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Sample records for single membrane potential

  1. Single cell wound generates electric current circuit and cell membrane potential variations that requires calcium influx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxardi, Guillaume; Reid, Brian; Maillard, Pauline; Zhao, Min

    2014-07-24

    Breaching of the cell membrane is one of the earliest and most common causes of cell injury, tissue damage, and disease. If the compromise in cell membrane is not repaired quickly, irreversible cell damage, cell death and defective organ functions will result. It is therefore fundamentally important to efficiently repair damage to the cell membrane. While the molecular aspects of single cell wound healing are starting to be deciphered, its bio-physical counterpart has been poorly investigated. Using Xenopus laevis oocytes as a model for single cell wound healing, we describe the temporal and spatial dynamics of the wound electric current circuitry and the temporal dynamics of cell membrane potential variation. In addition, we show the role of calcium influx in controlling electric current circuitry and cell membrane potential variations. (i) Upon wounding a single cell: an inward electric current appears at the wound center while an outward electric current is observed at its sides, illustrating the wound electric current circuitry; the cell membrane is depolarized; calcium flows into the cell. (ii) During cell membrane re-sealing: the wound center current density is maintained for a few minutes before decreasing; the cell membrane gradually re-polarizes; calcium flow into the cell drops. (iii) In conclusion, calcium influx is required for the formation and maintenance of the wound electric current circuitry, for cell membrane re-polarization and for wound healing.

  2. Single-cell-based evaluation of sperm progressive motility via fluorescent assessment of mitochondria membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscatelli, Natalina; Spagnolo, Barbara; Pisanello, Marco; Lemma, Enrico Domenico; De Vittorio, Massimo; Zara, Vincenzo; Pisanello, Ferruccio; Ferramosca, Alessandra

    2017-12-20

    Sperm cells progressive motility is the most important parameter involved in the fertilization process. Sperm middle piece contains mitochondria, which play a critical role in energy production and whose proper operation ensures the reproductive success. Notably, sperm progressive motility is strictly related to mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and consequently to mitochondrial functionality. Although previous studies presented an evaluation of mitochondrial function through MMP assessment in entire sperm cells samples, a quantitative approach at single-cell level could provide more insights in the analysis of semen quality. Here we combine laser scanning confocal microscopy and functional fluorescent staining of mitochondrial membrane to assess MMP distribution among isolated spermatozoa. We found that the sperm fluorescence value increases as a function of growing progressive motility and that such fluorescence is influenced by MMP disruptors, potentially allowing for the discrimination of different quality classes of sperm cells in heterogeneous populations.

  3. Membrane potential and microsecond to millisecond delayed light emission after a single excitation flash in isolated chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jursinic, P.; Govindjee; Wraight, C.A.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of light-induced and salt-jump induced membrane potential on microsecond and millisecond delayed light emission from chloroplasts, following a single 10 ns flash, have been studied. Microsecond delayed light emission is shown to be independent of the membrane potential contrary to proposals that the activation energy for delayed light emission can be modulated by transmembrane electric fields. This result is discussed in terms of the possible origin of this short-lived emission. Millisecond delayed light after a single excitation flash is enhanced by membrane potential only if a proton gradient is present. By measuring changes in ms delayed light caused by simultaneous injection of KCl and Na-benzoate (which creates a proton gradient) in the presence of valinomycin, the light-induced potential generated across the thylakoid membrane by a single excitation flash was calibrated and found to be 128 +- 10 mV in agreement with the recent measurements of Zickler and Witt, (FEBS Lett. 66, 142-148 (1976)), based on voltage-dependent ionophores. It is concluded that the secondary charges that give rise to ms delayed light, after a single flash, do not fully span the membrane. (author)

  4. A single-cell technique for the measurement of membrane potential, membrane conductance, and the efflux of rapidly penetrating solutes in Amphiuma erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, L C; Kregenow, F M

    1980-10-01

    We describe a single-cell technique for measuring membrane potential, membrane resistance, and the efflux of rapidly penetrating solutes such as Cl and H2O. Erythrocytes from Amphiuma means were aspirated into a Sylgard (Dow Corning Corp.)-coated capillary. The aspirated cell separated a solution within the capillary from a solution in the bath. Each of these two solutions was contiguous with approximately 5% of the total membrane surface. Microelectrodes placed concentrically within the capillary permit the measurement of intracellular voltage, specific membrane resistance, and the electrical seal between the two solutions. The intracellular voltage averaged -17.7 mV (pH 7.6) and changed as either intra- or extracellular chloride was varied. The average specific membrane resistance measured by passing current across the exposed membrane surface was 110 ohm-cm2. 36Cl and tritiated H2O fluxes (0.84 +/- 0.05 x 10(-6) M . cm-2 . min-1 and 6.4 +/- 1.5 x 10(-3) M . cm-2 . min-1, respectively) were determined by noting the rate at which isotope leaves the cell and crosses the membrane exposed to the bath. Our measured values for the flux of 36Cl and tritiated H2O approximate reported values for free-floating cells. 36Cl efflux, in addition, is inhibited by 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyano-stilbene 2,2'-disulfonic acid (SITS) and furosemide, known inhibitors of the anion exchange mechanism responsible for the rapid anion fluxes of red blood cells. One can also demonstrate directly that > 89% of 36Cl efflux is "electrically silent" by analyzing the flux in the presence of an imposed transcellular voltage.

  5. Time-resolved generation of membrane potential by ba3 cytochrome c oxidase from Thermus thermophilus coupled to single electron injection into the O and OH states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siletsky, Sergey A; Belevich, Ilya; Belevich, Nikolai P; Soulimane, Tewfik; Wikström, Mårten

    2017-11-01

    Two electrogenic phases with characteristic times of ~14μs and ~290μs are resolved in the kinetics of membrane potential generation coupled to single-electron reduction of the oxidized "relaxed" O state of ba 3 oxidase from T. thermophilus (O→E transition). The rapid phase reflects electron redistribution between Cu A and heme b. The slow phase includes electron redistribution from both Cu A and heme b to heme a 3 , and electrogenic proton transfer coupled to reduction of heme a 3 . The distance of proton translocation corresponds to uptake of a proton from the inner water phase into the binuclear center where heme a 3 is reduced, but there is no proton pumping and no reduction of Cu B . Single-electron reduction of the oxidized "unrelaxed" state (O H →E H transition) is accompanied by electrogenic reduction of the heme b/heme a 3 pair by Cu A in a "fast" phase (~22μs) and transfer of protons in "middle" and "slow" electrogenic phases (~0.185ms and ~0.78ms) coupled to electron redistribution from the heme b/heme a 3 pair to the Cu B site. The "middle" and "slow" electrogenic phases seem to be associated with transfer of protons to the proton-loading site (PLS) of the proton pump, but when all injected electrons reach Cu B the electronic charge appears to be compensated by back-leakage of the protons from the PLS into the binuclear site. Thus proton pumping occurs only to the extent of ~0.1 H + /e - , probably due to the formed membrane potential in the experiment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Introducing Membrane Charge and Membrane Potential to T Cell Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanqing Ma

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available While membrane models now include the heterogeneous distribution of lipids, the impact of membrane charges on regulating the association of proteins with the plasma membrane is often overlooked. Charged lipids are asymmetrically distributed between the two leaflets of the plasma membrane, resulting in the inner leaflet being negatively charged and a surface potential that attracts and binds positively charged ions, proteins, and peptide motifs. These interactions not only create a transmembrane potential but they can also facilitate the formation of charged membrane domains. Here, we reference fields outside of immunology in which consequences of membrane charge are better characterized to highlight important mechanisms. We then focus on T cell receptor (TCR signaling, reviewing the evidence that membrane charges and membrane-associated calcium regulate phosphorylation of the TCR–CD3 complex and discuss how the immunological synapse exhibits distinct patterns of membrane charge distribution. We propose that charged lipids, ions in solution, and transient protein interactions form a dynamic equilibrium during T cell activation.

  7. Membrane potentials of membranes with fixed ionic sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Albert; van der Wal, P.D.; van der Wal, P.D.; Skowronska-ptasinska, M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Sudholter, Ernst; Bergveld, Piet; Reinhoudt, David

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical model has been developed to simulate the formation of a membrane potential as a function of physically accessible parameters. The description is an extension of the well-known Teorell-Meyer-Sievers (TMS) model, now including free and fixed ionic sites and free and fixed neutral

  8. Membranes on nanopores for multiplexed single-transporter analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, Michael; Tampé, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The study of membrane proteins as prime drug targets has led to intensified efforts to characterize their structure and function. With regards to the structural analysis of membrane proteins, there have been considerable technological innovations in cryo-EM and X-ray crystallography, but advancements in the elucidation of membrane protein function, especially on a single-molecule level, have been struggling to bridge from basic science to high-throughput applications. There is a need for advanced biosensor platforms allowing membrane protein-mediated transport and potential suppressor libraries to be characterized. Membrane proteins facilitating the translocation of non-electrogenic substrates particularly suffer from a lack of such techniques to date. Here, we summarize recent developments in the field of membrane protein analysis, with a special focus on micro- and nanostructured platforms for purpose of high-throughput screening using fluorescent read-out systems. Additionally, their use as novel biosensor platforms to elucidate non-electrogenic substrate translocation is described. This overview contains 82 references. (author)

  9. Potential applications of electron emission membranes in medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilevych, Yevgen [Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration (IZM), Berlin (Germany); University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Brunner, Stefan E. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Chan, Hong Wah; Charbon, Edoardo [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Graaf, Harry van der, E-mail: vdgraaf@nikhef.nl [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hagen, Cornelis W. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Nützel, Gert; Pinto, Serge D. [Photonis, Roden (Netherlands); Prodanović, Violeta [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Rotman, Daan [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Santagata, Fabio [State Key Lab for Solid State Lighti Changzhou base, F7 R& D HUB 1, Science and Education Town, Changzhou 213161, Jangsu Province (China); Sarro, Lina; Schaart, Dennis R. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Sinsheimer, John; Smedley, John [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Tao, Shuxia; Theulings, Anne M.M.G. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-02-11

    With a miniaturised stack of transmission dynodes, a noise free amplifier is being developed for the detection of single free electrons, with excellent time- and 2D spatial resolution and efficiency. With this generic technology, a new family of detectors for individual elementary particles may become possible. Potential applications of such electron emission membranes in medicine are discussed.

  10. Relating membrane potential to impedance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen Gheorghiu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive, label-free assessment of membrane potential of living cells is still a challenging task. The theory linking membrane potential to the low frequency α dispersion exhibited by suspensions of spherical shelled particles (presenting a net charge distribution on the inner side of the shell has been pioneered in our previous studies with emphasis on the permittivity spectra. Whereas α dispersion is related to a rather large variation exhibited by the permittivity spectrum, we report that the related decrement presented by the impedance magnitude spectrum is either extremely small, or occurs (for large cells at very small frequencies (~mHz explaining the lack of experimental bioimpedance data on the matter. We stress that appropriate choice of the parameters (as revealed by the microscopic model may enable access to membrane potential as well as to other relevant parameters when investigating living cells and charged lipid vesicles. We analyse the effect on the low frequency of the permittivity and impedance spectra of: I. Parameters pertaining to cell membrane i.e. (i membrane potential (through the amount of the net charge on the inner side of the membrane, (ii size of the cells/vesicles, (iii conductivity of the membrane; II. Parameters of the extra cellular medium (viscosity and conductivity. The applicability of the study has far reaching implications for basic (life sciences (providing non-invasive access to the dynamics of relevant cell parameters as well as for biosensing applications, e.g. assessment of cytotoxicity of a wide range of stimuli. doi:10.5617/jeb.214 J Electr Bioimp, vol. 2, pp. 93-97, 2011

  11. Influence of quantum dot labels on single molecule movement in the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Mathias P.; Lagerholm, B. Christoffer

    2011-01-01

    Single particle tracking results are very dependent on the probe that is used. In this study we have investigated the influence that functionalized quantum dots (QDs) have on the recorded movement in single molecule tracking experiments of plasma membrane species in live cells. Potential issues...... for simultaneous investigations of different plasma membrane species in order to discriminate the effect of the label from differences in movement of the target molecules....

  12. Junction Potentials Bias Measurements of Ion Exchange Membrane Permselectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsbury, Ryan S; Flotron, Sophie; Zhu, Shan; Call, Douglas F; Coronell, Orlando

    2018-04-17

    Ion exchange membranes (IEMs) are versatile materials relevant to a variety of water and waste treatment, energy production, and industrial separation processes. The defining characteristic of IEMs is their ability to selectively allow positive or negative ions to permeate, which is referred to as permselectivity. Measured values of permselectivity that equal unity (corresponding to a perfectly selective membrane) or exceed unity (theoretically impossible) have been reported for cation exchange membranes (CEMs). Such nonphysical results call into question our ability to correctly measure this crucial membrane property. Because weighing errors, temperature, and measurement uncertainty have been shown to not explain these anomalous permselectivity results, we hypothesized that a possible explanation are junction potentials that occur at the tips of reference electrodes. In this work, we tested this hypothesis by comparing permselectivity values obtained from bare Ag/AgCl wire electrodes (which have no junction) to values obtained from single-junction reference electrodes containing two different electrolytes. We show that permselectivity values obtained using reference electrodes with junctions were greater than unity for CEMs. In contrast, electrodes without junctions always produced permselectivities lower than unity. Electrodes with junctions also resulted in artificially low permselectivity values for AEMs compared to electrodes without junctions. Thus, we conclude that junctions in reference electrodes introduce two biases into results in the IEM literature: (i) permselectivity values larger than unity for CEMs and (ii) lower permselectivity values for AEMs compared to those for CEMs. These biases can be avoided by using electrodes without a junction.

  13. Cell membrane disruption stimulates cAMP and Ca2+ signaling to potentiate cell membrane resealing in neighboring cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuru Togo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Disruption of cellular plasma membranes is a common event in many animal tissues, and the membranes are usually rapidly resealed. Moreover, repeated membrane disruptions within a single cell reseal faster than the initial wound in a protein kinase A (PKA- and protein kinase C (PKC-dependent manner. In addition to wounded cells, recent studies have demonstrated that wounding of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells potentiates membrane resealing in neighboring cells in the short-term by purinergic signaling, and in the long-term by nitric oxide/protein kinase G signaling. In the present study, real-time imaging showed that cell membrane disruption stimulated cAMP synthesis and Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular stores by purinergic signaling in neighboring MDCK cells. Furthermore, inhibition of PKA and PKC suppressed the ATP-mediated short-term potentiation of membrane resealing in neighboring cells. These results suggest that cell membrane disruption stimulates PKA and PKC via purinergic signaling to potentiate cell membrane resealing in neighboring MDCK cells.

  14. [Computer modeling the hydrostatic pressure characteristics of the membrane potential for polymeric membrane, separated non-homogeneous electrolyte solutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slezak, Izabella H; Jasik-Slezak, Jolanta; Rogal, Mirosława; Slezak, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of model equation depending the membrane potential deltapsis, on mechanical pressure difference (deltaP), concentration polarization coefficient (zetas), concentration Rayleigh number (RC) and ratio concentration of solutions separated by membrane (Ch/Cl), the characteristics deltapsis = f(deltaP)zetas,RC,Ch/Cl for steady values of zetas, RC and Ch/Cl in single-membrane system were calculated. In this system neutral and isotropic polymeric membrane oriented in horizontal plane, the non-homogeneous binary electrolytic solutions of various concentrations were separated. Nonhomogeneity of solutions is results from creations of the concentration boundary layers on both sides of the membrane. Calculations were made for the case where on a one side of the membrane aqueous solution of NaCl at steady concentration 10(-3) mol x l(-1) (Cl) was placed and on the other aqueous solutions of NaCl at concentrations from 10(-3) mol x l(-1) to 2 x 10(-2) mol x l(-1) (Ch). Their densities were greater than NaCl solution's at 10(-3) mol x l(-1). It was shown that membrane potential depends on hydrodynamic state of a complex concentration boundary layer-membrane-concentration boundary layer, what is controlled by deltaP, Ch/Cl, RC and zetas.

  15. Single Molecule Kinetics of ENTH Binding to Lipid Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozovsky, Sharon [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Forstner, Martin B. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Sondermann, Holger [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Groves, Jay T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-04-03

    Transient recruitment of proteins to membranes is a fundamental mechanism by which the cell exerts spatial and temporal control over proteins’ localization and interactions. Thus, the specificity and the kinetics of peripheral proteins’ membrane residence are an attribute of their function. In this article, we describe the membrane interactions of the interfacial epsin N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain with its target lipid phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2). The direct visualization and quantification of interactions of single ENTH molecules with supported lipid bilayers is achieved using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) with a time resolution of 13 ms. This enables the recording of the kinetic behavior of ENTH interacting with membranes with physiologically relevant concentrations of PtdIns(4,5)P2 despite the low effective binding affinity. Subsequent single fluorophore tracking permits us to build up distributions of residence times and to measure ENTH dissociation rates as a function of membrane composition. In addition, due to the high time resolution, we are able to resolve details of the motion of ENTH associated with a simple, homogeneous membrane. In this case ENTH’s diffusive transport appears to be the result of at least three different diffusion processes.

  16. On calculation of the electrostatic potential of a phosphatidylinositol phosphate-containing phosphatidylcholine lipid membrane accounting for membrane dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan C Fuller

    Full Text Available Many signaling events require the binding of cytoplasmic proteins to cell membranes by recognition of specific charged lipids, such as phosphoinositol-phosphates. As a model for a protein-membrane binding site, we consider one charged phosphoinositol phosphate (PtdIns(3P embedded in a phosphatidylcholine bilayer. As the protein-membrane binding is driven by electrostatic interactions, continuum solvent models require an accurate representation of the electrostatic potential of the phosphoinositol phosphate-containing membrane. We computed and analyzed the electrostatic potentials of snapshots taken at regular intervals from molecular dynamics simulations of the bilayer. We observe considerable variation in the electrostatic potential of the bilayer both along a single simulation and between simulations performed with the GAFF or CHARMM c36 force fields. However, we find that the choice of GAFF or CHARMM c36 parameters has little effect on the electrostatic potential of a given configuration of the bilayer with a PtdIns(3P embedded in it. From our results, we propose a remedian averaging method for calculating the electrostatic potential of a membrane system that is suitable for simulations of protein-membrane binding with a continuum solvent model.

  17. Membrane potential correlates of sensory perception in mouse barrel cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachidhanandam, Shankar; Sreenivasan, Varun; Kyriakatos, Alexandros; Kremer, Yves; Petersen, Carl C H

    2013-11-01

    Neocortical activity can evoke sensory percepts, but the cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. We trained mice to detect single brief whisker stimuli and report perceived stimuli by licking to obtain a reward. Pharmacological inactivation and optogenetic stimulation demonstrated a causal role for the primary somatosensory barrel cortex. Whole-cell recordings from barrel cortex neurons revealed membrane potential correlates of sensory perception. Sensory responses depended strongly on prestimulus cortical state, but both slow-wave and desynchronized cortical states were compatible with task performance. Whisker deflection evoked an early (sensory response that was encoded through cell-specific reversal potentials. A secondary late (50-400 ms) depolarization was enhanced on hit trials compared to misses. Optogenetic inactivation revealed a causal role for late excitation. Our data reveal dynamic processing in the sensory cortex during task performance, with an early sensory response reliably encoding the stimulus and later secondary activity contributing to driving the subjective percept.

  18. Attainability and minimum energy of single-stage membrane and membrane/distillation hybrid processes

    KAUST Repository

    Alshehri, Ali

    2014-12-01

    As an energy-efficient separation method, membrane technology has attracted more and more attentions in many challenging separation processes. The attainability and the energy consumption of a membrane process are the two basic fundamental questions that need to be answered. This report aims to use process simulations to find: (1) at what conditions a single-stage membrane process can meet the separation task that is defined by product purity and recovery ratio and (2) what are the most important parameters that determine the energy consumption. To perform a certain separation task, it was found that both membrane selectivity and pressure ratio exhibit a minimum value that is defined only by product purity and recovery ratio. The membrane/distillation hybrid system was used to study the energy consumption. A shortcut method was developed to calculate the minimum practical separation energy (MPSE) of the membrane process and the distillation process. It was found that the MPSE of the hybrid system is only determined by the membrane selectivity and the applied transmembrane pressure ratio in three stages. At the first stage when selectivity is low, the membrane process is not competitive to the distillation process. Adding a membrane unit to a distillation tower will not help in reducing energy. At the second medium selectivity stage, the membrane/distillation hybrid system can help reduce the energy consumption, and the higher the membrane selectivity, the lower is the energy. The energy conservation is further improved as pressure ratio increases. At the third stage when both selectivity and pressure ratio are high, the hybrid system will change to a single-stage membrane unit and this change will cause significant reduction in energy consumption. The energy at this stage keeps decreasing with selectivity at slow rate, but slightly increases with pressure ratio. Overall, the higher the membrane selectivity, the more the energy is saved. Therefore, the two

  19. Probing glycolytic and membrane potential oscillations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Allan K.; Andersen, Ann Zahle; Brasen, Jens Christian

    2008-01-01

    , while mitochondrial membrane potential was measured using the fluorescent dye DiOC(2)(3). The results show that, as opposed to NADH and other intermediates in glycolysis, intracellular glucose is not oscillating. Furthermore, oscillations in NADH and membrane potential are inhibited by the ATP...

  20. The effect of membrane diffusion potential change on anionic drugs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of membrane potential change on anionic drugs Indomethacin and barbitone induced human erythrocyte shape change and red cell uptake of drug has been studied using microscopy and spectrophotometry techniques respectively. The membrane potential was changed by reducing the extracellular chloride ...

  1. Effect of Membrane Tension on the Electric Field and Dipole Potential of Lipid Bilayer Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshaviak, Dora Toledo; Muellner, Michael J.; Chachisvilis, Mirianas

    2011-01-01

    The dipole potential of lipid bilayer membrane controls the difference in permeability of the membrane to oppositely charged ions. We have combined molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and experimental studies to determine changes in electric field and electrostatic potential of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) lipid bilayer in response to applied membrane tension. MD simulations based on CHARMM36 force field showed that electrostatic potential of DOPC bilayer decreases by ~45 mV in the physiologically relevant range of membrane tension values (0 to 15 dyn/cm). The electrostatic field exhibits a peak (~0.8×109 V/m) near the water/lipid interface which shifts by 0.9 Å towards the bilayer center at 15 dyn/cm. Maximum membrane tension of 15 dyn/cm caused 6.4% increase in area per lipid, 4.7% decrease in bilayer thickness and 1.4% increase in the volume of the bilayer. Dipole-potential sensitive fluorescent probes were used to detect membrane tension induced changes in DOPC vesicles exposed to osmotic stress. Experiments confirmed that dipole potential of DOPC bilayer decreases at higher membrane tensions. These results are suggestive of a potentially new mechanosensing mechanism by which mechanically induced structural changes in the lipid bilayer membrane could modulate the function of membrane proteins by altering electrostatic interactions and energetics of protein conformational states. PMID:21722624

  2. Improved antifouling potential of polyether sulfone polymeric membrane containing silver nanoparticles: self-cleaning membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Sidra; Nazar, Umair; Ali, Jafar; Ali, Qurat Ul Ain; Ahmad, Nasir M; Sarwar, Fiza; Waseem, Hassan; Jamil, Syed Umair Ullah

    2018-06-01

    A new strategy to enhance the antifouling potential of polyether sulfone (PES) membrane is presented. Chemically synthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were used to prepare a mixed-matrix PES membrane by the phase inversion technique. Primarily, AgNPs synthesis was confirmed by surface plasmon resonance at 410-430 nm using UV-Visible spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that AgNPs were crystalline with a diameter of 21 ± 2 nm. Furthermore, PES membranes were characterized by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to confirm the incorporation of AgNPs in membranes. Hydrophilicity of the membranes was enhanced, whereas roughness, mechanical strength and biofouling were relatively reduced after embedding the AgNPs. Antibacterial potential of AgNPs was evaluated for E. coli in the disc diffusion and colony-forming unit (CFU) count method. All of the membranes were assessed for antifouling activity by filtering a control dilution (10 6  CFU/ml) of E. coli and by counting CFU. Anti-biofouling activity of the membrane was observed with different concentrations of AgNPs. Maximum reduction (66%) was observed in membrane containing 1.5% of AgNPs. The addition of antibiotic ceftriaxone enhanced the antibacterial effect of AgNPs in PES membranes. Our practicable antifouling strategy may be applied to other polymeric membranes which may pave the new way to achieve sustainable and self-cleaning membrane reactors on large scale.

  3. Single-particle electron microscopy in the study of membrane protein structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Zorzi, Rita; Mi, Wei; Liao, Maofu; Walz, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Single-particle electron microscopy (EM) provides the great advantage that protein structure can be studied without the need to grow crystals. However, due to technical limitations, this approach played only a minor role in the study of membrane protein structure. This situation has recently changed dramatically with the introduction of direct electron detection device cameras, which allow images of unprecedented quality to be recorded, also making software algorithms, such as three-dimensional classification and structure refinement, much more powerful. The enhanced potential of single-particle EM was impressively demonstrated by delivering the first long-sought atomic model of a member of the biomedically important transient receptor potential channel family. Structures of several more membrane proteins followed in short order. This review recounts the history of single-particle EM in the study of membrane proteins, describes the technical advances that now allow this approach to generate atomic models of membrane proteins and provides a brief overview of some of the membrane protein structures that have been studied by single-particle EM to date. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Specific ion effects on membrane potential and the permselectivity of ion exchange membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geise, Geoffrey M; Cassady, Harrison J; Paul, Donald R; Logan, Bruce E; Hickner, Michael A

    2014-10-21

    Membrane potential and permselectivity are critical parameters for a variety of electrochemically-driven separation and energy technologies. An electric potential is developed when a membrane separates electrolyte solutions of different concentrations, and a permselective membrane allows specific species to be transported while restricting the passage of other species. Ion exchange membranes are commonly used in applications that require advanced ionic electrolytes and span technologies such as alkaline batteries to ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis, but membranes are often only characterized in sodium chloride solutions. Our goal in this work was to better understand membrane behaviour in aqueous ammonium bicarbonate, which is of interest for closed-loop energy generation processes. Here we characterized the permselectivity of four commercial ion exchange membranes in aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, ammonium chloride, sodium bicarbonate, and ammonium bicarbonate. This stepwise approach, using four different ions in aqueous solution, was used to better understand how these specific ions affect ion transport in ion exchange membranes. Characterization of cation and anion exchange membrane permselectivity, using these ions, is discussed from the perspective of the difference in the physical chemistry of the hydrated ions, along with an accompanying re-derivation and examination of the basic equations that describe membrane potential. In general, permselectivity was highest in sodium chloride and lowest in ammonium bicarbonate solutions, and the nature of both the counter- and co-ions appeared to influence measured permselectivity. The counter-ion type influences the binding affinity between counter-ions and polymer fixed charge groups, and higher binding affinity between fixed charge sites and counter-ions within the membrane decreases the effective membrane charge density. As a result permselectivity decreases. The charge density and polarizability

  5. Specific ion effects on membrane potential and the permselectivity of ion exchange membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Geise, Geoffrey M.

    2014-08-26

    © the Partner Organisations 2014. Membrane potential and permselectivity are critical parameters for a variety of electrochemically-driven separation and energy technologies. An electric potential is developed when a membrane separates electrolyte solutions of different concentrations, and a permselective membrane allows specific species to be transported while restricting the passage of other species. Ion exchange membranes are commonly used in applications that require advanced ionic electrolytes and span technologies such as alkaline batteries to ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis, but membranes are often only characterized in sodium chloride solutions. Our goal in this work was to better understand membrane behaviour in aqueous ammonium bicarbonate, which is of interest for closed-loop energy generation processes. Here we characterized the permselectivity of four commercial ion exchange membranes in aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, ammonium chloride, sodium bicarbonate, and ammonium bicarbonate. This stepwise approach, using four different ions in aqueous solution, was used to better understand how these specific ions affect ion transport in ion exchange membranes. Characterization of cation and anion exchange membrane permselectivity, using these ions, is discussed from the perspective of the difference in the physical chemistry of the hydrated ions, along with an accompanying re-derivation and examination of the basic equations that describe membrane potential. In general, permselectivity was highest in sodium chloride and lowest in ammonium bicarbonate solutions, and the nature of both the counter- and co-ions appeared to influence measured permselectivity. The counter-ion type influences the binding affinity between counter-ions and polymer fixed charge groups, and higher binding affinity between fixed charge sites and counter-ions within the membrane decreases the effective membrane charge density. As a result permselectivity decreases. The

  6. Zeta-potential of fouled thin film composite membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, K.; Hachisuka, H.; Nakamura, T. [Nitto denko Corp., Ibaraki, (Japan); Kimura, S. [Kogakuin University, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Environ. Chemical Engineering; Ueyama, K. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1999-10-01

    The surface zeta-potential of a cross-linked polyamide thin film composite reverse osmosis membrane was measured using an electrophoresis method. It was confirmed that this method could be effectively applied to analyze the fouling of such membranes. It is known that the water flux of membranes drastically decreases as a result of fouling by surfactants. Although the surfactants adsorbed on reverse osmosis membranes could not be detected by conventional methods such as SEM, EDX and FT-IR, their presence could be clarified by the profile measurements of the surface zeta-potential. The profiles of the membrane surface zeta-potentials changed to more positive values in the measured pH range as a result of fouling by cationic or amphoteric surfactants. This measuring method of surface zeta-potentials allowed us to analyze a very small amount of fouling of a thin film composite reverse osmosis membrane. This method could be used to analyze the fouled surface of the thin film composite reverse osmosis membrane which is used for production of ultrapure water and shows a remarkable decrease in flux. It also became clear that this method is easy and effective for the reverse osmosis membrane surface analysis of adsorbed materials such as surfactants. (author)

  7. Recovery of real dye bath wastewater using integrated membrane process: considering water recovery, membrane fouling and reuse potential of membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcik-Canbolat, Cigdem; Sengezer, Cisel; Sakar, Hacer; Karagunduz, Ahmet; Keskinler, Bulent

    2017-11-01

    It has been recognized by the whole world that textile industry which produce large amounts of wastewater with strong color and toxic organic compounds is a major problematical industry requiring effective treatment solutions. In this study, reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were tested on biologically treated real dye bath wastewater with and without pretreatment by nanofiltration (NF) membrane to recovery. Also membrane fouling and reuse potential of membranes were investigated by multiple filtrations. Obtained results showed that only NF is not suitable to produce enough quality to reuse the wastewater in a textile industry as process water while RO provide successfully enough permeate quality. The results recommend that integrated NF/RO membrane process is able to reduce membrane fouling and allow long-term operation for real dye bath wastewater.

  8. Potential of membrane processes in management of radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Surender; Jain, Savita; Raj, Kanwar

    2010-01-01

    Various categories of radioactive liquid waste are generated during operations and maintenance of nuclear installations. The potential of membrane processes for the treatment of low-level radioactive liquids is discussed in this paper

  9. Exploring the potential of commercial polyethylene membranes for desalination by membrane distillation

    KAUST Repository

    Zuo, Jian; Bonyadi, Sina; Chung, Neal Tai-Shung

    2015-01-01

    The potential of utilizing polyethylene (PE) membranes in membrane distillation (MD) for sea water desalination has been explored in this study. The advantages of using PE membranes are (1) their intrinsic hydrophobicity with low surface energy of 28-33×10N/m, (2) good chemical stability and low thermal conductivity and (3) their commercial availability that may expedite the MD commercialization process. Several commercial PE membranes with different physicochemical properties are employed to study the capability and feasibility of PE membrane application in an MD process. The effect of membrane pore size, porosity, thickness and wetting resistance on MD performance and energy efficiency have been investigated. The PE membranes demonstrate impressive separation performance with permeation fluxes reaching 123.0L/mh for a 3.5wt% sodium chloride (NaCl) feed solution at 80°C. This superior performance surpasses most of the prior commercial and lab-made flat sheet and hollow fiber membranes. A long term MD testing of 100h is also performed to evaluate the durability of PE membranes, and a relatively stable performance is observed during the entire experiment. This long term stability signifies the suitability of PE membranes for MD applications.

  10. Exploring the potential of commercial polyethylene membranes for desalination by membrane distillation

    KAUST Repository

    Zuo, Jian

    2015-09-26

    The potential of utilizing polyethylene (PE) membranes in membrane distillation (MD) for sea water desalination has been explored in this study. The advantages of using PE membranes are (1) their intrinsic hydrophobicity with low surface energy of 28-33×10N/m, (2) good chemical stability and low thermal conductivity and (3) their commercial availability that may expedite the MD commercialization process. Several commercial PE membranes with different physicochemical properties are employed to study the capability and feasibility of PE membrane application in an MD process. The effect of membrane pore size, porosity, thickness and wetting resistance on MD performance and energy efficiency have been investigated. The PE membranes demonstrate impressive separation performance with permeation fluxes reaching 123.0L/mh for a 3.5wt% sodium chloride (NaCl) feed solution at 80°C. This superior performance surpasses most of the prior commercial and lab-made flat sheet and hollow fiber membranes. A long term MD testing of 100h is also performed to evaluate the durability of PE membranes, and a relatively stable performance is observed during the entire experiment. This long term stability signifies the suitability of PE membranes for MD applications.

  11. Clean Transfer of Large Graphene Single Crystals for High-Intactness Suspended Membranes and Liquid Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jincan; Lin, Li; Sun, Luzhao; Huang, Yucheng; Koh, Ai Leen; Dang, Wenhui; Yin, Jianbo; Wang, Mingzhan; Tan, Congwei; Li, Tianran; Tan, Zhenjun; Liu, Zhongfan; Peng, Hailin

    2017-07-01

    The atomically thin 2D nature of suspended graphene membranes holds promising in numerous technological applications. In particular, the outstanding transparency to electron beam endows graphene membranes great potential as a candidate for specimen support of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, major hurdles remain to be addressed to acquire an ultraclean, high-intactness, and defect-free suspended graphene membrane. Here, a polymer-free clean transfer of sub-centimeter-sized graphene single crystals onto TEM grids to fabricate large-area and high-quality suspended graphene membranes has been achieved. Through the control of interfacial force during the transfer, the intactness of large-area graphene membranes can be as high as 95%, prominently larger than reported values in previous works. Graphene liquid cells are readily prepared by π-π stacking two clean single-crystal graphene TEM grids, in which atomic-scale resolution imaging and temporal evolution of colloid Au nanoparticles are recorded. This facile and scalable production of clean and high-quality suspended graphene membrane is promising toward their wide applications for electron and optical microscopy. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Surface characterization of hemodialysis membranes based on streaming potential measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, C; Jacobasch, H J; Reichelt, G

    1995-01-01

    Hemodialysis membranes made from cellulose (CUPROPHAN, HEMOPHAN) and sulfonated polyethersulfone (SPES) were characterized using the streaming potential technique to determine the zeta potential at their interfaces against well-defined aqueous solutions of varied pH and potassium chloride concentrations. Streaming potential measurements enable distinction between different membrane materials. In addition to parameters of the electrochemical double layer at membrane interfaces, thermodynamic characteristics of adsorption of different solved species were evaluated. For that aim a description of double layer formation as suggested by Börner and Jacobasch (in: Electrokinetic Phenomena, p. 231. Institut für Technologie der Polymere, Dresden (1989)) was applied which is based on the generally accepted model of the electrochemical double layer according to Stern (Z. Elektrochemie 30, 508 (1924)) and Grahame (Chem. Rev. 41, 441 (1947)). The membranes investigated show different surface acidic/basic and polar/nonpolar behavior. Furthermore, alterations of membrane interfaces through adsorption processes of components of biologically relevant solutions were shown to be detectable by streaming potential measurements.

  13. A single quark effective potential model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmann, B.E.J.; Vasconcellos, C.A.Z.

    1994-01-01

    In the present work we construct a radial spherical symmetric single quark potential model for the nucleon, consistent with asymptotic freedom and confinement. The quark mass enters as potential parameter and that way induces indirectly an isospin dependence in the interaction. As a consequence, a contribution to the negative charge square radius of the neutron arises an an effect of the quark core, which simulates an isospin symmetry breaking effect in the nucleon due to strong interaction. (author)

  14. Modulation of myometrium mitochondrial membrane potential by calmodulin antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Shlykov

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Influence of calmodulin antagonists on mitochondrial membrane potential was investigated using­ a flow cytometry method, confocal microscopy and fluorescent potential-sensitive probes TMRM and MTG. Influence of different concentrations of calmodulin antagonists on mitochondrial membrane potential was studied using flow cytometry method and a fraction of myometrium mitochondria of unpregnant rats. It was shown that 1-10 µМ calmidazolium gradually reduced mitochondria membrane potential. At the same time 10-100 µМ trifluope­razine influenced as follows: 10 µМ – increased polarization, while 100 µМ – caused almost complete depolarization of mitochondrial membranes. In experiments which were conducted with the use of confocal microscopy method and myometrium cells it was shown, that MTG addition to the incubation medium­ led to the appearance of fluorescence signal in a green range. Addition of the second probe (ТМRM resulted in the appearance of fluorescent signal in a red range. Mitochondrial membrane depolarization by 1µМ СССР or 10 mМ NaN3 was accompanied by the decline of “red” fluo­rescence intensity, “green” fluorescence was kept. The 10-15 minute incubation of myometrium cells in the presen­ce 10 µМ calmidazolium or 100 µМ trifluoperazine was accompanied by almost complete decrease of the TMRM fluorescent signal. Thus, with the use of potential-sensitive fluorescent probes TMRM and MTG it was shown, that calmodulin antagonists modulate mitochondrial membrane potential of myometrium cells.

  15. Membrane potential and cation channels in rat juxtaglomerular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, U G; Jørgensen, F; Andreasen, D

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between membrane potential and cation channels in juxtaglomerular (JG) cells is not well understood. Here we review electrophysiological and molecular studies of JG cells demonstrating the presence of large voltage-sensitive, calcium-activated potassium channels (BK(Ca)) of the Z......The relationship between membrane potential and cation channels in juxtaglomerular (JG) cells is not well understood. Here we review electrophysiological and molecular studies of JG cells demonstrating the presence of large voltage-sensitive, calcium-activated potassium channels (BK...

  16. Membrane, action, and oscillatory potentials in simulated protocells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syren, R. M.; Fox, S. W.; Przybylski, A. T.; Stratten, W. P.

    1982-01-01

    Electrical membrane potentials, oscillations, and action potentials are observed in proteinoid microspheres impaled with (3 M KCl) microelectrodes. Although effects are of greater magnitude when the vesicles contain glycerol and natural or synthetic lecithin, the results in the purely synthetic thermal protein structures are substantial, attaining 20 mV amplitude in some cases. The results add the property of electrical potential to the other known properties of proteinoid microspheres, in their role as models for protocells.

  17. Membrane bioreactors' potential for ethanol and biogas production: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylitervo, Päivi; Akinbomia, Julius; Taherzadeha, Mohammad J

    2013-01-01

    Companies developing and producing membranes for different separation purposes, as well as the market for these, have markedly increased in numbers over the last decade. Membrane and separation technology might well contribute to making fuel ethanol and biogas production from lignocellulosic materials more economically viable and productive. Combining biological processes with membrane separation techniques in a membrane bioreactor (MBR) increases cell concentrations extensively in the bioreactor. Such a combination furthermore reduces product inhibition during the biological process, increases product concentration and productivity, and simplifies the separation of product and/or cells. Various MBRs have been studied over the years, where the membrane is either submerged inside the liquid to be filtered, or placed in an external loop outside the bioreactor. All configurations have advantages and drawbacks, as reviewed in this paper. The current review presents an account of the membrane separation technologies, and the research performed on MBRs, focusing on ethanol and biogas production. The advantages and potentials of the technology are elucidated.

  18. Single-dose Rituximab Therapy for Refractory Idiopathic Membranous Nephropathy: A Single-center Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Katsuno, Takayuki; Ozaki, Takenori; Kim, Hangsoo; Kato, Noritoshi; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Akiyama, Shinichi; Ishimoto, Takuji; Kosugi, Tomoki; Tsuboi, Naotake; Ito, Yasuhiko; Maruyama, Shoichi

    2017-01-01

    To date, a recognized treatment for refractory membranous nephropathy (MN) has not been established. Recently, several reports have indicated the efficacy of rituximab as a novel treatment option. However, only a few published accounts exist of rituximab therapy for idiopathic MN (IMN) in the Asian population. We present the cases of three IMN patients who were treated with single-dose rituximab after they showed no response to conventional therapies, including corticosteroids, cyclosporine, ...

  19. Role of the Transmembrane Potential in the Membrane Proton Leak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ruprecht, A.; Sokolenko, E. A.; Beck, V.; Ninnemann, O.; Jabůrek, Martin; Trimbuch, T.; Klishin, S. S.; Ježek, Petr; Skulachev, V. P.; Pohl, E. E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 98, č. 8 (2010), s. 1503-1511 ISSN 0006-3495 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME09018; GA ČR(CZ) GA303/07/0105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : proton leak * membrane potential * uncoupling proteins Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.218, year: 2010

  20. Large-scale membrane transfer process: its application to single-crystal-silicon continuous membrane deformable mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Tong; Sasaki, Takashi; Hane, Kazuhiro; Akiyama, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a large-scale membrane transfer process developed for the construction of large-scale membrane devices via the transfer of continuous single-crystal-silicon membranes from one substrate to another. This technique is applied for fabricating a large stroke deformable mirror. A bimorph spring array is used to generate a large air gap between the mirror membrane and the electrode. A 1.9 mm × 1.9 mm × 2 µm single-crystal-silicon membrane is successfully transferred to the electrode substrate by Au–Si eutectic bonding and the subsequent all-dry release process. This process provides an effective approach for transferring a free-standing large continuous single-crystal-silicon to a flexible suspension spring array with a large air gap. (paper)

  1. Pharmacological exploration of the resting membrane potential reserve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Heyden, Marcel A G; Jespersen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    as well as by exchangers and pumps. This review will focus on the relative and regulated contribution of IK1, IK,ACh and IK,Ca, and on pharmacological modification of the channels underlying these currents in respect to the resting membrane potential, Na(+) channel availability and atrial......The cardiac action potential arises and spreads throughout the myocardium as a consequence of highly organized spatial and temporal expression of ion channels conducting Na(+), Ca(2+) or K(+) currents. The cardiac Na(+) current is responsible for the initiation and progression of the action...... potential. Altered Na(+) current has been found implicated in a number of different arrhythmias, including atrial fibrillation. In the atrium, the resting membrane potential is more depolarized than in the ventricles, and as cardiac Na(+) channels undergo voltage-dependent inactivation close...

  2. Spatial and temporal superresolution concepts to study plasma membrane organization by single molecule fluorescence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruprecht, V.

    2010-01-01

    molecules over multiple images. Proof-of-principles experiments on a fluid bilayer system, a quantitative assessment of the method and statistical estimates for the detection of rare events are presented. A different approach to catch molecular interactions of membrane components relies on analyzing brightness values of fluorescent spots in one color single molecule images. In this case the brightness value of observed spots is a direct measure for the number of fluorescent molecules within a molecular complex. The method was applied to study the homo-association of fluorescent lipid analogues in the live cell plasma membrane of living Cho and Jakarta T cells. The obtained results suggest the presence of stable lipid nano platforms in the live cell plasma membrane that are sensitive to cholesterol extraction and temperature elevation. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy is discussed as a complementary single molecule approach to unravel dynamic processes in the cellular plasma membrane. A theoretical study supported by Monte Carlo simulations is presented that demonstrates the potential of spot variation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (sv-FCS) to measure transient confinement times of plasma membrane constituents. Effects due to the underlying distribution of trapping times, trap mobility and the size of the confinement structure are also characterized. In comparison to conventional FCS measurements performed at a single laser beam waist the presented FCS concept features improved temporal resolution to access confinement times below the characteristic diffusion time of a tracer through the focal spot. (author) [de

  3. Effect of adsorption of charged macromolecules on streaming and membrane potential values measured with a microporous polysulfone membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benavente, J.; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    1997-01-01

    with a polyanion (dextran sulfate or DS) and a polycation (diethylaminoethyl or DEAE-dextran). From electrokinetic and electrochemical measurements, information about characteristic membrane parameters (transport number and ionic permselectivity) and membrane/solution interactions (zeta potential) can be obtained...

  4. Potential Applications of Zeolite Membranes in Reaction Coupling Separation Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunde V. Ojumu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Future production of chemicals (e.g., fine and specialty chemicals in industry is faced with the challenge of limited material and energy resources. However, process intensification might play a significant role in alleviating this problem. A vision of process intensification through multifunctional reactors has stimulated research on membrane-based reactive separation processes, in which membrane separation and catalytic reaction occur simultaneously in one unit. These processes are rather attractive applications because they are potentially compact, less capital intensive, and have lower processing costs than traditional processes. Therefore this review discusses the progress and potential applications that have occurred in the field of zeolite membrane reactors during the last few years. The aim of this article is to update researchers in the field of process intensification and also provoke their thoughts on further research efforts to explore and exploit the potential applications of zeolite membrane reactors in industry. Further evaluation of this technology for industrial acceptability is essential in this regard. Therefore, studies such as techno-economical feasibility, optimization and scale-up are of the utmost importance.

  5. Membrane potential of mitochondria from the liver of irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fomenko, B.S.; Kaminin, A.N.; Elfimova, I.A.; Akoev, I.G.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of the membrane potential of rat liver mitochondria 1 hour after irradiation with 800 R dose showed a decrease of its value. The potential decreased against the background of the activation of the generating mechanisms (the electron transport chain and ATP-ases). During energization of the membranes by the electron transport chain similar effect has been observed with different oxidation substrates (NAD linked substrates and succinate). It suggests that similar causative factors are at the basis of the changes observed. It is quite possible that the increase in the rate of both mitochondria respiration and ATP hydrolysis after the irradiation of animals was a consequence of the radiation-induced decrease in the potential value. (author)

  6. An Unusual Prohibitin Regulates Malaria Parasite Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Michael Matz

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Proteins of the stomatin/prohibitin/flotillin/HfIK/C (SPFH family are membrane-anchored and perform diverse cellular functions in different organelles. Here, we investigate the SPFH proteins of the murine malaria model parasite Plasmodium berghei, the conserved prohibitin 1, prohibitin 2, and stomatin-like protein and an unusual prohibitin-like protein (PHBL. The SPFH proteins localize to the parasite mitochondrion. While the conserved family members could not be deleted from the Plasmodium genome, PHBL was successfully ablated, resulting in impaired parasite fitness and attenuated virulence in the mammalian host. Strikingly, PHBL-deficient parasites fail to colonize the Anopheles vector because of complete arrest during ookinete development in vivo. We show that this arrest correlates with depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨmt. Our results underline the importance of SPFH proteins in the regulation of core mitochondrial functions and suggest that fine-tuning of ΔΨmt in malarial parasites is critical for colonization of the definitive host. : Matz et al. present an experimental genetics study of an unusual prohibitin-like protein in the malaria parasite and find that it regulates mitochondrial membrane polarity. Ablation of this protein causes almost complete mitochondrial depolarization in the mosquito vector, which, in turn, leads to a block in malaria parasite transmission. Keywords: Plasmodium berghei, malaria, SPFH, prohibitin, stomatin-like protein, mitochondrion, membrane potential, ookinete, transmission

  7. UCP2 muscle gene transfer modifies mitochondrial membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, A; Larrarte, E; Novo, F J; Garcia, M; Martinez, J A

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) muscle gene transfer on mitochondrial activity. Five week-old male Wistar rats received an intramuscular injection of plasmid pXU1 containing UCP2 cDNA in the right tibialis anterior muscles. Left tibialis anterior muscles were injected with vehicle as control. Ten days after DNA injection, tibialis anterior muscles were dissected and muscle mitochondria isolated and analyzed. There were two mitochondrial populations in the muscle after UCP2 gene transfer, one of low fluorescence and complexity and the other, showing high fluorescence and complexity. UCP2 gene transfer resulted in a 3.6 fold increase in muscle UCP2 protein levels compared to control muscles assessed by Western blotting. Furthermore, a significant reduction in mitochondria membrane potential assessed by spectrofluorometry and flow cytometry was observed. The mitochondria membrane potential reduction might account for a decrease in fluorescence of the low fluorescence mitochondrial subpopulation. It has been demonstrated that UCP2 muscle gene transfer in vivo is associated with a lower mitochondria membrane potential. Our results suggest the potential involvement of UCP2 in uncoupling respiration. International Journal of Obesity (2001) 25, 68-74

  8. Epiretinal membrane negative staining and double peeling in a single block with Brilliant Blue G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, David; Neves, Pedro

    2018-01-01

    To describe a surgical technique for combined peeling of epiretinal and internal limiting membranes. The authors present their procedure of choice for epiretinal membrane surgery: negative staining effect using Brilliant Blue G and single block removal of the epiretinal and internal limiting membranes in a single step. A total of 26 eyes were operated with the described technique. In all cases, the peeling was performed successfully and with no complications. Minimum postoperative follow-up was 12 months. There were no recurrences of epiretinal membranes. The ideal surgical approach for epiretinal membranes should attempt to reduce mechanical trauma, light exposure, and dye toxicity.

  9. Listening to membrane potential: photoacoustic voltage-sensitive dye recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haichong K.; Yan, Ping; Kang, Jeeun; Abou, Diane S.; Le, Hanh N. D.; Jha, Abhinav K.; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Kang, Jin U.; Rahmim, Arman; Wong, Dean F.; Boctor, Emad M.; Loew, Leslie M.

    2017-04-01

    Voltage-sensitive dyes (VSDs) are designed to monitor membrane potential by detecting fluorescence changes in response to neuronal or muscle electrical activity. However, fluorescence imaging is limited by depth of penetration and high scattering losses, which leads to low sensitivity in vivo systems for external detection. By contrast, photoacoustic (PA) imaging, an emerging modality, is capable of deep tissue, noninvasive imaging by combining near-infrared light excitation and ultrasound detection. Here, we show that voltage-dependent quenching of dye fluorescence leads to a reciprocal enhancement of PA intensity. We synthesized a near-infrared photoacoustic VSD (PA-VSD), whose PA intensity change is sensitive to membrane potential. In the polarized state, this cyanine-based probe enhances PA intensity while decreasing fluorescence output in a lipid vesicle membrane model. A theoretical model accounts for how the experimental PA intensity change depends on fluorescence and absorbance properties of the dye. These results not only demonstrate PA voltage sensing but also emphasize the interplay of both fluorescence and absorbance properties in the design of optimized PA probes. Together, our results demonstrate PA sensing as a potential new modality for recording and external imaging of electrophysiological and neurochemical events in the brain.

  10. [Computer modeling the dependences of the membrane potential for polymeric membrane separated non-homogeneous electrolyte solutions on concentration Rayleigh number].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slezak, Izabella H; Jasik-Slezak, Jolanta; Bilewicz-Wyrozumska, Teresa; Slezak, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of model equation describing the membrane potential delta psi(s) on concentration Rayleigh number (R(C)), mechanical pressure difference (deltaP), concentration polarization coefficient (zeta s) and ratio concentration of solutions separated by membrane (Ch/Cl), the characteristics delta psi(s) = f(Rc)(delta P, zeta s, Ch/Cl) for steady values of zeta s, R(C) and Ch/Cl in single-membrane system were calculated. In this system neutral and isotropic polymeric membrane oriented in horizontal plane, the non-homogeneous binary electrolytic solutions of various concentrations were separated. Nonhomogeneity of solutions is results from creations of the concentration boundary layers on both sides of the membrane. Calculations were made for the case where on a one side of the membrane aqueous solution of NaCl at steady concentration 10(-3) mol x l(-1) (Cl) was placed and on the other aqueous solutions of NaCl at concentrations from 10(-3) mol x l(-1) to 2 x 10(-2) mol x l(-1) (Ch). Their densities were greater than NaCl solution's at 10(-3) mol x l(-1). It was shown that membrane potential depends on hydrodynamic state of a complex concentration boundary layer-membrane-concentration boundary layer, what is controlled by deltaP, Ch/Cl, Rc and Zeta(s).

  11. Single-particle tracking: applications to membrane dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxton, M J; Jacobson, K

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of trajectories of individual proteins or lipids in the plasma membrane of cells show a variety of types of motion. Brownian motion is observed, but many of the particles undergo non-Brownian motion, including directed motion, confined motion, and anomalous diffusion. The variety of motion leads to significant effects on the kinetics of reactions among membrane-bound species and requires a revision of existing views of membrane structure and dynamics.

  12. Performance of single chamber biocatalyzed electrolysis with different types of ion exchange membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozendal, R.A.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Molenkamp, R.J.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper hydrogen production through biocatalyzed electrolysis was studied for the first time in a single chamber configuration. Single chamber biocatalyzed electrolysis was tested in two configurations: (i) with a cation exchange membrane (CEM) and (ii) with an anion exchange membrane (AEM).

  13. Attainability and minimum energy of single-stage membrane and membrane/distillation hybrid processes

    KAUST Repository

    Alshehri, Ali; Lai, Zhiping

    2014-01-01

    As an energy-efficient separation method, membrane technology has attracted more and more attentions in many challenging separation processes. The attainability and the energy consumption of a membrane process are the two basic fundamental questions

  14. Synaptic inhibition and excitation estimated via the time constant of membrane potential fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rune W.; Ditlevsen, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    When recording the membrane potential, V, of a neuron it is desirable to be able to extract the synaptic input. Critically, the synaptic input is stochastic and non-reproducible so one is therefore often restricted to single trial data. Here, we introduce means of estimating the inhibition and ex...... close to soma (recording site). Though our data is in current-clamp, the method also works in V-clamp recordings, with some minor adaptations. All custom made procedures are provided in Matlab....... and excitation and their confidence limits from single sweep trials. The estimates are based on the mean membrane potential, (V) , and the membrane time constant,τ. The time constant provides the total conductance (G = capacitance/τ) and is extracted from the autocorrelation of V. The synaptic conductances can....... The method gives best results if the synaptic input is large compared to other conductances, the intrinsic conductances have little or no time dependence or are comparably small, the ligand gated kinetics is faster than the membrane time constant, and the majority of synaptic contacts are electrotonically...

  15. Effect of Adsorbed Protein on the Hydraulic Permeability, Membrane and Streaming Potential Values Measured across a Microporous Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benavente, Juana; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    1998-01-01

    permeability decreases strongly when the pH decreases, having its minimum value at the isoelectric point of the protein; the apparent zeta potential values are also dependent on both pH and salt concentration. Differences in the streaming potential coefficient determined for two membranes fouled under......The effect of the adsorption of a protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), on the membrane potential, flux reduction and streaming potential measured across a microporous polysulphone membrane with different NaCl solutions and pH values is studied. From electrokinetic phenomena, information about...... the electrical properties of the membrane (fixed charge concentration and ionic transport numbers) or the membrane/solute interactions (streaming and zeta potentials) can be obtained. The influence of pH and ionic strength on volume flux and streaming potential values is considered. Results show that hydraulic...

  16. Polyethylenimine-mediated impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential, respiration and membrane integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anna Karina; Malinska, Dominika; Koszela-Piotrowska, Izabela

    2012-01-01

    The 25 kDa branched polyethylenimine (PEI) is a highly efficient synthetic polycation used in transfection protocols, but also triggers mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic cell death processes where the mechanistic issues are poorly understood. We now demonstrate that PEI in a concentration- and time......-dependent manner can affect functions (membrane potential, swelling and respiration) and ultrastructural integrity of freshly isolated rat liver mitochondria. The threshold concentration for detection of PEI-mediated impairment of rat liver mitochondrial functions is 3 µg/mL, however, lower PEI levels still exert...... some effects on mitochondrial morphology and respiration, and these may be related to the inherent membrane perturbing properties of this polycation. The PEI-mediated mitochondrial swelling phase is biphasic, with a fast decaying initial period (most prominent from 4 µg/mL PEI) followed by a slower...

  17. [Does a lateral gradient of membrane potential on the plasma membrane of growing pollen tube of germinating pollen grain exist?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, I M

    2011-01-01

    The data presented in the article by Breigina et al. (2009) "Changes in the membrane potential during pollen grain germination and pollen tube growth" (Tsitologiya. 51 (10): 815-823) and concerning the measurement of electric membrane potential (Delta Psi) on the plasma membrane of growing pollen tube of germinating pollen grain with the use of fluorescent potential-sensitive dye, di-4-ANEPPS, were critically analyzed in order to clarify whether a lateral gradient of Delta Psi on this membrane indeed exists. This analysis showed that the main conclusion of the authors of the above article on the existence of polar distribution of Delta Psi along the pollen tube plasma membrane is not in accordance with a number of known peculiarities of di-4-ANEPPS behavior in biological membranes and requires a significant revision. The findings in question reported by the authors, in my opinion, might be interpreted as evidence for the presence on the plasma membrane of growing pollen tube not only the membrane potential Delta Psi but also lateral gradient of so called intra-membrane dipole potential. Based on the comments made, another interpretation of the experimental results described by Breigina et al. has been offered. In addition, some drawbacks in the methodology used by the authors for measurement of Delta Psi with other fluorescent potential-sensitive dye, DiBAC3(3), are also shortly considered.

  18. Recording membrane potential changes through photoacoustic voltage sensitive dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haichong K.; Kang, Jeeun; Yan, Ping; Abou, Diane S.; Le, Hanh N. D.; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Kang, Jin U.; Gjedde, Albert; Rahmim, Arman; Wong, Dean F.; Loew, Leslie M.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2017-03-01

    Monitoring of the membrane potential is possible using voltage sensitive dyes (VSD), where fluorescence intensity changes in response to neuronal electrical activity. However, fluorescence imaging is limited by depth of penetration and high scattering losses, which leads to low sensitivity in vivo systems for external detection. In contrast, photoacoustic (PA) imaging, an emerging modality, is capable of deep tissue, noninvasive imaging by combining near infrared light excitation and ultrasound detection. In this work, we develop the theoretical concept whereby the voltage-dependent quenching of dye fluorescence leads to a reciprocal enhancement of PA intensity. Based on this concept, we synthesized a novel near infrared photoacoustic VSD (PA-VSD) whose PA intensity change is sensitive to membrane potential. In the polarized state, this cyanine-based probe enhances PA intensity while decreasing fluorescence output in a lipid vesicle membrane model. With a 3-9 μM VSD concentration, we measured a PA signal increase in the range of 5.3 % to 18.1 %, and observed a corresponding signal reduction in fluorescence emission of 30.0 % to 48.7 %. A theoretical model successfully accounts for how the experimental PA intensity change depends on fluorescence and absorbance properties of the dye. These results not only demonstrate the voltage sensing capability of the dye, but also indicate the necessity of considering both fluorescence and absorbance spectral sensitivities in order to optimize the characteristics of improved photoacoustic probes. Together, our results demonstrate photoacoustic sensing as a potential new modality for sub-second recording and external imaging of electrophysiological and neurochemical events in the brain.

  19. Second and third generation voltage-sensitive fluorescent proteins for monitoring membrane potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie Perron

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, optical neuroimaging methods have been enriched by engineered biosensors derived from fluorescent protein (FP reporters fused to protein detectors that convert physiological signals into changes of intrinsic FP fluorescence. These FP-based indicators are genetically encoded, and hence targetable to specific cell populations within networks of heterologous cell types. Among this class of biosensors, the development of optical probes for membrane potential is both highly desirable and challenging. A suitable FP voltage sensor would indeed be a valuable tool for monitoring the activity of thousands of individual neurons simultaneously in a non-invasive manner. Previous prototypic genetically-encoded FP voltage indicators achieved a proof of principle but also highlighted several difficulties such as poor cell surface targeting and slow kinetics. Recently, we developed a new series of FRET-based Voltage-Sensitive Fluorescent Proteins (VSFPs, referred to as VSFP2s, with efficient targeting to the plasma membrane and high responsiveness to membrane potential signaling in excitable cells. In addition to these FRET-based voltage sensors, we also generated a third series of probes consisting of single FPs with response kinetics suitable for the optical imaging of fast neuronal signals. These newly available genetically-encoded reporters for membrane potential will be instrumental for future experimental approaches directed toward the understanding of neuronal network dynamics and information processing in the brain. Here, we review the development and current status of these novel fluorescent probes.

  20. Polymeric membrane systems of potential use for battery separators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    Two membrane systems were investigated that may have potential use as alkaline battery separators. One system comprises two miscible polymers: a support polymer (e.g., polyvinyl formal) and an ion conductor such as polyacrylic acid. The other system involves a film composed of two immiscible polymers: a conducting polymer (e.g., calcium polyacrylate) suspended in an inert polymer support matrix, polyphenylene oxide. Resistivities in 45-percent potassium hydroxide and qualitative mechanical properties are presented for films comprising various proportions of conducting and support polymers. In terms of these parameters, the results are encouraging for optimum ratios of conducting to support polymers.

  1. Electrochemical charging of the single-layer graphene membrane

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komínková, Zuzana; Kalbáč, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 253, č. 12 (2016), s. 2331-2335 ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LL1301; GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : electrochemical charging * graphene membrane * in situ Raman spectroelectrochemistry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 1.674, year: 2016

  2. Recording membrane potential changes through photoacoustic voltage sensitive dye

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Haichong K.; Kang, Jeeun; Yan, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring of the membrane potential is possible using voltage sensitive dyes (VSD), where fluorescence intensity changes in response to neuronal electrical activity. However, fluorescence imaging is limited by depth of penetration and high scattering losses, which leads to low sensitivity in vivo...... systems for external detection. In contrast, photoacoustic (PA) imaging, an emerging modality, is capable of deep tissue, noninvasive imaging by combining near infrared light excitation and ultrasound detection. In this work, we develop the theoretical concept whereby the voltage-dependent quenching...... the experimental PA intensity change depends on fluorescence and absorbance properties of the dye. These results not only demonstrate the voltage sensing capability of the dye, but also indicate the necessity of considering both fluorescence and absorbance spectral sensitivities in order to optimize...

  3. High quality single crystal Ge nano-membranes for opto-electronic integrated circuitry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V. A.; Gammon, P. M.; Rhead, S. D.; Halpin, J. E.; Trushkevych, O.; Wilson, N. R.; Myronov, M.; Edwards, R. S.; Patchett, D. H.; Allred, P. S.; Prest, M. J.; Whall, T. E.; Parker, E. H. C.; Leadley, D. R.; Chávez-Ángel, E.; Shchepetov, A.; Prunnila, M.; Kachkanov, V.; Dolbnya, I. P.; Reparaz, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    A thin, flat, and single crystal germanium membrane would be an ideal platform on which to mount sensors or integrate photonic and electronic devices, using standard silicon processing technology. We present a fabrication technique compatible with integrated-circuit wafer scale processing to produce membranes of thickness between 60 nm and 800 nm, with large areas of up to 3.5 mm 2 . We show how the optical properties change with thickness, including appearance of Fabry-Pérot type interference in thin membranes. The membranes have low Q-factors, which allow the platforms to counteract distortion during agitation and movement. Finally, we report on the physical characteristics showing sub-nm roughness and a homogenous strain profile throughout the freestanding layer, making the single crystal Ge membrane an excellent platform for further epitaxial growth or deposition of materials

  4. High quality single crystal Ge nano-membranes for opto-electronic integrated circuitry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, V. A., E-mail: vishal.shah@warwick.ac.uk; Gammon, P. M. [Department of Engineering, The University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, The University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Rhead, S. D.; Halpin, J. E.; Trushkevych, O.; Wilson, N. R.; Myronov, M.; Edwards, R. S.; Patchett, D. H.; Allred, P. S.; Prest, M. J.; Whall, T. E.; Parker, E. H. C.; Leadley, D. R. [Department of Physics, The University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Chávez-Ángel, E. [ICN2-Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Department of Physics, UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Shchepetov, A.; Prunnila, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT, Espoo (Finland); Kachkanov, V.; Dolbnya, I. P. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Reparaz, J. S. [ICN2-Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); and others

    2014-04-14

    A thin, flat, and single crystal germanium membrane would be an ideal platform on which to mount sensors or integrate photonic and electronic devices, using standard silicon processing technology. We present a fabrication technique compatible with integrated-circuit wafer scale processing to produce membranes of thickness between 60 nm and 800 nm, with large areas of up to 3.5 mm{sup 2}. We show how the optical properties change with thickness, including appearance of Fabry-Pérot type interference in thin membranes. The membranes have low Q-factors, which allow the platforms to counteract distortion during agitation and movement. Finally, we report on the physical characteristics showing sub-nm roughness and a homogenous strain profile throughout the freestanding layer, making the single crystal Ge membrane an excellent platform for further epitaxial growth or deposition of materials.

  5. Spontaneous formation of structurally diverse membrane channel architectures from a single antimicrobial peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yukun; Chen, Charles H.; Hu, Dan; Ulmschneider, Martin B.; Ulmschneider, Jakob P.

    2016-11-01

    Many antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) selectively target and form pores in microbial membranes. However, the mechanisms of membrane targeting, pore formation and function remain elusive. Here we report an experimentally guided unbiased simulation methodology that yields the mechanism of spontaneous pore assembly for the AMP maculatin at atomic resolution. Rather than a single pore, maculatin forms an ensemble of structurally diverse temporarily functional low-oligomeric pores, which mimic integral membrane protein channels in structure. These pores continuously form and dissociate in the membrane. Membrane permeabilization is dominated by hexa-, hepta- and octamers, which conduct water, ions and small dyes. Pores form by consecutive addition of individual helices to a transmembrane helix or helix bundle, in contrast to current poration models. The diversity of the pore architectures--formed by a single sequence--may be a key feature in preventing bacterial resistance and could explain why sequence-function relationships in AMPs remain elusive.

  6. [Relationship between mitochondrial DNA copy number, membrane potential of human embryo and embryo morphology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H; Teng, X M; Li, Y F

    2017-11-25

    Objective: To explore the relationship between the embryo with the different morphological types in the third day and its mitochondrial copy number, the membrane potential. Methods: Totally 117 embryos with poor development after normal fertilization and were not suitable transferred in the fresh cycle and 106 frozen embryos that were discarded voluntarily by infertility patients with in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer after successful pregnancy were selected. According to evaluation of international standard in embryos, all cleavage stage embryos were divided into class Ⅰ frozen embryo group ( n= 64), class Ⅱ frozen embryo group ( n= 42) and class Ⅲ fresh embryonic group (not transplanted embryos; n= 117). Real-time PCR and confocal microscopy methods were used to detect mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number and the mitochondrial membrane potential of a single embryo. The differences between embryo quality and mtDNA copy number and membrane potential of each group were compared. Results: The copy number of mtDNA and the mitochondrial membrane potential in class Ⅲ fresh embryonic group [(1.7±1.0)×10(5) copy/μl, 1.56±0.32] were significantly lower than those in class Ⅰ frozen embryo group [(3.4±1.7)×10(5) copy/μl, 2.66±0.21] and class Ⅱ frozen embryo group [(2.6±1.2)×10(5) copy/μl, 1.80±0.32; all Pembryo group were significantly higher than those in classⅡ frozen embryo group (both Pembryos of the better quality embryo are higher.

  7. Gravikinesis in Stylonychia mytilus is based on membrane potential changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Martin; Bräucker, Richard; Hemmersbach, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    The graviperception of the hypotrichous ciliate Stylonychia mytilus was investigated using electrophysiological methods and behavioural analysis. It is shown that Stylonychia can sense gravity and thereby compensates sedimentation rate by a negative gravikinesis. The graviresponse consists of a velocity-regulating physiological component (negative gravikinesis) and an additional orientational component. The latter is largely based on a physical mechanism but might, in addition, be affected by the frequency of ciliary reversals, which is under physiological control. We show that the external stimulus of gravity is transformed to a physiological signal, activating mechanosensitive calcium and potassium channels. Earlier electrophysiological experiments revealed that these ion channels are distributed in the manner of two opposing gradients over the surface membrane. Here, we show, for the first time, records of gravireceptor potentials in Stylonychia that are presumably based on this two-gradient system of ion channels. The gravireceptor potentials had maximum amplitudes of approximately 4 mV and slow activation characteristics (0.03 mV s(-1)). The presumptive number of involved graviperceptive ion channels was calculated and correlates with the analysis of the locomotive behaviour.

  8. Improved performance of single-chamber microbial fuel cells through control of membrane deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Cheng, Shaoan; Huang, Xia; Logan, Bruce E

    2010-03-15

    Cation (CEMs) and anion exchange membrane (AEMs) are commonly used in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to enhance Coulombic efficiencies (CEs) by reducing the flux of oxygen through the cathode to bacteria on the anode. AEMs typically work better than CEMs, but in initial experiments we observed the opposite using a membrane electrode assembly MFC. The reason was identified to be membrane deformation, which resulted in water and gas trapped between the membrane and cathode. To correct this, stainless steel mesh was used to press the membrane flat against the cathode. With the steel mesh, AEM performance increased to 46+/-4 W/m(3) in a single cathode MFC, and 98+/-14 W/m(3) in a double-cathode MFC. These power densities were higher than those using a CEM of 32+/-2 W/m(3) (single cathode) and 63+/-6 W/m(3) (double cathode). Higher pH gradients across the membrane and salt precipitation on the cathode were responsible for the reduced performance of the CEM compared to the AEM. CEs reached over 90% for both membranes at >2A/m(2). These results demonstrate the importance of avoiding water accumulation in thin films between membranes and electrodes, and explain additional reasons for poorer performance of CEMs compared to AEMs. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Improved performance of single-chamber microbial fuel cells through control of membrane deformation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan

    2010-03-01

    Cation (CEMs) and anion exchange membrane (AEMs) are commonly used in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to enhance Coulombic efficiencies (CEs) by reducing thefluxof oxygen through the cathode to bacteriaonthe anode. AEMs typically work better than CEMs, but in initial experiments we observed the opposite using a membrane electrode assembly MFC. The reason was identified to be membrane deformation, which resulted in water and gas trapped between the membrane and cathode. To correct this, stainless steel mesh was used to press the membrane flat against the cathode. With the steel mesh, AEM performance increased to 46±4W/m3 in a single cathode MFC, and 98±14W/m3 in a double-cathode MFC. These power densities were higher than those using a CEM of 32±2W/m3 (single cathode) and 63±6W/m3 (double cathode). Higher pH gradients across the membrane and salt precipitation on the cathode were responsible for the reduced performance of the CEM compared to the AEM. CEs reached over 90% for both membranes at >2A/m2. These results demonstrate the importance of avoiding water accumulation in thin films between membranes and electrodes, and explain additional reasons for poorer performance of CEMs compared to AEMs. © 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Growth of single crystals from solutions using semi-permeable membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varkey, A. J.; Okeke, C. E.

    1983-05-01

    A technique suitable for growth of single crystals from solutions using semi-preamble membranes is described. Using this technique single crystals of copper sulphate, potassium bromide and ammonium dihydrogen phosphate have been successfully grown. Advantages of this technique over other methods are discussed.

  11. Biomaterials based on photosynthetic membranes as potential sensors for herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventrella, Andrea; Catucci, Lucia; Placido, Tiziana; Longobardi, Francesco; Agostiano, Angela

    2011-08-15

    In this study, ultrathin film multilayers of Photosystem II-enriched photosynthetic membranes (BBY) were prepared and immobilized on quartz substrates by means of a Layer by Layer procedure exploiting electrostatic interactions with poly(ethylenimine) as polyelectrolyte. The biomaterials thus obtained were characterized by means of optical techniques and Atomic Force Microscopy, highlighting the fact that the Layer by Layer approach allowed the BBYs to be immobilized with satisfactory results. The activity of these hybrid materials was evaluated by means of optical assays based on the Hill Reaction, indicating that the biosamples, which preserved about 65% of their original activity even ten weeks after preparation, were both stable and active. Furthermore, an investigation of the biochips' sensitivity to the herbicide terbutryn, as a model analyte, gave interesting results: inhibition of photosynthetic activity was observed at terbutryn concentrations higher than 10(-7)M, thus evidencing the potential of such biomaterials in the environmental biosensor field. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Covariant single-hole optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kam, J. de

    1982-01-01

    In this investigation a covariant optical potential model is constructed for scattering processes of mesons from nuclei in which the meson interacts repeatedly with one of the target nucleons. The nuclear binding interactions in the intermediate scattering state are consistently taken into account. In particular for pions and K - projectiles this is important in view of the strong energy dependence of the elementary projectile-nucleon amplitude. Furthermore, this optical potential satisfies unitarity and relativistic covariance. The starting point in our discussion is the three-body model for the optical potential. To obtain a practical covariant theory I formulate the three-body model as a relativistic quasi two-body problem. Expressions for the transition interactions and propagators in the quasi two-body equations are found by imposing the correct s-channel unitarity relations and by using dispersion integrals. This is done in such a way that the correct non-relativistic limit is obtained, avoiding clustering problems. Corrections to the quasi two-body treatment from the Pauli principle and the required ground-state exclusion are taken into account. The covariant equations that we arrive at are amenable to practical calculations. (orig.)

  13. Mechanical properties of electrospun bilayer fibrous membranes as potential scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Juan; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos

    2014-06-01

    Bilayer fibrous membranes of poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) were fabricated by electrospinning, using a parallel-disk mandrel configuration that resulted in the sequential deposition of a layer with fibers aligned across the two parallel disks and a layer with randomly oriented fibers, both layers deposited in a single process step. Membrane structure and fiber alignment were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and two-dimensional fast Fourier transform. Because of the intricacies of the generated electric field, bilayer membranes exhibited higher porosity than single-layer membranes consisting of randomly oriented fibers fabricated with a solid-drum collector. However, despite their higher porosity, bilayer membranes demonstrated generally higher elastic modulus, yield strength and toughness than single-layer membranes with random fibers. Bilayer membrane deformation at relatively high strain rates comprised multiple abrupt microfracture events characterized by discontinuous fiber breakage. Bilayer membrane elongation yielded excessive necking of the layer with random fibers and remarkable fiber stretching (on the order of 400%) in the layer with fibers aligned in the stress direction. In addition, fibers in both layers exhibited multiple localized necking, attributed to the nonuniform distribution of crystalline phases in the fibrillar structure. The high membrane porosity, good mechanical properties, and good biocompatibility and biodegradability of PLLA (demonstrated in previous studies) make the present bilayer membranes good scaffold candidates for a wide range of tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Caterpillar locomotion-inspired valveless pneumatic micropump using a single teardrop-shaped elastomeric membrane

    KAUST Repository

    So, Hongyun; Pisano, Albert P.; Seo, Young Ho

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a microfluidic pump operated by an asymmetrically deformed membrane, which was inspired by caterpillar locomotion. Almost all mechanical micropumps consist of two major components of fluid halting and fluid pushing parts, whereas the proposed caterpillar locomotion-inspired micropump has only a single, bilaterally symmetric membrane-like teardrop shape. A teardrop-shaped elastomeric membrane was asymmetrically deformed and then consecutively touched down to the bottom of the chamber in response to pneumatic pressure, thus achieving fluid pushing. Consecutive touchdown motions of the teardrop-shaped membrane mimicked the propagation of a caterpillar's hump during its locomotory gait. The initial touchdown motion of the teardrop-shaped membrane at the centroid worked as a valve that blocked the inlet channel, and then, the consecutive touchdown motions pushed fluid in the chamber toward the tail of the chamber connected to the outlet channel. The propagation of the touchdown motion of the teardrop-shaped membrane was investigated using computational analysis as well as experimental studies. This caterpillar locomotion-inspired micropump composed of only a single membrane can provide new opportunities for simple integration of microfluidic systems. © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  15. Fabrication and Characterization of Single Phase α-Alumina Membranes with Tunable Pore Diameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Tatsuya; Asoh, Hidetaka; Haraguchi, Satoshi; Ono, Sachiko

    2015-01-01

    Nanoporous and single phase α-alumina membranes with pore diameters tunable over a wide range of approximately 60–350 nm were successfully fabricated by optimizing the conditions for anodizing, subsequent detachment, and heat treatment. The pore diameter increased and the cell diameter shrunk upon crystallization to α-alumina by approximately 20% and 3%, respectively, in accordance with the 23% volume shrinkage resulting from the change in density associated with the transformation from the amorphous state to α-alumina. Nevertheless, flat α-alumina membranes, each with a diameter of 25 mm and a thickness of 50 μm, were obtained without thermal deformation. The α-alumina membranes exhibited high chemical resistance in various concentrated acidic and alkaline solutions as well as when exposed to high temperature steam under pressure. The Young’s modulus and hardness of the single phase α-alumina membranes formed by heat treatment at 1250 °C were notably decreased compared to the corresponding amorphous membranes, presumably because of the nodular crystallite structure of the cell walls and the substantial increase in porosity. Furthermore, when used for filtration, the α-alumina membrane exhibited a level of flux higher than that of the commercial ceramic membrane. PMID:28788005

  16. Caterpillar locomotion-inspired valveless pneumatic micropump using a single teardrop-shaped elastomeric membrane

    KAUST Repository

    So, Hongyun

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a microfluidic pump operated by an asymmetrically deformed membrane, which was inspired by caterpillar locomotion. Almost all mechanical micropumps consist of two major components of fluid halting and fluid pushing parts, whereas the proposed caterpillar locomotion-inspired micropump has only a single, bilaterally symmetric membrane-like teardrop shape. A teardrop-shaped elastomeric membrane was asymmetrically deformed and then consecutively touched down to the bottom of the chamber in response to pneumatic pressure, thus achieving fluid pushing. Consecutive touchdown motions of the teardrop-shaped membrane mimicked the propagation of a caterpillar\\'s hump during its locomotory gait. The initial touchdown motion of the teardrop-shaped membrane at the centroid worked as a valve that blocked the inlet channel, and then, the consecutive touchdown motions pushed fluid in the chamber toward the tail of the chamber connected to the outlet channel. The propagation of the touchdown motion of the teardrop-shaped membrane was investigated using computational analysis as well as experimental studies. This caterpillar locomotion-inspired micropump composed of only a single membrane can provide new opportunities for simple integration of microfluidic systems. © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  17. Fabrication and Characterization of Single Phase α-Alumina Membranes with Tunable Pore Diameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Masuda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous and single phase α-alumina membranes with pore diameters tunable over a wide range of approximately 60–350 nm were successfully fabricated by optimizing the conditions for anodizing, subsequent detachment, and heat treatment. The pore diameter increased and the cell diameter shrunk upon crystallization to α-alumina by approximately 20% and 3%, respectively, in accordance with the 23% volume shrinkage resulting from the change in density associated with the transformation from the amorphous state to α-alumina. Nevertheless, flat α-alumina membranes, each with a diameter of 25 mm and a thickness of 50 μm, were obtained without thermal deformation. The α-alumina membranes exhibited high chemical resistance in various concentrated acidic and alkaline solutions as well as when exposed to high temperature steam under pressure. The Young’s modulus and hardness of the single phase α-alumina membranes formed by heat treatment at 1250 °C were notably decreased compared to the corresponding amorphous membranes, presumably because of the nodular crystallite structure of the cell walls and the substantial increase in porosity. Furthermore, when used for filtration, the α-alumina membrane exhibited a level of flux higher than that of the commercial ceramic membrane.

  18. Single Lipid Molecule Dynamics on Supported Lipid Bilayers with Membrane Curvature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip P. Cheney

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The plasma membrane is a highly compartmentalized, dynamic material and this organization is essential for a wide variety of cellular processes. Nanoscale domains allow proteins to organize for cell signaling, endo- and exocytosis, and other essential processes. Even in the absence of proteins, lipids have the ability to organize into domains as a result of a variety of chemical and physical interactions. One feature of membranes that affects lipid domain formation is membrane curvature. To directly test the role of curvature in lipid sorting, we measured the accumulation of two similar lipids, 1,2-Dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DHPE and hexadecanoic acid (HDA, using a supported lipid bilayer that was assembled over a nanopatterned surface to obtain regions of membrane curvature. Both lipids studied contain 16 carbon, saturated tails and a head group tag for fluorescence microscopy measurements. The accumulation of lipids at curvatures ranging from 28 nm to 55 nm radii was measured and fluorescein labeled DHPE accumulated more than fluorescein labeled HDA at regions of membrane curvature. We then tested whether single biotinylated DHPE molecules sense curvature using single particle tracking methods. Similar to groups of fluorescein labeled DHPE accumulating at curvature, the dynamics of single molecules of biotinylated DHPE was also affected by membrane curvature and highly confined motion was observed.

  19. K+ transport and membrane potentials in isolated rat parotid acini

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nauntofte, B.; Dissing, S.

    1988-01-01

    42K+ transport properties of isolated rat parotid acini were characterized concomitant with measurements of membrane potentials (Em) by means of the fluorescent dye diSC3-(5). In unstimulated acini suspended in a 5 mM K+ buffer, Em was governed by the K+ and Cl- gradients and amounted to about -59 mV, a value that remained unaffected on cholinergic stimulation. In unstimulated acini, 42K+ influx was largely mediated by the Na+-K+ pump, and the residual influxes were mediated by a bumetanide-sensitive component (cotransport system) and by K+ channels. Efflux of 42K+ was largely mediated by a bumetanide-sensitive component and by K+ channels. In the unstimulated state, the cotransport system was mediating K+-K+ exchange without contributing to the net uptake of K+. Within 10 s after stimulation, a approximately 10-fold increase in the acinar K+ conductance (gK) occurred, resulting in a rapid net efflux of K+ that amounted to approximately 3.8 mmol.l cells-1.s-1. Measurements of 42K+ fluxes as a function of the external K+ concentration revealed that in the stimulated state gK increases when external K+ is raised from 0.7 to 10 mM, consistent with an activation of acinar gK by the binding of external K+ to the channel. 42K+ flux ratios as well as the effect of the K+ channel inhibitor from scorpion venom (LQV) suggest that approximately 90% of K+ transport in the stimulated state is mediated by ''maxi'' K+ channels

  20. Analysis of Light-Induced Transmembrane Ion Gradients and Membrane Potential in Photosystem I Proteoliposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennisi, Cristian P.; Greenbaum, Elias; Yoshida, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) complexes can support a light-driven electrochemical gradient for protons, which is the driving force for energy-conserving reactions across biological membranes. In this work, a computational model that enables a quantitative description of the light-induced proton gradients across the membrane of PSI proteoliposomes is presented. Using a set of electrodiffusion equations, a compartmental model of a vesicle suspended in aqueous medium was studied. The light-mediated proton movement was modeled as a single proton pumping step with backpressure of the electric potential. The model fits determinations of pH obtained from PSI proteoliposomes illuminated in the presence of mediators of cyclic electron transport. The model also allows analysis of the proton gradients in relation to the transmembrane ion fluxes and electric potential. Sensitivity analysis enabled a determination of the parameters that have greater influence on steady-state levels and onset/decay rates of transmembrane pH and electric potential. This model could be used as a tool for optimizing PSI proteoliposomes for photo-electrochemical applications.

  1. Surface expression, single-channel analysis and membrane topology of recombinant Chlamydia trachomatis Major Outer Membrane Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McClafferty Heather

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydial bacteria are obligate intracellular pathogens containing a cysteine-rich porin (Major Outer Membrane Protein, MOMP with important structural and, in many species, immunity-related roles. MOMP forms extensive disulphide bonds with other chlamydial proteins, and is difficult to purify. Leaderless, recombinant MOMPs expressed in E. coli have yet to be refolded from inclusion bodies, and although leadered MOMP can be expressed in E. coli cells, it often misfolds and aggregates. We aimed to improve the surface expression of correctly folded MOMP to investigate the membrane topology of the protein, and provide a system to display native and modified MOMP epitopes. Results C. trachomatis MOMP was expressed on the surface of E. coli cells (including "porin knockout" cells after optimizing leader sequence, temperature and medium composition, and the protein was functionally reconstituted at the single-channel level to confirm it was folded correctly. Recombinant MOMP formed oligomers even in the absence of its 9 cysteine residues, and the unmodified protein also formed inter- and intra-subunit disulphide bonds. Its topology was modeled as a (16-stranded β-barrel, and specific structural predictions were tested by removing each of the four putative surface-exposed loops corresponding to highly immunogenic variable sequence (VS domains, and one or two of the putative transmembrane strands. The deletion of predicted external loops did not prevent folding and incorporation of MOMP into the E. coli outer membrane, in contrast to the removal of predicted transmembrane strands. Conclusions C. trachomatis MOMP was functionally expressed on the surface of E. coli cells under newly optimized conditions. Tests of its predicted membrane topology were consistent with β-barrel oligomers in which major immunogenic regions are displayed on surface-exposed loops. Functional surface expression, coupled with improved understanding of MOMP

  2. Lipid diffusion in the distal and proximal leaflets of supported lipid bilayer membranes studied by single particle tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, Rafael L.; Barel, Itay; Brown, Frank L. H.; Haran, Gilad

    2018-03-01

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) have been studied extensively as simple but powerful models for cellular membranes. Yet, potential differences in the dynamics of the two leaflets of a SLB remain poorly understood. Here, using single particle tracking, we obtain a detailed picture of bilayer dynamics. We observe two clearly separate diffusing populations, fast and slow, that we associate with motion in the distal and proximal leaflets of the SLB, respectively, based on fluorescence quenching experiments. We estimate diffusion coefficients using standard techniques as well as a new method based on the blur of images due to motion. Fitting the observed diffusion coefficients to a two-leaflet membrane hydrodynamic model allows for the simultaneous determination of the intermonolayer friction coefficient and the substrate-membrane friction coefficient, without any prior assumptions on the strengths of the relevant interactions. Remarkably, our calculations suggest that the viscosity of the interfacial water confined between the membrane and the substrate is elevated by ˜104 as compared to bulk water. Using hidden Markov model analysis, we then obtain insight into the transbilayer movement of lipids. We find that lipid flip-flop dynamics are very fast, with half times in the range of seconds. Importantly, we find little evidence for membrane defect mediated lipid flip-flop for SLBs at temperatures well above the solid-to-liquid transition, though defects seem to be involved when the SLBs are cooled down. Our work thus shows that the combination of single particle tracking and advanced hydrodynamic modeling provides a powerful means to obtain insight into membrane dynamics.

  3. Normal chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum cells with a depolarized plasma membrane potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijn, Bert van; Vogelzang, Sake A.; Ypey, Dirk L.; Molen, Loek G. van der; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1990-01-01

    We examined a possible role for the plasma membrane potential in signal transduction during cyclic AMP-induced chemotaxis in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Chemotaxis, cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP responses in cells with a depolarized membrane potential were measured. Cells can be

  4. Specific ion effects on membrane potential and the permselectivity of ion exchange membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Geise, Geoffrey M.; Cassady, Harrison J.; Paul, Donald R.; Logan, Bruce E.; Hickner, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    -ions also appeared to influence permselectivity leading to ion-specific effects; co-ions that are charge dense and have low polarizability tended to result in high membrane permselectivity. This journal is

  5. Dynamic potential and surface morphology study of sertraline membrane sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khater, M.M.; Issa, Y.M.; Hassib, H.B.; Mohammed, S.H.

    2014-01-01

    New rapid, sensitive and simple electrometric method was developed to determine sertraline hydrochloride (Ser-Cl) in its pure raw material and pharmaceutical formulations. Membrane sensors based on heteropolyacids as ion associating material were prepared. Silicomolybdic acid (SMA), silicotungstic acid (STA) and phosphomolybdic acid (PMA) were used. The slope and limit of detection are 50.00, 60.00 and 53.24 mV/decade and 2.51, 5.62 and 4.85 μmol L−1 for Ser-ST, Ser-PM and Ser-SM membrane sensors, respectively. Linear range is 0.01–10.00 for the three sensors. These new sensors were used for the potentiometric titration of Ser-Cl using sodium tetraphenylborate as titrant. The surface morphologies of the prepared membranes with and without the modifier (ion-associate) were studied using scanning and atomic force microscopes. PMID:26257944

  6. Synthesis of single-crystal-like nanoporous carbon membranes and their application in overall water splitting

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hong

    2017-01-04

    Nanoporous graphitic carbon membranes with defined chemical composition and pore architecture are novel nanomaterials that are actively pursued. Compared with easy-to-make porous carbon powders that dominate the porous carbon research and applications in energy generation/conversion and environmental remediation, porous carbon membranes are synthetically more challenging though rather appealing from an application perspective due to their structural integrity, interconnectivity and purity. Here we report a simple bottom–up approach to fabricate large-size, freestanding and porous carbon membranes that feature an unusual single-crystal-like graphitic order and hierarchical pore architecture plus favourable nitrogen doping. When loaded with cobalt nanoparticles, such carbon membranes serve as high-performance carbon-based non-noble metal electrocatalyst for overall water splitting.

  7. Synthesis of single-crystal-like nanoporous carbon membranes and their application in overall water splitting

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hong; Min, Shixiong; Ma, Chun; Liu, Zhixiong; Zhang, Weiyi; Wang, Qiang; Li, Debao; Li, Yangyang; Turner, Stuart; Han, Yu; Zhu, Haibo; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Pan, Jun; Yu, Weili; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Li, Lain-Jong; Yuan, Jiayin; Antonietti, Markus; Wu, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Nanoporous graphitic carbon membranes with defined chemical composition and pore architecture are novel nanomaterials that are actively pursued. Compared with easy-to-make porous carbon powders that dominate the porous carbon research and applications in energy generation/conversion and environmental remediation, porous carbon membranes are synthetically more challenging though rather appealing from an application perspective due to their structural integrity, interconnectivity and purity. Here we report a simple bottom–up approach to fabricate large-size, freestanding and porous carbon membranes that feature an unusual single-crystal-like graphitic order and hierarchical pore architecture plus favourable nitrogen doping. When loaded with cobalt nanoparticles, such carbon membranes serve as high-performance carbon-based non-noble metal electrocatalyst for overall water splitting.

  8. The Motion of a Single Molecule, the Lambda-Receptor, in the Bacterial Outer Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Lene; Dreyer, Jakob Kisbye; Grego, Sonia

    2002-01-01

    Using optical tweezers and single particle tracking, we have revealed the motion of a single protein, the lambda-receptor, in the outer membrane of living Escherichia coli bacteria. We genetically modified the lambda-receptor placing a biotin on an extracellular site of the receptor in vivo....... The efficiency of this in vivo biotinylation is very low, thus enabling the attachment of a streptavidin-coated bead binding specifically to a single biotinylated lambda-receptor. The bead was used as a handle for the optical tweezers and as a marker for the single particle tracking routine. We propose a model...

  9. Single-Molecule Fluorescence Studies of Membrane Transporters Using Total Internal Reflection Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudsmits, Joris M H; van Oijen, Antoine M; Slotboom, Dirk J

    2017-01-01

    Cells are delineated by a lipid bilayer that physically separates the inside from the outer environment. Most polar, charged, or large molecules require proteins to reduce the energetic barrier for passage across the membrane and to achieve transport rates that are relevant for life. Here, we describe techniques to visualize the functioning of membrane transport proteins with fluorescent probes at the single-molecule level. First, we explain how to produce membrane-reconstituted transporters with fluorescent labels. Next, we detail the construction of a microfluidic flow cell to image immobilized proteoliposomes on a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope. We conclude by describing the methods that are needed to analyze fluorescence movies and obtain useful single-molecule data. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Modulation of membrane potential by an acetylcholine-activated potassium current in trout atrial myocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina, C.E.; Gesser, Hans; Llach, A.

    2007-01-01

    mV from 4.3 pA/pF to 27 pA/pF with an EC50 of 45 nM in atrial myocytes. Moreover, 3 nM ACh increased the slope conductance of Im fourfold, shifted its reversal potential from -78 ± 3 to -84 ± 3 mV, and stabilized the resting membrane potential at -92 ± 4 mV. ACh also shortened the action potential...... hypothesized that this is at least partly due to a small slope conductance of Im around the resting membrane potential in atrial myocytes. In accordance with this hypothesis, the slope conductance of Im was about sevenfold smaller in atrial than in ventricular myocytes. Interestingly, ACh increased Im at -120...... of an inwardly rectifying K+ current can modulate the membrane potential in the trout atrial myocytes and stabilize the resting membrane potential. teleost heart; IK,ACh; cholinergic modulation; action potential...

  11. The potential of fluorinated surfactants in membrane biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, F H; Holzenburg, A

    1995-01-01

    Detergents are important reagents in membrane biochemistry. Since each membrane system studied places different demands on the detergent in terms of desirous physicochemical properties, detergents new to biochemistry must continuously be sought. Ammonium perfluorooctanoate (APFO) was investigated, as representative of fluorinated surfactants, in terms of its suitability as a "biological detergent." It did not interfere with the Markwell modification of the Lowry procedure at detergent concentrations of up to 2% (w/v). Critical micellization concentration (cmc) values (0.013-0.0275 M) for this detergent were determined in a number of buffers of biological interest. It was demonstrated that the detergent can be removed by dialysis, albeit slowly. This slow removal may be particularly useful for reconstitution/crystallization studies. Solubilization studies on several membrane systems containing the proteins listed (the major protein of the membrane sector of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (16 kDa protein); photosystem II; equine herpes virus (EHV) envelope proteins) indicate that it is a potent solubilizing agent, likely to enhance the yield in cases where solubilization has already been demonstrated, and, in other cases, to solubilize proteins formerly recalcitrant to solubilization. The removal of APFO from solubilized 16-kDa protein by means of Extracti-Gel D resin as a means of exchanging detergents quickly and with a minimum requirement for second detergent was investigated.

  12. A Pathogenic Potential of Acinetobacter baumannii-Derived Membrane Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Suk Jin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii secretes outer membrane vesicles (OMVs. A. baumannii OMVs deliver many virulence factors to host cells and then induce cytotoxicity and innate immune response. OMVs secreted from bacteria contribute directly to host pathology during A. baumannii infection.

  13. Bone regeneration potential of sub-microfibrous membranes with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The results indicate that biodegradable PCL sub-microfibrous membrane produced by electrospinning process seems to have excellent biocompatibility, and may be used as a scaffold for bone tissue engineering. Keywords: Biocompatibility, Hard tissue, Biomaterial availability, Bone remodeling, Polylactic acid, ...

  14. An agar gel membrane-PDMS hybrid microfluidic device for long term single cell dynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ieong; Atsumi, Shota; Huang, Wei-Chih; Wu, Tung-Yun; Hanai, Taizo; Lam, Miu-Ling; Tang, Ping; Yang, Jian; Liao, James C; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2010-10-21

    Significance of single cell measurements stems from the substantial temporal fluctuations and cell-cell variability possessed by individual cells. A major difficulty in monitoring surface non-adherent cells such as bacteria and yeast is that these cells tend to aggregate into clumps during growth, obstructing the tracking or identification of single-cells over long time periods. Here, we developed a microfluidic platform for long term single-cell tracking and cultivation with continuous media refreshing and dynamic chemical perturbation capability. The design highlights a simple device-assembly process between PDMS microchannel and agar membrane through conformal contact, and can be easily adapted by microbiologists for their routine laboratory use. The device confines cell growth in monolayer between an agar membrane and a glass surface. Efficient nutrient diffusion through the membrane and reliable temperature maintenance provide optimal growth condition for the cells, which exhibited fast exponential growth and constant distribution of cell sizes. More than 24 h of single-cell tracking was demonstrated on a transcription-metabolism integrated synthetic biological model, the gene-metabolic oscillator. Single cell morphology study under alcohol toxicity allowed us to discover and characterize cell filamentation exhibited by different E. coli isobutanol tolerant strains. We believe this novel device will bring new capabilities to quantitative microbiology, providing a versatile platform for single cell dynamic studies.

  15. Fate and wetting potential of bio-refractory organics in membrane distillation for coke wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jing; Li, Jianfeng; Chen, Zuliang; Cheng, Fangqin

    2018-06-02

    Membrane distillation (MD) has been hindered in industrial applications due to the potential wetting or fouling caused by complicated organic compositions. This study investigated the correlations between the fate and wetting potential of bio-refractory organics in the MD process, where three coke wastewater samples pre-treated with bio-degradation and coagulation served as feed solutions. Results showed that although most of the bio-refractory organics in coke wastewater were rejected by the hydrophobic membrane, some volatile aromatic organics including benzenes, phenols, quinolines and naphthalenes passed through the membrane during the MD process. Interestingly, membrane wetting occurred coincidently with the penetration of phenolic and heterocyclic organics. The wetting rate was obviously correlated with the feed composition and membrane surface properties. Ultimately, novel insights into the anti-wetting strategy of MD with bio-refractory organics was proposed, illustrating that the polyaluminum chloride/polyacrylamide coagulation not only removed contaminants which could accelerate membrane wetting, but also retarded membrane wetting by the complexation with organics. The deposition of these complexes on the membrane surface introduced a secondary hydrophilic layer on the hydrophobic substrate, which established a composite membrane structure with superior wetting resistance. These new findings would be beneficial to wetting control in membrane distillation for wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Membrane potential and ion transport in lung epithelial type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallo, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The alveolar type II pneumocyte is critically important to the function and maintenance of pulmonary epithelium. To investigate the nature of the response of type II cells to membrane injury, and describe a possible mechanism by which these cells regulate surfactant secretion, the membrane potential of isolated rabbit type II cells was characterized. This evaluation was accomplished by measurements of the accumulation of the membrane potential probes: [ 3 H]triphenylmethylphosphonium ([ 3 H]TPMP + ), rubidium 86, and the fluorescent dye DiOC 5 . A compartmental analysis of probe uptake into mitochondrial, cytoplasmic, and non-membrane potential dependent stores was made through the use of selective membrane depolarizations with carbonycyanide M-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). These techniques and population analysis with flow cytometry, permitted the accurate evaluation of type II cell membrane potential under control conditions and under conditions which stimulated cell activity. Further analysis of ion transport by cells exposed to radiation or adrenergic stimulation revealed a common increase in Na + /K + ATPase activity, and an increase in sodium influx across the plasma membrane. This sodium influx was found to be a critical step in the initiation of surfactant secretion. It is concluded that radiation exposure as well as other pulmonary toxicants can directly affect the membrane potential and ionic regulation of type II cells. Ion transport, particularly of sodium, plays an important role in the regulation of type II cell function

  17. Influence of the external conditions on salt retention and pressure-induced electrical potential measured across a composite membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benavente, Juana; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    1999-01-01

    Transport on single electrolyte solutions (NaCl and MgCl2) due to pressure gradients across a commercial reverse osmosis membrane was studied by measuring volume flux (J(v)), salt rejection (S) and pressure induced electrical potential (Delta E) in a crossflow cell. The influence on these paramet......Transport on single electrolyte solutions (NaCl and MgCl2) due to pressure gradients across a commercial reverse osmosis membrane was studied by measuring volume flux (J(v)), salt rejection (S) and pressure induced electrical potential (Delta E) in a crossflow cell. The influence......, r = 1, 0.5 and 0.1), respectively. Results show that J(v), S and Delta E values slightly increase when the velocity of the feed solution increases, but the mixed electrolytes strongly affect both salt rejection and pressure-induced electrical potential. A change in the sign of both parameters...... with respect to the value determined with single electrolytes at the same concentration was obtained, which is attributed to a strong coupling among the fluxes of individual ions and their distribution in the membrane when transport of mixed salt is studied. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  18. Uncovering homo-and hetero-interactions on the cell membrane using single particle tracking approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torreno-Pina, Juan A; Manzo, Carlo; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F

    2016-01-01

    The plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells is responsible for a myriad of functions that regulate cell physiology and plays a crucial role in a multitude of processes that include adhesion, migration, signaling recognition and cell–cell communication. This is accomplished by specific interactions between different membrane components such as lipids and proteins on the lipid bilayer but also through interactions with the underlying cortical actin cytoskeleton on the intracellular side and the glycocalyx matrix in close proximity to the extracellular side. Advanced biophysical techniques, including single particle tracking (SPT) have revealed that the lateral diffusion of molecular components on the plasma membrane represents a landmark manifestation of such interactions. Indeed, by studying changes in the diffusivity of individual membrane molecules, including sub-diffusion, confined diffusion and/or transient arrest of molecules in membrane compartments, it has been possible to gain insight on the nature of molecular interactions and to infer on its functional role for cell response. In this review, we will revise some exciting results where SPT has been crucial to reveal homo- and hetero-interactions on the cell membrane. (paper)

  19. Advanced Material-Ordered Nanotubular Ceramic Membranes Covalently Capped with Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Al-Gharabli

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Advanced ceramic materials with a well-defined nano-architecture of their surfaces were formed by applying a two-step procedure. Firstly, a primary amine was docked on the ordered nanotubular ceramic surface via a silanization process. Subsequently, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs were covalently grafted onto the surface via an amide building block. Physicochemical (e.g., hydrophobicity, and surface free energy (SFE, mechanical, and tribological properties of the developed membranes were improved significantly. The design, preparation, and extended characterization of the developed membranes are presented. Tools such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM, single-area electron diffraction (SAED analysis, microscopy, tribology, nano-indentation, and Raman spectroscopy, among other techniques, were utilized in the characterization of the developed membranes. As an effect of hydrophobization, the contact angles (CAs changed from 38° to 110° and from 51° to 95° for the silanization of ceramic membranes 20 (CM20 and CM100, respectively. SWCNT functionalization reduced the CAs to 72° and 66° for ceramic membranes carbon nanotubes 20 (CM-CNT-20 and CM-CNT-100, respectively. The mechanical properties of the developed membranes improved significantly. From the nanotribological study, Young’s modulus increased from 3 to 39 GPa for CM-CNT-20 and from 43 to 48 GPa for pristine CM-CNT-100. Furthermore, the nanohardness increased by about 80% after the attachment of CNTs for both types of ceramics. The proposed protocol within this work for the development of functionalized ceramic membranes is both simple and efficient.

  20. Ion Permeability of Artificial Membranes Evaluated by Diffusion Potential and Electrical Resistance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlyonsky, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    In the present article, a novel model of artificial membranes that provides efficient assistance in teaching the origins of diffusion potentials is proposed. These membranes are made of polycarbonate filters fixed to 12-mm plastic rings and then saturated with a mixture of creosol and "n"-decane. The electrical resistance and potential…

  1. Protein-detergent interactions in single crystals of membrane proteins studied by neutron crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmins, P.A.; Pebay-Peyroula, E.

    1994-01-01

    The detergent micelles surrounding membrane protein molecules in single crystals can be investigated using neutron crystallography combined with H 2 O/D 2 O contrast variation. If the protein structure is known then the contrast variation method allows phases to be determined at a contrast where the detergent dominates the scattering. The application of various constraints allows the resulting scattering length density map to be realistically modeled. The method has been applied to two different forms of the membrane protein porin. In one case both hydrogenated and partially deuterated protein were used, allowing the head group and tail to be distinguished

  2. Protein-detergent interactions in single crystals of membrane proteins studied by neutron crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmins, P.A. [ILL, Grenoble (France); Pebay-Peyroula, E. [IBS-UJF Grenoble (France)

    1994-12-31

    The detergent micelles surrounding membrane protein molecules in single crystals can be investigated using neutron crystallography combined with H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O contrast variation. If the protein structure is known then the contrast variation method allows phases to be determined at a contrast where the detergent dominates the scattering. The application of various constraints allows the resulting scattering length density map to be realistically modeled. The method has been applied to two different forms of the membrane protein porin. In one case both hydrogenated and partially deuterated protein were used, allowing the head group and tail to be distinguished.

  3. Multiphoton-generated localized electron plasma for membrane permeability modification in single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, T.; Leblanc, M.; McMillan, J.; Westwood, J.; Khodaparast, G. A.

    2014-03-01

    Successful incorporation of a specific macromolecule into a single cell would be ideal for characterizing trafficking dynamics through plasmodesmata or for studying intracellular localizations. Here, we demonstrate NIR femtosecond laser-mediated infiltration of a membrane impermeable dextran-conjugated dye into living cells of Arabidopsis thaliana seedling stems. Based on the reactions of fluorescing vacuoles of transgenic cells and artificial cell walls comprised of nanocellulose, laser intensity and exposure time were adjusted to avoid deleterious effects. Using these plant-tailored laser parameters, cells were injected with the fluorophores and long-term dye retention was observed, all while preserving vital cell functions. This method is ideal for studies concerning cell-to-cell interactions and potentially paves the way for introducing transgenes to specific cells. This work was supported by NSF award IOS-0843372 to JHW, with additional support from and U.S. Department of Agriculture Hatch Project no. 135997, and by the Institute of Critical Technology and Applied Sciences (ICTAS) at Virginia Tech.

  4. Nanopore arrays in a silicon membrane for parallel single-molecule detection: fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Torsten; Zhang, Miao; Sychugov, Ilya; Roxhed, Niclas; Linnros, Jan

    2015-08-01

    Solid state nanopores enable translocation and detection of single bio-molecules such as DNA in buffer solutions. Here, sub-10 nm nanopore arrays in silicon membranes were fabricated by using electron-beam lithography to define etch pits and by using a subsequent electrochemical etching step. This approach effectively decouples positioning of the pores and the control of their size, where the pore size essentially results from the anodizing current and time in the etching cell. Nanopores with diameters as small as 7 nm, fully penetrating 300 nm thick membranes, were obtained. The presented fabrication scheme to form large arrays of nanopores is attractive for parallel bio-molecule sensing and DNA sequencing using optical techniques. In particular the signal-to-noise ratio is improved compared to other alternatives such as nitride membranes suffering from a high-luminescence background.

  5. Positive zeta potential of a negatively charged semi-permeable plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Shayandev; Jing, Haoyuan; Das, Siddhartha

    2017-08-01

    The negative charge of the plasma membrane (PM) severely affects the nature of moieties that may enter or leave the cells and controls a large number of ion-interaction-mediated intracellular and extracellular events. In this letter, we report our discovery of a most fascinating scenario, where one interface (e.g., membrane-cytosol interface) of the negatively charged PM shows a positive surface (or ζ) potential, while the other interface (e.g., membrane-electrolyte interface) still shows a negative ζ potential. Therefore, we encounter a completely unexpected situation where an interface (e.g., membrane-cytosol interface) that has a negative surface charge density demonstrates a positive ζ potential. We establish that the attainment of such a property by the membrane can be ascribed to an interplay of the nature of the membrane semi-permeability and the electrostatics of the electric double layer established on either side of the charged membrane. We anticipate that such a membrane property can lead to such capabilities of the cell (in terms of accepting or releasing certain kinds of moieties as well regulating cellular signaling) that was hitherto inconceivable.

  6. Intrinsic potential of cell membranes: opposite effects of lipid transmembrane asymmetry and asymmetric salt ion distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurtovenko, Andrey A; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2009-01-01

    Using atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we consider the intrinsic cell membrane potential that is found to originate from a subtle interplay between lipid transmembrane asymmetry and the asymmetric distribution of monovalent salt ions on the two sides of the cell membrane. It turns out......Cl saline solution and the PE leaflet is exposed to KCl, the outcome is that the effects of asymmetric lipid and salt ion distributions essentially cancel one another almost completely. Overall, our study highlights the complex nature of the intrinsic potential of cell membranes under physiological...... that both the asymmetric distribution of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) lipids across a membrane and the asymmetric distribution of NaCl and KCl induce nonzero drops in the transmembrane potential. However, these potential drops are opposite in sign. As the PC leaflet faces a Na...

  7. Atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy to probe single membrane proteins in lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapra, K Tanuj

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has opened vast avenues hitherto inaccessible to the biological scientist. The high temporal (millisecond) and spatial (nanometer) resolutions of the AFM are suited for studying many biological processes in their native conditions. The AFM cantilever stylus is aptly termed as a "lab on a tip" owing to its versatility as an imaging tool as well as a handle to manipulate single bonds and proteins. Recent examples assert that the AFM can be used to study the mechanical properties and monitor processes of single proteins and single cells, thus affording insight into important mechanistic details. This chapter specifically focuses on practical and analytical protocols of single-molecule AFM methodologies related to high-resolution imaging and single-molecule force spectroscopy of membrane proteins. Both these techniques are operator oriented, and require specialized working knowledge of the instrument, theoretical, and practical skills.

  8. Single-particle potential from resummed ladder diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, N.

    2013-01-01

    A recent work on the resummation of fermionic in-medium ladder diagrams to all orders is extended by calculating the complex single-particle potential U(p, k f ) + i W(p, k f ) p > k f . The on-shell single-particle potential is constructed by means of a complex-valued in-medium loop that includes corrections from a test particle of momentum vector p added to the filled Fermi sea. The single-particle potential U(k f , k f ) at the Fermi surface as obtained from the resummation of the combined particle and hole ladder diagrams is shown to satisfy the Hugenholtz-Van-Hove theorem. The perturbative contributions at various orders a n in the scattering length are deduced and checked against the known analytical results at order a 1 and a 2 . The limit a → ∞ is studied as a special case and a strong momentum dependence of the real (and imaginary) single-particle potential is found. This feature indicates an instability against a phase transition to a state with an empty shell inside the Fermi sphere such that the density gets reduced by about 5%. The imaginary single-particle potential vanishes linearly at the Fermi surface. For comparison, the same analysis is performed for the resummed particle-particle ladder diagrams alone. In this truncation an instability for hole excitations near the Fermi surface is found at strong coupling. For the set of particle-hole ring diagrams the single-particle potential is calculated as well. Furthermore, the resummation of in-medium ladder diagrams to all orders is studied for a two-dimensional Fermi gas with a short-range two-body contact interaction. (orig.)

  9. Influence of Glucose Deprivation on Membrane Potentials of Plasma Membranes, Mitochondria and Synaptic Vesicles in Rat Brain Synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrynevich, Sviatlana V; Pekun, Tatyana G; Waseem, Tatyana V; Fedorovich, Sergei V

    2015-06-01

    Hypoglycemia can cause neuronal cell death similar to that of glutamate-induced cell death. In the present paper, we investigated the effect of glucose removal from incubation medium on changes of mitochondrial and plasma membrane potentials in rat brain synaptosomes using the fluorescent dyes DiSC3(5) and JC-1. We also monitored pH gradients in synaptic vesicles and their recycling by the fluorescent dye acridine orange. Glucose deprivation was found to cause an inhibition of K(+)-induced Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis and a shift of mitochondrial and plasma membrane potentials to more positive values. The sensitivity of these parameters to the energy deficit caused by the removal of glucose showed the following order: mitochondrial membrane potential > plasma membrane potential > pH gradient in synaptic vesicles. The latter was almost unaffected by deprivation compared with the control. The pH-dependent dye acridine orange was used to investigate synaptic vesicle recycling. However, the compound's fluorescence was shown to be enhanced also by the mixture of mitochondrial toxins rotenone (10 µM) and oligomycin (5 µg/mL). This means that acridine orange can presumably be partially distributed in the intermembrane space of mitochondria. Glucose removal from the incubation medium resulted in a 3.7-fold raise of acridine orange response to rotenone + oligomycin suggesting a dramatic increase in the mitochondrial pH gradient. Our results suggest that the biophysical characteristics of neuronal presynaptic endings do not favor excessive non-controlled neurotransmitter release in case of hypoglycemia. The inhibition of exocytosis and the increase of the mitochondrial pH gradient, while preserving the vesicular pH gradient, are proposed as compensatory mechanisms.

  10. Induced-Charge Enhancement of the Diffusion Potential in Membranes with Polarizable Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhkov, I I; Lebedev, D V; Solodovnichenko, V S; Shiverskiy, A V; Simunin, M M

    2017-12-01

    When a charged membrane separates two salt solutions of different concentrations, a potential difference appears due to interfacial Donnan equilibrium and the diffusion junction. Here, we report a new mechanism for the generation of a membrane potential in polarizable conductive membranes via an induced surface charge. It results from an electric field generated by the diffusion of ions with different mobilities. For uncharged membranes, this effect strongly enhances the diffusion potential and makes it highly sensitive to the ion mobilities ratio, electrolyte concentration, and pore size. Theoretical predictions on the basis of the space-charge model extended to polarizable nanopores fully agree with experimental measurements in KCl and NaCl aqueous solutions.

  11. In situ single molecule imaging of cell membranes: linking basic nanotechniques to cell biology, immunology and medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Jiang; Jin, Hua; Yang, Fen; Chen, Zheng W.; Cai, Jiye

    2014-10-01

    The cell membrane, which consists of a viscous phospholipid bilayer, different kinds of proteins and various nano/micrometer-sized domains, plays a very important role in ensuring the stability of the intracellular environment and the order of cellular signal transductions. Exploring the precise cell membrane structure and detailed functions of the biomolecules in a cell membrane would be helpful to understand the underlying mechanisms involved in cell membrane signal transductions, which could further benefit research into cell biology, immunology and medicine. The detection of membrane biomolecules at the single molecule level can provide some subtle information about the molecular structure and the functions of the cell membrane. In particular, information obtained about the molecular mechanisms and other information at the single molecule level are significantly different from that detected from a large amount of biomolecules at the large-scale through traditional techniques, and can thus provide a novel perspective for the study of cell membrane structures and functions. However, the precise investigations of membrane biomolecules prompts researchers to explore cell membranes at the single molecule level by the use of in situ imaging methods, as the exact conformation and functions of biomolecules are highly controlled by the native cellular environment. Recently, the in situ single molecule imaging of cell membranes has attracted increasing attention from cell biologists and immunologists. The size of biomolecules and their clusters on the cell surface are set at the nanoscale, which makes it mandatory to use high- and super-resolution imaging techniques to realize the in situ single molecule imaging of cell membranes. In the past few decades, some amazing imaging techniques and instruments with super resolution have been widely developed for molecule imaging, which can also be further employed for the in situ single molecule imaging of cell membranes. In

  12. Outer membrane vesicles enhance the carcinogenic potential of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitcholtan, Kenny; Hampton, Mark B; Keenan, Jacqueline I

    2008-12-01

    Chronic Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with an increased risk of gastric carcinogenesis. These non-invasive bacteria colonize the gastric mucosa and constitutively shed small outer membrane vesicles (OMV). In this study, we investigated the direct effect of H.pylori OMV on cellular events associated with carcinogenesis. We observed increased micronuclei formation in AGS human gastric epithelial cells treated with OMV isolated from a toxigenic H.pylori strain (60190). This effect was absent in OMV from strain 60190v:1 that has a mutant vacA, indicating VacA-dependent micronuclei formation. VacA induces intracellular vacuolation, and reduced acridine orange staining indicated disruption in the integrity of these vacuoles. This was accompanied by an alteration in iron metabolism and glutathione (GSH) loss, suggesting a role for oxidative stress in genomic damage. Increasing intracellular GSH levels with a GSH ester abrogated the VacA-mediated increase in micronuclei formation. In conclusion, OMV-mediated delivery of VacA to the gastric epithelium may constitute a new mechanism for H.pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis.

  13. Charging a Capacitor from an External Fluctuating Potential using a Single Conical Nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Vicente; Ramirez, Patricio; Cervera, Javier; Nasir, Saima; Ali, Mubarak; Ensinger, Wolfgang; Mafe, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    We explore the electrical rectification of large amplitude fluctuating signals by an asymmetric nanostructure operating in aqueous solution. We show experimentally and theoretically that a load capacitor can be charged to voltages close to 1 V within a few minutes by converting zero time-average potentials of amplitudes in the range 0.5–3 V into average net currents using a single conical nanopore. This process suggests that significant energy conversion and storage from an electrically fluctuating environment is feasible with a nanoscale pore immersed in a liquid electrolyte solution, a system characteristic of bioelectronics interfaces, electrochemical cells, and nanoporous membranes. PMID:25830563

  14. Ion permeability of artificial membranes evaluated by diffusion potential and electrical resistance measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlyonsky, Vadim

    2013-12-01

    In the present article, a novel model of artificial membranes that provides efficient assistance in teaching the origins of diffusion potentials is proposed. These membranes are made of polycarbonate filters fixed to 12-mm plastic rings and then saturated with a mixture of creosol and n-decane. The electrical resistance and potential difference across these membranes can be easily measured using a low-cost volt-ohm meter and home-made Ag/AgCl electrodes. The advantage of the model is the lack of ionic selectivity of the membrane, which can be modified by the introduction of different ionophores to the organic liquid mixture. A membrane treated with the mixture containing valinomycin generates voltages from -53 to -25 mV in the presence of a 10-fold KCl gradient (in to out) and from -79 to -53 mV in the presence of a bi-ionic KCl/NaCl gradient (in to out). This latter bi-ionic gradient potential reverses to a value from +9 to +20 mV when monensin is present in the organic liquid mixture. Thus, the model can be build stepwise, i.e., all factors leading to the development of diffusion potentials can be introduced sequentially, helping students to understand the quantitative relationships of ionic gradients and differential membrane permeability in the generation of cell electrical signals.

  15. The Chemical Potential of Plasma Membrane Cholesterol: Implications for Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuyan, Artem G; Cohen, Fredric S

    2018-02-27

    Cholesterol is abundant in plasma membranes and exhibits a variety of interactions throughout the membrane. Chemical potential accounts for thermodynamic consequences of molecular interactions, and quantifies the effective concentration (i.e., activity) of any substance participating in a process. We have developed, to our knowledge, the first method to measure cholesterol chemical potential in plasma membranes. This was accomplished by complexing methyl-β-cyclodextrin with cholesterol in an aqueous solution and equilibrating it with an organic solvent containing dissolved cholesterol. The chemical potential of cholesterol was thereby equalized in the two phases. Because cholesterol is dilute in the organic phase, here activity and concentration were equivalent. This equivalence allowed the amount of cholesterol bound to methyl-β-cyclodextrin to be converted to cholesterol chemical potential. Our method was used to determine the chemical potential of cholesterol in erythrocytes and in plasma membranes of nucleated cells in culture. For erythrocytes, the chemical potential did not vary when the concentration was below a critical value. Above this value, the chemical potential progressively increased with concentration. We used standard cancer lines to characterize cholesterol chemical potential in plasma membranes of nucleated cells. This chemical potential was significantly greater for highly metastatic breast cancer cells than for nonmetastatic breast cancer cells. Chemical potential depended on density of the cancer cells. A method to alter and fix the cholesterol chemical potential to any value (i.e., a cholesterol chemical potential clamp) was also developed. Cholesterol content did not change when cells were clamped for 24-48 h. It was found that the level of activation of the transcription factor STAT3 increased with increasing cholesterol chemical potential. The cholesterol chemical potential may regulate signaling pathways. Copyright © 2018. Published by

  16. Diatomite reinforced chitosan composite membrane as potential scaffold for guided bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburaci, Sedef; Tihminlioglu, Funda

    2017-11-01

    In this study, natural silica source, diatomite, incorporated novel chitosan based composite membranes were fabricated and characterized for bone tissue engineering applications as possible bone regeneration membrane. The effect of diatomite loading on the mechanical, morphological, chemical, thermal and surface properties, wettability and in vitro cytotoxicity and cell proliferation on of composite membranes were investigated and observed by tensile test, atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), protein adsorption assay, air/water contact angle analysis and WST-1 respectively. Swelling studies were also performed by water absorption capacity determination. Results showed that incorporation of diatomite to the chitosan matrix increased the surface roughness, swelling capacity and tensile modulus of membranes. An increase of about 52% in Young's modulus was achieved for 10wt% diatomite composite membranes compared with chitosan membranes. High cell viability results were obtained with indirect extraction method. Besides, in vitro cell proliferation and ALP activity results showed that diatom incorporation significantly increased the ALP activity of Saos-2 cells cultured on chitosan membranes. The novel composite membranes prepared in the present study with tunable properties can be considered as a potential candidate as a scaffold in view of its enhanced physical & chemical properties as well as biological activities for bone tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Kir2.1 channels set two levels of resting membrane potential with inward rectification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuihao; Zuo, Dongchuan; Liu, Zheng; Chen, Haijun

    2018-04-01

    Strong inward rectifier K + channels (Kir2.1) mediate background K + currents primarily responsible for maintenance of resting membrane potential. Multiple types of cells exhibit two levels of resting membrane potential. Kir2.1 and K2P1 currents counterbalance, partially accounting for the phenomenon of human cardiomyocytes in subphysiological extracellular K + concentrations or pathological hypokalemic conditions. The mechanism of how Kir2.1 channels contribute to the two levels of resting membrane potential in different types of cells is not well understood. Here we test the hypothesis that Kir2.1 channels set two levels of resting membrane potential with inward rectification. Under hypokalemic conditions, Kir2.1 currents counterbalance HCN2 or HCN4 cation currents in CHO cells that heterologously express both channels, generating N-shaped current-voltage relationships that cross the voltage axis three times and reconstituting two levels of resting membrane potential. Blockade of HCN channels eliminated the phenomenon in K2P1-deficient Kir2.1-expressing human cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells or CHO cells expressing both Kir2.1 and HCN2 channels. Weakly inward rectifier Kir4.1 or inward rectification-deficient Kir2.1•E224G mutant channels do not set such two levels of resting membrane potential when co-expressed with HCN2 channels in CHO cells or when overexpressed in human cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. These findings demonstrate a common mechanism that Kir2.1 channels set two levels of resting membrane potential with inward rectification by balancing inward currents through different cation channels such as hyperpolarization-activated HCN channels or hypokalemia-induced K2P1 leak channels.

  18. Low energy single-staged anaerobic fluidized bed ceramic membrane bioreactor (AFCMBR) for wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Muhammad; McCarty, Perry L; Shin, Chungheon; Bae, Jaeho; Kim, Jeonghwan

    2017-09-01

    An aluminum dioxide (Al 2 O 3 ) ceramic membrane was used in a single-stage anaerobic fluidized bed ceramic membrane bioreactor (AFCMBR) for low-strength wastewater treatment. The AFCMBR was operated continuously for 395days at 25°C using a synthetic wastewater having a chemical oxygen demand (COD) averaging 260mg/L. A membrane net flux as high as 14.5-17L/m 2 h was achieved with only periodic maintenance cleaning, obtained by adding 25mg/L of sodium hypochlorite solution. No adverse effect of the maintenance cleaning on organic removal was observed. An average SCOD in the membrane permeate of 23mg/L was achieved with a 1h hydraulic retention time (HRT). Biosolids production averaged 0.014±0.007gVSS/gCOD removed. The estimated electrical energy required to operate the AFCMBR system was 0.039kWh/m 3 , which is only about 17% of the electrical energy that could be generated with the methane produced. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Advanced Fabrication of Single-Crystal Diamond Membranes for Quantum Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Challier

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Many promising applications of single crystal diamond and its color centers as sensor platform and in photonics require free-standing membranes with a thickness ranging from several micrometers to the few 100 nm range. In this work, we present an approach to conveniently fabricate such thin membranes with up to about one millimeter in size. We use commercially available diamond plates (thickness 50 μ m in an inductively coupled reactive ion etching process which is based on argon, oxygen and SF 6 . We thus avoid using toxic, corrosive feed gases and add an alternative to previously presented recipes involving chlorine-based etching steps. Our membranes are smooth (RMS roughness <1 nm and show moderate thickness variation (central part: <1 μ m over ≈200 × 200 μ m 2 . Due to an improved etch mask geometry, our membranes stay reliably attached to the diamond plate in our chlorine-based as well as SF 6 -based processes. Our results thus open the route towards higher reliability in diamond device fabrication and up-scaling.

  20. Controllable synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotube framework membranes and capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Changsik; Kwon, Taeyun; Han, Jae-Hee; Shandell, Mia; Strano, Michael S

    2009-12-01

    Controlling the morphology of membrane components at the nanometer scale is central to many next-generation technologies in water purification, gas separation, fuel cell, and nanofiltration applications. Toward this end, we report the covalent assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) into three-dimensional framework materials with intertube pores controllable by adjusting the size of organic linker molecules. The frameworks are fashioned into multilayer membranes possessing linker spacings from 1.7 to 3.0 nm, and the resulting framework films were characterized, including transport properties. Nanoindentation measurements by atomic force microscopy show that the spring constant of the SWNT framework film (22.6 +/- 1.2 N/m) increased by a factor of 2 from the control value (10.4 +/- 0.1 N/m). The flux ratio comparison in a membrane-permeation experiment showed that larger spacer sizes resulted in larger pore structures. This synthetic method was equally efficient on silica microspheres, which could then be etched to create all-SWNT framework, hollow capsules approximately 5 mum in diameter. These hollow capsules are permeable to organic and inorganic reagents, allowing one to form inorganic nanoparticles, for example, that become entrapped within the capsule. The ability to encapsulate functional nanomaterials inside perm-selective SWNT cages and membranes may find applications in new adsorbents, novel catalysts, and drug delivery vehicles.

  1. Influence of Active Layer on Separation Potentials of Nanofiltration Membranes for Inorganic Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadekar, Shardul S; Vidic, Radisav D

    2017-05-16

    Active layers of two fully aromatic and two semi-aromatic nanofiltration membranes were studied along with surface charge at different electrolyte composition and effective pore size to elucidate their influence on separation mechanisms for inorganic ions by steric, charge, and dielectric exclusion. The membrane potential method used for pore size measurement is underlined as the most appropriate measurement technique for this application owing to its dependence on the diffusional potentials of inorganic ions. Crossflow rejection experiments with dilute feed composition indicate that both fully aromatic membranes achieved similar rejection despite the differences in surface charge, which suggests that rejection by these membranes is exclusively dependent on size exclusion and the contribution of charge exclusion is weak. Rejection experiments with higher ionic strength and different composition of the feed solution confirmed this hypothesis. On the other hand, increase in the ionic strength of feed solution when the charge exclusion effects are negligible due to charge screening strongly influenced ion rejection by semi-aromatic membranes. The experimental results confirmed that charge exclusion contributes significantly to the performance of semi-aromatic membranes in addition to size exclusion. The contribution of dielectric exclusion to overall ion rejection would be more significant for fully aromatic membranes.

  2. Amnion and Chorion Membranes: Potential Stem Cell Reservoir with Wide Applications in Periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Akanksha; Kedige, Suresh D; Jain, Kanu

    2015-01-01

    The periodontal therapy usually aims at elimination of disease causing bacteria and resolution of inflammation. It involves either resective or regenerative surgery to resolve the inflammation associated defects. Over the years, several methods have been used for achievement of periodontal regeneration. One of the oldest biomaterials used for scaffolds is the fetal membrane. The amniotic membranes of developing embryo, that is, amnion (innermost lining) and chorion (a layer next to it), have the properties with significant potential uses in dentistry. This paper reviews the properties, mechanism of action, and various applications of these placental membranes in general and specifically in Periodontics.

  3. On the structure and dynamics of water associated with single-supported zwitterionic and anionic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiec, A.; Buck, Z. N.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    2017-01-01

    We have used high-resolution quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) to investigate the dynamics of water molecules (time scale of motion similar to ∼10-11- 10-9 s) in proximity to single-supported bilayers of the zwitterionic lipid DMPC (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine) and the ani......We have used high-resolution quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) to investigate the dynamics of water molecules (time scale of motion similar to ∼10-11- 10-9 s) in proximity to single-supported bilayers of the zwitterionic lipid DMPC (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine......) and the anionic lipid DMPG (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol) in the temperature range 160-295 K. For both membranes, the temperature dependence of the intensity of neutrons scattered elastically and incoherently from these samples indicates a series of freezing/melting transitions...... the membrane and two types of confined water in closer proximity to the lipids. Specifically, we propose a water type termed "confined 2" located within and just above the lipid head groups of the membrane and confined 1 water that lies between the bulk-like and confined 2 water. Confined 1 water is only...

  4. Scalable Fabrication of Integrated Nanophotonic Circuits on Arrays of Thin Single Crystal Diamond Membrane Windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piracha, Afaq H; Rath, Patrik; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Kühn, Stefan; Pernice, Wolfram H P; Prawer, Steven

    2016-05-11

    Diamond has emerged as a promising platform for nanophotonic, optical, and quantum technologies. High-quality, single crystalline substrates of acceptable size are a prerequisite to meet the demanding requirements on low-level impurities and low absorption loss when targeting large photonic circuits. Here, we describe a scalable fabrication method for single crystal diamond membrane windows that achieves three major goals with one fabrication method: providing high quality diamond, as confirmed by Raman spectroscopy; achieving homogeneously thin membranes, enabled by ion implantation; and providing compatibility with established planar fabrication via lithography and vertical etching. On such suspended diamond membranes we demonstrate a suite of photonic components as building blocks for nanophotonic circuits. Monolithic grating couplers are used to efficiently couple light between photonic circuits and optical fibers. In waveguide coupled optical ring resonators, we find loaded quality factors up to 66 000 at a wavelength of 1560 nm, corresponding to propagation loss below 7.2 dB/cm. Our approach holds promise for the scalable implementation of future diamond quantum photonic technologies and all-diamond photonic metrology tools.

  5. Flapping tail membrane in bats produces potentially important thrust during horizontal takeoffs and very slow flight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick A Adams

    Full Text Available Historically, studies concerning bat flight have focused primarily on the wings. By analyzing high-speed video taken on 48 individuals of five species of vespertilionid bats, we show that the capacity to flap the tail-membrane (uropatagium in order to generate thrust and lift during takeoffs and minimal-speed flight (<1 m (s-1 was largely underestimated. Indeed, bats flapped the tail-membrane by extensive dorso-ventral fanning motions covering as much as 135 degrees of arc consistent with thrust generation by air displacement. The degree of dorsal extension of the tail-membrane, and thus the potential amount of thrust generated during platform launches, was significantly correlated with body mass (P = 0.02. Adduction of the hind limbs during upstrokes collapsed the tail-membrane thereby reducing its surface area and minimizing negative lift forces. Abduction of the hind limbs during the downstroke fully expanded the tail-membrane as it was swept ventrally. The flapping kinematics of the tail-membrane is thus consistent with expectations for an airfoil. Timing offsets between the wings and tail-membrane during downstrokes was as much as 50%, suggesting that the tail-membrane was providing thrust and perhaps lift when the wings were retracting through the upstoke phase of the wing-beat cycle. The extent to which the tail-membrane was used during takeoffs differed significantly among four vespertilionid species (P = 0.01 and aligned with predictions derived from bat ecomorphology. The extensive fanning motion of the tail membrane by vespertilionid bats has not been reported for other flying vertebrates.

  6. Single-vesicle detection and analysis of peptide-induced membrane permeabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Ehrlich, Nicky; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager

    2015-01-01

    The capability of membrane-active peptides to disrupt phospholipid membranes is often studied by investigating peptide-induced leakage of quenched fluorescent molecules from large unilamellar lipid vesicles. In this article, we explore two fluorescence microscopy-based single-vesicle detection...... methods as alternatives to the quenching-based assays for studying peptide-induced leakage from large unilamellar lipid vesicles. Specifically, we use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to study the leakage of fluorescent molecules of different sizes from large unilamellar lipid vesicles...... dispersed in aqueous solution, and we use confocal imaging of surface-immobilized large unilamellar lipid vesicles to investigate whether there are heterogeneities in leakage between individual vesicles. Of importance, we design an experimental protocol that allows us to quantitatively correlate the results...

  7. Glucagon effects on the membrane potential and calcium uptake rate of rat liver mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wingrove, D.E.; Amatruda, J.M.; Gunter, T.E.

    1984-01-01

    It has been widely reported that the in vivo administration of glucagon to rats results in the stimulation of calcium influx in subsequently isolated liver mitochondria. The mechanism of this effect is investigated through simultaneous measurements of calcium uptake rate and mitochondrial membrane potential. This allows the measurement of the calcium uniporter conductance independent of hormonal effects on electron transport or respiration. Two experimental approaches are used. The first involves measuring the uptake of 40-50 nmol of Ca 2+ /mg of mitochondrial protein with the calcium dye antipyrylazo III; the second uses 45 Ca 2+ to follow uptake in the presence of 0.5 to 1.5 μM free calcium, buffered with HEDTA. In both cases a tetraphenyl phosphonium electrode is used to follow membrane potential, and membrane potential is varied using either malonate or butylmalonate in the presence of rotenone. The relative merits of these two approaches are discussed. The conductance of the calcium uniporter is found not to be stimulated by glucagon pretreatment. Also, the relative glucagon stimulation of both calcium influx and membrane potential is found to increase with increasing malonate concentration. These results imply that there is no direct stimulation of calcium uptake into liver mitochondria following glucagon treatment. The results are consistent with a glucagon stimulation of substrate transport, substrate oxidation, or a stimulation of electron transport resulting in an increased membrane potential and secondary stimulation of calcium uptake

  8. Energy-producing system of the membrane potential generation in γ-irradiated Streptococcus faecalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fomenko, B.S.

    1976-01-01

    γ-irradiated (20-100 krads) Str. faecalis cells exhibited increased glycolytic and ATPase activity whereas the ATP level remained unaffected by radiation. It is concluded that the radiation-induced reduction of the membrane potential in Str. faecalis, that has been earlier described, is not connected with the impairment of the energy-producing system of the potential generation

  9. Characterization of nanostructures in the live cell plasma membrane utilizing advanced single molecule fluorescence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brameshuber, M.

    2009-01-01

    Unrevealing the detailed structure of the cellular plasma membrane at a nanoscopic length scale is the key for understanding the regulation of various signaling pathways or interaction mechanism. Hypotheses postulate the existence of nanoscopic lipid platforms in the cell membrane which are termed lipid- or membrane rafts. Based on biochemical studies, rafts are believed to play a crucial role in many signaling processes. However, there is currently not much information on their size, shape, stability, surface density, composition and heterogeneity. In this thesis I present an ultra-sensitive fluorescence based method which allows for the first time the direct imaging of single mobile rafts in the live cell plasma membrane. The method senses rafts by their property to assemble a characteristic set of fluorescent marker-proteins or lipids on a time-scale of seconds. A special photobleaching protocol was developed and used to reduce the surface density of labeled mobile rafts down to the level of well-isolated diffraction-limited spots, without altering the single spot brightness. The statistical distribution of probe molecules per raft was determined by single molecule brightness analysis. For demonstration, I used the consensus markers Bodipy-GM1, a fluorescent lipid analogue, and glycosylphosphatidyl-inositol-anchored monomeric GFP. For both markers I found cholesterol-dependent association in the plasma membrane of living CHO and Jurkat T cells in the resting state, indicating the presence of mobile, stable rafts hosting these probes. I further characterized these structures by taking cell-to-cell variations under consideration. By comparing Bodipy-GM1 with mGFP-GPI homo-association upon temperature variation, two different states - a non-equilibrated and an equilibrated state - could be identified. I conclude that rafts are loaded non-randomly; the characteristic load is maintained during its lifetime in the plasma membrane of a non-activated cell. Beside these

  10. Induced mitochondrial membrane potential for modeling solitonic conduction of electrotonic signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R R Poznanski

    Full Text Available A cable model that includes polarization-induced capacitive current is derived for modeling the solitonic conduction of electrotonic potentials in neuronal branchlets with microstructure containing endoplasmic membranes. A solution of the nonlinear cable equation modified for fissured intracellular medium with a source term representing charge 'soakage' is used to show how intracellular capacitive effects of bound electrical charges within mitochondrial membranes can influence electrotonic signals expressed as solitary waves. The elastic collision resulting from a head-on collision of two solitary waves results in localized and non-dispersing electrical solitons created by the nonlinearity of the source term. It has been shown that solitons in neurons with mitochondrial membrane and quasi-electrostatic interactions of charges held by the microstructure (i.e., charge 'soakage' have a slower velocity of propagation compared with solitons in neurons with microstructure, but without endoplasmic membranes. When the equilibrium potential is a small deviation from rest, the nonohmic conductance acts as a leaky channel and the solitons are small compared when the equilibrium potential is large and the outer mitochondrial membrane acts as an amplifier, boosting the amplitude of the endogenously generated solitons. These findings demonstrate a functional role of quasi-electrostatic interactions of bound electrical charges held by microstructure for sustaining solitons with robust self-regulation in their amplitude through changes in the mitochondrial membrane equilibrium potential. The implication of our results indicate that a phenomenological description of ionic current can be successfully modeled with displacement current in Maxwell's equations as a conduction process involving quasi-electrostatic interactions without the inclusion of diffusive current. This is the first study in which solitonic conduction of electrotonic potentials are generated by

  11. Monitoring single membrane protein dynamics in a liposome manipulated in solution by the ABELtrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendler, T.; Renz, M.; Hammann, E.; Ernst, S.; Zarrabi, N.; Börsch, M.

    2011-02-01

    FoF1-ATP synthase is the essential membrane enzyme maintaining the cellular level of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and comprises two rotary motors. We measure subunit rotation in FoF1-ATP synthase by intramolecular Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between two fluorophores at the rotor and at the stator of the enzyme. Confocal FRET measurements of freely diffusing single enzymes in lipid vesicles are limited to hundreds of milliseconds by the transit times through the laser focus. We evaluate two different methods to trap the enzyme inside the confocal volume in order to extend the observation times. Monte Carlo simulations show that optical tweezers with low laser power are not suitable for lipid vesicles with a diameter of 130 nm. A. E. Cohen (Harvard) and W. E. Moerner (Stanford) have recently developed an Anti-Brownian electrokinetic trap (ABELtrap) which is capable to apparently immobilize single molecules, proteins, viruses or vesicles in solution. Trapping of fluorescent particles is achieved by applying a real time, position-dependent feedback to four electrodes in a microfluidic device. The standard deviation from a given target position in the ABELtrap is smaller than 200 nm. We develop a combination of the ABELtrap with confocal FRET measurements to monitor single membrane enzyme dynamics by FRET for more than 10 seconds in solution.

  12. Single-sweep spectral analysis of contact heat evoked potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tine M; Graversen, Carina; Frøkjaer, Jens B

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: The cortical response to nociceptive thermal stimuli recorded as contact heat evoked potentials (CHEPs) may be altered by morphine. However, previous studies have averaged CHEPs over multiple stimuli, which are confounded by jitter between sweeps. Thus, the aim was to assess single-sweep ch......AIMS: The cortical response to nociceptive thermal stimuli recorded as contact heat evoked potentials (CHEPs) may be altered by morphine. However, previous studies have averaged CHEPs over multiple stimuli, which are confounded by jitter between sweeps. Thus, the aim was to assess single...... by 13% (P = 0.04) and 9% (P = 0.007), while the beta and gamma bands were increased by 10% (P = 0.006) and 24% (P = 0.04). CONCLUSION: The decreases in the delta and theta band are suggested to represent a decrease in the pain specific morphology of the CHEPs, which indicates a diminished pain response...

  13. Demineralized Freeze-Dried Bovine Cortical Bone: Its Potential for Guided Bone Regeneration Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Kamadjaja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bovine pericardium collagen membrane (BPCM had been widely used in guided bone regeneration (GBR whose manufacturing process usually required chemical cross-linking to prolong its biodegradation. However, cross-linking of collagen fibrils was associated with poorer tissue integration and delayed vascular invasion. Objective. This study evaluated the potential of bovine cortical bone collagen membrane for GBR by evaluating its antigenicity potential, cytotoxicity, immune and tissue response, and biodegradation behaviors. Material and Methods. Antigenicity potential of demineralized freeze-dried bovine cortical bone membrane (DFDBCBM was done with histology-based anticellularity evaluation, while cytotoxicity was analyzed using MTT Assay. Evaluation of immune response, tissue response, and biodegradation was done by randomly implanting DFDBCBM and BPCM in rat’s subcutaneous dorsum. Samples were collected at 2, 5, and 7 days and 7, 14, 21, and 28 days for biocompatibility and tissue response-biodegradation study, respectively. Result. DFDBCBM, histologically, showed no retained cells; however, it showed some level of in vitro cytotoxicity. In vivo study exhibited increased immune response to DFDBCBM in early healing phase; however, normal tissue response and degradation rate were observed up to 4 weeks after DFDBCBM implantation. Conclusion. Demineralized freeze-dried bovine cortical bone membrane showed potential for clinical application; however, it needs to be optimized in its biocompatibility to fulfill all requirements for GBR membrane.

  14. TCA Cycle and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential Are Necessary for Diverse Biological Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Reyes, Inmaculada; Diebold, Lauren P; Kong, Hyewon; Schieber, Michael; Huang, He; Hensley, Christopher T; Mehta, Manan M; Wang, Tianyuan; Santos, Janine H; Woychik, Richard; Dufour, Eric; Spelbrink, Johannes N; Weinberg, Samuel E; Zhao, Yingming; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Chandel, Navdeep S

    2016-01-21

    Mitochondrial metabolism is necessary for the maintenance of oxidative TCA cycle function and mitochondrial membrane potential. Previous attempts to decipher whether mitochondria are necessary for biological outcomes have been hampered by genetic and pharmacologic methods that simultaneously disrupt multiple functions linked to mitochondrial metabolism. Here, we report that inducible depletion of mitochondrial DNA (ρ(ο) cells) diminished respiration, oxidative TCA cycle function, and the mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in diminished cell proliferation, hypoxic activation of HIF-1, and specific histone acetylation marks. Genetic reconstitution only of the oxidative TCA cycle function specifically in these inducible ρ(ο) cells restored metabolites, resulting in re-establishment of histone acetylation. In contrast, genetic reconstitution of the mitochondrial membrane potential restored ROS, which were necessary for hypoxic activation of HIF-1 and cell proliferation. These results indicate that distinct mitochondrial functions associated with respiration are necessary for cell proliferation, epigenetics, and HIF-1 activation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Fundamental transport mechanisms, fabrication and potential applications of nanoporous atomically thin membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luda; Boutilier, Michael S. H.; Kidambi, Piran R.; Jang, Doojoon; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas G.; Karnik, Rohit

    2017-06-01

    Graphene and other two-dimensional materials offer a new approach to controlling mass transport at the nanoscale. These materials can sustain nanoscale pores in their rigid lattices and due to their minimum possible material thickness, high mechanical strength and chemical robustness, they could be used to address persistent challenges in membrane separations. Here we discuss theoretical and experimental developments in the emerging field of nanoporous atomically thin membranes, focusing on the fundamental mechanisms of gas- and liquid-phase transport, membrane fabrication techniques and advances towards practical application. We highlight potential functional characteristics of the membranes and discuss applications where they are expected to offer advantages. Finally, we outline the major scientific questions and technological challenges that need to be addressed to bridge the gap from theoretical simulations and proof-of-concept experiments to real-world applications.

  16. Fundamental transport mechanisms, fabrication and potential applications of nanoporous atomically thin membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luda; Boutilier, Michael S H; Kidambi, Piran R; Jang, Doojoon; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas G; Karnik, Rohit

    2017-06-06

    Graphene and other two-dimensional materials offer a new approach to controlling mass transport at the nanoscale. These materials can sustain nanoscale pores in their rigid lattices and due to their minimum possible material thickness, high mechanical strength and chemical robustness, they could be used to address persistent challenges in membrane separations. Here we discuss theoretical and experimental developments in the emerging field of nanoporous atomically thin membranes, focusing on the fundamental mechanisms of gas- and liquid-phase transport, membrane fabrication techniques and advances towards practical application. We highlight potential functional characteristics of the membranes and discuss applications where they are expected to offer advantages. Finally, we outline the major scientific questions and technological challenges that need to be addressed to bridge the gap from theoretical simulations and proof-of-concept experiments to real-world applications.

  17. Study of water diffusion on single-supported bilayer lipid membranes by quasielastic neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bai, M.; Miskowiec, A.; Hansen, F. Y.

    2012-01-01

    High-energy-resolution quasielastic neutron scattering has been used to elucidate the diffusion of water molecules in proximity to single bilayer lipid membranes supported on a silicon substrate. By varying sample temperature, level of hydration, and deuteration, we identify three different types...... of diffusive water motion: bulk-like, confined, and bound. The motion of bulk-like and confined water molecules is fast compared to those bound to the lipid head groups (7-10 H2O molecules per lipid), which move on the same nanosecond time scale as H atoms within the lipid molecules. Copyright (C) EPLA, 2012...

  18. Diode-like properties of single- and multi-pore asymmetric track membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinska, K.; Gapeeva, A. R.; Orelovich, O. L.; Apel, P. Yu.

    2014-05-01

    In this work, we investigated the ionic transport properties of asymmetric polyethylene terephthalate (PET) track membranes with the thickness of 5 μm. The samples containing single pores and arrays of many pores were fabricated by irradiation with accelerated ions and subsequent physicochemical treatment. The method of etching in the presence of a surface-active agent was used to prepare the pores with highly-tapered tip. The transport of monovalent inorganic ions through the nano-scale holes was studied in a conductivity cell. The effective pore radii, electrical conductance and rectification ratios of pores were measured. The geometric characteristics of nanopores were investigated using FESEM.

  19. Synaptic input correlations leading to membrane potential decorrelation of spontaneous activity in cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graupner, Michael; Reyes, Alex D

    2013-09-18

    Correlations in the spiking activity of neurons have been found in many regions of the cortex under multiple experimental conditions and are postulated to have important consequences for neural population coding. While there is a large body of extracellular data reporting correlations of various strengths, the subthreshold events underlying the origin and magnitude of signal-independent correlations (called noise or spike count correlations) are unknown. Here we investigate, using intracellular recordings, how synaptic input correlations from shared presynaptic neurons translate into membrane potential and spike-output correlations. Using a pharmacologically activated thalamocortical slice preparation, we perform simultaneous recordings from pairs of layer IV neurons in the auditory cortex of mice and measure synaptic potentials/currents, membrane potentials, and spiking outputs. We calculate cross-correlations between excitatory and inhibitory inputs to investigate correlations emerging from the network. We furthermore evaluate membrane potential correlations near resting potential to study how excitation and inhibition combine and affect spike-output correlations. We demonstrate directly that excitation is correlated with inhibition thereby partially canceling each other and resulting in weak membrane potential and spiking correlations between neurons. Our data suggest that cortical networks are set up to partially cancel correlations emerging from the connections between neurons. This active decorrelation is achieved because excitation and inhibition closely track each other. Our results suggest that the numerous shared presynaptic inputs do not automatically lead to increased spiking correlations.

  20. GraDeR: Membrane Protein Complex Preparation for Single-Particle Cryo-EM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, Florian; Gerle, Christoph; Fischer, Niels; Oshima, Atsunori; Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Shimada, Satoru; Yokoyama, Ken; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Stark, Holger

    2015-09-01

    We developed a method, named GraDeR, which substantially improves the preparation of membrane protein complexes for structure determination by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). In GraDeR, glycerol gradient centrifugation is used for the mild removal of free detergent monomers and micelles from lauryl maltose-neopentyl glycol detergent stabilized membrane complexes, resulting in monodisperse and stable complexes to which standard processes for water-soluble complexes can be applied. We demonstrate the applicability of the method on three different membrane complexes, including the mammalian FoF1 ATP synthase. For this highly dynamic and fragile rotary motor, we show that GraDeR allows visualizing the asymmetry of the F1 domain, which matches the ground state structure of the isolated domain. Therefore, the present cryo-EM structure of FoF1 ATP synthase provides direct structural evidence for Boyer's binding change mechanism in the context of the intact enzyme. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Co-existence of Gel and Fluid Lipid Domains in Single-component Phospholipid Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Clare L [McMaster University; Barrett, M [McMaster University; Toppozini, L [McMaster University; Yamani, Zahra [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, National Research Council, Chalk River Laboratorie; Kucerka, Norbert [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre and Comelius University (Slovakia); Katsaras, John [ORNL; Fragneto, Giovanna [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Rheinstadter, Maikel C [McMaster University

    2012-01-01

    Lateral nanostructures in membranes, so-called rafts, are believed to strongly influence membrane properties and functions. The experimental observation of rafts has proven difficult as they are thought to be dynamic structures that likely fluctuate on nano- to microsecond time scales. Using neutron diffraction we present direct experimental evidence for the co-existence of gel and fluid lipid domains in a single-component phospholipid membrane made of DPPC as it undergoes its main phase transition. The coherence length of the neutron beam sets a lower limit for the size of structures that can be observed. Neutron coherence lengths between 30 and 242A used in this study were obtained by varying the incident neutron energy and the resolution of the neutron spectrometer. We observe Bragg peaks corresponding to co-existing nanometer sized structures, both in out-of-plane and in-plane scans, by tuning the neutron coherence length. During the main phase transition, instead of a continuous transition that shows a pseudo-critical behavior, we observe the co-existence of gel and fluid domains.

  2. Membrane potential dye imaging of ventromedial hypothalamus neurons from adult mice to study glucose sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazirani, Reema P; Fioramonti, Xavier; Routh, Vanessa H

    2013-11-27

    Studies of neuronal activity are often performed using neurons from rodents less than 2 months of age due to the technical difficulties associated with increasing connective tissue and decreased neuronal viability that occur with age. Here, we describe a methodology for the dissociation of healthy hypothalamic neurons from adult-aged mice. The ability to study neurons from adult-aged mice allows the use of disease models that manifest at a later age and might be more developmentally accurate for certain studies. Fluorescence imaging of dissociated neurons can be used to study the activity of a population of neurons, as opposed to using electrophysiology to study a single neuron. This is particularly useful when studying a heterogeneous neuronal population in which the desired neuronal type is rare such as for hypothalamic glucose sensing neurons. We utilized membrane potential dye imaging of adult ventromedial hypothalamic neurons to study their responses to changes in extracellular glucose. Glucose sensing neurons are believed to play a role in central regulation of energy balance. The ability to study glucose sensing in adult rodents is particularly useful since the predominance of diseases related to dysfunctional energy balance (e.g. obesity) increase with age.

  3. Primordial black holes from polynomial potentials in single field inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzberg, Mark P.; Yamada, Masaki

    2018-04-01

    Within canonical single field inflation models, we provide a method to reverse engineer and reconstruct the inflaton potential from a given power spectrum. This is not only a useful tool to find a potential from observational constraints, but also gives insight into how to generate a large amplitude spike in density perturbations, especially those that may lead to primordial black holes (PBHs). In accord with other works, we find that the usual slow-roll conditions need to be violated in order to generate a significant spike in the spectrum. We find that a way to achieve a very large amplitude spike in single field models is for the classical roll of the inflaton to overshoot a local minimum during inflation. We provide an example of a quintic polynomial potential that implements this idea and leads to the observed spectral index, observed amplitude of fluctuations on large scales, significant PBH formation on small scales, and is compatible with other observational constraints. We quantify how much fine-tuning is required to achieve this in a family of random polynomial potentials, which may be useful to estimate the probability of PBH formation in the string landscape.

  4. Modulation of the effect of acetylcholine on insulin release by the membrane potential of B cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermans, M.P.; Schmeer, W.; Henquin, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    Mouse islets were used to test the hypothesis that the B cell membrane must be depolarized for acetylcholine to increase insulin release. The resting membrane potential of B cells (at 3 mM glucose) was slightly decreased (5 mV) by acetylcholine, but no electrical activity appeared. This depolarization was accompanied by a Ca-independent acceleration of 86 Rb and 45 Ca efflux but no insulin release. When the B cell membrane was depolarized by a stimulatory concentration of glucose (10 mM), acetylcholine potentiated electrical activity, accelerated 86 Rb and 45 Ca efflux, and increased insulin release. This latter effect, but not the acceleration of 45 Ca efflux, was totally dependent on extracellular Ca. If glucose-induced depolarization of the B cell membrane was prevented by diazoxide, acetylcholine lost all effects but those produced at low glucose. In contrast, when the B cell membrane was depolarized by leucine or tolbutamide (at 3 mM glucose), acetylcholine triggered a further depolarization with appearance of electrical activity, accelerated 86 Rb and 45 Ca efflux, and stimulated insulin release. Acetylcholine produced similar effects (except for electrical activity) in the presence of high K or arginine which, unlike the above test agents, depolarize the B cell membrane by a mechanism other than a decrease in K+ permeability. Omission of extracellular Ca abolished the releasing effect of acetylcholine under all conditions but only partially decreased the stimulation of 45 Ca efflux. The results show thus that acetylcholine stimulation of insulin release does not result from mobilization of cellular Ca but requires that the B cell membrane be sufficiently depolarized to reach the threshold potential where Ca channels are activated. This may explain why acetylcholine alone does not initiate release but becomes active in the presence of a variety of agents

  5. Tuning of Hemes b Equilibrium Redox Potential Is Not Required for Cross-Membrane Electron Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintscher, Sebastian; Kuleta, Patryk; Cieluch, Ewelina; Borek, Arkadiusz; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2016-03-25

    In biological energy conversion, cross-membrane electron transfer often involves an assembly of two hemesb The hemes display a large difference in redox midpoint potentials (ΔEm_b), which in several proteins is assumed to facilitate cross-membrane electron transfer and overcome a barrier of membrane potential. Here we challenge this assumption reporting on hemebligand mutants of cytochromebc1in which, for the first time in transmembrane cytochrome, one natural histidine has been replaced by lysine without loss of the native low spin type of heme iron. With these mutants we show that ΔEm_b can be markedly increased, and the redox potential of one of the hemes can stay above the level of quinone pool, or ΔEm_b can be markedly decreased to the point that two hemes are almost isopotential, yet the enzyme retains catalytically competent electron transfer between quinone binding sites and remains functionalin vivo This reveals that cytochromebc1can accommodate large changes in ΔEm_b without hampering catalysis, as long as these changes do not impose overly endergonic steps on downhill electron transfer from substrate to product. We propose that hemesbin this cytochrome and in other membranous cytochromesbact as electronic connectors for the catalytic sites with no fine tuning in ΔEm_b required for efficient cross-membrane electron transfer. We link this concept with a natural flexibility in occurrence of several thermodynamic configurations of the direction of electron flow and the direction of the gradient of potential in relation to the vector of the electric membrane potential. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Expression of membrane-associated proteins within single emulsion cell facsimiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanasakulniyom, Mayuree; Martino, Chiara; Paterson, David; Horsfall, Louise; Rosser, Susan; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2012-07-07

    MreB is a structural membrane-associated protein which is one of the key components of the bacterial cytoskeleton. Although it plays an important role in shape maintenance of rod-like bacteria, the understanding of its mechanism of action is still not fully understood. This study shows how segmented flow and microdroplet technology can be used as a new tool for biological in vitro investigation of this protein. In this paper, we demonstrate cell-free expression in a single emulsion system to express red fluorescence protein (RFP) and MreB linked RFP (MreB-RFP). We follow the aggregation and localisation of the fusion protein MreB-RFP in this artificial cell-like environment. The expression of MreB-RFP in single emulsion droplets leads to the formation of micrometer-scale protein patches distributed at the water/oil interface.

  7. Transparent Nanopore Cavity Arrays Enable Highly Parallelized Optical Studies of Single Membrane Proteins on Chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederichs, Tim; Nguyen, Quoc Hung; Urban, Michael; Tampé, Robert; Tornow, Marc

    2018-06-13

    Membrane proteins involved in transport processes are key targets for pharmaceutical research and industry. Despite continuous improvements and new developments in the field of electrical readouts for the analysis of transport kinetics, a well-suited methodology for high-throughput characterization of single transporters with nonionic substrates and slow turnover rates is still lacking. Here, we report on a novel architecture of silicon chips with embedded nanopore microcavities, based on a silicon-on-insulator technology for high-throughput optical readouts. Arrays containing more than 14 000 inverted-pyramidal cavities of 50 femtoliter volumes and 80 nm circular pore openings were constructed via high-resolution electron-beam lithography in combination with reactive ion etching and anisotropic wet etching. These cavities feature both, an optically transparent bottom and top cap. Atomic force microscopy analysis reveals an overall extremely smooth chip surface, particularly in the vicinity of the nanopores, which exhibits well-defined edges. Our unprecedented transparent chip design provides parallel and independent fluorescent readout of both cavities and buffer reservoir for unbiased single-transporter recordings. Spreading of large unilamellar vesicles with efficiencies up to 96% created nanopore-supported lipid bilayers, which are stable for more than 1 day. A high lipid mobility in the supported membrane was determined by fluorescent recovery after photobleaching. Flux kinetics of α-hemolysin were characterized at single-pore resolution with a rate constant of 0.96 ± 0.06 × 10 -3 s -1 . Here, we deliver an ideal chip platform for pharmaceutical research, which features high parallelism and throughput, synergistically combined with single-transporter resolution.

  8. What Can We Learn about Cholesterol's Transmembrane Distribution Based on Cholesterol-Induced Changes in Membrane Dipole Potential?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Falkovich, S. G.; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Nesterenko, A. M.; Vattulainen, I.; Gurtovenko, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 22 (2016), s. 4585-4590 ISSN 1948-7185 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : membrane * cholesterol * membrane asymmetry * membrane dipole potential * transmembrane distribution Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 9.353, year: 2016

  9. Membrane distillation for wastewater reverse osmosis concentrate treatment with water reuse potential

    KAUST Repository

    Naidu, Gayathri

    2016-11-29

    Membrane distillation (MD) was evaluated as a treatment option of wastewater reverse osmosis concentrate (WWROC) discharged from wastewater reclamation plants (WRPs). A direct contact MD (DCMD), at obtaining 85% water recovery of WWROC showed only 13–15% flux decline and produced good quality permeate (10–15 µS/cm, 99% ion rejection) at moderate feed temperature of 55 °C. Prevalent calcium carbonate (CaCO3) deposition on the MD membrane occurred in treating WWROC at elevated concentrations. The combination of low salinity and loose CaCO3 adhesion on the membrane did not significantly contribute to DCMD flux decline. Meanwhile, high organic content in WWROC (58–60 mg/L) resulted in a significant membrane hydrophobicity reduction (70% lower water contact angle than virgin membrane) attributed to low molecular weight organic adhesion onto the MD membrane. Granular activated carbon (GAC) pretreatment helped in reducing organic contents of WWROC by 46–50%, and adsorbed a range of hydrophobic and hydrophilic micropollutants. This ensured high quality water production by MD (micropollutants-free) and enhanced its reuse potential. The MD concentrated WWROC was suitable for selective ion precipitation, promising a near zero liquid discharge in WRPs.

  10. Membrane distillation for wastewater reverse osmosis concentrate treatment with water reuse potential

    KAUST Repository

    Naidu, Gayathri; Jeong, Sanghyun; Choi, Youngkwon; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuthu

    2016-01-01

    Membrane distillation (MD) was evaluated as a treatment option of wastewater reverse osmosis concentrate (WWROC) discharged from wastewater reclamation plants (WRPs). A direct contact MD (DCMD), at obtaining 85% water recovery of WWROC showed only 13–15% flux decline and produced good quality permeate (10–15 µS/cm, 99% ion rejection) at moderate feed temperature of 55 °C. Prevalent calcium carbonate (CaCO3) deposition on the MD membrane occurred in treating WWROC at elevated concentrations. The combination of low salinity and loose CaCO3 adhesion on the membrane did not significantly contribute to DCMD flux decline. Meanwhile, high organic content in WWROC (58–60 mg/L) resulted in a significant membrane hydrophobicity reduction (70% lower water contact angle than virgin membrane) attributed to low molecular weight organic adhesion onto the MD membrane. Granular activated carbon (GAC) pretreatment helped in reducing organic contents of WWROC by 46–50%, and adsorbed a range of hydrophobic and hydrophilic micropollutants. This ensured high quality water production by MD (micropollutants-free) and enhanced its reuse potential. The MD concentrated WWROC was suitable for selective ion precipitation, promising a near zero liquid discharge in WRPs.

  11. Mass transfer ranking of polylysine, poly-ornithine and poly-methylene-co-guanidine microcapsule membranes using a single low molecular mass marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosinski Stefan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available On the long way to clinical transplantable hybrid systems, comprising of cells, acting as immuno-protected bioreactors microencapsulated in a polymeric matrix and delivering desired factors (proteins, hormones, enzymes etc to the patient's body, an important step is the optimization of the microcapsule. This topic includes the selection of a proper coating membrane which could fulfil, first of all, the mass transfer as well as biocompatibility, stability and durability requirements. Three different membranes from polymerised aminoacids, formed around exactly identical alginate gel cores, were considered, concerning their mass transport properties, as potential candidates in this task. The results of the evaluation of the mass ingress and mass transfer coefficient h for the selected low molecular mass marker, vitamin B12, in poly-L-lysine (HPLL poly-L-ornithine (HPLO and poly-methylene-co-guanidine hydrochloride (HPMCG membrane alginate microcapsules demonstrate the advantage of using the mass transfer approach to a preliminary screening of various microcapsule formulations. Applying a single marker and evaluating mass transfer coefficients can help to quickly rank the investigated membranes and microcapsules according to their permeability. It has been demonstrated that HPLL, HPLO and HPMCG microcapsules differ from each other by a factor of two concerning the rate of low molecular mass marker transport. Interesting differences in mass transfer through the membrane in both directions in-out was also found, which could possibly be related to the membrane asymmetry.

  12. Improved performance of single-chamber microbial fuel cells through control of membrane deformation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Cheng, Shaoan; Huang, Xia; Logan, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    , but in initial experiments we observed the opposite using a membrane electrode assembly MFC. The reason was identified to be membrane deformation, which resulted in water and gas trapped between the membrane and cathode. To correct this, stainless steel mesh

  13. Bcl-xL regulates mitochondrial energetics by stabilizing the inner membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Bei; Aon, Miguel A; Hsu, Yi-Te; Soane, Lucian; Teng, Xinchen; McCaffery, J Michael; Cheng, Wen-Chih; Qi, Bing; Li, Hongmei; Alavian, Kambiz N; Dayhoff-Brannigan, Margaret; Zou, Shifa; Pineda, Fernando J; O'Rourke, Brian; Ko, Young H; Pedersen, Peter L; Kaczmarek, Leonard K; Jonas, Elizabeth A; Hardwick, J Marie

    2011-10-17

    Mammalian Bcl-x(L) protein localizes to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it inhibits apoptosis by binding Bax and inhibiting Bax-induced outer membrane permeabilization. Contrary to expectation, we found by electron microscopy and biochemical approaches that endogenous Bcl-x(L) also localized to inner mitochondrial cristae. Two-photon microscopy of cultured neurons revealed large fluctuations in inner mitochondrial membrane potential when Bcl-x(L) was genetically deleted or pharmacologically inhibited, indicating increased total ion flux into and out of mitochondria. Computational, biochemical, and genetic evidence indicated that Bcl-x(L) reduces futile ion flux across the inner mitochondrial membrane to prevent a wasteful drain on cellular resources, thereby preventing an energetic crisis during stress. Given that F(1)F(O)-ATP synthase directly affects mitochondrial membrane potential and having identified the mitochondrial ATP synthase β subunit in a screen for Bcl-x(L)-binding partners, we tested and found that Bcl-x(L) failed to protect β subunit-deficient yeast. Thus, by bolstering mitochondrial energetic capacity, Bcl-x(L) may contribute importantly to cell survival independently of other Bcl-2 family proteins.

  14. Probing nanomechanical interaction at the interface between biological membrane and potentially toxic chemical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chanoong; Park, Sohee; Park, Jinwoo; Ko, Jina; Lee, Dong Woog; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2018-04-12

    Various xenobiotics interact with biological membranes, and precise evaluations of the molecular interactions between them are essential to foresee the toxicity and bioavailability of existing or newly synthesized molecules. In this study, surface forces apparatus (SFA) measurement and Langmuir trough based tensiometry are performed to reveal nanomechanical interaction mechanisms between potential toxicants and biological membranes for ex vivo toxicity evaluation. As a toxicant, polyhexamethylene guanidine (PHMG) was selected because PHMG containing humidifier disinfectant and Vodka caused lots of victims in both S. Korea and Russia, respectively, due to the lack of holistic toxicity evaluation of PHMG. Here, we measured strong attraction (Wad ∼4.2 mJ/m 2 ) between PHMG and head group of biological membranes while no detectable adhesion force between the head group and control molecules was measured. Moreover, significant changes in π-A isotherm of 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) monolayers were measured upon PHMG adsorption. These results indicate PHMG strongly binds to hydrophilic group of lipid membranes and alters the structural and phase behavior of them. More importantly, complementary utilization of SFA and Langmuir trough techniques are found to be useful to predict the potential toxicity of a chemical by evaluating the molecular interaction with biological membranes, the primary protective barrier for living organisms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of the potential anti-adhesion effect of the PVA/Gelatin membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sang-Ho; Son, So-Ra; Kumar Sakar, Swapan; Nguyen, Thi-Hiep; Kim, Shin-Woo; Min, Young-Ki; Lee, Byong-Taek

    2014-05-01

    A common and prevailing complication for patients with abdominal surgery is the peritoneal adhesion that follows during the post-operative recovery period. Biodegradable polymers have been suggested as a barrier to prevent the peritoneal adhesion. In this work, as a preventive method, PVA/Gelatin hydrogel-based membrane was investigated with various combinations of PVA and gelatin (50/50, 30/70/, and 10/90). Membranes were made by casting method using hot PVA-gelatin solution and the gelatin was cross-linked by exposing UV irradiation for 5 days to render stability of the produced sheathed form in the physiological environment. Physical crosslinking was chosen to avoid the problems of potential cytotoxic effect of chemical crosslinking. Their materials characterization and mechanical properties were evaluated by SEM surface characterization, hydrophilicity, biodegradation rate, and so forth. Cytocompatibility was observed by in vitro experiments with cell proliferation using confocal laser scanning microscopy and the MTT assay by L-929 mouse fibroblast cells. The fabricated PVA/Gel membranes were implanted between artificially defected cecum and peritoneal wall in rats and were sacrificed after 1 and 2 weeks post-operative to compare their tissue adhesion extents with that of control group where the defected surface was not separated by PVA/Gel membrane. The PVA/Gel membrane (10/90) significantly reduced the adhesion extent and showed to be a potential candidate for the anti-adhesion application. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Membrane potential, serum calcium and serum selenium decrease in preeclampsia subjects in Owerri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnkennedy Nnodim

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Pre-eclampsia is a serious hypertensive condition of pregnancy associated with high maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Women who have had pre-eclampsia have a greater risk of developing hypertension, stroke and ischemic heart disease in later life. The etiology of pre-eclampsia remains unclear. Placental insufficiency plays a key role in the progression of this disease. The aim of this study was to determine membrane potential, serum calcium and serum selenium levels in preeclampsia subjects in Owerri.   Methods A case control study involving 200 primigravida (100 preeclamptic and 100 apparently healthy between the ages of 20 and 32 years attending General Hospital Owerri. Fasting venous blood was collected for the determination of serum selenium and serum calcium while membrane potential was calculated using the Nernst equation. The serum calcium was estimated using Randox Kit and serum selenium by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The Independent Student t test was used for statistical analysis.   Results The results revealed that membrane potential and serum selenium as well as serum calcium were significantly decreased in preeclampsia when compared with the controls, at p<0.05.   Conclusion Our study demonstrated that the decrease in membrane potential, serum calcium and serum selenium levels may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia. There may be a need for increasing the dietary intake of these essential trace metals during pregnancy to prevent pre-eclampsia in Owerri.

  17. Evaluation of the Standard Ion Transfer Potentials for PVC Plasticized Membranes from Voltammetric Measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Langmaier, Jan; Stejskalová, Květoslava; Samec, Zdeněk

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 496, č. 1 (2001), s. 143-147 ISSN 0022-0728. [Symposium in Kyoto. Kyoto, 02.03.2000] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4040902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : ion voltammetry * PVC plasticized membrane * standard ion transfer potential Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 1.960, year: 2001

  18. Tension moderation and fluctuation spectrum in simulated lipid membranes under an applied electric potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loubet, Bastien; Lomholt, Michael Andersen; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2013-01-01

    , and bilayer thickness are investigated in detail. In particular, the least square fitting technique is used to calculate the fluctuation spectra. The simulations confirm a recently proposed theory that the effect of an applied electric potential on the membrane will be moderated by the elastic properties...

  19. Spike-threshold adaptation predicted by membrane potential dynamics in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Fontaine

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurons encode information in sequences of spikes, which are triggered when their membrane potential crosses a threshold. In vivo, the spiking threshold displays large variability suggesting that threshold dynamics have a profound influence on how the combined input of a neuron is encoded in the spiking. Threshold variability could be explained by adaptation to the membrane potential. However, it could also be the case that most threshold variability reflects noise and processes other than threshold adaptation. Here, we investigated threshold variation in auditory neurons responses recorded in vivo in barn owls. We found that spike threshold is quantitatively predicted by a model in which the threshold adapts, tracking the membrane potential at a short timescale. As a result, in these neurons, slow voltage fluctuations do not contribute to spiking because they are filtered by threshold adaptation. More importantly, these neurons can only respond to input spikes arriving together on a millisecond timescale. These results demonstrate that fast adaptation to the membrane potential captures spike threshold variability in vivo.

  20. Streaming potential investigations of polymer membranes developed for direct methanol fuel cell application

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Richau, K.; Mohr, R.; Kůdela, Vlastimil; Schauer, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 14, - (2003), s. 201-204 ISSN 0915-860X. [International Conference on Ion Exchange. Kanazawa, 14.07.2003-18.07.2003] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 366 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : streaming potential * ion-exchange membranes * specific conductivity Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  1. Unmasking of spiral ganglion neuron firing dynamics by membrane potential and neurotrophin-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozier, Robert A; Davis, Robin L

    2014-07-16

    Type I spiral ganglion neurons have a unique role relative to other sensory afferents because, as a single population, they must convey the richness, complexity, and precision of auditory information as they shape signals transmitted to the brain. To understand better the sophistication of spiral ganglion response properties, we compared somatic whole-cell current-clamp recordings from basal and apical neurons obtained during the first 2 postnatal weeks from CBA/CaJ mice. We found that during this developmental time period neuron response properties changed from uniformly excitable to differentially plastic. Low-frequency, apical and high-frequency basal neurons at postnatal day 1 (P1)-P3 were predominantly slowly accommodating (SA), firing at low thresholds with little alteration in accommodation response mode induced by changes in resting membrane potential (RMP) or added neurotrophin-3 (NT-3). In contrast, P10-P14 apical and basal neurons were predominately rapidly accommodating (RA), had higher firing thresholds, and responded to elevation of RMP and added NT-3 by transitioning to the SA category without affecting the instantaneous firing rate. Therefore, older neurons appeared to be uniformly less excitable under baseline conditions yet displayed a previously unrecognized capacity to change response modes dynamically within a remarkably stable accommodation framework. Because the soma is interposed in the signal conduction pathway, these specializations can potentially lead to shaping and filtering of the transmitted signal. These results suggest that spiral ganglion neurons possess electrophysiological mechanisms that enable them to adapt their response properties to the characteristics of incoming stimuli and thus have the capacity to encode a wide spectrum of auditory information. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/349688-15$15.00/0.

  2. Cell-Based Phenotyping Reveals QTL for Membrane Potential Maintenance Associated with Hypoxia and Salinity Stress Tolerance in Barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad B. Gill

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Waterlogging and salinity are two major abiotic stresses that hamper crop production world-wide resulting in multibillion losses. Plant abiotic stress tolerance is conferred by many interrelated mechanisms. Amongst these, the cell’s ability to maintain membrane potential (MP is considered to be amongst the most crucial traits, a positive relationship between the ability of plants to maintain highly negative MP and its tolerance to both salinity and waterlogging stress. However, no attempts have been made to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL conferring this trait. In this study, the microelectrode MIFE technique was used to measure the plasma membrane potential of epidermal root cells of 150 double haploid (DH lines of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. from a cross between a Chinese landrace TX9425 and Japanese malting cultivar Naso Nijo under hypoxic conditions. A major QTL for the MP in the epidermal root cells in hypoxia-exposed plants was identified. This QTL was located on 2H, at a similar position to the QTL for waterlogging and salinity tolerance reported in previous studies. Further analysis confirmed that MP showed a significant contribution to both waterlogging and salinity tolerance. The fact that the QTL for MP was controlled by a single major QTL illustrates the power of the single-cell phenotyping approach and opens prospects for fine mapping this QTL and thus being more effective in marker assisted selection.

  3. Deriving muscle fiber diameter from recorded single fiber potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewska, Ewa

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate muscle fiber diameters through analysis of single muscle fiber potentials (SFPs) recorded in the frontalis muscle of a healthy subject. Our previously developed analytical and graphic method to derive fiber diameter from the analysis of the negative peak duration and the amplitude of SFP, was applied to a sample of ten SFPs recorded in vivo. Muscle fiber diameters derived from the simulation method for the sample of frontalis muscle SFPs are consistent with anatomical data for this muscle. The results confirm the utility of proposed simulation method. Outlying data could be considered as the result of a contribution of other fibers to the potential recorded using an SFEMG electrode. Our graphic tool provides a rapid estimation of muscle fiber diameter. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Membrane/mediator-free rechargeable enzymatic biofuel cell utilizing graphene/single-wall carbon nanotube cogel electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Alan S; Jeong, Yeon Joo; Geier, Steven M; Koepsel, Richard R; Russell, Alan J; Islam, Mohammad F

    2015-02-25

    Enzymatic biofuel cells (EBFCs) utilize enzymes to convert chemical energy present in renewable biofuels into electrical energy and have shown much promise in the continuous powering of implantable devices. Currently, however, EBFCs are greatly limited in terms of power and operational stability with a majority of reported improvements requiring the inclusion of potentially toxic and unstable electron transfer mediators or multicompartment systems separated by a semipermeable membrane resulting in complicated setups. We report on the development of a simple, membrane/mediator-free EBFC utilizing novel electrodes of graphene and single-wall carbon nanotube cogel. These cogel electrodes had large surface area (∼ 800 m(2) g(-1)) that enabled high enzyme loading, large porosity for unhindered glucose transport and moderate electrical conductivity (∼ 0.2 S cm(-1)) for efficient charge collection. Glucose oxidase and bilirubin oxidase were physically adsorbed onto these electrodes to form anodes and cathodes, respectively, and the EBFC produced power densities up to 0.19 mW cm(-2) that correlated to 0.65 mW mL(-1) or 140 mW g(-1) of GOX with an open circuit voltage of 0.61 V. Further, the electrodes were rejuvenated by a simple wash and reloading procedure. We postulate these porous and ultrahigh surface area electrodes will be useful for biosensing applications, and will allow reuse of EBFCs.

  5. Influence of chronic x-ray exposure on adrenal glucocorticoid function and adrenocorticocyte membrane potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorban', Je.M.; Topol'nikova, N.V.

    1998-01-01

    The peculiarities of adrenal glucocorticoid function and membrane potential (MP) of zona fasciculata adrenocorticocyte (ACC) in rats after chronic x-ray exposure was studied. The changes of adrenal glucocorticoid function caused by chronic x-ray exposure within a relatively small period of irradiation (1.5 months) are obscure and manifest themselves only at physiological load. With the prolongation of the period (8 and 15 months), more considerable inhibition of the adrenal glucocorticoid function and disturbances in the membrane mechanisms of ACC MP level regulation are revealed

  6. Single particle level density in a finite depth potential well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlomo, S.; Kolomietz, V.M.; Dejbakhsh, H.

    1997-01-01

    We consider the single particle level density g(ε) of a realistic finite depth potential well, concentrating on the continuum (ε>0) region. We carry out quantum-mechanical calculations of the partial level density g l (ε), associated with a well-defined orbital angular momentum l≤40, using the phase-shift derivative method and the Greens-function method and compare the results with those obtained using the Thomas-Fermi approximation. We also numerically calculate g(ε) as a l sum of g l (ε) up to a certain value of scr(l) max ≤40 and determine the corresponding smooth level densities using the Strutinsky smoothing procedure. We demonstrate, in accordance with Levinson close-quote s theorem, that the partial contribution g l (ε) to the single particle level density from continuum states has positive and negative values. However, g(ε) is nonnegative. We also point out that this is not the case for an energy-dependent potential well. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  7. Impact of Storage and Purification on Mitochondrial Membrane Potential of Boar Spermatozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristotelis G. Lymberopoulos

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effect of semen purification and storage on sperm mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm. Gel-free whole ejaculates were collected from five proven fertile Large White boars aged two to three years. Aliquots of fresh semen were split, diluted in one step with commercial extenders and incubated at 37oC for 5-10 minutes. Semen was cooled to 18oC and packaged in 15-ml sterile propylene tubes. After 4-10 hours post-semen collection, stored semen was purified by colloidal centrifugation. After 48 hours post-semen collection, stored semen was incubated at 37oC and evaluated after 45 minutes for motility, velocity and sperm ΔΨm. Samples were stained with 2.99 μM JC-1 and 2.32 μM EH-1 and assessed by Fluorescence microscopy. After centrifugation a significant improvement of motility (P<0.035, and velocity (P<0.012 was noticed. The percentage of spermatozoa with intact plasma membrane and high/low mitochondrial membrane potential was statistical higher after centrifugation and storage at 18°C for 48 hours. In conclusion, colloidal purification of boar semen can improve sperm quality and  mitochondrial membrane potential.

  8. Infection-Induced Thrombin Production: A Potential Novel Mechanism for Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes (PPROM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Liping; Allen, Terrence K; Marinello, William P; Murtha, Amy P

    2018-04-13

    decidua cells was perinuclear and cytoplasmic. Prothrombin mRNA and protein expression in fetal membranes was significantly increased by U. parvum, but not lipopolysaccharide, treatments in a dose-dependent manner. Specifically, U. parvum at a dose of 1x10 7 cfu/ml significantly increased both prothrombin mRNA (fold changes in amnion: 4.1±1.9; chorion: 5.7±4.2; decidua: 10.0±5.4; FM: 9.2±3.0) and protein expression (fold changes in amnion: 138.0±44.0; chorion: 139.6±15.1; decidua: 56.9±29.1; fetal membrane: 133.1±40.0) compared to untreated controls. U. parvum at a dose of 1x10 6 cfu/ml significantly upregulated prothrombin protein expression in chorion cells (fold change: 54.9±5.3) and prothrombin mRNA expression in decidua cells (fold change: 4.4±1.9). Our results demonstrate that prothrombin can be directly produced by fetal membrane amnion, chorion, and decidua cells. Further, prothrombin production can be stimulated by U. parvum exposure in fetal membranes. These findings represent a potential novel underlying mechanism of U. parvum-induced rupture of fetal membranes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparative study of the energy potential of cyanide waters using two osmotic membrane modules under dead-end flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Díaz, Y.; Quiñones-Bolaños, E.; Bustos-Blanco, C.; Vives-Pérez, L.; Bustillo-Lecompte, C.; Saba, M.

    2017-12-01

    The energy potential of the osmotic pressure gradient of cyanide waters is evaluated using two membrane modules, horizontal and vertical, operated under dead-end flow. The membrane was characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The membrane is mainly composed of carbon, oxygen, and sulphur. The properties of the membrane were unchanged and had no pore clogging after exposure to the cyanide waters. Potentials of 1.78×10-4 and 6.36×10-5Wm-2 were found for the horizontal and vertical modules, respectively, using the Van’t Hoff equation. Likewise, the permeability coefficient of the membrane was higher in the vertical module. Although the energy potential is low under the studied conditions the vertical configuration has a greater potential due to the action of gravity and the homogenous contact of the fluid with the membrane.

  10. Interaction of the 106-126 prion peptide with lipid membranes and potential implication for neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupiereux, Ingrid; Zorzi, Willy; Lins, Laurence; Brasseur, Robert; Colson, Pierre; Heinen, Ernst; Elmoualij, Benaissa

    2005-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the accumulation in the brain of an abnormally misfolded, protease-resistant, and β-sheet rich pathogenic isoform (PrP sc ) of the cellular prion protein (PrP c ). In the present work, we were interested to study the mode of prion protein interaction with the membrane using the 106-126 peptide and small unilamellar lipid vesicles as model. As previously demonstrated, we showed by MTS assay that PrP 106-126 induces alterations in the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. We demonstrated for the first time by lipid-mixing assay and by the liposome vesicle leakage test that PrP 106-126, a non-tilted peptide, induces liposome fusion thus a potential cell membrane destabilization, as supported by membrane integrity assay (LDH). By circular dichroism (CD) analysis we showed that the fusogenic property of PrP 106-126 in the presence of liposome is associated with a predominantly β-sheet structure. These data suggest that the fusogenic property associated with a predominant β-sheet structure exhibited by the prion peptides contributes to the neurotoxicity of these peptides by destabilizing cellular membranes. The latter might be attached at the membrane surface in a parallel orientation as shown by molecular modeling

  11. On-line measurements of oscillating mitochondrial membrane potential in glucose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ann Zahle; Poulsen, Allan K.; Brasen, Jens Christian

    2007-01-01

    We employed the fluorescent cyanine dye DiOC(2)(3) to measure membrane potential in semi-anaerobic yeast cells under conditions where glycolysis was oscillating. Oscillations in glycolysis were studied by means of the naturally abundant nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). We found...... studies showed that glycolytic oscillations perturb the mitochondrial membrane potential and that the mitochondria do not have any controlling effect on the dynamics of glycolysis under these conditions. Depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane by addition of FCCP quenched mitochondrial membrane...... potential oscillations and delocalized DiOC(2)(3), while glycolysis continued to oscillate unaffected....

  12. On the freezing behavior and diffusion of water in proximity to single-supported zwitterionic and anionic bilayer lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiec, A.; Buck, Z. N.; Brown, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    We compare the freezing/melting behavior of water hydrating single-supported bilayers of a zwitterionic lipid DMPC with that of an anionic lipid DMPG. For both membranes, the temperature dependence of the elastically scattered neutron intensity indicates distinct water types undergoing...... translational diffusion: bulk-like water probably located above the membrane and two types of confined water closer to the lipid head groups. The membranes differ in the greater width of the water freezing transition near the anionic DMPG bilayer compared to zwitterionic DMPC as well as in the abruptness...

  13. Single house on-site grey water treatment using a submerged membrane bioreactor for toilet flushing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountoulakis, M S; Markakis, N; Petousi, I; Manios, T

    2016-05-01

    Wastewater recycling has been and continues to be practiced all over the world for a variety of reasons including: increasing water availability, combating water shortages and drought, and supporting environmental and public health protection. Nowadays, one of the most interesting issues for wastewater recycling is the on-site treatment and reuse of grey water. During this study the efficiency of a compact Submerged Membrane Bioreactor (SMBR) system to treat real grey water in a single house in Crete, Greece, was examined. In the study, grey water was collected from a bathtub, shower and washing machine containing significant amounts of organic matter and pathogens. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal in the system was approximately 87%. Total suspended solids (TSS) were reduced from 95mgL(-1) in the influent to 8mgL(-1) in the effluent. The efficiency of the system to reduce anionic surfactants was about 80%. Fecal and total coliforms decreased significantly using the SMBR system due to rejection, by the membrane, used in the study. Overall, the SMBR treatment produces average effluent values that would satisfy international guidelines for indoor reuse applications such as toilet flushing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Raman spectroscopy of single extracellular vesicles reveals subpopulations with varying membrane content (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Zachary J.; Lee, Changwon; Rojalin, Tatu; Carney, Randy P.; Hazari, Sidhartha; Knudson, Alisha; Lam, Kit S.; Saari, Heikki; Lazaro Ibañez, Elisa; Viitala, Tapani; Laaksonen, Timo; Yliperttula, Marjo; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    Exosomes are small (~100nm) membrane bound vesicles excreted by cells as part of their normal biological processes. These extracellular vesicles are currently an area of intense research, since they were recently found to carry functional mRNA that allows transfer of proteins and other cellular instructions between cells. Exosomes have been implicated in a wide range of diseases, including cancer. Cancer cells are known to have increased exosome production, and may use those exosomes to prepare remote environments for metastasis. Therefore, there is a strong need to develop characterization methods to help understand the structure and function of these vesicles. However, current techniques, such as proteomics and genomics technologies, rely on aggregating a large amount of exosome material and reporting on chemical content that is averaged over many millions of exosomes. Here we report on the use of laser-tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) to probe individual vesicles, discovering distinct heterogeneity among exosomes both within a cell line, as well as between different cell lines. Through principal components analysis followed by hierarchical clustering, we have identified four "subpopulations" of exosomes shared across seven cell lines. The key chemical differences between these subpopulations, as determined by spectral analysis of the principal component loadings, are primarily related to membrane composition. Specifically, the differences can be ascribed to cholesterol content, cholesterol to phospholipid ratio, and surface protein expression. Thus, we have shown LTRS to be a powerful method to probe the chemical content of single extracellular vesicles.

  15. Diode-like single-ion track membrane prepared by electro-stopping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel, P.Yu.; Korchev, Yu.E.; Siwy, Z.; Spohr, R.; Yoshida, M.

    2001-01-01

    The preparation of an asymmetric membrane in poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) is described, using a combination of chemical and electro-stopping. For this purpose, a single-ion-irradiated PET film is inserted into an electrolytic cell and etched from one side in 9 M sodium hydroxide while bathing the other side in a mixture of 2 M KCl and 2 M HCOOH (1:1 by volume), electrically retracting the OH - ions from the tip of the etch pit during pore break-through. When a preset current has been reached, the etch process is interrupted by replacing the etching solution with acidic 1 M potassium chloride solution. After etching, the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic is determined under symmetric bathing conditions, immersing both sides of the membrane in KCl solutions of identical concentration (0.01-1 M) and pH (3-8). The I-V characteristic is strongly non-linear, comparable to that of an electrical diode. If the polarity during etching is reversed, pushing the OH - ions into the tip of the etch pit, the resulting pores are larger and the degree of asymmetry smaller. The importance of electro-stopping is compared with chemical stopping

  16. High-throughput single-molecule force spectroscopy for membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosshart, Patrick D.; Casagrande, Fabio; Frederix, Patrick L. T. M.; Ratera, Merce; Bippes, Christian A.; Müller, Daniel J.; Palacin, Manuel; Engel, Andreas; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2008-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) is a powerful tool for studying the mechanical properties, intermolecular and intramolecular interactions, unfolding pathways, and energy landscapes of membrane proteins. One limiting factor for the large-scale applicability of SMFS on membrane proteins is its low efficiency in data acquisition. We have developed a semi-automated high-throughput SMFS (HT-SMFS) procedure for efficient data acquisition. In addition, we present a coarse filter to efficiently extract protein unfolding events from large data sets. The HT-SMFS procedure and the coarse filter were validated using the proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (BR) from Halobacterium salinarum and the L-arginine/agmatine antiporter AdiC from the bacterium Escherichia coli. To screen for molecular interactions between AdiC and its substrates, we recorded data sets in the absence and in the presence of L-arginine, D-arginine, and agmatine. Altogether ~400 000 force-distance curves were recorded. Application of coarse filtering to this wealth of data yielded six data sets with ~200 (AdiC) and ~400 (BR) force-distance spectra in each. Importantly, the raw data for most of these data sets were acquired in one to two days, opening new perspectives for HT-SMFS applications.

  17. High-throughput single-molecule force spectroscopy for membrane proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosshart, Patrick D; Casagrande, Fabio; Frederix, Patrick L T M; Engel, Andreas; Fotiadis, Dimitrios; Ratera, Merce; Palacin, Manuel; Bippes, Christian A; Mueller, Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) is a powerful tool for studying the mechanical properties, intermolecular and intramolecular interactions, unfolding pathways, and energy landscapes of membrane proteins. One limiting factor for the large-scale applicability of SMFS on membrane proteins is its low efficiency in data acquisition. We have developed a semi-automated high-throughput SMFS (HT-SMFS) procedure for efficient data acquisition. In addition, we present a coarse filter to efficiently extract protein unfolding events from large data sets. The HT-SMFS procedure and the coarse filter were validated using the proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (BR) from Halobacterium salinarum and the L-arginine/agmatine antiporter AdiC from the bacterium Escherichia coli. To screen for molecular interactions between AdiC and its substrates, we recorded data sets in the absence and in the presence of L-arginine, D-arginine, and agmatine. Altogether ∼400 000 force-distance curves were recorded. Application of coarse filtering to this wealth of data yielded six data sets with ∼200 (AdiC) and ∼400 (BR) force-distance spectra in each. Importantly, the raw data for most of these data sets were acquired in one to two days, opening new perspectives for HT-SMFS applications

  18. High-throughput single-molecule force spectroscopy for membrane proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosshart, Patrick D; Casagrande, Fabio; Frederix, Patrick L T M; Engel, Andreas; Fotiadis, Dimitrios [M E Mueller Institute for Structural Biology, Biozentrum of the University of Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Ratera, Merce; Palacin, Manuel [Institute for Research in Biomedicine, Barcelona Science Park, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Biology, University of Barcelona and Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red de Enfermedades Raras, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Bippes, Christian A; Mueller, Daniel J [BioTechnology Center, Technical University, Tatzberg 47, D-01307 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: andreas.engel@unibas.ch, E-mail: dimitrios.fotiadis@mci.unibe.ch

    2008-09-24

    Atomic force microscopy-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) is a powerful tool for studying the mechanical properties, intermolecular and intramolecular interactions, unfolding pathways, and energy landscapes of membrane proteins. One limiting factor for the large-scale applicability of SMFS on membrane proteins is its low efficiency in data acquisition. We have developed a semi-automated high-throughput SMFS (HT-SMFS) procedure for efficient data acquisition. In addition, we present a coarse filter to efficiently extract protein unfolding events from large data sets. The HT-SMFS procedure and the coarse filter were validated using the proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (BR) from Halobacterium salinarum and the L-arginine/agmatine antiporter AdiC from the bacterium Escherichia coli. To screen for molecular interactions between AdiC and its substrates, we recorded data sets in the absence and in the presence of L-arginine, D-arginine, and agmatine. Altogether {approx}400 000 force-distance curves were recorded. Application of coarse filtering to this wealth of data yielded six data sets with {approx}200 (AdiC) and {approx}400 (BR) force-distance spectra in each. Importantly, the raw data for most of these data sets were acquired in one to two days, opening new perspectives for HT-SMFS applications.

  19. Hydrogen Separation by Natural Zeolite Composite Membranes: Single and Multicomponent Gas Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afrooz Farjoo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Single and multicomponent gas permeation tests were used to evaluate the performance of metal-supported clinoptilolite membranes. The efficiency of hydrogen separation from lower hydrocarbons (methane, ethane, and ethylene was studied within the temperature and pressure ranges of 25–600 °C and 110–160 kPa, respectively. The hydrogen separation factor was found to reduce noticeably in the gas mixture compared with single gas experiments at 25 °C. The difference between the single and multicomponent gas results decreased as the temperature increased to higher than 300 °C, which is when the competitive adsorption–diffusion mechanism was replaced by Knudsen diffusion or activated diffusion mechanisms. To evaluate the effect of gas adsorption, the zeolite surface isotherms of each gas in the mixture were obtained from 25 °C to 600 °C. The results indicated negligible adsorption of individual gases at temperatures higher than 300 °C. Increasing the feed pressure resulted in a higher separation efficiency for the individual gases compared with the multicomponent mixture, due to the governing effect of the adsorptive mechanism. This study provides valuable insight into the application of natural zeolites for the separation of hydrogen from a mixture of hydrocarbons.

  20. Hydrogen Separation by Natural Zeolite Composite Membranes: Single and Multicomponent Gas Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farjoo, Afrooz; Kuznicki, Steve M; Sadrzadeh, Mohtada

    2017-10-06

    Single and multicomponent gas permeation tests were used to evaluate the performance of metal-supported clinoptilolite membranes. The efficiency of hydrogen separation from lower hydrocarbons (methane, ethane, and ethylene) was studied within the temperature and pressure ranges of 25-600 °C and 110-160 kPa, respectively. The hydrogen separation factor was found to reduce noticeably in the gas mixture compared with single gas experiments at 25 °C. The difference between the single and multicomponent gas results decreased as the temperature increased to higher than 300 °C, which is when the competitive adsorption-diffusion mechanism was replaced by Knudsen diffusion or activated diffusion mechanisms. To evaluate the effect of gas adsorption, the zeolite surface isotherms of each gas in the mixture were obtained from 25 °C to 600 °C. The results indicated negligible adsorption of individual gases at temperatures higher than 300 °C. Increasing the feed pressure resulted in a higher separation efficiency for the individual gases compared with the multicomponent mixture, due to the governing effect of the adsorptive mechanism. This study provides valuable insight into the application of natural zeolites for the separation of hydrogen from a mixture of hydrocarbons.

  1. Exploring in vivo cholesterol-mediated interactions between activated EGF receptors in plasma membrane with single-molecule optical tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chien Y.; Huang, Jung Y.; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The first step in many cellular signaling processes occurs at various types of receptors in the plasma membrane. Membrane cholesterol can alter these signaling pathways of living cells. However, the process in which the interaction of activated receptors is modulated by cholesterol remains unclear. In this study, we measured single-molecule optical trajectories of epidermal growth factor receptors moving in the plasma membranes of two cancerous cell lines and one normal endothelial cell line. A stochastic model was developed and applied to identify critical information from single-molecule trajectories. We discovered that unliganded epidermal growth factor receptors may reside nearby cholesterol-riched regions of the plasma membrane and can move into these lipid domains when subjected to ligand binding. The amount of membrane cholesterol considerably affects the stability of correlated motion of activated epidermal growth factor receptors. Our results provide single-molecule evidence of membrane cholesterol in regulating signaling receptors. Because the three cell lines used for this study are quite diverse, our results may be useful to shed light on the mechanism of cholesterol-mediated interaction between activated receptors in live cells

  2. Calibration procedures for the quantitative determination of membrane potential in human cells using anionic dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapperstück, Thomas; Glanz, Dagobert; Hanitsch, Stefan; Klapperstück, Manuela; Markwardt, Fritz; Wohlrab, Johannes

    2013-07-01

    Quantitative determinations of the cell membrane potential of lymphocytes (Wilson et al., J Cell Physiol 1985;125:72-81) and thymocytes (Krasznai et al., J Photochem Photobiol B 1995;28:93-99) using the anionic dye DiBAC4 (3) proved that dye depletion in the extracellular medium as a result of cellular uptake can be negligible over a wide range of cell densities. In contrast, most flow cytometric studies have not verified this condition but rather assumed it from the start. Consequently, the initially prepared extracellular dye concentration has usually been used for the calculation of the Nernst potential of the dye. In this study, however, external dye depletion could be observed in both large IGR-1 and small LCL-HO cells under experimental conditions, which have often been applied routinely in spectrofluorimetry and flow cytometry. The maximum cell density at which dye depletion could be virtually avoided was dependent on cell size and membrane potential and definitely needed to be taken into account to ensure reliable results. In addition, accepted calibration procedures based on the partition of sodium and potassium (Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation) or potassium alone (Nernst equation) were performed by flow cytometry on cell suspensions with an appropriately low cell density. The observed extensive lack of concordance between the correspondingly calculated membrane potential and the equilibrium potential of DiBAC4 (3) revealed that these methods require the additional measurement of cation parameters (membrane permeability and/or intracellular concentration). In contrast, due to the linear relation between fluorescence and low DiBAC4 (3) concentrations, the Nernst potential of the dye for totally depolarized cells can be reliably used for calibration with an essentially lower effort and expense. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  3. Zeta potential control in decontamination with inorganic membranes and inorganic adsorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andalaft, E; Vega, R; Correa, M; Araya, R; Loyola, P [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile)

    1997-02-01

    The application of some advanced separation processes such as microfiltration and ultrafiltration, electroosmosis and electrodialysis for treating nuclear waste from different aqueous streams is under examination at the Chilean Commission for Nuclear Energy. The application of these techniques can be extended to regular industrial wastes when economically advisable. This report deals mainly with electrodialysis, electroosmosis and adsorption with inorganic materials. Special attention is paid to zeta potential control as a driving factor to electroosmosis. For radioactive contaminants that are present in the form of cations, anions, non-ionic solutions, colloids and suspended matter, appropriate combination of the processes may considerably increase the efficiency of processes used. As an example, colloids and suspended particles may be retained in porous ceramic membranes by nanofiltration, ultrafiltration or microfiltration depending on the particle size of the particles. The control of zeta potential by acting in the solid phase or else on the liquid phase has been studied; a mathematical model to predict electrodialysis data has been developed, and finally, the use of a home-made inorganic adsorbent illustrated. The effect of gamma irradiation on the membranes has also been studied. Properties such as salt retention, water flux and pore size diameter determined on both organic and inorganic membranes before and after irradiation indicate deterioration of the organic membrane. (author). 13 refs, 15 figs, 2 tabs.

  4. Zeta potential control in decontamination with inorganic membranes and inorganic adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andalaft, E.; Vega, R.; Correa, M.; Araya, R.; Loyola, P.

    1997-01-01

    The application of some advanced separation processes such as microfiltration and ultrafiltration, electroosmosis and electrodialysis for treating nuclear waste from different aqueous streams is under examination at the Chilean Commission for Nuclear Energy. The application of these techniques can be extended to regular industrial wastes when economically advisable. This report deals mainly with electrodialysis, electroosmosis and adsorption with inorganic materials. Special attention is paid to zeta potential control as a driving factor to electroosmosis. For radioactive contaminants that are present in the form of cations, anions, non-ionic solutions, colloids and suspended matter, appropriate combination of the processes may considerably increase the efficiency of processes used. As an example, colloids and suspended particles may be retained in porous ceramic membranes by nanofiltration, ultrafiltration or microfiltration depending on the particle size of the particles. The control of zeta potential by acting in the solid phase or else on the liquid phase has been studied; a mathematical model to predict electrodialysis data has been developed, and finally, the use of a home-made inorganic adsorbent illustrated. The effect of gamma irradiation on the membranes has also been studied. Properties such as salt retention, water flux and pore size diameter determined on both organic and inorganic membranes before and after irradiation indicate deterioration of the organic membrane. (author). 13 refs, 15 figs, 2 tabs

  5. Single-particle fusion of influenza viruses reveals complex interactions with target membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Borg, Guus; Braddock, Scarlett; Blijleven, Jelle S.; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Roos, Wouter H.

    2018-05-01

    The first step in infection of influenza A virus is contact with the host cell membrane, with which it later fuses. The composition of the target bilayer exerts a complex influence on both fusion efficiency and time. Here, an in vitro, single-particle approach is used to study this effect. Using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and a microfluidic flow cell, the hemifusion of single virions is visualized. Hemifusion efficiency and kinetics are studied while altering target bilayer cholesterol content and sialic-acid donor. Cholesterol ratios tested were 0%, 10%, 20%, and 40%. Sialic-acid donors GD1a and GYPA were used. Both cholesterol ratio and sialic-acid donors proved to have a significant effect on hemifusion efficiency. Furthermore, comparison between GD1a and GYPA conditions shows that the cholesterol dependence of the hemifusion time is severely affected by the sialic-acid donor. Only GD1a shows a clear increasing trend in hemifusion efficiency and time with increasing cholesterol concentration of the target bilayer with maximum rates for GD1A and 40% cholesterol. Overall our results show that sialic acid donor and target bilayer composition should be carefully chosen, depending on the desired hemifusion time and efficiency in the experiment.

  6. Stabilization of mitochondrial membrane potential prevents doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in isolated rat heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montaigne, David; Marechal, Xavier; Baccouch, Riadh; Modine, Thomas; Preau, Sebastien; Zannis, Konstantinos; Marchetti, Philippe; Lancel, Steve; Neviere, Remi

    2010-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of doxorubicin on left ventricular function and cellular energy state in intact isolated hearts, and, to test whether inhibition of mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation would prevent doxorubicin-induced mitochondrial and myocardial dysfunction. Myocardial contractile performance and mitochondrial respiration were evaluated by left ventricular tension and its first derivatives and cardiac fiber respirometry, respectively. NADH levels, mitochondrial membrane potential and glucose uptake were monitored non-invasively via epicardial imaging of the left ventricular wall of Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. Heart performance was reduced in a time-dependent manner in isolated rat hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution containing 1 μM doxorubicin. Compared with controls, doxorubicin induced acute myocardial dysfunction (dF/dt max of 105 ± 8 mN/s in control hearts vs. 49 ± 7 mN/s in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05). In cardiac fibers prepared from perfused hearts, doxorubicin induced depression of mitochondrial respiration (respiratory control ratio of 4.0 ± 0.2 in control hearts vs. 2.2 ± 0.2 in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05) and cytochrome c oxidase kinetic activity (24 ± 1 μM cytochrome c/min/mg in control hearts vs. 14 ± 3 μM cytochrome c/min/mg in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05). Acute cardiotoxicity induced by doxorubicin was accompanied by NADH redox state, mitochondrial membrane potential, and glucose uptake reduction. Inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening by cyclosporine A largely prevented mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, cardiac energy state and dysfunction. These results suggest that in intact hearts an impairment of mitochondrial metabolism is involved in the development of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity.

  7. Generation of membrane potential beyond the conceptual range of Donnan theory and Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamagawa, Hirohisa; Ikeda, Kota

    2017-09-01

    Donnan theory and Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation (GHK eq.) state that the nonzero membrane potential is generated by the asymmetric ion distribution between two solutions separated by a semipermeable membrane and/or by the continuous ion transport across the semipermeable membrane. However, there have been a number of reports of the membrane potential generation behaviors in conflict with those theories. The authors of this paper performed the experimental and theoretical investigation of membrane potential and found that (1) Donnan theory is valid only when the macroscopic electroneutrality is sufficed and (2) Potential behavior across a certain type of membrane appears to be inexplicable on the concept of GHK eq. Consequently, the authors derived a conclusion that the existing theories have some limitations for predicting the membrane potential behavior and we need to find a theory to overcome those limitations. The authors suggest that the ion adsorption theory named Ling's adsorption theory, which attributes the membrane potential generation to the mobile ion adsorption onto the adsorption sites, could overcome those problems.

  8. The fabrication and characterization of organic light-emitting diodes using transparent single-crystal Si membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Su-Hwan; Kim, Dal-Ho; Kim, Ji-Heon; Lee, Gon-Sub; Park, Jea-Gun; Takeo, Katoh

    2009-01-01

    For applications such as solar cells and displays, transparent single-crystal Si membranes were fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer. The SOI wafer included a buried layer of SiO 2 and Si 3 N 4 as an etch-stop layer. The etch-stop layer enabled fabrication of transparent single-crystal Si membranes with various thicknesses, and the thinning technology is described. For membranes with thicknesses of 18, 72 and 5000 nm, the respective optical transparent were 96.9%, 93.7% and 9% for R (red, λ = 660 nm), 96.9%, 91.4% and 1% for G (green, λ = 525 nm), and 97.0%, 93.2% and 0% for B (blue, λ = 470 nm). Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) were then fabricated on transparent single-crystal Si membranes with various top Si thicknesses. OLEDs fabricated on 18, 72 and 5000 nm thick membranes and operated at 6 V demonstrated a luminance of 1350, 443 and 27 cd m -2 at the current densities of 148, 131 and 1.5 mA cm -2 , respectively.

  9. Water Gas Shift Reaction with A Single Stage Low Temperature Membrane Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciora, Richard J [Media and Process Technology Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Liu, Paul KT [Media and Process Technology Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2013-12-31

    Palladium membrane and Palladium membrane reactor were developed under this project for hydrogen separation and purification for fuel cell applications. A full-scale membrane reactor was designed, constructed and evaluated for the reformate produced from a commercial scale methanol reformer. In addition, the Pd membrane and module developed from this project was successfully evaluated in the field for hydrogen purification for commercial fuel cell applications.

  10. The fractal dimension of cell membrane correlates with its capacitance: A new fractal single-shell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xujing; Becker, Frederick F.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.

    2010-01-01

    The scale-invariant property of the cytoplasmic membrane of biological cells is examined by applying the Minkowski–Bouligand method to digitized scanning electron microscopy images of the cell surface. The membrane is found to exhibit fractal behavior, and the derived fractal dimension gives a good description of its morphological complexity. Furthermore, we found that this fractal dimension correlates well with the specific membrane dielectric capacitance derived from the electrorotation measurements. Based on these findings, we propose a new fractal single-shell model to describe the dielectrics of mammalian cells, and compare it with the conventional single-shell model (SSM). We found that while both models fit with experimental data well, the new model is able to eliminate the discrepancy between the measured dielectric property of cells and that predicted by the SSM. PMID:21198103

  11. Clusters of proteins in bio-membranes: insights into the roles of interaction potential shapes and of protein diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Meilhac, Nicolas; Destainville, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that proteins embedded in lipidic bio-membranes can spontaneously self-organize into stable small clusters, or membrane nano-domains, due to the competition between short-range attractive and longer-range repulsive forces between proteins, specific to these systems. In this paper, we carry on our investigation, by Monte Carlo simulations, of different aspects of cluster phases of proteins in bio-membranes. First, we compare different long-range potentials (includ...

  12. The generation of resting membrane potentials in an inner ear hair cell system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracho, H; Budelli, R

    1978-01-01

    1. The macula sacculi in the mudpuppy is an inner ear sensory area accessible for intracellular recordings in vitro and in vivo. 2. The resting potentials recorded in vitro can be explained by the electrodiffusion theory assuming a uniform ionic selective in the membranes of the neuroepithelial cells. 3. The resting potentials recorded in vivo are significantly larger than predicted by the electrodiffusion theory, probably because of an electrogenic metabolic process present in the neuroepithelial cells. 4. An equivalent circuit is proposed to explain the resting electrogenesis in the neuroepithelial cells present in the sensory area. Images Plate 1 PMID:702400

  13. Convergence of lateral dynamic measurements in the plasma membrane of live cells from single particle tracking and STED-FCS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerholm, B. Christoffer; Andrade, Débora M.; Clausen, Mathias P.

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) in combination with the super-resolution imaging method STED (STED-FCS), and single-particle tracking (SPT) are able to directly probe the lateral dynamics of lipids and proteins in the plasma membrane of live cells at spatial scales much below the diff...

  14. Acetylcholinesterase potentiates [3H]fluorowillardiine and [3H]AMPA binding to rat cortical membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivera, S.; Rodriguez-Ithurralde, D.; Henley, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    In addition to its action at cholinergic synapses acetylcholinesterase (AChE) has been proposed to modulate neuronal activity by mechanisms unrelated to the hydrolysis of acetylcholine. We have investigated the effects of AChE on the binding of the specific AMPA receptor agonists (S)-[ 3 H]5-fluorowillardiine ([ 3 H]FW) and [ 3 H]AMPA to rat cortical membranes. Pretreatment of membranes with AChE causes a dose-dependent increase in the binding of both radiolabelled agonists with a maximal increase to ∼60% above control. This increase is completely blocked by the specific AChE inhibitors propidium, physostigmine, DFP and BW 284C51. AChE pretreatment had no effect on [ 3 H]kainate binding. [ 3 H]FW binding to membranes from young (15-day-old) rats is four orders of magnitude more sensitive to AChE modulation than membranes from adult rats (EC 50 values of 4x10 -5 and 0.1 unit/ml, respectively) although the total percentage increase in binding is similar. Furthermore, the AChE-induced potentiation of [ 3 H]FW binding is Ca 2+ - and temperature-dependent suggesting an enzymatic action for AChE in this system. Saturation binding experiments with [ 3 H]FW to adult membranes reveal high and low affinity binding sites and demonstrate that the main action of AChE is to increase the B max of both sites. These findings suggest that modulation of AMPA receptors could provide a molecular mechanism of action for the previously reported effects of AChE in synapse formation, synaptic plasticity and neurodegeneration. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  15. GTP-binding-defective ARL4D alters mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chun Li

    Full Text Available ARL4D, ARL4A, and ARL4C are closely related members of the ADP-ribosylation factor/ARF-like protein (ARF/ARL family of GTPases. All three ARL4 proteins contain nuclear localization signals (NLSs at their C-termini and are primarily found at the plasma membrane, but they are also present in the nucleus and cytoplasm. ARF function and localization depends on their controlled binding and hydrolysis of GTP. Here we show that GTP-binding-defective ARL4D is targeted to the mitochondria, where it affects mitochondrial morphology and function. We found that a portion of endogenous ARL4D and the GTP-binding-defective ARL4D mutant ARL4D(T35N reside in the mitochondria. The N-terminal myristoylation of ARL4D(T35N was required for its localization to mitochondria. The localization of ARL4D(T35N to the mitochondria reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm and caused mitochondrial fragmentation. Furthermore, the C-terminal NLS region of ARL4D(T35N was required for its effect on the mitochondria. This study is the first to demonstrate that the dysfunctional GTP-binding-defective ARL4D is targeted to mitochondria, where it subsequently alters mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential.

  16. Cell dualism: presence of cells with alternative membrane potentials in growing populations of bacteria and yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Volodymyr; Rezaeinejad, Saeid; Chu, Jian

    2013-10-01

    It is considered that all growing cells, for exception of acidophilic bacteria, have negatively charged inside cytoplasmic membrane (Δψ⁻-cells). Here we show that growing populations of microbial cells contain a small portion of cells with positively charged inside cytoplasmic membrane (Δψ⁺-cells). These cells were detected after simultaneous application of the fluorescent probes for positive membrane potential (anionic dye DIBAC⁻) and membrane integrity (propidium iodide, PI). We found in exponentially growing cell populations of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae that the content of live Δψ⁻-cells was 93.6 ± 1.8 % for bacteria and 90.4 ± 4.0 % for yeasts and the content of live Δψ⁺-cells was 0.9 ± 0.3 % for bacteria and 2.4 ± 0.7 % for yeasts. Hypothetically, existence of Δψ⁺-cells could be due to short-term, about 1 min for bacteria and 5 min for yeasts, change of membrane potential from negative to positive value during the cell cycle. This change has been shown by the reversions of K⁺, Na⁺, and Ca²⁺ ions fluxes across the cell membrane during synchronous yeast culture. The transformation of Δψ(⁻-cells to Δψ⁺-cells can be explained by slow influx of K⁺ ions into Δψ⁻-cell to the trigger level of K⁺ concentration ("compression of potassium spring"), which is forming "alternative" Δψ⁺-cell for a short period, following with fast efflux of K⁺ ions out of Δψ⁺-cell ("release of potassium spring") returning cell to normal Δψ⁻ state. We anticipate our results to be a starting point to reveal the biological role of cell dualism in form of Δψ⁻- and Δψ⁺- cells.

  17. Inferring Trial-to-Trial Excitatory and Inhibitory Synaptic Inputs from Membrane Potential using Gaussian Mixture Kalman Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milad eLankarany

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Time-varying excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs govern activity of neurons and process information in the brain. The importance of trial-to-trial fluctuations of synaptic inputs has recently been investigated in neuroscience. Such fluctuations are ignored in the most conventional techniques because they are removed when trials are averaged during linear regression techniques. Here, we propose a novel recursive algorithm based on Gaussian mixture Kalman filtering for estimating time-varying excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs from single trials of noisy membrane potential in current clamp recordings. The Kalman filtering is followed by an expectation maximization algorithm to infer the statistical parameters (time-varying mean and variance of the synaptic inputs in a non-parametric manner. As our proposed algorithm is repeated recursively, the inferred parameters of the mixtures are used to initiate the next iteration. Unlike other recent algorithms, our algorithm does not assume an a priori distribution from which the synaptic inputs are generated. Instead, the algorithm recursively estimates such a distribution by fitting a Gaussian mixture model. The performance of the proposed algorithms is compared to a previously proposed PF-based algorithm (Paninski et al., 2012 with several illustrative examples, assuming that the distribution of synaptic input is unknown. If noise is small, the performance of our algorithms is similar to that of the previous one. However, if noise is large, they can significantly outperform the previous proposal. These promising results suggest that our algorithm is a robust and efficient technique for estimating time varying excitatory and inhibitory synaptic conductances from single trials of membrane potential recordings.

  18. Single-molecule tracking of small GTPase Rac1 uncovers spatial regulation of membrane translocation and mechanism for polarized signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sulagna; Yin, Taofei; Yang, Qingfen; Zhang, Jingqiao; Wu, Yi I.; Yu, Ji

    2015-01-01

    Polarized Rac1 signaling is a hallmark of many cellular functions, including cell adhesion, motility, and cell division. The two steps of Rac1 activation are its translocation to the plasma membrane and the exchange of nucleotide from GDP to GTP. It is, however, unclear whether these two processes are regulated independent of each other and what their respective roles are in polarization of Rac1 signaling. We designed a single-particle tracking (SPT) method to quantitatively analyze the kinetics of Rac1 membrane translocation in living cells. We found that the rate of Rac1 translocation was significantly elevated in protrusions during cell spreading on collagen. Furthermore, combining FRET sensor imaging with SPT measurements in the same cell, the recruitment of Rac1 was found to be polarized to an extent similar to that of the nucleotide exchange process. Statistical analysis of single-molecule trajectories and optogenetic manipulation of membrane lipids revealed that Rac1 membrane translocation precedes nucleotide exchange, and is governed primarily by interactions with phospholipids, particularly PI(3,4,5)P3, instead of protein factors. Overall, the study highlights the significance of membrane translocation in spatial Rac1 signaling, which is in addition to the traditional view focusing primarily on GEF distribution and exchange reaction. PMID:25561548

  19. Single Event Resolution of Plant Plasma Membrane Protein Endocytosis by TIRF Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alexander; Vert, Grégory

    2017-01-01

    Endocytosis is a key process in the internalization of extracellular materials and plasma membrane proteins, such as receptors and transporters, thereby controlling many aspects of cell signaling and cellular homeostasis. Endocytosis in plants has an essential role not only for basic cellular functions but also for growth and development, nutrient delivery, toxin avoidance, and pathogen defense. The precise mechanisms of endocytosis in plants remain quite elusive. The lack of direct visualization and examination of single events of endocytosis has greatly hampered our ability to precisely monitor the cell surface lifetime and the recruitment profile of proteins driving endocytosis or endocytosed cargos in plants. Here, we discuss the necessity to systematically implement total internal reflection fluorescence microcopy (TIRF) in the Plant Cell Biology community and present reliable protocols for high spatial and temporal imaging of endocytosis in plants using clathrin-mediated endocytosis as a test case, since it represents the major route for internalization of cell-surface proteins in plants. We developed a robust method to directly visualize cell surface proteins using TIRF microscopy combined to a high throughput, automated and unbiased analysis pipeline to determine the temporal recruitment profile of proteins to single sites of endocytosis, using the departure of clathrin as a physiological reference for scission. Using this 'departure assay', we assessed the recruitment of two different AP-2 subunits, alpha and mu, to the sites of endocytosis and found that AP2A1 was recruited in concert with clathrin, while AP2M was not. This validated approach therefore offers a powerful solution to better characterize the plant endocytic machinery and the dynamics of one's favorite cargo protein.

  20. From isolated light-harvesting complexes to the thylakoid membrane: a single-molecule perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, J. Michael; Malý, Pavel; Krüger, Tjaart P. J.; Grondelle, Rienk van

    2018-01-01

    The conversion of solar radiation to chemical energy in plants and green algae takes place in the thylakoid membrane. This amphiphilic environment hosts a complex arrangement of light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes that absorb light and transfer the excitation energy to photochemically active reaction centers. This efficient light-harvesting capacity is moreover tightly regulated by a photoprotective mechanism called non-photochemical quenching to avoid the stress-induced destruction of the catalytic reaction center. In this review we provide an overview of single-molecule fluorescence measurements on plant light-harvesting complexes (LHCs) of varying sizes with the aim of bridging the gap between the smallest isolated complexes, which have been well-characterized, and the native photosystem. The smallest complexes contain only a small number (10-20) of interacting chlorophylls, while the native photosystem contains dozens of protein subunits and many hundreds of connected pigments. We discuss the functional significance of conformational dynamics, the lipid environment, and the structural arrangement of this fascinating nano-machinery. The described experimental results can be utilized to build mathematical-physical models in a bottom-up approach, which can then be tested on larger in vivo systems. The results also clearly showcase the general property of biological systems to utilize the same system properties for different purposes. In this case it is the regulated conformational flexibility that allows LHCs to switch between efficient light-harvesting and a photoprotective function.

  1. Development and Characterization a Single-Active-Chamber Piezoelectric Membrane Pump with Multiple Passive Check Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ronghui; You, Feng; Lv, Zhihan; He, Zhaocheng; Wang, Haiwei; Huang, Ling

    2016-12-12

    In order to prevent the backward flow of piezoelectric pumps, this paper presents a single-active-chamber piezoelectric membrane pump with multiple passive check valves. Under the condition of a fixed total number of passive check valves, by means of changing the inlet valves and outlet valves' configuration, the pumping characteristics in terms of flow rate and backpressure are experimentally investigated. Like the maximum flow rate and backpressure, the testing results show that the optimal frequencies are significantly affected by changes in the number inlet valves and outlet valves. The variation ratios of the maximum flow rate and the maximum backpressure are up to 66% and less than 20%, respectively. Furthermore, the piezoelectric pump generally demonstrates very similar flow rate and backpressure characteristics when the number of inlet valves in one kind of configuration is the same as that of outlet valves in another configuration. The comparison indicates that the backflow from the pumping chamber to inlet is basically the same as the backflow from the outlet to the pumping chamber. No matter whether the number of inlet valves or the number of outlet valves is increased, the backflow can be effectively reduced. In addition, the backpressure fluctuation can be significantly suppressed with an increase of either inlet valves or outlet valves. It also means that the pump can prevent the backflow more effectively at the cost of power consumption. The pump is very suitable for conditions where more accurate flow rates are needed and wear and fatigue of check valves often occur.

  2. Potential antitumor therapeutic strategies of human amniotic membrane and amniotic fluid-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, N-H; Hwang, K-A; Kim, S U; Kim, Y-B; Hyun, S-H; Jeung, E-B; Choi, K-C

    2012-08-01

    As stem cells are capable of self-renewal and can generate differentiated progenies for organ development, they are considered as potential source for regenerative medicine and tissue replacement after injury or disease. Along with this capacity, stem cells have the therapeutic potential for treating human diseases including cancers. According to the origins, stem cells are broadly classified into two types: embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and adult stem cells. In terms of differentiation potential, ESCs are pluripotent and adult stem cells are multipotent. Amnion, which is a membranous sac that contains the fetus and amniotic fluid and functions in protecting the developing embryo during gestation, is another stem cell source. Amnion-derived stem cells are classified as human amniotic membrane-derived epithelial stem cells, human amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells and human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells. They are in an intermediate stage between pluripotent ESCs and lineage-restricted adult stem cells, non-tumorigenic, and contribute to low immunogenicity and anti-inflammation. Furthermore, they are easily available and do not cause any controversial issues in their recovery and applications. Not only are amnion-derived stem cells applicable in regenerative medicine, they have anticancer capacity. In non-engineered stem cells transplantation strategies, amnion-derived stem cells effectively target the tumor and suppressed the tumor growth by expressing cytotoxic cytokines. Additionally, they also have a potential as novel delivery vehicles transferring therapeutic genes to the cancer formation sites in gene-directed enzyme/prodrug combination therapy. Owing to their own advantageous properties, amnion-derived stem cells are emerging as a new candidate in anticancer therapy.

  3. Learning of Precise Spike Times with Homeostatic Membrane Potential Dependent Synaptic Plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Albers

    Full Text Available Precise spatio-temporal patterns of neuronal action potentials underly e.g. sensory representations and control of muscle activities. However, it is not known how the synaptic efficacies in the neuronal networks of the brain adapt such that they can reliably generate spikes at specific points in time. Existing activity-dependent plasticity rules like Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity are agnostic to the goal of learning spike times. On the other hand, the existing formal and supervised learning algorithms perform a temporally precise comparison of projected activity with the target, but there is no known biologically plausible implementation of this comparison. Here, we propose a simple and local unsupervised synaptic plasticity mechanism that is derived from the requirement of a balanced membrane potential. Since the relevant signal for synaptic change is the postsynaptic voltage rather than spike times, we call the plasticity rule Membrane Potential Dependent Plasticity (MPDP. Combining our plasticity mechanism with spike after-hyperpolarization causes a sensitivity of synaptic change to pre- and postsynaptic spike times which can reproduce Hebbian spike timing dependent plasticity for inhibitory synapses as was found in experiments. In addition, the sensitivity of MPDP to the time course of the voltage when generating a spike allows MPDP to distinguish between weak (spurious and strong (teacher spikes, which therefore provides a neuronal basis for the comparison of actual and target activity. For spatio-temporal input spike patterns our conceptually simple plasticity rule achieves a surprisingly high storage capacity for spike associations. The sensitivity of the MPDP to the subthreshold membrane potential during training allows robust memory retrieval after learning even in the presence of activity corrupted by noise. We propose that MPDP represents a biophysically plausible mechanism to learn temporal target activity patterns.

  4. Learning of Precise Spike Times with Homeostatic Membrane Potential Dependent Synaptic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Christian; Westkott, Maren; Pawelzik, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Precise spatio-temporal patterns of neuronal action potentials underly e.g. sensory representations and control of muscle activities. However, it is not known how the synaptic efficacies in the neuronal networks of the brain adapt such that they can reliably generate spikes at specific points in time. Existing activity-dependent plasticity rules like Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity are agnostic to the goal of learning spike times. On the other hand, the existing formal and supervised learning algorithms perform a temporally precise comparison of projected activity with the target, but there is no known biologically plausible implementation of this comparison. Here, we propose a simple and local unsupervised synaptic plasticity mechanism that is derived from the requirement of a balanced membrane potential. Since the relevant signal for synaptic change is the postsynaptic voltage rather than spike times, we call the plasticity rule Membrane Potential Dependent Plasticity (MPDP). Combining our plasticity mechanism with spike after-hyperpolarization causes a sensitivity of synaptic change to pre- and postsynaptic spike times which can reproduce Hebbian spike timing dependent plasticity for inhibitory synapses as was found in experiments. In addition, the sensitivity of MPDP to the time course of the voltage when generating a spike allows MPDP to distinguish between weak (spurious) and strong (teacher) spikes, which therefore provides a neuronal basis for the comparison of actual and target activity. For spatio-temporal input spike patterns our conceptually simple plasticity rule achieves a surprisingly high storage capacity for spike associations. The sensitivity of the MPDP to the subthreshold membrane potential during training allows robust memory retrieval after learning even in the presence of activity corrupted by noise. We propose that MPDP represents a biophysically plausible mechanism to learn temporal target activity patterns.

  5. Metagenomes reveal microbial structures, functional potentials, and biofouling-related genes in a membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinxing; Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Huan; Park, Hee-Deung; Wu, Zhichao

    2016-06-01

    Metagenomic sequencing was used to investigate the microbial structures, functional potentials, and biofouling-related genes in a membrane bioreactor (MBR). The results showed that the microbial community in the MBR was highly diverse. Notably, function analysis of the dominant genera indicated that common genes from different phylotypes were identified for important functional potentials with the observation of variation of abundances of genes in a certain taxon (e.g., Dechloromonas). Despite maintaining similar metabolic functional potentials with a parallel full-scale conventional activated sludge (CAS) system due to treating the identical wastewater, the MBR had more abundant nitrification-related bacteria and coding genes of ammonia monooxygenase, which could well explain its excellent ammonia removal in the low-temperature period. Furthermore, according to quantification of the genes involved in exopolysaccharide and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) protein metabolism, the MBR did not show a much different potential in producing EPS compared to the CAS system, and bacteria from the membrane biofilm had lower abundances of genes associated with EPS biosynthesis and transport compared to the activated sludge in the MBR.

  6. Surface-Enhanced Separation of Water from Hydrocarbons: Potential Dewatering Membranes for the Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Pine Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engtrakul, Chaiwat; Hu, Michael Z.; Bischoff, Brian L.; Jang, Gyoung G.

    2016-10-20

    The impact of surface-selective coatings on water permeation through a membrane when exposed to catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) vapor products was studied by tailoring the surface properties of the membrane coating from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic. Our approach used high-performance architectured surface-selective (HiPAS) membranes that were inserted after a CFP reactor. At this insertion point, the inner wall surface of a tubular membrane was exposed to a mixture of water and upgraded product vapors, including light gases and deoxygenated hydrocarbons. Under proper membrane operating conditions, a high selectivity for water over one-ring upgraded biomass pyrolysis hydrocarbons was observed as a result of a surface-enhanced capillary condensation process. Owing to this surface-enhanced effect, HiPAS membranes have the potential to enable high flux separations, suggesting that water can be selectively removed from the CFP product vapors.

  7. Single Molecule 3D Orientation in Time and Space: A 6D Dynamic Study on Fluorescently Labeled Lipid Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Börner, Richard; Ehrlich, Nicky; Hohlbein, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between single molecules profoundly depend on their mutual three-dimensional orientation. Recently, we demonstrated a technique that allows for orientation determination of single dipole emitters using a polarization-resolved distribution of fluorescence into several detection channels...... interesting in non-isotropic environments such as lipid membranes, which are of great importance in biology. We used giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) labeled with fluorescent dyes down to a single molecule concentration as a model system for both, assessing the robustness of the orientation determination...

  8. Electrospun nanofibrous SF/P(LLA-CL) membrane: a potential substratum for endothelial keratoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junzhao; Yan, Chenxi; Zhu, Mengyu; Yao, Qinke; Shao, Chunyi; Lu, Wenjuan; Wang, Jing; Mo, Xiumei; Gu, Ping; Fu, Yao; Fan, Xianqun

    2015-01-01

    Cornea transplant technology has progressed markedly in recent decades, allowing surgeons to replace diseased corneal endothelium by a thin lamellar structure. A thin, transparent, biocompatible, tissue-engineered substratum with corneal endothelial cells for endothelial keratoplasty is currently of interest. Electrospinning a nanofibrous structure can simulate the extracellular matrix and have beneficial effects for cell culture. Silk fibroin (SF) has good biocompatibility but poor mechanical properties, while poly(L-lactic acid-co-ε-caprolactone) (P(LLA-CL)) has good mechanical properties but poor biocompatibility. Blending SF with P(LLA-CL) can maintain the advantages of both these materials and overcome their disadvantages. Blended electrospun nanofibrous membranes may be suitable for regeneration of the corneal endothelium. The aim of this study was to produce a tissue-engineered construct suitable for endothelial keratoplasty. Five scaffolds containing different SF:P(LLA-CL) blended ratios (100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75, 0:100) were manufactured. A human corneal endothelial (B4G12) cell line was cultured on the membranes. Light transmission, speed of cell adherence, cell viability (live-dead test), cell proliferation (Ki-67, BrdU staining), and cell monolayer formation were detected on membranes with the different blended ratios, and expression of some functional genes was also detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Different blended ratios of scaffolds had different light transmittance properties. The 25:75 blended ratio membrane had the best transmittance among these scaffolds. All electrospun nanofibrous membranes showed improved speed of cell adherence when compared with the control group, especially when the P(LLA-CL) ratio increased. The 25:75 blended ratio membranes also had the highest cell proliferation. B4G12 cells could form a monolayer on all scaffolds, and most functional genes were also stably expressed on all scaffolds. Only two genes

  9. Performance Evaluation of Membrane-Based Septic Tank and Its Reuse Potential for Irrigating Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Mehwish; Hashmi, Imran; Khan, Sher Jamal

    2017-08-01

    Membrane technology, being the most emerging wastewater treatment option, has gained substantial importance with the massive objective of the reuse potential of wastewater. Keeping this in view, the present study was conducted with the rationale to evaluate the performance efficiency of membrane-based septic tank (MBST), and its reuse perspective for irrigating crops. The septic tank was designed by submerging a woven fiber microfiltration membrane module to treat domestic wastewater. Three crops Triticum aestivum (wheat), Coriandrum sativum (coriander), and Mentha arvensis (mint) were selected to be irrigated with treated MBST effluent, untreated wastewater, and tap water (as a control) for comparative growth analysis. Two pathogenic strains, Escherichia coli and Salmonella sp. were selected as reference microbes and their translocation rate was observed in root, shoot, and leaves. Upon maturity, the roots, shoots, and leaves of the above-mentioned plants were aseptically removed for microbiological analysis. Strains were analyzed, using analytical profile index and PCR analysis. Maximum removal efficiencies for MBST in terms of chemical oxygen demand (COD), turbidity, nutrients deduction (phosphorus), and indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli) were found to be 73, 96, 48, and 88%, respectively. Significant bacterial load reduction (p < 0.001) in terms of E. coli (3.8 log CFU/100 mL) and helminths (2 eggs/L) was observed in treated water. High plant yield was observed when irrigated with treated water as compared to tap water, as minimal nutrient removal (48%) was recorded in treated water, with the germination percentage of 88.8%.

  10. Benzothiophen-pyrazine scaffold as a potential membrane targeting drug carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazuryk, Olga; Niemiec, Elżbieta; Stochel, Grażyna; Gillaizeau, Isabelle; Brindell, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    The fluorescent properties of 2,5-di(benzo[b]thiophen-2-yl)pyrazine as a potential membrane targeting drug carrier were characterized and it was shown that its fluorescence intensity was much higher in organic solvent than in water. The embedding of studied compound by liposomes leads to ca. 2 orders of magnitude increase in its fluorescence intensity, suggesting its preferential accumulation in membranes. Preliminary biological studies showed its ability to accumulate in cells, and the concentration of 10 μM was sufficient for homogeneous staining of cells. The treatment of mouse carcinoma CT26 cells with studied compound up to 200 μM resulted in decreasing of viable cells by ca. 30%. Its reactivity towards albumin was found to be moderate with an association constant of 6×10 4 M −1 , while no interaction with DNA was observed. Our findings encourage for further studies on functionalization of this molecule to obtain a new class of anticancer drugs targeting membrane. Highlights: ► The fluorescence of 2,5-di(benzo[b]thiophen-2-yl)pyrazine is solvent dependent. ► Weak fluorescence is found in water while high in organic solvents (DMSO, chloroform). ► Embedding of compound in liposomes remarkably increased its fluorescence. ► No interaction with DNA is observed but moderate reactivity towards albumin is found. ► Homogeneous staining of cells is feasible using nontoxic dose of compound

  11. Vascular Displacement in Idiopathic Macular Hole after Single-layered Inverted Internal Limiting Membrane Flap Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Jung; Lee, In Ho; Park, Keun Heung; Pak, Kang Yeun; Park, Sung Who; Byon, Ik Soo; Lee, Ji Eun

    2017-08-01

    To compare vascular displacement in the macula after surgical closure of idiopathic macular hole (MH) after single-layered inverted internal limiting membrane (ILM) flap technique and conventional ILM removal. This retrospective study included patients who underwent either vitrectomy and ILM removal only or vitrectomy with single-layered inverted ILM flap for idiopathic MH larger than 400 μm from 2012 to 2015. A customized program compared the positions of the retinal vessels in the macula between preoperative and postoperative photographs. En face images of 6 × 6 mm optical coherence tomography volume scans were registered to calculate the scale. Retinal vessel displacement was measured as a vector value by comparing its location in 16 sectors of a grid partitioned into eight sectors in two rings (inner, 2 to 4 mm; outer, 4 to 6 mm). The distance and angle of displacement were calculated as an average vector and were compared between the two groups for whole sectors, inner ring, outer ring, and for each sector. Twenty patients were included in the ILM flap group and 22 in the ILM removal group. There were no statistical differences between the groups for baseline characteristics. The average displacement in the ILM flap group and the ILM removal group was 56.6 μm at -3.4° and 64.9 μm at -2.7°, respectively, for the whole sectors (p = 0.900), 76.1 μm at -1.1° and 87.3 μm at -0.9° for the inner ring (p = 0.980), and 37.4 μm at -8.2° and 42.7 μm at -6.3° for the outer ring (p = 0.314). There was no statistical difference in the displacement of each of the sectors. Postoperative topographic changes showed no significant differences between the ILM flap and the ILM removal group for idiopathic MH. The single-layered ILM flap technique did not appear to cause additional displacement of the retinal vessels in the macula. © 2017 The Korean Ophthalmological Society

  12. Enterocin P Selectively Dissipates the Membrane Potential of Enterococcus faecium T136

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, C.; Chen, Y.; Chung, H.-J.; Cintas, L. M.; Hernández, P. E.; Montville, T. J.; Chikindas, M. L.

    2001-01-01

    Enterocin P is a pediocin-like, broad-spectrum bacteriocin which displays a strong inhibitory activity against Listeria monocytogenes. The bacteriocin was purified from the culture supernatant of Enterococcus faecium P13, and its molecular mechanism of action against the sensitive strain E. faecium T136 was evaluated. Although enterocin P caused significant reduction of the membrane potential (ΔΨ) and the intracellular ATP pool of the indicator organism, the pH gradient (ΔpH) component of the proton motive force (Δp) was not dissipated. By contrast, enterocin P caused carboxyfluorescein efflux from E. faecium T136-derived liposomes. PMID:11282622

  13. Membrane potential and response properties of populations of cortical neurons in the high conductance state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno-Bote, Ruben; Parga, Nestor

    2005-01-01

    Because of intense synaptic activity, cortical neurons are in a high conductance state. We show that this state has important consequences on the properties of a population of independent model neurons with conductance-based synapses. Using an adiabaticlike approximation we study both the membrane potential and the firing probability distributions across the population. We find that the latter is bimodal in such a way that at any particular moment some neurons are inactive while others are active. The population rate and the response variability are also characterized

  14. Impact of Storage and Purification on Mitochondrial Membrane Potential of Boar Spermatozoa

    OpenAIRE

    Aristotelis G. Lymberopoulos; TAREK KHALIFA

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of semen purification and storage on sperm mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). Gel-free whole ejaculates were collected from five proven fertile Large White boars aged two to three years. Aliquots of fresh semen were split, diluted in one step with commercial extenders and incubated at 37oC for 5-10 minutes. Semen was cooled to 18oC and packaged in 15-ml sterile propylene tubes. After 4-10 hours post-semen collection, stored semen was purified by co...

  15. Monitoring human neutrophil granule secretion by flow cytometry: secretion and membrane potential changes assessed by light scatter and a fluorescent probe of membrane potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, M.P.; Seligmann, B.E.

    1985-01-01

    Purified human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) were incubated at 37 degrees C with the fluorescent membrane potential sensitive cyanine dye di-O-C(5)(3) and exposed to a number of stimulatory agents (N-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (FMLP), cytochalasin B (cyto B) + FMLP, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). Flow cytometry was utilized to measure changes in forward light scatter (FS), orthogonal light scatter (90 degrees-SC), and fluorescence intensity of individual cells over time. A saturating (10(-6) M) dose of FMLP lead to a significant increase in the cells' FS without a change in 90 degrees-SC as well as a heterogeneous loss of di-O-C(5)(3) fluorescence. PMA (100 ng/ml) also caused an increase in FS but a uniform loss of dye fluorescence by all cells (apparent depolarization). Cyto B + FMLP produced an increase in FS, a marked loss of 90 degrees-SC, and a uniform loss of fluorescence. Secretion experiments under identical incubation conditions indicated a significantly positive relationship between loss of enzyme markers or cell granularity and orthogonal light scatter (r . 0.959, 0.998, and 0.989 for loss of 90 degrees-SC vs lysozyme, beta-glucuronidase, and granularity index, respectively). Flow cytometric light scatter measurements may yield important information on the extent of prior cell degranulation or activation

  16. Monitoring the native phosphorylation state of plasma membrane proteins from a single mouse cerebellum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schindler, J.; Ye, J. Y.; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal processing in the cerebellum involves the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of various plasma membrane proteins such as AMPA or NMDA receptors. Despite the importance of changes in phosphorylation pattern, no global phospho-proteome analysis has yet been performed. As plasma membrane...

  17. Quantifying pulsed electric field-induced membrane nanoporation in single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Erick K; Ibey, Bennett L; Beier, Hope T; Armani, Andrea M

    2016-11-01

    Plasma membrane disruption can trigger a host of cellular activities. One commonly observed type of disruption is pore formation. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations of simplified lipid membrane structures predict that controllably disrupting the membrane via nano-scale poration may be possible with nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF). Until recently, researchers hoping to verify this hypothesis experimentally have been limited to measuring the relatively slow process of fluorescent markers diffusing across the membrane, which is indirect evidence of nanoporation that could be channel-mediated. Leveraging recent advances in nonlinear optical microscopy, we elucidate the role of pulse parameters in nsPEF-induced membrane permeabilization in live cells. Unlike previous techniques, it is able to directly observe loss of membrane order at the onset of the pulse. We also develop a complementary theoretical model that relates increasing membrane permeabilization to membrane pore density. Due to the significantly improved spatial and temporal resolution possible with our imaging method, we are able to directly compare our experimental and theoretical results. Their agreement provides substantial evidence that nanoporation does occur and that its development is dictated by the electric field distribution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Single-ion polymer electrolyte membranes enable lithium-ion batteries with a broad operating temperature range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weiwei; Zhang, Yunfeng; Li, Jing; Sun, Yubao; Cheng, Hansong

    2014-04-01

    Conductive processes involving lithium ions are analyzed in detail from a mechanistic perspective, and demonstrate that single ion polymeric electrolyte (SIPE) membranes can be used in lithium-ion batteries with a wide operating temperature range (25-80 °C) through systematic optimization of electrodes and electrode/electrolyte interfaces, in sharp contrast to other batteries equipped with SIPE membranes that display appreciable operability only at elevated temperatures (>60 °C). The performance is comparable to that of batteries using liquid electrolyte of inorganic salt, and the batteries exhibit excellent cycle life and rate performance. This significant widening of battery operation temperatures coupled with the inherent flexibility and robustness of the SIPE membranes makes it possible to develop thin and flexible Li-ion batteries for a broad range of applications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Potentialities of a Membrane Reactor with Laccase Grafted Membranes for the Enzymatic Degradation of Phenolic Compounds in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorleak Chea

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the degradation of phenolic compounds by laccases from Trametes versicolor in an enzymatic membrane reactor (EMR. The enzymatic membranes were prepared by grafting laccase on a gelatine layer previously deposited onto α-alumina tubular membranes. The 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (DMP was selected  from among the three different phenolic compounds tested (guaiacol, 4-chlorophenol and DMP to study the performance of the EMR in dead end configuration. At the lowest feed substrate concentration tested (100 mg·L−1, consumption increased with flux (up to 7.9 × 103 mg·h−1·m−2 at 128 L·h−1·m−2, whereas at the highest substrate concentration (500 mg·L−1, it was shown that the reaction was limited by the oxygen content.

  20. Evolution of Choroidal Neovascular Membrane in Best Disease after Single Intravitreal Bevacizumab. Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celea, Christiana; Pop, Mihai; Avidis-Zamfiroiu, Nicoleta; Celea, Cristian

    2015-03-01

    Best's disease is a hereditary form of macular dystrophy that starts in childhood and progresses until visual symptoms occur. In evolution it can be complicated with choroidal neovascularization, condition very rare in children. We report an important visual improvement in a 8-year-old caucasian girl after successful treatment with one intravitreal bevacizumab injection. There are few cases reported in literature (1-7), and the patient presented here have important particularities: one of the youngest children ever-mentioned with this complication, the third-member of her family with this disease and the first patient who didn't receive a second intravitreal bevacizumab at six weeks after first treatment, even though BCVA was lower than expected. The girl accused decrease of vision in the RE for the past 3-4 months. BCVA at presentation was 1/10. After 6 weeks from the intravitreal treatment, BCVA improved, but not very satisfactory (5/10). Because fundus and OCT aspects were encouraging, we waited another 4 weeks before the second injection. BCVA doubled in this period (8/10). Visual acuity, fundus and OCT aspects stabilized for 18 months of follow-up. We note that choroidal neovascular membrane associated with Best's disease can appear at such young children, this fact being very important in the phase of diagnosis, when the clinician should also take in consideration this possibility. Another important idea underlined here is the long-term efficacy of a single intravitreal anti-VEGF injection and also the no-need for imminent, fast re-treatment when the fundus and OCT aspects are encouraging through the follow-up.

  1. Development and Characterization a Single-Active-Chamber Piezoelectric Membrane Pump with Multiple Passive Check Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronghui Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to prevent the backward flow of piezoelectric pumps, this paper presents a single-active-chamber piezoelectric membrane pump with multiple passive check valves. Under the condition of a fixed total number of passive check valves, by means of changing the inlet valves and outlet valves’ configuration, the pumping characteristics in terms of flow rate and backpressure are experimentally investigated. Like the maximum flow rate and backpressure, the testing results show that the optimal frequencies are significantly affected by changes in the number inlet valves and outlet valves. The variation ratios of the maximum flow rate and the maximum backpressure are up to 66% and less than 20%, respectively. Furthermore, the piezoelectric pump generally demonstrates very similar flow rate and backpressure characteristics when the number of inlet valves in one kind of configuration is the same as that of outlet valves in another configuration. The comparison indicates that the backflow from the pumping chamber to inlet is basically the same as the backflow from the outlet to the pumping chamber. No matter whether the number of inlet valves or the number of outlet valves is increased, the backflow can be effectively reduced. In addition, the backpressure fluctuation can be significantly suppressed with an increase of either inlet valves or outlet valves. It also means that the pump can prevent the backflow more effectively at the cost of power consumption. The pump is very suitable for conditions where more accurate flow rates are needed and wear and fatigue of check valves often occur.

  2. Simultaneous Characterization of Instantaneous Young’s Modulus and Specific Membrane Capacitance of Single Cells Using a Microfluidic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a microfluidics-based approach capable of continuously characterizing instantaneous Young’s modulus (Einstantaneous and specific membrane capacitance (Cspecific membrane of suspended single cells. In this method, cells were aspirated through a constriction channel while the cellular entry process into the constriction channel was recorded using a high speed camera and the impedance profiles at two frequencies (1 kHz and 100 kHz were simultaneously measured by a lock-in amplifier. Numerical simulations were conducted to model cellular entry process into the constriction channel, focusing on two key parameters: instantaneous aspiration length (Linstantaneous and transitional aspiration length (Ltransitional, which was further translated to Einstantaneous. An equivalent distribution circuit model for a cell travelling in the constriction channel was used to determine Cspecific membrane. A non-small-cell lung cancer cell line 95C (n = 354 was used to evaluate this technique, producing Einstantaneous of 2.96 ± 0.40 kPa and Cspecific membrane of 1.59 ± 0.28 μF/cm2. As a platform for continuous and simultaneous characterization of cellular Einstantaneous and Cspecific membrane, this approach can facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of cellular biophysical properties.

  3. Single-cell mechanics--An experimental-computational method for quantifying the membrane-cytoskeleton elasticity of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartibi, M; Liu, Y X; Liu, G-Y; Komvopoulos, K

    2015-11-01

    The membrane-cytoskeleton system plays a major role in cell adhesion, growth, migration, and differentiation. F-actin filaments, cross-linkers, binding proteins that bundle F-actin filaments to form the actin cytoskeleton, and integrins that connect the actin cytoskeleton network to the cell plasma membrane and extracellular matrix are major cytoskeleton constituents. Thus, the cell cytoskeleton is a complex composite that can assume different shapes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based techniques have been used to measure cytoskeleton material properties without much attention to cell shape. A recently developed surface chemical patterning method for long-term single-cell culture was used to seed individual cells on circular patterns. A continuum-based cell model, which uses as input the force-displacement response obtained with a modified AFM setup and relates the membrane-cytoskeleton elastic behavior to the cell geometry, while treating all other subcellular components suspended in the cytoplasmic liquid (gel) as an incompressible fluid, is presented and validated by experimental results. The developed analytical-experimental methodology establishes a framework for quantifying the membrane-cytoskeleton elasticity of live cells. This capability may have immense implications in cell biology, particularly in studies seeking to establish correlations between membrane-cytoskeleton elasticity and cell disease, mortality, differentiation, and migration, and provide insight into cell infiltration through nonwoven fibrous scaffolds. The present method can be further extended to analyze membrane-cytoskeleton viscoelasticity, examine the role of other subcellular components (e.g., nucleus envelope) in cell elasticity, and elucidate the effects of mechanical stimuli on cell differentiation and motility. This is the first study to decouple the membrane-cytoskeleton elasticity from cell stiffness and introduce an effective approach for measuring the elastic modulus. The

  4. Oxygen transport by oxygen potential gradient in dense ceramic oxide membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiya, P.S.; Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Mieville, R.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.; Kleefisch, M.S.; Udovich, C.A. [Amoco Exploration/Production, Naperville, IL (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted in recent years on the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas (syngas: CO + H{sub 2}) with air as the oxidant. In partial oxidation, a mixed-oxide ceramic membrane selectively transports oxygen from the air; this transport is driven by the oxygen potential gradient. Of the several ceramic materials the authors have tested, a mixed oxide based on the Sr-Fe-Co-O system has been found to be very attractive. Extensive oxygen permeability data have been obtained for this material in methane conversion experiments carried out in a reactor. The data have been analyzed by a transport equation based on the phenomenological theory of diffusion under oxygen potential gradients. Thermodynamic calculations were used to estimate the driving force for the transport of oxygen ions. The results show that the transport equation deduced from the literature describes the permeability data reasonably well and can be used to determine the diffusion coefficients and the associated activation energy of oxygen ions in the ceramic membrane material.

  5. Single-cell proteomics: potential implications for cancer diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavasso, Sonia; Gullaksen, Stein-Erik; Skavland, Jørn; Gjertsen, Bjørn T

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell proteomics in cancer is evolving and promises to provide more accurate diagnoses based on detailed molecular features of cells within tumors. This review focuses on technologies that allow for collection of complex data from single cells, but also highlights methods that are adaptable to routine cancer diagnostics. Current diagnostics rely on histopathological analysis, complemented by mutational detection and clinical imaging. Though crucial, the information gained is often not directly transferable to defined therapeutic strategies, and predicting therapy response in a patient is difficult. In cancer, cellular states revealed through perturbed intracellular signaling pathways can identify functional mutations recurrent in cancer subsets. Single-cell proteomics remains to be validated in clinical trials where serial samples before and during treatment can reveal excessive clonal evolution and therapy failure; its use in clinical trials is anticipated to ignite a diagnostic revolution that will better align diagnostics with the current biological understanding of cancer.

  6. Energy Efficient Aeration in a Single Low Pressure Hollow Sheet Membrane Filtration Module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Thomas Ruby; Ratkovich, Nicolas Rios; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    The main drawback of membrane bioreactors (MBR) systems is the fouling of the membrane, which is decreased and/or prevented through gas sparging. However, this practice is based on rules of thumb or a trial-and-error approaches which are tedious, very time-consuming, do not necessarily provide...... optimal fouling control and they are not energy efficient. Therefore, dedicated experiments are needed to fully understand the hydrodynamics of it. A hollow sheet (HS) MBR was studied. Experimental velocity measurements were made using micro-propellers and compared to CFD results. A good agreement between...... is homogeneously distributes over the predominant part of the membrane surface....

  7. Bacterial Membrane Depolarization-Linked Fuel Cell Potential Burst as Signal for Selective Detection of Alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Sharbani; Goswami, Pranab

    2018-06-06

    The biosensing application of microbial fuel cell (MFC) is hampered by its long response time, poor selectivity, and technical difficulty in developing portable devices. Herein, a novel signal form for rapid detection of ethanol was generated in a photosynthetic MFC (PMFC). First, a dual chambered (100 mL each) PMFC was fabricated by using cyanobacteria-based anode and abiotic cathode, and its performance was examined for detection of alcohols. A graphene-based nanobiocomposite matrix was layered over graphite anode to support cyanobacterial biofilm growth and to facilitate electron transfer. Injection of alcohols into the anodic chamber caused a transient potential burst of the PMFC within 60 s (load 1000 Ω), and the magnitude of potential could be correlated to the ethanol concentrations in the range 0.001-20% with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.13% ( R 2 = 0.96). The device exhibited higher selectivity toward ethanol than methanol as discerned from the corresponding cell-alcohol interaction constant ( K i ) of 780 and 1250 mM. The concept was then translated to a paper-based PMFC (p-PMFC) (size ∼20 cm 2 ) wherein, the cells were merely immobilized over the anode. The device with a shelf life of ∼3 months detected ethanol within 10 s with a dynamic range of 0.005-10% and LOD of 0.02% ( R 2 = 0.99). The fast response time was attributed to the higher wettability of ethanol on the immobilized cell surface as validated by the contact angle data. Alcohols degraded the cell membrane on the order of ethanol > methanol, enhanced the redox current of the membrane-bound electron carrier proteins, and pushed the anodic band gap toward more negative value. The consequence was the potential burst, the magnitude of which was correlated to the ethanol concentrations. This novel approach has a great application potential for selective, sensitive, rapid, and portable detection of ethanol.

  8. A simple route to develop transparent doxorubicin-loaded nanodiamonds/cellulose nanocomposite membranes as potential wound dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaogang; Zhang, Hao; Cao, Zhenni; Cai, Ning; Xue, Yanan; Yu, Faquan

    2016-06-05

    The objective of this study is to develop transparent porous nanodiamonds/cellulose nanocomposite membranes with controlled release of doxorubicin for potential applications as wound dressings, which were fabricated by tape casting method from dispersing carboxylated nanodiamonds and dissolving cellulose homogeneously in 7 wt% NaOH/12 wt% urea aqueous solution. By adjusting the carboxylated nanodiamonds content, various nanocomposite membranes were obtained. The structure and properties of these membranes have been investigated by light transmittance measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), tensile tests, water loss analyses, etc. The drug loading and release was investigated using doxorubicin hydrochloride as a model drug. In vitro cytotoxicity assay of the membranes was also studied. This work presented a proof-of-concept utility of these membranes for loading and release of bioactive compounds to be employed as a candidate for wound dressing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ionic regulation of the plasma membrane potential of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) spermatozoa: Role in the initiation of sperm motility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatti, J.L.; Billard, R.; Christen, R.

    1990-01-01

    The ionic dependence of the trout sperm plasma membrane potential was analysed by measuring the accumulation of the lipophilic ions 3 H-tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP) and 14 C-thiocyanate (SCN) following dilution in artificial media isotonic to the seminal fluid. Our data showed that the trout sperm plasma membrane has a mixed conductance: the plasma membrane potential is sensitive upon the transmembrane gradients of K+, Na+, and H+. This potential is negative (less than -40 mV) in a 125 mM choline chloride media (ChM) at pH 8.5. Replacement of choline by sodium has a small depolarizing effect. The membrane potential is about -15 mV in a 125 mM potassium chloride and falls near zero mV only if valinomycin is added. In ChM changing the external pH (pHe) greatly affects the membrane potential: its value rises from less than -40 mV at pHe 9.0 to -17 mV at pHe 5.0. This pH effect is observed also in presence of sodium or potassium. A decrease in the transmembrane proton gradient produced by increasing internal pH without changing pHe induces also a depolarisation of the plasma membrane. In the different media in which trout sperm remain immotile after dilution (media with [K+] greater than 20-40 mM or a pH less than 7.5) the plasma membrane is more depolarized than in media allowing motility, suggesting a relationship between the state of membrane polarization and the intracellular effectors of the axonemal movement

  10. Control of somatic membrane potential in nociceptive neurons and its implications for peripheral nociceptive transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiaona; Hao, Han; Gigout, Sylvain; Huang, Dongyang; Yang, Yuehui; Li, Li; Wang, Caixue; Sundt, Danielle; Jaffe, David B.; Zhang, Hailin; Gamper, Nikita

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral sensory ganglia contain somata of afferent fibres conveying somatosensory inputs to the central nervous system. Growing evidence suggests that the somatic/perisomatic region of sensory neurons can influence peripheral sensory transmission. Control of resting membrane potential (Erest) is an important mechanism regulating excitability, but surprisingly little is known about how Erest is regulated in sensory neuron somata or how changes in somatic/perisomatic Erest affect peripheral sensory transmission. We first evaluated the influence of several major ion channels on Erest in cultured small-diameter, mostly capsaicin-sensitive (presumed nociceptive) dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The strongest and most prevalent effect on Erest was achieved by modulating M channels, K2P and 4-aminopiridine-sensitive KV channels, while hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated, voltage-gated Na+, and T-type Ca2+ channels to a lesser extent also contributed to Erest. Second, we investigated how varying somatic/perisomatic membrane potential, by manipulating ion channels of sensory neurons within the DRG, affected peripheral nociceptive transmission in vivo. Acute focal application of M or KATP channel enhancers or a hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel blocker to L5 DRG in vivo significantly alleviated pain induced by hind paw injection of bradykinin. Finally, we show with computational modelling how somatic/perisomatic hyperpolarization, in concert with the low-pass filtering properties of the t-junction within the DRG, can interfere with action potential propagation. Our study deciphers a complement of ion channels that sets the somatic Erest of nociceptive neurons and provides strong evidence for a robust filtering role of the somatic and perisomatic compartments of peripheral nociceptive neuron. PMID:25168672

  11. The Force Exerted by the Membrane Potential During Protein Import into the Mitochondrial Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Karim; Ghosal, Sandip; Matouschek, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    The electrostatic force exerted on a targeting sequence by the electrical potential across the inner mitochondrial membrane is calculated and found to vary from 1.4 pN to 2.2 pN (per unit elementary charge) as the radius of the inner membrane pore (assumed aqueous) is varied from 12 to 6.5 Angstroms, its measured range. Since the pore is not very much wider than the distance between water molecules, the full shielding effect of water may not be present; the extreme case of a nonaqueous pore gives a force of 3.1 pN per unit charge, which represents an upper limit. When applied to mitochondrial import experiments on the protein harness, these results imply that a force of 11 plus or minus 4 pN is sufficient to catalyze the unfolding of harness during import. Comparison of these results with unfolding forces measured using atomic force microscopy suggests that the two are not inconsistent.

  12. Going single but not solo with podocytes: potentials, limitations, and pitfalls of single-cell analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Mario

    2017-11-01

    Single-cell RNA-sequence (RNA-seq) is a widely used tool to study biological questions in single cells. The discussed study identified 92 genes being predominantly expressed in podocytes based on a 5-fold higher expression compared with endothelial and mesangial cells. In addition to technical pitfalls, the question that is discussed in this commentary is whether results of a single-cell RNAseq study are able to deliver expression data that truly characterize a podocyte. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Electrospun nanofibrous SF/P(LLA-CL membrane: a potential substratum for endothelial keratoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen JZ

    2015-05-01

    had different light transmittance properties. The 25:75 blended ratio membrane had the best transmittance among these scaffolds. All electrospun nanofibrous membranes showed improved speed of cell adherence when compared with the control group, especially when the P(LLA-CL ratio increased. The 25:75 blended ratio membranes also had the highest cell proliferation. B4G12 cells could form a monolayer on all scaffolds, and most functional genes were also stably expressed on all scaffolds. Only two genes showed changes in expression.Conclusion: All blended ratios of SF:P(LLA-CL scaffolds were evaluated and showed good biocompatibility for cell adherence and monolayer formation. Among them, the 25:75 blended ratio SF:P(LLA-CL scaffold had the best transmittance and the highest cell proliferation. These attributes further the potential application of the SF:P(LLA-CL scaffold for corneal endothelial transplantation. Keywords: silk fibroin, poly(L-lactic acid-co-Ɛ-caprolactone, B4G12, corneal endothelium, regeneration

  14. Highly Efficient Single-Step Enrichment of Low Abundance Phosphopeptides from Plant Membrane Preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Na Wu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry (MS-based large scale phosphoproteomics has facilitated the investigation of plant phosphorylation dynamics on a system-wide scale. However, generating large scale data sets for membrane phosphoproteins usually requires fractionation of samples and extended hands-on laboratory time. To overcome these limitations, we developed “ShortPhos,” an efficient and simple phosphoproteomics protocol optimized for research on plant membrane proteins. The optimized workflow allows fast and efficient identification and quantification of phosphopeptides, even from small amounts of starting plant materials. “ShortPhos” can produce label-free datasets with a high quantitative reproducibility. In addition, the “ShortPhos” protocol recovered more phosphorylation sites from membrane proteins, especially plasma membrane and vacuolar proteins, when compared to our previous workflow and other membrane-based data in the PhosPhAt 4.0 database. We applied “ShortPhos” to study kinase-substrate relationships within a nitrate-induction experiment on Arabidopsis roots. The “ShortPhos” identified significantly more known kinase-substrate relationships compared to previous phosphoproteomics workflows, producing new insights into nitrate-induced signaling pathways.

  15. The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin induces heterogeneity in lipid membranes: potential implication for its diverse biological action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID, indomethacin (Indo, has a large number of divergent biological effects, the molecular mechanism(s for which have yet to be fully elucidated. Interestingly, Indo is highly amphiphilic and associates strongly with lipid membranes, which influence localization, structure and function of membrane-associating proteins and actively regulate cell signaling events. Thus, it is possible that Indo regulates diverse cell functions by altering micro-environments within the membrane. Here we explored the effect of Indo on the nature of the segregated domains in a mixed model membrane composed of dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl-choline (di16:0 PC, or DPPC and dioleoyl phosphatidyl-choline (di18:1 PC or DOPC and cholesterol that mimics biomembranes.Using a series of fluorescent probes in a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET study, we found that Indo induced separation between gel domains and fluid domains in the mixed model membrane, possibly by enhancing the formation of gel-phase domains. This effect originated from the ability of Indo to specifically target the ordered domains in the mixed membrane. These findings were further confirmed by measuring the ability of Indo to affect the fluidity-dependent fluorescence quenching and the level of detergent resistance of membranes.Because the tested lipids are the main lipid constituents in cell membranes, the observed formation of gel phase domains induced by Indo potentially occurs in biomembranes. This marked Indo-induced change in phase behavior potentially alters membrane protein functions, which contribute to the wide variety of biological activities of Indo and other NSAIDs.

  16. The Involvement of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Cross-Resistance Between Radiation and Docetaxel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwahara, Yoshikazu [Department of Radiation Biology and Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tohoku Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Sendai (Japan); Department of Pathology, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Roudkenar, Mehryar Habibi; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Urushihara, Yusuke; Fukumoto, Motoi [Department of Pathology, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Saito, Yohei [Department of Radiopharmacy, Tohoku Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Sendai (Japan); Fukumoto, Manabu, E-mail: manabu.fukumoto.a8@tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Pathology, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Department of Molecular Pathology, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer cell radioresistance, clinically relevant radioresistant (CRR) cells that continue to proliferate during exposure to 2 Gy/day X-rays for more than 30 days were established. A modified high-density survival assay for anticancer drug screening revealed that CRR cells were resistant to an antimicrotubule agent, docetaxel (DTX). The involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from mitochondria (mtROS) in the cross-resistance to X-rays and DTX was studied. Methods and Materials: Sensitivity to anticancer agents was determined by a modified high-density cell survival or water-soluble tetrazolium salt assay. DTX-induced mtROS generation was determined by MitoSOX red staining. JC-1 staining was used to visualize mitochondrial membrane potential. DTX-induced DNA double-strand breaks were determined by γ-H2AX staining. To obtain mitochondrial DNA-lacking (ρ{sup 0}) cells, the cells were cultured for 3 to 4 weeks in medium containing ethidium bromide. Results: Treatment with DTX increased mtROS in parental cells but not in CRR cells. DTX induced DNA double-strand breaks in parental cells. The mitochondrial membrane potential of CRR cells was lower in CRR cells than in parental cells. Depletion of mtDNA induced DTX resistance in parental cells. Treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide also induced DTX resistance in parental cells. Conclusions: The mitochondrial dysfunction observed in CRR cells contributes to X-ray and DTX cross-resistance. The activation of oxidative phosphorylation in CRR cells may represent an effective approach to overcome radioresistant cancers. In general, the overexpression of β-tubulin or multidrug efflux pumps is thought to be involved in DTX resistance. In the present study, we discovered another DTX resistant mechanism by investigating CRR cells.

  17. The Single Transmembrane Segment of Minimal Sensor DesK Senses Temperature via a Membrane-Thickness Caliper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, Maria E; Oliveira, Rafael G; de Mendoza, Diego; Cybulski, Larisa E

    2016-11-01

    Thermosensors detect temperature changes and trigger cellular responses crucial for survival at different temperatures. The thermosensor DesK is a transmembrane (TM) histidine kinase which detects a decrease in temperature through its TM segments (TMS). Here, we address a key issue: how a physical stimulus such as temperature can be converted into a cellular response. We show that the thickness of Bacillus lipid membranes varies with temperature and that such variations can be detected by DesK with great precision. On the basis of genetic studies and measurements of in vitro activity of a DesK construct with a single TMS (minimal sensor DesK [MS-DesK]), reconstituted in liposomes, we propose an interplay mechanism directed by a conserved dyad, phenylalanine 8-lysine 10. This dyad is critical to anchor the only transmembrane segment of the MS-DesK construct to the extracellular water-lipid interphase and is required for the transmembrane segment of MS-DesK to function as a caliper for precise measurement of membrane thickness. The data suggest that positively charged lysine 10, which is located in the hydrophobic core of the membrane but is close to the water-lipid interface, pulls the transmembrane region toward the water phase to localize its charge at the interface. Nevertheless, the hydrophobic residue phenylalanine 8, located at the N-terminal extreme of the TMS, has a strong tendency to remain in the lipid phase, impairing access of lysine 10 to the water phase. The outcome of this interplay is a fine-tuned sensitivity to membrane thickness that elicits conformational changes that favor different signaling states of the protein. The ability to sense and respond to extracellular signals is essential for cell survival. One example is the cellular response to temperature variation. How do cells "sense" temperature changes? It has been proposed that the bacterial thermosensor DesK acts as a molecular caliper measuring membrane thickness variations that would occur

  18. Single-cell analysis of pyroptosis dynamics reveals conserved GSDMD-mediated subcellular events that precede plasma membrane rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vasconcelos, Nathalia M; Van Opdenbosch, Nina; Van Gorp, Hanne; Parthoens, Eef; Lamkanfi, Mohamed

    2018-04-17

    Pyroptosis is rapidly emerging as a mechanism of anti-microbial host defense, and of extracellular release of the inflammasome-dependent cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18, which contributes to autoinflammatory pathology. Caspases 1, 4, 5 and 11 trigger this regulated form of necrosis by cleaving the pyroptosis effector gasdermin D (GSDMD), causing its pore-forming amino-terminal domain to oligomerize and perforate the plasma membrane. However, the subcellular events that precede pyroptotic cell lysis are ill defined. In this study, we triggered primary macrophages to undergo pyroptosis from three inflammasome types and recorded their dynamics and morphology using high-resolution live-cell spinning disk confocal laser microscopy. Based on quantitative analysis of single-cell subcellular events, we propose a model of pyroptotic cell disintegration that is initiated by opening of GSDMD-dependent ion channels or pores that are more restrictive than recently proposed GSDMD pores, followed by osmotic cell swelling, commitment of mitochondria and other membrane-bound organelles prior to sudden rupture of the plasma membrane and full permeability to intracellular proteins. This study provides a dynamic framework for understanding cellular changes that occur during pyroptosis, and charts a chronological sequence of GSDMD-mediated subcellular events that define pyroptotic cell death at the single-cell level.

  19. NS309 decreases rat detrusor smooth muscle membrane potential and phasic contractions by activating SK3 channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Shankar P; Hristov, Kiril L; Soder, Rupal P; Kellett, Whitney F; Petkov, Georgi V

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Overactive bladder (OAB) is often associated with abnormally increased detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) contractions. We used NS309, a selective and potent opener of the small or intermediate conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK or IK, respectively) channels, to evaluate how SK/IK channel activation modulates DSM function. Experimental Approach We employed single-cell RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, whole cell patch-clamp in freshly isolated rat DSM cells and isometric tension recordings of isolated DSM strips to explore how the pharmacological activation of SK/IK channels with NS309 modulates DSM function. Key Results We detected SK3 but not SK1, SK2 or IK channels expression at both mRNA and protein levels by RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry in DSM single cells. NS309 (10 μM) significantly increased the whole cell SK currents and hyperpolarized DSM cell resting membrane potential. The NS309 hyperpolarizing effect was blocked by apamin, a selective SK channel inhibitor. NS309 inhibited the spontaneous phasic contraction amplitude, force, frequency, duration and tone of isolated DSM strips in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of NS309 on spontaneous phasic contractions was blocked by apamin but not by TRAM-34, indicating no functional role of the IK channels in rat DSM. NS309 also significantly inhibited the pharmacologically and electrical field stimulation-induced DSM contractions. Conclusions and Implications Our data reveal that SK3 channel is the main SK/IK subtype in rat DSM. Pharmacological activation of SK3 channels with NS309 decreases rat DSM cell excitability and contractility, suggesting that SK3 channels might be potential therapeutic targets to control OAB associated with detrusor overactivity. PMID:23145946

  20. Basally activated nonselective cation currents regulate the resting membrane potential in human and monkey colonic smooth muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Laura; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Lowe, Vanessa; Zheng, Haifeng; Peri, Lauren; Ro, Seungil; Sanders, Kenton M.

    2011-01-01

    Resting membrane potential (RMP) plays an important role in determining the basal excitability of gastrointestinal smooth muscle. The RMP in colonic muscles is significantly less negative than the equilibrium potential of K+, suggesting that it is regulated not only by K+ conductances but by inward conductances such as Na+ and/or Ca2+. We investigated the contribution of nonselective cation channels (NSCC) to the RMP in human and monkey colonic smooth muscle cells (SMC) using voltage- and current-clamp techniques. Qualitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was performed to examine potential molecular candidates for these channels among the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel superfamily. Spontaneous transient inward currents and holding currents were recorded in human and monkey SMC. Replacement of extracellular Na+ with equimolar tetraethylammonium or Ca2+ with Mn2+ inhibited basally activated nonselective cation currents. Trivalent cations inhibited these channels. Under current clamp, replacement of extracellular Na+ with N-methyl-d-glucamine or addition of trivalent cations caused hyperpolarization. Three unitary conductances of NSCC were observed in human and monkey colonic SMC. Molecular candidates for basally active NSCC were TRPC1, C3, C4, C7, M2, M4, M6, M7, V1, and V2 in human and monkey SMC. Comparison of the biophysical properties of these TRP channels with basally active NSCC (bINSCC) suggests that TRPM4 and specific TRPC heteromultimer combinations may underlie the three single-channel conductances of bINSCC. In conclusion, these findings suggest that basally activated NSCC contribute to the RMP in human and monkey colonic SMC and therefore may play an important role in determining basal excitability of colonic smooth muscle. PMID:21566016

  1. Revealing the Raft Domain Organization in the Plasma Membrane by Single-Molecule Imaging of Fluorescent Ganglioside Analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kenichi G N; Ando, Hiromune; Komura, Naoko; Konishi, Miku; Imamura, Akihiro; Ishida, Hideharu; Kiso, Makoto; Fujiwara, Takahiro K; Kusumi, Akihiro

    2018-01-01

    Gangliosides have been implicated in a variety of physiological processes, particularly in the formation and function of raft domains in the plasma membrane. However, the scarcity of suitable fluorescent ganglioside analogs had long prevented us from determining exactly how gangliosides perform their functions in the live-cell plasma membrane. With the development of new fluorescent ganglioside analogs, as described by Komura et al. (2017), this barrier has been broken. We can now address the dynamic behaviors of gangliosides in the live-cell plasma membrane, using fluorescence microscopy, particularly by single-fluorescent molecule imaging and tracking. Single-molecule tracking of fluorescent GM1 and GM3 revealed that these molecules are transiently and dynamically recruited to monomers (monomer-associated rafts) and homodimer rafts of the raftophilic GPI-anchored protein CD59 in quiescent cells, with exponential residency times of 12 and 40ms, respectively, in a manner dependent on raft-lipid interactions. Upon CD59 stimulation, which induces CD59-cluster signaling rafts, the fluorescent GM1 and GM3 analogs were recruited to the signaling rafts, with a lifetime of 48ms. These results represent the first direct evidence that GPI-anchored receptors and gangliosides interact in a cholesterol-dependent manner. Furthermore, they show that gangliosides continually move in and out of rafts that contain CD59 in an extremely dynamic manner, with much higher frequency than expected previously. Such studies would not have been possible without fluorescent ganglioside probes, which exhibit native-like behavior and single-molecule tracking. In this chapter, we review the methods for single-molecule tracking of fluorescent ganglioside analogs and the results obtained by applying these methods. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Toxins in botanical dietary supplements: blue cohosh components disrupt cellular respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sandipan; Mahdi, Fakhri; Ali, Zulfiqar; Jekabsons, Mika B; Khan, Ikhlas A; Nagle, Dale G; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-24

    Certain botanical dietary supplements have been associated with idiosyncratic organ-specific toxicity. Similar toxicological events, caused by drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, have forced the withdrawal or U.S. FDA "black box" warnings of major pharmaceuticals. To assess the potential mitochondrial liability of botanical dietary supplements, extracts from 352 authenticated plant samples used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic, and Western herbal medicine were evaluated for the ability to disrupt cellular respiration. Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides) methanol extract exhibited mitochondriotoxic activity. Used by some U.S. midwives to help induce labor, blue cohosh has been associated with perinatal stroke, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, multiple organ injury, and neonatal shock. The potential link between mitochondrial disruption and idiosyncratic herbal intoxication prompted further examination. The C. thalictroides methanol extract and three saponins, cauloside A (1), saponin PE (2), and cauloside C (3), exhibited concentration- and time-dependent mitochondriotoxic activities. Upon treatment, cell respiration rate rapidly increased and then dramatically decreased within minutes. Mechanistic studies revealed that C. thalictroides constituents impair mitochondrial function by disrupting membrane integrity. These studies provide a potential etiological link between this mitochondria-sensitive form of cytotoxicity and idiosyncratic organ damage.

  3. Toxins in Botanical Dietary Supplements: Blue Cohosh Components Disrupt Cellular Respiration and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sandipan; Mahdi, Fakhri; Ali, Zulfiqar; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Khan, Ikhlas A.; Nagle, Dale G.; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Certain botanical dietary supplements have been associated with idiosyncratic organ-specific toxicity. Similar toxicological events, caused by drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, have forced the withdrawal or U.S. FDA “Black Box” warnings of major pharmaceuticals. To assess the potential mitochondrial liability of botanical dietary supplements, extracts from 352 authenticated plant samples used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic, and Western herbal medicine were evaluated for the ability to disrupt cellular respiration. Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides) methanol extract exhibited mitochondriotoxic activity. Used by some U.S. midwives to help induce labor, blue cohosh has been associated with perinatal stroke, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, multiple organ injury, and neonatal shock. The potential link between mitochondrial disruption and idiosyncratic herbal intoxication prompted further examination. The C. thalictroides methanol extract and three saponins, cauloside A (1), saponin PE (2), and cauloside C (3) exhibited concentration- and time-dependent mitochondriotoxic activities. Upon treatment, cell respiration rate rapidly increased and then dramatically decreased within minutes. Mechanistic studies revealed that C. thalictroides constituents impair mitochondrial function by disrupting membrane integrity. These studies provide a potential etiological link between this mitochondria-sensitive form of cytotoxicity and idiosyncratic organ damage. PMID:24328138

  4. Heparan Sulfate: A Potential Candidate for the Development of Biomimetic Immunomodulatory Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Corradetti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Clinical trials have demonstrated that heparan sulfate (HS could be used as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Its anti-inflammatory effect makes it suitable for the development of biomimetic innovative strategies aiming at modulating stem cells behavior toward a pro-regenerative phenotype in case of injury or inflammation. Here, we propose collagen type I meshes fabricated by solvent casting and further crosslinked with HS (HS-Col to create a biomimetic environment resembling the extracellular matrix of soft tissue. HS-Col meshes were tested for their capability to provide physical support to stem cells’ growth, maintain their phenotypes and immunosuppressive potential following inflammation. HS-Col effect on stem cells was investigated in standard conditions as well as in an inflammatory environment recapitulated in vitro through a mix of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-gamma; 20 ng/ml. A significant increase in the production of molecules associated with immunosuppression was demonstrated in response to the material and when cells were grown in presence of pro-inflammatory stimuli, compared to bare collagen membranes (Col, leading to a greater inhibitory potential when mesenchymal stem cells were exposed to stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Our data suggest that the presence of HS is able to activate the molecular machinery responsible for the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines, potentially leading to a faster resolution of inflammation.

  5. Membrane Fouling Potential of Secondary Effluent Organic Matter (EfOM) from Conventional Activated Sludge Process

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Chunhai; Amy, Gary L.

    2012-01-01

    Secondary effluent organic matter (EfOM) from a conventional activated sludge process was filtered through constant-pressure dead-end filtration tests with a sequential ultrafiltration (UF, molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) of 10k Dalton) and nanofiltration (NF, MWCO of 200 Dalton) array to investigate its membrane fouling potential. Advanced analytical methods including liquid chromatography with online carbon detection (LC-OCD) and fluorescent excitation-emission matrix (F-EEM) were employed for EfOM characterization. EfOM consisted of humic substances and building blocks, low molecular weight (LMW) neutrals, biopolymers (mainly proteins) and hydrophobic organics according to the sequence of their organic carbon fractions. The UF rejected only biopolymers and the NF rejected most humics and building blocks and a significant part of LMW neutrals. Simultaneous occurrence of cake layer and standard blocking during the filtration process of both UF and NF was identified according to constant-pressure filtration equations, which was possibly caused by the heterogeneous nature of EfOM with a wide MW distribution (several ten to several million Dalton). Thus the corresponding two fouling indices (kc for cake layer and ks for standard blocking) from UF and NF could characterize the fouling potential of macromolecular biopolymers and low to intermediate MW organics (including humics, building blocks, LMW neutrals), respectively. Compared with macromolecular biopolymers, low to intermediate MW organics exhibited a much higher fouling potential due to their lower molecular weight and higher concentration.

  6. Zinc oxide nanoparticles mediated cytotoxicity, mitochondrial membrane potential and level of antioxidants in presence of melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sruthi, S; Millot, N; Mohanan, P V

    2017-10-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are widely used in a variety of products and are currently being investigated for biomedical applications. However, they have the potential to interact with macromolecules like proteins, lipids and DNA within the cells which makes the safe biomedical application difficult. The toxicity of the ZnO NP is mainly attributed reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Different strategies like iron doping, polymer coating and external supply of antioxidants have been evaluated to minimize the toxic potential of ZnO NPs. Melatonin is a hormone secreted by the pineal gland with great antioxidant properties. The melatonin is known to protect cells from ROS inducing external agents like lipopolysaccharides. In the present study, the protective effect of melatonin on ZnO NPs mediated toxicity was evaluated using C6 glial cells. The Cytotoxicity, mitochondrial membrane potential and free radical formation were measured to study the effect of melatonin. Antioxidant assays were done on mice brain slices, incubated with melatonin and ZnO NPs. The results of the study reveal that, instead of imparting a protective effect, the melatonin pre-treatment enhanced the toxicity of ZnO NPs. Melatonin increased antioxidant enzymes in brain slices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Amniotic membrane-derived stem cells: immunomodulatory properties and potential clinical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insausti CL

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Carmen L Insausti,1 Miguel Blanquer,1 Ana M García-Hernández,1 Gregorio Castellanos,2 José M Moraleda11Unidad de Trasplante Hematopoyético y Terapia Celular, 2Servicio de Cirugía, Hospital Clínico Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, IMIB, Campus Mare Nostrum, Universidad de Murcia, El Palmar, Murcia, SpainAbstract: Epithelial and mesenchymal cells isolated from the amniotic membrane (AM possess stem cell characteristics, differentiation potential toward lineages of different germ layers, and immunomodulatory properties. While their expansion and differentiation potential have been well studied and characterized, knowledge about their immunomodulatory properties and the mechanisms involved is still incomplete. These mechanisms have been evaluated on various target cells of the innate and the adaptive system and in animal models of different inflammatory diseases. Some results have evidenced that the immunomodulatory effect of AM-derived cells is dependent on cell-cell contact, but many of them have demonstrated that these properties are mediated through the secretion of suppressive molecules. In this review, we present an update on the described immunomodulatory properties of the derived amniotic cells and some of the proposed involved mechanisms. Furthermore, we describe some assays in animal models of different inflammatory diseases which reveal the potential use of these cells to treat such diseases.Keywords: epithelial cells, mesenchymal cells, cell therapy, immunomodulation

  8. Yeast Kch1 and Kch2 membrane proteins play a pleiotropic role in membrane potential establishment and monovalent cation homeostasis regulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Felcmanová, Kristina; Nevečeřalová, Petra; Sychrová, Hana; Zimmermannová, Olga

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 5 (2017), č. článku fox053. ISSN 1567-1356 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-03398S; GA MŠk(CZ) LH14297 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : Kch proteins * plasma-membrane potential * monovalent cation homeostasis * intracellular pH * Saccharomyces cerevisiae * Candida albicans Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Mycology Impact factor: 3.299, year: 2016

  9. Changes in the Sterol Composition of the Plasma Membrane Affect Membrane Potential, Salt Tolerance and the Activity of Multidrug Resistance Pumps in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kodedová, Marie; Sychrová, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 9 (2015), e0139306 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : Saccharomyces cerevisiae * ergosterol synthesis * multidrug resistance * membrane potential * diS-C3(3) assay Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.057, year: 2015

  10. Carrier mediated transport through supported liquid membranes; determination of transport parameters from a single transport experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chrisstoffels, L.A.J.; Struijk, Wilhelmina; de Jong, Feike; Reinhoudt, David

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a time-dependent transport model for carrier assisted cation transport through supported liquid membranes. The model describes the flux of salt as a function of time and two parameters viz. the diffusion coefficient of the cation complex (D), and the extraction constant (Kex).

  11. Propagation-of-uncertainty from contact angle and streaming potential measurements to XDLVO model assessments of membrane-colloid interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, Satish; Childress, Amy; Brant, Jonathan

    2014-08-15

    Membrane fouling assessed from a fundamental standpoint within the context of the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) model. The DLVO model requires that the properties of the membrane and foulant(s) be quantified. Membrane surface charge (zeta potential) and free energy values are characterized using streaming potential and contact angle measurements, respectively. Comparing theoretical assessments for membrane-colloid interactions between research groups requires that the variability of the measured inputs be established. The impact that such variability in input values on the outcome from interfacial models must be quantified to determine an acceptable variance in inputs. An interlaboratory study was conducted to quantify the variability in streaming potential and contact angle measurements when using standard protocols. The propagation of uncertainty from these errors was evaluated in terms of their impact on the quantitative and qualitative conclusions on extended DLVO (XDLVO) calculated interaction terms. The error introduced into XDLVO calculated values was of the same magnitude as the calculated free energy values at contact and at any given separation distance. For two independent laboratories to draw similar quantitative conclusions regarding membrane-foulant interfacial interactions the standard error in contact angle values must be⩽2.5°, while that for the zeta potential values must be⩽7 mV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Convergence of lateral dynamic measurements in the plasma membrane of live cells from single particle tracking and STED-FCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagerholm, B Christoffer; Eggeling, Christian; Andrade, Débora M; Clausen, Mathias P

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) in combination with the super-resolution imaging method STED (STED-FCS), and single-particle tracking (SPT) are able to directly probe the lateral dynamics of lipids and proteins in the plasma membrane of live cells at spatial scales much below the diffraction limit of conventional microscopy. However, a major disparity in interpretation of data from SPT and STED-FCS remains, namely the proposed existence of a very fast (unhindered) lateral diffusion coefficient, ⩾5 µ m 2 s −1 , in the plasma membrane of live cells at very short length scales, ≈⩽ 100 nm, and time scales, ≈1–10 ms. This fast diffusion coefficient has been advocated in several high-speed SPT studies, for lipids and membrane proteins alike, but the equivalent has not been detected in STED-FCS measurements. Resolving this ambiguity is important because the assessment of membrane dynamics currently relies heavily on SPT for the determination of heterogeneous diffusion. A possible systematic error in this approach would thus have vast implications in this field. To address this, we have re-visited the analysis procedure for SPT data with an emphasis on the measurement errors and the effect that these errors have on the measurement outputs. We subsequently demonstrate that STED-FCS and SPT data, following careful consideration of the experimental errors of the SPT data, converge to a common interpretation which for the case of a diffusing phospholipid analogue in the plasma membrane of live mouse embryo fibroblasts results in an unhindered, intra-compartment, diffusion coefficient of  ≈0.7–1.0 µ m 2 s −1 , and a compartment size of about 100–150 nm. (topical review)

  13. Single-trial event-related potentials to significant stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushby, Jacqueline A; Barry, Robert J

    2009-11-01

    The stimulus-response pattern of the skin conductance response (SCR) was used as a model of the Orienting Reflex (OR) to assess the P1, N1, P2, N2 and late positive complex (LPC/P300) components of the ERP in a simple habituation paradigm, in which a single series of 12 innocuous tones were presented at a very long interstimulus interval (2 min). To maintain their waking state during this boring task, participants were instructed to alternately close or open their eyes to each stimulus. None of the baseline-to-peak ERP measures showed trials effects comparable with the marked habituation over trials shown by the SCRs. Principal Components Analysis was used to decompose the ERP, yielding factors identified as the N1, N2, P3a, P3b and Novelty P3 components. An additional factor represented later eye-movement activity. No trial effects were apparent for the N1, N2, P3a or P3b components. The Novelty P3 showed marked response decrement over trials. These results are discussed in relation to current conceptualisations of the OR.

  14. Single-molecule resolution of protein dynamics on polymeric membrane surfaces: the roles of spatial and population heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Blake B; Mirhossaini, Roya B; Mabry, Joshua N; Sriram, Indira; Lajmi, Ajay; Zhang, Yanxia; Rojas, Orlando J; Schwartz, Daniel K

    2015-02-18

    Although polymeric membranes are widely used in the purification of protein pharmaceuticals, interactions between biomolecules and membrane surfaces can lead to reduced membrane performance and damage to the product. In this study, single-molecule fluorescence microscopy provided direct observation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human monoclonal antibody (IgG) dynamics at the interface between aqueous buffer and polymeric membrane materials including regenerated cellulose and unmodified poly(ether sulfone) (PES) blended with either polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), polyvinyl acetate-co-polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVAc-PVP), or polyethylene glycol methacrylate (PEGM) before casting. These polymer surfaces were compared with model surfaces composed of hydrophilic bare fused silica and hydrophobic trimethylsilane-coated fused silica. At extremely dilute protein concentrations (10(-3)-10(-7) mg/mL), protein surface exchange was highly dynamic with protein monomers desorbing from the surface within ∼1 s after adsorption. Protein oligomers (e.g., nonspecific dimers, trimers, or larger aggregates), although less common, remained on the surface for 5 times longer than monomers. Using newly developed super-resolution methods, we could localize adsorption sites with ∼50 nm resolution and quantify the spatial heterogeneity of the various surfaces. On a small anomalous subset of the adsorption sites, proteins adsorbed preferentially and tended to reside for significantly longer times (i.e., on "strong" sites). Proteins resided for shorter times overall on surfaces that were more homogeneous and exhibited fewer strong sites (e.g., PVAc-PVP/PES). We propose that strong surface sites may nucleate protein aggregation, initiated preferentially by protein oligomers, and accelerate ultrafiltration membrane fouling. At high protein concentrations (0.3-1.0 mg/mL), fewer strong adsorption sites were observed, and surface residence times were reduced. This suggests that at high concentrations

  15. Reduction of low potential electron acceptors requires the CbcL inner membrane cytochrome of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharoff, Lori; Chan, Chi Ho; Bond, Daniel R

    2016-02-01

    The respiration of metals by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens requires electrons generated by metabolism to pass from the interior of the cell to electron acceptors beyond the cell membranes. The G. sulfurreducens inner membrane multiheme c-type cytochrome ImcH is required for respiration to extracellular electron acceptors with redox potentials greater than -0.1 V vs. SHE, but ImcH is not essential for electron transfer to lower potential acceptors. In contrast, deletion of cbcL, encoding an inner membrane protein consisting of b-type and multiheme c-type cytochrome domains, severely affected reduction of low potential electron acceptors such as Fe(III)-oxides and electrodes poised at -0.1 V vs. SHE. Catalytic cyclic voltammetry of a ΔcbcL strain growing on poised electrodes revealed a 50 mV positive shift in driving force required for electron transfer out of the cell. In non-catalytic conditions, low-potential peaks present in wild type biofilms were absent in ∆cbcL mutants. Expression of cbcL in trans increased growth at low redox potential and restored features to cyclic voltammetry. This evidence supports a model where CbcL is a component of a second electron transfer pathway out of the G. sulfurreducens inner membrane that dominates when redox potential is at or below -0.1 V vs. SHE. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Vimentin is involved in regulation of mitochondrial motility and membrane potential by Rac1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena A. Matveeva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study we show that binding of mitochondria to vimentin intermediate filaments (VIF is regulated by GTPase Rac1. The activation of Rac1 leads to a redoubling of mitochondrial motility in murine fibroblasts. Using double-mutants Rac1(G12V, F37L and Rac1(G12V, Y40H that are capable to activate different effectors of Rac1, we show that mitochondrial movements are regulated through PAK1 kinase. The involvement of PAK1 kinase is also confirmed by the fact that expression of its auto inhibitory domain (PID blocks the effect of activated Rac1 on mitochondrial motility. The observed effect of Rac1 and PAK1 kinase on mitochondria depends on phosphorylation of the Ser-55 of vimentin. Besides the effect on motility Rac1 activation also decreases the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP which is detected by ∼20% drop of the fluorescence intensity of mitochondria stained with the potential sensitive dye TMRM. One of important consequences of the discovered regulation of MMP by Rac1 and PAK1 is a spatial differentiation of mitochondria in polarized fibroblasts: at the front of the cell they are less energized (by ∼25% than at the rear part.

  17. Plant plasma membrane aquaporins in natural vesicles as potential stabilizers and carriers of glucosinolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ballesta, Maria Del Carmen; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio; Moreno, Diego A; Carvajal, Micaela

    2016-07-01

    Their biodegradable nature and ability to target cells make biological vesicles potential nanocarriers for bioactives delivery. In this work, the interaction between proteoliposomes enriched in aquaporins derived from broccoli plants and the glucosinolates was evaluated. The vesicles were stored at different temperatures and their integrity was studied. Determination of glucosinolates, showed that indolic glucosinolates were more sensitive to degradation in aqueous solution than aliphatic glucosinolates. Glucoraphanin was stabilized by leaf and root proteoliposomes at 25°C through their interaction with aquaporins. An extensive hydrogen bond network, including different aquaporin residues, and hydrophobic interactions, as a consequence of the interaction between the linear alkane chain of glucoraphanin and Glu31 and Leu34 protein residues, were established as the main stabilizing elements. Combined our results showed that plasma membrane vesicles from leaf and root tissues of broccoli plants may be considered as suitable carriers for glucosinolate which stabilization can be potentially attributed to aquaporins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Signature of a Nonharmonic Potential as Revealed from a Consistent Shape and Fluctuation Analysis of an Adherent Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Schmidt

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of fluid membranes with a scaffold, which can be a planar surface or a more complex structure, is intrinsic to a number of systems from artificial supported bilayers and vesicles to cellular membranes. In principle, these interactions can be either discrete and protein mediated, or continuous. In the latter case, they emerge from ubiquitous intrinsic surface interaction potentials as well as nature-designed steric contributions of the fluctuating membrane or from the polymers of the glycocalyx. Despite the fact that these nonspecific potentials are omnipresent, their description has been a major challenge from experimental and theoretical points of view. Here, we show that a full understanding of the implications of the continuous interactions can be achieved only by expanding the standard superposition models commonly used to treat these types of systems, beyond the usual harmonic level of description. Supported by this expanded theoretical framework, we present three independent, yet mutually consistent, experimental approaches to measure the interaction potential strength and the membrane tension. Upon explicitly taking into account the nature of shot noise as well as the nature of finite experimental resolution, excellent agreement with the augmented theory is obtained, which finally provides a coherent view of the behavior of the membrane in the vicinity of a scaffold.

  19. A review of reverse osmosis membrane materials for desalination-Development to date and future potential

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kali Peng; Arnot, Tom C.; Mattia, Davide

    2011-01-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) is currently the most important desalination technology and it is experiencing significant growth. The objective of this paper is to review the historical and current development of RO membrane materials which are the key determinants of separation performance and water productivity, and hence to define performance targets for those who are developing new RO membrane materials. The chemistry, synthesis mechanism(s) and desalination performance of various RO membranes are ...

  20. Identification of membrane-associated proteins with pathogenic potential expressed by Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis grown in animal serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynal, José Tadeu; Bastos, Bruno Lopes; Vilas-Boas, Priscilla Carolinne Bagano; Sousa, Thiago de Jesus; Costa-Silva, Marcos; de Sá, Maria da Conceição Aquino; Portela, Ricardo Wagner; Moura-Costa, Lília Ferreira; Azevedo, Vasco; Meyer, Roberto

    2018-01-25

    Previous works defining antigens that might be used as vaccine targets against Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, which is the causative agent of sheep and goat caseous lymphadenitis, have focused on secreted proteins produced in a chemically defined culture media. Considering that such antigens might not reflect the repertoire of proteins expressed during infection conditions, this experiment aimed to investigate the membrane-associated proteins with pathogenic potential expressed by C. pseudotuberculosis grown directly in animal serum. Its membrane-associated proteins have been extracted using an organic solvent enrichment methodology, followed by LC-MS/MS and bioinformatics analysis for protein identification and classification. The results revealed 22 membrane-associated proteins characterized as potentially pathogenic. An interaction network analysis indicated that the four potentially pathogenic proteins ciuA, fagA, OppA4 and OppCD were biologically connected within two distinct network pathways, which were both associated with the ABC Transporters KEGG pathway. These results suggest that C. pseudotuberculosis pathogenesis might be associated with the transport and uptake of nutrients; other seven identified potentially pathogenic membrane proteins also suggest that pathogenesis might involve events of bacterial resistance and adhesion. The proteins herein reported potentially reflect part of the protein repertoire expressed during real infection conditions and might be tested as vaccine antigens.

  1. Multilayer network representation of membrane potential and cytosolic calcium concentration dynamics in beta cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosak, Marko; Dolenšek, Jurij; Markovič, Rene; Slak Rupnik, Marjan; Marhl, Marko; Stožer, Andraž

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Physiological processes within and among pancreatic beta cells are very complex. • We analyze the simultaneous recordings of membrane potential and calcium dynamics. • We represent the interaction patterns among beta cells as a multilayer network. • The nature of the intracellular dynamics is found to rely on the network structure. - Abstract: Modern theory of networks has been recognized as a very successful methodological concept for the description and analysis of complex systems. However, some complex systems are more complex than others. For instance, several real-life systems are constituted by interdependent subsystems and their elements are subjected to different types of interactions that can also change with time. Recently, the multilayer network formalism has been proposed as a general theoretical framework for the description and analysis of such multi-dimensional complex systems and is acquiring more and more prominence in terms of a new research direction. In the present study, we use this methodology for the description of functional connectivity patterns and signal propagation between pancreatic beta cells in an islet of Langerhans at the levels of membrane potential (MP) and cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca"2"+]_c) dynamics to study the extent of overlap in the two networks and to clarify whether time lags between the two signals in individual cells are in any way dependent on the role these cells play in the functional networks. The two corresponding network layers are constructed on the basis of signal directions and pairwise correlations, whereas the interlayer connections represent the time lag between both measured signals. Our results confirm our previous finding that both MP and [Ca"2"+]_c change spread across an islet in the form of a depolarization and a [Ca"2"+]_c wave, respectively. Both types of waves follow nearly the same path and the networks in both layers have a similar but not entirely the same structure

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells with osteogenic potential in human maxillary sinus membrane: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbéri, Antoine; Al-Nemer, Fatima; Hamade, Eva; Noujeim, Ziad; Badran, Bassam; Zibara, Kazem

    2017-06-01

    The aim of our study is to prove and validate the existence of an osteogenic progenitor cell population within the human maxillary Schneiderian sinus membrane (hMSSM) and to demonstrate their potential for bone formation. Ten hMSSM samples of approximately 2 × 2 cm were obtained during a surgical nasal approach for treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis and were retained for this study. The derived cells were isolated, cultured, and assayed at passage 3 for their osteogenic potential using the expression of Alkaline phosphatase, alizarin red and Von Kossa staining, flow cytometry, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. hMSSM-derived cells were isolated, showed homogenous spindle-shaped fibroblast-like morphology, characteristic of mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs), and demonstrated very high expression of MPC markers such as STRO-1, CD44, CD90, CD105, and CD73 in all tested passages. In addition, von Kossa and Alizarin red staining showed significant mineralization, a typical feature of osteoblasts. Moreover, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was significantly increased at days 7, 14, 21, and 28 of culture in hMSSM-derived cells grown in osteogenic medium, in comparison to controls. Furthermore, osteogenic differentiation significantly upregulated the transcriptional expression of osteogenic markers such as ALP, Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx-2), bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, osteocalcin (OCN), osteonectin (ON), and osteopontin (OPN), confirming that hMSSM-derived cells are of osteoprogenitor origin. Finally, hMSSM-derived cells were also capable of producing OPN proteins upon culturing in an osteogenic medium. Our data showed that hMSSM holds mesenchymal osteoprogenitor cells capable of differentiating to the osteogenic lineage. hMSSM contains potentially multipotent postnatal stem cells providing a promising clinical application in preimplant and implant therapy.

  3. The Antitumor Effect of Single-domain Antibodies Directed Towards Membrane-associated Catalase and Superoxide Dismutase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Georg; Motz, Manfred

    2016-11-01

    Neutralizing single-domain antibodies directed towards catalase or superoxide dismutase (SOD) caused efficient reactivation of intercellular reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS)-dependent apoptosis-inducing signaling specifically in human tumor cells. Single-domain antibodies targeted tumor cell-specific membrane-associated SOD and catalase, but not the corresponding intracellular enzymes. They were shown to be about 200-fold more effective than corresponding classical recombinant antigen-binding fragments and more than four log steps more efficient than monoclonal antibodies. Combined addition of single-domain antibodies against catalase and SOD caused a remarkable synergistic effect. Proof-of-concept experiments in immunocompromised mice using human tumor xenografts and single-domain antibodies directed towards SOD showed an inhibition of tumor growth. Neutralizing single-domain antibodies directed to catalase and SOD also caused a very strong synergistic effect with the established chemotherapeutic agent taxol, indicating an overlap of signaling pathways. This effect might also be useful in order to avoid unwanted side-effects and to drastically lower the costs for taxol-based therapy. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  4. Observing the morphology of single-layered embedded silicon nanocrystals by using temperature-stable TEM membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Gutsch

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We use high-temperature-stable silicon nitride membranes to investigate single layers of silicon nanocrystal ensembles by energy filtered transmission electron microscopy. The silicon nanocrystals are prepared from the precipitation of a silicon-rich oxynitride layer sandwiched between two SiO2 diffusion barriers and subjected to a high-temperature annealing. We find that such single layers are very sensitive to the annealing parameters and may lead to a significant loss of excess silicon. In addition, these ultrathin layers suffer from significant electron beam damage that needs to be minimized in order to image the pristine sample morphology. Finally we demonstrate how the silicon nanocrystal size distribution develops from a broad to a narrow log-normal distribution, when the initial precipitation layer thickness and stoichiometry are below a critical value.

  5. Optical coherence tomography: a potential tool to predict premature rupture of fetal membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micili, Serap C; Valter, Markus; Oflaz, Hakan; Ozogul, Candan; Linder, Peter; Föckler, Nicole; Artmann, Gerhard M; Digel, Ilya; Artmann, Aysegul T

    2013-04-01

    A fundamental question addressed in this study was the feasibility of preterm birth prediction based on a noncontact investigation of fetal membranes in situ. Although the phenomena of preterm birth and the premature rupture of the fetal membrane are well known, currently, there are no diagnostic tools for their prediction. The aim of this study was to assess whether optical coherence tomography could be used for clinical investigations of high-risk pregnancies. The thickness of fetal membranes was measured in parallel by optical coherence tomography and histological techniques for the following types of birth: normal births, preterm births without premature ruptures and births at full term with premature rupture of membrane. Our study revealed that the membrane thickness correlates with the birth type. Normal births membranes were statistically significantly thicker than those belonging to the other two groups. Thus, in spite of almost equal duration of gestation of the normal births and the births at full term with premature rupture, the corresponding membrane thicknesses differed. This difference is possibly related to previously reported water accumulation in the membranes. The optical coherence tomography results were encouraging, suggesting that this technology could be used in future to predict and distinguish between different kinds of births.

  6. Ion channel regulation of the dynamical instability of the resting membrane potential in saccular hair cells of the green frog (Rana esculenta)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorgensen, F; Kroese, ABA

    2005-01-01

    Aims: We investigated the ion channel regulation of the resting membrane potential of hair cells with the aim to determine if the resting membrane potential is poised close to instability and thereby a potential cause of the spontaneous afferent spike activity. Methods: The ionic mechanism and the

  7. Na+/K(+)pump activity in photoreceptors of the blowfly Calliphora : A model analysis based on membrane potential measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerster, U; Stavenga, DG; Backhaus, W

    Na+/K+-pump activity and intracellular Na+ and K+ concentration changes in blowfly photoreceptors are derived from intracellular potential measurements in vivo with a model based on the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz theory for membrane currents. The relation between the intracellular Na+ concentration and

  8. Mitochondrial membrane potential in human neutrophils is maintained by complex III activity in the absence of supercomplex organisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Raam, Bram J.; Sluiter, Wim; de Wit, Elly; Roos, Dirk; Verhoeven, Arthur J.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neutrophils depend mainly on glycolysis for their energy provision. Their mitochondria maintain a membrane potential (Deltapsi(m)), which is usually generated by the respiratory chain complexes. We investigated the source of Deltapsi(m) in neutrophils, as compared to peripheral blood

  9. Role of the Na+/K+-ATPase in regulating the membrane potential in rat peritoneal mast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, U G; Praetorius, Birger Hans; Knudsen, T

    1997-01-01

    1. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the Na+/K+-ATPase on the membrane potential of peritoneal mast cells isolated from male Sprague-Dawley SPF-rats. 2. Experiments were performed at 22-26 degrees C in the tight-seal whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique by use...

  10. Neuronal excitation and permeabilization by 200-ns pulsed electric field: An optical membrane potential study with FluoVolt dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomov, Andrei G; Semenov, Iurii; Casciola, Maura; Xiao, Shu

    2017-07-01

    Electric field pulses of nano- and picosecond duration are a novel modality for neurostimulation, activation of Ca 2+ signaling, and tissue ablation. However it is not known how such brief pulses activate voltage-gated ion channels. We studied excitation and electroporation of hippocampal neurons by 200-ns pulsed electric field (nsPEF), by means of time-lapse imaging of the optical membrane potential (OMP) with FluoVolt dye. Electroporation abruptly shifted OMP to a more depolarized level, which was reached within 10s), so cells remained above the resting OMP level for at least 20-30s. Activation of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) enhanced the depolarizing effect of electroporation, resulting in an additional tetrodotoxin-sensitive OMP peak in 4-5ms after nsPEF. Omitting Ca 2+ in the extracellular solution did not reduce the depolarization, suggesting no contribution of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC). In 40% of neurons, nsPEF triggered a single action potential (AP), with the median threshold of 3kV/cm (range: 1.9-4kV/cm); no APs could be evoked by stimuli below the electroporation threshold (1.5-1.9kV/cm). VGSC opening could already be detected in 0.5ms after nsPEF, which is too fast to be mediated by the depolarizing effect of electroporation. The overlap of electroporation and AP thresholds does not necessarily reflect the causal relation, but suggests a low potency of nsPEF, as compared to conventional electrostimulation, for VGSC activation and AP induction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Ocean acidification impacts on sperm mitochondrial membrane potential bring sperm swimming behaviour near its tipping point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Peter; Binet, Monique T; Havenhand, Jonathan N; Doyle, Christopher J; Williamson, Jane E

    2015-04-01

    Broadcast spawning marine invertebrates are susceptible to environmental stressors such as climate change, as their reproduction depends on the successful meeting and fertilization of gametes in the water column. Under near-future scenarios of ocean acidification, the swimming behaviour of marine invertebrate sperm is altered. We tested whether this was due to changes in sperm mitochondrial activity by investigating the effects of ocean acidification on sperm metabolism and swimming behaviour in the sea urchin Centrostephanus rodgersii. We used a fluorescent molecular probe (JC-1) and flow cytometry to visualize mitochondrial activity (measured as change in mitochondrial membrane potential, MMP). Sperm MMP was significantly reduced in ΔpH -0.3 (35% reduction) and ΔpH -0.5 (48% reduction) treatments, whereas sperm swimming behaviour was less sensitive with only slight changes (up to 11% decrease) observed overall. There was significant inter-individual variability in responses of sperm swimming behaviour and MMP to acidified seawater. We suggest it is likely that sperm exposed to these changes in pH are close to their tipping point in terms of physiological tolerance to acidity. Importantly, substantial inter-individual variation in responses of sperm swimming to ocean acidification may increase the scope for selection of resilient phenotypes, which, if heritable, could provide a basis for adaptation to future ocean acidification. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. NhaA Na+/H+ antiporter mutants that hardly react to the membrane potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudu Alkoby

    Full Text Available pH and Na+ homeostasis in all cells requires Na+/H+ antiporters. The crystal structure, obtained at pH 4, of NhaA, the main antiporter of Escherichia coli, has provided general insights into an antiporter mechanism and its unique pH regulation. Here, we describe a general method to select various NhaA mutants from a library of randomly mutagenized NhaA. The selected mutants, A167P and F267C are described in detail. Both mutants are expressed in Escherichia coli EP432 cells at 70-95% of the wild type but grow on selective medium only at neutral pH, A167P on Li+ (0.1 M and F267C on Na+ (0.6 M. Surprising for an electrogenic secondary transporter, and opposed to wild type NhaA, the rates of A167P and F267C are almost indifferent to membrane potential. Detailed kinetic analysis reveals that in both mutants the rate limiting step of the cation exchange cycle is changed from an electrogenic to an electroneutral reaction.

  13. Membrane potential dynamics of populations of cortical neurons during auditory streaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Brandon J.

    2015-01-01

    How a mixture of acoustic sources is perceptually organized into discrete auditory objects remains unclear. One current hypothesis postulates that perceptual segregation of different sources is related to the spatiotemporal separation of cortical responses induced by each acoustic source or stream. In the present study, the dynamics of subthreshold membrane potential activity were measured across the entire tonotopic axis of the rodent primary auditory cortex during the auditory streaming paradigm using voltage-sensitive dye imaging. Consistent with the proposed hypothesis, we observed enhanced spatiotemporal segregation of cortical responses to alternating tone sequences as their frequency separation or presentation rate was increased, both manipulations known to promote stream segregation. However, across most streaming paradigm conditions tested, a substantial cortical region maintaining a response to both tones coexisted with more peripheral cortical regions responding more selectively to one of them. We propose that these coexisting subthreshold representation types could provide neural substrates to support the flexible switching between the integrated and segregated streaming percepts. PMID:26269558

  14. Carbon nanotubes on Jurkat cells: effects on cell viability and plasma membrane potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Nicola, Milena; Ghibelli, Lina; Bellucci, Stefano; Bellis, Giovanni De; Micciulla, Federico; Traversa, Enrico

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are one of the most novel attractive materials in nanotechnology for their potential multiple applications, including in the biomedical fields. The biocompatibility and toxicity of these novel nanomaterials are still largely unknown and a systematic study on biological interference is essential. We present a toxicological assessment of different types of CNT on the human tumor lymphocytic Jurkat cells. The carbon nanomaterials examined differ in preparation, size, contaminants and morphology: (1) CNT composed of MWCNT+SWCNT, with no metal contaminants; (2) MWCNT and (3) SWCNT, both with metal contaminants; (4) carbon black as control. The results indicate that CNT exert a dose- and time-dependent cytotoxic effect on Jurkat cells, inducing apoptotic cell death, accelerating the transition to secondary necrosis and increasing the extent of apoptosis induced by damaging agents; interestingly, CNT induce a plasma membrane hyperpolarization. These alterations are produced by all types of CNT, but contaminants and/or the size modulate the extent of such effects. Thus CNT deeply affect cell behavior, suggesting that they might play a role in inflammation, and recommending greater attention in terms of evaluation of exposure risks.

  15. Mechanisms of generation of membrane potential resonance in a neuron with multiple resonant ionic currents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Fox

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal membrane potential resonance (MPR is associated with subthreshold and network oscillations. A number of voltage-gated ionic currents can contribute to the generation or amplification of MPR, but how the interaction of these currents with linear currents contributes to MPR is not well understood. We explored this in the pacemaker PD neurons of the crab pyloric network. The PD neuron MPR is sensitive to blockers of H- (IH and calcium-currents (ICa. We used the impedance profile of the biological PD neuron, measured in voltage clamp, to constrain parameter values of a conductance-based model using a genetic algorithm and obtained many optimal parameter combinations. Unlike most cases of MPR, in these optimal models, the values of resonant- (fres and phasonant- (fϕ = 0 frequencies were almost identical. Taking advantage of this fact, we linked the peak phase of ionic currents to their amplitude, in order to provide a mechanistic explanation the dependence of MPR on the ICa gating variable time constants. Additionally, we found that distinct pairwise correlations between ICa parameters contributed to the maintenance of fres and resonance power (QZ. Measurements of the PD neuron MPR at more hyperpolarized voltages resulted in a reduction of fres but no change in QZ. Constraining the optimal models using these data unmasked a positive correlation between the maximal conductances of IH and ICa. Thus, although IH is not necessary for MPR in this neuron type, it contributes indirectly by constraining the parameters of ICa.

  16. Testing of a 7-tube palladium membrane reactor for potential use in TEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, Bryan J.; Trujillo, Stephen; Willms, R. Scott

    2010-01-01

    A Palladium Membrane Reactor (PMR) consists of a palladium/silver membrane permeator filled with catalyst (catalyst may be inside or outside the membrane tubes). The PMR is designed to recover tritium from the methane, water, and other impurities present in fusion reactor effluent. A key feature of a PMR is that the total hydrogen isotope content of a stream is significantly reduced as (1) methane-steam reforming and/or water-gas shift reactions proceed on the catalyst bed and (2) hydrogen isotopes are removed via permeation through the membrane. With a PMR design matched to processing requirements, nearly complete hydrogen isotope removals can be achieved. A 3-tube PMR study was recently completed. From the results presented in this study, it was possible to conclude that a PMR is appropriate for TEP, perforated metal tube protectors function well, platinum on aluminum (PtA) catalyst performs the best, conditioning with air is probably required to properly condition the Pd/Ag tubes, and that CO/CO 2 ratios maybe an indicator of coking. The 3-tube PMR had a permeator membrane area of 0.0247 m 2 and a catalyst volume to membrane area ratio of 4.63 cc/cm 2 (with the catalyst on the outside of the membrane tubes and the catalyst only covering the membrane tube length). A PMR for TEP will require a larger membrane area (perhaps 0.35 m 2 ). With this in mind, an intermediate sized PMR was constructed. This PMR has 7 permeator tubes and a total membrane area of 0.0851 m 2 . The catalyst volume to membrane area ratio for the 7-tube PMR was 5.18 cc/cm 2 . The total membrane area of the 7-tube PMR (0.0851 m 2 ) is 3.45 times larger than total membrane area of the 3-tube PMR (0.0247 m 2 ). The following objectives were identified for the 7-tube PMR tests: (1) Refine test measurements, especially humidity and flow; (2) Refine maintenance procedures for Pd/Ag tube conditioning; (3) Evaluate baseline PMR operating conditions; (4) Determine PMR scaling method; (5) Evaluate PMR

  17. Surface Electrical Potentials of Root Cell Plasma Membranes: Implications for Ion Interactions, Rhizotoxicity, and Uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Min Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Many crop plants are exposed to heavy metals and other metals that may intoxicate the crop plants themselves or consumers of the plants. The rhizotoxicity of heavy metals is influenced strongly by the root cell plasma membrane (PM surface’s electrical potential (ψ0. The usually negative ψ0 is created by negatively charged constituents of the PM. Cations in the rooting medium are attracted to the PM surface and anions are repelled. Addition of ameliorating cations (e.g., Ca2+ and Mg2+ to the rooting medium reduces the effectiveness of cationic toxicants (e.g., Cu2+ and Pb2+ and increases the effectiveness of anionic toxicants (e.g., SeO42− and H2AsO4−. Root growth responses to ions are better correlated with ion activities at PM surfaces ({IZ}0 than with activities in the bulk-phase medium ({IZ}b (IZ denotes an ion with charge Z. Therefore, electrostatic effects play a role in heavy metal toxicity that may exceed the role of site-specific competition between toxicants and ameliorants. Furthermore, ψ0 controls the transport of ions across the PM by influencing both {IZ}0 and the electrical potential difference across the PM from the outer surface to the inner surface (Em,surf. Em,surf is a component of the driving force for ion fluxes across the PM and controls ion-channel voltage gating. Incorporation of {IZ}0 and Em,surf into quantitative models for root metal toxicity and uptake improves risk assessments of toxic metals in the environment. These risk assessments will improve further with future research on the application of electrostatic theory to heavy metal phytotoxicity in natural soils and aquatic environments.

  18. The potential of immobilized artificial membrane chromatography to predict human oral absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsopelas, Fotios; Vallianatou, Theodosia; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The potential of immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) chromatography to estimate human oral absorption (%HOA) was investigated. For this purpose, retention indices on IAM stationary phases reported previously by our group or measured by other authors under similar conditions were used to model %HOA data, compiled from literature sources. Considering the pH gradient in gastrointestinal tract, the highest logkw(IAM) values were considered, obtained either at pH7.4 or 5.5, defined as logkw(IAM)(best). Non linear models were established upon introduction of additional parameters and after exclusion of drugs which are substrates either to efflux or uptake transporters. The best model included Abraham's hydrogen-bond acidity parameter, molecular weight as well as the positively and negatively charged molecular fractions. For reasons of comparison between IAM chromatography and traditional lipophilicity, corresponding models were derived by replacing IAM retention factors with octanol-water distribution coefficients (logD). An overexpression of electrostatic interactions with phosphate anions was observed in the case of IAM retention as expressed by the negative contribution of the positively charged fraction F(+). The same parameter is statistically significant also in the logD model, but with a positive sign, indicating the attraction of basic drugs in the negatively charged inner membrane. To validate the obtained models a blind test set of 22 structurally diverse drugs was used, whose logkw(IAM)(best) values were determined and analyzed in the present study under similar conditions. IAM retention factors were further compared with MDCK cell lines permeability data taken from literature for a set of validation drugs. The overexpression of electrostatic interactions with phosphate anions on IAM surface was also evident in respect to MDCK permeability. In contrast to the clear classification between drugs with high and poor (or intermediate) absorption provided by MDCK

  19. Tracking single cells in live animals using a photoconvertible near-infrared cell membrane label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Alicia L; Fujisaki, Joji; Wu, Juwell; Runnels, Judith M; Turcotte, Raphaël; Spencer, Joel A; Celso, Cristina Lo; Scadden, David T; Strom, Terry B; Lin, Charles P

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel photoconversion technique to track individual cells in vivo using a commercial lipophilic membrane dye, DiR. We show that DiR exhibits a permanent fluorescence emission shift (photoconversion) after light exposure and does not reacquire the original color over time. Ratiometric imaging can be used to distinguish photoconverted from non-converted cells with high sensitivity. Combining the use of this photoconvertible dye with intravital microscopy, we tracked the division of individual hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells within the calvarium bone marrow of live mice. We also studied the peripheral differentiation of individual T cells by tracking the gain or loss of FoxP3-GFP expression, a marker of the immune suppressive function of CD4(+) T cells. With the near-infrared photoconvertible membrane dye, the entire visible spectral range is available for simultaneous use with other fluorescent proteins to monitor gene expression or to trace cell lineage commitment in vivo with high spatial and temporal resolution.

  20. Membrane rafts: a potential gateway for bacterial entry into host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartlova, Anetta; Cerveny, Lukas; Hubalek, Martin; Krocova, Zuzana; Stulik, Jiri

    2010-04-01

    Pathogenic bacteria have developed various mechanisms to evade host immune defense systems. Invasion of pathogenic bacteria requires interaction of the pathogen with host receptors, followed by activation of signal transduction pathways and rearrangement of the cytoskeleton to facilitate bacterial entry. Numerous bacteria exploit specialized plasma membrane microdomains, commonly called membrane rafts, which are rich in cholesterol, sphingolipids and a special set of signaling molecules which allow entry to host cells and establishment of a protected niche within the host. This review focuses on the current understanding of the raft hypothesis and the means by which pathogenic bacteria subvert membrane microdomains to promote infection.

  1. Membrane potential and proton cotransport of alanine and phosphate as affected by permeant weak acids in Lemna gibba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basso, B.; Ullrich-Eberius, C.I.

    1987-01-01

    The treatment of Lemna gibba plants with the weak acids (trimethylacetic acid and butyric acid), used as tools to decrease intracellular pH, induced a hyperpolarization of membrane potential, dependent on the concentration of the undissociated permeant form of the weak acid and on the value of the resting potential. Measurements were carried out both with high potential and low potential plants and the maximum values of acid induced hyperpolarization were about 35 and 71 millivolts, respectively. Weak acids influenced also the transient light-dark membrane potential changes, typical for photosynthesizing material, suggesting a dependence of these changes on an acidification of cytoplasm. In the presence of the weak acids, the membrane depolarization induced by the cotransport of alanine and phosphate with protons was reduced; the maximum reduction (about 90%) was obtained with alanine during 2 millimolar trimethylacetic acid perfusion at pH 5. A strong inhibition of the uptake rates (up to 48% for [ 14 C]alanine and 68% for 32 P-phosphate) was obtained in the presence of the weak acids, both by decreasing the pH of the medium and by increasing the concentration of the acid. In these experimental conditions, the ATP level and O 2 uptake rates did not change significantly. These results constitute good evidence that H + /solute cotransport in Lemna, already known to be dependent on the electrochemical potential difference for protons, is also strongly regulated by the cytoplasmic pH value

  2. Potentiality of a ceramic membrane reactor for the laccase-catalyzed removal of bisphenol A from secondary effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arca-Ramos, A; Eibes, G; Feijoo, G; Lema, J M; Moreira, M T

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the removal of bisphenol A (BPA) by laccase in a continuous enzymatic membrane reactor (EMR) was investigated. The effects of key parameters, namely, type of laccase, pH, and enzyme activity, were initially evaluated. Once optimal conditions were determined, the continuous removal of the pollutant in an EMR was assessed in synthetic and real biologically treated wastewaters. The reactor configuration consisted of a stirred tank reactor coupled to a ceramic membrane, which prevented the sorption of the pollutant and allowed the recovery and recycling of laccase. Nearly complete removal of BPA was attained under both operation regimes with removal yields above 94.5 %. In experiments with real wastewater, the removal of BPA remained high while the presence of colloids and certain ions and the formation of precipitates on the membrane potentially affected enzyme stability and made necessary the periodic addition of laccase. Polymerization and degradation were observed as probable mechanisms of BPA transformation by laccase.

  3. Antimicrobial properties and membrane-active mechanism of a potential α-helical antimicrobial derived from cathelicidin PMAP-36.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinfeng Lv

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, which present in the non-specific immune system of organism, are amongst the most promising candidates for the development of novel antimicrobials. The modification of naturally occurring AMPs based on their residue composition and distribution is a simple and effective strategy for optimization of known AMPs. In this study, a series of truncated and residue-substituted derivatives of antimicrobial peptide PMAP-36 were designed and synthesized. The 24-residue truncated peptide, GI24, displayed antimicrobial activity comparable to the mother peptide PMAP-36 with MICs ranging from 1 to 4 µM, which is lower than the MICs of bee venom melittin. Although GI24 displayed high antimicrobial activity, its hemolytic activity was much lower than melittin, suggesting that GI24 have optimal cell selectivity. In addition, the crucial site of GI24 was identified through single site-mutation. An amino acid with high hydrophobicity at position 23 played an important role in guaranteeing the high antimicrobial activity of GI24. Then, lipid vesicles and whole bacteria were employed to investigate the membrane-active mechanisms. Membrane-simulating experiments showed that GI24 interacted strongly with negatively charged phospholipids and weakly with zwitterionic phospholipids, which corresponded well with the data of its biological activities. Membrane permeabilization and flow cytometry provide the evidence that GI24 killed microbial cells by permeabilizing the cell membrane and damaging membrane integrity. GI24 resulted in greater cell morphological changes and visible pores on cell membrane as determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscope (TEM. Taken together, the peptide GI24 may provide a promising antimicrobial agent for therapeutic applications against the frequently-encountered bacteria.

  4. Modification of trout sperm membranes associated with activation and cryopreservation. Implications for fertilizing potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract We investigated the effects of two trout sperm activation solutions on sperm physiology and membrane organization prior to and following cryopreservation using flow cytometry and investigated their impact on in vitro fertility. Cryopreservation caused greater phospholipid disorder (high pl...

  5. Identification of antifungal H+-ATPase inhibitors with effect on the plasma membrane potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellerup, Lasse; Gordon, Sandra; Cohrt, Karen O'Hanlon

    2017-01-01

    to depolarize the membrane and inhibit extracellular acidification in intact fungal cells, concomitant with a significant increase in intracellular ATP levels. Collectively, we suggest these effects may be a common feature for Pma1 inhibitors. Additionally, the work uncovered a dual mechanism for the previously......The plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase (Pma1) is an essential fungal protein and a proposed target for new antifungal medications. A small-molecule library containing ∼191,000 commercially available compounds was screened for inhibition of S. cerevisiae plasma membranes containing Pma1. The overall hit...... identified cationic peptide BM2, revealing fungal membrane disruption in addition to Pma1 inhibition. The methods presented here provide a solid platform for the evaluation of Pma1-specific inhibitors in a drug development setting. The present inhibitors could serve as a starting point for the development...

  6. Molecular View of Cholesterol Flip-Flop and Chemical Potential in Different Membrane Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennett, W. F. Drew; MacCallum, Justin L.; Hinner, Marlon J.; Marrink, Siewert J.; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2009-01-01

    The relative stability of cholesterol in cellular membranes and the thermodynamics of fluctuations from equilibrium have important consequences for sterol trafficking and lateral domain formation. We used molecular dynamics computer simulations to investigate the partitioning of cholesterol in a

  7. Method for Estimating Evaporative Potential (IM/CLO) from ASTM Standard Single Wind Velocity Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-10

    IM/CLO) FROM ASTM STANDARD SINGLE WIND VELOCITY MEASURES DISCLAIMER The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private views of the...USARIEM TECHNICAL REPORT T16-14 METHOD FOR ESTIMATING EVAPORATIVE POTENTIAL (IM/CLO) FROM ASTM STANDARD SINGLE WIND VELOCITY... ASTM STANDARD SINGLE WIND VELOCITY MEASURES Adam W. Potter Biophysics and Biomedical Modeling Division U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental

  8. Characterization of the thermolysis products of Nafion membrane: A potential source of perfluorinated compounds in the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mingbao; Qu, Ruijuan; Wei, Zhongbo; Wang, Liansheng; Sun, Ping; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-05-01

    The thermal decomposition of Nafion N117 membrane, a typical perfluorosulfonic acid membrane that is widely used in various chemical technologies, was investigated in this study. Structural identification of thermolysis products in water and methanol was performed using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS). The fluoride release was studied using an ion-chromatography system, and the membrane thermal stability was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis. Notably, several types of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) including perfluorocarboxylic acids were detected and identified. Based on these data, a thermolysis mechanism was proposed involving cleavage of both the polymer backbone and its side chains by attack of radical species. This is the first systematic report on the thermolysis products of Nafion by simulating its high-temperature operation and disposal process via incineration. The results of this study indicate that Nafion is a potential environmental source of PFCs, which have attracted growing interest and concern in recent years. Additionally, this study provides an analytical justification of the LC/ESI-MS/MS method for characterizing the degradation products of polymer electrolyte membranes. These identifications can substantially facilitate an understanding of their decomposition mechanisms and offer insight into the proper utilization and effective management on these membranes.

  9. Polyamide Thin-Film Composite Membranes for Potential Raw Biogas Purification: Experiments and Modelling.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimčík, Miroslav; Růžička, Marek; Kárászová, Magda; Sedláková, Zuzana; Vejražka, Jiří; Veselý, M.; Čapek, P.; Friess, K.; Izák, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 167, JUL 14 (2016), s. 163-173 ISSN 1383-5866 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-12695S; GA TA ČR TE01020080; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13018; GA MŠk LH14006 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : thin film composite membrane * biogas membrane separation * transport modeling Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 3.359, year: 2016

  10. Flapping Tail Membrane in Bats Produces Potentially Important Thrust during Horizontal Takeoffs and Very Slow Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Rick A.; Snode, Emily R.; Shaw, Jason B.

    2012-01-01

    Historically, studies concerning bat flight have focused primarily on the wings. By analyzing high-speed video taken on 48 individuals of five species of vespertilionid bats, we show that the capacity to flap the tail-membrane (uropatagium) in order to generate thrust and lift during takeoffs and minimal-speed flight (ecomorphology. The extensive fanning motion of the tail membrane by vespertilionid bats has not been reported for other flying vertebrates. PMID:22393378

  11. Protecting nickel with graphene spin-filtering membranes: A single layer is enough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, M.-B.; Dlubak, B.; Piquemal-Banci, M.; Collin, S.; Petroff, F.; Anane, A.; Fert, A.; Seneor, P. [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales, 1 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau, France and Université Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Weatherup, R. S.; Hofmann, S.; Robertson, J. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB21PZ (United Kingdom); Yang, H. [IBS Center for Integrated Nanostructure Physics (CINAP), Institute for Basic Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Blume, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Schloegl, R. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-07-06

    We report on the demonstration of ferromagnetic spin injectors for spintronics which are protected against oxidation through passivation by a single layer of graphene. The graphene monolayer is directly grown by catalytic chemical vapor deposition on pre-patterned nickel electrodes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that even with its monoatomic thickness, monolayer graphene still efficiently protects spin sources against oxidation in ambient air. The resulting single layer passivated electrodes are integrated into spin valves and demonstrated to act as spin polarizers. Strikingly, the atom-thick graphene layer is shown to be sufficient to induce a characteristic spin filtering effect evidenced through the sign reversal of the measured magnetoresistance.

  12. Quantitative analysis of single muscle fibre action potentials recorded at known distances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, B.A.; Put, J.H.M.; Wallinga, W.; Wirtz, P.

    1989-01-01

    In vivo records of single fibre action potentials (SFAPs) have always been obtained at unknown distance from the active muscle fibre. A new experimental method has been developed enabling the derivation of the recording distance in animal experiments. A single fibre is stimulated with an

  13. Improved single particle potential for transport model simulations of nuclear reactions induced by rare isotope beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Chang; Li Baoan

    2010-01-01

    Taking into account more accurately the isospin dependence of nucleon-nucleon interactions in the in-medium many-body force term of the Gogny effective interaction, new expressions for the single-nucleon potential and the symmetry energy are derived. Effects of both the spin (isospin) and the density dependence of nuclear effective interactions on the symmetry potential and the symmetry energy are examined. It is shown that they both play a crucial role in determining the symmetry potential and the symmetry energy at suprasaturation densities. The improved single-nucleon potential will be useful for more accurate simulation of nuclear reactions induced by rare-isotope beams within transport models.

  14. Single guard cell recordings in intact plants : light-induced hyperpolarization of the plasma membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelfsema, MRG; Steinmeyer, R; Staal, M; Hedrich, R

    Guard cells are electrically isolated from other plant cells and therefore offer the unique possibility to conduct current- and voltage-clamp recordings on single cells in an intact plant. Guard cells in their natural environment were impaled with double-barreled electrodes and found to exhibit

  15. Latent Membrane Protein 1 as a molecular adjuvant for single-cycle lentiviral vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmberg Andrew R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular adjuvants are a promising method to enhance virus-specific immune responses and protect against HIV-1 infection. Immune activation by ligands for receptors such as CD40 can induce dendritic cell activation and maturation. Here we explore the incorporation of two CD40 mimics, Epstein Barr Virus gene LMP1 or an LMP1-CD40 chimera, into a strain of SIV that was engineered to be limited to a single cycle of infection. Results Full length LMP1 or the chimeric protein LMP1-CD40 was cloned into the nef-locus of single-cycle SIV. Human and Macaque monocyte derived macrophages and DC were infected with these viruses. Infected cells were analyzed for activation surface markers by flow cytometry. Cells were also analyzed for secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12p70 and TNF by cytometric bead array. Conclusions Overall, single-cycle SIV expressing LMP1 and LMP1-CD40 produced a broad and potent TH1-biased immune response in human as well as rhesus macaque macrophages and DC when compared with control virus. Single-cycle SIV-LMP1 also enhanced antigen presentation by lentiviral vector vaccines, suggesting that LMP1-mediated immune activation may enhance lentiviral vector vaccines against HIV-1.

  16. Production of multi-, oligo- and single-pore membranes using a continuous ion beam

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Apel, P. Yu.; Ivanov, O.; Lizunov, N. E.; Mamonova, T. I.; Nechaev, A. N.; Olejniczak, K.; Vacík, Jiří; Dmitriev, S. N.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 365, DEC (2015), s. 641-645 ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14004 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : ion beam * irradiation * ion track * etching * single nanopore Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.389, year: 2015

  17. Single mutation confers vanadate resistance to the plasma membrane H+-ATPase from the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulaszewski, S.; Van Herck, J.C.; Dufour, J.P.; Kulpa, J.; Nieuwenhuis, B.; Goffeau, A.

    1987-01-01

    A single-gene nuclear mutant has been selected from the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe for growth resistance to Dio-9, a plasma membrane H+-ATPase inhibitor. From this mutant, called pma1, an ATPase activity has been purified. It contains a Mr = 100,000 major polypeptide which is phosphorylated by [gamma- 32 P] ATP. Proton pumping is not impaired since the isolated mutant ATPase is able, in reconstituted proteoliposomes, to quench the fluorescence of the delta pH probe 9-amino-6-chloro-2-methoxy acridine. The isolated mutant ATPase is sensitive to Dio-9 as well as to seven other plasma membrane H+-ATPase inhibitors. The mutant H+-ATPase activity tested in vitro is, however, insensitive to vanadate. Its Km for MgATP is modified and its ATPase specific activity is decreased. The pma1 mutation decreases the rate of extracellular acidification induced by glucose when cells are incubated at pH 4.5 under nongrowing conditions. During growth, the intracellular mutant pH is more acid than the wild type one. The derepression by ammonia starvation of methionine transport is decreased in the mutant. The growth rate of pma1 mutants is reduced in minimal medium compared to rich medium, especially when combined to an auxotrophic mutation. It is concluded that the H+-ATPase activity from yeast plasma membranes controls the intracellular pH as well as the derepression of amino acid, purine, and pyrimidine uptakes. The pma1 mutation modifies several transport properties of the cells including those responsible for the uptake of Dio-9 and other inhibitors

  18. Imaging Action Potential in Single Mammalian Neurons by Tracking the Accompanying Sub-Nanometer Mechanical Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunze; Liu, Xian-Wei; Wang, Hui; Yu, Hui; Guan, Yan; Wang, Shaopeng; Tao, Nongjian

    2018-03-28

    Action potentials in neurons have been studied traditionally by intracellular electrophysiological recordings and more recently by the fluorescence detection methods. Here we describe a label-free optical imaging method that can measure mechanical motion in single cells with a sub-nanometer detection limit. Using the method, we have observed sub-nanometer mechanical motion accompanying the action potential in single mammalian neurons by averaging the repeated action potential spikes. The shape and width of the transient displacement are similar to those of the electrically recorded action potential, but the amplitude varies from neuron to neuron, and from one region of a neuron to another, ranging from 0.2-0.4 nm. The work indicates that action potentials may be studied noninvasively in single mammalian neurons by label-free imaging of the accompanying sub-nanometer mechanical motion.

  19. Terbutaline causes immobilization of single β2-adrenergic receptor-ligand complexes in the plasma membrane of living A549 cells as revealed by single-molecule microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieben, Anne; Kaminski, Tim; Kubitscheck, Ulrich; Häberlein, Hanns

    2011-02-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors are important targets for various drugs. After signal transduction, regulatory processes, such as receptor desensitization and internalization, change the lateral receptor mobility. In order to study the lateral diffusion of β2-adrenergic receptors (β2AR) complexed with fluorescently labeled noradrenaline (Alexa-NA) in plasma membranes of A549 cells, trajectories of single receptor-ligand complexes were monitored using single-particle tracking. We found that a fraction of 18% of all β2ARs are constitutively immobile. About 2/3 of the β2ARs moved with a diffusion constant of D2 = 0.03+/-0.001 μm2/s and about 17% were diffusing five-fold faster (D3 = 0.15+/-0.02 μm2/s). The mobile receptors moved within restricted domains and also showed a discontinuous diffusion behavior. Analysis of the trajectory lengths revealed two different binding durations with τ1 = 77+/-1 ms and τ2 = 388+/-11 ms. Agonistic stimulation of the β2AR-Alexa-NA complexes with 1 μM terbutaline caused immobilization of almost 50% of the receptors within 35 min. Simultaneously, the mean area covered by the mobile receptors decreased significantly. Thus, we demonstrated that agonistic stimulation followed by cell regulatory processes results in a change in β2AR mobility suggesting that different receptor dynamics characterize different receptor states.

  20. Detection of Single Pt Nanoparticle Collisions by Open-Circuit Potential Changes at Ag Ultramicroelectrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mun, Seon Kyu; Shin, Changhwan; Kwon, Seong Jung

    2016-01-01

    Single platinum (Pt) nanoparticle (NP) collisions were investigated with open-circuit potential (OCP) using a silver (Ag) ultramicroelectrode (UME). The Ag UME showed higher sensitivity to single Pt NP detection by the OCP method than gold (Au) UME. The detection of ⁓2 nm radius Pt NP collisions was carried out successfully using Ag UME. The magnitude of the potential step and collision frequency for the single Pt NP collision on Ag UME was investigated and compared with those of the previous work done on Au UME.

  1. Hybrid configurations via percutaneous access for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscotti, Mauer; Lee, Alison; Basner, Robert C; Agerstrand, Cara; Abrams, Darryl; Brodie, Daniel; Bacchetta, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in adults has surged in recent years. Typical configurations are venovenous (VV), which provides respiratory support, or venoarterial (VA), which provides both respiratory and circulatory support. In patients supported with VV ECMO who develop hemodynamic compromise, an arterial limb can be added (venovenous-arterial ECMO) to provide additional circulatory support. For patients on VA ECMO who develop concomitant respiratory failure in the setting of some residual cardiac function, an oxygenated reinfusion limb can be added to the internal jugular vein (venoarterial-venous ECMO) to improve oxygen delivery to the cerebral and coronary circulation. Such hybrid configurations can provide differential support for various forms of cardiopulmonary failure. We describe 21 patients who ultimately received a hybrid configuration at our institution between 2012 and 2013. Eight patients (38.1%) died during ECMO support, four patients (19.0%) died after decannulation but before hospital discharge, and nine patients (42.9%) survived to hospital discharge. Our modest survival rate is likely related to the complexity and severity of illness of these patients, and this relative success suggests that hybrid configurations can be effective. It serves patients well to maintain a flexible and adaptable approach to ECMO configurations for their variable cardiopulmonary needs.

  2. Assessing the Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Cells and In Vivo using Targeted Click Chemistry and Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Angela; Pell, Victoria R; Shaffer, Karl J; Evans, Cameron; Stanley, Nathan J; Robb, Ellen L; Prime, Tracy A; Chouchani, Edward T; Cochemé, Helena M; Fearnley, Ian M; Vidoni, Sara; James, Andrew M; Porteous, Carolyn M; Partridge, Linda; Krieg, Thomas; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P

    2016-02-09

    The mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) is a major determinant and indicator of cell fate, but it is not possible to assess small changes in Δψm within cells or in vivo. To overcome this, we developed an approach that utilizes two mitochondria-targeted probes each containing a triphenylphosphonium (TPP) lipophilic cation that drives their accumulation in response to Δψm and the plasma membrane potential (Δψp). One probe contains an azido moiety and the other a cyclooctyne, which react together in a concentration-dependent manner by "click" chemistry to form MitoClick. As the mitochondrial accumulation of both probes depends exponentially on Δψm and Δψp, the rate of MitoClick formation is exquisitely sensitive to small changes in these potentials. MitoClick accumulation can then be quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This approach enables assessment of subtle changes in membrane potentials within cells and in the mouse heart in vivo. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Key steps in type III secretion system (T3SS) towards translocon assembly with potential sensor at plant plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hongtao; Dong, Hansong

    2015-09-01

    Many plant- and animal-pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria employ the type III secretion system (T3SS) to translocate effector proteins from bacterial cells into the cytosol of eukaryotic host cells. The effector translocation occurs through an integral component of T3SS, the channel-like translocon, assembled by hydrophilic and hydrophobic proteinaceous translocators in a two-step process. In the first, hydrophilic translocators localize to the tip of a proteinaceous needle in animal pathogens, or a proteinaceous pilus in plant pathogens, and associate with hydrophobic translocators, which insert into host plasma membranes in the second step. However, the pilus needs to penetrate plant cell walls in advance. All hydrophilic translocators so far identified in plant pathogens are characteristic of harpins: T3SS accessory proteins containing a unitary hydrophilic domain or an additional enzymatic domain. Two-domain harpins carrying a pectate lyase domain potentially target plant cell walls and facilitate the penetration of the pectin-rich middle lamella by the bacterial pilus. One-domain harpins target plant plasma membranes and may play a crucial role in translocon assembly, which may also involve contrapuntal associations of hydrophobic translocators. In all cases, sensory components in the target plasma membrane are indispensable for the membrane recognition of translocators and the functionality of the translocon. The conjectural sensors point to membrane lipids and proteins, and a phosphatidic acid and an aquaporin are able to interact with selected harpin-type translocators. Interactions between translocators and their sensors at the target plasma membrane are assumed to be critical for translocon assembly. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  4. A nontoxic, photostable and high signal-to-noise ratio mitochondrial probe with mitochondrial membrane potential and viscosity detectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanan; Qi, Jianguo; Huang, Jing; Zhou, Xiaomin; Niu, Linqiang; Yan, Zhijie; Wang, Jianhong

    2018-01-01

    Herein, we reported a yellow emission probe 1-methyl-4-(6-morpholino-1, 3-dioxo-1H-benzo[de]isoquinolin-2(3H)-yl) pyridin-1-ium iodide which could specifically stain mitochondria in living immortalized and normal cells. In comparison to the common mitochondria tracker (Mitotracker Deep Red, MTDR), this probe was nontoxic, photostable and ultrahigh signal-to-noise ratio, which could real-time monitor mitochondria for a long time. Moreover, this probe also showed high sensitivity towards mitochondrial membrane potential and intramitochondrial viscosity change. Consequently, this probe was used for imaging mitochondria, detecting changes in mitochondrial membrane potential and intramitochondrial viscosity in physiological and pathological processes.

  5. Thermal single-gluon exchange potential for heavy quarkonium in the static limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Jia-Qing; Ma, Zhi-Lei; Shi, Chao-Yi; Li, Yun-De

    2015-01-01

    The calculations of thermal single-gluon exchange potential for heavy quarkonium in Feynman and Coulomb gauges are presented, and the comparisons between them and the hard thermal loop approximation ones which were first calculated by Laine et al. are illustrated. The numerical results show that the hard thermal loop thermal single-gluon exchange potential (especially its imaginary part) which used in many researches make some errors in the practical calculations at the temperature range accessible in the present experiment, and the problem of gauge dependent cannot be avoided when the complete self energy is used in the derivation of potential

  6. Yeast Kch1 and Kch2 membrane proteins play a pleiotropic role in membrane potential establishment and monovalent cation homeostasis regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felcmanova, Kristina; Neveceralova, Petra; Sychrova, Hana; Zimmermannova, Olga

    2017-08-01

    The Kch1 and Kch2 plasma-membrane proteins were identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as being essential for the activation of a high-affinity Ca2+ influx system. We searched for Kch proteins roles in the maintenance of cation homeostasis and tested the effect of kch1 and/or kch2 deletions on various physiological parameters. Compared to wild-type, kch1 kch2 mutant cells were smaller, relatively hyperpolarised, grew better under limited K+ conditions and exhibited altered growth in the presence of monovalent cations. The absence of Kch1 and Kch2 did not change the intracellular pH in cells growing at low potassium or the tolerance of cells to divalent cations, high concentration of sorbitol or extreme external pH. The overexpression of KCH1 only increased the intracellular pH in the presence of elevated K+ in media. None of the phenotypes associated with the deletion of KCH1 and KCH2 in wild type were observed in a strain lacking KCH genes and main K+ uptake systems Trk1 and Trk2. The role of the Kch homologue in cation homeostasis was also tested in Candida albicans cells. Our data demonstrate that Kch proteins significantly contribute to the maintenance of optimal cation homeostasis and membrane potential in S. cerevisiae but not in C. albicans. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Dietary Tocotrienol/γ-Cyclodextrin Complex Increases Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and ATP Concentrations in the Brains of Aged Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Schloesser

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain aging is accompanied by a decrease in mitochondrial function. In vitro studies suggest that tocotrienols, including γ- and δ-tocotrienol (T3, may exhibit neuroprotective properties. However, little is known about the effect of dietary T3 on mitochondrial function in vivo. In this study, we monitored the effect of a dietary T3/γ-cyclodextrin complex (T3CD on mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels in the brain of 21-month-old mice. Mice were fed either a control diet or a diet enriched with T3CD providing 100 mg T3 per kg diet for 6 months. Dietary T3CD significantly increased mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels compared to those of controls. The increase in MMP and ATP due to dietary T3CD was accompanied by an increase in the protein levels of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM. Furthermore, dietary T3CD slightly increased the mRNA levels of superoxide dismutase, γ-glutamyl cysteinyl synthetase, and heme oxygenase 1 in the brain. Overall, the present data suggest that T3CD increases TFAM, mitochondrial membrane potential, and ATP synthesis in the brains of aged mice.

  8. A new approach for determination of fouling potential by colloidal nanoparticles during reverse osmosis (RO) membrane filtration of seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ji Yeon; Lim, Sungil; Park, Kihong

    2013-01-01

    A direct measurement of number concentration of colloidal nanoparticles (15–450 nm) in water was made with the membrane filtration-differential mobility analyzer technique, and its corresponding flux decline rate (FDR) was determined by laboratory-scale RO fouling test unit using varying number concentrations of silica nanoparticles in artificial seawaters. This relationship was used to predict fouling potential of colloidal nanoparticles in reverse osmosis (RO) membrane process of seawaters in RO plant. It was found that the FDR linearly increased with the increasing number of colloidal nanoparticles for the given concentration range and that the relationship between the number concentration and the FDR also depended on RO membrane surface properties. Data for estimated FDR values for natural seawaters after pretreatment showed a clear difference among samples, which is contrary to the pre-existing index such as silt density index and modified fouling index. Our data suggest that measurement of colloidal nanoparticles is useful for selection of proper pretreatment and successful operation of RO membrane process along with other particle fouling predictors accounting for large particles (>450 nm).

  9. A new approach for determination of fouling potential by colloidal nanoparticles during reverse osmosis (RO) membrane filtration of seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Yeon; Lim, Sungil; Park, Kihong, E-mail: kpark@gist.ac.kr [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), School of Environmental Science and Engineering (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    A direct measurement of number concentration of colloidal nanoparticles (15-450 nm) in water was made with the membrane filtration-differential mobility analyzer technique, and its corresponding flux decline rate (FDR) was determined by laboratory-scale RO fouling test unit using varying number concentrations of silica nanoparticles in artificial seawaters. This relationship was used to predict fouling potential of colloidal nanoparticles in reverse osmosis (RO) membrane process of seawaters in RO plant. It was found that the FDR linearly increased with the increasing number of colloidal nanoparticles for the given concentration range and that the relationship between the number concentration and the FDR also depended on RO membrane surface properties. Data for estimated FDR values for natural seawaters after pretreatment showed a clear difference among samples, which is contrary to the pre-existing index such as silt density index and modified fouling index. Our data suggest that measurement of colloidal nanoparticles is useful for selection of proper pretreatment and successful operation of RO membrane process along with other particle fouling predictors accounting for large particles (>450 nm).

  10. Plasma membrane surface potential: dual effects upon ion uptake and toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electrical properties of plasma membranes (PMs), partially controlled by the ionic composition of the bathing medium, play significant roles in the distribution of ions at the exterior surface of PMs and in the transport of ions across PMs. The effects of coexistent cations (commonly Al3+, Ca2+, Mg...

  11. Development of a mathematical model for a single alkaline membrane fuel cell (AMFC) with fixed volume and general square section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, Elise Meister; Vargas, Jose Viriato Coelho [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Centro Politecnico. Setor de Tecnologia], Email: jvargas@demec.ufpr.br; Martins, Lauber de Souza; Ordonez, Juan Carlos [Florida State University, Tallahasse, FL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Center for Advanced Power Systems], Emails: martins@caps.fsu.edu, ordonez@eng.fsu.edu

    2010-07-01

    The Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell (AMFC) is a recently developed fuel cell type, which has shown good experimental results in the laboratory. This paper introduces a mathematical model for the single AMFC with fixed volume and general square section. The main objective is to produce a reliable model (and computationally fast) to predict the response of the single AMFC according to variations of the physical properties of manufacturing materials and operating and design parameters. The model is based on mass, momentum, energy and species conservation, and electrochemical principles, and takes into account pressure drops in the gas channels and temperature gradients with respect to space in the flow direction. The simulation results comprise the AMFC temperature distribution, net power and polarization curves. It is shown that temperature spatial gradients and gas channels pressure drops significantly affect fuel cell performance. Such effects are not usually investigated in the models available in the literature, with most of them assuming uniform pressure and temperature operation. Therefore, the model is expected to be a useful tool for AMFC design and optimization. (author)

  12. Effects of membrane curvature and pH on proton pumping activity of single cytochrome bo3 enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Mengqiu; Khan, Sanobar; Rong, Honglin

    2017-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of proton pumping by heme-copper oxidases (HCO) has intrigued the scientific community since it was first proposed. We have recently reported a novel technology that enables the continuous characterisation of proton transport activity of a HCO and ubiquinol oxidase from...... Escherichia coli, cytochrome bo3, for hundreds of seconds on the single enzyme level (Li et al. J Am Chem Soc 137 (2015) 16055–16063). Here, we have extended these studies by additional experiments and analyses of the proton transfer rate as a function of proteoliposome size and pH at the N- and P......-side of single HCOs. Proton transport activity of cytochrome bo3 was found to decrease with increased curvature of the membrane. Furthermore, proton uptake at the N-side (proton entrance) was insensitive to pH between pH 6.4–8.4, while proton release at the P-side had an optimum pH of ~ 7.4, suggesting...

  13. Evaluation of the Membrane Permeability (PAMPA and Skin) of Benzimidazoles with Potential Cannabinoid Activity and their Relation with the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS)

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez-Figueroa, M. Javiera; Pessoa-Mahana, C. David; Palavecino-González, M. Elisa; Mella-Raipán, Jaime; Espinosa-Bustos, Cristián; Lagos-Muñoz, Manuel E.

    2011-01-01

    The permeability of five benzimidazole derivates with potential cannabinoid activity was determined in two models of membranes, parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA) and skin, in order to study the relationship of the physicochemical properties of the molecules and characteristics of the membranes with the permeability defined by the Biopharmaceutics Classification System. It was established that the PAMPA intestinal absorption method is a good predictor for classifying thes...

  14. On the potential of nickel catalysts for steam reforming in membrane reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieterse, J.A.Z.; Boon, J.; Van Delft, Y.C.; Dijkstra, J.W.; Van den Brink, R.W. [Energy research Center of the Netherlands, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2010-10-15

    Hydrogen membrane reactors have been identified as a promising option for hydrogen production for power generation from natural gas with pre-combustion decarbonisation. While Pd or Pd-alloy membranes already provide good hydrogen permeances the most suitable catalyst design for steam reforming in membrane reactors (SRMR) is yet to be identified. This contribution aims to provide insight in the suitability of nickel based catalysts in SRMR. The use of nickel (Ni) catalysts would benefit the cost-effectiveness of membrane reactors and therefore its feasibility. For this, the activity of nickel catalysts in SRMR was assessed with kinetics reported in literature. A 1D model was composed in order to compare the hydrogen production rates derived from the kinetics with the rate of hydrogen withdrawal by permeation. Catalyst stability was studied by exposing the catalysts to reformate gas with two different H/C ratios to mimic the hydrogen lean reformate gas in the membrane reactor. For both the activity (modeling) and stability study the Ni-based catalysts were compared to relevant catalyst compositions based on rhodium (Rh). Using the high pressure kinetics reported for Al2O3 supported Rh and MgAl2O4 and Al2O3 supported Ni catalyst it showed that Ni and Rh catalysts may very well provide similar hydrogen production rates. Interestingly, the stability of Ni-based catalysts proved to be superior to precious metal based catalysts under exposure to simulated reformate feed gas with low H/C molar ratio. A commercial (pre-)reforming Ni-based catalyst was selected for further testing in an experimental membrane reactor for steam reforming at high pressure. During the test period 98% conversion at 873 K could be achieved. The conversion was adjusted to approximately 90% and stable conversion was obtained during the test period of another 3 weeks. Nonetheless, carbon quantification tests of the Ni catalyst indicated that a small amount of carbon had deposited onto the catalyst

  15. The fluorescence lifetime of BRI1-GFP as probe for the noninvasive determination of the membrane potential in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgass, K.; Caesar, K.; Schleifenbaum, F.; Meixner, A. J.; Harter, K.

    2010-02-01

    As the excited state lifetime of a fluorescent molecule depends on its environment, it is possible to use it as a probe for physico-chemical parameters of the surrounding medium. Whereas this is well known for many solid guest/host systems, only few reports of quantitative, temporal resolved in vivo studies to monitor the nano-environment for a protein-coupled chromophore such as GFP are known from literature. Here we present a novel approach to determine the membrane potential of living (plant) cells based on the fluorescence lifetime (FLT) analysis of membrane-located GFP. By using confocal sample scanning microscopy (CSSM) combined with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, we recently showed that the phytohormone brassinolide (BL) induces cell wall expansion and a decrease in the FLT of the BRI1-GFP in living cells of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. BRI1 is the dominant functional receptor for BL in Arabidopsis and locates to the plasma membrane. Although the dependence of the FLT of GFP on its physico-chemical environment such as pH-value, refractive index and pressure has been reported, the observed FLT decrease of BRI1-GFP in response to BL application could not be explained by these parameters. However, our in vivo FLT and CSSM analyses indicate that the BLinduced change in the FLT of BRI1-GFP is caused by hyperpolarisation of the plasma membrane (Em). Thus, our results indicate that BRI1-GFP serves as sensitive and non-invasive probe for recording the Em of the plasma membrane in living plant cells with high spatio-temporal resolution.

  16. Acetylcholinesterase potentiates [{sup 3}H]fluorowillardiine and [{sup 3}H]AMPA binding to rat cortical membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivera, S.; Rodriguez-Ithurralde, D. [Department of Anatomy, School of Medical Sciences, University of Bristol, University Walk, Bristol, BS8 1TD (United Kingdom); Henley, J.M. [Molecular Neuroscience Unit, Division Neuromyology, Instituto de Investigaciones Biologicas Clemente Estable, 11600 Montevideo (Uruguay)

    1999-04-01

    In addition to its action at cholinergic synapses acetylcholinesterase (AChE) has been proposed to modulate neuronal activity by mechanisms unrelated to the hydrolysis of acetylcholine. We have investigated the effects of AChE on the binding of the specific AMPA receptor agonists (S)-[{sup 3}H]5-fluorowillardiine ([{sup 3}H]FW) and [{sup 3}H]AMPA to rat cortical membranes. Pretreatment of membranes with AChE causes a dose-dependent increase in the binding of both radiolabelled agonists with a maximal increase to {approx}60% above control. This increase is completely blocked by the specific AChE inhibitors propidium, physostigmine, DFP and BW 284C51. AChE pretreatment had no effect on [{sup 3}H]kainate binding. [{sup 3}H]FW binding to membranes from young (15-day-old) rats is four orders of magnitude more sensitive to AChE modulation than membranes from adult rats (EC{sub 50} values of 4x10{sup -5} and 0.1 unit/ml, respectively) although the total percentage increase in binding is similar. Furthermore, the AChE-induced potentiation of [{sup 3}H]FW binding is Ca{sup 2+}- and temperature-dependent suggesting an enzymatic action for AChE in this system. Saturation binding experiments with [{sup 3}H]FW to adult membranes reveal high and low affinity binding sites and demonstrate that the main action of AChE is to increase the B{sub max} of both sites. These findings suggest that modulation of AMPA receptors could provide a molecular mechanism of action for the previously reported effects of AChE in synapse formation, synaptic plasticity and neurodegeneration. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  17. Potentiometric sensing of nuclease activities and oxidative damage of single-stranded DNA using a polycation-sensitive membrane electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jiawang; Qin, Wei

    2013-09-15

    A simple, general and label-free potentiometric method to measure nuclease activities and oxidative DNA damage in a homogeneous solution using a polycation-sensitive membrane electrode is reported. Protamine, a linear polyionic species, is used as an indicator to report the cleavage of DNA by nucleases such as restriction and nonspecific nucleases, and the damage of DNA induced by hydroxyl radicals. Measurements can be done with a titration mode or a direct detection mode. For the potentiometric titration mode, the enzymatic cleavage dramatically affects the electrostatical interaction between DNA and protamine and thus shifts the response curve for the potentiometric titration of the DNA with protamine. Under the optimized conditions, the enzyme activities can be sensed potentiometrically with detection limits of 2.7×10(-4)U/µL for S1 nuclease, and of 3.9×10(-4)U/µL for DNase I. For the direct detection mode, a biocomplex between protamine and DNA is used as a substrate. The nuclease of interest cleaves the DNA from the protamine/DNA complex into smaller fragments, so that free protamine is generated and can be detected potentiometrically via the polycation-sensitive membrane electrode. Using a direct measurement, the nuclease activities could be rapidly detected with detection limits of 3.2×10(-4)U/µL for S1 nuclease, and of 4.5×10(-4)U/µL for DNase I. Moreover, the proposed potentiometric assays demonstrate the potential applications in the detection of hydroxyl radicals. It is anticipated that the present potentiometric strategy will provide a promising platform for high-throughput screening of nucleases, reactive oxygen species and the drugs with potential inhibition abilities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A Preliminary Study of Human Amniotic Membrane as a Potential Chondrocyte Carrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Boo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the feasibility of using processed human amniotic membrane (HAM to support the attachment and proliferation of chondrocytes in vitro which in turn can be utilised as a cell delivery vehicle in tissue engineering applications. METHODS: Fresh HAM obtained from patients undergoing routine elective caesarean sections was harvested, processed and dried using either freeze drying (FD or air drying (AD methods prior to sterilisation by gamma irradiation. Isolated, processed and characterised rabbit autologous chondrocytes were seeded on processed HAM and cultured for up to three weeks. Cell attachment and proliferation were examined qualitatively using inverted brightfield microscopy. RESULTS: Processed HAM appeared to allow cell attachment when implanted with chondrocytes. Although cells seeded on AD and FD HAM did not appear to attach as strongly as those seeded on glycerol preserved intact human amniotic membrane, these cells to be proliferated in cell culture conditions. CONCLUSION: Preliminary results show that processed HAM promotes chondrocyte attachment and proliferation.

  19. Membrane bioreactor wastewater treatment plants reveal diverse yeast and protist communities of potential significance in biofouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liébana, Raquel; Arregui, Lucía; Belda, Ignacio; Gamella, Luis; Santos, Antonio; Marquina, Domingo; Serrano, Susana

    2015-01-01

    The yeast community was studied in a municipal full-scale membrane bioreactor wastewater treatment plant (MBR-WWTP). The unexpectedly high diversity of yeasts indicated that the activated sludge formed a suitable environment for them to proliferate, with cellular concentrations of 2.2 ± 0.8 × 10(3) CFU ml(-1). Sixteen species of seven genera were present in the biological reactor, with Ascomycetes being the most prevalent group (93%). Most isolates were able to grow in a synthetic wastewater medium, adhere to polyethylene surfaces, and develop biofilms of variable complexity. The relationship between yeast populations and the protists in the MBR-WWTP was also studied, revealing that some protist species preyed on and ingested yeasts. These results suggest that yeast populations may play a role in the food web of a WWTP and, to some extent, contribute to membrane biofouling in MBR systems.

  20. Entry of a Six-Residue Antimicrobial Peptide Derived from Lactoferricin B into Single Vesicles and Escherichia coli Cells without Damaging their Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniruzzaman, Md; Islam, Md Zahidul; Sharmin, Sabrina; Dohra, Hideo; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2017-08-22

    Lactoferricin B (LfcinB) and shorter versions of this peptide have antimicrobial activity. However, the elementary processes of interactions of these peptides with lipid membranes and bacteria are still not well understood. To elucidate the mechanism of their antimicrobial activity, we investigated the interactions of LfcinB (4-9) (its sequence of RRWQWR) with Escherichia coli cells and giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). LfcinB (4-9) and lissamine rhodamine B red-labeled LfcinB (4-9) (Rh-LfcinB (4-9)) did not induce an influx of a membrane-impermeant fluorescent probe, SYTOX green, from the outside of E. coli cells into their cytoplasm, indicating that no damage occurred in their plasma membrane. To examine the activity of LfcinB (4-9) to enter E. coli cytoplasm, we investigated the interaction of Rh-LfcinB (4-9) with single cells of E. coli containing calcein using confocal microscopy. We found that Rh-LfcinB (4-9) entered the cytoplasm without leakage of calcein. Next, we investigated the interactions of Rh-LfcinB (4-9) with single GUVs of dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG) and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) mixtures containing a fluorescent probe, Alexa Fluor 647 hydrazide (AF647), using the single GUV method. The results indicate that Rh-LfcinB (4-9) outside the GUV translocated through the GUV membrane and entered its lumen without leakage of AF647. Interaction of Rh-LfcinB (4-9) with DNA increased its fluorescence intensity greatly. Therefore, we can conclude that Rh-LfcinB (4-9) can translocate across lipid membrane regions of the plasma membrane of E. coli cells to enter their cytoplasm without leakage of calcein and its antimicrobial activity is not due to damage of their plasma membranes.

  1. Neem leaf extract as potential modifier of free radical interaction with RBC membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, Shilpa M.; Kulkarni, Satish G.; Rane, Charusheela

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Neem tree (Azadirachta indica) is well known as village pharmacy due to its multifaceted medicinal action in curing countless health problems. The leaf extract of Neem is known to purify blood by removing toxins and neutralizing free radicals. Using gamma irradiation as free radical generation process the efficacy of neem leaf extract in combating free radical attack on RBC membrane has been explored. The results narrating role of concentration and dose dependency in this radio modulation will be discussed

  2. Analytical relations between nuclear symmetry energy and single-nucleon potentials in isospin asymmetric nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Chang; Li Baoan; Chen Liewen; Ko, Che Ming

    2011-01-01

    Using the Hugenholtz-Van Hove theorem, we derive general expressions for the quadratic and quartic symmetry energies in terms of the isoscalar and isovector parts of single-nucleon potentials in isospin asymmetric nuclear matter. These expressions are useful for gaining deeper insights into the microscopic origins of the uncertainties in our knowledge on nuclear symmetry energies especially at supra-saturation densities. As examples, the formalism is applied to two model single-nucleon potentials that are widely used in transport model simulations of heavy-ion reactions.

  3. Performance of Pd on activated carbon as hydrogen electrode with respect to hydrogen yield in a single cell proton exchange membrane (PEM) water electrolyser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naga Mahesh, K.; Sarada Prasad, J.; Venkateswer Rao, M.; Himabindu, V. [Centre for Environment, Institute of Science and Technology, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University Hyderabad, Kukatpally, Hyderabad 500085 (A.P.) (India); Yerramilli, Anjaneyulu [TLGVRC, JSU Box 18739, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 32917 - 0939 (United States); Raghunathan Rao, P. [Fuel cell section, Heavy Water Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai - 400 085 (India)

    2009-08-15

    Palladium (Pd) on activated carbon is used as electrocatalyst coated on Nafion 115 membrane as Hydrogen electrode and RuO{sub 2} is coated on other side of membrane used as oxygen electrode. 5 wt% and 10 wt% Pd on activated carbon is prepared as membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and investigated the performance of the same using inhouse prepared 10 cm{sup 2} single cell. The performance of the single cell assembly and the hydrogen yield are reported during electrolysis operation at temperatures 27 C, 45 C and 65 C at 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 A/cm{sup 2} current densities with respect to voltages. (author)

  4. A single nucleotide polymorphism in the promoter of the LOXL1 gene and its relationship to pelvic organ prolapse and preterm premature rupture of membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Georgia; Lu, Minyan; Stoddard, Paul; Sammel, Mary D; Romero, Roberto; Strauss, Jerome F; Matthews, Catherine A

    2009-05-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse and preterm premature rupture of membranes, the 2 conditions which have in common weakening of the tensile strength of tissues, are thought to be caused, in part, by abnormal extracellular matrix synthesis and/or catabolism. We identified a new single nucleotide polymorphism (NT_010194(LOXL1):g.45008784A>C) in the promoter of the LOXL1 gene, which is essential for elastin synthesis. Promoter studies showed that the minor "C'' allele had significantly greater activity than the major "A'' allele. Case-control studies examined the association of the alleles of this single nucleotide polymorphism with pelvic organ prolapse and preterm premature rupture of membranes. When comparing allele frequencies and genotypes in pelvic organ prolapse cases versus controls, no significant associations were found. A case-control study conducted in African American neonates also found no significant associations between the promoter alleles and preterm premature rupture of membranes. We conclude that a functional single nucleotide polymorphism exists in the promoter region of the LOXL1 gene. Association studies suggest that the promoter single nucleotide polymorphism does not contribute significantly to risk of pelvic organ prolapse or preterm premature rupture of membranes.

  5. Functional characterisation of the human alpha1 glycine receptor in a fluorescence-based membrane potential assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Kristiansen, Uffe

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we have created a stable HEK293 cell line expressing the human homomeric alpha1 glycine receptor (GlyR) and characterised its functional pharmacology in a conventional patch-clamp assay and in the FLIPR Membrane Potential (FMP) assay, a fluorescence-based high throughput scr...... not be suited for sophisticated studies of GlyR pharmacology and kinetics. However, the assay offers several advantages in studies of ligand-receptor interactions. Furthermore, the assay could be highly useful in the search for structurally novel ligands acting at GlyRs.......In the present study, we have created a stable HEK293 cell line expressing the human homomeric alpha1 glycine receptor (GlyR) and characterised its functional pharmacology in a conventional patch-clamp assay and in the FLIPR Membrane Potential (FMP) assay, a fluorescence-based high throughput...... ion did not appear to potentiate GlyR function at lower concentrations. Analogously, whereas pregnenolone sulphate inhibited alpha1 GlyR function, the potentiation of alpha1 GlyR by pregnenolone in electrophysiological studies could not be reproduced in the assay. In conclusion, the FMP assay may...

  6. A single dose of dexamethasone encapsulated in polyethylene glycol-coated polylactic acid nanoparticles attenuates cisplatin-induced hearing loss following round window membrane administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Changling; Wang, Xueling; Zheng, Zhaozhu; Chen, Dongye; Wang, Xiaoqin; Shi, Fuxin; Yu, Dehong; Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the sustained drug release properties and hearing protection effect of polyethylene glycol-coated polylactic acid (PEG-PLA) stealth nanoparticles loaded with dexamethasone (DEX). DEX was fabricated into PEG-PLA nanoparticles using an emulsion and evaporation technique, as previously reported. The DEX-loaded PEG-PLA nanoparticles (DEX-NPs) had a hydrodynamic diameter of 130±4.78 nm, and a zeta potential of -26.13±3.28 mV. The in vitro release of DEX from DEX-NPs lasted 24 days in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4), 5 days in artificial perilymph (pH 7.4), and 1 day in rat plasma. Coumarin 6-labeled NPs placed onto the round window membrane (RWM) of guinea pigs penetrated RWM quickly and accumulated to the organs of Corti, stria vascularis, and spiral ganglion cells after 1 hour of administration. The DEX-NPs locally applied onto the RWM of guinea pigs by a single-dose administration continuously released DEX in 48 hours, which was significantly longer than the free DEX that was cleared out within 12 hours after administration at the same dose. Further functional studies showed that locally administrated single-dose DEX-NPs effectively preserved outer hair cells in guinea pigs after cisplatin insult and thus significantly attenuated hearing loss at 4 kHz and 8 kHz frequencies when compared to the control of free DEX formulation. Histological analyses indicated that the administration of DEX-NPs did not induce local inflammatory responses. Therefore, prolonged delivery of DEX by PEG-PLA nanoparticles through local RWM diffusion (administration) significantly protected the hair cells and auditory function in guinea pigs from cisplatin toxicity, as determined at both histological and functional levels, suggesting the potential therapeutic benefits in clinical applications.

  7. Single Particle Potential of a Σ Hyperon in Nuclear Matter. II Rearrangement Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabrowski, J.

    2000-01-01

    The rearrangement contribution to the real part of the single particle potential of a Σ hyperon in nuclear matter, U Σ , is investigated. The isospin and spin dependent parts of U Σ are considered. Results obtained for four models of the Nijmegen baryon-baryon interaction are presented and discussed. (author)

  8. Potential pitfalls of single phasing operation in a three phase distribution network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayanan, V S

    1986-07-01

    Finding it difficult to cope with the increased demand for electric power, some electricity boards have resorted to single phasing techniques in distribution system. This practice is harmful to the equipment in the power system. Some of the potential dangers associated with this undesirable practice are briefly discussed.

  9. Single-active-electron potentials for molecules in intense laser fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Samha, Mahmoud; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2010-01-01

    Single-active-electron potentials are computed for selected molecules, and molecular wave functions with the correct asymptotic behavior are produced. Asymptotic expansion coefficients are extracted from the wave functions and used to compute alignment-dependent ionization yields from molecular...

  10. Sensitivity of the amplitude of the single muscle fibre action potential to microscopic volume conduction parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alberts, B.A.; Rutten, Wim; Wallinga, W.; Boom, H.B.K.

    1988-01-01

    A microscopic model of volume conduction was applied to examine the sensitivity of the single muscle fibre action potential to variations in parameters of the source and of the volume conductor, such as conduction velocity, intracellular conductivity and intracellular volume fraction. The model

  11. A membrane-free, continuously feeding, single chamber up-flow biocatalyzed electrolysis reactor for nitrobenzene reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ai-Jie; Cui, Dan; Cheng, Hao-Yi; Guo, Yu-Qi; Kong, Fan-Ying; Ren, Nan-Qi; Wu, Wei-Min

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A novel membrane-free up-flow biocatalyzed electrolysis reactor (UBER) was developed. ► Nitrobenzene as the mode of nitroaromatics was efficiently converted to aniline. ► The impact of phosphate buffer and acetate concentrations and power supplied were investigated. ► The prospects of UBER for the recalcitrant compound removal were discussed. - Abstract: A new bioelectrochemical system (BES), a membrane-free, continuous feeding up-flow biocatalyzed electrolysis reactor (UBER) was developed to reduce oxidative toxic chemicals to less- or non-toxic reduced form in cathode zone with oxidation of electron donor in anode zone. Influent was fed from the bottom of UBER and passed through cathode zone and then anode zone. External power source (0.5 V) was provided between anode and cathode to enhance electrochemical reactions. Granular graphite and carbon brush were used as cathode and anode, respectively. This system was tested for the reduction of nitrobenzene (NB) using acetate as electron donor and carbon source. The influent contained NB (50–200 mg L −1 ) and acetate (1000 mg L −1 ). NB was removed by up to 98% mainly in cathode zone. The anode potential maintained under −480 mV. The maximum NB removal rate was up to 3.5 mol m −3 TV d −1 (TV = total empty volume) and the maximum aniline (AN) formation rate was 3.06 mol m −3 TV d −1 . Additional energy required was less than 0.075 kWh mol −1 NB. The molar ratio of NB removed vs acetate consumed varied from 4.3 ± 0.4 to 2.3 ± 0.1 mol mol −1 . Higher influent phosphate or acetate concentration helped NB removal rate. NB could be efficiently reduced to AN as the power supplied of 0.3 V.

  12. Evaluation of treated sewage reuse potential and membrane-based water reuse technology for the Bangkok Metropolitan area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiemchaisri, Chart; Chiemchaisri, Wilai; Prasertkulsak, Sirilak; Hamjinda, Nutta Sangnarin; Kootatep, Thammarat; Itonaga, Takanori; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Only 3.4% of total water use in the Bangkok Metropolitan area is reused treated sewage. This study anticipates that further treated-sewage reuse in industrial sectors, commercial buildings and public parks, in addition to present in-plant and street cleaning purposes, would increase total water reuse to about 10%. New water reuse technologies using membrane bioreactor (MBR) and microfiltration (MF) as tertiary treatment were implemented to assess their potential for their application in the Bangkok Metropolitan area. The MBR was applied to the treatment of raw sewage in a central treatment plant of the Bangkok Metropolitan area. The MF membrane was used for polishing the effluent of the treatment plant. The results show the quality of treated water from MBR and tertiary MF treatment could meet stringent water reuse quality standard in terms of biochemical oxygen demand, suspended solids and biological parameters. Constant permeate flux of the membrane was achieved over long-term operation, during which inorganic fouling was observed. This is due to the fact that incoming sewage contains a considerable amount of inorganic constituents contributed from storm water and street inlet in the combined sewerage systems. The total cost of the MBR for sewage treatment and production of reuse water is estimated to be about USD1.10/m3.

  13. Pressure drop and flow distribution characteristics of single and parallel serpentine flow fields for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Seung Man; Kim, Charn Jung; Jeon, Dong Hyup; Nam, Jin Hyun

    2012-01-01

    This study numerically investigates pressure drop and flow distribution characteristics of serpentine flow fields (SFFs) that are designed for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, which consider the Poiseuille flow with secondary pressure drop in the gas channel (GC) and the Darcy flow in the porous gas diffusion layer (GDL). The numerical results for a conventional SFF agreed well with those obtained via computational fluid dynamics simulations, thus proving the validity of the present flow network model. This model is employed to characterize various single and parallel SFFs, including multi-pass serpentine flow fields (MPSFFs). Findings reveal that under rib convection (convective flow through GDL under an interconnector rib) is an important transport process for conventional SFFs, with its intensity being significantly enhanced as GDL permeability increases. The results also indicate that under rib convection can be significantly improved by employing MPSFFs as the reactant flow field, because of the closely interlaced structure of GC regions that have different path lengths from the inlet. However, reactant flow rate through GCs proportionally decreases as under rib convection intensity increases, suggesting that proper optimization is required between the flow velocity in GCs and the under rib convection intensity in GDLs

  14. An electrochemical impedance spectroscopy study of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells electrocatalyst single wall carbon nanohorns-supported.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Lúcia; Boaventura, Marta; Passeira, Carolina; Gattia, Daniele Mirabile; Marazzi, Renzo; Antisari, Marco Vittori; Mendes, Adélio

    2011-10-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to study the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) performance when using single wall carbon nanohorns (SWNH) to support Pt nanoparticles. Additionally, as-prepared and oxidized SWNH Pt-supports were compared with conventional carbon black. Two different oxidizing treatments were considered: oxygen flow at 500 degrees C and reflux in an acid solution at 85 degrees C. Both oxidizing treatments increased SWNH surface area; oxygen treatment increased surface area 4 times while acid treatment increased 2.6 times. The increase in surface area should be related to the opening access to the inner tube of SWNH. Acid treatment of SWNH increased chemical fragility and decreased electrocatalyst load in comparison with as-prepared SWNH. On the other hand, the oxygen treated SWNH sample allowed to obtain the highest electrocatalyst load. The use of as-prepared and oxygen treated SWNH showed in both cases catalytic activities 60% higher than using conventional carbon black as electrocatalyst support in PEMFC. Moreover, EIS analysis indicated that the major improvement in performance is related to the cathode kinetics in the as-prepared SWNH sample, while concerning the oxidized SWNH sample, the improvements are related to the electrokinetics in both anode and cathode electrodes. These improvements should be related with differences in the hydrophobic character between SWNH and carbon black.

  15. Management benefits and safety of computed tomography in patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy: experience of a single centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jepson, S.L.; Harvey, C.; Entwisle, J.J.; Peek, G.J.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the benefits and logistical safety of computed tomography (CT) imaging in patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy in a single institution. Materials and methods: Over a period of 25 months, 134 patients (80 neonates, 19 children, and 35 adults) underwent ECMO therapy at this institution. The imaging of these patients was reviewed to identify patients who had undergone CT imaging whilst on ECMO. Patient notes were retrospectively reviewed. CT findings and subsequent decisions were analysed to assess the benefit of CT imaging. Complications arising due to the logistics of performing the scan were analysed to assess the safety of performing CT in ECMO patients. Results: Of 134 patients, 14 (10%) had a total of 15 CT examinations whilst undergoing ECMO therapy. Indications for CT included new neurology, increased respiratory demand, and increasing requirement for high ECMO flows. There were no major complications and two minor complications associated with the logistics of performing a CT examination on an ECMO patient. Significant findings resulted from 73.3% (11/15) of the CT examinations, and in all 15 examinations information was provided that was used in making further management decisions, including, in some cases, withdrawal of ECMO therapy. Conclusion: With an experienced team, CT imaging of patients on ECMO can be performed safely. CT provides valuable information for subsequent management of patients undergoing ECMO therapy.

  16. [Effect of 3-bromopyruvate on mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis of human breast carcinoma SK-BR-3 cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Zhe; Zhang, Qianwen; Chao, Zhenhua; Zhang, Pei; Xia, Fei; Jiang, Chenchen; Liu, Hao; Jiang, Zhiwen

    2013-09-01

    To study the effect of glycolysis inhibitor 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) in inducing apoptosis of human breast carcinoma cells SK-BR-3 and the possible mechanism. MTT assay was used to detect the growth inhibition induced by 3-BrPA in breast cancer cells SK-BR-3. The apoptotic cells were detected by flow cytometry with propidium iodide (PI). ATP levels in the cells were detected by ATP assay kit, and DHE fluorescent probe technique was used to determine superoxide anion levels; the mitochondrial membrane potential was assessed using JC-1 staining assay. MTT assay showed that the proliferation of SK-BR-3 cells was inhibited by 3-BrPA in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Exposure to 80, 160, and 320 µmol·L(-1) 3-BrPA for 24 h resulted in cell apoptosis rates of 6.7%, 22.3%, and 79.6%, respectively, and the intracellular ATP levels of SK-BR-3 cells treated with 80, 160, 320 µmol·L(-1) 3-BrPA for 5 h were 87.7%, 60.6%, and 23.7% of the control levels. 3-BrPA at 160 µmol·L(-1) increased reactive oxygen levels and lowered mitochondrial membrane potential of SK-BR-3 cells. 3-BrPA can inhibit cell proliferation, reduce the mitochondrial membrane potential and induce apoptosis in SK-BR-3 cells, the mechanism of which may involve a reduced ATP level by inhibiting glycolysis and increasing the reactive oxygen level in the cells.

  17. Internalisation of membrane progesterone receptor-α after treatment with progesterone: Potential involvement of a clathrin-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Helen; Reynolds, Alan; Stenbeck, Gudrun; Dong, Jing; Thomas, Peter; Karteris, Emmanouil

    2010-01-01

    Internalisation and recycling of seven trans-membrane domain receptors is a critical regulatory event for their signalling. The mechanism(s) by which membrane progesterone receptor-α (mPRα) number is regulated on the cell surface is unclear. In this study, we investigated the cellular distribution of mPRα and mechanisms of mPRα trafficking using a cell line derived from a primary culture of human myometrial cells (M11) as an experimental model. RT-PCR and immunofluorescent analysis demonstrated expression of mPRα in M11 cells with mPRα primarily distributed on the cell surface under basal conditions. For the first time, plasma membrane localisation of mPRα was confirmed using immuno-gold transmission electron microscopy. Stimulation of M11 cells with progesterone (P4, 100 nM) resulted in internalisation of mPRα from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasm (10 min) and subsequent partial translocation back to the cell surface (20 min). We investigated potential endocytotic pathways involved in trafficking of mPRα after its internalisation. Partial co-localisation of clathrin with mPRα was obvious after 10 min of P4 treatment. Of note, chlorpromazine (inhibitor of clathrin-mediated pathway) inhibited the endocytosis of mPRα, whereas treatment with nystatin (inhibitor of caveolae-mediated pathway) did not affect internalisation. Collectively, these data suggest that mPRα is expressed on the cell surface of M11 cells and undergoes endocytosis after P4 stimulation primarily via a clathrin-mediated pathway.

  18. Plasma membrane proteomics of human breast cancer cell lines identifies potential targets for breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne S Ziegler

    Full Text Available The use of broad spectrum chemotherapeutic agents to treat breast cancer results in substantial and debilitating side effects, necessitating the development of targeted therapies to limit tumor proliferation and prevent metastasis. In recent years, the list of approved targeted therapies has expanded, and it includes both monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors that interfere with key proteins involved in the uncontrolled growth and migration of cancer cells. The targeting of plasma membrane proteins has been most successful to date, and this is reflected in the large representation of these proteins as targets of newer therapies. In view of these facts, experiments were designed to investigate the plasma membrane proteome of a variety of human breast cancer cell lines representing hormone-responsive, ErbB2 over-expressing and triple negative cell types, as well as a benign control. Plasma membranes were isolated by using an aqueous two-phase system, and the resulting proteins were subjected to mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, each of the cell lines expressed some unique proteins, and a number of proteins were expressed in multiple cell lines, but in patterns that did not always follow traditional clinical definitions of breast cancer type. From our data, it can be deduced that most cancer cells possess multiple strategies to promote uncontrolled growth, reflected in aberrant expression of tyrosine kinases, cellular adhesion molecules, and structural proteins. Our data set provides a very rich and complex picture of plasma membrane proteins present on breast cancer cells, and the sorting and categorizing of this data provides interesting insights into the biology, classification, and potential treatment of this prevalent and debilitating disease.

  19. Electroresponsive properties and membrane potential trajectories of three types of inspiratory neurons in the newborn mouse brain stem in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Champagnat, J; Denavit-Saubié, M

    1996-01-01

    with the aim of extending the classification of inspiratory neurons to include analysis of active membrane properties. 2. The slice generated a regular rhythmic motor output recorded as burst of action potentials on a XII nerve root with a peak to peak time of 11.5 +/- 3.4 s and a duration of 483 +/- 54 ms......1. The electrophysiological properties of inspiratory neurons were studied in a rhythmically active thick-slice preparation of the newborn mouse brain stem maintained in vitro. Whole cell patch recordings were performed from 60 inspiratory neurons within the rostral ventrolateral part of the slice...

  20. Butachlor induced dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, oxidative DNA damage and necrosis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.; Musarrat, Javed

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Butachlor exhibited strong binding affinity with DNA and produced 8-oxodG adducts. ► Butachlor induced DNA strand breaks and micronuclei formation in PBMN cells. ► Butachlor induced ROS and dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential in cells. ► Butachlor resulted in cell cycle arrest and eventually caused cellular necrosis. -- Abstract: Butachlor is a systemic herbicide widely applied on rice, tea, wheat, beans and other crops; however, it concurrently exerts toxic effects on beneficial organisms like earthworms, aquatic invertebrates and other non-target animals including humans. Owing to the associated risk to humans, this chloroacetanilide class of herbicide was investigated with the aim to assess its potential for the (i) interaction with DNA, (ii) mitochondria membrane damage and DNA strand breaks and (iii) cell cycle arrest and necrosis in butachlor treated human peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMN) cells. Fluorescence quenching data revealed the binding constant (Ka = 1.2 × 10 4 M −1 ) and binding capacity (n = 1.02) of butachlor with ctDNA. The oxidative potential of butachlor was ascertained based on its capacity of inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and substantial amounts of promutagenic 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) adducts in DNA. Also, the discernible butachlor dose-dependent reduction in fluorescence intensity of a cationic dye rhodamine (Rh-123) and increased fluorescence intensity of 2′,7′-dichlorodihydro fluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) in treated cells signifies decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) due to intracellular ROS generation. The comet data revealed significantly greater Olive tail moment (OTM) values in butachlor treated PBMN cells vs untreated and DMSO controls. Treatment of cultured PBMN cells for 24 h resulted in significantly increased number of binucleated micronucleated (BNMN) cells with a dose dependent reduction in the nuclear division index (NDI). The flow

  1. Differences Between a Single- and a Double-Folding Nucleus-9Be Optical Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonaccorso, A.; Carstoiu, F.; Charity, R. J.; Kumar, R.; Salvioni, G.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently constructed two very successful n- 9 Be optical potentials (Bonaccorso and Charity in Phys Rev C89:024619, 2014). One by the Dispersive Optical Model (DOM) method and the other (AB) fully phenomenological. The two potentials have strong surface terms in common for both the real and the imaginary parts. This feature makes them particularly suitable to build a single-folded (light-) nucleus- 9 Be optical potential by using ab-initio projectile densities such as those obtained with the VMC method. On the other hand, a VMC density together with experimental nucleon–nucleon cross-sections can be used also to obtain a neutron and/or proton- 9 Be imaginary folding potential. We will use here an ab-initio VMC density to obtain both a n- 9 Be single-folded potential and a nucleus-nucleus double-folded potential. In this work we report on the cases of 8 B, 8 Li and 8 C projectiles. Our approach could be the basis for a systematic study of optical potentials for light exotic nuclei scattering on such light targets. Some of the projectiles studied are cores of other exotic nuclei for which neutron knockout has been used to extract spectroscopic information. For those cases, our study will serve to make a quantitative assessment of the core-target part of the reaction description, in particular its localization. (author)

  2. Spatial and frequency domain ring source models for the single muscle fiber action potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, Kaj-åge; R., Plonsey

    1994-01-01

    In the paper, single-fibre models for the extracellular action potential are developed that will allow the potential to the evaluated at an arbitrary field point in the extracellular space. Fourier-domain models are restricted in that they evaluate potentials at equidistant points along a line...... parallel to the fibre axis. Consequently, they cannot easily evaluate the potential at the boundary nodes of a boundary-element electrode model. The Fourier-domain models employ axial-symmetric ring source models, and thereby provide higher accuracy that the line source model, where the source is lumped...... including anisotropy show that the spatial models require extreme care in the integration procedure owing to the singularity in the weighting functions. With adequate sampling, the spatial models can evaluate extracellular potentials with high accuracy....

  3. Limbic system associated membrane protein as a potential target for neuropsychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eero eVasar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The studies performed in laboratory animals and psychiatric patients suggest a possible role of limbic system associated membrane protein (LAMP in the mechanisms of psychiatric disorders. Stressful manipulations and genetic invalidation have revealed a role of the Lsamp gene in the regulation of anxiety in rodents. Besides that, Lsamp deficient mice display reduced aggressiveness and impaired adaptation in novel and stressful environments. The behavioural effects of amphetamine were blunted in genetically modified mice. Recent pharmacological and biochemical studies point towards altered function of GABA-, 5-hydroxytryptamine- and dopaminergic systems in Lsamp deficient mice. Moreover, we found an association between the gene polymorphisms of LSAMP and major depressive disorder. Patients suffering from major depressive disorder had significantly increased ratio between risk and protective haplotypes of the LSAMP gene compared to healthy volunteers. However, the impact of these haplotypes for the function of LAMP is not clear and remains to be elucidated in future studies.

  4. Characterization of membrane potential-dependent uptake of the novel PET tracer 18F-fluorobenzyl triphenylphosphonium cation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madar, Igal; Ravert, Hayden; Abro, Masroor; Pomper, Martin; Dannals, Robert; Frost, James J.; Nelkin, Barry

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been attributed a critical role in the etiology and pathogenesis of numerous diseases, and is manifested by alterations of the organelle's membrane potential (Δψ m ). This suggests that Δψ m measurement can be highly useful for diagnostic purposes. In the current study, we characterized the capability of the novel PET agent 18 F-fluorobenzyl triphenylphosphonium ( 18 F-FBnTP) to assess Δψ m , compared with the well-established voltage sensor 3 H-tetraphenylphosphonium ( 3 H-TPP). 18 F-FBnTP and 3 H-TPP uptake under conditions known to alter Δψ m and plasma membrane potential (Δψ p ) was assayed in the H345 lung carcinoma cell line. 18 F-FBnTP biodistribution was assessed in CD1 mice using dynamic PET and ex vivo gamma well counting. 18 F-FBnTP and 3 H-TPP demonstrated similar uptake kinetics and plateau concentrations in H345 cells. Stepwise membrane depolarization resulted in a linear decrease in 18 F-FBnTP cellular uptake, with a slope (-0.58±0.06) and correlation coefficient (0.94±0.07) similar (p>0.17) to those measured for 3 H-TPP (-0.63±0.06 and 0.96±0.05, respectively). Selective collapse of Δψ m caused a substantial decrease in cellular uptake for 18 F-FBnTP (81.6±8.1%) and 3 H-TPP (85.4±6.7%), compared with control. Exposure to the proapoptotic staurosporine, known to collapse Δψ m , resulted in a decrease of 68.7±10.1% and 71.5±8.4% in 18 F-FBnTP and 3 H-TPP cellular uptake, respectively. 18 F-FBnTP accumulated mainly in kidney, heart and liver. 18 F-FBnTP is a mitochondria-targeting PET radiopharmaceutical responsive to alterations in membrane potential with voltage-dependent performance similar to that of 3 H-TPP. 18 F-FBnTP is a promising new voltage sensor for detection of physiological and pathological processes associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, such as apoptosis, using PET. (orig.)

  5. The Non-structural Protein of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Disrupts the Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and Induces Apoptosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnwal, Bhaskar; Karlberg, Helen; Mirazimi, Ali; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Viruses have developed distinct strategies to overcome the host defense system. Regulation of apoptosis in response to viral infection is important for virus survival and dissemination. Like other viruses, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is known to regulate apoptosis. This study, for the first time, suggests that the non-structural protein NSs of CCHFV, a member of the genus Nairovirus, induces apoptosis. In this report, we demonstrated the expression of CCHFV NSs, which contains 150 amino acid residues, in CCHFV-infected cells. CCHFV NSs undergoes active degradation during infection. We further demonstrated that ectopic expression of CCHFV NSs induces apoptosis, as reflected by caspase-3/7 activity and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, in different cell lines that support CCHFV replication. Using specific inhibitors, we showed that CCHFV NSs induces apoptosis via both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. The minimal active region of the CCHFV NSs protein was determined to be 93–140 amino acid residues. Using alanine scanning, we demonstrated that Leu-127 and Leu-135 are the key residues for NSs-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, CCHFV NSs co-localizes in mitochondria and also disrupts the mitochondrial membrane potential. We also demonstrated that Leu-127 and Leu-135 are important residues for disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential by NSs. Therefore, these results indicate that the C terminus of CCHFV NSs triggers mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, leading to activation of caspases, which, ultimately, leads to apoptosis. Given that multiple factors contribute to apoptosis during CCHFV infection, further studies are needed to define the involvement of CCHFV NSs in regulating apoptosis in infected cells. PMID:26574543

  6. Relationship of field-theory based single-boson-exchange potentials to static ones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amghar, A.; Desplanques, B.

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that field-theory based single-boson-exchange potentials cannot be identified to those of the Yukawa or Coulomb type that are currently inserted in the Schroedinger equation. The potential which is obtained rather correspond to this current single-boson-exchange potential corrected for the probability that the system under consideration is in a two-body component, therefore missing contributions due to the interaction of these two bodies while bosons are exchanged. The role of these contributions, which involve at least two-boson exchanges, is examined. The conditions that allow one to recover the usual single-boson-exchange potential are given. It is shown that the present results have some relation: (i) to the failure of the Bethe-Salpeter equation in reproducing the Dirac or Klein-Gordon equations in the limit where one of the constituents has a large mass, (ii) to the absence of corrections of relative order α log 1/α to a full calculation of the binding energy in the case of neutral massless bosons or (iii) to large corrections of wave-functions calculated perturbatively in some light-front approaches. Refs. 48 (author)

  7. Energy Efficiency Potential in the U.S. Single-Family Housing Stock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Eric J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Christensen, Craig B. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Horowitz, Scott G. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Robertson, Joseph J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Maguire, Jeffrey B. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-12-19

    Typical approaches for assessing energy efficiency potential in buildings use a limited number of prototypes, and therefore suffer from inadequate resolution when pass-fail cost-effectiveness tests are applied, which can significantly underestimate or overestimate the economic potential of energy efficiency technologies. This analysis applies a new approach to large-scale residential energy analysis, combining the use of large public and private data sources, statistical sampling, detailed building simulations, and high-performance computing to achieve unprecedented granularity - and therefore accuracy - in modeling the diversity of the single-family housing stock. The result is a comprehensive set of maps, tables, and figures showing the technical and economic potential of 50 plus residential energy efficiency upgrades and packages for each state. Policymakers, program designers, and manufacturers can use these results to identify upgrades with the highest potential for cost-effective savings in a particular state or region, as well as help identify customer segments for targeted marketing and deployment. The primary finding of this analysis is that there is significant technical and economic potential to save electricity and on-site fuel use in the single-family housing stock. However, the economic potential is very sensitive to the cost-effectiveness criteria used for analysis. Additionally, the savings of particular energy efficiency upgrades is situation-specific within the housing stock (depending on climate, building vintage, heating fuel type, building physical characteristics, etc.).

  8. Channeling potential in single-walled carbon nanotubes: The effect of radial deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-Assy, M.K.; Soliman, M.S.

    2016-01-01

    We study the effect of radial deformation in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), due to one external factor, on the channeling potential. The calculations covered the channeling potential for positrons of 100 MeV move along the z-axis, which is the axis of the radially deformed SWCNTs (6, 0), (8, 0) under external mechanical stress at different values for the induced strain and also for radially deformed SWCNT (5, 5) under external transverse electric field of 1.8 and 2.6 V/Å. The calculations executed according to the continuum model approximation given by Lindhard for the case of an axial channeling in single crystals. The results of the calculations in this work agreed well with previous calculations depending on the equilibrium electron density in perfect carbon nanotubes. It has been found that, for perfect nanotubes, the channeling potential, i.e., the potential at any point (x, y) in a plane normal to the nanotube axis (xy-plane), is a function of the distance from the nanotube center whatever the (x, y) coordinate and hence, it could be expressed in terms of one independent variable. On the other hand, in radially deformed SWCNTs, the channeling potential was found to be a function of two independent variables (x, y) and could be given here by a general formula in terms of fitting parameters for each nanotube with chiral index (n, m). The obtained formula has been used in plotting the contour plot for the channeling potential.

  9. Channeling potential in single-walled carbon nanotubes: The effect of radial deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Assy, M.K. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Suez-Canal University, Ismailia 41522 (Egypt); Soliman, M.S., E-mail: Mahmoud_einstien2@yahoo.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Suez-Canal University, El-Arish (Egypt)

    2016-10-01

    We study the effect of radial deformation in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), due to one external factor, on the channeling potential. The calculations covered the channeling potential for positrons of 100 MeV move along the z-axis, which is the axis of the radially deformed SWCNTs (6, 0), (8, 0) under external mechanical stress at different values for the induced strain and also for radially deformed SWCNT (5, 5) under external transverse electric field of 1.8 and 2.6 V/Å. The calculations executed according to the continuum model approximation given by Lindhard for the case of an axial channeling in single crystals. The results of the calculations in this work agreed well with previous calculations depending on the equilibrium electron density in perfect carbon nanotubes. It has been found that, for perfect nanotubes, the channeling potential, i.e., the potential at any point (x, y) in a plane normal to the nanotube axis (xy-plane), is a function of the distance from the nanotube center whatever the (x, y) coordinate and hence, it could be expressed in terms of one independent variable. On the other hand, in radially deformed SWCNTs, the channeling potential was found to be a function of two independent variables (x, y) and could be given here by a general formula in terms of fitting parameters for each nanotube with chiral index (n, m). The obtained formula has been used in plotting the contour plot for the channeling potential.

  10. Integrated membrane distillation-crystallization: process design and cost estimations for seawater treatment and fluxes of single salt solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creusen, R.J.M.; Medevoort, J. van; Roelands, C.P.M.; Renesse van Duivenbode, J.A.D. van; Hanemaaijer, J.H.; Leerdam, R.C. van

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this research is to design an integrated membrane distillation-crystallization (MDC) process for desalination of seawater with pure water and dry salts as the only products. The process is based on a combination of membrane distillation (MD) and osmotic distillation (OD) steps with

  11. Profiling of the Tox21 Chemical Collection for Mitochondrial Function to Identify Compounds that Acutely Decrease Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attene-Ramos, Matias S.; Huang, Ruili; Michael, Sam; Witt, Kristine L.; Richard, Ann; Tice, Raymond R.; Simeonov, Anton; Austin, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Understanding whether different environmental chemicals and druglike molecules impact mitochondrial function represents an initial step in predicting exposure-related toxicity and defining a possible role for such compounds in the onset of various diseases. Objectives: We sought to identify individual chemicals and general structural features associated with changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Methods: We used a multiplexed [two end points in one screen; MMP and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content] quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) approach combined with informatics tools to screen the Tox21 library of 10,000 compounds (~ 8,300 unique chemicals) at 15 concentrations each in triplicate to identify chemicals and structural features that are associated with changes in MMP in HepG2 cells. Results: Approximately 11% of the compounds (913 unique compounds) decreased MMP after 1 hr of treatment without affecting cell viability (ATP content). In addition, 309 compounds decreased MMP over a concentration range that also produced measurable cytotoxicity [half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) in MMP assay/IC50 in viability assay ≤ 3; p Tice RR, Simeonov A, Austin CP, Xia M. 2015. Profiling of the Tox21 chemical collection for mitochondrial function to identify compounds that acutely decrease mitochondrial membrane potential. Environ Health Perspect 123:49–56; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408642 PMID:25302578

  12. The Instrumentation of a Microfluidic Analyzer Enabling the Characterization of the Specific Membrane Capacitance, Cytoplasm Conductivity, and Instantaneous Young's Modulus of Single Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Deyong; Huang, Chengjun; Fan, Beiyuan; Long, Rong; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun; Wang, Junbo; Wu, Min-Hsien; Chen, Jian

    2017-06-19

    This paper presents the instrumentation of a microfluidic analyzer enabling the characterization of single-cell biophysical properties, which includes seven key components: a microfluidic module, a pressure module, an imaging module, an impedance module, two LabVIEW platforms for instrument operation and raw data processing, respectively, and a Python code for data translation. Under the control of the LabVIEW platform for instrument operation, the pressure module flushes single cells into the microfluidic module with raw biophysical parameters sampled by the imaging and impedance modules and processed by the LabVIEW platform for raw data processing, which were further translated into intrinsic cellular biophysical parameters using the code developed in Python. Based on this system, specific membrane capacitance, cytoplasm conductivity, and instantaneous Young's modulus of three cell types were quantified as 2.76 ± 0.57 μF/cm², 1.00 ± 0.14 S/m, and 3.79 ± 1.11 kPa for A549 cells ( n cell = 202); 1.88 ± 0.31 μF/cm², 1.05 ± 0.16 S/m, and 3.74 ± 0.75 kPa for 95D cells ( n cell = 257); 2.11 ± 0.38 μF/cm², 0.87 ± 0.11 S/m, and 5.39 ± 0.89 kPa for H460 cells ( n cell = 246). As a semi-automatic instrument with a throughput of roughly 1 cell per second, this prototype instrument can be potentially used for the characterization of cellular biophysical properties.

  13. Tunneling of coupled methyl quantum rotors in 4-methylpyridine: Single rotor potential versus coupling interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaei, Somayeh; Sebastiani, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    We study the influence of rotational coupling between a pair of methyl rotators on the tunneling spectrum in condensed phase. Two interacting adjacent methyl groups are simulated within a coupled-pair model composed of static rotational potential created by the chemical environment and the interaction potential between two methyl groups. We solve the two-dimensional time-independent Schrödinger equation analytically by expanding the wave functions on the basis set of two independent free-rotor functions. We investigate three scenarios which differ with respect to the relative strength of single-rotor and coupling potential. For each scenario, we illustrate the dependence of the energy level scheme on the coupling strength. It is found that the main determinant of splitting energy levels tends to be a function of the ratio of strengths of coupling and single-rotor potential. The tunnel splitting caused by coupling is maximized for the coupled rotors in which their total hindering potential is relatively shallow. Such a weakly hindered methyl rotational potential is predicted for 4-methylpyridine at low temperature. The experimental observation of multiple tunneling peaks arising from a single type of methyl group in 4-methylpyridine in the inelastic neutron scattering spectrum is widely attributed to the rotor-rotor coupling. In this regard, using a set of first-principles calculations combined with the nudged elastic band method, we investigate the rotational potential energy surface (PES) of the coaxial pairs of rotors in 4-methylpyridine. A Numerov-type method is used to numerically solve the two-dimensional time-independent Schrödinger equation for the calculated 2D-density functional theory profile. Our computed energy levels reproduce the observed tunneling transitions well. Moreover, the calculated density distribution of the three methyl protons resembles the experimental nuclear densities obtained from the Fourier difference method. By mapping the

  14. Chest computed tomography in children undergoing extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation: a 9-year single-centre experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, Susie J.; Calder, Alistair D. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom); Randle, Elise; Iguchi, Akane; Brown, Katherine; Hoskote, Aparna [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Cardiac Intensive Care and ECMO, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15

    We retrospectively reviewed the imaging findings, indications, technique and clinical impact in children who had undergone chest CT while undergoing extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Radiology and ECMO databases were searched to identify all 19 children who had undergone chest CT (20 scans in total) while on ECMO at our institution between May 2003 and May 2012. We reviewed all CT scans for imaging findings. Chest CT is performed in a minority of children on ECMO (4.5% in our series). Timing of chest CT following commencement of ECMO varied among patient groups but generally it was performed earlier in the neonatal group. Clinically significant imaging findings were found in the majority of chest CT scans. Many scans contained several findings, with most cases demonstrating parenchymal or pleural abnormalities. Case examples illustrate the spectrum of imaging findings, including underlying pathology such as necrotising pneumonia and severe barotrauma, and ECMO-related complications such as tension haemothoraces and cannula migration. The results of chest CT led to a change in patient management in 16 of 19 children (84%). There were no adverse events related to patient transfer. An understanding of scan technique and awareness of potential findings is important for the radiologist to provide prompt and optimal image acquisition and interpretation in appropriate patients. (orig.)

  15. Women's expectations and experiences of rupture of membranes and views of the potential use of reagent pads for detecting amniotic fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiby, Helen; Borrelli, Sara; Hughes, Anita J

    2017-12-01

    To explore first-time mothers' expectations and experiences regarding rupture of membranes at term and their views on the potential use of reagent pads that detect amniotic fluid. There is little information available on women's experiences of spontaneous rupture of membranes, or interest in using methods to confirm rupture of membranes (e.g. reagent pads). Descriptive qualitative study, using focus groups and telephone interviews with women during pregnancy and after the birth of their first baby. Thematic analysis was undertaken to analyse women's responses. Ethics committee approval was obtained. Twenty-five women participated in the study of whom 13 contributed both during pregnancy and postpartum between October 2015-March 2016. Three overarching themes were identified from the data from women's expectations and experiences: uncertainty in how, when and where membranes may rupture; information which was felt to be limited and confirmation of rupture of membranes. The potential use of reagent pads met with varied responses. Women were interested in having facts and figures regarding rupture of membranes, such as characteristics of liquor; volume and probability of membranes rupturing spontaneously at term. Use of a pad as a means of confirmation was viewed as helpful, although the potential for increasing anxiety was raised. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A multiscale approach to modelling electrochemical processes occurring across the cell membrane with application to transmission of action potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, G

    2009-09-01

    By application of matched asymptotic expansions, a simplified partial differential equation (PDE) model for the dynamic electrochemical processes occurring in the vicinity of a membrane, as ions selectively permeate across it, is formally derived from the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations of electrochemistry. It is demonstrated that this simplified model reduces itself, in the limit of a long thin axon, to the cable equation used by Hodgkin and Huxley to describe the propagation of action potentials in the unmyelinated squid giant axon. The asymptotic reduction from the simplified PDE model to the cable equation leads to insights that are not otherwise apparent; these include an explanation of why the squid giant axon attains a diameter in the region of 1 mm. The simplified PDE model has more general application than the Hodgkin-Huxley cable equation and can, e.g. be used to describe action potential propagation in myelinated axons and neuronal cell bodies.

  17. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for the Support of a Potential Organ Donor with a Fatal Brain Injury before Brain Death Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Wook Chang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The shortage of available organ donors is a significant problem and various efforts have been made to avoid the loss of organ donors. Among these, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO has been introduced to help support and manage potential donors. Many traumatic brain injury patients have healthy organs that might be eligible for donation for transplantation. However, the condition of a donor with a fatal brain injury may rapidly deteriorate prior to brain death determination; this frequently results in the loss of eligible donors. Here, we report the use of venoarterial ECMO to support a potential donor with a fatal brain injury before brain death determination, and thereby preserve donor organs. The patient successfully donated his liver and kidneys after brain death determination.

  18. Two projects in theoretical neuroscience: A convolution-based metric for neural membrane potentials and a combinatorial connectionist semantic network method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Garrett Nolan

    In this work, I present two projects that both contribute to the aim of discovering how intelligence manifests in the brain. The first project is a method for analyzing recorded neural signals, which takes the form of a convolution-based metric on neural membrane potential recordings. Relying only on integral and algebraic operations, the metric compares the timing and number of spikes within recordings as well as the recordings' subthreshold features: summarizing differences in these with a single "distance" between the recordings. Like van Rossum's (2001) metric for spike trains, the metric is based on a convolution operation that it performs on the input data. The kernel used for the convolution is carefully chosen such that it produces a desirable frequency space response and, unlike van Rossum's kernel, causes the metric to be first order both in differences between nearby spike times and in differences between same-time membrane potential values: an important trait. The second project is a combinatorial syntax method for connectionist semantic network encoding. Combinatorial syntax has been a point on which those who support a symbol-processing view of intelligent processing and those who favor a connectionist view have had difficulty seeing eye-to-eye. Symbol-processing theorists have persuasively argued that combinatorial syntax is necessary for certain intelligent mental operations, such as reasoning by analogy. Connectionists have focused on the versatility and adaptability offered by self-organizing networks of simple processing units. With this project, I show that there is a way to reconcile the two perspectives and to ascribe a combinatorial syntax to a connectionist network. The critical principle is to interpret nodes, or units, in the connectionist network as bound integrations of the interpretations for nodes that they share links with. Nodes need not correspond exactly to neurons and may correspond instead to distributed sets, or assemblies, of

  19. On-Chip Electrophoresis in Supported Lipid Bilayer Membranes Achieved Using Low Potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Weerd, Jasper; Krabbenborg, Sven; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes; Huskens, Jurriaan; Jonkheijm, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    A micro supported lipid bilayer (SLB) electrophoresis method was developed, which functions at low potentials and appreciable operating times. To this end, (hydroxymethyl)-ferrocene (FcCH2OH) was employed to provide an electrochemical reaction at the anode and cathode at low applied potential to

  20. Enhanced Electricity Generation by Using Cheese Whey Wastewater in A Single-chamber Membrane Less Microbial Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan A.Z. Al-Fetlawi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cells (MFCs are biochemical-catalyzed systems in which electricity is produced by oxidizing  biodegradable organic matters in presence of  bacteria. Many places suffer from lack of electricity infrastructure or even existence" ,"but in the same area  there is wastewater that can be used to generate clean energy". "A batch system single chamber  and  membrane-less microbial fuel cell is designed with wastewater as inoculum and fuel in the same time(before adding cheese whey at pH =7±0.4 and an operating temperature of 30 0C ". Wastewater samples are collected from the Al-Delmaj marsh site at an initial chemical oxygen demand concentration of 862 mg/l and pH of 7.8 (reduced to 7±0.4 in all experiments by adding HCL acid. Rectangular sheets of graphite and smooth surface carbon fiber of 42 cm2 surface area used for anode and cathode electrodes. The obtained results indicated that the cell performance for the cell using graphite for anode and cathode electrodes is better than that using the carbon fiber of smooth surface .the obtained  open circuit voltage and power per unit surface area (for graphite  were" 190 mV and 5.95 mW/m2 respectively ."Cheese whey as substrate was used to enhance the performance of cell to  439 mV OCV and 121.9mW/m2  maximum power density" .

  1. The "basic" approach: a single-centre experience with a cost-reducing model for paediatric cardiac extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padalino, Massimo A; Tessari, Chiara; Guariento, Alvise; Frigo, Anna C; Vida, Vladimiro L; Marcolongo, Andrea; Zanella, Fabio; Harvey, Michael J; Thiagarajan, Ravi R; Stellin, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a lifesaving but expensive therapy in terms of financial, technical and human resources. We report our experience with a 'basic' ECMO support model, consisting of ECMO initiated and managed without the constant presence of a bedside specialist, to assess safety, clinical outcomes and financial impact on our health system. We did a retrospective single-centre study of paediatric cardiac ECMO between January 2001 and March 2014. Outcomes included postimplant complications and survival at weaning and at discharge. We used activity based costing to compare the costs of current basic ECMO with those of a 'full optional' dedicated ECMO team (hypothesis 1); ECMO with a bedside nurse and perfusionist (hypothesis 2), and ECMO with a bedside perfusionist (hypothesis 3). Basic cardiac ECMO was required for 121 patients (median age 75 days, median weight 4.4 kg). A total of 107 patients (88%) had congenital heart disease; 37 had univentricular physiology. The median duration of ECMO was 7 days (interquartile range [IQR], 4-15 days). Overall survival at weaning and at 30 days in the neonatal and paediatric age groups was 58.6% and 30.6%, respectively; these results were not significantly different from Extracorporeal Life Support Organization data. Cost analysis revealed a saving of €30 366, €22 144 and €13 837 for each patient on basic ECMO for hypotheses 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Despite reduced human, technical and economical resources, a basic ECMO model without a bedside specialist was associated with satisfactory survival and lower costs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  2. Coupled Cluster Studies of Ionization Potentials and Electron Affinities of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Bo; Govind, Niranjan; Apra, Edoardo; Klemm, Michael; Hammond, Jeff R.; Kowalski, Karol

    2017-02-03

    In this paper we apply equation-of-motion coupled cluster (EOMCC) methods in studies of vertical ionization potentials (IP) and electron affinities (EA) for sin- gled walled carbon nanotubes. EOMCC formulations for ionization potentials and electron affinities employing excitation manifolds spanned by single and double ex- citations (IP/EA-EOMCCSD) are used to study IPs and EAs of nanotubes as a function of nanotube length. Several armchair nanotubes corresponding to C20nH20 models with n = 2 - 6 have been used in benchmark calculations. In agreement with previous studies, we demonstrate that the electronegativity of C20nH20 systems remains, to a large extent, independent of nanotube length. We also compare IP/EA- EOMCCSD results with those obtained with the coupled cluster models with single and double excitations corrected by perturbative triples, CCSD(T), and density func- tional theory (DFT) using global and range-separated hybrid exchange-correlation functionals.

  3. Membrane progesterone receptor alpha as a potential prognostic biomarker for breast cancer survival: a retrospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxuan Xie

    Full Text Available Classically, the actions of progesterone (P4 are attributed to the binding of nuclear progesterone receptor (PR and subsequent activation of its downstream target genes. These mechanisms, however, are not applicable to PR- or basal phenotype breast cancer (BPBC due to lack of PR in these cancers. Recently, the function of membrane progesterone receptor alpha (mPRα in human BPBC cell lines was studied in our lab. We proposed that the signaling cascades of P4→mPRα pathway may play an essential role in controlling cell proliferation and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT of breast cancer. Using human breast cancer tissue microarrays, we found in this study that the average intensity of mPRα expression, but not percentage of breast cancer with high level of mPRα expression (mPRα-HiEx, was significantly lower in the TNM stage 4 patients compared to those with TNM 1-3 patients; and both average intensities of mPRα expression and mPRα-HiEx rates were significantly higher in cancers negative for ER, as compared with those cancers with ER+. However, after adjusting for age at diagnosis and/or TNM stage, only average intensities of mPRα expression were associated with ER status. In addition, we found that the rates of mPRα-HiEx were significantly higher in cancers with epithelial growth factor receptor-1 (EGFR+ and high level of Ki67 expression, indicating positive correlation between mPRα over expression and EGFR or Ki67. Further analysis indicated that both mPRα-HiEx rate and average intensity of mPRα expression were significantly higher in HER2+ subtype cancers (i.e. HER2+ER-PR- as compared to ER+ subtype cancers. These data support our hypothesis that P4 modulates the activities of the PI3K and cell proliferation pathways through the caveolar membrane bound growth factor receptors such as mPRα and growth factor receptors. Future large longitudinal studies with larger sample size and survival outcomes are necessary to confirm our

  4. Correlates of a single cortical action potential in the epidural EEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teleńczuk, Bartosz; Baker, Stuart N; Kempter, Richard; Curio, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    To identify the correlates of a single cortical action potential in surface EEG, we recorded simultaneously epidural EEG and single-unit activity in the primary somatosensory cortex of awake macaque monkeys. By averaging over EEG segments coincident with more than hundred thousand single spikes, we found short-lived (≈ 0.5 ms) triphasic EEG deflections dominated by high-frequency components > 800 Hz. The peak-to-peak amplitude of the grand-averaged spike correlate was 80 nV, which matched theoretical predictions, while single-neuron amplitudes ranged from 12 to 966 nV. Combining these estimates with post-stimulus-time histograms of single-unit responses to median-nerve stimulation allowed us to predict the shape of the evoked epidural EEG response and to estimate the number of contributing neurons. These findings establish spiking activity of cortical neurons as a primary building block of high-frequency epidural EEG, which thus can serve as a quantitative macroscopic marker of neuronal spikes. PMID:25554430

  5. Single heavy flavour baryons using Coulomb plus a power law interquark potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majethiya, A.; Patel, B.; Vinodkumar, P.C.

    2008-01-01

    Properties of single heavy flavor baryons in a non-relativistic potential model with colour Coulomb plus a power law confinement potential have been studied using a simple variational method. The ground-state masses of single heavy baryons and the mass difference between the J P =3/2 + and J P =1/2 + states are computed using a spin-dependent two-body potential. Using the spin-flavour structure of the constituting quarks and by defining an effective confined mass of the constituent quarks within the baryons, the magnetic moments are computed. The masses and magnetic moments of the single heavy baryons are found to be in accordance with the existing experimental values and with other theoretical predictions. It is found that an additional attractive interaction of the order of -200 MeV is required for the antisymmetric states of Λ Q (Q element of c,b). It is also found that the spin-hyperfine interaction parameters play a decisive role in hadron spectroscopy. (orig.)

  6. Single-Trial Evoked Potential Estimating Based on Sparse Coding under Impulsive Noise Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nannan Yu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Estimating single-trial evoked potentials (EPs corrupted by the spontaneous electroencephalogram (EEG can be regarded as signal denoising problem. Sparse coding has significant success in signal denoising and EPs have been proven to have strong sparsity over an appropriate dictionary. In sparse coding, the noise generally is considered to be a Gaussian random process. However, some studies have shown that the background noise in EPs may present an impulsive characteristic which is far from Gaussian but suitable to be modeled by the α-stable distribution 1<α≤2. Consequently, the performances of general sparse coding will degrade or even fail. In view of this, we present a new sparse coding algorithm using p-norm optimization in single-trial EPs estimating. The algorithm can track the underlying EPs corrupted by α-stable distribution noise, trial-by-trial, without the need to estimate the α value. Simulations and experiments on human visual evoked potentials and event-related potentials are carried out to examine the performance of the proposed approach. Experimental results show that the proposed method is effective in estimating single-trial EPs under impulsive noise environment.

  7. Controllable resonant tunnelling through single-point potentials: A point triode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolotaryuk, A.V.; Zolotaryuk, Yaroslav

    2015-01-01

    A zero-thickness limit of three-layer heterostructures under two bias voltages applied externally, where one of which is supposed to be a gate parameter, is studied. As a result, an effect of controllable resonant tunnelling of electrons through single-point potentials is shown to exist. Therefore the limiting structure may be termed a “point triode” and considered in the theory of point interactions as a new object. The simple limiting analytical expressions adequately describe the resonant behaviour in the transistor with realistic parameter values and thus one can conclude that the zero-range limit of multi-layer structures may be used in fabricating nanodevices. The difference between the resonant tunnelling across single-point potentials and the Fabry–Pérot interference effect is also emphasized. - Highlights: • The zero-thickness limit of three-layer heterostructures is described in terms of point interactions. • The effect of resonant tunnelling through these single-point potentials is established. • The resonant tunnelling is shown to be controlled by a gate voltage

  8. Recording single neurons' action potentials from freely moving pigeons across three stages of learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starosta, Sarah; Stüttgen, Maik C; Güntürkün, Onur

    2014-06-02

    While the subject of learning has attracted immense interest from both behavioral and neural scientists, only relatively few investigators have observed single-neuron activity while animals are acquiring an operantly conditioned response, or when that response is extinguished. But even in these cases, observation periods usually encompass only a single stage of learning, i.e. acquisition or extinction, but not both (exceptions include protocols employing reversal learning; see Bingman et al.(1) for an example). However, acquisition and extinction entail different learning mechanisms and are therefore expected to be accompanied by different types and/or loci of neural plasticity. Accordingly, we developed a behavioral paradigm which institutes three stages of learning in a single behavioral session and which is well suited for the simultaneous recording of single neurons' action potentials. Animals are trained on a single-interval forced choice task which requires mapping each of two possible choice responses to the presentation of different novel visual stimuli (acquisition). After having reached a predefined performance criterion, one of the two choice responses is no longer reinforced (extinction). Following a certain decrement in performance level, correct responses are reinforced again (reacquisition). By using a new set of stimuli in every session, animals can undergo the acquisition-extinction-reacquisition process repeatedly. Because all three stages of learning occur in a single behavioral session, the paradigm is ideal for the simultaneous observation of the spiking output of multiple single neurons. We use pigeons as model systems, but the task can easily be adapted to any other species capable of conditioned discrimination learning.

  9. Soybean lecithin-based extender preserves spermatozoa membrane integrity and fertilizing potential during goat semen cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelucci, Sara; Pasciu, Valeria; Succu, Sara; Addis, Daniela; Leoni, Giovanni G; Manca, Maria E; Naitana, Salvatore; Berlinguer, Fiammetta

    2015-04-01

    Soybean lecithin may represent a suitable alternative to egg yolk for semen cryopreservation in livestock species. However, additional studies are needed to elucidate its effects on spermatozoa functional properties. Semen collected from five Sarda bucks was cryopreserved in Tris-based extender and glycerol (4% v:v) with different supplementations. In a preliminary experiment, different soybean lecithin concentrations were tested (1%-6% wt/vol) and results in terms of viability, percentages of progressive motile and rapid spermatozoa, and DNA integrity after thawing showed that the most effective concentration was 1%. In the second experiment, semen was frozen in a Tris-based extender with no supplementation (EXT), with 1% lecithin (EXT LC), and 20% egg yolk (EXT EY). The effectiveness of these extenders was also compared with a commercial extender. The EXT EY led to the highest viability and motility parameters after freezing and thawing (P lecithin can be considered as a suitable alternative to egg yolk in goat semen cryopreservation, because it ensures higher fertilization rates and a better protection from membrane damage by cold shock. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Investigating the effect of a single glycine to alanine substitution on interactions of antimicrobial peptide latarcin 2a with a lipid membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idiong, Grace; Won, Amy; Ruscito, Annamaria; Leung, Bonnie O; Hitchcock, Adam P; Ianoul, Anatoli

    2011-09-01

    Latarcins are linear, α-helical antimicrobial peptides purified from the venom of the Central Asian spider Lachesana tarabaevi, with lytic activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, erythrocytes, and yeast at micromolar concentrations. In this work, we investigated the role of the hinge in latarcin 2a (ltc2a, GLFGKLIKKFGRKAISYAVKKARGKH-COOH), which adopts a helix-hinge-helix conformation in membrane-mimicking environments, on peptide-membrane interactions and its potential effect on the selective toxicity of the peptide. A modified latarcin 2a, ltc2aG11A, obtained by replacing the glycine at position 11 with alanine (ltc2aG11A, GLFGKLIKKFARKAISYAVKKARGKH-COOH), adopts a more rigid structure due to the reduced conformational flexibility. Langmuir monolayer measurements combined with atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM) indicate that both peptides bind and insert preferentially into anionic compared with zwitterionic phospholipid monolayers. Modified ltc2aG11A was found to be more disruptive of supported phospholipid bilayer modeling mammalian cell membrane. However, no considerable difference in lytic activity of the two peptides toward bacterial membrane was found. Overall the data indicate that decrease in the flexibility of ltc2a induced by the modification in the hinge region is likely to increase the peptide's nonspecific interactions with zwitterionic cell membranes and potentially increase its toxicity against eukaryotic cells.

  11. Human Amniotic Membrane-Derived Products in Sports Medicine: Basic Science, Early Results, and Potential Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboh, Jonathan C; Saltzman, Bryan M; Yanke, Adam B; Cole, Brian J

    2016-09-01

    Amniotic membrane (AM)-derived products have been successfully used in ophthalmology, plastic surgery, and wound care, but little is known about their potential applications in orthopaedic sports medicine. To provide an updated review of the basic science and preclinical and clinical data supporting the use of AM-derived products and to review their current applications in sports medicine. Systematic review. A systematic search of the literature was conducted using the Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases. The search term amniotic membrane was used alone and in conjunction with stem cell, orthopaedic, tissue engineering, scaffold, and sports medicine. The search identified 6870 articles, 80 of which, after screening of the titles and abstracts, were considered relevant to this study. Fifty-five articles described the anatomy, basic science, and nonorthopaedic applications of AM-derived products. Twenty-five articles described preclinical and clinical trials of AM-derived products for orthopaedic sports medicine. Because the level of evidence obtained from this search was not adequate for systematic review or meta-analysis, a current concepts review on the anatomy, physiology, and clinical uses of AM-derived products is presented. Amniotic membranes have many promising applications in sports medicine. They are a source of pluripotent cells, highly organized collagen, antifibrotic and anti-inflammatory cytokines, immunomodulators, and matrix proteins. These properties may make it beneficial when applied as tissue engineering scaffolds, improving tissue organization in healing, and treatment of the arthritic joint. The current body of evidence in sports medicine is heavily biased toward in vitro and animal studies, with little to no human clinical data. Nonetheless, 14 companies or distributors offer commercial AM products. The preparation and formulation of these products alter their biological and mechanical properties, and a thorough understanding of these

  12. Differences Between a Single- and a Double-Folding Nucleus-^{9}Be Optical Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccorso, A.; Carstoiu, F.; Charity, R. J.; Kumar, R.; Salvioni, G.

    2016-05-01

    We have recently constructed two very successful n-^9Be optical potentials (Bonaccorso and Charity in Phys Rev C89:024619, 2014). One by the Dispersive Optical Model (DOM) method and the other (AB) fully phenomenological. The two potentials have strong surface terms in common for both the real and the imaginary parts. This feature makes them particularly suitable to build a single-folded (light-) nucleus-^9Be optical potential by using ab-initio projectile densities such as those obtained with the VMC method (Wiringa http://www.phy.anl.gov/theory/research/density/). On the other hand, a VMC density together with experimental nucleon-nucleon cross-sections can be used also to obtain a neutron and/or proton-^9Be imaginary folding potential. We will use here an ab-initio VMC density (Wiringa http://www.phy.anl.gov/theory/research/density/) to obtain both a n-^9Be single-folded potential and a nucleus-nucleus double-folded potential. In this work we report on the cases of ^8B, ^8Li and ^8C projectiles. Our approach could be the basis for a systematic study of optical potentials for light exotic nuclei scattering on such light targets. Some of the projectiles studied are cores of other exotic nuclei for which neutron knockout has been used to extract spectroscopic information. For those cases, our study will serve to make a quantitative assessment of the core-target part of the reaction description, in particular its localization.

  13. Evaluation of plasma membrane calcium/calmodulin-dependent ATPase isoform 4 as a potential target for fertility control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Elizabeth J; Neyses, Ludwig

    2010-01-01

    The array of contraceptives currently available is clearly inadequate and does not meet consumer demands since it is estimated that up to a quarter of all pregnancies worldwide are unintended. There is, therefore, an overwhelming global need to develop new effective, safe, ideally non-hormonal contraceptives for both male and female use. The contraceptive field, unlike other areas such as cancer, has a dearth of new targets. We have addressed this issue and propose that isoform 4 of the plasma membrane calcium ATPase is a potentially exciting novel target for fertility control. The plasma membrane calcium ATPase is a ubiquitously expressed calcium pump whose primary function in the majority of cells is to extrude calcium to the extracellular milieu. Two isoforms of this gene family, PMCA1 and PMCA4, are expressed in spermatozoa, with PMCA4 being the predominant isoform. Although this gene is ubiquitously expressed, its function is highly tissue-specific. Genetic deletion of PMCA4, in PMCA4 knockout mice, led to 100% infertility specifically in the male mutant mice due to a selective defect in sperm motility. It is important to note that the gene deletion did not affect normal mating characteristics in these mice. This phenotype was mimicked in wild-type sperm treated with the non-specific PMCA inhibitor 5-(and 6-) carboxyeosin diacetate succinimidyl ester; a proof-of-principle that inhibition of PMCA4 has potential importance in the control of fertility. This review outlines the potential for PMCA4 to be a novel target for fertility control by acting to inhibit sperm motility. It will outline the characteristics that make this target drugable and will describe methodologies to identify and validate novel inhibitors of this target.

  14. A perspective on the structural studies of inner membrane electrochemical potential-driven transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, M Joanne

    2008-09-01

    Electrochemical potential-driven transporters represent a vast array of proteins with varied substrate specificities. While diverse in size and substrate specificity, they are all driven by electrochemical potentials. Over the past five years there have been increasing numbers of X-ray structures reported for this family of transporters. Structural information is available for five subfamilies of electrochemical potential-driven transporters. No structural information exists for the remaining 91 subfamilies. In this review, the various subfamilies of electrochemical potential-driven transporters are discussed. The seven reported structures for the electrochemical potential-driven transporters and the methods for their crystallization are also presented. With a few exceptions, overall crystallization trends have been very similar for the transporters despite their differences in substrate specificity and topology. Also discussed is why the structural studies on these transporters were successful while others are not as fruitful. With the plethora of transporters with unknown structures, this review provides incentive for crystallization of transporters in the remaining subfamilies for which no structural information exists.

  15. Action potential propagation recorded from single axonal arbors using multi-electrode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Kenneth R; Bridges, Daniel C; Wu, Bian; Randall, Connor; Audouard, Morgane; Jang, Jiwon; Hansma, Paul K; Kosik, Kenneth S

    2018-04-11

    We report the presence of co-occurring extracellular action potentials (eAPs) from cultured mouse hippocampal neurons among groups of planar electrodes on multi-electrode arrays (MEAs). The invariant sequences of eAPs among co-active electrode groups, repeated co-occurrences and short inter-electrode latencies are consistent with action potential propagation in unmyelinated axons. Repeated eAP co-detection by multiple electrodes was widespread in all our data records. Co-detection of eAPs confirms they result from the same neuron and allows these eAPs to be isolated from all other spikes independently of spike sorting algorithms. We averaged co-occurring events and revealed additional electrodes with eAPs that would otherwise be below detection threshold. We used these eAP cohorts to explore the temperature sensitivity of action potential propagation and the relationship between voltage-gated sodium channel density and propagation velocity. The sequence of eAPs among co-active electrodes 'fingerprints' neurons giving rise to these events and identifies them within neuronal ensembles. We used this property and the non-invasive nature of extracellular recording to monitor changes in excitability at multiple points in single axonal arbors simultaneously over several hours, demonstrating independence of axonal segments. Over several weeks, we recorded changes in inter-electrode propagation latencies and ongoing changes in excitability in different regions of single axonal arbors. Our work illustrates how repeated eAP co-occurrences can be used to extract physiological data from single axons with low electrode density MEAs. However, repeated eAP co-occurrences leads to over-sampling spikes from single neurons and thus can confound traditional spike-train analysis.

  16. A single-step simultaneous protein staining procedure for polyacrylamide gels and nitrocellulose membranes by Alta during western blot analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Jayanta K; Berwal, Sunil K; Soni, Rupali N

    2012-01-01

    A simple method for staining of proteins simultaneously on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gels and nitrocellulose membranes by Alta during western blot analysis is described. A 5% solution of Alta, a commercially available cosmetic preparation, is added in the upper tank buffer during electrophoresis. On completion of electrophoresis, the gel is washed in distilled water and viewed on a white light plate and a transilluminator to photograph the protein profiles. The gel is processed for western blot transfer of proteins onto a nitrocellulose membrane, and upon completion, the protein profiles on the membrane are viewed and photographed as stated above. The membrane can then be processed for immunostaining as per the standard procedure. Thus, the staining procedure using Alta is simple, rapid (without any need of destaining), and cost-effective.

  17. Conductor polymeric membranes with potential for application in PEM type fuel cells; Membranas polimericas condutoras com potencialidades para aplicacao em celulas a combustivel do tipo PEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brioude, Michel de Meireles; Sodre, Livia Farias; Boaventura Filho, Jaime Soares; Jose, Nadia Mamede [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    In this work two series of membranes were prepared; they were based on hybrid organic-inorganic or composite materials and presented potentiality for application in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell, PEMFC. The polymeric phase was constituted of poly(dimethylsiloxane), PDMS, crosslinked with tetra ethoxysilane, TEOS, with a 70%/30% ratio. Phosphotungstic acid (PWA) or the sodium monododecylsulphate (MDS), as proton conductors, were added to the inorganic network, close to the gel point; the mixtures were transferred to a cast. The films were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The membranes showed good properties, as flexibility, thermal and mechanical stability with potentiality to be used as conducting membranes in technological applications. (author)

  18. Molecular-based detection of potentially pathogenic bacteria in membrane bioreactor (MBR) systems treating municipal wastewater: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harb, Moustapha; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2017-02-01

    Although membrane bioreactor (MBR) systems provide better removal of pathogens compared to conventional activated sludge processes, they do not achieve total log removal. The present study examines two MBR systems treating municipal wastewater, one a full-scale MBR plant and the other a lab-scale anaerobic MBR. Both of these systems were operated using microfiltration (MF) polymeric membranes. High-throughput sequencing and digital PCR quantification were utilized to monitor the log removal values (LRVs) of associated pathogenic species and their abundance in the MBR effluents. Results showed that specific removal rates vary widely regardless of the system employed. Each of the two MBR effluents' microbial communities contained genera associated with opportunistic pathogens (e.g., Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter) with a wide range of log reduction values (5.5). Digital PCR further confirmed that these bacterial groups included pathogenic species, in several instances at LRVs different than those for their respective genera. These results were used to evaluate the potential risks associated both with the reuse of the MBR effluents for irrigation purposes and with land application of the activated sludge from the full-scale MBR system.

  19. Molecular-based detection of potentially pathogenic bacteria in membrane bioreactor (MBR) systems treating municipal wastewater: a case study

    KAUST Repository

    Harb, Moustapha

    2016-12-24

    Although membrane bioreactor (MBR) systems provide better removal of pathogens compared to conventional activated sludge processes, they do not achieve total log removal. The present study examines two MBR systems treating municipal wastewater, one a full-scale MBR plant and the other a lab-scale anaerobic MBR. Both of these systems were operated using microfiltration (MF) polymeric membranes. High-throughput sequencing and digital PCR quantification were utilized to monitor the log removal values (LRVs) of associated pathogenic species and their abundance in the MBR effluents. Results showed that specific removal rates vary widely regardless of the system employed. Each of the two MBR effluents’ microbial communities contained genera associated with opportunistic pathogens (e.g., Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter) with a wide range of log reduction values (< 2 to >5.5). Digital PCR further confirmed that these bacterial groups included pathogenic species, in several instances at LRVs different than those for their respective genera. These results were used to evaluate the potential risks associated both with the reuse of the MBR effluents for irrigation purposes and with land application of the activated sludge from the full-scale MBR system.

  20. Primordial membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanczyc, Martin M; Monnard, Pierre-Alain

    2017-01-01

    Cellular membranes, which are self-assembled bilayer structures mainly composed of lipids, proteins and conjugated polysaccharides, are the defining feature of cell physiology. It is likely that the complexity of contemporary cells was preceded by simpler chemical systems or protocells during...... the various evolutionary stages that led from inanimate to living matter. It is also likely that primitive membranes played a similar role in protocell 'physiology'. The composition of such ancestral membranes has been proposed as mixtures of single hydrocarbon chain amphiphiles, which are simpler versions...

  1. Pado, a fluorescent protein with proton channel activity can optically monitor membrane potential, intracellular pH, and map gap junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bok Eum; Baker, Bradley J

    2016-04-04

    An in silico search strategy was developed to identify potential voltage-sensing domains (VSD) for the development of genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs). Using a conserved charge distribution in the S2 α-helix, a single in silico search yielded most voltage-sensing proteins including voltage-gated potassium channels, voltage-gated calcium channels, voltage-gated sodium channels, voltage-gated proton channels, and voltage-sensing phosphatases from organisms ranging from mammals to bacteria and plants. A GEVI utilizing the VSD from a voltage-gated proton channel identified from that search was able to optically report changes in membrane potential. In addition this sensor was capable of manipulating the internal pH while simultaneously reporting that change optically since it maintains the voltage-gated proton channel activity of the VSD. Biophysical characterization of this GEVI, Pado, demonstrated that the voltage-dependent signal was distinct from the pH-dependent signal and was dependent on the movement of the S4 α-helix. Further investigation into the mechanism of the voltage-dependent optical signal revealed that inhibiting the dimerization of the fluorescent protein greatly reduced the optical signal. Dimerization of the FP thereby enabled the movement of the S4 α-helix to mediate a fluorescent response.

  2. Analytical solutions for a single vertical drain with time-dependent vacuum combined surcharge preloading in membrane and membraneless systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, X Y; Indraratna, B; Rujikiatkamjorn, C

    2010-01-01

    Vertical drains combined with vacuum pressure and surcharge preloading are widely used to accelerate the consolidation process of soft clay in order to decrease the pore pressure as well as to increase the effective stress. Currently there are two types of vacuum preloading systems commercially available; (a) membrane system with an airtight membrane over the drainage layer and, (b) membraneless system where a vacuum system is connected to individual drain. Their effectiveness varies from site to site depending on the type of soil treated and the characteristics of the drain-vacuum system. This study presents the analytical solutions of vertical drains with vacuum preloading for both membrane and membraneless systems. According to the field and laboratory observations, the vacuum in both of the membraneless and membrane system was assumed to be decreasing along the drain whereas in the membrane system, it was maintained at a constant level. This model was verified by using the measured settlements and excess pore pressures obtained from large-scale laboratory testing and case studies in Australia. The analytical solutions improved the accuracy of predicting the dissipation of pore water pressure and the associated settlement. The effects of the permeability of the sand blanket in a membrane system and the possible loss of vacuum were also discussed.

  3. Potential of ultraviolet widefield imaging and multiphoton microscopy for analysis of dehydroergosterol in cellular membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Bagatolli, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Dehydroergosterol (DHE) is an intrinsically fluorescent sterol with absorption/emission in the ultraviolet (UV) region and biophysical properties similar to those of cholesterol. We compared the potential of UV-sensitive low-light-level wide-field (UV-WF) imaging with that of multiphoton (MP) exc...

  4. Kernel PLS Estimation of Single-trial Event-related Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosipal, Roman; Trejo, Leonard J.

    2004-01-01

    Nonlinear kernel partial least squaes (KPLS) regressior, is a novel smoothing approach to nonparametric regression curve fitting. We have developed a KPLS approach to the estimation of single-trial event related potentials (ERPs). For improved accuracy of estimation, we also developed a local KPLS method for situations in which there exists prior knowledge about the approximate latency of individual ERP components. To assess the utility of the KPLS approach, we compared non-local KPLS and local KPLS smoothing with other nonparametric signal processing and smoothing methods. In particular, we examined wavelet denoising, smoothing splines, and localized smoothing splines. We applied these methods to the estimation of simulated mixtures of human ERPs and ongoing electroencephalogram (EEG) activity using a dipole simulator (BESA). In this scenario we considered ongoing EEG to represent spatially and temporally correlated noise added to the ERPs. This simulation provided a reasonable but simplified model of real-world ERP measurements. For estimation of the simulated single-trial ERPs, local KPLS provided a level of accuracy that was comparable with or better than the other methods. We also applied the local KPLS method to the estimation of human ERPs recorded in an experiment on co,onitive fatigue. For these data, the local KPLS method provided a clear improvement in visualization of single-trial ERPs as well as their averages. The local KPLS method may serve as a new alternative to the estimation of single-trial ERPs and improvement of ERP averages.

  5. A MISO-ARX-Based Method for Single-Trial Evoked Potential Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nannan Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a novel method for solving the single-trial evoked potential (EP estimation problem. In this method, the single-trial EP is considered as a complex containing many components, which may originate from different functional brain sites; these components can be distinguished according to their respective latencies and amplitudes and are extracted simultaneously by multiple-input single-output autoregressive modeling with exogenous input (MISO-ARX. The extraction process is performed in three stages: first, we use a reference EP as a template and decompose it into a set of components, which serve as subtemplates for the remaining steps. Then, a dictionary is constructed with these subtemplates, and EPs are preliminarily extracted by sparse coding in order to roughly estimate the latency of each component. Finally, the single-trial measurement is parametrically modeled by MISO-ARX while characterizing spontaneous electroencephalographic activity as an autoregression model driven by white noise and with each component of the EP modeled by autoregressive-moving-average filtering of the subtemplates. Once optimized, all components of the EP can be extracted. Compared with ARX, our method has greater tracking capabilities of specific components of the EP complex as each component is modeled individually in MISO-ARX. We provide exhaustive experimental results to show the effectiveness and feasibility of our method.

  6. Membrane and envelope virus proteins co-expressed as lysosome associated membrane protein (LAMP fused antigens: a potential tool to develop DNA vaccines against flaviviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Dhalia

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination is the most practical and cost-effective strategy to prevent the majority of the flavivirus infection to which there is an available vaccine. However, vaccines based on attenuated virus can potentially promote collateral side effects and even rare fatal reactions. Given this scenario, the developent of alternative vaccination strategies such as DNA-based vaccines encoding specific flavivirus sequences are being considered. Endogenous cytoplasmic antigens, characteristically plasmid DNA-vaccine encoded, are mainly presented to the immune system through Major Histocompatibility Complex class I - MHC I molecules. The MHC I presentation via is mostly associated with a cellular cytotoxic response and often do not elicit a satisfactory humoral response. One of the main strategies to target DNA-encoded antigens to the MHC II compartment is expressing the antigen within the Lysosome-Associated Membrane Protein (LAMP. The flavivirus envelope protein is recognized as the major virus surface protein and the main target for neutralizing antibodies. Different groups have demonstrated that co-expression of flavivirus membrane and envelope proteins in mammalian cells, fused with the carboxyl-terminal of LAMP, is able to induce satisfactory levels of neutralizing antibodies. Here we reviewed the use of the envelope flavivirus protein co-expression strategy as LAMP chimeras with the aim of developing DNA vaccines for dengue, West Nile and yellow fever viruses.A vacinação é a estratégia mais prática e o melhor custo-benefício para prevenir a maioria das infecções dos flavivirus, para os quais existe vacina disponível. Entretanto, as vacinas baseadas em vírus atenuados podem potencialmente promover efeitos colaterais e, mais raramente, reações fatais. Diante deste cenário, o desenvolvimento de estratégias alternativas de vacinação, como vacinas baseadas em DNA codificando seqüências específicas dos flavivirus, está sendo considerado

  7. Combinatorial mutagenesis of the voltage-sensing domain enables the optical resolution of action potentials firing at 60 Hz by a genetically encoded fluorescent sensor of membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Hong Hua; Rajakumar, Dhanarajan; Kang, Bok Eum; Kim, Eun Ha; Baker, Bradley J

    2015-01-07

    ArcLight is a genetically encoded fluorescent voltage sensor using the voltage-sensing domain of the voltage-sensing phosphatase from Ciona intestinalis that gives a large but slow-responding optical signal in response to changes in membrane potential (Jin et al., 2012). Fluorescent voltage sensors using the voltage-sensing domain from other species give faster yet weaker optical signals (Baker et al., 2012; Han et al., 2013). Sequence alignment of voltage-sensing phosphatases from different species revealed conserved polar and charged residues at 7 aa intervals in the S1-S3 transmembrane segments of the voltage-sensing domain, suggesting potential coil-coil interactions. The contribution of these residues to the voltage-induced optical signal was tested using a cassette mutagenesis screen by flanking each transmembrane segment with unique restriction sites to allow for the testing of individual mutations in each transmembrane segment, as well as combinations in all four transmembrane segments. Addition of a counter charge in S2 improved the kinetics of the optical response. A double mutation in the S4 domain dramatically reduced the slow component of the optical signal seen in ArcLight. Combining that double S4 mutant with the mutation in the S2 domain yielded a probe with kinetics voltage-sensing domain could potentially lead to fluorescent sensors capable of optically resolving neuronal inhibition and subthreshold synaptic activity. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/350372-15$15.00/0.

  8. Potential in a single cancer cell to produce heterogeneous morphology, radiosensitivity and gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Sadayuki; Ishikawa, Ken-ichi; Kawai, Seiko; Koyama-Saegusa, Kumiko; Ishikawa, Atsuko; Imai, Takashi; Shimada, Yutaka; Inazawa, Johji

    2005-01-01

    Morphologically heterogeneous colonies were formed from a cultured cell line (KYSE70) established from one human esophageal carcinoma tissue. Two subclones were separated from a single clone (clone 13) of KYSE70 cells. One subclone (clone 13-3G) formed mainly mounding colonies and the other (clone 13-6G) formed flat, diffusive colonies. X-irradiation stimulated the cells to dedifferentiate from the mounding state to the flat, diffusive state. Clone 13-6G cells were more radiosensitive than the other 3 cell lines. Clustering analysis for gene expression level by oligonucleotide microarray demonstrated that in the radiosensitive clone 13-6G cells, expression of genes involved in cell adhesion was upregulated, but genes involved in the response to DNA damage stimulus were downregulated. The data demonstrated that a single cancer cell had the potential to produce progeny heterogeneous in terms of morphology, radiation sensitivity and gene expression, and irradiation enhanced the dedifferentiation of cancer cells. (author)

  9. Observation of Fermi Arc Surface States Induced by Organic Memristive/Memcapacitive Devices with a Double-Helical Polarized Single-Wall Nanotube Membrane for Direct Chelating with Matrix Matelloproteinase-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. T. CHEN

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Matrix Matelloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 plays a key role in many diseases. A new type of dual-functioning device was developed for fast, direct ultrasensitive detection of MMP-2. We report a memristive/memcapacitive device with vertex double-helical polarized biomimetic protein nanotubules forming double membranes with potential gradient mimicking mitochondria’s inner double membrane has developed. We also report Fermi arcs with nodes on the surface of the nanostructured membrane was observed at the first time by using a 3D real-time - energy-current dynamic mapping method based on data obtained from the Cyclic Voltammetry (CV method. The memristive/memcapacitive device comprises a cross- linked organic polymer having single-wall cross-bar polarized nanotube self-assembling membrane (SAM on a gold chip, under an applied potential, a pair of vertex double- helical circular current flow induced the Fermi arcs states occurrence and these Fermi arcs promoted a direct chelating with zinc ions of the MMP-2 to become possible without any antibody, tracer, or reagent used at room temperature was accomplished. We observed the pair of Dirac Cones became alignment and strengthened with each other in the presence of MMP-2 compared without MMP-2. The MMP-2 can be detected with ag/mL level sensitivity and the value of Detection of Limits (DOL reached orders of magnitude lower than published reports with simplified procedures by a Chronoamperometry (CA method and a Double Step Chronopotentiometry (DSCPO method using NIST SRM 965A standard human serum, respectively. The results show a feasible application for developing the commercial fast and real-time MMP monitoring devices for various diseases.

  10. Potassium accumulation by the glial membrane pump as revealed by membrane potential recording from isolated rabbit retinal Müller cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, A; Nilius, B; Eberhardt, W

    1986-01-30

    Müller (glial) cells were isolated from rabbit retinae by papaine and mechanical dissociation. In a special perfusion chamber, the cells were penetrated with a recording electrode. When high-K+ solutions were applied into the environment of the cells by means of a second micropipette, the cell membrane depolarized strongly. During prolonged application of high-K+ solutions, however, there occurred a marked repolarization, and after cessation of high-K+ application, a strong hyperpolarization was observed. Both effects disappeared under the influence of ouabain, suggesting the accumulation of intracellular K+ by an active membrane pump. The data were used for calculation of the membrane's Na+:K+ permeability ratio, the intracellular K+ concentration, the pump rate and the mean pump site density. The calculated values are in good agreement with published data from mammalian astrocytes and are compared with those from amphibian Müller cells.

  11. Analyses of the energy-dependent single separable potential models for the NN scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, S.S.; Beghi, L.

    1981-08-01

    Starting from a systematic study of the salient features regarding the quantum-mechanical two-particle scattering off an energy-dependent (ED) single separable potential and its connection with the rank-2 energy-independent (EI) separable potential in the T-(K-) amplitude formulation, the present status of the ED single separable potential models due to Tabakin (M1), Garcilazo (M2) and Ahmad (M3) has been discussed. It turned out that the incorporation of a self-consistent optimization procedure improves considerably the results of the 1 S 0 and 3 S 1 scattering phase shifts for the models (M2) and (M3) up to the CM wave number q=2.5 fm -1 , although the extrapolation of the results up to q=10 fm -1 reveals that the two models follow the typical behaviour of the well-known super-soft core potentials. It has been found that a variant of (M3) - i.e. (M4) involving one more parameter - gives the phase shifts results which are generally in excellent agreement with the data up to q=2.5 fm -1 and the extrapolation of the results for the 1 S 0 case in the higher wave number range not only follows the corresponding data qualitatively but also reflects a behaviour similar to the Reid soft core and Hamada-Johnston potentials together with a good agreement with the recent [4/3] Pade fits. A brief discussion regarding the features resulting from the variations in the ED parts of all the four models under consideration and their correlations with the inverse scattering theory methodology concludes the paper. (author)

  12. Synchronous plasma membrane electrochemical potential oscillations during yeast colony development and aging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palková, Z.; Váchová, Libuše; Gášková, D.; Kučerová, Helena

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 4 (2009), s. 228-235 ISSN 0968-7688 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/05/0294; GA ČR GA204/08/0718; GA MŠk(CZ) LC531 Grant - others:US(US) Howard Hughes Medical Institute International Research Award (#55005623) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : yeast colony population * transmembrane potential oscillations * cell energetics Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.777, year: 2009

  13. A single amino acid substitution modulates low-pH-triggered membrane fusion of GP64 protein in Autographa californica and Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedroviruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katou, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Hayato; Ikeda, Motoko; Kobayashi, Michihiro

    2010-01-01

    We have previously shown that budded viruses of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) enter the cell cytoplasm but do not migrate into the nuclei of non-permissive Sf9 cells that support a high titer of Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) multiplication. Here we show, using the syncytium formation assay, that low-pH-triggered membrane fusion of BmNPV GP64 protein (Bm-GP64) is significantly lower than that of AcMNPV GP64 protein (Ac-GP64). Mutational analyses of GP64 proteins revealed that a single amino acid substitution between Ac-GP64 H155 and Bm-GP64 Y153 can have significant positive or negative effects on membrane fusion activity. Studies using bacmid-based GP64 recombinant AcMNPV harboring point-mutated ac-gp64 and bm-gp64 genes showed that Ac-GP64 H155Y and Bm-GP64 Y153H substitutions decreased and increased, respectively, the multiplication and cell-to-cell spread of progeny viruses. These results indicate that Ac-GP64 H155 facilitates the low-pH-triggered membrane fusion reaction between virus envelopes and endosomal membranes.

  14. Choice of single-particle potential and the convergence of the effective interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Osnes, E.; Muether, H.; Schmid, K.W.

    1990-02-01

    The convergence of the expansion for the effective interaction is studied considering as example the shell model for the nuclei 18 O and 18 F. In this work the effective interaction is computed through third order in the Brueckner G matrix, using both a harmonic-oscillator (HO) basis and a Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (BHF) basis. The significant differences in the convergence behavior of the effective interaction in these two cases are reported. The results indicate that the choice of the BHF single-particle potential facilitates the convergence of the effective interaction in low-orders of the expansion, whereas the HO results exhibit a non-convergent behavior. The implications for the HO approach are discussed. All calculations have been performed considering a modern version of the Bonn one-boson-exchange potential for the nucleon-nucleon interaction. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Direct detection of a single evoked action potential with MRS in Lumbricus terrestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poplawsky, Alexander J; Dingledine, Raymond; Hu, Xiaoping P

    2012-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) measures neural activity indirectly by detecting the signal change associated with the hemodynamic response following brain activation. In order to alleviate the temporal and spatial specificity problems associated with fMRI, a number of attempts have been made to detect neural magnetic fields (NMFs) with MRI directly, but have thus far provided conflicting results. In this study, we used MR to detect axonal NMFs in the median giant fiber of the earthworm, Lumbricus terrestris, by examining the free induction decay (FID) with a sampling interval of 0.32 ms. The earthworm nerve cords were isolated from the vasculature and stimulated at the threshold of action potential generation. FIDs were acquired shortly after the stimulation, and simultaneous field potential recordings identified the presence or absence of single evoked action potentials. FIDs acquired when the stimulus did not evoke an action potential were summed as background. The phase of the background-subtracted FID exhibited a systematic change, with a peak phase difference of (-1.2 ± 0.3) × 10(-5) radians occurring at a time corresponding to the timing of the action potential. In addition, we calculated the possible changes in the FID magnitude and phase caused by a simulated action potential using a volume conductor model. The measured phase difference matched the theoretical prediction well in both amplitude and temporal characteristics. This study provides the first evidence for the direct detection of a magnetic field from an evoked action potential using MR. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Large aperture deformable mirror with a transferred single-crystal silicon membrane actuated using large-stroke PZT Unimorph Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hishinumat, Yoshikazu; Yang, Eui - Hyeok (EH)

    2005-01-01

    We have demonstrated a large aperture (50 mm x 50 mm) continuous membrane deformable mirror (DM) with a large-stroke piezoelectric unimorph actuator array. The DM consists of a continuous, large aperture, silicon membrane 'transferred' in its entirety onto a 20 x 20 piezoelectric unimorph actuator array. A PZT unimorph actuator, 2.5 mm in diameter with optimized PZT/Si thickness and design showed a deflection of 5.7 [m at 20V. An assembled DM showed an operating frequency bandwidth of 30 kHz and influence function of approximately 30%.

  17. Exercise body surface potential mapping in single and multiple coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montague, T.J.; Witkowski, F.X.; Miller, R.M.; Johnstone, D.E.; MacKenzie, R.B.; Spencer, C.A.; Horacek, B.M.

    1990-01-01

    Body surface ST integral maps were recorded in 36 coronary artery disease (CAD) patients at: rest; peak, angina-limited exercise; and, 1 and 5 min of recovery. They were compared to maps of 15 CAD patients who exercised to fatigue, without angina, and eight normal subjects. Peak exercise heart rates were similar (NS) in all groups. With exercise angina, patients with two and three vessel CAD had significantly (p less than 0.05) greater decrease in the body surface sum of ST integral values than patients with single vessel CAD. CAD patients with exercise fatigue, in the absence of angina, had decreased ST integrals similar (NS) to patients with single vessel CAD who manifested angina and the normal control subjects. There was, however, considerable overlap among individuals; some patients with single vessel CAD had as much exercise ST integral decrease as patients with three vessel CAD. All CAD patients had persistent ST integral decreases at 5 min of recovery and there was a direct correlation of the recovery and peak exercise ST changes. Exercise ST changes correlated, as well, with quantitative CAD angiographic scores, but not with thallium perfusion scores. These data suggest exercise ST integral body surface mapping allows quantitation of myocardium at ischemic risk in patients with CAD, irrespective of the presence or absence of ischemic symptoms during exercise. A major potential application of this technique is selection of CAD therapy guided by quantitative assessment of ischemic myocardial risk

  18. Potential DNA barcodes for Melilotus species based on five single loci and their combinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Wu

    Full Text Available Melilotus, an annual or biennial herb, belongs to the tribe Trifolieae (Leguminosae and consists of 19 species. As an important green manure crop, diverse Melilotus species have different values as feed and medicine. To identify different Melilotus species, we examined the efficiency of five candidate regions as barcodes, including the internal transcribed spacer (ITS and two chloroplast loci, rbcL and matK, and two non-coding loci, trnH-psbA and trnL-F. In total, 198 individuals from 98 accessions representing 18 Melilotus species were sequenced for these five potential barcodes. Based on inter-specific divergence, we analysed sequences and confirmed that each candidate barcode was able to identify some of the 18 species. The resolution of a single barcode and its combinations ranged from 33.33% to 88.89%. Analysis of pairwise distances showed that matK+rbcL+trnL-F+trnH-psbA+ITS (MRTPI had the greatest value and rbcL the least. Barcode gap values and similarity value analyses confirmed these trends. The results indicated that an ITS region, successfully identifying 13 of 18 species, was the most appropriate single barcode and that the combination of all five potential barcodes identified 16 of the 18 species. We conclude that MRTPI is the most effective tool for Melilotus species identification. Taking full advantage of the barcode system, a clear taxonomic relationship can be applied to identify Melilotus species and enhance their practical production.

  19. Dynamics of Membrane Potential Variation and Gene Expression Induced by Spodoptera littoralis, Myzus persicae, and Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricchi, Irene; Bertea, Cinzia M.; Occhipinti, Andrea; Paponov, Ivan A.; Maffei, Massimo E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Biotic stress induced by various herbivores and pathogens invokes plant responses involving different defense mechanisms. However, we do not know whether different biotic stresses share a common response or which signaling pathways are involved in responses to different biotic stresses. We investigated the common and specific responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to three biotic stress agents: Spodoptera littoralis, Myzus persicae, and the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Methodology/Principal Findings We used electrophysiology to determine the plasma membrane potential (Vm) and we performed a gene microarray transcriptome analysis on Arabidopsis upon either herbivory or bacterial infection. Vm depolarization was induced by insect attack; however, the response was much more rapid to S. littoralis (30 min −2 h) than to M. persicae (4–6 h). M. persicae differentially regulated almost 10-fold more genes than by S. littoralis with an opposite regulation. M. persicae modulated genes involved in flavonoid, fatty acid, hormone, drug transport and chitin metabolism. S. littoralis regulated responses to heat, transcription and ion transport. The latest Vm depolarization (16 h) was found for P. syringae. The pathogen regulated responses to salicylate, jasmonate and to microorganisms. Despite this late response, the number of genes differentially regulated by P. syringae was closer to those regulated by S. littoralis than by M. persicae. Conclusions/Significance Arabidopsis plasma membranes respond with a Vm depolarization at times depending on the nature of biotic attack which allow setting a time point for comparative genome-wide analysis. A clear relationship between Vm depolarization and gene expression was found. At Vm depolarization timing, M. persicae regulates a wider array of Arabidopsis genes with a clear and distinct regulation than S. littoralis. An almost completely opposite regulation was observed between the aphid and the pathogen, with the former

  20. Potential contact and intraocular lenses based on hydrophilic/hydrophobic sulfonated syndiotactic polystyrene membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Zuppolini

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Crystalline films of syndiotactic polystyrene (s-PS, a commercially available thermoplastic polymer, having a highly hydrophilic amorphous phase, were achieved by using a mild solid-state sulfonation procedure. Despite the used mild process conditions, an easy and uniform sulfonation of the phenyl rings of the amorphous phase is obtained. The crystallinity of the polymer was not affect by the sulfonation degree (S, at least at S less than 20%, and the obtained polymer films show the nanoporous crystalline form of s-PS. As widely reported in literature, the nanoporous nature of the polymer crystalline phase gives to these materials the ability to absorb and release organic molecules of appropriate size and polarity. This property, coupled to transparency, makes these materials potentially useful intraocular lens (IOLs and contact lens applications. Sulfonation procedure and sulfonated film samples characterization by using wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis spectroscopy techniques and water sorption tests were reported. Furthermore, the biocompatibility study demonstrated no cytotoxicity and appropriate cell interaction properties for the specific applications.

  1. Multilineage potential and proteomic profiling of human dental stem cells derived from a single donor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, Rajreddy; Kumar, B. Mohana; Lee, Won-Jae; Jeon, Ryoung-Hoon; Jang, Si-Jung; Lee, Yeon-Mi; Park, Bong-Wook; Byun, June-Ho; Ahn, Chun-Seob; Kim, Jae-Won; Rho, Gyu-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Dental tissues provide an alternative autologous source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for regenerative medicine. In this study, we isolated human dental MSCs of follicle, pulp and papilla tissue from a single donor tooth after impacted third molar extraction by excluding the individual differences. We then compared the morphology, proliferation rate, expression of MSC-specific and pluripotency markers, and in vitro differentiation ability into osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). Finally, we analyzed the protein expression profiles of undifferentiated dental MSCs using 2DE coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS. Three types of dental MSCs largely shared similar morphology, proliferation potential, expression of surface markers and pluripotent transcription factors, and differentiation ability into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Upon hepatogenic induction, all MSCs were transdifferentiated into functional HLCs, and acquired hepatocyte functions by showing their ability for glycogen storage and urea production. Based on the proteome profiling results, we identified nineteen proteins either found commonly or differentially expressed among the three types of dental MSCs. In conclusion, three kinds of dental MSCs from a single donor tooth possessed largely similar cellular properties and multilineage potential. Further, these dental MSCs had similar proteomic profiles, suggesting their interchangeable applications for basic research and call therapy. - Highlights: • Isolated and characterized three types of human dental MSCs from a single donor. • MSCs of dental follicle, pulp and papilla had largely similar biological properties. • All MSCs were capable of transdifferentiating into functional hepatocyte-like cells. • 2DE proteomics with MALDI-TOF/MS identified 19 proteins in three types of MSCs. • Similar proteomic profiles suggest interchangeable applications of dental MSCs

  2. Multilineage potential and proteomic profiling of human dental stem cells derived from a single donor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, Rajreddy; Kumar, B. Mohana; Lee, Won-Jae; Jeon, Ryoung-Hoon; Jang, Si-Jung; Lee, Yeon-Mi [Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Bong-Wook; Byun, June-Ho [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Medicine and Institute of Health Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-702 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Chun-Seob; Kim, Jae-Won [Department of Microbiology, Division of Life Sciences, Research Institute of Life Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Rho, Gyu-Jin, E-mail: jinrho@gnu.ac.kr [Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Life Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-01

    Dental tissues provide an alternative autologous source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for regenerative medicine. In this study, we isolated human dental MSCs of follicle, pulp and papilla tissue from a single donor tooth after impacted third molar extraction by excluding the individual differences. We then compared the morphology, proliferation rate, expression of MSC-specific and pluripotency markers, and in vitro differentiation ability into osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). Finally, we analyzed the protein expression profiles of undifferentiated dental MSCs using 2DE coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS. Three types of dental MSCs largely shared similar morphology, proliferation potential, expression of surface markers and pluripotent transcription factors, and differentiation ability into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Upon hepatogenic induction, all MSCs were transdifferentiated into functional HLCs, and acquired hepatocyte functions by showing their ability for glycogen storage and urea production. Based on the proteome profiling results, we identified nineteen proteins either found commonly or differentially expressed among the three types of dental MSCs. In conclusion, three kinds of dental MSCs from a single donor tooth possessed largely similar cellular properties and multilineage potential. Further, these dental MSCs had similar proteomic profiles, suggesting their interchangeable applications for basic research and call therapy. - Highlights: • Isolated and characterized three types of human dental MSCs from a single donor. • MSCs of dental follicle, pulp and papilla had largely similar biological properties. • All MSCs were capable of transdifferentiating into functional hepatocyte-like cells. • 2DE proteomics with MALDI-TOF/MS identified 19 proteins in three types of MSCs. • Similar proteomic profiles suggest interchangeable applications of dental MSCs.

  3. Characterization on glow-discharge-treated cellulose acetate membrane surfaces for single-layer enzyme electrode studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Biederman, H.; Boyaci, I. H.; Bílková, P.; Slavinská, D.; Mutlu, S.; Zemek, Josef; Trchová, M.; Klimovič, J.; Mutlu, M.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 81, - (2001), s. 1341-1352 ISSN 0021-8995 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : cellulose acetate membrane * plasma polymerization * surface treatment * enzyme electrodes Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.992, year: 2001

  4. Permeability and Diffusion Coefficients of Single Methyl Lactate Enantiomers in Nafion® and Cellophane Membranes Measured in Diffusion Cell.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hovorka, Š.; Randová, A.; Borbášová, T.; Sysel, P.; Vychodilová, Hana; Červenková Šťastná, Lucie; Brožová, Libuše; Žitka, Jan; Storch, Jan; Kačírková, Marie; Drašar, P.; Izák, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 158, JAN 28 (2016), s. 322-332 ISSN 1383-5866 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP106/12/0569 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : diffusion coefficient measurement * permeability * nafion * cellophane * chirality of polymer membrane Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 3.359, year: 2016

  5. Studies on the biocidal and cell membrane disruption potentials of stem bark extracts of Afzelia africana (Smith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAVID A AKINPELU

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We had recently reported antibacterial activity in the crude extract of the stem bark of Afzelia africana (Akinpelu et al., 2008. In this study, we assessed the biocidal and cell membrane disruption potentials of fractions obtained from the crude extract of the plant. The aqueous (AQ and butanol (BL fractions exhibited appreciable antibacterial activities against the test bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of the AQ and BL fractions ranged between 0.313 and 2.5 mg/ml, while their minimum bactericidal concentrations varied between 0.625 and 5.0 mg/ml. Also, the AQ fraction killed about 95.8% of E. coli cells within 105 min at a concentration of 5 mg/ml, while about 99.1% of Bacillus pumilus cells were killed by this fraction at the same concentration and exposure time. A similar trend was observed for the BL fraction. At a concentration of 5 mg/ml, the butanol fraction leaked 9.8 μg/ml of proteins from E. coli cells within 3 h, while the aqueous fraction leaked 6.5 μg/ml of proteins from the same organisms at the same concentration and exposure time. We propose that the stem bark of Afzelia africana is a potential source of bioactive compounds of importance to the pharmaceutical industry.

  6. Cytotoxic effects induced by interferon-ω gene lipofection through ROS generation and mitochondrial membrane potential disruption in feline mammary carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde, Marcela Solange; Targovnik, Alexandra Marisa; Miranda, María Victoria; Finocchiaro, Liliana María Elena; Glikin, Gerardo Claudio

    2016-08-01

    Progress in comparative oncology promises advances in clinical cancer treatments for both companion animals and humans. In this context, feline mammary carcinoma (FMC) cells have been proposed as a suitable model to study human breast cancer. Based on our previous data about the advantages of using type I interferon gene therapy over the respective recombinant DNA derived protein, the present work explored the effects of feline interferon-ω gene (fIFNω) transfer on FMC cells. Three different cell variants derived from a single spontaneous highly aggressive FMC tumor were successfully established and characterized. Lipofection of the fIFNω gene displayed a significant cytotoxic effect on the three cell variants. The extent of the response was proportional to ROS generation, mitochondrial membrane potential disruption and calcium uptake. Moreover, a lower sensitivity to the treatment correlated with a higher malignant phenotype. Our results suggest that fIFNω lipofection could offer an alternative approach in veterinary oncology with equal or superior outcome and with less adverse effects than recombinant fIFNω therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. LONG-TERM RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF VISUAL ACUITY AND OPTICAL COHERENCE TOPOGRAPHIC CHANGES AFTER SINGLE VERSUS DOUBLE PEELING DURING VITRECTOMY FOR MACULAR EPIRETINAL MEMBRANES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jesse J; Hoang, Quan V; Ridley-Lane, Megan L; Sebrow, Dov B; Dhrami-Gavazi, Elona; Chang, Stanley

    2016-11-01

    To determine the long-term effect of internal limiting membrane with associated epiretinal membrane (ERM) peeling versus single peeling alone in terms of best-corrected visual acuity and anatomical outcomes on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. This retrospective comparative cohort study of patients who had follow-up of >1 year and underwent surgery for ERM by a single surgeon (S.C.) from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2012 compared cases in which the internal limiting membrane was stained with brilliant blue G to facilitate double peeling (n = 42) and single peeling (n = 43) of the ERM alone for up to 3 years of follow-up. For continuous variables, an independent two-tailed t-test was performed. For binary variables, the Fisher's exact test was performed. Statistical significance was defined as P peeling group were more likely to have ERM remaining in the central fovea postoperatively (P = 0.0020, becoming significant by postoperative Year 1, P = 0.022) and less likely to develop inner retinal dimpling (P = 0.000, becoming significant by postoperative Month 3, P = 0.015). At 3 years, central foveal thickness had decreased in the single-peeling group by -136.9 µm and by -84.1 μm in the double-peeling group, which was not significantly different (P = 0.08). Mean best-corrected visual acuity improved in both the groups at all time points. There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups at 3 years (P = 0.44; single-peeling group, 0.32 ± 0.42, Snellen 20/42; double-peeling group, 0.23 ± 0.27, Snellen 20/34). Brilliant blue G-assisted internal limiting membrane peeling for ERM results in a more thorough removal of residual ERM around the paracentral fovea. However, there is no difference in long-term best-corrected visual acuity at 3 years and a greater likelihood of inner retinal dimpling.

  8. Multifunctional nanocomposite hollow fiber membranes by solvent transfer induced phase separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Martin F; Jeon, Harim; Hough, Noah; Kim, Jong Hak; Stebe, Kathleen J; Lee, Daeyeon

    2017-11-01

    The decoration of porous membranes with a dense layer of nanoparticles imparts useful functionality and can enhance membrane separation and anti-fouling properties. However, manufacturing of nanoparticle-coated membranes requires multiple steps and tedious processing. Here, we introduce a facile single-step method in which bicontinuous interfacially jammed emulsions are used to form nanoparticle-functionalized hollow fiber membranes. The resulting nanocomposite membranes prepared via solvent transfer-induced phase separation and photopolymerization have exceptionally high nanoparticle loadings (up to 50 wt% silica nanoparticles) and feature densely packed nanoparticles uniformly distributed over the entire membrane surfaces. These structurally well-defined, asymmetric membranes facilitate control over membrane flux and selectivity, enable the formation of stimuli responsive hydrogel nanocomposite membranes, and can be easily modified to introduce antifouling features. This approach forms a foundation for the formation of advanced nanocomposite membranes comprising diverse building blocks with potential applications in water treatment, industrial separations and as catalytic membrane reactors.

  9. Single K ATP channel opening in response to action potential firing in mouse dentate granule neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Geoffrey R; Lutas, Andrew; Martínez-François, Juan Ramón; Yellen, Gary

    2011-06-08

    ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K(ATP) channels) are important sensors of cellular metabolic state that link metabolism and excitability in neuroendocrine cells, but their role in nonglucosensing central neurons is less well understood. To examine a possible role for K(ATP) channels in modulating excitability in hippocampal circuits, we recorded the activity of single K(ATP) channels in cell-attached patches of granule cells in the mouse dentate gyrus during bursts of action potentials generated by antidromic stimulation of the mossy fibers. Ensemble averages of the open probability (p(open)) of single K(ATP) channels over repeated trials of stimulated spike activity showed a transient increase in p(open) in response to action potential firing. Channel currents were identified as K(ATP) channels through blockade with glibenclamide and by comparison with recordings from Kir6.2 knock-out mice. The transient elevation in K(ATP) p(open) may arise from submembrane ATP depletion by the Na(+)-K(+) ATPase, as the pump blocker strophanthidin reduced the magnitude of the elevation. Both the steady-state and stimulus-elevated p(open) of the recorded channels were higher in the presence of the ketone body R-β-hydroxybutyrate, consistent with earlier findings that ketone bodies can affect K(ATP) activity. Using perforated-patch recording, we also found that K(ATP) channels contribute to the slow afterhyperpolarization following an evoked burst of action potentials. We propose that activity-dependent opening of K(ATP) channels may help granule cells act as a seizure gate in the hippocampus and that ketone-body-mediated augmentation of the activity-dependent opening could in part explain the effect of the ketogenic diet in reducing epileptic seizures.

  10. Mass-charge-heat coupled transfers in a single cell of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell; Transferts couples masse-charge-chaleur dans une cellule de pile a combustible a membrane polymere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramousse, J

    2005-11-15

    Understanding and modelling of coupled mass, charges and heat transfers phenomena are fundamental to analyze the electrical behaviour of the system. The aim of the present model is to describe electrical performances of a PEFMC according to the fluidic and thermal operating conditions. The water content of the membrane and the water distribution in the single cell are estimated according to the coupled simulations of mass transport in the thickness of the single cell and in the feeding channels of the bipolar plates. A microscopic model of a Gas Diffusion Electrode is built up to describe charges transfer phenomena occurring at the electrodes. Completed by a study of heat transfer in the Membrane Electrode Assembly, conditions and preferential sites of water vapor condensation can be highlighted. A set of measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of carbon felts used in fuel cells as porous backing layers have also been performed. Although the value of this parameter is essential for the study of heat transfer, it is still under investigation because of the strong thermal anisotropy of the medium. (author)

  11. Bimolecular Master Equations for a Single and Multiple Potential Wells with Analytic Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Nima

    2018-04-12

    The analytic solutions, that is, populations, are derived for the K-adiabatic and K-active bimolecular master equations, separately, for a single and multiple potential wells and reaction channels, where K is the component of the total angular momentum J along the axis of least moment of inertia of the recombination products at a given energy E. The analytic approach provides the functional dependence of the population of molecules on its K-active or K-adiabatic dissociation, association rate constants and the intermolecular energy transfer, where the approach may complement the usual numerical approaches for reactions of interest. Our previous work, Part I, considered the solutions for a single potential well, whereby an assumption utilized there is presently obviated in the derivation of the exact solutions and farther discussed. At the high-pressure limit, the K-adiabatic and K-active bimolecular master equations may each reduce, respectively, to the K-adiabatic and K-active bimolecular Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory (high-pressure limit expressions) for bimolecular recombination rate constant, for a single potential well, and augmented by isomerization terms when multiple potential wells are present. In the low-pressure limit, the expression for population above the dissociation limit, associated with a single potential well, becomes equivalent to the usual presumed detailed balance between the association and dissociation rate constants, where the multiple well case is also considered. When the collision frequency of energy transfer, Z LJ , between the chemical intermediate and bath gas is sufficiently less than the dissociation rate constant k d ( E' J' K') for postcollision ( E' J' K), then the solution for population, g( EJK) + , above the critical energy further simplifies such that depending on Z LJ , the dissociation and association rate constant k r ( EJK), as g( EJK) + = k r ( EJK)A·BC/[ Z LJ + k d ( EJK)], where A and BC are the reactants, for

  12. The Relationship between Respiration-Related Membrane Potential Slow Oscillations and Discharge Patterns in Mitral/Tufted Cells: What Are the Rules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briffaud, Virginie; Fourcaud-Trocmé, Nicolas; Messaoudi, Belkacem; Buonviso, Nathalie; Amat, Corine

    2012-01-01

    Background A slow respiration-related rhythm strongly shapes the activity of the olfactory bulb. This rhythm appears as a slow oscillation that is detectable in the membrane potential, the respiration-related spike discharge of the mitral/tufted cells and the bulbar local field potential. Here, we investigated the rules that govern the manifestation of membrane potential slow oscillations (MPSOs) and respiration-related discharge activities under various afferent input conditions and cellular excitability states. Methodology and Principal Findings We recorded the intracellular membrane potential signals in the mitral/tufted cells of freely breathing anesthetized rats. We first demonstrated the existence of multiple types of MPSOs, which were influenced by odor stimulation and discharge activity patterns. Complementary studies using changes in the intracellular excitability state and a computational model of the mitral cell demonstrated that slow oscillations in the mitral/tufted cell membrane potential were also modulated by the intracellular excitability state, whereas the respiration-related spike activity primarily reflected the afferent input. Based on our data regarding MPSOs and spike patterns, we found that cells exhibiting an unsynchronized discharge pattern never exhibited an MPSO. In contrast, cells with a respiration-synchronized discharge pattern always exhibited an MPSO. In addition, we demonstrated that the association between spike patterns and MPSO types appeared complex. Conclusion We propose that both the intracellular excitability state and input strength underlie specific MPSOs, which, in turn, constrain the types of spike patterns exhibited. PMID:22952828

  13. The single-particle potential of nuclear matter in the LOCV framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modarres, M., E-mail: mmodares@ut.ac.ir [Physics Department, University of Tehran, North-Kargar Ave., 1439955961 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rajabi, A. [Physics Department, Shahid Rajaei Teacher Training University, Lavizan, 16788 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-10-01

    The density and momentum dependence of single-particle potential (SPP) and effective mass of symmetric nuclear matter are studied in the framework of lowest order constrained variational (LOCV) method. The Reid68, the Reid68-{Delta} and the Av{sub 18} interactions are considered as the input nucleon-nucleon potentials. It is shown that the SPP of nuclear matter, at fixed density, is an increasing function of nucleon momentum, and it has different behavior for the Reid type potentials with respect to Av{sub 18} interaction. We find good agreements between our LOCV SPP and those coming from others many-body techniques such as the (Dirac-)Brueckner-Hartree-Foch ((D)BHF), the fermion hypernetted chain (FHNC), mean field (MF), etc. On the other hand SPP dramatically depends on the density at low and high nucleon momentums. While the effective mass of nuclear matter increases as we increase the nucleon momentum, it decreases at the Fermi surface. Again, good agreements are observed between our calculated effective mass and those coming from the methods mentioned above.

  14. Single-site Green function of the Dirac equation for full-potential electron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kordt, Pascal

    2012-05-30

    I present an elaborated analytical examination of the Green function of an electron scattered at a single-site potential, for both the Schroedinger and the Dirac equation, followed by an efficient numerical solution, in both cases for potentials of arbitrary shape without an atomic sphere approximation. A numerically stable way to calculate the corresponding regular and irregular wave functions and the Green function is via the angular Lippmann-Schwinger integral equations. These are solved based on an expansion in Chebyshev polynomials and their recursion relations, allowing to rewrite the Lippmann-Schwinger equations into a system of algebraic linear equations. Gonzales et al. developed this method for the Schroedinger equation, where it gives a much higher accuracy compared to previous perturbation methods, with only modest increase in computational effort. In order to apply it to the Dirac equation, I developed relativistic Lippmann-Schwinger equations, based on a decomposition of the potential matrix into spin spherical harmonics, exploiting certain properties of this matrix. The resulting method was embedded into a Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker code for density functional calculations. As an example, the method is applied by calculating phase shifts and the Mott scattering of a tungsten impurity. (orig.)

  15. Single-site Green function of the Dirac equation for full-potential electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kordt, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    I present an elaborated analytical examination of the Green function of an electron scattered at a single-site potential, for both the Schroedinger and the Dirac equation, followed by an efficient numerical solution, in both cases for potentials of arbitrary shape without an atomic sphere approximation. A numerically stable way to calculate the corresponding regular and irregular wave functions and the Green function is via the angular Lippmann-Schwinger integral equations. These are solved based on an expansion in Chebyshev polynomials and their recursion relations, allowing to rewrite the Lippmann-Schwinger equations into a system of algebraic linear equations. Gonzales et al. developed this method for the Schroedinger equation, where it gives a much higher accuracy compared to previous perturbation methods, with only modest increase in computational effort. In order to apply it to the Dirac equation, I developed relativistic Lippmann-Schwinger equations, based on a decomposition of the potential matrix into spin spherical harmonics, exploiting certain properties of this matrix. The resulting method was embedded into a Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker code for density functional calculations. As an example, the method is applied by calculating phase shifts and the Mott scattering of a tungsten impurity. (orig.)

  16. Effects of single cycle binaural beat duration on auditory evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihajloski, Todor; Bohorquez, Jorge; Özdamar, Özcan

    2014-01-01

    Binaural beat (BB) illusions are experienced as continuous central pulsations when two sounds with slightly different frequencies are delivered to each ear. It has been shown that steady-state auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) to BBs can be captured and investigated. The authors recently developed a new method of evoking transient AEPs to binaural beats using frequency modulated stimuli. This methodology was able to create single BBs in predetermined intervals with varying carrier frequencies. This study examines the effects of the BB duration and the frequency modulating component of the stimulus on the binaural beats and their evoked potentials. Normal hearing subjects were tested with a set of four durations (25, 50, 100, and 200 ms) with two stimulation configurations, binaural dichotic (binaural beats) and diotic (frequency modulation). The results obtained from the study showed that out of the given durations, the 100 ms beat, was capable of evoking the largest amplitude responses. The frequency modulation effect showed a decrease in peak amplitudes with increasing beat duration until their complete disappearance at 200 ms. Even though, at 200 ms, the frequency modulation effects were not present, the binaural beats were still perceived and captured as evoked potentials.

  17. Visually Evoked 3-5 Hz Membrane Potential Oscillations Reduce the Responsiveness of Visual Cortex Neurons in Awake Behaving Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Michael C; Polack, Pierre-Olivier; Tran, Duy T; Golshani, Peyman

    2017-05-17

    Low-frequency membrane potential ( V m ) oscillations were once thought to only occur in sleeping and anesthetized states. Recently, low-frequency V m oscillations have been described in inactive awake animals, but it is unclear whether they shape sensory processing in neurons and whether they occur during active awake behavioral states. To answer these questions, we performed two-photon guided whole-cell V m recordings from primary visual cortex layer 2/3 excitatory and inhibitory neurons in awake mice during passive visual stimulation and performance of visual and auditory discrimination tasks. We recorded stereotyped 3-5 Hz V m oscillations where the V m baseline hyperpolarized as the V m underwent high amplitude rhythmic fluctuations lasting 1-2 s in duration. When 3-5 Hz V m oscillations coincided with visual cues, excitatory neuron responses to preferred cues were significantly reduced. Despite this disruption to sensory processing, visual cues were critical for evoking 3-5 Hz V m oscillations when animals performed discrimination tasks and passively viewed drifting grating stimuli. Using pupillometry and animal locomotive speed as indicators of arousal, we found that 3-5 Hz oscillations were not restricted to unaroused states and that they occurred equally in aroused and unaroused states. Therefore, low-frequency V m oscillations play a role in shaping sensory processing in visual cortical neurons, even during active wakefulness and decision making. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A neuron's membrane potential ( V m ) strongly shapes how information is processed in sensory cortices of awake animals. Yet, very little is known about how low-frequency V m oscillations influence sensory processing and whether they occur in aroused awake animals. By performing two-photon guided whole-cell recordings from layer 2/3 excitatory and inhibitory neurons in the visual cortex of awake behaving animals, we found visually evoked stereotyped 3-5 Hz V m oscillations that disrupt

  18. Relative mitochondrial membrane potential and [Ca2+]i in type I cells isolated from the rabbit carotid body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchen, M R; Biscoe, T J

    1992-05-01

    1. In the accompanying paper (Duchen & Biscoe, 1992) we have described graded changes in autofluorescence derived from mitochondrial NAD(P)H in type I cells of the carotid body in response to changes of PO2 over a physiologically significant range. These observations suggest that mitochondrial function in these cells is unusually sensitive to oxygen and could play a role in oxygen sensing. We have now explored further the relationships between hypoxia, mitochondrial membrane potential (delta psi m) and [Ca2+]i. 2. The fluorescence of Rhodamine 123 (Rh 123) accumulated within mitochondria is quenched by delta psi m. Mitochondrial depolarization thus increases the fluorescence signal. Blockade of electron transport (CN-, anoxia, rotenone) and uncoupling agents (e.g. carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxy-phenylhydrazone; FCCP) increased fluorescence by up to 80-120%, while fluorescence was reduced by blockade of the F0 proton channel of the mitochondrial ATP synthase complex (oligomycin). 3. delta psi m depolarized rapidly with anoxia, and was usually completely dissipated within 1-2 min. The depolarization of delta psi m with anoxia (or CN-) and repolarization on reoxygenation both followed a time course well characterized as the sum of two exponential processes. Oligomycin (0.2-2 micrograms/ml) hyperpolarized delta psi m and abolished the slower components of both the depolarization with anoxia and of the subsequent repolarization. These data (i) illustrate the role of the F1-F0 ATP synthetase in slowing the rate of dissipation of delta psi m on cessation of electron transport, (ii) confirm blockade of the ATP synthetase by oligomycin at these concentrations, and (iii) indicate significant accumulation of intramitochondrial ADP during 1-2 min of anoxia. 4. Depolarization of delta psi m was graded with graded changes in PO2 below about 60 mmHg. The stimulus-response curves thus constructed strongly resemble those for [Ca2+]i and NAD(P)H with PO2. The change in delta

  19. A single dose of dexamethasone encapsulated in polyethylene glycol-coated polylactic acid nanoparticles attenuates cisplatin-induced hearing loss following round window membrane administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun CL

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Changling Sun,1,3,* Xueling Wang,1,* Zhaozhu Zheng,2 Dongye Chen,1 Xiaoqin Wang,2 Fuxin Shi,1 Dehong Yu,1 Hao Wu11Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Xinhua Hospital, Ear Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Translational Medicine on Ear and Nose Diseases, Shanghai, 2National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, Soochow University, Suzhou, 3Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Affiliated Hospital of Jiangnan University, The Fourth People’s Hospital of Wuxi City, Wuxi, People’s Republic of China*These authors have contributed equally to this workAbstract: This study aimed to investigate the sustained drug release properties and hearing protection effect of polyethylene glycol-coated polylactic acid (PEG-PLA stealth nanoparticles loaded with dexamethasone (DEX. DEX was fabricated into PEG-PLA nanoparticles using an emulsion and evaporation technique, as previously reported. The DEX-loaded PEG-PLA nanoparticles (DEX-NPs had a hydrodynamic diameter of 130±4.78 nm, and a zeta potential of -26.13±3.28 mV. The in vitro release of DEX from DEX-NPs lasted 24 days in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4, 5 days in artificial perilymph (pH 7.4, and 1 day in rat plasma. Coumarin 6-labeled NPs placed onto the round window membrane (RWM of guinea pigs penetrated RWM quickly and accumulated to the organs of Corti, stria vascularis, and spiral ganglion cells after 1 hour of administration. The DEX-NPs locally applied onto the RWM of guinea pigs by a single-dose administration continuously released DEX in 48 hours, which was significantly longer than the free DEX that was cleared out within 12 hours after administration at the same dose. Further functional studies showed that locally administrated single-dose DEX-NPs effectively preserved outer hair cells in guinea pigs after cisplatin insult and thus significantly attenuated hearing loss at 4 kHz and 8

  20. Potential of sub- and supercritical CO_2 reaction media for sol-gel deposition of silica-based molecular sieve membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, Veronique; Duchateau, Maxime; Drobek, Martin; Julbe, Anne; Hertz, Audrey; Ruiz, Jean-Christophe; Sarrade, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    A new eco-friendly method recently developed in our group has been further investigated for the preparation of gas selective silica-based molecular sieve membranes on/in macroporous tubular ceramic supports without any intermediate layer. The synthesis protocol under sub- and supercritical conditions was based on an 'On-Stream Supercritical Fluid Deposition method' (OS-SFD) applying supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO_2) as an attractive 'green' solvent with easily adjustable properties enabling a controlled solubilisation/reaction of precursors and their transport to the ceramic support. Parameters influencing the final membrane characteristics such as permeates flow rate, calcination treatment and deposition steps have been examined for a selected reaction mixture, transmembrane pressure and defined deposition temperatures. On-line monitoring of the membrane formation process (deposition signature curve) was used in this process. Membrane characteristics are discussed in correlation with their gas permeation properties. The optimized crack-free silica membranes prepared at 50 C have a compact microstructure but a thermal stability limited to 400 C. A second deposition run allowed a recovery of the molecular sieving behaviour with a thermally activated transport for He up to 350 C. These promising results demonstrate the potential of this novel method for the preparation of uniform molecular sieve membranes deposited directly on macroporous supports with virtually zero waste. (authors)

  1. Single-Photon Ionization Soft-X-Ray Laser Mass Spectrometry of Potential Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, F.; Bernstein, E. R.; Rocca, J. J.

    A desk-top size capillary discharge 46.9 nm lasear is applied in the gas phase study of nanoclusters. The high photon energy allows for single-photon ionization mass spectrometry with reduced cluster fragmentation. In the present studies, neutral Al m C n and Al m C n H x cluster are investigation for the first time. Single photon ionization through 46.9 nm, 118 nm, 193 nm lasers is used to detect neutral cluster distributions through time of flight mass spectrometry. Al m C n clusters are generated through laser ablation of a mixture of Al and C powders pressed into a disk. An oscillation of the vertical ionization energies (VIEs) of Al m C n clusters is observed in the experiments. The VIEs of Al m C n clusters changes as a function of the numbers of Al and C atoms in the clusters. Al m C n H x clusters are generated through an Al ablation plasma-hydrocarbon reaction, an Al-C ablation plasma reacting with H2 gas, or through cold Al m C n clusters reacting with H2 gas in a fast flow reactor. DFT and ab inito calculations are carried out to explore the structures, IEs, and electronic structures of Al m C n H x clusters. C=C bonds are favored for the lowest energy structures for Al m C n clusters. Be m C n H x are generated through a beryllium ablation plasma-hydrocarbon reaction and detected by single photon ionization of 193 nm laser. Both Al m C n H x and Be m C n H x are considered as potential hydrogen storage materials.

  2. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a bridge to lung transplantation: A single-center experience in the present era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Emily M; Biswas Roy, Sreeja; Hashimi, A Samad; Serrone, Rosemarie; Panchanathan, Roshan; Kang, Paul; Varsch, Katherine E; Steinbock, Barry E; Huang, Jasmine; Omar, Ashraf; Patel, Vipul; Walia, Rajat; Smith, Michael A; Bremner, Ross M

    2017-11-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation has been used as a bridge to lung transplantation in patients with rapid pulmonary function deterioration. The reported success of this modality and perioperative and functional outcomes are varied. We retrospectively reviewed all patients who underwent lung transplantation at our institution over 1 year (January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2015). Patients were divided into 2 groups depending on whether they required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support as a bridge to transplant; preoperative characteristics, lung transplantation outcomes, and survival were compared between groups. Of the 93 patients, 12 (13%) received bridge to transplant, and 81 (87%) did not. Patients receiving bridge to transplant were younger, had higher lung allocation scores, had lower functional status, and were more often on mechanical ventilation at listing. Most patients who received bridge to transplant (n = 10, 83.3%) had pulmonary fibrosis. Mean pretransplant extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support was 103.6 hours in duration (range, 16-395 hours). All patients who received bridge to transplant were decannulated immediately after lung transplantation but were more likely to return to the operating room for secondary chest closure or rethoracotomy. Grade 3 primary graft dysfunction within 72 hours was similar between groups. Lung transplantation success and hospital discharge were 100% in the bridge to transplant group; however, these patients experienced longer hospital stays and higher rates of discharge to acute rehabilitation. The 1-year survival was 100% in the bridge to transplant group and 91% in the non-bridge to transplant group (log-rank, P = .24). The 1-year functional status was excellent in both groups. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation can be used to safely bridge high-acuity patients with end-stage lung disease to lung transplantation with good 30-day, 90-day, and 1-year survival and excellent 1-year functional status

  3. Single and multiple vibrational resonance in a quintic oscillator with monostable potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyakumari, S; Chinnathambi, V; Rajasekar, S; Sanjuan, M A F

    2009-10-01

    We analyze the occurrence of vibrational resonance in a damped quintic oscillator with three cases of single well of the potential V(x)=1/2omega(0)(2)x(2)+1/4betax(4)+1/6gammax(6) driven by both low-frequency force f cos omegat and high-frequency force g cos Omegat with Omega > omega. We restrict our analysis to the parametric choices (i) omega(0)(2), beta, gamma > 0 (single well), (ii) omega(0)(2), gamma > 0, beta 0, beta arbitrary, gamma choice (i) at most one resonance occur while for the other two choices (ii) and (iii) multiple resonance occur. Further, g(VR) is found to be independent of the damping strength d while omega(VR) depends on d. The theoretical predictions are found to be in good agreement with the numerical result. We illustrate that the vibrational resonance can be characterized in terms of width of the orbit also.

  4. Single-Trial Event-Related Potential Based Rapid Image Triage System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Yu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Searching for points of interest (POI in large-volume imagery is a challenging problem with few good solutions. In this work, a neural engineering approach called rapid image triage (RIT which could offer about a ten-fold speed up in POI searching is developed. It is essentially a cortically-coupled computer vision technique, whereby the user is presented bursts of images at a speed of 6–15 images per second and then neural signals called event-related potential (ERP is used as the ‘cue’ for user seeing images of high relevance likelihood. Compared to past efforts, the implemented system has several unique features: (1 it applies overlapping frames in image chip preparation, to ensure rapid image triage performance; (2 a novel common spatial-temporal pattern (CSTP algorithm that makes use of both spatial and temporal patterns of ERP topography is proposed for high-accuracy single-trial ERP detection; (3 a weighted version of probabilistic support-vector-machine (SVM is used to address the inherent unbalanced nature of single-trial ERP detection for RIT. High accuracy, fast learning, and real-time capability of the developed system shown on 20 subjects demonstrate the feasibility of a brainmachine integrated rapid image triage system for fast detection of POI from large-volume imagery.

  5. Variations in interpulse interval of double action potentials during propagation in single neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villagran-Vargas, Edgar; Rodríguez-Sosa, Leonardo; Hustert, Reinhold; Blicher, Andreas; Laub, Katrine; Heimburg, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    In this work, we analyzed the interpulse interval (IPI) of doublets and triplets in single neurons of three biological models. Pulse trains with two or three spikes originate from the process of sensory mechanotransduction in neurons of the locust femoral nerve, as well as through spontaneous activity both in the abdominal motor neurons and the caudal photoreceptor of the crayfish. We show that the IPI for successive low-frequency single action potentials, as recorded with two electrodes at two different points along a nerve axon, remains constant. On the other hand, IPI in doublets either remains constant, increases or decreases by up to about 3 ms as the pair propagates. When IPI increases, the succeeding pulse travels at a slower speed than the preceding one. When IPI is reduced, the succeeding pulse travels faster than the preceding one and may exceed the normal value for the specific neuron. In both cases, IPI increase and reduction, the speed of the preceding pulse differs slightly from the normal value, therefore the two pulses travel at different speeds in the same nerve axon. On the basis of our results, we may state that the effect of attraction or repulsion in doublets suggests a tendency of the spikes to reach a stable configuration. We strongly suggest that the change in IPI during spike propagation of doublets opens up a whole new realm of possibilities for neural coding and may have major implications for understanding information processing in nervous systems. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. What Can We Learn about Cholesterol's Transmembrane Distribution Based on Cholesterol-Induced Changes in Membrane Dipole Potential?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkovich, Stanislav G.; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Nesterenko, Alexey M.

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is abundant in the plasma membranes of animal cells and is known to regulate a variety of membrane properties. Despite decades of research, the transmembrane distribution of cholesterol is still a matter of debate. Here we consider this outstanding issue through atomistic simulations ...

  7. Pressure-induced basilar membrane position shifts and the stimulus-evoked potentials in the low-frequency region of the guinea pig cochlea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fridberger, A; vanMaarseveen, JTPW; Scarfone, E; Ulfendahl, M; Flock, B; Flock, A

    1997-01-01

    We have used the guinea pig isolated temporal bone preparation to investigate changes in the nonlinear properties of the tone-evoked cochlear potentials during reversible step displacements of the basilar membrane towards either the scala tympani or the scala vestibuli. The position shifts were

  8. Impact of the growth phase on the activity of multidrug resistance pumps and membrane potential of S.cerevidiae: effect of pump overproduction and carbon source

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čadek, R.; Chládková, K.; Sigler, Karel; Gášková, D.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 1665, - (2004), s. 111-117 ISSN 0005-2736 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS5020202 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : growth phases * s.cerevisiae * membrane potential Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.441, year: 2004

  9. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion of insulinoma INS-1E cells is associated with elevation of both respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špaček, Tomáš; Šantorová, Jitka; Zacharovová, K.; Berková, Z.; Hlavatá, Lydie; Saudek, F.; Ježek, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 8 (2008), s. 1522-1535 ISSN 1357-2725 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NR7917 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : in situ mitochondrial membrane potential * in situ mitochondrial respiration * glucose-stimulated insulin secretion Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 4.178, year: 2008

  10. Synthesis, Characterization and Application of Poly (Styrene-4- Vinyl Pyridine) Membranes Assembled With Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    He, Haoze

    2011-06-01

    Poly(styrene‐4‐vinylpyridine) (PS‐P4VP) isoporous membranes were prepared and their properties were evaluated in this research. The solution was prepared by dissolving PS‐P4VP polymer with necessary additives into a 1:1:1 1,4‐dioxane – N,N‐dimethyl formamide – tetrahydrofuran (DOX‐DMF‐THF, DDT) solvent. Then 0.5‐1.0 mL of the primary solution was cast onto the non‐woven substrate membrane on a glass slide, evaporated for 15‐20 sec and immersed into de‐ionized water for more than 30 min for the solidification of isoporous structure and for the formation of the primary films, which could be post‐processed in different ways for different tests. The membrane surface presents a well‐ordered, hexagonal self‐assembly structure, which is fit for aqueous and gaseous filtration. The pore size of the isoporous surface is 30~40 nm. The pore size is also sensitive to [H+] in the solution and a typical pair of S‐shape pH‐correlation curves with significant hysteresis was found. Four techniques were tried to improve the properties of the membranes in this research: 1) 1,4‐diiodobutane was introduced to chemically change the structure as a cross‐linking agent. 2) single‐wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) was linked to the membranes in order to strengthen the stability and rigidity and to reduce the hysteresis. 3) Homo‐poly(4‐vinylpyridine) (homo‐P4VP) was added and inserted into the PS‐P4VP micelles to affect the pore size and surface structure. 4) Copper acetate (Cu(Ac)2) was used as substitute of dioxane to prepare the Cu(Ac)2‐DMF‐THF (CDT) mixed solvent, for a better SWCNT dispersion. All the possible improvements were judged by the atomic force microscopy (AFM) images, water and gas flux tests and pH‐correlation curves. The introduction of SWCNT was the most important innovation in this research and is promising in future applications.

  11. A highly sensitive hydrogen sensor with gas selectivity using a PMMA membrane-coated Pd nanoparticle/single-layer graphene hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Juree; Lee, Sanggeun; Seo, Jungmok; Pyo, Soonjae; Kim, Jongbaeg; Lee, Taeyoon

    2015-02-18

    A polymer membrane-coated palladium (Pd) nanoparticle (NP)/single-layer graphene (SLG) hybrid sensor was fabricated for highly sensitive hydrogen gas (H2) sensing with gas selectivity. Pd NPs were deposited on SLG via the galvanic displacement reaction between graphene-buffered copper (Cu) and Pd ion. During the galvanic displacement reaction, graphene was used as a buffer layer, which transports electrons from Cu for Pd to nucleate on the SLG surface. The deposited Pd NPs on the SLG surface were well-distributed with high uniformity and low defects. The Pd NP/SLG hybrid was then coated with polymer membrane layer for the selective filtration of H2. Because of the selective H2 filtration effect of the polymer membrane layer, the sensor had no responses to methane, carbon monoxide, or nitrogen dioxide gas. On the contrary, the PMMA/Pd NP/SLG hybrid sensor exhibited a good response to exposure to 2% H2: on average, 66.37% response within 1.81 min and recovery within 5.52 min. In addition, reliable and repeatable sensing behaviors were obtained when the sensor was exposed to different H2 concentrations ranging from 0.025 to 2%.

  12. Effect of graphite addition into mill scale waste as a potential bipolar plates material of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaerudini, D. S.; Prakoso, G. B.; Insiyanda, D. R.; Widodo, H.; Destyorini, F.; Indayaningsih, N.

    2018-03-01

    Bipolar plates (BPP) is a vital component of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), which supplies fuel and oxidant to reactive sites, remove reaction products, collects produced current and provide mechanical support for the cells in the stack. This work concerns the utilization of mill scale, a by-product of iron and steel formed during the hot rolling of steel, as a potential material for use as BPP in PEMFC. On the other hand, mill scale is considered a very rich in iron source having characteristic required such as for current collector in BPP and would significantly contribute to lower the overall cost of PEMFC based fuel cell systems. In this study, the iron reach source of mill scale powder, after sieving of 150 mesh, was mechanically alloyed with the carbon source containing 5, 10, and 15 wt.% graphite using a shaker mill for 3 h. The mixed powders were then pressed at 300 MPa and sintered at 900 °C for 1 h under inert gas atmosphere. The structural changes of powder particles during mechanical alloying and after sintering were studied by X-ray diffractometry, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and microhardness measurement. The details of the presence of iron, carbon, and iron carbide (Fe-C) as the products of reactions as well as sufficient mechanical strength of the sintered materials were presented in this report.

  13. Low Resting Membrane Potential and Low Inward Rectifier Potassium Currents Are Not Inherent Features of hiPSC-Derived Cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, András; Lemoine, Marc D; Löser, Alexandra; Mannhardt, Ingra; Flenner, Frederik; Uzun, Ahmet Umur; Neuber, Christiane; Breckwoldt, Kaja; Hansen, Arne; Girdauskas, Evaldas; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Willems, Stephan; Jost, Norbert; Wettwer, Erich; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Christ, Torsten

    2018-03-13

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) cardiomyocytes (CMs) show less negative resting membrane potential (RMP), which is attributed to small inward rectifier currents (I K1 ). Here, I K1 was measured in hiPSC-CMs (proprietary and commercial cell line) cultured as monolayer (ML) or 3D engineered heart tissue (EHT) and, for direct comparison, in CMs from human right atrial (RA) and left ventricular (LV) tissue. RMP was measured in isolated cells and intact tissues. I K1 density in ML- and EHT-CMs from the proprietary line was similar to LV and RA, respectively. I K1 density in EHT-CMs from the commercial line was 2-fold smaller than in the proprietary line. RMP in EHT of both lines was similar to RA and LV. Repolarization fraction and I K,ACh response discriminated best between RA and LV and indicated predominantly ventricular phenotype in hiPSC-CMs/EHT. The data indicate that I K1 is not necessarily low in hiPSC-CMs, and technical issues may underlie low RMP in hiPSC-CMs. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Outer Membrane Protein A Conservation among Orientia tsutsugamushi Isolates Suggests Its Potential as a Protective Antigen and Diagnostic Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean M. Evans

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus threatens one billion people in the Asia-Pacific area and cases have emerged outside this region. It is caused by infection with any of the multitude of strains of the bacterium Orientia tsutsugamushi. A vaccine that affords heterologous protection and a commercially-available molecular diagnostic assay are lacking. Herein, we determined that the nucleotide and translated amino acid sequences of outer membrane protein A (OmpA are highly conserved among 51 O. tsutsugamushi isolates. Molecular modeling revealed the predicted tertiary structure of O. tsutsugamushi OmpA to be very similar to that of the phylogenetically-related pathogen, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, including the location of a helix that contains residues functionally essential for A. phagocytophilum infection. PCR primers were developed that amplified ompA DNA from all O. tsutsugamushi strains, but not from negative control bacteria. Using these primers in quantitative PCR enabled sensitive detection and quantitation of O. tsutsugamushi ompA DNA from organs and blood of mice that had been experimentally infected with the Karp or Gilliam strains. The high degree of OmpA conservation among O. tsutsugamushi strains evidences its potential to serve as a molecular diagnostic target and justifies its consideration as a candidate for developing a broadly-protective scrub typhus vaccine.

  15. Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration: altered mitochondria membrane potential and defective respiration in Pank2 knock-out mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Dario; Dusi, Sabrina; Morbin, Michela; Uggetti, Andrea; Moda, Fabio; D'Amato, Ilaria; Giordano, Carla; d'Amati, Giulia; Cozzi, Anna; Levi, Sonia; Hayflick, Susan; Tiranti, Valeria

    2012-12-15

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) comprises a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by high brain content of iron and presence of axonal spheroids. Mutations in the PANK2 gene, which encodes pantothenate kinase 2, underlie an autosomal recessive inborn error of coenzyme A metabolism, called pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN). PKAN is characterized by dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity and pigmentary retinal degeneration. The pathogenesis of this disorder is poorly understood and, although PANK2 is a mitochondrial protein, perturbations in mitochondrial bioenergetics have not been reported. A knock-out (KO) mouse model of PKAN exhibits retinal degeneration and azoospermia, but lacks any neurological phenotype. The absence of a clinical phenotype has partially been explained by the different cellular localization of the human and murine PANK2 proteins. Here we demonstrate that the mouse Pank2 protein localizes to mitochondria, similar to its human orthologue. Moreover, we show that Pank2-defective neurons derived from KO mice have an altered mitochondrial membrane potential, a defect further corroborated by the observations of swollen mitochondria at the ultra-structural level and by the presence of defective respiration.

  16. Characterization of thyroid hormone effects on Na-K pump and membrane potential of cultured rat skeletal myotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodie, C.; Sampson, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the effects of thyroid hormone on the Na-K pump and resting membrane potential (EM) of rat skeletal myotubes in culture. Myotubes were obtained from fetal (19-21 day) or neonatal rats (1-2 day) by serial trypsinization and maintained in culture for up to 10 days. Cells were treated with T4 or T3 on day 6 or 7, and measurements were made of EM, [ 3 H]ouabain binding, and ouabain-sensitive 86 Rb uptake at various times thereafter. Hormone treatment increased the values of all three variables within 24 h, plateau levels being attained by 48-72 h. Cycloheximide and actinomycin D totally blocked the effects of thyroid hormone when added together to the cells, thus suggesting that protein synthesis is necessary for the effects of these hormones. Scatchard analysis showed that the new receptors have lower ouabain affinity than those in control. Blockade of spontaneously occurring action potentials with tetrodotoxin, which blocks voltage-dependent Na channels, or Na/H antiporter with amiloride, abolished the hormone effects seen after 24 h and significantly reduced those obtained after 48 h of hormone treatment. The results demonstrate that thyroid hormone-induced increased amount and activity of the electrogenic Na-K pump in cultured myotubes occurs, at least in part, in response to an initial effect to increase Na influx. Moreover, the findings are consistent with the concept that the Na-K pump plays an important role in regulation of EM in this preparation

  17. Airway basement membrane perimeter in human airways is not a constant; potential implications for airway remodeling in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McParland, Brent E; Paré, Peter D; Johnson, Peter R A; Armour, Carol L; Black, Judith L

    2004-08-01

    Many studies that demonstrate an increase in airway smooth muscle in asthmatic patients rely on the assumption that bronchial internal perimeter (P(i)) or basement membrane perimeter (P(bm)) is a constant, i.e., not affected by fixation pressure or the degree of smooth muscle shortening. Because it is the basement membrane that has been purported to be the indistensible structure, this study examines the assumption that P(bm) is not affected by fixation pressure. P(bm) was determined for the same human airway segment (n = 12) fixed at distending pressures of 0 cmH(2)O and 21 cmH(2)O in the absence of smooth muscle tone. P(bm) for the segment fixed at 0 cmH(2)O was determined morphometrically, and the P(bm) for the same segment, had the segment been fixed at 21 cmH(2)O, was predicted from knowing the luminal volume and length of the airway when distended to 21 cmH(2)O (organ bath-derived P(i)). To ensure an accurate transformation of the organ bath-derived P(i) value to a morphometry-derived P(bm) value, had the segment been fixed at 21 cmH(2)O, the relationship between organ bath-derived P(i) and morphometry-derived P(bm) was determined for five different bronchial segments distended to 21 cmH(2)O and fixed at 21 cmH(2)O (r(2) = 0.99, P < 0.0001). Mean P(bm) for bronchial segments fixed at 0 cmH(2)O was 9.4 +/- 0.4 mm, whereas mean predicted P(bm), had the segments been fixed at 21 cmH(2)O, was 14.1 +/- 0.5 mm (P < 0.0001). This indicates that P(bm) is not a constant when isolated airway segments without smooth muscle tone are fixed distended to 21 cmH(2)O. The implication of these results is that the increase in smooth muscle mass in asthma may have been overestimated in some previous studies. Therefore, further studies are required to examine the potential artifact using whole lungs with and without abolition of airway smooth muscle tone and/or inflation.

  18. The application of particle filters in single trial event-related potential estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohseni, Hamid R; Nazarpour, Kianoush; Sanei, Saeid; Wilding, Edward L

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, an approach for the estimation of single trial event-related potentials (ST-ERPs) using particle filters (PFs) is presented. The method is based on recursive Bayesian mean square estimation of ERP wavelet coefficients using their previous estimates as prior information. To enable a performance evaluation of the approach in the Gaussian and non-Gaussian distributed noise conditions, we added Gaussian white noise (GWN) and real electroencephalogram (EEG) signals recorded during rest to the simulated ERPs. The results were compared to that of the Kalman filtering (KF) approach demonstrating the robustness of the PF over the KF to the added GWN noise. The proposed method also outperforms the KF when the assumption about the Gaussianity of the noise is violated. We also applied this technique to real EEG potentials recorded in an odd-ball paradigm and investigated the correlation between the amplitude and the latency of the estimated ERP components. Unlike the KF method, for the PF there was a statistically significant negative correlation between amplitude and latency of the estimated ERPs, matching previous neurophysiological findings

  19. A parallel interaction potential approach coupled with the immersed boundary method for fully resolved simulations of deformable interfaces and membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spandan, Vamsi; Meschini, Valentina; Ostilla-Mónico, Rodolfo; Lohse, Detlef; Querzoli, Giorgio; de Tullio, Marco D.; Verzicco, Roberto

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we show and discuss how the deformation dynamics of closed liquid-liquid interfaces (for example drops and bubbles) can be replicated with use of a phenomenological interaction potential model. This new approach to simulate liquid-liquid interfaces is based on the fundamental principle of minimum potential energy where the total potential energy depends on the extent of deformation of a spring network distributed on the surface of the immersed drop or bubble. Simulating liquid-liquid interfaces using this model require computing ad-hoc elastic constants which is done through a reverse-engineered approach. The results from our simulations agree very well with previous studies on the deformation of drops in standard flow configurations such as a deforming drop in a shear flow or cross flow. The interaction potential model is highly versatile, computationally efficient and can be easily incorporated into generic single phase fluid solvers to also simulate complex fluid-structure interaction problems. This is shown by simulating flow in the left ventricle of the heart with mechanical and natural mitral valves where the imposed flow, motion of ventricle and valves dynamically govern the behaviour of each other. Results from these simulations are compared with ad-hoc in-house experimental measurements. Finally, we present a simple and easy to implement parallelisation scheme, as high performance computing is unavoidable when studying large scale problems involving several thousands of simultaneously deforming bodies in highly turbulent flows.

  20. Potentials of single-cell biology in identification and validation of disease biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Furong; Wang, Diane C; Lu, Jiapei; Wu, Wei; Wang, Xiangdong

    2016-09-01

    Single-cell biology is considered a new approach to identify and validate disease-specific biomarkers. However, the concern raised by clinicians is how to apply single-cell measurements for clinical practice, translate the message of single-cell systems biology into clinical phenotype or explain alterations of single-cell gene sequencing and function in patient response to therapies. This study is to address the importance and necessity of single-cell gene sequencing in the identification and development of disease-specific biomarkers, the definition and significance of single-cell biology and single-cell systems biology in the understanding of single-cell full picture, the development and establishment of whole-cell models in the validation of targeted biological function and the figure and meaning of single-molecule imaging in single cell to trace intra-single-cell molecule expression, signal, interaction and location. We headline the important role of single-cell biology in the discovery and development of disease-specific biomarkers with a special emphasis on understanding single-cell biological functions, e.g. mechanical phenotypes, single-cell biology, heterogeneity and organization of genome function. We have reason to believe that such multi-dimensional, multi-layer, multi-crossing and stereoscopic single-cell biology definitely benefits the discovery and development of disease-specific biomarkers. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  1. Ultra-high-density 3D DNA arrays within nanoporous biocompatible membranes for single-molecule-level detection and purification of circulating nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramesh, M.; Shimoni, O.; Fox, K.; Karle, T. J.; Lohrmann, A.; Ostrikov, K.; Prawer, S.; Cervenka, J.

    2015-03-01

    Extracellular nucleic acids freely circulating in blood and other physiologic fluids are important biomarkers for non-invasive diagnostics and early detection of cancer and other diseases, yet difficult to detect because they exist in very low concentrations and large volumes. Here we demonstrate a new broad-range sensor platform for ultrasensitive and selective detection of circulating DNA down to the single-molecule level. The biosensor is based on a chemically functionalized nanoporous diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated alumina membrane. The few nanometer-thick, yet perfect and continuous DLC-coating confers the chemical stability and biocompatibility of the sensor, allowing its direct application in biological conditions. The selective detection is based on complementary hybridization of a fluorescently-tagged circulating cancer oncomarker (a 21-mer nucleic acid) with covalently immobilized DNA on the surface of the membrane. The captured DNAs are detected in the nanoporous structure of the sensor using confocal scanning laser microscopy. The flow-through membrane sensor demonstrates broad-range sensitivity, spanning from 1015 molecules per cm2 down to single molecules, which is several orders of magnitude improvement compared to the flat DNA microarrays. Our study suggests that these flow-through type nanoporous sensors represent a new powerful platform for large volume sampling and ultrasensitive detection of different chemical biomarkers.Extracellular nucleic acids freely circulating in blood and other physiologic fluids are important biomarkers for non-invasive diagnostics and early detection of cancer and other diseases, yet difficult to detect because they exist in very low concentrations and large volumes. Here we demonstrate a new broad-range sensor platform for ultrasensitive and selective detection of circulating DNA down to the single-molecule level. The biosensor is based on a chemically functionalized nanoporous diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated

  2. Plasma Membranes Modified by Plasma Treatment or Deposition as Solid Electrolytes for Potential Application in Solid Alkaline Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholdt, Marc; Ilie, Alina; Roualdès, Stéphanie; Frugier, Jérémy; Schieda, Mauricio; Coutanceau, Christophe; Martemianov, Serguei; Flaud, Valérie; Beche, Eric; Durand, Jean

    2012-01-01

    In the highly competitive market of fuel cells, solid alkaline fuel cells using liquid fuel (such as cheap, non-toxic and non-valorized glycerol) and not requiring noble metal as catalyst seem quite promising. One of the main hurdles for emergence of such a technology is the development of a hydroxide-conducting membrane characterized by both high conductivity and low fuel permeability. Plasma treatments can enable to positively tune the main fuel cell membrane requirements. In this work, commercial ADP-Morgane® fluorinated polymer membranes and a new brand of cross-linked poly(aryl-ether) polymer membranes, named AMELI-32®, both containing quaternary ammonium functionalities, have been modified by argon plasma treatment or triallylamine-based plasma deposit. Under the concomitant etching/cross-linking/oxidation effects inherent to the plasma modification, transport properties (ionic exchange capacity, water uptake, ionic conductivity and fuel retention) of membranes have been improved. Consequently, using plasma modified ADP-Morgane® membrane as electrolyte in a solid alkaline fuel cell operating with glycerol as fuel has allowed increasing the maximum power density by a factor 3 when compared to the untreated membrane. PMID:24958295

  3. Plasma membranes modified by plasma treatment or deposition as solid electrolytes for potential application in solid alkaline fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholdt, Marc; Ilie, Alina; Roualdès, Stéphanie; Frugier, Jérémy; Schieda, Mauricio; Coutanceau, Christophe; Martemianov, Serguei; Flaud, Valérie; Beche, Eric; Durand, Jean

    2012-07-30

    In the highly competitive market of fuel cells, solid alkaline fuel cells using liquid fuel (such as cheap, non-toxic and non-valorized glycerol) and not requiring noble metal as catalyst seem quite promising. One of the main hurdles for emergence of such a technology is the development of a hydroxide-conducting membrane characterized by both high conductivity and low fuel permeability. Plasma treatments can enable to positively tune the main fuel cell membrane requirements. In this work, commercial ADP-Morgane® fluorinated polymer membranes and a new brand of cross-linked poly(aryl-ether) polymer membranes, named AMELI-32®, both containing quaternary ammonium functionalities, have been modified by argon plasma treatment or triallylamine-based plasma deposit. Under the concomitant etching/cross-linking/oxidation effects inherent to the plasma modification, transport properties (ionic exchange capacity, water uptake, ionic conductivity and fuel retention) of membranes have been improved. Consequently, using plasma modified ADP-Morgane® membrane as electrolyte in a solid alkaline fuel cell operating with glycerol as fuel has allowed increasing the maximum power density by a factor 3 when compared to the untreated membrane.

  4. Generation of nanobubbles by ceramic membrane filters: The dependence of bubble size and zeta potential on surface coating, pore size and injected gas pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ahmed Khaled Abdella; Sun, Cuizhen; Hua, Likun; Zhang, Zhibin; Zhang, Yanhao; Zhang, Wen; Marhaba, Taha

    2018-07-01

    Generation of gaseous nanobubbles (NBs) by simple, efficient, and scalable methods is critical for industrialization and applications of nanobubbles. Traditional generation methods mainly rely on hydrodynamic, acoustic, particle, and optical cavitation. These generation processes render issues such as high energy consumption, non-flexibility, and complexity. This research investigated the use of tubular ceramic nanofiltration membranes to generate NBs in water with air, nitrogen and oxygen gases. This system injects pressurized gases through a tubular ceramic membrane with nanopores to create NBs. The effects of membrane pores size, surface energy, and the injected gas pressures on the bubble size and zeta potential were examined. The results show that the gas injection pressure had considerable effects on the bubble size, zeta potential, pH, and dissolved oxygen of the produced NBs. For example, increasing the injection air pressure from 69 kPa to 414 kPa, the air bubble size was reduced from 600 to 340 nm respectively. Membrane pores size and surface energy also had significant effects on sizes and zeta potentials of NBs. The results presented here aim to fill out the gaps of fundamental knowledge about NBs and development of efficient generation methods. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Phase separation of the plasma membrane in human red blood cells as a potential tool for diagnosis and progression monitoring of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Maulucci

    Full Text Available Glycosylation, oxidation and other post-translational modifications of membrane and transmembrane proteins can alter lipid density, packing and interactions, and are considered an important factor that affects fluidity variation in membranes. Red blood cells (RBC membrane physical state, showing pronounced alterations in Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, could be the ideal candidate for monitoring the disease progression and the effects of therapies. On these grounds, the measurement of RBC membrane fluidity alterations can furnish a more sensitive index in T1DM diagnosis and disease progression than Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, which reflects only the information related to glycosylation processes. Here, through a functional two-photon microscopy approach we retrieved fluidity maps at submicrometric scale in RBC of T1DM patients with and without complications, detecting an altered membrane equilibrium. We found that a phase separation between fluid and rigid domains occurs, triggered by systemic effects on membranes fluidity of glycation and oxidation. The phase separation patterns are different among healthy, T1DM and T1DM with complications patients. Blood cholesterol and LDL content are positively correlated with the extent of the phase separation patterns. To quantify this extent a machine learning approach is employed to develop a Decision-Support-System (DSS able to recognize different fluidity patterns in RBC. Preliminary analysis shows significant differences(p<0.001 among healthy, T1DM and T1DM with complications patients. The development of an assay based on Phase separation of the plasma membrane of the Red Blood cells is a potential tool for diagnosis and progression monitoring of type 1 diabetes mellitus, and could allow customization and the selection of medical treatments in T1DM in clinical settings, and enable the early detection of complications.

  6. Single point mutations distributed in 10 soluble and membrane regions of the Nicotiana plumbaginifolia plasma membrane PMA2 H+-ATPase activate the enzyme and modify the structure of the C-terminal region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsomme, P; Dambly, S; Maudoux, O; Boutry, M

    1998-12-25

    The Nicotiana plumbaginifolia pma2 (plasma membrane H+-ATPase) gene is capable of functionally replacing the H+-ATPase genes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, provided that the external pH is kept above 5.0. Single point mutations within the pma2 gene were previously identified that improved H+-ATPase activity and allowed yeast growth at pH 4.0. The aim of the present study was to identify most of the PMA2 positions, the mutation of which would lead to improved growth and to determine whether all these mutations result in similar enzymatic and structural modifications. We selected additional mutants in total 42 distinct point mutations localized in 30 codons. They were distributed in 10 soluble and membrane regions of the enzyme. Most mutant PMA2 H+-ATPases were characterized by a higher specific activity, lower inhibition by ADP, and lower stimulation by lysophosphatidylcholine than wild-type PMA2. The mutants thus seem to be constitutively activated. Partial tryptic digestion and immunodetection showed that the PMA2 mutants had a conformational change making the C-terminal region more accessible. These data therefore support the hypothesis that point mutations in various H+-ATPase parts displace the inhibitory C-terminal region, resulting in enzyme activation. The high density of mutations within the first half of the C-terminal region suggests that this part is involved in the interaction between the inhibitory C-terminal region and the rest of the enzyme.

  7. Evaluation of the membrane permeability (PAMPA and skin) of benzimidazoles with potential cannabinoid activity and their relation with the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Figueroa, M Javiera; Pessoa-Mahana, C David; Palavecino-González, M Elisa; Mella-Raipán, Jaime; Espinosa-Bustos, Cristián; Lagos-Muñoz, Manuel E

    2011-06-01

    The permeability of five benzimidazole derivates with potential cannabinoid activity was determined in two models of membranes, parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA) and skin, in order to study the relationship of the physicochemical properties of the molecules and characteristics of the membranes with the permeability defined by the Biopharmaceutics Classification System. It was established that the PAMPA intestinal absorption method is a good predictor for classifying these molecules as very permeable, independent of their thermodynamic solubility, if and only if these have a Log P(oct) value permeability is conditioned on the solubility of the molecule so that it can only serve as a model for classifying the permeability of molecules that possess high solubility (class I: high solubility, high permeability; class III: high solubility, low permeability).

  8. Potentially curative stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for single or oligometastasis to the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Dongryul; Ahn, Yong Chan; Seo, Jeong Min; Shin, Eun Hyuk; Park, Hee Chul; Lim, Do Hoon; Pyo, Hongryull

    2012-05-01

    To analyze the treatment outcomes of a potentially curative therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), for patients with single or oligometastasis to the lungs. Sixty-seven metastatic lung lesions in 57 patients were treated with SBRT between September 2001 and November 2010. All patients had single or oligo-metastasis to the lungs following a meticulous clinical work-up, including PET-CT scans. The lungs were the most common primary organ (33 lesions, 49.3%), followed by the head and neck (11 lesions, 16.4%), the liver (nine lesions, 13.5%), the colorectum (seven lesions, 10.4%), and other organs (seven lesions, 10.4%). Three different fractionation schedules were used: 50 Gy/5 fractions to four lesions (6.0%); 60 Gy/5 fractions to 44 lesions (65.7%); and 60 Gy/4 fractions to 19 lesions (28.3%). Local tumor progression occurred in three lesions (4.5%). The three-year actuarial local control rate was 94.5%. Tumors larger than or equal to 2.5 cm showed poorer local control (98.3% vs. 77.8%, p <0.01). Metastatic tumors from the liver and colorectum showed lower local control rates than those from other organs (77.8%, 85.7%, and 100%, p =0.04). The two-year overall survival rate was 57.2%. Patients with tumors smaller than 2.5 cm had more favorable survival rates (64.0% vs. 38.9% at two-year, p =0.032). Patients with extrathoracic disease had poorer survival rates (66.1% vs. 0% at two-year, p =0.003). Patients with disease-free intervals longer than two years showed a trend toward good prognosis (71.1% vs. 51.1% at two-year, p =0.106). Grade 2 lung toxicity occurred in four patients (6.0%). One patient experienced Grade 5 lung toxicity following SBRT. SBRT for single or oligo-metastasis to the lung seems quite effective and safe. Tumor size, disease-free interval, and presence of extrathoracic disease are prognosticators for survival.

  9. Potentially curative stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for single or oligometastasis to the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Dongryul; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Hee Chul; Lim, Do Hoon; Pyo, Hongryull; Seo, Jeong Min; Shin, Eun Hyuk

    2012-01-01

    Background. To analyze the treatment outcomes of a potentially curative therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), for patients with single or oligometastasis to the lungs. Material and methods. Sixty-seven metastatic lung lesions in 57 patients were treated with SBRT between September 2001 and November 2010. All patients had single or oligo-metastasis to the lungs following a meticulous clinical work-up, including PET-CT scans. The lungs were the most common primary organ (33 lesions, 49.3%), followed by the head and neck (11 lesions, 16.4%), the liver (nine lesions, 13.5%), the colorectum (seven lesions, 10.4%), and other organs (seven lesions, 10.4%). Three different fractionation schedules were used: 50 Gy/5 fractions to four lesions (6.0%); 60 Gy/5 fractions to 44 lesions (65.7%); and 60 Gy/4 fractions to 19 lesions (28.3%). Results. Local tumor progression occurred in three lesions (4.5%). The three-year actuarial local control rate was 94.5%. Tumors larger than or equal to 2.5 cm showed poorer local control (98.3% vs. 77.8%, p <0.01). Metastatic tumors from the liver and colorectum showed lower local control rates than those from other organs (77.8%, 85.7%, and 100%, p =0.04). The two-year overall survival rate was 57.2%. Patients with tumors smaller than 2.5 cm had more favorable survival rates (64.0% vs. 38.9% at two-year, p =0.032). Patients with extrathoracic disease had poorer survival rates (66.1% vs. 0% at two-year, p =0.003). Patients with disease-free intervals longer than two years showed a trend toward good prognosis (71.1% vs. 51.1% at two-year, p =0.106). Grade 2 lung toxicity occurred in four patients (6.0%). One patient experienced Grade 5 lung toxicity following SBRT. Conclusion. SBRT for single or oligo-metastasis to the lung seems quite effective and safe. Tumor size, disease-free interval, and presence of extrathoracic disease are prognosticators for survival

  10. Potentially curative stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for single or oligometastasis to the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dongryul; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Hee Chul; Lim, Do Hoon; Pyo, Hongryull [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], Email: ahnyc@skku.edu; Seo, Jeong Min [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Radiological Science, Daewon Univ. College, Jecheon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Eun Hyuk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Background. To analyze the treatment outcomes of a potentially curative therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), for patients with single or oligometastasis to the lungs. Material and methods. Sixty-seven metastatic lung lesions in 57 patients were treated with SBRT between September 2001 and November 2010. All patients had single or oligo-metastasis to the lungs following a meticulous clinical work-up, including PET-CT scans. The lungs were the most common primary organ (33 lesions, 49.3%), followed by the head and neck (11 lesions, 16.4%), the liver (nine lesions, 13.5%), the colorectum (seven lesions, 10.4%), and other organs (seven lesions, 10.4%). Three different fractionation schedules were used: 50 Gy/5 fractions to four lesions (6.0%); 60 Gy/5 fractions to 44 lesions (65.7%); and 60 Gy/4 fractions to 19 lesions (28.3%). Results. Local tumor progression occurred in three lesions (4.5%). The three-year actuarial local control rate was 94.5%. Tumors larger than or equal to 2.5 cm showed poorer local control (98.3% vs. 77.8%, p <0.01). Metastatic tumors from the liver and colorectum showed lower local control rates than those from other organs (77.8%, 85.7%, and 100%, p =0.04). The two-year overall survival rate was 57.2%. Patients with tumors smaller than 2.5 cm had more favorable survival rates (64.0% vs. 38.9% at two-year, p =0.032). Patients with extrathoracic disease had poorer survival rates (66.1% vs. 0% at two-year, p =0.003). Patients with disease-free intervals longer than two years showed a trend toward good prognosis (71.1% vs. 51.1% at two-year, p =0.106). Grade 2 lung toxicity occurred in four patients (6.0%). One patient experienced Grade 5 lung toxicity following SBRT. Conclusion. SBRT for single or oligo-metastasis to the lung seems quite effective and safe. Tumor size, disease-free interval, and presence of extrathoracic disease are prognosticators for survival.

  11. Effect of granular activated carbon addition on the effluent properties and fouling potentials of membrane-coupled expanded granular sludge bed process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, An; Liang, Heng; Qu, Fangshu; Bai, Langming; Li, Guibai; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan

    2014-11-01

    To mitigate membrane fouling of membrane-coupled anaerobic process, granular activated carbon (GAC: 50 g/L) was added into an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB). A short-term ultrafiltration test was investigated for analyzing membrane fouling potential and underlying fouling mechanisms. The results showed that adding GAC into the EGSB not only improved the COD removal efficiency, but also alleviated membrane fouling efficiently because GAC could help to reduce soluble microbial products, polysaccharides and proteins by 26.8%, 27.8% and 24.7%, respectively, compared with the control system. Furthermore, excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy analysis revealed that GAC addition mainly reduced tryptophan protein-like, aromatic protein-like and fulvic-like substances. In addition, the resistance distribution analysis demonstrated that adding GAC primarily decreased the cake layer resistance by 53.5%. The classic filtration mode analysis showed that cake filtration was the major fouling mechanism for membrane-coupled EGSB process regardless of the GAC addition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The potential of hybrid forward osmosis membrane bioreactor (FOMBR) processes in achieving high throughput treatment of municipal wastewater with enhanced phosphorus recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Guanglei; Zhang, Sui; Srinivasa Raghavan, Divya Shankari; Das, Subhabrata; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2016-11-15

    Extensive research in recent years has explored numerous new features in the forward osmosis membrane bioreactor (FOMBR) process. However, there is an aspect, which is revolutionary but not yet been investigated. In FOMBR, FO membrane shows high rejection for a wide range of soluble contaminants. As a result, hydraulic retention time (HRT) does not correctly reflect the nominal retention of these dissolved contaminants in the bioreactor. This decoupling of contaminants retention time (CRT, i.e. the nominal retention of the dissolved contaminants) from HRT endows FOMBR a potential in significantly reducing the HRT for wastewater treatment. In this work, we report our results in this unexplored treatment potential. Using real municipal wastewater as feed, both a hybrid microfiltration-forward osmosis membrane bioreactor (MF-FOMBR) and a newly developed hybrid biofilm-forward osmosis membrane bioreactor (BF-FOMBR) achieved high removal of organic matter and nitrogen under HRT of down to 2.0 h, with significantly enhanced phosphorus recovery capacities. In the BF-FOMBR, the used of fixed bed biofilm not only obviated the need of additional solid/liquid separation (e.g. MF) to extract the side-stream for salt accumulation control and phosphorus recovery, but effectively quarantined the biomass from the FO membrane. The absence of MF in the side-stream further allowed suspended growth to be continuously removed from the system, which produced a selection pressure for the predominance of attached growth. As a result, a significant reduction in FO membrane fouling (by 24.7-54.5%) was achieved in the BF-FOMBR due to substantially reduced bacteria deposition and colonization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of the Lifecycle Impacts and Potential for Avoided Impacts Associated with Single Family Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn how recovering construction and demolition materials from single-family homes and reusing them in building and road construction and other applications helps offset the environmental impacts associated with single-family homes.

  14. Membrane topology analysis of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp41

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Dan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gp41 subunit of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env has been widely regarded as a type I transmembrane protein with a single membrane-spanning domain (MSD. An alternative topology model suggested multiple MSDs. The major discrepancy between the two models is that the cytoplasmic Kennedy sequence in the single MSD model is assigned as the extracellular loop accessible to neutralizing antibodies in the other model. We examined the membrane topology of the gp41 subunit in both prokaryotic and mammalian systems. We attached topological markers to the C-termini of serially truncated gp41. In the prokaryotic system, we utilized a green fluorescent protein (GFP that is only active in the cytoplasm. The tag protein (HaloTag and a membrane-impermeable ligand specific to HaloTag was used in the mammalian system. Results In the absence of membrane fusion, both the prokaryotic and mammalian systems (293FT cells supported the single MSD model. In the presence of membrane fusion in mammalian cells (293CD4 cells, the data obtained seem to support the multiple MSD model. However, the region predicted to be a potential MSD is the highly hydrophilic Kennedy sequence and is least likely to become a MSD based on several algorithms. Further analysis revealed the induction of membrane permeability during membrane fusion, allowing the membrane-impermeable ligand and antibodies to cross the membrane. Therefore, we cannot completely rule out the possible artifacts. Addition of membrane fusion inhibitors or alterations of the MSD sequence decreased the induction of membrane permeability. Conclusions It is likely that a single MSD model for HIV-1 gp41 holds true even in the presence of membrane fusion. The degree of the augmentation of membrane permeability we observed was dependent on the membrane fusion and sequence of the MSD.

  15. Single-Cell Quantitative PCR: Advances and Potential in Cancer Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ok, Chi Young; Singh, Rajesh R; Salim, Alaa A

    2016-01-01

    Tissues are heterogeneous in their components. If cells of interest are a minor population of collected tissue, it would be difficult to obtain genetic or genomic information of the interested cell population with conventional genomic DNA extraction from the collected tissue. Single-cell DNA analysis is important in the analysis of genetics of cell clonality, genetic anticipation, and single-cell DNA polymorphisms. Single-cell PCR using Single Cell Ampligrid/GeXP platform is described in this chapter.

  16. Nano-porous anodic aluminium oxide membranes with 6-19 nm pore diameters formed by a low-potential anodizing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Fan; Liu Xiaohua; Pan Caofeng; Zhu Jing [Beijing National Center for Electron Microscopy, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2007-08-29

    Self-organized nano-porous anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) membranes with small pore diameters were obtained by applying a low anodizing potential in sulfuric acid solutions. The pore diameters of the as-prepared AAO membranes were in the range of about 6-19 nm and the interpore distances were about 20-58 nm. Low potentials (6-18 V) were applied in anodizing processes to make such small pores. A linear relationship between the anodizing potential (U{sub a}) and the interpore distance (D{sub int}) was also revealed. By carefully monitoring the current density's evolution as a function of time with different U{sub a} (2-18 V) during the anodizing processes, a new formula is proposed to simulate the self-ordering anodizing process.

  17. Simultaneous evaluation of substrate-dependent oxygen consumption rates and mitochondrial membrane potential by TMRM and safranin in cortical mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Subir Roy; Djordjevic, Jelena; Albensi, Benedict C; Fernyhough, Paul

    2015-12-08

    Mitochondrial membrane potential (mtMP) is critical for maintaining the physiological function of the respiratory chain to generate ATP. The present study characterized the inter-relationship between mtMP, using safranin and tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester (TMRM), and mitochondrial respiratory activity and established a protocol for functional analysis of mitochondrial bioenergetics in a multi-sensor system. Coupled respiration was decreased by 27 and 30-35% in the presence of TMRM and safranin respectively. Maximal respiration was higher than coupled with Complex I- and II-linked substrates in the presence of both dyes. Safranin showed decreased maximal respiration at a higher concentration of carbonyl cyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP) compared with TMRM. FCCP titration revealed that maximal respiration in the presence of glutamate and malate was not sustainable at higher FCCP concentrations as compared with pyruvate and malate. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and mtMP in response to mitochondrial substrates were higher in isolated mitochondria compared with tissue homogenates. Safranin exhibited higher sensitivity to changes in mtMP than TMRM. This multi-sensor system measured mitochondrial parameters in the brain of transgenic mice that model Alzheimer's disease (AD), because mitochondrial dysfunction is believed to be a primary event in the pathogenesis of AD. The coupled and maximal respiration of electron transport chain were decreased in the cortex of AD mice along with the mtMP compared with age-matched controls. Overall, these data demonstrate that safranin and TMRM are suitable for the simultaneous evaluation of mtMP and respiratory chain activity using isolated mitochondria and tissue homogenate. However, certain care should be taken concerning the selection of appropriate substrates and dyes for specific experimental circumstances. © 2016 Authors.

  18. Intrinsic mitochondrial membrane potential change and associated events mediate apoptosis in chemopreventive effect of diclofenac in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Sanyal, S N

    2010-01-01

    The present study explored the role of intrinsic mitochondrial membrane potential (delta psi M) in NSAID-induced apoptosis in the early stages of colon cancer. 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) was used to induce colon cancer and its chemoprevention was studied by diclofenac in a rat model. After 6 weeks of treatment with DMH (early stage), morphological analysis revealed a marked occurrence of preneoplastic features [i.e., mucosal plaque lesions (MPLs) in the colonic tissue]. Coadministration of diclofenac with DMH resulted in a significant reduction of these lesions, thereby proving the chemopreventive efficacy of diclofenac at the chosen anti-inflammatory dose. DMH treatment also led to a significant increase in delta psi M in the isolated colonocytes as assessed by JC-1 fluorescent staining, measured both by fluorescence microscopy and spectrofluorometerically. Further, there was seen a reduction in the number of cells showing low delta psi M, and hence monomer intensity of JC-1 by DMH treatment. To study the mechanism of these alterations in delta psi M in the present work, we studied the protein expression of important proapoptotic proteins, cytochrome c and Bax, by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. DMH treatment reduced the mitochondrial translocation of Bax whereas cytochrome c was found to be located prominently in the mitochondria. Protein expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 was also studied in the colonic mucosa, which was expectedly found to be overexpressed after DMH treatment. Diclofenac treatment ameliorated the elevated delta psi M and its associated events to exert its chemopreventive action against early stages of colon cancer.

  19. Qualification of standard membrane-feeding assay with Plasmodium falciparum malaria and potential improvements for future assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutoyo Miura

    Full Text Available Vaccines that interrupt malaria transmission are of increasing interest and a robust functional assay to measure this activity would promote their development by providing a biologically relevant means of evaluating potential vaccine candidates. Therefore, we aimed to qualify the standard membrane-feeding assay (SMFA. The assay measures the transmission-blocking activity of antibodies by feeding cultured P. falciparum gametocytes to Anopheles mosquitoes in the presence of the test antibodies and measuring subsequent mosquito infection. The International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH Harmonised Tripartite Guideline Q2(R1 details characteristics considered in assay validation. Of these characteristics, we decided to qualify the SMFA for Precision, Linearity, Range and Specificity. The transmission-blocking 4B7 monoclonal antibody was tested over 6 feeding experiments at several concentrations to determine four suitable concentrations that were tested in triplicate in the qualification experiments (3 additional feeds to evaluate Precision, Linearity and Range. For Specificity, 4B7 was tested in the presence of normal mouse IgG. We determined intra- and inter-assay variability of % inhibition of mean oocyst intensity at each concentration of 4B7 (lower concentrations showed higher variability. We also showed that % inhibition was dependent on 4B7 concentration and the activity is specific to 4B7. Since obtaining empirical data is time-consuming, we generated a model using data from all 9 feeds and simulated the effects of different parameters on final readouts to improve the assay procedure and analytical methods for future studies. For example, we estimated the effect of number of mosquitoes dissected on variability of % inhibition, and simulated the relationship between % inhibition in oocyst intensity and % inhibition of prevalence of infected mosquitos at different mean oocysts in the control. SMFA is one of the few biological assays used in

  20. High-throughput BioSorter quantification of relative mitochondrial content and membrane potential in living Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Young Joon; Guha, Sujay; Tuluc, Florin; Falk, Marni J

    2018-05-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain disease is caused by a wide range of individually rare genetic disorders that impair cellular energy metabolism. While fluorescence microscopy analysis of nematodes fed MitoTracker Green (MTG) and tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE) can reliably quantify relative mitochondrial density and membrane potential, respectively, in C. elegans models of mitochondrial dysfunction, it is a tedious process with limitations in the number and age of animals that can be studied. A novel, large particle, flow cytometry-based method reported here accelerates and automates the relative quantitation of mitochondrial physiology in nematode populations. Relative fluorescence profiles of nematode populations co-labeled with MTG and TMRE were obtained and analyzed by BioSorter (Union Biometrica). Variables tested included genetic mutation (wild-type N2 Bristol versus nuclear-encoded respiratory chain complex I mutant gas-1(fc21) worms), animal age (day 1 versus day 4 adults), classical respiratory chain inhibitor and uncoupler effects (oligomycin, FCCP), and pharmacologic therapy duration (24h versus 96h treatments with glucose or nicotinic acid). A custom MATLAB script, which can be run on any computer with MATLAB runtime, was written to automatically quantify and analyze results in large animal populations. BioSorter analysis independently validated relative MTG and TMRE changes that we had previously performed by fluorescence microscopy in a variety of experimental conditions, with notably greater animal population sizes and substantially reduced experimental time. Older, fragile animal populations that are difficult to study by microscopy approaches were readily amenable to analysis with the BioSorter method. Overall, this high-throughput method enables efficient relative quantitation of in vivo mitochondrial physiology over time in a living animal in response to gene mutations and candidate therapies, which can be used to accelerate the

  1. Risks from Past, Current, and Potential Hanford Single Shell Tank Leaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triplett, Mark B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Watson, David J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wellman, Dawn M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Due to significant delays in constructing and operating the Waste Treatment Plant, which is needed to support retrieval of waste from Hanford’s single shell tanks (SSTs), SSTs may now be required to store tank waste for two to three more decades into the future. Many SSTs were built almost 70 years ago, and all SSTs are well beyond their design lives. Recent examination of monitoring data suggests several of the tanks, which underwent interim stabilization a decade or more ago, may be leaking small amounts (perhaps 150–300 gallons per year) to the subsurface environment. A potential leak from tank T-111 is estimated to have released approximately 2,000 gallons into the subsurface. Observations of past leak events, recently published simulation results, and new simulations all suggest that recent leaks are unlikely to affect underlying groundwater above regulatory limits. However, these recent observations remind us that much larger source terms are still contained in the tanks and are also present in the vadose zone from historical intentional and unintentional releases. Recently there have been significant improvements in methods for detecting and characterizing soil moisture and contaminant releases, understanding and controlling mass-flux, and remediating deep vadose zone and groundwater plumes. To ensure extended safe storage of tank waste in SSTs, the following actions are recommended: 1) Improve capabilities for intrusion and leak detection. 2) Develop defensible conceptual models of intrusion and leak mechanisms. 3) Apply enhanced subsurface characterization methods to improve detection and quantification of moisture changes beneath tanks. 4) Maintain a flux-based assessment of past, present, and potential tank leaks to assess risks and to maintain priorities for applying mitigation actions. 5) Implement and maintain effective mitigation and remediation actions to protect groundwater resources. These actions will enable limited resources to be applied to

  2. Single potential electrodeposition of nanostructured battery materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, James Matthew

    different sizes, shapes, and surface areas. This is advantageous because high surface area materials benefit from improved kinetics for solid state transformations and from decreases in mechanical degradation that occurs during the lithiation and delithiation of battery materials. Intermetallic materials are an alternative to conventional anode materials because they have high capacities and react reversibly with lithium at potentials that hinder the dendrite formation of metallic lithium. Unfortunately, the volume expansion associated with the lithiation and delithiation of intermetallic materials is usually large (over 300%). With this in mind a procedure for the electrodeposition of Cu2Sb from aqueous solutions was developed and is presented in this thesis. Cu2Sb is an intermetallic that lithiates at potentials more positive than the potential needed to plate lithium metal, and has a volume expansion less than 100%. Electrodeposition of an intermetallic with a relatively small volume expansion and with high surface area morphology should dramatically reduce material degradation during battery cycling, thus promoting the life of the material. To electrodeposit Cu2Sb from aqueous solutions, soluble salts of Cu2+ and Sb3+ were needed. There are many Cu2+ salts that are highly soluble in water, but most Sb 3+ salts cause formation of Sb2O3 in aqueous solutions. To obtain Sb3+ in aqueous solutions, citric acid was used as a complexing agent. The results presented in this dissertation show that solution speciation plays an important role in the electrochemistry of aqueous citrate solutions of both copper and antimony. The cyclic voltammograms (CVs) presented here show that the reduction potential of Cu2+ shifted in the negative direction and the reduction potential of Sb 3+ shifted in the positive direction with an increase in pH. Also, Cu2Sb films were deposited at a single potential (-1050 mV vs. SSCE) from aqueous solutions at pH 6. We determined that the deposition

  3. A novel method for extraction of neural response from single channel cochlear implant auditory evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkiewicz, Daniel; Friesen, Lendra; Ghoraani, Behnaz

    2017-02-01

    Cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEP) are used to evaluate cochlear implant (CI) patient auditory pathways, but the CI device produces an electrical artifact, which obscures the relevant information in the neural response. Currently there are multiple methods, which attempt to recover the neural response from the contaminated CAEP, but there is no gold standard, which can quantitatively confirm the effectiveness of these methods. To address this crucial shortcoming, we develop a wavelet-based method to quantify the amount of artifact energy in the neural response. In addition, a novel technique for extracting the neural response from single channel CAEPs is proposed. The new method uses matching pursuit (MP) based feature extraction to represent the contaminated CAEP in a feature space, and support vector machines (SVM) to classify the components as normal hearing (NH) or artifact. The NH components are combined to recover the neural response without artifact energy, as verified using the evaluation tool. Although it needs some further evaluation, this approach is a promising method of electrical artifact removal from CAEPs. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Influence of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Microarray-Based Molecular Karyotype on Preimplantation Embryonic Development Potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the influence of the molecular karyotype based on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP microarray on embryonic development potential in preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD, we retrospectively analyzed the clinical data generated by PGD using embryos retrieved from parents with chromosome rearrangements in our center. In total, 929 embryos from 119 couples had exact diagnosis and development status. The blastocyst formation rate of balanced molecular karyotype embryos was 56.6% (276/488, which was significantly higher than that of genetic imbalanced embryos 24.5% (108/441 (P35 respectively. Blastocyst formation rates of male and female embryos were 44.5% (183/411 and 38.8% (201/518 respectively, with no significant difference between them (P>0.05. The rates of balanced molecular karyotype embryos vary from groups of embryos with different cell numbers at 68 hours after insemination. The blastocyst formation rate of embryos with 6-8 cells (48.1% was significantly higher than that of embryos with 8 cells (42.9% (P8 cells, embryos with 6-8 blastomeres have higher rate of balanced molecular karyotype and blastocyst formation.

  5. Short-term plasticity and long-term potentiation mimicked in single inorganic synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Takeo; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Terabe, Kazuya; Gimzewski, James K.; Aono, Masakazu

    2011-08-01

    Memory is believed to occur in the human brain as a result of two types of synaptic plasticity: short-term plasticity (STP) and long-term potentiation (LTP; refs , , , ). In neuromorphic engineering, emulation of known neural behaviour has proven to be difficult to implement in software because of the highly complex interconnected nature of thought processes. Here we report the discovery of a Ag2S inorganic synapse, which emulates the synaptic functions of both STP and LTP characteristics through the use of input pulse repetition time. The structure known as an atomic switch, operating at critical voltages, stores information as STP with a spontaneous decay of conductance level in response to intermittent input stimuli, whereas frequent stimulation results in a transition to LTP. The Ag2S inorganic synapse has interesting characteristics with analogies to an individual biological synapse, and achieves dynamic memorization in a single device without the need of external preprogramming. A psychological model related to the process of memorizing and forgetting is also demonstrated using the inorganic synapses. Our Ag2S element indicates a breakthrough in mimicking synaptic behaviour essential for the further creation of artificial neural systems that emulate characteristics of human memory.

  6. Point of zero potential of single-crystal electrode/inert electrolyte interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzycki, Piotr; Preočanin, Tajana

    2012-03-15

    Most of the environmentally important processes occur at the specific hydrated mineral faces. Their rates and mechanisms are in part controlled by the interfacial electrostatics, which can be quantitatively described by the point of zero potential (PZP). Unfortunately, the PZP value of specific crystal face is very difficult to be experimentally determined. Here we show that PZP can be extracted from a single-crystal electrode potentiometric titration, assuming the stable electrochemical cell resistivity and lack of specific electrolyte ions sorption. Our method is based on determining a common intersection point of the electrochemical cell electromotive force at various ionic strengths, and it is illustrated for a few selected surfaces of rutile, hematite, silver chloride, and bromide monocrystals. In the case of metal oxides, we have observed the higher PZP values than those theoretically predicted using the MultiSite Complexation Model (MUSIC), that is, 8.4 for (001) hematite (MUSIC-predicted ~6), 8.7 for (110) rutile (MUSIC-predicted ~6), and about 7 for (001) rutile (MUSIC-predicted 6.6). In the case of silver halides, the order of estimated PZP values (6.4 for AgClsoils and groundwaters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of membrane electroporation and protein denature in response to pulsed electric field with different durations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Feiran; Fang, Zhihui; Mast, Jason; Chen, Wei

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we compared the minimum potential differences in the electroporation of membrane lipid bilayers and the denaturation of membrane proteins in response to an intensive pulsed electric field with various pulse durations. Single skeletal muscle fibers were exposed to a pulsed external electric field. The field-induced changes in the membrane integrity (leakage current) and the Na channel currents were monitored to identify the minimum electric field needed to damage the membrane lipid bilayer and the membrane proteins, respectively. We found that in response to a relatively long pulsed electric shock (longer than the membrane intrinsic time constant), a lower membrane potential was needed to electroporate the cell membrane than for denaturing the membrane proteins, while for a short pulse a higher membrane potential was needed. In other words, phospholipid bilayers are more sensitive to the electric field than the membrane proteins for a long pulsed shock, while for a short pulse the proteins become more vulnerable. We can predict that for a short or ultrashort pulsed electric shock, the minimum membrane potential required to start to denature the protein functions in the cell plasma membrane is lower than that which starts to reduce the membrane integrity. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Determination of particle-release conditions in microfiltration: A simple single-particle model tested on a model membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, S.; van Rijn, C.J.M.; Nijdam, W.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2000-01-01

    A simple single-particle model was developed for cross-flow microfiltration with microsieves. The model describes the cross-flow conditions required to release a trapped spherical particle from a circular pore. All equations are derived in a fully analytical way without any fitting parameters. For

  9. Phase separation of the plasma membrane in human red blood cells as a potential tool for diagnosis and progression monitoring of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulucci, Giuseppe; Cordelli, Ermanno; Rizzi, Alessandro; De Leva, Francesca; Papi, Massimiliano; Ciasca, Gabriele; Samengo, Daniela; Pani, Giovambattista; Pitocco, Dario; Soda, Paolo; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; Iannello, Giulio; De Spirito, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Glycosylation, oxidation and other post-translational modifications of membrane and transmembrane proteins can alter lipid density, packing and interactions, and are considered an important factor that affects fluidity variation in membranes. Red blood cells (RBC) membrane physical state, showing pronounced alterations in Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), could be the ideal candidate for monitoring the disease progression and the effects of therapies. On these grounds, the measurement of RBC membrane fluidity alterations can furnish a more sensitive index in T1DM diagnosis and disease progression than Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), which reflects only the information related to glycosylation processes. Here, through a functional two-photon microscopy approach we retrieved fluidity maps at submicrometric scale in RBC of T1DM patients with and without complications, detecting an altered membrane equilibrium. We found that a phase separation between fluid and rigid domains occurs, triggered by systemic effects on membranes fluidity of glycation and oxidation. The phase separation patterns are different among healthy, T1DM and T1DM with complications patients. Blood cholesterol and LDL content are positively correlated with the extent of the phase separation patterns. To quantify this extent a machine learning approach is employed to develop a Decision-Support-System (DSS) able to recognize different fluidity patterns in RBC. Preliminary analysis shows significant differences(pBlood cells is a potential tool for diagnosis and progression monitoring of type 1 diabetes mellitus, and could allow customization and the selection of medical treatments in T1DM in clinical settings, and enable the early detection of complications.

  10. Reduction of DOM fractions and their trihalomethane formation potential in surface river water by in-line coagulation with ceramic membrane filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakruam, Pharkphum; Wattanachira, Suraphong

    2014-03-01

    This research was aimed at investigating the reduction of DOM fractions and their trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) by in-line coagulation with 0.1 μm ceramic membrane filtration. The combination of ceramic membrane filtration with a coagulation process is an alternative technology which can be applied to enhance conventional coagulation processes in the field of water treatment and drinking water production. The Ping River water (high turbidity water) was selected as the raw surface water because it is currently the main raw water source for water supply production in the urban and rural areas of Chiang Mai Province. From the investigation, the results showed that the highest percent reductions of DOC, UV-254, and THMFP (47.6%, 71.0%, and 67.4%, respectively) were achieved from in-line coagulation with ceramic membrane filtration at polyaluminum chloride dosage 40 mg/L. Resin adsorption techniques were employed to characterize the DOM in raw surface water and filtered water. The results showed that the use of a ceramic membrane with in-line coagulation was able to most efficiently reduce the hydrophobic fraction (HPOA) (68.5%), which was then followed by the hydrophilic fraction (HPIA) (49.3%). The greater mass DOC reduction of these two fractions provided the highest THMFP reductions (55.1% and 37.2%, respectively). Furthermore, the in-line coagulation with ceramic membrane filtration was able to reduce the hydrophobic (HPOB) fraction which is characterized by high reactivity toward THM formation. The percent reduction of mass DOC and THMFP of HPOB by in-line coagulation with ceramic membrane filtration was 45.9% and 48.0%, respectively. Copyright © 2014 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Adsorption of a single polymer chain on a surface: effects of the potential range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klushin, Leonid I; Polotsky, Alexey A; Hsu, Hsiao-Ping; Markelov, Denis A; Binder, Kurt; Skvortsov, Alexander M

    2013-02-01

    We investigate the effects of the range of adsorption potential on the equilibrium behavior of a single polymer chain end-attached to a solid surface. The exact analytical theory for ideal lattice chains interacting with a planar surface via a box potential of depth U and width W is presented and compared to continuum model results and to Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method for self-avoiding chains on a simple cubic lattice. We show that the critical value U(c) corresponding to the adsorption transition scales as W(-1/ν), where the exponent ν=1/2 for ideal chains and ν≈3/5 for self-avoiding walks. Lattice corrections for finite W are incorporated in the analytical prediction of the ideal chain theory U(c)≈(π(2)/24)(W+1/2)(-2) and in the best-fit equation for the MC simulation data U(c)=0.585(W+1/2)(-5/3). Tail, loop, and train distributions at the critical point are evaluated by MC simulations for 1≤W≤10 and compared to analytical results for ideal chains and with scaling theory predictions. The behavior of a self-avoiding chain is remarkably close to that of an ideal chain in several aspects. We demonstrate that the bound fraction θ and the related properties of finite ideal and self-avoiding chains can be presented in a universal reduced form: θ(N,U,W)=θ(NU(c),U/U(c)). By utilizing precise estimations of the critical points we investigate the chain length dependence of the ratio of the normal and lateral components of the gyration radius. Contrary to common expectations this ratio attains a limiting universal value /=0.320±0.003 only at N~5000. Finite-N corrections for this ratio turn out to be of the opposite sign for W=1 and for W≥2. We also study the N dependence of the apparent crossover exponent φ(eff)(N). Strong corrections to scaling of order N(-0.5) are observed, and the extrapolated value φ=0.483±0.003 is found for all values of W. The strong correction to scaling effects found here explain why

  12. Phase Locking of Multiple Single Neurons to the Local Field Potential in Cat V1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kevan A C; Schröder, Sylvia

    2016-02-24

    The local field potential (LFP) is thought to reflect a temporal reference for neuronal spiking, which may facilitate information coding and orchestrate the communication between neural populations. To explore this proposed role, we recorded the LFP and simultaneously the spike activity of one to three nearby neurons in V1 of anesthetized cats during the presentation of drifting sinusoidal gratings, binary dense noise stimuli, and natural movies. In all stimulus conditions and during spontaneous activity, the average LFP power at frequencies >20 Hz was higher when neurons were spiking versus not spiking. The spikes were weakly but significantly phase locked to all frequencies of the LFP. The average spike phase of the LFP was stable across high and low levels of LFP power, but the strength of phase locking at low frequencies (≤10 Hz) increased with increasing LFP power. In a next step, we studied how strong stimulus responses of single neurons are reflected in the LFP and the LFP-spike relationship. We found that LFP power was slightly increased and phase locking was slightly stronger during strong compared with weak stimulus-locked responses. In summary, the coupling strength between high frequencies of the LFP and spikes was not strongly modulated by LFP power, which is thought to reflect spiking synchrony, nor was it strongly influenced by how strongly the neuron was driven by the stimulus. Furthermore, a comparison between neighboring neurons showed no clustering of preferred LFP phase. We argue that hypotheses on the relevance of phase locking in their current form are inconsistent with our findings. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/362494-09$15.00/0.

  13. Potential synergy between the Ionospheric Disturbance Flag and NeQuick-G for single frequency users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon-Angel, Angela; Fortuny, Joaquim

    2016-04-01

    The document describing the particular ionospheric model developed for the Galileo satellite navigation system has been very recently released, the official Ionospheric Correction Algorithm for Galileo Single Frequency Users document (from here on-wards named Galileo-Iono), available at www.gsc-europa.eu/system/files/galileo_documents/Galileo_Ionospheric_Model.pdf. This publication allows GNSS receiver manufacturers to start the implementation of the specific algorithm targeted for their Galileo related products in order to be compliant with the Galileo system. As indicated in the Galileo OS SIS ICD, among the parameters that are broadcast in the Galileo navigation message, parameters that are sent within both F/NAV and I/NAV, one can find five Ionospheric Disturbance Flags for Regions 1 to 5 (SF1, SF2, SF3, SF4 and SF5). Nevertheless, in the current version of the model presented in the Galileo-Iono document, the Ionospheric Disturbance flags are "not used" within the Galileo ionospheric correction calculation. In this work, a potential approach to account for this information is being investigated. This plan includes the update of the Galileo ionospheric, NeQuick-G, correction model by specifying the use of these flags. Hence a customized version of the NeQuick-G model has been developed and tested. Specific scenarios will be considered to test whether this approach of considering the added value information of the Ionospheric Disturbance Flags is translated into the positioning domain. In order to assess the improvement obtained using the proposed approach five stations displaced in the five regions are used. Different days of data have been collected in nominal and disturbed conditions; the evaluation is carried out comparing the performance of the proposed approach with respect to the classical approach. The benefits of the use of the disturbance flags information are evaluated comparing the performance in similar geometry conditions.

  14. Pharmacological characterization of human excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT3 in a fluorescence-based membrane potential assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2004-01-01

    We have expressed the human excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT3 stably in HEK293 cells and characterized the transporters pharmacologically in a conventional [(3) H]-d-aspartate uptake assay and in a fluorescence-based membrane potential assay, the FLIPR Membrane Potential...... (FMP) assay. The K(m) and K(i) values obtained for 12 standard EAAT ligands at EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT3 in the FMP assay correlated well with the K(i) values obtained in the [(3) H]-d-aspartate assay (r(2) values of 0.92, 0.92, and 0.95, respectively). Furthermore, the pharmacological characteristics...

  15. A common pathway for regulation of nutritive blood flow to the brain: arterial muscle membrane potential and cytochrome P450 metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, D R; Roman, R J; Gebremedhin, D; Birks, E K; Lange, A R

    1998-12-01

    Perfusion pressure to the brain must remain relatively constant to provide rapid and efficient distribution of blood to metabolically active neurones. Both of these processes are regulated by the level of activation and tone of cerebral arterioles. The active state of cerebral arterial muscle is regulated, to a large extent, by the level of membrane potential. At physiological levels of arterial pressure, cerebral arterial muscle is maintained in an active state owing to membrane depolarization, compared with zero pressure load. As arterial pressure changes, so does membrane potential. The membrane is maintained in a relatively depolarized state because of, in part, inhibition of K+ channel activity. The activity of K+ channels, especially the large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ channel (KCa) is dependent upon the level of 20-HETE produced by arterial muscle. As arterial pressure increases, so does cytochrome P450 (P4504A) activity. P4504A enzymes catalyse omega-hydroxylation of arachidonic acid and formation of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE). 20-HETE is a potent inhibitor of KCa which maintains membrane depolarization and muscle cell activation. Astrocytes also metabolize AA via P450 enzymes of the 2C11 gene family to produce epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids are released from astrocytes by glutamate which 'spills over' during neuronal activity. These locally released EETs shunt blood to metabolically active neurones providing substrate to support neuronal function. This short paper will discuss the findings which support the above scenario, the purpose of which is to provide a basis for future studies on the molecular mechanisms through which cerebral blood flow matches metabolism.

  16. Modulation of the heterogeneous membrane potential response of neutrophils to N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) by leukotriene B4: evidence for cell recruitment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, M.P.

    1986-01-01

    Individual human neutrophils (PMN) isolated by Hypaque-Ficoll gradient sedimentation, dextran sedimentation, or buffy coat preparation were assessed for the effects of leukotriene B4 (5S,12R dihydroxy 6,14-cis-8, 10 trans eicosatetraenoic acid (LTB4)-pretreatment on N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP)-mediated membrane potential or oxidative responses by using flow cytometry and a lipophilic probe of membrane potential (di-pentyl-oxacarbocyanine, di-O-C(5)3), or the nitroblue tetrazolium dye (NBT) reduction test, respectively. Although exposure to LTB4 (10(-7) M) had no effect on the