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Sample records for single mammalian cell

  1. Robust synchronization of coupled circadian and cell cycle oscillators in single mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieler, Jonathan; Cannavo, Rosamaria; Gustafson, Kyle; Gobet, Cedric; Gatfield, David; Naef, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Circadian cycles and cell cycles are two fundamental periodic processes with a period in the range of 1 day. Consequently, coupling between such cycles can lead to synchronization. Here, we estimated the mutual interactions between the two oscillators by time-lapse imaging of single mammalian NIH3T3 fibroblasts during several days. The analysis of thousands of circadian cycles in dividing cells clearly indicated that both oscillators tick in a 1:1 mode-locked state, with cell divisions occurring tightly 5 h before the peak in circadian Rev-Erbα-YFP reporter expression. In principle, such synchrony may be caused by either unidirectional or bidirectional coupling. While gating of cell division by the circadian cycle has been most studied, our data combined with stochastic modeling unambiguously show that the reverse coupling is predominant in NIH3T3 cells. Moreover, temperature, genetic, and pharmacological perturbations showed that the two interacting cellular oscillators adopt a synchronized state that is highly robust over a wide range of parameters. These findings have implications for circadian function in proliferative tissues, including epidermis, immune cells, and cancer. PMID:25028488

  2. Targeted mutations induced by a single acetylaminofluorene DNA adduct in mammalian cells and bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moryia, M.; Takeshita, M.; Johnson, F.; Peden, K.; Will, S.; Grollman, A.P.

    1988-03-01

    Mutagenic specificity of 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF) has been established in mammalian cells and several strains of bacteria by using a shuttle plasmid vector containing a single N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)acetylaminofluorene (C8-dG-AAF) adduct. The nucleotide sequence of the gene conferring tetracycline resistance was modified by conservative codon replacement so as to accommodate the sequence d(CCTTCGCTAC) flanked by two restriction sites, Bsm I and Xho I. The corresponding synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide underwent reaction with 2-(N-acetoxy-N-acetylamino)-fluorene (AAAF), forming a single dG-AAF adduct. This modified oligodeoxynucleotide was hybridized to its complementary strand and ligated between the Bsm I and Xho I sites of the vector. Plasmids containing the C8-dG-AAF adduct were used to transfect simian virus 40-transformed simian kidney (COS-1) cells and to transform several AB strains of Escherichia coli. Colonies containing mutant plasmides were detected by hybridization to /sup 32/P-labeled oligodeoxynucleotides. Presence of the single DNA adduct increased the mutation frequency by 8-fold in both COS cells and E. coli. Over 80% of mutations detected in both systems were targeted and represented G x C ..-->.. C x G or G x C ..-->.. T x A transversions or single nucleotide deletions. The authors conclude that modification of a deoxyguanosine residue with AAF preferentially induces mutations targeted at this site when a plasmid containing a single C8-dG-AAF adduct is introduced into mammalian cells or bacteria.

  3. Mammalian cell biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkind, M.M.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: the effects of N-ethyl-maleimide and hydroxyurea on hamster cells in culture; sensitization of synchronized human cells to x rays by N-ethylmaleimide; sensitization of hypoxic mammalian cells with a sulfhydryl inhibitor; damage interaction due to ionizing and nonionizing radiation in mammalian cells; DNA damage relative to radioinduced cell killing; spurious photolability of DNA labeled with methyl- 14 C-thymidine; radioinduced malignant transformation of cultured mouse cells; a comparison of properties of uv and near uv light relative to cell function and DNA damage; Monte Carlo simulation of DNA damage and repair mechanisms; and radiobiology of fast neutrons

  4. Cultivation of Mammalian Cells Using a Single-use Pneumatic Bioreactor System

    OpenAIRE

    Obom, Kristina M.; Cummings, Patrick J.; Ciafardoni, Janelle A.; Hashimura, Yasunori; Giroux, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in mammalian, insect, and stem cell cultivation and scale-up have created tremendous opportunities for new therapeutics and personalized medicine innovations. However, translating these advances into therapeutic applications will require in vitro systems that allow for robust, flexible, and cost effective bioreactor systems. There are several bioreactor systems currently utilized in research and commercial settings; however, many of these systems are not optimal for establishi...

  5. Mammalian cell biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported on studies of the molecular biology and functional changes in cultured mammalian cells following exposure to x radiation, uv radiation, fission neutrons, or various chemical environmental pollutants alone or in combinations. Emphasis was placed on the separate and combined effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons released during combustion of fossil fuels and ionizing and nonionizing radiations. Sun lamps, which emit a continuous spectrum of near ultraviolet light of 290 nm to 315 nm were used for studies of predictive cell killing due to sunlight. Results showed that exposure to uv light (254 nm) may not be adequate to predict effects produced by sunlight. Data are included from studies on single-strand breaks and repair in DNA of cultured hamster cells exposed to uv or nearultraviolet light. The possible interactions of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)-anthracene (DmBA) alone or combined with exposure to x radiation, uv radiation (254 nm) or near ultraviolet simulating sunlight were compared for effects on cell survival

  6. Mechanical properties of mammalian single smooth muscle cells. I. A low cost large range microforce transducer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Glerum (Jacobus); R. van Mastrigt (Ron)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractA transducer has been developed for measuring the minute forces generated during isometric contractions (1.0-10.0 microN) of single smooth muscle cells from the pig urinary bladder and the human uterus. In addition to its high sensitivity, resolution and stability (100 mV microN-1, and

  7. Efficient biotinylation and single-step purification of tagged transcription factors in mammalian cells and transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Ernie; Rodriguez, Patrick; Bonte, Edgar; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Katsantoni, Eleni; Heck, Albert; Grosveld, Frank; Strouboulis, John

    2003-06-01

    Proteomic approaches require simple and efficient protein purification methodologies that are amenable to high throughput. Biotinylation is an attractive approach for protein complex purification due to the very high affinity of avidin/streptavidin for biotinylated templates. Here, we describe an approach for the single-step purification of transcription factor complex(es) based on specific in vivo biotinylation. We expressed the bacterial BirA biotin ligase in mammalian cells and demonstrated very efficient biotinylation of a hematopoietic transcription factor bearing a small (23-aa) artificial peptide tag. Biotinylation of the tagged transcription factor altered neither the factor's protein interactions or DNA binding properties in vivo nor its subnuclear distribution. Using this approach, we isolated the biotin-tagged transcription factor and at least one other known interacting protein from crude nuclear extracts by direct binding to streptavidin beads. Finally, this method works efficiently in transgenic mice, thus raising the prospect of using biotinylation tagging in protein complex purification directly from animal tissues. Therefore, BirA-mediated biotinylation of tagged proteins provides the basis for the single-step purification of proteins from mammalian cells.

  8. Label-free visualization of nilotinib-functionalized gold nanoparticles within single mammalian cells by C60- SIMS imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Anna N; Tian, Hua; Schoen, Christian; Winograd, Nicholas

    2017-05-01

    Obtaining a comprehensive grasp of the behavior and interaction of pharmaceutical compounds within single cells provides some of the fundamental details necessary for more effective drug development. In particular, the changes ensuing in the carrier, drug, and host environment in targeted drug therapy applications must be explored in greater detail, as these are still not well understood. Here, nilotinib-functionalized gold nanoparticles are examined within single mammalian cells with use of imaging cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry in a model study designed to enhance our understanding of what occurs to these particles once that have been internalized. Nilotinib, several types of gold nanoparticles, and the functionalized combination of the two were surveyed and successfully imaged within single cells to determine uptake and performance. Both nilotinib and the gold particle are able to be distinguished and visualized in the functionalized nanoparticle assembly within the cell. These compounds, while both internalized, do not appear to be present in the same pixels of the chemical image, indicating possible cleavage of nilotinib from the particle after cell uptake. The method provided in this work is a direct measurement of uptake and subcellular distribution of an active drug and its carrier within a framework. The results obtained from this study have the potential to be applied to future studies to provide more effective and specific cellular delivery of a relevant pharmaceutical compound.

  9. Combining confocal and atomic force microscopy to quantify single-virus binding to mammalian cell surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Richard; Delguste, Martin; Koehler, Melanie; Dumitru, Andra C; Laskowski, Pawel R; Müller, Daniel J; Alsteens, David

    2017-11-01

    Over the past five years, atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based approaches have evolved into a powerful multiparametric tool set capable of imaging the surfaces of biological samples ranging from single receptors to membranes and tissues. One of these approaches, force-distance curve-based AFM (FD-based AFM), uses a probing tip functionalized with a ligand to image living cells at high-resolution and simultaneously localize and characterize specific ligand-receptor binding events. Analyzing data from FD-based AFM experiments using appropriate probabilistic models allows quantification of the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters that describe the free-energy landscape of the ligand-receptor bond. We have recently developed an FD-based AFM approach to quantify the binding events of single enveloped viruses to surface receptors of living animal cells while simultaneously observing them by fluorescence microscopy. This approach has provided insights into the early stages of the interaction between a virus and a cell. Applied to a model virus, we probed the specific interaction with cells expressing viral cognate receptors and measured the affinity of the interaction. Furthermore, we observed that the virus rapidly established specific multivalent interactions and found that each bond formed in sequence strengthened the attachment of the virus to the cell. Here we describe detailed procedures for probing the specific interactions of viruses with living cells; these procedures cover tip preparation, cell sample preparation, step-by-step FD-based AFM imaging and data analysis. Experienced microscopists should be able to master the entire set of protocols in 1 month.

  10. The effect of optical substrates on micro-FTIR analysis of single mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbe, Katia; Filik, Jacob; Frogley, Mark D; Cinque, Gianfelice

    2013-02-01

    The study of individual cells with infrared (IR) microspectroscopy often requires living cells to be cultured directly onto a suitable substrate. The surface effect of the specific substrates on the cell growth-viability and associated biochemistry-as well as on the IR analysis-spectral interference and optical artifacts-is all too often ignored. Using the IR beamline, MIRIAM (Diamond Light Source, UK), we show the importance of the substrate used for IR absorption spectroscopy by analyzing two different cell lines cultured on a range of seven optical substrates in both transmission and reflection modes. First, cell viability measurements are made to determine the preferable substrates for normal cell growth. Successively, synchrotron radiation IR microspectroscopy is performed on the two cell lines to determine any genuine biochemically induced changes or optical effect in the spectra due to the different substrates. Multivariate analysis of spectral data is applied on each cell line to visualize the spectral changes. The results confirm the advantage of transmission measurements over reflection due to the absence of a strong optical standing wave artifact which amplifies the absorbance spectrum in the high wavenumber regions with respect to low wavenumbers in the mid-IR range. The transmission spectra reveal interference from a more subtle but significant optical artifact related to the reflection losses of the different substrate materials. This means that, for comparative studies of cell biochemistry by IR microspectroscopy, it is crucial that all samples are measured on the same substrate type.

  11. Single Cell Electroporation Method for Mammalian CNS Neurons in Organotypic Slice Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesaka, Naofumi; Hayano, Yasufumi; Yamada, Akito; Yamamoto, Nobuhiko

    Axon tracing is an essential technique to study the projection pattern of neurons in the CNS. Horse radish peroxidase and lectins have contributed to revealing many neural connection patterns in the CNS (Itaya and van Hoesen, 1982; Fabian and Coulter, 1985; Yoshihara, 2002). Moreover, a tracing method with fluorescent dye has enabled the observation of growing axons in living conditions, and demon strated a lot of developmental aspects in axon growth and guidance (Harris et al., 1987; O'Rourke and Fraser, 1990; Kaethner and Stuermer, 1992; Halloran and Kalil, 1994; Yamamoto et al., 1997). More recently, genetically encoded fluores cent proteins can be used as a powerful tool to observe various biological events. Several gene transfer techniques such as microinjection, biolistic gene gun, viral infection, lipofection and transgenic technology have been developed (Feng et al., 2000; Ehrengruber et al., 2001; O'Brien et al., 2001; Ma et al., 2002; Sahly et al., 2003). In particular, the electroporation technique was proved as a valuable tool, since it can be applied to a wide range of tissues and cell types with little toxicity and can be performed with relative technical easiness. Most methods, including a stand ard electroporation technique, are suitable for gene transfer to a large number of cells. However, this is not ideal for axonal tracing, because observation of individ ual axons is occasionally required. To overcome this problem, we have developed an electroporation method using glass micropipettes containing plasmid solutions and small current injection. Here we introduce the method in detail and exemplified results with some example applications and discuss its usefulness.

  12. Single-Cell Profiling of Epigenetic Modifiers Identifies PRDM14 as an Inducer of Cell Fate in the Mammalian Embryo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Burton

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell plasticity or potency is necessary for the formation of multiple cell types. The mechanisms underlying this plasticity are largely unknown. Preimplantation mouse embryos undergo drastic changes in cellular potency, starting with the totipotent zygote through to the formation of the pluripotent inner cell mass (ICM and differentiated trophectoderm in the blastocyst. Here, we set out to identify and functionally characterize chromatin modifiers that define the transitions of potency and cell fate in the mouse embryo. Using a quantitative microfluidics approach in single cells, we show that developmental transitions are marked by distinctive combinatorial profiles of epigenetic modifiers. Pluripotent cells of the ICM are distinct from their differentiated trophectoderm counterparts. We show that PRDM14 is heterogeneously expressed in 4-cell-stage embryos. Forced expression of PRDM14 at the 2-cell stage leads to increased H3R26me2 and can induce a pluripotent ICM fate. Our results shed light on the epigenetic networks that govern cellular potency and identity in vivo.

  13. Dissecting Cell-Type Composition and Activity-Dependent Transcriptional State in Mammalian Brains by Massively Parallel Single-Nucleus RNA-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Peng; Fabyanic, Emily; Kwon, Deborah Y; Tang, Sheng; Zhou, Zhaolan; Wu, Hao

    2017-12-07

    Massively parallel single-cell RNA sequencing can precisely resolve cellular diversity in a high-throughput manner at low cost, but unbiased isolation of intact single cells from complex tissues such as adult mammalian brains is challenging. Here, we integrate sucrose-gradient-assisted purification of nuclei with droplet microfluidics to develop a highly scalable single-nucleus RNA-seq approach (sNucDrop-seq), which is free of enzymatic dissociation and nucleus sorting. By profiling ∼18,000 nuclei isolated from cortical tissues of adult mice, we demonstrate that sNucDrop-seq not only accurately reveals neuronal and non-neuronal subtype composition with high sensitivity but also enables in-depth analysis of transient transcriptional states driven by neuronal activity, at single-cell resolution, in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. MeV single-ion beam irradiation of mammalian cells using the Surrey vertical nanobeam, compared with broad proton beam and X-ray irradiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakrajang, K.; Jeynes, J. C. G.; Merchant, M. J.; Kirkby, K.; Kirkby, N.; Thopan, P.; Yu, L. D.

    2013-07-01

    As a part of a systematic study on mechanisms involved in physical cancer therapies, this work investigated response of mammalian cells to ultra-low-dose ion beam irradiation. The ion beam irradiation was performed using the recently completed nanobeam facility at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre. A scanning focused vertical ion nano-beam was applied to irradiate Chinese hamster V79 cells. The V79 cells were irradiated in two different beam modes, namely, focused single ion beam and defocused scanning broad ion beam of 3.8-MeV protons. The single ion beam was capable of irradiating a single cell with a precisely controlled number of the ions to extremely low doses. After irradiation and cell incubation, the number of surviving colonies as a function of the number of the irradiating ions was measured for the cell survival fraction curve. A lower survival for the single ion beam irradiation than that of the broad beam case implied the hypersensitivity and bystander effect. The ion-beam-induced cell survival curves were compared with that from 300-kV X-ray irradiation. Theoretical studies indicated that the cell death in single ion irradiation mainly occurred in the cell cycle phases of cell division and intervals between the cell division and the DNA replication. The success in the experiment demonstrated the Surrey vertical nanobeam successfully completed.

  15. Mutagenesis in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burki, H.J.

    1981-01-01

    Mutagenic processes in synchronous cultures of Chinese hamster ovary cells have been studied. There is a difference in the induction of mutants by ultraviolet light during the cell cycle. There appears to be a sensitive period in the middle of the G1 stage of the cell cycle suggesting some mutagenic mechanism is present at that time. Studies indicate that mutation induction during the cell cycle is also mutagen specific since exposure to ethyl nitrosourea in the same system produces different results. Two clones have been isolated which are ultrasensitive to ultraviolet light. These cells are being used to determine if this hypermutability is cell-cycle dependent, related to cell cycle biochemistry, or to repair processes independent of cell cycle. Tritium and bromodeoxyuridine induced damage to synchronously dividing cell cultures are also being studied in relation to DNA replication. Cell killing by ionizing radiation is also related to the cell cycle. Sensitive times in the cell cycle for mutation induction by ionization radiation are identified

  16. Technology of mammalian cell encapsulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uludag, H; De Vos, P; Tresco, PA

    2000-01-01

    Entrapment of mammalian cells in physical membranes has been practiced since the early 1950s when it was originally introduced as a basic research tool. The method has since been developed based on the promise of its therapeutic usefulness in tissue transplantation. Encapsulation physically isolates

  17. MeV single-ion beam irradiation of mammalian cells using the Surrey vertical nanobeam, compared with broad proton beam and X-ray irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakrajang, K. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Jeynes, J.C.G.; Merchant, M.J.; Kirkby, K.; Kirkby, N. [Surrey Ion Beam Center, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Science, University of Surrey, Guildford Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Thopan, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@fnrf.science.cmu.ac.th [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: •Recently completed nanobeam at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre was used. •3.8-MeV single and broad proton beams irradiated Chinese hamster cells. •Cell survival curves were measured and compared with 300-kV X-ray irradiation. •Single ion irradiation had a lower survival part at ultra-low dose. •It implies hypersensitivity, bystander effect and cell cycle phase of cell death. -- Abstract: As a part of a systematic study on mechanisms involved in physical cancer therapies, this work investigated response of mammalian cells to ultra-low-dose ion beam irradiation. The ion beam irradiation was performed using the recently completed nanobeam facility at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre. A scanning focused vertical ion nano-beam was applied to irradiate Chinese hamster V79 cells. The V79 cells were irradiated in two different beam modes, namely, focused single ion beam and defocused scanning broad ion beam of 3.8-MeV protons. The single ion beam was capable of irradiating a single cell with a precisely controlled number of the ions to extremely low doses. After irradiation and cell incubation, the number of surviving colonies as a function of the number of the irradiating ions was measured for the cell survival fraction curve. A lower survival for the single ion beam irradiation than that of the broad beam case implied the hypersensitivity and bystander effect. The ion-beam-induced cell survival curves were compared with that from 300-kV X-ray irradiation. Theoretical studies indicated that the cell death in single ion irradiation mainly occurred in the cell cycle phases of cell division and intervals between the cell division and the DNA replication. The success in the experiment demonstrated the Surrey vertical nanobeam successfully completed.

  18. A Vector with a Single Promoter for In Vitro Transcription and Mammalian Cell Expression of CRISPR gRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Romanienko

    Full Text Available The genomes of more than 50 organisms have now been manipulated due to rapid advancement of gene editing technology. One way to perform gene editing in the mouse using the CRISPR/CAS system, guide RNA (gRNA and CAS9 mRNA transcribed in vitro are microinjected into fertilized eggs that are then allowed to develop to term. As a rule, gRNAs are tested first in tissue culture cells and the one with the highest locus-specific cleavage activity is chosen for microinjection. For cell transfections, gRNAs are typically expressed using the human U6 promoter (hU6. However, gRNAs for microinjection into zygotes are obtained by in vitro transcription from a T7 bacteriophage promoter in a separate plasmid vector. Here, we describe the design and construction of a combined U6T7 hybrid promoter from which the same gRNA sequence can be expressed. An expression vector containing such a hybrid promoter can now be used to generate gRNA for testing in mammalian cells as well as for microinjection purposes. The gRNAs expressed and transcribed from this vector are found to be functional in cells as well as in mice.

  19. Mutation in cultured mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, N.; Okada, S.

    1982-01-01

    Mammalian cell cultures were exposed to gamma-rays at various dose rates. Dose-rate effects were observed in cultured somatic cells of the mouse for cell killing and mutations resistant to 6-thioguanine (TGsup(r)) and to methotrexate (MTXsup(r)). Linear quadratic model may be applied to cell killing and TGsup(r) mutations in some cases but can not explain the whole data. Results at low doses with far low dose-rate were not predictable from data at high doses with acute or chronic irradiation. Radioprotective effects of dimethyl sulfoxide were seen only after acute exposure but not after chronic one, suggesting that damages by indirect action of radiations may be potentially reparable by cells. TGsup(r) mutations seem to contain gross structural changes whereas MTXsup(r) ones may have smaller alterations. (Namekawa, K.)

  20. Electrochemical monitoring of intracellular enzyme activity of single living mammalian cells by using a double-mediator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumae, Yoshiharu; Takahashi, Yasufumi; Ino, Kosuke; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO) activity of single HeLa cells were evaluated by using the menadione–ferrocyanide double mediator system combined with scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). - Highlights: • NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase activity of single cells were evaluated with SECM. • Fe(CN) 6 3− /menadione concentrations were optimized for long-term SECM monitoring. • Menadione affect the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species and GSH. • At 100 μM menadione, the Fe(CN) 6 3− generation rate decreased rapidly within 30 min. - Abstract: We evaluated the intracellular NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO) activity of single HeLa cells by using the menadione–ferrocyanide double-mediator system combined with scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The double-mediator system was used to amplify the current response from the intracellular NQO activity and to reduce menadione-induced cell damage. The electron shuttle between the electrode and menadione was mediated by the ferrocyanide/ferricyanide redox couple. Generation of ferrocyanide was observed immediately after the addition of a lower concentration (10 μM) of menadione. The ferrocyanide generation rate was constant for 120 min. At a higher menadione concentration (100 μM), the ferrocyanide generation rate decreased within 30 min because of the cytotoxic effect of menadione. We also investigated the relationship between intracellular reactive oxygen species or glutathione levels and exposure to different menadione concentrations to determine the optimal condition for SECM with minimal invasiveness. The present study clearly demonstrates that SECM is useful for the analysis of intracellular enzymatic activities in single cells with a double-mediator system

  1. Electrochemical monitoring of intracellular enzyme activity of single living mammalian cells by using a double-mediator system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumae, Yoshiharu [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, Aramaki 6-6-11-605, Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Takahashi, Yasufumi [Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Ino, Kosuke [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, Aramaki 6-6-11-605, Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Shiku, Hitoshi, E-mail: shiku@bioinfo.che.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, Aramaki 6-6-11-605, Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Matsue, Tomokazu, E-mail: matsue@bioinfo.che.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, Aramaki 6-6-11-605, Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-09-09

    Graphical abstract: NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO) activity of single HeLa cells were evaluated by using the menadione–ferrocyanide double mediator system combined with scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). - Highlights: • NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase activity of single cells were evaluated with SECM. • Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3−}/menadione concentrations were optimized for long-term SECM monitoring. • Menadione affect the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species and GSH. • At 100 μM menadione, the Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3−} generation rate decreased rapidly within 30 min. - Abstract: We evaluated the intracellular NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO) activity of single HeLa cells by using the menadione–ferrocyanide double-mediator system combined with scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The double-mediator system was used to amplify the current response from the intracellular NQO activity and to reduce menadione-induced cell damage. The electron shuttle between the electrode and menadione was mediated by the ferrocyanide/ferricyanide redox couple. Generation of ferrocyanide was observed immediately after the addition of a lower concentration (10 μM) of menadione. The ferrocyanide generation rate was constant for 120 min. At a higher menadione concentration (100 μM), the ferrocyanide generation rate decreased within 30 min because of the cytotoxic effect of menadione. We also investigated the relationship between intracellular reactive oxygen species or glutathione levels and exposure to different menadione concentrations to determine the optimal condition for SECM with minimal invasiveness. The present study clearly demonstrates that SECM is useful for the analysis of intracellular enzymatic activities in single cells with a double-mediator system.

  2. DNA synthesis in irradiated mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Painter, R.B.; California Univ., San Francisco; Young, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    One of the first responses observed in S phase mammalian cells that have suffered DNA damage is the inhibition of initiation of DNA replicons. In cells exposed to ionizing radiation, a single-strand break appears to be the stimulus for this effect, whereby the initiation of many adjacent replicons (a replicon cluster) is blocked by a single-strand break in any one of them. In cells exposed to ultraviolet light (u.v.), replicon initiation is blocked at fluences that induce about one pyrimidine dimer per replicon. The inhibition of replicon initiation by u.v. in Chinese hamster cells that are incapable of excising pyrimidine dimers from their DNA is virtually the same as in cells that are proficient in dimer excision. Therefore, a single-strand break formed during excision repair of pyrimidine dimers is not the stimulus for inhibition of replicon initiation in u.v.-irradiated cells. Considering this fact, as well as the comparative insensitivity of human ataxia telangiectasia cells to u.v.-induced inhibition of replicon initiation, we propose that a relatively rare lesion is the stimulus for u.v. -induced inhibition of replicon initiation. (author

  3. INVESTIGATION OF DNA REPAIR BY SISTER CHROMATID EXCHANGE (SCE) ANALYSIS AND THE ALKALINE SINGLE CELL GEL ASSAY (SCG) IN MAMMALIAN GO-LYMPHOCYTES AFTER IN VITRO EXPOSURE TO ETHYLENE OXIDE (EO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigation ofDNA Repair by Sister Chromatid Exchange (SCE) Analysis and the Alkaline Single Cell Gel Assay (SCG) in Mammalian Go-Lymphocytes after In Vitro Exposure to Ethylene Oxide (EO). EO is a large volume chemical used primarily as an intermediate in manufacturing...

  4. Mechanical properties of mammalian single smooth muscle cells. II. Evaluation of a modified technique for attachment of cells to the measurement apparatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Glerum (Jacobus); R. van Mastrigt (Ron)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractA method is described for attaching isolated single smooth muscle cells to an apparatus designed for measuring the longitudinal forces developed passively and actively by the cell upon straining, electrical or pharmacological stimulation. Primary attachment of the cell is based on its

  5. Basic Techniques in Mammalian Cell Tissue Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Katy; May, Kristin M

    2016-11-01

    Cultured mammalian cells are used extensively in cell biology studies. It requires a number of special skills in order to be able to preserve the structure, function, behavior, and biology of the cells in culture. This unit describes the basic skills required to maintain and preserve cell cultures: maintaining aseptic technique, preparing media with the appropriate characteristics, passaging, freezing and storage, recovering frozen stocks, and counting viable cells. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  6. Nutrient acquisition strategies of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Wilhelm; Thompson, Craig B

    2017-06-07

    Mammalian cells are surrounded by diverse nutrients, such as glucose, amino acids, various macromolecules and micronutrients, which they can import through transmembrane transporters and endolysosomal pathways. By using different nutrient sources, cells gain metabolic flexibility to survive periods of starvation. Quiescent cells take up sufficient nutrients to sustain homeostasis. However, proliferating cells depend on growth-factor-induced increases in nutrient uptake to support biomass formation. Here, we review cellular nutrient acquisition strategies and their regulation by growth factors and cell-intrinsic nutrient sensors. We also discuss how oncogenes and tumour suppressors promote nutrient uptake and thereby support the survival and growth of cancer cells.

  7. Radiation effects in mammalian cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, C.K.; Han, A.; Elkind, M.M.; Wells, R.L.; Buess, E.M.; Lin, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this research effort is to elucidate the mechanisms for the radiation-induced changes in mammalian cells that lead to cell death, mutation, neoplastic transformation, DNA damage, and chromosomal alterations. Of particular interest are the effects of low-dose-rate and fractionated irradiation on these end points with respect to the mechanisms whereby these effects are influenced by cellular repair processes, inhibitors, and promoters that act at the genetic or biochemical level. 17 refs

  8. Radiation sensitivity of mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    The authors tested various aspects of the so-called ''competition'' model for radiation sensitization/protection. In this model, sensitizers and/or protectors react in first order chemical reactions with radiation-induced target radicals in the cell, producing damage fixation or repair respectively. It is only because of these parallel, first-order competing reactions that they may assign net amounts of damage on the basis of the chemical reactivity of the sentiziers/protectors with the radicals. It might be expected that such a simple model could not explain all aspects of cellular radiosensitivity and this has indeed been found to be true. However, one is able, with the simple model, to pose quite specific questions, and obtain quantitative information with respect to the relative agreement between experiment and theory. Many experiments by several investigators have found areas of disagreement with the competition theory, particularly with respect to the follow items: 1) role of cellular glutathione as the most important endogeneous radiation protector 2) characteristics of various sensitizers which cause them to behave differently from each other 3) methods relating to the quantitative kinetic analysis of experimenal results. This paper addresses these specific areas of disagreement from both an experimental and theoretical basis

  9. Crude subcellular fractionation of cultured mammalian cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holden Paul

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression and study of recombinant proteins in mammalian culture systems can be complicated during the cell lysis procedure by contaminating proteins from cellular compartments distinct from those within which the protein of interest resides and also by solubility issues that may arise from the use of a single lysis buffer. Partial subcellular fractionation using buffers of increasing stringency, rather than whole cell lysis is one way in which to avoid or reduce this contamination and ensure complete recovery of the target protein. Currently published protocols involve time consuming centrifugation steps which may require expensive equipment and commercially available kits can be prohibitively expensive when handling large or multiple samples. Findings We have established a protocol to sequentially extract proteins from cultured mammalian cells in fractions enriched for cytosolic, membrane bound organellar, nuclear and insoluble proteins. All of the buffers used can be made inexpensively and easily and the protocol requires no costly equipment. While the method was optimized for a specific cell type, we demonstrate that the protocol can be applied to a variety of commonly used cell lines and anticipate that it can be applied to any cell line via simple optimization of the primary extraction step. Conclusion We describe a protocol for the crude subcellular fractionation of cultured mammalian cells that is both straightforward and cost effective and may facilitate the more accurate study of recombinant proteins and the generation of purer preparations of said proteins from cell extracts.

  10. The German ISS experiment Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CERASP): The effects of single and combined space flight conditions on mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumstark-Khan, C.; Hellweg, C.; Arenz, A.

    2005-08-01

    The German experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CERASP)", to be performed on the International Space Station (ISS) will supply basic information on the cellular response to radiation applied in microgravity. One of the biological endpoints under investigation will be gene activation by space flight conditions in mammalian cells, based on fluorescent promoter reporter systems using green fluorescent protein. The promoter element to be investigated reflects the activity of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway. Results obtained with X-rays and accelerated argon ions (95 MeV/u, LET 230 keV/μm) produced at the French heavy ion accelerator GANIL imply that densely ionizing radiation has a stronger potential to activate NF-κB dependent gene expression than sparsely ionizing radiation.

  11. The German ISS-experiment Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CERASP): The effects of single and combined space flight conditions on mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, C. E.; Thelen, M.; Arenz, A.; Baumstark-Khan, C.

    The combined action of ionizing radiation and microgravity will continue to influence future manned space missions, with special risks for astronauts on the Moon surface or for long duration missions to Mars. There is increasing evidence that basic cellular functions are sensitive not only to radiation but also to microgravity. Previous space flight experiments gave contradictory results: from inhibition of DNA repair by microgravity to enhancement, whereas others did not detect any influence of microgravity on repair. At the Radiation Biology Department of the German Aerospace Center (DLR), recombinant bacterial and mammalian cell systems were developed as reporters for cellular signal transduction modulation by genotoxic environmental conditions. The space experiment “Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space” (CERASP) to be performed at the International Space Station (ISS) will make use of such reporter cell lines thereby supplying basic information on the cellular response to radiation applied in microgravity. One of the biological endpoints will be survival reflected by radiation-dependent reduction of constitutive expression of the enhanced variant of green fluorescent protein (EGFP). A second end-point will be gene activation by space flight conditions in mammalian cells, based on fluorescent promoter reporter systems using the destabilized d2EGFP variant. The promoter element to be investigated reflects the activity of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway. The NF-κB family of proteins plays a major role in the inflammatory and immune response, cell proliferation and differentiation, apoptosis and tumor genesis. Results obtained with X-rays and accelerated heavy ions produced at the French heavy ion accelerator GANIL imply that densely ionizing radiation has a stronger potential to activate NF-κB dependent gene expression than sparsely ionizing radiation. The correlation of NF-κB activation to negative regulation of apoptosis could favor

  12. X-rays sensitive mammalian cell mutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsumi, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    A phenomenon that in x-ray-sensitive mammalian-cell mutants, cellular death due to x-ray radiation was not increased by caffeine, but on the contrary, the dead cells were resuscitated by it was discussed. The survival rate of mutant cells increased by caffein in a low concentration. This suggested that caffeine may have induced some mechanism to produce x-ray resistant mutant cells. Postirradiation treatment with caffeine increased considerably the survival rate of the mutant cells, and this suggested the existence of latent caffeine-sensitive potentially lethal damage repair system. This system, after a few hours, is thought to be substituted by caffeine-resistant repair system which is induced by caffeine, and this may be further substituted by x-ray-resistant repair system. The repair system was also induced by adenine. (Ueda, J.)

  13. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chen, D.S. [Rochester Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    1993-02-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population.

  14. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Chen, D.S. (Rochester Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology)

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population.

  15. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M.; Chen, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population

  16. Mammalian synthetic biology for studying the cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Melina; Xiang, Joy S; Smolke, Christina D

    2017-01-02

    Synthetic biology is advancing the design of genetic devices that enable the study of cellular and molecular biology in mammalian cells. These genetic devices use diverse regulatory mechanisms to both examine cellular processes and achieve precise and dynamic control of cellular phenotype. Synthetic biology tools provide novel functionality to complement the examination of natural cell systems, including engineered molecules with specific activities and model systems that mimic complex regulatory processes. Continued development of quantitative standards and computational tools will expand capacities to probe cellular mechanisms with genetic devices to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the cell. In this study, we review synthetic biology tools that are being applied to effectively investigate diverse cellular processes, regulatory networks, and multicellular interactions. We also discuss current challenges and future developments in the field that may transform the types of investigation possible in cell biology. © 2017 Mathur et al.

  17. RNAa is conserved in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Huang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA activation (RNAa is a newly discovered mechanism of gene activation triggered by small double-stranded RNAs termed 'small activating RNAs' (saRNAs. Thus far, RNAa has only been demonstrated in human cells and is unclear whether it is conserved in other mammals.In the present study, we evaluated RNAa in cells derived from four mammalian species including nonhuman primates (African green monkey and chimpanzee, mouse, and rat. Previously, we identified saRNAs leading to the activation of E-cadherin, p21, and VEGF in human cells. As the targeted sequences are highly conserved in primates, transfection of each human saRNA into African green monkey (COS1 and chimpanzee (WES cells also resulted in induction of the intended gene. Additional saRNAs targeting clinically relevant genes including p53, PAR4, WT1, RB1, p27, NKX3-1, VDR, IL2, and pS2 were also designed and transfected into COS1 and WES cells. Of the nine genes, p53, PAR4, WT1, and NKX3-1 were induced by their corresponding saRNAs. We further extended our analysis of RNAa into rodent cell types. We identified two saRNAs that induced the expression of mouse Cyclin B1 in NIH/3T3 and TRAMP C1 cells, which led to increased phosphorylation of histone H3, a downstream marker for chromosome condensation and entry into mitosis. We also identified two saRNAs that activated the expression of CXCR4 in primary rat adipose-derived stem cells.This study demonstrates that RNAa exists in mammalian species other than human. Our findings also suggest that nonhuman primate disease models may have clinical applicability for validating RNAa-based drugs.

  18. Molecular dosimetry of DNA damage caused by alkylation. I. Single-strand breaks induced by ethylating agents in cultured mammalian cells in relation to survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbondandolo, A.; Dogliotti, E.; Lohman, P.H.M.; Berends, F.

    1982-01-01

    Cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells were treated with ethylating agents. DNA lesions giving rise to single-strand breaks (ssb) or alkali-labile sites were measured by centrifugation in alkaline sucrose gradients after lysis in alkali. 4 agents with different tendencies to ethylate preferentially

  19. Engineered Trehalose Permeable to Mammalian Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Abazari

    Full Text Available Trehalose is a naturally occurring disaccharide which is associated with extraordinary stress-tolerance capacity in certain species of unicellular and multicellular organisms. In mammalian cells, presence of intra- and extracellular trehalose has been shown to confer improved tolerance against freezing and desiccation. Since mammalian cells do not synthesize nor import trehalose, the development of novel methods for efficient intracellular delivery of trehalose has been an ongoing investigation. Herein, we studied the membrane permeability of engineered lipophilic derivatives of trehalose. Trehalose conjugated with 6 acetyl groups (trehalose hexaacetate or 6-O-Ac-Tre demonstrated superior permeability in rat hepatocytes compared with regular trehalose, trehalose diacetate (2-O-Ac-Tre and trehalose tetraacetate (4-O-Ac-Tre. Once in the cell, intracellular esterases hydrolyzed the 6-O-Ac-Tre molecules, releasing free trehalose into the cytoplasm. The total concentration of intracellular trehalose (plus acetylated variants reached as high as 10 fold the extracellular concentration of 6-O-Ac-Tre, attaining concentrations suitable for applications in biopreservation. To describe this accumulation phenomenon, a diffusion-reaction model was proposed and the permeability and reaction kinetics of 6-O-Ac-Tre were determined by fitting to experimental data. Further studies suggested that the impact of the loading and the presence of intracellular trehalose on cellular viability and function were negligible. Engineering of trehalose chemical structure rather than manipulating the cell, is an innocuous, cell-friendly method for trehalose delivery, with demonstrated potential for trehalose loading in different types of cells and cell lines, and can facilitate the wide-spread application of trehalose as an intracellular protective agent in biopreservation studies.

  20. Somatic cell genetics and the radiation biology of mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puck, T.T.

    1984-01-01

    Early application of somatic cell genetics to mammalian cell radiobiology provided a definitive measurement of the mean lethal dose of ionizing radiation for mammalian cells and re-defined cellular radiosensitivity in a quantitative fashion with important implications in radiotherapy. These studies demonstrated that the killing of mammalian cells by ionizing radiation is due to damage to the DNA. They first established the fundamental role of cell turnover in determining some of the major pathological effects of the mammalian radiation syndrome. They made possible production and study of many kinds of mutant and hybrid cells including radiation-repair deficient mutants. Methods of genetic-biochemical analysis of mutants and hybrids have been devised which make possible identification of specific metabolic effects resulting from irradiation and similar actions. These studies have demonstrated that X-irradiated cells can be used as feeder layers for nourishing other cells dependent on specific cell-cell interactions for their growth. More recently, new applications have provided improved detection and quantitation of effects of low levels of radiation and other mutagens, and have made possible fine structure mapping of human genes

  1. Automated counting of mammalian cell colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, P R; Vojnovic, B; Kelly, J; Mayes, C R; Boulton, P; Woodcock, M; Joiner, M C

    2001-01-01

    Investigating the effect of low-dose radiation exposure on cells using assays of colony-forming ability requires large cell samples to maintain statistical accuracy. Manually counting the resulting colonies is a laborious task in which consistent objectivity is hard to achieve. This is true especially with some mammalian cell lines which form poorly defined or 'fuzzy' colonies, typified by glioma or fibroblast cell lines. A computer-vision-based automated colony counter is presented in this paper. It utilizes novel imaging and image-processing methods involving a modified form of the Hough transform. The automated counter is able to identify less-discrete cell colonies typical of these cell lines. The results of automated colony counting are compared with those from four manual (human) colony counts for the cell lines HT29, A172, U118 and IN1265. The results from the automated counts fall well within the distribution of the manual counts for all four cell lines with respect to surviving fraction (SF) versus dose curves, SF values at 2 Gy (SF2) and total area under the SF curve (Dbar). From the variation in the counts, it is shown that the automated counts are generally more consistent than the manual counts.

  2. Host cell reactivation in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lytle, C.D.; Benane, S.G.; Stafford, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    The survival of UV-irradiated herpes simplex virus was determined in cultured Potoroo (a marsupial) and human cells under lighting conditions which promoted photereactivation. Photoreactivation was readily demonstrated for herpes virus in two lines of Potoroo cells with dose reduction factors of 0.7 to 0.8 for ovary cells and 0.5 to 0.7 for kidney cells. Light from Blacklite (near UV) lamps was more effective than from Daylight (mostly visible) lamps, suggesting that near UV radiation was more effecient for photoreactivation in Potoroo cells. The quantitative and qualitative aspects of this photoreactivation were similar to those reported for a similar virus infecting chick embryo cells. UV-survival curves of herpes virus in Potoroo cells indicated a high level of 'dark' host cell reactivation. No photoreactivation was found for UV-irradiated vaccinia virus in Potoroo cells. A similar photoreactivation study was done using special control lighting (lambda>600 nm) and human cells with normal repair and with cells deficient in excision repair (XP). No photoreactivation was found for UV-irradiated herpes virus in either human cell with either Blacklite or Daylight lamps as the sources of photoreactivating light. This result contrasts with a report of photoreactivation for a herpes virus in the same XP cells using incandescent lamps. (author)

  3. Synthetic RNA Controllers for Programming Mammalian Cell Fate and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-04

    Final report for “Synthetic RNA controllers for programming mammalian cell fate and function” Principal Investigator: Christina D. Smolke...SUBTITLE Synthetic RNA controllers for programming mammalian cell fate and function 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18   2 Synthetic RNA controllers for programming mammalian cell fate and function Task 1

  4. A hybrid mammalian cell cycle model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Noël

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid modeling provides an effective solution to cope with multiple time scales dynamics in systems biology. Among the applications of this method, one of the most important is the cell cycle regulation. The machinery of the cell cycle, leading to cell division and proliferation, combines slow growth, spatio-temporal re-organisation of the cell, and rapid changes of regulatory proteins concentrations induced by post-translational modifications. The advancement through the cell cycle comprises a well defined sequence of stages, separated by checkpoint transitions. The combination of continuous and discrete changes justifies hybrid modelling approaches to cell cycle dynamics. We present a piecewise-smooth version of a mammalian cell cycle model, obtained by hybridization from a smooth biochemical model. The approximate hybridization scheme, leading to simplified reaction rates and binary event location functions, is based on learning from a training set of trajectories of the smooth model. We discuss several learning strategies for the parameters of the hybrid model.

  5. Passaging protocols for mammalian neural stem cells in suspension bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Arindom; Kallos, Michael S; Behie, Leo A

    2002-01-01

    Mammalian neural stem cells (NSC) offer great promise as therapeutic agents for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. As a consequence of the large numbers of cells that will be needed for drug testing and transplantation studies, it is necessary to develop protocols for the large-scale expansion of mammalian NSC. Neural stem cells and early progenitor cells can be expanded in vitro as aggregates in controlled bioreactors using carefully designed media. The first objective of this study was to determine if it is possible to maintain a population of murine neural stem and progenitor cells as aggregates in suspension culture bioreactors over extended periods of time. We discovered that serial passaging of a mixture of aggregates sizes resulted in high viabilities, high viable cell densities, and good control of aggregate diameter. When the NSC aggregates were serially subcultured three times without mechanical dissociation, a total multiplication ratio of 2.9 x 10(3) was achieved over a period of 12 days, whereas the aggregate size was controlled (mean diameter less than 150 microm) below levels at which necrosis would occur. Moreover, cell densities of 1.0 x 10(6) cells/mL were repeatedly achieved in batch culture with viabilities exceeding 80%. The second objective was to examine the proliferative potential of single cells shed from the surface of these aggregates. We found that the single cells, when subcultured, retained the capacity to generate new aggregates, gave rise to cultures with high viable cell densities and were able to differentiate into all of the primary cell phenotypes in the central nervous system.

  6. Repair of radiation damage in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The responses, such as survival, mutation, and carcinogenesis, of mammalian cells and tissues to radiation are dependent not only on the magnitude of the damage to macromolecular structures - DNA, RNA, protein, and membranes - but on the rates of macromolecular syntheses of cells relative to the half-lives of the damages. Cells possess a number of mechanisms for repairing damage to DNA. If the repair systems are rapid and error free, cells can tolerate much larger doses than if repair is slow or error prone. It is important to understand the effects of radiation and the repair of radiation damage because there exist reasonable amounts of epidemiological data that permits the construction of dose-response curves for humans. The shapes of such curves or the magnitude of the response will depend on repair. Radiation damage is emphasized because: (a) radiation dosimetry, with all its uncertainties for populations, is excellent compared to chemical dosimetry; (b) a number of cancer-prone diseases are known in which there are defects in DNA repair and radiation results in more chromosomal damage in cells from such individuals than in cells from normal individuals; (c) in some cases, specific radiation products in DNA have been correlated with biological effects, and (d) many chemical effects seem to mimic radiation effects. A further reason for emphasizing damage to DNA is the wealth of experimental evidence indicating that damages to DNA can be initiating events in carcinogenesis

  7. Cell fate regulation in early mammalian development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oron, Efrat; Ivanova, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    Preimplantation development in mammals encompasses a period from fertilization to implantation and results in formation of a blastocyst composed of three distinct cell lineages: epiblast, trophectoderm and primitive endoderm. The epiblast gives rise to the organism, while the trophectoderm and the primitive endoderm contribute to extraembryonic tissues that support embryo development after implantation. In many vertebrates, such as frog or fish, maternally supplied lineage determinants are partitioned within the egg. Cell cleavage that follows fertilization results in polarization of these factors between the individual blastomeres, which become restricted in their developmental fate. In contrast, the mouse oocyte and zygote lack clear polarity and, until the eight-cell stage, individual blastomeres retain the potential to form all lineages. How are cell lineages specified in the absence of a maternally supplied blueprint? This is a fundamental question in the field of developmental biology. The answer to this question lies in understanding the cell–cell interactions and gene networks involved in embryonic development prior to implantation and using this knowledge to create testable models of the developmental processes that govern cell fates. We provide an overview of classic and contemporary models of early lineage development in the mouse and discuss the emerging body of work that highlights similarities and differences between blastocyst development in the mouse and other mammalian species. (paper)

  8. Mitochondrial toxicity of triclosan on mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charmaine Ajao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of triclosan (5-chloro-2′-(2,4-dichlorophenoxyphenol on mammalian cells were investigated using human peripheral blood mono nuclear cells (PBMC, keratinocytes (HaCaT, porcine spermatozoa and kidney tubular epithelial cells (PK-15, murine pancreatic islets (MIN-6 and neuroblastoma cells (MNA as targets. We show that triclosan (1–10 μg ml−1 depolarised the mitochondria, upshifted the rate of glucose consumption in PMBC, HaCaT, PK-15 and MNA, and subsequently induced metabolic acidosis. Triclosan induced a regression of insulin producing pancreatic islets into tiny pycnotic cells and necrotic death. Short exposure to low concentrations of triclosan (30 min, ≤1 μg/ml paralyzed the high amplitude tail beating and progressive motility of spermatozoa, within 30 min exposure, depolarized the spermatozoan mitochondria and hyperpolarised the acrosome region of the sperm head and the flagellar fibrous sheath (distal part of the flagellum. Experiments with isolated rat liver mitochondria showed that triclosan impaired oxidative phosphorylation, downshifted ATP synthesis, uncoupled respiration and provoked excessive oxygen uptake. These exposure concentrations are 100–1000 fold lower that those permitted in consumer goods. The mitochondriotoxic mechanism of triclosan differs from that of valinomycin, cereulide and the enniatins by not involving potassium ionophoric activity.

  9. Repair of furocoumarin adducts in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolan, M.E.; Smith, C.A.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    DNA repair was studied in cultured mammalian cells treated with the furocoumarins 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP), aminomethyl trioxsalen, or angelicin and irradiated with near UV light. The amount of DNA cross-linked by 8-MOP in normal human cells decreased by about one-half in 24 hours after treatment; no decrease was observed in xeroderma pigmentosum cells, group A. At present, it is not known to what extent this decrease represents complete repair events at the sites of cross-links. Furocoumarin adducts elicited excision repair in normal human and monkey cells but not in xeroderma pigmentosum group A cells. This excision repair resembled in several aspects that elicited by pyrimidine dimers, formed in DNA by irradiation with 254-nm UV light; however, it appeared that for at least 8-MOP and aminomethyl trioxsalen, removal of adducts was not as efficient as was the removal of pyrimidine dimers. A comparison was also made of repair in the 172-base-pair repetitive alpha-DNA component of monkey cells to repair in the bulk of the genome. Although repair elicited by pyrimidine dimers in alpha-DNA was the same as in the bulk DNA, that following treatment of cells with either aminomethyl trioxsalen or angelicin and near UV was markedly deficient in alpha-DNA. This deficiency reflected the removal of fewer adducts from alpha-DNA after the same initial adduct frequencies. These results could mean that each furocoumarin may produce several structurally distinct adducts to DNA in cells and that the capacity of cellular repair systems to remove these various adducts may vary greatly

  10. Protection of cultured mammalian cells by rebamipide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoku, Shigetoshi; Aramaki, Ryoji [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Tanaka, Hisashi; Kusumoto, Naotoshi

    1997-06-01

    Rebamipide which is used as a drug for gastritis and stomach ulcer has large capability for OH radical scavenging. It is expected that rebamipide has protective effect against ionizing radiations. The present paper deals with protective effect of rebamipide for cultured mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiations. As rebamipide is insoluble in water, three solvents were used to dissolve. Rebamipide dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl formamide (DMFA) and 0.02 N NaOH was added to the cells in Eagle`s minimum essential medium (MEM) supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum and the cells were irradiated with X-rays. After irradiation, the cells were trypsinized, plated in MEM with 10% fetal calf serum and incubated for 7 days in a CO{sub 2} incubator to form colonies. Rebamipide dissolved in 0.02 N NaOH exhibited the protective effect expected its OH radical scavenging capability. However, the protective effect of rebamipide dissolved in DMSO was about half of that expected by its radical scavenging capability and that of rebamipide dissolved in DMFA was not observed. Uptake of rebamipide labeled with {sup 14}C increased with increasing contact time with rebamipide. These rebamipide mainly distributed in nucleus rather than cytoplasm. (author)

  11. Inertial picobalance reveals fast mass fluctuations in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Martín, David; Fläschner, Gotthold; Gaub, Benjamin; Martin, Sascha; Newton, Richard; Beerli, Corina; Mercer, Jason; Gerber, Christoph; Müller, Daniel J.

    2017-10-01

    The regulation of size, volume and mass in living cells is physiologically important, and dysregulation of these parameters gives rise to many diseases. Cell mass is largely determined by the amount of water, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and nucleic acids present in a cell, and is tightly linked to metabolism, proliferation and gene expression. Technologies have emerged in recent years that make it possible to track the masses of single suspended cells and adherent cells. However, it has not been possible to track individual adherent cells in physiological conditions at the mass and time resolutions required to observe fast cellular dynamics. Here we introduce a cell balance (a ‘picobalance’), based on an optically excited microresonator, that measures the total mass of single or multiple adherent cells in culture conditions over days with millisecond time resolution and picogram mass sensitivity. Using our technique, we observe that the mass of living mammalian cells fluctuates intrinsically by around one to four per cent over timescales of seconds throughout the cell cycle. Perturbation experiments link these mass fluctuations to the basic cellular processes of ATP synthesis and water transport. Furthermore, we show that growth and cell cycle progression are arrested in cells infected with vaccinia virus, but mass fluctuations continue until cell death. Our measurements suggest that all living cells show fast and subtle mass fluctuations throughout the cell cycle. As our cell balance is easy to handle and compatible with fluorescence microscopy, we anticipate that our approach will contribute to the understanding of cell mass regulation in various cell states and across timescales, which is important in areas including physiology, cancer research, stem-cell differentiation and drug discovery.

  12. Programmed cell senescence during mammalian embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Espín, Daniel; Cañamero, Marta; Maraver, Antonio; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Contreras, Julio; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Rodríguez-Baeza, Alfonso; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Ruberte, Jesús; Collado, Manuel; Serrano, Manuel

    2013-11-21

    Cellular senescence disables proliferation in damaged cells, and it is relevant for cancer and aging. Here, we show that senescence occurs during mammalian embryonic development at multiple locations, including the mesonephros and the endolymphatic sac of the inner ear, which we have analyzed in detail. Mechanistically, senescence in both structures is strictly dependent on p21, but independent of DNA damage, p53, or other cell-cycle inhibitors, and it is regulated by the TGF-β/SMAD and PI3K/FOXO pathways. Developmentally programmed senescence is followed by macrophage infiltration, clearance of senescent cells, and tissue remodeling. Loss of senescence due to the absence of p21 is partially compensated by apoptosis but still results in detectable developmental abnormalities. Importantly, the mesonephros and endolymphatic sac of human embryos also show evidence of senescence. We conclude that the role of developmentally programmed senescence is to promote tissue remodeling and propose that this is the evolutionary origin of damage-induced senescence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Imaging Action Potential in Single Mammalian Neurons by Tracking the Accompanying Sub-Nanometer Mechanical Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunze; Liu, Xian-Wei; Wang, Hui; Yu, Hui; Guan, Yan; Wang, Shaopeng; Tao, Nongjian

    2018-03-28

    Action potentials in neurons have been studied traditionally by intracellular electrophysiological recordings and more recently by the fluorescence detection methods. Here we describe a label-free optical imaging method that can measure mechanical motion in single cells with a sub-nanometer detection limit. Using the method, we have observed sub-nanometer mechanical motion accompanying the action potential in single mammalian neurons by averaging the repeated action potential spikes. The shape and width of the transient displacement are similar to those of the electrically recorded action potential, but the amplitude varies from neuron to neuron, and from one region of a neuron to another, ranging from 0.2-0.4 nm. The work indicates that action potentials may be studied noninvasively in single mammalian neurons by label-free imaging of the accompanying sub-nanometer mechanical motion.

  14. Does autophagy have a license to kill mammalian cells?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scarlatti, F.; Granata, R.; Meijer, A. J.; Codogno, P.

    2009-01-01

    Macroautophagy is an evolutionarily conserved vacuolar, self-digesting mechanism for cellular components, which end up in the lysosomal compartment. In mammalian cells, macroautophagy is cytoprotective, and protects the cells against the accumulation of damaged organelles or protein aggregates, the

  15. DNA computation in mammalian cells: microRNA logic operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemphill, James; Deiters, Alexander

    2013-07-17

    DNA computation can utilize logic gates as modules to create molecular computers with biological inputs. Modular circuits that recognize nucleic acid inputs through strand hybridization activate computation cascades to produce controlled outputs. This allows for the construction of synthetic circuits that can be interfaced with cellular environments. We have engineered oligonucleotide AND gates to respond to specific microRNA (miRNA) inputs in live mammalian cells. Both single and dual-sensing miRNA-based computation devices were synthesized for the cell-specific identification of endogenous miR-21 and miR-122. A logic gate response was observed with miRNA expression regulators, exhibiting molecular recognition of miRNA profile changes. Nucleic acid logic gates that are functional in a cellular environment and recognize endogenous inputs significantly expand the potential of DNA computation to monitor, image, and respond to cell-specific markers.

  16. The different shades of mammalian pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijk, E.W.; Lopes, S.M.; Geijsen, N.; Macklon, N.S.; Roelen, B.A.J.

    2011-01-01

    The different shades of mammalian pluripotent stem cells Abstract BACKGROUND Pluripotent stem cells have been derived from a variety of sources such as from the inner cell mass of preimplantation embryos, from primordial germ cells, from teratocarcinomas and from male germ cells. The recent

  17. Size Specific Transfection to Mammalian Cells by Micropillar Array Electroporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Yingbo; Huang, Shuyan; Lu, Yang; Liu, Xuan; Wang, Shengnian

    2016-12-01

    Electroporation serves as a promising non-viral gene delivery approach, while its current configuration carries several drawbacks associated with high-voltage electrical pulses and heterogeneous treatment on individual cells. Here we developed a new micropillar array electroporation (MAE) platform to advance the electroporation-based delivery of DNA and RNA probes into mammalian cells. By introducing well-patterned micropillar array texture on the electrode surface, the number of pillars each cell faces varies with its plasma membrane surface area, despite their large population and random locations. In this way, cell size specific electroporation is conveniently carried out, contributing to a 2.5~3 fold increase on plasmid DNA transfection and an additional 10-55% transgene knockdown with siRNA probes, respectively. The delivery efficiency varies with the number and size of micropillars as well as their pattern density. As MAE works like many single cell electroporation are carried out in parallel, the electrophysiology response of individual cells is representative, which has potentials to facilitate the tedious, cell-specific protocol screening process in current bulk electroporation (i.e., electroporation to a large population of cells). Its success might promote the wide adoption of electroporation as a safe and effective non-viral gene delivery approach needed in many biological research and clinical treatments.

  18. Engineered mammalian cells for production of recombinant proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention relates to mammalian cells modified to provide for improved expression of a recombinant protein of interest. In particular, the invention relates to CHO cells and other host cells in which the expression of one or more endogenous secreted proteins has been disrupted, as well...... as to the preparation, identification and use of such cells in the production of recombinant proteins.......The present invention relates to mammalian cells modified to provide for improved expression of a recombinant protein of interest. In particular, the invention relates to CHO cells and other host cells in which the expression of one or more endogenous secreted proteins has been disrupted, as well...

  19. Incorporation of mammalian actin into microfilaments in plant cell nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paves Heiti

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actin is an ancient molecule that shows more than 90% amino acid homology between mammalian and plant actins. The regions of the actin molecule that are involved in F-actin assembly are largely conserved, and it is likely that mammalian actin is able to incorporate into microfilaments in plant cells but there is no experimental evidence until now. Results Visualization of microfilaments in onion bulb scale epidermis cells by different techniques revealed that rhodamine-phalloidin stained F-actin besides cytoplasm also in the nuclei whereas GFP-mouse talin hybrid protein did not enter the nuclei. Microinjection of fluorescently labeled actin was applied to study the presence of nuclear microfilaments in plant cells. Ratio imaging of injected fluorescent rabbit skeletal muscle actin and phalloidin staining of the microinjected cells showed that mammalian actin was able to incorporate into plant F-actin. The incorporation occurred preferentially in the nucleus and in the perinuclear region of plant cells whereas part of plant microfilaments, mostly in the periphery of cytoplasm, did not incorporate mammalian actin. Conclusions Microinjected mammalian actin is able to enter plant cell's nucleus, whereas incorporation of mammalian actin into plant F-actin occurs preferentially in the nucleus and perinuclear area.

  20. Amino acids in the cultivation of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Andrew; Keusgen, Michael; von Hagen, Jörg

    2016-05-01

    Amino acids are crucial for the cultivation of mammalian cells. This importance of amino acids was realized soon after the development of the first cell lines, and a solution of a mixture of amino acids has been supplied to cultured cells ever since. The importance of amino acids is further pronounced in chemically defined mammalian cell culture media, making the consideration of their biological and chemical properties necessary. Amino acids concentrations have been traditionally adjusted to their cellular consumption rates. However, since changes in the metabolic equilibrium of amino acids can be caused by changes in extracellular concentrations, metabolomics in conjunction with flux balance analysis is being used in the development of culture media. The study of amino acid transporters is also gaining importance since they control the intracellular concentrations of these molecules and are influenced by conditions in cell culture media. A better understanding of the solubility, stability, dissolution kinetics, and interactions of these molecules is needed for an exploitation of these properties in the development of dry powdered chemically defined media for mammalian cells. Due to the complexity of these mixtures however, this has proven to be challenging. Studying amino acids in mammalian cell culture media will help provide a better understanding of how mammalian cells in culture interact with their environment. It would also provide insight into the chemical behavior of these molecules in solutions of complex mixtures, which is important in the understanding of the contribution of individual amino acids to protein structure.

  1. Mammalian cell HPRT gene mutation assay: test methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, George E

    2012-01-01

    Using the combination of bacterial gene mutation assay and chromosomal aberrations test in mammalian cells may not detect a small proportion of mammalian specific mutagenic agents. Therefore, at the current time a third assay should be used, except for compounds for which there is little or no exposure (DOH (2000) Department of Health Guidance for the testing of chemicals for Mutagenicity. Committee on Mutagenicity of Chemicals in Food, Consumer Products and the Environment). The hypoxanthine phosphorybosyl transferase (HPRT) gene is on the X chromosome of mammalian cells, and it is used as a model gene to investigate gene mutations in mammalian cell lines. The assay can detect a wide range of chemicals capable of causing DNA damage that leads to gene mutation. The test follows a very similar methodology to the thymidine kinase (TK) mouse lymphoma assay (MLA), and both are included in the guidelines for mammalian gene mutation tests (OECD (1997) Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Ninth addendum to the OECD Guidelines for the Testing of Chemicals. In Vitro Mammalian Cell Gene Mutation Test: 476). The HPRT methodology is such that mutations which destroy the functionality of the HPRT gene and or/protein are detected by positive selection using a toxic analogue, and HPRT ( - ) mutants are seen as viable colonies. Unlike bacterial reverse mutation assays, mammalian gene mutation assays respond to a broad spectrum of mutagens, since any mutation resulting in the ablation of gene expression/function produces a HPRT ( - ) mutant. Human cells are readily used, and mechanistic studies using the HPRT test methodology with modifications, such as knock-out cell lines for DNA repair, can provide details of the mode of action (MOA) of the test compound (24).This chapter provides the methodology for carrying out the assay in different cell lines in the presence and absence of metabolism with technical information and general advice on how to carry out the

  2. Viral risk mitigation for Mammalian cell culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Bob; Rosenthal, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Adventitious viral contamination in mammalian cell culture manufacturing facilities can lead to loss of product due to regulatory concerns regarding potential health risks. These events can also result in manufacturing shutdowns for extended periods of time. Numerous measures are currently taken to minimize these risks. Nonetheless, raw materials remain a high-risk entry point for viral contamination of mammalian cell cultures. Two virucidal technologies, ultraviolet radiation in the C band and high-temperature short-time pasteurization, were tested for the treatment of mammalian cell culture media. The results demonstrated no impact to the cell culture process or the quality of the products produced at the chosen dosage while providing robust viral protection.

  3. Regeneration of hair cells in the mammalian vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; You, Dan; Chen, Yan; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2016-06-01

    Hair cells regenerate throughout the lifetime of non-mammalian vertebrates, allowing these animals to recover from hearing and balance deficits. Such regeneration does not occur efficiently in humans and other mammals. Thus, balance deficits become permanent and is a common sensory disorder all over the world. Since Forge and Warchol discovered the limited spontaneous regeneration of vestibular hair cells after gentamicininduced damage in mature mammals, significant efforts have been exerted to trace the origin of the limited vestibular regeneration in mammals after hair cell loss. Moreover, recently many strategies have been developed to promote the hair cell regeneration and subsequent functional recovery of the vestibular system, including manipulating the Wnt, Notch and Atoh1. This article provides an overview of the recent advances in hair cell regeneration in mammalian vestibular epithelia. Furthermore, this review highlights the current limitations of hair cell regeneration and provides the possible solutions to regenerate functional hair cells and to partially restore vestibular function.

  4. Fungal cell gigantism during mammalian infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Zaragoza

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between fungal pathogens with the host frequently results in morphological changes, such as hyphae formation. The encapsulated pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is not considered a dimorphic fungus, and is predominantly found in host tissues as round yeast cells. However, there is a specific morphological change associated with cryptococcal infection that involves an increase in capsule volume. We now report another morphological change whereby gigantic cells are formed in tissue. The paper reports the phenotypic characterization of giant cells isolated from infected mice and the cellular changes associated with giant cell formation. C. neoformans infection in mice resulted in the appearance of giant cells with cell bodies up to 30 microm in diameter and capsules resistant to stripping with gamma-radiation and organic solvents. The proportion of giant cells ranged from 10 to 80% of the total lung fungal burden, depending on infection time, individual mice, and correlated with the type of immune response. When placed on agar, giant cells budded to produce small daughter cells that traversed the capsule of the mother cell at the speed of 20-50 m/h. Giant cells with dimensions that approximated those in vivo were observed in vitro after prolonged culture in minimal media, and were the oldest in the culture, suggesting that giant cell formation is an aging-dependent phenomenon. Giant cells recovered from mice displayed polyploidy, suggesting a mechanism by which gigantism results from cell cycle progression without cell fission. Giant cell formation was dependent on cAMP, but not on Ras1. Real-time imaging showed that giant cells were engaged, but not engulfed by phagocytic cells. We describe a remarkable new strategy for C. neoformans to evade the immune response by enlarging cell size, and suggest that gigantism results from replication without fission, a phenomenon that may also occur with other fungal pathogens.

  5. Measurement of Heme Synthesis Levels in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooda, Jagmohan; Alam, Maksudul; Zhang, Li

    2015-07-09

    Heme serves as the prosthetic group for a wide variety of proteins known as hemoproteins, such as hemoglobin, myoglobin and cytochromes. It is involved in various molecular and cellular processes such as gene transcription, translation, cell differentiation and cell proliferation. The biosynthesis levels of heme vary across different tissues and cell types and is altered in diseased conditions such as anemia, neuropathy and cancer. This technique uses [4-(14)C] 5-aminolevulinic acid ([(14)C] 5-ALA), one of the early precursors in the heme biosynthesis pathway to measure the levels of heme synthesis in mammalian cells. This assay involves incubation of cells with [(14)C] 5-ALA followed by extraction of heme and measurement of the radioactivity incorporated into heme. This procedure is accurate and quick. This method measures the relative levels of heme biosynthesis rather than the total heme content. To demonstrate the use of this technique the levels of heme biosynthesis were measured in several mammalian cell lines.

  6. Movement of Naegleria fowleri stimulated by mammalian cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, M; Carchman, R; Marciano-Cabral, F

    1986-02-01

    Naegleria fowleri amebae, but not those of N. australiensis, N. gruberi, or N. lovaniensis, demonstrated enhanced motility when placed in proximity to mammalian cells. Amebae of nonpathogenic species of Naegleria, however, were more motile in cell culture medium than the amebae of N. fowleri. The locomotory response of highly pathogenic mouse-passaged N. fowleri amebae to nerve cells was greater than axenically cultured amebae. The enhanced mobility elicited by whole nerve cells or disrupted nerve cells was not directed migration but chemokinetic. Naegleria fowleri responded to disrupted neuroblastoma cells more vigorously than to disrupted African green monkey kidney (Vero) cells.

  7. Polyamine metabolism in synchronously growing mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heby, O.; Marton, L.J.; Gray, J.W.; Lindl, P.A.; Wilson, C.B.

    1976-03-02

    The times of synthesis of the polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine in relation to the cell cycle have been examined in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells synchronized by selective detachment of mitotic cells. This technique produced cell populations with narrow age distributions. Following plating, the cells grew with high synchrony for more than one cell cycle in monolayer culture. At various times after plating, the distribution of cells among the G1, S and G2M phases of the cell cycle was calculated from DNA histograms obtained by flow microfluorometric analysis. At these same times L-ornithine decarboxylase assays and polyamine determinations showed that the synthesis of the polyamines was initiated in mid-G1 and that the polyamines started to accumulate towards the end of the G1 phase. Maximal rate of synthesis was obtained as the cells started to synthesize DNA and the highest polyamine content was obtained in the beginning of the S phase. Synthesis and accumulation of the polyamines decreased significantly during mid-S but towards the end of the S phase they increased again. The polyamine biosynthetic activity and the concentration of the polyamines reached a second maximum prior to cell division. The role of the polyamines in the traverse of the cell cycle and especially in the initiation or continuation of DNA synthesis is indicated also by the fact that fewer cells were found in the S phase when spermidine and spermine synthesis was inhibited by methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone).

  8. Equipment for large-scale mammalian cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Sadettin S

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides information on commonly used equipment in industrial mammalian cell culture, with an emphasis on bioreactors. The actual equipment used in the cell culture process can vary from one company to another, but the main steps remain the same. The process involves expansion of cells in seed train and inoculation train processes followed by cultivation of cells in a production bioreactor. Process and equipment options for each stage of the cell culture process are introduced and examples are provided. Finally, the use of disposables during seed train and cell culture production is discussed.

  9. Genome engineering of mammalian haploid embryonic stem cells using the Cas9/RNA system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuro Horii

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Haploid embryonic stem cells (ESCs are useful for studying mammalian genes because disruption of only one allele can cause loss-of-function phenotypes. Here, we report the use of haploid ESCs and the CRISPR RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease gene-targeting system to manipulate mammalian genes. Co-transfection of haploid ESCs with vectors expressing Cas9 nuclease and single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs targeting Tet1, Tet2, and Tet3 resulted in the complete disruption of all three genes and caused a loss-of-function phenotype with high efficiency (50%. Co-transfection of cells with vectors expressing Cas9 and sgRNAs targeting two loci on the same chromosome resulted in the creation of a large chromosomal deletion and a large inversion. Thus, the use of the CRISPR system in combination with haploid ESCs provides a powerful platform to manipulate the mammalian genome.

  10. Single molecule approaches for quantifying transcription and degradation rates in intact mammalian tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar Halpern, Keren; Itzkovitz, Shalev

    2016-04-01

    A key challenge in mammalian biology is to understand how rates of transcription and mRNA degradation jointly shape cellular gene expression. Powerful techniques have been developed for measuring these rates either genome-wide or at the single-molecule level, however these techniques are not applicable to assessment of cells within their native tissue microenvironment. Here we describe a technique based on single molecule Fluorescence in-situ Hybridization (smFISH) to measure transcription and degradation rates in intact mammalian tissues. The technique is based on dual-color libraries targeting the introns and exons of the genes of interest, enabling visualization and quantification of both nascent and mature mRNA. We present a software, TransQuant, that facilitates quantifying these rates from smFISH images. Our approach enables assessment of both transcription and degradation rates of any gene of interest while controlling for the inherent heterogeneity of intact tissues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Flux analysis of mammalian cell culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, D.E.; Tramper, J.

    2010-01-01

    Animal cells are used for the production of vaccines and pharmaceutical proteins. The increase in demand for these products requires an increase in volumetric productivity of animal cell culture processes, which can be attained through an increase in biomass concentration and/or specific

  12. Transcriptome Landscapes of Mammalian Embryonic Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkhof, B.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes research on gene expression profiles from different embryonic stages and cell types to identify genes involved in pluripotency or differentiation in bovine and porcine cells. The results are compared with data from other mammals. RNA expression profiles of morula and blastocyst

  13. Paraquat-induced radiosensitization of mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.C.; Fujikura, Toshio; Hiraoka, Toshio; Tenou, Hiromi.

    1983-06-01

    The herbicide, paraquat (methyl viologen, 1-1' dimethy1-4, 4'-bipyridinium dichloride), stimulates the production of superoxide anion (O 2 sup(-.)) in aerobic cells and therefore mimics some effects of ionizing radiation. In addition, concentrations of cellular glutathione are reduced by reaction with O 2 sup(-.). It is reported here that paraquat, toxic in its own right to aerobic cells, acts as a radiosensitizer when cells are exposed to nontoxic concentrations of the drug prior to and during irradiation. The radiomimetic effect of paraquat, alone and in combination with X-rays, was examined. Paraquat affects aerated cells (hamster lung V79 cells) in a dose-dependent manner. Doses in excess of 1 mM for two hours cause significant cell killing. In combination with radiation, sublethal doses of paraquat, given for two hours prior to irradiation, enhance the lethal effects of radiation. However, if cells are exposed to the same concentration of paraquat following irradiation, no additional lethal effect is observed. Paraquat is a useful tool to study the effects of O 2 sup(-.) and may lead to better understanding of the mechanisms of radiation-induced energy deposition in cells. (author)

  14. Sex determination in mammalian germ cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassy M Spiller

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Germ cells are the precursors of the sperm and oocytes and hence are critical for survival of the species. In mammals, they are specified during fetal life, migrate to the developing gonads and then undergo a critical period during which they are instructed, by the soma, to adopt the appropriate sexual fate. In a fetal ovary, germ cells enter meiosis and commit to oogenesis, whereas in a fetal testis, they avoid entry into meiosis and instead undergo mitotic arrest and mature toward spermatogenesis. Here, we discuss what we know so far about the regulation of sex-specific differentiation of germ cells, considering extrinsic molecular cues produced by somatic cells, as well as critical intrinsic changes within the germ cells. This review focuses almost exclusively on our understanding of these events in the mouse model.

  15. Quantitative genetic-interaction mapping in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roguev, Assen; Talbot, Dale; Negri, Gian Luca; Shales, Michael; Cagney, Gerard; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Panning, Barbara; Krogan, Nevan J

    2013-01-01

    Mapping genetic interactions (GIs) by simultaneously perturbing pairs of genes is a powerful tool for understanding complex biological phenomena. Here we describe an experimental platform for generating quantitative GI maps in mammalian cells using a combinatorial RNA interference strategy. We performed ~11,000 pairwise knockdowns in mouse fibroblasts, focusing on 130 factors involved in chromatin regulation to create a GI map. Comparison of the GI and protein-protein interaction (PPI) data revealed that pairs of genes exhibiting positive GIs and/or similar genetic profiles were predictive of the corresponding proteins being physically associated. The mammalian GI map identified pathways and complexes but also resolved functionally distinct submodules within larger protein complexes. By integrating GI and PPI data, we created a functional map of chromatin complexes in mouse fibroblasts, revealing that the PAF complex is a central player in the mammalian chromatin landscape. PMID:23407553

  16. Cryopreservation of spin-dried mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilay Chakraborty

    Full Text Available This study reports an alternative approach to achieve vitrification where cells are pre-desiccated prior to cooling to cryogenic temperatures for storage. Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cells suspended in a trehalose solution were rapidly and uniformly desiccated to a low moisture content (<0.12 g of water per g of dry weight using a spin-drying technique. Trehalose was also introduced into the cells using a high-capacity trehalose transporter (TRET1. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR was used to examine the uniformity of water concentration distribution in the spin-dried samples. 62% of the cells were shown to survive spin-drying in the presence of trehalose following immediate rehydration. The spin-dried samples were stored in liquid nitrogen (LN(2 at a vitrified state. It was shown that following re-warming to room temperature and re-hydration with a fully complemented cell culture medium, 51% of the spin-dried and vitrified cells survived and demonstrated normal growth characteristics. Spin-drying is a novel strategy that can be used to improve cryopreservation outcome by promoting rapid vitrification.

  17. Adult Mammalian Neural Stem Cells and Neurogenesis: Five Decades Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Allison M.; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun

    2015-01-01

    Summary Adult somatic stem cells in various organs maintain homeostatic tissue regeneration and enhance plasticity. Since its initial discovery five decades ago, investigations of adult neurogenesis and neural stem cells have led to an established and expanding field that has significantly influenced many facets of neuroscience, developmental biology and regenerative medicine. Here we review recent progress and focus on questions related to adult mammalian neural stem cells that also apply to other somatic stem cells. We further discuss emerging topics that are guiding the field toward better understanding adult neural stem cells and ultimately applying these principles to improve human health. PMID:26431181

  18. Photooxidative damage to mammalian cells and proteins by visible light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packer, L.; Kellogg, E.W. III

    1980-01-01

    In the present article, studies carried out in our laboratory on the effects of visible irradiation and O 2 in a variety of target systems ranging from cultured mammalian cells to purified catalase are reviewed. We will relate these studies of photooxidative damage to a scheme for the propagation of intracellular damage which traces a number of the possible pro-oxidant and anti-oxidant pathways found in the cell

  19. Photooxidative damage to mammalian cells and proteins by visible light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Packer, L.; Kellogg, E.W. III

    1980-01-01

    In the present article, studies carried out in our laboratory on the effects of visible irradiation and O/sub 2/ in a variety of target systems ranging from cultured mammalian cells to purified catalase are reviewed. We will relate these studies of photooxidative damage to a scheme for the propagation of intracellular damage which traces a number of the possible pro-oxidant and anti-oxidant pathways found in the cell.

  20. Intracellular transport of cholesterol in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasaemle, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    The erythrocyte was selected as a simple cell for the study of transbilayer movement of cholesterol. Cholesterol oxidase was used to measure the distribution of [ 3 H]cholesterol across the erythrocyte membrane. Cholesterol oxidase was also used to estimate the rate of transport of low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol to the plasma membrane of cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) fibroblasts; the half-time of this process was 42 minutes. The rate of transport of LDL cholesterol to the plasma membrane was confirmed by a second procedure using amphotericin B. Amphotericin B was also used to estimate the rate of transport of endogenously synthesized cholesterol to the plasma membrane of CHO cells. New methodology was developed including improvements of the previously published cholesterol oxidase assay for plasma membrane cholesterol. A new method for detecting transport of cholesterol to the plasma membrane in cultured cells was developed using amphotericin B. Preliminary studies investigated the use of fluorescent polyenes, pimaricin and etruscomycin, as probes for plasma membrane cholesterol in transport studies. Finally, a modification of a previously published cell staining protocol yielded a simple, quantitative assay for cell growth

  1. Lipid map of the mammalian cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meer, G.; de Kroon, A.I.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Technological developments, especially in mass spectrometry and bioinformatics, have revealed that living cells contain thousands rather than dozens of different lipids [for classification and nomenclature, see Fahy et al. (Fahy et al., 2009)]. Now, the resulting questions are what is the relevance

  2. Passive versus active local microrheology in mammalian cells and amoebae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riviere, C.; Gazeau, F.; Marion, S.; Bacri, J.-C.; Wilhelm, C.

    2004-12-01

    We compare in this paper the rotational magnetic microrheology detailed by Marion et al [18] and Wilhelm et al [19] to the passive tracking microrheology. The rotational microrheology has been designed to explore, using magnetic rotating probes, the local intracellular microenvironment of living cells in terms of viscoelasticity. Passive microrheology techniques is based on the analysis of spontaneous diffusive motions of Brownian probes. The dependence of mean square displacement (MSD) with the time then directly reflects the type of movement (sub-, hyper- or diffusive motions). Using the same intracellular probes, we performed two types of measurements (active and passive). Based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, one should obtain the same information from the both techniques in a thermally equilibrium system. Interestingly, our measurements differ, and the discordances directly inform on active biological processes, which add to thermally activated fluctuations in our out-of equilibrium systems. In both cell models used, mammalian Hela cells and amoebae Entamoeba Histolytica, a hyper-diffusive regime at a short time is observed, which highlights the presence of an active non-thermal driving force, acting on the probe. However, the nature of this active force in mammalian cells and amoebae is different, according to their different phenotypes. In mammalian cells active processes are governed by the transport, via molecular motors, on the microtubule network. In amoebae, which are highly motile cells free of microtubule network, the active processes are dominated by strong fluxes of cytoplasm driven by extension of pseudopodia, in random directions, leading to an amplitude of motion one order of magnitude higher than for mammalian cells. Figs 7, Refs 32.

  3. Stability of resazurin in buffers and mammalian cell culture media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Eva; Nicolaisen, G.M.

    1999-01-01

    The utility of a ferricyanide/ferrocyanide system used in the AlamarBlue(TM) (Serotec, Oxford, UK) vital. dye to inhibit the reduction of resazurin by mammalian cell culture media is questioned. Resazurin was found to be relatively stable when dissolved in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The use...... of HEPES resulted in a huge immediate dye reduction, which was significantly enhanced by exposure to diffuse light from fluorescent tubes in the laboratory 8 h per day. The reduction of resazurin by various cell culture media was time and temperature dependent, and it was significantly enhanced......'s nutrient mixture F-10 and F-12. Fetal calf serum (5-20%) slightly decreased resazurin reduction during the first 2 days of incubation. The reduction of resazurin by mammalian cell culture media do not appear to be problematic under normal culture conditions, and it is primarily dependent upon the presence...

  4. Sensing the Heat Stress by Mammalian Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cates Jordan; Graham Garrett C; Omattage Natalie; Pavesich Elizabeth; Setliff Ian; Shaw Jack; Smith Caitlin; Lipan Ovidiu

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The heat-shock response network controls the adaptation and survival of the cell against environmental stress. This network is highly conserved and is connected with many other signaling pathways. A key element of the heat-shock network is the heat-shock transcription factor-1 (HSF), which is transiently activated by elevated temperatures. HSF translocates to the nucleus upon elevated temperatures, forming homotrimeric complexes. The HSF homotrimers bind to the heat shock ...

  5. Bartonella entry mechanisms into mammalian host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicher, Simone C; Dehio, Christoph

    2012-08-01

    The Gram-negative genus Bartonella comprises arthropod-borne pathogens that typically infect mammals in a host-specific manner. Bartonella bacilliformis and Bartonella quintana are human-specific pathogens, while several zoonotic bartonellae specific for diverse animal hosts infect humans as an incidental host. Clinical manifestations of Bartonella infections range from mild symptoms to life-threatening disease. Following transmission by blood-sucking arthropods or traumatic contact with infected animals, bartonellae display sequential tropisms towards endothelial and possibly other nucleated cells and erythrocytes, the latter in a host-specific manner. Attachment to the extracellular matrix (ECM) and to nucleated cells is mediated by surface-exposed bacterial adhesins, in particular trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs). The subsequent engulfment of the pathogen into a vacuolar structure follows a unique series of events whereby the pathogen avoids the endolysosomal compartments. For Bartonella henselae and assumingly most other species, the infection process is aided at different steps by Bartonella effector proteins (Beps). They are injected into host cells through the type IV secretion system (T4SS) VirB/D4 and subvert host cellular functions to favour pathogen uptake. Bacterial binding to erythrocytes is mediated by Trw, another T4SS, in a strictly host-specific manner, followed by pathogen-forced uptake involving the IalB invasin and subsequent replication and persistence within a membrane-bound intra-erythrocytic compartment. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Sensing the Heat Stress by Mammalian Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cates Jordan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The heat-shock response network controls the adaptation and survival of the cell against environmental stress. This network is highly conserved and is connected with many other signaling pathways. A key element of the heat-shock network is the heat-shock transcription factor-1 (HSF, which is transiently activated by elevated temperatures. HSF translocates to the nucleus upon elevated temperatures, forming homotrimeric complexes. The HSF homotrimers bind to the heat shock element on the DNA and control the expression of the hsp70 gene. The Hsp70 proteins protect cells from thermal stress. Thermal stress causes the unfolding of proteins, perturbing thus the pathways under their control. By binding to these proteins, Hsp70 allows them to refold and prevents their aggregation. The modulation of the activity of the hsp70-promoter by the intensity of the input stress is thus critical for cell's survival. The promoter activity starts from a basal level and rapidly increases once the stress is applied, reaches a maximum level and attenuates slowely back to the basal level. This phenomenon is the hallmark of many experimental studies and of all computational network analysis. Results The molecular construct used as a measure of the response to thermal stress is a Hsp70-GFP fusion gene transfected in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells. The time profile of the GFP protein depends on the transient activity, Transient(t, of the heat shock system. The function Transient(t depends on hsp70 promoter activity, transcriptional regulation and the translation initiation effects elicited by the heat stress. The GFP time profile is recorded using flow cytometry measurements, a technique that allows a quantitative measurement of the fluorescence of a large number of cells (104. The GFP responses to one and two heat shocks were measured for 261 conditions of different temperatures and durations. We found that: (i the response of the cell to two

  7. Mammalian Non-CpG Methylation: Stem Cells and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara E. Pinney

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Although CpG dinucleotides remain the primary site for DNA methylation in mammals, there is emerging evidence that DNA methylation at non-CpG sites (CpA, CpT and CpC is not only present in mammalian cells, but may play a unique role in the regulation of gene expression. For some time it has been known that non-CpG methylation is abundant in plants and present in mammalian embryonic stem cells, but non-CpG methylation was thought to be lost upon cell differentiation. However, recent publications have described a role for non-CpG methylation in adult mammalian somatic cells including the adult mammalian brain, skeletal muscle, and hematopoietic cells and new interest in this field has been stimulated by the availability of high throughput sequencing techniques that can accurately measure this epigenetic modification. Genome wide assays indicate that non-CpG methylation is negligible in human fetal brain, but abundant in human adult brain tissue. Genome wide measurement of non-CpG methylation coupled with RNA-Sequencing indicates that in the human adult brain non-CpG methylation levels are inversely proportional to the abundance of mRNA transcript at the associated gene. Additionally specific examples where alterations in non-CpG methylation lead to changes in gene expression have been described; in PGC1α in human skeletal muscle, IFN-γ in human T-cells and SYT11 in human brain, all of which contribute to the development of human disease.

  8. Carbamazepine induces mitotic arrest in mammalian Vero cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Martin, J.M.; Fernandez Freire, P.; Labrador, V.; Hazen, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    We reported recently that the anticonvulsant drug carbamazepine, at supratherapeutic concentrations, exerts antiproliferative effects in mammalian Vero cells, but the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. This motivates us to examine rigorously whether growth arrest was associated with structural changes in cellular organization during mitosis. In the present work, we found that exposure of the cells to carbamazepine led to an increase in mitotic index, mainly due to the sustained block at the metaphase/anaphase boundary, with the consequent inhibition of cell proliferation. Indirect immunofluorescence, using antibodies directed against spindle apparatus proteins, revealed that mitotic arrest was associated with formation of monopolar spindles, caused by impairment of centrosome separation. The final consequence of the spindle defects induced by carbamazepine, depended on the duration of cell cycle arrest. Following the time course of accumulation of metaphase and apoptotic cells during carbamazepine treatments, we observed a causative relationship between mitotic arrest and induction of cell death. Conversely, cells released from the block of metaphase by removal of the drug, continued to progress through mitosis and resume normal proliferation. Our results show that carbamazepine shares a common antiproliferative mechanism with spindle-targeted drugs and contribute to a better understanding of the cytostatic activity previously described in Vero cells. Additional studies are in progress to extend these initial findings that define a novel mode of action of carbamazepine in cultured mammalian cells

  9. Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Mammalian Endangered Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Nun, Inbar Friedrich; Montague, Susanne C; Houck, Marlys L; Ryder, Oliver; Loring, Jeanne F

    2015-01-01

    For some highly endangered species there are too few reproductively capable animals to maintain adequate genetic diversity, and extraordinary measures are necessary to prevent their extinction. Cellular reprogramming is a means to capture the genomes of individual animals as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which may eventually facilitate reintroduction of genetic material into breeding populations. Here, we describe a method for generating iPSCs from fibroblasts of mammalian endangered species.

  10. A platform for functional assessment of large variant libraries in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephany, Jason J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Sequencing-based, massively parallel genetic assays have revolutionized our ability to quantify the relationship between many genotypes and a phenotype of interest. Unfortunately, variant library expression platforms in mammalian cells are far from ideal, hindering the study of human gene variants in their physiologically relevant cellular contexts. Here, we describe a platform for phenotyping variant libraries in transfectable mammalian cell lines in two steps. First, a landing pad cell line with a genomically integrated, Tet-inducible cassette containing a Bxb1 recombination site is created. Second, a single variant from a library of transfected, promoter-less plasmids is recombined into the landing pad in each cell. Thus, every cell in the recombined pool expresses a single variant, allowing for parallel, sequencing-based assessment of variant effect. We describe a method for incorporating a single landing pad into a defined site of a cell line of interest, and show that our approach can be used generate more than 20 000 recombinant cells in a single experiment. Finally, we use our platform in combination with a sequencing-based assay to explore the N-end rule by simultaneously measuring the effects of all possible N-terminal amino acids on protein expression. PMID:28335006

  11. Rapid and serial quantification of adhesion forces of yeast and Mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Potthoff

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion to surfaces represents the basis for niche colonization and survival. Here we establish serial quantification of adhesion forces of different cell types using a single probe. The pace of single-cell force-spectroscopy was accelerated to up to 200 yeast and 20 mammalian cells per probe when replacing the conventional cell trapping cantilever chemistry of atomic force microscopy by underpressure immobilization with fluidic force microscopy (FluidFM. In consequence, statistically relevant data could be recorded in a rapid manner, the spectrum of examinable cells was enlarged, and the cell physiology preserved until approached for force spectroscopy. Adhesion forces of Candida albicans increased from below 4 up to 16 nN at 37°C on hydrophobic surfaces, whereas a Δhgc1-mutant showed forces consistently below 4 nN. Monitoring adhesion of mammalian cells revealed mean adhesion forces of 600 nN of HeLa cells on fibronectin and were one order of magnitude higher than those observed for HEK cells.

  12. Mammalian designer cells: Engineering principles and biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Mingqi; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Biotechnology is a widely interdisciplinary field focusing on the use of living cells or organisms to solve established problems in medicine, food production and agriculture. Synthetic biology, the science of engineering complex biological systems that do not exist in nature, continues to provide the biotechnology industry with tools, technologies and intellectual property leading to improved cellular performance. One key aspect of synthetic biology is the engineering of deliberately reprogrammed designer cells whose behavior can be controlled over time and space. This review discusses the most commonly used techniques to engineer mammalian designer cells; while control elements acting on the transcriptional and translational levels of target gene expression determine the kinetic and dynamic profiles, coupling them to a variety of extracellular stimuli permits their remote control with user-defined trigger signals. Designer mammalian cells with novel or improved biological functions not only directly improve the production efficiency during biopharmaceutical manufacturing but also open the door for cell-based treatment strategies in molecular and translational medicine. In the future, the rational combination of multiple sets of designer cells could permit the construction and regulation of higher-order systems with increased complexity, thereby enabling the molecular reprogramming of tissues, organisms or even populations with highest precision. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Apple derived cellulose scaffolds for 3D mammalian cell culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Modulevsky

    Full Text Available There are numerous approaches for producing natural and synthetic 3D scaffolds that support the proliferation of mammalian cells. 3D scaffolds better represent the natural cellular microenvironment and have many potential applications in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that 3D cellulose scaffolds produced by decellularizing apple hypanthium tissue can be employed for in vitro 3D culture of NIH3T3 fibroblasts, mouse C2C12 muscle myoblasts and human HeLa epithelial cells. We show that these cells can adhere, invade and proliferate in the cellulose scaffolds. In addition, biochemical functionalization or chemical cross-linking can be employed to control the surface biochemistry and/or mechanical properties of the scaffold. The cells retain high viability even after 12 continuous weeks of culture and can achieve cell densities comparable with other natural and synthetic scaffold materials. Apple derived cellulose scaffolds are easily produced, inexpensive and originate from a renewable source. Taken together, these results demonstrate that naturally derived cellulose scaffolds offer a complementary approach to existing techniques for the in vitro culture of mammalian cells in a 3D environment.

  14. Mammalian Cochlear Hair Cell Regeneration and Ribbon Synapse Reformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hair cells (HCs are the sensory preceptor cells in the inner ear, which play an important role in hearing and balance. The HCs of organ of Corti are susceptible to noise, ototoxic drugs, and infections, thus resulting in permanent hearing loss. Recent approaches of HCs regeneration provide new directions for finding the treatment of sensor neural deafness. To have normal hearing function, the regenerated HCs must be reinnervated by nerve fibers and reform ribbon synapse with the dendrite of spiral ganglion neuron through nerve regeneration. In this review, we discuss the research progress in HC regeneration, the synaptic plasticity, and the reinnervation of new regenerated HCs in mammalian inner ear.

  15. Enhanced production of docosahexaenoic acid in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiming Zhu

    Full Text Available Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, one of the important polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA with pharmaceutical and nutraceutical effects, may be obtained through diet or synthesized in vivo from dietary a-linolenic acid (ALA. However, the accumulation of DHA in human body or other mammals relies on the intake of high dose of DHA for a certain period of time, and the bioconversion of dietary ALA to DHA is very limited. Therefore the mammalian cells are not rich in DHA. Here, we report a new technology for increased production of DHA in mammalian cells. By using transient transfection method, Siganus canaliculatus Δ4 desaturase was heterologously expressed in chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells, and simultaneously, mouse Δ6-desaturase and Δ5-desaturase were overexpressed. The results demonstrated that the overexpression of Δ6/Δ5-desaturases significantly enhanced the ability of transfected cells to convert the added ALA to docosapentaenoic acid (DPA which in turn get converted into DHA directly and efficiently by the heterologously expressed Δ4 desaturase. This technology provides the basis for potential utility of these gene constructs in the creation of transgenic livestock for increased production of DHA/related products to meet the growing demand of this important PUFA.

  16. Membrane phospholipids and radiation-induced death of mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolters, H.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation-induced cell killing is generally believed to be a consequence of residual DNA damage or damage that is mis-repaired. However, besides this DNA damage, damage to other molecules or structures of the cell may be involved in the killing. Especially membranes have been suggested as a determinant in cellular radiosensitivity. In this thesis experiments are described, dealing with the possible involvement of membranes in radiation-induced killing of mammalian cells. A general treatise of membrane structure is followed by information concerning deleterious effects of radiation on membranes. Consequences of damage to structure and function of membranes are reviewed. Thereafter evidence relating to the possible involvement of membranes in radiation-induced cell killing is presented. (Auth.)

  17. Shear stress induced stimulation of mammalian cell metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcintire, L. V.; Frangos, J. A.; Eskin, S. G.

    1988-01-01

    A flow apparatus was developed for the study of the metabolic response of anchorage dependent cells to a wide range of steady and pulsatile shear stresses under well controlled conditions. Human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers were subjected to steady shear stresses of up to 24 dynes/sq cm, and the production of prostacyclin was determined. The onset of flow led to a burst in prostacyclin production which decayed to a long term steady state rate (SSR). The SSR of cells exposed to flow was greater than the basal release level, and increased linearly with increasing shear stress. It is demonstrated that shear stresses in certain ranges may not be detrimental to mammalian cell metabolism. In fact, throughout the range of shear stresses studied, metabolite production is maximized by maximizing shear stress.

  18. Sensitization of ultraviolet radiation damage in bacteria and mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, G.J.; Watts, M.E.; Patel, K.B.; Adams, G.E.

    1978-01-01

    Bacteria (Serratia marcescens) and mammalian cells (Chinese hamsters V79-379A) were irradiated in monolayers with ultraviolet light at 254 nm or 365 nm in the presence or absence of radiosensitizing drugs. At 254 nm, killing is very efficient (Dsub(37) approximately equal 1 J m -2 exposure, or approximately equal 6 x 10 4 photons absorbed by DNA per bacterium), and sensitizers have no effect. At 365 nm, cells are not killed in buffer, but are inactivated in the presence of nifurpipone or misonidazole. Lethal exposures (approximately equal 5 x 10 3 J m -2 at 10 nM misonidazole) correspond to about 10 7 photons absorbed by sensitizer molecules per bacterium. Toxicity of stable photoproducts of the drugs is not involved, nor is oxygen required. Hence the transient species formed by photo-excitation of radiosensitizer molecules are capable of killing cells in the absence of other types of radiation damage. (author)

  19. Distinctive transforming genes in x-ray-transformed mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borek, C.; Ong, A.; Mason, H.

    1987-01-01

    DNAs from hamster embryo cells and mouse C3H/10T1/2 cells transformed in vitro by x-irradiation into malignant cells transmit the radiation transformation phenotype by producing transformed colonies (transfectants) in two mouse recipient lines, the NIH 3T3 and C3H/101/2 cells, and in a rat cell line, the Rat-2 cells. DNAs from unirradiated cells or irradiated and visibly untransformed cells do not produce transformed colonies. The transfectant grow in agar and form tumors in nude mice. Treatment of the DNAs with restriction endonucleases prior to transfection indicates that the same transforming gene (oncogene) is present in each of the transformed mouse cells and is the same in each of the transformed hamster cells. Southern blot analysis of 3T3 or Rat-2 transfectants carrying oncogenes from radiation-transformed C3H/10T1/2 or hamster cells indicates that the oncogenes responsible for the transformation of 3T3 cells are not the Ki-ras, Ha-ras, N-ras genes, nor are they neu, trk, raf, abl, or fms. The work demonstrates that DNAs from mammalian cells transformed into malignancy by direct exposure in vitro to radiation contain genetic sequences with detectable transforming activity in three recipient cell lines. The results provide evidence that DNA is the target of radiation carcinogenesis induced at a cellular level in vitro. The experiments indicate that malignant radiogenic transformation in vitro of hamster embryo and mouse C3H/10T1/2 cells involves the activation of unique non-ras transforming genes, which heretofore have not been described

  20. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of urban particulate matter in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumax-Vorzet, Audrey F; Tate, M; Walmsley, Richard; Elder, Rhod H; Povey, Andrew C

    2015-09-01

    Ambient air particulate matter (PM)-associated reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been linked to a variety of altered cellular outcomes. In this study, three different PM samples from diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), urban dust standard reference material SRM1649a and air collected in Manchester have been tested for their ability to oxidise DNA in a cell-free assay, to increase intracellular ROS levels and to induce CYP1A1 gene expression in mammalian cells. In addition, the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of PM were assessed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and alkaline comet assay, respectively. All PM samples catalysed the Fenton reaction in a cell-free assay, but only DEP resulted in the generation of ROS as measured by dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate oxidation in mammalian cells. However, there was no evidence that increased ROS was a consequence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism via CYP1A1 induction as urban dust, the Manchester dust samples but not DEP-induced CYP1A1 expression. Urban dust was more cytotoxic in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) than the other PM samples and also induced expression of GADD45a in the GreenScreen Human Cell assay without S9 activation suggesting the presence of a direct-acting genotoxicant. Urban dust and DEP produced comparable levels of DNA damage, as assessed by the alkaline comet assay, in MEFs at higher levels than those induced by Manchester PM. In conclusion, results from the cytotoxic and genotoxic assays are not consistent with ROS production being the sole determinant of PM-induced toxicity. This suggests that the organic component can contribute significantly to this toxicity and that further work is required to better characterise the extent to which ROS and organic components contribute to PM-induced toxicity. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society.

  1. Introducing Mammalian Cell Culture and Cell Viability Techniques in the Undergraduate Biology Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowey-Dellinger, Kristen; Dixon, Luke; Ackerman, Kristin; Vigueira, Cynthia; Suh, Yewseok K; Lyda, Todd; Sapp, Kelli; Grider, Michael; Crater, Dinene; Russell, Travis; Elias, Michael; Coffield, V McNeil; Segarra, Verónica A

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate students learn about mammalian cell culture applications in introductory biology courses. However, laboratory modules are rarely designed to provide hands-on experience with mammalian cells or teach cell culture techniques, such as trypsinization and cell counting. Students are more likely to learn about cell culture using bacteria or yeast, as they are typically easier to grow, culture, and manipulate given the equipment, tools, and environment of most undergraduate biology laboratories. In contrast, the utilization of mammalian cells requires a dedicated biological safety cabinet and rigorous antiseptic techniques. For this reason, we have devised a laboratory module and method herein that familiarizes students with common cell culture procedures, without the use of a sterile hood or large cell culture facility. Students design and perform a time-efficient inquiry-based cell viability experiment using HeLa cells and tools that are readily available in an undergraduate biology laboratory. Students will become familiar with common techniques such as trypsinizing cells, cell counting with a hemocytometer, performing serial dilutions, and determining cell viability using trypan blue dye. Additionally, students will work with graphing software to analyze their data and think critically about the mechanism of death on a cellular level. Two different adaptations of this inquiry-based lab are presented-one for non-biology majors and one for biology majors. Overall, these laboratories aim to expose students to mammalian cell culture and basic techniques and help them to conceptualize their application in scientific research.

  2. Centriole movements in mammalian epithelial cells during cytokinesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanke Hans J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In cytokinesis, when the cleavage furrow has been formed, the two centrioles in each daughter cell separate. It has been suggested that the centrioles facilitate and regulate cytokinesis to some extent. It has been postulated that termination of cytokinesis (abscission depends on the migration of a centriole to the intercellular bridge and then back to the cell center. To investigate the involvement of centrioles in cytokinesis, we monitored the movements of centrioles in three mammalian epithelial cell lines, HeLa, MCF 10A, and the p53-deficient mouse mammary tumor cell line KP-7.7, by time-lapse imaging. Centrin1-EGFP and α-Tubulin-mCherry were co-expressed in the cells to visualize respectively the centrioles and microtubules. Results Here we report that separated centrioles that migrate from the cell pole are very mobile during cytokinesis and their movements can be characterized as 1 along the nuclear envelope, 2 irregular, and 3 along microtubules forming the spindle axis. Centriole movement towards the intercellular bridge was only seen occasionally and was highly cell-line dependent. Conclusions These findings show that centrioles are highly mobile during cytokinesis and suggest that the repositioning of a centriole to the intercellular bridge is not essential for controlling abscission. We suggest that centriole movements are microtubule dependent and that abscission is more dependent on other mechanisms than positioning of centrioles.

  3. Genotoxic activity of caramel on Salmonella and cultured mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y N; Chen, X R; Ding, C; Cai, Z N; Li, Q G

    1984-04-01

    The genetic activity of 2 commercial caramel preparations, manufactured either by heating the malt sugar solution directly (non-ammoniated caramel) or by heating it with ammonia (ammoniated caramel) was studied in the Salmonella mutagenicity test and UDS assay in cultured mammalian cells. The non-ammoniated caramel was found to be mutagenic to S. typhimurium TA100, while the ammoniated one was genetically active in all the tester strains used, namely TA100, TA97 and TA98. It was also demonstrated that non-ammoniated caramel was capable of inducing UDS in cultured human amnion FL cells, but for the ammoniated one, no such activity was observed. Furthermore, based on the results obtained in the DNA synthesis inhibition assay, it was suggested that the DNA synthesis inhibition seen in our experiments with the ammoniated caramel was probably not of DNA damage in origin. These data indicate that the mutagenic fractions formed during ammoniated and non-ammoniated caramelization were quite different.

  4. Studies of copper transport in mammalian cells using copper radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camakaris, J.; Voskoboinik, I.; Brooks, H.; Greenough, M. [University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC (Australia). Department of Genetics; Smith, S. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Radiopharmaceuticals Division; Mercer, J. [Deakin University, Clayton, VIC (Australia). Centre of Cellular and Molecular Biology

    1998-12-31

    The trace element copper poses a major problem for all organisms. It is essential as a number of vital enzymes require it. Copper deficiency can lead to neurological disorders, osteoporosis and weakening of arteries. However Cu is also highly toxic and homeostatic mechanisms have evolved to maintain Cu at levels which satisfy requirements but do not cause toxicity. Toxicity is mediated by the oxidative capacity of Cu and its ability to generate toxic free radicals. There are several acquired and inherited diseases due to either Cu toxicity or Cu deficiency. The study of these diseases facilitates identification of genes and proteins involved in copper homeostasis, and this in turn will provide rational therapeutic approaches. Using the copper radioisotopes {sup 64}Cu (t1/2 = 12.8 hr) and {sup 67}Cu (t1/2 = 61 hr) we have developed a number of systems for studying copper transport in mammalian cells. These include investigation of copper uptake, copper efflux and ligand blot assays for Cu-binding proteins. Our studies have focused on Menkes disease which is an inherited and usually lethal copper deficiency disorder in humans. We have demonstrated that the Menkes protein is directly involved as a copper efflux pump in mammalian cells. Using cells overexpressing the Menkes protein we have provided the first biochemical evidence that this functions as a Cu translocating (across the membrane) P-type ATPase (Voskoboinik et al., FEBS Letters, in press). These studies were carried out using purified plasma membrane vesicles. We are now carrying out structure- function studies on this protein using targeted mutations and assaying using the radiocopper vesicle assay. Recently we have commenced studies on the role of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in copper transport and relationship of this to Alzheimers disease

  5. The Mammalian Cell Cycle Regulates Parvovirus Nuclear Capsid Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riolobos, Laura; Domínguez, Carlos; Kann, Michael; Almendral, José M.

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown whether the mammalian cell cycle could impact the assembly of viruses maturing in the nucleus. We addressed this question using MVM, a reference member of the icosahedral ssDNA nuclear parvoviruses, which requires cell proliferation to infect by mechanisms partly understood. Constitutively expressed MVM capsid subunits (VPs) accumulated in the cytoplasm of mouse and human fibroblasts synchronized at G0, G1, and G1/S transition. Upon arrest release, VPs translocated to the nucleus as cells entered S phase, at efficiencies relying on cell origin and arrest method, and immediately assembled into capsids. In synchronously infected cells, the consecutive virus life cycle steps (gene expression, proteins nuclear translocation, capsid assembly, genome replication and encapsidation) proceeded tightly coupled to cell cycle progression from G0/G1 through S into G2 phase. However, a DNA synthesis stress caused by thymidine irreversibly disrupted virus life cycle, as VPs became increasingly retained in the cytoplasm hours post-stress, forming empty capsids in mouse fibroblasts, thereby impairing encapsidation of the nuclear viral DNA replicative intermediates. Synchronously infected cells subjected to density-arrest signals while traversing early S phase also blocked VPs transport, resulting in a similar misplaced cytoplasmic capsid assembly in mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, thymidine and density arrest signals deregulating virus assembly neither perturbed nuclear translocation of the NS1 protein nor viral genome replication occurring under S/G2 cycle arrest. An underlying mechanism of cell cycle control was identified in the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated VPs trimeric assembly intermediates, which accessed a non-conserved route distinct from the importin α2/β1 and transportin pathways. The exquisite cell cycle-dependence of parvovirus nuclear capsid assembly conforms a novel paradigm of time and functional coupling between cellular and virus life

  6. The Mammalian Cell Cycle Regulates Parvovirus Nuclear Capsid Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Ranedo, Jon; Hernando, Eva; Riolobos, Laura; Domínguez, Carlos; Kann, Michael; Almendral, José M

    2015-06-01

    It is unknown whether the mammalian cell cycle could impact the assembly of viruses maturing in the nucleus. We addressed this question using MVM, a reference member of the icosahedral ssDNA nuclear parvoviruses, which requires cell proliferation to infect by mechanisms partly understood. Constitutively expressed MVM capsid subunits (VPs) accumulated in the cytoplasm of mouse and human fibroblasts synchronized at G0, G1, and G1/S transition. Upon arrest release, VPs translocated to the nucleus as cells entered S phase, at efficiencies relying on cell origin and arrest method, and immediately assembled into capsids. In synchronously infected cells, the consecutive virus life cycle steps (gene expression, proteins nuclear translocation, capsid assembly, genome replication and encapsidation) proceeded tightly coupled to cell cycle progression from G0/G1 through S into G2 phase. However, a DNA synthesis stress caused by thymidine irreversibly disrupted virus life cycle, as VPs became increasingly retained in the cytoplasm hours post-stress, forming empty capsids in mouse fibroblasts, thereby impairing encapsidation of the nuclear viral DNA replicative intermediates. Synchronously infected cells subjected to density-arrest signals while traversing early S phase also blocked VPs transport, resulting in a similar misplaced cytoplasmic capsid assembly in mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, thymidine and density arrest signals deregulating virus assembly neither perturbed nuclear translocation of the NS1 protein nor viral genome replication occurring under S/G2 cycle arrest. An underlying mechanism of cell cycle control was identified in the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated VPs trimeric assembly intermediates, which accessed a non-conserved route distinct from the importin α2/β1 and transportin pathways. The exquisite cell cycle-dependence of parvovirus nuclear capsid assembly conforms a novel paradigm of time and functional coupling between cellular and virus life

  7. Biological studies using mammalian cell lines and the current status of the microbeam irradiation system, SPICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Iso, H.; Yasuda, N.; Oikawa, M.; Higuchi, Y.; Kato, T.; Hafer, K.; Kodama, K.; Hamano, T.; Suya, N.; Imaseki, H.

    2009-06-01

    The development of SPICE (single-particle irradiation system to cell), a microbeam irradiation system, has been completed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The beam size has been improved to approximately 5 μm in diameter, and the cell targeting system can irradiate up to 400-500 cells per minute. Two cell dishes have been specially designed: one a Si 3N 4 plate (2.5 mm × 2.5 mm area with 1 μm thickness) supported by a 7.5 mm × 7.5 mm frame of 200 μm thickness, and the other a Mylar film stretched by pressing with a metal ring. Both dish types may be placed on a voice coil stage equipped on the cell targeting system, which includes a fluorescent microscope and a CCD camera for capturing cell images. This microscope system captures images of dyed cell nuclei, computes the location coordinates of individual cells, and synchronizes this with the voice coil motor stage and single-particle irradiation system consisting of a scintillation counter and a beam deflector. Irradiation of selected cells with a programmable number of protons is now automatable. We employed the simultaneous detection method for visualizing the position of mammalian cells and proton traversal through CR-39 to determine whether the targeted cells are actually irradiated. An immuno-assay was also performed against γ-H2AX, to confirm the induction of DNA double-strand breaks in the target cells.

  8. Biological studies using mammalian cell lines and the current status of the microbeam irradiation system, SPICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Iso, H.; Yasuda, N.; Oikawa, M.; Higuchi, Y.; Kato, T.; Hafer, K.; Kodama, K.; Hamano, T.; Suya, N.; Imaseki, H.

    2009-01-01

    The development of SPICE (single-particle irradiation system to cell), a microbeam irradiation system, has been completed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The beam size has been improved to approximately 5 μm in diameter, and the cell targeting system can irradiate up to 400-500 cells per minute. Two cell dishes have been specially designed: one a Si 3 N 4 plate (2.5 mm x 2.5 mm area with 1 μm thickness) supported by a 7.5 mm x 7.5 mm frame of 200 μm thickness, and the other a Mylar film stretched by pressing with a metal ring. Both dish types may be placed on a voice coil stage equipped on the cell targeting system, which includes a fluorescent microscope and a CCD camera for capturing cell images. This microscope system captures images of dyed cell nuclei, computes the location coordinates of individual cells, and synchronizes this with the voice coil motor stage and single-particle irradiation system consisting of a scintillation counter and a beam deflector. Irradiation of selected cells with a programmable number of protons is now automatable. We employed the simultaneous detection method for visualizing the position of mammalian cells and proton traversal through CR-39 to determine whether the targeted cells are actually irradiated. An immuno-assay was also performed against γ-H2AX, to confirm the induction of DNA double-strand breaks in the target cells.

  9. The fungicide mancozeb induces toxic effects on mammalian granulosa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paro, Rita [Department of Health Sciences, University of L' Aquila, Via Vetoio, L' Aquila (Italy); Tiboni, Gian Mario [Department of Medicine and Aging, Section of Reproductive Sciences, University “G. D' Annunzio”, Chieti-Pescara (Italy); Buccione, Roberto [Tumor Cell Invasion Laboratory, Consorzio Mario Negri Sud, Santa Maria Imbaro, Chieti (Italy); Rossi, Gianna; Cellini, Valerio [Department of Health Sciences, University of L' Aquila, Via Vetoio, L' Aquila (Italy); Canipari, Rita [Department of Anatomy, Histology, Forensic Medicine and Orthopedics, Section of Histology and Embryology, School of Pharmacy and Medicine, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome (Italy); Cecconi, Sandra, E-mail: sandra.cecconi@cc.univaq.it [Department of Health Sciences, University of L' Aquila, Via Vetoio, L' Aquila (Italy)

    2012-04-15

    The ethylene-bis-dithiocarbamate mancozeb is a widely used fungicide with low reported toxicity in mammals. In mice, mancozeb induces embryo apoptosis, affects oocyte meiotic spindle morphology and impairs fertilization rate even when used at very low concentrations. We evaluated the toxic effects of mancozeb on the mouse and human ovarian somatic granulosa cells. We examined parameters such as cell morphology, induction of apoptosis, and p53 expression levels. Mouse granulosa cells exposed to mancozeb underwent a time- and dose-dependent modification of their morphology, and acquired the ability to migrate but not to proliferate. The expression level of p53, in terms of mRNA and protein content, decreased significantly in comparison with unexposed cells, but no change in apoptosis was recorded. Toxic effects could be attributed, at least in part, to the presence of ethylenthiourea (ETU), the main mancozeb catabolite, which was found in culture medium. Human granulosa cells also showed dose-dependent morphological changes and reduced p53 expression levels after exposure to mancozeb. Altogether, these results indicate that mancozeb affects the somatic cells of the mammalian ovarian follicles by inducing a premalignant-like status, and that such damage occurs to the same extent in both mouse and human GC. These results further substantiate the concept that mancozeb should be regarded as a reproductive toxicant. Highlights: ► The fungicide mancozeb affects oocyte spindle morphology and fertilization rate. ► We investigated the toxic effects of mancozeb on mouse and human granulosa cells. ► Granulosa cells modify their morphology and expression level of p53. ► Mancozeb induces a premalignant-like status in exposed cells.

  10. Cell-mediated mutagenesis and cell transformation of mammalian cells by chemical carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huberman, E.; Langenbach, R.

    1977-01-01

    We have developed a cell-mediated mutagenesis assay in which cells with the appropriate markers for mutagenesis are co-cultivated with either lethally irradiated rodent embryonic cells that can metabolize carcinogenic hydrocarbons or with primary rat liver cells that can metabolize chemicals carcinogenic to the liver. During co-cultivation, the reactive metabolites of the procarcinogen appear to be transmitted to the mutable cells and induce mutations in them. Assays of this type make it possible to demonstrate a relationship between carcinogenic potency of the chemicals and their ability to induce mutations in mammalian cells. In addition, by simultaneously comparing the frequencies of transformation and mutation induced in normal diploid hamster cells by benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and one of its metabolites, it is possible to estimate the genetic target size for cell transformation in vitro

  11. Inter-chromosomal gene regulation in the mammalian cell nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, Wouter; Grosveld, Frank

    2007-10-01

    Cellular phenotypes can critically rely on mono-allelic gene expression. Recent studies suggest that in mammalian cells inter-chromosomal DNA interactions may mediate the decision which allele to activate and which to silence. Here, these findings are discussed in the context of knowledge on gene competition, chromatin dynamics, and nuclear organization. We argue that data obtained by 4C technology strongly support the idea that chromatin folds according to self-organizing principles. In this concept, the nuclear positioning of a given locus is probabilistic as it also depends on the properties of neighbouring DNA segments and, by extrapolation, the whole chromosome. The linear distribution of repetitive DNA sequences and of active and inactive DNA regions is important for the folding and relative positioning of chromosomes. This stochastic concept of nuclear organization predicts that tissue-specific interactions between two selected loci present on different chromosomes will be rare.

  12. Chromosome aberrations and cell survival in irradiated mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tremp, J.

    1981-01-01

    A possible correlation between chromosome aberrations and reduced proliferation capacity or cell death was investigated. Synchronized Chinese hamster fibroblast cells were irradiated with 300 rad of x rays in early G 1 . Despite synchronization the cells reached the subsequent mitosis at different times. The frequency of chromosome aberrations was determined in the postirradiation division at 2-h intervals. The highest frequency occurred in cells with a first cell cycle of medium length. The colony-forming ability of mitotic cells was measured in parallel samples by following the progress of individual mitoses. The proportion of cells forming macrocolonies decreased with increasing cell cycle length, and the number of non-colony-forming cells increased. Irrespective of various first cell cycle lengths and different frequencies of chromosome aberrations, the number of cells forming microcolonies remained constant. A correlation was found between the absence of chromosome aberrations and the ability of cells to form macrocolonies. However, cells with a long first cell cycle formed fewer macrocolonies than expected

  13. Combined effects of hyperthermia and radiation in cultured mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Hur, E.; Elkind, M.M.; Riklis, E.

    1977-01-01

    Hyperthermia (temperatures of 39 0 C or higher) enhances the killing of mammalian cells by ionizing radiation (fission-spectrum neutrons and x-rays). The nature and the magnitude of the enhanced radiation killing varies with temperature and for a fixed temperature during irradiation, the enhanced lethality varies inversely with dose rate. For temperatures up to 41 0 C, dose fractionation measurements indicate that hyperthermia inhibits the repair of sublethal damage. At higher temperatures, the expression of potentially lethal damage is enhanced. Since the effect of heat is greatest in cells irradiated during DNA synthesis, the radiation age-response pattern is flattened by hyperthermia. In addition to the enhanced cell killing described above, three other features of the effect of hyperthermia are important in connection with the radiation treatment of cancer. The first is that heat selectively sensitizes S-phase cells to radiation. The second is that it takes radiation survivors 10 to 20 hrs after a modest heat treatment to recover their ability to repair sublethal damage. And the third is that hyperthermia reduces the magnitude of the oxygen enhancement ratio. Thus, heat if applied selectively, could significantly increase the margin of damage between tumors and normal tissues

  14. Heavy ion induced genetic effects in mammalian cells. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, J.; Brend'amour, M.; Casares, A.; Egenolf, R.; Gutermuth, F.; Ikpeme, S.E.; Koch, S.; Kost, M.; Loebrich, M.; Pross, H.D.; Russmann, C.; Schmidt, P.; Schneider, E.; Stoll, U.; Weber, K.J.

    2001-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are generally assumed to be the most relevant initial event producing radiation-induced cellular lethality, as well as mutations and transformations. The dependence of their formation on radiation quality has been recently reviewed. Contrary to earlier observations there seems to be now agreement that the RBE does not increase above unity with increasing LET in mammalian cells when conventional techniques are applied which are not able to resolve smaller fragments. If they are, however, included in the analysis maximum RBE values around 2 are obtained. The situation is different with yeast: An increased effectiveness for DSB induction has been reported with alpha particles, as well as for heavy ions. This may be due to differences in methods or to chromosomal structure, as discussed in more detail in this paper. DSB induction was measured for a LET range of 100 to 11500 keV/? m in yeast cells using pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Under the conditions applied the chromosomes of the yeast cells could be separated according to size allowing the direct quantification of the DSB yield by measuring the intensity of the largest chromosomes. The results demonstrate clearly that DSB induction in yeast depends on radiation quality. The derived cross-sections for DSB induction were also compared to those for cell inactivation determined in parallel experiments under identical irradiation conditions. (orig.)

  15. Structure and function of stem cell pools in mammalian cell renewal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliedner, T.M.; Nothdurft, W.

    1979-01-01

    Stem cells play a key-role in the maintenance of the equilibrium between cell loss and cell production in cell renewal systems as well as in the understanding of the radiation pathophysiology of mammalian organisms. The integrity of mammalian organisms with the need to maintain a constant ''millieu interior'' is depending on the normal functioning of cell renewal systems, especially those of epithelial surfaces and blood cell forming organs. All cell renewal systems of bodies have a very similar functional structure consisting of functional, proliferative - amplifying and stem cell compartments. They differ in transit and cell cycle times and in the number of amplification division - aside from the difference in their functional and biochemical make-up. The stem cell pools are providing the cells capable of differentiation without depleting their own kind. This can be achieved by symmetrical or assymmetrical stem cell division. In normal steady state, 50% of the stem cell division remain in the stem cell pool, while the other 50% leave it to differentiate, proliferate and mature, hemopoietic system is distributed throughout bodies. This is an important factor in the radiation biology of mammalian organisms since the loss of function in one area can be compensated for by more production in other areas, and locally depleted sites can be reseeded with the stem cells migrating in from blood. (Yamashita, S.)

  16. Dual-function vector for protein expression in both mammalian cells and Xenopus laevis oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Thomas; Grunnet, M; Angelo, K

    2002-01-01

    will often engage both oocytes and mammalian cells. Efficient expression of a protein in both systems have thus far only been possible by subcloning the cDNA into two different vectors because several different molecular requirements should be fulfilled to obtain a high protein level in both mammalian cells...

  17. Chemical mapping of mammalian cells by atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Kedar; Prosa, Ty; Fu, Jing; Kelly, Thomas F; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2012-01-01

    In atom probe tomography (APT), a technique that has been used to determine 3D maps of ion compositions of metals and semiconductors at sub-nanometer resolution, controlled emissions of ions can be induced from needle-shaped specimens in the vicinity of a strong electric field. Detection of these ions in the plane of a position sensitive detector provides two-dimensional compositional information while the sequence of ion arrival at the detector provides information in the third dimension. However, the applicability of APT to imaging unstained cells has not been explored. Here, we report the use of APT to obtain 3D spatial distributions of cellular ions and metabolites from unstained, freeze-dried mammalian cells. Multiple peaks were reliably obtained in the mass spectrum from tips with diameters of ~ 50 nm and heights of ~ 200 nm, with mass-to-charge ratios (m/z) ranging from 1 to 80. Peaks at m/z 12, 23, 28 and 39, corresponding to carbon, sodium, carbonyl and potassium ions respectively, showed distinct patterns of spatial distribution within the cell. Our studies establish that APT could become a powerful tool for mapping the sub-cellular distribution of atomic species, such as labeled metabolites, at 3D spatial resolutions as high as ~ 1 nm. PMID:22245777

  18. Oxidized Base Damage and Single-Strand Break Repair in Mammalian Genomes: Role of Disordered Regions and Posttranslational Modifications in Early Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Hegde, Muralidhar L.; Izumi, Tadahide; Mitra, Sankar

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative genome damage induced by reactive oxygen species includes oxidized bases, abasic (AP) sites, and single-strand breaks, all of which are repaired via the evolutionarily conserved base excision repair/single-strand break repair (BER/SSBR) pathway. BER/SSBR in mammalian cells is complex, with preferred and backup sub-pathways, and is linked to genome replication and transcription. The early BER/SSBR enzymes, namely, DNA glycosylases (DGs) and the end-processing proteins such as abasic ...

  19. Genetic changes in Mammalian cells transformed by helium cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. (Naples Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche); Yang, T.C.; Roots, R. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Midterm Syrian Hamster embryo (SHE) cells were employed to study high LET-radiation induced tumorigenesis. Normal SHE cells (secondary passage) were irradiated with accelerated helium ions at an incident energy of 22 MeV/u (9--10 keV/{mu}m). Transformed clones were isolated after growth in soft agar of cells obtained from the foci of the initial monolayer plated postirradiation. To study the progression process of malignant transformation, the transformed clones were followed by monolayer subculturing for prolonged periods of time. Subsequently, neoplasia tests in nude mice were done. In this work, however, we have focused on karyotypic changes in the banding patterns of the chromosomes during the early part of the progressive process of cell transformation for helium ion-induced transformed cells. 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Genetic changes in Mammalian cells transformed by helium cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G.

    1990-11-01

    Midterm Syrian Hamster embryo (SHE) cells were employed to study high LET-radiation induced tumorigenesis. Normal SHE cells (secondary passage) were irradiated with accelerated helium ions at an incident energy of 22 MeV/u (9--10 keV/μm). Transformed clones were isolated after growth in soft agar of cells obtained from the foci of the initial monolayer plated postirradiation. To study the progression process of malignant transformation, the transformed clones were followed by monolayer subculturing for prolonged periods of time. Subsequently, neoplasia tests in nude mice were done. In this work, however, we have focused on karyotypic changes in the banding patterns of the chromosomes during the early part of the progressive process of cell transformation for helium ion-induced transformed cells. 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Monitoring leachables from single-use bioreactor bags for mammalian cell culture by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by ultra high performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorival-García, N; Bones, J

    2017-08-25

    A method for the identification of leachables in chemically defined media for CHO cell culture using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and UHPLC-MS is described. A Box-Behnken design of experiments (DoE) approach was applied to obtain the optimum extraction conditions of the target analytes. Performance of DLLME as extraction technique was studied by comparison of two commercial chemically defined media for CHO cell culture. General extraction conditions for any group of leachables, regardless of their specific chemical functionalities can be applied and similar optimum conditions were obtained with the two media. Extraction efficiency and matrix effects were determined. The method was validated using matrix-matched standard calibration followed by recovery assays with spiked samples. Finally, cell culture media was incubated in 7 single use bioreactors (SUBs) from different vendors and analysed. TBPP was not detected in any of the samples, whereas DtBP and TBPP-ox were found in all samples, with bDtBPP detected in six SUBs. This method can be used for early identification of non-satisfactory SUB films for cultivation of CHO cell lines for biopharmaceutical production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Silk screen based dual spin-filter module for perfusion culture of adherent and non-adherent mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamthan, Shweta; Gomes, James; Roychoudhury, Pradip K

    2014-08-01

    Spin-filters have been primarily used for producing therapeutic proteins from mammalian cells. However, disposability and/or high filter clogging of the existing spin-filter systems affect the process economy and productivity. Hence, to address these drawbacks a reusable dual spin-filter module for perfusion culture of adherent and non-adherent mammalian cells was designed. Two non-woven Bombyx mori silk layers were used as filter screen; the outer layer was conducive to cell attachment whilst the inner was non-conducive. Adherent cells can be cultured either in suspended mode using its inner single module or as monolayer of cells using its dual concentric module. We achieved 30 % higher urokinase productivity as compared to the stainless-steel spin-filter during perfusion experiments of adherent human kidney cells in suspended mode. This was due to the hydrophobic and negatively-charged silk screen that allows clog-free perfusion culture for prolonged periods.

  3. Persistent human cardiac Na+ currents in stably transfected mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ging Kuo; Russell, Gabriella; Wang, Sho-Ya

    2013-01-01

    Miniature persistent late Na+ currents in cardiomyocytes have been linked to arrhythmias and sudden death. The goals of this study are to establish a stable cell line expressing robust persistent cardiac Na+ currents and to test Class 1 antiarrhythmic drugs for selective action against resting and open states. After transient transfection of an inactivation-deficient human cardiac Na+ channel clone (hNav1.5-CW with L409C/A410W double mutations), transfected mammalian HEK293 cells were treated with 1 mg/ml G-418. Individual G-418-resistant colonies were isolated using glass cylinders. One colony with high expression of persistent Na+ currents was subjected to a second colony selection. Cells from this colony remained stable in expressing robust peak Na+ currents of 996 ± 173 pA/pF at +50 mV (n = 20). Persistent late Na+ currents in these cells were clearly visible during a 4-second depolarizing pulse albeit decayed slowly. This slow decay is likely due to slow inactivation of Na+ channels and could be largely eliminated by 5 μM batrachotoxin. Peak cardiac hNav1.5-CW Na+ currents were blocked by tetrodotoxin with an IC50 value of 2.27 ± 0.08 μM (n = 6). At clinic relevant concentrations, Class 1 antiarrhythmics are much more selective in blocking persistent late Na+ currents than their peak counterparts, with a selectivity ratio ranging from 80.6 (flecainide) to 3 (disopyramide). We conclude that (1) Class 1 antiarrhythmics differ widely in their resting- vs. open-channel selectivity, and (2) stably transfected HEK293 cells expressing large persistent hNav1.5-CW Na+ currents are suitable for studying as well as screening potent open-channel blockers. PMID:23695971

  4. UVC-induced stress granules in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Taha Moutaoufik

    Full Text Available Stress granules (SGs are well characterized cytoplasmic RNA bodies that form under various stress conditions. We have observed that exposure of mammalian cells in culture to low doses of UVC induces the formation of discrete cytoplasmic RNA granules that were detected by immunofluorescence staining using antibodies to RNA-binding proteins. UVC-induced cytoplasmic granules are not Processing Bodies (P-bodies and are bone fide SGs as they contain TIA-1, TIA-1/R, Caprin1, FMRP, G3BP1, PABP1, well known markers, and mRNA. Concomitant with the accumulation of the granules in the cytoplasm, cells enter a quiescent state, as they are arrested in G1 phase of the cell cycle in order to repair DNA damages induced by UVC irradiation. This blockage persists as long as the granules are present. A tight correlation between their decay and re-entry into S-phase was observed. However the kinetics of their formation, their low number per cell, their absence of fusion into larger granules, their persistence over 48 hours and their slow decay, all differ from classical SGs induced by arsenite or heat treatment. The induction of these SGs does not correlate with major translation inhibition nor with phosphorylation of the α subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α. We propose that a restricted subset of mRNAs coding for proteins implicated in cell cycling are removed from the translational apparatus and are sequestered in a repressed form in SGs.

  5. Experimental Design to Evaluate Directed Adaptive Mutation in Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaro, Christopher R; May, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Background We describe the experimental design for a methodological approach to determine whether directed adaptive mutation occurs in mammalian cells. Identification of directed adaptive mutation would have profound practical significance for a wide variety of biomedical problems, including disease development and resistance to treatment. In adaptive mutation, the genetic or epigenetic change is not random; instead, the presence and type of selection influences the frequency and character of the mutation event. Adaptive mutation can contribute to the evolution of microbial pathogenesis, cancer, and drug resistance, and may become a focus of novel therapeutic interventions. Objective Our experimental approach was designed to distinguish between 3 types of mutation: (1) random mutations that are independent of selective pressure, (2) undirected adaptive mutations that arise when selective pressure induces a general increase in the mutation rate, and (3) directed adaptive mutations that arise when selective pressure induces targeted mutations that specifically influence the adaptive response. The purpose of this report is to introduce an experimental design and describe limited pilot experiment data (not to describe a complete set of experiments); hence, it is an early report. Methods An experimental design based on immortalization of mouse embryonic fibroblast cells is presented that links clonal cell growth to reversal of an inactivating polyadenylation site mutation. Thus, cells exhibit growth only in the presence of both the countermutation and an inducing agent (doxycycline). The type and frequency of mutation in the presence or absence of doxycycline will be evaluated. Additional experimental approaches would determine whether the cells exhibit a generalized increase in mutation rate and/or whether the cells show altered expression of error-prone DNA polymerases or of mismatch repair proteins. Results We performed the initial stages of characterizing our system

  6. DNA strand breaks, repair, and survival in x-irradiated mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugle, D.L.; Gillespie, C.J.; Chapman, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    The yields of unrepairable single- and double-strand breaks in the DNA of x-irradiated Chinese hamster cells were measured by low-speed neutral and alkaline sucrose density gradient sedimentation in order to investigate the relation between these lesions and reproductive death. After maximal single-strand rejoining, at all doses, the number of residual single-strand breaks was twice the number of residual double-strand breaks. Both double-strand and unrepairable single-strand breaks were proportional to the square of absorbed dose, in the range 10-50 krad. No rejoining of double-strand breaks was observed. These observations suggest that, in mammalian cells, most double-strand breaks are not repairable, while all single-strand breaks are repaired except those that are sufficiently close on complementary strands to constitute double-strand breaks. Comparison with cell survival measurements at much lower doses suggests that loss of reproductive capacity corresponds to induction of approximately one double-strand break

  7. DNA methylation supports intrinsic epigenetic memory in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the role of DNA methylation in the initiation and maintenance of silenced chromatin in somatic mammalian cells. We found that a mutated transgene, in which all the CpG dinucleotides have been eliminated, underwent transcriptional silencing to the same extent as the unmodified transgene. These observations demonstrate that DNA methylation is not required for silencing. The silenced CpG-free transgene exhibited all the features of heterochromatin, including silencing of transcriptional activity, delayed DNA replication, lack of histone H3 and H4 acetylation, lack of H3-K4 methylation, and enrichment in tri-methyl-H3-K9. In contrast, when we tested for transgene reactivation using a Cre recombinase-mediated inversion assay, we observed a marked difference between a CpG-free and an unmodified transgene: the CpG-free transgene resumed transcription and did not exhibit markers of heterochromatin whereas the unmodified transgene remained silenced. These data indicate that methylation of CpG residues conferred epigenetic memory in this system. These results also suggest that replication delay, lack of histone H3 and H4 acetylation, H3-K4 methylation, and enrichment in tri-methyl-H3-K9 are not sufficient to confer epigenetic memory. We propose that DNA methylation within transgenes serves as an intrinsic epigenetic memory to permanently silence transgenes and prevent their reactivation.

  8. Bacillus thuringiensis membrane-damaging toxins acting on mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celandroni, Francesco; Salvetti, Sara; Senesi, Sonia; Ghelardi, Emilia

    2014-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is widely used as a biopesticide in forestry and agriculture, being able to produce potent species-specific insecticidal toxins and considered nonpathogenic to other animals. More recently, however, repeated observations are documenting the association of this microorganism with various infectious diseases in humans, such as food-poisoning-associated diarrheas, periodontitis, bacteremia, as well as ocular, burn, and wound infections. Similar to B. cereus, B. thuringiensis produces an array of virulence factors acting against mammalian cells, such as phosphatidylcholine- and phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC and PI-PLC), hemolysins, in particular hemolysin BL (HBL), and various enterotoxins. The contribution of some of these toxins to B. thuringiensis pathogenicity has been studied in animal models of infection, following intravitreous, intranasal, or intratracheal inoculation. These studies lead to the speculation that the activities of PC-PLC, PI-PLC, and HBL are responsible for most of the pathogenic properties of B. thuringiensis in nongastrointestinal infections in mammals. This review summarizes data regarding the biological activity, the genetic basis, and the structural features of these membrane-damaging toxins. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) imaging in plant seedlings and mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qiguang; Soutto, Mohammed; Xu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yunfei; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2011-01-01

    Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) has become a widely used technique to monitor protein-protein interactions. It involves resonance energy transfer between a bioluminescent donor and a fluorescent acceptor. Because the donor emits photons intrinsically, fluorescence excitation is unnecessary. Therefore, BRET avoids some of the problems inherent in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) approaches, such as photobleaching, autofluorescence, and undesirable stimulation of photobiological processes. In the past, BRET signals have generally been too dim to be effectively imaged. Newly available cameras that are more sensitive coupled to image splitter now enable BRET imaging in plant and mammalian cells and tissues. In addition, new substrates and enhanced luciferases enable brighter signals that allow even subcellular BRET imaging. Here, we report methods for BRET imaging of (1) localization of COP1 dimerization in plant cells and tissues and (2) subcellular distributions of interactions of the CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein α (C/EBPα) in single mammalian cells. We also discuss methods for the correction of BRET images for tissues that absorb light of different spectra. This progress should catalyze further applications of BRET for imaging and high-throughput assays.

  10. The impact of locally multiply damaged sites (LMDS) induced by ionizing radiation in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D.; Boucher, D. [Institut Curie-Section de Recherche, UMR2027 CNRS, LCR-V28 du CEA, Centre Universitaire, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2006-07-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have shown that ionising radiations produce a specific type of clustered cell damage called locally multiply damaged sites or LMDS. These lesions consist of closely positioned single-strand breaks, (oxidative) base damage and DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in between one helical turn of DNA. As specific markers of radiation-induced damage these lesions are likely to condition biological responses and are thus of great interest for radiation protection. Calculations indicate that there should be more LMDS induced by high than by low LET radiation, and they should be absent in un-irradiated cells. Processes like K-shell activation and local Auger electron emission can be expected to add complex DSB or LMDS, producing significant chromosomal damage. In the discussion of the specificity of ionising radiation in comparison to other genotoxic agents, many arguments have been put forward that these lesions should be particularly deleterious for living cells. Complex lesions of that type should represent big obstacles for DNA repair and give rise to high lethality. Moreover, cellular attempts to repair them could accentuate harm, leading to mutations, genetic instability and cancer. In vitro experiments with oligonucleotides containing an artificially introduced set of base damage and SSB in different combinations have shown that depending on the close positioning of the damage on DNA, repair enzymes, and even whole cell extracts, are unable to repair properly and may stimulate mis-repair. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in conjunction with enzymatic treatments has been used to detect LMDS in mammalian cells after high and low LET radiation. In order to further define the importance of LMDS for radiation induced cellular responses, we studied the induction of LMDS as a function of radiation dose and dose rate in mammalian cells (CHO and MRC5) using {sup 137}Cs gamma-radiation. Using PFGE and specific glycosylases to convert oxidative damage

  11. The impact of locally multiply damaged sites (LMDS) induced by ionizing radiation in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averbeck, D.; Boucher, D.

    2006-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have shown that ionising radiations produce a specific type of clustered cell damage called locally multiply damaged sites or LMDS. These lesions consist of closely positioned single-strand breaks, (oxidative) base damage and DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in between one helical turn of DNA. As specific markers of radiation-induced damage these lesions are likely to condition biological responses and are thus of great interest for radiation protection. Calculations indicate that there should be more LMDS induced by high than by low LET radiation, and they should be absent in un-irradiated cells. Processes like K-shell activation and local Auger electron emission can be expected to add complex DSB or LMDS, producing significant chromosomal damage. In the discussion of the specificity of ionising radiation in comparison to other genotoxic agents, many arguments have been put forward that these lesions should be particularly deleterious for living cells. Complex lesions of that type should represent big obstacles for DNA repair and give rise to high lethality. Moreover, cellular attempts to repair them could accentuate harm, leading to mutations, genetic instability and cancer. In vitro experiments with oligonucleotides containing an artificially introduced set of base damage and SSB in different combinations have shown that depending on the close positioning of the damage on DNA, repair enzymes, and even whole cell extracts, are unable to repair properly and may stimulate mis-repair. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in conjunction with enzymatic treatments has been used to detect LMDS in mammalian cells after high and low LET radiation. In order to further define the importance of LMDS for radiation induced cellular responses, we studied the induction of LMDS as a function of radiation dose and dose rate in mammalian cells (CHO and MRC5) using 137 Cs gamma-radiation. Using PFGE and specific glycosylases to convert oxidative damage into

  12. Regulation of DNA repair processes in mammalian cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bil'din, V.N.; Sergina, T.B.; Zhestyanikov, V.D.

    1992-01-01

    A study was made of the repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) in proliferating and quiescent mouse Swiss 3T6 cells and in those stimulated from the quiet status by epidermal growth factor in combination with insulin, in the presence of specific inhibitors of DNA polymerase α and β (aphidicolin) and DNA polymerase β (2', 3'-dideoxythjymidine-5'-triphosphate). The repair of DNA SSB induced by X-ray-irradiation (10 Gy) or by γ-ray irradiation (150 Gy) is more sensitive to aphidicolin and mitogen-simulated cells three times stronger than in proliferating cells. The influence of 2', 3'-dideoxythymidine-5'-triphosphate on the rate of DNA SSB repair in cells of all the three types does not differ. Thus, the decrease in DNA repair efficiency in quiescent cells is connected with a decrease in the activity of aphidicolin-sensitive DNA polymerase, apparently DNA polymerase α

  13. Effects of track structure and cell inactivation on the calculation of heavy ion mutation rates in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Shavers, M. R.; Katz, R.

    1996-01-01

    It has long been suggested that inactivation severely effects the probability of mutation by heavy ions in mammalian cells. Heavy ions have observed cross sections of inactivation that approach and sometimes exceed the geometric size of the cell nucleus in mammalian cells. In the track structure model of Katz the inactivation cross section is found by summing an inactivation probability over all impact parameters from the ion to the sensitive sites within the cell nucleus. The inactivation probability is evaluated using the dose-response of the system to gamma-rays and the radial dose of the ions and may be equal to unity at small impact parameters for some ions. We show how the effects of inactivation may be taken into account in the evaluation of the mutation cross sections from heavy ions in the track structure model through correlation of sites for gene mutation and cell inactivation. The model is fit to available data for HPRT mutations in Chinese hamster cells and good agreement is found. The resulting calculations qualitatively show that mutation cross sections for heavy ions display minima at velocities where inactivation cross sections display maxima. Also, calculations show the high probability of mutation by relativistic heavy ions due to the radial extension of ions track from delta-rays in agreement with the microlesion concept. The effects of inactivation on mutations rates make it very unlikely that a single parameter such as LET or Z*2/beta(2) can be used to specify radiation quality for heavy ion bombardment.

  14. Modelling a tethered mammalian sperm cell undergoing hyperactivation

    KAUST Repository

    Curtis, M.P.

    2012-09-01

    The beat patterns of mammalian sperm flagella can be categorised into two different types. The first involves symmetric waves propagating down the flagellum with a net linear propulsion of the sperm cell. The second, hyperactive, waveform is classified by vigorous asymmetric waves of higher amplitude, lower wavenumber and frequency propagating down the flagellum resulting in highly curved trajectories. The latter beat pattern is part of the capacitation process whereby sperm prepare for the prospective penetration of the zona pellucida and fusion with the egg. Hyperactivation is often observed to initiate as sperm escape from epithelial and ciliary bindings formed within the isthmic regions of the female oviducts, leading to a conjecture in the literature that this waveform is mechanically important for sperm escape. Hence, we explore the mechanical effects of hyperactivation on a tethered sperm, focussing on a Newtonian fluid. Using a resistive force theory model we demonstrate that hyperactivation can indeed generate forces that pull the sperm away from a tethering point and consequently a hyperactivated sperm cell bound to an epithelial surface need not always be pushed by its flagellum. More generally, directions of the forces generated by tethered flagella are insensitive to reductions in beat frequency and the detailed flagellar responses depend on the nature of the binding at the tethering point. Furthermore, waveform asymmetry and amplitude increases enhance the tendency for a tethered flagellum to start tugging on its binding. The same is generally predicted to be true for reductions in the wavenumber of the flagellum beat, but not universally so, emphasising the dynamical complexity of flagellar force generation. Finally, qualitative observations drawn from experimental data of human sperm bound to excised female reproductive tract are also presented and are found to be consistent with the theoretical predictions. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Genomic footprinting in mammalian cells with ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, M.M.; Wang, Z.; Grossmann, G.; Becherer, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    A simple and accurate genomic primer extension method has been developed to detect ultraviolet footprinting patterns of regulatory protein-DNA interactions in mammalian genomic DNA. The technique can also detect footprinting or sequencing patterns introduced into genomic DNA by other methods. Purified genomic DNA, containing either damaged bases or strand breaks introduced by footprinting or sequencing reactions, is first cut with a convenient restriction enzyme to reduce its molecular weight. A highly radioactive single-stranded DNA primer that is complementary to a region of genomic DNA whose sequence or footprint one wishes to examine is then mixed with 50 micrograms of restriction enzyme-cut genomic DNA. The primer is approximately 100 bases long and contains 85 radioactive phosphates, each of specific activity 3000 Ci/mmol (1 Ci = 37 GBq). A simple and fast method for preparing such primers is described. Following brief heat denaturation at 100 degrees C, the solution of genomic DNA and primer is cooled to 74 degrees C and a second solution containing Taq polymerase (Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase) and the four deoxynucleotide triphosphates is added to initiate primer extension of genomic DNA. Taq polymerase extends genomic hybridized primer until its polymerization reaction is terminated either by a damaged base or strand break in genomic DNA or by the addition of dideoxynucleotide triphosphates in the polymerization reaction. The concurrent primer hybridization-extension reaction is terminated after 5 hr and unhybridized primer is digested away by mung bean nuclease. Primer-extended genomic DNA is then denatured and electrophoresed on a polyacrylamide sequencing gel, and radioactive primer extension products are revealed by autoradiography

  16. FBH1 helicase disrupts RAD51 filaments in vitro and modulates homologous recombination in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simandlova, Jitka; Zagelbaum, Jennifer; Payne, Miranda J

    2013-01-01

    Efficient repair of DNA double strand breaks and interstrand cross-links requires the homologous recombination (HR) pathway, a potentially error-free process that utilizes a homologous sequence as a repair template. A key player in HR is RAD51, the eukaryotic ortholog of bacterial RecA protein. RAD....... Using a combination of molecular genetic, biochemical, and single-molecule biophysical techniques, we provide mechanistic insight into the mode of action of the FBH1 helicase as a regulator of RAD51-dependent HR in mammalian cells. We show that FBH1 binds directly to RAD51 and is able to disrupt RAD51...... filaments on DNA through its ssDNA translocase function. Consistent with this, a mutant mouse embryonic stem cell line with a deletion in the FBH1 helicase domain fails to limit RAD51 chromatin association and shows hyper-recombination. Our data are consistent with FBH1 restraining RAD51 DNA binding under...

  17. High-speed atomic force microscopy imaging of live mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Mikihiro; Watanabe, Hiroki; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ando, Toshio; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2017-01-01

    Direct imaging of morphological dynamics of live mammalian cells with nanometer resolution under physiological conditions is highly expected, but yet challenging. High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) is a unique technique for capturing biomolecules at work under near physiological conditions. However, application of HS-AFM for imaging of live mammalian cells was hard to be accomplished because of collision between a huge mammalian cell and a cantilever during AFM scanning. Here, we review our recent improvements of HS-AFM for imaging of activities of live mammalian cells without significant damage to the cell. The improvement of an extremely long (~3 μm) AFM tip attached to a cantilever enables us to reduce severe damage to soft mammalian cells. In addition, a combination of HS-AFM with simple fluorescence microscopy allows us to quickly locate the cell in the AFM scanning area. After these improvements, we demonstrate that developed HS-AFM for live mammalian cells is possible to image morphogenesis of filopodia, membrane ruffles, pits open-close formations, and endocytosis in COS-7, HeLa cells as well as hippocampal neurons.

  18. Intercellular contact: its influence on the Dsub(q) of mammalian cell survival curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, R.E.; Sutherland, R.M.

    1975-01-01

    Cell survival in tissues exposed to a given dose of ionizing radiation is usually greater than that of similar cells grown individually in vitro, despite the fact that the radiosensitivities (D 0 ) are virtually identical under the two conditions. An analogous increase in cell survival is observed when Chinese hamster V79-171 cells are grown in suspension culture and irradiated as multicell spheroids. Unfortunately, the information gained from the survival curves so obtained is limited by the inhomogeneity of the cell population with respect to both degree of contact and cell cycle position. The latter can be studied using synchronized small spheroids. The ratio of Dsub(q) of spheroid cells to Dsub(q) of single cells increased as the cells progressed through the cell cycle, from a minimum of 1.3 for G 1 phase cells to a maximum of 2.2 for late S-phase cells. The enhanced survival, or 'contact effect', developed slowly as the spheroids grew, after an initial latent period of about one generation cycle of the cells. A second effect of intercellular contact on mammalian cell survival has also been observed. When cells are assayed under conditions in which intercellular contact is maintained, the net cellular survival is increased further. This effect is different from the usual repair of potentially lethal damage, in that it occurs much more slowly and results in modification of the survival-curve shoulder. Not all cell types tested have shown enhanced survival when grown as spheroids. Several MNNG-induced mutants of the Chinese hamster V79-171 line have been isolated and sublines which do and do not show the contact effect are now available. These may permit study of the mechanism(s) of contact effects. (author)

  19. Studies on radiation transformation of cultured mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terasima, Toyozo; Sakiyama, Hisako; Yasukawa, Mieko

    1978-01-01

    In an attempt to induce in vitro transformation by radiation, several cell lines and primary cultures derived from embryonal tissues of hamster, mouse and man were tested. Under various conditions favorable for transformation, none of these were successfully transformed except for C3H mouse embryo-derived 10Tl/2 cells. Normally the cells contact-inhibited were irradiated with single graded doses and dispersed 3 hours after, followed by inoculation and 8-week cultivation with repeated medium renewals. A few types of focus were identified according to the description of Reznikoff et al. The foci characterized by (i) high cell density, (ii) increased affinity to a basic dye, and (iii) piled-up structure, were taken as an indication of transformation. The frequency of transformation was 6.5 x 10 -4 for 300 R which was 4 times higher than the frequency found in the untreated control. It increased dose-dependently until 500 R and then levelled off. Another type of experiment using TR cells derived from a leukemia-prone trisomy 21 human embryo, revealed that a single 300 R exposure to x-ray induced clones showing higher plating efficiency and plateau density than unirradiated control after 200 days of post-irradiation cultivation. However, the clones isolated did not show any particular transformational properties in vitro and tumorigenic activity on inoculation into nude mice. (author)

  20. Enhanced excision repair activity in mammalian cells after ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bases, R.; Franklin, W.A.; Moy, T.; Mendez, F.

    1992-01-01

    Monkey CV-1 cells which had received 5 Gy 12 h before harvesting lysates from their cultures contained approximately three times as much DNA excision repair enzyme activity as unirradiated cells, determined in crude cell lysates by the release of intermediate mobility DNA fragments and fragments with 3'-phosphoryl ends from 5'- 32 P-end labelled irradiated 95 bp αDNA. Different 3'-termini endow fragments with differing mobilities, signifying steps in the processing of radiation damaged DNA. Similar results were obtained when Krebs II mouse tumour cells growing in mice as ascites received 5Gy 12 h before harvest. Enzyme activities from CV-1 cells and from Krebs II cells were partially purified as 60-70 kDa proteins on Superose 12 or Ultrogel AcA-54 columns. Divalent cations were not required for enzyme activity. A 23 nucleotide long defined duplex oligodeoxynucleotide substrate containing a single 8-oxodG residue was also very actively cleaved by partially purified cell enzymes. 8-oxoguanine is a major product of ionizing radiation's action on DNA and recognized by the enzymes described here. (author)

  1. Molecular basis of mammalian cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuko Yoshida

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Establishment of infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas' disease, depends on a series of events involving interactions of diverse parasite molecules with host components. Here we focus on the mechanisms of target cell invasion by metacyclic trypomastigotes (MT and mammalian tissue culture trypomastigotes (TCT. During MT or TCT internalization, signal transduction pathways are activated both in the parasite and the target cell, leading to Ca2+ mobilization. For cell adhesion, MT engage surface glycoproteins, such as gp82 and gp35/50, which are Ca2+ signal-inducing molecules. In T. cruzi isolates that enter host cells in gp82-mediated manner, parasite protein tyrosine kinase as well as phospholipase C are activated, and Ca2+ is released from I P3-sensitive stores, whereas in T. cruzi isolates that attach to target cells mainly through gp35/50, the signaling pathway involving adenylate cyclase appears to be stimulated, with Ca2+ release from acidocalciosomes. In addition, T. cruzi isolate-dependent inhibitory signals, mediated by MT-specific gp90, may be triggered both in the host cell and the parasite. The repertoire of TCT molecules implicated in cell invasion includes surface glycoproteins of gp85 family, with members containing binding sites for laminin and cytokeratin 18, enzymes such as cruzipain, trans-sialidase, and an oligopeptidase B that generates a Ca2+-agonist from a precursor molecule.O estabelecimento da infecção por Trypanosoma cruzi, o agente da doença de Chagas, depende de uma série de eventos envolvendo interações de diversas moléculas do parasita com componentes do hospedeiro. Focalizamos aqui os mecanismos de invasão celular por tripomastigotas metacíclicos (TM e por tripomastigotas de cultura de tecido (TCT. Durante a internalização de TM ou TCT, vias de transdução de sinal são ativadas tanto no parasita como na célula alvo, acarretando a mobilização de Ca2+. Para adesão, TM utiliza as glicoprote

  2. Length-Scale Mediated Differential Adhesion of Mammalian Cells and Microbes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Yi; Subbiahdoss, Guruprakash; Swartjes, Jan; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.; Libera, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Surfaces of implantable biomedical devices are increasingly engineered to promote their interactions with tissue. However, surfaces that stimulate desirable mammalian cell adhesion, spreading, and proliferation also enable microbial colonization. The biomaterials-associated infection that can result

  3. The protective effects of glycerine on mammalian cells in ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Huiyun; Yu Lixiang; Liu Xinghai; Wu Lijun

    2002-03-01

    The discovery of bio-effects induced by ion implantation has opened a novel branch in the field of radiation biology-the low energy heavy ion biology. The experimental samples in the field have, however, been within the limits of plants and microbes because of the sample's vacuum-resistant ability. The mutation studying of mammalian cells with ion implantation hasn't been reported in the past years. Main reason for that is that it is difficult to keep mammalian cells alive in vacuum during ion implantation. In the present study, the tolerance of mammalian cells in vacuum was enhanced efficiently by pre-treatment with glycerin at low concentration and proper treatment time, which provide a new way for the study on the biological effects of ion beam implantation in the mammalian cells

  4. The radiosensitivity of some trisomic variants of a diploid mammalian cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrass, N.C.

    1980-03-01

    The radiosensitivity of trisomic cells from a diploid BHK21 Cl3 cell line was investigated. The technique used confined measurement of most of the established criteria to a single set of direct observations on one population of cells, and the results from this method were compared with those obtained from some more conventional techniques. Trisomic cells were isolated after a chronic treatment of the diploid cells with low doses of colcemid, which increased the incidence of nondisjunction at anaphase. Over several cell cycles the incidence of trisomy in the population increased to the extent where standard cloning techniques yielded a tolerably high proportion of trisomic clones. The radiosensitivity of one of these clones was examined in detail and the results compared with those obtained by other workers. Other trisomic clones were also assayed for the incidence of chromosome aberrations, post irradiation colony-forming ability and tumourigenicity to identify any which display markedly individual characteristics. These results and their implications in the radiobiology of mammalian cells are discussed. (author)

  5. Algal autolysate medium to label proteins for NMR in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuccio, Carmelo; Luchinat, Enrico; Barbieri, Letizia [University of Florence, Magnetic Resonance Center (CERM) (Italy); Neri, Sara [Giotto Biotech S.R.L. (Italy); Fragai, Marco, E-mail: fragai@cerm.unifi.it [University of Florence, Magnetic Resonance Center (CERM) (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    In-cell NMR provides structural and functional information on proteins directly inside living cells. At present, the high costs of the labeled media for mammalian cells represent a limiting factor for the development of this methodology. Here we report a protocol to prepare a homemade growth medium from Spirulina platensis autolysate, suitable to express uniformly labeled proteins inside mammalian cells at a reduced cost-per-sample. The human proteins SOD1 and Mia40 were overexpressed in human cells grown in {sup 15}N-enriched S. platensis algal-derived medium, and high quality in-cell NMR spectra were obtained.

  6. An alternative pathway for signal flow from rod photoreceptors to ganglion cells in mammalian retina.

    OpenAIRE

    DeVries, S H; Baylor, D A

    1995-01-01

    Rod signals in the mammalian retina are thought to reach ganglion cells over the circuit rod-->rod depolarizing bipolar cell-->AII amacrine cell-->cone bipolar cells-->ganglion cells. A possible alternative pathway involves gap junctions linking the rods and cones, the circuit being rod-->cone-->cone bipolar cells-->ganglion cells. It is not clear whether this second pathway indeed relays rod signals to ganglion cells. We studied signal flow in the isolated rabbit retina with a multielectrode...

  7. Mechanisms of radiation-induced changes in mammalian cell properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkind, M.M.; Han, A.; Ben-Hur, E.; Hill, C.K.; Myers, C.; Suzuki, F.; Utsumi, H.; Liu, C.M.; Theriot, L.D.

    1981-01-01

    The primary focus of this research is to determine the presence or absence of repair processes relative to linear or so-called single-hit dose effects. Experimental techniques and protocols are developed to test if repair processes contribute to the linear components of the induction of cell killing, mutation, and transformation and, if the slopes of such linear components are dependent upon dose rate. Principal methods are those cell culture techniques for assessing survival, altered phenotype, and transformation. Chinese hamster cells incubated in medium containing 90% D 2 O are inhibited from repairing potentially lethal x-ray and neutron damage (fisson-spectrum neutrons). The sector of damage whose repair is affected by D 2 O medium partially overlaps with that affected by anisotonic buffer. As in the instance of anisotonic buffer, enhanced cell killing due to D 2 O medium does not prevent cells from repairing sublethal damage when incubation in normal medium is resumed. Usng lt of human risk associated with nuclearing collective dose commitment will result in more attention being paid to potential releases of radionuclides at relatively short times after disposal

  8. C60-SIMS imaging of nanoparticles within mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Anna N; Tian, Hua; Winograd, Nicholas

    2015-07-01

    To achieve successful drug delivery via nanoparticles the interactions between the nanoparticle and the chemistry of the surrounding biological environment is of central importance. A thorough understanding of these interactions is necessary in order to better elucidate information regarding drug pathways and mechanisms of action in treatment protocols. As such, it is important to identify the location of the nanoparticle, the state of its functionalization, as well as any changes in the cellular environment. The use of cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) using C60 (+) primary ions makes simultaneous acquisition of this information possible. Here, SIMS has been successfully used to chemically image gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) within a model, single cell system involving macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells. The macrophage-like properties of this cell line make it extremely well-suited for cell-uptake studies. Both AuNPs and two pharmaceutical compounds, amiodarone and elacridar, were successfully imaged within a cellular system using cluster SIMS. To verify that SIMS can also be used to detect functionalization and nanoparticles simultaneously, fluorophore-functionalized AuNPs were studied as a model system. The fluorescent characteristics of these functionalized nanoparticles enabled the visual confirmation of the presence and location of the particles within the cell.

  9. Multimodal sensory integration in single cerebellar granule cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Taro; Shimuta, Misa; Häusser, Michael

    2015-12-29

    The mammalian cerebellum is a highly multimodal structure, receiving inputs from multiple sensory modalities and integrating them during complex sensorimotor coordination tasks. Previously, using cell-type-specific anatomical projection mapping, it was shown that multimodal pathways converge onto individual cerebellar granule cells (Huang et al., 2013). Here we directly measure synaptic currents using in vivo patch-clamp recordings and confirm that a subset of single granule cells receive convergent functional multimodal (somatosensory, auditory, and visual) inputs via separate mossy fibers. Furthermore, we show that the integration of multimodal signals by granule cells can enhance action potential output. These recordings directly demonstrate functional convergence of multimodal signals onto single granule cells.

  10. Lesions in DNA of hypoxic mammalian cells irradiated in the presence of TAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skov, K A; Palcic, B; Skarsgard, L D

    1980-05-01

    TAN (triacetoneamine-N-oxyl) at a concentration of 10 mM gives a dose modifying factor (DMF) of 1.45 for the surviving fraction of gamma-irradiated hypoxic mammalian cells. Under the same conditions, however, TAN produces little or no enhancement of single strand breaks (SSB) in DNA (DMF congruent to 1). In this study, enhancement of the type of DNA lesions exposed by an extract of M. luteus is reported. The DMF for this type of damage (MLS) is 1.5. TAN is known to affect the size of DNA synthesized after irradiation, presumably by causing interruptions in synthesis at TAN-DNA adduct sites. The absolute number of M. luteus extract sensitive sites detected in this work corresponds to approximately on half of the number of sites of interrupted synthesis. In its sensitizing effect on DNA, the free radical TAN is different from the electron affinic drug, misonidazole.

  11. Heavy ion effects on mammalian cells: Inactivation measurements with different cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulf, H.; Kraft-Weyrather, W.; Miltenburger, H.G.; Kraft, G.

    1985-07-01

    In track segment experiments, the inactivation of different mammalian cells by heavy charged particles between helium and uranium in the energy range between 1 and 1000 MeV/u has been measured at the heavy ion accelerator Unilac, Darmstadt, the Tandem Van de Graaf, Heidelberg and the Bevalac, Berkeley. The inactivation cross sections calculated from the final slope of the dose effect curves are given as a function of the particle energy and the LET. (orig.)

  12. Differential effects of paromomycin on ribosomes of Leishmania mexicana and mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Marisa M; Malchiodi, Emilio L; Algranati, Israel D

    2011-01-01

    Paromomycin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic having low mammalian cell toxicity, is one of the drugs currently used in the chemotherapy of cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis. In order to understand the mode of action of this antibiotic at the molecular level, we have investigated the effects of paromomycin on protein synthesis in Leishmania and its mammalian hosts. We were able to demonstrate that in vivo protein synthesis in the promastigote stage of the parasite and its proliferation rate are markedly inhibited by paromomycin while being only slightly affected by other aminoglycoside antibiotics, such as streptomycin and neomycin B. Furthermore, both in vitro polypeptide synthesis induced by poly(U) as mRNA and accuracy of translation are significantly decreased by paromomycin in cell-free systems containing ribosomal particles of Leishmania promastigotes. Conversely, when ribosomes from mammalian cells are used instead of the protozoan particles, polyphenylalanine synthesis is only barely reduced by the antibiotic and the translation misreading remains almost unaltered. Surface plasmon resonance analysis of the interaction between paromomycin and protozoan or mammalian cell ribosomal RNAs shows a strong binding of antibiotic to the parasite ribosomal decoding site and practically no interaction with the mammalian cell counterpart. Our results indicating differential effects of paromomycin on the translation processes of the Leishmania parasite and its mammalian hosts can explain the therapeutic efficiency of this antibiotic as an antileishmaniasis agent.

  13. Microfluidics for single cell analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marie Pødenphant

    Isolation and manipulation of single cells have gained an increasing interest from researchers because of the heterogeneity of cells from the same cell culture. Single cell analysis can ensure a better understanding of differences between individual cells and potentially solve a variety of clinical...... problems. In this thesis lab on a chip systems for rare single cell analysis are investigated. The focus was to develop a commercial, disposable device for circulating tumour cell (CTC) analysis. Such a device must be able to separate rare cells from blood samples and subsequently capture the specific...... cells, and simultaneously be fabricated and operated at low costs and be user-friendly. These challenges were addressed through development of two microfluidic devices, one for rare cell isolation based on pinched flow fractionation (PFF) and one for single cell capture based on hydrodynamic trapping...

  14. Gold nanoparticles delivery in mammalian live cells: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Lévy

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Functional nanomaterials have recently attracted strong interest from the biology community, not only as potential drug delivery vehicles or diagnostic tools, but also as optical nanomaterials. This is illustrated by the explosion of publications in the field with more than 2,000 publications in the last 2 years (4,000 papers since 2000; from ISI Web of Knowledge, ‘nanoparticle and cell’ hit. Such a publication boom in this novel interdisciplinary field has resulted in papers of unequal standard, partly because it is challenging to assemble the required expertise in chemistry, physics, and biology in a single team. As an extreme example, several papers published in physical chemistry journals claim intracellular delivery of nanoparticles, but show pictures of cells that are, to the expert biologist, evidently dead (and therefore permeable. To attain proper cellular applications using nanomaterials, it is critical not only to achieve efficient delivery in healthy cells, but also to control the intracellular availability and the fate of the nanomaterial. This is still an open challenge that will only be met by innovative delivery methods combined with rigorous and quantitative characterization of the uptake and the fate of the nanoparticles. This review mainly focuses on gold nanoparticles and discusses the various approaches to nanoparticle delivery, including surface chemical modifications and several methods used to facilitate cellular uptake and endosomal escape. We will also review the main detection methods and how their optimum use can inform about intracellular localization, efficiency of delivery, and integrity of the surface capping. Raphaël Lévy is a BBSRC David Phillips Research Fellow at the University of Liverpool. He graduated in Physics at the University Louis Pasteur in Strasbourg (France. In 2002, after a Master in Soft Condensed Matter Physics, he obtained a PhD in Physics at the University Louis Pasteur. He then moved to

  15. Optimization of 13C isotopic tracers for metabolic flux analysis in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Jason L; Metallo, Christian M; Zhang, Jie; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2012-03-01

    Mammalian cells consume and metabolize various substrates from their surroundings for energy generation and biomass synthesis. Glucose and glutamine, in particular, are the primary carbon sources for proliferating cancer cells. While this combination of substrates generates static labeling patterns for use in (13)C metabolic flux analysis (MFA), the inability of single tracers to effectively label all pathways poses an obstacle for comprehensive flux determination within a given experiment. To address this issue we applied a genetic algorithm to optimize mixtures of (13)C-labeled glucose and glutamine for use in MFA. We identified tracer combinations that minimized confidence intervals in an experimentally determined flux network describing central carbon metabolism in tumor cells. Additional simulations were used to determine the robustness of the [1,2-(13)C(2)]glucose/[U-(13)C(5)]glutamine tracer combination with respect to perturbations in the network. Finally, we experimentally validated the improved performance of this tracer set relative to glucose tracers alone in a cancer cell line. This versatile method allows researchers to determine the optimal tracer combination to use for a specific metabolic network, and our findings applied to cancer cells significantly enhance the ability of MFA experiments to precisely quantify fluxes in higher organisms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. AMMONIA REMOVAL FROM MAMMALIAN CELL CULTURE MEDIUM BY ION-EXCHANGE MEMBRANES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolites such as ammonia and lactic acid formed during mammalian cell culture can frequently be toxic to the cells themselves beyond a threshold concentration of the metabolites. Cell culture conducted in the presence of such accumulated metabolites is therefore limited in pro...

  17. Droplet size influences division of mammalian cell factories in droplet microfluidic cultivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Periyannan Rajeswari, Prem Kumar; Joensson, Haakan N.; Svahn, Helene Andersson

    2017-01-01

    in droplets. Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells, the most widely used mammalian host cells for biopharmaceuticals production were encapsulated and cultivated in 33, 180 and 320 pL droplets for 3 days. Periodic monitoring of the droplets during incubation showed that the cell divisions in 33 pL droplets stopped...

  18. Processing of radiation-induced clustered DNA damage generates DSB in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulston, M.K.; De Lara, C.M.; Davis, E.L.; Jenner, T.J.; O'Neill, P.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Clustered DNA damage sites, in which two or more lesions are formed within a few helical turns of the DNA after passage of a single radiation track, are signatures of DNA modifications induced by ionizing radiation in mammalian cell. With 60 Co-radiation, the abundance of clustered DNA damage induced in CHO cells is ∼4x that of prompt double strand breaks (DSB) determined by PFGE. Less is known about the processing of non-DSB clustered DNA damage induced in cells. To optimize observation of any additional DSB formed during processing of DNA damage at 37 deg C, xrs-5 cells deficient in non-homologous end joining were used. Surprisingly, ∼30% of the DSB induced by irradiation at 37 deg C are rejoined within 4 minutes in both mutant and wild type cells. No significant mis-repair of these apparent DSB was observed. It is suggested that a class of non-DSB clustered DNA damage is formed which repair correctly within 4 min but, if 'trapped' prior to repair, are converted into DSB during the lysis procedure of PFGE. However at longer times, a proportion of non-DSB clustered DNA damage sites induced by γ-radiation are converted into DSB within ∼30 min following post-irradiation incubation at 37 deg C. The corresponding formation of additional DSB was not apparent in wild type CHO cells. From these observations, it is estimated that only ∼10% of the total yield of non DSB clustered DNA damage sites are converted into DSB through cellular processing. The biological consequences that the majority of non-DSB clustered DNA damage sites are not converted into DSBs may be significant even at low doses, since a finite chance exists of these clusters being formed in a cell by a single radiation track

  19. Nucleolar localization of influenza A NS1: striking differences between mammalian and avian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazel-Sanchez Beryl

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In mammalian cells, nucleolar localization of influenza A NS1 requires the presence of a C-terminal nucleolar localization signal. This nucleolar localization signal is present only in certain strains of influenza A viruses. Therefore, only certain NS1 accumulate in the nucleolus of mammalian cells. In contrast, we show that all NS1 tested in this study accumulated in the nucleolus of avian cells even in the absence of the above described C-terminal nucleolar localization signal. Thus, nucleolar localization of NS1 in avian cells appears to rely on a different nucleolar localization signal that is more conserved among influenza virus strains.

  20. Mammalian knock out cells reveal prominent roles for atlastin GTPases in ER network morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Guohua; Zhu, Peng-Peng; Renvoisé, Benoît; Maldonado-Báez, Lymarie; Park, Seong Hee; Blackstone, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Atlastins are large, membrane-bound GTPases that participate in the fusion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) tubules to generate the polygonal ER network in eukaryotes. They also regulate lipid droplet size and inhibit bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, though mechanisms remain unclear. Humans have three atlastins (ATL1, ATL2, and ATL3), and ATL1 and ATL3 are mutated in autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia and hereditary sensory neuropathies. Cellular investigations of atlastin orthologs in most yeast, plants, flies and worms are facilitated by the presence of a single or predominant isoform, but loss-of-function studies in mammalian cells are complicated by multiple, broadly-expressed paralogs. We have generated mouse NIH-3T3 cells lacking all three mammalian atlastins (Atl1/2/3) using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene knockout (KO). ER morphology is markedly disrupted in these triple KO cells, with prominent impairment in formation of three-way ER tubule junctions. This phenotype can be rescued by expression of distant orthologs from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sey1p) and Arabidopsis (ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE3) as well as any one of the three human atlastins. Minimal, if any, changes are observed in the morphology of mitochondria and the Golgi apparatus. Alterations in BMP signaling and increased sensitivity to ER stress are also noted, though effects appear more modest. Finally, atlastins appear required for the proper differentiation of NIH-3T3 cells into an adipocyte-like phenotype. These findings have important implications for the pathogenesis of hereditary spastic paraplegias and sensory neuropathies associated with atlastin mutations. - Highlights: • NIH-3T3 cells lacking all three atlastin paralogs were generated using CRISPR/Cas9. • Cells lacking all atlastin GTPases exhibit far fewer 3-way ER tubule junctions. • ER morphology defects in atlastin knockout cells are rescued by distant plant and yeast orthologs. • Atlastin knock out cells also

  1. Mammalian knock out cells reveal prominent roles for atlastin GTPases in ER network morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Guohua; Zhu, Peng-Peng; Renvoisé, Benoît; Maldonado-Báez, Lymarie; Park, Seong Hee; Blackstone, Craig, E-mail: blackstc@ninds.nih.gov

    2016-11-15

    Atlastins are large, membrane-bound GTPases that participate in the fusion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) tubules to generate the polygonal ER network in eukaryotes. They also regulate lipid droplet size and inhibit bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, though mechanisms remain unclear. Humans have three atlastins (ATL1, ATL2, and ATL3), and ATL1 and ATL3 are mutated in autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia and hereditary sensory neuropathies. Cellular investigations of atlastin orthologs in most yeast, plants, flies and worms are facilitated by the presence of a single or predominant isoform, but loss-of-function studies in mammalian cells are complicated by multiple, broadly-expressed paralogs. We have generated mouse NIH-3T3 cells lacking all three mammalian atlastins (Atl1/2/3) using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene knockout (KO). ER morphology is markedly disrupted in these triple KO cells, with prominent impairment in formation of three-way ER tubule junctions. This phenotype can be rescued by expression of distant orthologs from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sey1p) and Arabidopsis (ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE3) as well as any one of the three human atlastins. Minimal, if any, changes are observed in the morphology of mitochondria and the Golgi apparatus. Alterations in BMP signaling and increased sensitivity to ER stress are also noted, though effects appear more modest. Finally, atlastins appear required for the proper differentiation of NIH-3T3 cells into an adipocyte-like phenotype. These findings have important implications for the pathogenesis of hereditary spastic paraplegias and sensory neuropathies associated with atlastin mutations. - Highlights: • NIH-3T3 cells lacking all three atlastin paralogs were generated using CRISPR/Cas9. • Cells lacking all atlastin GTPases exhibit far fewer 3-way ER tubule junctions. • ER morphology defects in atlastin knockout cells are rescued by distant plant and yeast orthologs. • Atlastin knock out cells also

  2. The RNA binding protein RBPMS is a selective marker of ganglion cells in the mammalian retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Allen R.; de Sevilla Müller, Luis Pérez; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    There are few neurochemical markers that reliably identify retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which are a heterogeneous population of cells that integrate and transmit the visual signal from the retina to the central visual nuclei. We have developed and characterized a new set of affinity purified guinea pig and rabbit antibodies against RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (RBPMS). On Western blots these antibodies recognize a single band at ~24 kDa, corresponding to RBPMS, and they strongly label RGC and displaced RGC (dRGC) somata in mouse, rat, guinea pig, rabbit and monkey retina. RBPMS immunoreactive cells and RGCs identified by other techniques have a similar range of somal diameters and areas. The density of RBPMS cells in mouse and rat retina is comparable to earlier semi-quantitative estimates of RGCs. RBPMS is mainly expressed in medium and large DAPI-, DRAQ5-, NeuroTrace- and NeuN-stained cells in the ganglion cell layer (GCL), and RBPMS is not expressed in syntaxin (HPC-1) immunoreactive cells in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and GCL, consistent with their identity as RGCs, and not displaced amacrine cells. In mouse and rat retina, most RBPMS cells are lost following optic nerve crush or transection at three weeks, and all Brn3a, SMI-32 and melanopsin immunoreactive RGCs also express RBPMS immunoreactivity. RBPMS immunoreactivity is localized to CFP-fluorescent RGCs in the B6.Cg-Tg(Thy1-CFP)23Jrs/J mouse line. These findings show that antibodies against RBPMS are robust reagents that exclusively identify RGCs and dRGCs in multiple mammalian species, and they will be especially useful for quantification of RGCs. PMID:24318667

  3. Internalisation of engineered nanoparticles into mammalian cells in vitro: influence of cell type and particle properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, Wibke; Bastian, Susanne; Trahorsch, Ulrike; Iwe, Maria; Kühnel, Dana; Meißner, Tobias; Springer, Armin; Gelinsky, Michael; Richter, Volkmar; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Potthoff, Annegret; Lehmann, Irina; Schirmer, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    Cellular internalisation of industrial engineered nanoparticles is undesired and a reason for concern. Here we investigated and compared the ability of seven different mammalian cell cultures in vitro to incorporate six kinds of engineered nanoparticles, focussing on the role of cell type and particle properties in particle uptake. Uptake was examined using light and electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) for particle element identification. Flow cytometry was applied for semi-quantitative analyses of particle uptake and for exploring the influence on uptake by the phagocytosis inhibitor Cytochalasin D (CytoD). All particles studied were found to enter each kind of cultured cells. Yet, particles were never found within cell nuclei. The presence of the respective particles within the cells was confirmed by EDX. Live-cell imaging revealed the time-dependent process of internalisation of technical nanoparticles, which was exemplified by tungsten carbide particle uptake into the human skin cells, HaCaT. Particles were found to co-localise with lysosomal structures within the cells. The incorporated nanoparticles changed the cellular granularity, as measured by flow cytometry, already after 3 h of exposure in a particle specific manner. By correlating particle properties with flow cytometry data, only the primary particle size was found to be a weakly influential property for particle uptake. CytoD, an inhibitor of actin filaments and therewith of phagocytosis, significantly inhibited the internalisation of particle uptake in only two of the seven investigated cell cultures. Our study, therefore, supports the notion that nanoparticles can enter mammalian cells quickly and easily, irrespective of the phagocytic ability of the cells.

  4. Factors affecting the spontaneous mutational spectra in somatic mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.А. Ковальова

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available  In our survey of references we are discussed the influence of factors biological origin on the spontaneous mutation specters in mammalian. Seasonal and age components influence on the frequence of cytogenetic anomalies. The immune and endocrinous systems are take part in control of the alteration of the spontaneous mutation specters. Genetical difference of sensibility in animal and human at the alteration of factors enviroment as and  genetical differences of repair systems activity are may influence on individual variation of spontaneous destabilization characters of chromosomal apparatus.

  5. Inositol Hexakisphosphate Kinase 1 (IP6K1) Regulates Inositol Synthesis in Mammalian Cells*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenxi; Ye, Cunqi; Greenberg, Miriam L.

    2016-01-01

    myo-Inositol, the precursor of all inositol compounds, has pivotal roles in cell metabolism and signaling pathways. Although physiological studies indicate a strong correlation between abnormal intracellular inositol levels and neurological disorders, very little is known about the regulation of inositol synthesis in mammalian cells. In this study, we report that IP6K1, an inositol hexakisphosphate kinase that catalyzes the synthesis of inositol pyrophosphate, regulates inositol synthesis in mammalian cells. Ip6k1 ablation led to profound changes in DNA methylation and expression of Isyna1 (designated mIno1), which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme inositol-3-phosphate synthase. Interestingly, IP6K1 preferentially bound to the phospholipid phosphatidic acid, and this binding was required for IP6K1 nuclear localization and the regulation of mIno1 transcription. This is the first demonstration of IP6K1 as a novel negative regulator of inositol synthesis in mammalian cells. PMID:26953345

  6. Serum-Free Cryopreservation of Five Mammalian Cell Lines in Either a Pelleted or Suspended State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corsini Joe

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein we have explored two practical aspects of cryopreserving cultured mammalian cells during routine laboratory maintenance. First, we have examined the possibility of using a serum-free, hence more affordable, cryopreservative. Using five mammalian lines (Crandell Feline Kidney, MCF7, A72, WI 38 and NB324K, we found that the serum-free alternative preserves nearly as efficiently as the serum-containing preservatives. Second, we compared cryostorage of those cells in suspended versus a pellet form using both aforementioned cryopreservatives. Under our conditions, cells were in general recovered equally well in a suspended versus a pellet form.

  7. Assaying Break and Nick-Induced Homologous Recombination in Mammalian Cells Using the DR-GFP Reporter and Cas9 Nucleases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriend, Lianne E. M.; Jasin, Maria; Krawczyk, Przemek M.

    2014-01-01

    Thousands of DNA breaks occur daily in mammalian cells, including potentially tumorigenic double-strand breaks (DSBs) and less dangerous but vastly more abundant single-strand breaks (SSBs). The majority of SSBs are quickly repaired, but some can be converted to DSBs, posing a threat to the

  8. Fusion of SpCas9 to E. coli Rec A protein enhances CRISPR-Cas9 mediated gene knockout in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Petersen, Trine Skov; Jensen, Kristopher Torp; Bolund, Lars; Kühn, Ralf; Luo, Yonglun

    2017-04-10

    Mammalian cells repair double-strand DNA breaks (DSB) by a range of different pathways following DSB induction by the engineered clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein Cas9. While CRISPR-Cas9 thus enables predesigned modifications of the genome, applications of CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome-editing are frequently hampered by the unpredictable and varying pathways for DSB repair in mammalian cells. Here we present a strategy of fusing Cas9 to recombinant proteins for fine-tuning of the DSB repair preferences in mammalian cells. By fusing Streptococcus Pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) to the recombinant protein A (Rec A, NP_417179.1) from Escherichia coli, we create a recombinant Cas9 protein (rSpCas9) which enhances the generation of indel mutations at DSB sites in mammalian cells, increases the frequency of DSB repair by homology-directed single-strand annealing (SSA), and represses homology-directed gene conversion by approximately 33%. Our study thus proves for the first time that fusing SpCas9 to recombinant proteins can influence the balance between DSB repair pathways in mammalian cells. This approach may form the basis for further investigations of the applications of recombinant Cas9 proteins to fine-tuning DSB repair pathways in eukaryotic cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A synthetic mammalian network to compute population borders based on engineered reciprocal cell-cell communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolar, Katja; Wischhusen, Hanna M; Müller, Konrad; Karlsson, Maria; Weber, Wilfried; Zurbriggen, Matias D

    2015-12-30

    Multicellular organisms depend on the exchange of information between specialized cells. This communication is often difficult to decipher in its native context, but synthetic biology provides tools to engineer well-defined systems that allow the convenient study and manipulation of intercellular communication networks. Here, we present the first mammalian synthetic network for reciprocal cell-cell communication to compute the border between a sender/receiver and a processing cell population. The two populations communicate via L-tryptophan and interleukin-4 to highlight the population border by the production of a fluorescent protein. The sharpness of that visualized edge can be adjusted by modulating key parameters of the network. We anticipate that this network will on the one hand be a useful tool to gain deeper insights into the mechanisms of tissue formation in nature and will on the other hand contribute to our ability to engineer artificial tissues.

  10. Wnt/β-catenin signaling in adult mammalian epithelial stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kretzschmar, Kai; Clevers, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Adult stem cells self-renew and replenish differentiated cells in various organs and tissues throughout a mammal's life. Over the last 25 years an ever-growing body of knowledge has unraveled the essential regulation of adult mammalian epithelia by the canonical Wnt signaling with its key

  11. Uniform stable-isotope labeling in mammalian cells: formulation of a cost-effective culture medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egorova-Zachernyuk, T.A.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Grip, W.J. de

    2011-01-01

    Uniform stable-isotope labeling of mammalian cells is achieved via a novel formulation of a serum-free cell culture medium that is based on stable-isotope-labeled autolysates and lipid extracts of various microbiological origin. Yeast autolysates allow complete replacement of individual amino acids

  12. Product quality considerations for mammalian cell culture process development and manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramer, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The manufacturing of a biologic drug from mammalian cells results in not a single substance, but an array of product isoforms, also known as variants. These isoforms arise due to intracellular or extracellular events as a result of biological or chemical modification. The most common examples related to biomanufacturing include amino acid modifications (glycosylation, isomerization, oxidation, adduct formation, pyroglutamate formation, phosphorylation, sulfation, amidation), amino acid sequence variants (genetic mutations, amino acid misincorporation, N- and C-terminal heterogeneity, clipping), and higher-order structure modifications (misfolding, aggregation, disulfide pairing). Process-related impurities (HCP, DNA, media components, viral particles) are also important quality attributes related to product safety. The observed ranges associated with each quality attribute define the product quality profile. A biologic drug must have a correct and consistent quality profile throughout clinical development and scale-up to commercial production to ensure product safety and efficacy. In general, the upstream process (cell culture) defines the quality of product-related substances, whereas the downstream process (purification) defines the residual level of process- and product-related impurities. The purpose of this chapter is to review the impact of the cell culture process on product quality. Emphasis is placed on studies with industrial significance and where the direct mechanism of product quality impact was determined. Where possible, recommendations for maintaining consistent or improved quality are provided.

  13. The use of a cloned bacterial gene to study mutation in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thacker, J.; Debenham, P.G.; Stretch, A.; Webb, M.B.T.

    1983-01-01

    The recombinant DNA molecule pSV2-gpt, which contains the bacterial gene coding for xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (XGPRT) activity, was introduced into a hamster cell line lacking the equivalent mammalian enzyme (HGPRT). Hamster cell sublines were found with stable expression of XGPRT activity and were used to study mutation of the integrated pSV2-gpt DNA sequence. Mutants were selected by their resistance to 6-thioguanine (TG) under optimal conditions which were found to be very similar to those for selection of HGPRT-deficient mutants of mammalian cells. The frequency of XGPRT-deficient mutants was increased by treatment with X-rays, ethyl methanesulphonate and ethyl nitrosourea. X-Ray induction of mutants increased approximately linearly with dose up to about 500 rad, but the frequency of mutants per rad was very much higher than that usually found for 'native' mammalian genes. (orig./AJ)

  14. A DNA vector-based RNAi technology to suppress gene expression in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Guangchao; Soohoo, Christina; Affar, El Bachir; Gay, Frédérique; Shi, Yujiang; Forrester, William C; Shi, Yang

    2002-04-16

    Double-stranded RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) has recently emerged as a powerful reverse genetic tool to silence gene expression in multiple organisms including plants, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Drosophila. The discovery that synthetic double-stranded, 21-nt small interfering RNA triggers gene-specific silencing in mammalian cells has further expanded the utility of RNAi into mammalian systems. Here we report a technology that allows synthesis of small interfering RNAs from DNA templates in vivo to efficiently inhibit endogenous gene expression. Significantly, we were able to use this approach to demonstrate, in multiple cell lines, robust inhibition of several endogenous genes of diverse functions. These findings highlight the general utility of this DNA vector-based RNAi technology in suppressing gene expression in mammalian cells.

  15. Radiation equivalence of genotoxic chemicals - Validation in cultered mammalian cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, M.S.S.

    1982-01-01

    Published data on mutations induced by ionizing radiation and 6 monofunctional alkylating agents, namely EMS, MMS, ENNG, MNNG, ENU and MNU, in different cell lines (Chinese hamster ovary, Chinese hamster lung V79, mouse lymphoma L5178 and human cells) were analysed so that radiation-equivalent chemical (REC) values could be calculated. REC values thus obtained for a given alkylating agent with different cell lines fall within a narrow range suggesting its validation in cultured mammalian cell systems including human. (orig.)

  16. Analysis of single biological cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watt, Frank

    2002-01-01

    The extraction of elemental information from single cultured cells using nuclear microscopy is an area of great potential because it can provide both quantitative information on the uptake of elements by the cell, and also its elemental response to a wide variety of external stimuli. A recent technique based on nuclear physics technology enables the analysis of single cells down to the parts per million level to be achieved

  17. Single Cell Isolation and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Hu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence shows that the heterogeneity of individual cells within a genetically identical population can be critical to their peculiar function and fate. Conventional cell based assays mainly analysis the average responses from a population cells, while the difference within individual cells may often be masked. The cell size, RNA transcripts and protein expression level are quite different within individual cells and these variations are key point to answer the problems in cancer, neurobiology, stem cell biology, immunology and developmental biology. To better understand the cell-to-cell variations, the single cell analysis can provide much more detailed information which may be helpful for therapeutic decisions in an increasingly personalized medicine. In this review, we will focus on the recent development in single cell analysis, including methods used in single cell isolation, analysis and some application examples. The review provides the historical background to single cell analysis, discusses limitations, and current and future possibilities in this exciting field of research.

  18. Differential effect of procaine on irradiated mammalian cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djordjevic, B.

    1979-01-01

    HeLa and V-79 Chinese hamster cells temporarily stored in ampoules were treated with the local anesthetic procaine. Postirradiation treatment increased lethality in HeLa cells depending on drug concentration, duration of treatment, and cell density, as measured by colony-forming ability upon plating. If present during irradiation only, procaine protected from irradiation. In V-79 cells, procaine potentiated radiation lethality only in freshly trypsinized cells. Procaine effect was thus cell type specific and most likely involved the cell membrane

  19. Single cell electroporation on chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valero, Ana

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis the results of the development of microfluidic cell trap devices for single cell electroporation are described, which are to be used for gene transfection. The performance of two types of Lab-on-a-Chip trapping devices was tested using beads and cells, whereas the functionality for

  20. Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii is a novel suppressor of heat shock response in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Keiichi; Yamagishi, Nobuyuki; Saito, Youhei; Takasaki, Midori; Konoshima, Takao; Hatayama, Takumi

    2006-01-01

    Because heat shock proteins (Hsps) are involved in protecting cells and in the pathophysiology of diseases such as inflammation, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders, the use of regulators of the expression of Hsps in mammalian cells seems to be useful as a potential therapeutic modality. To identify compounds that modulate the response to heat shock, we analyzed several natural products using a mammalian cell line containing an hsp promoter-regulated reporter gene. In this study, we found that an extract from Fructus Arctii markedly suppressed the expression of Hsp induced by heat shock. A component of the extract arctigenin, but not the component arctiin, suppressed the response at the level of the activation of heat shock transcription factor, the induction of mRNA, and the synthesis and accumulation of Hsp. Furthermore, arctigenin inhibited the acquisition of thermotolerance in mammalian cells, including cancer cells. Thus, arctigenin seemed to be a new suppressive regulator of heat shock response in mammalian cells, and may be useful for hyperthermia cancer therapy. PMID:16817321

  1. DNA-reactive protein monoepoxides induce cell death and mutagenesis in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakova, Natalia Y; Michaelson-Richie, Erin D; Gherezghiher, Teshome B; Kurtz, Jamie; Ming, Xun; Wickramaratne, Susith; Campion, Melissa; Kanugula, Sreenivas; Pegg, Anthony E; Campbell, Colin

    2013-05-07

    Although cytotoxic alkylating agents possessing two electrophilic reactive groups are thought to act by cross-linking cellular biomolecules, their exact mechanisms of action have not been established. In cells, these compounds form a mixture of DNA lesions, including nucleobase monoadducts, interstrand and intrastrand cross-links, and DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs). Interstrand DNA-DNA cross-links block replication and transcription by preventing DNA strand separation, contributing to toxicity and mutagenesis. In contrast, potential contributions of drug-induced DPCs are poorly understood. To gain insight into the biological consequences of DPC formation, we generated DNA-reactive protein reagents and examined their toxicity and mutagenesis in mammalian cells. Recombinant human O(6)-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) protein or its variants (C145A and K125L) were treated with 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane to yield proteins containing 2-hydroxy-3,4-epoxybutyl groups on cysteine residues. Gel shift and mass spectrometry experiments confirmed that epoxide-functionalized AGT proteins formed covalent DPC but no other types of nucleobase damage when incubated with duplex DNA. Introduction of purified AGT monoepoxides into mammalian cells via electroporation generated AGT-DNA cross-links and induced cell death and mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene. Smaller numbers of DPC lesions and reduced levels of cell death were observed when using protein monoepoxides generated from an AGT variant that fails to accumulate in the cell nucleus (K125L), suggesting that nuclear DNA damage is required for toxicity. Taken together, these results indicate that AGT protein monoepoxides produce cytotoxic and mutagenic DPC lesions within chromosomal DNA. More generally, these data suggest that covalent DPC lesions contribute to the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of bis-electrophiles.

  2. Whole-cell Escherichia coli lactate biosensor for monitoring mammalian cell cultures during biopharmaceutical production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goers, Lisa; Ainsworth, Catherine; Goey, Cher Hui; Kontoravdi, Cleo; Freemont, Paul S; Polizzi, Karen M

    2017-06-01

    Many high-value added recombinant proteins, such as therapeutic glycoproteins, are produced using mammalian cell cultures. In order to optimize the productivity of these cultures it is important to monitor cellular metabolism, for example the utilization of nutrients and the accumulation of metabolic waste products. One metabolic waste product of interest is lactic acid (lactate), overaccumulation of which can decrease cellular growth and protein production. Current methods for the detection of lactate are limited in terms of cost, sensitivity, and robustness. Therefore, we developed a whole-cell Escherichia coli lactate biosensor based on the lldPRD operon and successfully used it to monitor lactate concentration in mammalian cell cultures. Using real samples and analytical validation we demonstrate that our biosensor can be used for absolute quantification of metabolites in complex samples with high accuracy, sensitivity, and robustness. Importantly, our whole-cell biosensor was able to detect lactate at concentrations more than two orders of magnitude lower than the industry standard method, making it useful for monitoring lactate concentrations in early phase culture. Given the importance of lactate in a variety of both industrial and clinical contexts we anticipate that our whole-cell biosensor can be used to address a range of interesting biological questions. It also serves as a blueprint for how to capitalize on the wealth of genetic operons for metabolite sensing available in nature for the development of other whole-cell biosensors. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1290-1300. © 2017 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A validated system for ligation-free USER™ -based assembly of expression vectors for mammalian cell engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anne Mathilde; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Hansen, Bjarne Gram

    The development in the field of mammalian cell factories require fast and high-throughput methods, this means a high need for simpler and more efficient cloning techniques. For optimization of protein expression by genetic engineering and for allowing metabolic engineering in mammalian cells, a n...... versatile expression vector system was developed. This vector system applies the ligation-free uracilexcision cloning technique to construct mammalian expression vectors of multiple parts and with maximum flexibility....

  4. Comparison of mammalian and fish cell line cytotoxicity: impact of endpoint and exposure duration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guelden, Michael; Moerchel, Sabine; Seibert, Hasso

    2005-01-01

    Comparisons of acute toxic concentrations of chemicals to fish in vivo and cytotoxic concentrations to fish cell lines in vitro reveal rather good correlations of the toxic potencies in vitro and in vivo, but a clearly lower sensitivity of the fish cells. To examine whether the low sensitivity is specific for fish cells, cytotoxic potencies of reference chemicals from the Multicenter Evaluation of In Vitro Cytotoxicity program (MEIC) reported for the fish cell lines R1 and RTG-2 were compared with those obtained with the mouse Balb/c 3T3 cell line. Cytotoxic potencies (EC 50 values) for MEIC reference chemicals were determined with exponentially growing Balb/c 3T3 cells using three different test protocols. To assess both endpoints, cell proliferation and cell survival, EC 50 values were measured for the decrease in final cell protein after 24 and 72 h of exposure and for the reduction of cell protein increase during 24 h of exposure. EC 50 values obtained with the fish cell lines R1 and RTG-2 using cell survival as endpoint were taken from the MEIC data base. The comparison of cytotoxic potencies shows that, in general, the fish cell lines and the mammalian cell line are almost equally sensitive towards the cytotoxic action of chemicals. The mammalian cell line assay, however, becomes considerably more sensitive, by factors of 3.4-8.5, than the fish cell line assays, if cell growth instead of cell survival is used as endpoint. It is concluded, that cell proliferation might be a better endpoint than cell survival and that mammalian cell lines might be suited to assess fish acute toxicity

  5. High-throughput screens in mammalian cells using the CRISPR-Cas9 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jingyu; Zhou, Yuexin; Zhu, Shiyou; Wei, Wensheng

    2015-06-01

    As a powerful genome-editing tool, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system has been quickly developed into a large-scale function-based screening strategy in mammalian cells. This new type of genetic library is constructed through the lentiviral delivery of single-guide RNA collections that direct Cas9 or inactive dead Cas9 fused with effectors to interrogate gene function or regulate gene transcription in targeted cells. Compared with RNA interference screening, the CRISPR-Cas9 system demonstrates much higher levels of effectiveness and reliability with respect to both loss-of-function and gain-of-function screening. Unlike the RNA interference strategy, a CRISPR-Cas9 library can target both protein-coding sequences and regulatory elements, including promoters, enhancers and elements transcribing microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs. This powerful genetic tool will undoubtedly accelerate the mechanistic discovery of various biological processes. In this mini review, we summarize the general procedure of CRISPR-Cas9 library mediated functional screening, system optimization strategies and applications of this new genetic toolkit. © 2015 FEBS.

  6. Single-cell western blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadri, Syed M S

    2015-01-01

    Cell heterogeneity is a variation in cellular processes in functionally similar cells. Cells from the same tissue which are considered genetically identical may have difference in size, structure, and level of protein expression which can lead to major impact on the functions of cell leading to difference in physiological consequences. Single-cell proteome-wide studies are used to detect cell heterogeneity. Flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry do play an important role in evaluating cell heterogeneity. However, these methods are based on separation by antibodies with limited specificity. Cross-reactivity can occur leading to bias in result. Western blot is done to separate the proteins according to molecular weight. Therefore, off-target and on-target signals can be discriminated. Detection of protein expression from a tissue can be done with the help of western blot. However, it is unable to differentiate protein expression of individual cells. For detection of this cell-to-cell variation, a highly advanced technique termed "single-cell western blotting" is carried out. Single-cell western blot has enabled us to detect protein expression at cellular level at a fairly advanced high resolution using a western blot designed to assess cell heterogeneity.

  7. Measuring single-cell density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, William H; Bryan, Andrea K; Diez-Silva, Monica; Suresh, Subra; Higgins, John M; Manalis, Scott R

    2011-07-05

    We have used a microfluidic mass sensor to measure the density of single living cells. By weighing each cell in two fluids of different densities, our technique measures the single-cell mass, volume, and density of approximately 500 cells per hour with a density precision of 0.001 g mL(-1). We observe that the intrinsic cell-to-cell variation in density is nearly 100-fold smaller than the mass or volume variation. As a result, we can measure changes in cell density indicative of cellular processes that would be otherwise undetectable by mass or volume measurements. Here, we demonstrate this with four examples: identifying Plasmodium falciparum malaria-infected erythrocytes in a culture, distinguishing transfused blood cells from a patient's own blood, identifying irreversibly sickled cells in a sickle cell patient, and identifying leukemia cells in the early stages of responding to a drug treatment. These demonstrations suggest that the ability to measure single-cell density will provide valuable insights into cell state for a wide range of biological processes.

  8. Bystander effects on mammalian cells induced by carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jufang; Zhao Jing; Ma Qiufeng; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Li Weijian; Zhou Guangming; Dang Bingrong; Mao Limin; Feng Yan

    2004-01-01

    Bystander effects on unirradiated V79 cells were observed by irradiated conditioned medium (ICM) method and co-cultured with carbon-ion-irradiated V79 cells. The results showed that the colony formation efficiency of unirradiated cells is obviously decreased by ICM. After co-culture with carbon-ion-irradiated cells for some time, the colony formation efficiency of co-cultured cells was lower than expected results assuming no bystander effects. The micronucleus frequency and hprt gene mutation rate was almost the same as expected results. Cytotoxic factor(s), which was effective for cell growth but not for micronucleus and mutation on unirradiated cells, might be released by irradiated cells. (authors)

  9. Laser flow microphotometry for rapid analysis and sorting of mammalian cells. [X and gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullaney, P.F.; Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.; Cram, L.S.; Crowell, J.M.; Salzman, G.C.; Martin, J.C.; Price, B.

    1976-01-01

    Quantitative precision measurements can be made of the optical properties of individual mammalian cells using flow microphotometry. Suspended cells pass through a special flow chamber where they are lined up for exposure to blue light from an argon-ion laser. As each cell crosses the laser beam, it produces one or more optical pulses of a duration equal to cell transit time across the beam. These pulses are detected, amplified, and analyzed using the techniques of gamma ray spectroscopy. Quantitative DNA distributions made it possible to distinguish tumor cells from normal cells as well as to assay for radiation effects on tumor cells subjected to x and gamma radiation. (HLW)

  10. Acyl-CoA binding protein is an essential protein in mammalian cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jens; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2002-01-01

    In the present work, small interference RNA was used to knock-down acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) in HeLa, HepG2 and Chang cells. Transfection with ACBP-specific siRNA stopped growth, detached cells from the growth surface and blocked thymidine and acetate incorporation. The results show...... that depletion of ACBP in mammalian cells results in lethality, suggesting that ACBP is an essential protein....

  11. Immune Regulation and Evasion of Mammalian Host Cell Immunity During Viral Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Pratheek, B. M.; Saha, Soham; Maiti, Prasanta K.; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian host immune system has wide array of defence mechanisms against viral infections. Depending on host immunity and the extent of viral persistence, either the host immune cells might clear/restrict the viral load and disease progression or the virus might evade host immunity by down regulating host immune effector response(s). Viral antigen processing and presentation in the host cells through major histocompatibility complex (MHC) elicit subsequent anti-viral effector T cell resp...

  12. Best practices for media selection for mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Paul J

    2017-09-01

    Cell culture medium is a complex mixture of nutrients and growth factors that, along with the physical environment, can either help or destroy your experiment or production run. Nutritional requirements differ with different cell types and functions, as do optimal pH and osmolality. As cell growth proceeds, different cells will utilize amino acids and other components at different rates. By controlling for ammonia, free radicals, heavy metal toxicity, pH shifts, fluctuations in osmolality, nutrient depletion, and chemical and biological contaminants, you will optimize the chances of success. The contribution of each component of the medium is essential for the maintenance of the cell type of interest. While some cell types, such as established human cancer cell lines, may be quite able to tolerate a range of media and supplements, many normal cells and stems cells are not. Optimization of each component may be required to successfully maintain the latter cell types. The procedures for selecting and optimizing cell culture media and supplements are presented.

  13. Dynamic photochemical lipid micropatterning for manipulation of nonadherent mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamahira, Shinya; Takasaki, Yumi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Sumaru, Kimio; Kanamori, Toshiyuki; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2014-01-01

    Cell micropatterning methods with stimuli-responsive dynamic surfaces are getting a lot of attention in a wide variety of research fields, ranging from cell engineering to fundamental studies in cell biology. The surface of a slide coated with photo-cleavable poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-lipid can be used to spatiotemporally control cell immobilization and release by light irradiation. On the basis of this surface, it is easy to design simple methods for making a fine micropattern of any kind of cell. Furthermore, target cells can be selectively and rapidly released from this surface by light irradiation. In this review, we first describe how to obtain the photo-cleavable PEG-lipid from commercially available compounds through a facile four-step synthesis. Next, as a cell-patterning method, the protocols of coating substrates with the PEG-lipid, irradiating a pattern of light onto the coated substrate, and loading cells onto the irradiated surface are described. These protocols require no expensive equipment and potentially apply to any substrates that can adsorb serum albumin or chemically expose amine moieties on their surfaces. Finally, as an advanced method, cell release from the PEG-lipid surface in microfluidic devices is introduced. We also discuss the advantages and the possible applications of the present dynamic cell-patterning method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. YAP/TAZ enhance mammalian embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in a Tead-dependent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Dasol; Byun, Sung-Hyun; Park, Soojeong; Kim, Juwan; Kim, Inhee; Ha, Soobong; Kwon, Mookwang; Yoon, Keejung, E-mail: keejung@skku.edu

    2015-02-27

    Mammalian brain development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways controlling cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Here we show that YAP/TAZ enhance embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in a cell autonomous fashion using diverse experimental approaches. Introduction of retroviral vectors expressing YAP or TAZ into the mouse embryonic brain induced cell localization in the ventricular zone (VZ), which is the embryonic neural stem cell niche. This change in cell distribution in the cortical layer is due to the increased stemness of infected cells; YAP-expressing cells were colabeled with Sox2, a neural stem cell marker, and YAP/TAZ increased the frequency and size of neurospheres, indicating enhanced self-renewal- and proliferative ability of neural stem cells. These effects appear to be TEA domain family transcription factor (Tead)–dependent; a Tead binding-defective YAP mutant lost the ability to promote neural stem cell characteristics. Consistently, in utero gene transfer of a constitutively active form of Tead2 (Tead2-VP16) recapitulated all the features of YAP/TAZ overexpression, and dominant negative Tead2-EnR resulted in marked cell exit from the VZ toward outer cortical layers. Taken together, these results indicate that the Tead-dependent YAP/TAZ signaling pathway plays important roles in neural stem cell maintenance by enhancing stemness of neural stem cells during mammalian brain development. - Highlights: • Roles of YAP and Tead in vivo during mammalian brain development are clarified. • Expression of YAP promotes embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in vivo in a cell autonomous fashion. • Enhancement of neural stem cell characteristics by YAP depends on Tead. • Transcriptionally active form of Tead alone can recapitulate the effects of YAP. • Transcriptionally repressive form of Tead severely reduces stem cell characteristics.

  15. Overexpression of the cochaperone CHIP enhances Hsp70-dependent folding activity in mammalian cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampinga, HH; Kanon, B; Salomons, FA; Kabakov, AE; Patterson, C

    CHIP is a cochaperone of Hsp70 that inhibits Hsp70-dependent refolding in vitro. However, the effect of altered expression of CHIP on the fate of unfolded proteins in mammalian cells has not been determined. Surprisingly, we found that overexpression of CHIP in fibroblasts increased the refolding of

  16. Autonomous bioluminescent expression of the bacterial luciferase gene cassette (lux in a mammalian cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan M Close

    Full Text Available The bacterial luciferase (lux gene cassette consists of five genes (luxCDABE whose protein products synergistically generate bioluminescent light signals exclusive of supplementary substrate additions or exogenous manipulations. Historically expressible only in prokaryotes, the lux operon was re-synthesized through a process of multi-bicistronic, codon-optimization to demonstrate for the first time self-directed bioluminescence emission in a mammalian HEK293 cell line in vitro and in vivo.Autonomous in vitro light production was shown to be 12-fold greater than the observable background associated with untransfected control cells. The availability of reduced riboflavin phosphate (FMNH(2 was identified as the limiting bioluminescence substrate in the mammalian cell environment even after the addition of a constitutively expressed flavin reductase gene (frp from Vibrio harveyi. FMNH(2 supplementation led to a 151-fold increase in bioluminescence in cells expressing mammalian codon-optimized luxCDE and frp genes. When injected subcutaneously into nude mice, in vivo optical imaging permitted near instantaneous light detection that persisted independently for the 60 min length of the assay with negligible background.The speed, longevity, and self-sufficiency of lux expression in the mammalian cellular environment provides a viable and powerful alternative for real-time target visualization not currently offered by existing bioluminescent and fluorescent imaging technologies.

  17. Low levels of aflatoxin B1, ricin and milk enhance recombinant protein production in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changing the optimal tissue culture medium by adding low levels of environmental stress such as 1 µM of the fungal toxin aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), 1 ng of the castor bean protein toxin ricin in transduced mammalian cells or 1% reconstituted milk enhances transcription and increases production of the foll...

  18. Dual-function vector for protein expression in both mammalian cells and Xenopus laevis oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Thomas; Grunnet, M; Angelo, K

    2002-01-01

    -function vector capable of supporting protein production in both Xenopus oocytes and CHO-K1 cells at an expression level equivalent to the levels obtained with vectors optimized for either oocyte or mammalian expression. Our functional studies have been performed with hERGI, KCNQ4, and Kv1.3 potassium channels....

  19. RNAi screening for characterisation of ER-associated degradation pathways in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Månsson, Mats David Joakim

    fluorescence-based RNAi screens in mammalian cells on TCR-α-GFP and HANSκLC, for identification of ERAD pathways. By validating the obtained screening hits we concluded that UBE2J2 is involved in TCR-α-GFP degradation, possibly by ubiquitination of C-terminal serine residues in TCR-α-GFP. Additionally, we also...

  20. Influence of ornithine decarboxylase antizymes and antizyme inhibitors on agmatine uptake by mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos-Molina, Bruno; López-Contreras, Andrés J; Lambertos, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Agmatine (4-aminobutylguanidine), a dicationic molecule at physiological pH, exerts relevant modulatory actions at many different molecular target sites in mammalian cells, having been suggested that the administration of this compound may have therapeutic interest. Several plasma membrane transp...

  1. Golgi structure formation, function, and post-translational modifications in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shijiao; Wang, Yanzhuang

    2017-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus is a central membrane organelle for trafficking and post-translational modifications of proteins and lipids in cells. In mammalian cells, it is organized in the form of stacks of tightly aligned flattened cisternae, and dozens of stacks are often linked laterally into a ribbon-like structure located in the perinuclear region of the cell. Proper Golgi functionality requires an intact architecture, yet Golgi structure is dynamically regulated during the cell cycle and under disease conditions. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the relationship between Golgi structure formation, function, and regulation, with focus on how post-translational modifications including phosphorylation and ubiquitination regulate Golgi structure and on how Golgi unstacking affects its functions, in particular, protein trafficking, glycosylation, and sorting in mammalian cells.

  2. Alternatively spliced short and long isoforms of adaptor protein intersectin 1 form complexes in mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rynditch A. V.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Intersectin 1 (ITSN1 is an adaptor protein involved in membrane trafficking and cell signaling. Long and short isoforms of ITSN1 (ITSN1-L and ITSN1-S are produced by alternative splicing. The aim of our study was to investigate whether ITSN1-L and ITSN1-S could interact in mammalian cells. Methods. During this study we employed immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy. Results. We have shown that endogenous ITSN1-S co-precipitates with overexpressed ITSN1-L in PC12, 293 and 293T cells. Long and short isoforms of ITSN1 also co-localize in 293T cells. Conclusions. ITSN1-L and ITSN1-S form complexes in mammalian cells.

  3. Enhanced production and isotope enrichment of recombinant glycoproteins produced in cultured mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skelton, David; Goodyear, Abbey [Florida State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Ni, DaQun; Walton, Wendy J.; Rolle, Myron; Hare, Joan T. [Florida State University, Institute of Molecular Biophysics (United States); Logan, Timothy M., E-mail: tlogan@fsu.ed [Florida State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States)

    2010-10-15

    NMR studies of post-translationally modified proteins are complicated by the lack of an efficient method to produce isotope enriched recombinant proteins in cultured mammalian cells. We show that reducing the glucose concentration and substituting glutamate for glutamine in serum-free medium increased cell viability while simultaneously increasing recombinant protein yield and the enrichment of non-essential amino acids compared to culture in unmodified, serum-free medium. Adding dichloroacetate, a pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibitor, further improves cell viability, recombinant protein yield, and isotope enrichment. We demonstrate the method by producing partially enriched recombinant Thy1 glycoprotein from Lec1 Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using U-{sup 13}C-glucose and {sup 15}N-glutamate as labeled precursors. This study suggests that uniformly {sup 15}N,{sup 13}C-labeled recombinant proteins may be produced in cultured mammalian cells starting from a mixture of labeled essential amino acids, glucose, and glutamate.

  4. Correlated fluorescence microscopy and cryo-electron tomography of virus-infected or transfected mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Cheri M; Strauss, Joshua D; Ke, Zunlong; Dillard, Rebecca S; Hammonds, Jason E; Alonas, Eric; Desai, Tanay M; Marin, Mariana; Storms, Rachel E; Leon, Fredrick; Melikyan, Gregory B; Santangelo, Philip J; Spearman, Paul W; Wright, Elizabeth R

    2017-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) combines spatiotemporal information from fluorescence light microscopy (fLM) with high-resolution structural data from cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET). These technologies provide opportunities to bridge knowledge gaps between cell and structural biology. Here we describe our protocol for correlated cryo-fLM, cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), and cryo-ET (i.e., cryo-CLEM) of virus-infected or transfected mammalian cells. Mammalian-derived cells are cultured on EM substrates, using optimized conditions that ensure that the cells are spread thinly across the substrate and are not physically disrupted. The cells are then screened by fLM and vitrified before acquisition of cryo-fLM and cryo-ET images, which is followed by data processing. A complete session from grid preparation through data collection and processing takes 5-15 d for an individual experienced in cryo-EM.

  5. Cell thickness of UV absorption by the cell: relation to UV action spectrum shift in mammalian cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakharov, V.H.; Voronkova, L.N.; Blokhin, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    By means of reconstruction of series half - thin transverse sections the three - dimensional morphometry of SPEV cells for a series of their specific states in culture is performed: for exponential growth in a monolayer, in a merged monolayer, in the mitosis phase, for giant cells and suspension cells. In the monolayer the cell thickness in its central part depended mainly on the nucleus thickness and in average changed but slightly despite a wide range of changes in volumes of nuclei and cells and their density in culture. The cell thickness has noticeably increased in mitosis. For the above states of cells UV radiation absorption spectra are determined. It is shown that a certain shift of action spectrus of death of mammalian cells as compared with that for bacterial cell can be a seguence of selfshielding and not differences in the nature of active chromophores

  6. Immune cells and non-immune cells with immune function in mammalian cochleae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bo Hua; Zhang, Celia; Frye, Mitchell D

    2017-12-20

    The cochlea has an immune environment dominated by macrophages under resting conditions. When stressed, circulating monocytes enter the cochlea. These immune mediators, along with cochlear resident cells, organize a complex defense response against pathological challenges. Since the cochlea has minimal exposure to pathogens, most inflammatory conditions in the cochlea are sterile. Although the immune response is initiated for the protection of the cochlea, off-target effects can cause collateral damage to cochlear cells. A better understanding of cochlear immune capacity and regulation would therefore lead to development of new therapeutic treatments. Over the past decade, there have been many advances in our understanding of cochlear immune capacity. In this review, we provide an update and overview of the cellular components of cochlear immune capacity with a focus on macrophages in mammalian cochleae. We describe the composition and distribution of immune cells in the cochlea and suggest that phenotypic and functional characteristics of macrophages have site-specific diversity. We also highlight the response of immune cells to acute and chronic stresses and comment on the potential function of immune cells in cochlear homeostasis and disease development. Finally, we briefly review potential roles for cochlear resident cells in immune activities of the cochlea. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Dielectrophoretic Characterisation of Mammalian Cells above 100 MHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Chung

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Dielectrophoresis (DEP is a label-free technique for the characterization and manipulation of biological particles - such as cells, bacteria and viruses. Many studies have focused on the DEP cross-over frequency fxo1, where cells in a non-uniform electric field undergo a transition from negative to positive DEP. Determination of fxo1 provides a value for the membrane capacitance from the cell diameter, the means to monitor changes in cell morphology and viability, and the information required when devising DEP cell separation protocols. In this paper we describe the first systematic measurements of the second DEP cross-over frequency fxo2 that occurs at much higher frequencies. Theory indicates that fxo2 is sensitive to the internal dielectric properties of a cell, and our experiments on murine myeloma cells reveal that these properties exhibit temporal changes that are sensitive to both the osmolality and temperature of the cell suspending medium. doi:10.5617/jeb.196 J Electr Bioimp, vol. 2, pp. 64-71, 2011

  8. Measurements of scattering and absorption in mammalian cell suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourant, Judith R.; Freyer, James P.; Johnson, Tamara M.

    1996-04-01

    During the past several years a range of spectroscopies, including fluorescence and elastic- scatter spectroscopy, have been investigated for optically based detection of cancer and other tissue pathologies. Both elastic-scatter and fluorescence signals depend, in part, on scattering and absorption properties of the cells in the tissue. Therefore an understanding of the scattering and absorption properties of cells is a necessary prerequisite for understanding and developing these techniques. Cell suspensions provide a simple model with which to begin studying the absorption and scattering properties of cells. In this study we have made preliminary measurements of the scattering and absorption properties of suspensions of mouse mammary carcinoma cells (EMT6) over a broad wavelength range (380 nm to 800 nm).

  9. Rapid Detection of Apoptosis in Cultured Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Igor; Serebryakova, Maria; Solovjeva, Liudmila; Svetlova, Maria; Firsanov, Denis

    2017-01-01

    Flow cytometry is a powerful tool for the analysis of apoptosis, the process that directly determines cell fate after the action of different stresses. Here, we describe a flow cytometry method for the assessment of early and late stages of apoptosis in non-fixed cultured cells using SYTO16, DRAQ7, and PO-PRO1 dyes simultaneously. This multicolor flow cytometry procedure requires 45 min for completion and provides a quantitative assessment of cell viability. It can be useful in evaluating the cytotoxic properties of new drugs, and antitumor interventions.

  10. Photo-transfection of mammalian cells via femtosecond laser pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mthunzi, P

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available ). Transfection efficiencies between 40 - 63 % are recorded. We show for the first time that, due to their different sensitivity, surface receptors and membrane structure the cell lines mentioned above displayed varying photo-transfection efficiencies at different...

  11. The Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biaglow, John E.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the effects of radiation on dividing cells and factors influencing these effects; also briefly reviews the radical mechanism for radiation damage. Emphasizes the importance of oxygen in radiation effects. (CS)

  12. Optical sorting and photo-transfection of mammalian cells

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mthunzi, P

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available ), embryonic kidney, Chinese hamster ovary as well as pluripotent stem cells using a tightly focused titanium sapphire femtosecond pulsed laser beam spot. These investigations permitted advanced biological studies in femtosecond laser transfection: firstly...

  13. In Vitro Cytotoxicity of Nanoparticles in Mammalian Germline Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Braydich-Stolle, Laura; Hussain, Saber; Schlager, John J.; Hofmann, Marie-Claude

    2005-01-01

    Gametogenesis is a complex biological process that is particularly sensitive to environmental insults such as chemicals. Many chemicals have a negative impact on the germline, either by directly affecting the germ cells, or indirectly through their action on the somatic nursing cells. Ultimately, these effects can inhibit fertility, and they may have negative consequences for the development of the offspring. Recently, nanomaterials such as nanotubes, nanowires, fullerene derivatives (buckyba...

  14. Bicaudal is a conserved substrate for Drosophila and mammalian caspases and is essential for cell survival.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Creagh, Emma M

    2009-01-01

    Members of the caspase family of cysteine proteases coordinate cell death through restricted proteolysis of diverse protein substrates and play a conserved role in apoptosis from nematodes to man. However, while numerous substrates for the mammalian cell death-associated caspases have now been described, few caspase substrates have been identified in other organisms. Here, we have utilized a proteomics-based approach to identify proteins that are cleaved by caspases during apoptosis in Drosophila D-Mel2 cells, a subline of the Schneider S2 cell line. This approach identified multiple novel substrates for the fly caspases and revealed that bicaudal\\/betaNAC is a conserved substrate for Drosophila and mammalian caspases. RNAi-mediated silencing of bicaudal expression in Drosophila D-Mel2 cells resulted in a block to proliferation, followed by spontaneous apoptosis. Similarly, silencing of expression of the mammalian bicaudal homologue, betaNAC, in HeLa, HEK293T, MCF-7 and MRC5 cells also resulted in spontaneous apoptosis. These data suggest that bicaudal\\/betaNAC is essential for cell survival and is a conserved target of caspases from flies to man.

  15. YAP/TAZ enhance mammalian embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in a Tead-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dasol; Byun, Sung-Hyun; Park, Soojeong; Kim, Juwan; Kim, Inhee; Ha, Soobong; Kwon, Mookwang; Yoon, Keejung

    2015-02-27

    Mammalian brain development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways controlling cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Here we show that YAP/TAZ enhance embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in a cell autonomous fashion using diverse experimental approaches. Introduction of retroviral vectors expressing YAP or TAZ into the mouse embryonic brain induced cell localization in the ventricular zone (VZ), which is the embryonic neural stem cell niche. This change in cell distribution in the cortical layer is due to the increased stemness of infected cells; YAP-expressing cells were colabeled with Sox2, a neural stem cell marker, and YAP/TAZ increased the frequency and size of neurospheres, indicating enhanced self-renewal- and proliferative ability of neural stem cells. These effects appear to be TEA domain family transcription factor (Tead)-dependent; a Tead binding-defective YAP mutant lost the ability to promote neural stem cell characteristics. Consistently, in utero gene transfer of a constitutively active form of Tead2 (Tead2-VP16) recapitulated all the features of YAP/TAZ overexpression, and dominant negative Tead2-EnR resulted in marked cell exit from the VZ toward outer cortical layers. Taken together, these results indicate that the Tead-dependent YAP/TAZ signaling pathway plays important roles in neural stem cell maintenance by enhancing stemness of neural stem cells during mammalian brain development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Single Molecule Spectroscopy: Single Live Cell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    kbhattacharjee

    Live Cell Imaging: Seeing inside a cell. • Cell: ~20,000 nm ~ 100 times bigger than focus. • Label different parts of a cell with fluorescent dye. • Cancer Cell: How different from a normal cell? cell. Space & time resolution ...

  17. In vitro cytotoxicity of nanoparticles in mammalian germline stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braydich-Stolle, Laura; Hussain, Saber; Schlager, John J; Hofmann, Marie-Claude

    2005-12-01

    Gametogenesis is a complex biological process that is particularly sensitive to environmental insults such as chemicals. Many chemicals have a negative impact on the germline, either by directly affecting the germ cells, or indirectly through their action on the somatic nursing cells. Ultimately, these effects can inhibit fertility, and they may have negative consequences for the development of the offspring. Recently, nanomaterials such as nanotubes, nanowires, fullerene derivatives (buckyballs), and quantum dots have received enormous national attention in the creation of new types of analytical tools for biotechnology and the life sciences. Despite the wide application of nanomaterials, there is a serious lack of information concerning their impact on human health and the environment. Thus, there are limited studies available on toxicity of nanoparticles for risk assessment of nanomaterials. The purpose of this study was to assess the suitability of a mouse spermatogonial stem cell line as a model to assess nanotoxicity in the male germline in vitro. The effects of different types of nanoparticles on these cells were evaluated by light microscopy, and by cell proliferation and standard cytotoxicity assays. Our results demonstrate a concentration-dependent toxicity for all types of particles tested, whereas the corresponding soluble salts had no significant effect. Silver nanoparticles were the most toxic while molybdenum trioxide (MoO(3)) nanoparticles were the least toxic. Our results suggest that this cell line provides a valuable model with which to assess the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles in the germ line in vitro.

  18. Mammalian mediator 19 mediates H1299 lung adenocarcinoma cell clone conformation, growth, and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lu-Lu; Guo, Shu-Liang; Ma, Su-Ren; Luo, Yong-Ai

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian mediator (MED) is a multi-protein coactivator that has been identified by several research groups. The involvement of the MED complex subunit 19 (MED 19) in the metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma cell line (H1299), which expresses the MED 19 subunit, was here investigated. When MED 19 expression was decreased by RNA interference H1299 cells demonstrated reduced clone formation, arrest in the S phase of the cell cycle, and lowered metastatic capacity. Thus, MED 19 appears to play important roles in the biological behavior of non-small cell lung carcinoma cells. These findings may be important for the development of novel lung carcinoma treatments.

  19. miR-96 regulates the progression of differentiation in mammalian cochlear inner and outer hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Stephanie; Johnson, Stuart L; Furness, David N; Chen, Jing; Ingham, Neil; Hilton, Jennifer M; Steffes, Georg; Lewis, Morag A; Zampini, Valeria; Hackney, Carole M; Masetto, Sergio; Holley, Matthew C; Steel, Karen P; Marcotti, Walter

    2011-02-08

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs able to regulate a broad range of protein-coding genes involved in many biological processes. miR-96 is a sensory organ-specific miRNA expressed in the mammalian cochlea during development. Mutations in miR-96 cause nonsyndromic progressive hearing loss in humans and mice. The mouse mutant diminuendo has a single base change in the seed region of the Mir96 gene leading to widespread changes in the expression of many genes. We have used this mutant to explore the role of miR-96 in the maturation of the auditory organ. We found that the physiological development of mutant sensory hair cells is arrested at around the day of birth, before their biophysical differentiation into inner and outer hair cells. Moreover, maturation of the hair cell stereocilia bundle and remodelling of auditory nerve connections within the cochlea fail to occur in miR-96 mutants. We conclude that miR-96 regulates the progression of the physiological and morphological differentiation of cochlear hair cells and, as such, coordinates one of the most distinctive functional refinements of the mammalian auditory system.

  20. Single-Cell Expression Profiling and Proteomics of Primordial Germ Cells, Spermatogonial Stem Cells, Adult Germ Stem Cells, and Oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Sabine; Azizi, Hossein; Skutella, Thomas

    2018-01-04

    The mammalian germ cells, cell assemblies, tissues, and organs during development and maturation have been extensively studied at the tissue level. However, to investigate and understand the fundamental insights at the molecular basis of germ and stem cells, their cell fate plasticity, and determination, it is of most importance to analyze at the large scale on the single-cell level through different biological windows. Here, modern molecular techniques optimized for single-cell analysis, including single fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) or microfluidic high-throughput quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) for single-cell gene expression and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MSMS) for protein profiling, have been established and are still getting optimized.This review aims on describing and discussing recent single-cell expression profiling and proteomics of different types of human germ cells, including primordial germ cells (PGCs), spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), human adult germ stem cells (haGSCs), and oocytes.

  1. Alkyltransferase-mediated toxicity of bis-electrophiles in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalapila, Aley G.; Pegg, Anthony E.

    2009-01-01

    The primary function of O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) is to maintain genomic integrity in the face of damage by both endogenous and exogenous alkylating agents. However, paradoxically, bacterial and mammalian AGTs have been shown to increase cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of dihaloalkanes and other bis-electrophiles when expressed in bacterial cells. We have extended these studies to mammalian cells using CHO cells that lack AGT expression and CHO cells stably transfected with a plasmid that expresses human AGT. The cytotoxicity of 1,2-dibromoethane, dibromomethane and epibromohydrin was significantly increased by the presence of AGT but cytotoxicity of butadiene diepoxide was not affected. Mutations caused by these agents were assessed using hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) as a reporter gene. There was a small (c. 2–3-fold) but statistically significant AGT-mediated increase in mutations caused by 1,2-dibromoethane, dibromomethane and epibromohydrin. Analysis of the mutation spectrum induced by 1,2-dibromoethane showed that the presence of AGT also altered the types of mutations with an increase in total base substitution mutants due to a rise in transversions at both G:C and A:T sites. AGT expression also led to mutations arising from the transcribed strand, which were not seen in cells lacking AGT. Although the frequency of deletion mutations was decreased by AGT expression, the formation of large deletions (≥3 exons) was increased. This work demonstrates that interaction of AGT with some bis-electrophiles can cause mutagenicity and diminished cell survival in mammalian cells. It is consistent with the hypothesis that DNA-AGT cross-links, which have been characterized in experiments with purified AGT protein and such bis-electrophiles, can be formed in mammalian cells. PMID:19941875

  2. A novel bio-functional material based on mammalian cell aggresomes

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Carmona, Escarlata

    2015-01-01

    Aggresomes are protein aggregates found in mammalian cells when the intracellular protein degradation machinery is over-titered. Despite that they abound in cells producing recombinant proteins of biomedical and biotechnological interest, the physiological roles of these protein clusters and the functional status of the embedded proteins remain basically unexplored. In this work, we have determined for the first time that, like in bacterial inclusion bodies, deposition of recombinant proteins...

  3. Expression of a preproinsulin-beta-galactosidase gene fusion in mammalian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, D A; Chou, J; MacKrell, A J; Casadaban, M J; Steiner, D F

    1983-01-01

    As an approach to the study of mammalian gene expression, the promoters and translation initiation regions of the rat preproinsulin II and the simian virus 40 early genes were fused to the structural gene of Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase, a sensitive probe for gene expression. These fusions were introduced into COS-7 cells, a simian virus 40 large tumor-antigen-producing monkey kidney cell line, where they directed the synthesis of enzymatically active hybrid beta-galactosidase proteins...

  4. OrbShake Bioreactors for Mammalian Cell Cultures: Engineering and Scale-up

    OpenAIRE

    Tissot, Stéphanie

    2011-01-01

    Most of the biopharmaceuticals nowadays are produced by animal cells. The worldwide demand for a specific group of biopharmaceuticals, the monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), has significantly increased this last decade. The mAbs are used as therapeutics in particular against cancer and autoimmune disorders. Most of the mAbs are produced as recombinant proteins by mammalian cells which ensure human-like post-translationnal modifications to obtain a fully ...

  5. A comparison of mammalian cell sensitivity to either 254 nm or artificial 'solar' simulated radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, R.F.; Coohill, T.P.

    1987-01-01

    The sensitivity of six mammalian cell strains to either germicidal (254 nm) or artificial ''solar'' simulated radiation was tested. The solar simulator used had an output similar, in some respects, to natural sunlight. Cellular capacity for Herpes simplex virus production was used as the assay procedure. The tested cells were a strain of African green monkey kidney cells and five human skin fibroblast cell strains. The latter included a ''normal'' cell strain, and four photosensitive cell strains; three of which were strains of xeroderma pigmentosum cells, and one strain of Bloom's syndrome cells. When comparing the D 10 values, the different cell strains varied by a factor of six in response to germicidal radiation, but only by a factor of two to artificial ''solar'' simulated radiation. The relative sensitivity of the cells to either type of radiation also varied from 1.7 to 10.9. Large variations in response occurred even among the xeroderma pigmentosum cell strains. These responses suggest that mammalian cell sensitivity to 254 nm radiation may not be a true indicator of a cell's responses to natural sunlight. (author)

  6. The Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis toxin complex is active against cultured mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hares, Michelle C; Hinchliffe, Stewart J; Strong, Philippa C R; Eleftherianos, Ioannis; Dowling, Andrea J; ffrench-Constant, Richard H; Waterfield, Nick

    2008-11-01

    The toxin complex (Tc) genes were first identified in the insect pathogen Photorhabdus luminescens and encode approximately 1 MDa protein complexes which are toxic to insect pests. Subsequent genome sequencing projects have revealed the presence of tc orthologues in a range of bacterial pathogens known to be associated with insects. Interestingly, members of the mammalian-pathogenic yersiniae have also been shown to encode Tc orthologues. Studies in Yersinia enterocolitica have shown that divergent tc loci either encode insect-active toxins or play a role in colonization of the gut in gastroenteritis models of rats. So far little is known about the activity of the Tc proteins in the other mammalian-pathogenic yersiniae. Here we present work to suggest that Tc proteins in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis are not insecticidal toxins but have evolved for mammalian pathogenicity. We show that Tc is secreted by Y. pseudotuberculosis strain IP32953 during growth in media at 28 degrees C and 37 degrees C. We also demonstrate that oral toxicity of strain IP32953 to Manduca sexta larvae is not due to Tc expression and that lysates of Escherichia coli BL21 expressing the Yersinia Tc proteins are not toxic to Sf9 insect cells but are toxic to cultured mammalian cell lines. Cell lysates of E. coli BL21 expressing the Y. pseudotuberculosis Tc proteins caused actin ruffles, vacuoles and multi-nucleation in cultured human gut cells (Caco-2); similar morphology was observed after application of a lysate of E. coli BL21 expressing the Y. pestis Tc proteins to mouse fibroblast NIH3T3 cells, but not Caco-2 cells. Finally, transient expression of the individual Tc proteins in Caco-2 and NIH3T3 cell lines reproduced the actin and nuclear rearrangement observed with the topical applications. Together these results add weight to the growing hypothesis that the Tc proteins in Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. pestis have been adapted for mammalian pathogenicity. We further

  7. Mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation: structural and biochemical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabanero, M.; Flores V, L. L.; Azorin V, J. C.; Vallejo, M. A.; Cordova F, T.; Sosa A, M.; Castruita D, J. P.; Barbosa S, G.

    2015-10-01

    Acute or chronic exposure to ionizing radiation is a factor that may be hazardous to health. It has been reported that exposure to low doses of radiation (less than 50 mSv / year) and subsequently exposure to high doses have greater effects in people. However, it is unknown molecular and biochemical level alteration. This study, analyzes the susceptibility of a biological system (HeLa Atcc CCL-2 human cervix cancer cell line) to ionizing radiation (6 and 60 mSv/ 90). Our evaluate multiple variables such as: total protein profile, mitochondrial metabolic activity (XTT assay), cell viability (Trypan blue exclusion assay), cytoskeleton (actin micro filaments), nuclei (D API), genomic DNA. The results indicate, that cells exposed to ionizing radiation structurally show alterations in nuclear phenotype and aneuploidy, further disruption in the tight junctions and consequently on the distribution of actin micro filaments. Similar alterations were observed in cells treated with a genotoxic agent (200μM H 2 O 2 /1 h). In conclusion, this multi-criteria assessment enables precise comparisons of the effects of radiation between any biological systems. However, it is necessary to determine stress markers for integration of the effects of ionizing radiation. (Author)

  8. Chromatin factors affecting DNA repair in mammalian cell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harless, J.; Hittelman, W.; Meyn, R.; Hewitt, R.

    1983-01-01

    We are investigating chromatin factors that participate in the incision step of DNA repair in eukaryotic cells. Localization of repair activity within nuclei, the stability and extractability of activity, the specificity for recognizing damage in chromatin or purified DNA as substrates are of interest in this investigation of human cells, CHO cells, and their radiation sensitive mutants. We have developed procedures that provide nuclei in which their DNA behaves as a collection of circular molecules. The integrity of the DNA in human nuclei can be maintained during incubation in appropriate buffers for as long as 60 minutes. When cells or nuclei are exposed to uv light prior to incubation, incisions presumably associated with DNA repair can be demonstrated. Incision activity is stable to prior extraction of nuclei with 0.6 M NaCl, which removes many nonhistone proteins. Our studies are consistent with an hypothesis that factors responsible for initiating DNA repair are localized in the nuclear matrix. 18 references, 3 figures

  9. Mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation: structural and biochemical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabanero, M.; Flores V, L. L. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Departamento de Biologia, DCNE, Noria Alta s/n, 36250 Guanajuato, Gto. (Mexico); Azorin V, J. C.; Vallejo, M. A.; Cordova F, T.; Sosa A, M. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Departamento de Ingenieria Fisica, DCI, Loma del Bosque 103, Col. Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Castruita D, J. P. [Universidad de Guadalajara, Departamento de Ecologia, CUCBA, Las Agujas, 45100 Zapopan, Jalisco (Mexico); Barbosa S, G., E-mail: myrna.sabanero@gmail.com [Universidad de Guanajuato, Departamento de Ciencias Medicas, DCS, 20 de Enero No. 929, Col. Obregon, 37000 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Acute or chronic exposure to ionizing radiation is a factor that may be hazardous to health. It has been reported that exposure to low doses of radiation (less than 50 mSv / year) and subsequently exposure to high doses have greater effects in people. However, it is unknown molecular and biochemical level alteration. This study, analyzes the susceptibility of a biological system (HeLa Atcc CCL-2 human cervix cancer cell line) to ionizing radiation (6 and 60 mSv/ 90). Our evaluate multiple variables such as: total protein profile, mitochondrial metabolic activity (XTT assay), cell viability (Trypan blue exclusion assay), cytoskeleton (actin micro filaments), nuclei (D API), genomic DNA. The results indicate, that cells exposed to ionizing radiation structurally show alterations in nuclear phenotype and aneuploidy, further disruption in the tight junctions and consequently on the distribution of actin micro filaments. Similar alterations were observed in cells treated with a genotoxic agent (200μM H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/1 h). In conclusion, this multi-criteria assessment enables precise comparisons of the effects of radiation between any biological systems. However, it is necessary to determine stress markers for integration of the effects of ionizing radiation. (Author)

  10. Trafficking and processing of bacterial proteins by mammalian cells: Insights from chondroitinase ABC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Elizabeth; Raza, Mansoor; Ellis, Clare; Burnside, Emily; Love, Fiona; Heller, Simon; Elliot, Matthew; Daniell, Esther; Dasgupta, Debayan; Alves, Nuno; Day, Priscilla; Fawcett, James; Keynes, Roger

    2017-01-01

    There is very little reported in the literature about the relationship between modifications of bacterial proteins and their secretion by mammalian cells that synthesize them. We previously reported that the secretion of the bacterial enzyme Chondroitinase ABC by mammalian cells requires the strategic removal of at least three N-glycosylation sites. The aim of this study was to determine if it is possible to enhance the efficacy of the enzyme as a treatment for spinal cord injury by increasing the quantity of enzyme secreted or by altering its cellular location. To determine if the efficiency of enzyme secretion could be further increased, cells were transfected with constructs encoding the gene for chondroitinase ABC modified for expression by mammalian cells; these contained additional modifications of strategic N-glycosylation sites or alternative signal sequences to direct secretion of the enzyme from the cells. We show that while removal of certain specific N-glycosylation sites enhances enzyme secretion, N-glycosylation of at least two other sites, N-856 and N-773, is essential for both production and secretion of active enzyme. Furthermore, we find that the signal sequence directing secretion also influences the quantity of enzyme secreted, and that this varies widely amongst the cell types tested. Last, we find that replacing the 3'UTR on the cDNA encoding Chondroitinase ABC with that of β-actin is sufficient to target the enzyme to the neuronal growth cone when transfected into neurons. This also enhances neurite outgrowth on an inhibitory substrate. Some intracellular trafficking pathways are adversely affected by cryptic signals present in the bacterial gene sequence, whilst unexpectedly others are required for efficient secretion of the enzyme. Furthermore, targeting chondroitinase to the neuronal growth cone promotes its ability to increase neurite outgrowth on an inhibitory substrate. These findings are timely in view of the renewed prospects for

  11. The effects of selenium on glutathione peroxidase activity and radioprotection in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, A.M.; Murray, J.L.; Dale, P.; Tritz, R.; Grdina, D.J.

    1995-09-05

    The media of representative mammalian cell lines were supplemented with low levels of selenium in the form of sodium selenite in order to investigate the effects of selenium on mammalian cells. Following incubation in 30 nM sodium selenite, these cells were assayed for changes in glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. The cells examined included NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts, PC12 rat sympathetic precursor cells, SupT-1 human lymphocytes, MCF-7{sup adr} human breast carcinoma cells and AA8 Chinese hamster ovary cells. Selenium supplementation resulted in a marginal increase in GPx activity for the NIH 3T3, MCF-7{sup adr} and Supt-1 cells but stimulated GPx activity approximately 5-fold in PC12 and AA8 cells. AA8 cells were selected to evaluate whether selenium supplementation was radioprotective against {sup 60}cobalt gamma irradiation. Protection against radiation-induced mutation was measured by evaluating mutation frequency at the hprt locus. In this assay, preincubation of AA8 CHO cells significantly protected these cells from exposure to 8 Gy.

  12. The effects of selenium on glutathione peroxidase activity and radioprotection in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, A.M.; Murray, J.L.; Dale, P.; Tritz, R.; Grdina, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    The media of representative mammalian cell lines were supplemented with low levels of selenium in the form of sodium selenite in order to investigate the effects of selenium on mammalian cells. Following incubation in 30 nM sodium selenite, these cells were assayed for changes in glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. The cells examined included NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts, PC12 rat sympathetic precursor cells, SupT-1 human lymphocytes, MCF-7 adr human breast carcinoma cells and AA8 Chinese hamster ovary cells. Selenium supplementation resulted in a marginal increase in GPx activity for the NIH 3T3, MCF-7 adr and Supt-1 cells but stimulated GPx activity approximately 5-fold in PC12 and AA8 cells. AA8 cells were selected to evaluate whether selenium supplementation was radioprotective against 60 cobalt gamma irradiation. Protection against radiation-induced mutation was measured by evaluating mutation frequency at the hprt locus. In this assay, preincubation of AA8 CHO cells significantly protected these cells from exposure to 8 Gy

  13. Fluorescence microscopy imaging of electroperturbation in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yinghua; Vernier, P Thomas; Behrend, Matthew; Wang, Jingjing; Thu, Mya Mya; Gundersen, Martin; Marcu, Laura

    2006-01-01

    We report the design, integration, and validation of a fluorescence microscopy system for imaging of electroperturbation--the effects of nanosecond, megavolt-per-meter pulsed electric fields on biological cells and tissues. Such effects have potential applications in cancer therapy, gene regulation, and biophysical research by noninvasively disrupting intracellular compartments and inducing apoptosis in malignant cells. As the primary observing platform, an epifluorescence microscope integrating a nanosecond high-voltage pulser and a micrometer electrode chamber enable in situ imaging of the intracellular processes triggered by high electric fields. Using specific fluorescence molecular probes, the dynamic biological responses of Jurkat T lymphocytes to nanosecond electric pulses (nanoelectropulses) are studied with this system, including calcium bursts, the polarized translocation of phosphatidylserine (PS), and nuclear enlargement and chromatin/DNA structural changes.

  14. Exploring the ultrashort pulse laser parameter space for membrane permeabilisation in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudhall, Andrew P; Antkowiak, Maciej; Tsampoula, Xanthi; Mazilu, Michael; Metzger, Nikolaus K; Gunn-Moore, Frank; Dholakia, Kishan

    2012-01-01

    The use of ultrashort femtosecond pulsed lasers to effect membrane permeabilisation and initiate both optoinjection and transfection of cells has recently seen immense interest. We investigate femtosecond laser-induced membrane permeabilisation in mammalian cells as a function of pulse duration, pulse energy and number of pulses, by quantifying the efficiency of optoinjection for these parameters. Depending on pulse duration and pulse energy we identify two distinct membrane permeabilisation regimes. In the first regime a nonlinear dependence of order 3.4-9.6 is exhibited below a threshold peak power of at least 6 kW. Above this threshold peak power, the nonlinear dependence is saturated resulting in linear behaviour. This indicates that the membrane permeabilisation mechanism requires efficient multiphoton absorption to produce free electrons but once this process saturates, linear absorption dominates. Our experimental findings support a previously proposed theoretical model and provide a step towards the optimisation of laser-mediated gene delivery into mammalian cells.

  15. Processing of double-stranded RNA in mammalian cells: a direct antiviral role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantier, Michael P

    2014-06-01

    Processing of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) contributes directly to an antiviral effect in plants and invertebrates, which is amplified through the recruitment of RNA interference (RNAi). In mammals, viral dsRNAs are the substrate of the innate immune response and limit viral spread by impacting on cellular translation and cytokine production, as well as promoting cell death. Recent studies suggest that viral siRNAs also exert a direct antiviral activity in mammalian cells. Here, I review the current knowledge of dsRNA processing in mammalian cells and discuss the recent findings in light of the complex interplay between RNAi and dsRNA-driven innate immune responses toward the common goal of virus restriction.

  16. Fluorogenic RNA Mango aptamers for imaging small non-coding RNAs in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autour, Alexis; C Y Jeng, Sunny; D Cawte, Adam; Abdolahzadeh, Amir; Galli, Angela; Panchapakesan, Shanker S S; Rueda, David; Ryckelynck, Michael; Unrau, Peter J

    2018-02-13

    Despite having many key roles in cellular biology, directly imaging biologically important RNAs has been hindered by a lack of fluorescent tools equivalent to the fluorescent proteins available to study cellular proteins. Ideal RNA labelling systems must preserve biological function, have photophysical properties similar to existing fluorescent proteins, and be compatible with established live and fixed cell protein labelling strategies. Here, we report a microfluidics-based selection of three new high-affinity RNA Mango fluorogenic aptamers. Two of these are as bright or brighter than enhanced GFP when bound to TO1-Biotin. Furthermore, we show that the new Mangos can accurately image the subcellular localization of three small non-coding RNAs (5S, U6, and a box C/D scaRNA) in fixed and live mammalian cells. These new aptamers have many potential applications to study RNA function and dynamics both in vitro and in mammalian cells.

  17. Dynamic JUNQ inclusion bodies are asymmetrically inherited in mammalian cell lines through the asymmetric partitioning of vimentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrodnik, Mikołaj; Salmonowicz, Hanna; Brown, Rachel; Turkowska, Joanna; Średniawa, Władysław; Pattabiraman, Sundararaghavan; Amen, Triana; Abraham, Ayelet-chen; Eichler, Noam; Lyakhovetsky, Roman; Kaganovich, Daniel

    2014-06-03

    Aging is associated with the accumulation of several types of damage: in particular, damage to the proteome. Recent work points to a conserved replicative rejuvenation mechanism that works by preventing the inheritance of damaged and misfolded proteins by specific cells during division. Asymmetric inheritance of misfolded and aggregated proteins has been shown in bacteria and yeast, but relatively little evidence exists for a similar mechanism in mammalian cells. Here, we demonstrate, using long-term 4D imaging, that the vimentin intermediate filament establishes mitotic polarity in mammalian cell lines and mediates the asymmetric partitioning of damaged proteins. We show that mammalian JUNQ inclusion bodies containing soluble misfolded proteins are inherited asymmetrically, similarly to JUNQ quality-control inclusions observed in yeast. Mammalian IPOD-like inclusion bodies, meanwhile, are not always inherited by the same cell as the JUNQ. Our study suggests that the mammalian cytoskeleton and intermediate filaments provide the physical scaffold for asymmetric inheritance of dynamic quality-control JUNQ inclusions. Mammalian IPOD inclusions containing amyloidogenic proteins are not partitioned as effectively during mitosis as their counterparts in yeast. These findings provide a valuable mechanistic basis for studying the process of asymmetric inheritance in mammalian cells, including cells potentially undergoing polar divisions, such as differentiating stem cells and cancer cells.

  18. Different intracellular distribution of avian reovirus core protein sigmaA in cells of avian and mammalian origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez-Iglesias, Lorena; Lostale-Seijo, Irene; Martinez-Costas, Jose [Departamento de Bioquimica y Biologia Molecular, Facultad de Farmacia, y Centro Singular de Investigacion en Quimica Biologica y Materiales Moleculares (CIQUS), Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782-Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Benavente, Javier, E-mail: franciscojavier.benavente@usc.es [Departamento de Bioquimica y Biologia Molecular, Facultad de Farmacia, y Centro Singular de Investigacion en Quimica Biologica y Materiales Moleculares (CIQUS), Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782-Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2012-10-25

    A comparative analysis of the intracellular distribution of avian reovirus (ARV) core protein sigmaA in cells of avian and mammalian origin revealed that, whereas the viral protein accumulates in the cytoplasm and nucleolus of avian cells, most sigmaA concentrates in the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells in tight association with the insoluble nuclear matrix fraction. Our results further showed that sigmaA becomes arrested in the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells via association with mammalian cell-specific factors and that this association prevents nucleolar targeting. Inhibition of RNA polymerase II activity, but not of RNA polymerase I activity, in infected mammalian cells induces nucleus-to-cytoplasm sigmaA translocation through a CRM1- and RanGTP-dependent mechanism, yet a heterokaryon assay suggests that sigmaA does not shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm. The scarcity of sigmaA in cytoplasmic viral factories of infected mammalian cells could be one of the factors contributing to limited ARV replication in mammalian cells.

  19. C60-SIMS imaging of nanoparticles within mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bloom, Anna N.; Tian, Hua; Winograd, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    To achieve successful drug delivery via nanoparticles the interactions between the nanoparticle and the chemistry of the surrounding biological environment is of central importance. A thorough understanding of these interactions is necessary in order to better elucidate information regarding drug pathways and mechanisms of action in treatment protocols. As such, it is important to identify the location of the nanoparticle, the state of its functionalization, as well as any changes in the cell...

  20. The Role of Mammalian Glial Cells in Circadian Rhythm Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donají Chi-Castañeda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are biological oscillations with a period of about 24 hours. These rhythms are maintained by an innate genetically determined time-keeping system called the circadian clock. A large number of the proteins involved in the regulation of this clock are transcription factors controlling rhythmic transcription of so-called clock-controlled genes, which participate in a plethora of physiological functions in the organism. In the brain, several areas, besides the suprachiasmatic nucleus, harbor functional clocks characterized by a well-defined time pattern of clock gene expression. This expression rhythm is not restricted to neurons but is also present in glia, suggesting that these cells are involved in circadian rhythmicity. However, only certain glial cells fulfill the criteria to be called glial clocks, namely, to display molecular oscillators based on the canonical clock protein PERIOD, which depends on the suprachiasmatic nucleus for their synchronization. In this contribution, we summarize the current information about activity of the clock genes in glial cells, their potential role as oscillators as well as clinical implications.

  1. Replication stress in Mammalian cells and its consequences for mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelot, Camille; Magdalou, Indiana; Lopez, Bernard S

    2015-05-22

    The faithful transmission of genetic information to daughter cells is central to maintaining genomic stability and relies on the accurate and complete duplication of genetic material during each cell cycle. However, the genome is routinely exposed to endogenous and exogenous stresses that can impede the progression of replication. Such replication stress can be an early cause of cancer or initiate senescence. Replication stress, which primarily occurs during S phase, results in consequences during mitosis, jeopardizing chromosome segregation and, in turn, genomic stability. The traces of replication stress can be detected in the daughter cells during G1 phase. Alterations in mitosis occur in two types: 1) local alterations that correspond to breaks, rearrangements, intertwined DNA molecules or non-separated sister chromatids that are confined to the region of the replication dysfunction; 2) genome-wide chromosome segregation resulting from centrosome amplification (although centrosomes do not contain DNA), which amplifies the local replication stress to the entire genome. Here, we discuss the endogenous causes of replication perturbations, the mechanisms of replication fork restart and the consequences for mitosis, chromosome segregation and genomic stability.

  2. Metformin (dimethyl-biguanide induced DNA damage in mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubem R. Amador

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metformin (dimethyl-biguanide is an insulin-sensitizing agent that lowers fasting plasma-insulin concentration, wherefore it's wide use for patients with a variety of insulin-resistant and prediabetic states, including impaired glucose tolerance. During pregnancy it is a further resource for reducing first-trimester pregnancy loss in women with the polycystic ovary syndrome. We tested metformin genotoxicity in cells of Chinese hamster ovary, CHO-K1 (chromosome aberrations; comet assays and in mice (micronucleus assays. Concentrations of 114.4 µg/mL and 572 µg/mL were used in in vitro tests, and 95.4 mg/kg, 190.8 mg/kg and 333.9 mg/kg in assaying. Although the in vitro tests revealed no chromosome aberrations in metaphase cells, DNA damage was detected by comet assaying after 24 h of incubation at both concentrations. The frequency of DNA damage was higher at concentrations of 114.4 µg/mL. Furthermore, although mortality was not observed in in vitro tests, the highest dose of metformin suppressed bone marrow cells. However, no statistically significant differences were noted in micronuclei frequencies between treatments. In vitro results indicate that chronic metformin exposure may be potentially genotoxic. Thus, pregnant woman undergoing treatment with metformin should be properly evaluated beforehand, as regards vulnerability to DNA damage.

  3. Low levels of aflatoxin B1, ricin, and milk enhance recombinant protein production in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuven Rasooly

    Full Text Available Gene expression in transduced mammalian cells correlates with virus titer, but high doses of vector for gene therapy leads to toxicity in humans and in animals. Changing the optimal tissue culture medium by adding low levels of environmental stressors, such as 1 µM of the fungal toxin aflatoxin B1 (AFB1, 1 ng of the castor bean protein toxin ricin, or 1% reconstituted milk, enhances transcription and increases production of proteins in transduced mammalian cells as demonstrated by production of the following three recombinant proteins: firefly luciferase, β-galactosidase, and green fluorescent protein (GFP. Higher concentrations of the stress-producing substances damage the cells beyond recovery, resulting in inhibited gene expression and cell death. We also evaluated the effect of the stressor substances on the enhanced infectivity of virus. The presented findings extend methods for large-scale transient recombinant protein production in mammalian cells and suggest that it may be possible to reduce the cytotoxicity of the adenovirus by reducing the virus titer without adversely affecting gene expression levels.

  4. Low levels of aflatoxin B1, ricin, and milk enhance recombinant protein production in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasooly, Reuven; Hernlem, Bradley; Friedman, Mendel

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression in transduced mammalian cells correlates with virus titer, but high doses of vector for gene therapy leads to toxicity in humans and in animals. Changing the optimal tissue culture medium by adding low levels of environmental stressors, such as 1 µM of the fungal toxin aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), 1 ng of the castor bean protein toxin ricin, or 1% reconstituted milk, enhances transcription and increases production of proteins in transduced mammalian cells as demonstrated by production of the following three recombinant proteins: firefly luciferase, β-galactosidase, and green fluorescent protein (GFP). Higher concentrations of the stress-producing substances damage the cells beyond recovery, resulting in inhibited gene expression and cell death. We also evaluated the effect of the stressor substances on the enhanced infectivity of virus. The presented findings extend methods for large-scale transient recombinant protein production in mammalian cells and suggest that it may be possible to reduce the cytotoxicity of the adenovirus by reducing the virus titer without adversely affecting gene expression levels.

  5. Autonomously bioluminescent mammalian cells for continuous and real-time monitoring of cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan M; Webb, James D; Ripp, Steven A; Sayler, Gary S

    2013-10-28

    Mammalian cell-based in vitro assays have been widely employed as alternatives to animal testing for toxicological studies but have been limited due to the high monetary and time costs of parallel sample preparation that are necessitated due to the destructive nature of firefly luciferase-based screening methods. This video describes the utilization of autonomously bioluminescent mammalian cells, which do not require the destructive addition of a luciferin substrate, as an inexpensive and facile method for monitoring the cytotoxic effects of a compound of interest. Mammalian cells stably expressing the full bacterial bioluminescence (luxCDABEfrp) gene cassette autonomously produce an optical signal that peaks at 490 nm without the addition of an expensive and possibly interfering luciferin substrate, excitation by an external energy source, or destruction of the sample that is traditionally performed during optical imaging procedures. This independence from external stimulation places the burden for maintaining the bioluminescent reaction solely on the cell, meaning that the resultant signal is only detected during active metabolism. This characteristic makes the lux-expressing cell line an excellent candidate for use as a biosentinel against cytotoxic effects because changes in bioluminescent production are indicative of adverse effects on cellular growth and metabolism. Similarly, the autonomous nature and lack of required sample destruction permits repeated imaging of the same sample in real-time throughout the period of toxicant exposure and can be performed across multiple samples using existing imaging equipment in an automated fashion.

  6. Radon exposure system for mammalian cells in culture: Design, operation, and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed, T.M.; Kretz, N.D.; Schlenker, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    A novel system for Rn gas exposure of mammalian cells in culture has been designed, constructed, and used to directly assess both the magnitude and the nature of chronic, low-dose Rn/Rn daughter toxicity of exposed vital lung cells isolated from normal pulmonary tissue, propagated and exposed in vitro. Direct correlations between atmospheric Rn concentrations, alpha-particle fluences, and macro- and microdoses of absorbed radiation doses by lung cells provide for a heretofore unavailable assessment of critical doses to vital cells

  7. Strategies to Suspension Serum-Free Adaptation of Mammalian Cell Lines for Recombinant Glycoprotein Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Angelo Luis; Biaggio, Rafael Tagé; Swiech, Kamilla

    2018-01-01

    Serum-free suspension cultures are preferably required for recombinant protein production due to its readiness in upstream/downstream processing and scale-up, therefore increasing process productivity and competitiveness. This type of culture replaces traditional cell culturing as the presence of animal-derived components may introduce lot-a-lot variability and adventitious pathogens to the process. However, adapting cells to serum-free conditions is challenging, time-consuming, and cell line and medium dependent. In this chapter, we present different approaches that can be used to adapt mammalian cell lines from an anchorage-dependent serum supplemented culture to a suspension serum-free culture.

  8. Interplay between autophagy and programmed cell death in mammalian neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Min Chung

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian neural stem cells (NSCs are of particular interestbecause of their role in brain development and function. Recentfindings suggest the intimate involvement of programmed celldeath (PCD in the turnover of NSCs. However, the underlyingmechanisms of PCD are largely unknown. Although apoptosis isthe best-defined form of PCD, accumulating evidence hasrevealed a wide spectrum of PCD encompassing apoptosis,autophagic cell death (ACD and necrosis. This mini-reviewaims to illustrate a unique regulation of PCD in NSCs. Theresults of our recent studies on autophagic death of adulthippocampal neural stem (HCN cells are also discussed. HCNcell death following insulin withdrawal clearly provides areliable model that can be used to analyze the molecularmechanisms of ACD in the larger context of PCD. Moreresearch efforts are needed to increase our understanding of themolecular basis of NSC turnover under degenerating conditions,such as aging, stress and neurological diseases. Efforts aimed atprotecting and harnessing endogenous NSCs will offer novelopportunities for the development of new therapeutic strategiesfor neuropathologies. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(8: 383-390

  9. Plant single-cell and single-cell-type metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Biswapriya B; Assmann, Sarah M; Chen, Sixue

    2014-10-01

    In conjunction with genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics, plant metabolomics is providing large data sets that are paving the way towards a comprehensive and holistic understanding of plant growth, development, defense, and productivity. However, dilution effects from organ- and tissue-based sampling of metabolomes have limited our understanding of the intricate regulation of metabolic pathways and networks at the cellular level. Recent advances in metabolomics methodologies, along with the post-genomic expansion of bioinformatics knowledge and functional genomics tools, have allowed the gathering of enriched information on individual cells and single cell types. Here we review progress, current status, opportunities, and challenges presented by single cell-based metabolomics research in plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. NMR-based metabolomics of mammalian cell and tissue cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aranibar, Nelly; Borys, Michael; Mackin, Nancy A.; Ly, Van; Abu-Absi, Nicholas; Abu-Absi, Susan; Niemitz, Matthias; Schilling, Bernhard; Li, Zheng Jian; Brock, Barry; Russell, Reb J.; Tymiak, Adrienne; Reily, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy was used to evaluate growth media and the cellular metabolome in two systems of interest to biomedical research. The first of these was a Chinese hamster ovary cell line engineered to express a recombinant protein. Here, NMR spectroscopy and a quantum mechanical total line shape analysis were utilized to quantify 30 metabolites such as amino acids, Krebs cycle intermediates, activated sugars, cofactors, and others in both media and cell extracts. The impact of bioreactor scale and addition of anti-apoptotic agents to the media on the extracellular and intracellular metabolome indicated changes in metabolic pathways of energy utilization. These results shed light into culture parameters that can be manipulated to optimize growth and protein production. Second, metabolomic analysis was performed on the superfusion media in a common model used for drug metabolism and toxicology studies, in vitro liver slices. In this study, it is demonstrated that two of the 48 standard media components, choline and histidine are depleted at a faster rate than many other nutrients. Augmenting the starting media with extra choline and histidine improves the long-term liver slice viability as measured by higher tissues levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), glutathione and ATP, as well as lower LDH levels in the media at time points out to 94 h after initiation of incubation. In both models, media components and cellular metabolites are measured over time and correlated with currently accepted endpoint measures.

  11. Replication of West Nile virus, Rabensburg lineage in mammalian cells is restricted by temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliota Matthew T

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Flavivirus currently consists of approximately 80 single-strand positive-sense RNA viruses. These replicate in a range of hosts including myriad vertebrate, insect, and tick species. As a consequence of this broad host range, the majority of flaviviruses can be propagated in most vertebrate and insect cell cultures. This ability to infect arthropods and vertebrates usually is essential for maintenance of these viruses in nature. But recently, there has been the discovery of a number of flaviviruses that infect mosquitoes but not vertebrates. It remains largely unknown why certain flaviviruses infect vertebrates and mosquitoes while others infect mosquitoes or vertebrates exclusively. Methods Here, we initiated in vitro host range studies of Rabensburg virus (RABV, an intermediate between the mosquito-specific and horizontally transmitted flaviviruses, to provide information on the factor(s that underlie the varying host range of flaviviruses. RABV is an intermediate between the mosquito-specific and horizontally transmitted flaviviruses because it does not infect mammalian or avian cell cultures, house sparrows, or chickens, but it does share genetic characteristics with the Japanese Encephalitis serogroup of flaviviruses. Results In vitro growth kinetic assays revealed the complete abrogation of RABV growth on Vero and E6 cells incubated at temperatures 35°C and higher, but surprisingly RABV infected, replicated efficiently, and displayed overt cytopathic effects (CPE on Vero and E6 cell cultures incubated below 35°C. In contrast, RABV was fully viable, replicated efficiently, and displayed overt CPE on C6/36 cells incubated at 28°C or 37°C, thus implicating temperature as an important factor limiting the host range of RABV. Conclusions These data are critical for further study to more fully identify the determinants that mediate the evolution of biological transmission among flaviviruses. It also will be

  12. Endocytosis and exocytosis of nanoparticles in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Nuri; Park, Ji-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Engineered nanoparticles that can be injected into the human body hold tremendous potential to detect and treat complex diseases. Understanding of the endocytosis and exocytosis mechanisms of nanoparticles is essential for safe and efficient therapeutic application. In particular, exocytosis is of significance in the removal of nanoparticles with drugs and contrast agents from the body, while endocytosis is of great importance for the targeting of nanoparticles in disease sites. Here, we review the recent research on the endocytosis and exocytosis of functionalized nanoparticles based on various sizes, shapes, and surface chemistries. We believe that this review contributes to the design of safe nanoparticles that can efficiently enter and leave human cells and tissues. PMID:24872703

  13. Large-scale RNA interference screening in mammalian cells identifies novel regulators of mutant huntingtin aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Yamanaka

    Full Text Available In polyglutamine (polyQ diseases including Huntington's disease (HD, mutant proteins containing expanded polyQ stretch form aggregates in neurons. Genetic or RNAi screenings in yeast, C. elegans or Drosophila have identified multiple genes modifying polyQ aggregation, a few of which are confirmed effective in mammals. However, the overall molecular mechanism underlying polyQ protein aggregation in mammalian cells still remains obscure. We here perform RNAi screening in mouse neuro2a cells to identify mammalian modifiers for aggregation of mutant huntingtin, a causative protein of HD. By systematic cell transfection and automated cell image analysis, we screen ∼ 12000 shRNA clones and identify 111 shRNAs that either suppress or enhance mutant huntingtin aggregation, without altering its gene expression. Classification of the shRNA-targets suggests that genes with various cellular functions such as gene transcription and protein phosphorylation are involved in modifying the aggregation. Subsequent analysis suggests that, in addition to the aggregation-modifiers sensitive to proteasome inhibition, some of them, such as a transcription factor Tcf20, and kinases Csnk1d and Pik3c2a, are insensitive to it. As for Tcf20, which contains polyQ stretches at N-terminus, its binding to mutant huntingtin aggregates is observed in neuro2a cells and in HD model mouse neurons. Notably, except Pik3c2a, the rest of the modifiers identified here are novel. Thus, our first large-scale RNAi screening in mammalian system identifies previously undescribed genetic players that regulate mutant huntingtin aggregation by several, possibly mammalian-specific mechanisms.

  14. Eps8 regulates hair bundle length and functional maturation of mammalian auditory hair cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Zampini

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Hair cells of the mammalian cochlea are specialized for the dynamic coding of sound stimuli. The transduction of sound waves into electrical signals depends upon mechanosensitive hair bundles that project from the cell's apical surface. Each stereocilium within a hair bundle is composed of uniformly polarized and tightly packed actin filaments. Several stereociliary proteins have been shown to be associated with hair bundle development and function and are known to cause deafness in mice and humans when mutated. The growth of the stereociliar actin core is dynamically regulated at the actin filament barbed ends in the stereociliary tip. We show that Eps8, a protein with actin binding, bundling, and barbed-end capping activities in other systems, is a novel component of the hair bundle. Eps8 is localized predominantly at the tip of the stereocilia and is essential for their normal elongation and function. Moreover, we have found that Eps8 knockout mice are profoundly deaf and that IHCs, but not OHCs, fail to mature into fully functional sensory receptors. We propose that Eps8 directly regulates stereocilia growth in hair cells and also plays a crucial role in the physiological maturation of mammalian cochlear IHCs. Together, our results indicate that Eps8 is critical in coordinating the development and functionality of mammalian auditory hair cells.

  15. Eps8 regulates hair bundle length and functional maturation of mammalian auditory hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampini, Valeria; Rüttiger, Lukas; Johnson, Stuart L; Franz, Christoph; Furness, David N; Waldhaus, Jörg; Xiong, Hao; Hackney, Carole M; Holley, Matthew C; Offenhauser, Nina; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Knipper, Marlies; Masetto, Sergio; Marcotti, Walter

    2011-04-01

    Hair cells of the mammalian cochlea are specialized for the dynamic coding of sound stimuli. The transduction of sound waves into electrical signals depends upon mechanosensitive hair bundles that project from the cell's apical surface. Each stereocilium within a hair bundle is composed of uniformly polarized and tightly packed actin filaments. Several stereociliary proteins have been shown to be associated with hair bundle development and function and are known to cause deafness in mice and humans when mutated. The growth of the stereociliar actin core is dynamically regulated at the actin filament barbed ends in the stereociliary tip. We show that Eps8, a protein with actin binding, bundling, and barbed-end capping activities in other systems, is a novel component of the hair bundle. Eps8 is localized predominantly at the tip of the stereocilia and is essential for their normal elongation and function. Moreover, we have found that Eps8 knockout mice are profoundly deaf and that IHCs, but not OHCs, fail to mature into fully functional sensory receptors. We propose that Eps8 directly regulates stereocilia growth in hair cells and also plays a crucial role in the physiological maturation of mammalian cochlear IHCs. Together, our results indicate that Eps8 is critical in coordinating the development and functionality of mammalian auditory hair cells.

  16. Inositol Hexakisphosphate Kinase 1 (IP6K1) Regulates Inositol Synthesis in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenxi; Ye, Cunqi; Greenberg, Miriam L

    2016-05-13

    myo-Inositol, the precursor of all inositol compounds, has pivotal roles in cell metabolism and signaling pathways. Although physiological studies indicate a strong correlation between abnormal intracellular inositol levels and neurological disorders, very little is known about the regulation of inositol synthesis in mammalian cells. In this study, we report that IP6K1, an inositol hexakisphosphate kinase that catalyzes the synthesis of inositol pyrophosphate, regulates inositol synthesis in mammalian cells. Ip6k1 ablation led to profound changes in DNA methylation and expression of Isyna1 (designated mIno1), which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme inositol-3-phosphate synthase. Interestingly, IP6K1 preferentially bound to the phospholipid phosphatidic acid, and this binding was required for IP6K1 nuclear localization and the regulation of mIno1 transcription. This is the first demonstration of IP6K1 as a novel negative regulator of inositol synthesis in mammalian cells. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Morphological differences between normal and cancerous mammalian cells via multitechnique microscopic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saab, Marie-Belle; Estephan, Elias; Martin, Marta; Bec, Nicole; Larroque, Christian; Cloître, Thierry; Cuisinier, Frédéric; Gergely, Csilla

    2010-04-01

    Despite of the recent year's important advances in breast cancer biology, there is a continuous demand for new microscopic studies able to provide complementary information on cell shape that is an essential feature of the tumour cells affecting their proliferation and spreading. Understanding the relationship between cell shape and cellular function is important for regulation of cell phenotype modification in particular during cancerogenesis. Utilizing a multitechnique approach, we have investigated the morphological differences of normal human mammalian epithelial cells (HMEC) and cancerous breast epithelial cells (MCF7) cells, both mammalian epithelial cells, but from the same cell type, allowing us to compare them. The goal of our investigation was to combine information on morphological properties of these cells provided by imaging techniques like atomic force microscopy (AFM), brightfield microscopy with in-depth images of microtubules via the multiphoton microscopy (MPM). Cells morphology studies for both cells' types were first carried out using the contact mode AFM which has gained great potential for studying biological systems. Brightfield optical imaging was operated in correlation with the AFM measurements. Topography analyses were performed for living cells as well as fixed ones for both MCF7 and HMEC 184 A1 cells. Living cancerous cells are much softer than normal ones, smaller in shape, and more difficult to manipulate. Photonic responses of fixed cells have been then evaluated by the multiphoton microscopy. Due to light's good penetration depth (IR excitation) in biological samples, MPM has already proved to be a reliable and powerful tool in medical and biological deep tissue imaging. Moreover, MPM provides useful three-dimensional information on the structural and optical properties of the specimen due to its intrinsic optical sectioning resolution. Combination of these microscopic techniques allows us to correlate external cell morphology, with

  18. A High-Throughput Microfluidic Platform for Mammalian Cell Transfection and Culturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Kristina; Maerkl, Sebastian J.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian synthetic biology could be augmented through the development of high-throughput microfluidic systems that integrate cellular transfection, culturing, and imaging. We created a microfluidic chip that cultures cells and implements 280 independent transfections at up to 99% efficiency. The chip can perform co-transfections, in which the number of cells expressing each protein and the average protein expression level can be precisely tuned as a function of input DNA concentration and synthetic gene circuits can be optimized on chip. We co-transfected four plasmids to test a histidine kinase signaling pathway and mapped the dose dependence of this network on the level of one of its constituents. The chip is readily integrated with high-content imaging, enabling the evaluation of cellular behavior and protein expression dynamics over time. These features make the transfection chip applicable to high-throughput mammalian protein and synthetic biology studies. PMID:27030663

  19. Inside Job: Methods for Delivering Proteins to the Interior of Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Virginia J; McNaughton, Brian R

    2017-08-17

    Currently, 7 of the top 10 selling drugs are biologics, and all of them are proteins. Their large size, structural complexity, and molecular diversity often results in surfaces capable of potent and selective recognition of receptors that challenge, or evade, traditional small molecules. However, most proteins do not penetrate the lipid bilayer exterior of mammalian cells. This severe limitation dramatically limits the number of disease-relevant receptors that proteins can target and modulate. Given the major role proteins play in modern medicine, and the magnitude of this limitation, it is unsurprising that an enormous amount of effort has been dedicated to overcoming this pesky impediment. In this article, we summarize and evaluate current approaches for intracellular delivery of exogenous proteins to mammalian cells and, in doing so, aim to illuminate fertile ground for future discovery in this critical area of research. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Single-cell photoacoustic thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Wang, Lidai; Li, Chiye; Liu, Yan; Ke, Haixin; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Lihong V

    2013-02-01

    A novel photoacoustic thermometric method is presented for simultaneously imaging cells and sensing their temperature. With three-seconds-per-frame imaging speed, a temperature resolution of 0.2°C was achieved in a photo-thermal cell heating experiment. Compared to other approaches, the photoacoustic thermometric method has the advantage of not requiring custom-developed temperature-sensitive biosensors. This feature should facilitate the conversion of single-cell thermometry into a routine lab tool and make it accessible to a much broader biological research community.

  1. Systems analysis of N-glycan processing in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Hossler

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available N-glycosylation plays a key role in the quality of many therapeutic glycoprotein biologics. The biosynthesis reactions of these oligosaccharides are a type of network in which a relatively small number of enzymes give rise to a large number of N-glycans as the reaction intermediates and terminal products. Multiple glycans appear on the glycoprotein molecules and give rise to a heterogeneous product. Controlling the glycan distribution is critical to the quality control of the product. Understanding N-glycan biosynthesis and the etiology of microheterogeneity would provide physiological insights, and facilitate cellular engineering to enhance glycoprotein quality. We developed a mathematical model of glycan biosynthesis in the Golgi and analyzed the various reaction variables on the resulting glycan distribution. The Golgi model was modeled as four compartments in series. The mechanism of protein transport across the Golgi is still controversial. From the viewpoint of their holding time distribution characteristics, the two main hypothesized mechanisms, vesicular transport and Golgi maturation models, resemble four continuous mixing-tanks (4CSTR and four plug-flow reactors (4PFR in series, respectively. The two hypotheses were modeled accordingly and compared. The intrinsic reaction kinetics were first evaluated using a batch (or single PFR reactor. A sufficient holding time is needed to produce terminally-processed glycans. Altering enzyme concentrations has a complex effect on the final glycan distribution, as the changes often affect many reaction steps in the network. Comparison of the glycan profiles predicted by the 4CSTR and 4PFR models points to the 4PFR system as more likely to be the true mechanism. To assess whether glycan heterogeneity can be eliminated in the biosynthesis of biotherapeutics the 4PFR model was further used to assess whether a homogeneous glycan profile can be created through metabolic engineering. We demonstrate by

  2. Mutations affecting lipopolysaccharide enhance ail-mediated entry of Yersinia enterocolitica into mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, D E

    1994-07-01

    Two genes of Yersinia enterocolitica, inv and ail, have been identified as having a role in the bacterial adherence to and entry into mammalian cells in vitro. Expression of both genes is regulated by temperature. In stationary phase, ail gene expression is detectable only in bacteria at 37 degrees C, not at lower temperatures. An inv mutant derivative of Y. enterocolitica, which cannot enter mammalian cells when grown at 30 degrees C because of the lack of both inv and ail gene products, was mutagenized with the transposons mini-Tn10 and Tn5B50 to look for an increase in Ail-mediated cell entry. Sixteen mutants that could enter tissue culture cells after growth at 30 degrees C were selected. All of the mutants had increased cell surface Ail levels as detected by an Ail-specific monoclonal antibody. All of the ten Tn5B50 and one of the six mini-Tn10 mutants showed no increase in ail expression, but they had alterations in their lipopolysaccharide (LPS) such that no O side chains were detectable in bacteria grown at 30 degrees C. Thus, these mutants that are increased in their ability to enter cells appear to be so as a result of a change in the LPS on the surface resulting in increased levels of Ail protein able to interact with the mammalian cell surface. In the remaining mini-Tn10 mutants, LPS is normal, and the increase in cell surface Ail levels appears to be due to an increase in ail mRNA present in the cell. These mutants may therefore be affecting a repressor of ail gene expression.

  3. Toxicity of tungsten carbide and cobalt-doped tungsten carbide nanoparticles in mammalian cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Susanne; Busch, Wibke; Kühnel, Dana; Springer, Armin; Meissner, Tobias; Holke, Roland; Scholz, Stefan; Iwe, Maria; Pompe, Wolfgang; Gelinsky, Michael; Potthoff, Annegret; Richter, Volkmar; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Schirmer, Kristin

    2009-04-01

    Tungsten carbide nanoparticles are being explored for their use in the manufacture of hard metals. To develop nanoparticles for broad applications, potential risks to human health and the environment should be evaluated and taken into consideration. We aimed to assess the toxicity of well-characterized tungsten carbide (WC) and cobalt-doped tungsten carbide (WC-Co) nanoparticle suspensions in an array of mammalian cells. We examined acute toxicity of WC and of WC-Co (10% weight content Co) nanoparticles in different human cell lines (lung, skin, and colon) as well as in rat neuronal and glial cells (i.e., primary neuronal and astroglial cultures and the oligodendrocyte precursor cell line OLN-93). Furthermore, using electron microscopy, we assessed whether nanoparticles can be taken up by living cells. We chose these in vitro systems in order to evaluate for potential toxicity of the nanoparticles in different mammalian organs (i.e., lung, skin, intestine, and brain). Chemical-physical characterization confirmed that WC as well as WC-Co nanoparticles with a mean particle size of 145 nm form stable suspensions in serum-containing cell culture media. WC nanoparticles were not acutely toxic to the studied cell lines. However, cytotoxicity became apparent when particles were doped with Co. The most sensitive were astrocytes and colon epithelial cells. Cytotoxicity of WC-Co nanoparticles was higher than expected based on the ionic Co content of the particles. Analysis by electron microscopy demonstrated presence of WC nanoparticles within mammalian cells. Our findings demonstrate that doping of WC nanoparticles with Co markedly increases their cytotoxic effect and that the presence of WC-Co in particulate form is essential to elicit this combinatorial effect.

  4. Toxicity of Tungsten Carbide and Cobalt-Doped Tungsten Carbide Nanoparticles in Mammalian Cells in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Susanne; Busch, Wibke; Kühnel, Dana; Springer, Armin; Meißner, Tobias; Holke, Roland; Scholz, Stefan; Iwe, Maria; Pompe, Wolfgang; Gelinsky, Michael; Potthoff, Annegret; Richter, Volkmar; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Schirmer, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    Background Tungsten carbide nanoparticles are being explored for their use in the manufacture of hard metals. To develop nanoparticles for broad applications, potential risks to human health and the environment should be evaluated and taken into consideration. Objective We aimed to assess the toxicity of well-characterized tungsten carbide (WC) and cobaltdoped tungsten carbide (WC-Co) nanoparticle suspensions in an array of mammalian cells. Methods We examined acute toxicity of WC and of WC-Co (10% weight content Co) nanoparticles in different human cell lines (lung, skin, and colon) as well as in rat neuronal and glial cells (i.e., primary neuronal and astroglial cultures and the oligodendro cyte precursor cell line OLN-93). Furthermore, using electron microscopy, we assessed whether nanoparticles can be taken up by living cells. We chose these in vitro systems in order to evaluate for potential toxicity of the nanoparticles in different mammalian organs (i.e., lung, skin, intestine, and brain). Results Chemical–physical characterization confirmed that WC as well as WC-Co nanoparticles with a mean particle size of 145 nm form stable suspensions in serum-containing cell culture media. WC nanoparticles were not acutely toxic to the studied cell lines. However, cytotoxicity became apparent when particles were doped with Co. The most sensitive were astrocytes and colon epithelial cells. Cytotoxicity of WC-Co nanoparticles was higher than expected based on the ionic Co content of the particles. Analysis by electron microscopy demonstrated presence of WC nanoparticles within mammalian cells. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that doping of WC nanoparticles with Co markedly increases their cytotoxic effect and that the presence of WC-Co in particulate form is essential to elicit this combinatorial effect. PMID:19440490

  5. Targeted Nanodiamonds for Identification of Subcellular Protein Assemblies in Mammalian Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lake, Michael P.; Bouchard, Louis-S.

    2017-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can be used to successfully determine the structures of proteins. However, such studies are typically done ex situ after extraction of the protein from the cellular environment. Here we describe an application for nanodiamonds as targeted intensity contrast labels in biological TEM, using the nuclear pore complex (NPC) as a model macroassembly. We demonstrate that delivery of antibody-conjugated nanodiamonds to live mammalian cells using maltotriose-conj...

  6. [Mathematical modeling of synergistic interaction of sequential thermoradiation action on mammalian cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkina, S V; Semkina, M A; Kritskiĭ, R O; Petin, V G

    2010-01-01

    Data obtained by other authors for mammalian cells treated by sequential action of ionizing radiation and hyperthermia were used to estimate the dependence of synergistic enhancement ratio on the ratio of damages induced by these agents. Experimental results were described and interpreted by means of the mathematical model of synergism in accordance with which the synergism is expected to result from the additional lethal damage arising from the interaction of sublesions induced by both agents.

  7. Mutagenicity of arsenic in mammalian cells: role of reactive oxygen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, T. K.; Liu, S. X.; Waldren, C.

    1998-01-01

    Arsenite, the trivalent form of arsenic present in the environment, is a known human carcinogen that lacked mutagenic activity in bacterial and standard mammalian cell mutation assays. We show herein that when evaluated in an assay (AL cell assay), in which both intragenic and multilocus mutations are detectable, that arsenite is in fact a strong dose-dependent mutagen and that it induces mostly large deletion mutations. Cotreatment of cells with the oxygen radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide significantly reduces the mutagenicity of arsenite. Thus, the carcinogenicity of arsenite can be explained at least in part by it being a mutagen that depends on reactive oxygen species for its activity.

  8. Bactericidal Antibiotics Induce Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Oxidative Damage in Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, James C.; Liesa, Marc; Morones-Ramirez, J Ruben; Slomovic, Shimyn; Molina, Anthony; Shirihai, Orian S.; Collins, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged antibiotic treatment can lead to detrimental side effects in patients, including ototoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and tendinopathy, yet the mechanisms underlying the effects of antibiotics in mammalian systems remain unclear. It has been suggested that bactericidal antibiotics induce the formation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in bacteria. We show that clinically relevant doses of bactericidal antibiotics—quinolones, aminoglycosides, and β-lactams—cause mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS overproduction in mammalian cells. We demonstrate that these bactericidal antibiotic–induced effects lead to oxidative damage to DNA, proteins, and membrane lipids. Mice treated with bactericidal antibiotics exhibited elevated oxidative stress markers in the blood, oxidative tissue damage, and up-regulated expression of key genes involved in antioxidant defense mechanisms, which points to the potential physiological relevance of these antibiotic effects. The deleterious effects of bactericidal antibiotics were alleviated in cell culture and in mice by the administration of the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine or prevented by preferential use of bacteriostatic antibiotics. This work highlights the role of antibiotics in the production of oxidative tissue damage in mammalian cells and presents strategies to mitigate or prevent the resulting damage, with the goal of improving the safety of antibiotic treatment in people. PMID:23825301

  9. Modification of N-glycosylation sites allows secretion of bacterial chondroitinase ABC from mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Elizabeth M.; Fyfe, Ian; Gardiner, Sonya; Li, Li; Warren, Philippa; Fawcett, James W.; Keynes, Roger J.; Rogers, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Although many eukaryotic proteins have been secreted by transfected bacterial cells, little is known about how a bacterial protein is treated as it passes through the secretory pathway when expressed in a eukaryotic cell. The eukaryotic N-glycosylation system could interfere with folding and secretion of prokaryotic proteins whose sequence has not been adapted for glycosylation in structurally appropriate locations. Here we show that such interference does indeed occur for chondroitinase ABC from the bacterium Proteus vulgaris, and can be overcome by eliminating potential N-glycosylation sites. Chondroitinase ABC was heavily glycosylated when expressed in mammalian cells or in a mammalian translation system, and this process prevented secretion of functional enzyme. Directed mutagenesis of selected N-glycosylation sites allowed efficient secretion of active chondroitinase. As these proteoglycans are known to inhibit regeneration of axons in the mammalian central nervous system, the modified chondroitinase gene is a potential tool for gene therapy to promote neural regeneration, ultimately in human spinal cord injury. PMID:19900493

  10. Comparative mammalian cell cytotoxicity of wastewater with elevated bromide and iodide after chlorination, chloramination, or ozonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shengkun; Nguyen, Thanh H; Plewa, Michael J

    2017-08-01

    Recycling wastewater is becoming more common as communities around the world try to better control their water resources against an increased frequency of either prolonged droughts or intense flooding. For communities in coastal areas, wastewaters may contain elevated levels of bromide (Br - ) and iodide (I - ) from seawater intrusion or high mineral content of source waters. Disinfection of such wastewater is mandatory to prevent the spread of pathogens, however little is known about the toxicity of wastewater after disinfection in the presence of Br - and I - . In this study we compared the induction of chronic cytotoxicity in mammalian cells in samples of municipal secondary wastewater effluent amended with elevated levels of Br - /I - after disinfection by chlorine, chloramines or ozone to identify which disinfection process generated wastewater with the lowest level of adverse biological response. Chlorination increased mammalian cell cytotoxicity by 5 times as compared to non-disinfected controls. Chloramination produced disinfected wastewater that expressed 6.3 times more cytotoxicity than the non-disinfected controls and was 1.3 times more cytotoxic than the chlorinated samples. Ozonation produced wastewater with cytotoxicity comparable to the non-disinfected controls and was at least 4 times less cytotoxic than the chlorine disinfected wastewaters. These results indicate that compared to chlorination and chloramination, ozonation of wastewater with high Br - /I - levels yielded the lowest mammalian cell cytotoxicity, suggesting its potential as a more favorable method to disinfect wastewater with minimizing the biological toxicity in mind. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Delivery of proteins to mammalian cells via gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinemann, D; Kalies, S; Schomaker, M; Ertmer, W; Meyer, H; Ripken, T; Murua Escobar, H

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle laser interactions are in widespread use in cell manipulation. In particular, molecular medicine needs techniques for the directed delivery of molecules into mammalian cells. Proteins are the final mediator of most cellular cascades. However, despite several methodical approaches, the efficient delivery of proteins to cells remains challenging. This paper presents a new protein transfection technique via laser scanning of cells previously incubated with gold nanoparticles. The laser-induced plasmonic effects on the gold nanoparticles cause a transient permeabilization of the cellular membrane, allowing proteins to enter the cell. Applying this technique, it was possible to deliver green fluorescent protein into mammalian cells with an efficiency of 43%, maintaining a high level of cell viability. Furthermore, a functional delivery of Caspase 3, an apoptosis mediating protein, was demonstrated and evaluated in several cellular assays. Compared to conventional protein transfection techniques such as microinjection, the methodical approach presented here enables high-throughput transfection of about 10 000 cells per second. Moreover, a well-defined point in time of delivery is guaranteed by gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection, allowing the detailed temporal analysis of cellular pathways and protein trafficking. (papers)

  12. Cytotoxic Effects of Tropodithietic Acid on Mammalian Clonal Cell Lines of Neuronal and Glial Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Wichmann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The marine metabolite tropodithietic acid (TDA, produced by several Roseobacter clade bacteria, is known for its broad antimicrobial activity. TDA is of interest not only as a probiotic in aquaculture, but also because it might be of use as an antibacterial agent in non-marine or non-aquatic environments, and thus the potentially cytotoxic influences on eukaryotic cells need to be evaluated. The present study was undertaken to investigate its effects on cells of the mammalian nervous system, i.e., neuronal N2a cells and OLN-93 cells as model systems for nerve cells and glia. The data show that in both cell lines TDA exerted morphological changes and cytotoxic effects at a concentration of 0.3–0.5 µg/mL (1.4–2.4 µM. Furthermore, TDA caused a breakdown of the mitochondrial membrane potential, the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1/2, and the induction of the small heat shock protein HSP32/HO-1, which is considered as a sensor of oxidative stress. The cytotoxic effects were accompanied by an increase in intracellular Ca2+-levels, the disturbance of the microtubule network, and the reorganization of the microfilament system. Hence, mammalian cells are a sensitive target for the action of TDA and react by the activation of a stress response resulting in cell death.

  13. Fluorescence and confocal imaging of mammalian cells using conjugated oligoelectrolytes with phenylenevinylene core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milczarek, Justyna; Pawlowska, Roza; Zurawinski, Remigiusz; Lukasik, Beata; Garner, Logan E.; Chworos, Arkadiusz

    2017-05-01

    Over the last few years, considerable efforts are taken, in order to find a molecular fluorescent probe fulfilling their applicability requirements. Due to a good optical properties and affinity to biological structures conjugated oligoelectrolytes (COEs) can be considered as a promising dyes for application in fluorescence-based bioimaging. In this work, we synthetized COEs with phenylenevinylene core (PV-COEs) and applied as fluorescent membranous-specific probes. Cytotoxicity effects of each COE were probed on cancerous and non-cancerous cell types and little to no toxicity effects were observed at the high range of concentrations. The intensity of cell fluorescence following the COE staining was determined by the photoluminescence analysis and fluorescence activated cell sorting method (FACS). Intercalation of tested COEs into mammalian cell membranes was revealed by fluorescent and confocal microscopy colocalization with commercial dyes specific for cellular structures including mitochondria, Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum. The phenylenevinylene conjugated oligoelectrolytes have been found to be suitable for fluorescent bioimaging of mammalian cells and membrane-rich organelles. Due to their water solubility coupled with spontaneous intercalation into cells, favorable photophysical features, ease of cell staining, low cytotoxicity and selectivity for membranous structures, PV-COEs can be applied as markers for fluorescence imaging of a variety of cell types.

  14. Quantitative analysis of gold and carbon nanoparticles in mammalian cells by flow cytometry light scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Gang [Nanjing University, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences (China); Liu, Naicheng; Wang, Zhenheng [Nanjing University, Department of Orthopedics, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine (China); Shi, Tongguo; Gan, Jingjing; Wang, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Junfeng, E-mail: jfzhang@nju.edu.cn [Nanjing University, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences (China)

    2017-02-15

    Nanoparticle-based applications for diagnostics and therapeutics have been extensively studied. These applications require a profound understanding of the fate of nanoparticles (NPs) in cellular environments. However, until now, few analytical methods are available and most of them rely on fluorescent properties or special elements of NPs; therefore, for NPs without observable optical properties or special elements, the existing methods are hardly applicable. In this study, we introduce a flow cytometry light scattering (FCLS)-based approach that quantifies in situ NPs accurately in mammalian cells. Continuous cells of heterogeneous human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2 cells), mouse peritoneal macrophages (MPM), and human adenocarcinomic alveolar basal epithelia (A549 cells) were cultured with NPs with certain concentrations and size. The intensity of the flow cytometric side scattered light, which indicates the quantity of NPs in the cells, was analyzed. The result shows an accurate size- and dose-dependent uptake of Au NPs (5, 30, 250 nm) in Caco-2 cells. The size- and dose- dependence of Au NPs (5, 30, 250 nm) and carbon NPs (50, 500 nm) in cells was validated by transmission electron microscope (TEM). This paper demonstrates the great potential of flow cytometry light scattering in the quantitative study of the size and dose effect on in situ metallic or non-metallic NPs in mammalian cells.

  15. Methods for Using Small Non-Coding RNAs to Improve Recombinant Protein Expression in Mammalian Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Inwood

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to produce recombinant proteins by utilizing different “cell factories” revolutionized the biotherapeutic and pharmaceutical industry. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells are the dominant industrial producer, especially for antibodies. Human embryonic kidney cells (HEK, while not being as widely used as CHO cells, are used where CHO cells are unable to meet the needs for expression, such as growth factors. Therefore, improving recombinant protein expression from mammalian cells is a priority, and continuing effort is being devoted to this topic. Non-coding RNAs are RNA segments that are not translated into a protein and often have a regulatory role. Since their discovery, major progress has been made towards understanding their functions. Non-coding RNA has been investigated extensively in relation to disease, especially cancer, and recently they have also been used as a method for engineering cells to improve their protein expression capability. In this review, we provide information about methods used to identify non-coding RNAs with the potential of improving recombinant protein expression in mammalian cell lines.

  16. Antioxidant activity of Ge-132, a synthetic organic germanium, on cultured mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Takeyoshi; Hanyu, Takashi; Nozaki, Kota; Kataoka, Kosuke; Kawatani, Tomoro; Asahi, Toru; Sawamura, Naoya

    2018-03-02

    Ge-132 is a synthetic organic germanium that is used as a dietary supplement. The antioxidant activity of Ge-132 on cultured mammalian cells was investigated in this study. First, Ge-132 cytotoxicity on mammalian cultured cells was determined by measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels. Ge-132 had no cytotoxic effect on three different cell lines. Second, the cell proliferative effect of Ge-132 was determined by measuring ATP content of whole cells and counting them. Ge-132 treatment of CHO-K1 and SH-SY5Y cells promoted cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Finally, antioxidant activity of Ge-132 against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress was determined by measuring the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and carbonylated proteins. Pre-incubation of CHO-K1 and SH-SY5Y cells with Ge-132 suppressed intracellular ROS production and carbonylated protein levels induced by hydrogen peroxide. Our results suggest that Ge-132 has antioxidant activity against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress.

  17. ACh-induced hyperpolarization and decreased resistance in mammalian type II vestibular hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppi, Lauren A; Tabatabaee, Hessam; Drury, Hannah R; Jobling, Phillip; Callister, Robert J; Migliaccio, Americo A; Jordan, Paivi M; Holt, Joseph C; Rabbitt, Richard D; Lim, Rebecca; Brichta, Alan M

    2018-01-01

    In the mammalian vestibular periphery, electrical activation of the efferent vestibular system (EVS) has two effects on afferent activity: 1) it increases background afferent discharge and 2) decreases afferent sensitivity to rotational stimuli. Although the cellular mechanisms underlying these two contrasting afferent responses remain obscure, we postulated that the reduction in afferent sensitivity was attributed, in part, to the activation of α9- containing nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (α9*nAChRs) and small-conductance potassium channels (SK) in vestibular type II hair cells, as demonstrated in the peripheral vestibular system of other vertebrates. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of the predominant EVS neurotransmitter ACh on vestibular type II hair cells from wild-type (wt) and α9-subunit nAChR knockout (α9 -/- ) mice. Immunostaining for choline acetyltransferase revealed there were no obvious gross morphological differences in the peripheral EVS innervation among any of these strains. ACh application onto wt type II hair cells, at resting potentials, produced a fast inward current followed by a slower outward current, resulting in membrane hyperpolarization and decreased membrane resistance. Hyperpolarization and decreased resistance were due to gating of SK channels. Consistent with activation of α9*nAChRs and SK channels, these ACh-sensitive currents were antagonized by the α9*nAChR blocker strychnine and SK blockers apamin and tamapin. Type II hair cells from α9 -/- mice, however, failed to respond to ACh at all. These results confirm the critical importance of α9nAChRs in efferent modulation of mammalian type II vestibular hair cells. Application of exogenous ACh reduces electrical impedance, thereby decreasing type II hair cell sensitivity. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Expression of α9 nicotinic subunit was crucial for fast cholinergic modulation of mammalian vestibular type II hair cells. These findings show a multifaceted

  18. Tyrosine hydroxylase positive perisomatic rings are formed around various amacrine cell types in the mammalian retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debertin, Gábor; Kántor, Orsolya; Kovács-Öller, Tamás; Balogh, Lajos; Szabó-Meleg, Edina; Orbán, József; Nyitrai, Miklós; Völgyi, Béla

    2015-08-01

    Dopaminergic neurons of the central nervous system are mainly found in nuclei of the midbrain and the hypothalamus that provide subcortical and cortical targets with a rich and divergent innervation. Disturbance of signaling through this system underlies a variety of deteriorating conditions such as Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia. Although retinal dopaminergic signaling is largely independent of the above circuitry, malfunction of the retinal dopaminergic system has been associated with anomalies in visual adaptation and a number of retinal disorders. Dopamine (DA) is released mainly in a paracrine manner by a population of tyrosine hydroxylase expressing (TH(+) ) amacrine cells (AC) of the mammalian retina; thus DA reaches virtually all retinal cell types by diffusion. Despite this paracrine release, however, the so called AII ACs have been considered as the main targets of DA signaling owing to a characteristic and robust ring-like TH(+) innervation to the soma/dendritic-stalk area of AII cells. This apparent selectivity of TH(+) innervation seems to contradict the divergent DAergic signaling scheme of other brain loci. In this study, however, we show evidence for intimate proximity between TH(+) rings and somata of neurochemically identified non-AII cells. We also show that this phenomenon is not species specific, as we observe it in popular mammalian animal models including the rabbit, the rat, and the mouse. Finally, our dataset suggests the existence of further, yet unidentified post-synaptic targets of TH(+) dendritic rings. Therefore, we hypothesize that TH(+) ring-like structures target the majority of ACs non-selectively and that such contacts are wide-spread among mammals. Therefore, this new view of inner retinal TH(+) innervation resembles the divergent DAergic innervation of other brain areas through the mesolimbic, mesocortical, and mesostriatal signaling streams. AII amacrine cells have been considered as the main targets of dopamine

  19. Oxidized base damage and single-strand break repair in mammalian genomes: role of disordered regions and posttranslational modifications in early enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Muralidhar L; Izumi, Tadahide; Mitra, Sankar

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative genome damage induced by reactive oxygen species includes oxidized bases, abasic (AP) sites, and single-strand breaks, all of which are repaired via the evolutionarily conserved base excision repair/single-strand break repair (BER/SSBR) pathway. BER/SSBR in mammalian cells is complex, with preferred and backup sub-pathways, and is linked to genome replication and transcription. The early BER/SSBR enzymes, namely, DNA glycosylases (DGs) and the end-processing proteins such as abasic endonuclease 1 (APE1), form complexes with downstream repair (and other noncanonical) proteins via pairwise interactions. Furthermore, a unique feature of mammalian early BER/SSBR enzymes is the presence of a disordered terminal extension that is absent in their Escherichia coli prototypes. These nonconserved segments usually contain organelle-targeting signals, common interaction interfaces, and sites of posttranslational modifications that may be involved in regulating their repair function including lesion scanning. Finally, the linkage of BER/SSBR deficiency to cancer, aging, and human neurodegenerative diseases, and therapeutic targeting of BER/SSBR are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Single-Cell Western Blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkala, Elly; Herr, Amy E

    2015-01-01

    Little headway has been made in single cell protein analysis, aside from tools that rely solely on antibody-probe based detection (i.e., flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry), which are limited by low specificity and multiplexing capabilities. To address these protein analysis gaps, we have introduced a single-cell western blot (scWestern). The protein assay is capable of highly specific analysis by coupling antibody-based detection with a polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) protein separation. Cells are settled via gravity into polyacrylamide (PA) microwells, chemically lysed in the wells, and then subjected to PAGE through the walls of the microwells and into the surrounding PA gel. Over a thousand single-cell separations are performed simultaneously, and multiple protein targets of interest are investigated. After PAGE separation, photo-immobilization of all proteins to the gel allows for antibody probing and lends to the archival quality of the scWestern assay where new proteins targets can be investigated months after the initial separations are performed.

  1. Thicker three-dimensional tissue from a "symbiotic recycling system" combining mammalian cells and algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Yuji; Kagawa, Yuki; Sakaguchi, Katsuhisa; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo

    2017-01-31

    In this paper, we report an in vitro co-culture system that combines mammalian cells and algae, Chlorococcum littorale, to create a three-dimensional (3-D) tissue. While the C2C12 mouse myoblasts and rat cardiac cells consumed oxygen actively, intense oxygen production was accounted for by the algae even in the co-culture system. Although cell metabolism within thicker cardiac cell-layered tissues showed anaerobic respiration, the introduction of innovative co-cultivation partially changed the metabolism to aerobic respiration. Moreover, the amount of glucose consumption and lactate production in the cardiac tissues and the amount of ammonia in the culture media decreased significantly when co-cultivated with algae. In the cardiac tissues devoid of algae, delamination was observed histologically, and the release of creatine kinase (CK) from the tissues showed severe cardiac cell damage. On the other hand, the layered cell tissues with algae were observed to be in a good histological condition, with less than one-fifth decline in CK release. The co-cultivation with algae improved the culture condition of the thicker tissues, resulting in the formation of 160 μm-thick cardiac tissues. Thus, the present study proposes the possibility of creating an in vitro "symbiotic recycling system" composed of mammalian cells and algae.

  2. Analysis of the factors in determining radiosensitivity in mammalian cells by using radio-sensitive and -resistant clones isolated from HeLa S3 cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikaido, Osamu; Horikawa, Masakatsu

    1976-01-01

    The factors in determining radiosensitivity of cultured mammalian cells were analysed by using two clones each having different radiosensitivities. The radiosensitive clones were isolated from HeLa S3 cells by the N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-treatment, X-irradiation (200 R) and 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR)-visible light method. On the other hand, the radioresistant clone was isolated by single X-irradiation (2000 R) from MNNG-treated HeLa S3 cell population. The radiosensitivities expressed in D sub(o) and D sub(q) values were 110 and 140 R in radiosensitive SM-1a clone and 180 and 230 R in radioresistant RM-1b clone respectively. The biological and biochemical characteristics of both clones such as the distribution of chromosome numbers, formation and rejoining of single strand breaks in DNA caused by X-irradiation, non-protein sulfhydryl (NPSH) and apparent total sulfhydryl (APSH) contents were measured. Among the characteristics analysed, different contents of NPSH in the cell were well correlated to their daiosensitivities among the original HeLa S3 cells, SM-1a and RM-1b clone. Additionally, it was found that the radioresistant L.P3 Co-3 cells isolated by Tsuboi et al. from the original mouse L.P3 cells by means of serial irradiation with 60 Co γ-rays have more abundant NPSH than the original L.P3 cells. From these results, it can be concluded that the amount of NPSH play the main role in determining radiosensitivity in cultured mammalian cells. (auth.)

  3. Detection, characterization, and spontaneous differentiation in vitro of very small embryonic-like putative stem cells in adult mammalian ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parte, Seema; Bhartiya, Deepa; Telang, Jyoti; Daithankar, Vinita; Salvi, Vinita; Zaveri, Kusum; Hinduja, Indira

    2011-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to detect, characterize, and study differentiation potential of stem cells in adult rabbit, sheep, monkey, and menopausal human ovarian surface epithelium (OSE). Two distinct populations of putative stem cells (PSCs) of variable size were detected in scraped OSE, one being smaller and other similar in size to the surrounding red blood cells in the scraped OSE. The smaller 1-3 μm very small embryonic-like PSCs were pluripotent in nature with nuclear Oct-4 and cell surface SSEA-4, whereas the bigger 4-7 μm cells with cytoplasmic localization of Oct-4 and minimal expression of SSEA-4 were possibly the tissue committed progenitor stem cells. Pluripotent gene transcripts of Oct-4, Oct-4A, Nanog, Sox-2, TERT, and Stat-3 in human and sheep OSE were detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The PSCs underwent spontaneous differentiation into oocyte-like structures, parthenote-like structures, embryoid body-like structures, cells with neuronal-like phenotype, and embryonic stem cell-like colonies, whereas the epithelial cells transformed into mesenchymal phenotype by epithelial-mesenchymal transition in 3 weeks of OSE culture. Germ cell markers like c-Kit, DAZL, GDF-9, VASA, and ZP4 were immuno-localized in oocyte-like structures. In conclusion, as opposed to the existing view of OSE being a bipotent source of oocytes and granulosa cells, mammalian ovaries harbor distinct very small embryonic-like PSCs and tissue committed progenitor stem cells population that have the potential to develop into oocyte-like structures in vitro, whereas mesenchymal fibroblasts appear to form supporting granulosa-like somatic cells. Research at the single-cell level, including complete gene expression profiling, is required to further confirm whether postnatal oogenesis is a conserved phenomenon in adult mammals.

  4. The ciliary margin zone of the mammalian retina generates retinal ganglion cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcucci, Florencia; Murcia-Belmonte, Veronica; Coca, Yaiza; Ferreiro-Galve, Susana; Wang, Qing; Kuwajima, Takaaki; Khalid, Sania; Ross, M. Elizabeth; Herrera, Eloisa; Mason, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Summary The retina of lower vertebrates grows continuously by integrating new neurons generated from progenitors in the ciliary margin zone (CMZ). Whether the mammalian CMZ provides the neural retina with retinal cells is controversial. Live-imaging of embryonic retina expressing eGFP in the CMZ shows that cells migrate laterally from the CMZ to the neural retina where differentiated retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) reside. As Cyclin D2, a cell-cycle regulator, is enriched in ventral CMZ, we analyzed Cyclin D2−/− mice to test whether the CMZ is a source of retinal cells. Neurogenesis is diminished in Cyclin D2 mutants, leading to a reduction of RGCs in the ventral retina. In line with these findings, in the albino retina, the decreased production of ipsilateral RGCs is correlated with fewer Cyclin D2+ cells. Together, these results implicate the mammalian CMZ as a neurogenic site that produces RGCs and whose proper generation depends on Cyclin D2 activity. PMID:28009286

  5. Cytotoxicity Analysis of Three Bacillus thuringiensis Subsp. israelensis δ-Endotoxins towards Insect and Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira Corrêa, Roberto Franco; Ardisson-Araújo, Daniel Mendes Pereira; Monnerat, Rose Gomes; Ribeiro, Bergmann Morais

    2012-01-01

    Three members of the δ-endotoxin group of toxins expressed by Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis, Cyt2Ba, Cry4Aa and Cry11A, were individually expressed in recombinant acrystalliferous B. thuringiensis strains for in vitro evaluation of their toxic activities against insect and mammalian cell lines. Both Cry4Aa and Cry11A toxins, activated with either trypsin or Spodoptera frugiperda gastric juice (GJ), resulted in different cleavage patterns for the activated toxins as seen by SDS-PAGE. The GJ-processed proteins were not cytotoxic to insect cell cultures. On the other hand, the combination of the trypsin-activated Cry4Aa and Cry11A toxins yielded the highest levels of cytotoxicity to all insect cells tested. The combination of activated Cyt2Ba and Cry11A also showed higher toxic activity than that of toxins activated individually. When activated Cry4Aa, Cry11A and Cyt2Ba were used simultaneously in the same assay a decrease in toxic activity was observed in all insect cells tested. No toxic effect was observed for the trypsin-activated Cry toxins in mammalian cells, but activated Cyt2Ba was toxic to human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) when tested at 20 µg/mL. PMID:23029407

  6. The Ciliary Margin Zone of the Mammalian Retina Generates Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcucci, Florencia; Murcia-Belmonte, Veronica; Wang, Qing; Coca, Yaiza; Ferreiro-Galve, Susana; Kuwajima, Takaaki; Khalid, Sania; Ross, M Elizabeth; Mason, Carol; Herrera, Eloisa

    2016-12-20

    The retina of lower vertebrates grows continuously by integrating new neurons generated from progenitors in the ciliary margin zone (CMZ). Whether the mammalian CMZ provides the neural retina with retinal cells is controversial. Live imaging of embryonic retina expressing eGFP in the CMZ shows that cells migrate laterally from the CMZ to the neural retina where differentiated retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) reside. Because Cyclin D2, a cell-cycle regulator, is enriched in ventral CMZ, we analyzed Cyclin D2 -/- mice to test whether the CMZ is a source of retinal cells. Neurogenesis is diminished in Cyclin D2 mutants, leading to a reduction of RGCs in the ventral retina. In line with these findings, in the albino retina, the decreased production of ipsilateral RGCs is correlated with fewer Cyclin D2 + cells. Together, these results implicate the mammalian CMZ as a neurogenic site that produces RGCs and whose proper generation depends on Cyclin D2 activity. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cytotoxicity analysis of three Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis δ-endotoxins towards insect and mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Franco Teixeira Corrêa

    Full Text Available Three members of the δ-endotoxin group of toxins expressed by Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis, Cyt2Ba, Cry4Aa and Cry11A, were individually expressed in recombinant acrystalliferous B. thuringiensis strains for in vitro evaluation of their toxic activities against insect and mammalian cell lines. Both Cry4Aa and Cry11A toxins, activated with either trypsin or Spodoptera frugiperda gastric juice (GJ, resulted in different cleavage patterns for the activated toxins as seen by SDS-PAGE. The GJ-processed proteins were not cytotoxic to insect cell cultures. On the other hand, the combination of the trypsin-activated Cry4Aa and Cry11A toxins yielded the highest levels of cytotoxicity to all insect cells tested. The combination of activated Cyt2Ba and Cry11A also showed higher toxic activity than that of toxins activated individually. When activated Cry4Aa, Cry11A and Cyt2Ba were used simultaneously in the same assay a decrease in toxic activity was observed in all insect cells tested. No toxic effect was observed for the trypsin-activated Cry toxins in mammalian cells, but activated Cyt2Ba was toxic to human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 when tested at 20 µg/mL.

  8. Endothelial cell tropism is a determinant of H5N1 pathogenesis in mammalian species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smanla Tundup

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning the unusually high virulence of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses in mammalian species remains unknown. Here, we investigated if the cell tropism of H5N1 virus is a determinant of enhanced virulence in mammalian species. We engineered H5N1 viruses with restricted cell tropism through the exploitation of cell type-specific microRNA expression by incorporating microRNA target sites into the viral genome. Restriction of H5N1 replication in endothelial cells via miR-126 ameliorated disease symptoms, prevented systemic viral spread and limited mortality, despite showing similar levels of peak viral replication in the lungs as compared to control virus-infected mice. Similarly, restriction of H5N1 replication in endothelial cells resulted in ameliorated disease symptoms and decreased viral spread in ferrets. Our studies demonstrate that H5N1 infection of endothelial cells results in excessive production of cytokines and reduces endothelial barrier integrity in the lungs, which culminates in vascular leakage and viral pneumonia. Importantly, our studies suggest a need for a combinational therapy that targets viral components, suppresses host immune responses, and improves endothelial barrier integrity for the treatment of highly pathogenic H5N1 virus infections.

  9. Rapid Detection of γ-H2AX by Flow Cytometry in Cultured Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firsanov, Denis; Solovjeva, Liudmila; Lublinskaya, Olga; Zenin, Valeriy; Kudryavtsev, Igor; Serebryakova, Maria; Svetlova, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Methods commonly used for detection of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and analysis of cell death are generally time-consuming, and, therefore, any improvements in these techniques are important for researchers and clinicians. At present, flow cytometry is the most rapid method for detection of DSBs and cell viability. In this chapter, we provide our experience and methodological modification of flow cytometry protocol for the detection of γ-H2AX, a well-known marker of DSBs, in fixed mammalian fibroblasts. The modifications permit a reduction in the time required for DSB detection by flow cytometry.

  10. Cadmium-nickel toxicity interactions towards a bacterium, filamentous fungi, and a cultured mammalian cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babich, H.; Shopsis, C.; Borenfreund, E.

    1986-10-01

    The response of the biota to exposure to individual metals may differ from its response to multiple metals, as mixtures of metals may interact antagonistically or synergistically in their resultant toxicity. The present study evaluated the effects of a combination of Cd and Ni on the freshwater bacterium, Aeromonas hydrophila, the terrestrial fungi, Trichodema viride and Aspergillus niger, and the mammalian cell line, BALB/c mouse 3T3 fibroblasts. This particular spectrum of target cells was selected because studies in the literature show a wide variety of possible interactions between Cd and Ni in their combined toxicities towards bacteria cyanobacteria, slime molds, isolated rat hepatocytes, and rats.

  11. Repair capability of mammalian cell fractions demonstrated using infectivity of bacteriophage DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, S.P.; Lytle, C.D.; Benane, S.G.

    1976-01-01

    Extracts of Potoroo kidney cells (PtK2) were examined for ability to provide a repair function in vitro. The biological activity (infectivity) of uv-irradiated replicative form (RF) DNA of bacteriophage phiX174 was restored during incubation of the DNA with a nuclear extract but not with a cytoplasmic extract. The infectivity of the RF-DNA was determined in spheroplasts of E. coli C/sub s/, which is HCR - . This system for biological assay of uv-irradiated DNA repaired in vitro may be used to complement biochemical and biophysical investigations of molecular repair mechanisms in mammalian cells

  12. Assessing mRNA nuclear export in mammalian cells by microinjection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eliza S; Palazzo, Alexander F

    2017-08-15

    The nuclear export of mRNAs is an important yet little understood part of eukaryotic gene expression. One of the easiest methods for monitoring mRNA export in mammalian tissue culture cells is through the microinjection of DNA plasmids into the nucleus and monitoring the distribution of the transcribed product over time. Here we describe how to setup a microscope equipped with a micromanipulator used in cell microinjections, and we explain how to perform a nuclear mRNA export assay and obtain the nuclear export rate for any given mRNA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Quantitative Analyses of Core Promoters Enable Precise Engineering of Regulated Gene Expression in Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ede, Christopher; Chen, Ximin; Lin, Meng-Yin; Chen, Yvonne Y.

    2016-01-01

    Inducible transcription systems play a crucial role in a wide array of synthetic biology circuits. However, the majority of inducible promoters are constructed from a limited set of tried-and-true promoter parts, which are susceptible to common shortcomings such as high basal expression levels (i.e., leakiness). To expand the toolbox for regulated mammalian gene expression and facilitate the construction of mammalian genetic circuits with precise functionality, we quantitatively characterized a panel of eight core promoters, including sequences with mammalian, viral, and synthetic origins. We demonstrate that this selection of core promoters can provide a wide range of basal gene expression levels and achieve a gradient of fold-inductions spanning two orders of magnitude. Furthermore, commonly used parts such as minimal CMV and minimal SV40 promoters were shown to achieve robust gene expression upon induction, but also suffer from high levels of leakiness. In contrast, a synthetic promoter, YB_TATA, was shown to combine low basal expression with high transcription rate in the induced state to achieve significantly higher fold-induction ratios compared to all other promoters tested. These behaviors remain consistent when the promoters are coupled to different genetic outputs and different response elements, as well as across different host-cell types and DNA copy numbers. We apply this quantitative understanding of core promoter properties to the successful engineering of human T cells that respond to antigen stimulation via chimeric antigen receptor signaling specifically under hypoxic environments. Results presented in this study can facilitate the design and calibration of future mammalian synthetic biology systems capable of precisely programmed functionality. PMID:26883397

  14. Geometry-induced injection dispersion in single-cell protein electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qiong; Herr, Amy E

    2018-02-13

    Arrays of microwells are widely used to isolate individual cells, facilitate high throughput cytometry assays, and ensure compatibility of those assays with whole-cell imaging. Microwell geometries have recently been utilized for handling and preparation of single-cell lysate, prior to single-cell protein electrophoresis. It is in the context of single-cell electrophoresis that we investigate the interplay of microwell geometry (circular, rectangular, triangular) and transport (diffusion, electromigration) on the subsequent performance of single-cell polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) for protein targets. We define and measure injector-induced dispersion during PAGE, and develop a numerical model of band broadening sources, experimentally validate the numerical model, and then identify operating conditions (characterized through the Peclet number, Pe) that lead to microwell-geometry induced losses in separation performance. With analysis of mammalian cells as a case study, we sought to understand at what Pe is the PAGE separation performance adversely sensitized to the microwell geometry. In developing design rules, we find that for the microwell geometries that are the most suitable for isolation of mammalian cells and moderate mass protein targets, the Pe is usually small enough (Pe geometry on protein PAGE of single-cell lysate. In extreme cases where the largest mammalian cells are analyzed (Pe > ∼20), consideration of Pe suggests using a rectangular - and not the widely used circular - microwell geometry to maximize protein PAGE separation performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Naturally occurring and stress induced tubular structures from mammalian cells, a survival mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Jian

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tubular shaped mammalian cells in response to dehydration have not been previously reported. This may be due to the invisibility of these cells in aqueous solution, and because sugars and salts added to the cell culture for manipulation of the osmotic conditions inhibit transformation of normal cells into tubular shaped structures. Results We report the transformation of normal spherical mammalian cells into tubular shaped structures in response to stress. We have termed these transformed structures 'straw cells' which we have associated with a variety of human tissue types, including fresh, post mortem and frozen lung, liver, skin, and heart. We have also documented the presence of straw cells in bovine brain and prostate tissues of mice. The number of straw cells in heart, lung tissues, and collapsed straw cells in urine increases with the age of the mammal. Straw cells were also reproduced in vitro from human cancer cells (THP1, CACO2, and MCF7 and mouse stem cells (D1 and adipose D1 by dehydrating cultured cells. The tubular center of the straw cells is much smaller than the original cell; houses condensed organelles and have filamentous extensions that are covered with microscopic hair-like structures and circular openings. When rehydrated, the filaments uptake water rapidly. The straw cell walls, have a range of 120 nm to 200 nm and are composed of sulfated-glucose polymers and glycosylated acidic proteins. The transformation from normal cell to straw cells takes 5 to 8 hr in open-air. This process is characterized by an increase in metabolic activity. When rehydrated, the straw cells regain their normal spherical shape and begin to divide in 10 to 15 days. Like various types of microbial spores, straw cells are resistant to harsh environmental conditions such as UV-C radiation. Conclusion Straw cells are specialized cellular structures and not artifacts from spontaneous polymerization, which are generated in response

  16. Trafficking and processing of bacterial proteins by mammalian cells: Insights from chondroitinase ABC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Muir

    Full Text Available There is very little reported in the literature about the relationship between modifications of bacterial proteins and their secretion by mammalian cells that synthesize them. We previously reported that the secretion of the bacterial enzyme Chondroitinase ABC by mammalian cells requires the strategic removal of at least three N-glycosylation sites. The aim of this study was to determine if it is possible to enhance the efficacy of the enzyme as a treatment for spinal cord injury by increasing the quantity of enzyme secreted or by altering its cellular location.To determine if the efficiency of enzyme secretion could be further increased, cells were transfected with constructs encoding the gene for chondroitinase ABC modified for expression by mammalian cells; these contained additional modifications of strategic N-glycosylation sites or alternative signal sequences to direct secretion of the enzyme from the cells. We show that while removal of certain specific N-glycosylation sites enhances enzyme secretion, N-glycosylation of at least two other sites, N-856 and N-773, is essential for both production and secretion of active enzyme. Furthermore, we find that the signal sequence directing secretion also influences the quantity of enzyme secreted, and that this varies widely amongst the cell types tested. Last, we find that replacing the 3'UTR on the cDNA encoding Chondroitinase ABC with that of β-actin is sufficient to target the enzyme to the neuronal growth cone when transfected into neurons. This also enhances neurite outgrowth on an inhibitory substrate.Some intracellular trafficking pathways are adversely affected by cryptic signals present in the bacterial gene sequence, whilst unexpectedly others are required for efficient secretion of the enzyme. Furthermore, targeting chondroitinase to the neuronal growth cone promotes its ability to increase neurite outgrowth on an inhibitory substrate. These findings are timely in view of the renewed

  17. Improvement of mammalian cell culture performance through surfactant enabled concentrated feed media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossler, Patrick; McDermott, Sean; Racicot, Christopher; Fann, John C H

    2013-01-01

    The design of basal and feed media in mammalian cell culture is paramount towards ensuring acceptable upstream process performance in various operation modes, especially fed-batch culture. Mammalian cell culture media designs have evolved from the classical formulations designed by Eagle and Ham, to today's formulations designed from continuous improvement and statistical frameworks. Feed media is especially important for ensuring robust cell growth, productivity, and ensuring the product quality of recombinant therapeutics are within acceptable ranges. Numerous studies have highlighted the benefit of various media designs, supplements, and feed addition strategies towards the resulting cell culture process. In this work we highlight the use of a top-down level approach towards feed media design enabled by the use of select surfactants for the targeted enrichment of a chemically defined feed media. The use of the enriched media was able to improve product titers at g/L levels, without adversely impacting the growth of multiple Chinese Hamster Ovary cell lines or the product quality of multiple recombinant antibodies. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  18. DNA damage response to different surface chemistry of silver nanoparticles in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Karns, Michael; Goodson, Michael; Rowe, John; Hussain, Saber M.; Schlager, John J.; Hong Yiling

    2008-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have recently received much attention for their possible applications in biotechnology and life sciences. Ag NPs are of interest to defense and engineering programs for new material applications as well as for commercial purposes as an antimicrobial. However, little is known about the genotoxicity of Ag NPs following exposure to mammalian cells. This study was undertaken to examine the DNA damage response to polysaccharide surface functionalized (coated) and non-functionalized (uncoated) Ag NPs in two types of mammalian cells; mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF). Both types of Ag NPs up-regulated the cell cycle checkpoint protein p53 and DNA damage repair proteins Rad51 and phosphorylated-H2AX expression. Furthermore both of them induced cell death as measured by the annexin V protein expression and MTT assay. Our observations also suggested that the different surface chemistry of Ag NPs induce different DNA damage response: coated Ag NPs exhibited more severe damage than uncoated Ag NPs. The results suggest that polysaccharide coated particles are more individually distributed while agglomeration of the uncoated particles limits the surface area availability and access to membrane bound organelles

  19. Detection of PIWI and piRNAs in the mitochondria of mammalian cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, ChangHyuk; Tak, Hyosun; Rho, Mina; Chang, Hae Ryung; Kim, Yon Hui; Kim, Kyung Tae; Balch, Curt; Lee, Eun Kyung; Nam, Seungyoon

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • piRNA sequences were mapped to human mitochondrial (mt) genome. • We inspected small RNA-Seq datasets from somatic cell mt subcellular fractions. • Piwi and piRNA transcripts are present in mammalian somatic cancer cell mt fractions. - Abstract: Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are 26–31 nt small noncoding RNAs that are processed from their longer precursor transcripts by Piwi proteins. Localization of Piwi and piRNA has been reported mostly in nucleus and cytoplasm of higher eukaryotes germ-line cells, where it is believed that known piRNA sequences are located in repeat regions of nuclear genome in germ-line cells. However, localization of PIWI and piRNA in mammalian somatic cell mitochondria yet remains largely unknown. We identified 29 piRNA sequence alignments from various regions of the human mitochondrial genome. Twelve out 29 piRNA sequences matched stem-loop fragment sequences of seven distinct tRNAs. We observed their actual expression in mitochondria subcellular fractions by inspecting mitochondrial-specific small RNA-Seq datasets. Of interest, the majority of the 29 piRNAs overlapped with multiple longer transcripts (expressed sequence tags) that are unique to the human mitochondrial genome. The presence of mature piRNAs in mitochondria was detected by qRT-PCR of mitochondrial subcellular RNAs. Further validation showed detection of Piwi by colocalization using anti-Piwil1 and mitochondria organelle-specific protein antibodies

  20. Immune regulation and evasion of Mammalian host cell immunity during viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratheek, B M; Saha, Soham; Maiti, Prasanta K; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis

    2013-06-01

    The mammalian host immune system has wide array of defence mechanisms against viral infections. Depending on host immunity and the extent of viral persistence, either the host immune cells might clear/restrict the viral load and disease progression or the virus might evade host immunity by down regulating host immune effector response(s). Viral antigen processing and presentation in the host cells through major histocompatibility complex (MHC) elicit subsequent anti-viral effector T cell response(s). However, modulation of such response(s) might generate one of the important viral immune evasion strategies. Viral peptides are mostly generated by proteolytic cleavage in the cytosol of the infected host cells. CD8(+) T lymphocytes play critical role in the detection of viral infection by recognizing these peptides displayed at the plasma membrane by MHC-I molecules. The present review summarises the current knowledge on the regulation of mammalian host innate and adaptive immune components, which are operative in defence mechanisms against viral infections and the variety of strategies that viruses have evolved to escape host cell immunity. The understanding of viral immune evasion strategies is important for designing anti-viral immunotherapies.

  1. Use of viral promoters in mammalian cell-based bioassays: How reliable?

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    Gill-Sharma Manjit

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cell-based bioassays have been suggested for screening of hormones and drug bioactivities. They are a plausible alternative to animal based methods. The technique used is called receptor/reporter system. Receptor/reporter system was initially developed as a research technique to understand gene function. Often reporter constructs containing viral promoters were used because they could be expressed with very 'high' magnitude in a variety of cell types in the laboratory. On the other hand mammalian genes are expressed in a cell/tissue specific manner, which makes them (i.e. cells/tissues specialized for specific function in vivo. Therefore, if the receptor/reporter system is to be used as a cell-based screen for testing of hormones and drugs for human therapy then the choice of cell line as well as the promoter in the reporter module is of prime importance so as to get a realistic measure of the bioactivities of 'test' compounds. We evaluated two conventionally used viral promoters and a natural mammalian promoter, regulated by steroid hormone progesterone, in a cell-based receptor/reporter system. The promoters were spliced into vectors expressing enzyme CAT (chloramphenicol acetyl transferase, which served as a reporter of their magnitudes and consistencies in controlling gene expressions. They were introduced into breast cell lines T47D and MCF-7, which served as a cell-based source of progesterone receptors. The yardstick of their reliability was highest magnitude as well as consistency in CAT expression on induction by sequential doses of progesterone. All the promoters responded to induction by progesterone doses ranging from 10-12 to 10-6 molar by expressing CAT enzyme, albeit with varying magnitudes and consistencies. The natural mammalian promoter showed the most coherence in magnitude as well as dose dependent expression profile in both the cell lines. Our study casts doubts on use of viral promoters in a cell-based bioassay for

  2. Radiation induced reproductive death as a function of mammalian cell ploidy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philbrick, D.A.

    1976-09-01

    Mammalian cells containing different multiples of the diploid chromosome set were created through drug induction and cell fusion. In all cell strains used the chromosome number was determined from metaphase spreads, as well as from DNA content and cell size. The survival of cells as a function of radiation dose was determined for cell lines with differing chromosome complements at 37 0 C, 4 0 C, in hypertonic media, while frozen, and with increasing levels of incorporated IUdR. Survival of frozen diploid and hypotetraploid Chinese hamster cells was determined following varying numbers of decays of incorporated 3 HTdR and 125 IUdR. The percent of reproductively viable cells following irradiation is a function of the cell ploidy, i.e., the number of haploid sets of chromosomes contained in the cell genome. At 37 0 C and in hypertonic media, the Chinese hamster cells of progressively higher ploidies are increasingly sensitive to irradiation. As the number of chromosomes per unit cell volume increases the radiosensitivity increases. Both trends suggest interaction between chromosomes as an important cause of cell death

  3. Radiation induced reproductive death as a function of mammalian cell ploidy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philbrick, D.A.

    1976-09-01

    Mammalian cells containing different multiples of the diploid chromosome set were created through drug induction and cell fusion. In all cell strains used the chromosome number was determined from metaphase spreads, as well as from DNA content and cell size. The survival of cells as a function of radiation dose was determined for cell lines with differing chromosome complements at 37/sup 0/C, 4/sup 0/C, in hypertonic media, while frozen, and with increasing levels of incorporated IUdR. Survival of frozen diploid and hypotetraploid Chinese hamster cells was determined following varying numbers of decays of incorporated /sup 3/HTdR and /sup 125/IUdR. The percent of reproductively viable cells following irradiation is a function of the cell ploidy, i.e., the number of haploid sets of chromosomes contained in the cell genome. At 37/sup 0/C and in hypertonic media, the Chinese hamster cells of progressively higher ploidies are increasingly sensitive to irradiation. As the number of chromosomes per unit cell volume increases the radiosensitivity increases. Both trends suggest interaction between chromosomes as an important cause of cell death.

  4. Epicardial Origin of Resident Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Adult Mammalian Heart

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    Naisana S. Asli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of stem and progenitor cells in the adult mammalian heart has added a vital dimension to the field of cardiac regeneration. Cardiac-resident stem cells are likely sequestered as reserve cells within myocardial niches during the course of embryonic cardiogenesis, although they may also be recruited from external sources, such as bone marrow. As we begin to understand the nature of cardiac-resident stem and progenitor cells using a variety of approaches, it is evident that they possess an identity embedded within their gene regulatory networks that favours cardiovascular lineage potential. In addition to contributing lineage descendants, cardiac stem cells may also be stress sensors, offering trophic cues to other cell types, including cardiomyocytes and vasculature cells, and likely other stem cells and immune cells, during adaptation and repair. This presents numerous possibilities for endogenous cardiac stem and progenitor cells to be used in cell therapies or as targets in heart rejuvenation. In this review, we focus on the epicardium as an endogenous source of multi-potential mesenchymal progenitor cells in development and as a latent source of such progenitors in the adult. We track the origin and plasticity of the epicardium in embryos and adults in both homeostasis and disease. In this context, we ask whether directed activation of epicardium-derived progenitor cells might have therapeutic application.

  5. An Evolutionary-Conserved Function of Mammalian Notch Family Members as Cell Adhesion Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Akihiko; Yoshino, Miya; Hikosaka, Mari; Okuyama, Kazuki; Zhou, Lan; Sakano, Seiji; Yagita, Hideo; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2014-01-01

    Notch family members were first identified as cell adhesion molecules by cell aggregation assays in Drosophila studies. However, they are generally recognized as signaling molecules, and it was unclear if their adhesion function was restricted to Drosophila. We previously demonstrated that a mouse Notch ligand, Delta-like 1 (Dll1) functioned as a cell adhesion molecule. We here investigated whether this adhesion function was conserved in the diversified mammalian Notch ligands consisted of two families, Delta-like (Dll1, Dll3 and Dll4) and Jagged (Jag1 and Jag2). The forced expression of mouse Dll1, Dll4, Jag1, and Jag2, but not Dll3, on stromal cells induced the rapid and enhanced adhesion of cultured mast cells (MCs). This was attributed to the binding of Notch1 and Notch2 on MCs to each Notch ligand on the stromal cells themselves, and not the activation of Notch signaling. Notch receptor-ligand binding strongly supported the tethering of MCs to stromal cells, the first step of cell adhesion. However, the Jag2-mediated adhesion of MCs was weaker and unlike other ligands appeared to require additional factor(s) in addition to the receptor-ligand binding. Taken together, these results demonstrated that the function of cell adhesion was conserved in mammalian as well as Drosophila Notch family members. Since Notch receptor-ligand interaction plays important roles in a broad spectrum of biological processes ranging from embryogenesis to disorders, our finding will provide a new perspective on these issues from the aspect of cell adhesion. PMID:25255288

  6. Single-Cell Genomic Analysis in Plants

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    Yuxuan Yuan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Individual cells in an organism are variable, which strongly impacts cellular processes. Advances in sequencing technologies have enabled single-cell genomic analysis to become widespread, addressing shortcomings of analyses conducted on populations of bulk cells. While the field of single-cell plant genomics is in its infancy, there is great potential to gain insights into cell lineage and functional cell types to help understand complex cellular interactions in plants. In this review, we discuss current approaches for single-cell plant genomic analysis, with a focus on single-cell isolation, DNA amplification, next-generation sequencing, and bioinformatics analysis. We outline the technical challenges of analysing material from a single plant cell, and then examine applications of single-cell genomics and the integration of this approach with genome editing. Finally, we indicate future directions we expect in the rapidly developing field of plant single-cell genomic analysis.

  7. mRNA export from mammalian cell nuclei is dependent on GANP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Vihandha O; McMurtrie, Paul I A; Mills, Anthony D; Takei, Yoshinori; Penrhyn-Lowe, Sue; Amagase, Yoko; Main, Sarah; Marr, Jackie; Stewart, Murray; Laskey, Ronald A

    2010-01-12

    Bulk nuclear export of messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs) through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) is mediated by NXF1. It binds mRNPs through adaptor proteins such as ALY and SR splicing factors and mediates translocation through the central NPC transport channel via transient interactions with FG nucleoporins. Here, we show that mammalian cells require GANP (germinal center-associated nuclear protein) for efficient mRNP nuclear export and for efficient recruitment of NXF1 to NPCs. Separate regions of GANP show local homology to FG nucleoporins, the yeast mRNA export factor Sac3p, and the mammalian MCM3 acetyltransferase. GANP interacts with both NXF1 and NPCs and partitions between NPCs and the nuclear interior. GANP depletion inhibits mRNA export, with retention of mRNPs and NXF1 in punctate foci within the nucleus. The GANP N-terminal region that contains FG motifs interacts with the NXF1 FG-binding domain. Overexpression of this GANP fragment leads to nuclear accumulation of both poly(A)(+)RNA and NXF1. Treatment with transcription inhibitors redistributes GANP from NPCs into foci throughout the nucleus. These results establish GANP as an integral component of the mammalian mRNA export machinery and suggest a model whereby GANP facilitates the transfer of NXF1-containing mRNPs to NPCs. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis of Phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-Trisphosphates of PTEN Expression on Mammalian Cells

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    Nusrat Jahan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to find an experimental condition which enables us to perform enzymatic studies on the cellular behavior of PTEN (phosphatase and tensine homolog through identification of molecular species of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5- trisphosphates and their quantitative analysis in a mammalian cell line using mass spectrometry. We initially exployed a two-step extraction process using HCl for extraction of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphates from two mammalian cell lines and further analyzed the extracted phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphates using tandem mass spectrometry for the identification of them. We finally quantified the concentration of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphates using internal standard calibration. From these observation, we found that HEK 293-T cells is a good model to examine the enzymatic behavior of PTEN in a cell, and the minimum amount of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphates is more than 50 pmol for quantification in a mass spectrometer. These results suggest that the well-optimized experimental conditions are required for the investigation of the cellular PTEN in terms of the catalytic mechanism and further for the detailed identification of cellular substrates

  9. Viral Cre-LoxP tools aid genome engineering in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Ranjita; Mendenhall, Amy; Sarkar, Nandita; Mukherjee, Chandreyee; Afshari, Amirali; Huang, Joseph; Lu, Biao

    2017-01-01

    Targeted nucleases have transformed genome editing technology, providing more efficient methods to make targeted changes in mammalian genome. In parallel, there is an increasing demand of Cre-LoxP technology for complex genome manipulation such as large deletion, addition, gene fusion and conditional removal of gene sequences at the target site. However, an efficient and easy-to-use Cre-recombinase delivery system remains lacking. We designed and constructed two sets of expression vectors for Cre-recombinase using two highly efficient viral systems, the integrative lentivirus and non-integrative adeno associated virus. We demonstrate the effectiveness of those methods in Cre-delivery into stably-engineered HEK293 cells harboring LoxP-floxed red fluorescent protein (RFP) and puromycin (Puro) resistant reporters. The delivered Cre recombinase effectively excised the floxed RFP-Puro either directly or conditionally, therefore validating the function of these molecular tools. Given the convenient options of two selections markers, these viral-based systems offer a robust and easy-to-use tool for advanced genome editing, expanding complicated genome engineering to a variety of cell types and conditions. We have developed and functionally validated two viral-based Cre-recombinase delivery systems for efficient genome manipulation in various mammalian cells. The ease of gene delivery with the built-in reporters and inducible element enables live cell monitoring, drug selection and temporal knockout, broadening applications of genome editing.

  10. Strategic cell-cycle regulatory features that provide mammalian cells with tunable G1 length and reversible G1 arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Pfeuty

    Full Text Available Transitions between consecutive phases of the eukaryotic cell cycle are driven by the catalytic activity of selected sets of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks. Yet, their occurrence and precise timing is tightly scheduled by a variety of means including Cdk association with inhibitory/adaptor proteins (CKIs. Here we focus on the regulation of G1-phase duration by the end of which cells of multicelled organisms must decide whether to enter S phase or halt, and eventually then, differentiate, senesce or die to obey the homeostatic rules of their host. In mammalian cells, entry in and progression through G1 phase involve sequential phosphorylation and inactivation of the retinoblastoma Rb proteins, first, by cyclin D-Cdk4,6 with the help of CKIs of the Cip/Kip family and, next, by the cyclin E-Cdk2 complexes that are negatively regulated by Cip/Kip proteins. Using a dynamical modeling approach, we show that the very way how the Rb and Cip/Kip regulatory modules interact differentially with cyclin D-Cdk4,6 and cyclin E-Cdk2 provides to mammalian cells a powerful means to achieve an exquisitely-sensitive control of G1-phase duration and fully reversible G1 arrests. Consistently, corruption of either one of these two modules precludes G1 phase elongation and is able to convert G1 arrests from reversible to irreversible. This study unveils fundamental design principles of mammalian G1-phase regulation that are likely to confer to mammalian cells the ability to faithfully control the occurrence and timing of their division process in various conditions.

  11. Simultaneous AFM topography and recognition imaging at the plasma membrane of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chtcheglova, Lilia A; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Elucidation the nano-organization of membrane proteins at/within the plasma membrane is probably the most demanding and still challenging task in cell biology since requires experimental approaches with nanoscale resolution. During last decade, atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based simultaneous topography and recognition imaging (TREC) has become a powerful tool to quickly obtain local receptor nano-maps on complex heterogeneous biosurfaces such as cells and membranes. Here we emphasize the TREC technique and explain how to unravel the nano-landscape of mammalian cells. We describe the procedures for all steps of the experiment including tip functionalization with ligand molecules, sample preparation, and localization of key molecules on the cell surface. We also discuss the current limitations and future perspectives of this technique. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Autoradiographic assay of mutants resistant to diphtheria toxin in mammalian cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronen, A.; Gingerich, J.D.; Duncan, A.M.V.; Heddle, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Diptheria toxin kills mammalian cells by ribosylating elongation factor 2, a protein factor necessary for protein synthesis. The frequency of cells able to form colonies in the presence of the toxin can be used as an assay for mutation to diphtheria toxin resistance. Resistance to diphtheria toxin can also be detected autoradiographically in cells exposed to [ 3 H]leucine after treatment with the toxin. In cultures of Chinese hamster ovary cells, the frequency of such resistant cells is increased by exposure of the cells to γ-rays, ultraviolet light, ethylnitrosourea, mitomycin c, ethidium bromide, and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The resistant cells form discrete microcolonies if they are allowed to divide several times before intoxication which indicates that they are genuine mutants. The assay is potentially adaptable to any cell population that can be intoxicated with diphtheria toxin and labeled with [ 3 H]leucine, whether or not the cells can form colonies. It may be useful, therefore, for measuring mutation rates in slowly growing or nondividing cell populations such as breast, brain, and liver, as well as in cells that do divide but cannot be readily cloned, such as the colonic epithelium. 23 references, 6 figures

  13. Synchronized mammalian cell culture: part I--a physical strategy for synchronized cultivation under physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barradas, Oscar Platas; Jandt, Uwe; Becker, Max; Bahnemann, Janina; Pörtner, Ralf; Zeng, An-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Conventional analysis and optimization procedures of mammalian cell culture processes mostly treat the culture as a homogeneous population. Hence, the focus is on cell physiology and metabolism, cell line development, and process control strategy. Impact on cultivations caused by potential variations in cellular properties between different subpopulations, however, has not yet been evaluated systematically. One main cause for the formation of such subpopulations is the progress of all cells through the cell cycle. The interaction of potential cell cycle specific variations in the cell behavior with large-scale process conditions can be optimally determined by means of (partially) synchronized cultivations, with subsequent population resolved model analysis. Therefore, it is desirable to synchronize a culture with minimal perturbation, which is possible with different yield and quality using physical selection methods, but not with frequently used chemical or whole-culture methods. Conventional nonsynchronizing methods with subsequent cell-specific, for example, flow cytometric analysis, can only resolve cell-limited effects of the cell cycle. In this work, we demonstrate countercurrent-flow centrifugal elutriation as a useful physical method to enrich mammalian cell populations within different phases of a cell cycle, which can be further cultivated for synchronized growth in bioreactors under physiological conditions. The presented combined approach contrasts with other physical selection methods especially with respect to the achievable yield, which makes it suitable for bioreactor scale cultivations. As shown with two industrial cell lines (CHO-K1 and human AGE1.HN), synchronous inocula can be obtained with overall synchrony degrees of up to 82% in the G1 phase, 53% in the S phase and 60% in the G2/M phase, with enrichment factors (Ysync) of 1.71, 1.79, and 4.24 respectively. Cells are able to grow with synchrony in bioreactors over several cell cycles. This

  14. Differential biological effects of iodoacetate in mammalian cell lines; radio sensitization and radio protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Usha; Anjaria, K.B.; Desai, Utkarsha N.; Chaurasia, Rajesh K.; Shirsath, K.B.; Bhat, Nagesh N.; Balakrishnan, Sreedevi; Sapra, B.K.; Nairy, Rajesha

    2014-01-01

    There are several studies where it has been shown that Iodoacetate (IA) possesses in vivo anti-tumor activity. The fact that it is a model glycolytic inhibitor makes it more interesting. As seen in recent trends, glycolytic inhibitors are emerging as new strategy for cancer therapeutic research taking advantage of glycolytic phenotype of cancerous tissues. IA has been reported to have radioprotective effects in yeast cells and human lymphocytes. Biological effects of IA in response to radiation in mammalian cell lines are not well documented. We screened IA for cytotoxicity using clonogenic assay at different concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 2.5 μg/ml using three different mammalian cell lines; A-549 (human lung carcinoma cell line), MCF-7 (human mammary cancer cell line) and a noncancerous CHO (Chinese hamster ovary cell line). For studying radioprotective/radio sensitizing efficacy, cells were exposed to 4 Gy of 60 Co-γ radiation using a teletherapy source at a dose rate of 1 Gy/min, following which IA post-treatment was carried out. Clonogenic and micronucleus assay were performed to assess radioprotection/sensitization. The results indicated that IA was highly cytotoxic in cancerous cell lines A-549 (IC 50 =1.25 μg/ml) and MCF-7 (IC 50 = 1.9 μg/ml). In contrast, it was totally non-toxic in non-cancerous cell line, viz. CHO, in the same concentration range. In addition, IA exhibited radio protective effect in CHO cell line, whereas in other two cancer cell lines, viz. A-549 and MCF-7, radio sensitizing effect was seen as judged by induction of cell killing and micronuclei. In conclusion, lA, a model glycolytic inhibitor, was found to be selectively cytotoxic in cancer cells as compared to normal cells. Further, it reduced radiation induced damage (micronuclei and cell killing) in normal cells but increased it in cancer cells indicating its potential use in cancer therapy. (author)

  15. Regeneration of stereocilia of hair cells by forced Atoh1 expression in the adult mammalian cochlea.

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    Shi-Ming Yang

    Full Text Available The hallmark of mechanosensory hair cells is the stereocilia, where mechanical stimuli are converted into electrical signals. These delicate stereocilia are susceptible to acoustic trauma and ototoxic drugs. While hair cells in lower vertebrates and the mammalian vestibular system can spontaneously regenerate lost stereocilia, mammalian cochlear hair cells no longer retain this capability. We explored the possibility of regenerating stereocilia in the noise-deafened guinea pig cochlea by cochlear inoculation of a viral vector carrying Atoh1, a gene critical for hair cell differentiation. Exposure to simulated gunfire resulted in a 60-70 dB hearing loss and extensive damage and loss of stereocilia bundles of both inner and outer hair cells along the entire cochlear length. However, most injured hair cells remained in the organ of Corti for up to 10 days after the trauma. A viral vector carrying an EGFP-labeled Atoh1 gene was inoculated into the cochlea through the round window on the seventh day after noise exposure. Auditory brainstem response measured one month after inoculation showed that hearing thresholds were substantially improved. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the damaged/lost stereocilia bundles were repaired or regenerated after Atoh1 treatment, suggesting that Atoh1 was able to induce repair/regeneration of the damaged or lost stereocilia. Therefore, our studies revealed a new role of Atoh1 as a gene critical for promoting repair/regeneration of stereocilia and maintaining injured hair cells in the adult mammal cochlea. Atoh1-based gene therapy, therefore, has the potential to treat noise-induced hearing loss if the treatment is carried out before hair cells die.

  16. Signal transduction induced in Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes during the invasion of mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yoshida

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Penetration of Trypanosoma cruzi into mammalian cells depends on the activation of the parasite's protein tyrosine kinase and on the increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration. We used metacyclic trypomastigotes, the T. cruzi developmental forms that initiate infection in mammalian hosts, to investigate the association of these two events and to identify the various components of the parasite signal transduction pathway involved in host cell invasion. We have found that i both the protein tyrosine kinase activation, as measured by phosphorylation of a 175-kDa protein (p175, and Ca2+ mobilization were induced in the metacyclic forms by the HeLa cell extract but not by the extract of T. cruzi-resistant K562 cells; ii treatment of parasites with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein blocked both p175 phosphorylation and the increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration; iii the recombinant protein J18, which contains the full-length sequence of gp82, a metacyclic stage surface glycoprotein involved in target cell invasion, interfered with tyrosine kinase and Ca2+ responses, whereas the monoclonal antibody 3F6 directed at gp82 induced parasite p175 phosphorylation and Ca2+ mobilization; iv treatment of metacyclic forms with phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 blocked Ca2+ signaling and impaired the ability of the parasites to enter HeLa cells, and v drugs such as heparin, a competitive IP3-receptor blocker, caffeine, which affects Ca2+ release from IP3-sensitive stores, in addition to thapsigargin, which depletes intracellular Ca2+ compartments and lithium ion, reduced the parasite infectivity. Taken together, these data suggest that protein tyrosine kinase, phospholipase C and IP3 are involved in the signaling cascade that is initiated on the parasite cell surface by gp82 and leads to Ca2+ mobilization required for target cell invasion.

  17. Cell tropism predicts long-term nucleotide substitution rates of mammalian RNA viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison L Hicks

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The high rates of RNA virus evolution are generally attributed to replication with error-prone RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. However, these long-term nucleotide substitution rates span three orders of magnitude and do not correlate well with mutation rates or selection pressures. This substitution rate variation may be explained by differences in virus ecology or intrinsic genomic properties. We generated nucleotide substitution rate estimates for mammalian RNA viruses and compiled comparable published rates, yielding a dataset of 118 substitution rates of structural genes from 51 different species, as well as 40 rates of non-structural genes from 28 species. Through ANCOVA analyses, we evaluated the relationships between these rates and four ecological factors: target cell, transmission route, host range, infection duration; and three genomic properties: genome length, genome sense, genome segmentation. Of these seven factors, we found target cells to be the only significant predictors of viral substitution rates, with tropisms for epithelial cells or neurons (P<0.0001 as the most significant predictors. Further, one-tailed t-tests showed that viruses primarily infecting epithelial cells evolve significantly faster than neurotropic viruses (P<0.0001 and P<0.001 for the structural genes and non-structural genes, respectively. These results provide strong evidence that the fastest evolving mammalian RNA viruses infect cells with the highest turnover rates: the highly proliferative epithelial cells. Estimated viral generation times suggest that epithelial-infecting viruses replicate more quickly than viruses with different cell tropisms. Our results indicate that cell tropism is a key factor in viral evolvability.

  18. Multiplicity of Steady States in Glycolysis and Shift of Metabolic State in Cultured Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Simon; Daoutidis, Prodromos; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2015-01-01

    Cultured mammalian cells exhibit elevated glycolysis flux and high lactate production. In the industrial bioprocesses for biotherapeutic protein production, glucose is supplemented to the culture medium to sustain continued cell growth resulting in the accumulation of lactate to high levels. In such fed-batch cultures, sometimes a metabolic shift from a state of high glycolysis flux and high lactate production to a state of low glycolysis flux and low lactate production or even lactate consumption is observed. While in other cases with very similar culture conditions, the same cell line and medium, cells continue to produce lactate. A metabolic shift to lactate consumption has been correlated to the productivity of the process. Cultures that exhibited the metabolic shift to lactate consumption had higher titers than those which didn’t. However, the cues that trigger the metabolic shift to lactate consumption state (or low lactate production state) are yet to be identified. Metabolic control of cells is tightly linked to growth control through signaling pathways such as the AKT pathway. We have previously shown that the glycolysis of proliferating cells can exhibit bistability with well-segregated high flux and low flux states. Low lactate production (or lactate consumption) is possible only at a low glycolysis flux state. In this study, we use mathematical modeling to demonstrate that lactate inhibition together with AKT regulation on glycolysis enzymes can profoundly influence the bistable behavior, resulting in a complex steady-state topology. The transition from the high flux state to the low flux state can only occur in certain regions of the steady state topology, and therefore the metabolic fate of the cells depends on their metabolic trajectory encountering the region that allows such a metabolic state switch. Insights from such switch behavior present us with new means to control the metabolism of mammalian cells in fed-batch cultures. PMID:25806512

  19. Multiplicity of steady states in glycolysis and shift of metabolic state in cultured mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulukutla, Bhanu Chandra; Yongky, Andrew; Grimm, Simon; Daoutidis, Prodromos; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2015-01-01

    Cultured mammalian cells exhibit elevated glycolysis flux and high lactate production. In the industrial bioprocesses for biotherapeutic protein production, glucose is supplemented to the culture medium to sustain continued cell growth resulting in the accumulation of lactate to high levels. In such fed-batch cultures, sometimes a metabolic shift from a state of high glycolysis flux and high lactate production to a state of low glycolysis flux and low lactate production or even lactate consumption is observed. While in other cases with very similar culture conditions, the same cell line and medium, cells continue to produce lactate. A metabolic shift to lactate consumption has been correlated to the productivity of the process. Cultures that exhibited the metabolic shift to lactate consumption had higher titers than those which didn't. However, the cues that trigger the metabolic shift to lactate consumption state (or low lactate production state) are yet to be identified. Metabolic control of cells is tightly linked to growth control through signaling pathways such as the AKT pathway. We have previously shown that the glycolysis of proliferating cells can exhibit bistability with well-segregated high flux and low flux states. Low lactate production (or lactate consumption) is possible only at a low glycolysis flux state. In this study, we use mathematical modeling to demonstrate that lactate inhibition together with AKT regulation on glycolysis enzymes can profoundly influence the bistable behavior, resulting in a complex steady-state topology. The transition from the high flux state to the low flux state can only occur in certain regions of the steady state topology, and therefore the metabolic fate of the cells depends on their metabolic trajectory encountering the region that allows such a metabolic state switch. Insights from such switch behavior present us with new means to control the metabolism of mammalian cells in fed-batch cultures.

  20. Functional assessment of sodium chloride cotransporter NCC mutants in polarized mammalian epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaek, Lena L; Rizzo, Federica; MacAulay, Nanna

    2017-01-01

    -free solutions. NCC was detected in the plasma membrane, and both membrane abundance and phosphorylation of NCC were increased by incubation in chloride-free solutions. Furthermore, in cells exposed for 15 min to low or high extracellular K(+), the levels of phosphorylated NCC increased and decreased...... constitutively active, even without chloride-free stimulation. In conclusion, this system allows the activity, cellular localization, and abundance of wild-type or mutant NCC to be examined in the same polarized mammalian expression system in a rapid, easy, and low-cost fashion....

  1. MAM (mitochondria-associated membranes) in mammalian cells: lipids and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Jean E

    2014-04-04

    One mechanism by which communication between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria is achieved is by close juxtaposition between these organelles via mitochondria-associated membranes (MAM). The MAM consist of a region of the ER that is enriched in several lipid biosynthetic enzyme activities and becomes reversibly tethered to mitochondria. Specific proteins are localized, sometimes transiently, in the MAM. Several of these proteins have been implicated in tethering the MAM to mitochondria. In mammalian cells, formation of these contact sites between MAM and mitochondria appears to be required for key cellular events including the transport of calcium from the ER to mitochondria, the import of phosphatidylserine into mitochondria from the ER for decarboxylation to phosphatidylethanolamine, the formation of autophagosomes, regulation of the morphology, dynamics and functions of mitochondria, and cell survival. This review focuses on the functions proposed for MAM in mediating these events in mammalian cells. In light of the apparent involvement of MAM in multiple fundamental cellular processes, recent studies indicate that impaired contact between MAM and mitochondria might underlie the pathology of several human neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. Moreover, MAM has been implicated in modulating glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance, as well as in some viral infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Some important advances in DNA repair study on the mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Shouxuan.

    1991-01-01

    In the recent years the study of DNA damage and repair in the mammalian cells has gone deeply at gene level and got the following advances: (1) For a long time DNA has been considered to be an uniform unit in case of damage and repair. Now this concept should be replaced by the non-random distribution of damage and heterogenous repair in the genome. These would allow us to study cellular mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, aging and dying processes in great detail, and would be beneficial to the elucidation of mechanisms of radiation sickness and chemical toxicology. (2) The advent of new techniques in molecular biology has made it possible to isolate and clone the human DNA repair genes. Up to now more than ten human DNA repair genes have been cloned and these works would have an important impact on the theoretical and practical study in this field. Because DNA repair system is very complicate, voluminous work should be done in the future. (3) The technique of gene transfer has been efficiently used in the study of DNA repair in mammalian cells and has made great contribution in the cellular engineering. It could modify the genetic behavior of the gene-accepting cells, and enhance the DNA repair ability to physical and chemical damages. Human gene therapy for DNA deficient diseases is now on the day

  3. Evaluation of 13C isotopic tracers for metabolic flux analysis in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metallo, Christian M; Walther, Jason L; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2009-11-01

    (13)C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) is the most comprehensive means of characterizing cellular metabolic states. Uniquely labeled isotopic tracers enable more focused analyses to probe specific reactions within the network. As a result, the choice of tracer largely determines the precision with which one can estimate metabolic fluxes, especially in complex mammalian systems that require multiple substrates. Here we have experimentally determined metabolic fluxes in a tumor cell line, successfully recapitulating the hallmarks of cancer cell metabolism. Using these data, we computationally evaluated specifically labeled (13)C glucose and glutamine tracers for their ability to precisely and accurately estimate fluxes in central carbon metabolism. These methods enabled us to identify the optimal tracer for analyzing individual fluxes, specific pathways, and central carbon metabolism as a whole. [1,2-(13)C(2)]glucose provided the most precise estimates for glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the overall network. Tracers such as [2-(13)C]glucose and [3-(13)C]glucose also outperformed the more commonly used [1-(13)C]glucose. [U-(13)C(5)]glutamine emerged as the preferred isotopic tracer for the analysis of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. These results provide valuable, quantitative information on the performance of (13)C-labeled substrates and can aid in the design of more informative MFA experiments in mammalian cell culture.

  4. Bacteriophages as vehicles for gene delivery into mammalian cells: prospects and problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2014-10-01

    The identification of more efficient gene delivery vehicles (GDVs) is essential to fulfill the expectations of clinical gene therapy. Bacteriophages, due to their excellent safety profile, extreme stability under a variety of harsh environmental conditions and the capability for being genetically manipulated, have drawn a flurry of interest to be applied as a newly arisen category of gene delivery platforms. The incessant evolutionary interaction of bacteriophages with human cells has turned them into a part of our body's natural ecosystem. However, these carriers represent several barriers to gene transduction of mammalian cells. The lack of evolvement of specialized machinery for targeted cellular internalization, endosomal, lysosomal and proteasomal escape, cytoplasmic entry, nuclear localization and intranuclear transcription poses major challenges to the expression of the phage-carried gene. In this review, we describe pros and cons of bacteriophages as GDVs, provide an insight into numerous barriers that bacteriophages face for entry into and subsequent trafficking inside mammalian cells and elaborate on the strategies used to bypass these barriers. Tremendous genetic flexibility of bacteriophages to undergo numerous surface modifications through phage display technology has proven to be a turning point in the uncompromising efforts to surmount the limitations of phage-mediated gene expression. The revelatory outcomes of the studies undertaken within the recent years have been promising for phage-mediated gene delivery to move from concept to reality.

  5. Autoprocessing of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease miniprecursor fusions in mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chaoping

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV protease (PR is a virus-encoded aspartic protease that is essential for viral replication and infectivity. The fully active and mature dimeric protease is released from the Gag-Pol polyprotein as a result of precursor autoprocessing. Results We here describe a simple model system to directly examine HIV protease autoprocessing in transfected mammalian cells. A fusion precursor was engineered encoding GST fused to a well-characterized miniprecursor, consisting of the mature protease along with its upstream transframe region (TFR, and small peptide epitopes to facilitate detection of the precursor substrate and autoprocessing products. In HEK 293T cells, the resulting chimeric precursor undergoes effective autoprocessing, producing mature protease that is rapidly degraded likely via autoproteolysis. The known protease inhibitors Darunavir and Indinavir suppressed both precursor autoprocessing and autoproteolysis in a dose-dependent manner. Protease mutations that inhibit Gag processing as characterized using proviruses also reduced autoprocessing efficiency when they were introduced to the fusion precursor. Interestingly, autoprocessing of the fusion precursor requires neither the full proteolytic activity nor the majority of the N-terminal TFR region. Conclusions We suggest that the fusion precursors provide a useful system to study protease autoprocessing in mammalian cells, and may be further developed for screening of new drugs targeting HIV protease autoprocessing.

  6. Detection of Metabolic Fluxes of O and H Atoms into Intracellular Water in Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; Quaroni, Luca; Podlesak, David W.; Zlateva, Theodora; Bollinger, Nikki; McAllister, Aaron; Lott, Michael J.; Hegg, Eric L.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic processes result in the release and exchange of H and O atoms from organic material as well as some inorganic salts and gases. These fluxes of H and O atoms into intracellular water result in an isotopic gradient that can be measured experimentally. Using isotope ratio mass spectroscopy, we revealed that slightly over 50% of the H and O atoms in the intracellular water of exponentially-growing cultured Rat-1 fibroblasts were isotopically distinct from growth medium water. We then employed infrared spectromicroscopy to detect in real time the flux of H atoms in these same cells. Importantly, both of these techniques indicate that the H and O fluxes are dependent on metabolic processes; cells that are in lag phase or are quiescent exhibit a much smaller flux. In addition, water extracted from the muscle tissue of rats contained a population of H and O atoms that were isotopically distinct from body water, consistent with the results obtained using the cultured Rat-1 fibroblasts. Together these data demonstrate that metabolic processes produce fluxes of H and O atoms into intracellular water, and that these fluxes can be detected and measured in both cultured mammalian cells and in mammalian tissue. PMID:22848359

  7. Single molecule microscopy in 3D cell cultures and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Florian M; Kaemmerer, Elke; Meckel, Tobias

    2014-12-15

    From the onset of the first microscopic visualization of single fluorescent molecules in living cells at the beginning of this century, to the present, almost routine application of single molecule microscopy, the method has well-proven its ability to contribute unmatched detailed insight into the heterogeneous and dynamic molecular world life is composed of. Except for investigations on bacteria and yeast, almost the entire story of success is based on studies on adherent mammalian 2D cell cultures. However, despite this continuous progress, the technique was not able to keep pace with the move of the cell biology community to adapt 3D cell culture models for basic research, regenerative medicine, or drug development and screening. In this review, we will summarize the progress, which only recently allowed for the application of single molecule microscopy to 3D cell systems and give an overview of the technical advances that led to it. While initially posing a challenge, we finally conclude that relevant 3D cell models will become an integral part of the on-going success of single molecule microscopy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Mammalian aPKC/Par polarity complex mediated regulation of epithelial division orientation and cell fate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorhagen, Susanne; Niessen, Carien M., E-mail: carien.niessen@uni-koeln.de

    2014-11-01

    Oriented cell division is a key regulator of tissue architecture and crucial for morphogenesis and homeostasis. Balanced regulation of proliferation and differentiation is an essential property of tissues not only to drive morphogenesis but also to maintain and restore homeostasis. In many tissues orientation of cell division is coupled to the regulation of differentiation producing daughters with similar (symmetric cell division, SCD) or differential fate (asymmetric cell division, ACD). This allows the organism to generate cell lineage diversity from a small pool of stem and progenitor cells. Division orientation and/or the ratio of ACD/SCD need to be tightly controlled. Loss of orientation or an altered ratio can promote overgrowth, alter tissue architecture and induce aberrant differentiation, and have been linked to morphogenetic diseases, cancer and aging. A key requirement for oriented division is the presence of a polarity axis, which can be established through cell intrinsic and/or extrinsic signals. Polarity proteins translate such internal and external cues to drive polarization. In this review we will focus on the role of the polarity complex aPKC/Par3/Par6 in the regulation of division orientation and cell fate in different mammalian epithelia. We will compare the conserved function of this complex in mitotic spindle orientation and distribution of cell fate determinants and highlight common and differential mechanisms in which this complex is used by tissues to adapt division orientation and cell fate to the specific properties of the epithelium.

  9. Mammalian Cell Culture Clarification: A Case Study Using Chimeric Anti-CEA Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ali Abol Hassan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular expression of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs in mammalian cell culture provides both opportunities and restrictions for the design of robust harvest and clarification operations. With advances in cell culture media and cell lines, it is now possible to achieve high titers of over 5 g/l for mAbs. However, Mammalian cells are sensitive to breakage due to shear stress that can result in release of proteases and other host cell proteins (HCPs which eventually affects product stability and purity. There is larger number of mAbs undergoing clinical development and it has placed significant importance on platform technologies of process development. Generally, Centrifugation and microfiltration are the primary harvest techniques used in the industry and depth filtration is also used as a step operation on clarification. This study compares the unit operations; centrifugation, microfiltration and depth filtration for maximum recovery of monoclonal antibodies. The results have shown that the depth filtration as more suitable operation for mammalian cell culture clarification since it gives 96% recovery of mAbs in comparison to centrifugation and microfiltration. ABSTRAK: Pengungkapan luar sel dari antibodi monoklon (monoclonal antibodies ((mAbs dalam kultur sel mamalia memberi ruang dan batasan terhadap reka bentuk penuaian yang cekap dan penerangan operasi. Dengan kemajuan dalam media sel kultur dan cell lines (produk yang berupa sel kekal yang digunakan untuk tujuan kajian biologi, kini adalah berkemungkinan untuk memperolehi titer tinggi melebihi 5g/l untuk mAbs [2]. Walaupun begitu, sel mamalia sensitif terhadap retakan disebabkan tegasan ricih yang menyebabkan pengeluaran protease dan hos sel protein yang lain, (host cell proteins (HCPs akhirnya mempengaruhi kestabilan dan keaslian produk. Terdapat mAbs dalam jumlah besar yang masih menjalani pembangunan klinikal dan sesungguhnya ini penting sebagai satu landasan teknologi dalam

  10. Recombinant human albumin supports single cell cloning of CHO cells in chemically defined media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang; Wooh, Jong Wei; Hou, Jeff Jia Cheng; Hughes, Benjamin S; Gray, Peter P; Munro, Trent P

    2012-01-01

    Biologic drugs, such as monoclonal antibodies, are commonly made using mammalian cells in culture. The cell lines used for manufacturing should ideally be clonal, meaning derived from a single cell, which represents a technically challenging process. Fetal bovine serum is often used to support low cell density cultures, however, from a regulatory perspective, it is preferable to avoid animal-derived components to increase process consistency and reduce the risk of contamination from adventitious agents. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the most widely used cell line in industry and a large number of serum-free, protein-free, and fully chemically defined growth media are commercially available, although these media alone do not readily support efficient single cell cloning. In this work, we have developed a simple, fully defined, single-cell cloning media, specifically for CHO cells, using commercially available reagents. Our results show that a 1:1 mixture of CD-CHO™ and DMEM/F12 supplemented with 1.5 g/L of recombinant albumin (Albucult®) supports single cell cloning. This formulation can support recovery of single cells in 43% of cultures compared to 62% in the presence of serum. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  11. Fluorine nuclear magnetic resonance-based assay in living mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Marina; Giacomina, Francesca; Romeo, Elisa; Castellani, Beatrice; Ottonello, Giuliana; Lambruschini, Chiara; Garau, Gianpiero; Scarpelli, Rita; Bandiera, Tiziano; Piomelli, Daniele; Dalvit, Claudio

    2016-02-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based screening has been recognized as a powerful approach for the identification and characterization of molecules interacting with pharmaceutical targets. Indeed, several NMR methods have been developed and successfully applied to many drug discovery projects. Whereas most of these approaches have targeted isolated biomolecular receptors, very few cases are reported with the screening performed in intact cells and cell extracts. Here we report the first successful application of the fluorine NMR-based assay n-FABS (n-fluorine atoms for biochemical screening) in living mammalian cells expressing the membrane protein fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). This method allows the identification of both weak and potent inhibitors and the measurement of their potency in a physiological environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Lack of genotoxicity of formocresol, paramonochlorophenol, and calcium hydroxide on mammalian cells by comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Marques, Mariângela Esther Alencar; Salvadori, Daisy Maria Fávero

    2004-08-01

    Formocresol, paramonochlorophenol, and calcium hydroxide are widely used in dentistry because of their antibacterial activities in root canal disinfection. However, the results of genotoxicity studies using these materials are inconsistent in literature. The goal of this study was to examine the genotoxic potential of formocresol, paramonochlorophenol, and calcium hydroxide using mouse lymphoma cells and human fibroblasts cells in vitro by the comet assay. Data were assessed by Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test. The results showed that all compounds tested did not cause DNA damage for the tail moment or tail intensity parameters. These findings suggest that formocresol, paramonochlorophenol, and calcium hydroxide do not promote DNA damage in mammalian cells and that the comet assay is a suitable tool to investigate genotoxicity.

  13. Electron microscopy using the genetically encoded APEX2 tag in cultured mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martell, Jeffrey D; Deerinck, Thomas J; Lam, Stephanie S; Ellisman, Mark H; Ting, Alice Y

    2018-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) is the premiere technique for high-resolution imaging of cellular ultrastructure. Unambiguous identification of specific proteins or cellular compartments in electron micrographs, however, remains challenging because of difficulties in delivering electron-dense contrast agents to specific subcellular targets within intact cells. We recently reported enhanced ascorbate peroxidase 2 (APEX2) as a broadly applicable genetic tag that generates EM contrast on a specific protein or subcellular compartment of interest. This protocol provides guidelines for designing and validating APEX2 fusion constructs, along with detailed instructions for cell culture, transfection, fixation, heavy-metal staining, embedding in resin, and EM imaging. Although this protocol focuses on EM in cultured mammalian cells, APEX2 is applicable to many cell types and contexts, including intact tissues and organisms, and is useful for numerous applications beyond EM, including live-cell proteomic mapping. This protocol, which describes procedures for sample preparation from cell monolayers and cell pellets, can be completed in 10 d, including time for APEX2 fusion construct validation, cell growth, and solidification of embedding resins. Notably, the only additional steps required relative to a standard EM sample preparation are cell transfection and a 2- to 45-min staining period with 3,3′-diaminobenzidine (DAB) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). PMID:28796234

  14. SMC1B is present in mammalian somatic cells and interacts with mitotic cohesin proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannini, Linda; Cucco, Francesco; Quarantotti, Valentina; Amato, Clelia; Tinti, Mara; Tana, Luigi; Frattini, Annalisa; Delia, Domenico; Krantz, Ian D; Jessberger, Rolf; Musio, Antonio

    2015-12-17

    Cohesin is an evolutionarily conserved protein complex that plays a role in many biological processes: it ensures faithful chromosome segregation, regulates gene expression and preserves genome stability. In mammalian cells, the mitotic cohesin complex consists of two structural maintenance of chromosome proteins, SMC1A and SMC3, the kleisin protein RAD21 and a fourth subunit either STAG1 or STAG2. Meiotic paralogs in mammals were reported for SMC1A, RAD21 and STAG1/STAG2 and are called SMC1B, REC8 and STAG3 respectively. It is believed that SMC1B is only a meiotic-specific cohesin member, required for sister chromatid pairing and for preventing telomere shortening. Here we show that SMC1B is also expressed in somatic mammalian cells and is a member of a mitotic cohesin complex. In addition, SMC1B safeguards genome stability following irradiation whereas its ablation has no effect on chromosome segregation. Finally, unexpectedly SMC1B depletion impairs gene transcription, particularly at genes mapping to clusters such as HOX and PCDHB. Genome-wide analyses show that cluster genes changing in expression are enriched for cohesin-SMC1B binding.

  15. Role of H1 linker histones in mammalian development and stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chenyi; Fan, Yuhong

    2016-03-01

    H1 linker histones are key chromatin architectural proteins facilitating the formation of higher order chromatin structures. The H1 family constitutes the most heterogeneous group of histone proteins, with eleven non-allelic H1 variants in mammals. H1 variants differ in their biochemical properties and exhibit significant sequence divergence from one another, yet most of them are highly conserved during evolution from mouse to human. H1 variants are differentially regulated during development and their cellular compositions undergo dramatic changes in embryogenesis, gametogenesis, tissue maturation and cellular differentiation. As a group, H1 histones are essential for mouse development and proper stem cell differentiation. Here we summarize our current knowledge on the expression and functions of H1 variants in mammalian development and stem cell differentiation. Their diversity, sequence conservation, complex expression and distinct functions suggest that H1s mediate chromatin reprogramming and contribute to the large variations and complexity of chromatin structure and gene expression in the mammalian genome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Modular extracellular sensor architecture for engineering mammalian cell-based devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daringer, Nichole M; Dudek, Rachel M; Schwarz, Kelly A; Leonard, Joshua N

    2014-12-19

    Engineering mammalian cell-based devices that monitor and therapeutically modulate human physiology is a promising and emerging frontier in clinical synthetic biology. However, realizing this vision will require new technologies enabling engineered circuitry to sense and respond to physiologically relevant cues. No existing technology enables an engineered cell to sense exclusively extracellular ligands, including proteins and pathogens, without relying upon native cellular receptors or signal transduction pathways that may be subject to crosstalk with native cellular components. To address this need, we here report a technology we term a Modular Extracellular Sensor Architecture (MESA). This self-contained receptor and signal transduction platform is maximally orthogonal to native cellular processes and comprises independent, tunable protein modules that enable performance optimization and straightforward engineering of novel MESA that recognize novel ligands. We demonstrate ligand-inducible activation of MESA signaling, optimization of receptor performance using design-based approaches, and generation of MESA biosensors that produce outputs in the form of either transcriptional regulation or transcription-independent reconstitution of enzymatic activity. This systematic, quantitative platform characterization provides a framework for engineering MESA to recognize novel ligands and for integrating these sensors into diverse mammalian synthetic biology applications.

  17. Alteration of mammalian-cell toxicity of pesticides by structural iron(II) in ferruginous smectite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Kara C; Stucki, Joseph W; Warner, Richard E; Plewa, Michael J

    2004-08-15

    The ultimate concern over pesticides in the environment is their toxic impact on nontarget organisms, including humans. Soil clays are known to interact with pesticides in ways that decrease the concentration of the parent compound in the soil solution (adsorption, sequestration, degradation). These phenomena are generally regarded as beneficial, but toxicological verification is lacking. In this study, mammalian-cell cytotoxicity of four commonly used agricultural chemicals (2,4-D, alachlor, dicamba, and oxamyl) was assessed after exposure to either reduced or oxidized ferruginous smectite (SWa-1). Results revealed that treatment with reduced smectite produced differential effects on mammalian-cell viability, depending on the pesticide. Oxamyl and alachlor reacted with reduced SWa-1 showed a significant decrease in their overall cytotoxic potential. Dicamba reacted with the reduced-clay treatment and generated products that were more toxic than the parent pesticide. Finally, no differences were observed between redox treatments for 2,4-D. The significance of these results is that oxidized smectites have virtually no influence on the toxicity of pesticides, whereas reduced-Fe smectite plays an important role in altering the cytotoxic potential of agricultural pesticides. The Fe oxidation state of clay minerals should, therefore, be taken into account in pesticide management programs.

  18. Cytokinesis is blocked in mammalian cells transfected with Chlamydia trachomatis gene CT223

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weeks Sara K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chlamydiae alter many aspects of host cell biology, including the division process, but the molecular biology of these alterations remains poorly characterized. Chlamydial inclusion membrane proteins (Incs are likely candidates for direct interactions with host cell cytosolic proteins, as they are secreted to the inclusion membrane and exposed to the cytosol. The inc gene CT223 is one of a sequential set of orfs that encode or are predicted to encode Inc proteins. CT223p is localized to the inclusion membrane in all tested C. trachomatis serovars. Results A plasmid transfection approach was used to examine the function of the product of CT223 and other Inc proteins within uninfected mammalian cells. Fluorescence microscopy was used to demonstrate that CT223, and, to a lesser extent, adjacent inc genes, are capable of blocking host cell cytokinesis and facilitating centromere supranumeracy defects seen by others in chlamydiae-infected cells. Both phenotypes were associated with transfection of plasmids encoding the carboxy-terminal tail of CT223p, a region of the protein that is likely exposed to the cytosol in infected cells. Conclusion These studies suggest that certain Inc proteins block cytokinesis in C. trachomatis-infected cells. These results are consistent with the work of others showing chlamydial inhibition of host cell cytokinesis.

  19. The effect of isochoric freezing on mammalian cells in an extracellular phosphate buffered solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preciado, J; Rubinsky, B

    2018-04-20

    Isochoric (constant volume) freezing has been recently suggested as a new method for cell and organ preservation. As a first step in studying the effect of isochoric freezing on mammalian cells, Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells (MDCK), were frozen in an isochoric system, in a simple extracellular phosphate buffered solution to -10 °C (96.5 MPa), - 15 °C (162 MPa) and -20 °C (205 MPa) for 60 and 120 min. Cell membrane integrity and cell metabolism were studied with a Live/Dead cell vitality assay and flow cytometry. We found that cell survival decreases with an increase in pressure (lower temperatures) and time of exposure. For example, 60% of cells survived 60 min at - 10 °C and only 18% survived 120 min at this temperature. Negligible survival was measured at - 20 °C. This study may serve as the baseline towards further research on techniques to optimize the effects of isochoric freezing on living biological matter. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Incorporation of functionalized gold nanoparticles into nanofibers for enhanced attachment and differentiation of mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Electrospun nanofibers have been widely used as substrata for mammalian cell culture owing to their structural similarity to natural extracellular matrices. Structurally consistent electrospun nanofibers can be produced with synthetic polymers but require chemical modification to graft cell-adhesive molecules to make the nanofibers functional. Development of a facile method of grafting functional molecules on the nanofibers will contribute to the production of diverse cell type-specific nanofiber substrata. Results Small molecules, peptides, and functionalized gold nanoparticles were successfully incorporated with polymethylglutarimide (PMGI) nanofibers through electrospinning. The PMGI nanofibers functionalized by the grafted AuNPs, which were labeled with cell-adhesive peptides, enhanced HeLa cell attachment and potentiated cardiomyocyte differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells. Conclusions PMGI nanofibers can be functionalized simply by co-electrospinning with the grafting materials. In addition, grafting functionalized AuNPs enable high-density localization of the cell-adhesive peptides on the nanofiber. The results of the present study suggest that more cell type-specific synthetic substrata can be fabricated with molecule-doped nanofibers, in which diverse functional molecules are grafted alone or in combination with other molecules at different concentrations. PMID:22686683

  1. Metabolic responses and pathway changes of mammalian cells under different culture conditions with media supplementations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seo-Young; Reimonn, Thomas M; Agarabi, Cyrus D; Brorson, Kurt A; Yoon, Seongkyu

    2018-02-21

    Amino acids and glucose consumption, cell growth and monoclonal antibody (mAb) production in mammalian cell culture are key considerations during upstream process and particularly media optimization. Understanding the interrelations and the relevant cellular physiology will provide insight for setting strategy of robust and effective mAb production. The aim of this study was to further our understanding of nutrient consumption metabolism, since this could have significant impact on enhancing mAb titer, cell proliferation, designing feeding strategies, and development of feed media. The nutrient consumption pattern, mAb concentration, and cell growth were analyzed in three sets of cell cultures with media supplementation of glucose, methionine, threonine, tryptophan, and tyrosine. The amino acids metabolism and its impact on cell growth and mAb production during the batch and fed-batch culture were closely analyzed. It was shown that the phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan biosynthesis pathways were significantly altered under different culture conditions with different media. These changes were more apparent in the fed-batch process in which higher mAb titer was observed due to the metabolic changes than mAb titer in the batch process. The pathway analysis approach was well utilized for evaluating the impact on the relevant pathways involved under different cell culture conditions to improve cell growth and mAb titer. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2018. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  2. Chlorpromazine reduces the intercellular communication via gap junctions in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orellana, Juan A.; Palacios-Prado, Nicolas; Saez, Juan C.

    2006-01-01

    In the work presented herein, we evaluated the effect of chlorpromazine (CPZ) on gap junctions expressed by two mammalian cell types; Gn-11 cells (cell line derived from mouse LHRH neurons) and rat cortical astrocytes maintained in culture. We also attempted to elucidate possible mechanisms of action of CPZ effects on gap junctions. CPZ, in concentrations comparable with doses used to treat human diseases, was found to reduce the intercellular communication via gap junctions as evaluated with measurements of dye coupling (Lucifer yellow). In both cell types, maximal inhibition of functional gap junctions was reached within about 1 h of treatment with CPZ, an recovery was almost complete at about 5 h after CPZ wash out. In both cell types, CPZ treatment increased the phosphorylation state of connexin43 (Cx43), a gap junction protein subunit. Moreover, CPZ reduced the reactivity of Cx43 (immunofluorescence) at cell interfaces and concomitantly increased its reactivity in intracellular vesicles, suggesting an increased retrieval from and/or reduced insertion into the plasma membrane. CPZ also caused cellular retraction reducing cell-cell contacts in a reversible manner. The reduction in contact area might destabilize existing gap junctions and abrogate formation of new ones. Moreover, the CPZ-induced reduction in gap junctional communication may depend on the connexins (Cxs) forming the junctions. If Cx43 were the only connexin expressed, MAPK-dependent phosphorylation of this connexin would induce closure of gap junction channels

  3. Escherichia coli producing colibactin triggers premature and transmissible senescence in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Secher

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence is an irreversible state of proliferation arrest evoked by a myriad of stresses including oncogene activation, telomere shortening/dysfunction and genotoxic insults. It has been associated with tumor activation, immune suppression and aging, owing to the secretion of proinflammatory mediators. The bacterial genotoxin colibactin, encoded by the pks genomic island is frequently harboured by Escherichia coli strains of the B2 phylogenetic group. Mammalian cells exposed to live pks+ bacteria exhibit DNA-double strand breaks (DSB and undergo cell-cycle arrest and death. Here we show that cells that survive the acute bacterial infection with pks+ E. coli display hallmarks of cellular senescence: chronic DSB, prolonged cell-cycle arrest, enhanced senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal activity, expansion of promyelocytic leukemia nuclear foci and senescence-associated heterochromatin foci. This was accompanied by reactive oxygen species production and pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and proteases secretion. These mediators were able to trigger DSB and enhanced SA-β-Gal activity in bystander recipient cells treated with conditioned medium from senescent cells. Furthermore, these senescent cells promoted the growth of human tumor cells. In conclusion, the present data demonstrated that the E. coli genotoxin colibactin induces cellular senescence and subsequently propel bystander genotoxic and oncogenic effects.

  4. Incorporation of functionalized gold nanoparticles into nanofibers for enhanced attachment and differentiation of mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Dongju

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electrospun nanofibers have been widely used as substrata for mammalian cell culture owing to their structural similarity to natural extracellular matrices. Structurally consistent electrospun nanofibers can be produced with synthetic polymers but require chemical modification to graft cell-adhesive molecules to make the nanofibers functional. Development of a facile method of grafting functional molecules on the nanofibers will contribute to the production of diverse cell type-specific nanofiber substrata. Results Small molecules, peptides, and functionalized gold nanoparticles were successfully incorporated with polymethylglutarimide (PMGI nanofibers through electrospinning. The PMGI nanofibers functionalized by the grafted AuNPs, which were labeled with cell-adhesive peptides, enhanced HeLa cell attachment and potentiated cardiomyocyte differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells. Conclusions PMGI nanofibers can be functionalized simply by co-electrospinning with the grafting materials. In addition, grafting functionalized AuNPs enable high-density localization of the cell-adhesive peptides on the nanofiber. The results of the present study suggest that more cell type-specific synthetic substrata can be fabricated with molecule-doped nanofibers, in which diverse functional molecules are grafted alone or in combination with other molecules at different concentrations.

  5. Mammalian Tead proteins regulate cell proliferation and contact inhibition as transcriptional mediators of Hippo signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Mitsunori; Sasaki, Hiroshi

    2008-12-01

    Regulation of organ size is important for development and tissue homeostasis. In Drosophila, Hippo signaling controls organ size by regulating the activity of a TEAD transcription factor, Scalloped, through modulation of its co-activator protein Yki. Here, we show that mouse Tead proteins regulate cell proliferation by mediating Hippo signaling. In NIH3T3 cells, cell density and Hippo signaling regulated the activity of endogenous Tead proteins by modulating nuclear localization of a Yki homolog, Yap1, and the resulting change in Tead activity altered cell proliferation. Tead2-VP16 mimicked Yap1 overexpression, including increased cell proliferation, reduced cell death, promotion of EMT, lack of cell contact inhibition and promotion of tumor formation. Growth-promoting activities of various Yap1 mutants correlated with their Tead-co-activator activities. Tead2-VP16 and Yap1 regulated largely overlapping sets of genes. However, only a few of the Tead/Yap1-regulated genes in NIH3T3 cells were affected in Tead1(-/-);Tead2(-/-) or Yap1(-/-) embryos. Most of the previously identified Yap1-regulated genes were not affected in NIH3T3 cells or mutant mice. In embryos, levels of nuclear Yap1 and Tead1 varied depending on cell type. Strong nuclear accumulation of Yap1 and Tead1 were seen in myocardium, correlating with requirements of Tead1 for proliferation. However, their distribution did not always correlate with proliferation. Taken together, mammalian Tead proteins regulate cell proliferation and contact inhibition as a transcriptional mediator of Hippo signaling, but the mechanisms by which Tead/Yap1 regulate cell proliferation differ depending on the cell type, and Tead, Yap1 and Hippo signaling may play multiple roles in mouse embryos.

  6. Mapping of the secretome of primary isolates of mammalian cells, stem cells and derived cell lines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skalníková, Helena; Motlík, Jan; Gadher, S. J.; Kovářová, Hana

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2011), s. 691-708 ISSN 1615-9853 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538; GA MŠk(CZ) ME10044 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : cell biology * conditioned media * cytokine Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.505, year: 2011

  7. Collective behaviors of mammalian cells on amine-coated silicon nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, So Yeon; Yang, Eun Gyeong

    2013-01-01

    Intensive studies with vertical nanowire (NW) arrays have illustrated broad implications for manipulating mammalian cells in vitro, but how cellular responses are influenced by the presence of NWs has not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we address collective cellular behaviors, including surface area of cells, membrane trafficking, focal adhesion distribution and dynamics, and cytoskeletal protein distribution on amine-coated silicon (Si) NWs with different physical properties. The degree of HeLa cell spreading was inversely proportional to the surface area occupied by the NWs, which was not affected by manipulation of membrane trafficking dynamics. In the presence of a diffusive focal complex around the NWs, strong, well organized focal adhesion was hardly visible on the NWs, implying that the cells were interacting weakly with the NW-embedded surface. Furthermore, we found that actin filament formation of the cells on long NWs was not favorable, and this could explain our observation of reduced cell spreading, as well as the decreased number of focal adhesion complexes. Taken together, our results suggest that cells can survive on silicon NWs by adjusting their morphology and adhesion behavior through actively organizing these molecules. (paper)

  8. Theoretical modeling of mechanical homeostasis of a mammalian cell under gravity-directed vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lüwen; Zhang, Chen; Zhang, Fan; Lü, Shouqin; Sun, Shujin; Lü, Dongyuan; Long, Mian

    2018-02-01

    Translocation of dense nucleus along gravity vector initiates mechanical remodeling of a eukaryotic cell. In our previous experiments, we quantified the impact of gravity vector on cell remodeling by placing an MC3T3-E1 cell onto upward (U)-, downward (D)-, or edge-on (E)- orientated substrate. Our experimental data demonstrate that orientation dependence of nucleus longitudinal translocation is positively correlated with cytoskeletal (CSK) remodeling of their expressions and structures and also is associated with rearrangement of focal adhesion complex (FAC). However, the underlying mechanism how CSK network and FACs are reorganized in a mammalian cell remains unclear. In this paper, we developed a theoretical biomechanical model to integrate the mechanosensing of nucleus translocation with CSK remodeling and FAC reorganization induced by a gravity vector. The cell was simplified as a nucleated tensegrity structure in the model. The cell and CSK filaments were considered to be symmetrical. All elements of CSK filaments and cytomembrane that support the nucleus were simplified as springs. FACs were simplified as an adhesion cluster of parallel bonds with shared force. Our model proposed that gravity vector-directed translocation of the cell nucleus is mechanically balanced by CSK remodeling and FAC reorganization induced by a gravitational force. Under gravity, dense nucleus tends to translocate and exert additional compressive or stretching force on the cytoskeleton. Finally, changes of the tension force acting on talin by microfilament alter the size of FACs. Results from our model are in qualitative agreement with those from experiments.

  9. Toxicity of Volatile Methylated Species of Bismuth, Arsenic, Tin, and Mercury in Mammalian Cells In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dopp

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The biochemical transformation of mercury, tin, arsenic and bismuth through formation of volatile alkylated species performs a fundamental role in determining the environmental processing of these elements. While the toxicity of inorganic forms of most of these compounds are well documented (e.g., arsenic, mercury and some of them are of relatively low toxicity (e.g., tin, bismuth, the more lipid-soluble organometals can be highly toxic. In the present study we investigated the cyto- and genotoxicity of five volatile metal(loid compounds: trimethylbismuth, dimethylarsenic iodide, trimethylarsine, tetramethyltin, and dimethylmercury. As far as we know, this is the first study investigating the toxicity of volatile metal(loid compounds in vitro. Our results showed that dimethylmercury was most toxic to all three used cell lines (CHO-9 cells, CaCo, Hep-G2 followed by dimethylarsenic iodide. Tetramethyltin was the least toxic compound; however, the toxicity was also dependend upon the cell type. Human colon cells (CaCo were most susceptible to the toxicity of the volatile compounds compared to the other cell lines. We conclude from our study that volatile metal(loid compounds can be toxic to mammalian cells already at very low concentrations but the toxicity depends upon the metal(loid species and the exposed cell type.

  10. Mammalian STE20-like kinase 2, not kinase 1, mediates photoreceptor cell death during retinal detachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, H; Murakami, Y; Kataoka, K; Lin, H; Connor, K M; Miller, J W; Zhou, D; Avruch, J; Vavvas, D G

    2014-01-01

    Photoreceptor cell death is the definitive cause of vision loss in retinal detachment (RD). Mammalian STE20-like kinase (MST) is a master regulator of both cell death and proliferation and a critical factor in development and tumorigenesis. However, to date the role of MST in neurodegeneration has not been fully explored. Utilizing MST1−/− and MST2−/− mice we identified MST2, but not MST1, as a regulator of photoreceptor cell death in a mouse model of RD. MST2−/− mice demonstrated significantly decreased photoreceptor cell death and outer nuclear layer (ONL) thinning after RD. Additionally, caspase-3 activation was attenuated in MST2−/− mice compared to control mice after RD. The transcription of p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) and Fas was also reduced in MST2−/− mice post-RD. Retinas of MST2−/− mice displayed suppressed nuclear relocalization of phosphorylated YAP after RD. Consistent with the reduction of photoreceptor cell death, MST2−/− mice showed decreased levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and interleukin 6 as well as attenuated inflammatory CD11b cell infiltration during the early phase of RD. These results identify MST2, not MST1, as a critical regulator of caspase-mediated photoreceptor cell death in the detached retina and indicate its potential as a future neuroprotection target. PMID:24874741

  11. A noninvasive technique for the measurement of the energetic state of free-suspension mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Tchavtchavadze, M; Chen, J; Perrier, Michel; Jolicoeur, Mario

    2010-01-01

    A perfusion small-scale bioreactor allowing on-line monitoring of the cell energetic state was developed for free-suspension mammalian cells. The bioreactor was designed to perform in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which is a noninvasive and nondestructive method that permits the monitoring of intracellular nutrient concentrations, metabolic precursors and intermediates, as well as metabolites and energy shuttles, such as ATP, ADP, and NADPH. The bioreactor was made of a 10-mm NMR tube following a fluidized bed design. Perfusion flow rate allowing for adequate oxygen supply was found to be above 0.79 mL min(-1) for high-density cell suspensions (10(8) cells). Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were studied here as model system. Hydrodynamic studies using coloration/decoloration and residence time distribution measurements were realized to perfect bioreactor design as well as to determine operating conditions bestowing adequate homogeneous mixing and cell retention in the NMR reading zone. In vivo (31)P NMR was performed and demonstrated the small-scale bioreactor platform ability to monitor the cell physiological behavior for 30-min experiments.

  12. New vector for transfer of yeast artificial chromosomes to mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markie, D.; Ragoussis, J.; Senger, G.; Rowan, A.; Trowsdale, J.; Sheer, D.; Bodmer, W.F. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London (United Kingdom)); Sansom, D. (Bath Inst. for Rheumatic Diseases, Avon (United Kingdom))

    1993-03-01

    A modification vector has been constructed to facilitate the transfer of yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) to mammalian cells in culture by targeting a dominant selectable marker (G418 resistance) to the right arm of pYAC4 clones. The ADE2 gene is used for yeast selection with consequent disruption of the URA3 gene, allowing direct modification of YACs within the common host strain AB1380, and providing a simple test for correct targeting. This vector has been tested by modification of a 550-kb YAC containing part of the human MHC class II region and transfer to CHO cells by protoplast fusion. Analysis of 15 independent G418-resistant CHO lines obtained following fusion suggests the majority contain a complete YAC with moderate amplification in some lines. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Detection of DNA strand breaks in mammalian cells using the radioresistant bacterium PprA protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Katsuya; Wada, Seiichi; Narumi, Issay; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Funayama, Tomoo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2003-01-01

    We have previously found that the PprA protein from Deinococcus radiodurans possesses ability to recognize DNA carrying strand breaks. In the present study, we attempted to visualize radiation-induced DNA strand breaks with PprA protein using immunofluorescence technique to elucidate the DNA damage response mechanism in mammalian cultured cells. As a result, colocalization of Cy2 and DAPI fluorescent signals was observed. This observation suggests that DNA strand breaks in the nucleus of CHO-K1 cells were effectively detected using the PprA protein. The amount of DNA strand breaks (integrated density of Cy2 fluorescent signals) was increased with the increase in the radiation dose. (author)

  14. DNA precursor compartmentation in mammalian cells: distribution and rates of equilibration between nucleus and cytoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeds, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    A rapid nuclear isolation technique was adapted in order to examine the question of DNA precursor compartmentation in mammalian cells. By using this method a reproducible proportion of the cellular nucleotides remained associated with the isolated nuclei. Examination, at several different cell densities, of exponentially growing HeLa cells showed that the nuclei contained a constant but distinct proportion of each dNTP. The nuclear dATP and dTTP concentrations were equal at all densities examined even though the dTTP pool was 150% of the dATP whole-cell pool. The nuclear portion of the whole-cell pools was roughly equal to the volume occupied by the nucleus. The nuclear-cytoplasmic dNTP pool distribution did not change throughout the cell cycle of synchronized Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The rates at which either radiolabeled cytidine or deoxycytidine equilibrated with the nuclear and whole-cell dCTP pools of G1 and S phase CHO cells were compared. Experiments comparing the labeling kinetics of 3 H-thymidine in G1, S phase, and exponentially growing cells revealed that the S phase dTTP pool equilibrated with exogenously added thymidine faster than the G1 phase pool. The rate of equilibration in exponentially growing cells appeared to be a combination of that seen in G1 and S phases. A linear rate of 3 H-thymidine incorporation into DNA occurred at the same rate in S phase and exponentially growing cells

  15. Understanding and modeling retention of mammalian cells in fluidized bed centrifuges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, William; Rubin, Jonathan; Scully, Jennifer; Kamaraju, Hari; Wnukowski, Piotr; Bhatia, Ravinder

    2016-11-01

    Within the last decade, fully disposable centrifuge technologies, fluidized-bed centrifuges (FBC), have been introduced to the biologics industry. The FBC has found a niche in cell therapy where it is used to collect, concentrate, and then wash mammalian cell product while continuously discarding centrate. The goal of this research was to determine optimum FBC conditions for recovery of live cells, and to develop a mathematical model that can assist with process scaleup. Cell losses can occur during bed formation via flow channels within the bed. Experimental results with the kSep400 centrifuge indicate that, for a given volume processed: the bed height (a bed compactness indicator) is affected by RPM and flowrate, and dead cells are selectively removed during operation. To explain these results, two modeling approaches were used: (i) equating the centrifugal and inertial forces on the cells (i.e., a force balance model or FBM) and (ii) a two-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to predict liquid flow patterns and cell retention in the bowl. Both models predicted bed height vs. time reasonably well, though the CFD model proved more accurate. The flow patterns predicted by CFD indicate a Coriolis-driven flow that enhances uniformity of cells in the bed and may lead to cell losses in the outflow over time. The CFD-predicted loss of viable cells and selective removal of the dead cells generally agreed with experimental trends, but did over-predict dead cell loss by up to 3-fold for some of the conditions. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1520-1530, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  16. Overexpression of AQP3 Modifies the Cell Cycle and the Proliferation Rate of Mammalian Cells in Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán-Cobo, Ana; Ramírez-Lorca, Reposo; Serna, Ana; Echevarría, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal AQP3 overexpression in tumor cells of different origins has been reported and a role for this enhanced AQP3 expression in cell proliferation and tumor processess has been indicated. To further understand the role AQP3 plays in cell proliferation we explore the effect that stable over expression of AQP3 produces over the proliferation rate and cell cycle of mammalian cells. The cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry with propidium iodide (PI) and the cell proliferation rate measured through cell counting and BrdU staining. Cells with overexpression of AQP3 (AQP3-o) showed higher proliferation rate and larger percentage of cells in phases S and G2/M, than wild type cells (wt). Evaluation of the cell response against arresting the cell cycle with Nocodazole showed that AQP3-o exhibited a less modified cell cycle pattern and lower Annexin V specific staining than wt, consistently with a higher resistance to apoptosis of AQP3-overexpressing cells. The cell volume and complexity were also larger in AQP3-o compared to wt cells. After transcriptomic analysis, RT-qPCR was performed to highlight key molecules implicated in cell proliferation which expression may be altered by overexpression of AQP3 and the comparative analysis between both type of cells showed significant changes in the expression of Zeb2, Jun, JunB, NF-kβ, Cxcl9, Cxcl10, TNF, and TNF receptors. We conclude that the role of AQP3 in cell proliferation seems to be connected to increments in the cell cycle turnover and changes in the expression levels of relevant genes for this process. Larger expression of AQP3 may confer to the cell a more tumor like phenotype and contributes to explain the presence of this protein in many different tumors.

  17. Hierarchical micro/nanostructured titanium with balanced actions to bacterial and mammalian cells for dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Y

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Yu Zhu,1,* Huiliang Cao,2,* Shichong Qiao,1,* Manle Wang,2,3 Yingxin Gu,1 Huiwen Luo,1 Fanhao Meng,2 Xuanyong Liu,2 Hongchang Lai1 1Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Implantology, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 2State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 3School of Materials Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: A versatile strategy to endow dental implants with long-term antibacterial ability without compromising the cytocompatibility is highly desirable to combat implant-related infection. Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs have been utilized as a highly effective and broad-spectrum antibacterial agent for surface modification of biomedical devices. However, the high mobility and subsequent hazardous effects of the particles on mammalian cells may limit its practical applications. Thus, Ag NPs were immobilized on the surface of sand-blasted, large grit, and acid-etched (SLA titanium by manipulating the atomic-scale heating effect of silver plasma immersion ion implantation. The silver plasma immersion ion implantation-treated SLA surface gave rise to both good antibacterial activity and excellent compatibility with mammalian cells. The antibacterial activity rendered by the immobilized Ag NPs was assessed using Fusobacterium nucleatum and Staphylococcus aureus, commonly suspected pathogens for peri-implant disease. The immobilized Ag NPs offered a good defense against multiple cycles of bacteria attack in both F. nucleatum and S. aureus, and the mechanism was independent of silver release. F. nucleatum showed a higher susceptibility to Ag NPs than S. aureus, which might be explained by the presence of different wall structures. Moreover, the

  18. Imaging mammalian cells with soft x rays: The importance of specimen preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.T.; Meyer-Ilse, W.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of mammalian cell structure and spatial organization are a very prominent part of modern cell biology. The interest in them as well as their size make them very accommodating subject specimens for imaging with soft x-rays using the XM-1 transmission microscope built and operated by The Center for X-ray Optics on Beam Line 6.1 at the Advanced Light Source. The purpose of these experiments was to determine if the fixative protocols normally used in electron or visible light microscopy were adequate to allow imaging cells, either fibroblasts or neurons, with minimal visible radiation damage due to imaging with soft x-rays at 2.4 nm. Two cell types were selected. Fibroblasts are easily cultured but fragile cells which are commonly used as models for the detailed study of cell physiology. Neurons are complex and sensitive cells which are difficult to prepare and to culture for study in isolation from their connections with surrounding cells. These cell types pose problems in their preparation for any microscopy. To improve the contrast and to prevent postmortem alteration of the chemistry and hence the structure of cells extracted from culture or from living organisms, fixation and staining techniques are employed in electron and visible light microscopy. It has been accepted by biologists for years that these treatments create artifacts and false structure. The authors have begun to develop protocols for specimens of each of these two cell types for soft x-ray microscopy which will preserve them in as near normal state as possible using minimal fixation, and make it possible to image them in either a hydrated or dried state free of secondary addition of stains or other labels

  19. Imaging mammalian cells with soft x rays: The importance of specimen preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, J.T.; Meyer-Ilse, W. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Studies of mammalian cell structure and spatial organization are a very prominent part of modern cell biology. The interest in them as well as their size make them very accommodating subject specimens for imaging with soft x-rays using the XM-1 transmission microscope built and operated by The Center for X-ray Optics on Beam Line 6.1 at the Advanced Light Source. The purpose of these experiments was to determine if the fixative protocols normally used in electron or visible light microscopy were adequate to allow imaging cells, either fibroblasts or neurons, with minimal visible radiation damage due to imaging with soft x-rays at 2.4 nm. Two cell types were selected. Fibroblasts are easily cultured but fragile cells which are commonly used as models for the detailed study of cell physiology. Neurons are complex and sensitive cells which are difficult to prepare and to culture for study in isolation from their connections with surrounding cells. These cell types pose problems in their preparation for any microscopy. To improve the contrast and to prevent postmortem alteration of the chemistry and hence the structure of cells extracted from culture or from living organisms, fixation and staining techniques are employed in electron and visible light microscopy. It has been accepted by biologists for years that these treatments create artifacts and false structure. The authors have begun to develop protocols for specimens of each of these two cell types for soft x-ray microscopy which will preserve them in as near normal state as possible using minimal fixation, and make it possible to image them in either a hydrated or dried state free of secondary addition of stains or other labels.

  20. The three-dimensional organization of telomeres in the nucleus of mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrin Mathilde

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The observation of multiple genetic markers in situ by optical microscopy and their relevance to the study of three-dimensional (3D chromosomal organization in the nucleus have been greatly developed in the last decade. These methods are important in cancer research because cancer is characterized by multiple alterations that affect the modulation of gene expression and the stability of the genome. It is, therefore, essential to analyze the 3D genome organization of the interphase nucleus in both normal and cancer cells. Results We describe a novel approach to study the distribution of all telomeres inside the nucleus of mammalian cells throughout the cell cycle. It is based on 3D telomere fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by quantitative analysis that determines the telomeres' distribution in the nucleus throughout the cell cycle. This method enables us to determine, for the first time, that telomere organization is cell-cycle dependent, with assembly of telomeres into a telomeric disk in the G2 phase. In tumor cells, the 3D telomere organization is distorted and aggregates are formed. Conclusions The results emphasize a non-random and dynamic 3D nuclear telomeric organization and its importance to genomic stability. Based on our findings, it appears possible to examine telomeric aggregates suggestive of genomic instability in individual interphase nuclei and tissues without the need to examine metaphases. Such new avenues of monitoring genomic instability could potentially impact on cancer biology, genetics, diagnostic innovations and surveillance of treatment response in medicine.

  1. Reduced quenching and extraction time for mammalian cells using filtration and syringe extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Bort, Juan A.; Shanmukam, Vinoth; Pabst, Martin; Windwarder, Markus; Neumann, Laura; Alchalabi, Ali; Krebiehl, Guido; Koellensperger, Gunda; Hann, Stephan; Sonntag, Denise; Altmann, Friedrich; Heel, Christine; Borth, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    In order to preserve the in vivo metabolite levels of cells, a quenching protocol must be quickly executed to avoid degradation of labile metabolites either chemically or biologically. In the case of mammalian cell cultures cultivated in complex media, a wash step previous to quenching is necessary to avoid contamination of the cell pellet with extracellular metabolites, which could distort the real intracellular concentration of metabolites. This is typically achieved either by one or multiple centrifugation/wash steps which delay the time until quenching (even harsh centrifugation requires several minutes for processing until the cells are quenched) or filtration. In this article, we describe and evaluate a two-step optimized protocol based on fast filtration by use of a vacuum pump for quenching and subsequent extraction of intracellular metabolites from CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) suspension cells, which uses commercially available components. The method allows transfer of washed cells into liquid nitrogen within 10–15 s of sampling and recovers the entire extraction solution volume. It also has the advantage to remove residual filter filaments in the final sample, thus preventing damage to separation columns during subsequent MS analysis. Relative to other methods currently used in the literature, the resulting energy charge of intracellular adenosine nucleotides was increased to 0.94 compared to 0.90 with cold PBS quenching or 0.82 with cold methanol/AMBIC quenching. PMID:24794799

  2. Experimental design and reporting standards for metabolomics studies of mammalian cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayton, Sarah; Maker, Garth L; Mullaney, Ian; Trengove, Robert D

    2017-12-01

    Metabolomics is an analytical technique that investigates the small biochemical molecules present within a biological sample isolated from a plant, animal, or cultured cells. It can be an extremely powerful tool in elucidating the specific metabolic changes within a biological system in response to an environmental challenge such as disease, infection, drugs, or toxins. A historically difficult step in the metabolomics pipeline is in data interpretation to a meaningful biological context, for such high-variability biological samples and in untargeted metabolomics studies that are hypothesis-generating by design. One way to achieve stronger biological context of metabolomic data is via the use of cultured cell models, particularly for mammalian biological systems. The benefits of in vitro metabolomics include a much greater control of external variables and no ethical concerns. The current concerns are with inconsistencies in experimental procedures and level of reporting standards between different studies. This review discusses some of these discrepancies between recent studies, such as metabolite extraction and data normalisation. The aim of this review is to highlight the importance of a standardised experimental approach to any cultured cell metabolomics study and suggests an example procedure fully inclusive of information that should be disclosed in regard to the cell type/s used and their culture conditions. Metabolomics of cultured cells has the potential to uncover previously unknown information about cell biology, functions and response mechanisms, and so the accurate biological interpretation of the data produced and its ability to be compared to other studies should be considered vitally important.

  3. Activation of ADP-ribosyltransferase in polyamine-depleted mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, H M; Gordon, A M; Keir, H M; Pearson, C K

    1984-01-01

    Mammalian fibroblasts were cultured in the presence of alpha-methylornithine and/or methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), which inhibit the synthesis of polyamines. This led to a decrease in the cellular content of the polyamines spermine and spermidine by up to 60% when the cells were grown in the presence of both drugs together. The activity of the chromatin-associated enzyme ADP-ribosyltransferase was enhanced 2-3-fold in the drug-treated cells when measured in cells subsequently rendered permeable to exogenous NAD+, the substrate for the transferase. This is a novel and surprising observation, since the transferase is invariably activated by the addition of polyamines to a suitable incubation system such as permeabilized cells, isolated nuclei or the purified enzyme. We found no evidence that the activation was due to the appearance of DNA strand breaks, by using a variety of procedures including both neutral [the 'nucleoid' technique of Cook & Brazell [(1975) J. Cell Sci. 19, 261-279; (1976) J. Cell Sci. 22, 287-302

  4. Development of a Safeguard System Using an Episomal Mammalian Artificial Chromosome for Gene and Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narumi Uno

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a safeguard system to remove tumorigenic cells would allow safer clinical applications of stem cells for the treatment of patients with an intractable disease including genetic disorders. Such safeguard systems should not disrupt the host genome and should have long-term stability. Here, we attempted to develop a tumor-suppressing mammalian artificial chromosome containing a safeguard system that uses the immune rejection system against allogeneic tissue from the host. For proof-of-concept of the safeguard system, B16F10 mouse melanoma cells expressing the introduced H2-K(d major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I-allogenic haplotype were transplanted into recipient C57BL/6J mice expressing MHC H2-K(b. Subcutaneous implantation of B16F10 cells into C57BL/6J mice resulted in high tumorigenicity. The volume of tumors derived from B16F10 cells expressing allogenic MHC H2-K(d was decreased significantly (P < 0.01. Suppression of MHC H2-K(d-expressing tumors in C57BL/6J mice was enhanced by immunization with MHC H2-K(d-expressing splenocytes (P < 0.01. These results suggest that the safeguard system is capable of suppressing tumor formation by the transplanted cells.

  5. Effect of surface organic coatings of cellulose nanocrystals on the viability of mammalian cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Ambar S; Jaramillo, Francesca; Hemraz, Usha D; Boluk, Yaman; Ckless, Karina; Sunasee, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) have emerged as promising candidates for a number of bio-applications. Surface modification of CNCs continues to gain significant research interest as it imparts new properties to the surface of the nanocrystals for the design of multifunctional CNCs-based materials. A small chemical surface modification can potentially lead to drastic behavioral changes of cell-material interactions thereby affecting the intended bio-application. In this work, unmodified CNCs were covalently decorated with four different organic moieties such as a diaminobutane fragment, a cyclic oligosaccharide ( β -cyclodextrin), a thermoresponsive polymer (poly[ N -isopropylacrylamide]), and a cationic aminomethacrylamide-based polymer using different synthetic covalent methods. The effect of surface coatings of CNCs and the respective dose-response of the above organic moieties on the cell viability were evaluated on mammalian cell cultures (J774A.1 and MFC-7), using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphe-nyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assays. Overall, the results indicated that cells exposed to surface-coated CNCs for 24 h did not display major changes in cell viability, membrane permeability as well as cell morphology. However, with longer exposure, all these parameters were somewhat affected, which appears not to be correlated with either anionic or cationic surface coatings of CNCs used in this study.

  6. microRNA-mediated messenger RNA deadenylation contributes to translational repression in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Traude H Beilharz

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Animal microRNAs (miRNAs typically regulate gene expression by binding to partially complementary target sites in the 3' untranslated region (UTR of messenger RNA (mRNA reducing its translation and stability. They also commonly induce shortening of the mRNA 3' poly(A tail, which contributes to their mRNA decay promoting function. The relationship between miRNA-mediated deadenylation and translational repression has been less clear. Using transfection of reporter constructs carrying three imperfectly matching let-7 target sites in the 3' UTR into mammalian cells we observe rapid target mRNA deadenylation that precedes measureable translational repression by endogenous let-7 miRNA. Depleting cells of the argonaute co-factors RCK or TNRC6A can impair let-7-mediated repression despite ongoing mRNA deadenylation, indicating that deadenylation alone is not sufficient to effect full repression. Nevertheless, the magnitude of translational repression by let-7 is diminished when the target reporter lacks a poly(A tail. Employing an antisense strategy to block deadenylation of target mRNA with poly(A tail also partially impairs translational repression. On the one hand, these experiments confirm that tail removal by deadenylation is not strictly required for translational repression. On the other hand they show directly that deadenylation can augment miRNA-mediated translational repression in mammalian cells beyond stimulating mRNA decay. Taken together with published work, these results suggest a dual role of deadenylation in miRNA function: it contributes to translational repression as well as mRNA decay and is thus critically involved in establishing the quantitatively appropriate physiological response to miRNAs.

  7. Human TMEM30a promotes uptake of antitumor and bioactive choline phospholipids into mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Brady, Erin; McIntyre, Thomas M

    2011-03-01

    Antitumor alkylphospholipids initiate apoptosis in transformed HL-60 and Jurkat cells while sparing their progenitors. 1-O-Alkyl-2-carboxymethyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (Edelfosine) like other short-chained phospholipids--inflammatory platelet-activating factor (PAF) and apoptotic oxidatively truncated phospholipids--are proposed to have intracellular sites of action, yet a conduit for these choline phospholipids into mammalian cells is undefined. Edelfosine is also accumulated by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a process requiring the membrane protein Lem3p, and the human genome contains a Lem3p homolog TMEM30a. We show that import of choline phospholipids into S. cerevisiae ΔLem3 is partially reconstituted by human TMEM30a and by Lem3p-TMEM30a chimeras, showing the proteins are orthologous. TMEM30a-GFP chimeras expressed in mammalian cells localized in plasma membranes, as well as internal organelles, and ectopic TMEM30a expression promoted uptake of exogenous choline and ethanolamine phospholipids. Short hairpin RNA knockdown of TMEM30a reduced fluorescent choline phospholipid and [(3)H]PAF import. This knockdown also reduced mitochondrial depolarization from exogenous Edelfosine or the mitotoxic oxidatively truncated phospholipid azelaoyl phosphatidylcholine, and the knockdown reduced apoptosis in response to these two phospholipids. These results show that extracellular choline phospholipids with short sn-2 residues can have intracellular roles and sites of metabolism because they are transport substrates for a TMEM30a phospholipid import system. Variation in this mechanism could limit sensitivity to short chain choline phospholipids such as Edelfosine, PAF, and proapoptotic phospholipids.

  8. An improved UPLC-MS/MS platform for quantitative analysis of glycerophosphoinositol in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Grauso

    Full Text Available The glycerophosphoinositols constitute a class of biologically active lipid-derived mediators whose intracellular levels are modulated during physiological and pathological cell processes. Comprehensive assessment of the role of these compounds expands beyond the cellular biology of lipids and includes rapid and unambiguous measurement in cells and tissues. Here we describe a sensitive and simple liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS method for quantitative analysis of the most abundant among these phosphoinositide derivatives in mammalian cells, the glycerophosphoinositol (GroPIns. The method has been developed in mouse Raw 264.7 macrophages with limits of quantitation at 3 ng/ml. Validation on the same cell line showed excellent response in terms of linear dynamic range (from 3 to 3,000 ng/ml, intra-day and inter-day precision (coefficient of variation ≤ 7.10% and accuracy (between 98.1 and 109.0% in the range 10-320 ng/ml. As proof of concept, a simplified analytical platform based on this method and external calibration was also tested on four stimulated and unstimulated cell lines, including Raw 264.7 macrophages, Jurkat T-cells, A375MM melanoma cells and rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells. The results indicate a wide variation in GroPIns levels among different cell lines and stimulation conditions, although the measurements were always in line with the literature. No significant matrix effects were observed thus indicating that the here proposed method can be of general use for similar determinations in cells of different origin.

  9. Two inhibitory systems and CKIs regulate cell cycle exit of mammalian cardiomyocytes after birth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tane, Shoji; Okayama, Hitomi; Ikenishi, Aiko; Amemiya, Yuki [School of Life Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan); Nakayama, Keiichi I. [Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Takeuchi, Takashi, E-mail: takeuchi@med.tottori-u.ac.jp [School of Life Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan)

    2015-10-16

    Mammalian cardiomyocytes actively proliferate during embryonic stages, following which they exit their cell cycle after birth, and the exit is maintained. Previously, we showed that two inhibitory systems (the G1-phase inhibitory system: repression of cyclin D1 expression; the M-phase inhibitory system: inhibition of CDK1 activation) maintain the cell cycle exit of mouse adult cardiomyocytes. We also showed that two CDK inhibitors (CKIs), p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1}, regulate the cell cycle exit in a portion of postnatal cardiomyocytes. It remains unknown whether the two inhibitory systems are involved in the cell cycle exit of postnatal cardiomyocytes and whether p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1} also inhibit entry to M-phase. Here, we showed that more than 40% of cardiomyocytes entered an additional cell cycle by induction of cyclin D1 expression at postnatal stages, but M-phase entry was inhibited in the majority of cardiomyocytes. Marked cell cycle progression and endoreplication were observed in cardiomyocytes of p21{sup Cip1} knockout mice at 4 weeks of age. In addition, tri- and tetranucleated cardiomyocytes increased significantly in p21{sup Cip1} knockout mice. These data showed that the G1-phase inhibitory system and two CKIs (p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1}) inhibit entry to an additional cell cycle in postnatal cardiomyocytes, and that the M-phase inhibitory system and p21{sup Cip1} inhibit M-phase entry of cardiomyocytes which have entered the additional cell cycle. - Highlights: • Many postnatal cardiomyocytes entered an additional cell cycle by cyclin D1 induction. • The majority of cardiomyocytes could not enter M-phase after cyclin D1 induction. • Cell cycle progressed markedly in p21{sup Cip1} knockout mice after postnatal day 14. • Tri- and tetranucleated cardiomyocytes increased in p21{sup Cip1} knockout mice.

  10. Chasing the precursor of functional hematopoietic stem cells at the single cell levels in mouse embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaochen; Gong, Yuemin; Ema, Hideo

    2016-07-22

    Adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), the ideal system for regenerative research, were isolated at single cell levels decades ago, whereas studies on embryonic HSCs are much more difficult. Zhou et al identified a new pre-HSC cell surface marker, CD201, by which they isolated pre-HSCs at single cell levels for further analyses. The novel expression pattern of HSC development is revealed, including the fundamental role of mammalian targets of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in HSCs emergence, and the repopulation potential of S/G2/M phase pre-HSCs. Deeper understandings of the cellular origin and developmental regulatory network of HSCs are essential to develop new strategies of generating HSCs in vitro for clinical application.

  11. Saikosaponin d induces cell death through caspase-3-dependent, caspase-3-independent and mitochondrial pathways in mammalian hepatic stellate cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ming-Feng; Huang, S. Joseph; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Liu, Pei-Shan; Lin, Kun-I; Liu, Ching-Wen; Hsieh, Wen-Chuan; Shiu, Li-Yen; Chen, Chang-Han

    2016-01-01

    Saikosaponin d (SSd) is one of the main active triterpene saponins in Bupleurum falcatum. It has a steroid-like structure, and is reported to have pharmacological activities, including liver protection in rat, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction in several cancer cell lines. However, the biological functions and molecular mechanisms of mammalian cells under SSd treatment are still unclear. The cytotoxicity and apoptosis of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) upon SSd treatment were discovered by MTT assay, colony formation assay and flow cytometry. The collage I/III, caspase activity and apoptotic related genes were examined by quantitative PCR, Western blotting, immunofluorescence and ELISA. The mitochondrial functions were monitored by flow cytometry, MitoTracker staining, ATP production and XF24 bioenergetic assay. This study found that SSd triggers cell death via an apoptosis path. An example of this path might be typical apoptotic morphology, increased sub-G1 phase cell population, inhibition of cell proliferation and activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9. However, the apoptotic effects induced by SSd are partially blocked by the caspase-3 inhibitor, Z-DEVD-FMK, suggesting that SSd may trigger both HSC-T6 and LX-2 cell apoptosis through caspase-3-dependent and independent pathways. We also found that SSd can trigger BAX and BAK translocation from the cytosol to the mitochondria, resulting in mitochondrial function inhibition, membrane potential disruption. Finally, SSd also increases the release of apoptotic factors. The overall analytical data indicate that SSd-elicited cell death may occur through caspase-3-dependent, caspase-3-independent and mitochondrial pathways in mammalian HSCs, and thus can delay the formation of liver fibrosis by reducing the level of HSCs

  12. Syntheses of nicotinamide riboside and derivatives: effective agents for increasing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tianle; Chan, Noel Yan-Ki; Sauve, Anthony A

    2007-12-27

    A new two-step methodology achieves stereoselective synthesis of beta-nicotinamide riboside and a series of related amide, ester, and acid nucleosides. Compounds were prepared through a triacetylated-nicotinate ester nucleoside, via coupling of either ethylnicotinate or phenylnicotinate with 1,2,3,5-tetra-O-acetyl-beta-D-ribofuranose. Nicotinamide riboside, nicotinic acid riboside, O-ethylnicotinate riboside, O-methylnicotinate riboside, and several N-alkyl derivatives increased NAD+ concentrations from 1.2-2.7-fold in several mammalian cell lines. These findings establish bioavailability and potent effects of these nucleosides in stimulating the increase of NAD+ concentrations in mammalian cells.

  13. Damage and repair in mammalian cells after ultraviolet and/or visible light treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harm, H.

    1976-01-01

    Ultraviolet (uv) light (254 nm or 302 nm) was used to induce lesions in DNA of cultured mammalian cells in vivo, particularly in fibroblasts from potoroo cornea, mouse skin (3T3), cat cornea, human skin (healthy and diseased), and in freshly obtained ox cornea tissue. In addition, white light (WL) from daylight fluorescent lamps, filtered through a plexiglass plate cutting off virtually all photons less than 380 nm and being fully transparent for greater than 400 nm, was applied in vivo either as photoreactivating light after uv irradiation, or as damaging radiation by itself. Completely unirradiated samples under otherwise identical conditions served as controls. DNA from cells exposed to these different radiations was extracted and tested for its capability of competitively inhibiting photoenzymatic repair of uv-irradiated Haemophilus influenzae transforming DNA in vitro in the presence of yeast photoreactivating enzyme (PRE) and photoreactivating light. In several (but not all) of the cases, DNA from cells treated with uv + WL displayed considerably less competitive inhibition than DNA from cells treated with uv alone, even though under certain conditions WL itself caused damage serving as substrate from the PRE in vitro. Cell cultures differing in their origin or in their number of passages varied substantially in this respect

  14. The Unfolded Protein Response in Homeostasis and Modulation of Mammalian Immune Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Ana Sofia; Alves, Inês; Helguero, Luisa; Domingues, Maria Rosário; Neves, Bruno Miguel

    2016-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays important roles in eukaryotic protein folding and lipid biosynthesis. Several exogenous and endogenous cellular sources of stress can perturb ER homeostasis leading to the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the lumen. Unfolded protein accumulation triggers a signal-transduction cascade known as the unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptive mechanism which aims to protect cells from protein aggregates and to restore ER functions. Further to this protective mechanism, in immune cells, UPR molecular effectors have been shown to participate in a wide range of biological processes such as cell differentiation, survival and immunoglobulin and cytokine production. Recent findings also highlight the involvement of the UPR machinery in the maturational program and antigen presentation capacities of dendritic cells. UPR is therefore a key element in immune system homeostasis with direct implications on both adaptive and innate immune responses. The present review summarizes the knowledge on the emerging roles of UPR signaling cascades in mammalian immune cells as well as the consequences of their dysregulation in relation to the pathogenesis of several diseases.

  15. Imaging dynamic redox changes in mammalian cells with green fluorescent protein indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Colette T; Dore, Timothy M; Hanson, George T; Jackson, W Coyt; Remington, S James; Tsien, Roger Y

    2004-05-21

    Changes in the redox equilibrium of cells influence a host of cell functions. Alterations in the redox equilibrium are precipitated by changing either the glutathione/glutathione-disulfide ratio (GSH/GSSG) and/or the reduced/oxidized thioredoxin ratio. Redox-sensitive green fluorescent proteins (GFP) allow real time visualization of the oxidation state of the indicator. Ratios of fluorescence from excitation at 400 and 490 nm indicate the extent of oxidation and thus the redox potential while canceling out the amount of indicator and the absolute optical sensitivity. Because the indicator is genetically encoded, it can be targeted to specific proteins or organelles of interest and expressed in a wide variety of cells and organisms. We evaluated roGFP1 (GFP with mutations C48S, S147C, and Q204C) and roGFP2 (the same plus S65T) with physiologically or toxicologically relevant oxidants both in vitro and in living mammalian cells. Furthermore, we investigated the response of the redox probes under physiological redox changes during superoxide bursts in macrophage cells, hyperoxic and hypoxic conditions, and in responses to H(2)O(2)-stimulating agents, e.g. epidermal growth factor and lysophosphatidic acid.

  16. The Mammalian circadian clock gene per2 modulates cell death in response to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnone, Maria Chiara; Langmesser, Sonja; Bezdek, April Candice; Tallone, Tiziano; Rusconi, Sandro; Albrecht, Urs

    2014-01-01

    Living in the earth's oxygenated environment forced organisms to develop strategies to cope with the damaging effects of molecular oxygen known as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we show that Per2, a molecular component of the mammalian circadian clock, is involved in regulating a cell's response to oxidative stress. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) containing a mutation in the Per2 gene are more resistant to cytotoxic effects mediated by ROS than wild-type cells, which is paralleled by an altered regulation of bcl-2 expression in Per2 mutant MEFs. The elevated survival rate and alteration of NADH/NAD(+) ratio in the mutant cells is reversed by introduction of the wild-type Per2 gene. Interestingly, clock synchronized cells display a time dependent sensitivity to paraquat, a ROS inducing agent. Our observations indicate that the circadian clock is involved in regulating the fate of a cell to survive or to die in response to oxidative stress, which could have implications for cancer development and the aging process.

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ku can bind to nuclear DNA damage and sensitize mammalian cells to bleomycin sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castore, Reneau; Hughes, Cameron; Debeaux, Austin; Sun, Jingxin; Zeng, Cailing; Wang, Shih-Ya; Tatchell, Kelly; Shi, Runhua; Lee, Kyung-Jong; Chen, David J; Harrison, Lynn

    2011-11-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are effective cancer treatments due to their ability to generate DNA damage. The major lethal lesion is the DNA double-strand break (DSB). Human cells predominantly repair DSBs by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), which requires Ku70, Ku80, DNA-PKcs, DNA ligase IV and accessory proteins. Repair is initiated by the binding of the Ku heterodimer at the ends of the DSB and this recruits DNA-PKcs, which initiates damage signaling and functions in repair. NHEJ also exists in certain types of bacteria that have dormant phases in their life cycle. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ku (Mt-Ku) resembles the DNA-binding domain of human Ku but does not have the N- and C-terminal domains of Ku70/80 that have been implicated in binding mammalian NHEJ repair proteins. The aim of this work was to determine whether Mt-Ku could be used as a tool to bind DSBs in mammalian cells and sensitize cells to DNA damage. We generated a fusion protein (KuEnls) of Mt-Ku, EGFP and a nuclear localization signal that is able to perform bacterial NHEJ and hence bind DSBs. Using transient transfection, we demonstrated that KuEnls is able to bind laser damage in the nucleus of Ku80-deficient cells within 10 sec and remains bound for up to 2 h. The Mt-Ku fusion protein was over-expressed in U2OS cells and this increased the sensitivity of the cells to bleomycin sulfate. Hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation do not predominantly produce DSBs and there was little or no change in sensitivity to these agents. Since in vitro studies were unable to detect binding of Mt-Ku to DNA-PKcs or human Ku70/80, this work suggests that KuEnls sensitizes cells by binding DSBs, preventing human NHEJ. This study indicates that blocking or decreasing the binding of human Ku to DSBs could be a method for enhancing existing cancer treatments.

  18. Mammalian nitrilase 1 homologue Nit1 is a negative regulator in T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haibing; Hou, Ying-Ju; Han, Shuang-Yin; Zhang, Eric C.; Huebner, Kay

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian Nit1 protein is homologous to plant and bacterial nitrilases. In flies and worms, Nit1 is fused to the 5′ end of Fhit, suggesting that Nit1 may functionally interact with the Fhit pathway. Fhit has been shown to play a role of a tumor suppressor. Somatic loss of Fhit in human tissues is associated with a wide variety of cancers. Deletion of Fhit results in a predisposition to induced and spontaneous tumors in mice. It has been suggested that Nit1 collaborates with Fhit in tumor suppression. Similar to mice lacking Fhit, Nit1-deficient mice are more sensitive to carcinogen-induced tumors. It was previously shown that ectopic expression of Nit1 or Fhit led to caspase activation and apoptosis, and that both proteins may play a role in DNA damage-induced apoptosis. In this study, we analyzed the physiological function of Nit1 in T cells using Nit1-knockout mice. Nit1-deficient T cells can undergo apoptosis induced by DNA damage due to irradiation and chemical treatment. However, apoptosis induced by Fas or Ca++ signals appeared to be compromised. Additionally, Nit1 deficiency resulted in T cell hyperproliferative responses induced by TCR stimulation. The expressions of T cell activation markers were elevated in Nit1−/− T cells. There was a spontaneous cell cycle entry and enhanced cell cycle progression in Nit1−/− T cells. These data indicate that Nit1 is a novel negative regulator in primary T cells. PMID:19395373

  19. Hydrogen peroxide production is affected by oxygen levels in mammalian cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddalena, Lucas A; Selim, Shehab M; Fonseca, Joao; Messner, Holt; McGowan, Shannon; Stuart, Jeffrey A

    2017-11-04

    Although oxygen levels in the extracellular space of most mammalian tissues are just a few percent, under standard cell culture conditions they are not regulated and are often substantially higher. Some cellular sources of reactive oxygen species, like NADPH oxidase 4, are sensitive to oxygen levels in the range between 'normal' physiological (typically 1-5%) and standard cell culture (up to 18%). Hydrogen peroxide in particular participates in signal transduction pathways via protein redox modifications, so the potential increase in its production under standard cell culture conditions is important to understand. We measured the rates of cellular hydrogen peroxide production in some common cell lines, including C2C12, PC-3, HeLa, SH-SY5Y, MCF-7, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) maintained at 18% or 5% oxygen. In all instances the rate of hydrogen peroxide production by these cells was significantly greater at 18% oxygen than at 5%. The increase in hydrogen peroxide production at higher oxygen levels was either abolished or substantially reduced by treatment with GKT 137831, a selective inhibitor of NADPH oxidase subunits 1 and 4. These data indicate that oxygen levels experienced by cells in culture influence hydrogen peroxide production via NADPH oxidase 1/4, highlighting the importance of regulating oxygen levels in culture near physiological values. However, we measured pericellular oxygen levels adjacent to cell monolayers under a variety of conditions and with different cell lines and found that, particularly when growing at 5% incubator oxygen levels, pericellular oxygen was often lower and variable. Together, these observations indicate the importance, and difficulty, of regulating oxygen levels experienced by cells in culture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural and functional characterization of the conserved salt bridge in mammalian paneth cell alpha-defensins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosengren, K Johan; Daly, Norelle L; Fornander, Liselotte M

    2006-01-01

    variant retains a well defined native fold because of a rearrangement of side chains, which result in compensating favorable interactions. Furthermore, salt bridge-deficient Crp4 mutants were tested for bactericidal effects and resistance to proteolytic degradation, and all of the variants had similar......alpha-Defensins are mediators of mammalian innate immunity, and knowledge of their structure-function relationships is essential for understanding their mechanisms of action. We report here the NMR solution structures of the mouse Paneth cell alpha-defensin cryptdin-4 (Crp4) and a mutant (E15D......)-Crp4 peptide, in which a conserved Glu(15) residue was replaced by Asp. Structural analysis of the two peptides confirms the involvement of this Glu in a conserved salt bridge that is removed in the mutant because of the shortened side chain. Despite disruption of this structural feature, the peptide...

  1. Accurate and semi-automated analysis of bacterial association with mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, C M; Paré, S; Galea, G; Simpson, J C; Smith, S G J

    2016-03-01

    To efficiently and accurately quantify the interactions of bacteria with mammalian cells, a reliable fluorescence microscopy assay was developed. Bacteria were engineered to become rapidly and stably fluorescent using Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) expressed from an inducible Tet promoter. Upon application of the fluorescent bacteria onto a monolayer, extracellular bacteria could be discriminated from intracellular bacteria by antibody staining and microscopy. All bacteria could be detected by GFP expression. External bacteria stained orange, whereas internalised bacteria did not. Internalised bacteria could thus be discriminated from external bacteria by virtue of being green but not orange fluorescent. Image acquisition and counting of various fluorophore-stained entities were accomplished with a high-content screening platform. This allowed for semi-automated and accurate counting of intracellular and extracellular bacteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. An early developmental vertebrate model for nanomaterial safety: bridging cell-based and mammalian toxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Carl A; Di Silvio, Desire; Devarajan, Aarthi; Bigini, Paolo; Micotti, Edoardo; Giudice, Chiara; Salmona, Mario; Wheeler, Grant N; Sherwood, Victoria; Bombelli, Francesca Baldelli

    2016-03-01

    With the rise in production of nanoparticles (NPs) for an ever-increasing number of applications, there is an urgent need to efficiently assess their potential toxicity. We propose a NP hazard assessment protocol that combines mammalian cytotoxicity data with embryonic vertebrate abnormality scoring to determine an overall toxicity index. We observed that, after exposure to a range of NPs, Xenopus phenotypic scoring showed a strong correlation with cell based in vitro assays. Magnetite-cored NPs, negative for toxicity in vitro and Xenopus, were further confirmed as nontoxic in mice. The results highlight the potential of Xenopus embryo analysis as a fast screening approach for toxicity assessment of NPs, which could be introduced for the routine testing of nanomaterials.

  3. Targeted nanodiamonds for identification of subcellular protein assemblies in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Michael P; Bouchard, Louis-S

    2017-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can be used to successfully determine the structures of proteins. However, such studies are typically done ex situ after extraction of the protein from the cellular environment. Here we describe an application for nanodiamonds as targeted intensity contrast labels in biological TEM, using the nuclear pore complex (NPC) as a model macroassembly. We demonstrate that delivery of antibody-conjugated nanodiamonds to live mammalian cells using maltotriose-conjugated polypropylenimine dendrimers results in efficient localization of nanodiamonds to the intended cellular target. We further identify signatures of nanodiamonds under TEM that allow for unambiguous identification of individual nanodiamonds from a resin-embedded, OsO4-stained environment. This is the first demonstration of nanodiamonds as labels for nanoscale TEM-based identification of subcellular protein assemblies. These results, combined with the unique fluorescence properties and biocompatibility of nanodiamonds, represent an important step toward the use of nanodiamonds as markers for correlated optical/electron bioimaging.

  4. Trypanosoma cruzi: Entry Into Mammalian Host Cells and Parasitophorous Vacuole Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emile Santos Barrias

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. This protozoan is an obligate intracellular parasite. The infective forms of the parasite are the metacyclic trypomastigotes, amastigotes and bloodstream trypomastigotes. The recognition between the parasite and mammalian host cell, involves numerous molecules present in both cell types, and similar to several intracellular pathogens, T.cruzi is internalized by host cells via multiple endocytic pathways. Morphological studies demonstrated that after the interaction of the infective forms of T.cruzi with phagocytic or non-phagocytic cell types, plasma membrane protrusions can form, showing similarity with those observed during canonical phagocytosis or macropinocytic events. Additionally, several molecules known to be molecular markers of membrane rafts, macropinocytosis and phagocytosis have been demonstrated to be present at the invasion site. These events may or may not depend on the host cell lysosomes and cytoskeleton. In addition, after penetration, components of the host endosomal-lysosomal system, such as early endosomes, late endosomes and lysosomes, participate in the formation of the nascent parasithophorous vacuole (VP. Dynamin, a molecule involved in vesicle formation, has been shown to be involved in the parasitophorous vacuole release from the host cell plasma membrane. This review focuses on the multiple pathways that T.cruzi can use to enter the host cells until complete VP formation. We will describe different endocytic processes, such as phagocytosis, macropinocytosis, endocytosis using membrane microdomains and clathrin-dependent endocytosis and show results that are consistent with their use by this smart parasite. We will also discuss other mechanisms that have been described, such as active penetration and the process that takes advantage of cell membrane wound repair.

  5. Chicken embryonic stem cells and primordial germ cells display different heterochromatic histone marks than their mammalian counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Clémence; Montillet, Guillaume; Jean, Christian; Fuet, Aurélie; Pain, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin epigenetics participate in control of gene expression during metazoan development. DNA methylation and post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones have been extensively characterised in cell types present in, or derived from, mouse embryos. In embryonic stem cells (ESCs) derived from blastocysts, factors involved in deposition of epigenetic marks regulate properties related to self-renewal and pluripotency. In the germ lineage, changes in histone PTMs and DNA demethylation occur during formation of the primordial germ cells (PGCs) to reset the epigenome of the future gametes. Trimethylation of histone H3 on lysine 27 (H3K27me3) by Polycomb group proteins is involved in several epigenome-remodelling steps, but it remains unclear whether these epigenetic features are conserved in non-mammalian vertebrates. To investigate this question, we compared the abundance and nuclear distribution of the main histone PTMs, 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) in chicken ESCs, PGCs and blastodermal cells (BCs) with differentiated chicken ESCs and embryonic fibroblasts. In addition, we analysed the expression of chromatin modifier genes to better understand the establishment and dynamics of chromatin epigenetic profiles. The nuclear distributions of most PTMs and 5hmC in chicken stem cells were similar to what has been described for mammalian cells. However, unlike mouse pericentric heterochromatin (PCH), chicken ESC PCH contained high levels of trimethylated histone H3 on lysine 27 (H3K27me3). In differentiated chicken cells, PCH was less enriched in H3K27me3 relative to chromatin overall. In PGCs, the H3K27me3 global level was greatly reduced, whereas the H3K9me3 level was elevated. Most chromatin modifier genes known in mammals were expressed in chicken ESCs, PGCs and BCs. Genes presumably involved in de novo DNA methylation were very highly expressed. DNMT3B and HELLS/SMARCA6 were highly expressed in chicken ESCs, PGCs and BCs compared to

  6. Cdt1 revisited: complex and tight regulation during the cell cycle and consequences of deregulation in mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujita Masatoshi

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In eukaryotic cells, replication of genomic DNA initiates from multiple replication origins distributed on multiple chromosomes. To ensure that each origin is activated precisely only once during each S phase, a system has evolved which features periodic assembly and disassembly of essential pre-replication complexes (pre-RCs at replication origins. The pre-RC assembly reaction involves the loading of a presumptive replicative helicase, the MCM2-7 complexes, onto chromatin by the origin recognition complex (ORC and two essential factors, CDC6 and Cdt1. The eukaryotic cell cycle is driven by the periodic activation and inactivation of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks and assembly of pre-RCs can only occur during the low Cdk activity period from late mitosis through G1 phase, with inappropriate re-assembly suppressed during S, G2, and M phases. It was originally suggested that inhibition of Cdt1 function after S phase in vertebrate cells is due to geminin binding and that Cdt1 hyperfunction resulting from Cdt1-geminin imbalance induces re-replication. However, recent progress has revealed that Cdt1 activity is more strictly regulated by two other mechanisms in addition to geminin: (1 functional and SCFSkp2-mediated proteolytic regulation through phosphorylation by Cdks; and (2 replication-coupled proteolysis mediated by the Cullin4-DDB1Cdt2 ubiquitin ligase and PCNA, an eukaryotic sliding clamp stimulating replicative DNA polymerases. The tight regulation implies that Cdt1 control is especially critical for the regulation of DNA replication in mammalian cells. Indeed, Cdt1 overexpression evokes chromosomal damage even without re-replication. Furthermore, deregulated Cdt1 induces chromosomal instability in normal human cells. Since Cdt1 is overexpressed in cancer cells, this could be a new molecular mechanism leading to carcinogenesis. In this review, recent insights into Cdt1 function and regulation in mammalian cells are discussed.

  7. Fundamental aspects of the freezing of cells, with emphasis on mammalian ova and embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazur, P.

    1980-01-01

    The problem in cryobiology is how to cool cells to -196/sup 0/C and return them to normal temperatures without killing them. One important factor is the presence of a protective additive like glycerol or dimethyl sulfoxide. Mammalian cells rarely survive freezing to below -40/sup 0/C in its absence. In the presence of an additive, survival is critically dependent on the cooling rate. Supraoptimal rates and suboptimal rates are both damaging. Death at supraoptimal rates is the result of the formation of intracellular ice and its recrystallization during warming. Death at suboptimal rates is a consequence of the major alterations in aqueous solutions produced by ice formation. The chief effects are a major reduction in the fraction of the solution remaining unfrozen at a given temperature and a major increase in the solute concentration of that fraction. The introduction of molar concentrations of additive greatly reduces both the fraction frozen and the concentration of electrolytes in the unfrozen channels and in the cell interior. Usually, freezing either kills cells outright or it results in survivors that retain full capacity to function. But there is the possibility that in some cases survivors may in fact be impaired genetically or physiologically. All evidence indicates that genetic damage does not occur. But there are clear examples in which freezing does induce nonlethal physiological damage. (ERB)

  8. Mammalian Systems Biotechnology Reveals Global Cellular Adaptations in a Recombinant CHO Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusufi, Faraaz Noor Khan; Lakshmanan, Meiyappan; Ho, Ying Swan; Loo, Bernard Liat Wen; Ariyaratne, Pramila; Yang, Yuansheng; Ng, Say Kong; Tan, Tessa Rui Min; Yeo, Hock Chuan; Lim, Hsueh Lee; Ng, Sze Wai; Hiu, Ai Ping; Chow, Chung Ping; Wan, Corrine; Chen, Shuwen; Teo, Gavin; Song, Gao; Chin, Ju Xin; Ruan, Xiaoan; Sung, Ken Wing Kin; Hu, Wei-Shou; Yap, Miranda Gek Sim; Bardor, Muriel; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2017-05-24

    Effective development of host cells for therapeutic protein production is hampered by the poor characterization of cellular transfection. Here, we employed a multi-omics-based systems biotechnology approach to elucidate the genotypic and phenotypic differences between a wild-type and recombinant antibody-producing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line. At the genomic level, we observed extensive rearrangements in specific targeted loci linked to transgene integration sites. Transcriptional re-wiring of DNA damage repair and cellular metabolism in the antibody producer, via changes in gene copy numbers, was also detected. Subsequent integration of transcriptomic data with a genome-scale metabolic model showed a substantial increase in energy metabolism in the antibody producer. Metabolomics, lipidomics, and glycomics analyses revealed an elevation in long-chain lipid species, potentially associated with protein transport and secretion requirements, and a surprising stability of N-glycosylation profiles between both cell lines. Overall, the proposed knowledge-based systems biotechnology framework can further accelerate mammalian cell-line engineering in a targeted manner. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Measurement of DNA-protein crosslinks in mammalian cells without X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantt, R.; Stephens, E.V.; Davis, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    To study the mechanisms of formation and repair of DNA-protein crosslinks in mammalian cells, the best general method to assay these lesions is the Kohn membrane alkaline elution procedure. Use of this sensitive technique requires the introduction of random strand breaks in the DNA by X-irradiation to reduce the very high molecular weight so that it elutes off the filter at an appropriate rate. This report describes an alternative method for fragmenting the DNA in the absence of X-irradiation equipment. Convenient reproducible elution rates of DNA from various mouse and human cells in culture without X-irradiation result from elution through polyvinyl chloride filters with 75 mM sodium hydroxide (0.33 ml/min) instead of the standard 20 mM EDTA-tetrapropylammonium hydroxide, pH 12.2 (0.03 to 0.04 ml/min). Dose-dependent retardation of the DNA elution was observed over the range 0 to 30 microM trans-platinum(II)diamminedichloride, and proteinase K treatment during cell lysis restored the elution rate to that of the untreated control cell DNA. In the absence of X-irradiation, this elution method measures DNA-protein crosslinks with higher sensitivity and equivalent reproducibility as the air-burst procedure

  10. Leptin induction following irradiation is a conserved feature in mammalian epithelial cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licursi, Valerio; Cestelli Guidi, Mariangela; Del Vecchio, Giorgia; Mannironi, Cecilia; Presutti, Carlo; Amendola, Roberto; Negri, Rodolfo

    2017-09-01

    Leptin (LEP) is a peptide hormone with multiple physiological functions. Besides its systemic actions, it has important peripheral roles such as a mitogen action on keratinocytes following skin lesions. We previously showed that LEP mRNA is significantly induced in response to neutron irradiation in mouse skin and that the protein increases in the irradiated epidermis and in the related subcutaneous adipose tissue. In this work, we investigated the post-transcriptional regulation of LEP by miRNAs and the conservation of LEP's role in radiation response in human cells. We used microarray analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to analyze modulation of miRNAs potentially targeting LEP in mouse skin following irradiation and bioinformatic analysis of transcriptome of irradiated human cell lines and cancer tissues from radiotherapy-treated patients to evaluate LEP expression. We show that a network of miRNAs potentially targeting LEP mRNA is modulated in irradiated mouse skin and that LEP itself is significantly modulated by irradiation in human epithelial cell lines and in breast cancer tissues from radiotherapy-treated patients. These results confirm and extend the previous evidence that LEP has a general and important role in the response of mammalian cells to irradiation.

  11. The mammalian circadian clock gene Per2 modulates cell death in response to oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Magnone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Living in the earth’s oxygenated environment forced organisms to develop strategies to cope with the damaging effects of molecular oxygen known as reactive oxygen species (ROS. Here we show that Per2, a molecular component of the mammalian circadian clock, is involved in regulating a cell’s response to oxidative stress. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs containing a mutation in the Per2 gene are more resistant to cytotoxic effects mediated by ROS than wild type cells which is paralleled by an altered regulation of bcl-2 expression in Per2 mutant MEFs. The elevated survival rate and alteration of NADH/NAD+ ratio in the mutant cells is reversed by introduction of the wild type Per2 gene. Interestingly, clock synchronized cells display a time dependent sensitivity to paraquat, a ROS inducing agent. Our observations indicate that the circadian clock is involved in regulating the fate of a cell to survive or to die in response to oxidative stress, which could have implications for cancer development and the aging process.

  12. Transcription inhibition by DRB potentiates recombinational repair of UV lesions in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivaylo Stoimenov

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination (HR is intricately associated with replication, transcription and DNA repair in all organisms studied. However, the interplay between all these processes occurring simultaneously on the same DNA molecule is still poorly understood. Here, we study the interplay between transcription and HR during ultraviolet light (UV-induced DNA damage in mammalian cells. Our results show that inhibition of transcription with 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB increases the number of UV-induced DNA lesions (γH2AX, 53BP1 foci formation, which correlates with a decrease in the survival of wild type or nucleotide excision repair defective cells. Furthermore, we observe an increase in RAD51 foci formation, suggesting HR is triggered in response to an increase in UV-induced DSBs, while inhibiting transcription. Unexpectedly, we observe that DRB fails to sensitise HR defective cells to UV treatment. Thus, increased RAD51 foci formation correlates with increased cell death, suggesting the existence of a futile HR repair of UV-induced DSBs which is linked to transcription inhibition.

  13. Single cell enzyme diagnosis on the chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sissel Juul; Harmsen, Charlotte; Nielsen, Mette Juul

    2013-01-01

    Conventional diagnosis based on ensemble measurements often overlooks the variation among cells. Here, we present a droplet-microfluidics based platform to investigate single cell activities. Adopting a previously developed isothermal rolling circle amplification-based assay, we demonstrate detec...

  14. Gene Regulatory Network Analysis Reveals Differences in Site-specific Cell Fate Determination in Mammalian Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan eErtaylan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis - the generation of new neurons - is an ongoing process that persists in the adult mammalian brain of several species, including humans. In this work we analyze two discrete brain regions: the subventricular zone (SVZ lining the walls of the lateral ventricles; and the subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in mice and shed light on the SVZ and SGZ specific neurogenesis. We propose a computational model that relies on the construction and analysis of region specific gene regulatory networks from the publicly available data on these two regions. Using this model a number of putative factors involved in neuronal stem cell (NSC identity and maintenance were identified. We also demonstrate potential gender and niche-derived differences based on cell surface and nuclear receptors via Ar, Hif1a and Nr3c1.We have also conducted cell fate determinant analysis for SVZ NSC populations to Olfactory Bulb interneurons and SGZ NSC populations to the granule cells of the Granular Cell Layer. We report thirty-one candidate cell fate determinant gene pairs, ready to be validated. We focus on Ar - Pax6 in SVZ and Sox2 - Ncor1 in SGZ. Both pairs are expressed and localized in the suggested anatomical structures as shown by in situ hybridization and found to physically interact.Finally, we conclude that there are fundamental differences between SGZ and SVZ neurogenesis. We argue that these regulatory mechanisms are linked to the observed differential neurogenic potential of these regions. The presence of nuclear and cell surface receptors in the region specific regulatory circuits indicate the significance of niche derived extracellular factors, hormones and region specific factors such as the oxygen sensitivity, dictating SGZ and SVZ specific neurogenesis.

  15. Fast Filtration of Bacterial or Mammalian Suspension Cell Cultures for Optimal Metabolomics Results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Bordag

    Full Text Available The metabolome offers real time detection of the adaptive, multi-parametric response of the organisms to environmental changes, pathophysiological stimuli or genetic modifications and thus rationalizes the optimization of cell cultures in bioprocessing. In bioprocessing the measurement of physiological intracellular metabolite levels is imperative for successful applications. However, a sampling method applicable to all cell types with little to no validation effort which simultaneously offers high recovery rates, high metabolite coverage and sufficient removal of extracellular contaminations is still missing. Here, quenching, centrifugation and fast filtration were compared and fast filtration in combination with a stabilizing washing solution was identified as the most promising sampling method. Different influencing factors such as filter type, vacuum pressure, washing solutions were comprehensively tested. The improved fast filtration method (MxP® FastQuench followed by routine lipid/polar extraction delivers a broad metabolite coverage and recovery reflecting well physiological intracellular metabolite levels for different cell types, such as bacteria (Escherichia coli as well as mammalian cells chinese hamster ovary (CHO and mouse myeloma cells (NS0.The proposed MxP® FastQuench allows sampling, i.e. separation of cells from medium with washing and quenching, in less than 30 seconds and is robustly designed to be applicable to all cell types. The washing solution contains the carbon source respectively the 13C-labeled carbon source to avoid nutritional stress during sampling. This method is also compatible with automation which would further reduce sampling times and the variability of metabolite profiling data.

  16. Effect of surface organic coatings of cellulose nanocrystals on the viability of mammalian cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimenez AS

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ambar S Jimenez,1 Francesca Jaramillo,1 Usha D Hemraz,2 Yaman Boluk,3 Karina Ckless,1 Rajesh Sunasee1 1Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Plattsburgh, Plattsburgh, NY, USA; 2National Research Council, Montreal, QC, Canada, 3Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, University of Alberta and National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council, Edmonton, AB, Canada Abstract: Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs have emerged as promising candidates for a number of bio-applications. Surface modification of CNCs continues to gain significant research interest as it imparts new properties to the surface of the nanocrystals for the design of multifunctional CNCs-based materials. A small chemical surface modification can potentially lead to drastic behavioral changes of cell-material interactions thereby affecting the intended bio-application. In this work, unmodified CNCs were covalently decorated with four different organic moieties such as a diaminobutane fragment, a cyclic oligosaccharide (β-cyclodextrin, a thermoresponsive polymer (poly[N-isopropylacrylamide], and a cationic aminomethacrylamide-based polymer using different synthetic covalent methods. The effect of surface coatings of CNCs and the respective dose-response of the above organic moieties on the cell viability were evaluated on mammalian cell cultures (J774A.1 and MFC-7, using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assays. Overall, the results indicated that cells exposed to surface-coated CNCs for 24 h did not display major changes in cell viability, membrane permeability as well as cell morphology. However, with longer exposure, all these parameters were somewhat affected, which appears not to be correlated with either anionic or cationic surface coatings of CNCs used in this study. Keywords: cellulose nanocrystals, surface coating, cell viability, MTT, LDH

  17. Responses of cultured mammalian cells to prolonged low dose rate gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kal, H.B.; Rongen, E. van; Welleweerd, J.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were performed to verify the finding of others that prolonged irradiation caused sudden death of cells. Continuous irradiation (dose rate 0.09 Gy/h) was applied to the R-1, RUC-2, V79 and T-1g cells for up to 140 days. End points were: Population growth rate, plating efficiency and radiosensitivity. The population doubling times were increased and plating efficiencies decreased; cell survival after single doses at acute dose rate were lower than that of control cells. Part of the cell parameters returned to control values within three weeks after prolonged irradiation had been terminated. Sudden death after prolonged exposure was not observed. (orig.) [de

  18. The effect of space microgravity on the physiological activity of mammalian resident cardiac stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belostotskaya, Galina; Zakharov, Eugeny

    Prolonged exposure to weightlessness during space flights is known to cause depression of heart function in mammals. The decrease in heart weight and its remodeling under the influence of prolonged weightlessness (or space microgravity) is assumed to be due to both morphological changes of working cardiomyocytes and their progressive loss, as well as to possible depletion of resident cardiac stem cells (CSCs) population, or their inability to self-renewal and regeneration of muscle tissue under conditions of weightlessness. We have previously shown that the presence of different maturity clones formed by resident CSCs not only in culture but also in the mammalian myocardium can be used as an indicator of the regenerative activity of myocardial cells [Belostotskaya, et al., 2013: 2014]. In this study, we were interested to investigate whether the 30-day near-Earth space flight on the spacecraft BION-M1 affects the regenerative potential of resident CSCs. Immediately after landing of the spacecraft, we had examined the presence of resident c-kit+, Sca-1+ and Isl1+ CSCs and their development in suspension of freshly isolated myocardial cells of C57BL mice in comparison to controls. Cardiac cell suspension was obtained by enzymatic digestion of the heart [Belostotskaya and Golovanova, 2014]. Immunocytochemically stained preparations of fixed cells were analyzed with confocal microscope Leica TCS SP5 (Germany) in the Resource Center of St-Petersburg State University. CSCs were labeled with appropriate antibodies. CSCs differentiation into mature cardiomyocytes was verified using antibodies to Sarcomeric α-Actinin and Cardiac Troponin T. Antibodies to Connexin43 were used to detect cell-cell contacts. All antibodies were conjugated with Alexa fluorochromes (488, 532, 546, 568, 594 and/or 647 nm), according to Zenon-technology (Invitrogen). It has been shown that, under identical conditions of cell isolation, more complete digestion of heart muscle was observed in

  19. The relationships between RBE and LET for different types of lethal damage in mammalian cells: biophysical and molecular mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barendsen, G. W.

    1994-01-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of radiations as a function of linear energy transfer (LET) is analyzed for different types of damage causing reproductive death of mammalian cells. Survival curves are evaluated assuming a linear-quadratic dose dependence of the induction of reproductive

  20. Polymeric nanosensors for measuring the full dynamic pH range of endosomes and lysosomes in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Honghao; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Benjaminsen, Rikke Vicki

    2009-01-01

    Polymer nanoparticle sensors have been constructed for studying pH in the endocytic pathway in mammalian cells. The pH sensors for fluorescence ratiometric measurements were prepared using inverse microemulsion polymerization with rhodamine as reference fluorophor and fluorescein and oregon green...

  1. Genome-wide exploration of miRNA function in mammalian muscle cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polesskaya, Anna; Degerny, Cindy; Pinna, Guillaume; Maury, Yves; Kratassiouk, Gueorgui; Mouly, Vincent; Morozova, Nadya; Kropp, Jeremie; Frandsen, Niels; Harel-Bellan, Annick

    2013-01-01

    MiRNAs impact on the control of cell fate by regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Here, using mammalian muscle differentiation as a model and a phenotypic loss-of-function screen, we explored the function of miRNAs at the genome-wide level. We found that the depletion of a high number of miRNAs (63) impacted on differentiation of human muscle precursors, underscoring the importance of this post-transcriptional mechanism of gene regulation. Interestingly, a comparison with miRNA expression profiles revealed that most of the hit miRNAs did not show any significant variations of expression during differentiation. These constitutively expressed miRNAs might be required for basic and/or essential cell function, or else might be regulated at the post-transcriptional level. MiRNA inhibition yielded a variety of phenotypes, reflecting the widespread miRNA involvement in differentiation. Using a functional screen (the STarS--Suppressor Target Screen--approach, i. e. concomitant knockdown of miRNAs and of candidate target proteins), we discovered miRNA protein targets that are previously uncharacterized controllers of muscle-cell terminal differentiation. Our results provide a strategy for functional annotation of the human miRnome.

  2. Protein self-assembly following in situ expression in artificial and mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migas, Urszula M; Quinn, Michelle K; McManus, Jennifer J

    2017-05-22

    The self-assembly of proteins has been widely studied in controlled in vitro conditions, and more recently in biological environments. The self-assembly of proteins in biology can be a feature of the pathogenesis of protein condensation disease, or can occur during normal physiological function, for example during the formation of intracellular non-membrane bound organelles. To determine the mechanisms for the assembly process fully, controlled in vitro experiments using purified protein solutions are often required. However, making direct connections between insights gathered from controlled experiments and those in complex biological environments remains a challenge. Using the P23T mutant of human γD-crystallin, a protein associated with congenital cataract, we have demonstrated that the equilibrium solubility boundary and solution behavior measured using phase diagrams of purified protein solutions is consistent with the assembly of the protein expressed in cell-free expression medium in artificial cells (without fluorescent labelling) and condensates formed in mammalian cells, thereby directly connecting in vitro measurements with those performed under physiological conditions.

  3. Relative ion yields in mammalian cell components using C60 SIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Selda; Piwowar, Alan; Hue, Jonathan; Shen, Kan; Winograd, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry has been used to better understand the influence of molecular environment on the relative ion yields of membrane lipid molecules found in high abundance in a model mammalian cell line, RAW264.7. Control lipid mixtures were prepared to simulate lipid–lipid interactions in the inner and outer leaflet of cell membranes. Compared with its pure film, the molecular ion yields of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine are suppressed when mixed with 2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. In the mixture, proton competition between 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and 2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine led to lower ionization efficiency. The possible mechanism for ion suppression was also investigated with 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The formation of a hydroxyl bond in lipid mixtures confirms the mechanism involving proton exchange with the surrounding environment. Similar effects were observed for lipid mixtures mimicking the composition of the inner leaflet of cell membranes. The secondary molecular ion yield of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine was observed to be enhanced in the presence of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine. PMID:25140069

  4. Screening of potential lactobacilli antigenotoxicity by microbial and mammalian cell-based tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldini, G; Trotta, F; Villarini, M; Moretti, M; Pasquini, R; Scassellati-Sforzolini, G; Cenci, G

    2005-06-25

    Antigenotoxicity is considered an important property for probiotic lactobacilli. The ability of non probiotic lactobacilli from dairy products and starters to inhibit two reference genotoxins: 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine was evaluated. The study was carried out using short-term assays with different targets, such as procaryotic cells (SOS-Chromotest for genotoxicity in Escherichia coli and Ames test for mutagenicity in Salmonella typhimurium) and eucaryotic cells (Comet assay for genotoxicity in Caco-2 enterocytes). A high proportion of strains inhibiting 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide activity was found in Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Lactobacillus plantarum. Inhibition of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine activity occurred in only one L. acidophilus strain. All the strains with antigenotoxic properties also demonstrated antimutagenic activity and produced modifications in genotoxin spectroscopic profiles. Strain viability during and after genotoxin exposure was confirmed. Concordance of the results obtained with microbial and mammalian cell-based tests is underlined.

  5. REST-mediated recruitment of polycomb repressor complexes in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Nikolaj; Lerdrup, Mads; Landt, Eskild

    2012-01-01

    Polycomb Repressive Complex (PRC) 1 and PRC2 regulate genes involved in differentiation and development. However, the mechanism for how PRC1 and PRC2 are recruited to genes in mammalian cells is unclear. Here we present evidence for an interaction between the transcription factor REST, PRC1......, and increased gene expression. Genome-wide analysis of Polycomb binding in Rest¿/¿ and Eed¿/¿ mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells showed that Rest was required for PRC1 recruitment to a subset of Polycomb regulated neuronal genes. Furthermore, we found that PRC1 can be recruited to Rest binding sites independently...... of CpG islands and the H3K27Me3 mark. Surprisingly, PRC2 was frequently increased around Rest binding sites located in CpG-rich regions in the Rest¿/¿ mES cells, indicating a more complex interplay where Rest also can limit PRC2 recruitment. Therefore, we propose that Rest has context...

  6. Physical and biological parameters affecting DNA double strand break misrejoining in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehne, M.; Rothkamm, K.; Loebrich, M.

    2002-01-01

    In an attempt to investigate the effect of radiation quality, dose and specific repair pathways on correct and erroneous rejoining of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), an assay was applied that allows the identification and quantification of incorrectly rejoined DSB ends produced by ionising radiation. While substantial misrejoining occurs in mammalian cells after high acute irradiation doses, decreasing misrejoining frequencies were observed in dose fractionation experiments with X rays. In line with this finding, continuous irradiation with gamma rays at low dose rate leads to non detectable misrejoining. This indicates that the probability for a DSB to be misrejoined decreases drastically when DSBs are separated in time and space. The same dose fractionation approach was applied to determine DSB misrejoining after a particle exposure. In contrast to the results with X rays, there was no significant decrease in DSB misrejoining with increasing fractionation. This suggests that DSB misrejoining after a irradiation is not significantly affected by a separation of particle tracks. To identify the enzymatic pathways that are involved in DSB misrejoining, cell lines deficient in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) were examined. After high X ray doses, DSB misrejoining is considerable reduced in NHEJ mutants. Low dose rate experiments show elevated DSB misrejoining in NHEJ mutants compared with wild-type cells. The authors propose that NHEJ serves as an efficient pathway for rejoining correct break ends in situations of separated breaks but generates genomic rearrangements if DSBs are close in time and space. (author)

  7. Visualization of subunit interactions and ternary complexes of protein phosphatase 2A in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Ting Mo

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a ubiquitous phospho-serine/threonine phosphatase that controls many diverse cellular functions. The predominant form of PP2A is a heterotrimeric holoenzyme consisting of a scaffolding A subunit, a variable regulatory B subunit, and a catalytic C subunit. The C subunit also associates with other interacting partners, such as α4, to form non-canonical PP2A complexes. We report visualization of PP2A complexes in mammalian cells. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC analysis of PP2A subunit interactions demonstrates that the B subunit plays a key role in directing the subcellular localization of PP2A, and confirms that the A subunit functions as a scaffold in recruiting the B and C subunits to form a heterotrimeric holoenzyme. BiFC analysis also reveals that α4 promotes formation of the AC core dimer. Furthermore, we demonstrate visualization of specific ABC holoenzymes in cells by combining BiFC and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (BiFC-FRET. Our studies not only provide direct imaging data to support previous biochemical observations on PP2A complexes, but also offer a promising approach for studying the spatiotemporal distribution of individual PP2A complexes in cells.

  8. A simple ImageJ macro tool for analyzing mitochondrial network morphology in mammalian cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Andrew J; Maddalena, Lucas A; Robb, Ellen L; Moradi, Fereshteh; Stuart, Jeffrey A

    2017-04-01

    Mitochondria exist in a dynamic cycle of fusion and fission whose balance directly influences the morphology of the 'mitochondrial network', a term that encompasses the branched, reticular structure of fused mitochondria as well as the separate, punctate individual organelles within a eukaryotic cell. Over the past decade, the significance of the mitochondrial network has been increasingly appreciated, motivating the development of various approaches to analyze it. Here, we describe the Mitochondrial Network Analysis (MiNA) toolset, a relatively simple pair of macros making use of existing ImageJ plug-ins, allowing for semi-automated analysis of mitochondrial networks in cultured mammalian cells. MiNA is freely available at https://github.com/ScienceToolkit/MiNA. The tool incorporates optional preprocessing steps to enhance the quality of images before converting the images to binary and producing a morphological skeleton for calculating nine parameters to quantitatively capture the morphology of the mitochondrial network. The efficacy of the macro toolset is demonstrated using a sample set of images from SH-SY5Y, C2C12, and mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cell cultures treated under different conditions and exhibiting hyperfused, fused, and fragmented mitochondrial network morphologies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Autographa californica Multicapsid Nucleopolyhedrovirus efficiently infects Sf9 cells and transduces mammalian cells via direct fusion with the plasma membrane at low pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dong, S.; Wang, M.; Qiu, Z.; Deng, F.; Vlak, J.M.; Hu, Z.H.; Wang, H.L.

    2010-01-01

    The budded virus (BV) of the Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) infects insect cells and transduces mammalian cells mainly through the endocytosis pathway. However, this study revealed that the treatment of the virus bound to Sf9 cells at low pH could efficiently rescue

  10. Dynamic gene expression for metabolic engineering of mammalian cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Huong; Vishwanathan, Nandita; Kantardjieff, Anne; Doo, Inseok; Srienc, Michael; Zheng, Xiaolu; Somia, Nikunj; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2013-11-01

    Recombinant mammalian cells are the major hosts for the production of protein therapeutics. In addition to high expression of the product gene, a hyper-producer must also harbor superior phenotypic traits related to metabolism, protein secretion, and growth control. Introduction of genes endowing the relevant hyper-productivity traits is a strategy frequently used to enhance the productivity. Most of such cell engineering efforts have been performed using constitutive expression systems. However, cells respond to various environmental cues and cellular events dynamically according to cellular needs. The use of inducible systems allows for time dependent expression, but requires external manipulation. Ideally, a transgene's expression should be synchronous to the host cell's own rhythm, and at levels appropriate for the objective. To that end, we identified genes with different expression dynamics and intensity ranges using pooled transcriptome data. Their promoters may be used to drive the expression of the transgenes following the desired dynamics. We isolated the promoter of the Thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip) gene and demonstrated its capability to drive transgene expression in concert with cell growth. We further employed this Chinese hamster promoter to engineer dynamic expression of the mouse GLUT5 fructose transporter in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, enabling them to utilize sugar according to cellular needs rather than in excess as typically seen in culture. Thus, less lactate was produced, resulting in a better growth rate, prolonged culture duration, and higher product titer. This approach illustrates a novel concept in metabolic engineering which can potentially be used to achieve dynamic control of cellular behaviors for enhanced process characteristics. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Expression and mechanism of mammalian target of rapamycin in age-related renal cell senescence and organ aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Li; Cai, Guangyan; Liu, Fuyou; Fu, Bo; Liu, Weiping; Hong, Quan; Ma, Qiang; Peng, Youming; Wang, Jianzhong; Chen, Xiangmei

    2009-10-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is relevant to cell senescence and organismal aging. This study firstly showed that the level of mTOR expression increased with aging in rat kidneys, rat mesangial cells and WI-38 cells (P aging-related phenotypes were all reduced in cells treated with rapamycin (an inhibitor of mTOR) than in control cells (P aging, and that mTOR may promote cellular senescence by regulating the cell cycle through p21(WAF1/CIP1/SDI1), which might provide a new target for preventing renal aging.

  12. Quantifying the Traction Force of a Single Cell by Aligned Silicon Nanowire Array

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Zhou

    2009-10-14

    The physical behaviors of stationary cells, such as the morphology, motility, adhesion, anchorage, invasion and metastasis, are likely to be important for governing their biological characteristics. A change in the physical properties of mammalian cells could be an indication of disease. In this paper, we present a silicon-nanowire-array based technique for quantifying the mechanical behavior of single cells representing three distinct groups: normal mammalian cells, benign cells (L929), and malignant cells (HeLa). By culturing the cells on top of NW arrays, the maximum traction forces of two different tumor cells (HeLa, L929) have been measured by quantitatively analyzing the bending of the nanowires. The cancer cell exhibits a larger traction force than the normal cell by ∼20% for a HeLa cell and ∼50% for a L929 cell. The traction forces have been measured for the L929 cells and mechanocytes as a function of culture time. The relationship between cells extending area and their traction force has been investigated. Our study is likely important for studying the mechanical properties of single cells and their migration characteristics, possibly providing a new cellular level diagnostic technique. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  13. Cytolethal distending toxin: a conserved bacterial genotoxin that blocks cell cycle progression, leading to apoptosis of a broad range of mammalian cell lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinadasa, Rasika N; Bloom, Stephen E; Weiss, Robert S; Duhamel, Gerald E

    2011-07-01

    Cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) is a heterotrimeric AB-type genotoxin produced by several clinically important Gram-negative mucocutaneous bacterial pathogens. Irrespective of the bacterial species of origin, CDT causes characteristic and irreversible cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a broad range of cultured mammalian cell lineages. The active subunit CdtB has structural homology with the phosphodiesterase family of enzymes including mammalian DNase I, and alone is necessary and sufficient to account for cellular toxicity. Indeed, mammalian cells treated with CDT initiate a DNA damage response similar to that elicited by ionizing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks resulting in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The mechanism of CDT-induced apoptosis remains incompletely understood, but appears to involve both p53-dependent and -independent pathways. While epithelial, endothelial and fibroblast cell lines respond to CDT by undergoing arrest of cell cycle progression resulting in nuclear and cytoplasmic distension that precedes apoptotic cell death, cells of haematopoietic origin display rapid apoptosis following a brief period of cell cycle arrest. In this review, the ecology of pathogens producing CDT, the molecular biology of bacterial CDT and the molecular mechanisms of CDT-induced cytotoxicity are critically appraised. Understanding the contribution of a broadly conserved bacterial genotoxin that blocks progression of the mammalian cell cycle, ultimately causing cell death, should assist with elucidating disease mechanisms for these important pathogens.

  14. Niche-independent symmetrical self-renewal of a mammalian tissue stem cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Conti

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent mouse embryonic stem (ES cells multiply in simple monoculture by symmetrical divisions. In vivo, however, stem cells are generally thought to depend on specialised cellular microenvironments and to undergo predominantly asymmetric divisions. Ex vivo expansion of pure populations of tissue stem cells has proven elusive. Neural progenitor cells are propagated in combination with differentiating progeny in floating clusters called neurospheres. The proportion of stem cells in neurospheres is low, however, and they cannot be directly observed or interrogated. Here we demonstrate that the complex neurosphere environment is dispensable for stem cell maintenance, and that the combination of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2 and epidermal growth factor (EGF is sufficient for derivation and continuous expansion by symmetrical division of pure cultures of neural stem (NS cells. NS cells were derived first from mouse ES cells. Neural lineage induction was followed by growth factor addition in basal culture media. In the presence of only EGF and FGF-2, resulting NS cells proliferate continuously, are diploid, and clonogenic. After prolonged expansion, they remain able to differentiate efficiently into neurons and astrocytes in vitro and upon transplantation into the adult brain. Colonies generated from single NS cells all produce neurons upon growth factor withdrawal. NS cells uniformly express morphological, cell biological, and molecular features of radial glia, developmental precursors of neurons and glia. Consistent with this profile, adherent NS cell lines can readily be established from foetal mouse brain. Similar NS cells can be generated from human ES cells and human foetal brain. The extrinsic factors EGF plus FGF-2 are sufficient to sustain pure symmetrical self-renewing divisions of NS cells. The resultant cultures constitute the first known example of tissue-specific stem cells that can be propagated without accompanying

  15. Moving epithelia: Tracking the fate of mammalian limbal epithelial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Girolamo, Nick

    2015-09-01

    Lineage tracing allows the destiny of a stem cell (SC) and its progeny to be followed through time. In order to track their long-term fate, SC must be permanently marked to discern their distribution, division, displacement and differentiation. This information is essential for unravelling the mysteries that govern their replenishing activity while they remain anchored within their niche microenvironment. Modern-day lineage tracing uses inducible genetic recombination to illuminate cells within embryonic, newborn and adult tissues, and the advent of powerful high-resolution microscopy has enabled the behaviour of labelled cells to be monitored in real-time in a living organism. The simple structural organization of the mammalian cornea, including its accessibility and transparency, renders it the ideal tissue to study SC fate using lineage tracing assisted by non-invasive intravital microscopy. Despite more than a century of research devoted to understanding how this tissue is maintained and repaired, many limitations and controversies continue to plague the field, including uncertainties about the specificity of current SC markers, the number of SC within the cornea, their mode of division, their location, and importantly the signals that dictate cell migration. This communication will highlight historical discoveries as well as recent developments in the corneal SC field; more specifically how the progeny of these cells are mobilised to replenish this dynamic tissue during steady-state, disease and transplantation. Also discussed is how insights gleaned from animal studies can be used to advance our knowledge of the fundamental mechanisms that govern modelling and remodelling of the human cornea in health and disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ribosome profiling reveals translational regulation of mammalian cells in response to hypoxic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhiwen; Yang, Jiaqi; Dai, Aimei; Wang, Yuming; Li, Wei; Xie, Zhi

    2017-08-21

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells transfer oxygen and nutrients from choroid to the neural retina. Reduced oxygen to RPE perturbs development and functions of blood vessels in retina. Previous efforts of genome-wide studies have been largely focused on transcriptional changes of cells in response to hypoxia. Recently developed ribosome profiling provides an opportunity to study genome-wide translational changes. To gain systemic insights into the transcriptional and translational regulation of cellular in response to hypoxic stress, we used simultaneous RNA sequencing and ribosome profiling on an RPE cells line, ARPE-19, under hypoxia condition. Both HIF-1α and EPAS1 (HIF-2α) proteins were stabilized in ARPE-19 under hypoxic stress treatment at 1 h, 2 h and 4 h. Analysis of simultaneous RNA sequencing and ribosome profiling data showed genome-wide gene expression changes at both transcriptional and translational levels. Comparative analysis of ribosome profiling and RNA-seq data revealed that hypoxia induced changes of more genes at the translational than the transcriptional levels. Ribosomes densities at 5' untranslated region (UTR) significantly increased under hypoxic stress. Interestingly, the increase in ribosome densities at 5' UTR is positively correlated with the presence of upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in the 5' UTR of mRNAs. Our results characterized translational profiles of mRNAs for a RPE cell line in response to hypoxia. In particular, uORFs play important roles in the regulation of translation efficiency by affecting ribosomes loading onto mRNAs. This study provides the first attempt to understand translational response of mammalian cells under hypoxic condition.

  17. MiRNA-Target Interaction Reveals Cell-Specific Post-Transcriptional Regulation in Mammalian Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun Kulkarni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are 18–22 nucleotides long, non-coding RNAs that bind transcripts with complementary sequences leading to either mRNA degradation or translational suppression. However, the inherent differences in preferred mode of miRNA regulation among cells of different origin have not been examined. In our previous transcriptome profiling studies, we observed that post-transcriptional regulation can differ substantially depending on the cell in context. Here we examined mechanistic differences in the regulation of a let-7a targeted (wild type or resistant (mutant engineered renilla transcript across various mammalian cell lines of diverse origin. Dual luciferase assays show that compared to mutant (mut, the reporter gene containing wild type (wt let-7a binding sites was efficiently suppressed upon transfection in various cell lines. Importantly, the strength of miRNA regulation varied across the cell lines. Total RNA analysis demonstrates that wt renilla mRNA was expressed to similar or higher levels compared to mut suggesting that translation repression is a predominant mode of miRNA regulation. Nonetheless, transcript degradation was observed in some cell lines. Ago-2 immunoprecipitation show that miRNA repressed renilla mRNA are associated with functional mi-RISC (miRNA-RNA induced silencing complex. Given the immense potential of miRNA as a therapeutic option, these findings highlight the necessity to thoroughly examine the mode of mRNA regulation in order to achieve the beneficial effects in targeting cells.

  18. Identifying and engineering promoters for high level and sustainable therapeutic recombinant protein production in cultured mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Steven C L; Yang, Yuansheng

    2014-08-01

    Promoters are essential on plasmid vectors to initiate transcription of the transgenes when generating therapeutic recombinant proteins expressing mammalian cell lines. High and sustained levels of gene expression are desired during therapeutic protein production while gene expression is useful for cell engineering. As many finely controlled promoters exhibit cell and product specificity, new promoters need to be identified, optimized and carefully evaluated before use. Suitable promoters can be identified using techniques ranging from simple molecular biology methods to modern high-throughput omics screenings. Promoter engineering is often required after identification to either obtain high and sustained expression or to provide a wider range of gene expression. This review discusses some of the available methods to identify and engineer promoters for therapeutic recombinant protein expression in mammalian cells.

  19. Epigenetics reloaded: the single-cell revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bheda, Poonam; Schneider, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Mechanistically, how epigenetic states are inherited through cellular divisions remains an important open question in the chromatin field and beyond. Defining the heritability of epigenetic states and the underlying chromatin-based mechanisms within a population of cells is complicated due to cell heterogeneity combined with varying levels of stability of these states; thus, efforts must be focused toward single-cell analyses. The approaches presented here constitute the forefront of epigenetics research at the single-cell level using classic and innovative methods to dissect epigenetics mechanisms from the limited material available in a single cell. This review further outlines exciting future avenues of research to address the significance of epigenetic heterogeneity and the contributions of microfluidics technologies to single-cell isolation and analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Visualization and quantification of GPCR trafficking in mammalian cells by confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooh, Mohammed M; Bahouth, Suleiman W

    2017-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are recognized as one of the most fruitful group of therapeutic targets, accounting for more than 40% of all approved pharmaceuticals on the market. Therefore, the search for selective agents that affect GPCR function is of major interest to the pharmaceutical industry. This chapter describes methods for measuring agonist-promoted GPCR trafficking, which involves the internalization of the GPCR and its subsequent recycling back to the plasma membrane or retention and eventual degradation. These pathways will be analyzed by confocal cellular imaging, using the β 1 -adrenergic receptor (β 1 -AR) as a primary model. A major problem encountered in studying GPCR trafficking is the unavailability of antibodies that would recognize the native receptor in cells or tissues. Therefore, wild-type, point mutants, and β 1 -AR chimeras are generated as epitope-tagged proteins, which are stably- or transiently expressed in mammalian cells. GPCR are labeled with a fluorophore-conjugated antibody directed against the N-terminal epitope tag. The trafficking of the fluorophore-tagged GPCR between divergent trafficking pathways that result in retention and eventual degradation or recycling and reinsertion into the plasma membrane can be followed by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy techniques outlined in this review. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. NRK1 controls nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide riboside metabolism in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak, Joanna; Joffraud, Magali; Trammell, Samuel A J; Ras, Rosa; Canela, Núria; Boutant, Marie; Kulkarni, Sameer S; Rodrigues, Marcelo; Redpath, Philip; Migaud, Marie E; Auwerx, Johan; Yanes, Oscar; Brenner, Charles; Cantó, Carles

    2016-10-11

    NAD + is a vital redox cofactor and a substrate required for activity of various enzyme families, including sirtuins and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases. Supplementation with NAD + precursors, such as nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) or nicotinamide riboside (NR), protects against metabolic disease, neurodegenerative disorders and age-related physiological decline in mammals. Here we show that nicotinamide riboside kinase 1 (NRK1) is necessary and rate-limiting for the use of exogenous NR and NMN for NAD + synthesis. Using genetic gain- and loss-of-function models, we further demonstrate that the role of NRK1 in driving NAD + synthesis from other NAD + precursors, such as nicotinamide or nicotinic acid, is dispensable. Using stable isotope-labelled compounds, we confirm NMN is metabolized extracellularly to NR that is then taken up by the cell and converted into NAD + . Our results indicate that mammalian cells require conversion of extracellular NMN to NR for cellular uptake and NAD + synthesis, explaining the overlapping metabolic effects observed with the two compounds.

  2. Effects of ionizing radiations on DNA replication in cultured mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, F.; Okada, S.

    1975-01-01

    The dose-response curve of [ 3 H] thymidine incorporation into the acid-insoluble fraction of cultured mammalian cells, grown in the presence of 10 -4 M cold thymidine, is different from that of incorporation in the absence of cold thymidine. For quantitative estimation of net DNA synthesis in nonirradiated and irradiated cells, two methods were used: isolation of newly synthesized BUdR-labeled DNA by CsCl gradient centrifugation and a fluorometric estimation of DNA content in the synchronized population. Both methods showed that the depression of [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation in the presence of cold thymidine reflected a depression of net DNA synthesis. Radiosensitive steps in DNA synthesis were examined by the use of alkaline sucrose gradient centrifugation. The rate of replication along the DNA strands was inhibited to a lesser extent than that of over-all DNA synthesis. The labeling patterns of DNA exposed to [ 3 H]thymidine for 20 min indicated that ionizing radiation preferentially interfered with the formation of small-size 3 H-labeled DNA pieces. These results suggest that the initiation of DNA replication is more radiosensitive than the elongation of DNA strands whose replication has already been initiated. (U.S.)

  3. Protective effect of dietary phytochemicals against arsenite induced genotoxicity in mammalian V79 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Madhumita; Sinha, Dona; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Paul, Susmita; Bhattacharya, R K

    2008-10-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure causes skin diseases, gastrointestinal and neurological disorders, diabetes and cancer in various organs. Oxidative stress associated with arsenic exposure cause genetic instabilities and may initiate carcinogenesis. Phytochemicals present in vegetables, fruits, spices, tea, and medicinal plants, have shown to suppress experimental carcinogenesis in various organs. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the protective effect of some of the phytochemicals against the arsenite induced DNA damage in normal mammalian V79 cells. Comet assay was used for assessment of DNA damage and 2', 7'-dichlorofluorescein dihydroacetate for estimation of ROS generated by arsenite. The effect of the phytochemicals was observed during simultaneous treatment with arsenic, before arsenite exposure and during repair experiments. Of all the phytochemicals tested against arsenic, curcumin gave better protection during simultaneous treatment and resveratrol during pre treatment, which was evident both from comet assay and ROS generation experiments. During pre treatment a longer duration of treatment with lower dose of phytochemicals proved fruitful in reducing the genotoxicity. During repair experiments the phytochemicals enhanced recovery of DNA damage and ellagic acid gave promising results. The results indicated that natural phytochemicals may have the efficacy in reducing arsenic induced genotoxicity, in scavenging ROS and in enhancing the process of DNA repair in V79 cells.

  4. A toolkit for graded expression of green fluorescent protein fusion proteins in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalaskowski, Marcus M; Ehm, Patrick; Giehler, Susanne; Mayr, Georg W

    2012-09-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) and GFP-like proteins of different colors are important tools in cell biology. In many studies, the intracellular targeting of proteins has been determined by transiently expressing GFP fusion proteins and analyzing their intracellular localization by fluorescence microscopy. In most vectors, expression of GFP is driven by the enhancer/promoter cassette of the immediate early gene of human cytomegalovirus (hCMV). This cassette generates high levels of protein expression in most mammalian cell lines. Unfortunately, these nonphysiologically high protein levels have been repeatedly reported to artificially alter the intracellular targeting of proteins fused to GFP. To cope with this problem, we generated a multitude of attenuated GFP expression vectors by modifying the hCMV enhancer/promoter cassette. These modified vectors were transiently expressed, and the expression levels of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) alone and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) fused to another protein were determined by fluorescence microscopy and/or Western blotting. As shown in this study, we were able to (i) clearly reduce the expression of EGFP alone and (ii) reduce expression of an EYFP fusion protein down to the level of the endogenous protein, both in a graded manner. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Acidic mammalian chitinase regulates epithelial cell apoptosis via a chitinolytic-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, Dominik; He, Chuan Hua; Koller, Babara; Da Silva, Carla A; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Lee, Chun Geun; Flavell, Richard A; Elias, Jack A

    2009-04-15

    Acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) is produced during and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Th2-mediated diseases and antiparasite responses. However, the effector responses of AMCase in these settings have not been adequately defined and the relationship(s) between its chitinolytic and other biologic properties have not been investigated. In these studies, we demonstrate that AMCase protects airway epithelial cells from Fas ligand- and growth factor withdrawal-induced apoptosis. This cytoprotection was associated with Akt phosphorylation and abrogated when the PI3K/Akt pathway was inhibited. Comparable cytoprotection was also seen in experiments comparing wild-type AMCase and mutant AMCase that lacked chitinolytic activity. Importantly, the apoptosis-inhibiting effect of enzymatically active and inactive AMCase was abrogated by treatment with allosamidin. These studies demonstrate that secreted AMCase feeds back in an autocrine and/or paracrine manner to protect pulmonary epithelial cells from growth factor withdrawal- and Fas ligand-induced apoptosis. They also demonstrate that the cytoprotection is mediated via a PI3K/Akt-dependent and allosamidin-sensitive pathway that is independent of the chitinolytic activity of this chitinase.

  6. Acidic Mammalian Chitinase Regulates Epithelial Cell via a Chitinolytic-Independent Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, D.; He, C. H.; Koller, B.; Da Silva, C. A.; Kobayashi, Y.; Lee, C. G.; Flavell, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    Acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) is produced during and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Th2-mediated diseases and antiparasite responses. However, the effector responses of AMCase in these settings have not been adequately defined and the relationship(s) between its chitinolytic and other biologic properties have not been investigated. In these studies we demonstrate that AMCase protects airway epithelial cells from Fas ligand (FasL)- and growth factor withdrawal-induced apoptosis. This cytoprotection was associated with Akt phosphorylation and abrogated when the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway was inhibited. Comparable cytoprotection was also seen in experiments comparing wild type AMCase and mutant AMCase that lacked chitinolytic activity. Importantly, the apoptosis-inhibiting effect of enzymatically-active and -inactive AMCase was abrogated by treatment with allosamidin. These studies demonstrate that secreted AMCase feeds back in an autocrine and/or paracrine manner to protect pulmonary epithelial cells from growth factor withdrawal- and FasL-induced apoptosis. They also demonstrate that the cytoprotection is mediated via a PI3K/Akt-dependent and allosamidin-sensitive pathway that is independent of the chitinolytic acvtivity of this chitinase. PMID:19342690

  7. Base substitutions, frameshifts, and small deletions constitute ionizing radiation-induced point mutations in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosovsky, A.J.; de Boer, J.G.; de Jong, P.J.; Drobetsky, E.A.; Glickman, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    The relative role of point mutations and large genomic rearrangements in ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis has been an issue of long-standing interest. Recent studies using Southern blotting analysis permit the partitioning of ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis in mammalian cells into detectable deletions and major genomic rearrangements and into point mutations. The molecular nature of these point mutations has been left unresolved; they may include base substitutions as well as small deletions, insertions, and frame-shifts below the level of resolution of Southern blotting analysis. In this investigation, we have characterized a collection of ionizing radiation-induced point mutations at the endogenous adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (aprt) locus of Chinese hamster ovary cells at the DNA sequence level. Base substitutions represented approximately equal to 2/3 of the point mutations analyzed. Although the collection of mutants is relatively small, every possible type of base substitution event has been recovered. These mutations are well distributed throughout the coding sequence with only one multiple occurrence. Small deletions represented the remainder of characterized mutants; no insertions have been observed. Sequence-directed mechanisms mediated by direct repeats could account for some of the observed deletions, while others appear to be directly attributable to radiation-induced strand breakage

  8. Transcription is Associated with Z-DNA Formation in Metabolically Active Permeabilized Mammalian Cell Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittig, Burghardt; Dorbic, Tomislav; Rich, Alexander

    1991-03-01

    Mammalian cells have been encapsulated in agarose microbeads, and from these cells metabolically active permeabilized nuclei were prepared. Previously, we showed that biotin-labeled monoclonal antibodies against Z-DNA can be diffused into the nuclei and, over a specific concentration range, they will bind to Z-DNA within the nucleus in a concentration-independent manner. By using radiolabeled streptavidin, we showed that the amount of Z-DNA antibody bound is related to the torsional strain of the DNA in the nucleus. Relaxation of the DNA results in a decrease of Z-DNA formation, whereas increasing torsional strain through inhibiting topoisomerase I results in increased Z-DNA formation. Here we measure the influence of RNA transcription and DNA replication. Transcription is associated with a substantial increase in the binding of anti-Z-DNA antibodies, paralleling the increased level of RNA synthesized as the level of ribonucleoside triphosphate in the medium is increased. DNA replication yields smaller increases in the binding of Z-DNA antibodies. Stopping RNA transcription with inhibitors results in a large loss of Z-DNA antibody binding, whereas only a small decrease is associated with inhibition of DNA replication.

  9. Single-cell sequencing in stem cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Lu; Tang, Fuchou

    2016-04-15

    Cell-to-cell variation and heterogeneity are fundamental and intrinsic characteristics of stem cell populations, but these differences are masked when bulk cells are used for omic analysis. Single-cell sequencing technologies serve as powerful tools to dissect cellular heterogeneity comprehensively and to identify distinct phenotypic cell types, even within a 'homogeneous' stem cell population. These technologies, including single-cell genome, epigenome, and transcriptome sequencing technologies, have been developing rapidly in recent years. The application of these methods to different types of stem cells, including pluripotent stem cells and tissue-specific stem cells, has led to exciting new findings in the stem cell field. In this review, we discuss the recent progress as well as future perspectives in the methodologies and applications of single-cell omic sequencing technologies.

  10. Live-cell imaging study of mitochondrial morphology in mammalian cells exposed to X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, M.; Yokoya, A.; Narita, A.; Fujii, K.; Kanari, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Morphological changes in mitochondria induced by X-irradiation in normal murine mammary gland cells were studied with a live-cell microscopic imaging technique. Mitochondria were visualised by staining with a specific fluorescent probe in the cells, which express fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator 2 (Fucci2) probes to visualise cell cycle. In unirradiated cells, the number of cells with fragmented mitochondria was about 20 % of the total cells through observation period (96 h). In irradiated cells, the population with fragmented mitochondria significantly increased depending on the absorbed dose. Particularly, for 8 Gy irradiation, the accumulation of fragmentation persists even in the cells whose cell cycle came to a stand (80 % in G1 (G0-like) phase). The fraction reached to a maximum at 96 h after irradiation. The kinetics of the fraction with fragmented mitochondria was similar to that for cells in S/G2/M phase (20 %) through the observation period (120 h). The evidences show that, in irradiated cells, some signals are continually released from a nucleus or cytoplasm even in the G0-like cells to operate some sort of protein machineries involved in mitochondrial fission. It is inferred that this delayed mitochondrial fragmentation is strongly related to their dysfunction, and hence might modulate radiobiological effects such as mutation or cell death. (authors)

  11. Live-cell imaging study of mitochondrial morphology in mammalian cells exposed to X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, M; Kanari, Y; Yokoya, A; Narita, A; Fujii, K

    2015-09-01

    Morphological changes in mitochondria induced by X-irradiation in normal murine mammary gland cells were studied with a live-cell microscopic imaging technique. Mitochondria were visualised by staining with a specific fluorescent probe in the cells, which express fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator 2 (Fucci2) probes to visualise cell cycle. In unirradiated cells, the number of cells with fragmented mitochondria was about 20 % of the total cells through observation period (96 h). In irradiated cells, the population with fragmented mitochondria significantly increased depending on the absorbed dose. Particularly, for 8 Gy irradiation, the accumulation of fragmentation persists even in the cells whose cell cycle came to a stand (80 % in G1 (G0-like) phase). The fraction reached to a maximum at 96 h after irradiation. The kinetics of the fraction with fragmented mitochondria was similar to that for cells in S/G2/M phase (20 %) through the observation period (120 h). The evidences show that, in irradiated cells, some signals are continually released from a nucleus or cytoplasm even in the G0-like cells to operate some sort of protein machineries involved in mitochondrial fission. It is inferred that this delayed mitochondrial fragmentation is strongly related to their dysfunction, and hence might modulate radiobiological effects such as mutation or cell death. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Sericin, a protein derived from silkworms, accelerates the proliferation of several mammalian cell lines including a hybridoma

    OpenAIRE

    Terada, Satoshi; Nishimura, Taeko; Sasaki, Masahiro; Yamada, Hideyuki; Miki, Masao

    2002-01-01

    Sericin, a constituent of the silkworm cocoon, was added to the culture of four mammalian cell lines: murine hybridoma 2E3-O,human hepatoblastoma HepG2, human epithelial HeLa and human embryonal kidney 293 cells. The proliferation of all cell lineswas accelerated in the presence of sericin. The hybridoma cellline was further studied. The 2E3-O cell line was so well adapted to serum-free medium that both the proliferation rate and maximum cell density in serum-free ASF103 medium were higher th...

  13. Human TMEM30a Promotes Uptake of Anti-tumor and Bioactive Choline Phospholipids into Mammalian Cells1

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Rui; Brady, Erin; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Anti-tumor alkylphospholipids initiate apoptosis in transformed HL-60 and Jurkat cells while sparing their progenitors. Edelfosine like other short-chained phospholipids—inflammatory Platelet-activating Factor (PAF) and apoptotic oxidatively-truncated phospholipids—are proposed to have intracellular sites of action, yet a conduit for these choline phospholipids into mammalian cells is undefined. Edelfosine is also accumulated by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in process requiring the membrane prote...

  14. Microbial regulation of glucose metabolism and cell-cycle progression in mammalian colonocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallas R Donohoe

    Full Text Available A prodigious number of microbes inhabit the human body, especially in the lumen of the gastrointestinal (GI tract, yet our knowledge of how they regulate metabolic pathways within our cells is rather limited. To investigate the role of microbiota in host energy metabolism, we analyzed ATP levels and AMPK phosphorylation in tissues isolated from germfree and conventionally-raised C57BL/6 mice. These experiments demonstrated that microbiota are required for energy homeostasis in the proximal colon to a greater extent than other segments of the GI tract that also harbor high densities of bacteria. This tissue-specific effect is consistent with colonocytes utilizing bacterially-produced butyrate as their primary energy source, whereas most other cell types utilize glucose. However, it was surprising that glucose did not compensate for butyrate deficiency. We measured a 3.5-fold increase in glucose uptake in germfree colonocytes. However, (13C-glucose metabolic-flux experiments and biochemical assays demonstrated that they shifted their glucose metabolism away from mitochondrial oxidation/CO(2 production and toward increased glycolysis/lactate production, which does not yield enough ATPs to compensate. The mechanism responsible for this metabolic shift is diminished pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH levels and activity. Consistent with perturbed PDH function, the addition of butyrate, but not glucose, to germfree colonocytes ex vivo stimulated oxidative metabolism. As a result of this energetic defect, germfree colonocytes exhibited a partial block in the G(1-to-S-phase transition that was rescued by a butyrate-fortified diet. These data reveal a mechanism by which microbiota regulate glucose utilization to influence energy homeostasis and cell-cycle progression of mammalian host cells.

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Calcium- and Phosphorylation-dependentCalmodulin Complexes in Mammalian Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Deok-Jin; Wang, Daojing

    2006-05-26

    Protein conformational changes due to cofactor binding (e.g. metal ions, heme) and/or posttranslational modifications (e.g. phosphorylation) modulate dynamic protein complexes. Calmodulin (CaM) plays an essential role in regulating calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) signaling and homeostasis. No systematic approach on the identification of phosphorylation-dependent Ca{sup 2+}/CaM binding proteins has been published. Herein, we report a proteome-wide study of phosphorylation-dependent CaM binding proteins from mammalian cells. This method, termed 'Dynamic Phosphoprotein Complex Trapping', 'DPPC Trapping' for short, utilizes a combination of in vivo and in vitro assays. The basic strategy is to drastically shift the equilibrium towards endogenous phosphorylation of Ser, Thr, and Tyr at the global scale by inhibiting corresponding phosphatases in vivo. The phosphorylation-dependent calmodulin-binding proteins are then trapped in vitro in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner by CaM-Sepharose chromatography. Finally, the isolated calmodulin-binding proteins are separated by SDS-PAGE and identified by LC/MS/MS. In parallel, the phosphorylation-dependent binding is visualized by silver staining and/or Western blotting. Using this method, we selectively identified over 120 CaM-associated proteins including many previously uncharacterized. We verified ubiquitin-protein ligase EDD1, inositol 1, 4, 5-triphosphate receptor type 1 (IP{sub 3}R1), and ATP-dependent RNA helicase DEAD box protein 3 (DDX3), as phosphorylation-dependent CaM binding proteins. To demonstrate the utilities of our method in understanding biological pathways, we showed that pSer/Thr of IP{sub 3}R1 in vivo by staurosporine-sensitive kinase(s), but not by PKA/PKG/PKC, significantly reduced the affinity of its Ca{sup 2+}-dependent CaM binding. However, pSer/Thr of IP{sub 3}R1 did not substantially affect its Ca{sup 2+}-independent CaM binding. We further showed that phosphatase PP1, but not PP2A or PP2B

  16. Mammalian cell invasion and intracellular trafficking by Trypanosoma cruzi infective forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato A. Mortara

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas’ disease, occurs as different strains or isolates that may be grouped in two major phylogenetic lineages: T. cruzi I, associated with the sylvatic cycle and T. cruzi II, linked to the human disease. In the mammalian host the parasite has to invade cells and many studies implicated the flagellated trypomastigotes in this process. Several parasite surface components and some of host cell receptors with which they interact have been identified. Our work focused on how amastigotes, usually found growing in the cytoplasm, can invade mammalian cells with infectivities comparable to that of trypomastigotes. We found differences in cellular responses induced by amastigotes and trypomastigotes regarding cytoskeletal components and actin-rich projections. Extracellularly generated amastigotes of T. cruzi I strains may display greater infectivity than metacyclic trypomastigotes towards cultured cell lines as well as target cells that have modified expression of different classes of cellular components. Cultured host cells harboring the bacterium Coxiella burnetii allowed us to gain new insights into the trafficking properties of the different infective forms of T. cruzi, disclosing unexpected requirements for the parasite to transit between the parasitophorous vacuole to its final destination in the host cell cytoplasm.O agente etiológico da doença de Chagas, Trypanosoma cruzi, ocorre como cepas ou isolados que podem ser agrupados em duas grandes linhagens filogenéticas: T. cruzi I associada ao ciclo silvestre e T. cruzi II ligada à doençahumana. No hospedeiro mamífero o parasita tem que invadir células, e vários estudos relacionam as formas flageladas tripomastigotas neste processo. Diferentes componentes de superfície dos parasitas e alguns dos respectivos receptores foram identificados. Em nosso trabalho temos procurado compreender como amastigotas, que normalmente são encontrados crescendo

  17. A three-dimensional comparison of tick-borne flavivirus infection in mammalian and tick cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle K Offerdahl

    Full Text Available Tick-borne flaviviruses (TBFV are sustained in nature through cycling between mammalian and tick hosts. In this study, we used African green monkey kidney cells (Vero and Ixodes scapularis tick cells (ISE6 to compare virus-induced changes in mammalian and arthropod cells. Using confocal microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and electron tomography (ET, we examined viral protein distribution and the ultrastructural changes that occur during TBFV infection. Within host cells, flaviviruses cause complex rearrangement of cellular membranes for the purpose of virus replication. Virus infection was accompanied by a marked expansion in endoplasmic reticulum (ER staining and markers for TBFV replication were localized mainly to the ER in both cell lines. TEM of Vero cells showed membrane-bound vesicles enclosed in a network of dilated, anastomosing ER cisternae. Virions were seen within the ER and were sometimes in paracrystalline arrays. Tubular structures or elongated vesicles were occasionally noted. In acutely and persistently infected ISE6 cells, membrane proliferation and vesicles were also noted; however, the extent of membrane expansion and the abundance of vesicles were lower and no viral particles were observed. Tubular profiles were far more prevalent in persistently infected ISE6 cells than in acutely infected cells. By ET, tubular profiles, in persistently infected tick cells, had a cross-sectional diameter of 60-100 nm, reached up to 800 nm in length, were closed at the ends, and were often arranged in fascicle-like bundles, shrouded with ER membrane. Our experiments provide analysis of viral protein localization within the context of both mammalian and arthropod cell lines as well as both acute and persistent arthropod cell infection. Additionally, we show for the first time 3D flavivirus infection in a vector cell line and the first ET of persistent flavivirus infection.

  18. Parallel single-cell analysis microfluidic platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brink, Floris Teunis Gerardus; Gool, Elmar; Frimat, Jean-Philippe; Bomer, Johan G.; van den Berg, Albert; le Gac, Severine

    2011-01-01

    We report a PDMS microfluidic platform for parallel single-cell analysis (PaSCAl) as a powerful tool to decipher the heterogeneity found in cell populations. Cells are trapped individually in dedicated pockets, and thereafter, a number of invasive or non-invasive analysis schemes are performed.

  19. The response of mammalian cells to UV-light reveals Rad54-dependent and independent pathways of homologous recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eppink, Berina; Tafel, Agnieszka A; Hanada, Katsuhiro

    2011-01-01

    with lesions in replicating DNA. The core HR protein in mammalian cells is the strand exchange protein RAD51, which is aided by numerous proteins, including RAD54. We used RAD54 as a cellular marker for HR to study the response of mammalian embryonic stem (ES) cells to UV irradiation. In contrast to yeast, ES......Ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced DNA lesions can be efficiently repaired by nucleotide excision repair (NER). However, NER is less effective during replication of UV-damaged chromosomes. In contrast, translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) and homologous recombination (HR) are capable of dealing....... We demonstrate using chromosome fiber analysis at the individual replication fork level, that HR activity is important for the restart of DNA replication after induction of DNA damage by UV-light in NER-deficient cells. Furthermore, our data reveal RAD54-dependent and -independent contributions of HR...

  20. Microencapsulation for the Therapeutic Delivery of Drugs, Live Mammalian and Bacterial Cells, and Other Biopharmaceutics: Current Status and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Tomaro-Duchesneau

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microencapsulation is a technology that has shown significant promise in biotherapeutics, and other applications. It has been proven useful in the immobilization of drugs, live mammalian and bacterial cells and other cells, and other biopharmaceutics molecules, as it can provide material structuration, protection of the enclosed product, and controlled release of the encapsulated contents, all of which can ensure efficient and safe therapeutic effects. This paper is a comprehensive review of microencapsulation and its latest developments in the field. It provides a comprehensive overview of the technology and primary goals of microencapsulation and discusses various processes and techniques involved in microencapsulation including physical, chemical, physicochemical, and other methods involved. It also summarizes the state-of-the-art successes of microencapsulation, specifically with regard to the encapsulation of microorganisms, mammalian cells, drugs, and other biopharmaceutics in various diseases. The limitations and future directions of microencapsulation technologies are also discussed.

  1. Microencapsulation for the Therapeutic Delivery of Drugs, Live Mammalian and Bacterial Cells, and Other Biopharmaceutics: Current Status and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Shyamali; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Kahouli, Imen; Prakash, Satya

    2013-01-01

    Microencapsulation is a technology that has shown significant promise in biotherapeutics, and other applications. It has been proven useful in the immobilization of drugs, live mammalian and bacterial cells and other cells, and other biopharmaceutics molecules, as it can provide material structuration, protection of the enclosed product, and controlled release of the encapsulated contents, all of which can ensure efficient and safe therapeutic effects. This paper is a comprehensive review of microencapsulation and its latest developments in the field. It provides a comprehensive overview of the technology and primary goals of microencapsulation and discusses various processes and techniques involved in microencapsulation including physical, chemical, physicochemical, and other methods involved. It also summarizes the state-of-the-art successes of microencapsulation, specifically with regard to the encapsulation of microorganisms, mammalian cells, drugs, and other biopharmaceutics in various diseases. The limitations and future directions of microencapsulation technologies are also discussed. PMID:26555963

  2. Automated Single Cell Data Decontamination Pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennessen, Kristin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Pati, Amrita [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.

    2014-03-21

    Recent technological advancements in single-cell genomics have encouraged the classification and functional assessment of microorganisms from a wide span of the biospheres phylogeny.1,2 Environmental processes of interest to the DOE, such as bioremediation and carbon cycling, can be elucidated through the genomic lens of these unculturable microbes. However, contamination can occur at various stages of the single-cell sequencing process. Contaminated data can lead to wasted time and effort on meaningless analyses, inaccurate or erroneous conclusions, and pollution of public databases. A fully automated decontamination tool is necessary to prevent these instances and increase the throughput of the single-cell sequencing process

  3. Single-cell technologies in environmental omics

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2015-10-22

    Environmental studies are primarily done by culturing isolated microorganisms or by amplifying and sequencing conserved genes. Difficulties understanding the complexity of large numbers of various microorganisms in an environment led to the development of techniques to enrich specific microorganisms for upstream analysis, ultimately leading to single-cell isolation and analyses. We discuss the significance of single-cell technologies in omics studies with focus on metagenomics and metatranscriptomics. We propose that by reducing sample heterogeneity using single-cell genomics, metaomic studies can be simplified.

  4. Direct fluorescent-dye labeling of α-tubulin in mammalian cells for live cell and superresolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schvartz, Tomer; Aloush, Noa; Goliand, Inna; Segal, Inbar; Nachmias, Dikla; Arbely, Eyal; Elia, Natalie

    2017-10-15

    Genetic code expansion and bioorthogonal labeling provide for the first time a way for direct, site-specific labeling of proteins with fluorescent-dyes in live cells. Although the small size and superb photophysical parameters of fluorescent-dyes offer unique advantages for high-resolution microscopy, this approach has yet to be embraced as a tool in live cell imaging. Here we evaluated the feasibility of this approach by applying it for α-tubulin labeling. After a series of calibrations, we site-specifically labeled α-tubulin with silicon rhodamine (SiR) in live mammalian cells in an efficient and robust manner. SiR-labeled tubulin successfully incorporated into endogenous microtubules at high density, enabling video recording of microtubule dynamics in interphase and mitotic cells. Applying this labeling approach to structured illumination microscopy resulted in an increase in resolution, highlighting the advantages in using a smaller, brighter tag. Therefore, using our optimized assay, genetic code expansion provides an attractive tool for labeling proteins with a minimal, bright tag in quantitative high-resolution imaging. © 2017 Schvartz et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  5. Optimization of mNeonGreen for Homo sapiens increases its fluorescent intensity in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanida-Miyake, Emiko; Koike, Masato; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Tanida, Isei

    2018-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is tremendously useful for investigating many cellular and intracellular events. The monomeric GFP mNeonGreen is about 3- to 5-times brighter than GFP and monomeric enhanced GFP and shows high photostability. The maturation half-time of mNeonGreen is about 3-fold faster than that of monomeric enhanced GFP. However, the cDNA sequence encoding mNeonGreen contains some codons that are rarely used in Homo sapiens. For better expression of mNeonGreen in human cells, we synthesized a human-optimized cDNA encoding mNeonGreen and generated an expression plasmid for humanized mNeonGreen under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter. The resultant plasmid was introduced into HEK293 cells. The fluorescent intensity of humanized mNeonGreen was about 1.4-fold higher than that of the original mNeonGreen. The humanized mNeonGreen with a mitochondria-targeting signal showed mitochondrial distribution of mNeonGreen. We further generated an expression vector of humanized mNeonGreen with 3xFLAG tags at its carboxyl terminus as these tags are useful for immunological analyses. The 3xFLAG-tagged mNeonGreen was recognized well with an anti-FLAG-M2 antibody. These plasmids for the expression of humanized mNeonGreen and mNeonGreen-3xFLAG are useful tools for biological studies in mammalian cells using mNeonGreen.

  6. Selective encapsulation of hemoproteins from mammalian cells using mesoporous metal oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairy, Mohamed; El-Safty, Sherif A

    2013-11-01

    A key requirement in successful protein encapsulation is the fabrication of selective protein supercaptors that are not impeded by the physical shape and three-dimensional hydrodynamics of the protein, exhibit minimal clogging effect but with high protein retention, and with uniformly sized adsorbent pores. We report a novel nanomagnet-selective supercaptor approach in the encapsulation of hemoprotein from mammalian cells using mesoporous metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs). Different morphologies of mesoporous NiO and Fe3O4 NPs were fabricated. Among these nanoadsorbents, NiO nanoroses (NRs) had higher loading capacity of hemoprotein than NiO nanospheres (NSs) and nanoplatelets (NPLs), or even superparamagnetic Fe3O4 NPs. The key finding of this study was that mesoporous NiO nanomagnet supercaptors show exceptional encapsulation and selective separation of high-concentration Hb from human blood. In this induced-fit separation model, in addition to the heme group distributions and protein-carrier binding energy, the morphology and magnetic properties of NiO NPs had a key function in broadening the controlled immobilization affinity and selectivity of hemoproteins. In addition, thermodynamics, kinetics, and theoretical studies were carried out to investigate the optimal performance of protein adsorption. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Targeted nanodiamonds for identification of subcellular protein assemblies in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Lake

    Full Text Available Transmission electron microscopy (TEM can be used to successfully determine the structures of proteins. However, such studies are typically done ex situ after extraction of the protein from the cellular environment. Here we describe an application for nanodiamonds as targeted intensity contrast labels in biological TEM, using the nuclear pore complex (NPC as a model macroassembly. We demonstrate that delivery of antibody-conjugated nanodiamonds to live mammalian cells using maltotriose-conjugated polypropylenimine dendrimers results in efficient localization of nanodiamonds to the intended cellular target. We further identify signatures of nanodiamonds under TEM that allow for unambiguous identification of individual nanodiamonds from a resin-embedded, OsO4-stained environment. This is the first demonstration of nanodiamonds as labels for nanoscale TEM-based identification of subcellular protein assemblies. These results, combined with the unique fluorescence properties and biocompatibility of nanodiamonds, represent an important step toward the use of nanodiamonds as markers for correlated optical/electron bioimaging.

  8. Comparative Mammalian Cell Cytotoxicity of Wastewaters for Agricultural Reuse after Ozonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shengkun; Lu, Jinfeng; Plewa, Michael J; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2016-11-01

    Reusing wastewater in agriculture is becoming increasingly common, which necessitates disinfection to ensure reuse safety. However, disinfectants can react with wastewater constituents to form disinfection byproducts (DBPs), many of which are toxic and restrict the goal of safe reuse. Our objective was to benchmark the induction of mammalian cell cytotoxicity after ozonation against chlorination for three types of real wastewaters: municipal secondary effluent and two sources of minimally treated swine farm wastewaters. A new method to evaluate samples of suspected high cytotoxicity was devised. For the secondary effluent, ozonation reduced the cytotoxicity by as much as 10 times; chlorination lowered the cytotoxicity only when followed by dechlorination. The swine farm wastewaters were up to 2000 times more cytotoxic than the secondary effluent, and the highest reduction in cytotoxicity was 17 times as achieved by ozonation. These results indicate that secondary effluent is preferred over swine wastewaters for agricultural reuse regardless of the tested disinfectants. Ozonation consistently reduced the cytotoxicity of both the full strength and the organic extracts of all tested wastewaters more than chlorination. The only significant correlation was observed in the secondary wastewater between total haloacetonitriles and cytotoxicity. While the association of reduced toxicity with the modification or reduction of specific compound(s) is unclear, regulated DBPs may not be the primary forcing agents.

  9. Dibutyltin Compounds Effects on PPARγ/RXRα Activity, Adipogenesis, and Inflammation in Mammalians Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora A. Milton

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Organotins are a group of chemical compounds that have a tin atom covalently bound to one or more organic groups. The best-studied organotin is tributyltin chloride, which is an environmental pollutant and an endocrine disruptor. Tributyltin chloride has been shown to bind to PPARγ/RXRα and induces adipogenesis in different mammalian cells. However, there are few studies with other organotin compounds, such as dibutyltins. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dibutyltins diacetate, dichloride, dilaurate, and maleate on the transcriptional activity of the nuclear PPARγ and RXRα receptors, and on adipogenesis and inflammation. Analogous to tributyltin chloride, in reporter gene assay using HeLa cells, we observed that dibutyltins diacetate, dichloride, dilaurate, and maleate are partial agonists of PPARγ. Unlike tributyltin chloride, which is a full agonist of RXRα, dibutyltins dichloride and dilaurate are partial RXRα agonists. Additionally, the introduction of the C285S mutation, which disrupts tributyltin chloride binding to PPARγ, abrogated the dibutyltin agonistic activity. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, all dibutyltin induced adipogenesis, although the effect was less pronounced than that of rosiglitazone and tributyltin chloride. This adipogenic effect was confirmed by the expression of adipogenic markers Fabp4, Adipoq, and Glut4. Exposure of 3T3-L1 cells with dibutyltin in the presence of T0070907, a specific PPARγ antagonist, reduced fat accumulation, suggesting that adipogenic effect occurs through PPARγ. Furthermore, dibutyltins dichloride, dilaurate, and maleate inhibited the expression of proinflammatory genes in 3T3-L1 cells, such as Vcam1, Dcn, Fn1, S100a8, and Lgals9. Additionally, in RAW 264.7 macrophages, tributyltin chloride and dibutyltin dilaurate reduced LPS-stimulated TNFα expression. Our findings indicate that dibutyltins diacetate, dichloride, dilaurate, and maleate are PPARγ partial agonists and

  10. Membrane protein stoichiometry studied in intact mammalian cells using liquid-phase electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE Jonge, N

    2018-02-01

    Receptor membrane proteins in the plasma membranes of cells respond to extracellular chemical signals by conformational changes, spatial redistribution, and (re-)assembly into protein complexes, for example, into homodimers (pairs of the same protein type). The functional state of the proteins can be determined from information about how subunits are assembled into protein complexes. Stoichiometric information about the protein complex subunits, however, is generally not obtained from intact cells but from pooled material extracted from many cells, resulting in a lack of fundamental knowledge about the functioning of membrane proteins. First, functional states may dramatically differ from cell to cell on account of cell heterogeneity. Second, extracting the membrane proteins from the plasma membrane may lead to many artefacts. Liquid-phase scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), in short liquid STEM, is a new technique capable of determining the locations of individual membrane proteins within the intact plasma membranes of cells in liquid. Many tens of whole cells can readily be imaged. It is possible to analyse the stoichiometry of membrane proteins in single cells while accounting for heterogenic cell populations. Liquid STEM was used to image epidermal growth factor receptors in whole COS7 cells. A study of the dimerisation of the HER2 protein in breast cancer cells revealed the presence of rare cancer cells in which HER2 was in a different functional state than in the bulk cells. Stoichiometric information about receptors is essential not only for basic science but also for biomedical application because they present many important pharmaceutical targets. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  11. Influence of cell microenvironment on the intrinsic radiosensitivity of mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, N.M.S.; Nori, Dattatreyudu

    1995-01-01

    Survival of cells cultured in the regular growth medium has been compared with that of cells cultured in media with reduced nutrient concentration. Nutrient concentration in the cell microenvironment cultured in regular physiological growth medium, composed of MEM with 15% serum, has been taken to be 100%. Relative to this, the nutrient concentration in the dilute media has been varied from 20 to 80%. The cell survival increased with the decrease in the nutrient concentration in the microenvironment, and reached a plateau in media with 40% or less of nutrient concentration. The magnitude of increase in the radioresistance of log phase cells in medium with 40% nutrient concentration was by a factor of 2.4. Growth kinetics in regular growth medium and in diluted media with nutrient concentration of 40% were nearly the same. The survival of cells cultured in reduced nutrient concentration was the same under growth and non growth post-irradiation repair conditions. Reduction in the concentration of serum, the source of hormones and growth factors, from 15% to 5% also increased the radioresistance of cell by a factor of 1.64. Conclusions: (1) cells in micro environments with reduced nutrient concentration are more refractory to radiation induced cell killing by a factor of as much as 2.4, (2) post-irradiation cell cycle progression does not appear to reduce the repair of x-ray induced damage, and (3) failure of radiotherapy in the local control of some large solid tumors may be related to the presence of pockets of cells in micro environments with inadequate and/or reduce supply of nutrients. 11 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  12. The influence of reactive oxygen species on cell cycle progression in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbon, Eline Hendrike; Post, Jan Andries; Boonstra, Johannes

    2012-12-10

    Cell cycle regulation is performed by cyclins and cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs). Recently, it has become clear that reactive oxygen species (ROS) influence the presence and activity of these enzymes and thereby control cell cycle progression. In this review, we first describe the discovery of enzymes specialized in ROS production: the NADPH oxidase (NOX) complexes. This discovery led to the recognition of ROS as essential players in many cellular processes, including cell cycle progression. ROS influence cell cycle progression in a context-dependent manner via phosphorylation and ubiquitination of CDKs and cell cycle regulatory molecules. We show that ROS often regulate ubiquitination via intermediate phosphorylation and that phosphorylation is thus the major regulatory mechanism influenced by ROS. In addition, ROS have recently been shown to be able to activate growth factor receptors. We will illustrate the diverse roles of ROS as mediators in cell cycle regulation by incorporating phosphorylation, ubiquitination and receptor activation in a model of cell cycle regulation involving EGF-receptor activation. We conclude that ROS can no longer be ignored when studying cell cycle progression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Differentiation-Dependent Glycosylation of Cells in Squamous Cell Epithelia Detected by a Mammalian Lectin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plzák, J.; Holíková, Z.; Smetana Jr., K.; Dvořánková, B.; Hercogová, J.; Kaltner, H.; Motlík, Jan; Gabius, H. J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 171, - (2002), s. 135-144 ISSN 1422-6405 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065; GA AV ČR KSK5052113 Keywords : carcinoma * basal cell * cell differentiation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.442, year: 2002

  14. Technologies for Single-Cell Isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Andre; Schoendube, Jonas; Zimmermann, Stefan; Steeb, Maximilian; Zengerle, Roland; Koltay, Peter

    2015-07-24

    The handling of single cells is of great importance in applications such as cell line development or single-cell analysis, e.g., for cancer research or for emerging diagnostic methods. This review provides an overview of technologies that are currently used or in development to isolate single cells for subsequent single-cell analysis. Data from a dedicated online market survey conducted to identify the most relevant technologies, presented here for the first time, shows that FACS (fluorescence activated cell sorting) respectively Flow cytometry (33% usage), laser microdissection (17%), manual cell picking (17%), random seeding/dilution (15%), and microfluidics/lab-on-a-chip devices (12%) are currently the most frequently used technologies. These most prominent technologies are described in detail and key performance factors are discussed. The survey data indicates a further increasing interest in single-cell isolation tools for the coming years. Additionally, a worldwide patent search was performed to screen for emerging technologies that might become relevant in the future. In total 179 patents were found, out of which 25 were evaluated by screening the title and abstract to be relevant to the field.

  15. Cell arrest and cell death in mammalian preimplantation development: lessons from the bovine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidenfrost, Sandra; Boelhauve, Marc; Reichenbach, Myriam; Güngör, Tuna; Reichenbach, Horst-Dieter; Sinowatz, Fred; Wolf, Eckhard; Habermann, Felix A

    2011-01-01

    The causes, modes, biological role and prospective significance of cell death in preimplantation development in humans and other mammals are still poorly understood. Early bovine embryos represent a very attractive experimental model for the investigation of this fundamental and important issue. To obtain reference data on the temporal and spatial occurrence of cell death in early bovine embryogenesis, three-dimensionally preserved embryos of different ages and stages of development up to hatched blastocysts were examined in toto by confocal laser scanning microscopy. In parallel, transcript abundance profiles for selected apoptosis-related genes were analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Our study documents that in vitro as well as in vivo, the first four cleavage cycles are prone to a high failure rate including different types of permanent cell cycle arrest and subsequent non-apoptotic blastomere death. In vitro produced and in vivo derived blastocysts showed a significant incidence of cell death in the inner cell mass (ICM), but only in part with morphological features of apoptosis. Importantly, transcripts for CASP3, CASP9, CASP8 and FAS/FASLG were not detectable or found at very low abundances. In vitro and in vivo, errors and failures of the first and the next three cleavage divisions frequently cause immediate embryo death or lead to aberrant subsequent development, and are the main source of developmental heterogeneity. A substantial occurrence of cell death in the ICM even in fast developing blastocysts strongly suggests a regular developmentally controlled elimination of cells, while the nature and mechanisms of ICM cell death are unclear. Morphological findings as well as transcript levels measured for important apoptosis-related genes are in conflict with the view that classical caspase-mediated apoptosis is the major cause of cell death in early bovine development.

  16. Cell arrest and cell death in mammalian preimplantation development: lessons from the bovine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Leidenfrost

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The causes, modes, biological role and prospective significance of cell death in preimplantation development in humans and other mammals are still poorly understood. Early bovine embryos represent a very attractive experimental model for the investigation of this fundamental and important issue. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To obtain reference data on the temporal and spatial occurrence of cell death in early bovine embryogenesis, three-dimensionally preserved embryos of different ages and stages of development up to hatched blastocysts were examined in toto by confocal laser scanning microscopy. In parallel, transcript abundance profiles for selected apoptosis-related genes were analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Our study documents that in vitro as well as in vivo, the first four cleavage cycles are prone to a high failure rate including different types of permanent cell cycle arrest and subsequent non-apoptotic blastomere death. In vitro produced and in vivo derived blastocysts showed a significant incidence of cell death in the inner cell mass (ICM, but only in part with morphological features of apoptosis. Importantly, transcripts for CASP3, CASP9, CASP8 and FAS/FASLG were not detectable or found at very low abundances. CONCLUSIONS: In vitro and in vivo, errors and failures of the first and the next three cleavage divisions frequently cause immediate embryo death or lead to aberrant subsequent development, and are the main source of developmental heterogeneity. A substantial occurrence of cell death in the ICM even in fast developing blastocysts strongly suggests a regular developmentally controlled elimination of cells, while the nature and mechanisms of ICM cell death are unclear. Morphological findings as well as transcript levels measured for important apoptosis-related genes are in conflict with the view that classical caspase-mediated apoptosis is the major cause of cell death in early bovine

  17. Phototransfection of mammalian cells using femtosecond laser pulses: optimization and applicability to stem cell differentiation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mthunzi, P

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available , the influence of the cell passage number on the transfection efficiency is explored and, second, the ability to enhance the transfection efficiency via whole culture treatments. Our results should encourage wider uptake of this methodology...

  18. Study of Cell Division Aberrations Induced by Some Silica Dusts in Mammalian Cells in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béna, F; Danière, M C; Terzetti, F; Poirot, O; Elias, Z

    2000-01-01

    Previously we observed that some crystalline and amorphous (diatomaceous earths) silicas (but not pyrogenic amorphous silica) induced morphological transformation of Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells. In order to explore the mechanisms of the silica-induced cell transformation, in this study we have examined the possibility that silica may cause genomic changes by interfering with the normal events of mitotic division. The SHE cells were exposed to transforming samples of Min-U-Sil 5 quartz and amorphous diatomite earth (DE) as well as to inactive amorphous synthetic Aerosil 0X50 at concentrations between 9 and 36 μg/cm(2) of culture slide. Effects on the mitotic spindle and on chromosome congression and segregation through the mitotic stages were concurrently examined by differential and indirect immunofluorescence stainings using anti-β-tubulin antibody. Min-U-Sil 5 and DE dusts induced a significant increase in the number of aberrant mitotic cells detected by differential staining. Increased frequencies of monopolar mitoses and scattered chromosomes as well as a small incidence of lagging chromosomes in DE-treated cells were observed. The immunostaining was more efficient in the detection of spindle disturbances. Min-U-Sil induced a significantly concentration-dependent increase of monopolar spindles. At the highest concentration, highly disorganized prophase spindles and prometaphase multipolars were observed. These damages caused a concentration-dependent decrease in metaphase to anaphase transition. DE-induced spindle aberrations did not reach significant levels over control, although increase in monopolar and multipolar spindles were recorded. Exposure to OX50 particles did not disrupt spindle integrity. To determine whether micronuclei (MN) arise from divisional abnormalities induced by the active samples, we performed in SHE and human bronchial epithelial cells kinetochore (K)-specific and centromere (C)-specific staining, respectively. A concentration

  19. Characterization of mammalian cell culture raw materials by combining spectroscopy and chemometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trunfio, Nicholas; Lee, Haewoo; Starkey, Jason; Agarabi, Cyrus; Liu, Jay

    2017-01-01

    Two of the primary issues with characterizing the variability of raw materials used in mammalian cell culture, such as wheat hydrolysate, is that the analyses of these materials can be time consuming, and the results of the analyses are not straightforward to interpret. To solve these issues, spectroscopy can be combined with chemometrics to provide a quick, robust and easy to understand methodology for the characterization of raw materials; which will improve cell culture performance by providing an assessment of the impact that a given raw material will have on final product quality. In this study, four spectroscopic technologies: near infrared spectroscopy, middle infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy were used in conjunction with principal component analysis to characterize the variability of wheat hydrolysates, and to provide evidence that the classification of good and bad lots of raw material is possible. Then, the same spectroscopic platforms are combined with partial least squares regressions to quantitatively predict two cell culture critical quality attributes (CQA): integrated viable cell density and IgG titer. The results showed that near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy are capable of characterizing the wheat hydrolysate's chemical structure, with NIR performing slightly better; and that they can be used to estimate the raw materials’ impact on the CQAs. These results were justified by demonstrating that of all the components present in the wheat hydrolysates, six amino acids: arginine, glycine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, isoleucine and threonine; and five trace elements: copper, phosphorus, molybdenum, arsenic and aluminum, had a large, statistically significant effect on the CQAs, and that NIR and fluorescence spectroscopy performed the best for characterizing the important amino acids. It was also found that the trace elements of interest were not characterized well by any of the spectral

  20. Characterization of mammalian cell culture raw materials by combining spectroscopy and chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trunfio, Nicholas; Lee, Haewoo; Starkey, Jason; Agarabi, Cyrus; Liu, Jay; Yoon, Seongkyu

    2017-07-01

    Two of the primary issues with characterizing the variability of raw materials used in mammalian cell culture, such as wheat hydrolysate, is that the analyses of these materials can be time consuming, and the results of the analyses are not straightforward to interpret. To solve these issues, spectroscopy can be combined with chemometrics to provide a quick, robust and easy to understand methodology for the characterization of raw materials; which will improve cell culture performance by providing an assessment of the impact that a given raw material will have on final product quality. In this study, four spectroscopic technologies: near infrared spectroscopy, middle infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy were used in conjunction with principal component analysis to characterize the variability of wheat hydrolysates, and to provide evidence that the classification of good and bad lots of raw material is possible. Then, the same spectroscopic platforms are combined with partial least squares regressions to quantitatively predict two cell culture critical quality attributes (CQA): integrated viable cell density and IgG titer. The results showed that near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy are capable of characterizing the wheat hydrolysate's chemical structure, with NIR performing slightly better; and that they can be used to estimate the raw materials' impact on the CQAs. These results were justified by demonstrating that of all the components present in the wheat hydrolysates, six amino acids: arginine, glycine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, isoleucine and threonine; and five trace elements: copper, phosphorus, molybdenum, arsenic and aluminum, had a large, statistically significant effect on the CQAs, and that NIR and fluorescence spectroscopy performed the best for characterizing the important amino acids. It was also found that the trace elements of interest were not characterized well by any of the spectral

  1. Radiation-induced bystander effect and adaptive response in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, H.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Waldren, C. A.; Hei, T. K.

    2004-01-01

    Two conflicting phenomena, bystander effect and adaptive response, are important in determining the biological responses at low doses of radiation and have the potential to impact the shape of the dose-response relationship. Using the Columbia University charged-particle microbeam and the highly sensitive AL cell mutagenic assay, we show here that non-irradiated cells acquire mutagenesis through direct contact with cells whose nuclei have been traversed with a single alpha particle each. Pretreatment of cells with a low dose of X-rays four hours before alpha particle irradiation significantly decreased this bystander mutagenic response. Results from the present study address some of the fundamental issues regarding both the actual target and radiation dose effect and can contribute to our current understanding in radiation risk assessment. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Subcellular western blotting of single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Kevin A; Herr, Amy E

    2017-01-01

    Although immunoassays are the de facto standard for determining subcellular protein localization in individual cells, antibody probe cross-reactivity and fixation artifacts remain confounding factors. To enhance selectivity while providing single-cell resolution, we introduce a subcellular western blotting technique capable of separately assaying proteins in the 14 pL cytoplasm and 2 pL nucleus of individual cells. To confer precision fluidic control, we describe a passive multilayer microdevice that leverages the rapid transport times afforded by miniaturization. After isolating single cells in microwells, we apply single-cell differential detergent fractionation to lyse and western blot the cytoplasmic lysate, whereas the nucleus remains intact in the microwell. Subsequently, we lyse the intact nucleus and western blot the nuclear lysate. To index each protein analysis to the originating subcellular compartment, we utilize bi-directional electrophoresis, a multidimensional separation that assays the lysate from each compartment in a distinct region of the separation axis. Single-cell bi-directional electrophoresis eliminates the need for semi-subjective image segmentation algorithms required in immunocytochemistry. The subcellular, single-cell western blot is demonstrated for six targets per cell, and successfully localizes spliceosome-associated proteins solubilized from large protein and RNA complexes, even for closely sized proteins (a 7 kDa difference). Measurement of NF-κB translocation dynamics in unfixed cells at 15-min intervals demonstrates reduced technical variance compared with immunofluorescence. This chemical cytometry assay directly measures the nucleocytoplasmic protein distribution in individual unfixed cells, thus providing insight into protein signaling in heterogeneous cell populations.

  3. A Novel Terminator Primer and Enhancer Reagents for Direct Expression of PCR-Amplified Genes in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Mikiko; Suzuki, Ayako; Akada, Junko; Yarimizu, Tohru; Iwakiri, Ryo; Hoshida, Hisashi; Akada, Rinji

    2015-08-01

    Escherichia coli plasmids are commonly used for gene expression experiments in mammalian cells, while PCR-amplified DNAs are rarely used even though PCR is a much faster and easier method to construct recombinant DNAs. One difficulty may be the limited amount of DNA produced by PCR. For direct utilization of PCR-amplified DNA in transfection experiments, efficient transfection with a smaller amount of DNA should be attained. For this purpose, we investigated two enhancer reagents, polyethylene glycol and tRNA, for a chemical transfection method. The addition of the enhancers to a commercial transfection reagent individually and synergistically exhibited higher transfection efficiency applicable for several mammalian cell culture lines in a 96-well plate. By taking advantage of a simple transfection procedure using PCR-amplified DNA, SV40 and rabbit β-globin terminator lengths were minimized. The terminator length is short enough to design in oligonucleotides; thus, terminator primers can be used for the construction and analysis of numerous mutations, deletions, insertions, and tag-fusions at the 3'-terminus of any gene. The PCR-mediated gene manipulation with the terminator primers will transform gene expression by allowing for extremely simple and high-throughput experiments with small-scale, multi-well, and mammalian cell cultures.

  4. The effect of silver nanoparticles and silver ions on mammalian and plant cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiravova, Jana; Tomankova, Katerina Barton; Harvanova, Monika; Malina, Lukas; Malohlava, Jakub; Luhova, Lenka; Panacek, Ales; Manisova, Barbora; Kolarova, Hana

    2016-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are the most frequently applied nanomaterials. In our experiments, we tested AgNPs (size 27 nm) manufactured by the Tollens process. Physico-chemical methods (TEM, DLS, AFM and spectrophotometry) were used for characterization and imaging of AgNPs. The effects of AgNPs and Ag(+) were studied in two experimental models (plant and mammalian cells). Human keratinocytes (SVK14) and mouse fibroblasts (NIH3T3) cell lines were selected to evaluate the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity effect on mammalian cells. Higher sensitivity to AgNPs and Ag(+) was observed in NIH3T3 than in SVK14 cells. AgNPs accumulated in the nucleus of NIH3T3 cells, caused DNA damage and increased the number of apoptotic and necrotic cells. Three genotypes of Solanum spp. (S. lycopersicum cv. Amateur, S. chmielewskii, S. habrochaites) were selected to test the toxicity of AgNPs and Ag(+) on the plant cells. The highest values of peroxidase activity and lipid peroxidation were recorded after the treatment of S. habrochaites genotype with AgNPs. Increased ROS levels were likely the reason for observed damaged membranes in S. habrochaites. We found that the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of AgNPs depend not only on the characteristics of nanoparticles, but also on the type of cells that are treated with AgNPs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Synchronized mammalian cell culture: part II--population ensemble modeling and analysis for development of reproducible processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandt, Uwe; Barradas, Oscar Platas; Pörtner, Ralf; Zeng, An-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The consideration of inherent population inhomogeneities of mammalian cell cultures becomes increasingly important for systems biology study and for developing more stable and efficient processes. However, variations of cellular properties belonging to different sub-populations and their potential effects on cellular physiology and kinetics of culture productivity under bioproduction conditions have not yet been much in the focus of research. Culture heterogeneity is strongly determined by the advance of the cell cycle. The assignment of cell-cycle specific cellular variations to large-scale process conditions can be optimally determined based on the combination of (partially) synchronized cultivation under otherwise physiological conditions and subsequent population-resolved model adaptation. The first step has been achieved using the physical selection method of countercurrent flow centrifugal elutriation, recently established in our group for different mammalian cell lines which is presented in Part I of this paper series. In this second part, we demonstrate the successful adaptation and application of a cell-cycle dependent population balance ensemble model to describe and understand synchronized bioreactor cultivations performed with two model mammalian cell lines, AGE1.HNAAT and CHO-K1. Numerical adaptation of the model to experimental data allows for detection of phase-specific parameters and for determination of significant variations between different phases and different cell lines. It shows that special care must be taken with regard to the sampling frequency in such oscillation cultures to minimize phase shift (jitter) artifacts. Based on predictions of long-term oscillation behavior of a culture depending on its start conditions, optimal elutriation setup trade-offs between high cell yields and high synchronization efficiency are proposed. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  6. Cell cycle-dependent microtubule-based dynamic transport of cytoplasmic dynein in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Kobayashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cytoplasmic dynein complex is a large multi-subunit microtubule (MT-associated molecular motor involved in various cellular functions including organelle positioning, vesicle transport and cell division. However, regulatory mechanism of the cell-cycle dependent distribution of dynein has not fully been understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report live-cell imaging of cytoplasmic dynein in HeLa cells, by expressing multifunctional green fluorescent protein (mfGFP-tagged 74-kDa intermediate chain (IC74. IC74-mfGFP was successfully incorporated into functional dynein complex. In interphase, dynein moved bi-directionally along with MTs, which might carry cargos such as transport vesicles. A substantial fraction of dynein moved toward cell periphery together with EB1, a member of MT plus end-tracking proteins (+TIPs, suggesting +TIPs-mediated transport of dynein. In late-interphase and prophase, dynein was localized at the centrosomes and the radial MT array. In prometaphase and metaphase, dynein was localized at spindle MTs where it frequently moved from spindle poles toward chromosomes or cell cortex. +TIPs may be involved in the transport of spindle dyneins. Possible kinetochore and cortical dyneins were also observed. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that cytoplasmic dynein is transported to the site of action in preparation for the following cellular events, primarily by the MT-based transport. The MT-based transport may have greater advantage than simple diffusion of soluble dynein in rapid and efficient transport of the limited concentration of the protein.

  7. High inorganic triphosphatase activities in bacteria and mammalian cells: identification of the enzymes involved.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Kohn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We recently characterized a specific inorganic triphosphatase (PPPase from Nitrosomonas europaea. This enzyme belongs to the CYTH superfamily of proteins. Many bacterial members of this family are annotated as predicted adenylate cyclases, because one of the founding members is CyaB adenylate cyclase from A. hydrophila. The aim of the present study is to determine whether other members of the CYTH protein family also have a PPPase activity, if there are PPPase activities in animal tissues and what enzymes are responsible for these activities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Recombinant enzymes were expressed and purified as GST- or His-tagged fusion proteins and the enzyme activities were determined by measuring the release of inorganic phosphate. We show that the hitherto uncharacterized E. coli CYTH protein ygiF is a specific PPPase, but it contributes only marginally to the total PPPase activity in this organism, where the main enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of inorganic triphosphate (PPP(i is inorganic pyrophosphatase. We further show that CyaB hydrolyzes PPP(i but this activity is low compared to its adenylate cyclase activity. Finally we demonstrate a high PPPase activity in mammalian and quail tissue, particularly in the brain. We show that this activity is mainly due to Prune, an exopolyphosphatase overexpressed in metastatic tumors where it promotes cell motility. CONCLUSIONS AND GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE: We show for the first time that PPPase activities are widespread in bacteria and animals. We identified the enzymes responsible for these activities but we were unable to detect significant amounts of PPP(i in E. coli or brain extracts using ion chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. The role of these enzymes may be to hydrolyze PPP(i, which could be cytotoxic because of its high affinity for Ca(2+, thereby interfering with Ca(2+ signaling.

  8. Efficiency of Plasmocin™ on various mammalian cell lines infected by mollicutes in comparison with commonly used antibiotics in cell culture: a local experience

    OpenAIRE

    Molla Kazemiha, Vahid; Azari, Shahram; Amanzadeh, Amir; Bonakdar, Shahin; Shojaei Moghadam, Morteza; Habibi Anbouhi, Mahdi; Maleki, Susan; Ahmadi, Nahid; Mousavi, Tahmineh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma contamination is a deleterious event for cell culture laboratories. Plasmocin™ is used to prevent and eradicate mycoplasma infections from cell. In this study, 80 different mammalian cell lines from various sources; human, monkey, mice, hamster and rat were used to study and evaluate plasmocin™ efficiency and compare it to commonly used antibiotics such as BM-cyclin, ciprofloxacin and mycoplasma removal agent (MRA). It was shown that mycoplasma infections were eradicated by plasmoc...

  9. Roles of Rad51 protein in homologous recombination in mammalian cells: relation with repair, replication and cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, S.

    2001-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a fundamental process, allowing a faithful repair. In mammalian, MmRAD51, which is the homologue of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ScRAD51 key protein for HR, is an essential gene. This work is based on the characterisation of viable hyper and hypo-recombinant cell lines specifically affected in the Rad51 pathway. By expressing wild type and dominant negative forms of MmRad51, we demonstrated that Rad51 pathway participates to the repair by HR to induced DNA damages. However, inhibition of the Rad 51 pathway does not affect cell viability, spontaneously or after irradiation, whereas, radiation induced HR is inhibited. In the presence of DNA damages during late S and G2/M phase, inhibition of Rad51 pathway induced chromosomal aberrations, leading to a transient arrest in mitosis. This arrest is associated with an increased of cell death. However, a fraction of cells