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Sample records for single locus variant

  1. Variants at the 9p21 locus and melanoma risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maccioni, Livia; Rachakonda, Panduranga Sivaramakrishna; Bermejo, Justo Lorenzo; Planelles, Dolores; Requena, Celia; Hemminki, Kari; Nagore, Eduardo; Kumar, Rajiv

    2013-01-01

    The influence of variants at the 9p21 locus on melanoma risk has been reported through investigation of CDKN2A variants through candidate gene approach as well as by genome wide association studies (GWAS). In the present study we genotyped, 25 SNPs that tag 273 variants on chromosome 9p21 in 837 melanoma cases and 1154 controls from Spain. Ten SNPs were selected based on previous associations, reported in GWAS, with either melanocytic nevi or melanoma risk or both. The other 15 SNPs were selected to fine map the CDKN2A gene region. All the 10 variants selected from the GWAS showed statistically significant association with melanoma risk. Statistically significant association with melanoma risk was also observed for the carriers of the variant T-allele of rs3088440 (540 C>T) at the 3’ UTR of CDKN2A gene with an OR 1.52 (95% CI 1.14-2.04). Interaction analysis between risk associated polymorphisms and previously genotyped MC1R variants, in the present study, did not show any statistically significant association. Statistical significant association was observed for the interaction between phototypes and the rs10811629 (located in intron 5 of MTAP). The strongest association was observed between the homozygous carrier of the A–allele and phototype II with an OR of 15.93 (95% CI 5.34-47.54). Our data confirmed the association of different variants at chromosome 9p21 with melanoma risk and we also found an association of a variant with skin phototypes

  2. Locus Reference Genomic sequences: An improved basis for describing human DNA variants

    KAUST Repository

    Dalgleish, Raymond; Flicek, Paul; Cunningham, Fiona; Astashyn, Alex; Tully, Raymond E; Proctor, Glenn; Chen, Yuan; McLaren, William M; Larsson, Pontus; Vaughan, Brendan W; Bé roud, Christophe; Dobson, Glen; Lehvä slaiho, Heikki; Taschner, Peter EM; den Dunnen, Johan T; Devereau, Andrew; Birney, Ewan; Brookes, Anthony J; Maglott, Donna R

    2010-01-01

    As our knowledge of the complexity of gene architecture grows, and we increase our understanding of the subtleties of gene expression, the process of accurately describing disease-causing gene variants has become increasingly problematic. In part, this is due to current reference DNA sequence formats that do not fully meet present needs. Here we present the Locus Reference Genomic (LRG) sequence format, which has been designed for the specifi c purpose of gene variant reporting. The format builds on the successful National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) RefSeqGene project and provides a single-fi le record containing a uniquely stable reference DNA sequence along with all relevant transcript and protein sequences essential to the description of gene variants. In principle, LRGs can be created for any organism, not just human. In addition, we recognize the need to respect legacy numbering systems for exons and amino acids and the LRG format takes account of these. We hope that widespread adoption of LRGs - which will be created and maintained by the NCBI and the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) - along with consistent use of the Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS)- approved variant nomenclature will reduce errors in the reporting of variants in the literature and improve communication about variants aff ecting human health. Further information can be found on the LRG web site (http://www.lrg-sequence.org). 2010 Dalgleish et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  3. Locus Reference Genomic sequences: An improved basis for describing human DNA variants

    KAUST Repository

    Dalgleish, Raymond

    2010-04-15

    As our knowledge of the complexity of gene architecture grows, and we increase our understanding of the subtleties of gene expression, the process of accurately describing disease-causing gene variants has become increasingly problematic. In part, this is due to current reference DNA sequence formats that do not fully meet present needs. Here we present the Locus Reference Genomic (LRG) sequence format, which has been designed for the specifi c purpose of gene variant reporting. The format builds on the successful National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) RefSeqGene project and provides a single-fi le record containing a uniquely stable reference DNA sequence along with all relevant transcript and protein sequences essential to the description of gene variants. In principle, LRGs can be created for any organism, not just human. In addition, we recognize the need to respect legacy numbering systems for exons and amino acids and the LRG format takes account of these. We hope that widespread adoption of LRGs - which will be created and maintained by the NCBI and the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) - along with consistent use of the Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS)- approved variant nomenclature will reduce errors in the reporting of variants in the literature and improve communication about variants aff ecting human health. Further information can be found on the LRG web site (http://www.lrg-sequence.org). 2010 Dalgleish et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  4. Single locus complementary sex determination in Hymenoptera : an "unintelligent" design?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilgenburg, Ellen van; Driessen, Gerard; Beukeboom, Leo W.

    2006-01-01

    The haplodiploid sex determining mechanism in Hymenoptera (males are haploid, females are diploid) has played an important role in the evolution of this insect order. In Hymenoptera sex is usually determined by a single locus, heterozygotes are female and hemizygotes are male. Under inbreeding,

  5. Single locus complementary sex determination in Hymenoptera: an "unintelligent" design?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgenburg, E.; Driessen, G.J.J.; Beukeboom, L.W.

    2006-01-01

    The haplodiploid sex determining mechanism in Hymenoptera (males are haploid, females are diploid) has played an important role in the evolution of this insect order. In Hymenoptera sex is usually determined by a single locus, heterozygotes are female and hemizygotes are male. Under inbreeding,

  6. Common variants at the CHEK2 gene locus and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lawrenson, K.; Iversen, E.S.; Tyrer, J.; Weber, R.P.; Concannon, P.; Hazelett, D.J.; Li, Q.; Marks, J.R.; Berchuck, A.; Lee, J.M.; Aben, K.K.H.; Anton-Culver, H.; Antonenkova, N.; Bandera, E.V.; Bean, Y.; Beckmann, M.W.; Bisogna, M.; Bjorge, L.; Bogdanova, N.; Brinton, L.A.; Brooks-Wilson, A.; Bruinsma, F.; Butzow, R.; Campbell, I.G.; Carty, K.; Chang-Claude, J.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Chen, A; Chen, Z.; Cook, L.S.; Cramer, D.W; Cunningham, J.M.; Cybulski, C.; Plisiecka-Halasa, J.; Dennis, J.; Dicks, E.; Doherty, J.A.; Dork, T.; Bois, A. du; Eccles, D.; Easton, D.T.; Edwards, R.P.; Eilber, U.; Ekici, A.B.; Fasching, P.A.; Fridley, B.L.; Gao, Y.T.; Gentry-Maharaj, A.; Giles, G.G.; Glasspool, R.; Goode, E.L.; Goodman, M.T.; Gronwald, J.; Harter, P.; Hasmad, H.N.; Hein, A.; Heitz, F.; Hildebrandt, M.A.T.; Hillemanns, P.; Hogdall, E.; Hogdall, C.; Hosono, S.; Jakubowska, A.; Paul, J.; Jensen, A.; Karlan, B.Y.; Kjaer, S.K.; Kelemen, L.E.; Kellar, M.; Kelley, J.L.; Kiemeney, L.A.; Krakstad, C.; Lambrechts, D.; Lambrechts, S.; Le, N.D.; Lee, A.W.; Cannioto, R.; Leminen, A.; Lester, J.; Levine, D.A.; Liang, D.; Lissowska, J.; Lu, K.; Lubinski, J.; Lundvall, L.; Massuger, L.F.; Matsuo, K.; McGuire, V.; McLaughlin, J.R.; Nevanlinna, H.; McNeish, I.; Menon, U.; Modugno, F.; Moysich, K.B.; Narod, S.A.; Nedergaard, L.; Ness, R.B.; Azmi, M.A. Noor; Odunsi, K.; Olson, S.H.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 20 genomic regions associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but many additional risk variants may exist. Here, we evaluated associations between common genetic variants [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels] in DNA repair

  7. Single locus complementary sex determination in Hymenoptera: an "unintelligent" design?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Driessen Gerard

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The haplodiploid sex determining mechanism in Hymenoptera (males are haploid, females are diploid has played an important role in the evolution of this insect order. In Hymenoptera sex is usually determined by a single locus, heterozygotes are female and hemizygotes are male. Under inbreeding, homozygous diploid and sterile males occur which form a genetic burden for a population. We review life history and genetical traits that may overcome the disadvantages of single locus complementary sex determination (sl-CSD. Behavioural adaptations to avoid matings between relatives include active dispersal from natal patches and mating preferences for non-relatives. In non-social species, temporal and spatial segregation of male and female offspring reduces the burden of sl-CSD. In social species, diploid males are produced at the expense of workers and female reproductives. In some social species, diploid males and diploid male producing queens are killed by workers. Diploid male production may have played a role in the evolution or maintenance of polygyny (multiple queens and polyandry (multiple mating. Some forms of thelytoky (parthenogenetic female production increase homozygosity and are therefore incompatible with sl-CSD. We discuss a number of hypothetical adaptations to sl-CSD which should be considered in future studies of this insect order.

  8. Multiple independent variants at the TERT locus are associated with telomere length and risks of breast and ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojesen, Stig E; Pooley, Karen A; Johnatty, Sharon E; Beesley, Jonathan; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Edwards, Stacey L; Pickett, Hilda A; Shen, Howard C; Smart, Chanel E; Hillman, Kristine M; Mai, Phuong L; Lawrenson, Kate; Stutz, Michael D; Lu, Yi; Karevan, Rod; Woods, Nicholas; Johnston, Rebecca L; French, Juliet D; Chen, Xiaoqing; Weischer, Maren; Nielsen, Sune F; Maranian, Melanie J; Ghoussaini, Maya; Ahmed, Shahana; Baynes, Caroline; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Lush, Michael; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Françis; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Despierre, Evelyn; Risch, Harvey A; González-Neira, Anna; Rossing, Mary Anne; Pita, Guillermo; Doherty, Jennifer A; Álvarez, Nuria; Larson, Melissa C; Fridley, Brooke L; Schoof, Nils; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cicek, Mine S; Peto, Julian; Kalli, Kimberly R; Broeks, Annegien; Armasu, Sebastian M; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Braaf, Linde M; Winterhoff, Boris; Nevanlinna, Heli; Konecny, Gottfried E; Lambrechts, Diether; Rogmann, Lisa; Guénel, Pascal; Teoman, Attila; Milne, Roger L; Garcia, Joaquin J; Cox, Angela; Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Hein, Rebecca; Sawyer, Elinor J; Haiman, Christopher A; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Andrulis, Irene L; Moysich, Kirsten B; Hopper, John L; Odunsi, Kunle; Lindblom, Annika; Giles, Graham G; Brenner, Hermann; Simard, Jacques; Lurie, Galina; Fasching, Peter A; Carney, Michael E; Radice, Paolo; Wilkens, Lynne R; Swerdlow, Anthony; Goodman, Marc T; Brauch, Hiltrud; García-Closas, Montserrat; Hillemanns, Peter; Winqvist, Robert; Dürst, Matthias; Devilee, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Butzow, Ralf; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Dörk, Thilo; Pelttari, Liisa M; Zheng, Wei; Leminen, Arto; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Bunker, Clareann H; Kristensen, Vessela; Ness, Roberta B; Muir, Kenneth; Edwards, Robert; Meindl, Alfons; Heitz, Florian; Matsuo, Keitaro; du Bois, Andreas; Wu, Anna H; Harter, Philipp; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Blot, William; Hosono, Satoyo; Kang, Daehee; Nakanishi, Toru; Hartman, Mikael; Yatabe, Yasushi; Hamann, Ute; Karlan, Beth Y; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Gaborieau, Valerie; Jensen, Allan; Eccles, Diana; Høgdall, Estrid; Shen, Chen-Yang; Brown, Judith; Woo, Yin Ling; Shah, Mitul; Azmi, Mat Adenan Noor; Luben, Robert; Omar, Siti Zawiah; Czene, Kamila; Vierkant, Robert A; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Vachon, Celine; Olson, Janet E; Wang, Xianshu; Levine, Douglas A; Rudolph, Anja; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Iversen, Edwin; Nickels, Stefan; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Silva, Isabel Dos Santos; Cramer, Daniel W; Gibson, Lorna; Terry, Kathryn L; Fletcher, Olivia; Vitonis, Allison F; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Poole, Elizabeth M; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Tworoger, Shelley S; Liu, Jianjun; Bandera, Elisa V; Li, Jingmei; Olson, Sara H; Humphreys, Keith; Orlow, Irene; Blomqvist, Carl; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Salvesen, Helga B; Muranen, Taru A; Wik, Elisabeth; Brouwers, Barbara; Krakstad, Camilla; Wauters, Els; Halle, Mari K; Wildiers, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Mulot, Claire; Aben, Katja K; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; van Altena, Anne M; Truong, Thérèse; Massuger, Leon F A G; Benitez, Javier; Pejovic, Tanja; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Hoatlin, Maureen; Zamora, M Pilar; Cook, Linda S; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Kelemen, Linda E; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Le, Nhu D; Sohn, Christof; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Cybulski, Cezary; Henderson, Brian E; Menkiszak, Janusz; Schumacher, Fredrick; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Marchand, Loic Le; Yang, Hannah P; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Knight, Julia A; Høgdall, Claus K; Apicella, Carmel; Gore, Martin; Tsimiklis, Helen; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Jager, Agnes; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Brown, Robert; Martens, John W M; Flanagan, James M; Kriege, Mieke; Paul, James; Margolin, Sara; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Severi, Gianluca; Whittemore, Alice S; Baglietto, Laura; McGuire, Valerie; Stegmaier, Christa; Sieh, Weiva; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Labrèche, France; Gao, Yu-Tang; Goldberg, Mark S; Yang, Gong; Dumont, Martine; McLaughlin, John R; Hartmann, Arndt; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Phelan, Catherine M; Lux, Michael P; Permuth-Wey, Jenny; Peissel, Bernard; Sellers, Thomas A; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Barile, Monica; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ashworth, Alan; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Jones, Michael; Ramus, Susan J; Orr, Nick; Menon, Usha; Pearce, Celeste L; Brüning, Thomas; Pike, Malcolm C; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Chanock, Stephen J; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Pylkäs, Katri; Bidzinski, Mariusz; Kauppila, Saila; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Long, Jirong; Shrubsole, Martha; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Ditsch, Nina; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Stram, Daniel O; van den Berg, David; Yip, Cheng Har; Ikram, M Kamran; Teh, Yew-Ching; Cai, Hui; Lu, Wei; Signorello, Lisa B; Cai, Qiuyin; Noh, Dong-Young; Yoo, Keun-Young; Miao, Hui; Iau, Philip Tsau-Choong; Teo, Yik Ying; McKay, James; Shapiro, Charles; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Fountzilas, George; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Healey, Catherine S; Luccarini, Craig; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Peterlongo, Paolo; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Offit, Kenneth; Hansen, Thomas V O; Neuhausen, Susan L; Szabo, Csilla I; Blanco, Ignacio; Garber, Judy; Narod, Steven A; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Godwin, Andrew K; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E; Caldes, Trinidad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Tihomirova, Laima; Arun, Banu K; Campbell, Ian; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; van Asperen, Christi J; van Roozendaal, Kees E P; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Collée, J Margriet; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Hooning, Maartje J; Rookus, Matti A; van der Luijt, Rob B; van Os, Theo A M; Evans, D Gareth; Frost, Debra; Fineberg, Elena; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Kennedy, M John; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Ellis, Steve D; Cole, Trevor; Paillerets, Brigitte Bressac-de; Buecher, Bruno; Damiola, Francesca; Faivre, Laurence; Frenay, Marc; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Caron, Olivier; Giraud, Sophie; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Gronwald, Jacek; Byrski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B; Bonanni, Bernardo; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Giannini, Giuseppe; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Rhiem, Kerstin; Niederacher, Dieter; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Sutter, Christian; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Borg, Åke; Melin, Beatrice; Rantala, Johanna; Soller, Maria; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Salani, Ritu; Kaulich, Daphne Gschwantler; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Paluch, Shani Shimon; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Robson, Mark; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Foretova, Lenka; Savage, Sharon A; Lester, Jenny; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Olswold, Curtis; Cunningham, Julie M; Slager, Susan; Pankratz, Vernon S; Dicks, Ed; Lakhani, Sunil R; Couch, Fergus J; Hall, Per; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Gayther, Simon A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Reddel, Roger R; Goode, Ellen L; Greene, Mark H; Easton, Douglas F; Berchuck, Andrew; Antoniou, Antonis C; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M

    2013-01-01

    TERT-locus single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and leucocyte telomere measures are reportedly associated with risks of multiple cancers. Using the iCOGs chip, we analysed ~480 TERT-locus SNPs in breast (n=103,991), ovarian (n=39,774) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (11,705) cancer cases and controls. 53,724 participants have leucocyte telomere measures. Most associations cluster into three independent peaks. Peak 1 SNP rs2736108 minor allele associates with longer telomeres (P=5.8×10−7), reduced estrogen receptor negative (ER-negative) (P=1.0×10−8) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P=1.1×10−5) breast cancer risks, and altered promoter-assay signal. Peak 2 SNP rs7705526 minor allele associates with longer telomeres (P=2.3×10−14), increased low malignant potential ovarian cancer risk (P=1.3×10−15) and increased promoter activity. Peak 3 SNPs rs10069690 and rs2242652 minor alleles increase ER-negative (P=1.2×10−12) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P=1.6×10−14) breast and invasive ovarian (P=1.3×10−11) cancer risks, but not via altered telomere length. The cancer-risk alleles of rs2242652 and rs10069690 respectively increase silencing and generate a truncated TERT splice-variant. PMID:23535731

  9. Genome wide association identifies common variants at the SERPINA6/SERPINA1 locus influencing plasma cortisol and corticosteroid binding globulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Bolton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Variation in plasma levels of cortisol, an essential hormone in the stress response, is associated in population-based studies with cardio-metabolic, inflammatory and neuro-cognitive traits and diseases. Heritability of plasma cortisol is estimated at 30-60% but no common genetic contribution has been identified. The CORtisol NETwork (CORNET consortium undertook genome wide association meta-analysis for plasma cortisol in 12,597 Caucasian participants, replicated in 2,795 participants. The results indicate that <1% of variance in plasma cortisol is accounted for by genetic variation in a single region of chromosome 14. This locus spans SERPINA6, encoding corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG, the major cortisol-binding protein in plasma, and SERPINA1, encoding α1-antitrypsin (which inhibits cleavage of the reactive centre loop that releases cortisol from CBG. Three partially independent signals were identified within the region, represented by common SNPs; detailed biochemical investigation in a nested sub-cohort showed all these SNPs were associated with variation in total cortisol binding activity in plasma, but some variants influenced total CBG concentrations while the top hit (rs12589136 influenced the immunoreactivity of the reactive centre loop of CBG. Exome chip and 1000 Genomes imputation analysis of this locus in the CROATIA-Korcula cohort identified missense mutations in SERPINA6 and SERPINA1 that did not account for the effects of common variants. These findings reveal a novel common genetic source of variation in binding of cortisol by CBG, and reinforce the key role of CBG in determining plasma cortisol levels. In turn this genetic variation may contribute to cortisol-associated degenerative diseases.

  10. Locus-Specific Databases and Recommendations to Strengthen Their Contribution to the Classification of Variants in Cancer Susceptibility Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greenblatt, Marc S.; Brody, Lawrence C.; Foulkes, William D.; Genuardi, Maurizio; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Olivier, Magali; Plon, Sharon E.; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Sinilnikova, Olga; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2008-01-01

    Locus-specific databases (LSDBs) are curated collections of sequence variants in genes associated with disease. LSDBs of cancer-related genes often serve as a critical resource to researchers, diagnostic laboratories, clinicians, and others in the cancer genetics community. LSDBs are poised to play

  11. Common variants at the CHEK2 gene locus and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrenson, Kate; Iversen, Edwin S; Tyrer, Jonathan; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Concannon, Patrick; Hazelett, Dennis J; Li, Qiyuan; Marks, Jeffrey R; Berchuck, Andrew; Lee, Janet M; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bandera, Elisa V; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chen, Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T; Edwards, Robert P; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Fridley, Brooke L; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L; Goodman, Marc T; Gronwald, Jacek; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Paul, James; Jensen, Allan; Karlan, Beth Y; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Kelemen, Linda E; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krakstad, Camilla; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D; Lee, Alice W; Cannioto, Rikki; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; Nevanlinna, Heli; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Narod, Steven A; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B; Noor Azmi, Mat Adenan; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Phelan, Catherine M; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Ramus, Susan J; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B; Budzilowska, Agnieszka; Sellers, Thomas A; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L; Thompson, Pamela J; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tworoger, Shelley S; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wicklund, Kristine G; Wilkens, Lynne R; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Freedman, Matthew L; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Pharoah, Paul D; Gayther, Simon A; Schildkraut, Joellen M

    2015-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 20 genomic regions associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but many additional risk variants may exist. Here, we evaluated associations between common genetic variants [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels] in DNA repair genes and EOC risk. We genotyped 2896 common variants at 143 gene loci in DNA samples from 15 397 patients with invasive EOC and controls. We found evidence of associations with EOC risk for variants at FANCA, EXO1, E2F4, E2F2, CREB5 and CHEK2 genes (P ≤ 0.001). The strongest risk association was for CHEK2 SNP rs17507066 with serous EOC (P = 4.74 x 10(-7)). Additional genotyping and imputation of genotypes from the 1000 genomes project identified a slightly more significant association for CHEK2 SNP rs6005807 (r (2) with rs17507066 = 0.84, odds ratio (OR) 1.17, 95% CI 1.11-1.24, P = 1.1×10(-7)). We identified 293 variants in the region with likelihood ratios of less than 1:100 for representing the causal variant. Functional annotation identified 25 candidate SNPs that alter transcription factor binding sites within regulatory elements active in EOC precursor tissues. In The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset, CHEK2 gene expression was significantly higher in primary EOCs compared to normal fallopian tube tissues (P = 3.72×10(-8)). We also identified an association between genotypes of the candidate causal SNP rs12166475 (r (2) = 0.99 with rs6005807) and CHEK2 expression (P = 2.70×10(-8)). These data suggest that common variants at 22q12.1 are associated with risk of serous EOC and CHEK2 as a plausible target susceptibility gene. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Lupus risk variants in the PXK locus alter B-cell receptor internalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel E. Vaughn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Genome wide association studies have identified variants in PXK that confer risk for humoral autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus, rheumatoid arthritis and more recently systemic sclerosis. While PXK is involved in trafficking of epidermal growth factor Receptor (EGFR in COS-7 cells, mechanisms linking PXK to lupus pathophysiology have remained undefined. In an effort to uncover the mechanism at this locus that increases lupus-risk, we undertook a fine-mapping analysis in a large multi-ancestral study of lupus patients and controls. We define a large (257kb common haplotype that confers lupus risk detected only in European ancestral populations and spans the promoter through the 3’ UTR of PXK. The strongest association was found at rs6445972 with P < 4.62 x 10-10, OR 0.81 (0.75 – 0.86. Using stepwise logistic regression analysis, we demonstrate that one signal drives the genetic association in the region. Bayesian analysis confirms our results, identifying a 95% credible set consisting of 172 variants spanning 200kb.Functionally, we found that PXK operates on the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR; we confirmed that PXK influenced the rate of BCR internalization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that individuals carrying the risk haplotype exhibited a decreased rate of BCR internalization, a process known to impact B cell survival and cell fate. Taken together, these data define a new candidate mechanism for the genetic association of variants around PXK with lupus risk and highlight the regulation of intracellular trafficking as a genetically regulated pathway mediating human autoimmunity.

  13. eMelanoBase: an online locus-specific variant database for familial melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, David C Y; Holland, Elizabeth A; Becker, Therese M; Hayward, Nicholas K; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Mann, Graham J

    2003-01-01

    A proportion of melanoma-prone individuals in both familial and non-familial contexts has been shown to carry inactivating mutations in either CDKN2A or, rarely, CDK4. CDKN2A is a complex locus that encodes two unrelated proteins from alternately spliced transcripts that are read in different frames. The alpha transcript (exons 1alpha, 2, and 3) produces the p16INK4A cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, while the beta transcript (exons 1beta and 2) is translated as p14ARF, a stabilizing factor of p53 levels through binding to MDM2. Mutations in exon 2 can impair both polypeptides and insertions and deletions in exons 1alpha, 1beta, and 2, which can theoretically generate p16INK4A-p14ARF fusion proteins. No online database currently takes into account all the consequences of these genotypes, a situation compounded by some problematic previous annotations of CDKN2A-related sequences and descriptions of their mutations. As an initiative of the international Melanoma Genetics Consortium, we have therefore established a database of germline variants observed in all loci implicated in familial melanoma susceptibility. Such a comprehensive, publicly accessible database is an essential foundation for research on melanoma susceptibility and its clinical application. Our database serves two types of data as defined by HUGO. The core dataset includes the nucleotide variants on the genomic and transcript levels, amino acid variants, and citation. The ancillary dataset includes keyword description of events at the transcription and translation levels and epidemiological data. The application that handles users' queries was designed in the model-view-controller architecture and was implemented in Java. The object-relational database schema was deduced using functional dependency analysis. We hereby present our first functional prototype of eMelanoBase. The service is accessible via the URL www.wmi.usyd.edu.au:8080/melanoma.html. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. The IBO germination quantitative trait locus encodes a phosphatase 2C-related variant with a nonsynonymous amino acid change that interferes with abscisic acid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiguet-Vercher, Amélia; Santuari, Luca; Gonzalez-Guzman, Miguel; Depuydt, Stephen; Rodriguez, Pedro L; Hardtke, Christian S

    2015-02-01

    Natural genetic variation is crucial for adaptability of plants to different environments. Seed dormancy prevents precocious germination in unsuitable conditions and is an adaptation to a major macro-environmental parameter, the seasonal variation in temperature and day length. Here we report the isolation of IBO, a quantitative trait locus (QTL) that governs c. 30% of germination rate variance in an Arabidopsis recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from the parental accessions Eilenburg-0 (Eil-0) and Loch Ness-0 (Lc-0). IBO encodes an uncharacterized phosphatase 2C-related protein, but neither the Eil-0 nor the Lc-0 variant, which differ in a single amino acid, have any appreciable phosphatase activity in in vitro assays. However, we found that the amino acid change in the Lc-0 variant of the IBO protein confers reduced germination rate. Moreover, unlike the Eil-0 variant of the protein, the Lc-0 variant can interfere with the activity of the phosphatase 2C ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE 1 in vitro. This suggests that the Lc-0 variant possibly interferes with abscisic acid signaling, a notion that is supported by physiological assays. Thus, we isolated an example of a QTL allele with a nonsynonymous amino acid change that might mediate local adaptation of seed germination timing. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Quantitative Single-letter Sequencing: a method for simultaneously monitoring numerous known allelic variants in single DNA samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duborjal Hervé

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pathogens such as fungi, bacteria and especially viruses, are highly variable even within an individual host, intensifying the difficulty of distinguishing and accurately quantifying numerous allelic variants co-existing in a single nucleic acid sample. The majority of currently available techniques are based on real-time PCR or primer extension and often require multiplexing adjustments that impose a practical limitation of the number of alleles that can be monitored simultaneously at a single locus. Results Here, we describe a novel method that allows the simultaneous quantification of numerous allelic variants in a single reaction tube and without multiplexing. Quantitative Single-letter Sequencing (QSS begins with a single PCR amplification step using a pair of primers flanking the polymorphic region of interest. Next, PCR products are submitted to single-letter sequencing with a fluorescently-labelled primer located upstream of the polymorphic region. The resulting monochromatic electropherogram shows numerous specific diagnostic peaks, attributable to specific variants, signifying their presence/absence in the DNA sample. Moreover, peak fluorescence can be quantified and used to estimate the frequency of the corresponding variant in the DNA population. Using engineered allelic markers in the genome of Cauliflower mosaic virus, we reliably monitored six different viral genotypes in DNA extracted from infected plants. Evaluation of the intrinsic variance of this method, as applied to both artificial plasmid DNA mixes and viral genome populations, demonstrates that QSS is a robust and reliable method of detection and quantification for variants with a relative frequency of between 0.05 and 1. Conclusion This simple method is easily transferable to many other biological systems and questions, including those involving high throughput analysis, and can be performed in any laboratory since it does not require specialized

  16. Common genetic variants near the Brittle Cornea Syndrome locus ZNF469 influence the blinding disease risk factor central corneal thickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Central corneal thickness (CCT, one of the most highly heritable human traits (h(2 typically>0.9, is important for the diagnosis of glaucoma and a potential risk factor for glaucoma susceptibility. We conducted genome-wide association studies in five cohorts from Australia and the United Kingdom (total N = 5058. Three cohorts were based on individually genotyped twin collections, with the remaining two cohorts genotyped on pooled samples from singletons with extreme trait values. The pooled sample findings were validated by individual genotyping the pooled samples together with additional samples also within extreme quantiles. We describe methods for efficient combined analysis of the results from these different study designs. We have identified and replicated quantitative trait loci on chromosomes 13 and 16 for association with CCT. The locus on chromosome 13 (nearest gene FOXO1 had an overall meta-analysis p-value for all the individually genotyped samples of 4.6x10(-10. The locus on chromosome 16 was associated with CCT with p = 8.95x10(-11. The nearest gene to the associated chromosome 16 SNPs was ZNF469, a locus recently implicated in Brittle Cornea Syndrome (BCS, a very rare disorder characterized by abnormal thin corneas. Our findings suggest that in addition to rare variants in ZNF469 underlying CCT variation in BCS patients, more common variants near this gene may contribute to CCT variation in the general population.

  17. Multilocus genetic models of handedness closely resemble single-locus models in explaining family data and are compatible with genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, I C; Davison, Angus; Armour, John A L

    2013-06-01

    Right- and left-handedness run in families, show greater concordance in monozygotic than dizygotic twins, and are well described by single-locus Mendelian models. Here we summarize a large genome-wide association study (GWAS) that finds no significant associations with handedness and is consistent with a meta-analysis of GWASs. The GWAS had 99% power to detect a single locus using the conventional criterion of P < 5 × 10(-8) for the single locus models of McManus and Annett. The strong conclusion is that handedness is not controlled by a single genetic locus. A consideration of the genetic architecture of height, primary ciliary dyskinesia, and intelligence suggests that handedness inheritance can be explained by a multilocus variant of the McManus DC model, classical effects on family and twins being barely distinguishable from the single locus model. Based on the ENGAGE meta-analysis of GWASs, we estimate at least 40 loci are involved in determining handedness. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  18. Identification of rs671, a common variant of ALDH2, as a gout susceptibility locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakiyama, Masayuki; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Ken; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Kawai, Sayo; Okada, Rieko; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Toru; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2016-05-16

    Gout is a common disease resulting from hyperuricemia. Recently, a genome-wide association study identified an association between gout and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2188380, located on an intergenic region between MYL2 and CUX2 on chromosome 12. However, other genes around rs2188380 could possibly be gout susceptibility genes. Therefore, we performed a fine-mapping study of the MYL2-CUX2 region. From 8,595 SNPs in the MYL2-CUX2 region, 9 tag SNPs were selected, and genotyping of 1,048 male gout patients and 1,334 male controls was performed by TaqMan method. Eight SNPs showed significant associations with gout after Bonferroni correction. rs671 (Glu504Lys) of ALDH2 had the most significant association with gout (P = 1.7 × 10(-18), odds ratio = 0.53). After adjustment for rs671, the other 8 SNPs no longer showed a significant association with gout, while the significant association of rs671 remained. rs671 has been reportedly associated with alcohol drinking behavior, and it is well-known that alcohol drinking elevates serum uric acid levels. These data suggest that rs671, a common functional SNP of ALDH2, is a genuine gout-associated SNP in the MYL2-CUX2 locus and that "A" allele (Lys) of rs671 plays a protective role in the development of gout.

  19. Multiple independent variants at the TERT locus are associated with telomere length and risks of breast and ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bojesen, Stig E; Pooley, Karen A; Johnatty, Sharon E; Beesley, Jonathan; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Edwards, Stacey L; Pickett, Hilda A; Shen, Howard C; Smart, Chanel E; Hillman, Kristine M; Mai, Phuong L; Lawrenson, Kate; Stutz, Michael D; Lu, Yi

    2013-01-01

    TERT-locus single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and leucocyte telomere measures are reportedly associated with risks of multiple cancers. Using the iCOGs chip, we analysed ~480 TERT-locus SNPs in breast (n=103,991), ovarian (n=39,774) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (11,705) cancer cases and controls. 53,724 participants have leucocyte telomere measures. Most associations cluster into three independent peaks. Peak 1 SNP rs2736108 minor allele associates with longer telomeres (P=5.8×10−7), reduce...

  20. A common variant at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus is associated with estrogen receptor–negative breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiman, Christopher A; Chen, Gary K; Vachon, Celine M; Canzian, Federico; Dunning, Alison; Millikan, Robert C; Wang, Xianshu; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Ahmed, Shahana; Ambrosone, Christine B; Baglietto, Laura; Balleine, Rosemary; Bandera, Elisa V; Beckmann, Matthias W; Berg, Christine D; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William J; Brauch, Hiltrud; Buring, Julie E; Carey, Lisa A; Carpenter, Jane E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chasman, Daniel I; Clarke, Christine L; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Deming, Sandra L; Diasio, Robert B; Dimopoulos, Athanasios M; Driver, W Ryan; Dünnebier, Thomas; Durcan, Lorraine; Eccles, Diana; Edlund, Christopher K; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Feigelson, Heather S; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fostira, Florentia; Försti, Asta; Fountzilas, George; Gerty, Susan M; Giles, Graham G; Godwin, Andrew K; Goodfellow, Paul; Graham, Nikki; Greco, Dario; Hamann, Ute; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Rebecca; Heinz, Judith; Holbrook, Andrea; Hoover, Robert N; Hu, Jennifer J; Hunter, David J; Ingles, Sue A; Irwanto, Astrid; Ivanovich, Jennifer; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nicola; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kaaks, Rudolf; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Kolonel, Laurence N; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kulkarni, Swati; Lambrechts, Diether; Lee, Adam M; Le Marchand, Loïc; Lesnick, Timothy; Liu, Jianjun; Lindstrom, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; Martin, Nicholas G; Miron, Penelope; Montgomery, Grant W; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nickels, Stephan; Nyante, Sarah; Olswold, Curtis; Palmer, Julie; Pathak, Harsh; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Perou, Charles M; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D P; Pooler, Loreall C; Press, Michael F; Pylkäs, Katri; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Rosenberg, Lynn; Ross, Eric; Rüdiger, Thomas; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Sawyer, Elinor; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Schumacher, Fredrick; Severi, Gianluca; Sheng, Xin; Signorello, Lisa B; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Stevens, Kristen N; Southey, Melissa C; Tapper, William J; Tomlinson, Ian; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Wauters, Els; Weaver, JoEllen; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Van Den Berg, David; Wan, Peggy; Xia, Lucy Y; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G; Siddiq, Afshan; Slager, Susan L; Stram, Daniel O; Easton, Douglas; Kraft, Peter; Henderson, Brian E; Couch, Fergus J

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer shows a higher incidence in women of African ancestry compared to women of European ancestry. In search of common risk alleles for ER-negative breast cancer, we combined genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from women of African ancestry (1,004 ER-negative cases and 2,745 controls) and European ancestry (1,718 ER-negative cases and 3,670 controls), with replication testing conducted in an additional 2,292 ER-negative cases and 16,901 controls of European ancestry. We identified a common risk variant for ER-negative breast cancer at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus on chromosome 5p15 (rs10069690: per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.18 per allele, P = 1.0 × 10−10). The variant was also significantly associated with triple-negative (ER-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative and human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2)-negative) breast cancer (OR = 1.25, P = 1.1 × 10−9), particularly in younger women (<50 years of age) (OR = 1.48, P = 1.9 × 10−9). Our results identify a genetic locus associated with estrogen receptor negative breast cancer subtypes in multiple populations. PMID:22037553

  1. A common variant at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus is associated with estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiman, Christopher A; Chen, Gary K; Vachon, Celine M; Canzian, Federico; Dunning, Alison; Millikan, Robert C; Wang, Xianshu; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Ahmed, Shahana; Ambrosone, Christine B; Baglietto, Laura; Balleine, Rosemary; Bandera, Elisa V; Beckmann, Matthias W; Berg, Christine D; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William J; Brauch, Hiltrud; Buring, Julie E; Carey, Lisa A; Carpenter, Jane E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chasman, Daniel I; Clarke, Christine L; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Deming, Sandra L; Diasio, Robert B; Dimopoulos, Athanasios M; Driver, W Ryan; Dünnebier, Thomas; Durcan, Lorraine; Eccles, Diana; Edlund, Christopher K; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Feigelson, Heather S; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fostira, Florentia; Försti, Asta; Fountzilas, George; Gerty, Susan M; Giles, Graham G; Godwin, Andrew K; Goodfellow, Paul; Graham, Nikki; Greco, Dario; Hamann, Ute; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Rebecca; Heinz, Judith; Holbrook, Andrea; Hoover, Robert N; Hu, Jennifer J; Hunter, David J; Ingles, Sue A; Irwanto, Astrid; Ivanovich, Jennifer; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nicola; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kaaks, Rudolf; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Kolonel, Laurence N; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kulkarni, Swati; Lambrechts, Diether; Lee, Adam M; Marchand, Loïc Le; Lesnick, Timothy; Liu, Jianjun; Lindstrom, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; Martin, Nicholas G; Miron, Penelope; Montgomery, Grant W; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nickels, Stephan; Nyante, Sarah; Olswold, Curtis; Palmer, Julie; Pathak, Harsh; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Perou, Charles M; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D P; Pooler, Loreall C; Press, Michael F; Pylkäs, Katri; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Rosenberg, Lynn; Ross, Eric; Rüdiger, Thomas; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Sawyer, Elinor; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Schumacher, Fredrick; Severi, Gianluca; Sheng, Xin; Signorello, Lisa B; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Stevens, Kristen N; Southey, Melissa C; Tapper, William J; Tomlinson, Ian; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Wauters, Els; Weaver, JoEllen; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Van Den Berg, David; Wan, Peggy; Xia, Lucy Y; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G; Siddiq, Afshan; Slager, Susan L; Stram, Daniel O; Easton, Douglas; Kraft, Peter; Henderson, Brian E; Couch, Fergus J

    2011-10-30

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer shows a higher incidence in women of African ancestry compared to women of European ancestry. In search of common risk alleles for ER-negative breast cancer, we combined genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from women of African ancestry (1,004 ER-negative cases and 2,745 controls) and European ancestry (1,718 ER-negative cases and 3,670 controls), with replication testing conducted in an additional 2,292 ER-negative cases and 16,901 controls of European ancestry. We identified a common risk variant for ER-negative breast cancer at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus on chromosome 5p15 (rs10069690: per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.18 per allele, P = 1.0 × 10(-10)). The variant was also significantly associated with triple-negative (ER-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative and human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2)-negative) breast cancer (OR = 1.25, P = 1.1 × 10(-9)), particularly in younger women (<50 years of age) (OR = 1.48, P = 1.9 × 10(-9)). Our results identify a genetic locus associated with estrogen receptor negative breast cancer subtypes in multiple populations.

  2. Common variants at the CHEK2 gene locus and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawrenson, Kate; Iversen, Edwin S; Tyrer, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    genes and EOC risk. We genotyped 2896 common variants at 143 gene loci in DNA samples from 15 397 patients with invasive EOC and controls. We found evidence of associations with EOC risk for variants at FANCA, EXO1, E2F4, E2F2, CREB5 and CHEK2 genes (P ≤ 0.001). The strongest risk association......, CHEK2 gene expression was significantly higher in primary EOCs compared to normal fallopian tube tissues (P = 3.72×10(-8)). We also identified an association between genotypes of the candidate causal SNP rs12166475 (r (2) = 0.99 with rs6005807) and CHEK2 expression (P = 2.70×10(-8)). These data suggest...... that common variants at 22q12.1 are associated with risk of serous EOC and CHEK2 as a plausible target susceptibility gene....

  3. DNA Methylation Variants at HIF3A Locus, B-Vitamin Intake, and Long-term Weight Change: Gene-Diet Interactions in Two U.S. Cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yan; Qi, Qibin; Xu, Min; Ley, Sylvia H; Li, Yanping; Kang, Jae H; Wiggs, Janey; Pasquale, Louis R; Chan, Andrew T; Rimm, Eric B; Hunter, David J; Manson, JoAnn E; Willett, Walter C; Hu, Frank B; Qi, Lu

    2015-09-01

    The first epigenome-wide association study of BMI identified DNA methylation at an HIF3A locus associated with BMI. We tested the hypothesis that DNA methylation variants are associated with BMI according to intake of B vitamins. In two large cohorts, we found significant interactions between the DNA methylation-associated HIF3A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3826795 and intake of B vitamins on 10-year changes in BMI. The association between rs3826795 and BMI changes consistently increased across the tertiles of total vitamin B2 and B12 intake (all P for interaction vitamin B2 intake and -0.10 (SE 0.06), -0.01 (SE 0.06), and 0.10 (SE 0.07) within subgroups defined by increasing tertiles of total vitamin B12 intake. In two independent cohorts, a DNA methylation variant in HIF3A was associated with BMI changes through interactions with total or supplemental vitamin B2, vitamin B12, and folate. These findings suggest a potential causal relation between DNA methylation and adiposity. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  4. Multiple independent variants at the TERT locus are associated with telomere length and risks of breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojesen, Stig E; Pooley, Karen A; Johnatty, Sharon E; Beesley, Jonathan; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Edwards, Stacey L; Pickett, Hilda A; Shen, Howard C; Smart, Chanel E; Hillman, Kristine M; Mai, Phuong L; Lawrenson, Kate; Stutz, Michael D; Lu, Yi; Karevan, Rod; Woods, Nicholas; Johnston, Rebecca L; French, Juliet D; Chen, Xiaoqing; Weischer, Maren; Nielsen, Sune F; Maranian, Melanie J; Ghoussaini, Maya; Ahmed, Shahana; Baynes, Caroline; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Lush, Michael; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Françis; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Despierre, Evelyn; Risch, Harvey A; González-Neira, Anna; Rossing, Mary Anne; Pita, Guillermo; Doherty, Jennifer A; Alvarez, Nuria; Larson, Melissa C; Fridley, Brooke L; Schoof, Nils; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cicek, Mine S; Peto, Julian; Kalli, Kimberly R; Broeks, Annegien; Armasu, Sebastian M; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Braaf, Linde M; Winterhoff, Boris; Nevanlinna, Heli; Konecny, Gottfried E; Lambrechts, Diether; Rogmann, Lisa; Guénel, Pascal; Teoman, Attila; Milne, Roger L; Garcia, Joaquin J; Cox, Angela; Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Hein, Rebecca; Sawyer, Elinor J; Haiman, Christopher A; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Andrulis, Irene L; Moysich, Kirsten B; Hopper, John L; Odunsi, Kunle; Lindblom, Annika; Giles, Graham G; Brenner, Hermann; Simard, Jacques; Lurie, Galina; Fasching, Peter A; Carney, Michael E; Radice, Paolo; Wilkens, Lynne R; Swerdlow, Anthony; Goodman, Marc T; Brauch, Hiltrud; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Hillemanns, Peter; Winqvist, Robert; Dürst, Matthias; Devilee, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Butzow, Ralf; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Dörk, Thilo; Pelttari, Liisa M; Zheng, Wei; Leminen, Arto; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Bunker, Clareann H; Kristensen, Vessela; Ness, Roberta B; Muir, Kenneth; Edwards, Robert; Meindl, Alfons; Heitz, Florian; Matsuo, Keitaro; du Bois, Andreas; Wu, Anna H; Harter, Philipp; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Blot, William; Hosono, Satoyo; Kang, Daehee; Nakanishi, Toru; Hartman, Mikael; Yatabe, Yasushi; Hamann, Ute; Karlan, Beth Y; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Gaborieau, Valerie; Jensen, Allan; Eccles, Diana; Høgdall, Estrid; Shen, Chen-Yang; Brown, Judith; Woo, Yin Ling; Shah, Mitul; Azmi, Mat Adenan Noor; Luben, Robert; Omar, Siti Zawiah; Czene, Kamila; Vierkant, Robert A; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Vachon, Celine; Olson, Janet E; Wang, Xianshu; Levine, Douglas A; Rudolph, Anja; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Iversen, Edwin; Nickels, Stefan; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Silva, Isabel Dos Santos; Cramer, Daniel W; Gibson, Lorna; Terry, Kathryn L; Fletcher, Olivia; Vitonis, Allison F; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Poole, Elizabeth M; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Tworoger, Shelley S; Liu, Jianjun; Bandera, Elisa V; Li, Jingmei; Olson, Sara H; Humphreys, Keith; Orlow, Irene; Blomqvist, Carl; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Salvesen, Helga B; Muranen, Taru A; Wik, Elisabeth; Brouwers, Barbara; Krakstad, Camilla; Wauters, Els; Halle, Mari K; Wildiers, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Mulot, Claire; Aben, Katja K; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Altena, Anne Mvan; Truong, Thérèse; Massuger, Leon F A G; Benitez, Javier; Pejovic, Tanja; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Hoatlin, Maureen; Zamora, M Pilar; Cook, Linda S; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Kelemen, Linda E; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Le, Nhu D; Sohn, Christof; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Cybulski, Cezary; Henderson, Brian E; Menkiszak, Janusz; Schumacher, Fredrick; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Le Marchand, Loic; Yang, Hannah P; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Knight, Julia A; Høgdall, Claus K; Apicella, Carmel; Gore, Martin; Tsimiklis, Helen; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Jager, Agnes; den Ouweland, Ans M Wvan; Brown, Robert; Martens, John W M; Flanagan, James M; Kriege, Mieke; Paul, James; Margolin, Sara; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Severi, Gianluca; Whittemore, Alice S; Baglietto, Laura; McGuire, Valerie; Stegmaier, Christa; Sieh, Weiva; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Labrèche, France; Gao, Yu-Tang; Goldberg, Mark S; Yang, Gong; Dumont, Martine; McLaughlin, John R; Hartmann, Arndt; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Phelan, Catherine M; Lux, Michael P; Permuth-Wey, Jenny; Peissel, Bernard; Sellers, Thomas A; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Barile, Monica; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ashworth, Alan; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Jones, Michael; Ramus, Susan J; Orr, Nick; Menon, Usha; Pearce, Celeste L; Brüning, Thomas; Pike, Malcolm C; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Chanock, Stephen J; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Pylkäs, Katri; Bidzinski, Mariusz; Kauppila, Saila; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Long, Jirong; Shrubsole, Martha; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Ditsch, Nina; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Stram, Daniel O; van den Berg, David; Yip, Cheng Har; Ikram, M Kamran; Teh, Yew-Ching; Cai, Hui; Lu, Wei; Signorello, Lisa B; Cai, Qiuyin; Noh, Dong-Young; Yoo, Keun-Young; Miao, Hui; Iau, Philip Tsau-Choong; Teo, Yik Ying; McKay, James; Shapiro, Charles; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Fountzilas, George; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Healey, Catherine S; Luccarini, Craig; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Peterlongo, Paolo; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Offit, Kenneth; Hansen, Thomas V O; Neuhausen, Susan L; Szabo, Csilla I; Blanco, Ignacio; Garber, Judy; Narod, Steven A; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Godwin, Andrew K; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E; Caldes, Trinidad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Tihomirova, Laima; Arun, Banu K; Campbell, Ian; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; van Asperen, Christi J; van Roozendaal, Kees E P; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Collée, J Margriet; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Hooning, Maartje J; Rookus, Matti A; van der Luijt, Rob B; Os, Theo A Mvan; Evans, D Gareth; Frost, Debra; Fineberg, Elena; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Kennedy, M John; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Ellis, Steve D; Cole, Trevor; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Damiola, Francesca; Faivre, Laurence; Frenay, Marc; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Caron, Olivier; Giraud, Sophie; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Gronwald, Jacek; Byrski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B; Bonanni, Bernardo; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Giannini, Giuseppe; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Rhiem, Kerstin; Niederacher, Dieter; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Sutter, Christian; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Borg, Ake; Melin, Beatrice; Rantala, Johanna; Soller, Maria; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Salani, Ritu; Kaulich, Daphne Gschwantler; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Paluch, Shani Shimon; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Robson, Mark; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Foretova, Lenka; Savage, Sharon A; Lester, Jenny; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Olswold, Curtis; Cunningham, Julie M; Slager, Susan; Pankratz, Vernon S; Dicks, Ed; Lakhani, Sunil R; Couch, Fergus J; Hall, Per; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Gayther, Simon A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Reddel, Roger R; Goode, Ellen L; Greene, Mark H; Easton, Douglas F; Berchuck, Andrew; Antoniou, Antonis C; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M

    2013-04-01

    TERT-locus SNPs and leukocyte telomere measures are reportedly associated with risks of multiple cancers. Using the Illumina custom genotyping array iCOGs, we analyzed ∼480 SNPs at the TERT locus in breast (n = 103,991), ovarian (n = 39,774) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (n = 11,705) cancer cases and controls. Leukocyte telomere measurements were also available for 53,724 participants. Most associations cluster into three independent peaks. The minor allele at the peak 1 SNP rs2736108 associates with longer telomeres (P = 5.8 × 10(-7)), lower risks for estrogen receptor (ER)-negative (P = 1.0 × 10(-8)) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P = 1.1 × 10(-5)) breast cancers and altered promoter assay signal. The minor allele at the peak 2 SNP rs7705526 associates with longer telomeres (P = 2.3 × 10(-14)), higher risk of low-malignant-potential ovarian cancer (P = 1.3 × 10(-15)) and greater promoter activity. The minor alleles at the peak 3 SNPs rs10069690 and rs2242652 increase ER-negative (P = 1.2 × 10(-12)) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P = 1.6 × 10(-14)) breast and invasive ovarian (P = 1.3 × 10(-11)) cancer risks but not via altered telomere length. The cancer risk alleles of rs2242652 and rs10069690, respectively, increase silencing and generate a truncated TERT splice variant.

  5. An unusual occurrence of repeated single allele variation on Y-STR locus DYS458

    OpenAIRE

    Shrivastava, Pankaj; Trivedi, Veena Ben; Jain, Toshi; Ali, Mehmood

    2016-01-01

    Six brothers were accused of gagging and raping a woman. A single male Y-STR profile was obtained from vaginal smear swab and clothes of the victim, which did not match with the DNA profile of the accused brothers. As a reference point, the blood sample of their father (aged 87 years) was also analyzed with the same kit. The Y-STR haplotype of all six brothers was found to be the same as that of their father except at locus DYS458. At this locus, while the eldest, second and fourth siblings s...

  6. An unusual occurrence of repeated single allele variation on Y-STR locus DYS458

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Shrivastava

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Six brothers were accused of gagging and raping a woman. A single male Y-STR profile was obtained from vaginal smear swab and clothes of the victim, which did not match with the DNA profile of the accused brothers. As a reference point, the blood sample of their father (aged 87 years was also analyzed with the same kit. The Y-STR haplotype of all six brothers was found to be the same as that of their father except at locus DYS458. At this locus, while the eldest, second and fourth siblings share allele 18 with their father, a loss of one repeat (allele 17 instead of 18 is observed in the third son while fifth and sixth siblings have allele 19 representing a gain of one repeat. Thus, two changes viz. a gain (twice and loss of one repeat at this locus in one generation is both interesting and unusual.

  7. Pervasive within-Mitochondrion Single-Nucleotide Variant Heteroplasmy as Revealed by Single-Mitochondrion Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Morris

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: A number of mitochondrial diseases arise from single-nucleotide variant (SNV accumulation in multiple mitochondria. Here, we present a method for identification of variants present at the single-mitochondrion level in individual mouse and human neuronal cells, allowing for extremely high-resolution study of mitochondrial mutation dynamics. We identified extensive heteroplasmy between individual mitochondrion, along with three high-confidence variants in mouse and one in human that were present in multiple mitochondria across cells. The pattern of variation revealed by single-mitochondrion data shows surprisingly pervasive levels of heteroplasmy in inbred mice. Distribution of SNV loci suggests inheritance of variants across generations, resulting in Poisson jackpot lines with large SNV load. Comparison of human and mouse variants suggests that the two species might employ distinct modes of somatic segregation. Single-mitochondrion resolution revealed mitochondria mutational dynamics that we hypothesize to affect risk probabilities for mutations reaching disease thresholds. : Morris et al. use independent sequencing of multiple individual mitochondria from mouse and human brain cells to show high pervasiveness of mutations. The mutations are heteroplasmic within single mitochondria and within and between cells. These findings suggest mechanisms by which mutations accumulate over time, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction and disease. Keywords: single mitochondrion, single cell, human neuron, mouse neuron, single-nucleotide variation

  8. Single-locus complementary sex determination in the inbreeding wasp Euodynerus foraminatus Saussure (Hymenoptera: Vespidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahlhut, J K; Cowan, D P

    2004-03-01

    The Hymenoptera have arrhenotokous haplodiploidy in which males normally develop from unfertilized eggs and are haploid, while females develop from fertilized eggs and are diploid. Multiple sex determination systems are known to underlie haplodiploidy, and the best understood is single-locus complementary sex determination (sl-CSD) in which sex is determined at a single polymorphic locus. Individuals heterozygous at the sex locus develop as females; individuals that are hemizygous (haploid) or homozygous (diploid) at the sex locus develop as males. sl-CSD can be detected with inbreeding experiments that produce diploid males in predictable proportions as well as sex ratio shifts due to diploid male production. This sex determination system is considered incompatible with inbreeding because the ensuing increase in homozygosity increases the production of diploid males that are inviable or infertile, imposing a high cost on matings between close relatives. However, in the solitary hunting wasp Euodynerus foraminatus, a species suspected of having sl-CSD, inbreeding may be common due to a high incidence of sibling matings at natal nests. In laboratory crosses with E. foraminatus, we find that sex ratios and diploid male production (detected as microsatellite heterozygosity) are consistent with sl-CSD, but not with other sex determination systems. This is the first documented example of sl-CSD in a hymenopteran with an apparent natural history of inbreeding, and thus presents a paradox for our understanding of hymenopteran genetics.

  9. Single locus affects embryonic segment polarity and multiple aspects of an adult evolutionary novelty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saenko Suzanne V

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The characterization of the molecular changes that underlie the origin and diversification of morphological novelties is a key challenge in evolutionary developmental biology. The evolution of such traits is thought to rely largely on co-option of a toolkit of conserved developmental genes that typically perform multiple functions. Mutations that affect both a universal developmental process and the formation of a novelty might shed light onto the genetics of traits not represented in model systems. Here we describe three pleiotropic mutations with large effects on a novel trait, butterfly eyespots, and on a conserved stage of embryogenesis, segment polarity. Results We show that three mutations affecting eyespot size and/or colour composition in Bicyclus anynana butterflies occurred in the same locus, and that two of them are embryonic recessive lethal. Using surgical manipulations and analysis of gene expression patterns in developing wings, we demonstrate that the effects on eyespot morphology are due to changes in the epidermal response component of eyespot induction. Our analysis of morphology and of gene expression in mutant embryos shows that they have a typical segment polarity phenotype, consistent with the mutant locus encoding a negative regulator of Wingless signalling. Conclusions This study characterizes the segregation and developmental effects of alleles at a single locus that controls the morphology of a lineage-specific trait (butterfly eyespots and a conserved process (embryonic segment polarity and, specifically, the regulation of Wingless signalling. Because no gene with such function was found in the orthologous, highly syntenic genomic regions of two other lepidopterans, we hypothesize that our locus is a yet undescribed, possibly lineage-specific, negative regulator of the conserved Wnt/Wg pathway. Moreover, the fact that this locus interferes with multiple aspects of eyespot morphology and maps to a

  10. BISQUE: locus- and variant-specific conversion of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic database identifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael J; Geske, Philip; Yu, Haiyuan

    2016-05-15

    Biological sequence databases are integral to efforts to characterize and understand biological molecules and share biological data. However, when analyzing these data, scientists are often left holding disparate biological currency-molecular identifiers from different databases. For downstream applications that require converting the identifiers themselves, there are many resources available, but analyzing associated loci and variants can be cumbersome if data is not given in a form amenable to particular analyses. Here we present BISQUE, a web server and customizable command-line tool for converting molecular identifiers and their contained loci and variants between different database conventions. BISQUE uses a graph traversal algorithm to generalize the conversion process for residues in the human genome, genes, transcripts and proteins, allowing for conversion across classes of molecules and in all directions through an intuitive web interface and a URL-based web service. BISQUE is freely available via the web using any major web browser (http://bisque.yulab.org/). Source code is available in a public GitHub repository (https://github.com/hyulab/BISQUE). haiyuan.yu@cornell.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Natural selection maintains a single-locus leaf shape cline in Ivyleaf morning glory, Ipomoea hederacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campitelli, Brandon E; Stinchcombe, John R

    2013-02-01

    Clines in phenotypic traits with an underlying genetic basis potentially implicate natural selection. However, neutral evolutionary processes such as random colonization, spatially restricted gene flow, and genetic drift could also result in similar spatial patterns, especially for single-locus traits because of their susceptibility to stochastic events. One way to distinguish between adaptive and neutral mechanisms is to compare the focal trait to neutral genetic loci to determine whether neutral loci demonstrate clinal variation (consistent with a neutral cline), or not. Ivyleaf morning glory, Ipomoea hederacea, exhibits a latitudinal cline for a Mendelian leaf shape polymorphism in eastern North America, such that lobed genotypes dominate northern populations and heart-shaped genotypes are restricted to southern populations. Here, we evaluate potential evolutionary mechanisms for this cline by first determining the allele frequencies at the leaf shape locus for 77 populations distributed throughout I. hederacea's range and then comparing the geographical pattern at this locus to neutral amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) loci. We detected both significant clinal variation and high genetic differentiation at the leaf shape locus across all populations. In contrast, 99% of the putatively neutral loci do not display clinal variation, and I. hederacea populations show very little overall genetic differentiation, suggesting that there is a moderate level of gene flow. In addition, the leaf shape locus was identified as a major F(ST) outlier experiencing divergent selection, relative to all the AFLP loci. Together, these data strongly suggest that the cline in leaf shape is being maintained by spatially varying natural selection. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Sequence variants at the myostatin gene locus influence the body composition of Thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozaki, Teruaki; Sato, Fumio; Hill, Emmeline W; Miyake, Takeshi; Endo, Yoshiro; Kakoi, Hironaga; Gawahara, Hitoshi; Hirota, Kei-ichi; Nakano, Yasuko; Nambo, Yasuo; Kurosawa, Masahiko

    2011-12-01

    Myostatin is a member of the transforming growth factor-β family with a key role in inhibition of muscle growth by negative regulation of both myoblast proliferation and differentiation. Recently, a genomic region on ECA18, which includes the MSTN gene, was identified as a candidate region influencing racing performance in Thoroughbreds. In this study, four SNPs on ECA18, g.65809482T>C, g.65868604G>T, g.66493737C>T, and g.66539967A>G, were genotyped in 91 Thoroughbred horses-in-training to evaluate the association between genotype and body composition traits, including body weight, withers height, chest circumference, cannon circumference, and body weight/withers height. Of these, statistically differences in body weight and body weight/withers height were associated with specific genotypes in males. Specifically, body weight/withers height showed statistically significant differences depending on genotype at g.658604G>T, g.66493737C>T, and g.66539967A>G (PT, had the highest value (3.17 ± 0.05 kg·cm(-1)) for body weight/withers height in March, while those with a genotype associated with suitability for long-distance racing, T/T, had the lowest (2.99 ± 0.03 kg·cm(-1)). In females, the trends in the association of body weight/withers height with genotypes were similar to those observed in males. As the SNPs are not believed to be linked to coding variants in MSTN, these results suggest that regulation of MSTN gene expression influences skeletal muscle mass and hence racing performance, particularly optimum race distance, in Thoroughbred horses.

  13. Identification of rs671, a common variant of ALDH2, as a gout susceptibility locus

    OpenAIRE

    Sakiyama, Masayuki; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Ken; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Kawai, Sayo; Okada, Rieko; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Toru; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Gout is a common disease resulting from hyperuricemia. Recently, a genome-wide association study identified an association between gout and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2188380, located on an intergenic region between MYL2 and CUX2 on chromosome 12. However, other genes around rs2188380 could possibly be gout susceptibility genes. Therefore, we performed a fine-mapping study of the MYL2-CUX2 region. From 8,595 SNPs in the MYL2-CUX2 region, 9 tag SNPs were selected, and genotyping ...

  14. Immunochip analyses identify a novel risk locus for primary biliary cirrhosis at 13q14, multiple independent associations at four established risk loci and epistasis between 1p31 and 7q32 risk variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juran, Brian D.; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Invernizzi, Pietro; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Li, Yafang; Xie, Gang; Kosoy, Roman; Ransom, Michael; Sun, Ye; Bianchi, Ilaria; Schlicht, Erik M.; Lleo, Ana; Coltescu, Catalina; Bernuzzi, Francesca; Podda, Mauro; Lammert, Craig; Shigeta, Russell; Chan, Landon L.; Balschun, Tobias; Marconi, Maurizio; Cusi, Daniele; Heathcote, E. Jenny; Mason, Andrew L.; Myers, Robert P.; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Odin, Joseph A.; Luketic, Velimir A.; Bacon, Bruce R.; Bodenheimer, Henry C.; Liakina, Valentina; Vincent, Catherine; Levy, Cynthia; Franke, Andre; Gregersen, Peter K.; Bossa, Fabrizio; Gershwin, M. Eric; deAndrade, Mariza; Amos, Christopher I.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Seldin, Michael F.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.

    2012-01-01

    To further characterize the genetic basis of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), we genotyped 2426 PBC patients and 5731 unaffected controls from three independent cohorts using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array (Immunochip) enriched for autoimmune disease risk loci. Meta-analysis of the genotype data sets identified a novel disease-associated locus near the TNFSF11 gene at 13q14, provided evidence for association at six additional immune-related loci not previously implicated in PBC and confirmed associations at 19 of 22 established risk loci. Results of conditional analyses also provided evidence for multiple independent association signals at four risk loci, with haplotype analyses suggesting independent SNP effects at the 2q32 and 16p13 loci, but complex haplotype driven effects at the 3q25 and 6p21 loci. By imputing classical HLA alleles from this data set, four class II alleles independently contributing to the association signal from this region were identified. Imputation of genotypes at the non-HLA loci also provided additional associations, but none with stronger effects than the genotyped variants. An epistatic interaction between the IL12RB2 risk locus at 1p31and the IRF5 risk locus at 7q32 was also identified and suggests a complementary effect of these loci in predisposing to disease. These data expand the repertoire of genes with potential roles in PBC pathogenesis that need to be explored by follow-up biological studies. PMID:22936693

  15. Multiple independent variants at the TERT locus are associated with telomere length and risks of breast and ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bojesen, Stig E.; Pooley, Karen A.; Johnatty, Sharon E.; Beesley, Jonathan; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Edwards, Stacey L.; Pickett, Hilda A.; Shen, Howard C.; Smart, Chanel E.; Hillman, Kristine M.; Mai, Phuong L.; Lawrenson, Kate; Stutz, Michael D.; Lu, Yi; Karevan, Rod; Woods, Nicholas; Johnston, Rebecca L.; French, Juliet D.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Weischer, Maren; Nielsen, Sune F.; Maranian, Melanie J.; Ghoussaini, Maya; Ahmed, Shahana; Baynes, Caroline; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Lush, Michael; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Françis; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Despierre, Evelyn; Risch, Harvey A.; González-Neira, Anna; Rossing, Mary Anne; Pita, Guillermo; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Alvarez, Nuria; Larson, Melissa C.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Schoof, Nils; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cicek, Mine S.; Peto, Julian; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Broeks, Annegien; Armasu, Sebastian M.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Braaf, Linde M.; Winterhoff, Boris; Nevanlinna, Heli; Konecny, Gottfried E.; Lambrechts, Diether; Rogmann, Lisa; Guénel, Pascal; Teoman, Attila; Milne, Roger L.; Garcia, Joaquin J.; Cox, Angela; Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Hein, Rebecca; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Andrulis, Irene L.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Hopper, John L.; Odunsi, Kunle; Lindblom, Annika; Giles, Graham G.; Brenner, Hermann; Simard, Jacques; Lurie, Galina; Fasching, Peter A.; Carney, Michael E.; Radice, Paolo; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Goodman, Marc T.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Hillemanns, Peter; Winqvist, Robert; Dürst, Matthias; Devilee, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Butzow, Ralf; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Dörk, Thilo; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Zheng, Wei; Leminen, Arto; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Bunker, Clareann H.; Kristensen, Vessela; Ness, Roberta B.; Muir, Kenneth; Edwards, Robert; Meindl, Alfons; Heitz, Florian; Matsuo, Keitaro; du Bois, Andreas; Wu, Anna H.; Harter, Philipp; teo, Soo-Hwang; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Blot, William; Hosono, Satoyo; Kang, Daehee; Nakanishi, Toru; Hartman, Mikael; Yatabe, Yasushi; Hamann, Ute; Karlan, Beth Y.; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Gaborieau, Valerie; Jensen, Allan; Eccles, Diana; Høgdall, Estrid; Shen, Chen-Yang; Brown, Judith; Woo, Yin Ling; Shah, Mitul; Azmi, Mat Adenan Noor; Luben, Robert; Omar, Siti Zawiah; Czene, Kamila; Vierkant, Robert A.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Vachon, Celine; Olson, Janet E.; Wang, Xianshu; Levine, Douglas A.; Rudolph, Anja; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Iversen, Edwin; Nickels, Stefan; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Silva, Isabel Dos Santos; Cramer, Daniel W.; Gibson, Lorna; Terry, Kathryn L.; Fletcher, Olivia; Vitonis, Allison F.; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Liu, Jianjun; Bandera, Elisa V.; Li, Jingmei; Olson, Sara H.; Humphreys, Keith; Orlow, Irene; Blomqvist, Carl; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Salvesen, Helga B.; Muranen, Taru A.; Wik, Elisabeth; Brouwers, Barbara; Krakstad, Camilla; Wauters, Els; Halle, Mari K.; Wildiers, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Mulot, Claire; Aben, Katja K.; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Altena, Anne Mvan; Truong, Thérèse; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; Benitez, Javier; Pejovic, Tanja; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Hoatlin, Maureen; Zamora, M. Pilar; Cook, Linda S.; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Le, Nhu D.; Sohn, Christof; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Cybulski, Cezary; Henderson, Brian E.; Menkiszak, Janusz; Schumacher, Fredrick; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Le Marchand, Loic; Yang, Hannah P.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Knight, Julia A.; Høgdall, Claus K.; Apicella, Carmel; Gore, Martin; Tsimiklis, Helen; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Jager, Agnes; den Ouweland, Ans M. Wvan; Brown, Robert; Martens, John W. M.; Flanagan, James M.; Kriege, Mieke; Paul, James; Margolin, Sara; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Severi, Gianluca; Whittemore, Alice S.; Baglietto, Laura; McGuire, Valerie; Stegmaier, Christa; Sieh, Weiva; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Labrèche, France; Gao, Yu-Tang; Goldberg, Mark S.; Yang, Gong; Dumont, Martine; McLaughlin, John R.; Hartmann, Arndt; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Lux, Michael P.; Permuth-Wey, Jenny; Peissel, Bernard; Sellers, Thomas A.; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Barile, Monica; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ashworth, Alan; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Jones, Michael; Ramus, Susan J.; Orr, Nick; Menon, Usha; Pearce, Celeste L.; Brüning, Thomas; Pike, Malcolm C.; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Chanock, Stephen J.; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Pylkäs, Katri; Bidzinski, Mariusz; Kauppila, Saila; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Long, Jirong; Shrubsole, Martha; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Ditsch, Nina; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Stram, Daniel O.; van den Berg, David; Yip, Cheng Har; Ikram, M. Kamran; teh, Yew-Ching; Cai, Hui; Lu, Wei; Signorello, Lisa B.; Cai, Qiuyin; Noh, Dong-Young; Yoo, Keun-Young; Miao, Hui; Iau, Philip Tsau-Choong; teo, Yik Ying; McKay, James; Shapiro, Charles; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Fountzilas, George; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Healey, Catherine S.; Luccarini, Craig; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Peterlongo, Paolo; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Offit, Kenneth; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Blanco, Ignacio; Garber, Judy; Narod, Steven A.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Godwin, Andrew K.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Tihomirova, Laima; Arun, Banu K.; Campbell, Ian; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; van Asperen, Christi J.; van Roozendaal, Kees E. P.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Collée, J. Margriet; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Rookus, Matti A.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Os, Theo A. Mvan; Evans, D. Gareth; Frost, Debra; Fineberg, Elena; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Kennedy, M. John; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Ellis, Steve D.; Cole, Trevor; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Damiola, Francesca; Faivre, Laurence; Frenay, Marc; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Caron, Olivier; Giraud, Sophie; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Gronwald, Jacek; Byrski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Giannini, Giuseppe; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Rhiem, Kerstin; Niederacher, Dieter; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Sutter, Christian; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Borg, Ake; Melin, Beatrice; Rantala, Johanna; Soller, Maria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Salani, Ritu; Kaulich, Daphne Gschwantler; tea, Muy-Kheng; Paluch, Shani Shimon; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Robson, Mark; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Foretova, Lenka; Savage, Sharon A.; Lester, Jenny; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Olswold, Curtis; Cunningham, Julie M.; Slager, Susan; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Dicks, Ed; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Couch, Fergus J.; Hall, Per; Monteiro, Alvaro N. A.; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Reddel, Roger R.; Goode, Ellen L.; Greene, Mark H.; Easton, Douglas F.; Berchuck, Andrew; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M.

    2013-01-01

    TERT-locus SNPs and leukocyte telomere measures are reportedly associated with risks of multiple cancers. Using the Illumina custom genotyping array iCOGs, we analyzed ∼480 SNPs at the TERT locus in breast (n = 103,991), ovarian (n = 39,774) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (n = 11,705) cancer cases and

  16. Multiple independent variants at the TERT locus are associated with telomere length and risks of breast and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, Stig Egil; Pooley, Karen A; Johnatty, Sharon E

    2013-01-01

    TERT-locus SNPs and leukocyte telomere measures are reportedly associated with risks of multiple cancers. Using the Illumina custom genotyping array iCOGs, we analyzed ∼480 SNPs at the TERT locus in breast (n = 103,991), ovarian (n = 39,774) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (n = 11,705) cancer cases...

  17. HIV control through a single nucleotide on the HLA-B locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Henrik N; Harndahl, Mikkel; Leslie, Alasdair J

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variation within the HLA-B locus has the strongest impact on HIV disease progression of any polymorphisms within the human genome. However, identifying the exact mechanism involved is complicated by several factors. HLA-Bw4 alleles provide ligands for NK cells and for CD8 T cells, and str......Genetic variation within the HLA-B locus has the strongest impact on HIV disease progression of any polymorphisms within the human genome. However, identifying the exact mechanism involved is complicated by several factors. HLA-Bw4 alleles provide ligands for NK cells and for CD8 T cells......:02, which differ by only a single amino acid. Crucially, they occur primarily on identical HLA class I haplotypes and, as Bw6 alleles, do not act as NK cell ligands and are therefore largely unconfounded by other genetic factors. We show that in an outbred cohort (n = 2,093) of HIV C......-clade-infected individuals, a single amino acid change at position 9 of the HLA-B molecule critically affects peptide binding and significantly alters the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes targeted, measured directly ex vivo by gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay (P = 2 × 10...

  18. Microstructure evolution to reach the single variant in an ordered Fe–55at.%Pd alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farjami, Sahar; Fukuda, Takashi; Kakeshita, Tomoyuki

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We confirmed formation of the single variant in Fe–55at.%Pd by XRD measurement and TEM observation. ► The size of each ordered domain is about 2 nm at the early stage of ordering. ► High density of antiphase boundaries has been observed after formation of the single variant. -- Abstract: Recently, we reported single variant formation in an Fe–55at.%Pd is certainly realized from a disordered fcc-phase to an ordered L1 0 -phase by heat-treatment under magnetic field. In the present study, we have investigated microstructure evolution during the process of the single variant formation by an X-ray diffraction and an electron microscopy observation. As a result, followings are obtained: size of the ordered particles at the early stage of ordering is about 2 nm and the nucleation ratio of preferable variant, whose easy axis lies in the field direction, is higher than that of other variants. Each of the ordered preferable variant grows by consuming the order variants and finally come together to become a single variant. Based on the observation, a model is proposed for the single variant formation of the ordered L1 0 -phase under magnetic field

  19. Genetic and functional identification of the likely causative variant for cholesterol gallstone disease at the ABCG5/8 lithogenic locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Kampen, Oliver; Buch, Stephan; Nothnagel, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The sterolin locus (ABCG5/ABCG8) confers susceptibility for cholesterol gallstone disease in humans. Both the responsible variant and the molecular mechanism causing an increased incidence of gallstones in these patients have as yet not been identified. Genetic mapping utilized patient samples from...... Germany (2,808 cases, 2,089 controls), Chile (680 cases, 442 controls), Denmark (366 cases, 766 controls), India (247 cases, 224 controls), and China (280 cases, 244 controls). Analysis of allelic imbalance in complementary DNA (cDNA) samples from human liver (n = 22) was performed using pyrosequencing....... Transiently transfected HEK293 cells were used for [(3) H]-cholesterol export assays, analysis of protein expression, and localization of allelic constructs. Through fine mapping in German and Chilean samples, an ∼250 kB disease-associated interval could be defined for this locus. Lack of allelic imbalance...

  20. Sex-specific effects of naturally occurring variants in the dopamine receptor D2 locus on insulin secretion and Type 2 diabetes susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guigas, B.; Leeuw van Weenen, J.E. de; van Leeuwen, N.; Simonis-Bik, A.M.; Haeften, T.W. van; Nijpels, G.; Houwing-Duistermaat, J.J.; Beekman, M.; Deelen, J.; Havekes, L.M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Vogelzangs, N.; Riet, E. van 't; Dehghan, A.; Hofman, A.; Witteman, J.C.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Grarup, N.; Jørgensen, T.; Witte, D.R.; Lauritzen, T.; Hansen, T.; Pedersen, O.; Hottenga, J.; Romijn, J.A.; Diamant, M.; Kramer, M.H.H.; Heine, R.J.; Willemsen, G.; Dekker, J.M.; Eekhoff, E.M.; Pijl, H.; Geus, E.J. de; Slagboom, P.E.; Hart, L.M. 't

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Modulation of dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) activity affects insulin secretion in both rodents and isolated pancreatic β-cells. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms in the DRD2/ANKK1 locus may affect susceptibility to Type 2 diabetes in humans. Methods: Four potentially

  1. Sex-specific effects of naturally occurring variants in the dopamine receptor D2 locus on insulin secretion and Type 2 diabetes susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guigas, B; de Leeuw van Weenen, J E; van Leeuwen, N

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Modulation of dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) activity affects insulin secretion in both rodents and isolated pancreatic β-cells. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms in the DRD2/ANKK1 locus may affect susceptibility to Type 2 diabetes in humans. METHODS: Four potentially....... In addition, 340 Dutch subjects underwent a 2-h hyperglycaemic clamp to investigate insulin secretion. Since sexual dimorphic associations related to DRD2 polymorphisms have been previously reported, we also performed a gender-stratified analysis. RESULTS: rs1800497 at the DRD2/ANKK1 locus was associated...

  2. Fine-scale mapping of 8q24 locus identifies multiple independent risk variants for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiajun; Zhang, Yanfeng; Zheng, Wei; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Ghoussaini, Maya; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Lush, Michael; Milne, Roger L; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Beesley, Jonathan; Kar, Siddhartha; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W; Zhao, Zhiguo; Guo, Xingyi; Benitez, Javier; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Blot, William; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Brinton, Louise; Broeks, Annegien; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Cai, Hui; Canisius, Sander; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Devilee, Peter; Droit, Arnaud; Dork, Thilo; Fasching, Peter A; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fostira, Florentia; Gaborieau, Valerie; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; Guenel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hopper, John L; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Ito, Hidemi; Jakubowska, Anna; Johnson, Nichola; Torres, Diana; Kabisch, Maria; Kang, Daehee; Khan, Sofia; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Lambrechts, Diether; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Le Marchand, Loic; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Matsuo, Keitaro; McLean, Catriona; Meindl, Alfons; Muir, Kenneth; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nord, Silje; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Olson, Janet E; Orr, Nick; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Peterlongo, Paolo; Putti, Thomas Choudary; Rudolph, Anja; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hou, Ming-Feng; Shrubsole, Matha J; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony; Teo, Soo Hwang; Thienpont, Bernard; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Therese; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Wen, Wanqing; Winqvist, Robert; Wu, Anna H; Yip, Cheng Har; Zamora, Pilar M; Zheng, Ying; Floris, Giuseppe; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Hooning, Maartje J; Martens, John W M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Kristensen, Vessela N; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Simard, Jacques; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Antoniou, Antonis C; Easton, Douglas F; Cai, Qiuyin; Long, Jirong

    2016-09-15

    Previous genome-wide association studies among women of European ancestry identified two independent breast cancer susceptibility loci represented by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs13281615 and rs11780156 at 8q24. A fine-mapping study across 2.06 Mb (chr8:127,561,724-129,624,067, hg19) in 55,540 breast cancer cases and 51,168 controls within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium was conducted. Three additional independent association signals in women of European ancestry, represented by rs35961416 (OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.93-0.97, conditional p = 5.8 × 10(-6) ), rs7815245 (OR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.91-0.96, conditional p = 1.1 × 10(-6) ) and rs2033101 (OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.02-1.07, conditional p = 1.1 × 10(-4) ) were found. Integrative analysis using functional genomic data from the Roadmap Epigenomics, the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements project, the Cancer Genome Atlas and other public resources implied that SNPs rs7815245 in Signal 3, and rs1121948 in Signal 5 (in linkage disequilibrium with rs11780156, r(2)  = 0.77), were putatively functional variants for two of the five independent association signals. The results highlighted multiple 8q24 variants associated with breast cancer susceptibility in women of European ancestry. © 2016 UICC.

  3. Genome Editing a Mouse Locus Encoding a Variant Histone, H3.3B, to Report on its Expression in Live Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Duancheng; Noh, Kyung-Min; Goldberg, Aaron D.; Allis, C. David; Rosenwaks, Zev; Rafii, Shahin; Banaszynski, Laura A.

    2018-01-01

    Summary Chromatin remodeling via incorporation of histone variants plays a key role in the regulation of embryonic development. The histone variant H3.3 has been associated with a number of early events including formation of the paternal pronucleus upon fertilization. The small number of amino acid differences between H3.3 and its canonical counterparts (H3.1 and H3.2) has limited studies of the developmental significance of H3.3 deposition into chromatin due to difficulties in distinguishing the H3 isoforms. To this end, we used zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) mediated gene editing to introduce a small C-terminal hemagglutinin (HA) tag to the endogenous H3.3B locus in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), along with an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) and a separately translated fluorescent reporter of expression. This system will allow detection of expression driven by the reporter in cells, animals, and embryos, and will facilitate investigation of differential roles of paternal and maternal H3.3 protein during embryogenesis that would not be possible using variant-specific antibodies. Further, the ability to monitor endogenous H3.3 protein in various cell lineages will enhance our understanding of the dynamics of this histone variant over the course of development. genesis PMID:25262655

  4. A Common Variant at the 14q32 Endometrial Cancer Risk Locus Activates AKT1 through YY1 Binding

    OpenAIRE

    Painter, Jodie N.; Kaufmann, Susanne; O’Mara, Tracy A.; Hillman, Kristine M.; Sivakumaran, Haran; Darabi, Hatef; Cheng, Timothy H.T.; Pearson, John; Kazakoff, Stephen; Waddell, Nicola; Hoivik, Erling A.; Goode, Ellen L.; Scott, Rodney J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Dunning, Alison M.

    2016-01-01

    A recent meta-analysis of multiple genome-wide association and follow-up endometrial cancer case-control datasets identified a novel genetic risk locus for this disease at chromosome 14q32.33. To prioritize the functional SNP(s) and target gene(s) at this locus we employed an in silico fine-mapping approach using genotyped and imputed SNP data for 6,608 endometrial cancer cases and 37,925 controls of European ancestry. Association and functional analyses provide evidence that the best candida...

  5. Fine-scale mapping of 8q24 locus identifies multiple independent risk variants for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Jiajun; Zhang, Yanfeng; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    public resources implied that SNPs rs7815245 in Signal 3, and rs1121948 in Signal 5 (in linkage disequilibrium with rs11780156, r(2)  = 0.77), were putatively functional variants for two of the five independent association signals. The results highlighted multiple 8q24 variants associated with breast...

  6. Development of a Single Locus Sequence Typing (SLST) Scheme for Typing Bacterial Species Directly from Complex Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Christian F P; Jensen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    The protocol describes a computational method to develop a Single Locus Sequence Typing (SLST) scheme for typing bacterial species. The resulting scheme can be used to type bacterial isolates as well as bacterial species directly from complex communities using next-generation sequencing technologies.

  7. A low frequency variant within the GWAS locus of MTNR1B affects fasting glucose concentrations: genetic risk is modulated by obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Been, L F; Hatfield, J L; Shankar, A; Aston, C E; Ralhan, S; Wander, G S; Mehra, N K; Singh, J R; Mulvihill, J J; Sanghera, D K

    2012-11-01

    Two common variants (rs1387153, rs10830963) in MTNR1B have been reported to have independent effects on fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels with increased risk to type 2 diabetes (T2D) in recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS). In this investigation, we report the association of these two variants, and an additional variant (rs1374645) within the GWAS locus of MTNR1B with FBG, 2h glucose, insulin resistance (HOMA IR), β-cell function (HOMA B), and T2D in our sample of Asian Sikhs from India. Our cohort comprised 2222 subjects [1201 T2D, 1021 controls]. None of these SNPs was associated with T2D in this cohort. Our data also could not confirm association of rs1387153 and rs10830963 with FBG phenotype. However, upon stratifying data according to body mass index (BMI) (low ≤ 25 kg/m(2) and high > 25 kg/m(2)) in normoglycemic subjects (n = 1021), the rs1374645 revealed a strong association with low FBG levels in low BMI group (β = -0.073, p = 0.002, Bonferroni p = 0.01) compared to the high BMI group (β = 0.015, p = 0.50). We also detected a strong evidence of interaction between rs1374645 and BMI with respect to FBG levels (p = 0.002). Our data provide new information about the significant impact of another MTNR1B variant on FBG levels that appears to be modulated by BMI. Future confirmation on independent datasets and functional studies will be required to define the role of this variant in fasting glucose variation. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adoue, Véronique; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Canisius, Sander; Lemaçon, Audrey; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Baynes, Caroline; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G.; Goldberg, Mark S.; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker-Alnæs, Grethe; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Hallberg, Emily; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hopper, John L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Marchand, Loic Le; Lindblom, Annika; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Maranian, Mel; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Milne, Roger L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olswold, Curtis; Peto, Julian; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rudolph, Anja; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Investigators, kConFab/AOCS; Zheng, Wei; Benitez, Javier; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Kristensen, Vessela; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Pastinen, Tomi; Nord, Silje; Simard, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional candidates for further investigation as disease-causing variants. To investigate whether common variants associated with differential allelic expression were involved in breast cancer susceptibility, a list of genes was established on the basis of their involvement in cancer related pathways and/or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage disequilibrium block containing several genes, including, HELQ, encoding the protein HEL308 a DNA dependant ATPase and DNA Helicase involved in DNA repair, MRPS18C encoding the Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein S18C and FAM175A (ABRAXAS), encoding a BRCA1 BRCT domain-interacting protein involved in DNA damage response and double-strand break (DSB) repair. Expression QTL analysis in breast cancer tissue showed rs11099601 to be associated with HELQ (P = 8.28x10-14), MRPS18C (P = 1.94x10-27) and FAM175A (P = 3.83x10-3), explaining about 20%, 14% and 1%, respectively of the variance inexpression of these genes in breast carcinomas. PMID:27792995

  9. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Adoue, Véronique; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Canisius, Sander; Lemaçon, Audrey; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Baynes, Caroline; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; Goldberg, Mark S; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker-Alnæs, Grethe; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hallberg, Emily; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindblom, Annika; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Maranian, Mel; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Milne, Roger L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olswold, Curtis; Peto, Julian; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rudolph, Anja; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M W; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Zheng, Wei; Benitez, Javier; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Pharoah, Paul D P; Kristensen, Vessela; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Pastinen, Tomi; Nord, Silje; Simard, Jacques

    2016-12-06

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional candidates for further investigation as disease-causing variants. To investigate whether common variants associated with differential allelic expression were involved in breast cancer susceptibility, a list of genes was established on the basis of their involvement in cancer related pathways and/or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage disequilibrium block containing several genes, including, HELQ, encoding the protein HEL308 a DNA dependant ATPase and DNA Helicase involved in DNA repair, MRPS18C encoding the Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein S18C and FAM175A (ABRAXAS), encoding a BRCA1 BRCT domain-interacting protein involved in DNA damage response and double-strand break (DSB) repair. Expression QTL analysis in breast cancer tissue showed rs11099601 to be associated with HELQ (P = 8.28x10-14), MRPS18C (P = 1.94x10-27) and FAM175A (P = 3.83x10-3), explaining about 20%, 14% and 1%, respectively of the variance inexpression of these genes in breast carcinomas.

  10. Effects of phylogenetic reconstruction method on the robustness of species delimitation using single-locus data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Cuong Q; Humphreys, Aelys M; Fontaneto, Diego; Barraclough, Timothy G; Paradis, Emmanuel

    2014-10-01

    Coalescent-based species delimitation methods combine population genetic and phylogenetic theory to provide an objective means for delineating evolutionarily significant units of diversity. The generalised mixed Yule coalescent (GMYC) and the Poisson tree process (PTP) are methods that use ultrametric (GMYC or PTP) or non-ultrametric (PTP) gene trees as input, intended for use mostly with single-locus data such as DNA barcodes. Here, we assess how robust the GMYC and PTP are to different phylogenetic reconstruction and branch smoothing methods. We reconstruct over 400 ultrametric trees using up to 30 different combinations of phylogenetic and smoothing methods and perform over 2000 separate species delimitation analyses across 16 empirical data sets. We then assess how variable diversity estimates are, in terms of richness and identity, with respect to species delimitation, phylogenetic and smoothing methods. The PTP method generally generates diversity estimates that are more robust to different phylogenetic methods. The GMYC is more sensitive, but provides consistent estimates for BEAST trees. The lower consistency of GMYC estimates is likely a result of differences among gene trees introduced by the smoothing step. Unresolved nodes (real anomalies or methodological artefacts) affect both GMYC and PTP estimates, but have a greater effect on GMYC estimates. Branch smoothing is a difficult step and perhaps an underappreciated source of bias that may be widespread among studies of diversity and diversification. Nevertheless, careful choice of phylogenetic method does produce equivalent PTP and GMYC diversity estimates. We recommend simultaneous use of the PTP model with any model-based gene tree (e.g. RAxML) and GMYC approaches with BEAST trees for obtaining species hypotheses.

  11. Multiple-locus variant-repeat assay (MLVA) is a useful tool for molecular epidemiologic analysis of Streptococcus agalactiae strains causing bovine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Andreas; Bruheim, Torkjel; Afset, Jan Egil; Bergh, Kåre

    2012-06-15

    Group B streptococci (GBS) were considered a major cause of mastitis in cattle until preventive measures succeeded in controlling the disease in the 1970s and 1980s. During the last 5-6 years an increasing number of cases have been observed in some Scandinavian countries. A total of 187 GBS isolates from mastitis cases were collected from 119 animals in 34 Norwegian farms in the period from April 2007 to November 2010. 133 (71%) of the isolates were from farms with automated milking systems. The strains underwent typing of capsular polysaccharides (CPS) and surface proteins, and were analyzed by multi-locus variable repeat assay (MLVA) to investigate the epidemiological relationship of strains within and between farms. The GBS strains were differentiated into 12 types by CPS and surface protein analysis, with CPS types V (54%) and IV (34%) predominating. MLVA was superior to CPS and protein typing for strain differentiation, resolving the 187 strains into 37 types. In 29 of 34 farms all GBS strains had identical MLVA profiles specific for each farm. However, in one farm represented with 48 isolates, four MLVA variants with differences in one repeat locus were observed during the almost 3-year long collection period. Similar variations were observed at four other farms. This might reflect the stability of repeat loci under in vivo conditions. Farms with automated milking systems were overrepresented in this material. In conclusion, the five-loci MLVA allowed rapid high-resolution genotyping of the bovine GBS strains within and between farms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Germline contamination and leakage in whole genome somatic single nucleotide variant detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendorek, Dorota H; Caloian, Cristian; Ellrott, Kyle; Bare, J Christopher; Yamaguchi, Takafumi N; Ewing, Adam D; Houlahan, Kathleen E; Norman, Thea C; Margolin, Adam A; Stuart, Joshua M; Boutros, Paul C

    2018-01-31

    The clinical sequencing of cancer genomes to personalize therapy is becoming routine across the world. However, concerns over patient re-identification from these data lead to questions about how tightly access should be controlled. It is not thought to be possible to re-identify patients from somatic variant data. However, somatic variant detection pipelines can mistakenly identify germline variants as somatic ones, a process called "germline leakage". The rate of germline leakage across different somatic variant detection pipelines is not well-understood, and it is uncertain whether or not somatic variant calls should be considered re-identifiable. To fill this gap, we quantified germline leakage across 259 sets of whole-genome somatic single nucleotide variant (SNVs) predictions made by 21 teams as part of the ICGC-TCGA DREAM Somatic Mutation Calling Challenge. The median somatic SNV prediction set contained 4325 somatic SNVs and leaked one germline polymorphism. The level of germline leakage was inversely correlated with somatic SNV prediction accuracy and positively correlated with the amount of infiltrating normal cells. The specific germline variants leaked differed by tumour and algorithm. To aid in quantitation and correction of leakage, we created a tool, called GermlineFilter, for use in public-facing somatic SNV databases. The potential for patient re-identification from leaked germline variants in somatic SNV predictions has led to divergent open data access policies, based on different assessments of the risks. Indeed, a single, well-publicized re-identification event could reshape public perceptions of the values of genomic data sharing. We find that modern somatic SNV prediction pipelines have low germline-leakage rates, which can be further reduced, especially for cloud-sharing, using pre-filtering software.

  13. Identification of a regulatory variant that binds FOXA1 and FOXA2 at the CDC123/CAMK1D type 2 diabetes GWAS locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie P Fogarty

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Many of the type 2 diabetes loci identified through genome-wide association studies localize to non-protein-coding intronic and intergenic regions and likely contain variants that regulate gene transcription. The CDC123/CAMK1D type 2 diabetes association signal on chromosome 10 spans an intergenic region between CDC123 and CAMK1D and also overlaps the CDC123 3'UTR. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the association signal, we used open chromatin, histone modifications and transcription factor ChIP-seq data sets from type 2 diabetes-relevant cell types to identify SNPs overlapping predicted regulatory regions. Two regions containing type 2 diabetes-associated variants were tested for enhancer activity using luciferase reporter assays. One SNP, rs11257655, displayed allelic differences in transcriptional enhancer activity in 832/13 and MIN6 insulinoma cells as well as in human HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. The rs11257655 risk allele T showed greater transcriptional activity than the non-risk allele C in all cell types tested. Using electromobility shift and supershift assays we demonstrated that the rs11257655 risk allele showed allele-specific binding to FOXA1 and FOXA2. We validated FOXA1 and FOXA2 enrichment at the rs11257655 risk allele using allele-specific ChIP in human islets. These results suggest that rs11257655 affects transcriptional activity through altered binding of a protein complex that includes FOXA1 and FOXA2, providing a potential molecular mechanism at this GWAS locus.

  14. Prioritizing single-nucleotide polymorphisms and variants associated with clinical mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suravajhala P

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Prashanth Suravajhala,1 Alfredo Benso2 1Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Center for Quantitative Genetics and Genomics, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark; 2Department of Control and Computer Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Torino, Italy Abstract: Next-generation sequencing technology has provided resources to easily explore and identify candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and variants. However, there remains a challenge in identifying and inferring the causal SNPs from sequence data. A problem with different methods that predict the effect of mutations is that they produce false positives. In this hypothesis, we provide an overview of methods known for identifying causal variants and discuss the challenges, fallacies, and prospects in discerning candidate SNPs. We then propose a three-point classification strategy, which could be an additional annotation method in identifying causalities. Keywords: clinical mastitis, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, variants, associations, diseases, linkage disequilibrium, GWAS

  15. Single-Locus versus Multilocus Patterns of Local Adaptation to Climate in Eastern White Pine (Pinus strobus, Pinaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om P Rajora

    Full Text Available Natural plant populations are often adapted to their local climate and environmental conditions, and populations of forest trees offer some of the best examples of this pattern. However, little empirical work has focused on the relative contribution of single-locus versus multilocus effects to the genetic architecture of local adaptation in plants/forest trees. Here, we employ eastern white pine (Pinus strobus to test the hypothesis that it is the inter-genic effects that primarily drive climate-induced local adaptation. The genetic structure of 29 range-wide natural populations of eastern white pine was determined in relation to local climatic factors using both a reference set of SSR markers, and SNPs located in candidate genes putatively involved in adaptive response to climate. Comparisons were made between marker sets using standard single-locus outlier analysis, single-locus and multilocus environment association analyses and a novel implementation of Population Graphs. Magnitudes of population structure were similar between the two marker sets. Outlier loci consistent with diversifying selection were rare for both SNPs and SSRs. However, genetic distances based on the multilocus among population covariances (cGD were significantly more correlated to climate, even after correcting for spatial effects, for SNPs as compared to SSRs. Coalescent simulations confirmed that the differences in mutation rates between SSRs and SNPs did not affect the topologies of the Population Graphs, and hence values of cGD and their correlations with associated climate variables. We conclude that the multilocus covariances among populations primarily reflect adaptation to local climate and environment in eastern white pine. This result highlights the complexity of the genetic architecture of adaptive traits, as well as the need to consider multilocus effects in studies of local adaptation.

  16. Hb F Levels in Indian Sickle Cell Patients and Association with the HBB Locus Variant rs10128556 (C>T), and the HBG XmnI (Arab-Indian) Variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanushali, Aparna A; Himani, Kumari; Patra, Pradeep K; Das, Bibhu R

    The prevalence of sickle cell disease in India is very high. Hb F is one of the most powerful modulators of disease severity in sickle cell disease patients. It was traditionally thought that the disease is milder in Indian sickle cell disease patients predominantly due to the Arab-Indian haplotype characterized by the HBG XmnI [rs7482144 (G>A)] variant, which is associated with increased Hb F levels. In the current study, we investigated the Hb F levels in individuals with the rs10128556 (C>T) variant and also determined its linkage with the HBG XmnI variant. The present study was conducted on a cohort of 275 individuals, which consisted of 221 patients with sickle cell disease and 54 patients with sickle cell trait. Analysis of hemoglobin (Hb) fractions and variants was done on the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system. Genotyping for rs10128556 was done by direct sequencing of the products. Mean Hb F levels in the sickle cell disease patients was 19.36 ± 6.79. The genotypic frequencies for rs10128556 were 82.0% (TT), 16.7% (CT) and 1.3% (CC) for sickle cell disease patients. The minor C allele resulted in 52.0% decrease in Hb F levels when homozygous and 7.0% decrease when heterozygous. The rs10128556 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was in strong but not complete linkage with the HBG XmnI variant. In conclusion, the study determined for the first time the frequency and association of rs10128556 in Indian sickle cell disease patients with Hb F. It also established that it was not in complete linkage with the HBG XmnI variant in this high risk population.

  17. Factor 11 single-nucleotide variants in women with heavy menstrual bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiewel-Verschueren, Sophie; Mulder, Andre B.; Meijer, Karina; Mulder, Rene

    2017-01-01

    In a previous study it was shown that lower factor XI (FXI) levels in women with heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB). Our aim was to determine the single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the F11 gene in women with HMB. In addition, an extensive literature search was performed to determine the clinical

  18. Identification of independent association signals and putative functional variants for breast cancer risk through fine-scale mapping of the 12p11 locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Chenjie; Guo, Xingyi; Long, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs10771399, at 12p11 that is associated with breast cancer risk. METHOD: We performed a fine-scale mapping study of a 700 kb region including 441 genotyped and more than 1300...... Asians, but none of the associations were statistically significant in African descendants. Multiple candidate functional variants are located in putative enhancer sequences. Chromatin interaction data suggested that PTHLH was the likely target gene of these enhancers. Of the six variants...... with the strongest evidence of potential functionality, rs11049453 was statistically significantly associated with the expression of PTHLH and its nearby gene CCDC91 at P 

  19. Fine-scale mapping of 8q24 locus identifies multiple independent risk variants for breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Shi (Jiajun); Zhang, Y. (Yanfeng); W. Zheng (Wei); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); M. Ghoussaini (Maya); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet K.); Wang, Q. (Qin); J. Dennis (Joe); Lush, M. (Michael); R.L. Milne (Roger); X.-O. Shu (Xiao-Ou); J. Beesley (Jonathan); S. Kar (Siddhartha); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); Arndt, V. (Volker); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); Z. Zhao (Zhiguo); Guo, X. (Xingyi); J. Benítez (Javier); A. Beeghly-Fadiel (Alicia); W.J. Blot (William); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); H. Brenner (Hermann); L.A. Brinton (Louise); A. Broeks (Annegien); T. Brüning (Thomas); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); H. Cai (Hui); S. Canisius (Sander); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); Choi, J.-Y. (Ji-Yeob); F.J. Couch (Fergus); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); P. Devilee (Peter); A. Droit (Arnaud); T. Dörk (Thilo); P.A. Fasching (Peter); O. Fletcher (Olivia); H. Flyger (Henrik); F. Fostira (Florentia); Gaborieau, V. (Valerie); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); G.G. Giles (Graham); Grip, M. (Mervi); P. Guénel (Pascal); C.A. Haiman (Christopher A.); U. Hamann (Ute); J.M. Hartman (Joost); X. Miao; A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); J.L. Hopper (John); Hsiung, C.-N. (Chia-Ni); H. Ito (Hidemi); A. Jakubowska (Anna); Johnson, N. (Nichola); D. Torres (Diana); M. Kabisch (Maria); D. Kang (Daehee); S. Khan (Sofia); J.A. Knight (Julia); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); Lambrechts, D. (Diether); J. Li (Jingmei); A. Lindblom (Annika); A. Lophatananon (Artitaya); J. Lubinski (Jan); A. Mannermaa (Arto); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); L. Le Marchand (Loic); S. Margolin (Sara); Marme, F. (Frederik); K. Matsuo (Keitaro); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); A. Meindl (Alfons); K.R. Muir (K.); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); S. Nord (Silje); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); J.E. Olson (Janet); N. Orr (Nick); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); T.C. Putti (Thomas Choudary); Rudolph, A. (Anja); Sangrajrang, S. (Suleeporn); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); C.-Y. Shen (Chen-Yang); M.-F. Hou (Ming-Feng); M. Shrubsole (Martha); M.C. Southey (Melissa); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); Hwang Teo, S. (Soo); B. Thienpont (Bernard); A.E. Toland (Amanda); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); T. Truong (Thérèse); C.-C. Tseng (Chiu-Chen); W. Wen (Wanqing); R. Winqvist (Robert); A.H. Wu (Anna); C. Har Yip (Cheng); P.M. Zamora (Pilar M.); Zheng, Y. (Ying); O.A.M. Floris; Cheng, C.-Y. (Ching-Yu); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); J.W.M. Martens (John); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); V. Kristensen (Vessela); P. Hall (Per); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); J. Simard (Jacques); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.M. Dunning (Alison); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); D.F. Easton (Douglas F.); Q. Cai (Qiuyin); J. Long (Jirong)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPrevious genome-wide association studies among women of European ancestry identified two independent breast cancer susceptibility loci represented by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs13281615 and rs11780156 at 8q24. A fine-mapping study across 2.06 Mb

  20. Identification and Functional Characterization of G6PC2 Coding Variants Influencing Glycemic Traits Define an Effector Transcript at the G6PC2-ABCB11 Locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahajan, Anubha; Sim, Xueling; Ng, Hui Jin

    2015-01-01

    . To test this, we analyzed exome-array data from up to 33,231 non-diabetic individuals of European ancestry. We found exome-wide significant (P... and functional effects was only possible when haplotype phase was considered. In contrast to earlier reports suggesting that, paradoxically, glucose-raising alleles at this locus are protective against type 2 diabetes (T2D), the p.Val219Leu G6PC2 variant displayed a modest but directionally consistent...

  1. Identification of independent association signals and putative functional variants for breast cancer risk through fine-scale mapping of the 12p11 locus

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Chenjie; Guo, Xingyi; Long, Jirong; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Droit, Arnaud; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Ghoussaini, Maya; Kar, Siddhartha; Freeman, Adam; Hopper, John L.; Milne, Roger L.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Agata, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiple recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs10771399, at 12p11 that is associated with breast cancer risk. Method: We performed a fine-scale mapping study of a 700 kb region including 441 genotyped and more than 1300 imputed genetic variants in 48,155 cases and 43,612 controls of European descent, 6269 cases and 6624 controls of East Asian descent and 1116 cases and 932 controls of African descent in the Breast C...

  2. RareVar: A Framework for Detecting Low-Frequency Single-Nucleotide Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yangyang; Xuei, Xiaoling; Li, Lang; Nakshatri, Harikrishna; Edenberg, Howard J; Liu, Yunlong

    2017-07-01

    Accurate identification of low-frequency somatic point mutations in tumor samples has important clinical utilities. Although high-throughput sequencing technology enables capturing such variants while sequencing primary tumor samples, our ability for accurate detection is compromised when the variant frequency is close to the sequencer error rate. Most current experimental and bioinformatic strategies target mutations with ≥5% allele frequency, which limits our ability to understand the cancer etiology and tumor evolution. We present an experimental and computational modeling framework, RareVar, to reliably identify low-frequency single-nucleotide variants from high-throughput sequencing data under standard experimental protocols. RareVar protocol includes a benchmark design by pooling DNAs from already sequenced individuals at various concentrations to target variants at desired frequencies, 0.5%-3% in our case. By applying a generalized, linear model-based, position-specific error model, followed by machine-learning-based variant calibration, our approach outperforms existing methods. Our method can be applied on most capture and sequencing platforms without modifying the experimental protocol.

  3. [The phonological variant of primary progressive aphasia, a single case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesfeldt, H F A

    2011-04-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by an insidious onset and gradual progression of deficits that can involve any aspect of language, including word finding, object naming, fluency, syntax, phonology and word comprehension. The initial symptoms occur in the absence of major deficits in other cognitive domains, including episodic memory, visuospatial abilities and visuoconstruction. According to recent diagnostic guidelines, PPA is typically divided into three variants: nonfluent variant PPA (also termed progressive nonfluent aphasia), semantic variant PPA (also termed semantic dementia) and logopenic/phonological variant PPA (also termed logopenic progressive aphasia). The paper describes a 79-yr old man, who presented with normal motor speech and production rate, impaired single word retrieval and phonemic errors in spontaneous speech and confrontational naming. Confrontation naming was strongly affected by lexical frequency. He was impaired on repetition of sentences and phrases. Reading was intact for regularly spelled words but not for irregular words (surface dyslexia). Comprehension was spared at the single word level, but impaired for complex sentences. He performed within the normal range on the Dutch equivalent of the Pyramids and Palm Trees (PPT) Pictures Test, indicating that semantic processing was preserved. There was, however, a slight deficiency on the PPT Words Test, which appeals to semantic knowledge of verbal associations. His core deficit was interpreted as an inability to retrieve stored lexical-phonological information for spoken word production in spontaneous speech, confrontation naming, repetition and reading aloud.

  4. Identification of independent association signals and putative functional variants for breast cancer risk through fine-scale mapping of the 12p11 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chenjie; Guo, Xingyi; Long, Jirong; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Droit, Arnaud; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Ghoussaini, Maya; Kar, Siddhartha; Freeman, Adam; Hopper, John L; Milne, Roger L; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Agata, Simona; Ahmed, Shahana; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Arason, Adalgeir; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Bacot, Francois; Barrowdale, Daniel; Baynes, Caroline; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Bermisheva, Marina; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William J; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S; Cai, Qiuyin; Caldes, Trinidad; Campbell, Ian; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Claes, Kathleen B M; Clarke, Christine; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; de la Hoya, Miguel; De Leeneer, Kim; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Domchek, Susan M; Doody, Michele; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dwek, Miriam; Dworniczak, Bernd; Egan, Kathleen; Eilber, Ursula; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ellis, Steve; Frost, Debra; Lalloo, Fiona; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; Friedlander, Michael; Friedman, Eitan; Gambino, Gaetana; Gao, Yu-Tang; Garber, Judy; García-Closas, Montserrat; Gehrig, Andrea; Damiola, Francesca; Lesueur, Fabienne; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Giles, Graham G; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hallberg, Emily; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Hartman, Mikael; Hassan, Norhashimah; Healey, Sue; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Verhoef, Senno; Hendricks, Carolyn B; Hillemanns, Peter; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hulick, Peter J; Hunter, David J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Ito, Hidemi; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Joly Beauparlant, Charles; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kang, Daehee; Karlan, Beth Y; Kauppila, Saila; Kerin, Michael J; Khan, Sofia; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Knight, Julia A; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kraft, Peter; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Chuen Neng; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lester, Jenny; Li, Jingmei; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Menegaux, Florence; Montagna, Marco; Muir, Kenneth; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Newcomb, Polly A; Nord, Silje; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olswold, Curtis; Osorio, Ana; Papi, Laura; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva; Peeters, Stephanie; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M; Presneau, Nadege; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Ramus, Susan J; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Rennert, Gad; Rhiem, Kerstin; Rudolph, Anja; Salani, Ritu; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Schürmann, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shen, Chen-Yang; Shrubsole, Martha J; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Sigurdson, Alice; Singer, Christian F; Slager, Susan; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo H; Terry, Mary Beth; Tessier, Daniel C; Teulé, Alex; Thomassen, Mads; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Toland, Amanda E; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Ven den Berg, David; Vijai, Joseph; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whittemore, Alice S; Winqvist, Robert; Wong, Tien Y; Wu, Anna H; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Pharoah, Paul D P; Hall, Per; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Simard, Jacques; Couch, Fergus J; Antoniou, Antonis C; Easton, Douglas F; Zheng, Wei

    2016-06-21

    Multiple recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs10771399, at 12p11 that is associated with breast cancer risk. We performed a fine-scale mapping study of a 700 kb region including 441 genotyped and more than 1300 imputed genetic variants in 48,155 cases and 43,612 controls of European descent, 6269 cases and 6624 controls of East Asian descent and 1116 cases and 932 controls of African descent in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC; http://bcac.ccge.medschl.cam.ac.uk/ ), and in 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Stepwise regression analyses were performed to identify independent association signals. Data from the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements project (ENCODE) and the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used for functional annotation. Analysis of data from European descendants found evidence for four independent association signals at 12p11, represented by rs7297051 (odds ratio (OR) = 1.09, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.06-1.12; P = 3 × 10(-9)), rs805510 (OR = 1.08, 95 % CI = 1.04-1.12, P = 2 × 10(-5)), and rs1871152 (OR = 1.04, 95 % CI = 1.02-1.06; P = 2 × 10(-4)) identified in the general populations, and rs113824616 (P = 7 × 10(-5)) identified in the meta-analysis of BCAC ER-negative cases and BRCA1 mutation carriers. SNPs rs7297051, rs805510 and rs113824616 were also associated with breast cancer risk at P associations were statistically significant in African descendants. Multiple candidate functional variants are located in putative enhancer sequences. Chromatin interaction data suggested that PTHLH was the likely target gene of these enhancers. Of the six variants with the strongest evidence of potential functionality, rs11049453 was statistically significantly associated with the expression of PTHLH and its nearby gene CCDC91 at P association signals at

  5. Meta-genome-wide association studies identify a locus on chromosome 1 and multiple variants in the MHC region for serum C-peptide in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshandel, Delnaz; Gubitosi-Klug, Rose; Bull, Shelley B; Canty, Angelo J; Pezzolesi, Marcus G; King, George L; Keenan, Hillary A; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Maahs, David M; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E K; Orchard, Trevor J; Costacou, Tina; Weedon, Michael N; Oram, Richard A; Paterson, Andrew D

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify genetic variants associated with beta cell function in type 1 diabetes, as measured by serum C-peptide levels, through meta-genome-wide association studies (meta-GWAS). We performed a meta-GWAS to combine the results from five studies in type 1 diabetes with cross-sectionally measured stimulated, fasting or random C-peptide levels, including 3479 European participants. The p values across studies were combined, taking into account sample size and direction of effect. We also performed separate meta-GWAS for stimulated (n = 1303), fasting (n = 2019) and random (n = 1497) C-peptide levels. In the meta-GWAS for stimulated/fasting/random C-peptide levels, a SNP on chromosome 1, rs559047 (Chr1:238753916, T>A, minor allele frequency [MAF] 0.24-0.26), was associated with C-peptide (p = 4.13 × 10 -8 ), meeting the genome-wide significance threshold (p C>T, MAF 0.07-0.10, p = 8.43 × 10 -8 ). In the stimulated C-peptide meta-GWAS, rs61211515 (Chr6:30100975, T/-, MAF 0.17-0.19) in the MHC region was associated with stimulated C-peptide (β [SE] = - 0.39 [0.07], p = 9.72 × 10 -8 ). rs61211515 was also associated with the rate of stimulated C-peptide decline over time in a subset of individuals (n = 258) with annual repeated measures for up to 6 years (p = 0.02). In the meta-GWAS of random C-peptide, another MHC region, SNP rs3135002 (Chr6:32668439, C>A, MAF 0.02-0.06), was associated with C-peptide (p = 3.49 × 10 -8 ). Conditional analyses suggested that the three identified variants in the MHC region were independent of each other. rs9260151 and rs3135002 have been associated with type 1 diabetes, whereas rs559047 and rs61211515 have not been associated with a risk of developing type 1 diabetes. We identified a locus on chromosome 1 and multiple variants in the MHC region, at least some of which were distinct from type 1 diabetes risk loci, that were associated with C

  6. Production of multiple bacteriocins from a single locus by gastrointestinal strains of Lactobacillus salivarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Eileen F; O'Connor, Paula M; Raftis, Emma J; O'Toole, Paul W; Stanton, Catherine; Cotter, Paul D; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin

    2011-12-01

    Bacteriocins produced by Lactobacillus salivarius isolates derived from a gastrointestinal origin have previously demonstrated efficacy for in vivo protection against Listeria monocytogenes infection. In this study, comparative genomic analysis was employed to investigate the intraspecies diversity of seven L. salivarius isolates of human and porcine intestinal origin, based on the genome of the well-characterized bacteriocin-producing strain L. salivarius UCC118. This revealed a highly conserved megaplasmid-borne gene cluster in these strains involved in the regulation and secretion of two-component class IIb bacteriocins. However, considerable intraspecific variation was observed in the structural genes encoding the bacteriocin peptides. They ranged from close relatives of abp118, such as salivaricin P, which differs by 2 amino acids, to completely novel bacteriocins, such as salivaricin T, which is characterized in this study. Salivaricin T inhibits closely related lactobacilli and bears little homology to previously characterized salivaricins. Interestingly, the two peptides responsible for salivaricin T activity, SalTα and SalTβ, share considerable identity with the component peptides of thermophilin 13, a bacteriocin produced by Streptococcus thermophilus. Furthermore, the salivaricin locus of strain DPC6488 also encodes an additional novel one-component class IId anti-listerial bacteriocin, salivaricin L. These findings suggest a high level of redundancy in the bacteriocins that can be produced by intestinal L. salivarius isolates using the same enzymatic production and export machinery. Such diversity may contribute to their ability to dominate and compete within the complex microbiota of the mammalian gut.

  7. A Common CYFIP1 Variant at the 15q11.2 Disease Locus Is Associated with Structural Variation at the Language-Related Left Supramarginal Gyrus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Jae Woo

    Full Text Available Copy number variants (CNVs at the Breakpoint 1 to Breakpoint 2 region at 15q11.2 (BP1-2 are associated with language-related difficulties and increased risk for developmental disorders in which language is compromised. Towards underlying mechanisms, we investigated relationships between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs across the region and quantitative measures of human brain structure obtained by magnetic resonance imaging of healthy subjects. We report an association between rs4778298, a common variant at CYFIP1, and inter-individual variation in surface area across the left supramarginal gyrus (lh.SMG, a cortical structure implicated in speech and language in independent discovery (n = 100 and validation cohorts (n = 2621. In silico analyses determined that this same variant, and others nearby, is also associated with differences in levels of CYFIP1 mRNA in human brain. One of these nearby polymorphisms is predicted to disrupt a consensus binding site for FOXP2, a transcription factor implicated in speech and language. Consistent with a model where FOXP2 regulates CYFIP1 levels and in turn influences lh.SMG surface area, analysis of publically available expression data identified a relationship between expression of FOXP2 and CYFIP1 mRNA in human brain. We propose that altered CYFIP1 dosage, through aberrant patterning of the lh.SMG, may contribute to language-related difficulties associated with BP1-2 CNVs. More generally, this approach may be useful in clarifying the contribution of individual genes at CNV risk loci.

  8. Transmission of single and multiple viral variants in primary HIV-1 subtype C infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Novitsky

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available To address whether sequences of viral gag and env quasispecies collected during the early post-acute period can be utilized to determine multiplicity of transmitted HIV's, recently developed approaches for analysis of viral evolution in acute HIV-1 infection [1,2] were applied. Specifically, phylogenetic reconstruction, inter- and intra-patient distribution of maximum and mean genetic distances, analysis of Poisson fitness, shape of highlighter plots, recombination analysis, and estimation of time to the most recent common ancestor (tMRCA were utilized for resolving multiplicity of HIV-1 transmission in a set of viral quasispecies collected within 50 days post-seroconversion (p/s in 25 HIV-infected individuals with estimated time of seroconversion. The decision on multiplicity of HIV infection was made based on the model's fit with, or failure to explain, the observed extent of viral sequence heterogeneity. The initial analysis was based on phylogeny, inter-patient distribution of maximum and mean distances, and Poisson fitness, and was able to resolve multiplicity of HIV transmission in 20 of 25 (80% cases. Additional analysis involved distribution of individual viral distances, highlighter plots, recombination analysis, and estimation of tMRCA, and resolved 4 of the 5 remaining cases. Overall, transmission of a single viral variant was identified in 16 of 25 (64% cases, and transmission of multiple variants was evident in 8 of 25 (32% cases. In one case multiplicity of HIV-1 transmission could not be determined. In primary HIV-1 subtype C infection, samples collected within 50 days p/s and analyzed by a single-genome amplification/sequencing technique can provide reliable identification of transmission multiplicity in 24 of 25 (96% cases. Observed transmission frequency of a single viral variant and multiple viral variants were within the ranges of 64% to 68%, and 32% to 36%, respectively.

  9. Genotype-Phenotype Associations of the CD-Associated Single Nucleotide Polymorphism within the Gene Locus Encoding Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-Receptor Type 22 in Patients of the Swiss IBD Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne R Spalinger

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22 plays an important role in immune cell function and intestinal homeostasis. The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs2476601 within the PTPN22 gene locus results in aberrant function of PTPN22 protein and protects from Crohn's disease (CD. Here, we investigated associations of PTPN22 SNP rs2476601 in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients in the Swiss IBD Cohort Study (SIBDCS.2'028 SIBDCS patients (1173 CD and 855 ulcerative colitis (UC patients were included. The clinical characteristics were analysed for an association with the presence of the PTPN22 SNP rs2476601 genotypes 'homozygous variant' (AA, 'heterozygous' (GA and 'homozygous wild-type' (GG.13 patients (0.6% were homozygous variant (AA for the PTPN22 polymorphism, 269 (13.3% heterozygous variant (GA and 1'746 (86.1% homozygous wild-type (GG. In CD, AA and GA genotypes were associated with less use of steroids and antibiotics, and reduced prevalence of vitamin D and calcium deficiency. In UC the AA and GA genotype was associated with increased use of azathioprine and anti-TNF antibodies, but significantly less patients with the PTPN22 variant featured malabsorption syndrome (p = 0.026.Our study for the first time addressed how presence of SNP rs2476601 within the PTPN22 gene affects clinical characteristics in IBD-patients. Several factors that correlate with more severe disease were found to be less common in CD patients carrying the A-allele, pointing towards a protective role for this variant in affected CD patients. In UC patients however, we found the opposite trend, suggesting a disease-promoting effect of the A-allele.

  10. The UNG2 Arg88Cys variant abrogates RPA-mediated recruitment of UNG2 to single-stranded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torseth, Kathrin; Doseth, Berit; Hagen, Lars; Olaisen, Camilla; Liabakk, Nina-Beate; Græsmann, Heidi; Durandy, Anne; Otterlei, Marit; Krokan, Hans E; Kavli, Bodil; Slupphaug, Geir

    2012-06-01

    In human cell nuclei, UNG2 is the major uracil-DNA glycosylase initiating DNA base excision repair of uracil. In activated B cells it has an additional role in facilitating mutagenic processing of AID-induced uracil at Ig loci and UNG-deficient patients develop hyper-IgM syndrome characterized by impaired class-switch recombination and disturbed somatic hypermutation. How UNG2 is recruited to either error-free or mutagenic uracil processing remains obscure, but likely involves regulated interactions with other proteins. The UNG2 N-terminal domain contains binding motifs for both proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and replication protein A (RPA), but the relative contribution of these interactions to genomic uracil processing is not understood. Interestingly, a heterozygous germline single-nucleotide variant leading to Arg88Cys (R88C) substitution in the RPA-interaction motif of UNG2 has been observed in humans, but with unknown functional relevance. Here we demonstrate that UNG2-R88C protein is expressed from the variant allele in a lymphoblastoid cell line derived from a heterozygous germ line carrier. Enzyme activity as well as localization in replication foci of UNG2-R88C was similar to that of WT. However, binding to RPA was essentially abolished by the R88C substitution, whereas binding to PCNA was unaffected. Moreover, we show that disruption of the PCNA-binding motif impaired recruitment of UNG2 to S-phase replication foci, demonstrating that PCNA is a major factor for recruitment of UNG2 to unperturbed replication forks. Conversely, in cells treated with hydroxyurea, RPA mediated recruitment of UNG2 to stalled replication forks independently of functional PCNA binding. Modulation of PCNA- versus RPA-binding may thus constitute a functional switch for UNG2 in cells subsequent to genotoxic stress and potentially also during the processing of uracil at the immunoglobulin locus in antigen-stimulated B cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  11. Identification and characterization of two functional variants in the human longevity gene FOXO3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flachsbart, Friederike; Dose, Janina; Gentschew, Liljana

    2017-01-01

    FOXO3 is consistently annotated as a human longevity gene. However, functional variants and underlying mechanisms for the association remain unknown. Here, we perform resequencing of the FOXO3 locus and single-nucleotide variant (SNV) genotyping in three European populations. We find two FOXO3 SN...

  12. Precise detection of de novo single nucleotide variants in human genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Romero, Laura; Palacios-Flores, Kim; Reyes, José; García, Delfino; Boege, Margareta; Dávila, Guillermo; Flores, Margarita; Schatz, Michael C; Palacios, Rafael

    2018-05-07

    The precise determination of de novo genetic variants has enormous implications across different fields of biology and medicine, particularly personalized medicine. Currently, de novo variations are identified by mapping sample reads from a parent-offspring trio to a reference genome, allowing for a certain degree of differences. While widely used, this approach often introduces false-positive (FP) results due to misaligned reads and mischaracterized sequencing errors. In a previous study, we developed an alternative approach to accurately identify single nucleotide variants (SNVs) using only perfect matches. However, this approach could be applied only to haploid regions of the genome and was computationally intensive. In this study, we present a unique approach, coverage-based single nucleotide variant identification (COBASI), which allows the exploration of the entire genome using second-generation short sequence reads without extensive computing requirements. COBASI identifies SNVs using changes in coverage of exactly matching unique substrings, and is particularly suited for pinpointing de novo SNVs. Unlike other approaches that require population frequencies across hundreds of samples to filter out any methodological biases, COBASI can be applied to detect de novo SNVs within isolated families. We demonstrate this capability through extensive simulation studies and by studying a parent-offspring trio we sequenced using short reads. Experimental validation of all 58 candidate de novo SNVs and a selection of non-de novo SNVs found in the trio confirmed zero FP calls. COBASI is available as open source at https://github.com/Laura-Gomez/COBASI for any researcher to use. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  13. Development and validation of a single-tube multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis for Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoinette A T P Brink

    Full Text Available Genotyping of Klebsiella pneumoniae is indispensable for management of nosocomial infections, monitoring of emerging strains--including extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL producers-, and general epidemiology. Such objectives require a high-resolution genotyping method with a fixed scheme that allows (1 long-term retrospective and prospective assessment, (2 objective result readout and (3 library storage for database development and exchangeable results. We have developed a multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA using a single-tube fluorescently primed multiplex PCR for 8 Variable Number Tandem Repeats (VNTRs and automated fragment size analysis. The type allocation scheme was optimized using 224 K. pneumoniae clinical isolates, which yielded 101 MLVA types. The method was compared to the gold standard multilocus sequence typing (MLST using a subset of these clinical isolates (n = 95 and found to be highly concordant, with at least as high a resolution but with considerably less hands-on time. Our results position this MLVA scheme as an appropriate, high-throughput and relatively low-cost tool for K. pneumoniae epidemiology.

  14. A single genetic locus in the phytopathogen Pantoea stewartii enables gut colonization and pathogenicity in an insect host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrinides, John; No, Alexander; Ochman, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Aphids are typically exposed to a variety of epiphytic and phytopathogenic bacteria, many of which have entomopathogenic potential. Here we describe the interaction between Pantoea stewartii ssp. stewartii DC283 (DC283), an enteric phytopathogen and causal agent of Stewart's wilt, and the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. When ingested by aphids, DC283 establishes and aggregates in the crop and gut, preventing honeydew flow and excretion, resulting in aphid death in 72 h. A mutagenesis screen identified a single locus, termed ucp1 (youcannot pass), whose disruption abolishes aphid pathogenicity. Moreover, the expression of ucp1 in Escherichia coli is sufficient to mediate the hindgut aggregation phenotype by this normally avirulent species. Ucp1 is related to six other proteins in the DC283 genome, each having a common N-terminal region and a divergent C-terminus, but only ucp1 has a role in pathogenicity. Based on predicted motifs and secondary structure, Ucp1 is a membrane-bound protein that functions in bacterial adhesion and promotes the formation of aggregates that are lethal to the insect host. These results illustrate that the enteric plant pathogenic bacteria have the capacity to exploit alternative non-plant hosts, and retain genetic determinants for colonizing the gut.

  15. Multi-locus genotyping of bottom fermenting yeasts by single nucleotide polymorphisms indicative of brewing characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikushima, Shigehito; Tateishi, Yoshiyuki; Kanai, Keiko; Shimada, Emiko; Tanaka, Misa; Ishiguro, Tatsuji; Mizutani, Satoru; Kobayashi, Osamu

    2012-04-01

    Yeast plays a capital role in brewing fermentation and has a direct impact on flavor and aroma. For the evaluation of competent brewing strains during quality control or development of novel strains it is standard practice to perform fermentation tests, which are costly and time-consuming. Here, we have categorized DNA markers which enable to distinguish and to screen brewing strains more efficiently than ever before. Sequence analysis at 289 loci in the genomes of six bottom fermenting Saccharomyces pastorianus strains revealed that 30 loci contained single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). By determining the nucleotide sequences at the SNP-loci in 26 other S. pastorianus strains and 20 strains of the top fermenting yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, almost all these strains could be discriminated solely on the basis of the SNPs. By comparing the fermentative phenotypes of these strains we found that some DNA markers showed a strong association with brewing characteristics, such as the production of ethyl acetate and hydrogen sulphide (H2S). Therefore, the DNA markers we identified will facilitate quality control and the efficient development of brewing yeast strains. Copyright © 2011 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. An Engineered Kinetic Amplification Mechanism for Single Nucleotide Variant Discrimination by DNA Hybridization Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sherry Xi; Seelig, Georg

    2016-04-20

    Even a single-nucleotide difference between the sequences of two otherwise identical biological nucleic acids can have dramatic functional consequences. Here, we use model-guided reaction pathway engineering to quantitatively improve the performance of selective hybridization probes in recognizing single nucleotide variants (SNVs). Specifically, we build a detection system that combines discrimination by competition with DNA strand displacement-based catalytic amplification. We show, both mathematically and experimentally, that the single nucleotide selectivity of such a system in binding to single-stranded DNA and RNA is quadratically better than discrimination due to competitive hybridization alone. As an additional benefit the integrated circuit inherits the property of amplification and provides at least 10-fold better sensitivity than standard hybridization probes. Moreover, we demonstrate how the detection mechanism can be tuned such that the detection reaction is agnostic to the position of the SNV within the target sequence. in contrast, prior strand displacement-based probes designed for kinetic discrimination are highly sensitive to position effects. We apply our system to reliably discriminate between different members of the let-7 microRNA family that differ in only a single base position. Our results demonstrate the power of systematic reaction network design to quantitatively improve biotechnology.

  17. The cardiovascular implication of single nucleotide polymorphisms of chromosome 9p21 locus among Arab population

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    Ayman A El-Menyar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Based on several reports including genome-wide association studies, genetic variability has been linked with higher (nearly half susceptibility toward coronary artery disease (CAD. We aimed to evaluate the association of chromosome 9p21 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs: rs2383207, rs10757278, and rs10757274 with the risk and severity of CAD among Arab population. Materials and Methods: A prospective observational case-control study was conducted between 2011 and 2012, in which 236 patients with CAD were recruited from the Heart Hospital in Qatar. Patients were categorized according to their coronary angiographic findings. Also, 152 healthy volunteers were studied to determine if SNPs are associated with risk of CAD. All subjects were genotyped for SNPs (rs2383207, rs2383206, rs10757274 and rs10757278 using allele-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results: Patients with CAD had a mean age of 57 ± 10; of them 77% were males, 54% diabetics, and 25% had family history of CAD. All SNPs were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium except rs2383206, with call rate >97%. After adjusting for age, sex and body mass index, the carriers of GG genotype for rs2383207 have increased the risk of having CAD with odds ratio (OR of 1.52 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-2.961, P = 0.046. Also, rs2383207 contributed to CAD severity with adjusted OR 1.80 (95% CI = 1.04-3.12, P = 0.035 based on the dominant genetic model. The other SNPs (rs10757274 and rs10757278 showed no significant association with the risk of CAD or its severity. Conclusion: Among Arab population in Qatar, only G allele of rs2483207 SNP is significantly associated with risk of CAD and its severity.

  18. Fine-Scale Mapping of the 5q11.2 Breast Cancer Locus Reveals at Least Three Independent Risk Variants Regulating MAP3K1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glubb, Dylan M.; Maranian, Mel J.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Pooley, Karen A.; Meyer, Kerstin B.; Kar, Siddhartha; Carlebur, Saskia; O'Reilly, Martin; Betts, Joshua A.; Hillman, Kristine M.; Kaufmann, Susanne; Beesley, Jonathan; Canisius, Sander; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Hogervorst, Frans B.; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Fasching, Peter A.; Ruebner, Matthias; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Peto, Julian; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Yang, Rongxi; Surowy, Harald; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Sanchez, Marie; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; González-Neira, Anna; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Brüning, Thomas; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tanaka, Hideo; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Helbig, Sonja; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; van den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Lambrechts, Diether; Zhao, Hui; Weltens, Caroline; van Limbergen, Erik; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Capra, Fabio; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Hallberg, Emily; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; See, Mee-Hoong; Cornes, Belinda; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Ikram, M. Kamran; Kristensen, Vessela; Zheng, Wei; Halverson, Sandra L.; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Asperen, Christi J.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Klevebring, Daniel; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W. M.; Collée, J. Margriet; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B.; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Ghoussaini, Maya; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K.; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Tang, Anthony; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Jones, Michael; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S.; Brown, Melissa A.; Ponder, Bruce A. J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Thompson, Deborah J.; Edwards, Stacey L.; Easton, Douglas F.; Dunning, Alison M.; French, Juliet D.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revealed SNP rs889312 on 5q11.2 to be associated with breast cancer risk in women of European ancestry. In an attempt to identify the biologically relevant variants, we analyzed 909 genetic variants across 5q11.2 in 103,991 breast cancer individuals and

  19. Fine-scale mapping of the 5q11.2 breast cancer locus reveals at least three independent risk variants regulating MAP3K1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.M. Glubb (Dylan); M. Maranian (Melanie); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); K.A. Pooley (Karen); K.B. Meyer (Kerstin); S. Kar (Siddhartha); A.F.C. Carlebur; M. O'Reilly (Marian); J.A. Betts (Joshua); K.M. Hillman (Kristine); S. Kaufmann (Susanne); J. Beesley (Jonathan); S. Canisius (Sander); J.L. Hopper (John); M.C. Southey (Melissa); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); C.E. van der Schoot (Ellen); K.R. Muir (K.); A. Lophatananon (Artitaya); S. Stewart-Brown (Sarah); P. Siriwanarangsan (Pornthep); P.A. Fasching (Peter); M. Ruebner (Matthias); A.B. Ekici (Arif); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); J. Peto (Julian); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); O. Fletcher (Olivia); N. Johnson (Nichola); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul D.P.); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); R. Yang (Rongxi); H. Surowy (Harald); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); F. Menegaux (Florence); M. Sanchez (Marie); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); H. Flyger (Henrik); A. González-Neira (Anna); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Brenner (Hermann); A.K. Dieffenbach (Aida Karina); V. Arndt (Volker); C. Stegmaier (Christa); A. Meindl (Alfons); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); Y.-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); T. Brüning (Thomas); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Blomqvist (Carl); K. Matsuo (Keitaro); H. Ito (Hidemi); H. Iwata (Hisato); H. Tanaka (Hideo); T. Dörk (Thilo); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); S. Helbig (Sonja); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); A.H. Wu (Anna H.); C.-C. Tseng (Chiu-Chen); D. Van Den Berg (David); D.O. Stram (Daniel O.); D. Lambrechts (Diether); H. Zhao (Hui); C. Weltens (Caroline); E. van Limbergen (Erik); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); M. Barile (Monica); F. Capra (Fabio); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J.E. Olson (Janet); B. Hallberg (Boubou); C. Vachon (Celine); G.G. Giles (Graham); R.L. Milne (Roger); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); J. Simard (Jacques); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); F. Labrèche (France); M. Dumont (Martine); S.-H. Teo (Soo-Hwang); C.H. Yip (Cheng Har); M.-H. See (Mee-Hoong); B.K. Cornes (Belinda); C-Y. Cheng (Ching-Yu); M.K. Ikram (Kamran); V. Kristensen (Vessela); W. Zheng (Wei); S.L. Halverson (Sandra L.); M. Shrubsole (Martha); J. Long (Jirong); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); S. Kauppila (Saila); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); S. Tchatchou (Sandrine); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); K. Czene (Kamila); D. Klevebring (Daniel); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. Eriksson (Mikael); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); J.W.M. Martens (John W. M.); J.M. Collée (Margriet); P. Hall (Per); J. Li (Jingmei); K. Humphreys (Keith); X.-O. Shu (Xiao-Ou); W. Lu (Wei); Y.-T. Gao (Yu-Tang); H. Cai (Hui); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); W.J. Blot (William); L.B. Signorello (Lisa B.); Q. Cai (Qiuyin); M. Shah (Mitul); M. Ghoussaini (Maya); D. Kang (Daehee); J.-Y. Choi (J.); S.K. Park (Sue); D-Y. Noh (Dong-Young); M. Hartman (Mikael); X. Miao; W.-Y. Lim (Wei-Yen); A. Tang (Anthony); U. Hamann (Ute); D. Torres (Diana); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); S. Sangrajrang (Suleeporn); V. Gaborieau (Valerie); P. Brennan (Paul); J.D. McKay (James); C. Olswold (Curtis); S. Slager (Susan); A.E. Toland (Amanda); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); C-Y. Shen (Chen-Yang); P.-E. Wu (Pei-Ei); J-C. Yu (Jyh-Cherng); M.-F. Hou (Ming-Feng); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); A. Ashworth (Alan); N. Orr (Nick); M. Jones (Michael); G. Pita (Guillermo); M.R. Alonso (Rosario); N. Álvarez (Nuria); D. Herrero (Daniel); D.C. Tessier (Daniel C.); D. Vincent (Daniel); F. Bacot (Francois); C. Luccarini (Craig); C. Baynes (Caroline); S. Ahmed (Shahana); S. Healey (Sue); M. Brown (Melissa); B.A.J. Ponder (Bruce A.J.); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D. Thompson (Deborah); S.L. Edwards (Stacey); D.F. Easton (Douglas); A.M. Dunning (Alison); J.D. French (Juliet)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractGenome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revealed SNP rs889312 on 5q11.2 to be associated with breast cancer risk in women of European ancestry. In an attempt to identify the biologically relevant variants, we analyzed 909 genetic variants across 5q11.2 in 103,991 breast cancer

  20. Nonrandom Distribution of miRNAs Genes and Single Nucleotide Variants in Keratoconus Loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota M Nowak

    Full Text Available Despite numerous studies, the causes of both development and progression of keratoconus remain elusive. Previous studies of this disorder focused mainly on one or two genetic factors only. However, in the analysis of such complex diseases all potential factors should be taken into consideration. The purpose of this study was a comprehensive analysis of known keratoconus loci to uncover genetic factors involved in this disease causation in the general population, which could be omitted in the original studies. In this investigation genomic data available in various databases and experimental own data were assessed. The lists of single nucleotide variants and miRNA genes localized in reported keratoconus loci were obtained from Ensembl and miRBase, respectively. The potential impact of nonsynonymous amino acid substitutions on protein structure and function was assessed with PolyPhen-2 and SIFT. For selected protein genes the ranking was made to choose those most promising for keratoconus development. Ranking results were based on topological features in the protein-protein interaction network. High specificity for the populations in which the causative sequence variants have been identified was found. In addition, the possibility of links between previously analyzed keratoconus loci was confirmed including miRNA-gene interactions. Identified number of genes associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory agents corroborated the hypothesis of their effect on the disease etiology. Distribution of the numerous sequences variants within both exons and mature miRNA which forces you to search for a broader look at the determinants of keratoconus. Our findings highlight the complexity of the keratoconus genetics.

  1. Single-variant and multi-variant trend tests for genetic association with next-generation sequencing that are robust to sequencing error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wonkuk; Londono, Douglas; Zhou, Lisheng; Xing, Jinchuan; Nato, Alejandro Q; Musolf, Anthony; Matise, Tara C; Finch, Stephen J; Gordon, Derek

    2012-01-01

    lower power than the corresponding single-variant simulation results, most probably due to our specification of multi-variant SNP correlation values. In conclusion, our LTTae,NGS addresses two key challenges with NGS disease studies; first, it allows for differential misclassification when computing the statistic; and second, it addresses the multiple-testing issue in that there is a multi-variant form of the statistic that has only one degree of freedom, and provides a single p value, no matter how many loci. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Application of a 5-tiered scheme for standardized classification of 2,360 unique mismatch repair gene variants in the InSiGHT locus-specific database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Bryony A; Spurdle, Amanda B; Plazzer, John-Paul

    2014-01-01

    and apply a standardized classification scheme to constitutional variants in the Lynch syndrome-associated genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Unpublished data submission was encouraged to assist in variant classification and was recognized through microattribution. The scheme was refined by multidisciplinary...... are now possible for 1,370 variants that were not obviously protein truncating from nomenclature. This large-scale endeavor will facilitate the consistent management of families suspected to have Lynch syndrome and demonstrates the value of multidisciplinary collaboration in the curation......The clinical classification of hereditary sequence variants identified in disease-related genes directly affects clinical management of patients and their relatives. The International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumours (InSiGHT) undertook a collaborative effort to develop, test...

  3. Genetic evidence and integration of various data sources for classifying uncertain variants into a single model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldgar, D.E.; Easton, D.F.; Byrnes, G.B.; Spurdle, A.B.; Iversen, E.S.; Greenblatt, M.S.; Boffetta, P.; Couch, F.J.; Wind, N. de; Eccles, D.; Foulkes, W.D.; Genuardi, M.; Hofstra, R.M.; Hogervorst, F.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.; Plon, S.E.; Radice, P.; Rasmussen, L.; Sinilnikova, O.M.; Tavtigian, S.V.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic testing often results in the finding of a variant whose clinical significance is unknown. A number of different approaches have been employed in the attempt to classify such variants. For some variants, case-control, segregation, family history, or other statistical studies can provide

  4. Functional Variants at the 11q13 Risk Locus for Breast Cancer Regulate Cyclin D1 Expression through Long-Range Enhancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Juliet D.; Ghoussaini, Maya; Edwards, Stacey L.; Meyer, Kerstin B.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Ahmed, Shahana; Khan, Sofia; Maranian, Mel J.; O’Reilly, Martin; Hillman, Kristine M.; Betts, Joshua A.; Carroll, Thomas; Bailey, Peter J.; Dicks, Ed; Beesley, Jonathan; Tyrer, Jonathan; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Beck, Andrew; Knoblauch, Nicholas W.; Chen, Constance; Kraft, Peter; Barnes, Daniel; González-Neira, Anna; Alonso, M. Rosario; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Conroy, Don; Dennis, Joe; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Cornelissen, Sten; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Fasching, Peter A.; Loehberg, Christian R.; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Peto, Julian; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Johnson, Nichola; Aitken, Zoe; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Menegaux, Florence; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Benitez, Javier; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Engel, Christoph; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Justenhoven, Christina; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Heikkilä, Päivi; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Sueta, Aiko; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Lambrechts, Diether; Peeters, Stephanie; Smeets, Ann; Floris, Giuseppe; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Sardella, Domenico; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lee, Adam; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Ng, Char-Hong; Vithana, Eranga Nishanthie; Kristensen, Vessela; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Klevebring, Daniel; Schoof, Nils; Hooning, Maartje J.; Martens, John W.M.; Collée, J. Margriet; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cox, Angela; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B.; Cai, Qiuyin; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Healey, Catherine S.; Shah, Mitul; Pooley, Karen A.; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Sng, Jen-Hwei; Sim, Xueling; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; McKay, James; Toland, Amanda E.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Godwin, Andrew K.; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Chen, Shou-Tung; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Ponder, Bruce A.J.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Brown, Melissa A.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Dunning, Alison M.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of 4,405 variants in 89,050 European subjects from 41 case-control studies identified three independent association signals for estrogen-receptor-positive tumors at 11q13. The strongest signal maps to a transcriptional enhancer element in which the G allele of the best candidate causative variant rs554219 increases risk of breast cancer, reduces both binding of ELK4 transcription factor and luciferase activity in reporter assays, and may be associated with low cyclin D1 protein levels in tumors. Another candidate variant, rs78540526, lies in the same enhancer element. Risk association signal 2, rs75915166, creates a GATA3 binding site within a silencer element. Chromatin conformation studies demonstrate that these enhancer and silencer elements interact with each other and with their likely target gene, CCND1. PMID:23540573

  5. Functional Analysis of a Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Locus Implicates BCAR1 and Suggests a Causal Variant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boardman-Pretty, Freya; Smith, Andrew J. P.; Cooper, Jackie

    2015-01-01

    disequilibrium (r2≥0.8) with rs4888378 were identified from 1000 Genome Project. ENCODE regulatory chromatin marks were used to create a shortlist of 6 possible regulatory variants. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays on the shortlist detected allele-specific protein binding to the lead SNP rs4888378...

  6. Functional variants at the 11q13 risk locus for breast cancer regulate cyclin D1 expression through long-range enhancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    French, Juliet D; Ghoussaini, Maya; Edwards, Stacey L

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of 4,405 variants in 89,050 European subjects from 41 case-control studies identified three independent association signals for estrogen-receptor-positive tumors at 11q13. The strongest signal maps to a transcriptional enhancer element in which the G allele of the best candidate causativ...

  7. Application of a 5-tiered scheme for standardized classification of 2,360 unique mismatch repair gene variants in the InSiGHT locus-specific database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, Bryony A.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Plazzer, John-Paul; Greenblatt, Marc S.; Akagi, Kiwamu; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Bapat, Bharati; Bernstein, Inge; Capella, Gabriel; den Dunnen, Johan T.; du Sart, Desiree; Fabre, Aurelie; Farrell, Michael P.; Farrington, Susan M.; Frayling, Ian M.; Frebourg, Thierry; Goldgar, David E.; Heinen, Christopher D.; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Kohonen-Corish, Maija; Robinson, Kristina Lagerstedt; Leung, Suet Yi; Martins, Alexandra; Moller, Pal; Morak, Monika; Nystrom, Minna; Peltomaki, Paivi; Pineda, Marta; Qi, Ming; Ramesar, Rajkumar; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte; Scott, Rodney J.; Sijmons, Rolf; Tavtigian, Sean V.; Tops, Carli M.; Weber, Thomas; Wijnen, Juul; Woods, Michael O.; Macrae, Finlay; Genuardi, Maurizio

    The clinical classification of hereditary sequence variants identified in disease-related genes directly affects clinical management of patients and their relatives. The International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumours (InSiGHT) undertook a collaborative effort to develop, test and

  8. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Hamdi (Yosr); Soucy, P. (Penny); Adoue, V. (Véronique); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); S. Canisius (Sander); Lemaçon, A. (Audrey); A. Droit (Arnaud); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); Arndt, V. (Volker); Baynes, C. (Caroline); C. Blomqvist (Carl); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet K.); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); J.S. Brand (Judith S.); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); Brenner, H. (Hermann); A. Broeks (Annegien); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); Couch, F.J. (Fergus J.); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); J. Dennis (Joe); P. Devilee (Peter); T. Dörk (Thilo); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); M. Eriksson (Mats); P.A. Fasching (Peter); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); H. Flyger (Henrik); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); Giles, G.G. (Graham G.); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); A. González-Neira (Anna); G. Grenaker Alnæs (Grethe); P. Guénel (Pascal); L. Haeberle (Lothar); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); U. Hamann (Ute); Hallberg, E. (Emily); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); J.L. Hopper (John); A. Jakubowska (Anna); M. Jones (Michael); M. Kabisch (Maria); V. Kataja (Vesa); Lambrechts, D. (Diether); L. Le Marchand (Loic); A. Lindblom (Annika); J. Lubinski (Jan); A. Mannermaa (Arto); M. Maranian (Melanie); S. Margolin (Sara); Marme, F. (Frederik); R.L. Milne (Roger); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); P. Neven (Patrick); C. Olswold (Curtis); J. Peto (Julian); Plaseska-Karanfilska, D. (Dijana); K. Pykäs (Katri); P. Radice (Paolo); A. Rudolph (Anja); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); X.-O. Shu (Xiao-Ou); M.C. Southey (Melissa); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); D. Torres (Diana); T. Truong (Thérèse); C. Vachon (Celine); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); Q. Wang (Qin); R. Winqvist (Robert); W. Zheng (Wei); J. Benítez (Javier); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.M. Dunning (Alison); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); Kristensen, V. (Vessela); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas); T. Pastinen (Tomi); S. Nord (Silje); J. Simard (Jacques)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThere are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are

  9. The semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia: clinical and neuroimaging evidence in single subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Iaccarino

    Full Text Available We present a clinical-neuroimaging study in a series of patients with a clinical diagnosis of semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia (svPPA, with the aim to provide clinical-functional correlations of the cognitive and behavioral manifestations at the single-subject level.We performed neuropsychological investigations, 18F-FDG-PET single-subject and group analysis, with an optimized SPM voxel-based approach, and correlation analyses. A measurement of white matter integrity by means of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI was also available for a subgroup of patients.Cognitive assessment confirmed the presence of typical semantic memory deficits in all patients, with a relative sparing of executive, attentional, visuo-constructional, and episodic memory domains. 18F-FDG-PET showed a consistent pattern of cerebral hypometabolism across all patients, which correlated with performance in semantic memory tasks. In addition, a majority of patients also presented with behavioral disturbances associated with metabolic dysfunction in limbic structures. In a subgroup of cases the DTI analysis showed FA abnormalities in the inferior longitudinal and uncinate fasciculi.Each svPPA individual had functional derangement involving an extended, connected system within the left temporal lobe, a crucial part of the verbal semantic network, as well as an involvement of limbic structures. The latter was associated with behavioral manifestations and extended beyond the area of atrophy shown by CT scan.Single-subject 18F-FDG-PET analysis can account for both cognitive and behavioral alterations in svPPA. This provides useful support to the clinical diagnosis.

  10. The regulated secretory pathway and human disease: insights from gene variants and single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen eSalton

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The regulated secretory pathway provides critical control of peptide, growth factor, and hormone release from neuroendocrine and endocrine cells, and neurons, maintaining physiological homeostasis. Propeptides and prohormones are packaged into dense core granules (DCGs, where they frequently undergo tissue-specific processing as the DCG matures. Proteins of the granin family are DCG components, and although their function is not fully understood, data suggest they are involved in DCG formation and regulated protein/peptide secretion, in addition to their role as precursors of bioactive peptides. Association of gene variation, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, with neuropsychiatric, endocrine and metabolic diseases, has implicated specific secreted proteins and peptides in disease pathogenesis. For example, a SNP at position 196 (G/A of the human brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF gene dysregulates protein processing and secretion and leads to cognitive impairment. This suggests more generally that variants identified in genes encoding secreted growth factors, peptides, hormones, and proteins involved in DCG biogenesis, protein processing, and the secretory apparatus, could provide insight into the process of regulated secretion as well as disorders that result when it is impaired.

  11. SNPer: an R library for quantitative variant analysis on single nucleotide polymorphisms among influenza virus populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unitsa Sangket

    Full Text Available Influenza virus (IFV can evolve rapidly leading to genetic drifts and shifts resulting in human and animal influenza epidemics and pandemics. The genetic shift that gave rise to the 2009 influenza A/H1N1 pandemic originated from a triple gene reassortment of avian, swine and human IFVs. More minor genetic alterations in genetic drift can lead to influenza drug resistance such as the H274Y mutation associated with oseltamivir resistance. Hence, a rapid tool to detect IFV mutations and the potential emergence of new virulent strains can better prepare us for seasonal influenza outbreaks as well as potential pandemics. Furthermore, identification of specific mutations by closely examining single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in IFV sequences is essential to classify potential genetic markers associated with potentially dangerous IFV phenotypes. In this study, we developed a novel R library called "SNPer" to analyze quantitative variants in SNPs among IFV subpopulations. The computational SNPer program was applied to three different subpopulations of published IFV genomic information. SNPer queried SNPs data and grouped the SNPs into (1 universal SNPs, (2 likely common SNPs, and (3 unique SNPs. SNPer outperformed manual visualization in terms of time and labor. SNPer took only three seconds with no errors in SNP comparison events compared with 40 hours with errors using manual visualization. The SNPer tool can accelerate the capacity to capture new and potentially dangerous IFV strains to mitigate future influenza outbreaks.

  12. Leveraging long read sequencing from a single individual to provide a comprehensive resource for benchmarking variant calling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, John C; Tootoonchi Afshar, Pegah; Mohiyuddin, Marghoob; Chen, Xi; Li, Jian; Bani Asadi, Narges; Gerstein, Mark B; Wong, Wing H; Lam, Hugo Y K

    2015-09-28

    A high-confidence, comprehensive human variant set is critical in assessing accuracy of sequencing algorithms, which are crucial in precision medicine based on high-throughput sequencing. Although recent works have attempted to provide such a resource, they still do not encompass all major types of variants including structural variants (SVs). Thus, we leveraged the massive high-quality Sanger sequences from the HuRef genome to construct by far the most comprehensive gold set of a single individual, which was cross validated with deep Illumina sequencing, population datasets, and well-established algorithms. It was a necessary effort to completely reanalyze the HuRef genome as its previously published variants were mostly reported five years ago, suffering from compatibility, organization, and accuracy issues that prevent their direct use in benchmarking. Our extensive analysis and validation resulted in a gold set with high specificity and sensitivity. In contrast to the current gold sets of the NA12878 or HS1011 genomes, our gold set is the first that includes small variants, deletion SVs and insertion SVs up to a hundred thousand base-pairs. We demonstrate the utility of our HuRef gold set to benchmark several published SV detection tools.

  13. Common single nucleotide variants underlying drug addiction: more than a decade of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, Kora-Mareen; Giné, Elena; Echeverry-Alzate, Victor; Calleja-Conde, Javier; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodriguez; López-Moreno, Jose Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Drug-related phenotypes are common complex and highly heritable traits. In the last few years, candidate gene (CGAS) and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a huge number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with drug use, abuse or dependence, mainly related to alcohol or nicotine. Nevertheless, few of these associations have been replicated in independent studies. The aim of this study was to provide a review of the SNPs that have been most significantly associated with alcohol-, nicotine-, cannabis- and cocaine-related phenotypes in humans between the years of 2000 and 2012. To this end, we selected CGAS, GWAS, family-based association and case-only studies published in peer-reviewed international scientific journals (using the PubMed/MEDLINE and Addiction GWAS Resource databases) in which a significant association was reported. A total of 371 studies fit the search criteria. We then filtered SNPs with at least one replication study and performed meta-analysis of the significance of the associations. SNPs in the alcohol metabolizing genes, in the cholinergic gene cluster CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4, and in the DRD2 and ANNK1 genes, are, to date, the most replicated and significant gene variants associated with alcohol- and nicotine-related phenotypes. In the case of cannabis and cocaine, a far fewer number of studies and replications have been reported, indicating either a need for further investigation or that the genetics of cannabis/cocaine addiction are more elusive. This review brings a global state-of-the-art vision of the behavioral genetics of addiction and collaborates on formulation of new hypothesis to guide future work. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  14. Fine-mapping inflammatory bowel disease loci to single-variant resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Hailiang; Fang, Ming; Jostins, Luke; Umićević Mirkov, Maša; Boucher, Gabrielle; Anderson, Carl A; Andersen, Vibeke; Cleynen, Isabelle; Cortes, Adrian; Crins, François; D'Amato, Mauro; Deffontaine, Valérie; Dmitrieva, Julia; Docampo, Elisa; Elansary, Mahmoud; Farh, Kyle Kai-How; Franke, Andre; Gori, Ann-Stephan; Goyette, Philippe; Halfvarson, Jonas; Haritunians, Talin; Knight, Jo; Lawrance, Ian C; Lees, Charlie W; Louis, Edouard; Mariman, Rob; Meuwissen, Theo; Mni, Myriam; Momozawa, Yukihide; Parkes, Miles; Spain, Sarah L; Théâtre, Emilie; Trynka, Gosia; Satsangi, Jack; van Sommeren, Suzanne; Vermeire, Severine; Xavier, Ramnik J; Weersma, Rinse K; Duerr, Richard H; Mathew, Christopher G; Rioux, John D; McGovern, Dermot P B; Cho, Judy H; Georges, Michel; Daly, Mark J; Barrett, Jeffrey C

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders that affect millions of people worldwide. Genome-wide association studies have identified 200 inflammatory bowel disease-associated loci, but few have been conclusively resolved to specific functional variants. Here we

  15. Fine-mapping inflammatory bowel disease loci to single-variant resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Hailiang; Fang, Ming; Jostins, Luke

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders that affect millions of people worldwide. Genome-wide association studies have identified 200 inflammatory bowel disease-associated loci, but few have been conclusively resolved to specific functional variants. Here w...

  16. Single-nucleotide variant in multiple copies of a deleted in azoospermia (DAZ) sequence - a human Y chromosome quantitative polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmulewicz, Martin N; Ruiz, Luis M; Reategui, Erika P; Hussini, Saeed; Herrera, Rene J

    2002-01-01

    The evolution of the deleted in azoospermia (DAZ) gene family supports prevalent theories on the origin and development of sex chromosomes and sexual dimorphism. The ancestral DAZL gene in human chromosome 3 is known to be involved in germline development of both males and females. The available phylogenetic data suggest that some time after the divergence of the New World and Old World monkey lineages, the DAZL gene, which is found in all mammals, was copied to the Y chromosome of an ancestor to the Old World monkeys, but not New World monkeys. In modern man, the Y-linked DAZ gene complex is located on the distal part of the q arm. It is thought that after being copied to the Y chromosome, and after the divergence of the human and great ape lineages, the DAZ gene in the former underwent internal rearrangements. This included tandem duplications as well as a T > C transition altering an MboI restriction enzyme site in a duplicated sequence. In this study, we report on the ratios of MboI-/MboI+ variant sequences in individuals from seven worldwide human populations (Basque, Benin, Egypt, Formosa, Kungurtug, Oman and Rwanda) in the DAZ complex. The ratio of PCR MboI- and MboI+ amplicons can be used to characterize individuals and populations. Our results show a nonrandom distribution of MboI-/MboI+ sequence ratios in all populations examined, as well as significant differences in ratios between populations when compared pairwise. The multiple ratios imply that there have been more than one recent reorganization events at this locus. Considering the dynamic nature of this locus and its involvement in male fertility, we investigated the extent and distribution of this polymorphism. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  17. Identification of independent association signals and putative functional variants for breast cancer risk through fine-scale mapping of the 12p11 locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Zeng (Chenjie); Guo, X. (Xingyi); J. Long (Jirong); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); A. Droit (Arnaud); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); M. Ghoussaini (Maya); S. Kar (Siddhartha); Freeman, A. (Adam); J.L. Hopper (John); R.L. Milne (Roger); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet K.); Wang, Q. (Qin); J. Dennis (Joe); S. Agata (Simona); S. Ahmed (Shahana); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); Antonenkova, N.N. (Natalia N.); A. Arason (Adalgeir); Arndt, V. (Volker); B.K. Arun (Banu); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); F. Bacot (Francois); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); Baynes, C. (Caroline); A. Beeghly-Fadiel (Alicia); J. Benítez (Javier); M. Bermisheva (Marina); C. Blomqvist (Carl); W.J. Blot (William); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); J.S. Brand (Judith S.); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); P. Brennan (Paul); H. Brenner (Hermann); A. Broeks (Annegien); T. Brüning (Thomas); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); S.S. Buys (Saundra); Q. Cai (Qiuyin); T. Caldes (Trinidad); I. Campbell (Ian); T.A. Carpenter (Adrian); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); Choi, J.-Y. (Ji-Yeob); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); C. Clarke (Christine); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); K. Czene (Kamila); M.B. Daly (Mary B.); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); K. De Leeneer (Kim); P. Devilee (Peter); O. Díez (Orland); S.M. Domchek (Susan); M. Doody (Michele); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); T. Dörk (Thilo); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); M. Dumont (Martine); M. Dwek (Miriam); Dworniczak, B. (Bernd); K.M. Egan (Kathleen); U. Eilber (Ursula); Z. Einbeigi (Zakaria); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); S.D. Ellis (Steve); D. Frost (Debra); F. Lalloo (Fiona); P.A. Fasching (Peter); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); H. Flyger (Henrik); M. Friedlander (Michael); E. Friedman (Eitan); Gambino, G. (Gaetana); Gao, Y.-T. (Yu-Tang); J. Garber (Judy); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); F. Damiola (Francesca); F. Lesueur (Fabienne); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); Giles, G.G. (Graham G.); A.K. Godwin (Andrew K.); D. Goldgar (David); A. González-Neira (Anna); M.H. Greene (Mark H.); P. Guénel (Pascal); L. Haeberle (Lothar); C.A. Haiman (Christopher A.); Hallberg, E. (Emily); U. Hamann (Ute); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); S. Hart (Stewart); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); J.M. Hartman (Joost); N. Hassan (Norhashimah); S. Healey (Sue); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); S. Verhoef; Hendricks, C.B. (Carolyn B.); P. Hillemanns (Peter); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); P.J. Hulick (Peter); D. Hunter (David); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); C. Isaacs (Claudine); H. Ito (Hidemi); A. Jakubowska (Anna); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); Jaworska-Bieniek, K. (Katarzyna); U.B. Jensen; E.M. John (Esther); Joly Beauparlant, C. (Charles); M. Jones (Michael); M. Kabisch (Maria); D. Kang (Daehee); Karlan, B.Y. (Beth Y.); S. Kauppila (Saila); M. Kerin (Michael); S. Khan (Sofia); E.K. Khusnutdinova (Elza); J.A. Knight (Julia); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); P. Kraft (Peter); A. Kwong (Ava); Y. Laitman (Yael); Lambrechts, D. (Diether); C. Lazaro (Conxi); L. Le Marchand (Loic); C.N. Lee (Chuen); M.H. Lee (Min Hyuk); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); J. Li (Jingmei); A. Liljegren (Annelie); A. Lindblom (Annika); A. Lophatananon (Artitaya); J. Lubinski (Jan); P.L. Mai (Phuong); A. Mannermaa (Arto); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); S. Margolin (Sara); Marme, F. (Frederik); K. Matsuo (Keitaro); L. McGuffog (Lesley); A. Meindl (Alfons); F. Menegaux (Florence); M. Montagna (Marco); K.R. Muir (K.); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); P. Newcomb (Polly); S. Nord (Silje); R.L. Nussbaum (Robert L.); K. Offit (Kenneth); E. Olah; O.I. Olopade (Olufunmilayo I.); C. Olswold (Curtis); A. Osorio (Ana); L. Papi (Laura); T.-W. Park-Simon; Paulsson-Karlsson, Y. (Ylva); S.T.H. Peeters (Stephanie); B. Peissel (Bernard); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); J. Peto (Julian); G. Pfeiler (Georg); C. Phelan (Catherine); Presneau, N. (Nadege); P. Radice (Paolo); N. Rahman (Nazneen); S.J. Ramus (Susan); M.U. Rashid (Muhammad); G. Rennert (Gad); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); Rudolph, A. (Anja); R. Salani (Ritu); Sangrajrang, S. (Suleeporn); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); P. Schürmann (Peter); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); C.-Y. Shen (Chen-Yang); M. Shrubsole (Martha); X.-O. Shu (Xiao-Ou); A.J. Sigurdson (Alice); C.F. Singer (Christian); S. Slager (Susan); Soucy, P. (Penny); M.C. Southey (Melissa); D. Steinemann (Doris); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); C. Szabo (Csilla); Tchatchou, S. (Sandrine); P.J. Teixeira; S.-H. Teo (Soo-Hwang); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); D.C. Tessier (Daniel C.); A. Teulé (A.); M. Thomassen (Mads); L. Tihomirova (Laima); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); A.E. Toland (Amanda); N. Tung (Nadine); C. Turnbull (Clare); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); ven den Berg, D. (David); J. Vijai (Joseph); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); R. Winqvist (Robert); Wong, T.Y. (Tien Y.); A.H. Wu (Anna); Yannoukakos, D. (Drakoulis); J-C. Yu (Jyh-Cherng); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); P. Hall (Per); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.M. Dunning (Alison); J. Simard (Jacques); F.J. Couch (Fergus); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); D.F. Easton (Douglas F.); W. Zheng (Wei)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Multiple recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs10771399, at 12p11 that is associated with breast cancer risk. Method: We performed a fine-scale mapping study of a 700 kb region including 441 genotyped and more

  18. Quantitative characterization of all single amino acid variants of a viral capsid-based drug delivery vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Emily C; Jakobson, Christopher M; Favor, Andrew H; Lobba, Marco J; Álvarez-Benedicto, Ester; Francis, Matthew B; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2018-04-11

    Self-assembling proteins are critical to biological systems and industrial technologies, but predicting how mutations affect self-assembly remains a significant challenge. Here, we report a technique, termed SyMAPS (Systematic Mutation and Assembled Particle Selection), that can be used to characterize the assembly competency of all single amino acid variants of a self-assembling viral structural protein. SyMAPS studies on the MS2 bacteriophage coat protein revealed a high-resolution fitness landscape that challenges some conventional assumptions of protein engineering. An additional round of selection identified a previously unknown variant (CP[T71H]) that is stable at neutral pH but less tolerant to acidic conditions than the wild-type coat protein. The capsids formed by this variant could be more amenable to disassembly in late endosomes or early lysosomes-a feature that is advantageous for delivery applications. In addition to providing a mutability blueprint for virus-like particles, SyMAPS can be readily applied to other self-assembling proteins.

  19. FunSAV: predicting the functional effect of single amino acid variants using a two-stage random forest model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjun Wang

    Full Text Available Single amino acid variants (SAVs are the most abundant form of known genetic variations associated with human disease. Successful prediction of the functional impact of SAVs from sequences can thus lead to an improved understanding of the underlying mechanisms of why a SAV may be associated with certain disease. In this work, we constructed a high-quality structural dataset that contained 679 high-quality protein structures with 2,048 SAVs by collecting the human genetic variant data from multiple resources and dividing them into two categories, i.e., disease-associated and neutral variants. We built a two-stage random forest (RF model, termed as FunSAV, to predict the functional effect of SAVs by combining sequence, structure and residue-contact network features with other additional features that were not explored in previous studies. Importantly, a two-step feature selection procedure was proposed to select the most important and informative features that contribute to the prediction of disease association of SAVs. In cross-validation experiments on the benchmark dataset, FunSAV achieved a good prediction performance with the area under the curve (AUC of 0.882, which is competitive with and in some cases better than other existing tools including SIFT, SNAP, Polyphen2, PANTHER, nsSNPAnalyzer and PhD-SNP. The sourcecodes of FunSAV and the datasets can be downloaded at http://sunflower.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp/sjn/FunSAV.

  20. An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment for Upper-Level Forensic Science, Biochemistry, or Molecular Biology Courses: Human DNA Amplification Using STR Single Locus Primers by Real-Time PCR with SYBR Green Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Kelly M.; Kadunc, Raelynn E.

    2012-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) was conducted using published human TPOX single-locus DNA primers for validation and various student-designed short tandem repeat (STR) primers for Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) loci. SYBR Green was used to detect the amplification of the expected amplicons. The…

  1. MR imaging of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, cerebellitis and myelitis in infancy: likely topographic variant of a single process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortuno, J. R.; Menor, F.; Esteban, M. J.; Pamies, J.; Gomez-Gosalvez, F. A.; Jover, J.

    2003-01-01

    To describe MR images of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADE) in a paediatric group, particularly focused on its likely topographic variants, cerebellitis and myelitis, its evolution, and the differential diagnosis between it an an initial outbreak of multiple sclerosis. Initial and follow-up cranial MR images were retrospectively reviewed for 14 paediatric patients diagnosed with either ADE, cerebellitis or myelitis. In 9 patients, a spinal cord monitoring was included. Three topographic variants have been considered: ADE (7 patients). In the case of ADE, the supratentorial white matter was always affected, the brain stem in five (71%) and the cerebellum in two (28,5%). Basal ganglionic lesions were detected in 5 patients (71%) and cortical lesions in one (14%). Associated spinal cord abnormality was found in five of the six cases in which this study was included (83%). ADE lesions tended to be nodular and poorly differentiated whereas in cerebellitis and myelitis the predominant pattern was one of diffuse damage. Evolution of the lesions was toward reduction/resolution. Follow-up using MR in the medium-term in 6 patients (four ADE and two cerebellitis) did not detect any new lesions. Clinical follow-up of the patients did not show any neurological recurrences in any of them. ADE, cerebillits and myelitis could be topographic variants of a single process with a common pathogeny. As the spinal cord often seems to play a role in ADE, spinal cord monitoring would be recommended, even in the absence of the above-mentioned symptoms. This spinal cord abnormality, which is usually diffuse, plus deep gray matter damage, as well as the disease of monophase course, corroborated by a sequential MR follow-up, is all helpful in the differential diagnosis with multiple sclerosis. Nonetheless, the differential diagnosis between a recurring form of ADE and an encephalomyelitis is practically impossible to make. (Author) 33 refs

  2. Investigation of the role of TCF4 rare sequence variants in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basmanav, F Buket; Forstner, Andreas J; Fier, Heide; Herms, Stefan; Meier, Sandra; Degenhardt, Franziska; Hoffmann, Per; Barth, Sandra; Fricker, Nadine; Strohmaier, Jana; Witt, Stephanie H; Ludwig, Michael; Schmael, Christine; Moebus, Susanne; Maier, Wolfgang; Mössner, Rainald; Rujescu, Dan; Rietschel, Marcella; Lange, Christoph; Nöthen, Markus M; Cichon, Sven

    2015-07-01

    Transcription factor 4 (TCF4) is one of the most robust of all reported schizophrenia risk loci and is supported by several genetic and functional lines of evidence. While numerous studies have implicated common genetic variation at TCF4 in schizophrenia risk, the role of rare, small-sized variants at this locus-such as single nucleotide variants and short indels which are below the resolution of chip-based arrays requires further exploration. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between rare TCF4 sequence variants and schizophrenia. Exon-targeted resequencing was performed in 190 German schizophrenia patients. Six rare variants at the coding exons and flanking sequences of the TCF4 gene were identified, including two missense variants and one splice site variant. These six variants were then pooled with nine additional rare variants identified in 379 European participants of the 1000 Genomes Project, and all 15 variants were genotyped in an independent German sample (n = 1,808 patients; n = 2,261 controls). These data were then analyzed using six statistical methods developed for the association analysis of rare variants. No significant association (P power analyses suggest that further research into the possible involvement of rare TCF4 sequence variants in schizophrenia risk is warranted by the assessment of larger cohorts with higher statistical power to identify rare variant associations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Genome-Wide Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms Discovery and High-Density Genetic Map Construction in Cauliflower Using Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhenqing; Gu, Honghui; Sheng, Xiaoguang; Yu, Huifang; Wang, Jiansheng; Huang, Long; Wang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Molecular markers and genetic maps play an important role in plant genomics and breeding studies. Cauliflower is an important and distinctive vegetable; however, very few molecular resources have been reported for this species. In this study, a novel, specific-locus amplified fragment (SLAF) sequencing strategy was employed for large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery and high-density genetic map construction in a double-haploid, segregating population of cauliflower. A total of 12.47 Gb raw data containing 77.92 M pair-end reads were obtained after processing and 6815 polymorphic SLAFs between the two parents were detected. The average sequencing depths reached 52.66-fold for the female parent and 49.35-fold for the male parent. Subsequently, these polymorphic SLAFs were used to genotype the population and further filtered based on several criteria to construct a genetic linkage map of cauliflower. Finally, 1776 high-quality SLAF markers, including 2741 SNPs, constituted the linkage map with average data integrity of 95.68%. The final map spanned a total genetic length of 890.01 cM with an average marker interval of 0.50 cM, and covered 364.9 Mb of the reference genome. The markers and genetic map developed in this study could provide an important foundation not only for comparative genomics studies within Brassica oleracea species but also for quantitative trait loci identification and molecular breeding of cauliflower. PMID:27047515

  4. Single assay for simultaneous detection and differential identification of human and avian influenza virus types, subtypes, and emergent variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Metzgar

    Full Text Available For more than four decades the cause of most type A influenza virus infections of humans has been attributed to only two viral subtypes, A/H1N1 or A/H3N2. In contrast, avian and other vertebrate species are a reservoir of type A influenza virus genome diversity, hosting strains representing at least 120 of 144 combinations of 16 viral hemagglutinin and 9 viral neuraminidase subtypes. Viral genome segment reassortments and mutations emerging within this reservoir may spawn new influenza virus strains as imminent epidemic or pandemic threats to human health and poultry production. Traditional methods to detect and differentiate influenza virus subtypes are either time-consuming and labor-intensive (culture-based or remarkably insensitive (antibody-based. Molecular diagnostic assays based upon reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR have short assay cycle time, and high analytical sensitivity and specificity. However, none of these diagnostic tests determine viral gene nucleotide sequences to distinguish strains and variants of a detected pathogen from one specimen to the next. Decision-quality, strain- and variant-specific pathogen gene sequence information may be critical for public health, infection control, surveillance, epidemiology, or medical/veterinary treatment planning. The Resequencing Pathogen Microarray (RPM-Flu is a robust, highly multiplexed and target gene sequencing-based alternative to both traditional culture- or biomarker-based diagnostic tests. RPM-Flu is a single, simultaneous differential diagnostic assay for all subtype combinations of type A influenza viruses and for 30 other viral and bacterial pathogens that may cause influenza-like illness. These other pathogen targets of RPM-Flu may co-infect and compound the morbidity and/or mortality of patients with influenza. The informative specificity of a single RPM-Flu test represents specimen-specific viral gene sequences as determinants of virus type, A

  5. Single assay for simultaneous detection and differential identification of human and avian influenza virus types, subtypes, and emergent variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzgar, David; Myers, Christopher A; Russell, Kevin L; Faix, Dennis; Blair, Patrick J; Brown, Jason; Vo, Scott; Swayne, David E; Thomas, Colleen; Stenger, David A; Lin, Baochuan; Malanoski, Anthony P; Wang, Zheng; Blaney, Kate M; Long, Nina C; Schnur, Joel M; Saad, Magdi D; Borsuk, Lisa A; Lichanska, Agnieszka M; Lorence, Matthew C; Weslowski, Brian; Schafer, Klaus O; Tibbetts, Clark

    2010-02-03

    For more than four decades the cause of most type A influenza virus infections of humans has been attributed to only two viral subtypes, A/H1N1 or A/H3N2. In contrast, avian and other vertebrate species are a reservoir of type A influenza virus genome diversity, hosting strains representing at least 120 of 144 combinations of 16 viral hemagglutinin and 9 viral neuraminidase subtypes. Viral genome segment reassortments and mutations emerging within this reservoir may spawn new influenza virus strains as imminent epidemic or pandemic threats to human health and poultry production. Traditional methods to detect and differentiate influenza virus subtypes are either time-consuming and labor-intensive (culture-based) or remarkably insensitive (antibody-based). Molecular diagnostic assays based upon reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) have short assay cycle time, and high analytical sensitivity and specificity. However, none of these diagnostic tests determine viral gene nucleotide sequences to distinguish strains and variants of a detected pathogen from one specimen to the next. Decision-quality, strain- and variant-specific pathogen gene sequence information may be critical for public health, infection control, surveillance, epidemiology, or medical/veterinary treatment planning. The Resequencing Pathogen Microarray (RPM-Flu) is a robust, highly multiplexed and target gene sequencing-based alternative to both traditional culture- or biomarker-based diagnostic tests. RPM-Flu is a single, simultaneous differential diagnostic assay for all subtype combinations of type A influenza viruses and for 30 other viral and bacterial pathogens that may cause influenza-like illness. These other pathogen targets of RPM-Flu may co-infect and compound the morbidity and/or mortality of patients with influenza. The informative specificity of a single RPM-Flu test represents specimen-specific viral gene sequences as determinants of virus type, A/HN subtype, virulence

  6. Continuous imaging of a single neutral atom in a variant magneto-optical trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Tian; Zhou Shuyu; Chen Peng; Li Lin; Hong Tao; Wang Yuzhu

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate continuous imaging of a single 87 Rb atom confined in a steep magneto-optical trap with an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera and realize a one-dimensional micro-optical trap array with a Dammann grating. We adopt several methods to reduce the noise in the fluorescence signal we obtain with the EMCCD. Step jumping characteristics of the fluorescence demonstrate capturing and losing of individual atoms. (authors)

  7. Single-chain vascular endothelial growth factor variant with antagonist activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Thomas P; Soni, Bobby; Schwartz, Thue W

    2002-01-01

    receptor molecules and inducing dimerization. By mixing two vascular endothelial growth factor monomers, each with different substitutions, heterodimers with only one active receptor binding site have previously been prepared. These heterodimers bind the receptor molecule but are unable to induce...... dimerization and activation. However, preparation of heterodimers is cumbersome, involving separate expression of different monomers, refolding the mixture, and separating heterodimers from homodimers. Here we show that a fully functional ligand can efficiently be expressed as a single protein chain containing...

  8. Heterogeneity of rabbit endogenous pyrogens is not attributable to glycosylated variants of a single polypeptide chain.

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, P A; Cebula, T A; Windle, B E

    1981-01-01

    Rabbit endogenous pyrogens were of about the same molecular size, but showed considerable heterogeneity of their isoelectric points. We attempted to show that this heterogeneity was attributable to variable glycosylation of a single polypeptide chain. When peritoneal exudate cells were stimulated to make pyrogens in the presence of 2-deoxy-D-glucose, there was a relatively trivial suppression of pyrogen release, and analysis by isoelectric focusing showed parallel inhibition of secretion of a...

  9. Single channel planar lipid bilayer recordings of the melittin variant MelP5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennouri, Aziz; Mayer, Simon Finn; Schroeder, Thomas B H; Mayer, Michael

    2017-10-01

    MelP5 is a 26 amino acid peptide derived from melittin, the main active constituent of bee venom, with five amino acid replacements. The pore-forming activity of MelP5 in lipid membranes is attracting attention because MelP5 forms larger pores and induces dye leakage through liposome membranes at a lower concentration than melittin. Studies of MelP5 have so far focused on ensemble measurements of membrane leakage and impedance; here we extend this characterization with an electrophysiological comparison between MelP5 and melittin using planar lipid bilayer recordings. These experiments reveal that MelP5 pores in lipid membranes composed of 3:1 phosphatidylcholine:cholesterol consist of an average of 10 to 12 monomers compared to an average of 3 to 9 monomers for melittin. Both peptides form transient pores with dynamically varying conductance values similar to previous findings for melittin, but MelP5 occasionally also forms stable, well-defined pores with single channel conductance values that vary greatly and range from 50 to 3000pS in an electrolyte solution containing 100mM KCl. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Heterogeneity of rabbit endogenous pyrogens is not attributable to glycosylated variants of a single polypeptide chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, P A; Cebula, T A; Windle, B E

    1981-10-01

    Rabbit endogenous pyrogens were of about the same molecular size, but showed considerable heterogeneity of their isoelectric points. We attempted to show that this heterogeneity was attributable to variable glycosylation of a single polypeptide chain. When peritoneal exudate cells were stimulated to make pyrogens in the presence of 2-deoxy-D-glucose, there was a relatively trivial suppression of pyrogen release, and analysis by isoelectric focusing showed parallel inhibition of secretion of all the forms of endogenous pyrogen. When cells were stimulated in the presence of 3H-labeled amino acids and 14C-labeled glucosamine or glucose, the purified pyrogens were labeled with 3H but not with 14C. Macrophage membrane preparations were made which contained glycosyl transferases and could transfer sugar residues from sugar nucleotides to deglycosylated fetuin. These macrophage membrane preparations did not transfer sugars to the pI 7.3 endogenous pyrogen. Treatment of endogenous pyrogens with neuraminidase or with periodate produced no evidence suggesting that the pyrogens were glycosylated. Last, endogenous pyrogens did not bind to any of four lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. This evidence suggests that the heterogeneity of rabbit endogenous pyrogens is not attributable to glycosylation and must have some other cause.

  11. Detection of de novo single nucleotide variants in offspring of atomic-bomb survivors close to the hypocenter by whole-genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horai, Makiko; Mishima, Hiroyuki; Hayashida, Chisa; Kinoshita, Akira; Nakane, Yoshibumi; Matsuo, Tatsuki; Tsuruda, Kazuto; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Sato, Shinya; Imanishi, Daisuke; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Hata, Tomoko; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Yoshiura, Koh-Ichiro

    2018-03-01

    Ionizing radiation released by the atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, in 1945 caused many long-term illnesses, including increased risks of malignancies such as leukemia and solid tumours. Radiation has demonstrated genetic effects in animal models, leading to concerns over the potential hereditary effects of atomic bomb-related radiation. However, no direct analyses of whole DNA have yet been reported. We therefore investigated de novo variants in offspring of atomic-bomb survivors by whole-genome sequencing (WGS). We collected peripheral blood from three trios, each comprising a father (atomic-bomb survivor with acute radiation symptoms), a non-exposed mother, and their child, none of whom had any past history of haematological disorders. One trio of non-exposed individuals was included as a control. DNA was extracted and the numbers of de novo single nucleotide variants in the children were counted by WGS with sequencing confirmation. Gross structural variants were also analysed. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants prior to the study. There were 62, 81, and 42 de novo single nucleotide variants in the children of atomic-bomb survivors, compared with 48 in the control trio. There were no gross structural variants in any trio. These findings are in accord with previously published results that also showed no significant genetic effects of atomic-bomb radiation on second-generation survivors.

  12. Screening for single nucleotide variants, small indels and exon deletions with a next-generation sequencing based gene panel approach for Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawitz, Peter M; Schiska, Daniela; Krüger, Ulrike; Appelt, Sandra; Heinrich, Verena; Parkhomchuk, Dmitri; Timmermann, Bernd; Millan, Jose M; Robinson, Peter N; Mundlos, Stefan; Hecht, Jochen; Gross, Manfred

    2014-09-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized both by deafness and blindness. For the three clinical subtypes of Usher syndrome causal mutations in altogether 12 genes and a modifier gene have been identified. Due to the genetic heterogeneity of Usher syndrome, the molecular analysis is predestined for a comprehensive and parallelized analysis of all known genes by next-generation sequencing (NGS) approaches. We describe here the targeted enrichment and deep sequencing for exons of Usher genes and compare the costs and workload of this approach compared to Sanger sequencing. We also present a bioinformatics analysis pipeline that allows us to detect single-nucleotide variants, short insertions and deletions, as well as copy number variations of one or more exons on the same sequence data. Additionally, we present a flexible in silico gene panel for the analysis of sequence variants, in which newly identified genes can easily be included. We applied this approach to a cohort of 44 Usher patients and detected biallelic pathogenic mutations in 35 individuals and monoallelic mutations in eight individuals of our cohort. Thirty-nine of the sequence variants, including two heterozygous deletions comprising several exons of USH2A, have not been reported so far. Our NGS-based approach allowed us to assess single-nucleotide variants, small indels, and whole exon deletions in a single test. The described diagnostic approach is fast and cost-effective with a high molecular diagnostic yield.

  13. Second site escape of a T20-dependent HIV-1 variant by a single amino acid change in the CD4 binding region of the envelope glycoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berkhout Ben

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously described the selection of a T20-dependent human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 variant in a patient on T20 therapy. The fusion inhibitor T20 targets the viral envelope (Env protein by blocking a conformational switch that is critical for viral entry into the host cell. T20-dependent viral entry is the result of 2 mutations in Env (GIA-SKY, creating a protein that undergoes a premature conformational switch, and the presence of T20 prevents this premature switch and rescues viral entry. In the present study, we performed 6 independent evolution experiments with the T20-dependent HIV-1 variant in the absence of T20, with the aim to identify second site compensatory changes, which may provide new mechanistic insights into Env function and the T20-dependence mechanism. Results Escape variants with improved replication capacity appeared within 42 days in 5 evolution cultures. Strikingly, 3 cultures revealed the same single amino acid change in the CD4 binding region of Env (glycine at position 431 substituted for arginine: G431R. This mutation was sufficient to abolish the T20-dependence phenotype and restore viral replication in the absence of T20. The GIA-SKY-G431R escape variant produces an Env protein that exhibits reduced syncytia formation and reduced cell-cell fusion activity. The escape variant was more sensitive to an antibody acting on an early gp41 intermediate, suggesting that the G431R mutation helps preserve a pre-fusion Env conformation, similar to T20 action. The escape variant was also less sensitive to soluble CD4, suggesting a reduced CD4 receptor affinity. Conclusion The forced evolution experiments indicate that the premature conformational switch of the T20-dependent HIV-1 Env variant (GIA-SKY can be corrected by a second site mutation in Env (GIA-SKY-G431R that affects the interaction with the CD4 receptor.

  14. Microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphisms in the β-globin locus control region-hypersensitive Site 2: SPECIFICITY of Tunisian βs chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Mustapha, Maha; Moumni, Imen; Zorai, Amine; Douzi, Kaïs; Ghanem, Abderraouf; Abbes, Salem

    2012-01-01

    The diversity of sickle cell disease severity is attributed to several cis acting factors, among them the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and (AT) rich region in the β-locus control region (β-LCR). This contains five DNase I hypersensitive sites (HS) located 6 to 22 kb upstream to the ϵ gene. The most important of these is the HS2 (5' β-LCR-HS2), characterized by the presence of three different SNPs and a microsatellite region known to be in association with β(S) chromosomes in various populations. The aim of this study was to present the molecular investigation of the 5' β-LCR-HS2 site in normal and sickle cell disease individuals in order to determine if there is any correlation or specificity between these molecular markers, the β(S) Tunisian chromosomes and phenotypical expression of sickle cell disease. One hundred and twenty-four chromosomes from Tunisian individuals (49 β(S) carriers and 13 normal individuals) were screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing for the polymorphic short tandem microsatellite repeats (AT)(X)N(12)(AT)(Y) and the three SNPs (rs7119428, rs9736333 and rs60240093) of the 5' β-LCR-HS2. Twelve configurations of the microsatellite motif were found with an ancestral configuration elaborated by ClustalW software. Normal and mutated alleles were observed at the homozygous and heterozygous states for the three SNPs. Correlation between microsatellites and SNPs suggests that mutant SNP alleles were mainly associated, in the homozygous sickle cell disease phenotype, with the (AT)(8)N(12)GT(AT)(7) configuration, whereas, normal SNP alleles were associated with the (AT)(X)N(12)(AT)(11) configurations in normal β(A) chromosomes. The correlation of these various configurations with Hb F expression was also investigated. The principal component analysis (PCA) showed the correlation between the homozygous sickle cell disease phenotype, mutated SNP alleles and the Benin microsatellite configuration (AT)(8)N(12)GT

  15. Co-release of noradrenaline and dopamine in the cerebral cortex elicited by single train and repeated train stimulation of the locus coeruleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Pierluigi

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies by our group suggest that extracellular dopamine (DA and noradrenaline (NA may be co-released from noradrenergic nerve terminals in the cerebral cortex. We recently demonstrated that the concomitant release of DA and NA could be elicited in the cerebral cortex by electrical stimulation of the locus coeruleus (LC. This study analyses the effect of both single train and repeated electrical stimulation of LC on NA and DA release in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC, occipital cortex (Occ, and caudate nucleus. To rule out possible stressful effects of electrical stimulation, experiments were performed on chloral hydrate anaesthetised rats. Results Twenty min electrical stimulation of the LC, with burst type pattern of pulses, increased NA and DA both in the mPFC and in the Occ. NA in both cortices and DA in the mPFC returned to baseline within 20 min after the end of the stimulation period, while DA in the Occ reached a maximum increase during 20 min post-stimulation and remained higher than baseline values at 220 min post-stimulation. Local perfusion with tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10 μM markedly reduced baseline NA and DA in the mPFC and Occ and totally suppressed the effect of electrical stimulation in both areas. A sequence of five 20 min stimulations at 20 min intervals were delivered to the LC. Each stimulus increased NA to the same extent and duration as the first stimulus, whereas DA remained elevated at the time next stimulus was delivered, so that baseline DA progressively increased in the mPFC and Occ to reach about 130 and 200% the initial level, respectively. In the presence of the NA transport (NAT blocker desipramine (DMI, 100 μM, multiple LC stimulation still increased extracellular NA and DA levels. Electrical stimulation of the LC increased NA levels in the homolateral caudate nucleus, but failed to modify DA level. Conclusion The results confirm and extend that LC stimulation induces a concomitant

  16. Alzheimer Disease and Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia: Automatic Classification Based on Cortical Atrophy for Single-Subject Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Christiane; Pijnenburg, Yolande A L; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Versteeg, Adriaan; Tijms, Betty; de Munck, Jan C; Hafkemeijer, Anne; Rombouts, Serge A R B; van der Grond, Jeroen; van Swieten, John; Dopper, Elise; Scheltens, Philip; Barkhof, Frederik; Vrenken, Hugo; Wink, Alle Meije

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of an image-based classifier to distinguish between Alzheimer disease (AD) and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) in individual patients by using gray matter (GM) density maps computed from standard T1-weighted structural images obtained with multiple imagers and with independent training and prediction data. Materials and Methods The local institutional review board approved the study. Eighty-four patients with AD, 51 patients with bvFTD, and 94 control subjects were divided into independent training (n = 115) and prediction (n = 114) sets with identical diagnosis and imager type distributions. Training of a support vector machine (SVM) classifier used diagnostic status and GM density maps and produced voxelwise discrimination maps. Discriminant function analysis was used to estimate suitability of the extracted weights for single-subject classification in the prediction set. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and area under the ROC curve (AUC) were calculated for image-based classifiers and neuropsychological z scores. Results Training accuracy of the SVM was 85% for patients with AD versus control subjects, 72% for patients with bvFTD versus control subjects, and 79% for patients with AD versus patients with bvFTD (P ≤ .029). Single-subject diagnosis in the prediction set when using the discrimination maps yielded accuracies of 88% for patients with AD versus control subjects, 85% for patients with bvFTD versus control subjects, and 82% for patients with AD versus patients with bvFTD, with a good to excellent AUC (range, 0.81-0.95; P ≤ .001). Machine learning-based categorization of AD versus bvFTD based on GM density maps outperforms classification based on neuropsychological test results. Conclusion The SVM can be used in single-subject discrimination and can help the clinician arrive at a diagnosis. The SVM can be used to distinguish disease-specific GM patterns in patients with AD

  17. Improved score statistics for meta-analysis in single-variant and gene-level association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingjing; Chen, Sai; Abecasis, Gonçalo

    2018-06-01

    Meta-analysis is now an essential tool for genetic association studies, allowing them to combine large studies and greatly accelerating the pace of genetic discovery. Although the standard meta-analysis methods perform equivalently as the more cumbersome joint analysis under ideal settings, they result in substantial power loss under unbalanced settings with various case-control ratios. Here, we investigate the power loss problem by the standard meta-analysis methods for unbalanced studies, and further propose novel meta-analysis methods performing equivalently to the joint analysis under both balanced and unbalanced settings. We derive improved meta-score-statistics that can accurately approximate the joint-score-statistics with combined individual-level data, for both linear and logistic regression models, with and without covariates. In addition, we propose a novel approach to adjust for population stratification by correcting for known population structures through minor allele frequencies. In the simulated gene-level association studies under unbalanced settings, our method recovered up to 85% power loss caused by the standard methods. We further showed the power gain of our methods in gene-level tests with 26 unbalanced studies of age-related macular degeneration . In addition, we took the meta-analysis of three unbalanced studies of type 2 diabetes as an example to discuss the challenges of meta-analyzing multi-ethnic samples. In summary, our improved meta-score-statistics with corrections for population stratification can be used to construct both single-variant and gene-level association studies, providing a useful framework for ensuring well-powered, convenient, cross-study analyses. © 2018 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  18. [Construction of a phage antibody library and screening of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor variant III single chain antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dong-gang; Duan, Xiao-yi; Guo, You-min; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Quan-ying; Yang, Guang-xiao

    2010-01-01

    To obtain specific anti-epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) single chain antibody (ScFv) by phage antibody library display system. The total RNA was extracted from the spleen B cells of BALB/c mice immunized with pep-3-OVA protein, and the first-strand cDNA was synthesized by reverse transcription. Antibody VH and VL gene fragments were amplified and joined to a ScFv gene with the linker. The ScFv gene was ligated into the phagemid vector pCANTAB5E, which was transformed into competent E. coli TG1. The transformed cells were then infected with M13KO7 helper phage to yield the recombinant phage to construct the phage ScFv library. Pep-3-BSA protein was used to screen the phage antibody library and ELISA carried out to characterize the activity of the antibody. The VH and VL gene fragments of the antibody were about 350 bp and 320 bp in length as analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The ScFv gene was 780 bp, consistent with the expected length. The recombinant phagemid with ScFv gene insert was rescued, and an immune phage ScFv library with the content of 5.0x10(6) was constructed. The recombinant ScFv phage had a titer of 3.0x10(4) cfu/ml, and the fourth phage harvest yielded 56 times as much as that of the first one. SDS-PAGE demonstrated a molecular mass of the soluble ScFv of about 28 kD. ELISA results indicated good specificity of the ScFv to bind EGFRvIII. An immune phage ScFv library is successfully constructed, and the ScFv antibody fragment is capable of specific binding to EGFRvIII.

  19. Comparison of semi-automated commercial rep-PCR fingerprinting, spoligotyping, 12-locus MIRU-VNTR typing and single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of the embB gene as molecular typing tools for Mycobacterium bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Federica; Camperio, Cristina; Coltella, Luana; Selvaggini, Serena; Boniotti, Maria Beatrice; Pacciarini, Maria Lodovica; Di Marco Lo Presti, Vincenzo; Marianelli, Cinzia

    2017-08-04

    Highly discriminatory genotyping strategies are essential in molecular epidemiological studies of tuberculosis. In this study we evaluated, for the first time, the efficacy of the repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) DiversiLab Mycobacterium typing kit over spoligotyping, 12-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing and embB single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis for Mycobacterium bovis typing. A total of 49 M. bovis animal isolates were used. DNA was extracted and genomic DNA was amplified using the DiversiLab Mycobacterium typing kit. The amplified fragments were separated and detected using a microfluidics chip with Agilent 2100. The resulting rep-PCR-based DNA fingerprints were uploaded to and analysed using web-based DiversiLab software through Pearson's correlation coefficient. Rep-PCR DiversiLab grouped M. bovis isolates into ten different clusters. Most isolates sharing identical spoligotype, MIRU-VNTR profile or embB gene polymorphism were grouped into different rep-PCR clusters. Rep-PCR DiversiLab displayed greater discriminatory power than spoligotyping and embB SNP analysis but a lower resolution power than the 12-locus MIRU-VNTR analysis. MIRU-VNTR confirmed that it is superior to the other PCR-based methods tested here. In combination with spoligotyping and 12-locus MIRU-VNTR analysis, rep-PCR improved the discriminatory power for M. bovis typing.

  20. Single nucleotide variants and InDels identified from whole-genome re-sequencing of Guzerat, Gyr, Girolando and Holstein cattle breeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedenia Bonvino Stafuzza

    Full Text Available Whole-genome re-sequencing, alignment and annotation analyses were undertaken for 12 sires representing four important cattle breeds in Brazil: Guzerat (multi-purpose, Gyr, Girolando and Holstein (dairy production. A total of approximately 4.3 billion reads from an Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencer generated for each animal 10.7 to 16.4-fold genome coverage. A total of 27,441,279 single nucleotide variations (SNVs and 3,828,041 insertions/deletions (InDels were detected in the samples, of which 2,557,670 SNVs and 883,219 InDels were novel. The submission of these genetic variants to the dbSNP database significantly increased the number of known variants, particularly for the indicine genome. The concordance rate between genotypes obtained using the Bovine HD BeadChip array and the same variants identified by sequencing was about 99.05%. The annotation of variants identified numerous non-synonymous SNVs and frameshift InDels which could affect phenotypic variation. Functional enrichment analysis was performed and revealed that variants in the olfactory transduction pathway was over represented in all four cattle breeds, while the ECM-receptor interaction pathway was over represented in Girolando and Guzerat breeds, the ABC transporters pathway was over represented only in Holstein breed, and the metabolic pathways was over represented only in Gyr breed. The genetic variants discovered here provide a rich resource to help identify potential genomic markers and their associated molecular mechanisms that impact economically important traits for Gyr, Girolando, Guzerat and Holstein breeding programs.

  1. A study on single nucleotide polymorphism of exon 7 T/C (locus 593 of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase gene in healthy Han population in the Shanghai region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-bao XIA

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the distribution of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH gene exon 7 T/C (locus 593 in healthy Han population in Shanghai region and the features different from other races. Methods The SNP in PAF-AH gene exon 7 T/C (locus 593 was detected and analyzed by PCR and sequencing in 110 healthy Han people from Shanghai areas. The genotype and allele frequency were then calculated and compared with that in other races in combination with review of relevant literature. Results The amplified product of the SNP in PAF-AH gene exon 7 T/C (locus 593 was 240 bp in 110 healthy Han people, of whom 97 were with TT genotype and 13 with TC genotype, but no CC genotype was found. As to the allele frequency distribution, T type allele took the highest position, and C type followed. The genotype frequency of TT and TC was 88.2% and 11.8%, respectively, and they were markedly different from that in German population (0.95%, while not statistically significant different from that in British population (7.67%. Conclusions There exists SNP in PAF-AH gene exon 7 T/C (position 593 in healthy Han people in Shanghai region, with a higher frequency of T→C mutation. The mutational genotype frequency is found to be located at the locus 593 is 11.81%, and it is markedly different from that in German population, but not significantly different from that in British population.

  2. Highly parallel and short-acting amplification with locus-specific primers to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms by the DigiTag2 assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nao Nishida

    Full Text Available The DigiTag2 assay enables analysis of a set of 96 SNPs using Kapa 2GFast HotStart DNA polymerase with a new protocol that has a total running time of about 7 hours, which is 6 hours shorter than the previous protocol. Quality parameters (conversion rate, call rate, reproducibility and concordance were at the same levels as when genotype calls were acquired using the previous protocol. Multiplex PCR with 192 pairs of locus-specific primers was available for target preparation in the DigiTag2 assay without the optimization of reaction conditions, and quality parameters had the same levels as those acquired with 96-plex PCR. The locus-specific primers were able to achieve sufficient (concentration of target amplicon ≥5 nM and specific (concentration of unexpected amplicons <2 nM amplification within 2 hours, were also able to achieve detectable amplifications even when working in a 96-plex or 192-plex form. The improved DigiTag2 assay will be an efficient platform for screening an intermediate number of SNPs (tens to hundreds of sites in the replication analysis after genome-wide association study. Moreover, highly parallel and short-acting amplification with locus-specific primers may thus facilitate widespread application to other PCR-based assays.

  3. Functional PMS2 hybrid alleles containing a pseudogene-specific missense variant trace back to a single ancient intrachromosomal recombination event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganster, Christina; Wernstedt, Annekatrin; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard; Messiaen, Ludwine; Schmidt, Konrad; Rahner, Nils; Heinimann, Karl; Fonatsch, Christa; Zschocke, Johannes; Wimmer, Katharina

    2010-05-01

    Sequence exchange between PMS2 and its pseudogene PMS2CL, embedded in an inverted duplication on chromosome 7p22, has been reported to be an ongoing process that leads to functional PMS2 hybrid alleles containing PMS2- and PMS2CL-specific sequence variants at the 5'-and the 3'-end, respectively. The frequency of PMS2 hybrid alleles, their biological significance, and the mechanisms underlying their formation are largely unknown. Here we show that overall hybrid alleles account for one-third of 384 PMS2 alleles analyzed in individuals of different ethnic backgrounds. Depending on the population, 14-60% of hybrid alleles carry PMS2CL-specific sequences in exons 13-15, the remainder only in exon 15. We show that exons 13-15 hybrid alleles, named H1 hybrid alleles, constitute different haplotypes but trace back to a single ancient intrachromosomal recombination event with crossover. Taking advantage of an ancestral sequence variant specific for all H1 alleles we developed a simple gDNA-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay that can be used to identify H1-allele carriers with high sensitivity and specificity (100 and 99%, respectively). Because H1 hybrid alleles harbor missense variant p.N775S of so far unknown functional significance, we assessed the H1-carrier frequency in 164 colorectal cancer patients. So far, we found no indication that the variant plays a major role with regard to cancer susceptibility. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Mapping of the disease locus and identification of ADAMTS10 as a candidate gene in a canine model of primary open angle glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kuchtey

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG is a leading cause of blindness worldwide, with elevated intraocular pressure as an important risk factor. Increased resistance to outflow of aqueous humor through the trabecular meshwork causes elevated intraocular pressure, but the specific mechanisms are unknown. In this study, we used genome-wide SNP arrays to map the disease gene in a colony of Beagle dogs with inherited POAG to within a single 4 Mb locus on canine chromosome 20. The Beagle POAG locus is syntenic to a previously mapped human quantitative trait locus for intraocular pressure on human chromosome 19. Sequence capture and next-generation sequencing of the entire canine POAG locus revealed a total of 2,692 SNPs segregating with disease. Of the disease-segregating SNPs, 54 were within exons, 8 of which result in amino acid substitutions. The strongest candidate variant causes a glycine to arginine substitution in a highly conserved region of the metalloproteinase ADAMTS10. Western blotting revealed ADAMTS10 protein is preferentially expressed in the trabecular meshwork, supporting an effect of the variant specific to aqueous humor outflow. The Gly661Arg variant in ADAMTS10 found in the POAG Beagles suggests that altered processing of extracellular matrix and/or defects in microfibril structure or function may be involved in raising intraocular pressure, offering specific biochemical targets for future research and treatment strategies.

  5. A variant in the G6PC2/ABCB11 locus is associated with increased fasting plasma glucose, increased basal hepatic glucose production and increased insulin release after oral and intravenous glucose loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, C S; Grarup, N; Krarup, N T

    2009-01-01

    An association between elevated fasting plasma glucose and the common rs560887 G allele in the G6PC2/ABCB11 locus has been reported. In Danes we aimed to examine rs560887 in relation to plasma glucose and serum insulin responses following oral and i.v. glucose loads and in relation to hepatic...... glucose production during a hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp. Furthermore, we examined rs560887 for association with impaired fasting glycaemia (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), type 2 diabetes and components of the metabolic syndrome....

  6. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression : identification of a modifier of breast cancer risk at locus 11q22.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline B; Pastinen, Tomi; Droit, Arnaud; Lemaçon, Audrey; Adlard, Julian; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Arason, Adalgeir; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K; Azzollini, Jacopo; Bane, Anita; Barjhoux, Laure; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berthet, Pascaline; Blok, Marinus J; Bobolis, Kristie; Bonadona, Valérie; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bradbury, Angela R; Brewer, Carole; Buecher, Bruno; Buys, Saundra S; Caligo, Maria A; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; De la Hoya, Miguel; De Leeneer, Kim; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Ros; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Ejlertsen, Bent; Engel, Christoph; Gareth Evans, D; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Foretova, Lenka; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Fountzilas, George; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Ganschow, Pamela; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldgar, David E; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Hahnen, Eric; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Hays, John L; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hulick, Peter J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Joseph, Vijai; Just, Walter; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Karlan, Beth Y; Kets, Carolien M; Kirk, Judy; Kriege, Mieke; Laitman, Yael; Laurent, Maïté; Lazaro, Conxi; Leslie, Goska; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Loman, Niklas; Loud, Jennifer T; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mariani, Milena; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McGuffog, Lesley; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Montagna, Marco; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nussbaum, Robert L; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Ong, Kai-Ren; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Osorio, Ana; Papi, Laura; Park, Sue Kyung; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Segura, Pedro Perez; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M; Radice, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Rookus, Matti A; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Sevenet, Nicolas; Shah, Payal D; Singer, Christian F; Slavin, Thomas P; Snape, Katie; Sokolowska, Johanna; Sønderstrup, Ida Marie Heeholm; Southey, Melissa; Spurdle, Amanda B; Stadler, Zsofia; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Tan, Yen; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teulé, Alex; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tung, Nadine; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van der Luijt, Rob B; van Engelen, Klaartje; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wijnen, Juul T; Rebbeck, Timothy; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Nord, Silje; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C; Simard, Jacques

    PURPOSE: Cis-acting regulatory SNPs resulting in differential allelic expression (DAE) may, in part, explain the underlying phenotypic variation associated with many complex diseases. To investigate whether common variants associated with DAE were involved in breast cancer susceptibility among BRCA1

  7. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: identification of a modifier of breast cancer risk at locus 11q22.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Hamdi (Yosr); Soucy, P. (Penny); Kuchenbaeker, K.B. (Karoline B.); Pastinen, T. (Tomi); A. Droit (Arnaud); Lemaçon, A. (Audrey); J.W. Adlard (Julian); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A. Arason (Adalgeir); N. Arnold (Norbert); B.K. Arun (Banu); J. Azzollini; A.L. Bane (Anita L.); Barjhoux, L. (Laure); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); J. Benítez (Javier); P. Berthet (Pascaline); M.J. Blok (Marinus); K.A. Bobolis (Kristie A.); V. Bonadona (Valérie); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); Bradbury, A.R. (Angela R.); C. Brewer (Carole); B. Buecher (Bruno); Buys, S.S. (Saundra S.); M.A. Caligo (Maria); Chiquette, J. (Jocelyne); W. Chung (Wendy); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); Daly, M.B. (Mary B.); F. Damiola (Francesca); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); K. De Leeneer (Kim); O. Díez (Orland); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); S.M. Domchek (Susan); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); D. Eccles (Diana); R. Eeles (Ros); Z. Einbeigi (Zakaria); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); EMBRACE; C. Engel (Christoph); Gareth Evans, D.; L. Feliubadaló (L.); L. Foretova (Lenka); F. Fostira (Florentia); Foulkes, W.D. (William D.); G. Fountzilas (George); E. Friedman (Eitan); D. Frost (Debra); P. Ganschow (Pamela); P.A. Ganz (Patricia A.); J. Garber (Judy); S.A. Gayther (Simon); GEMO Study Collaborators; A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); A.K. Godwin (Andrew K.); D. Goldgar (David); M.H. Greene (Mark H.); J. Gronwald (Jacek); E. Hahnen (Eric); U. Hamann (Ute); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); S. Hart (Stewart); J. Hays (John); HEBON; F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); P.J. Hulick (Peter); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); C. Isaacs (Claudine); L. Izatt (Louise); A. Jakubowska (Anna); M. James (Margaret); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); U.B. Jensen; E.M. John (Esther); V. Joseph (Vijai); Just, W. (Walter); Kaczmarek, K. (Katarzyna); Karlan, B.Y. (Beth Y.); KConFab Investigators; C.M. Kets; J. Kirk (Judy); Kriege, M. (Mieke); Y. Laitman (Yael); Laurent, M. (Maïté); C. Lazaro (Conxi); Leslie, G. (Goska); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); F. Lesueur (Fabienne); A. Liljegren (Annelie); N. Loman (Niklas); J.T. Loud (Jennifer); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); Mariani, M. (Milena); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); L. McGuffog (Lesley); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A. Meindl (Alfons); A. Miller (Austin); M. Montagna (Marco); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); R.L. Nussbaum (Robert L.); Olah, E. (Edith); O.I. Olopade (Olufunmilayo I.); K.-R. Ong (Kai-Ren); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); A. Osorio (Ana); L. Papi (Laura); S.K. Park (Sue K.); Pedersen, I.S. (Inge Sokilde); B. Peissel (Bernard); P.P. Segura (Pedro Perez); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); C. Phelan (Catherine); P. Radice (Paolo); J. Rantala (Johanna); Rappaport-Fuerhauser, C. (Christine); G. Rennert (Gad); A.L. Richardson (Andrea); M. Robson (Mark); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); M.A. Rookus (Matti); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); N. Sevenet (Nicolas); Shah, P.D. (Payal D.); C.F. Singer (Christian); Slavin, T.P. (Thomas P.); Snape, K. (Katie); J. Sokolowska (Johanna); Sønderstrup, I.M.H. (Ida Marie Heeholm); M.C. Southey (Melissa); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); Stadler, Z. (Zsofia); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); C. Sutter (Christian); Tan, Y. (Yen); M.-K. Tea; P.J. Teixeira; A. Teulé (A.); S.-H. Teo (Soo-Hwang); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); M. Thomassen (Mads); L. Tihomirova (Laima); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); A.E. Toland (Amanda); N. Tung (Nadine); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); K. van Engelen (Klaartje); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); K. Offit (Kenneth); Couch, F.J. (Fergus J.); S. Nord (Silje); D.F. Easton (Douglas F.); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); Simard, J. (Jacques)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Cis-acting regulatory SNPs resulting in differential allelic expression (DAE) may, in part, explain the underlying phenotypic variation associated with many complex diseases. To investigate whether common variants associated with DAE were involved in breast cancer susceptibility

  8. Analysis of the ABCA4 genomic locus in Stargardt disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zernant, Jana; Xie, Yajing Angela; Ayuso, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    excluded since they were not conserved in non-human primates, were frequent in African populations and, therefore, represented ancestral, and not disease-associated, variants. The sequence variability in the ABCA4 locus is extensive and the non-coding sequences do not harbor frequent mutations in STGD...... patients of European-American descent. Defining disease-associated alleles in the ABCA4 locus requires exceptionally well characterized large cohorts and extensive analyses by a combination of various approaches....

  9. Comparative analysis of chimeric ZFP-, TALE- and Cas9-piggyBac transposases for integration into a single locus in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wentian; Galvan, Daniel L; Woodard, Lauren E; Dorset, Dan; Levy, Shawn; Wilson, Matthew H

    2017-08-21

    Integrating DNA delivery systems hold promise for many applications including treatment of diseases; however, targeted integration is needed for improved safety. The piggyBac (PB) transposon system is a highly active non-viral gene delivery system capable of integrating defined DNA segments into host chromosomes without requiring homologous recombination. We systematically compared four different engineered zinc finger proteins (ZFP), four transcription activator-like effector proteins (TALE), CRISPR associated protein 9 (SpCas9) and the catalytically inactive dSpCas9 protein fused to the amino-terminus of the transposase enzyme designed to target the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene located on human chromosome X. Chimeric transposases were evaluated for expression, transposition activity, chromatin immunoprecipitation at the target loci, and targeted knockout of the HPRT gene in human cells. One ZFP-PB and one TALE-PB chimera demonstrated notable HPRT gene targeting. In contrast, Cas9/dCas9-PB chimeras did not result in gene targeting. Instead, the HPRT locus appeared to be protected from transposon integration. Supplied separately, PB permitted highly efficient isolation of Cas9-mediated knockout of HPRT, with zero transposon integrations in HPRT by deep sequencing. In summary, these tools may allow isolation of 'targeted-only' cells, be utilized to protect a genomic locus from transposon integration, and enrich for Cas9-mutated cells. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2017.

  10. MR imaging of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, cerebellitis and myelitis in infancy: likely topographic variant of a single process; Imagen en RM de encefalomielitis aguda diseminada, cerebelitis y mielitis en la infancia: probables variantes topograficas de un mismo proceso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortuno, J. R.; Menor, F.; Esteban, M. J.; Pamies, J. [Hospital Universitario Infantil La Fe (Spain); Gomez-Gosalvez, F. A. [Hospital Verge dels Liris de Alcoi (Spain); Jover, J. [Hospital General de Elda (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    To describe MR images of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADE) in a paediatric group, particularly focused on its likely topographic variants, cerebellitis and myelitis, its evolution, and the differential diagnosis between it an an initial outbreak of multiple sclerosis. Initial and follow-up cranial MR images were retrospectively reviewed for 14 paediatric patients diagnosed with either ADE, cerebellitis or myelitis. In 9 patients, a spinal cord monitoring was included. Three topographic variants have been considered: ADE (7 patients). In the case of ADE, the supratentorial white matter was always affected, the brain stem in five (71%) and the cerebellum in two (28,5%). Basal ganglionic lesions were detected in 5 patients (71%) and cortical lesions in one (14%). Associated spinal cord abnormality was found in five of the six cases in which this study was included (83%). ADE lesions tended to be nodular and poorly differentiated whereas in cerebellitis and myelitis the predominant pattern was one of diffuse damage. Evolution of the lesions was toward reduction/resolution. Follow-up using MR in the medium-term in 6 patients (four ADE and two cerebellitis) did not detect any new lesions. Clinical follow-up of the patients did not show any neurological recurrences in any of them. ADE, cerebillits and myelitis could be topographic variants of a single process with a common pathogeny. As the spinal cord often seems to play a role in ADE, spinal cord monitoring would be recommended, even in the absence of the above-mentioned symptoms. This spinal cord abnormality, which is usually diffuse, plus deep gray matter damage, as well as the disease of monophase course, corroborated by a sequential MR follow-up, is all helpful in the differential diagnosis with multiple sclerosis. Nonetheless, the differential diagnosis between a recurring form of ADE and an encephalomyelitis is practically impossible to make. (Author) 33 refs.

  11. Fine-scale mapping of the 5q11.2 breast cancer locus reveals at least three independent risk variants regulating MAP3K1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glubb, Dylan M; Maranian, Mel J; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2015-01-01

    evidence of association of a further 173 variants (iCHAV2) containing three subsets with a range of effects (the strongest was rs113317823 [pcond = 1.61 × 10(-5)]) and five variants composing iCHAV3 (lead rs11949391; ER(+): OR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.87-0.93, pcond = 1.4 × 10(-4)). Twenty-six percent......CHAV2a], and rs17432750 [iCHAV3]) increased MAP3K1 transcriptional activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed diminished GATA3 binding to the minor (cancer-protective) allele of rs17432750, indicating a mechanism for its action. We propose that the cancer risk alleles act to increase MAP3...

  12. Phylogenetic analysis consistent with a clinical history of sexual transmission of HIV-1 from a single donor reveals transmission of highly distinct variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McClure Myra

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To combat the pandemic of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1, a successful vaccine will need to cope with the variability of transmissible viruses. Human hosts infected with HIV-1 potentially harbour many viral variants but very little is known about viruses that are likely to be transmitted, or even if there are viral characteristics that predict enhanced transmission in vivo. We show for the first time that genetic divergence consistent with a single transmission event in vivo can represent several years of pre-transmission evolution. Results We describe a highly unusual case consistent with a single donor transmitting highly related but distinct HIV-1 variants to two individuals on the same evening. We confirm that the clustering of viral genetic sequences, present within each recipient, is consistent with the history of a single donor across the viral env, gag and pol genes by maximum likelihood and Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo based phylogenetic analyses. Based on an uncorrelated, lognormal relaxed clock of env gene evolution calibrated with other datasets, the time since the most recent common ancestor is estimated as 2.86 years prior to transmission (95% confidence interval 1.28 to 4.54 years. Conclusion Our results show that an effective design for a preventative vaccine will need to anticipate extensive HIV-1 diversity within an individual donor as well as diversity at the population level.

  13. Minor drug-resistant HIV type-1 variants in breast milk and plasma of HIV type-1-infected Ugandan women after nevirapine single-dose prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilger, Daniel; Hauser, Andrea; Kuecherer, Claudia; Mugenyi, Kizito; Kabasinguzi, Rose; Somogyi, Sybille; Harms, Gundel; Kunz, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Nevirapine single-dose (NVP-SD) reduces mother-to-child transmission of HIV type-1 (HIV-1), but frequently induces resistance mutations in the HIV-1 genome. Little is known about drug-resistant HIV-1 variants in the breast milk of women who have taken NVP-SD. Blood and breast milk samples of 39 HIV-1-infected Ugandan women were taken 6-12 weeks after NVP-SD intake. Samples were analysed by population sequencing and allele-specific real-time PCR (AS-PCR) with detection limits for NVP-resistant HIV-1 variants (K103N and Y181C) of D n = 5, G n = 2 and C n = 1). A total of 7 (37%) and 10 (53%) women carried NVP-resistant virus in breast milk and plasma, respectively. Overall, 71% (5/7) women with NVP-resistant HIV-1 in breast milk displayed >1 drug-resistant variant. Resistance in breast milk was higher at week 6 (6/13 samples [46%]) compared with week 12 (1/6 samples [17%]). In total, 10 drug-resistant populations harbouring the K103N and/or Y181C mutation were detected in the 19 breast milk samples; 7 (70%) were caused by resistant minorities (< 5% of the total HIV-1 population). In the four women with drug-resistant virus in both plasma and breast milk, the mutation patterns differed between the two compartments. Minor populations of drug-resistant HIV-1 were frequently found in breast milk of Ugandan women after exposure to NVP-SD. Further studies need to explore the role of minor drug-resistant variants in the postnatal transmission of (resistant) HIV-1.

  14. Genetic characterization of Anaplasma marginale strains from Tunisia using single and multiple gene typing reveals novel variants with an extensive genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Said, Mourad; Ben Asker, Alaa; Belkahia, Hanène; Ghribi, Raoua; Selmi, Rachid; Messadi, Lilia

    2018-05-12

    Anaplasma marginale, which is responsible for bovine anaplasmosis in tropical and subtropical regions, is a tick-borne obligatory intraerythrocytic bacterium of cattle and wild ruminants. In Tunisia, information about the genetic diversity and the phylogeny of A. marginale strains are limited to the msp4 gene analysis. The purpose of this study is to investigate A. marginale isolates infecting 16 cattle located in different bioclimatic areas of northern Tunisia with single gene analysis and multilocus sequence typing methods on the basis of seven partial genes (dnaA, ftsZ, groEL, lipA, secY, recA and sucB). The single gene analysis confirmed the presence of different and novel heterogenic A. marginale strains infecting cattle from the north of Tunisia. The concatenated sequence analysis showed a phylogeographical resolution at the global level and that most of the Tunisian sequence types (STs) formed a separate cluster from a South African isolate and from all New World isolates and strains. By combining the characteristics of each single locus with those of the multi-loci scheme, these results provide a more detailed understanding on the diversity and the evolution of Tunisian A. marginale strains. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of positional candidate genes in the AAA1 susceptibility locus for abdominal aortic aneurysms on chromosome 19

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrell Robert E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a complex disorder with multiple genetic risk factors. Using affected relative pair linkage analysis, we previously identified an AAA susceptibility locus on chromosome 19q13. This locus has been designated as the AAA1 susceptibility locus in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM database. Methods Nine candidate genes were selected from the AAA1 locus based on their function, as well as mRNA expression levels in the aorta. A sample of 394 cases and 419 controls was genotyped for 41 SNPs located in or around the selected nine candidate genes using the Illumina GoldenGate platform. Single marker and haplotype analyses were performed. Three genes (CEBPG, PEPD and CD22 were selected for DNA sequencing based on the association study results, and exonic regions were analyzed. Immunohistochemical staining of aortic tissue sections from AAA and control individuals was carried out for the CD22 and PEPD proteins with specific antibodies. Results Several SNPs were nominally associated with AAA (p CEBPG, peptidase D (PEPD, and CD22. Haplotype analysis found a nominally associated 5-SNP haplotype in the CEBPG/PEPD locus, as well as a nominally associated 2-SNP haplotype in the CD22 locus. DNA sequencing of the coding regions revealed no variation in CEBPG. Seven sequence variants were identified in PEPD, including three not present in the NCBI SNP (dbSNP database. Sequencing of all 14 exons of CD22 identified 20 sequence variants, five of which were in the coding region and six were in the 3'-untranslated region. Five variants were not present in dbSNP. Immunohistochemical staining for CD22 revealed protein expression in lymphocytes present in the aneurysmal aortic wall only and no detectable expression in control aorta. PEPD protein was expressed in fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in the media-adventitia border in both aneurysmal and non-aneurysmal tissue samples. Conclusions Association testing

  16. Image simulation using LOCUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, J.D.; Roberts, J.A.

    1989-09-01

    The LOCUS data base program has been used to simulate images and to solve simple equations. This has been accomplished by making each record (which normally would represent a data entry)represent sequenced or random number pairs

  17. Identification of Candidate Gene Variants in Korean MODY Families by Whole-Exome Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Ye Jee; Kim, Jung Eun; Hwang, Su-Kyeong; Choi, Bong Seok; Choi, Byung Ho; Cho, Eun-Mi; Jang, Kyoung Mi; Ko, Cheol Woo

    2015-01-01

    To date, 13 genes causing maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) have been identified. However, there is a big discrepancy in the genetic locus between Asian and Caucasian patients with MODY. Thus, we conducted whole-exome sequencing in Korean MODY families to identify causative gene variants. Six MODY probands and their family members were included. Variants in the dbSNP135 and TIARA databases for Koreans and the variants with minor allele frequencies >0.5% of the 1000 Genomes database were excluded. We selected only the functional variants (gain of stop codon, frameshifts and nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variants) and conducted a case-control comparison in the family members. The selected variants were scanned for the previously introduced gene set implicated in glucose metabolism. Three variants c.620C>T:p.Thr207Ile in PTPRD, c.559C>G:p.Gln187Glu in SYT9, and c.1526T>G:p.Val509Gly in WFS1 were respectively identified in 3 families. We could not find any disease-causative alleles of known MODY 1-13 genes. Based on the predictive program, Thr207Ile in PTPRD was considered pathogenic. Whole-exome sequencing is a valuable method for the genetic diagnosis of MODY. Further evaluation is necessary about the role of PTPRD, SYT9 and WFS1 in normal insulin release from pancreatic beta cells. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. 40 CFR 798.5195 - Mouse biochemical specific locus test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-induced variants are bred to determine the genetic nature of the change. (f) Data and reports—(1... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Genetic Toxicity § 798.5195 Mouse...) A biochemical specific locus mutation is a genetic change resulting from a DNA lesion causing...

  19. Regulatory mechanisms underlying atopic dermatitis: Functional characterization of the C11orf30/LRRC32 locus and analysis of genome-wide expression profiles in patients

    OpenAIRE

    Manz, Judith

    2018-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disorder with a strong genetic component. Genome-wide association studies have been successful in the identification of common single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with AD, but their functional relevance has not been investigated yet. This work presents a comprehensive functional characterization of common and infrequent variants at the AD-associated C11orf30/LRRC32 locus. Analyses of cutaneous gene expression profiles in AD patients ...

  20. Single nucleotide polymorphisms at erythropoietin, superoxide dismutase 1, splicing factor, arginine/serin-rich 15 and plasmacytoma variant translocation genes association with diabetic nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maisaa Alwohhaib

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of genes have been identified in diabetic nephropathy. Association between diabetes-associated nephropathy and polymorphisms in the erythropoietin (EPO gene, variants in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 gene and plasmacytoma variant translocation 1 (PVT1 gene have been identified. The EPO, SOD1:SFRS15 and PVT1 genes were genotyped using the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP technique in 38 diabetic nephropathy patients (Group 1 compared with 64 diabetic type 2 subjects without nephropathy (Group 2 at the Mubarak Alkabeer Hospital, Kuwait. The frequency of the risk allele T of the EPO (rs1617640 gene was high in both groups (0.96 in Group 1 and 0.92 in Group 2. Similarly, SNPs of the PVT1 (rs2720709 gene showed a higher frequency of the risk allele G in both groups (0.70 in the Group 1 and 0.68 in Group 2. Although the frequency of the risk allele A was higher than the frequency of the non-risk allele C of the SOD1:SFRS15 gene in both groups, the lowest probability value was observed in those gene SNPs (P = 0.05. We observed that the A allele of the SOD1:SFRS15 gene (rs17880135 was more frequently present in Group 1 (0.75 compared with Group 2 (0.62. Susceptibility to diabetes-associated nephropathy is partially mediated by genetic predisposition, and screening tests may open the gate for new therapeutic approaches.

  1. Apoptotic function of human PMS2 compromised by the nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphic variant R20Q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinovic-Terzic, Ivana; Yoshioka-Yamashita, Atsuko; Shimodaira, Hideki; Avdievich, Elena; Hunton, Irina C; Kolodner, Richard D; Edelmann, Winfried; Wang, Jean Y J

    2008-09-16

    Mismatch repair (MMR) corrects replication errors during DNA synthesis. The mammalian MMR proteins also activate cell cycle checkpoints and apoptosis in response to persistent DNA damage. MMR-deficient cells are resistant to cisplatin, a DNA cross-linking agent used in chemotherapy, because of impaired activation of apoptotic pathways. It is shown that postmeiotic segregation 2 (PMS2), an MMR protein, is required for cisplatin-induced activation of p73, a member of the p53 family of transcription factors with proapoptotic activity. The human PMS2 is highly polymorphic, with at least 12 known nonsynonymous codon changes identified. We show here that the PMS2(R20Q) variant is defective in activating p73-dependent apoptotic response to cisplatin. When expressed in Pms2-deficient mouse fibroblasts, human PMS2(R20Q) but not PMS2 interfered with the apoptotic response to cisplatin. Correspondingly, PMS2 but not PMS2(R20Q) enhanced the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin measured by clonogenic survival. Because PMS2(R20Q) lacks proapoptotic activity, this polymorphic allele may modulate tumor responses to cisplatin among cancer patients.

  2. Endogenous Locus Reporter Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaping; Hermes, Jeffrey; Li, Jing; Tudor, Matthew

    2018-01-01

    Reporter gene assays are widely used in high-throughput screening (HTS) to identify compounds that modulate gene expression. Traditionally a reporter gene assay is built by cloning an endogenous promoter sequence or synthetic response elements in the regulatory region of a reporter gene to monitor transcriptional activity of a specific biological process (exogenous reporter assay). In contrast, an endogenous locus reporter has a reporter gene inserted in the endogenous gene locus that allows the reporter gene to be expressed under the control of the same regulatory elements as the endogenous gene, thus more accurately reflecting the changes seen in the regulation of the actual gene. In this chapter, we introduce some of the considerations behind building a reporter gene assay for high-throughput compound screening and describe the methods we have utilized to establish 1536-well format endogenous locus reporter and exogenous reporter assays for the screening of compounds that modulate Myc pathway activity.

  3. Association study of genetic variants at single nucleotide polymorphism rs109231409 of mannose-binding lectins 1 gene with mastitis susceptibility in Vrindavani crossbred cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Muhasin Asaf

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken to identify whether single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs109231409 located on mannose-binding lectins 1 (MBL1 gene was associated with mastitis tolerance/susceptibility. Materials and Methods: After grouping 100 Vrindavani crossbred cattle as mastitis positive and negative animals, they were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction (PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphisms method. Gene and genotype frequencies of different patterns were estimated by standard procedure (POPGENE version 1.32, (University of Alberta, Canada and statistical analysis was carried out by logistic regression methods using STATA 12 software (StataCorp LP, USA. Results: The 588 bp fragment of MBL1 gene was amplified using PCR. PCR product was digested with ApaI restriction enzyme showed two distinct genotypes viz., GG (311 bp and 272 bp fragments and GA (588 bp, 311 bp and 277 bp fragments. The gene, genotype frequencies, average heterozygosity, polymorphic information content and χ2 values for the locus rs109231409 was ascertained. Conclusions: No significant association between SNP “rs109231409” with mastitis tolerance was found. Although there is a lack of association, further studies have to be undertaken in a large population in order to validate the impact of rs109231409 (g.855G >A on mastitis tolerance.

  4. Stress-induced martensite variant reorientation in magnetic shape memory Ni–Mn–Ga single crystal studied by neutron diffraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Molnár, Peter; Šittner, Petr; Lukáš, Petr; Hannula, S.-P.; Heczko, Oleg

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 3 (2008), 035014/1-035014/4 ISSN 0964-1726 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : NiMnGa single crystal * neutron diffraction * stress induced martensite reorientation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.743, year: 2008

  5. Cellulase variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazej, Robert; Toriello, Nicholas; Emrich, Charles; Cohen, Richard N.; Koppel, Nitzan

    2015-07-14

    This invention provides novel variant cellulolytic enzymes having improved activity and/or stability. In certain embodiments the variant cellulotyic enzymes comprise a glycoside hydrolase with or comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to one or more of residues F64, A226, and/or E246 in Thermobifida fusca Cel9A enzyme. In certain embodiments the glycoside hydrolase is a variant of a family 9 glycoside hydrolase. In certain embodiments the glycoside hydrolase is a variant of a theme B family 9 glycoside hydrolase.

  6. The IGF2 Locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) is a peptide hormone regulating various cellular processes such as proliferation and apoptosis. IGF2 is vital to embryo development. The IGF2 locus covers approximately 150-kb genomic region on human chromosome 11, containing two imprinted genes, IGF2 and H19, sha...

  7. Significant Locus and Metabolic Genetic Correlations Revealed in Genome-Wide Association Study of Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Laramie; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Gaspar, Helena; Walters, Raymond; Goldstein, Jackie; Anttila, Verneri; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Ripke, Stephan; Thornton, Laura; Hinney, Anke; Daly, Mark; Sullivan, Patrick F; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Breen, Gerome; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2017-09-01

    The authors conducted a genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa and calculated genetic correlations with a series of psychiatric, educational, and metabolic phenotypes. Following uniform quality control and imputation procedures using the 1000 Genomes Project (phase 3) in 12 case-control cohorts comprising 3,495 anorexia nervosa cases and 10,982 controls, the authors performed standard association analysis followed by a meta-analysis across cohorts. Linkage disequilibrium score regression was used to calculate genome-wide common variant heritability (single-nucleotide polymorphism [SNP]-based heritability [h 2 SNP ]), partitioned heritability, and genetic correlations (r g ) between anorexia nervosa and 159 other phenotypes. Results were obtained for 10,641,224 SNPs and insertion-deletion variants with minor allele frequencies >1% and imputation quality scores >0.6. The h 2 SNP of anorexia nervosa was 0.20 (SE=0.02), suggesting that a substantial fraction of the twin-based heritability arises from common genetic variation. The authors identified one genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 12 (rs4622308) in a region harboring a previously reported type 1 diabetes and autoimmune disorder locus. Significant positive genetic correlations were observed between anorexia nervosa and schizophrenia, neuroticism, educational attainment, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and significant negative genetic correlations were observed between anorexia nervosa and body mass index, insulin, glucose, and lipid phenotypes. Anorexia nervosa is a complex heritable phenotype for which this study has uncovered the first genome-wide significant locus. Anorexia nervosa also has large and significant genetic correlations with both psychiatric phenotypes and metabolic traits. The study results encourage a reconceptualization of this frequently lethal disorder as one with both psychiatric and metabolic etiology.

  8. Multiple Locus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat and Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Brucella Typing Reveals Multiple Lineages in Brucella melitensis Currently Endemic in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjun Sun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is a worldwide zoonotic disease caused by Brucella spp. In China, brucellosis is recognized as a reemerging disease mainly caused by Brucella melitensis specie. To better understand the currently endemic B. melitensis strains in China, three Brucella genotyping methods were applied to 110 B. melitensis strains obtained in past several years. By MLVA genotyping, five MLVA-8 genotypes were identified, among which genotypes 42 (1-5-3-13-2-2-3-2 was recognized as the predominant genotype, while genotype 63 (1-5-3-13-2-3-3-2 and a novel genotype of 1-5-3-13-2-4-3-2 were second frequently observed. MLVA-16 discerned a total of 57 MLVA-16 genotypes among these Brucella strains, with 41 genotypes being firstly detected and the other 16 genotypes being previously reported. By BruMLSA21 typing, six sequence types (STs were identified, among them ST8 is the most frequently seen in China while the other five STs were firstly detected and designated as ST137, ST138, ST139, ST140, and ST141 by international multilocus sequence typing database. Whole-genome sequence (WGS-single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP-based typing and phylogenetic analysis resolved Chinese B. melitensis strains into five clusters, reflecting the existence of multiple lineages among these Chinese B. melitensis strains. In phylogeny, Chinese lineages are more closely related to strains collected from East Mediterranean and Middle East countries, such as Turkey, Kuwait, and Iraq. In the next few years, MLVA typing will certainly remain an important epidemiological tool for Brucella infection analysis, as it displays a high discriminatory ability and achieves result largely in agreement with WGS-SNP-based typing. However, WGS-SNP-based typing is found to be the most powerful and reliable method in discerning Brucella strains and will be popular used in the future.

  9. Analysis of single nucleotide variants of HFE gene and association to survival in The Cancer Genome Atlas GBM data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Y; Zhu, Junjia; Salzberg, Anna C; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Dajiang J; Muscat, Joshua E; Langan, Sara T; Connor, James R

    2017-01-01

    Human hemochromatosis protein (HFE) is involved in iron metabolism. Two major HFE polymorphisms, H63D and C282Y, have been associated with an increased risk of cancers. Previously, we reported decreased gender effects in overall survival based on H63D or C282Y HFE polymorphisms patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). However, the effect of other single nucleotide variation (SNV) in the HFE gene on the cancer development and progression has not been systematically studied. To expand our finding in a larger sample, and to identify other HFE SNV, we analyzed the frequency of somatic SNV in HFE gene and its relationship to survival in GBM patients using The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) GBM (Caucasian only) database. We found 9 SNVs with increased frequency in blood normal of TCGA GBM patients compared to the 1000Genome. Among 9 SNVs, 7 SNVs were located in the intron and 2 SNVs (i.e., H63D, C282Y) in the exon of HFE gene. The statistical analysis demonstrated that blood normal samples of TCGA GBM have more H63D (p = 0.0002, 95% Confidence interval (CI): 0.2119-0.3223) or C282Y (p = 0.0129, 95% CI: 0.0474-0.1159) HFE polymorphisms than 1000Genome. The Kaplan-Meier survival curve for the 264 GBM samples revealed no difference between wild type (WT) HFE and H63D, and WT HFE and C282Y GBM patients. In addition, there was no difference in the survival of male/female GBM patients based on HFE genotype. There was no correlation between HFE expression and survival. In conclusion, the current results suggest that somatic HFE polymorphisms do not impact GBM patients' survival in the TCGA data set of GBM.

  10. Analysis of single nucleotide variants of HFE gene and association to survival in The Cancer Genome Atlas GBM data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Y Lee

    Full Text Available Human hemochromatosis protein (HFE is involved in iron metabolism. Two major HFE polymorphisms, H63D and C282Y, have been associated with an increased risk of cancers. Previously, we reported decreased gender effects in overall survival based on H63D or C282Y HFE polymorphisms patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. However, the effect of other single nucleotide variation (SNV in the HFE gene on the cancer development and progression has not been systematically studied. To expand our finding in a larger sample, and to identify other HFE SNV, we analyzed the frequency of somatic SNV in HFE gene and its relationship to survival in GBM patients using The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA GBM (Caucasian only database. We found 9 SNVs with increased frequency in blood normal of TCGA GBM patients compared to the 1000Genome. Among 9 SNVs, 7 SNVs were located in the intron and 2 SNVs (i.e., H63D, C282Y in the exon of HFE gene. The statistical analysis demonstrated that blood normal samples of TCGA GBM have more H63D (p = 0.0002, 95% Confidence interval (CI: 0.2119-0.3223 or C282Y (p = 0.0129, 95% CI: 0.0474-0.1159 HFE polymorphisms than 1000Genome. The Kaplan-Meier survival curve for the 264 GBM samples revealed no difference between wild type (WT HFE and H63D, and WT HFE and C282Y GBM patients. In addition, there was no difference in the survival of male/female GBM patients based on HFE genotype. There was no correlation between HFE expression and survival. In conclusion, the current results suggest that somatic HFE polymorphisms do not impact GBM patients' survival in the TCGA data set of GBM.

  11. Somatic cell genotoxicity at the glycophorin A locus in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, R.H.; Grant, S.G.; Langlois, R.G.; Bigbee, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    We have developed an assay for detecting variant erythrocytes that occur as a result of in vivo allele loss at the glycophorin A (GPA) locus on chromosome 4 in humans. This gene codes for an erythroid- specific cell surface glycoprotein, and with our assay we are able to detect rare variant erythrocytes that have lost expression of one of the two GPA alleles. Two distinctly different variant cell types are detected with this assay. One variant cell type (called N OE) is hemizygous. Our assay also detects homozygous variant erythrocytes that have lost expression of the GPA(M) allele and express the GPA(N) allele at twice the heterozygous level. The results of this assay are an enumeration of the frequency of N OE and NN variant cell types for each individual analyzed. These variant cell frequencies provide a measure of the amount of somatic cell genotoxicity that has occurred at the GPA locus. Such genotoxicity could be the result of (1) reactions of toxic chemicals to which the individual has been exposed, or (2) high energy radiation effects on erythroid precursor cells, or (3) errors in DNA replication or repair in these cells of the bone marrow. Thus, the GPA-based variant cell frequency can serve as a biodosimeter that indicates the amount of genotoxic exposure each individual has received. Because two very different kinds of variant cells are enumerated, different kinds of genotoxicity should be distinguishable. Results of the GPA somatic genotoxicity assay may also provide valuable information for cancer-risk estimation on each individual. 16 refs

  12. Type I error rates of rare single nucleotide variants are inflated in tests of association with non-normally distributed traits using simple linear regression methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi; Sung, Heejong; Sabourin, Jeremy A; Justice, Cristina M; Sorant, Alexa J M; Wilson, Alexander F

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effects of (a) the minor allele frequency of the single nucleotide variant (SNV), (b) the degree of departure from normality of the trait, and (c) the position of the SNVs on type I error rates were investigated in the Genetic Analysis Workshop (GAW) 19 whole exome sequence data. To test the distribution of the type I error rate, 5 simulated traits were considered: standard normal and gamma distributed traits; 2 transformed versions of the gamma trait (log 10 and rank-based inverse normal transformations); and trait Q1 provided by GAW 19. Each trait was tested with 313,340 SNVs. Tests of association were performed with simple linear regression and average type I error rates were determined for minor allele frequency classes. Rare SNVs (minor allele frequency < 0.05) showed inflated type I error rates for non-normally distributed traits that increased as the minor allele frequency decreased. The inflation of average type I error rates increased as the significance threshold decreased. Normally distributed traits did not show inflated type I error rates with respect to the minor allele frequency for rare SNVs. There was no consistent effect of transformation on the uniformity of the distribution of the location of SNVs with a type I error.

  13. Analysis of Coinfections with A/H1N1 Strain Variants among Pigs in Poland by Multitemperature Single-Strand Conformational Polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Lepek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring and control of infections are key parts of surveillance systems and epidemiological risk prevention. In the case of influenza A viruses (IAVs, which show high variability, a wide range of hosts, and a potential of reassortment between different strains, it is essential to study not only people, but also animals living in the immediate surroundings. If understated, the animals might become a source of newly formed infectious strains with a pandemic potential. Special attention should be focused on pigs, because of the receptors specific for virus strains originating from different species, localized in their respiratory tract. Pigs are prone to mixed infections and may constitute a reservoir of potentially dangerous IAV strains resulting from genetic reassortment. It has been reported that a quadruple reassortant, A(H1N1pdm09, can be easily transmitted from humans to pigs and serve as a donor of genetic segments for new strains capable of infecting humans. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop a simple, cost-effective, and rapid method for evaluation of IAV genetic variability. We describe a method based on multitemperature single-strand conformational polymorphism (MSSCP, using a fragment of the hemagglutinin (HA gene, for detection of coinfections and differentiation of genetic variants of the virus, difficult to identify by conventional diagnostic.

  14. The LOCUS interface to the MFE database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miner, W.H. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The MFE database now consists of over 900 shots from TFTR, PDX, PLT, T-10, JT-60, TEXT, JET and ASDEX. A variety of discharge conditions is represented, ranging from single time slice Ohmic discharges to multiple time-slice auxiliary heated discharges. Included with most datasets is a reference that describes the experiment being performed when the data was taken. The MFE database is currently implemented under INGRES on a VAX that is on Internet. LOCUS, a database utility, developed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is now available as an interface to the database. The LOCUS front end provides a graphic interface to the database from any generic graphics terminal that supports Tektronix 4010 emulation. It provides a variety of procedures for extracting, manipulating and graphing data from the MFE database. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the LOCUS interface, the authors examine, in detail, one of the recently added JET, H-mode discharges. In this example, they address some new concepts such as monitor functions, which have been introduced in order to help users more fully understand the multiple time-slice datasets. They also describe some of the more advanced techniques available in LOCUS for data access and manipulation. Specific areas of interest that are discussed are searching for and retrieving datasets, graphics, data fitting, and linear regression analysis

  15. Genome-wide association study identifies novel locus for neuroticism and shows polygenic association with Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moor, Marleen H.M.; van den Berg, Stéphanie M.; Verweij, Karin J.H.; Krueger, Robert F.; Luciano, Michelle; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Matteson, Lindsay K.; Derringer, Jaime; Esko, Tõnu; Amin, Najaf; Gordon, Scott D.; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hart, Amy B.; Seppälä, Ilkka; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Konte, Bettina; Lahti, Jari; Lee, Minyoung; Miller, Mike; Nutile, Teresa; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Viktorin, Alexander; Wedenoja, Juho; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Adkins, Daniel E.; Agrawal, Arpana; Allik, Jüri; Appel, Katja; Bigdeli, Timothy B.; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Costa, Paul T.; Smith, George Davey; Davies, Gail; de Wit, Harriet; Ding, Jun; Engelhardt, Barbara E.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franke, Barbara; Giegling, Ina; Grucza, Richard; Hartmann, Annette M.; Heath, Andrew C.; Heinonen, Kati; Henders, Anjali K.; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Janzing, Joost; Jokela, Markus; Karlsson, Robert; Kemp, John P.; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G.; Latvala, Antti; Lehtimäki, Terho; Liewald, David C.; Madden, Pamela A.F.; Magri, Chiara; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Marten, Jonathan; Maschio, Andrea; Medland, Sarah E.; Mihailov, Evelin; Milaneschi, Yuri; Montgomery, Grant W.; Nauck, Matthias; Ouwens, Klaasjan G.; Palotie, Aarno; Pettersson, Erik; Polasek, Ozren; Qian, Yong; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Raitakari, Olli T.; Realo, Anu; Rose, Richard J.; Ruggiero, Daniela; Schmidt, Carsten O.; Slutske, Wendy S.; Sorice, Rossella; Starr, John M.; Pourcain, Beate St; Sutin, Angelina R.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Trochet, Holly; Vermeulen, Sita; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Widen, Elisabeth; Wouda, Jasper; Wright, Margaret J.; Zgaga, Lina; Scotland, Generation; Porteous, David; Minelli, Alessandra; Palmer, Abraham A.; Rujescu, Dan; Ciullo, Marina; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Metspalu, Andres; Kaprio, Jaakko; Deary, Ian J.; Räikkönen, Katri; Wilson, James F.; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Bierut, Laura J.; Hettema, John M.; Grabe, Hans J.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Evans, David M.; Schlessinger, David; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Terracciano, Antonio; McGue, Matt; Penninx, Brenda W.J.H.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Neuroticism is a personality trait that is briefly defined by emotional instability. It is a robust genetic risk factor for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and other psychiatric disorders. Hence, neuroticism is an important phenotype for psychiatric genetics. The Genetics of Personality Consortium (GPC) has created a resource for genome-wide association analyses of personality traits in over 63,000 participants (including MDD cases). Objective To identify genetic variants associated with neuroticism by performing a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) results based on 1000Genomes imputation, to evaluate if common genetic variants as assessed by Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) explain variation in neuroticism by estimating SNP-based heritability, and to examine whether SNPs that predict neuroticism also predict MDD. Setting 30 cohorts with genome-wide genotype, personality and MDD data from the GPC. Participants The study included 63,661 participants from 29 discovery cohorts and 9,786 participants from a replication cohort. Participants came from Europe, the United States or Australia. Main outcome measure(s) Neuroticism scores harmonized across all cohorts by Item Response Theory (IRT) analysis, and clinically assessed MDD case-control status. Results A genome-wide significant SNP was found in the MAGI1 gene (rs35855737; P=9.26 × 10−9 in the discovery meta-analysis, and P=2.38 × 10−8 in the meta-analysis of all 30 cohorts). Common genetic variants explain 15% of the variance in neuroticism. Polygenic scores based on the meta-analysis of neuroticism in 27 of the discovery cohorts significantly predicted neuroticism in 2 independent cohorts. Importantly, polygenic scores also predicted MDD in these cohorts. Conclusions and relevance This study identifies a novel locus for neuroticism. The variant is located in a known gene that has been associated with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in previous studies. In addition, the study

  16. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in an Indian cohort and association of CNTN4, MMP2 and SNTB1 variants with oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yete, Subuhi; Pradhan, Sultan; Saranath, Dhananjaya

    2017-08-01

    Oral cancer is a high incidence cancer in India primarily due to the prevalent tobacco/areca nut chewing habits and hence a major health concern. India constitutes 26% of the global oral cancer burden. Besides the well-established risk factors, the genomic constitution of an individual plays a role in oral cancer. The aim of the current study was to analyse genomic variants represented as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), analyse their prevalence and investigate risk association of allelotypes/genotypes to oral cancers. Eleven SNPs in genes associated with biological functions were analysed in an Indian cohort (n = 1000) comprising 500 oral cancer patients and 500 long term tobacco habitués as controls, using Allelic discrimination Real-Time PCR assay with SYBR Green dye. Fisher's exact test and Odds Ratio were used for statistical analysis. Increased risk was observed for rs9849237 CC [P = 0.008; OR 1.412 (1.09-1.82)] and rs243865 CT [P = 0.004; OR 1.469 (1.13-1.90)] genotypes, whereas rs9849237 CT [P = 0.034; OR 0.755 (0.58-0.97)], rs243865 CC [P = 0.002; OR 0.669 (0.51-0.86)] and rs10090787 CC [P = 0.049; OR 0.774 (0.60-0.99)] genotypes indicated decreased risk to oral cancer. The other SNPs showed equidistribution in both groups. Our data indicated genotypes and alleles in specific SNPs rs9849237, rs243865 and rs10090787 with increased/decreased risk to oral cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of Splice Variants, Targeted MicroRNAs and Functional Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of the BOLA-DQA2 Gene in Dairy Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Qinlei; Huang, Jinming; Ju, Zhihua; Li, Qiuling; Li, Liming; Wang, Changfa; Sun, Tao; Wang, Lingling; Hou, Minghai

    2012-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex, class II, DQ alpha 2, also named BOLA-DQA2, belongs to the Bovine Leukocyte Antigen (BOLA) class II genes which are involved in the immune response. To explore the variability of the BOLA-DQA2 gene and resistance to mastitis in cows, the splice variants (SV), targeted microRNAs (miRNAs), and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in this study. A new SV (BOLA-DQA2-SV1) lacking part of exon 3 (195 bp) and two 3′-untranslated regions (UTR) (52 bp+167 bp) of the BOLA-DQA2 gene was found in the healthy and mastitis-infected mammary gland tissues. Four of 13 new SNPs and multiple nucleotide polymorphisms resulted in amino acid changes in the protein and SNP (c. +1283 C>T) may affect the binding to the seed sequence of bta-miR-2318. Further, we detected the relative expressions of two BOLA-DQA2 transcripts and five candidated microRNAs binding to the 3′-UTR of two transcripts in the mammary gland tissues in dairy cattle by using the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The result showed that expression of the BOLA-DQA2-SV1 mRNA was significantly upregulated 2.67-fold (pmastitis-infected mammary tissues (n=5) compared with the healthy mammary gland mammary tissues (n=5). Except for bta-miR-1777a, miRNA expression (bta-miR-296, miR-2430, and miR-671) was upregulated 1.75 to 2.59-fold (pmastitis cows. Our findings reveal that BOLA-DQA2-SV1 may play an important role in the mastitis resistance in dairy cattle. Whether the SNPs affect the structure of the BOLA-DQA2 gene or association with mastitis resistance is unknown and warrants further investigation. PMID:22084936

  18. Illustrating, Quantifying, and Correcting for Bias in Post-hoc Analysis of Gene-Based Rare Variant Tests of Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinde, Kelsey E.; Arbet, Jaron; Green, Alden; O'Connell, Michael; Valcarcel, Alessandra; Westra, Jason; Tintle, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    To date, gene-based rare variant testing approaches have focused on aggregating information across sets of variants to maximize statistical power in identifying genes showing significant association with diseases. Beyond identifying genes that are associated with diseases, the identification of causal variant(s) in those genes and estimation of their effect is crucial for planning replication studies and characterizing the genetic architecture of the locus. However, we illustrate that straightforward single-marker association statistics can suffer from substantial bias introduced by conditioning on gene-based test significance, due to the phenomenon often referred to as “winner's curse.” We illustrate the ramifications of this bias on variant effect size estimation and variant prioritization/ranking approaches, outline parameters of genetic architecture that affect this bias, and propose a bootstrap resampling method to correct for this bias. We find that our correction method significantly reduces the bias due to winner's curse (average two-fold decrease in bias, p bias and improve inference in post-hoc analysis of gene-based tests under a wide variety of genetic architectures. PMID:28959274

  19. Bipolar disorder: Evidence for a major locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, M.A.; Flodman, P.L. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Sadovnick, A.D.; Ameli, H. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)] [and others

    1995-10-09

    Complex segregation analyses were conducted on families of bipolar I and bipolar II probands to delineate the mode of inheritance. The probands were ascertained from consecutive referrals to the Mood Disorder Service, University Hospital, University of British Columbia and diagnosed by DSM-III-R and Research Diagnostic Criteria. Data were available on over 1,500 first-degree relatives of the 186 Caucasian probands. The purpose of the analyses was to determine if, after correcting for age and birth cohort, there was evidence for a single major locus. Five models were fit to the data using the statistical package SAGE: (1) dominant, (2) recessive, (3) arbitrary mendelian inheritance, (4) environmental, and (5) no major effects. A single dominant, mendelian major locus was the best fitting of these models for the sample of bipolar I and II probands when only bipolar relatives were defined as affected (polygenic inheritance could not be tested). Adding recurrent major depression to the diagnosis {open_quotes}affected{close_quotes} for relatives reduced the evidence for a major locus effect. Our findings support the undertaking of linkage studies and are consistent with the analyses of the National Institutes of Mental Health (NIMH) Collaborative Study data by Rice et al. and Blangero and Elston. 39 refs., 4 tabs.

  20. Identification of a novel percent mammographic density locus at 12q24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Kristen N; Lindstrom, Sara; Scott, Christopher G; Thompson, Deborah; Sellers, Thomas A; Wang, Xianshu; Wang, Alice; Atkinson, Elizabeth; Rider, David N; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Varghese, Jajini S; Audley, Tina; Brown, Judith; Leyland, Jean; Luben, Robert N; Warren, Ruth M L; Loos, Ruth J F; Wareham, Nicholas J; Li, Jingmei; Hall, Per; Liu, Jianjun; Eriksson, Louise; Czene, Kamila; Olson, Janet E; Pankratz, V Shane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Diasio, Robert B; Lee, Adam M; Heit, John A; DeAndrade, Mariza; Goode, Ellen L; Vierkant, Robert A; Cunningham, Julie M; Armasu, Sebastian M; Weinshilboum, Richard; Fridley, Brooke L; Batzler, Anthony; Ingle, James N; Boyd, Norman F; Paterson, Andrew D; Rommens, Johanna; Martin, Lisa J; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Stone, Jennifer; Apicella, Carmel; Kraft, Peter; Hankinson, Susan E; Hazra, Aditi; Hunter, David J; Easton, Douglas F; Couch, Fergus J; Tamimi, Rulla M; Vachon, Celine M

    2012-07-15

    Percent mammographic density adjusted for age and body mass index (BMI) is one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer and has a heritable component that remains largely unidentified. We performed a three-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) of percent mammographic density to identify novel genetic loci associated with this trait. In stage 1, we combined three GWASs of percent density comprised of 1241 women from studies at the Mayo Clinic and identified the top 48 loci (99 single nucleotide polymorphisms). We attempted replication of these loci in 7018 women from seven additional studies (stage 2). The meta-analysis of stage 1 and 2 data identified a novel locus, rs1265507 on 12q24, associated with percent density, adjusting for age and BMI (P = 4.43 × 10(-8)). We refined the 12q24 locus with 459 additional variants (stage 3) in a combined analysis of all three stages (n = 10 377) and confirmed that rs1265507 has the strongest association in the 12q24 region (P = 1.03 × 10(-8)). Rs1265507 is located between the genes TBX5 and TBX3, which are members of the phylogenetically conserved T-box gene family and encode transcription factors involved in developmental regulation. Understanding the mechanism underlying this association will provide insight into the genetics of breast tissue composition.

  1. Fine-scale mapping of the 4q24 locus identifies & pr two Independent loci associated with breast cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    X. Guo (Xingyi); J. Long (Jirong); C. Zeng (Chenjie); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); M. Ghoussaini (Maya); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); R.L. Milne (Roger L.); X.-O. Shu (Xiao-Ou); Q. Cai (Qiuyin); J. Beesley (Jonathan); S. Kar (Siddhartha); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); V. Arndt (Volker); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); A. Beeghly-Fadiel (Alicia); J. Benítez (Javier); W.J. Blot (William); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); H. Brenner (Hermann); L.A. Brinton (Louise); A. Broekss (Annegien); T. Brüning (Thomas); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); H. Cai (Hui); S. Canisius (Sander); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); J.-Y. Choi (J.); F.J. Couch (Fergus); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); P. Devilee (Peter); A. Droit (Arnaud); T. Dörk (Thilo); P.A. Fasching (Peter); O. Fletcher (Olivia); H. Flyger (Henrik); F. Fostira (Florentia); V. Gaborieau (Valerie); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); G.G. Giles (Graham G.); M. Grip (Mervi); P. Guénel (Pascal); C.A. Haiman (Christopher A.); U. Hamann (Ute); J.M. Hartman (Joost); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); J.L. Hopper (John L.); C.-N. Hsiung (Chia-Ni); H. Ito (Hidemi); A. Jakubowska (Anna); N. Johnson (Nichola); M. Kabisch (Maria); D. Kang (Daehee); S. Khan (Sofia); J.A. Knight (Julia); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); D. Lambrechts (Diether); L. Le Marchand (Loic); J. Li (Jingmei); A. Lindblom (Annika); A. Lophatananon (Artitaya); J. Lubinski (Jan); A. Mannermaa (Arto); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); S. Margolin (Sara); F. Marme (Federick); K. Matsuo (Keitaro); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); A. Meindl (Alfons); K. Muir (Kenneth); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); S. Nord (Silje); J.E. Olson (Janet); N. Orr (Nick); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); T.C. Putti (Thomas Choudary); A. Rudolph (Anja); S. Sangrajrang (Suleeporn); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); C-Y. Shen (Chen-Yang); J. Shi (Jiajun); M. Shrubsole (Martha); M.C. Southey (Melissa); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); S.H. Teo (Soo Hwang); B. Thienpont (Bernard); A.E. Toland (Amanda); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); I. Tomlinson (Ian); T. Truong (Thérèse); C.-C. Tseng (Chiu-chen); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); W. Wen (Wanqing); R. Winqvist (Robert); A. Wu (Anna); C.H. Yip (Cheng Har); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); Y. Zheng (Ying); P. Hall (Per); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); J. Simard (Jacques); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.M. Dunning (Alison); D.F. Easton (Douglas F.); W. Zheng (Wei); R. Eeles (Rosalind); A.A. Al Olama (Ali Amin); Z. Kote-Jarai; S. Benlloch (Sara); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); L. McGuffog (Lesley); K. Offit (Kenneth); A. Lee (Andrew); E. Dicks (Ed); C. Luccarini (Craig); D.C. Tessier (Daniel C.); F. Bacot (Francois); D. Vincent (Daniel); S. La Boissière (Sylvie); F. Robidoux (Frederic); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); J.M. Cunningham (Julie); S.A. Windebank (Sharon A.); C.A. Hilker (Christopher A.); J. Meyer (Jeffrey); M. Angelakos (Maggie); J. Maskiell (Judi); E.J. Rutgers (Emiel J.); S. Verhoef; F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); P. Boonyawongviroj (Prat); P. Siriwanarungsan (Pornthep); A. Schrauder (André); M. Rübner (Matthias); S. Oeser (Sonja); S. Landrith (Silke); E. Williams (Eileen); E. Ryder-Mills (Elaine); K. Sargus (Kara); N. McInerney (Niall); G. Colleran (Gabrielle); A. Rowan (Andrew); A. Jones (Angela); C. Sohn (Christof); A. Schneeweiß (Andeas); P. Bugert (Peter); N. Álvarez (Nuria); L. Bernstein (Leslie); J. Lacey (James); S. Wang (Sophia); H. Ma (Huiyan); Y. Lu (Yani); J. Clague De Hart (Jessica); D. Deapen (Dennis); R. Pinder (Rich); E. Lee (Eunjung); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); P. Horn-Ross (Pam); P. Reynolds (Peggy); D. Nelson (David); H. Park (Hannah); H. Ziegler (Hartwig); S. Wolf (Sonja); V. Hermann (Volker); W.-Y. Lo (Wing-Yee); C. Justenhoven (Christina); Y.-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); C. Baisch (Christian); H.-P. Fischer (Hans-Peter); B. Pesch (Beate); S. Rabstein (Sylvia); A. Lotz (Anne); V. Harth (Volker); T. Heikkinen (Tuomas); I. Erkkilä (Irja); K. Aaltonen (Kirsimari); K. von Smitten (Karl); N.N. Antonenkova (Natalia); P. Hillemanns (Peter); H. Christiansen (Hans); E. Myöhänen (Eija); H. Kemiläinen (Helena); H. Thorne (Heather); E. Niedermayr (Eveline); D. Bowtell; G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A. De Fazio (Anna); D. Gertig; A. Green; P. Webb (Penny); A. Green; P. Parsons; N. Hayward; P.M. Webb (P.); D. Whiteman; A. Fung (Annie); J. Yashiki (June); G. Peuteman (Gilian); D. Smeets (Dominiek); T. Van Brussel (Thomas); K. Corthouts (Kathleen); N. Obi (Nadia); J. Heinz (Judith); T.W. Behrens (Timothy); U. Eilber (Ursula); M. Celik (Muhabbet); T. Olchers (Til); B. Peissel (Bernard); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); D. Zaffaroni (Daniela); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); I. Feroce (Irene); A. Maniscalco (Angela); A. Rossi (Alessandra); L. Bernard (Loris); M. Tranchant (Martine); M.-F. Valois (Marie-France); A. Turgeon (Annie); L. Heguy (Lea); P.S. Yee (Phuah Sze); P. Kang (Peter); K.I. Nee (Kang In); S. Mariapun (Shivaani); Y. Sook-Yee (Yoon); D.S.C. Lee (Daphne S.C.); T.Y. Ching (Teh Yew); N.A.M. Taib (Nur Aishah Mohd); M. Otsukka (Meeri); K. Mononen (Kari); T. Selander (Teresa); N. Weerasooriya (Nayana); E.M.M. Krol-Warmerdam (Elly); J. Molenaar; J. Blom; N. Szeszenia-Dabrowska (Neonilia); B. Peplonska (Beata); W. Zatonski (Witold); P. Chao (Pei); M. Stagner (Michael); P. Bos (Petra); J. Blom (Jannet); E. Crepin (Ellen); A. Nieuwlaat (Anja); A. Heemskerk (Annette); S. Higham (Sue); H.E. Cramp (Helen); D. Connley (Daniel); S. Balasubramanian (Sabapathy); I.W. Brock (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); P. Kerbrat (Pierre); P. Arveux (Patrick); R. Le Scodan (Romuald); Y. Raoul (Yves); P. Laurent-Puig (Pierre); C. Mulot (Claire); C. Stegmaier (Christa); K. Butterbach (Katja); J.H. Karstens (Johann); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); P. Seibold (Petra); A. Vrieling (Alina); S. Nickels (Stefan); P. Radice (Paolo); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); S. Kauppila (Saila); D. Conroy (Don); C. Baynes (Caroline); K. Chua (Kimberley); R. Pilarski (Robert)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: A recent association study identified a common variant (rs9790517) at 4q24 to be associated with breast cancer risk. Independent association signals and potential functional variants in this locus have not been explored. Methods: We conducted a fine-mapping analysis in 55,540

  2. Illustrating, Quantifying, and Correcting for Bias in Post-hoc Analysis of Gene-Based Rare Variant Tests of Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey E. Grinde

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available To date, gene-based rare variant testing approaches have focused on aggregating information across sets of variants to maximize statistical power in identifying genes showing significant association with diseases. Beyond identifying genes that are associated with diseases, the identification of causal variant(s in those genes and estimation of their effect is crucial for planning replication studies and characterizing the genetic architecture of the locus. However, we illustrate that straightforward single-marker association statistics can suffer from substantial bias introduced by conditioning on gene-based test significance, due to the phenomenon often referred to as “winner's curse.” We illustrate the ramifications of this bias on variant effect size estimation and variant prioritization/ranking approaches, outline parameters of genetic architecture that affect this bias, and propose a bootstrap resampling method to correct for this bias. We find that our correction method significantly reduces the bias due to winner's curse (average two-fold decrease in bias, p < 2.2 × 10−6 and, consequently, substantially improves mean squared error and variant prioritization/ranking. The method is particularly helpful in adjustment for winner's curse effects when the initial gene-based test has low power and for relatively more common, non-causal variants. Adjustment for winner's curse is recommended for all post-hoc estimation and ranking of variants after a gene-based test. Further work is necessary to continue seeking ways to reduce bias and improve inference in post-hoc analysis of gene-based tests under a wide variety of genetic architectures.

  3. rDNA Copy Number Variants Are Frequent Passenger Mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Deletion Collections and de Novo Transformants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth X. Kwan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomal DNA (rDNA locus is known to exhibit greater instability relative to the rest of the genome. However, wild-type cells preferentially maintain a stable number of rDNA copies, suggesting underlying genetic control of the size of this locus. We performed a screen of a subset of the Yeast Knock-Out (YKO single gene deletion collection to identify genetic regulators of this locus and to determine if rDNA copy number correlates with yeast replicative lifespan. While we found no correlation between replicative lifespan and rDNA size, we identified 64 candidate strains with significant rDNA copy number differences. However, in the process of validating candidate rDNA variants, we observed that independent isolates of our de novo gene deletion strains had unsolicited but significant changes in rDNA copy number. Moreover, we were not able to recapitulate rDNA phenotypes from the YKO yeast deletion collection. Instead, we found that the standard lithium acetate transformation protocol is a significant source of rDNA copy number variation, with lithium acetate exposure being the treatment causing variable rDNA copy number events after transformation. As the effects of variable rDNA copy number are being increasingly reported, our finding that rDNA is affected by lithium acetate exposure suggested that rDNA copy number variants may be influential passenger mutations in standard strain construction in S. cerevisiae.

  4. rDNA Copy Number Variants Are Frequent Passenger Mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Deletion Collections and de Novo Transformants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Elizabeth X; Wang, Xiaobin S; Amemiya, Haley M; Brewer, Bonita J; Raghuraman, M K

    2016-09-08

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus is known to exhibit greater instability relative to the rest of the genome. However, wild-type cells preferentially maintain a stable number of rDNA copies, suggesting underlying genetic control of the size of this locus. We performed a screen of a subset of the Yeast Knock-Out (YKO) single gene deletion collection to identify genetic regulators of this locus and to determine if rDNA copy number correlates with yeast replicative lifespan. While we found no correlation between replicative lifespan and rDNA size, we identified 64 candidate strains with significant rDNA copy number differences. However, in the process of validating candidate rDNA variants, we observed that independent isolates of our de novo gene deletion strains had unsolicited but significant changes in rDNA copy number. Moreover, we were not able to recapitulate rDNA phenotypes from the YKO yeast deletion collection. Instead, we found that the standard lithium acetate transformation protocol is a significant source of rDNA copy number variation, with lithium acetate exposure being the treatment causing variable rDNA copy number events after transformation. As the effects of variable rDNA copy number are being increasingly reported, our finding that rDNA is affected by lithium acetate exposure suggested that rDNA copy number variants may be influential passenger mutations in standard strain construction in S. cerevisiae. Copyright © 2016 Kwan et al.

  5. Fixation probability in a two-locus intersexual selection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Guillermo; Lessard, Sabin

    2016-06-01

    We study a two-locus model of intersexual selection in a finite haploid population reproducing according to a discrete-time Moran model with a trait locus expressed in males and a preference locus expressed in females. We show that the probability of ultimate fixation of a single mutant allele for a male ornament introduced at random at the trait locus given any initial frequency state at the preference locus is increased by weak intersexual selection and recombination, weak or strong. Moreover, this probability exceeds the initial frequency of the mutant allele even in the case of a costly male ornament if intersexual selection is not too weak. On the other hand, the probability of ultimate fixation of a single mutant allele for a female preference towards a male ornament introduced at random at the preference locus is increased by weak intersexual selection and weak recombination if the female preference is not costly, and is strong enough in the case of a costly male ornament. The analysis relies on an extension of the ancestral recombination-selection graph for samples of haplotypes to take into account events of intersexual selection, while the symbolic calculation of the fixation probabilities is made possible in a reasonable time by an optimizing algorithm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterisation of monotreme caseins reveals lineage-specific expansion of an ancestral casein locus in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Christophe M; Sharp, Julie A; Nicholas, Kevin R

    2009-01-01

    Using a milk-cell cDNA sequencing approach we characterised milk-protein sequences from two monotreme species, platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) and found a full set of caseins and casein variants. The genomic organisation of the platypus casein locus is compared with other mammalian genomes, including the marsupial opossum and several eutherians. Physical linkage of casein genes has been seen in the casein loci of all mammalian genomes examined and we confirm that this is also observed in platypus. However, we show that a recent duplication of beta-casein occurred in the monotreme lineage, as opposed to more ancient duplications of alpha-casein in the eutherian lineage, while marsupials possess only single copies of alpha- and beta-caseins. Despite this variability, the close proximity of the main alpha- and beta-casein genes in an inverted tail-tail orientation and the relative orientation of the more distant kappa-casein genes are similar in all mammalian genome sequences so far available. Overall, the conservation of the genomic organisation of the caseins indicates the early, pre-monotreme development of the fundamental role of caseins during lactation. In contrast, the lineage-specific gene duplications that have occurred within the casein locus of monotremes and eutherians but not marsupials, which may have lost part of the ancestral casein locus, emphasises the independent selection on milk provision strategies to the young, most likely linked to different developmental strategies. The monotremes therefore provide insight into the ancestral drivers for lactation and how these have adapted in different lineages.

  7. Evaluation of potential regulatory function of breast cancer risk locus at 6q25.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yaqiong; Ye, Chuanzhong; Guo, Xingyi; Wen, Wanqing; Long, Jirong; Gao, Yu-Tang; Shu, Xiao Ou; Zheng, Wei; Cai, Qiuyin

    2016-02-01

    In a genome-wide association study conducted among Chinese women, we identified the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2046210 at 6q25.1 for breast cancer risk. To explore a potential regulatory role for this risk locus, we measured expression levels of nine genes at the locus in breast cancer tissue and adjacent normal tissue samples obtained from 67 patients recruited in the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study. We found that rs2046210 had a statistically significant association with the expression levels of the AKAP12 and ESR1 genes in adjacent normal breast tissues. Women who carry the AA/AG risk genotypes had higher expressions of these two genes compared to those who carry G/G genotypes (P = 0.02 and 0.04 for the AKAP12 and ESR1, respectively). However, no significant differences of SNP rs2046210 with gene expression levels were found in tumor tissues. In The Cancer Genome Atlas samples, the AA/AG risk genotypes of SNP rs2046210 were associated with a significantly higher expression level of the AKAP12 gene and a lower level of the ESR1 gene in tumor tissue. Functional analysis using ENCODE data revealed that SNP rs7763637, which is in strong linkage disequilibrium with SNP rs2046210, is likely a potential functional variant, regulating the AKAP12 gene. Taken together, these results from our study suggest that the association between the 6q25.1 locus and breast cancer risk may be mediated through SNPs that regulate expressions of the AKAP12 gene. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Defective replication initiation results in locus specific chromosome breakage and a ribosomal RNA deficiency in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph C Sanchez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A form of dwarfism known as Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS is caused by recessive mutations in one of six different genes (ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDC6, CDT1, and MCM5. These genes encode components of the pre-replication complex, which assembles at origins of replication prior to S phase. Also, variants in two additional replication initiation genes have joined the list of causative mutations for MGS (Geminin and CDC45. The identity of the causative MGS genetic variants strongly suggests that some aspect of replication is amiss in MGS patients; however, little evidence has been obtained regarding what aspect of chromosome replication is faulty. Since the site of one of the missense mutations in the human ORC4 alleles is conserved between humans and yeast, we sought to determine in what way this single amino acid change affects the process of chromosome replication, by introducing the comparable mutation into yeast (orc4Y232C. We find that yeast cells with the orc4Y232C allele have a prolonged S-phase, due to compromised replication initiation at the ribosomal DNA (rDNA locus located on chromosome XII. The inability to initiate replication at the rDNA locus results in chromosome breakage and a severely reduced rDNA copy number in the survivors, presumably helping to ensure complete replication of chromosome XII. Although reducing rDNA copy number may help ensure complete chromosome replication, orc4Y232C cells struggle to meet the high demand for ribosomal RNA synthesis. This finding provides additional evidence linking two essential cellular pathways-DNA replication and ribosome biogenesis.

  9. Defective replication initiation results in locus specific chromosome breakage and a ribosomal RNA deficiency in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Joseph C; Kwan, Elizabeth X; Pohl, Thomas J; Amemiya, Haley M; Raghuraman, M K; Brewer, Bonita J

    2017-10-01

    A form of dwarfism known as Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is caused by recessive mutations in one of six different genes (ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDC6, CDT1, and MCM5). These genes encode components of the pre-replication complex, which assembles at origins of replication prior to S phase. Also, variants in two additional replication initiation genes have joined the list of causative mutations for MGS (Geminin and CDC45). The identity of the causative MGS genetic variants strongly suggests that some aspect of replication is amiss in MGS patients; however, little evidence has been obtained regarding what aspect of chromosome replication is faulty. Since the site of one of the missense mutations in the human ORC4 alleles is conserved between humans and yeast, we sought to determine in what way this single amino acid change affects the process of chromosome replication, by introducing the comparable mutation into yeast (orc4Y232C). We find that yeast cells with the orc4Y232C allele have a prolonged S-phase, due to compromised replication initiation at the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus located on chromosome XII. The inability to initiate replication at the rDNA locus results in chromosome breakage and a severely reduced rDNA copy number in the survivors, presumably helping to ensure complete replication of chromosome XII. Although reducing rDNA copy number may help ensure complete chromosome replication, orc4Y232C cells struggle to meet the high demand for ribosomal RNA synthesis. This finding provides additional evidence linking two essential cellular pathways-DNA replication and ribosome biogenesis.

  10. A modifier of Huntington's disease onset at the MLH1 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Min; Chao, Michael J; Harold, Denise; Abu Elneel, Kawther; Gillis, Tammy; Holmans, Peter; Jones, Lesley; Orth, Michael; Myers, Richard H; Kwak, Seung; Wheeler, Vanessa C; MacDonald, Marcy E; Gusella, James F

    2017-10-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by an expanded CAG repeat in HTT. Many clinical characteristics of HD such as age at motor onset are determined largely by the size of HTT CAG repeat. However, emerging evidence strongly supports a role for other genetic factors in modifying the disease pathogenesis driven by mutant huntingtin. A recent genome-wide association analysis to discover genetic modifiers of HD onset age provided initial evidence for modifier loci on chromosomes 8 and 15 and suggestive evidence for a locus on chromosome 3. Here, genotyping of candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms in a cohort of 3,314 additional HD subjects yields independent confirmation of the former two loci and moves the third to genome-wide significance at MLH1, a locus whose mouse orthologue modifies CAG length-dependent phenotypes in a Htt-knock-in mouse model of HD. Both quantitative and dichotomous association analyses implicate a functional variant on ∼32% of chromosomes with the beneficial modifier effect that delays HD motor onset by 0.7 years/allele. Genomic DNA capture and sequencing of a modifier haplotype localize the functional variation to a 78 kb region spanning the 3'end of MLH1 and the 5'end of the neighboring LRRFIP2, and marked by an isoleucine-valine missense variant in MLH1. Analysis of expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTLs) provides modest support for altered regulation of MLH1 and LRRFIP2, raising the possibility that the modifier affects regulation of both genes. Finally, polygenic modification score and heritability analyses suggest the existence of additional genetic modifiers, supporting expanded, comprehensive genetic analysis of larger HD datasets. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Novel identification of the IRF7 region as an anticentromere autoantibody propensity locus in systemic sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, F David; Gutala, Ramana; Simeón, Carmen P; Carreira, Patricia; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Vicente-Rabaneda, Esther; García-Hernández, Francisco J; de la Peña, Paloma García; Fernández-Castro, Mónica; Martínez-Estupiñán, Lina; Egurbide, María Victoria; Tsao, Betty P; Gourh, Pravitt; Agarwal, Sandeep K; Assassi, Shervin; Mayes, Maureen D; Arnett, Frank C; Tan, Filemon K; Martín, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Objective Systemic sclerosis (SSc) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are related chronic autoimmune diseases of complex aetiology in which the interferon (IFN) pathway plays a key role. Recent studies have reported an association between IRF7 and SLE which confers a risk to autoantibody production. A study was undertaken to investigate whether the IRF7 genomic region is also involved in susceptibility to SSc and the main clinical features. Methods Two case-control sets of Caucasian origin from the USA and Spain, comprising a total of 2316 cases of SSc and 2347 healthy controls, were included in the study. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the PHRF1-IRF7-CDHR5 locus were genotyped using TaqMan allelic discrimination technology. A meta-analysis was performed to test the overall effect of these genetic variants on SSc. Results Four out of five analysed SNPs were Significantly associated with the presence of anticentromere autoantibodies (ACA) in the patients with SSc in the combined analysis (rs1131665: pFDR=6.14 × 10−4, OR=0.78; rs4963128: pFDR=6.14 × 10−4, OR=0.79; rs702966: pFDR=3.83 × 10−3, OR=0.82; and rs2246614: pFDR=3.83 × 10−3, OR=0.83). Significant p values were also obtained when the disease was tested globally; however, the statistical significance was lost when the ACA-positive patients were excluded from the study, suggesting that these associations rely on ACA positivity. Conditional logistic regression and allelic combination analyses suggested that the functional IRF7 SNP rs1131665 is the most likely causal variant. Conclusions The results show that variation in the IRF7 genomic region is associated with the presence of ACA in patients with SSc, supporting other evidence that this locus represents a common risk factor for autoantibody production in autoimmune diseases. PMID:21926187

  12. Holoprosencephaly Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical manifestations in 15 patients (6 boys and 9 girls with middle interhemispheric variant (MIH of holoprosencephaly (HPE were compared with classic subtypes (alobar, semilobar, and lobar of HPE in a multicenter study at Stanford University School of Medicine and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital; Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia; University of California at San Francisco; Texas Scottish Rite Hospital, Dallas; and Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD.

  13. Inferring Demographic History Using Two-Locus Statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragsdale, Aaron P; Gutenkunst, Ryan N

    2017-06-01

    Population demographic history may be learned from contemporary genetic variation data. Methods based on aggregating the statistics of many single loci into an allele frequency spectrum (AFS) have proven powerful, but such methods ignore potentially informative patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between neighboring loci. To leverage such patterns, we developed a composite-likelihood framework for inferring demographic history from aggregated statistics of pairs of loci. Using this framework, we show that two-locus statistics are more sensitive to demographic history than single-locus statistics such as the AFS. In particular, two-locus statistics escape the notorious confounding of depth and duration of a bottleneck, and they provide a means to estimate effective population size based on the recombination rather than mutation rate. We applied our approach to a Zambian population of Drosophila melanogaster Notably, using both single- and two-locus statistics, we inferred a substantially lower ancestral effective population size than previous works and did not infer a bottleneck history. Together, our results demonstrate the broad potential for two-locus statistics to enable powerful population genetic inference. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  14. FTO variants are associated with obesity in the Chinese and Malay populations in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jonathan T; Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Seielstad, Mark; Sim, Xue Ling; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Chia, Kee Seng; Wong, Tien Yin; Saw, Seang Mei; Chew, Suok Kai; Aung, Tin; Tai, E-Shyong

    2008-10-01

    Association between genetic variants at the FTO locus and obesity has been consistently observed in populations of European ancestry and inconsistently in non-Europeans. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of FTO variants on obesity and type 2 diabetes in Southeast Asian populations. We examined associations between nine previously reported FTO single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and related traits in 4,298 participants (2,919 Chinese, 785 Malays, and 594 Asian Indians) from the 1998 Singapore National Health Survey (NHS98) and 2,996 Malays from the Singapore Malay Eye Study (SiMES). All nine SNPs exhibited strong linkage disequilibrium (r(2) = 0.6-0.99), and minor alleles were associated with obesity in the same direction as previous studies with effect sizes ranging from 0.42 to 0.68 kg/m(2) (P Chinese, 0.65 to 0.91 kg/m(2) (P Malays, and 0.52 to 0.64 kg/m(2) (P Malays after adjustment for age, sex, smoking, alcohol consumption, and exercise. The variants were also associated with type 2 diabetes, though not after adjustment for BMI (with the exception of the SiMES Malays: odds ratio 1.17-1.22; P Chinese and Malays in Singapore. Our data do not support the hypothesis that differences in allele frequency or genetic architecture underlie the lack of association observed in some populations of Asian ancestry. Examination of gene-environment interactions involving variants at this locus may provide further insights into the role of FTO in the pathogenesis of human obesity and diabetes.

  15. Clustered coding variants in the glutamate receptor complexes of individuals with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René A W Frank

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Current models of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder implicate multiple genes, however their biological relationships remain elusive. To test the genetic role of glutamate receptors and their interacting scaffold proteins, the exons of ten glutamatergic 'hub' genes in 1304 individuals were re-sequenced in case and control samples. No significant difference in the overall number of non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs was observed between cases and controls. However, cluster analysis of nsSNPs identified two exons encoding the cysteine-rich domain and first transmembrane helix of GRM1 as a risk locus with five mutations highly enriched within these domains. A new splice variant lacking the transmembrane GPCR domain of GRM1 was discovered in the human brain and the GRM1 mutation cluster could perturb the regulation of this variant. The predicted effect on individuals harbouring multiple mutations distributed in their ten hub genes was also examined. Diseased individuals possessed an increased load of deleteriousness from multiple concurrent rare and common coding variants. Together, these data suggest a disease model in which the interplay of compound genetic coding variants, distributed among glutamate receptors and their interacting proteins, contribute to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and bipolar disorders.

  16. Two-locus linkage analysis in multiple sclerosis (MS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tienari, P.J. (National Public Health Institute, Helsinki (Finland) Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)); Terwilliger, J.D.; Ott, J. (Columbia Univ., New York (United States)); Palo, J. (Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)); Peltonen, L. (National Public Health Institute, Helsinki (Finland))

    1994-01-15

    One of the major challenges in genetic linkage analyses is the study of complex diseases. The authors demonstrate here the use of two-locus linkage analysis in multiple sclerosis (MS), a multifactorial disease with a complex mode of inheritance. In a set of Finnish multiplex families, they have previously found evidence for linkage between MS susceptibility and two independent loci, the myelin basic protein gene (MBP) on chromosome 18 and the HLA complex on chromosome 6. This set of families provides a unique opportunity to perform linkage analysis conditional on two loci contributing to the disease. In the two-trait-locus/two-marker-locus analysis, the presence of another disease locus is parametrized and the analysis more appropriately treats information from the unaffected family member than single-disease-locus analysis. As exemplified here in MS, the two-locus analysis can be a powerful method for investigating susceptibility loci in complex traits, best suited for analysis of specific candidate genes, or for situations in which preliminary evidence for linkage already exists or is suggested. 41 refs., 6 tabs.

  17. Human obesity associated with an intronic SNP in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a key role in energy balance. In population studies, SNPs of the BDNF locus have been linked to obesity, but the mechanism by which these variants cause weight gain is unknown. Here, we examined human hypothalamic BDNF expression in association with 44 ...

  18. The MHC locus and genetic susceptibility to autoimmune and infectious diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matzaraki, Vasiliki; Kumar, Vinod; Wijmenga, Cisca; Zhernakova, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    In the past 50 years, variants in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, also known as the human leukocyte antigen (HLA), have been reported as major risk factors for complex diseases. Recent advances, including large genetic screens, imputation, and analyses of non-additive and epistatic

  19. A colorectal cancer susceptibility new variant at 4q26 in the Spanish population identified by genome-wide association analysis.

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    Luis M Real

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non-hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC is a complex disorder resulting from the combination of genetic and non-genetic factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS are useful for identifying such genetic susceptibility factors. However, the single loci so far associated with CRC only represent a fraction of the genetic risk for CRC development in the general population. Therefore, many other genetic risk variants alone and in combination must still remain to be discovered. The aim of this work was to search for genetic risk factors for CRC, by performing single-locus and two-locus GWAS in the Spanish population. RESULTS: A total of 801 controls and 500 CRC cases were included in the discovery GWAS dataset. 77 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from single-locus and 243 SNPs from two-locus association analyses were selected for replication in 423 additional CRC cases and 1382 controls. In the meta-analysis, one SNP, rs3987 at 4q26, reached GWAS significant p-value (p = 4.02×10(-8, and one SNP pair, rs1100508 CG and rs8111948 AA, showed a trend for two-locus association (p = 4.35×10(-11. Additionally, our GWAS confirmed the previously reported association with CRC of five SNPs located at 3q36.2 (rs10936599, 8q24 (rs10505477, 8q24.21(rs6983267, 11q13.4 (rs3824999 and 14q22.2 (rs4444235. CONCLUSIONS: Our GWAS for CRC patients from Spain confirmed some previously reported associations for CRC and yielded a novel candidate risk SNP, located at 4q26. Epistasis analyses also yielded several novel candidate susceptibility pairs that need to be validated in independent analyses.

  20. Multiple lupus-associated ITGAM variants alter Mac-1 functions on neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yebin; Wu, Jianming; Kucik, Dennis F; White, Nathan B; Redden, David T; Szalai, Alexander J; Bullard, Daniel C; Edberg, Jeffrey C

    2013-11-01

    Multiple studies have demonstrated that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ITGAM locus (including the nonsynonymous SNPs rs1143679, rs1143678, and rs1143683) are associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). ITGAM encodes the protein CD11b, a subunit of the β2 integrin Mac-1. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of ITGAM genetic variation on the biologic functions of neutrophil Mac-1. Neutrophils from ITGAM-genotyped and -sequenced healthy donors were isolated for functional studies. The phagocytic capacity of neutrophil ITGAM variants was probed with complement-coated erythrocytes, serum-treated zymosan, heat-treated zymosan, and IgG-coated erythrocytes. The adhesion capacity of ITGAM variants, in adhering to either purified intercellular adhesion molecule 1 or tumor necrosis factor α-stimulated endothelial cells, was assessed in a flow chamber. Expression levels of total CD11b and activation of CD11b were assessed by flow cytometry. Mac-1-mediated neutrophil phagocytosis, determined in cultures with 2 different complement-coated particles, was significantly reduced in individuals with nonsynonymous variant alleles of ITGAM. This reduction in phagocytosis was related to variation at either rs1143679 (in the β-propeller region) or rs1143678/rs1143683 (highly linked SNPs in the cytoplasmic/calf-1 regions). Phagocytosis mediated by Fcγ receptors was also significantly reduced in donors with variant ITGAM alleles. Similarly, firm adhesion of neutrophils was significantly reduced in individuals with variant ITGAM alleles. These functional alterations were not attributable to differences in total receptor expression or activation. The nonsynonymous ITGAM variants rs1143679 and rs1143678/rs113683 contribute to altered Mac-1 function on neutrophils. These results underscore the need to consider multiple nonsynonymous SNPs when assessing the functional consequences of ITGAM variation on immune cell processes and the risk of SLE

  1. BDNF Variants May Modulate Long-Term Visual Memory Performance in a Healthy Cohort

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    Nesli Avgan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is involved in numerous cognitive functions including learning and memory. BDNF plays an important role in synaptic plasticity in humans and rats with BDNF shown to be essential for the formation of long-term memories. We previously identified a significant association between the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism (rs6265 and long-term visual memory (p-value = 0.003 in a small cohort (n = 181 comprised of healthy individuals who had been phenotyped for various aspects of memory function. In this study, we have extended the cohort to 597 individuals and examined multiple genetic variants across both the BDNF and BDNF-AS genes for association with visual memory performance as assessed by the Wechsler Memory Scale—Fourth Edition subtests Visual Reproduction I and II (VR I and II. VR I assesses immediate visual memory, whereas VR II assesses long-term visual memory. Genetic association analyses were performed for 34 single nucleotide polymorphisms genotyped on Illumina OmniExpress BeadChip arrays with the immediate and long-term visual memory phenotypes. While none of the BDNF and BDNF-AS variants were shown to be significant for immediate visual memory, we found 10 variants (including the Val66Met polymorphism (p-value = 0.006 that were nominally associated, and three variants (two variants in BDNF and one variant in the BDNF-AS locus that were significantly associated with long-term visual memory. Our data therefore suggests a potential role for BDNF, and its anti-sense transcript BDNF-AS, in long-term visual memory performance.

  2. BDNF Variants May Modulate Long-Term Visual Memory Performance in a Healthy Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avgan, Nesli; Sutherland, Heidi G; Spriggens, Lauren K; Yu, Chieh; Ibrahim, Omar; Bellis, Claire; Haupt, Larisa M; Shum, David H K; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2017-03-17

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in numerous cognitive functions including learning and memory. BDNF plays an important role in synaptic plasticity in humans and rats with BDNF shown to be essential for the formation of long-term memories. We previously identified a significant association between the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism (rs6265) and long-term visual memory ( p -value = 0.003) in a small cohort ( n = 181) comprised of healthy individuals who had been phenotyped for various aspects of memory function. In this study, we have extended the cohort to 597 individuals and examined multiple genetic variants across both the BDNF and BDNF-AS genes for association with visual memory performance as assessed by the Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition subtests Visual Reproduction I and II (VR I and II). VR I assesses immediate visual memory, whereas VR II assesses long-term visual memory. Genetic association analyses were performed for 34 single nucleotide polymorphisms genotyped on Illumina OmniExpress BeadChip arrays with the immediate and long-term visual memory phenotypes. While none of the BDNF and BDNF-AS variants were shown to be significant for immediate visual memory, we found 10 variants (including the Val66Met polymorphism ( p -value = 0.006)) that were nominally associated, and three variants (two variants in BDNF and one variant in the BDNF-AS locus) that were significantly associated with long-term visual memory. Our data therefore suggests a potential role for BDNF , and its anti-sense transcript BDNF-AS , in long-term visual memory performance.

  3. Underestimated effect sizes in GWAS: fundamental limitations of single SNP analysis for dichotomous phenotypes.

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    Sven Stringer

    Full Text Available Complex diseases are often highly heritable. However, for many complex traits only a small proportion of the heritability can be explained by observed genetic variants in traditional genome-wide association (GWA studies. Moreover, for some of those traits few significant SNPs have been identified. Single SNP association methods test for association at a single SNP, ignoring the effect of other SNPs. We show using a simple multi-locus odds model of complex disease that moderate to large effect sizes of causal variants may be estimated as relatively small effect sizes in single SNP association testing. This underestimation effect is most severe for diseases influenced by numerous risk variants. We relate the underestimation effect to the concept of non-collapsibility found in the statistics literature. As described, continuous phenotypes generated with linear genetic models are not affected by this underestimation effect. Since many GWA studies apply single SNP analysis to dichotomous phenotypes, previously reported results potentially underestimate true effect sizes, thereby impeding identification of true effect SNPs. Therefore, when a multi-locus model of disease risk is assumed, a multi SNP analysis may be more appropriate.

  4. FTO genetic variants, dietary intake and body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qi, Qibin; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Downer, Mary K

    2014-01-01

    FTO is the strongest known genetic susceptibility locus for obesity. Experimental studies in animals suggest the potential roles of FTO in regulating food intake. The interactive relation among FTO variants, dietary intake and body mass index (BMI) is complex and results from previous often small...

  5. Genome-Wide Association Analysis of Young-Onset Stroke Identifies a Locus on Chromosome 10q25 Near HABP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Ching; Stanne, Tara M; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Ho, Weang Kee; Traylor, Matthew; Amouyel, Philippe; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Malik, Rainer; Xu, Huichun; Kittner, Steven J; Cole, John W; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Danesh, John; Rasheed, Asif; Zhao, Wei; Engelter, Stefan; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Lathrop, Mark; Leys, Didier; Thijs, Vincent; Metso, Tiina M; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Pezzini, Alessandro; Parati, Eugenio A; Norrving, Bo; Bevan, Steve; Rothwell, Peter M; Sudlow, Cathie; Slowik, Agnieszka; Lindgren, Arne; Walters, Matthew R; Jannes, Jim; Shen, Jess; Crosslin, David; Doheny, Kimberly; Laurie, Cathy C; Kanse, Sandip M; Bis, Joshua C; Fornage, Myriam; Mosley, Thomas H; Hopewell, Jemma C; Strauch, Konstantin; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Gieger, Christian; Waldenberger, Melanie; Peters, Annette; Meisinger, Christine; Ikram, M Arfan; Longstreth, W T; Meschia, James F; Seshadri, Sudha; Sharma, Pankaj; Worrall, Bradford; Jern, Christina; Levi, Christopher; Dichgans, Martin; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B; Markus, Hugh S; Debette, Stephanie; Rolfs, Arndt; Saleheen, Danish; Mitchell, Braxton D

    2016-02-01

    Although a genetic contribution to ischemic stroke is well recognized, only a handful of stroke loci have been identified by large-scale genetic association studies to date. Hypothesizing that genetic effects might be stronger for early- versus late-onset stroke, we conducted a 2-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies, focusing on stroke cases with an age of onset genetic variants at loci with association Pstroke susceptibility locus at 10q25 reached genome-wide significance in the combined analysis of all samples from the discovery and follow-up stages (rs11196288; odds ratio =1.41; P=9.5×10(-9)). The associated locus is in an intergenic region between TCF7L2 and HABP2. In a further analysis in an independent sample, we found that 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms in high linkage disequilibrium with rs11196288 were significantly associated with total plasma factor VII-activating protease levels, a product of HABP2. HABP2, which encodes an extracellular serine protease involved in coagulation, fibrinolysis, and inflammatory pathways, may be a genetic susceptibility locus for early-onset stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Investigation of the 5q33.3 longevity locus and age-related phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Marianne; Thinggaard, Mikael; Christensen, Kaare

    2017-01-01

    A large meta-analysis recently found the 5q33.3 locus to be associated with survival to ≥ 90 years and lower all-cause mortality, thus suggesting it as a third human longevity locus alongside APOE and FOXO3A. The 5q33.3 locus has previously been associated with blood pressure regulation and cardi......A large meta-analysis recently found the 5q33.3 locus to be associated with survival to ≥ 90 years and lower all-cause mortality, thus suggesting it as a third human longevity locus alongside APOE and FOXO3A. The 5q33.3 locus has previously been associated with blood pressure regulation...... and cardiovascular diseases in middle-aged individuals. However, part of the influence on mortality appears to be independent of cardiovascular phenotypes, and the role of the 5q33.3 locus in longevity and survival is therefore still partly unknown. We investigated the association between the longevity......-associated variant rs2149954 on chromosome 5q33.3 and age-related phenotypes in two cohorts of 1,588 and 1,271 long-lived individuals (mean ages 93.1 and 95.9 years, respectively) as well as in 700 middle-aged and 677 elderly individuals (mean ages 52.5 and 78.7 years). Altogether, nominally significant associations...

  7. A Missense LRRK2 Variant Is a Risk Factor for Excessive Inflammatory Responses in Leprosy.

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    Vinicius M Fava

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Depending on the epidemiological setting, a variable proportion of leprosy patients will suffer from excessive pro-inflammatory responses, termed type-1 reactions (T1R. The LRRK2 gene encodes a multi-functional protein that has been shown to modulate pro-inflammatory responses. Variants near the LRRK2 gene have been associated with leprosy in some but not in other studies. We hypothesized that LRRK2 was a T1R susceptibility gene and that inconsistent association results might reflect different proportions of patients with T1R in the different sample settings. Hence, we evaluated the association of LRRK2 variants with T1R susceptibility.An association scan of the LRRK2 locus was performed using 156 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Evidence of association was evaluated in two family-based samples: A set of T1R-affected and a second set of T1R-free families. Only SNPs significant for T1R-affected families with significant evidence of heterogeneity relative to T1R-free families were considered T1R-specific. An expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL analysis was applied to evaluate the impact of T1R-specific SNPs on LRRK2 gene transcriptional levels.A total of 18 T1R-specific variants organized in four bins were detected. The core SNP capturing the T1R association was the LRRK2 missense variant M2397T (rs3761863 that affects LRRK2 protein turnover. Additionally, a bin of nine SNPs associated with T1R were eQTLs for LRRK2 in unstimulated whole blood cells but not after exposure to Mycobacterium leprae antigen.The results support a preferential association of LRRK2 variants with T1R. LRRK2 involvement in T1R is likely due to a pathological pro-inflammatory loop modulated by LRRK2 availability. Interestingly, the M2397T variant was reported in association with Crohn's disease with the same risk allele as in T1R suggesting common inflammatory mechanism in these two distinct diseases.

  8. Locus of Control and Obesity

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    Florence eNeymotin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the developed world, the hazards associated with obesity have largely outstripped the risk of starvation. Obesity remains a difficult public health issue to address, due in large part to the many disciplines involved. A full understanding requires knowledge in the fields of genetics, endocrinology, psychology, sociology, economics, and public policy – among others. In this short review, which serves as an introduction to the Frontiers in Endocrinology research topic, we address one cross-disciplinary relationship: the interaction between the hunger/satiation neural circuitry, an individual’s perceived locus of control, and the risk for obesity. Mammals have evolved a complex system for modulating energy intake. Overlaid on this, in humans, there exists a wide variation in perceived locus of control – that is, the extent to which an individual believes to be in charge of the events that affect them. Whether one has primarily an internal or external locus of control itself affects, and is affected by, external and physiological factors and has been correlated with the risk for obesity. Thus, the path from hunger and satiation to an individual’s actual behavior may often be moderated by psychological factors, included among which is locus of control.

  9. Locus of control and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neymotin, Florence; Nemzer, Louis R

    2014-01-01

    In the developed world, the hazards associated with obesity have largely outstripped the risk of starvation. Obesity remains a difficult public health issue to address, due in large part to the many disciplines involved. A full understanding requires knowledge in the fields of genetics, endocrinology, psychology, sociology, economics, and public policy - among others. In this short review, which serves as an introduction to the Frontiers in Endocrinology research topic, we address one cross-disciplinary relationship: the interaction between the hunger/satiation neural circuitry, an individual's perceived locus of control, and the risk for obesity. Mammals have evolved a complex system for modulating energy intake. Overlaid on this, in humans, there exists a wide variation in "perceived locus of control" - that is, the extent to which an individual believes to be in charge of the events that affect them. Whether one has primarily an internal or external locus of control itself affects, and is affected by, external and physiological factors and has been correlated with the risk for obesity. Thus, the path from hunger and satiation to an individual's actual behavior may often be moderated by psychological factors, included among which is locus of control.

  10. Locus-specific view of flax domestication history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yong-Bi; Diederichsen, Axel; Allaby, Robin G

    2012-01-01

    Crop domestication has been inferred genetically from neutral markers and increasingly from specific domestication-associated loci. However, some crops are utilized for multiple purposes that may or may not be reflected in a single domestication-associated locus. One such example is cultivated flax (Linum usitatissimum L.), the earliest oil and fiber crop, for which domestication history remains poorly understood. Oil composition of cultivated flax and pale flax (L. bienne Mill.) indicates that the sad2 locus is a candidate domestication locus associated with increased unsaturated fatty acid production in cultivated flax. A phylogenetic analysis of the sad2 locus in 43 pale and 70 cultivated flax accessions established a complex domestication history for flax that has not been observed previously. The analysis supports an early, independent domestication of a primitive flax lineage, in which the loss of seed dispersal through capsular indehiscence was not established, but increased oil content was likely occurred. A subsequent flax domestication process occurred that probably involved multiple domestications and includes lineages that contain oil, fiber, and winter varieties. In agreement with previous studies, oil rather than fiber varieties occupy basal phylogenetic positions. The data support multiple paths of flax domestication for oil-associated traits before selection of the other domestication-associated traits of seed dispersal loss and fiber production. The sad2 locus is less revealing about the origin of winter tolerance. In this case, a single domestication-associated locus is informative about the history of domesticated forms with the associated trait while partially informative on forms less associated with the trait. PMID:22408732

  11. A Major Locus for Quantitatively Measured Shank Skin Color Traits in Korean Native Chicken

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    S. Jin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Shank skin color of Korean native chicken (KNC shows large color variations. It varies from white, yellow, green, bluish or grey to black, whilst in the majority of European breeds the shanks are typically yellow-colored. Three shank skin color-related traits (i.e., lightness [L*], redness [a*], and yellowness [b*] were measured by a spectrophotometer in 585 progeny from 68 nuclear families in the KNC resource population. We performed genome scan linkage analysis to identify loci that affect quantitatively measured shank skin color traits in KNC. All these birds were genotyped with 167 DNA markers located throughout the 26 autosomes. The SOLAR program was used to conduct multipoint variance-component quantitative trait locus (QTL analyses. We detected a major QTL that affects b* value (logarithm of odds [LOD] = 47.5, p = 1.60×10−49 on GGA24 (GGA for Gallus gallus. At the same location, we also detected a QTL that influences a* value (LOD = 14.2, p = 6.14×10−16. Additionally, beta-carotene dioxygenase 2 (BCDO2, the obvious positional candidate gene under the linkage peaks on GGA24, was investigated by the two association tests: i.e., measured genotype association (MGA and quantitative transmission disequilibrium test (QTDT. Significant associations were detected between BCDO2 g.9367 A>C and a* (PMGA = 1.69×10−28; PQTDT = 2.40×10−25. The strongest associations were between BCDO2 g.9367 A>C and b* (PMGA = 3.56×10−66; PQTDT = 1.68×10−65. However, linkage analyses conditional on the single nucleotide polymorphism indicated that other functional variants should exist. Taken together, we demonstrate for the first time the linkage and association between the BCDO2 locus on GGA24 and quantitatively measured shank skin color traits in KNC.

  12. The 4q27 locus and prostate cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tindall, Elizabeth A; Hoang, Hoa N; Southey, Melissa C; English, Dallas R; Hopper, John L; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Hayes, Vanessa M

    2010-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is considered to be implicated in the development of prostate cancer. In this study we are the first to investigate a potential association between variants in an autoimmune related region on chromosome 4q27 and prostate cancer risk. This region harbors two cytokine genes IL-2 and the recently described IL-21. We genotyped six variants previously associated with autoimmune disease (namely rs13151961, rs13119723, rs17388568, rs3136534, rs6822844 and rs6840978) and one functional IL-2 promoter variant (rs2069762) for possible association with prostate cancer risk using the Australian Risk Factors for Prostate Cancer case-control Study. Overall, our results do not support an association between the seven variants at position 4q27 and prostate cancer risk. Per allele odds ratios (ORs) were not significantly different from 1 (all P-values = 0.06). However, we found suggestive evidence for a significant association between the presence of the rs13119723 variant (located in a protein of unknown function) and men with a family history of prostate cancer in first-degree relatives (P-value for interaction 0.02). The per allele OR associated with this variant was significantly higher than 1 (2.37; 95% C.I. = 1.01-5.57). We suggest that genetic variation within the chromosome 4q27 locus might be associated with prostate cancer susceptibility in men with a family history of the disease. Furthermore, our study alludes to a potential role of unknown protein KIAA1109 in conferring this risk

  13. Genetic variants associated with the root system architecture of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) under contrasting phosphate supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohua; Chen, Yanling; Thomas, Catherine L; Ding, Guangda; Xu, Ping; Shi, Dexu; Grandke, Fabian; Jin, Kemo; Cai, Hongmei; Xu, Fangsen; Yi, Bin; Broadley, Martin R; Shi, Lei

    2017-08-01

    Breeding crops with ideal root system architecture for efficient absorption of phosphorus is an important strategy to reduce the use of phosphate fertilizers. To investigate genetic variants leading to changes in root system architecture, 405 oilseed rape cultivars were genotyped with a 60K Brassica Infinium SNP array in low and high P environments. A total of 285 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were associated with root system architecture traits at varying phosphorus levels. Nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms corroborate a previous linkage analysis of root system architecture quantitative trait loci in the BnaTNDH population. One peak single-nucleotide polymorphism region on A3 was associated with all root system architecture traits and co-localized with a quantitative trait locus for primary root length at low phosphorus. Two more single-nucleotide polymorphism peaks on A5 for root dry weight at low phosphorus were detected in both growth systems and co-localized with a quantitative trait locus for the same trait. The candidate genes identified on A3 form a haplotype 'BnA3Hap', that will be important for understanding the phosphorus/root system interaction and for the incorporation into Brassica napus breeding programs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  14. Lack of Association between SLC30A8 Variants and Type 2 Diabetes in Mexican American Families

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    Hemant Kulkarni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available SLC30A8 encodes zinc transporter 8 which is involved in packaging and release of insulin. Evidence for the association of SLC30A8 variants with type 2 diabetes (T2D is inconclusive. We interrogated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs around SLC30A8 for association with T2D in high-risk, pedigreed individuals from extended Mexican American families. This study of 118 SNPs within 50 kb of the SLC30A8 locus tested the association with eight T2D-related traits at four levels: (i each SNP using measured genotype approach (MGA; (ii interaction of SNPs with age and sex; (iii combinations of SNPs using Bayesian Quantitative Trait Nucleotide (BQTN analyses; and (iv entire gene locus using the gene burden test. Only one SNP (rs7817754 was significantly associated with incident T2D but a summary statistic based on all T2D-related traits identified 11 novel SNPs. Three SNPs and one SNP were weakly but interactively associated with age and sex, respectively. BQTN analyses could not demonstrate any informative combination of SNPs over MGA. Lastly, gene burden test results showed that at best the SLC30A8 locus could account for only 1-2% of the variability in T2D-related traits. Our results indicate a lack of association of the SLC30A8 SNPs with T2D in Mexican American families.

  15. Stability of monomeric Cro variants: Isoenergetic transformation of a type I' to a type II' beta-hairpin by single amino acid replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollah, A K M M; Stennis, Rhonda L; Mossing, Michael C

    2003-05-01

    The thermodynamic stabilities of three monomeric variants of the bacteriophage lambda Cro repressor that differ only in the sequence of two amino acids at the apex of an engineered beta-hairpin have been determined. The sequences of the turns are EVK-XX-EVK, where the two central residues are DG, GG, and GT, respectively. Standard-state unfolding free energies, determined from circular dichroism measurements as a function of urea concentration, range from 2.4 to 2.7 kcal/mole, while those determined from guanidine hydrochloride range from 2.8 to 3.3 kcal/mole for the three proteins. Thermal denaturation yields van't Hoff unfolding enthalpies of 36 to 40 kcal /mole at midpoint temperatures in the range of 53 to 58 degrees C. Extrapolation of the thermal denaturation free energies with heat capacities of 400 to 600 cal/mole deg gives good agreement with the parameters determined in denaturant titrations. As predicted from statistical surveys of amino acid replacements in beta-hairpins, energetic barriers to transformation from a type I' turn (DG) to a type II' turn (GT) can be quite small.

  16. An in-depth characterization of the major psoriasis susceptibility locus identifies candidate susceptibility alleles within an HLA-C enhancer element.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Clop

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is an immune-mediated skin disorder that is inherited as a complex genetic trait. Although genome-wide association scans (GWAS have identified 36 disease susceptibility regions, more than 50% of the genetic variance can be attributed to a single Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC locus, known as PSORS1. Genetic studies indicate that HLA-C is the strongest PSORS1 candidate gene, since markers tagging HLA-Cw*0602 consistently generate the most significant association signals in GWAS. However, it is unclear whether HLA-Cw*0602 is itself the causal PSORS1 allele, especially as the role of SNPs that may affect its expression has not been investigated. Here, we have undertaken an in-depth molecular characterization of the PSORS1 interval, with a view to identifying regulatory variants that may contribute to disease susceptibility. By analysing high-density SNP data, we refined PSORS1 to a 179 kb region encompassing HLA-C and the neighbouring HCG27 pseudogene. We compared multiple MHC sequences spanning this refined locus and identified 144 candidate susceptibility variants, which are unique to chromosomes bearing HLA-Cw*0602. In parallel, we investigated the epigenetic profile of the critical PSORS1 interval and uncovered three enhancer elements likely to be active in T lymphocytes. Finally we showed that nine candidate susceptibility SNPs map within a HLA-C enhancer and that three of these variants co-localise with binding sites for immune-related transcription factors. These data indicate that SNPs affecting HLA-Cw*0602 expression are likely to contribute to psoriasis susceptibility and highlight the importance of integrating multiple experimental approaches in the investigation of complex genomic regions such as the MHC.

  17. Prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis Four rag Locus Genotypes in Patients of Orthodontic Gingivitis and Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Yujie; Wang, Lili; Guo, Yang; Xiao, Shuiqing

    2013-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is considered as a major etiological agent in periodontal diseases and implied to result in gingival inflammation under orthodontic appliance. rag locus is a pathogenicity island found in Porphyromonas gingivalis. Four rag locus variants are different in pathogenicity of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Moreover, there are different racial and geographic differences in distribution of rag locus genotypes. In this study, we assessed the prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis and rag locus genotypes in 102 gingival crevicular fluid samples from 57 cases of gingivitis patients with orthodontic appliances, 25 cases of periodontitis patients and 20 cases of periodontally healthy people through a 16S rRNA-based PCR and a multiplex PCR. The correlations between Porphyromona.gingivalis/rag locus and clinical indices were analyzed. The prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis and rag locus genes in periodontitis group was the highest among three groups and higher in orthodontic gingivitis than healthy people (porthodontic gingivitis and mild-to-moderate periodontitis in Shandong. Porphyromonas.gingivalis carrying rag-1 has the strong virulence and could be associated with severe periodontitis. PMID:23593379

  18. Inferring relationships between pairs of individuals from locus heterozygosities

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    Spinetti Isabella

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The traditional exact method for inferring relationships between individuals from genetic data is not easily applicable in all situations that may be encountered in several fields of applied genetics. This study describes an approach that gives affordable results and is easily applicable; it is based on the probabilities that two individuals share 0, 1 or both alleles at a locus identical by state. Results We show that these probabilities (zi depend on locus heterozygosity (H, and are scarcely affected by variation of the distribution of allele frequencies. This allows us to obtain empirical curves relating zi's to H for a series of common relationships, so that the likelihood ratio of a pair of relationships between any two individuals, given their genotypes at a locus, is a function of a single parameter, H. Application to large samples of mother-child and full-sib pairs shows that the statistical power of this method to infer the correct relationship is not much lower than the exact method. Analysis of a large database of STR data proves that locus heterozygosity does not vary significantly among Caucasian populations, apart from special cases, so that the likelihood ratio of the more common relationships between pairs of individuals may be obtained by looking at tabulated zi values. Conclusions A simple method is provided, which may be used by any scientist with the help of a calculator or a spreadsheet to compute the likelihood ratios of common alternative relationships between pairs of individuals.

  19. Protein variants in Hiroshima and Nagasaki: tales of two cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neel, J V; Satoh, C; Smouse, P; Asakawa, J; Takahashi, N; Goriki, K; Fujita, M; Kageoka, T; Hazama, R

    1988-12-01

    The results of 1,465,423 allele product determinations based on blood samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, involving 30 different proteins representing 32 different gene products, are analyzed in a variety of ways, with the following conclusions: (1) Sibships and their parents are included in the sample. Our analysis reveals that statistical procedures designed to reduce the sample to equivalent independent genomes do not in population comparisons compensate for the familial cluster effect of rare variants. Accordingly, the data set was reduced to one representative of each sibship (937,427 allele products). (2) Both chi 2-type contrasts and a genetic distance measure (delta) reveal that rare variants (P less than .01) are collectively as effective as polymorphisms in establishing genetic differences between the two cities. (3) We suggest that rare variants that individually exhibit significant intercity differences are probably the legacy of tribal private polymorphisms that occurred during prehistoric times. (4) Despite the great differences in the known histories of the two cities, both the overall frequency of rare variants and the number of different rare variants are essentially identical in the two cities. (5) The well-known differences in locus variability are confirmed, now after adjustment for sample size differences for the various locus products; in this large series we failed to detect variants at only three of 29 loci for which sample size exceeded 23,000. (6) The number of alleles identified per locus correlates positively with subunit molecular weight. (7) Loci supporting genetic polymorphisms are characterized by more rare variants than are loci at which polymorphisms were not encountered. (8) Loci whose products do not appear to be essential for health support more variants than do loci the absence of whose product is detrimental to health. (9) There is a striking excess of rare variants over the expectation under the neutral mutation

  20. Screening of whole genome sequences identified high-impact variants for stallion fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrimpf, Rahel; Gottschalk, Maren; Metzger, Julia; Martinsson, Gunilla; Sieme, Harald; Distl, Ottmar

    2016-04-14

    Stallion fertility is an economically important trait due to the increase of artificial insemination in horses. The availability of whole genome sequence data facilitates identification of rare high-impact variants contributing to stallion fertility. The aim of our study was to genotype rare high-impact variants retrieved from next-generation sequencing (NGS)-data of 11 horses in order to unravel harmful genetic variants in large samples of stallions. Gene ontology (GO) terms and search results from public databases were used to obtain a comprehensive list of human und mice genes predicted to participate in the regulation of male reproduction. The corresponding equine orthologous genes were searched in whole genome sequence data of seven stallions and four mares and filtered for high-impact genetic variants using SnpEFF, SIFT and Polyphen 2 software. All genetic variants with the missing homozygous mutant genotype were genotyped on 337 fertile stallions of 19 breeds using KASP genotyping assays or PCR-RFLP. Mixed linear model analysis was employed for an association analysis with de-regressed estimated breeding values of the paternal component of the pregnancy rate per estrus (EBV-PAT). We screened next generation sequenced data of whole genomes from 11 horses for equine genetic variants in 1194 human and mice genes involved in male fertility and linked through common gene ontology (GO) with male reproductive processes. Variants were filtered for high-impact on protein structure and validated through SIFT and Polyphen 2. Only those genetic variants were followed up when the homozygote mutant genotype was missing in the detection sample comprising 11 horses. After this filtering process, 17 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) were left. These SNPs were genotyped in 337 fertile stallions of 19 breeds using KASP genotyping assays or PCR-RFLP. An association analysis in 216 Hanoverian stallions revealed a significant association of the splice-site disruption variant

  1. The Ties that Bind (the Igh Locus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krangel, Michael S

    2016-05-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus V(D)J recombination requires a 3D chromatin organization which permits widely distributed variable (V) gene segments to contact distant diversity (D) and joining (J) gene segments. A recent study has identified key nodes in the locus interactome, paving the way for new molecular insights into how the locus is configured for recombination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Von Willebrand Factor Gene Variants Associate with Herpes simplex Encephalitis.

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    Nada Abdelmagid

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE is a rare complication of Herpes simplex virus type-1 infection. It results in severe parenchymal damage in the brain. Although viral latency in neurons is very common in the population, it remains unclear why certain individuals develop HSE. Here we explore potential host genetic variants predisposing to HSE. In order to investigate this we used a rat HSE model comparing the HSE susceptible SHR (Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats with the asymptomatic infection of BN (Brown Norway. Notably, both strains have HSV-1 spread to the CNS at four days after infection. A genome wide linkage analysis of 29 infected HXB/BXH RILs (recombinant inbred lines-generated from the prior two strains, displayed variable susceptibility to HSE enabling the definition of a significant QTL (quantitative trait locus named Hse6 towards the end of chromosome 4 (160.89-174Mb containing the Vwf (von Willebrand factor gene. This was the only gene in the QTL with both cis-regulation in the brain and included several non-synonymous SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism. Intriguingly, in human chromosome 12 several SNPs within the intronic region between exon 43 and 44 of the VWF gene were associated with human HSE pathogenesis. In particular, rs917859 is nominally associated with an odds ratio of 1.5 (95% CI 1.11-2.02; p-value = 0.008 after genotyping in 115 HSE cases and 428 controls. Although there are possibly several genetic and environmental factors involved in development of HSE, our study identifies variants of the VWF gene as candidates for susceptibility in experimental and human HSE.

  3. Functional Analysis of the Coronary Heart Disease Risk Locus on Chromosome 21q22

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    Katherine E. Beaney

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The coronary heart disease (CHD risk locus on 21q22 (lead SNP rs9982601 lies within a “gene desert.” The aim of this study was to assess if this locus is associated with CHD risk factors and to identify the functional variant(s and gene(s involved. Methods. A phenome scan was performed with UCLEB Consortium data. Allele-specific protein binding was studied using electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Dual-reporter luciferase assays were used to assess the impact of genetic variation on expression. Expression quantitative trait analysis was performed with Advanced Study of Aortic Pathology (ASAP and Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx consortium data. Results. A suggestive association between QT interval and the locus was observed (rs9982601  p=0.04. One variant at the locus, rs28451064, showed allele-specific protein binding and its minor allele showed 12% higher luciferase expression (p = 4.82 × 10−3 compared to the common allele. The minor allele of rs9982601 was associated with higher expression of the closest upstream genes (SLC5A3 1.30-fold increase p = 3.98 × 10−5; MRPS6 1.15-fold increase p = 9.60 × 10−4 in aortic intima media in ASAP. Both rs9982601 and rs28451064 showed a suggestive association with MRPS6 expression in relevant tissues in the GTEx data. Conclusions. A candidate functional variant, rs28451064, was identified. Future work should focus on identifying the pathway(s involved.

  4. Variant Review with the Integrative Genomics Viewer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James T; Thorvaldsdóttir, Helga; Wenger, Aaron M; Zehir, Ahmet; Mesirov, Jill P

    2017-11-01

    Manual review of aligned reads for confirmation and interpretation of variant calls is an important step in many variant calling pipelines for next-generation sequencing (NGS) data. Visual inspection can greatly increase the confidence in calls, reduce the risk of false positives, and help characterize complex events. The Integrative Genomics Viewer (IGV) was one of the first tools to provide NGS data visualization, and it currently provides a rich set of tools for inspection, validation, and interpretation of NGS datasets, as well as other types of genomic data. Here, we present a short overview of IGV's variant review features for both single-nucleotide variants and structural variants, with examples from both cancer and germline datasets. IGV is freely available at https://www.igv.org Cancer Res; 77(21); e31-34. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Sex-specific effects of weight-affecting gene variants in a life course perspective--The HUNT Study, Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvaløy, K; Kulle, B; Romundstad, P; Holmen, T L

    2013-09-01

    The impact of previously identified genetic variants directly or indirectly associated with obesity, were investigated at birth, adolescence and adulthood to provide knowledge concerning timing and mechanisms of obesity susceptibility with focus on sex differences. Twenty four previously identified obesity- and eating disorder susceptibility loci were tested for association with adiposity traits at birth (ponderal index (PI)), adolescence and young adulthood (body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and waist-hip ratio (WHR)) in 1782 individuals from the HUNT study. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) were evaluated individually and by haplotype sliding-window approach for windows50 kb (near-MC4R, FTO and near-BDNF). The analyses were performed on the total and sex stratified samples. The most substantial effect on BMI was observed for the near-MC4R variants at adolescence and adulthood (adjusted P-values in adolescence: 0.002 and 0.003 for rs17782313 and rs571312, respectively). The same variants showed inverse association with PI in males (adjusted P-values: 0.019-0.036). Furthermore, significant effects were observed at adolescence with BMI for the near-KCTD15 variant (rs11084753) (adjusted P=0.038) in the combined sample. The near-INSIG2 (rs7566605) was significantly associated to WHR in males and near-BDNF (rs925946) in the combined sample (adjusted P=0.027 and P=0.033, respectively). The OPRD1 locus was associated to BMI and WC in males both at adolescence and adulthood with highest effect in adults (adjusted P=0.058). Interaction with sex was identified for near-MC4R, OPRD1, COMT, near-BDNF and DRD2. Most obesity susceptibility variants show stronger effect at adolescence than at birth and adulthood with a clear sex-specific effect at some loci. The near-MC4R locus exhibit inverse effect on weight at birth in boys compared with findings at adolescence and adulthood. Some variants less known for obesity-susceptibility such as OPRD1 were found to

  6. Identification and replication of the interplay of four genetic high-risk variants for urinary bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selinski, Silvia; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Ickstadt, Katja; Gerullis, Holger; Otto, Thomas; Roth, Emanuel; Volkert, Frank; Ovsiannikov, Daniel; Moormann, Oliver; Banfi, Gergely; Nyirady, Peter; Vermeulen, Sita H; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine D; Johnson, Alison; Karagas, Margaret R; Kogevinas, Manolis; Malats, Nuria; Schwenn, Molly; Silverman, Debra T; Koutros, Stella; Rothman, Nathaniel; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus

    2017-12-07

    Little is known whether genetic variants identified in genome-wide association studies interact to increase bladder cancer risk. Recently, we identified two- and three-variant combinations associated with a particular increase of bladder cancer risk in a urinary bladder cancer case-control series (Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors at TU Dortmund (IfADo), 1501 cases, 1565 controls). In an independent case-control series (Nijmegen Bladder Cancer Study, NBCS, 1468 cases, 1720 controls) we confirmed these two- and three-variant combinations. Pooled analysis of the two studies as discovery group (IfADo-NBCS) resulted in sufficient statistical power to test up to four-variant combinations by a logistic regression approach. The New England and Spanish Bladder Cancer Studies (2080 cases and 2167 controls) were used as a replication series. Twelve previously identified risk variants were considered. The strongest four-variant combination was obtained in never smokers. The combination of rs1014971[AA] near apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3A (APOBEC3A) and chromobox homolog 6 (CBX6), solute carrier family 1s4 (urea transporter), member 1 (Kidd blood group) (SLC14A1) exon single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1058396[AG, GG], UDP glucuronosyltransferase 1 family, polypeptide A complex locus (UGT1A) intron SNP rs11892031[AA] and rs8102137[CC, CT] near cyclin E1 (CCNE1) resulted in an unadjusted odds ratio (OR) of 2.59 (95% CI = 1.93-3.47; P = 1.87 × 10-10), while the individual variant ORs ranged only between 1.11 and 1.30. The combination replicated in the New England and Spanish Bladder Cancer Studies (ORunadjusted = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.10-2.33; P = 0.013). The four-variant combination is relatively frequent, with 25% in never smoking cases and 11% in never smoking controls (total study group: 19% cases, 14% controls). In conclusion, we show that four high-risk variants can statistically interact to confer

  7. Genetic variants alter T-bet binding and gene expression in mucosal inflammatory disease.

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    Katrina Soderquest

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The polarization of CD4+ T cells into distinct T helper cell lineages is essential for protective immunity against infection, but aberrant T cell polarization can cause autoimmunity. The transcription factor T-bet (TBX21 specifies the Th1 lineage and represses alternative T cell fates. Genome-wide association studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that may be causative for autoimmune diseases. The majority of these polymorphisms are located within non-coding distal regulatory elements. It is considered that these genetic variants contribute to disease by altering the binding of regulatory proteins and thus gene expression, but whether these variants alter the binding of lineage-specifying transcription factors has not been determined. Here, we show that SNPs associated with the mucosal inflammatory diseases Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis (UC and celiac disease, but not rheumatoid arthritis or psoriasis, are enriched at T-bet binding sites. Furthermore, we identify disease-associated variants that alter T-bet binding in vitro and in vivo. ChIP-seq for T-bet in individuals heterozygous for the celiac disease-associated SNPs rs1465321 and rs2058622 and the IBD-associated SNPs rs1551398 and rs1551399, reveals decreased binding to the minor disease-associated alleles. Furthermore, we show that rs1465321 is an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL for the neighboring gene IL18RAP, with decreased T-bet binding associated with decreased expression of this gene. These results suggest that genetic polymorphisms may predispose individuals to mucosal autoimmune disease through alterations in T-bet binding. Other disease-associated variants may similarly act by modulating the binding of lineage-specifying transcription factors in a tissue-selective and disease-specific manner.

  8. Special cases of martensite compatibility: A near single-variant habit-plane and the martensite of nanocrystalline NiTi

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    Petersmann Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lattice parameters measured near the high temperature (~1000°C bcc α to hcp β transformation in an intermetallic Mo-containing γ-TiAl based alloy indicate a middle valued eigenvalue of the corresponding deformation gradient near 1. Habit-planes calculated under the assumption of a simple slip as lattice invariant shear, agree with experimentally determined orientations of the lens like plates recorded via electron backscattering. By contrast, twinning as invariant lattice shear has been investigated in nanocrystalline NiTi. Here the grain size causes the formation mechanism of the martensite to change from a “herring-bone” morphology faciliting a habit-plane between two twinned laminates and the austenite to a single laminate, which in the nonlinear theory formally cannot form a habit-plane with the austenite. Since this might cause high accommodation strains, the effectiveness of stress accommodation of martensite formed in neighboring grains of a polycrystal is investigated. Subsequent numerical microstructural modeling is outlined. The resulting energetically most favorable transformation sequence yields the transformation kinetics.

  9. Variants of PLCXD3 are not associated with variant or sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a large international study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balendra, Rubika; Uphill, James; Collinson, Claire; Druyeh, Ronald; Adamson, Gary; Hummerich, Holger; Zerr, Inga; Gambetti, Pierluigi; Collinge, John; Mead, Simon

    2016-04-07

    Human prion diseases are relentlessly progressive neurodegenerative disorders which include sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) and variant CJD (vCJD). Aside from variants of the prion protein gene (PRNP) replicated association at genome-wide levels of significance has proven elusive. A recent association study identified variants in or near to the PLCXD3 gene locus as strong disease risk factors in multiple human prion diseases. This study claimed the first non-PRNP locus to be highly significantly associated with prion disease in genomic studies. A sub-study of a genome-wide association study with imputation aiming to replicate the finding at PLCXD3 including 129 vCJD and 2500 sCJD samples. Whole exome sequencing to identify rare coding variants of PLCXD3. Imputation of relevant polymorphisms was accurate based on wet genotyping of a sample. We found no supportive evidence that PLCXD3 variants are associated with disease. The marked discordance in vCJD genotype frequencies between studies, despite extensive overlap in vCJD cases, and the finding of Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium in the original study, suggests possible reasons for the discrepancies between studies.

  10. Revealing Ligand Binding Sites and Quantifying Subunit Variants of Noncovalent Protein Complexes in a Single Native Top-Down FTICR MS Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huilin; Wongkongkathep, Piriya; Van Orden, Steve L.; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R.; Loo, Joseph A.

    2014-12-01

    "Native" mass spectrometry (MS) has been proven to be increasingly useful for structural biology studies of macromolecular assemblies. Using horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (hADH) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (yADH) as examples, we demonstrate that rich information can be obtained in a single native top-down MS experiment using Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry (FTICR MS). Beyond measuring the molecular weights of the protein complexes, isotopic mass resolution was achieved for yeast ADH tetramer (147 kDa) with an average resolving power of 412,700 at m/z 5466 in absorption mode, and the mass reflects that each subunit binds to two zinc atoms. The N-terminal 89 amino acid residues were sequenced in a top-down electron capture dissociation (ECD) experiment, along with the identifications of the zinc binding site at Cys46 and a point mutation (V58T). With the combination of various activation/dissociation techniques, including ECD, in-source dissociation (ISD), collisionally activated dissociation (CAD), and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD), 40% of the yADH sequence was derived directly from the native tetramer complex. For hADH, native top-down ECD-MS shows that both E and S subunits are present in the hADH sample, with a relative ratio of 4:1. Native top-down ISD of the hADH dimer shows that each subunit (E and S chains) binds not only to two zinc atoms, but also the NAD/NADH ligand, with a higher NAD/NADH binding preference for the S chain relative to the E chain. In total, 32% sequence coverage was achieved for both E and S chains.

  11. Locus: mede-ontwikkelaar van inclusieve arbeidsorganisaties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukema, Leni; de Lange, Annet; Wielenga-Meijer, Etty; Duijker, Theo; Hanstede, Bram

    2018-01-01

    in deze bijdrage wordt Locus beschreven, een netwerk waarin publieke partijen en grote, landelijk opererende bedrijven samenwerken om mensen met een afstand tot de arbeidsmarkt duurzaam aan het werk te helpen. Het hoofdstuk start met de ontstaansgeschiedenis en benadering van Locus. Vervolgens wordt

  12. Genetic analysis of the claret locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequeira, W.; Nelson, C.R.; Szauter, P.

    1989-01-01

    The claret (ca) locus of Drosophila melanogaster comprises two separately mutable domains, one responsible for eye color and one responsible for proper disjunction of chromosomes in meiosis and early cleavage divisions. Previously isolated alleles are of three types: (1) alleles of the claret (ca) type that affect eye color only, (2) alleles of the claret-nondisjunctional (ca nd ) type that affect eye color and chromosome behavior, and (3) a meiotic mutation, non-claret disjunctional (ncd), that affects chromosome behavior only. In order to investigate the genetic structure of the claret locus, the authors have isolated 19 radiation-induced alleles of claret on the basis of the eye color phenotype. Two of these 19 new alleles are of the ca nd type, while 17 are of the ca type, demonstrating that the two domains do not often act as a single target for mutagenesis. This suggests that the two separately mutable functions are likely to be encoded by separate or overlapping genes rather than by a single gene. One of the new alleles of the ca nd type is a chromosome rearrangement with a breakpoint at the position of the claret locus. If this breakpoint is the cause of the mutant phenotype and there are no other mutations associated with the rearrangement, the two functions must be encoded by overlapping genes

  13. CDKL5 variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalscheuer, Vera M.; Hennig, Friederike; Leonard, Helen; Downs, Jenny; Clarke, Angus; Benke, Tim A.; Armstrong, Judith; Pineda, Mercedes; Bailey, Mark E.S.; Cobb, Stuart R.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To provide new insights into the interpretation of genetic variants in a rare neurologic disorder, CDKL5 deficiency, in the contexts of population sequencing data and an updated characterization of the CDKL5 gene. Methods: We analyzed all known potentially pathogenic CDKL5 variants by combining data from large-scale population sequencing studies with CDKL5 variants from new and all available clinical cohorts and combined this with computational methods to predict pathogenicity. Results: The study has identified several variants that can be reclassified as benign or likely benign. With the addition of novel CDKL5 variants, we confirm that pathogenic missense variants cluster in the catalytic domain of CDKL5 and reclassify a purported missense variant as having a splicing consequence. We provide further evidence that missense variants in the final 3 exons are likely to be benign and not important to disease pathology. We also describe benign splicing and nonsense variants within these exons, suggesting that isoform hCDKL5_5 is likely to have little or no neurologic significance. We also use the available data to make a preliminary estimate of minimum incidence of CDKL5 deficiency. Conclusions: These findings have implications for genetic diagnosis, providing evidence for the reclassification of specific variants previously thought to result in CDKL5 deficiency. Together, these analyses support the view that the predominant brain isoform in humans (hCDKL5_1) is crucial for normal neurodevelopment and that the catalytic domain is the primary functional domain. PMID:29264392

  14. Risk and protective genetic variants in suicidal behaviour: association with SLC1A2, SLC1A3, 5-HTR1B &NTRK2 polymorphisms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Therese M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Suicidal behaviour is known to aggregate in families. Patients with psychiatric disorders are at higher risk for suicide attempts (SA), however protective and risk genetic variants for suicide appear to be independent of underlying psychiatric disorders. Here we investigate genetic variants in genes important for neurobiological pathways linked to suicidal behaviour and\\/or associated endophenotypes, for association with SA among patients with co-existing psychiatric illness. Selected gene-gene and gene-environment interactions were also tested. METHODS: DNA was obtained from bloods of 159 patients (76 suicide attempters and 83 non-attempters), who were profiled for DSM-IV Axis I psychiatric diagnosis. Twenty-eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 18 candidate genes (COMT, 5-HT2A, 5-HT1A, 5-HTR1B, TPH1, MAO-A, TPH2, DBH, CNR1, BDNF, ABCG1, GABRA5, GABRG2, GABRB2, SLC1A2, SLC1A3, NTRK2, CRHR1) were genotyped. Genotyping was performed by KBioscience. Tests of association between genetic variants and SA were conducted using Chi squared and Armitage Trend tests. Binary logistical regression analyses were performed to evaluate the contribution of individual genetic variants to the prediction of SA, and to examine SNPs for potential gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. RESULTS: Our analysis identified 4 SNPs (rs4755404, rs2269272, rs6296 and rs1659400), which showed evidence of association with SA compared to a non-attempter control group. We provide evidence of a 3-locus gene-gene interaction, and a putative gene-environment interaction, whereby genetic variation at the NTRK2 locus may moderate the risk associated with history of childhood abuse. CONCLUSION: Preliminary findings suggest that allelic variability in SLC1A2\\/3, 5-HTR1B and NTRK2 may be relevant to the underlying diathesis for suicidal acts.

  15. Fine mapping of the NRG1 Hirschsprung's disease locus.

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    Clara Sze-Man Tang

    Full Text Available The primary pathology of Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR, colon aganglionosis is the absence of ganglia in variable lengths of the hindgut, resulting in functional obstruction. HSCR is attributed to a failure of migration of the enteric ganglion precursors along the developing gut. RET is a key regulator of the development of the enteric nervous system (ENS and the major HSCR-causing gene. Yet the reduced penetrance of RET DNA HSCR-associated variants together with the phenotypic variability suggest the involvement of additional genes in the disease. Through a genome-wide association study, we uncovered a ∼350 kb HSCR-associated region encompassing part of the neuregulin-1 gene (NRG1. To identify the causal NRG1 variants contributing to HSCR, we genotyped 243 SNPs variants on 343 ethnic Chinese HSCR patients and 359 controls. Genotype analysis coupled with imputation narrowed down the HSCR-associated region to 21 kb, with four of the most associated SNPs (rs10088313, rs10094655, rs4624987, and rs3884552 mapping to the NRG1 promoter. We investigated whether there was correlation between the genotype at the rs10088313 locus and the amount of NRG1 expressed in human gut tissues (40 patients and 21 controls and found differences in expression as a function of genotype. We also found significant differences in NRG1 expression levels between diseased and control individuals bearing the same rs10088313 risk genotype. This indicates that the effects of NRG1 common variants are likely to depend on other alleles or epigenetic factors present in the patients and would account for the variability in the genetic predisposition to HSCR.

  16. An in vivo cis-regulatory screen at the type 2 diabetes associated TCF7L2 locus identifies multiple tissue-specific enhancers.

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    Daniel Savic

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have repeatedly shown an association between non-coding variants in the TCF7L2 locus and risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D, implicating a role for cis-regulatory variation within this locus in disease etiology. Supporting this hypothesis, we previously localized complex regulatory activity to the TCF7L2 T2D-associated interval using an in vivo bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC enhancer-trapping reporter strategy. To follow-up on this broad initial survey of the TCF7L2 regulatory landscape, we performed a fine-mapping enhancer scan using in vivo mouse transgenic reporter assays. We functionally interrogated approximately 50% of the sequences within the T2D-associated interval, utilizing sequence conservation within this 92-kb interval to determine the regulatory potential of all evolutionary conserved sequences that exhibited conservation to the non-eutherian mammal opossum. Included in this study was a detailed functional interrogation of sequences spanning both protective and risk alleles of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs7903146, which has exhibited allele-specific enhancer function in pancreatic beta cells. Using these assays, we identified nine segments regulating various aspects of the TCF7L2 expression profile and that constitute nearly 70% of the sequences tested. These results highlight the regulatory complexity of this interval and support the notion that a TCF7L2 cis-regulatory disruption leads to T2D predisposition.

  17. Novel somatic single nucleotide variants within the RNA binding protein hnRNP A1 in multiple sclerosis patients [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4dh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangmin Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Some somatic single nucleotide variants (SNVs are thought to be pathogenic, leading to neurological disease. We hypothesized that heterogeneous nuclear ribonuclear protein A1 (hnRNP A1, an autoantigen associated with multiple sclerosis (MS would contain SNVs. MS patients develop antibodies to hnRNP A1293-304, an epitope within the M9 domain (AA268-305 of hnRNP A1. M9 is hnRNP A1’s nucleocytoplasmic transport domain, which binds transportin-1 (TPNO-1 and allows for hnRNP A1’s transport into and out of the nucleus. Genomic DNA sequencing of M9 revealed nine novel SNVs that resulted in an amino acid substitution in MS patients that were not present in controls. SNVs occurred within the TPNO-1 binding domain (hnRNP A1268-289 and the MS IgG epitope (hnRNP A1293-304, within M9.  In contrast to the nuclear localization of wild type (WT hnRNP A1, mutant hnRNP A1 mis-localized to the cytoplasm, co-localized with stress granules and caused cellular apoptosis. Whilst WT hnRNP A1 bound TPNO-1, mutant hnRNP A1 showed reduced TPNO-1 binding. These data suggest SNVs in hnRNP A1 might contribute to pathogenesis of MS.

  18. Novel somatic single nucleotide variants within the RNA binding protein hnRNP A1 in multiple sclerosis patients [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3nv

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangmin Lee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Some somatic single nucleotide variants (SNVs are thought to be pathogenic, leading to neurological disease. We hypothesized that heterogeneous nuclear ribonuclear protein A1 (hnRNP A1, an autoantigen associated with multiple sclerosis (MS would contain SNVs. MS patients develop antibodies to hnRNP A1293-304, an epitope within the M9 domain (AA268-305 of hnRNP A1. M9 is hnRNP A1’s nucleocytoplasmic transport domain, which binds transportin-1 (TPNO-1 and allows for hnRNP A1’s transport into and out of the nucleus. Genomic DNA sequencing of M9 revealed nine novel SNVs that resulted in an amino acid substitution in MS patients that were not present in controls. SNVs occurred within the TPNO-1 binding domain (hnRNP A1268-289 and the MS IgG epitope (hnRNP A1293-304, within M9.  In contrast to the nuclear localization of wild type (WT hnRNP A1, mutant hnRNP A1 mis-localized to the cytoplasm, co-localized with stress granules and caused cellular apoptosis. Whilst WT hnRNP A1 bound TPNO-1, mutant hnRNP A1 showed reduced TPNO-1 binding. These data suggest SNVs in hnRNP A1 might contribute to pathogenesis of MS.

  19. Integrating functional data to prioritize causal variants in statistical fine-mapping studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleb Kichaev

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Standard statistical approaches for prioritization of variants for functional testing in fine-mapping studies either use marginal association statistics or estimate posterior probabilities for variants to be causal under simplifying assumptions. Here, we present a probabilistic framework that integrates association strength with functional genomic annotation data to improve accuracy in selecting plausible causal variants for functional validation. A key feature of our approach is that it empirically estimates the contribution of each functional annotation to the trait of interest directly from summary association statistics while allowing for multiple causal variants at any risk locus. We devise efficient algorithms that estimate the parameters of our model across all risk loci to further increase performance. Using simulations starting from the 1000 Genomes data, we find that our framework consistently outperforms the current state-of-the-art fine-mapping methods, reducing the number of variants that need to be selected to capture 90% of the causal variants from an average of 13.3 to 10.4 SNPs per locus (as compared to the next-best performing strategy. Furthermore, we introduce a cost-to-benefit optimization framework for determining the number of variants to be followed up in functional assays and assess its performance using real and simulation data. We validate our findings using a large scale meta-analysis of four blood lipids traits and find that the relative probability for causality is increased for variants in exons and transcription start sites and decreased in repressed genomic regions at the risk loci of these traits. Using these highly predictive, trait-specific functional annotations, we estimate causality probabilities across all traits and variants, reducing the size of the 90% confidence set from an average of 17.5 to 13.5 variants per locus in this data.

  20. Discovery of coding genetic variants influencing diabetes-related serum biomarkers and their impact on risk of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahluwalia, Tarun Veer Singh; Allin, Kristine Højgaard; Sandholt, Camilla Helene

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) prevalence is spiraling globally, and knowledge of its pathophysiological signatures is crucial for a better understanding and treatment of the disease. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to discover underlying coding genetic variants influencing fasting serum levels of nine......-nucleotide polymorphisms and were tested for association with each biomarker. Identified loci were tested for association with T2D through a large-scale meta-analysis involving up to 17 024 T2D cases and up to 64 186 controls. RESULTS: We discovered 11 associations between single-nucleotide polymorphisms and five distinct......, of which the association with the CELSR2 locus has not been shown previously. CONCLUSION: The identified loci influence processes related to insulin signaling, cell communication, immune function, apoptosis, DNA repair, and oxidative stress, all of which could provide a rationale for novel diabetes...

  1. HTRA1 variant confers similar risks to geographic atrophy and neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, D Joshua; Yang, Zhenglin; Gibbs, Daniel; Chen, Haoyu; Kaminoh, Yuuki; Jorgensen, Adam; Zeng, Jiexi; Luo, Ling; Brinton, Eric; Brinton, Gregory; Brand, John M; Bernstein, Paul S; Zabriskie, Norman A; Tang, Shibo; Constantine, Ryan; Tong, Zongzhong; Zhang, Kang

    2007-05-02

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment in the developed world. The two forms of advanced AMD, geographic atrophy (GA) and choroidal neovascularization (wet AMD), represent two types of degenerative processes in the macula that lead to loss of central vision. Soft confluent drusen, characterized by deposits in macula without visual loss are considered a precursor of advanced AMD. A single nucleotide polymorphism, rs11200638, in the promoter of HTRA1 has been shown to increases the risk for wet AMD. However, its impact on soft confluent drusen and GA or the relationship between them is unclear. To better understand the role the HTRA1 polymorphism plays in AMD subtypes, we genotyped an expanded Utah population with 658 patients having advanced AMD or soft confluent drusen and 294 normal controls and found that the rs11200638 was significantly associated with GA. This association remains significant conditional on LOC387715 rs10490924. In addition, rs11200638 was significantly associated with soft confluent drusen, which are strongly immunolabeled with HTRA1 antibody in an AMD eye with GA similar to wet AMD. Two-locus analyses were performed for CFH Y402H variant at 1q31 and the HTRA1 polymorphism. Together CFH and HTRA1 risk variants increase the odds of having AMD by more than 40 times. These findings expand the role of HTRA1 in AMD. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanism will provide an important insight in pathogenesis of AMD.

  2. A Single IGF1 Allele Is a Major Determinant of Small Size in Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Nathan B.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Chase, Kevin; Gray, Melissa M.; Zhao, Keyan; Zhu, Lan; Padhukasahasram, Badri; Karlins, Eric; Davis, Sean; Jones, Paul G.; Quignon, Pascale; Johnson, Gary S.; Parker, Heidi G.; Fretwell, Neale; Mosher, Dana S.; Lawler, Dennis F.; Satyaraj, Ebenezer; Nordborg, Magnus; Lark, K. Gordon; Wayne, Robert K.; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2009-01-01

    The domestic dog exhibits greater diversity in body size than any other terrestrial vertebrate. We used a strategy that exploits the breed structure of dogs to investigate the genetic basis of size. First, through a genome-wide scan, we identified a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) on chromosome 15 influencing size variation within a single breed. Second, we examined genetic variation in the 15-megabase interval surrounding the QTL in small and giant breeds and found marked evidence for a selective sweep spanning a single gene (IGF1), encoding insulin-like growth factor 1. A single IGF1 single-nucleotide polymorphism haplotype is common to all small breeds and nearly absent from giant breeds, suggesting that the same causal sequence variant is a major contributor to body size in all small dogs. PMID:17412960

  3. VNTR internal structure mapping at the {alpha}-globin 3{prime}HVR locus reveals a hierachy of related lineages in oceania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinson, J.J.; Clegg, J.B.; Boyce, A.J. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1994-09-01

    Analysis of the {alpha}-globin gene complex in Oceania has revealed many different rearrangements which remove one of the adult globin genes. Frequencies of these deletion chromosomes are elevated by malarial resistance conferred by the resulting {alpha}-thalassaemia. One particular deletion chromosome, designated -{alpha}{sup 3.7}III, is found at high levels in Melanesia and Polynesia: RFLP haplotype analysis shows that this deletion is always found on chromosomes bearing the IIIa haplotype and is likely to be the product of one single rearrangement event. A subset of the -{alpha}{sup 3.7}III chromosomes carries a more recent mutation which generates the haemoglobin variant HbJ{sup Tongariki}. We have characterized the allelic variation at the 3{prime}HVR VNTR locus located 6 kb from the globin genes in each of these groups of chromosomes. We have determined the internal structure of these alleles by RFLP mapping of PCR-amplified DNA: within each group, the allelic diversity results from the insertion and/or deletion of small {open_quotes}motifs{close_quotes} of up to 6 adjacent repeats. Mapping of 3{prime}HVR alleles associated with other haplotypes reveals that these are composed of repeat arrays that are substantially different to those derived from IIIa chromosomes, indicating that interchromosomal recombination between heterologous haplotypes does not account for any of the diversity seen to date. We have recently shown that allelic size variation at the two VNTR loci flanking the {alpha}-globin complex is very closely linked to the haplotypes known to be present at this locus. Here we show that, within a haplotype, VNTR alleles are very closely related to each other on the basis of internal structure and demonstrate that intrachromosomal mutation processes involving small numbers of tandem repeats are the main cause of variation at this locus.

  4. EL LOCUS DE DISTRIBUCION COMO COROLARIO DEL LOCUS DE CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Mayoral

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Este es un artículo científico acerca del Locus de Distribución, surgido de un estudio realizado con una población de docentes y alumnos universitarios. Respecto de los primeros, se ha indagado acerca de las atribuciones que se realizaban en torno a las recompensas y sanciones, que ellos distribuían a sus alumnos. Respecto de los segundos, se ha buscado determinar la valoración que estos realizaban de sus profesores, en términos de aquellas atribuciones. Para ello, se utilizaron dos paradigmas clásicamente empleados para verificar la existencia de una norma: el paradigma de la autopresentación (docentes, y el paradigma de los juicios (alumnos. La cuestión planteada fue determinar si en el caso de los comportamientos distributivos de refuerzos, las causas se atribuían a variables externas -en particular a los receptores de esos refuerzos- y si esas formas de atribución eran conocidas y valoradas o no, por los alumnos. De los resultados, surgió la confirmación de nuestra hipótesis de explicaciones externas en materia de comportamientos distributivos de sanciones en el ámbito de la docencia y la valoración positiva de estas atribuciones por los alumnos.

  5. IDOL N342S Variant, Atherosclerosis Progression and Cardiovascular Disorders in the Italian General Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Dhyani

    Full Text Available Inducible degrader of the low density lipoprotein receptor (IDOL, is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that negatively modulates low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R expression. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS indicated that genetic variants in IDOL gene contributes to variation in LDL-C plasma levels and the detailed analysis of a specific locus resulted in the identification of the functional common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs9370867 (c.G1025A, p.N342S associates with increased LDL-R degradation and increased LDL-C levels. These findings, however, were not confirmed in two other independent cohorts and no data about the impact of this variant on atherosclerosis progression and cardiovascular risk are available. Aim of this study was to investigate the association between a functional variant in IDOL and atherosclerosis progression in an Italian general population. 1384 subjects enrolled in the PLIC study (Progression of Lesions in the Intima of Carotid were genotyped by Q-PCR allelic discrimination and the association with anthropometric parameters, plasma lipids and the carotid intima media thickness (cIMT and the impact on cardiovascular disease (CVD incidence were investigated. The N342S variant was not associated with changes of the plasma lipid profile among GG, AG or AA carriers, including total cholesterol (249±21, 249±19 and 248±21 mg/dl respectively, LDL-C (158±25, 161±22 and 160±23 mg/dL, cIMT (0.74±0.14, 0.75±0.17 and 0.77±0.15 mm and CVD incidence. In agreement, the expression of LDLR and the uptake of LDL was similar in macrophages derived from GG and AA carriers. Taken together our findings indicate that the N342S variant does not impact plasma lipid profile and is not associated with atherosclerosis progression and CVD in the general population, suggesting that other variants in the IDOL gene might be functionally linked with cholesterol metabolism.

  6. Translocations affecting human immunoglobulin heavy chain locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sklyar I. V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Translocations involving human immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH locus are implicated in different leukaemias and lymphomas, including multiple myeloma, mantle cell lymphoma, Burkitt’s lymphoma and diffuse large B cell lymphoma. We have analysed published data and identified eleven breakpoint cluster regions (bcr related to these cancers within the IgH locus. These ~1 kbp bcrs are specific for one or several types of blood cancer. Our findings could help devise PCR-based assays to detect cancer-related translocations, to identify the mechanisms of translocations and to help in the research of potential translocation partners of the immunoglobulin locus at different stages of B-cell differentiation.

  7. Variants of cellobiohydrolases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bott, Richard R.; Foukaraki, Maria; Hommes, Ronaldus Wilhelmus; Kaper, Thijs; Kelemen, Bradley R.; Kralj, Slavko; Nikolaev, Igor; Sandgren, Mats; Van Lieshout, Johannes Franciscus Thomas; Van Stigt Thans, Sander

    2018-04-10

    Disclosed are a number of homologs and variants of Hypocrea jecorina Ce17A (formerly Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I or CBH1), nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The homologs and variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted and/or deleted.

  8. Origin of allelic diversity in antirrhinum S locus RNases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Y; Carpenter, R; Dickinson, H G; Coen, E S

    1996-01-01

    In many plant species, self-incompatibility (SI) is genetically controlled by a single multiallelic S locus. Previous analysis of S alleles in the Solanaceae, in which S locus ribonucleases (S RNases) are responsible for stylar expression of SI, has demonstrated that allelic diversity predated speciation within this family. To understand how allelic diversity has evolved, we investigated the molecular basis of gametophytic SI in Antirrhinum, a member of the Scrophulariaceae, which is closely related to the Solanaceae. We have characterized three Antirrhinum cDNAs encoding polypeptides homologous to S RNases and shown that they are encoded by genes at the S locus. RNA in situ hybridization revealed that the Antirrhinum S RNase are primarily expressed in the stylar transmitting tissue. This expression is consistent with their proposed role in arresting the growth of self-pollen tubes. S alleles from the Scrophulariaceae form a separate group from those of the Solanaceae, indicating that new S alleles have been generated since these families separated (approximately 40 million years). We propose that the recruitment of an ancestral RNase gene into SI occurred during an early stage of angiosperm evolution and that, since that time, new alleles subsequently have arisen at a low rate. PMID:8672882

  9. Breast cancer risk variants at 6q25 display different phenotype associations and regulate ESR1, RMND1 and CCDC170

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Dunning (Alison); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); D. Thompson (Deborah); J.D. French (Juliet); J. Beesley (Jonathan); S. Healey (Sue); S. Kar (Siddhartha); K.A. Pooley (Karen); E. Lopez-Knowles (Elena); E. Dicks (Ed); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); N.A. Sinnott-Armstrong (Nicholas A); R.C. Sallari (Richard C); K.M. Hillman (Kristine); S. Kaufmann (Susanne); H. Sivakumaran (Haran); M.M. Marjaneh (Mahdi Moradi); J.S. Lee (Jason); M. Hills (Margaret); M. Jarosz (Monika); S. Drury (Suzie); S. Canisius (Sander); M. KBolla (Manjeet); J. Dennis (Joe); Q. Wang (Qin); J. LHopper (John); M.C. Southey (Mellissa C.); A. Broeks (Annegien); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Lophatananon (Artitaya); K.R. Muir (K.); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); P.A. Fasching (Peter); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); J. Peto (Julian); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I. Tomlinson (Ian); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); H. Flyger (Henrik); A. Gonzlez-Neira (Anna); J.I.A. Perez (Jose I.A.); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); L. Eunjung (Lee); V. Arndt (Volker); H. Brenner (Hermann); A. Meindl (Alfons); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); U. Hamann (Ute); K. Aittomki (Kristiina); C. Blomqvist (Carl); H. Ito (Hidemi); K. Matsuo (Keitaro); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); T. Dörk (Thilo); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); A. Mannermaa (Arto); C.-C. Tseng (Chiu-Chen); A.H. Wu (Anna); D. Lambrechts (Diether); H. Wildiers (Hans); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); P. Radice (Paolo); J. EOlson (Janet); G. GGiles (Graham); R.L. Milne (Roger L); C.A. Haiman (Christopher A.); B.E. Henderson (Brian); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); S.H. Teo (Soo Hwang); C.H. Yip (Cheng Har); S. Nord (Silje); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); V. Kristensen (Vessela); J. Long (Jirong); W. Zheng (Wei); K. Pylks (Katri); R. Winqvist (Robert); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia A.); P. Devilee (Peter); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); M.E. Sherman (Mark); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); K. Humphreys (Keith); Y.-T. Gao (Yu-Tang); X.-O. Shu (Xiao-Ou); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); W.J. Blot (William); Q. Cai (Qiuyin); M. Ghoussaini (Maya); B. Perkins (Barbara); M. Shah (Mitul); J.-Y. Choi (Ji-Yeob); D. Kang (Daehee); S.C. Lee (Soo Chin); J.M. Hartman (Joost); M. Kabisch (Maria); D. Torres (Diana); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); P. Brennan (Paul); S. Sangrajrang (Suleeporn); C.B. Ambrosone (Christine); A.E. Toland (Amanda); C-Y. Shen (Chen-Yang); P.-E. Wu (Pei-Ei); N. Orr (Nick); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); A. Lee (Andrew); M.K. Kapuscinski (Miroslav K.); E.M. John (Esther); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); M.B. Daly (Mary B.); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); L. Tihomirova (Laima); N. Tung (Nadine); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); T.V. OHansen (Thomas V); A. Osorio (Ana); J. Benítez (Javier); R. Rando (Rachel); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); B. Peissel (Bernard); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); L. Papi (Laura); L. Ottini (Laura); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); P. Apostolou (Paraskevi); J. Garber (Judy); M.U. Rashid (Muhammad Usman); D. Frost (Debra); L. Izatt (Louise); S.D. Ellis (Steve); A.K. Godwin (Andrew K.); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Niederacher (Dieter); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); N. Bogdanova-Markov (Nadja); C. Sagne (Charlotte); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); F. Damiola (Francesca); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); C. Isaacs (Claudine); K.B. MClaes (Kathleen B); K. De Leeneer (Kim); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); T. Caldes (Trinidad); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); S. Khan (Sofia); A.R. Mensenkamp (Arjen); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); M.A. Rookus (Matti); A. Kwong (Ava); E. Olah (Edith); O. Díez (Orland); J. Brunet (Joan); M.A. Pujana (Miguel); J. Gronwald (Jacek); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); R. Laframboise (Rachel); P. Soucy (Penny); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Agata (Simona); P.J. Teixeira; S. Kyung Park (Sue); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); F.J. Couch (Fergus J); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); L. Foretova (Lenka); J. Vijai (Joseph); K. Offit (Kenneth); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); C. MPhelan (Catherine); M.H. Greene (Mark H.); P.L. Mai (Phuong); G. Rennert (Gad); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); P.J. Hulick (Peter); K.-A. Phillips (Kelly-Anne); M. Piedmonte (Marion); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); A. Bojesen (Anders); M. Thomassen (Mads); M.A. Caligo (Maria); S.-Y. Yoon (Sook-Yee); E. Friedman (Eitan); Y. Laitman (Yael); Å. Borg (Åke); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); J. Rantala (Johanna); O.I. Olopade (Olufunmilayo I.); P.A. Ganz (Patricia A.); R. Nussbaum (Robert); S.A. Gayther (Simon); K. LNathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); B.K. Arun (Banu); G. Mitchell (Gillian); B.Y. Karlan (Beth Y.); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); G. Maskarinec (Gertraud); C. Woolcott (Christy); C.G. Scott (Christopher G.); J. Stone (Jennifer); C. Apicella (Carmel); R. Tamimi (Rulla); R.N. Luben (Robert); K.-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); S. Helland (Slaug); V. Haakensen (Vilde); M. Dowsett (Mitch); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Hall (Per); M. Garca-Closas (Montserrat); C. Vachon (Celine); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); D.F. Easton (Douglas F.); S.L. Edwards (Stacey)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe analyzed 3,872 common genetic variants across the ESR1 locus (encoding estrogen receptor α) in 118,816 subjects from three international consortia. We found evidence for at least five independent causal variants, each associated with different phenotype sets, including estrogen

  10. Updates of the HbVar database of human hemoglobin variants and thalassemia mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Giardine (Belinda); J. Borg (Joseph); E. Viennas (Emmanouil); C. Pavlidis (Cristiana); K. Moradkhani (Kamran); P. Joly (Philippe); M. Bartsakoulia (Marina); C. Riemer (Cathy); W. Miller (Webb); G. Tzimas (Giannis); H. Wajcman (Henri); R.C. Hardison (Ross); G.P. Patrinos (George)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractHbVar (http://globin.bx.psu.edu/hbvar) is one of the oldest and most appreciated locus-specific databases launched in 2001 by a multi-center academic effort to provide timely information on the genomic alterations leading to hemoglobin variants and all types of thalassemia and

  11. A large duplication involving the IHH locus mimics acrocallosal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel-Apak, Memnune; Bögershausen, Nina; Pawlik, Barbara; Li, Yun; Apak, Selcuk; Uyguner, Oya; Milz, Esther; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Karaman, Birsen; Gülgören, Ayan; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz; Nürnberg, Peter; Kayserili, Hülya; Wollnik, Bernd

    2012-06-01

    Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling is a major determinant of various processes during embryonic development and has a pivotal role in embryonic skeletal development. A specific spatial and temporal expression of Ihh within the developing limb buds is essential for accurate digit outgrowth and correct digit number. Although missense mutations in IHH cause brachydactyly type A1, small tandem duplications involving the IHH locus have recently been described in patients with mild syndactyly and craniosynostosis. In contrast, a ∼600-kb deletion 5' of IHH in the doublefoot mouse mutant (Dbf) leads to severe polydactyly without craniosynostosis, but with craniofacial dysmorphism. We now present a patient resembling acrocallosal syndrome (ACS) with extensive polysyndactyly of the hands and feet, craniofacial abnormalities including macrocephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, dysplastic and low-set ears, severe hypertelorism and profound psychomotor delay. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array copy number analysis identified a ∼900-kb duplication of the IHH locus, which was confirmed by an independent quantitative method. A fetus from a second pregnancy of the mother by a different spouse showed similar craniofacial and limb malformations and the same duplication of the IHH-locus. We defined the exact breakpoints and showed that the duplications are identical tandem duplications in both sibs. No copy number changes were observed in the healthy mother. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a human phenotype similar to the Dbf mutant and strikingly overlapping with ACS that is caused by a copy number variation involving the IHH locus on chromosome 2q35.

  12. Culture, gender and locus of control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottsen, Christina Lundsgaard; Johannessen, Kim Berg; Berntsen, Dorthe

    The current study is a cross-cultural comparison between the Middle East and Scandinavia. Two societies that offer a unique opportunity to examine gender differences in personal goals and how goals are affected by locus of control.......The current study is a cross-cultural comparison between the Middle East and Scandinavia. Two societies that offer a unique opportunity to examine gender differences in personal goals and how goals are affected by locus of control....

  13. Causal and synthetic associations of variants in the SERPINA gene cluster with alpha1-antitrypsin serum levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Andri Thun

    Full Text Available Several infrequent genetic polymorphisms in the SERPINA1 gene are known to substantially reduce concentration of alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT in the blood. Since low AAT serum levels fail to protect pulmonary tissue from enzymatic degradation, these polymorphisms also increase the risk for early onset chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The role of more common SERPINA1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in respiratory health remains poorly understood. We present here an agnostic investigation of genetic determinants of circulating AAT levels in a general population sample by performing a genome-wide association study (GWAS in 1392 individuals of the SAPALDIA cohort. Five common SNPs, defined by showing minor allele frequencies (MAFs >5%, reached genome-wide significance, all located in the SERPINA gene cluster at 14q32.13. The top-ranking genotyped SNP rs4905179 was associated with an estimated effect of β = -0.068 g/L per minor allele (P = 1.20*10(-12. But denser SERPINA1 locus genotyping in 5569 participants with subsequent stepwise conditional analysis, as well as exon-sequencing in a subsample (N = 410, suggested that AAT serum level is causally determined at this locus by rare (MAF<1% and low-frequent (MAF 1-5% variants only, in particular by the well-documented protein inhibitor S and Z (PI S, PI Z variants. Replication of the association of rs4905179 with AAT serum levels in the Copenhagen City Heart Study (N = 8273 was successful (P<0.0001, as was the replication of its synthetic nature (the effect disappeared after adjusting for PI S and Z, P = 0.57. Extending the analysis to lung function revealed a more complex situation. Only in individuals with severely compromised pulmonary health (N = 397, associations of common SNPs at this locus with lung function were driven by rarer PI S or Z variants. Overall, our meta-analysis of lung function in ever-smokers does not support a functional role of common SNPs in the SERPINA gene

  14. Podoplanin-positive cancer-associated fibroblast recruitment within cancer stroma is associated with a higher number of single nucleotide variants in cancer cells in lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasone, Shoko; Mimaki, Sachiyo; Ichikawa, Tomohiro; Aokage, Keiju; Miyoshi, Tomohiro; Sugano, Masato; Kojima, Motohiro; Fujii, Satoshi; Kuwata, Takeshi; Ochiai, Atsushi; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Goto, Koichi; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Ishii, Genichiro

    2018-05-01

    Podoplanin-positive cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play an essential role in tumor progression. However, it is still unclear whether specific genomic alterations of cancer cells are required to recruit podoplanin-positive CAFs. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the mutation status of lung adenocarcinoma cells and the presence of podoplanin-positive CAFs. Ninety-seven lung adenocarcinomas for which whole exome sequencing data were available were enrolled. First, we analyzed the clinicopathological features of the cases, and then, evaluated the relationship between genetic features of cancer cells (major driver mutations and the number of single nucleotide variants, SNVs) and the presence of podoplanin-positive CAFs. The presence of podoplanin-positive CAFs was associated with smoking history, solid predominant subtype, and lymph node metastasis. We could not find any significant correlations between major genetic mutations (EGFR, KRAS, TP53, MET, ERBB2, BRAF, and PIC3CA) in cancer cells and the presence of podoplanin-positive CAFs. However, cases with podoplanin-positive CAFs had a significantly higher number of SNVs in cancer cells than the podoplanin-negative CAFs cases (median 84 vs 37, respectively; p = 0.001). This was also detected in a non-smoker subgroup (p = 0.037). Multivariate analyses revealed that the number of SNVs in cancer cells was the only statistically significant independent predictor for the presence of podoplanin-positive CAFs (p = 0.044). In lung adenocarcinoma, the presence of podoplanin-positive CAFs was associated with higher numbers of SNVs in cancer cells, suggesting a relationship between accumulations of SNVs in cancer cells and the generation of a tumor-promoting microenvironment.

  15. [Intra- and interspecific polymorphism of (AAT)n in microsatellite locus du47D in parthenogenetic species of the genus Darevskia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchagin, V I; Vergun, A A; Godakova, S A; Tokarskaia, O N

    2013-03-01

    The molecular structure of the allelic variants of (AAT)n of the Du47D microsatellite locus was determined in parthenogenetic lizards Darevskia dahli, D. armeniaca, and D. rostombekovi. Comparative analysis of these alleles showed that they were characterized by perfect structure of microsatellite cluster, and were different in the number of (AAT) monomeric units, as well as in the combinations of species-specific substitutions and deletions in the microsatellite flanking regions. Molecular structure of microsatellite cluster, species-specific single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), and different representation of alleles Du47 in the samples of parthenogenetic species examined point to the origin of the alleles from different bisexual species, which is consistent with the hybrid nature of unisexual species of the genus Darevskia. In addition, these data reflect different combination patterns of interspecific hybridization events with the participation of the same bisexual species upon the formation of hybrid genomes of parthenogenetic species. Possible application of the allelic variants of microsatellite loci of parthenogenetic lizards as the genetic markers for the analysis of the genomes of parthenogenetic species in the light of evolution, ecology, and parthenogenetic type of reproduction in vertebrates is discussed.

  16. Chromosome 11q13.5 variant associated with childhood eczema: an effect supplementary to filaggrin mutations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Regan, Grainne M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Atopic eczema is a common inflammatory skin disease with multifactorial etiology. The genetic basis is incompletely understood; however, loss of function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) are the most significant and widely replicated genetic risk factor reported to date. The first genome-wide association study in atopic eczema recently identified 2 novel genetic variants in association with eczema susceptibility: a single nucleotide polymorphism on chromosome 11q13.5 (rs7927894) and a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs877776) within the gene encoding hornerin on chromosome 1q21. OBJECTIVE: To test the association of these 2 novel variants with pediatric eczema and to investigate their interaction with FLG null mutations. METHODS: Case-control study to investigate the association of rs7927894, rs877776 and the 4 most prevalent FLG null mutations with moderate-severe eczema in 511 Irish pediatric cases and 1000 Irish controls. Comprehensive testing for interaction between each of the loci was also performed. RESULTS: The association between rs7927894 and atopic eczema was replicated in this population (P = .0025, chi(2) test; odds ratio, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.09-1.49). The 4 most common FLG null variants were strongly associated with atopic eczema (P = 1.26 x 10(-50); combined odds ratio, 5.81; 95% CI, 4.51-7.49). Interestingly, the rs7927894 association was independent of the well-established FLG risk alleles and may be multiplicative in its effect. There was no significant association between rs877776 and pediatric eczema in this study. CONCLUSION: Single nucleotide polymorphism rs7927894 appears to mark a genuine eczema susceptibility locus that will require further elucidation through fine mapping and functional analysis.

  17. Annotating pathogenic non-coding variants in genic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfman, Sahar; Wang, Quanli; McSweeney, K Melodi; Ren, Zhong; La Carpia, Francesca; Halvorsen, Matt; Schoch, Kelly; Ratzon, Fanni; Heinzen, Erin L; Boland, Michael J; Petrovski, Slavé; Goldstein, David B

    2017-08-09

    Identifying the underlying causes of disease requires accurate interpretation of genetic variants. Current methods ineffectively capture pathogenic non-coding variants in genic regions, resulting in overlooking synonymous and intronic variants when searching for disease risk. Here we present the Transcript-inferred Pathogenicity (TraP) score, which uses sequence context alterations to reliably identify non-coding variation that causes disease. High TraP scores single out extremely rare variants with lower minor allele frequencies than missense variants. TraP accurately distinguishes known pathogenic and benign variants in synonymous (AUC = 0.88) and intronic (AUC = 0.83) public datasets, dismissing benign variants with exceptionally high specificity. TraP analysis of 843 exomes from epilepsy family trios identifies synonymous variants in known epilepsy genes, thus pinpointing risk factors of disease from non-coding sequence data. TraP outperforms leading methods in identifying non-coding variants that are pathogenic and is therefore a valuable tool for use in gene discovery and the interpretation of personal genomes.While non-coding synonymous and intronic variants are often not under strong selective constraint, they can be pathogenic through affecting splicing or transcription. Here, the authors develop a score that uses sequence context alterations to predict pathogenicity of synonymous and non-coding genetic variants, and provide a web server of pre-computed scores.

  18. A genome-wide meta-analysis of genetic variants associated with allergic rhinitis and grass sensitization and their interaction with birth order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Curjuric, Ivan; Coin, Lachlan J; Kumar, Ashish; McArdle, Wendy L; Imboden, Medea; Leynaert, Benedicte; Kogevinas, Manolis; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Pekkanen, Juha; Wjst, Matthias; Bircher, Andreas J; Sovio, Ulla; Rochat, Thierry; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Balding, David J; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Strachan, David P; Jarvis, Deborah L

    2011-11-01

    Hay fever or seasonal allergic rhinitis (AR) is a chronic disorder associated with IgE sensitization to grass. The underlying genetic variants have not been studied comprehensively. There is overwhelming evidence that those who have older siblings have less AR, although the mechanism for this remains unclear. We sought to identify common genetic variant associations with prevalent AR and grass sensitization using existing genome-wide association study (GWAS) data and to determine whether genetic variants modify the protective effect of older siblings. Approximately 2.2 million genotyped or imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms were investigated in 4 large European adult cohorts for AR (3,933 self-reported cases vs 8,965 control subjects) and grass sensitization (2,315 cases vs 10,032 control subjects). Three loci reached genome-wide significance for either phenotype. The HLA variant rs7775228, which cis-regulates HLA-DRB4, was strongly associated with grass sensitization and weakly with AR (P(grass) = 1.6 × 10(-9); P(AR) = 8.0 × 10(-3)). Variants in a locus near chromosome 11 open reading frame 30 (C11orf30) and leucine-rich repeat containing 32 (LRRC32), which was previously associated with atopic dermatitis and eczema, were also strongly associated with both phenotypes (rs2155219; P(grass) = 9.4 × 10(-9); P(AR) = 3.8 × 10(-8)). The third genome-wide significant variant was rs17513503 (P(grass) = 1.2 × 10(-8); PAR = 7.4 × 10(-7)) which was located near transmembrane protein 232 (TMEM232) and solute carrier family 25, member 46 (SLC25A46). Twelve further loci with suggestive associations were also identified. Using a candidate gene approach, where we considered variants within 164 genes previously thought to be important, we found variants in 3 further genes that may be of interest: thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), Toll-like receptor 6 (TLR6) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 1 (NOD1/CARD4). We found no evidence for variants

  19. A functional brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene variant increases the risk of moderate-to-severe allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peng; Andiappan, Anand Kumar; Quek, Jia Min; Lee, Bernett; Au, Bijin; Sio, Yang Yie; Irwanto, Astrid; Schurmann, Claudia; Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Suri, Bani Kaur; Matta, Sri Anusha; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; Esko, Tonu; Sun, Liangdan; Zhang, Xuejun; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Furen; Larbi, Anis; Xu, Xin; Poidinger, Michael; Liu, Jianjun; Chew, Fook Tim; Rotzschke, Olaf; Shi, Li; Wang, De Yun

    2015-06-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a secretory protein that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis (AR), atopic asthma, and eczema, but it is currently unknown whether BDNF polymorphisms influence susceptibility to moderate-to-severe AR. We sought to identify disease associations and the functional effect of BDNF genetic variants in patients with moderate-to-severe AR. Tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning the BDNF gene were selected from the human HapMap Han Chinese from Beijing (CHB) data set, and associations with moderate-to-severe AR were assessed in 2 independent cohorts of Chinese patients (2216 from Shandong province and 1239 living in Singapore). The functional effects of the BDNF genetic variants were determined by using both in vitro and ex vivo assays. The tagging SNP rs10767664 was significantly associated with the risk of moderate-to-severe AR in both Singapore Chinese (P = .0017; odds ratio, 1.324) and Shandong Chinese populations (P = .039; odds ratio, 1.180). The coding nonsynonymous SNP rs6265 was in perfect linkage with rs10767664 and conferred increased BDNF protein secretion by a human cell line in vitro. Subjects bearing the AA genotype of rs10767664 exhibited increased risk of moderate-to-severe AR and displayed increased BDNF protein and total IgE levels in plasma. Using a large-scale expression quantitative trait locus study, we demonstrated that BDNF SNPs are significantly associated with altered BDNF concentrations in peripheral blood. A common genetic variant of the BDNF gene is associated with increased risk of moderate-to-severe AR, and the AA genotype is associated with increased BDNF mRNA levels in peripheral blood. Together, these data indicate that functional BDNF gene variants increase the risk of moderate-to-severe AR. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A silent allele in the locus D5S818 contained within the PowerPlex®21 PCR Amplification Kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling; Tai, Yunchun; Qiu, Pingming; Du, Weian; Liu, Chao

    2015-11-01

    Three paternity tests cases were found with a single locus mismatch at the locus D5S818 with PowerPlex®21 PCR Amplification Kit (Promega). Forward and reverse primers were redesigned to type the samples again and to evaluate if there were alleles dropped out. The results showed the existence of a silent allele 12 in all the three families, due to a point mutation that changed cytosine to adenine at 90 nucleotides upstream from the 5' end of the AGAT repeat sequences in all the six individuals. A single locus mismatch due to a silent allele may occur in any locus using any kit. Therefore, we recommend using multiple kits to confirm the results in paternity testing cases with mismatches, especially when there is a single locus mismatch with homozygote involved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Migraine Variants in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Headaches in Children FAQ Migraine Variants In Children Children Get Migraines Too! Learn More Migraine Information Find Help Doctors & Resources Get Connected Join the Conversation Follow Us on Social Media Company About News Resources Privacy Policy Contact Phone: ...

  2. Identification of a possible susceptibility locus for UVB-induced skin tanning phenotype in Korean females using genomewide association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Taek-Jong; Chang, Yun-Hee; Shin, Young-Ah; Shin, Jung-Min; Kim, Ji-Hye; Lim, Seul-Ki; Lee, Sang-Hwha; Lee, Min-Geol; Yoon, Tae-Jin; Kim, Chang-Deok; Lee, Jeung-Hoon; Koh, Jae Sook; Seo, Young Kyoung; Chang, Min-Youl; Lee, Young

    2015-12-01

    A two-stage genomewide association (GWA) analysis was conducted to investigate the genetic factors influencing ultraviolet (UV)-induced skin pigmentation in Korean females after UV exposure. Previously, a GWA study evaluating ~500 000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 99 Korean females identified eight SNPs that were highly associated with tanning ability. To confirm these associations, we genotyped the SNPs in an independent replication study (112 Korean females). We found that a novel SNP in the intron of the WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) gene yielded significant replicated associations with skin tanning ability (P-value = 1.16 × 10(-4) ). To understand the functional consequences of this locus located in the non-coding region, we investigated the role of WWOX in human melanocytes using a recombinant adenovirus expressing a microRNA specific for WWOX. Inhibition of WWOX expression significantly increased the expression and activity of tyrosinase in human melanocytes. Taken together, our results suggest that genetic variants in the intronic region of WWOX could be determinants in the UV-induced tanning ability of Korean females. WWOX represents a new candidate gene to evaluate the molecular basis of the UV-induced tanning ability in individuals. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Intact Protein Analysis at 21 Tesla and X-Ray Crystallography Define Structural Differences in Single Amino Acid Variants of Human Mitochondrial Branched-Chain Amino Acid Aminotransferase 2 (BCAT2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lissa C.; Håkansson, Maria; Walse, Björn; Nilsson, Carol L.

    2017-09-01

    Structural technologies are an essential component in the design of precision therapeutics. Precision medicine entails the development of therapeutics directed toward a designated target protein, with the goal to deliver the right drug to the right patient at the right time. In the field of oncology, protein structural variants are often associated with oncogenic potential. In a previous proteogenomic screen of patient-derived glioblastoma (GBM) tumor materials, we identified a sequence variant of human mitochondrial branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase 2 as a putative factor of resistance of GBM to standard-of-care-treatments. The enzyme generates glutamate, which is neurotoxic. To elucidate structural coordinates that may confer altered substrate binding or activity of the variant BCAT2 T186R, a 45 kDa protein, we applied combined ETD and CID top-down mass spectrometry in a LC-FT-ICR MS at 21 T, and X-Ray crystallography in the study of both the variant and non-variant intact proteins. The combined ETD/CID fragmentation pattern allowed for not only extensive sequence coverage but also confident localization of the amino acid variant to its position in the sequence. The crystallographic experiments confirmed the hypothesis generated by in silico structural homology modeling, that the Lys59 side-chain of BCAT2 may repulse the Arg186 in the variant protein (PDB code: 5MPR), leading to destabilization of the protein dimer and altered enzyme kinetics. Taken together, the MS and novel 3D structural data give us reason to further pursue BCAT2 T186R as a precision drug target in GBM. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Linking genotypes database with locus-specific database and genotype-phenotype correlation in phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wettstein, Sarah; Underhaug, Jarl; Perez, Belen; Marsden, Brian D; Yue, Wyatt W; Martinez, Aurora; Blau, Nenad

    2015-03-01

    The wide range of metabolic phenotypes in phenylketonuria is due to a large number of variants causing variable impairment in phenylalanine hydroxylase function. A total of 834 phenylalanine hydroxylase gene variants from the locus-specific database PAHvdb and genotypes of 4181 phenylketonuria patients from the BIOPKU database were characterized using FoldX, SIFT Blink, Polyphen-2 and SNPs3D algorithms. Obtained data was correlated with residual enzyme activity, patients' phenotype and tetrahydrobiopterin responsiveness. A descriptive analysis of both databases was compiled and an interactive viewer in PAHvdb database was implemented for structure visualization of missense variants. We found a quantitative relationship between phenylalanine hydroxylase protein stability and enzyme activity (r(s) = 0.479), between protein stability and allelic phenotype (r(s) = -0.458), as well as between enzyme activity and allelic phenotype (r(s) = 0.799). Enzyme stability algorithms (FoldX and SNPs3D), allelic phenotype and enzyme activity were most powerful to predict patients' phenotype and tetrahydrobiopterin response. Phenotype prediction was most accurate in deleterious genotypes (≈ 100%), followed by homozygous (92.9%), hemizygous (94.8%), and compound heterozygous genotypes (77.9%), while tetrahydrobiopterin response was correctly predicted in 71.0% of all cases. To our knowledge this is the largest study using algorithms for the prediction of patients' phenotype and tetrahydrobiopterin responsiveness in phenylketonuria patients, using data from the locus-specific and genotypes database.

  5. Exome and Transcriptome Sequencing of Aedes aegypti Identifies a Locus That Confers Resistance to Brugia malayi and Alters the Immune Response

    KAUST Repository

    Juneja, Punita; Ariani, Cristina V.; Ho, Yung Shwen; Akorli, Jewelna; Palmer, William J.; Pain, Arnab; Jiggins, Francis M.

    2015-01-01

    to target protein-coding regions of the genome, and used association mapping in a wild Kenyan population to identify a single, dominant, sex-linked locus underlying resistance. This falls in a region of the genome where a resistance locus was previously

  6. Hybrid male sterility in rice is due to epistatic interactions with a pollen killer locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Takahiko; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Kurata, Nori

    2011-11-01

    In intraspecific crosses between cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) subspecies indica and japonica, the hybrid male sterility gene S24 causes the selective abortion of male gametes carrying the japonica allele (S24-j) via an allelic interaction in the heterozygous hybrids. In this study, we first examined whether male sterility is due solely to the single locus S24. An analysis of near-isogenic lines (NIL-F(1)) showed different phenotypes for S24 in different genetic backgrounds. The S24 heterozygote with the japonica genetic background showed male semisterility, but no sterility was found in heterozygotes with the indica background. This result indicates that S24 is regulated epistatically. A QTL analysis of a BC(2)F(1) population revealed a novel sterility locus that interacts with S24 and is found on rice chromosome 2. The locus was named Epistatic Factor for S24 (EFS). Further genetic analyses revealed that S24 causes male sterility when in combination with the homozygous japonica EFS allele (efs-j). The results suggest that efs-j is a recessive sporophytic allele, while the indica allele (EFS-i) can dominantly counteract the pollen sterility caused by S24 heterozygosity. In summary, our results demonstrate that an additional epistatic locus is an essential element in the hybrid sterility caused by allelic interaction at a single locus in rice. This finding provides a significant contribution to our understanding of the complex molecular mechanisms underlying hybrid sterility and microsporogenesis.

  7. Development of single locus DNA microsatellite markers in Oryctes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Oryctes rhinoceros, commonly known as rhinoceros bee- tle, is an important pest in oil palm plantations. The pres- ence of this pest in replanting sites as early as six months ..... rhinoceros: breeding and damage on oil palm in an oil palm to oil.

  8. Locus of control in relation to flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celeste M Taylor

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The principal objective of the study was to examine the relationship between locus of control and optimal experience (flow in carrying out work and/or study activities. Two questionnaires measuring the aforementioned constructs were administered to a group of first and second-year Human Resource Management students (n=168 between the ages of 16 and 30. The results suggest that more frequent experience of flow is positively correlated with Autonomy and Internal Locus of Control. Limitations, lines of future research, implications and further contributions are discussed.

  9. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; van Eijk, Kristel R; Walters, Raymond K; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Winkler, Anderson M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M H; Hartberg, Cecilie B; Haukvik, Unn K; Heister, Angelien J G A M; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Makkinje, Remco R R; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A M; McKay, D Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S L; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Bastin, Mark E; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Carless, Melanie A; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hartman, Catharina A; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Mostert, Jeanette C; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nalls, Michael A; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars G; Nöthen, Markus M; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; van 't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J; Wassink, Thomas H; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Ashbrook, David G; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J; Morris, Derek W; Williams, Robert W; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Roffman, Joshua L; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smoller, Jordan W; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brouwer, Rachel M; Cannon, Dara M; Cookson, Mark R; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jönsson, Erik G; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Adams, Hieab H H; Launer, Lenore J; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L; Becker, James T; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W T; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M; Medland, Sarah E

    2015-04-09

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction.

  10. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Olde Loohuis, Loes M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J.; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Walters, Raymond K.; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M. H.; Hartberg, Cecilie B.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Makkinje, Remco R. R.; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C.; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A.; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S. L.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Bastin, Mark E.; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Carless, Melanie A.; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars G.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D.; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R.; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.; Valdés Hernández, Maria C.; van ’t Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J.; Morris, Derek W.; Williams, Robert W.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cookson, Mark R.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Jönsson, Erik G.; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S.; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Weale, Michael E.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Adams, Hieab H. H.; Launer, Lenore J.; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L.; Becker, James T.; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J.; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W. T.; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M. Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M.; Medland, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences1. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement2, learning, memory3 and motivation4, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease2. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume5 and intracranial volume6. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10−33; 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability inhuman brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  11. Updated listing of haplotypes at the human phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisensmith, R.C.; Woo, S.L.C. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States))

    1992-12-01

    Analysis of mutant PAH chromosomes has identified approximately 60 different single-base substitutions and deletions within the PAH locus. Nearly all of these molecular lesions are in strong linkage disequilibrium with specific RFLP haplotypes in different ethnic populations. Thus, haplotype analysis is not only useful for diagnostic purposes but is proving to be a valuable tool in population genetic studies of the origin and spread of phenylketonuria alleles in human populations. PCR-based methods have been developed to detect six of the eight polymorphic restriction sites used for determination of RFLP haplotypes at the PAH locus. A table of the proposed expanded haplotypes is given.

  12. Association studies of novel obesity-related gene variants with quantitative metabolic phenotypes in a population-based sample of 6,039 Danish individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, K S; Gjesing, A P; Grarup, N

    2012-01-01

    .0011) using the HOMA-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index and a 2.2% reduction (p = 0.0014) with the Matsuda index. Of the variants associated with WHR, LYPLAL1/SLC30A10 rs4846567 G allele carriers showed a 5.2% lower HOMA-IR (p = 0.00086) in women, indicating improved insulin sensitivity. Female carriers...... of the VEGFA rs6905288 A allele were insulin resistant, with a 3.7% increase in HOMA-IR (p = 0.00036) and 4.0% decrease in Matsuda index (p = 2 x 10(-4)). Our correlative findings from analysing single-locus data suggest that some variation in validated BMI and WHR loci are associated with either increased...

  13. Genetic mapping of the female mimic morph locus in the ruff

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Ruffs (Aves: Philomachus pugnax) possess a genetic polymorphism for male mating behaviour resulting in three permanent alternative male reproductive morphs: (i) territorial ‘Independents’, (ii) non-territorial ‘Satellites’, and (iii) female-mimicking ‘Faeders’. Development into independent or satellite morphs has previously been shown to be due to a single-locus, two-allele autosomal Mendelian mode of inheritance at the Satellite locus. Here, we use linkage analysis to map the chromosomal location of the Faeder locus, which controls development into the Faeder morph, and draw further conclusions about candidate genes, assuming shared synteny with other birds. Results Segregation data on the Faeder locus were obtained from captive-bred pedigrees comprising 64 multi-generation families (N = 381). There was no evidence that the Faeder locus was linked to the Satellite locus, but it was linked with microsatellite marker Ppu020. Comparative mapping of ruff microsatellite markers against the chicken (Gallus gallus) and zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) genomes places the Ppu020 and Faeder loci on a region of chromosome 11 that includes the Melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) gene, which regulates colour polymorphisms in numerous birds and other vertebrates. Melanin-based colouration varies with life-history strategies in ruffs and other species, thus the MC1R gene is a strong candidate to play a role in alternative male morph determination. Conclusion Two unlinked loci appear to control behavioural development in ruffs. The Faeder locus is linked to Ppu020, which, assuming synteny, is located on avian chromosome 11. MC1R is a candidate gene involved in alternative male morph determination in ruffs. PMID:24256185

  14. The role of β3 integrin gene variants in Autism Spectrum Disorders--diagnosis and symptomatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuch, Jaqueline Bohrer; Muller, Diana; Endres, Renata Giuliani; Bosa, Cleonice Alves; Longo, Dânae; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Ranzan, Josiane; Becker, Michele Michelin; dos Santos Riesgo, Rudimar; Roman, Tatiana

    2014-12-10

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) represent a group of very complex early-onset neurodevelopmental diseases. In this study, we analyzed 5 SNPs (rs2317385, rs5918, rs15908, rs12603582, rs3809865) at the β3 integrin locus (ITGB3), which has been suggested as a possible susceptibility gene, both as single markers and as part of haplotypes in 209 ASD children and their biological parents. We tested for association with the following: a) DSM-IV ASD diagnosis; b) clinical symptoms common in ASD patients (repetitive behaviors, echolalia, seizures and epilepsy, mood instability, aggression, psychomotor agitation, sleep disorders); and c) dimensional scores obtained with the Autism Screening Questionnaire and the Childhood Autism Rating Scale. These hypotheses were investigated using family-based tests, logistic regression models and analysis of covariance. The family-based tests showed an association with the H5 haplotype (composed by GTCGA alleles, the order of SNPs as above), which was transmitted less often than expected by chance (P=0.006; Pcorr=0.036). The analyses of the clinical symptoms showed a trend for an association with rs12603582 (P=0.008; Pcorr=0.064) and positive results for the haplotype composed of rs15908 and rs12603582 (Pglcorr=0.048; Pindcorr=0.015), both in symptoms of echolalia. Other nominal associations with different variants were found and involved epilepsy/seizures, aggression symptoms and higher ASQ scores. Although our positive results are not definitive, they suggest small effect associations of the ITGB3 gene with both ASD diagnosis and symptoms of echolalia. Other studies are nonetheless needed to fully understand the involvement of this locus on the etiology of ASDs and its different clinical aspects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Recombination suppression at the dominant Rhg1/Rfs2 locus underlying soybean resistance to the cyst nematode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Ahmed J; Srour, Ali; Saini, Navinder; Hemmati, Naghmeh; El Shemy, Hany A; Lightfoot, David A

    2012-04-01

    Host resistance to "yellow dwarf" or "moonlight" disease cause by any population (Hg type) of Heterodera glycines I., the soybean cyst nematode (SCN), requires a functional allele at rhg1. The host resistance encoded appears to mimic an apoptotic response in the giant cells formed at the nematode feeding site about 24-48 h after nematode feeding commences. Little is known about how the host response to infection is mediated but a linked set of 3 genes has been identified within the rhg1 locus. This study aimed to identify the role of the genes within the locus that includes a receptor-like kinase (RLK), a laccase and an ion antiporter. Used were near isogeneic lines (NILs) that contrasted at their rhg1 alleles, gene-based markers, and a new Hg type 0 and new recombination events. A syntenic gene cluster on Lg B1 was found. The effectiveness of SNP probes from the RLK for distinguishing homolog sequence variants on LgB1 from alleles at the rhg1 locus on LgG was shown. The resistant allele of the rhg1 locus was shown to be dominant in NILs. None of the recombination events were within the cluster of the three candidate genes. Finally, rhg1 was shown to reduce the plant root development. A model for rhg1 as a dominant multi-gene resistance locus based on the developmental control was inferred.

  16. Hemoglobin Variants: Biochemical Properties and Clinical Correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Christopher S.; Dickson, Claire F.; Gell, David A.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2013-01-01

    Diseases affecting hemoglobin synthesis and function are extremely common worldwide. More than 1000 naturally occurring human hemoglobin variants with single amino acid substitutions throughout the molecule have been discovered, mainly through their clinical and/or laboratory manifestations. These variants alter hemoglobin structure and biochemical properties with physiological effects ranging from insignificant to severe. Studies of these mutations in patients and in the laboratory have produced a wealth of information on hemoglobin biochemistry and biology with significant implications for hematology practice. More generally, landmark studies of hemoglobin performed over the past 60 years have established important paradigms for the disciplines of structural biology, genetics, biochemistry, and medicine. Here we review the major classes of hemoglobin variants, emphasizing general concepts and illustrative examples. PMID:23388674

  17. Singled out?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Frank

    2004-03-01

    The increasing use of single use medical devices is being driven by a growing awareness of iatrogenic (from the Greek; caused by the doctor) and nosocomial infections. Public health perceptions relating to transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, specifically variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Hepatitis B are high on the political agenda and a matter of concern to healthcare professionals.

  18. Exclusion of close linkage between the synaptic vesicular monoamine transporter locus and schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persico, A.M.; Uhl, G.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wang, Zhe Wu [Universitario Campus Bio-Medico, Rome (Italy)] [and others

    1995-12-18

    The principal brain synaptic vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2) is responsible for the reuptake of serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and histamine from the cytoplasm into synaptic vesicles, thus contributing to determination of the size of releasable neurotransmitter vesicular pools. Potential involvement of VMAT2 gene variants in the etiology of schizophrenia and related disorders was tested using polymorphic VMAT2 gene markers in 156 subjects from 16 multiplex pedigrees with schizophrenia, schizophreniform, schizoaffective, and schizotypal disorders and mood incongruent psychotic depression. Assuming genetic homogeneity, complete ({theta} = 0.0) linkage to the schizophrenia spectrum was excluded under both dominant and recessive models. Allelic variants at the VMAT2 locus do not appear to provide major genetic contributions to the etiology of schizophrenia spectrum disorders in these pedigrees. 16 refs.

  19. A population-specific uncommon variant in GRIN3A associated with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Atsushi; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Fukuo, Yasuhisa; Ikeda, Masashi; Okochi, Tomo; Maekawa, Motoko; Toyota, Tomoko; Yamada, Kazuo; Hattori, Eiji; Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Toyoshima, Manabu; Ujike, Hiroshi; Inada, Toshiya; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Ozaki, Norio; Nanko, Shinichiro; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Mori, Norio; Kanba, Shigenobu; Iwata, Nakao; Kato, Tadafumi; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2013-03-15

    Genome-wide association studies have successfully identified several common variants showing robust association with schizophrenia. However, individually, these variants only produce a weak effect. To identify genetic variants with larger effect sizes, increasing attention is now being paid to uncommon and rare variants. From the 1000 Genomes Project data, we selected 47 candidate single nucleotide variants (SNVs), which were: 1) uncommon (minor allele frequency way to discover risk variants with larger effects. Copyright © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Oscillating Evolution of a Mammalian Locus with Overlapping Reading Frames: An XLalphas/ALEX Relay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available XLalphas and ALEX are structurally unrelated mammalian proteins translated from alternative overlapping reading frames of a single transcript. Not only are they encoded by the same locus, but a specific XLalphas/ALEX interaction is essential for G-protein signaling in neuroendocrine cells. A disruption of this interaction leads to abnormal human phenotypes, including mental retardation and growth deficiency. The region of overlap between the two reading frames evolves at a remarkable speed: the divergence between human and mouse ALEX polypeptides makes them virtually unalignable. To trace the evolution of this puzzling locus, we sequenced it in apes, Old World monkeys, and a New World monkey. We show that the overlap between the two reading frames and the physical interaction between the two proteins force the locus to evolve in an unprecedented way. Namely, to maintain two overlapping protein-coding regions the locus is forced to have high GC content, which significantly elevates its intrinsic evolutionary rate. However, the two encoded proteins cannot afford to change too quickly relative to each other as this may impair their interaction and lead to severe physiological consequences. As a result XLalphas and ALEX evolve in an oscillating fashion constantly balancing the rates of amino acid replacements. This is the first example of a rapidly evolving locus encoding interacting proteins via overlapping reading frames, with a possible link to the origin of species-specific neurological differences.

  1. Root locus analysis and design of the adaptation process in active noise control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei Ardekani, Iman; Abdulla, Waleed H

    2012-10-01

    This paper applies root locus theory to develop a graphical tool for the analysis and design of adaptive active noise control systems. It is shown that the poles of the adaptation process performed in these systems move on typical trajectories in the z-plane as the adaptation step-size varies. Based on this finding, the dominant root of the adaptation process and its trajectory can be determined. The first contribution of this paper is formulating parameters of the adaptation process root locus. The next contribution is introducing a mechanism for modifying the trajectory of the dominant root in the root locus. This mechanism creates a single open loop zero in the original root locus. It is shown that appropriate localization of this zero can cause the dominant root of the locus to be pushed toward the origin, and thereby the adaptation process becomes faster. The validity of the theoretical findings is confirmed in an experimental setup which is implemented using real-time multi-threading and multi-core processing techniques.

  2. Breast cancer risk variants at 6q25 display different phenotype associations and regulate ESR1, RMND1 and CCDC170

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunning, Alison M; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed 3,872 common genetic variants across the ESR1 locus (encoding estrogen receptor α) in 118,816 subjects from three international consortia. We found evidence for at least five independent causal variants, each associated with different phenotype sets, including estrogen receptor (ER(+)...

  3. Calling genotypes from public RNA-sequencing data enables identification of genetic variants that affect gene-expression levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelen, Patrick; Zhernakova, Daria V.; de Haan, Mark; van der Sijde, Marijke; Bonder, Marc Jan; Karjalainen, Juha; van der Velde, K. Joeri; Abbott, Kristin M.; Fu, Jingyuan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sinke, Richard J.; Swertz, Morris A.; Franke, Lude

    2015-01-01

    Background: RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) is a powerful technique for the identification of genetic variants that affect gene-expression levels, either through expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping or through allele-specific expression (ASE) analysis. Given increasing numbers of RNA-seq

  4. Genetic variants influencing phenotypic variance heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ek, Weronica E; Rask-Andersen, Mathias; Karlsson, Torgny; Enroth, Stefan; Gyllensten, Ulf; Johansson, Åsa

    2018-03-01

    Most genetic studies identify genetic variants associated with disease risk or with the mean value of a quantitative trait. More rarely, genetic variants associated with variance heterogeneity are considered. In this study, we have identified such variance single-nucleotide polymorphisms (vSNPs) and examined if these represent biological gene × gene or gene × environment interactions or statistical artifacts caused by multiple linked genetic variants influencing the same phenotype. We have performed a genome-wide study, to identify vSNPs associated with variance heterogeneity in DNA methylation levels. Genotype data from over 10 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and DNA methylation levels at over 430 000 CpG sites, were analyzed in 729 individuals. We identified vSNPs for 7195 CpG sites (P mean DNA methylation levels. We further showed that variance heterogeneity between genotypes mainly represents additional, often rare, SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the respective vSNP and for some vSNPs, multiple low frequency variants co-segregating with one of the vSNP alleles. Therefore, our results suggest that variance heterogeneity of DNA methylation mainly represents phenotypic effects by multiple SNPs, rather than biological interactions. Such effects may also be important for interpreting variance heterogeneity of more complex clinical phenotypes.

  5. The Impact of Locus of Control on Language Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali Salmani

    2012-01-01

    This study hypothesized that students' loci of control affected their language achievement. 198 (N = 198) EFL students took the Rotter's (1966) locus of control test and were classified as locus-internal (ni = 78), and locus-external (ne = 120). They then took their ordinary courses and at the end of the semester, they were given their exams.…

  6. Self-Esteem, Locus of Control, and Student Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterbin, Allan; Rakow, Ernest

    The direct effects of locus of control and self-esteem on standardized test scores were studied. The relationships among the standardized test scores and measures of locus of control and self-esteem for 12,260 students from the National Education Longitudinal Study 1994 database were examined, using the same definition of locus of control and…

  7. Circadian gene variants and susceptibility to type 2 diabetes: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ann Kelly

    Full Text Available Disruption of endogenous circadian rhythms has been shown to increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, suggesting that circadian genes might play a role in determining disease susceptibility. We present the results of a pilot study investigating the association between type 2 diabetes and selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in/near nine circadian genes. The variants were chosen based on their previously reported association with prostate cancer, a disease that has been suggested to have a genetic link with type 2 diabetes through a number of shared inherited risk determinants.The pilot study was performed using two genetically homogeneous Punjabi cohorts, one resident in the United Kingdom and one indigenous to Pakistan. Subjects with (N = 1732 and without (N = 1780 type 2 diabetes were genotyped for thirteen circadian variants using a competitive allele-specific polymerase chain reaction method. Associations between the SNPs and type 2 diabetes were investigated using logistic regression. The results were also combined with in silico data from other South Asian datasets (SAT2D consortium and white European cohorts (DIAGRAM+ using meta-analysis. The rs7602358G allele near PER2 was negatively associated with type 2 diabetes in our Punjabi cohorts (combined odds ratio [OR] = 0.75 [0.66-0.86], p = 3.18 × 10(-5, while the BMAL1 rs11022775T allele was associated with an increased risk of the disease (combined OR = 1.22 [1.07-1.39], p = 0.003. Neither of these associations was replicated in the SAT2D or DIAGRAM+ datasets, however. Meta-analysis of all the cohorts identified disease associations with two variants, rs2292912 in CRY2 and rs12315175 near CRY1, although statistical significance was nominal (combined OR = 1.05 [1.01-1.08], p = 0.008 and OR = 0.95 [0.91-0.99], p = 0.015 respectively.None of the selected circadian gene variants was associated with type 2 diabetes with study-wide significance after meta-analysis. The nominal

  8. Analysis of protein-altering variants in telomerase genes and their association with MUC5B common variant status in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: a candidate gene sequencing study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressen, Amy; Abbas, Alexander R; Cabanski, Christopher; Reeder, Janina; Ramalingam, Thirumalai R; Neighbors, Margaret; Bhangale, Tushar R; Brauer, Matthew J; Hunkapiller, Julie; Reeder, Jens; Mukhyala, Kiran; Cuenco, Karen; Tom, Jennifer; Cowgill, Amy; Vogel, Jan; Forrest, William F; Collard, Harold R; Wolters, Paul J; Kropski, Jonathan A; Lancaster, Lisa H; Blackwell, Timothy S; Arron, Joseph R; Yaspan, Brian L

    2018-06-08

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) risk has a strong genetic component. Studies have implicated variations at several loci, including TERT, surfactant genes, and a single nucleotide polymorphism at chr11p15 (rs35705950) in the intergenic region between TOLLIP and MUC5B. Patients with IPF who have risk alleles at rs35705950 have longer survival from the time of IPF diagnosis than do patients homozygous for the non-risk allele, whereas patients with shorter telomeres have shorter survival times. We aimed to assess whether rare protein-altering variants in genes regulating telomere length are enriched in patients with IPF homozygous for the non-risk alleles at rs35705950. Between Nov 1, 2014, and Nov 1, 2016, we assessed blood samples from patients aged 40 years or older and of European ancestry with sporadic IPF from three international phase 3 clinical trials (INSPIRE, CAPACITY, ASCEND), one phase 2 study (RIFF), and US-based observational studies (Vanderbilt Clinical Interstitial Lung Disease Registry and the UCSF Interstitial Lung Disease Clinic registry cohorts) at the Broad Institute (Cambridge, MA, USA) and Human Longevity (San Diego, CA, USA). We also assessed blood samples from non-IPF controls in several clinical trials. We did whole-genome sequencing to assess telomere length and identify rare protein-altering variants, stratified by rs35705950 genotype. We also assessed rare functional variation in TERT exons and compared telomere length and disease progression across genotypes. We assessed samples from 1510 patients with IPF and 1874 non-IPF controls. 30 (3%) of 1046 patients with an rs35705950 risk allele had a rare protein-altering variant in TERT compared with 34 (7%) of 464 non-risk allele carriers (odds ratio 0·40 [95% CI 0·24-0·66], p=0·00039). Subsequent analyses identified enrichment of rare protein-altering variants in PARN and RTEL1, and rare variation in TERC in patients with IPF compared with controls. We expanded our study population to

  9. Histone variants and lipid metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghesan, Michela; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Sheedfar, Fareeba; Oben, Jude; Pazienza, Valerio; Vinciguerra, Manlio

    2014-01-01

    Within nucleosomes, canonical histones package the genome, but they can be opportunely replaced with histone variants. The incorporation of histone variants into the nucleosome is a chief cellular strategy to regulate transcription and cellular metabolism. In pathological terms, cellular steatosis

  10. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengmeng Du

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs. We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33. We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s.

  11. The renal urate transporter SLC17A1 locus: confirmation of association with gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis-Moffatt, Jade E; Phipps-Green, Amanda J; Chapman, Brett; Jones, Gregory T; van Rij, Andre; Gow, Peter J; Harrison, Andrew A; Highton, John; Jones, Peter B; Montgomery, Grant W; Stamp, Lisa K; Dalbeth, Nicola; Merriman, Tony R

    2012-04-27

    Two major gout-causing genes have been identified, the urate transport genes SLC2A9 and ABCG2. Variation within the SLC17A1 locus, which encodes sodium-dependent phosphate transporter 1, a renal transporter of uric acid, has also been associated with serum urate concentration. However, evidence for association with gout is equivocal. We investigated the association of the SLC17A1 locus with gout in New Zealand sample sets. Five variants (rs1165196, rs1183201, rs9358890, rs3799344, rs12664474) were genotyped across a New Zealand sample set totaling 971 cases and 1,742 controls. Cases were ascertained according to American Rheumatism Association criteria. Two population groups were studied: Caucasian and Polynesian. At rs1183201 (SLC17A1), evidence for association with gout was observed in both the Caucasian (odds ratio (OR) = 0.67, P = 3.0 × 10-6) and Polynesian (OR = 0.74, P = 3.0 × 10-3) groups. Meta-analysis confirmed association of rs1183201 with gout at a genome-wide level of significance (OR = 0.70, P = 3.0 × 10-8). Haplotype analysis suggested the presence of a common protective haplotype. We confirm the SLC17A1 locus as the third associated with gout at a genome-wide level of significance.

  12. Common variants in SOCS7 gene predict obesity, disturbances in lipid metabolism and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellechea, M L; Steinhardt, A Penas; Rodriguez, G; Taverna, M J; Poskus, E; Frechtel, G

    2013-05-01

    Specific Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) members, such as SOCS7, may play a role in the development of insulin resistance (IR) owing to their ability to inhibit insulin signaling pathways. The objective was to explore the association between common variants and related haplotypes in SOCS7 gene and metabolic traits related to obesity, lipid metabolism and IR. 780 unrelated men were included in a cross-sectional study. We selected three tagged SNPs that capture 100% of SNPs with minor allele frequency ≥ 0.10. Analyses were done separately for each SNP and followed up by haplotype analysis. rs8074124C was associated with both obesity (p = 0.005) and abdominal obesity (p = 0.002) and allele C carriers showed, in comparison with TT carriers, lower BMI (p = 0.001) and waist circumference (p = 0.001). rs8074124CC- carriers showed lower fasting insulin (p = 0.017) and HOMA-IR (p = 0.018) than allele T carriers. rs12051836C was associated with hypertriglyceridemia (p = 0.009) and hypertriglyceridemic waist (p = 0.006). rs12051836CC- carriers showed lower fasting insulin (p = 0.043) and HOMA-IR (p = 0.042). Haplotype-based association analysis (rs8074124 and rs12051836 in that order) showed associations with lipid and obesity -related phenotypes, consistent with single locus analysis. Haplotype analysis also revealed association between haplotype CT and both decreased HDL-C (p = 0.026) and HDL-C (p = 0.014) as a continuous variable. We found, for the first time, significant associations between SOCS7 common variants and related haplotypes and obesity, IR and lipid metabolism disorders. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. seed storage proteins arl2 and its variants from the apa locus of wild ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sion of arcelin and ARL2 tepary bean proteins. Furthermore, a reduction in size and weight of emerged adult insects to almost half was observed. This work demonstrates the superior resistance common bean backcross lines to A. obtectus conferred by the presence of the APA proteins introgressed from tepary bean.

  14. Pleiotropic roles of Clostridium difficile sin locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Junjun; Dupuy, Bruno

    2018-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the primary cause of nosocomial diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. It produces dormant spores, which serve as an infectious vehicle responsible for transmission of the disease and persistence of the organism in the environment. In Bacillus subtilis, the sin locus coding SinR (113 aa) and SinI (57 aa) is responsible for sporulation inhibition. In B. subtilis, SinR mainly acts as a repressor of its target genes to control sporulation, biofilm formation, and autolysis. SinI is an inhibitor of SinR, so their interaction determines whether SinR can inhibit its target gene expression. The C. difficile genome carries two sinR homologs in the operon that we named sinR and sinR’, coding for SinR (112 aa) and SinR’ (105 aa), respectively. In this study, we constructed and characterized sin locus mutants in two different C. difficile strains R20291 and JIR8094, to decipher the locus’s role in C. difficile physiology. Transcriptome analysis of the sinRR’ mutants revealed their pleiotropic roles in controlling several pathways including sporulation, toxin production, and motility in C. difficile. Through various genetic and biochemical experiments, we have shown that SinR can regulate transcription of key regulators in these pathways, which includes sigD, spo0A, and codY. We have found that SinR’ acts as an antagonist to SinR by blocking its repressor activity. Using a hamster model, we have also demonstrated that the sin locus is needed for successful C. difficile infection. This study reveals the sin locus as a central link that connects the gene regulatory networks of sporulation, toxin production, and motility; three key pathways that are important for C. difficile pathogenesis. PMID:29529083

  15. The algebraic locus of Feynman integrals

    OpenAIRE

    Kol, Barak

    2016-01-01

    In the Symmetries of Feynman Integrals (SFI) approach, a diagram's parameter space is foliated by orbits of a Lie group associated with the diagram. SFI is related to the important methods of Integrations By Parts and of Differential Equations. It is shown that sometimes there exist a locus in parameter space where the set of SFI differential equations degenerates into an algebraic equation, thereby enabling a solution in terms of integrals associated with degenerations of the diagram. This i...

  16. Variants of glycoside hydrolases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teter, Sarah [Davis, CA; Ward, Connie [Hamilton, MT; Cherry, Joel [Davis, CA; Jones, Aubrey [Davis, CA; Harris, Paul [Carnation, WA; Yi, Jung [Sacramento, CA

    2011-04-26

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent glycoside hydrolase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 21, 94, 157, 205, 206, 247, 337, 350, 373, 383, 438, 455, 467, and 486 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, and optionally further comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2 a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, wherein the variants have glycoside hydrolase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant glycoside hydrolases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  17. Whole-exome sequencing of individuals from an isolated population implicates rare risk variants in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lescai, F; Als, T D; Li, Q

    2017-01-01

    Bipolar disorder affects about 1% of the world's population, and its estimated heritability is about 75%. Only few whole genome or whole-exome sequencing studies in bipolar disorder have been reported, and no rare coding variants have yet been robustly identified. The use of isolated populations...... PITPNM2 missense variant, which is located in a highly significant schizophrenia GWAS locus. Likewise, PIK3C2A identified in the gene-based analysis is located in a combined bipolar and schizophrenia GWAS locus. Our results show support both for existing findings in the literature, as well as for new...... risk genes, and identify rare variants that might provide additional information on the underlying biology of bipolar disorder....

  18. The mating type locus (MAT and sexual reproduction of Cryptococcus heveanensis: insights into the evolution of sex and sex-determining chromosomal regions in fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Metin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Mating in basidiomycetous fungi is often controlled by two unlinked, multiallelic loci encoding homeodomain transcription factors or pheromones/pheromone receptors. In contrast to this tetrapolar organization, Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii have a bipolar mating system, and a single biallelic locus governs sexual reproduction. The C. neoformans MAT locus is unusually large (>100 kb, contains >20 genes, and enhances virulence. Previous comparative genomic studies provided insights into how this unusual MAT locus might have evolved involving gene acquisitions into two unlinked loci and fusion into one contiguous locus, converting an ancestral tetrapolar system to a bipolar one. Here we tested this model by studying Cryptococcus heveanensis, a sister species to the pathogenic Cryptococcus species complex. An extant sexual cycle was discovered; co-incubating fertile isolates results in the teleomorph (Kwoniella heveanensis with dikaryotic hyphae, clamp connections, septate basidia, and basidiospores. To characterize the C. heveanensis MAT locus, a fosmid library was screened with C. neoformans/C. gattii MAT genes. Positive fosmids were sequenced and assembled to generate two large probably unlinked MAT gene clusters: one corresponding to the homeodomain locus and the other to the pheromone/receptor locus. Strikingly, two divergent homeodomain genes (SXI1, SXI2 are present, similar to the bE/bW Ustilago maydis paradigm, suggesting one or the other homeodomain gene was recently lost in C. neoformans/C. gattii. Sequencing MAT genes from other C. heveanensis isolates revealed a multiallelic homeodomain locus and at least a biallelic pheromone/receptor locus, similar to known tetrapolar species. Taken together, these studies reveal an extant C. heveanensis sexual cycle, define the structure of its MAT locus consistent with tetrapolar mating, and support the proposed evolutionary model for the bipolar Cryptococcus MAT locus revealing

  19. Genome-wide association study identifies a novel canine glaucoma locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saija J Ahonen

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is an optic neuropathy and one of the leading causes of blindness. Its hereditary forms are classified into primary closed-angle (PCAG, primary open-angle (POAG and primary congenital glaucoma (PCG. Although many loci have been mapped in human, only a few genes have been identified that are associated with the development of glaucoma and the genetic basis of the disease remains poorly understood. Glaucoma has also been described in many dog breeds, including Dandie Dinmont Terriers (DDT in which it is a late-onset (>7 years disease. We designed clinical and genetic studies to better define the clinical features of glaucoma in the DDT and to identify the genetic cause. Clinical diagnosis was based on ophthalmic examinations of the affected dogs and 18 additionally investigated unaffected DDTs. We collected DNA from over 400 DTTs and a genome wide association study was performed in a cohort of 23 affected and 23 controls, followed by a fine mapping, a replication study and candidate gene sequencing. The clinical study suggested that ocular abnormalities including abnormal iridocorneal angles and pectinate ligament dysplasia are common (50% and 72%, respectively in the breed and the disease resembles human PCAG. The genetic study identified a novel 9.5 Mb locus on canine chromosome 8 including the 1.6 Mb best associated region (p = 1.63 × 10(-10, OR = 32 for homozygosity. Mutation screening in five candidate genes did not reveal any causative variants. This study indicates that although ocular abnormalities are common in DDTs, the genetic risk for glaucoma is conferred by a novel locus on CFA8. The canine locus shares synteny to a region in human chromosome 14q, which harbors several loci associated with POAG and PCG. Our study reveals a new locus for canine glaucoma and ongoing molecular studies will likely help to understand the genetic etiology of the disease.

  20. Detecting rare variants in case-parents association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-Fu Cheng

    Full Text Available Despite the success of genome-wide association studies (GWASs in detecting common variants (minor allele frequency ≥0.05 many suggested that rare variants also contribute to the genetic architecture of diseases. Recently, researchers demonstrated that rare variants can show a strong stratification which may not be corrected by using existing methods. In this paper, we focus on a case-parents study and consider methods for testing group-wise association between multiple rare (and common variants in a gene region and a disease. All tests depend on the numbers of transmitted mutant alleles from parents to their diseased children across variants and hence they are robust to the effect of population stratification. We use extensive simulation studies to compare the performance of four competing tests: the largest single-variant transmission disequilibrium test (TDT, multivariable test, combined TDT, and a likelihood ratio test based on a random-effects model. We find that the likelihood ratio test is most powerful in a wide range of settings and there is no negative impact to its power performance when common variants are also included in the analysis. If deleterious and protective variants are simultaneously analyzed, the likelihood ratio test was generally insensitive to the effect directionality, unless the effects are extremely inconsistent in one direction.

  1. Delineation of concentration ranges and longitudinal changes of human plasma protein variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olgica Trenchevska

    Full Text Available Human protein diversity arises as a result of alternative splicing, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and posttranslational modifications. Because of these processes, each protein can exists as multiple variants in vivo. Tailored strategies are needed to study these protein variants and understand their role in health and disease. In this work we utilized quantitative mass spectrometric immunoassays to determine the protein variants concentration of beta-2-microglobulin, cystatin C, retinol binding protein, and transthyretin, in a population of 500 healthy individuals. Additionally, we determined the longitudinal concentration changes for the protein variants from four individuals over a 6 month period. Along with the native forms of the four proteins, 13 posttranslationally modified variants and 7 SNP-derived variants were detected and their concentration determined. Correlations of the variants concentration with geographical origin, gender, and age of the individuals were also examined. This work represents an important step toward building a catalog of protein variants concentrations and examining their longitudinal changes.

  2. Structure of chymotrypsin variant B from Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Asgeirsson, B; Thórólfsson, M

    1996-01-01

    The amino-acid sequence of chymotrypsin variant B isolated from the pyloric caeca of Atlantic cod has been elucidated. The characterization of the primary structure is based on N-terminal Edman degradation and mass spectrometry of the native protein and enzymatically derived peptides. Chymotrypsi...... autolysis sites, cod variant B only contains a single autolysis site. The three-dimensional structures of the A- and B-variants of cod has been modelled on the known crystal structure of bovine alpha-chymotrypsin showing almost superimposable structures....

  3. Identification of a shared genetic susceptibility locus for coronary heart disease and periodontitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne S Schaefer

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate a mutual epidemiological relationship between coronary heart disease (CHD and periodontitis. Both diseases are associated with similar risk factors and are characterized by a chronic inflammatory process. In a candidate-gene association study, we identify an association of a genetic susceptibility locus shared by both diseases. We confirm the known association of two neighboring linkage disequilibrium regions on human chromosome 9p21.3 with CHD and show the additional strong association of these loci with the risk of aggressive periodontitis. For the lead SNP of the main associated linkage disequilibrium region, rs1333048, the odds ratio of the autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance is 1.99 (95% confidence interval 1.33-2.94; P = 6.9 x 10(-4 for generalized aggressive periodontitis, and 1.72 (1.06-2.76; P = 2.6 x 10(-2 for localized aggressive periodontitis. The two associated linkage disequilibrium regions map to the sequence of the large antisense noncoding RNA ANRIL, which partly overlaps regulatory and coding sequences of CDKN2A/CDKN2B. A closely located diabetes-associated variant was independent of the CHD and periodontitis risk haplotypes. Our study demonstrates that CHD and periodontitis are genetically related by at least one susceptibility locus, which is possibly involved in ANRIL activity and independent of diabetes associated risk variants within this region. Elucidation of the interplay of ANRIL transcript variants and their involvement in increased susceptibility to the interactive diseases CHD and periodontitis promises new insight into the underlying shared pathogenic mechanisms of these complex common diseases.

  4. Accurate genotyping across variant classes and lengths using variant graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibbesen, Jonas Andreas; Maretty, Lasse; Jensen, Jacob Malte

    2018-01-01

    of read k-mers to a graph representation of the reference and variants to efficiently perform unbiased, probabilistic genotyping across the variation spectrum. We demonstrate that BayesTyper generally provides superior variant sensitivity and genotyping accuracy relative to existing methods when used...... collecting a set of candidate variants across discovery methods, individuals and databases, and then realigning the reads to the variants and reference simultaneously. However, this realignment problem has proved computationally difficult. Here, we present a new method (BayesTyper) that uses exact alignment...... to integrate variants across discovery approaches and individuals. Finally, we demonstrate that including a ‘variation-prior’ database containing already known variants significantly improves sensitivity....

  5. Identification of rat Rosa26 locus enables generation of knock-in rat lines ubiquitously expressing tdTomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Kato-Itoh, Megumi; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Tamura, Chihiro; Sanbo, Makoto; Hirabayashi, Masumi; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2012-11-01

    Recent discovery of a method for derivation and culture of germline-competent rat pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) enables generation of transgenic rats or knock-out rats via genetic modification of such PSCs. This opens the way to use rats, as is routine in mice, for analyses of gene functions or physiological features. In mouse or human, one widely used technique to express a gene of interest stably and ubiquitously is to insert that gene into the Rosa26 locus via gene targeting of PSCs. Rosa26 knock-in mice conditionally expressing a reporter or a toxin gene have contributed to tracing or ablation of specific cell lineages. We successfully identified a rat orthologue of the mouse Rosa26 locus. Insertion of tdTomato, a variant of red fluorescent protein, into the Rosa26 locus of PSCs of various rat strains allows ubiquitous expression of tdTomato. Through germline transmission of one Rosa26-tdTomato knock-in embryonic stem cell line, we also obtained tdTomato knock-in rats. These expressed tdTomato ubiquitously throughout their bodies, which indicates that the rat Rosa26 locus conserves functions of its orthologues in mouse and human. The new tools described here (targeting vectors, knock-in PSCs, and rats) should be useful for a variety of research using rats.

  6. Artemisinin Resistance-Associated Polymorphisms at the K13-Propeller Locus Are Absent in Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Tamar E.; Boulter, Alexis; Existe, Alexandre; Romain, Jean R.; St. Victor, Jean Yves; Mulligan, Connie J.; Okech, Bernard A.

    2015-01-01

    Antimalarial drugs are a key tool in malaria elimination programs. With the emergence of artemisinin resistance in southeast Asia, an effort to identify molecular markers for surveillance of resistant malaria parasites is underway. Non-synonymous mutations in the kelch propeller domain (K13-propeller) in Plasmodium falciparum have been associated with artemisinin resistance in samples from southeast Asia, but additional studies are needed to characterize this locus in other P. falciparum populations with different levels of artemisinin use. Here, we sequenced the K13-propeller locus in 82 samples from Haiti, where limited government oversight of non-governmental organizations may have resulted in low-level use of artemisinin-based combination therapies. We detected a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at nucleotide 1,359 in a single isolate. Our results contribute to our understanding of the global genomic diversity of the K13-propeller locus in P. falciparum populations. PMID:25646258

  7. Analysis of fast neutron-generated mutants at the Arabidopsis thaliana HY4 locus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruggemann, E.; Handwerger, K.; Essex, C.; Storz, G.

    1996-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is expected to produce mutants with deletions or other chromosomal rearrangements. These mutants are useful for a variety of purposes, such as creating null alleles and cloning genes whose existence is known only from their mutant phenotype; however, only a few mutations generated by ionizing radiation have been characterized at the molecular level in Arabidopsis thaliana. Twenty fast neutron-generated alleles of the Arabidopsis HY4 locus, which encodes a blue light receptor, CRY1, were isolated and characterized. Nine of the mutant alleles displayed normal genetic behavior. The other 11 mutant alleles were poorly transmitted through the male gametophyte and were lethal in homozygous plants. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that alleles of the first group generally contain small or moderate-sized deletions at HY4, while alleles of the second group contain large deletions at this locus. These results demonstrate that fast neutrons can produce a range of deletions at a single locus in Arabidopsis. Many of these deletions would be suitable for cloning by genomic subtraction or representational difference analysis. The results also suggest the presence of an essential locus adjacent to HY4. (author)

  8. Genomewide scan identifies susceptibility locus for dyslexia on Xq27 in an extended Dutch family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kovel, C G F; Hol, F A; Heister, J G A M; Willemen, J J H T; Sandkuijl, L A; Franke, B; Padberg, G W

    2004-09-01

    Dyslexia is a common disorder with a strong genetic component, but despite significant research effort, the aetiology is still largely unknown. To identify loci contributing to dyslexia risk. This was a genomewide linkage analysis in a single large family. Dutch families with at least two first degree relatives suffering from dyslexia participated in the study. Participants were recruited through an advertisement campaign in papers and magazines. The main outcome measure was linkage between genetic markers and dyslexia phenotype. Using parametric linkage analysis, we found strong evidence for a locus influencing dyslexia on Xq27.3 (multipoint lod = 3.68). Recombinations in two family members flanked an 8 cM region, comprising 11 currently confirmed genes. All four males carrying the risk haplotype had very low scores on the reading tests. The presentation in females was more variable, but 8/9 females carrying the risk haplotype were diagnosed dyslexic by our composite score, so we considered the putative risk allele to be dominant with reduced penetrance. Linkage was not found in an additional collection of affected sibling pairs. A locus influencing dyslexia risk is probably located between markers DXS1227 and DXS8091 on the X chromosome, closely situated to a locus indicated by a published genome scan of English sibling pairs. Although the locus may not be a common cause for dyslexia, the relatively small and gene poor region offers hope to identify the responsible gene.

  9. Insertional inactivation of a chromosomal locus that modulates expression of potential virulence determinants in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, A L; Wolz, C; Yeaman, M R; Bayer, A S

    1995-06-01

    A single insertion of transposon Tn551 into a unique chromosomal locus of Staphylococcus aureus ISP479C has resulted in a pleiotropic effect on the expression of both extracellular and cell wall proteins. In particular, the expression of cell wall protein A and clumping activity with fibrinogen were rendered undetectable in the mutant 1E3 compared with the parent. The secretion of alpha-hemolysin in mutant 1E3 was modestly increased. Southern blot and phenotypic analyses indicated that this locus is distinct from agr, xpr, and sar, three previously described global regulatory loci. Transduction experiments demonstrated that the genotype associated with mutant 1E3 could be transferred back into the parental strain ISP479C. The transductant 1E3-2 displayed a phenotypic profile similar to that of the original mutant. Northern (RNA) blot studies showed that this locus may be involved in modulating target genes at the mRNA level. In the rabbit endocarditis model, there was a significant decrease in both the infectivity rate and intravegetation bacterial density with mutant 1E3 compared with the parent at an inoculum of 10(3) CFU. Since protein A and the fibrinogen-binding protein(s) are major surface proteins that may mediate bacterial adhesion to host tissues, this locus may be an important genetic element involved in the expression of virulence determinants in S. aureus.

  10. Expression of transgenes targeted to the Gt(ROSA26Sor locus is orientation dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Strathdee

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Targeting transgenes to a chosen location in the genome has a number of advantages. A single copy of the DNA construct can be inserted by targeting into regions of chromatin that allow the desired developmental and tissue-specific expression of the transgene.In order to develop a reliable system for reproducibly expressing transgenes it was decided to insert constructs at the Gt(ROSA26Sor locus. A cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter was used to drive expression of the Tetracycline (tet transcriptional activator, rtTA2(s-M2, and test the effectiveness of using the ROSA26 locus to allow transgene expression. The tet operator construct was inserted into one allele of ROSA26 and a tet responder construct controlling expression of EGFP was inserted into the other allele.Expression of the targeted transgenes was shown to be affected by both the presence of selectable marker cassettes and by the orientation of the transgenes with respect to the endogenous ROSA26 promoter. These results suggest that transcriptional interference from the endogenous gene promoter or from promoters in the selectable marker cassettes may be affecting transgene expression at the locus. Additionally we have been able to determine the optimal orientation for transgene expression at the ROSA26 locus.

  11. A two-locus model of spatially varying stabilizing or directional selection on a quantitative trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geroldinger, Ludwig; Bürger, Reinhard

    2014-06-01

    The consequences of spatially varying, stabilizing or directional selection on a quantitative trait in a subdivided population are studied. A deterministic two-locus two-deme model is employed to explore the effects of migration, the degree of divergent selection, and the genetic architecture, i.e., the recombination rate and ratio of locus effects, on the maintenance of genetic variation. The possible equilibrium configurations are determined as functions of the migration rate. They depend crucially on the strength of divergent selection and the genetic architecture. The maximum migration rates are investigated below which a stable fully polymorphic equilibrium or a stable single-locus polymorphism can exist. Under stabilizing selection, but with different optima in the demes, strong recombination may facilitate the maintenance of polymorphism. However usually, and in particular with directional selection in opposite direction, the critical migration rates are maximized by a concentrated genetic architecture, i.e., by a major locus and a tightly linked minor one. Thus, complementing previous work on the evolution of genetic architectures in subdivided populations subject to diversifying selection, it is shown that concentrated architectures may aid the maintenance of polymorphism. Conditions are obtained when this is the case. Finally, the dependence of the phenotypic variance, linkage disequilibrium, and various measures of local adaptation and differentiation on the parameters is elaborated. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Locus of control and online learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suretha Esterhuysen

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The integration of online learning in university courses is considered to be both inevitable and necessary. Thus there is an increasing need to raise awareness among educators and course designers about the critical issues impacting on online learning. The aim of this study, therefore, was to assess the differences between two groups of first-year Business Sciences learners (online and conventional learners in terms of biographic and demographic characteristics and locus of control. The study population consisted of 586 first-year learners of whom 185 completed the Locus of Control Inventory (LCI. The results show that the two groups of learners do not differ statistically significantly from each other with respect to locus of control. The findings and their implications are also discussed. Opsomming Die integrasie van aanlyn-leer in universiteitskursusse word beskou as sowel onafwendbaar as noodsaaklik. Daar is dus ’n toenemende behoefte om bewustheid onder opvoedkundiges en kursusontwerpers te kweek oor die kritiese aspekte wat ’n impak op aanlyn-leer het (Morgan, 1996. Daarom was die doel van hierdie ondersoek om die verskille tussen twee groepe eerstejaarleerders in Bestuurs- en Ekonomiese Wetenskap (aanlyn en konvensionele leerders te bepaal ten opsigte van biografiese en demografiese eienskappe en lokus van beheer. Die populasie het bestaan uit 586 eerstejaarleerders waarvan 185 die Lokus van Beheer Vraelys voltooi het. Die resultate toon dat die twee groepe leerders nie statisties beduidend van mekaar verskil het met betrekking tot lokus van beheer nie. Die bevindinge en implikasies word ook bespreek.

  13. Designing Epigenome Editors: Considerations of Biochemical and Locus Specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Dilara; Keung, Albert J

    2018-01-01

    The advent of locus-specific protein recruitment technologies has enabled a new class of studies in chromatin biology. Epigenome editors enable biochemical modifications of chromatin at almost any specific endogenous locus. Their locus specificity unlocks unique information including the functional roles of distinct modifications at specific genomic loci. Given the growing interest in using these tools for biological and translational studies, there are many specific design considerations depending on the scientific question or clinical need. Here we present and discuss important design considerations and challenges regarding the biochemical and locus specificities of epigenome editors. These include how to account for the complex biochemical diversity of chromatin; control for potential interdependency of epigenome editors and their resultant modifications; avoid sequestration effects; quantify the locus specificity of epigenome editors; and improve locus specificity by considering concentration, affinity, avidity, and sequestration effects.

  14. Cut Locus Construction using Deformable Simplicial Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misztal, Marek Krzysztof; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Anton, François

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for appproximating cut loci for a given point p on Riemannian 2D manifolds, closely related to the notion of Voronoi diagrams. Our method finds the cut locus by advecting a front of points equally distant from p along the geodesics originating at p and finding...... the domain to have disk topology. We test our method for tori of revolution and compare our results to the benchmark ones from [2]. The method, however, is generic and can be easily adapted to construct cut loci for other manifolds of genera other than 1....

  15. Lynch syndrome associated with two MLH1 promoter variants and allelic imbalance of MLH1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesson, Luke B; Packham, Deborah; Kwok, Chau-To; Nunez, Andrea C; Ng, Benedict; Schmidt, Christa; Fields, Michael; Wong, Jason W H; Sloane, Mathew A; Ward, Robyn L

    2015-06-01

    Lynch syndrome is a hereditary cancer syndrome caused by a constitutional mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes. The implementation of predictive testing and targeted preventative surveillance is hindered by the frequent finding of sequence variants of uncertain significance in these genes. We aimed to determine the pathogenicity of previously reported variants (c.-28A>G and c.-7C>T) within the MLH1 5'untranslated region (UTR) in two individuals from unrelated suspected Lynch syndrome families. We investigated whether these variants were associated with other pathogenic alterations using targeted high-throughput sequencing of the MLH1 locus. We also determined their relationship to gene expression and epigenetic alterations at the promoter. Sequencing revealed that the c.-28A>G and c.-7C>T variants were the only potentially pathogenic alterations within the MLH1 gene. In both individuals, the levels of transcription from the variant allele were reduced to 50% compared with the wild-type allele. Partial loss of expression occurred in the absence of constitutional epigenetic alterations within the MLH1 promoter. We propose that these variants may be pathogenic due to constitutional partial loss of MLH1 expression, and that this may be associated with intermediate penetrance of a Lynch syndrome phenotype. Our findings provide further evidence of the potential importance of noncoding variants in the MLH1 5'UTR in the pathogenesis of Lynch syndrome. © 2015 The Authors. **Human Mutation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Variants of Moreau's sweeping process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqi, A.H.; Manchanda, P.

    2001-07-01

    In this paper we prove the existence and uniqueness of two variants of Moreau's sweeping process -u'(t) is an element of Nc (t) (u(t)), where in one variant we replace u(t) by u'(t) in the right-hand side of the inclusion and in the second variant u'(t) and u(t) are respectively replaced by u''(t) and u'(t). (author)

  17. Hairy cell leukemia-variant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadri, Mohammad I.; Al-Sheikh, Iman H.

    2001-01-01

    Hairy cell leukaemia variant is a very rare chronic lymphoproliferative disorder and is closely related to hairy cell leukemia. We hereby describe a case of hairy cell leukaemia variant for the first time in Saudi Arabia. An elderly Saudi man presented with pallor, massive splenomegaly, and moderate hepatomegaly. Hemoglobin was 7.7 g/dl, Platelets were 134 x109/l and white blood count was 140x10 9/l with 97% being abnormal lymphoid cells with cytoplasmic projections. The morphology, cytochemistry, and immunophenotype of the lymphoid cells were classical of hairy cell leukaemia variant. The bone marrow was easily aspirated and findings were consistent with hairy cell leukaemia variant. (author)

  18. Association of ADIPOQ gene variants with body weight, type 2 diabetes and serum adiponectin concentrations: the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venojärvi Mika

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adiponectin, secreted mainly by mature adipocytes, is a protein with insulin-sensitising and anti-atherogenic effects. Human adiponectin is encoded by the ADIPOQ gene on the chromosomal locus 3q27. Variations in ADIPOQ are associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes (T2DM and related phenotypes in several populations. Our aim was to study the association of the ADIPOQ variations with body weight, serum adiponectin concentrations and conversion to T2DM in overweight subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. Moreover, we investigated whether ADIPOQ gene variants modify the effect of lifestyle changes on these traits. Methods Participants in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study were randomly assigned to a lifestyle intervention group or a control group. Those whose DNA was available (n = 507 were genotyped for ten ADIPOQ single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Associations between SNPs and baseline body weight and serum adiponectin concentrations were analysed using the univariate analysis of variance. The 4-year longitudinal weight data were analysed using linear mixed models analysis and the change in serum adiponectin from baseline to year four was analysed using Kruskal-Wallis test. In addition, the association of SNPs with the risk of developing T2DM during the follow-up of 0-11 (mean 6.34 years was analysed by Cox regression analysis. Results rs266729, rs16861205, rs1501299, rs3821799 and rs6773957 associated significantly (p Conclusions These results from the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study support the concept that genetic variation in ADIPOQ locus contributes to variation in body size and serum adiponectin concentrations and may also modify the risk of developing T2DM. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00518167

  19. Identifying genetic variants that affect viability in large cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakhamanesh Mostafavi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A number of open questions in human evolutionary genetics would become tractable if we were able to directly measure evolutionary fitness. As a step towards this goal, we developed a method to examine whether individual genetic variants, or sets of genetic variants, currently influence viability. The approach consists in testing whether the frequency of an allele varies across ages, accounting for variation in ancestry. We applied it to the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA cohort and to the parents of participants in the UK Biobank. Across the genome, we found only a few common variants with large effects on age-specific mortality: tagging the APOE ε4 allele and near CHRNA3. These results suggest that when large, even late-onset effects are kept at low frequency by purifying selection. Testing viability effects of sets of genetic variants that jointly influence 1 of 42 traits, we detected a number of strong signals. In participants of the UK Biobank of British ancestry, we found that variants that delay puberty timing are associated with a longer parental life span (P~6.2 × 10-6 for fathers and P~2.0 × 10-3 for mothers, consistent with epidemiological studies. Similarly, variants associated with later age at first birth are associated with a longer maternal life span (P~1.4 × 10-3. Signals are also observed for variants influencing cholesterol levels, risk of coronary artery disease (CAD, body mass index, as well as risk of asthma. These signals exhibit consistent effects in the GERA cohort and among participants of the UK Biobank of non-British ancestry. We also found marked differences between males and females, most notably at the CHRNA3 locus, and variants associated with risk of CAD and cholesterol levels. Beyond our findings, the analysis serves as a proof of principle for how upcoming biomedical data sets can be used to learn about selection effects in contemporary humans.

  20. Relationships between locus of control and paranormal beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, Robert W; Davis, Jessica Boyette

    2004-06-01

    The present study investigated the associations between scores on paranormal beliefs, locus of control, and certain psychological processes such as affect and cognitions as measured by the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count. Analysis yielded significant correlations between scores on Locus of Control and two subscales of Tobacyk's (1988) Revised Paranormal Beliefs Scale, New Age Philosophy and Traditional Paranormal Beliefs. A step-wise multiple regression analysis indicated that Locus of Control was significantly related to New Age Philosophy. Other correlations were found between Tobacyk's subscales, Locus of Control, and three processes measured by the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count.

  1. Impact of locus of control on health message effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ying; Shen, Fuyuan

    2011-10-01

    This article examined how individuals' locus of control might moderate the effect of health message frames. An experiment was conducted whereby participants read either individual- or social-responsibility message frames after their locus of control was primed. Results indicated that messages presented in individual-responsibility frames were more persuasive when people were primed with internal locus of control, whereas social-responsibility framed appeals were more persuasive when people were primed with external locus of control. These results were found for individuals in both high and low cognitive load conditions. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

  2. X-linked dominant cone-rod degeneration: linkage mapping of a new locus for retinitis pigmentosa (RP 15) to Xp22.13-p22.11.

    OpenAIRE

    McGuire, R E; Sullivan, L S; Blanton, S H; Church, M W; Heckenlively, J R; Daiger, S P

    1995-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is the name given to a heterogeneous group of hereditary retinal degenerations characterized by progressive visual field loss, pigmentary changes of the retina, abnormal electroretinograms, and, frequently, night blindness. In this study, we investigated a family with dominant cone-rod degeneration, a variant form of retinitis pigmentosa. We used microsatellite markers to test for linkage to the disease locus and excluded all mapped autosomal loci. However, a marker from ...

  3. Bivariate genome-wide association meta-analysis of pediatric musculoskeletal traits reveals pleiotropic effects at the SREBF1/TOM1L2 locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Kemp, John P; Dimou, Niki L

    2017-01-01

    bone mineral density loci: WNT4, GALNT3, MEPE, CPED1/WNT16, TNFSF11, RIN3, and PPP6R3/LRP5. Variants in the TOM1L2/SREBF1 locus exert opposing effects TB-LM and TBLH-BMD, and have a stronger association with the former trait. We show that SREBF1 is expressed in murine and human osteoblasts, as well...

  4. Product Variant Master as a Means to Handle Variant Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildre, Hans Petter; Mortensen, Niels Henrik; Andreasen, Mogens Myrup

    1996-01-01

    be implemented in the CAD system I-DEAS. A precondition for high degree of computer support is identification of a product variant master from which new variants can be derived. This class platform defines how a product build up fit certain production methods and rules governing determination of modules...

  5. Lack of Association of CD55 Receptor Genetic Variants and Severe Malaria in Ghanaian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Schuldt

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In a recent report, the cellular receptor CD55 was identified as a molecule essential for the invasion of human erythrocytes by Plasmodium falciparum, the causal agent of the most severe form of malaria. As this invasion process represents a critical step during infection with the parasite, it was hypothesized that genetic variants in the gene could affect severe malaria (SM susceptibility. We performed high-resolution variant discovery of rare and common genetic variants in the human CD55 gene. Association testing of these variants in over 1700 SM cases and unaffected control individuals from the malaria-endemic Ashanti Region in Ghana, West Africa, were performed on the basis of single variants, combined rare variant analyses, and reconstructed haplotypes. A total of 26 genetic variants were detected in coding and regulatory regions of CD55. Five variants were previously unknown. None of the single variants, rare variants, or haplotypes showed evidence for association with SM or P. falciparum density. Here, we present the first comprehensive analysis of variation in the CD55 gene in the context of SM and show that genetic variants present in a Ghanaian study group appear not to influence susceptibility to the disease.

  6. Expression of an estrogen-regulated variant transcript of the peroxisomal branched chain fatty acid oxidase ACOX2 in breast carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjørklund, Sunniva Stordal; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Seiler, Michael; Kumar, Surendra; Alnæs, Grethe I. Grenaker; Ming, Yao; Kerrigan, John; Naume, Bjørn; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Bhanot, Gyan; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Ganesan, Shridar

    2015-01-01

    Alternate transcripts from a single gene locus greatly enhance the combinatorial flexibility of the human transcriptome. Different patterns of exon usage have been observed when comparing normal tissue to cancers, suggesting that variant transcripts may play a role in the tumor phenotype. Ribonucleic acid-sequencing (RNA-seq) data from breast cancer samples was used to identify an intronic start variant transcript of Acyl-CoA oxidase 2, ACOX2 (ACOX2-i9). Difference in expression between Estrogen Receptor (ER) positive and ER negative patients was assessed by the Wilcoxon rank sum test, and the findings validated in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) breast cancer dataset (BRCA). ACOX2-i9 expression was also assessed in cell lines using both quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. Knock down by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and colony formation assays were used to determine whether ACOX2-i9 expression would influence cellular fitness. The effect of ACOX2-i9 expression on patient survival was assessed by the Kaplan-Meier survival function, and association to clinical parameters was analyzed using a Fisher exact test. The expression and translation of ACOX2-i9 into a 25 kDa protein was demonstrated in HepG2 cells as well as in several breast cancer cell lines. shRNA knock down of the ACOX2-i9 variant resulted in decreased cell viability of T47D and MDA-MB 436 cells. Moreover, expression of ACOX2-i9 was shown to be estrogen regulated, being induced by propyl pyrazoletriol and inhibited by tamoxifen and fulvestrant in ER+ T47D and Mcf-7 cells, but not in the ER- MDA-MB 436 cell line. This variant transcript showed expression predominantly in ER-positive breast tumors as assessed in our initial set of 53 breast cancers and further validated in 87 tumor/normal pairs from the TCGA breast cancer dataset, and expression was associated with better outcome in ER positive patients. ACOX2-i9 is specifically enriched in ER+ breast

  7. Expression of an estrogen-regulated variant transcript of the peroxisomal branched chain fatty acid oxidase ACOX2 in breast carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørklund, Sunniva Stordal; Kristensen, Vessela N; Seiler, Michael; Kumar, Surendra; Alnæs, Grethe I Grenaker; Ming, Yao; Kerrigan, John; Naume, Bjørn; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Bhanot, Gyan; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Ganesan, Shridar

    2015-07-17

    Alternate transcripts from a single gene locus greatly enhance the combinatorial flexibility of the human transcriptome. Different patterns of exon usage have been observed when comparing normal tissue to cancers, suggesting that variant transcripts may play a role in the tumor phenotype. Ribonucleic acid-sequencing (RNA-seq) data from breast cancer samples was used to identify an intronic start variant transcript of Acyl-CoA oxidase 2, ACOX2 (ACOX2-i9). Difference in expression between Estrogen Receptor (ER) positive and ER negative patients was assessed by the Wilcoxon rank sum test, and the findings validated in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) breast cancer dataset (BRCA). ACOX2-i9 expression was also assessed in cell lines using both quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. Knock down by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and colony formation assays were used to determine whether ACOX2-i9 expression would influence cellular fitness. The effect of ACOX2-i9 expression on patient survival was assessed by the Kaplan-Meier survival function, and association to clinical parameters was analyzed using a Fisher exact test. The expression and translation of ACOX2-i9 into a 25 kDa protein was demonstrated in HepG2 cells as well as in several breast cancer cell lines. shRNA knock down of the ACOX2-i9 variant resulted in decreased cell viability of T47D and MDA-MB 436 cells. Moreover, expression of ACOX2-i9 was shown to be estrogen regulated, being induced by propyl pyrazoletriol and inhibited by tamoxifen and fulvestrant in ER+ T47D and Mcf-7 cells, but not in the ER- MDA-MB 436 cell line. This variant transcript showed expression predominantly in ER-positive breast tumors as assessed in our initial set of 53 breast cancers and further validated in 87 tumor/normal pairs from the TCGA breast cancer dataset, and expression was associated with better outcome in ER positive patients. ACOX2-i9 is specifically enriched in ER+ breast

  8. Genetic and physical analysis of a YAC contig spanning the fungal disease resistance locus Asc of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesbah, L.A.; Kneppers, T.J.A.; Takken, F.L.W.; Laurent, P.; Hille, J.; Nijkamp, H.J.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Alternaria stem canker disease of tomato is caused by the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici (AAL). The fungus produces AAL toxins that kill the plant tissue. Resistance to the fungus segregates as a single locus, called Asc, and has been genetically mapped on

  9. Genetic and physical analysis of a YAC contig spannig the fungal disease resistance locus Asc of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesbah, L.A.; Kneppers, T.J.A.; Takken, F.L.W.; Laurent, P.J.F.; Hille, J.; Nijkamp, H.J.J.

    1999-01-01

    The Alternaria in stem canker disease of tomato is caused by the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici (AAL). The fungus produces AAL toxins that kill the plant tissue. Resistance to the fungus segregates as a single locus, called Asc, and has been genetically mapped

  10. Genetic variation at the PCSK9 locus, low density lipoproteins, response to pravastatin and coronary heart disease: results from PROSPER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caucasian carriers of the T allele at R46L in the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) locus have been reported to have 15% lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (C) levels and 47% lower coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Our objective was to examine two PCSK9 single nucle...

  11. Incidental copy-number variants identified by routine genome testing in a clinical population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Philip M.; Soens, Zachry T.; Campbell, Ian M.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Cheung, Sau Wai; Patel, Ankita; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Plon, Sharon E.; Shaw, Chad A.; McGuire, Amy L.; Lupski, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Mutational load of susceptibility variants has not been studied on a genomic scale in a clinical population, nor has the potential to identify these mutations as incidental findings during clinical testing been systematically ascertained. Methods Array comparative genomic hybridization, a method for genome-wide detection of DNA copy-number variants, was performed clinically on DNA from 9,005 individuals. Copy-number variants encompassing or disrupting single genes were identified and analyzed for their potential to confer predisposition to dominant, adult-onset disease. Multigene copy-number variants affecting dominant, adult-onset cancer syndrome genes were also assessed. Results In our cohort, 83 single-gene copy-number variants affected 40 unique genes associated with dominant, adult-onset disorders and unrelated to the patients’ referring diagnoses (i.e., incidental) were found. Fourteen of these copy-number variants are likely disease-predisposing, 25 are likely benign, and 44 are of unknown clinical consequence. When incidental copy-number variants spanning up to 20 genes were considered, 27 copy-number variants affected 17 unique genes associated with dominant, adult-onset cancer predisposition. Conclusion Copy-number variants potentially conferring susceptibility to adult-onset disease can be identified as incidental findings during routine genome-wide testing. Some of these mutations may be medically actionable, enabling disease surveillance or prevention; however, most incidentally observed single-gene copy-number variants are currently of unclear significance to the patient. PMID:22878507

  12. Genetic and environmental influences on the relationship between flow proneness, locus of control and behavioral inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam A Mosing

    Full Text Available Flow is a psychological state of high but subjectively effortless attention that typically occurs during active performance of challenging tasks and is accompanied by a sense of automaticity, high control, low self-awareness, and enjoyment. Flow proneness is associated with traits and behaviors related to low neuroticism such as emotional stability, conscientiousness, active coping, self-esteem and life satisfaction. Little is known about the genetic architecture of flow proneness, behavioral inhibition and locus of control--traits also associated with neuroticism--and their interrelation. Here, we hypothesized that individuals low in behavioral inhibition and with an internal locus of control would be more likely to experience flow and explored the genetic and environmental architecture of the relationship between the three variables. Behavioral inhibition and locus of control was measured in a large population sample of 3,375 full twin pairs and 4,527 single twins, about 26% of whom also scored the flow proneness questionnaire. Findings revealed significant but relatively low correlations between the three traits and moderate heritability estimates of .41, .45, and .30 for flow proneness, behavioral inhibition, and locus of control, respectively, with some indication of non-additive genetic influences. For behavioral inhibition we found significant sex differences in heritability, with females showing a higher estimate including significant non-additive genetic influences, while in males the entire heritability was due to additive genetic variance. We also found a mainly genetically mediated relationship between the three traits, suggesting that individuals who are genetically predisposed to experience flow, show less behavioral inhibition (less anxious and feel that they are in control of their own destiny (internal locus of control. We discuss that some of the genes underlying this relationship may include those influencing the function of

  13. Genetic and environmental influences on the relationship between flow proneness, locus of control and behavioral inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosing, Miriam A; Pedersen, Nancy L; Cesarini, David; Johannesson, Magnus; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Nakamura, Jeanne; Madison, Guy; Ullén, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    Flow is a psychological state of high but subjectively effortless attention that typically occurs during active performance of challenging tasks and is accompanied by a sense of automaticity, high control, low self-awareness, and enjoyment. Flow proneness is associated with traits and behaviors related to low neuroticism such as emotional stability, conscientiousness, active coping, self-esteem and life satisfaction. Little is known about the genetic architecture of flow proneness, behavioral inhibition and locus of control--traits also associated with neuroticism--and their interrelation. Here, we hypothesized that individuals low in behavioral inhibition and with an internal locus of control would be more likely to experience flow and explored the genetic and environmental architecture of the relationship between the three variables. Behavioral inhibition and locus of control was measured in a large population sample of 3,375 full twin pairs and 4,527 single twins, about 26% of whom also scored the flow proneness questionnaire. Findings revealed significant but relatively low correlations between the three traits and moderate heritability estimates of .41, .45, and .30 for flow proneness, behavioral inhibition, and locus of control, respectively, with some indication of non-additive genetic influences. For behavioral inhibition we found significant sex differences in heritability, with females showing a higher estimate including significant non-additive genetic influences, while in males the entire heritability was due to additive genetic variance. We also found a mainly genetically mediated relationship between the three traits, suggesting that individuals who are genetically predisposed to experience flow, show less behavioral inhibition (less anxious) and feel that they are in control of their own destiny (internal locus of control). We discuss that some of the genes underlying this relationship may include those influencing the function of dopaminergic neural

  14. Characterization of the bovine type I IFN locus: rearrangements, expansions, and novel subfamilies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Angela M

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Type I interferons (IFN have major roles in the innate immune response to viruses, a function that is believed to have led to expansion in the number and complexity of their genes, although these genes have remained confined to single chromosomal region in all mammals so far examined. IFNB and IFNE define the limits of the locus, with all other Type I IFN genes except IFNK distributed between these boundaries, strongly suggesting that the locus has broadened as IFN genes duplicated and then evolved into a series of distinct families. Results The Type I IFN locus in Bos taurus has undergone significant rearrangement and expansion compared to mouse and human, however, with the constituent genes separated into two sub-loci separated by >700 kb. The IFNW family is greatly expanded, comprising 24 potentially functional genes and at least 8 pseudogenes. The IFNB (n = 6, represented in human and mouse by one copy, are also present as multiple copies in Bos taurus. The IFNT, which encode a non-virally inducible, ruminant-specific IFN secreted by the pre-implantation conceptus, are represented by three genes and two pseudogenes. The latter have sequences intermediate between IFNT and IFNW. A new Type I IFN family (IFNX of four members, one of which is a pseudogene, appears to have diverged from the IFNA lineage at least 83 million years ago, but is absent in all other sequenced genomes with the possible exception of the horse, a non-ruminant herbivore. Conclusion In summary, we have provided the first comprehensive annotation of the Type I IFN locus in Bos taurus, thereby providing an insight into the functional evolution of the Type I IFN in ruminants. The diversity and global spread of the ruminant species may have required an expansion of the Type I IFN locus and its constituent genes to provide broad anti-viral protection required for foraging and foregut fermentation.

  15. MTHFR gene C677T and A1298C variants are associated with FMF risk in a Turkish cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nursal, Ayse Feyda; Kaya, Süheyla; Sezer, Ozlem; Karakus, Nevin; Yigit, Serbulent

    2018-02-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a crucial enzyme in homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism. We aimed to evaluate a possible relationship between MTHFR gene C677T (rs 1801133), A1298C (rs 1801131) variants and susceptibility to FMF in a Turkish cohort. This case-control study included 198 Turkish FMF patients and 100 healthy subjects as controls. MTHFR C677T and A1298C were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) methods. The genotype distribution and allele frequency of the MTHFR C677T were statistically different between the patients and the control group (P=.006, P=.001, respectively). The frequency of the TT genotype and T allele of MTHFR C677T was significantly higher in the patients than in the controls. The genotype distribution of MTHFR A1298C variant did not show any statistically significant difference between the patients and the controls (P›.05). The patients had statistically different frequencies in allele C of MTHFR A1298C variant compared with the control (P=.032). We also examined the risk associated with inheriting the combined genotypes for the two MTHFR variants. According to these results, individuals who were CC homozygous at C677T locus and AA homozygous at A1298C locus have a lower risk of developing FMF (P=.002). Individuals who were TT homozygous at C677T locus and AC heterozygous at A1298C locus have higher risk of developing FMF (P=.033). Our findings clearly showed there was an association the MTHFR C677T/A1298C variants and susceptibility to FMF in the Turkish sample. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Lack of direct evidence for natural selection at the candidate thrifty gene locus, PPARGC1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadzow, Murray; Merriman, Tony R; Boocock, James; Dalbeth, Nicola; Stamp, Lisa K; Black, Michael A; Visscher, Peter M; Wilcox, Phillip L

    2016-11-15

    The gene PPARGC1A, in particular the Gly482Ser variant (rs8192678), had been proposed to be subject to natural selection, particularly in recent progenitors of extant Polynesian populations. Reasons include high levels of population differentiation and increased frequencies of the derived type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk 482Ser allele, and association with body mass index (BMI) in a small Tongan population. However, no direct statistical tests for selection have been applied. Using a range of Polynesian populations (Tongan, Māori, Samoan) we re-examined evidence for association between Gly482Ser with T2D and BMI as well as gout. Using also Asian, European, and African 1000 Genome Project samples a range of statistical tests for selection (F ST , integrated haplotype score (iHS), cross population extended haplotype homozygosity (XP-EHH), Tajima's D and Fay and Wu's H) were conducted on the PPARGC1A locus. No statistically significant evidence for association between Gly482Ser and any of BMI, T2D or gout was found. Population differentiation (F ST ) was smallest between Asian and Pacific populations (New Zealand Māori ≤ 0.35, Samoan ≤ 0.20). When compared to European (New Zealand Māori ≤ 0.40, Samoan ≤ 0.25) or African populations (New Zealand Māori ≤ 0.80, Samoan ≤ 0.66) this differentiation was larger. We did not find any strong evidence for departure from neutral evolution at this locus when applying any of the other statistical tests for selection. However, using the same analytical methods, we found evidence for selection in specific populations at previously identified loci, indicating that lack of selection was the most likely explanation for the lack of evidence of selection in PPARGC1A. We conclude that there is no compelling evidence for selection at this locus, and that this gene should not be considered a candidate thrifty gene locus in Pacific populations. High levels of population differentiation at this locus and the

  17. BAT-25 polymorphism in Chinese from Jiangsu province and its implication for locus microsatellite instability screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yan Ying; Xie, Ling; Liu, Li; Zhang, Shu Peng; Wu, Xiao Bin; Zhu, Chang Le; Lai, Ren Sheng

    2012-10-08

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common tumors with high mortality in China. Microsatellite instability (MSI) analysis is important for the diagnosis of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) and for the prediction of 5-FU chemotherapy efficiency of colorectal tumors, especially in terms of therapeutic response and overall survival rates. Among the MSI markers recommended by the NIH/NCI, BAT-25 has been extensively studied for its major role in MSI. BAT-25 presents different polymorphisms in different ethnic populations and studies of its polymorphisms in the Chinese population are still very limited. To analyze the frequency of constitutive polymorphic variation at the BAT-25 locus in Chinese from Jiangsu Province and its implication for locus MSI screening. The frequency of allelic variation at the BAT-25 locus of cervical cells from 500 healthy women and blood from 16 healthy males was assessed by direct sequencing. Twenty samples were also analyzed by fragment analysis. DNA extracted from blood of 94 patients with gastrointestinal cancer or endometrial cancer was analyzed by fragment analysis. After comparison with the sequencing results, the more frequent allele lengths were 126-127 bp, 128-129 bp, 129-130 bp, respectively consistent with the 24 poly(T) (T24), T25 and T26 alleles. At the BAT-25 locus, 516 healthy individuals had respectively 1.36%, 97.28% and 1.36% of the T24, T25 and T26. Whereas for the 94 cancer patients allelic frequencies were 0.53%, 1.06%, 96.8%, 1.6% for T15, T24, T25 and T26 alleles respectively. Sixteen healthy males had only the T25 allele and heterozygous T15 was only found in 1 male patient with colon cancer. We established the relation between fragment length and thymine repeats in BAT-25. The results showed that the BAT-25 locus is quasimonomorphic in Chinese from Jiangsu province. Moreover we showed that variant alleles of BAT-25 were found more likely in blood from cancer patients than in healthy individuals

  18. Effect of agmatine on locus coeruleus neuron activity: possible involvement of nitric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Durántez, Eduardo; Ruiz-Ortega, José A; Pineda, Joseba; Ugedo, Luisa

    2002-01-01

    To investigate whether agmatine (the proposed endogenous ligand for imidazoline receptors) controls locus coeruleus neuron activity and to elucidate its mechanism of action, we used single-unit extracellular recording techniques in anaesthetized rats. Agmatine (10, 20 and 40 μg, i.c.v.) increased in a dose-related manner the firing rate of locus coeruleus neurons (maximal increase: 95±13% at 40 μg). I1-imidazoline receptor ligands stimulate locus coeruleus neuron activity through an indirect mechanism originated in the paragigantocellularis nucleus via excitatory amino acids. However, neither electrolytic lesions of the paragigantocellularis nucleus nor pretreatment with the excitatory amino acid antagonist kynurenic acid (1 μmol, i.c.v.) modified agmatine effect (10 μg, i.c.v.). After agmatine administration (20 μg, i.c.v.), dose-response curves for the effect of clonidine (0.625 – 10 μg kg−1 i.v.) or morphine (0.3 – 4.8 mg kg−1 i.v.) on locus coeruleus neurons were not different from those obtained in the control groups. Pretreatment with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitors Nω-nitro-L-arginine (10 μg, i.c.v.) or Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (100 μg, i.c.v.) but not with the less active stereoisomer Nω-nitro-D-arginine methyl ester (100 μg, i.c.v.) completely blocked agmatine effect (10 and 40 μg, i.c.v.). Similarly, when agmatine (20 pmoles) was applied into the locus coeruleus there was an increase that was blocked by Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (100 μg, i.c.v.) in the firing rate of the locus coeruleus neurons (maximal increase 53±11% and 14±10% before and after nitric oxide synthase inhibition, respectively). This study demonstrates that agmatine stimulates the firing rate of locus coeruleus neurons via a nitric oxide synthase-dependent mechanism located in this nucleus. PMID:11877321

  19. Predominance of hepatitis C virus Q80K among NS3 baseline-resistance-associated amino acid variants in direct-antiviral-agent-naïve patients with chronic hepatitis: single-centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Tina; Proietti, Alex; Boglione, Lucio; Milia, Maria Grazia; Allice, Tiziano; Burdino, Elisa; Orofino, Giancarlo; Bonora, Stefano; Di Perri, Giovanni; Ghisetti, Valeria

    2015-11-01

    In the era of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs), hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotyping tests at baseline are controversial. The HCV NS3-Q80K polymorphism is associated with resistance to the recently approved NS3 inhibitor simeprevir (SMV) when combined with PEG-interferon and ribavirin (PEG-IFN/RBV) and alternative therapy should be considered for patients with baseline Q80K. The aim of this study was to provide an estimate of Q80K prevalence at baseline in a study group of 205 DAA-naïve patients (21% of them with HIV coinfection) using NS3 full-population direct sequencing to detect resistance-associated amino acid variants (RAVs). NS3 RAVs were identified in 56 patients (27.3%). Q80K was the most frequently reported one (41%), in both HIV/HCV-coinfected and HCV-monoinfected patients, but it was only detectable in cases of HCV-subtype 1a infection. Therefore, in clinical practice, an NS3-Q80K genotyping test prior to simeprevir plus PEG-IFN/RBV treatment is highly recommended.

  20. Reversion in variants from a duplication strain of Aspergillus nidulans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, E.M.; Azevedo, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    Strains of Aspergillus nidulans with a chromosome segment in duplicate, one in normal position and one translocated to another chromosome, are unstable at mitosis. In addition to variants which result from deletions in either of the duplicate segments, which usually have improved morphology, they produce variants with deteriorated morphology. Three deteriorated variants reverted frequently to parental type morphology, both spontaneously and after ultra-violet treatment. Of six reversions analysed genetically, five were due to suppressors and one was probably due to back mutation. The suppressors segregated as single genes and were not linked to the mutation which they suppress. The instability of these so-called 'deteriorated' variants is discussed in relation to mitotic instability phenomena in A. nidulans. (orig.) [de

  1. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vigorito, E.; Kuchenbaecker, K.B.; Beesley, J.; Adlard, J.; Agnarsson, B.A.; Andrulis, I.L.; Arun, B.K.; Barjhoux, L.; Belotti, M.; Benitez, J.; Berger, A.; Bojesen, A.; Bonanni, B.; Brewer, C.; Caldes, T.; Caligo, M.A.; Campbell, I.; Chan, S.B.; Claes, K.B.; Cohn, D.E.; Cook, J.; Daly, M.B.; Damiola, F.; Davidson, R.; Pauw, A. de; Delnatte, C.; Diez, O.; Domchek, S.M.; Dumont, M.; Durda, K.; Dworniczak, B.; Easton, D.F.; Eccles, D.; Edwinsdotter Ardnor, C.; Eeles, R.; Ejlertsen, B.; Ellis, S.; Evans, D.G.; Feliubadalo, L.; Fostira, F.; Foulkes, W.D.; Friedman, E.; Frost, D.; Gaddam, P.; Ganz, P.A.; Garber, J.; Garcia-Barberan, V.; Gauthier-Villars, M.; Gehrig, A.; Gerdes, A.M.; Giraud, S.; Godwin, A.K.; Goldgar, D.E.; Hake, C.R.; Hansen, T.V.; Healey, S.; Hodgson, S.; Hogervorst, F.B.; Houdayer, C.; Hulick, P.J.; Imyanitov, E.N.; Isaacs, C.; Izatt, L.; Izquierdo, A.; Jacobs, L; Jakubowska, A.; Janavicius, R.; Jaworska-Bieniek, K.; Jensen, U.B.; John, E.M.; Vijai, J.; Karlan, B.Y.; Kast, K.; Khan, S.; Kwong, A.; Laitman, Y.; Lester, J.; Lesueur, F.; Liljegren, A.; Lubinski, J.; Mai, P.L.; Manoukian, S.; Mazoyer, S.; Meindl, A.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Montagna, M.; Nathanson, K.L.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Nevanlinna, H.; Niederacher, D.; Olah, E.; Olopade, O.I.; Ong, K.R.; Osorio, A.; Park, S.K.; Paulsson-Karlsson, Y.; Pedersen, I.S.; Peissel, B.; Peterlongo, P.; et al.,

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2

  2. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Beesley, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 ...

  3. Impact of Pathogen Population Heterogeneity and Stress-Resistant Variants on Food Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abee, T; Koomen, J; Metselaar, K I; Zwietering, M H; den Besten, H M W

    2016-01-01

    This review elucidates the state-of-the-art knowledge about pathogen population heterogeneity and describes the genotypic and phenotypic analyses of persister subpopulations and stress-resistant variants. The molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of persister phenotypes and genetic variants are identified. Zooming in on Listeria monocytogenes, a comparative whole-genome sequence analysis of wild types and variants that enabled the identification of mutations in variants obtained after a single exposure to lethal food-relevant stresses is described. Genotypic and phenotypic features are compared to those for persistent strains isolated from food processing environments. Inactivation kinetics, models used for fitting, and the concept of kinetic modeling-based schemes for detection of variants are presented. Furthermore, robustness and fitness parameters of L. monocytogenes wild type and variants are used to model their performance in food chains. Finally, the impact of stress-resistant variants and persistence in food processing environments on food safety is discussed.

  4. Locus - ASTRA | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/astra/LATEST/astra_locus.zip File size: 887 KB Simple search URL htt...icing type (ex. cassette) About This Database Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Locus - ASTRA | LSDB Archive ...

  5. Is this Red Spot the Blue Spot (locus ceruleum)?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Won Sick; Lee, Yu Kyung; Lee, Min Kyung; Hwang, Kyung Hoon [Gachon University Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    The authors report brain images of 18F-FDG-PET in a case of schizophrenia. The images showed strikingly increased bilateral uptake in the locus ceruleum. The locus ceruleum is called the blue spot and known to be a center of the norepinephrinergic system.

  6. Metacognition: As a Predictor of One's Academic Locus of Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Serhat; Akin, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of metacognition on one's academic locus of control. The study's sample group consists of 451 university students enrolled in various programs at Sakarya University, Turkey. In this study, the Metacognitive Awareness Inventory and the Academic Locus of Control Scale were used. The correlations and…

  7. Personality and Locus of Control among School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Archana A.; Jogsan, Yogesh A.

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this investigation is to find out the sex differences in personality traits and locus of control among school children. A total 60 children (30 boys and 30 girls) were taken as a sample. The research tool for personality, children personality questionnaire was used, which was made by Cattell and Porter. Locus of control was…

  8. Physical Attractiveness, Locus of Control, Sex Role, and Conversational Assertiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Keith F.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes the relationship among physical attractiveness, locus of control, sex role orientation, and assertiveness in undergraduate students. Reviews videotapes of mixed-sex student groups engaged in discussion. Finds an internal locus of control positively correlated with assertiveness. Uses a behavioral measure of assertiveness rather than…

  9. Locus of control and investment in risky assets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salamanca Acosta, N.; de Grip, A.; Fouarge, D.; Montizaan, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Using representative household panel data, we show that the investment behavior of households is related to the economic locus of control of household heads. A household’s internal locus of control in economic issues is positively related to its decision to hold risky assets as well as its share of

  10. Locus of control and investment in risky assets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salamanca, N.; de Grip, A.; Fouarge, D.; Montizaan, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Using representative household panel data, we show that the investment behavior of households is related to the economic locus of control of household heads. A household's internal locus of control in economic issues is positively related to its decision to hold risky assets as well as its share of

  11. Is this Red Spot the Blue Spot (locus ceruleum)?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Won Sick; Lee, Yu Kyung; Lee, Min Kyung; Hwang, Kyung Hoon

    2010-01-01

    The authors report brain images of 18F-FDG-PET in a case of schizophrenia. The images showed strikingly increased bilateral uptake in the locus ceruleum. The locus ceruleum is called the blue spot and known to be a center of the norepinephrinergic system.

  12. A variational Bayes discrete mixture test for rare variant association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logsdon, Benjamin A; Dai, James Y; Auer, Paul L; Johnsen, Jill M; Ganesh, Santhi K; Smith, Nicholas L; Wilson, James G; Tracy, Russell P; Lange, Leslie A; Jiao, Shuo; Rich, Stephen S; Lettre, Guillaume; Carlson, Christopher S; Jackson, Rebecca D; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Wurfel, Mark M; Nickerson, Deborah A; Tang, Hua; Reiner, Alexander P; Kooperberg, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Recently, many statistical methods have been proposed to test for associations between rare genetic variants and complex traits. Most of these methods test for association by aggregating genetic variations within a predefined region, such as a gene. Although there is evidence that "aggregate" tests are more powerful than the single marker test, these tests generally ignore neutral variants and therefore are unable to identify specific variants driving the association with phenotype. We propose a novel aggregate rare-variant test that explicitly models a fraction of variants as neutral, tests associations at the gene-level, and infers the rare-variants driving the association. Simulations show that in the practical scenario where there are many variants within a given region of the genome with only a fraction causal our approach has greater power compared to other popular tests such as the Sequence Kernel Association Test (SKAT), the Weighted Sum Statistic (WSS), and the collapsing method of Morris and Zeggini (MZ). Our algorithm leverages a fast variational Bayes approximate inference methodology to scale to exome-wide analyses, a significant computational advantage over exact inference model selection methodologies. To demonstrate the efficacy of our methodology we test for associations between von Willebrand Factor (VWF) levels and VWF missense rare-variants imputed from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Exome Sequencing project into 2,487 African Americans within the VWF gene. Our method suggests that a relatively small fraction (~10%) of the imputed rare missense variants within VWF are strongly associated with lower VWF levels in African Americans.

  13. The role of horizontal transfer in the evolution of a highly variable lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis locus in xanthomonads that infect rice, citrus and crucifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanove Adam J

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is a pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP of animal and plant pathogenic bacteria. Variation at the interstrain level is common in LPS biosynthetic gene clusters of animal pathogenic bacteria. This variation has been proposed to play a role in evading the host immune system. Even though LPS is a modulator of plant defense responses, reports of interstrain variation in LPS gene clusters of plant pathogenic bacteria are rare. Results In this study we report the complete sequence of a variant 19.9 kb LPS locus present in the BXO8 strain of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo, the bacterial blight pathogen of rice. This region is completely different in size, number and organization of genes from the LPS locus present in most other strains of Xoo from India and Asia. Surprisingly, except for one ORF, all the other ORFs at the BXO8 LPS locus are orthologous to the genes present at this locus in a sequenced strain of X. axonopodis pv. citri (Xac; a pathogen of citrus plants. One end of the BXO8 LPS gene cluster, comprised of ten genes, is also present in the related rice pathogen, X. oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc. In Xoc, the remainder of the LPS gene cluster, consisting of seven genes, is novel and unrelated to LPS gene clusters of any of the sequenced xanthomonads. We also report substantial interstrain variation suggestive of very recent horizontal gene transfer (HGT at the LPS biosynthetic locus of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc, the black rot pathogen of crucifers. Conclusion Our analyses indicate that HGT has altered the LPS locus during the evolution of Xanthomonas oryzae pathovars and suggest that the ancestor of all Xanthomonas oryzae pathovars had an Xac type of LPS gene cluster. Our finding of interstrain variation in two major xanthomonad pathogens infecting different hosts suggests that the LPS locus in plant pathogenic bacteria, as in animal pathogens, is under intense

  14. Escala de Locus de controle ELCO/TELEBRÁS Scale of Locus of control - ELCO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Pasquali

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Com base na teoria de Rotter e Escala de Levenson foi elaborada uma escala de Locus de Controle Organizacional (ELCO, composta por 28 itens. A escala foi validada com uma amostra de 350 empregados do Sistema Telebrás. Verificou-se a presença dos 2 fatores previstos na teoria, a saber: internalidade e externalidade, aparecendo a escala de externalidade, com 18 itens, bem estruturada (alfa = 0.81 e a de internalidade, com 10 itens, deixando a desejar no que se refere à consistência interna (alfa = 0.66. Com os dados desta pesquisa foi feita também análise do Locus de Controle desses mesmos empregados. A constatação mais saliente foi a de que o nível de internalidade caiu com o aumento do nível escolar e o aumento da experiência profissional desses mesmos empregados. Estes resultados surpreendentes foram interpretados em termos da situação típica da empresa, que está passando por um período de transição, a saber: a passagem da condição de empresa estatal para empresa privada, o que seria motivo da perda de confiança dos empregados na própria competência, particularmente por parte daqueles com maior competência intelectual e maior experiência profissional. Fez-se igualmente reparos na qualidade psicométrica da escala e da própria teoria do Locus de controle, no sentido de que esta precisa ser melhor axiomatizada para possibilitar a elaboração de escalas mais precisas para a medida dos construtos que propõe.A scale with 28 items, the Organizational Locus of Control (ELCO, was built based on Rotter’s theory and Levenson’s scale. ELCO was validated on a sample of 350 employees of Telebrás, a governmental firm in Brazil. As foreseen from the theory, a principal-axis factoring showed the presence of the expected two factors, namely internal and external locus of control. The external locus of control factor, composed of 18 items, showed good internal consistency (alpha =.81 whereas the internal factor, with 10 items

  15. Identification of the BCAR1-CFDP1-TMEM170A locus as a determinant of carotid intima-media thickness and coronary artery disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertow, Karl; Sennblad, Bengt; Strawbridge, Rona J; Ohrvik, John; Zabaneh, Delilah; Shah, Sonia; Veglia, Fabrizio; Fava, Cristiano; Kavousi, Maryam; McLachlan, Stela; Kivimäki, Mika; Bolton, Jennifer L; Folkersen, Lasse; Gigante, Bruna; Leander, Karin; Vikström, Max; Larsson, Malin; Silveira, Angela; Deanfield, John; Voight, Benjamin F; Fontanillas, Pierre; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Colombo, Gualtiero I; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nick J; Uitterlinden, André G; Gabrielsen, Anders; Hedin, Ulf; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Nyyssönen, Kristiina; Rauramaa, Rainer; Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka; Savonen, Kai; Smit, Andries J; Giral, Philippe; Mannarino, Elmo; Robertson, Christine M; Talmud, Philippa J; Hedblad, Bo; Hofman, Albert; Erdmann, Jeanette; Reilly, Muredach P; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Farrall, Martin; Clarke, Robert; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Seedorf, Udo; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Hansson, Göran K; Eriksson, Per; Samani, Nilesh J; Watkins, Hugh; Price, Jacqueline F; Hingorani, Aroon D; Melander, Olle; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Baldassarre, Damiano; Tremoli, Elena; de Faire, Ulf; Humphries, Steve E; Hamsten, Anders

    2012-12-01

    Carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) is a widely accepted marker of subclinical atherosclerosis. To date, large-scale investigations of genetic determinants of cIMT are sparse. To identify cIMT-associated genes and genetic variants, a discovery analysis using the Illumina 200K CardioMetabochip was conducted in 3430 subjects with detailed ultrasonographic determinations of cIMT from the IMPROVE (Carotid Intima Media Thickness [IMT] and IMT-Progression as Predictors of Vascular Events in a High Risk European Population) study. Segment-specific IMT measurements of common carotid, bifurcation, and internal carotid arteries, and composite IMT variables considering the whole carotid tree (IMT(mean), IMT(max), and IMT(mean-max)), were analyzed. A replication stage investigating 42 single-nucleotide polymorphisms for association with common carotid IMT was undertaken in 5 independent European cohorts (total n=11,590). A locus on chromosome 16 (lead single-nucleotide polymorphism rs4888378, intronic in CFDP1) was associated with cIMT at significance levels passing multiple testing correction at both stages (array-wide significant discovery P=6.75 × 10(-7) for IMT(max); replication P=7.24×10(-6) for common cIMT; adjustments for sex, age, and population substructure where applicable; minor allele frequency 0.43 and 0.41, respectively). The protective minor allele was associated with lower carotid plaque score in a replication cohort (P=0.04, n=2120) and lower coronary artery disease risk in 2 case-control studies of subjects with European ancestry (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] 0.83 [0.77-0.90], P=6.53 × 10(-6), n=13 591; and 0.95 [0.92-0.98], P=1.83 × 10(-4), n=82 297, respectively). Queries of human biobank data sets revealed associations of rs4888378 with nearby gene expression in vascular tissues (n=126-138). This study identified rs4888378 in the BCAR1-CFDP1-TMEM170A locus as a novel genetic determinant of cIMT and coronary artery disease risk in individuals

  16. The endogenous retroviral locus ERVWE1 is a bona fide gene involved in hominoid placental physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, François; Bouton, Olivier; Prudhomme, Sarah; Cheynet, Valérie; Oriol, Guy; Bonnaud, Bertrand; Lucotte, Gérard; Duret, Laurent; Mandrand, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    The definitive demonstration of a role for a recently acquired gene is a difficult task, requiring exhaustive genetic investigations and functional analysis. The situation is indeed much more complicated when facing multicopy gene families, because most or portions of the gene are conserved among the hundred copies of the family. This is the case for the ERVWE1 locus of the human endogenous retrovirus W family (HERV-W), which encodes an envelope glycoprotein (syncytin) likely involved in trophoblast differentiation. Here we describe, in 155 individuals, the positional conservation of this locus and the preservation of the envelope ORF. Sequencing of the critical elements of the ERVWE1 provirus showed a striking conservation among the 48 alleles of 24 individuals, including the LTR elements involved in the transcriptional machinery, the splice sites involved in the maturation of subgenomic Env mRNA, and the Env ORF. The functionality and tissue specificity of the 5′ LTR were demonstrated, as well as the fusogenic activity of the envelope polymorphic variants. Such functions were also shown to be preserved in the orthologous loci isolated from chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and gibbon. This functional preservation among humans and during evolution strongly argued for the involvement of this recently acquired retroviral envelope glycoprotein in hominoid placental physiology. PMID:14757826

  17. Fine-scale mapping of the 4q24 locus identifies two independent loci associated with breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xingyi; Long, Jirong; Zeng, Chenjie; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Ghoussaini, Maya; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Milne, Roger L; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cai, Qiuyin; Beesley, Jonathan; Kar, Siddhartha P; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Blot, William; Bogdanova, Natalia; Bojesen, Stig E; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Brinton, Louise; Broeks, Annegien; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Cai, Hui; Canisius, Sander; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Devilee, Peter; Droit, Arnaud; Dörk, Thilo; Fasching, Peter A; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fostira, Florentia; Gaborieau, Valerie; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; Grip, Mervi; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hartman, Mikael; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hopper, John L; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Ito, Hidemi; Jakubowska, Anna; Johnson, Nichola; Kabisch, Maria; Kang, Daehee; Khan, Sofia; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Lambrechts, Diether; Le Marchand, Loic; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Matsuo, Keitaro; McLean, Catriona A; Meindl, Alfons; Muir, Kenneth; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nord, Silje; Olson, Janet E; Orr, Nick; Peterlongo, Paolo; Putti, Thomas Choudary; Rudolph, Anja; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Shen, Chen-Yang; Shi, Jiajun; Shrubsole, Martha J; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony; Teo, Soo Hwang; Thienpont, Bernard; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian P M; Truong, Thérèse; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; van den Ouweland, Ans; Wen, Wanqing; Winqvist, Robert; Wu, Anna; Yip, Cheng Har; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Ying; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Simard, Jacques; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F; Zheng, Wei

    2015-11-01

    A recent association study identified a common variant (rs9790517) at 4q24 to be associated with breast cancer risk. Independent association signals and potential functional variants in this locus have not been explored. We conducted a fine-mapping analysis in 55,540 breast cancer cases and 51,168 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Conditional analyses identified two independent association signals among women of European ancestry, represented by rs9790517 [conditional P = 2.51 × 10(-4); OR, 1.04; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.02-1.07] and rs77928427 (P = 1.86 × 10(-4); OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.02-1.07). Functional annotation using data from the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project revealed two putative functional variants, rs62331150 and rs73838678 in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with rs9790517 (r(2) ≥ 0.90) residing in the active promoter or enhancer, respectively, of the nearest gene, TET2. Both variants are located in DNase I hypersensitivity and transcription factor-binding sites. Using data from both The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Molecular Taxonomy of Breast Cancer International Consortium (METABRIC), we showed that rs62331150 was associated with level of expression of TET2 in breast normal and tumor tissue. Our study identified two independent association signals at 4q24 in relation to breast cancer risk and suggested that observed association in this locus may be mediated through the regulation of TET2. Fine-mapping study with large sample size warranted for identification of independent loci for breast cancer risk. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Resequencing of IRS2 reveals rare variants for obesity but not fasting glucose homeostasis in Hispanic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butte, Nancy F; Voruganti, V Saroja; Cole, Shelley A; Haack, Karin; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Muzny, Donna M; Wheeler, David A; Chang, Kyle; Hawes, Alicia; Gibbs, Richard A

    2011-09-22

    Our objective was to resequence insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) to identify variants associated with obesity- and diabetes-related traits in Hispanic children. Exonic and intronic segments, 5' and 3' flanking regions of IRS2 (∼14.5 kb), were bidirectionally sequenced for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery in 934 Hispanic children using 3730XL DNA Sequencers. Additionally, 15 SNPs derived from Illumina HumanOmni1-Quad BeadChips were analyzed. Measured genotype analysis tested associations between SNPs and obesity and diabetes-related traits. Bayesian quantitative trait nucleotide analysis was used to statistically infer the most likely functional polymorphisms. A total of 140 SNPs were identified with minor allele frequencies (MAF) ranging from 0.001 to 0.47. Forty-two of the 70 coding SNPs result in nonsynonymous amino acid substitutions relative to the consensus sequence; 28 SNPs were detected in the promoter, 12 in introns, 28 in the 3'-UTR, and 2 in the 5'-UTR. Two insertion/deletions (indels) were detected. Ten independent rare SNPs (MAF = 0.001-0.009) were associated with obesity-related traits (P = 0.01-0.00002). SNP 10510452_139 in the promoter region was shown to have a high posterior probability (P = 0.77-0.86) of influencing BMI, fat mass, and waist circumference in Hispanic children. SNP 10510452_139 contributed between 2 and 4% of the population variance in body weight and composition. None of the SNPs or indels were associated with diabetes-related traits or accounted for a previously identified quantitative trait locus on chromosome 13 for fasting serum glucose. Rare but not common IRS2 variants may play a role in the regulation of body weight but not an essential role in fasting glucose homeostasis in Hispanic children.

  19. Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR intron 1 variants are major risk factors for Graves' disease in three European Caucasian cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Płoski

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR gene is an established susceptibility locus for Graves' disease (GD, with recent studies refining association to two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, rs179247 and rs12101255, within TSHR intron 1.We aimed to validate association of rs179247 and rs12101255 in Polish and UK Caucasian GD case-control subjects, determine the mode of inheritance and to see if association correlates with specific GD clinical manifestations. We investigated three case-control populations; 558 GD patients and 520 controls from Warsaw, Poland, 196 GD patients and 198 controls from Gliwice, Poland and 2504 GD patients from the UK National collection and 2784 controls from the 1958 British Birth cohort. Both rs179247 (P = 1.2×10(-2-6.2×10(-15, OR = 1.38-1.45 and rs12101255 (P = 1.0×10(-4-3.68×10(-21, OR = 1.47-1.87 exhibited strong association with GD in all three cohorts. Logistic regression suggested association of rs179247 is secondary to rs12101255 in all cohorts. Inheritance modeling suggested a co-dominant mode of inheritance in all cohorts. Genotype-phenotype correlations provided no clear evidence of association with any specific clinical characteristics.We have validated association of TSHR intron 1 SNPs with GD in three independent European cohorts and have demonstrated that the aetiological variant within the TSHR is likely to be in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs12101255. Fine mapping is now required to determine the exact location of the aetiological DNA variants within the TSHR.

  20. Family studies to find rare high risk variants in migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Rikke Dyhr; Christensen, Anne Francke; Olesen, Jes

    2017-12-01

    Migraine has long been known as a common complex disease caused by genetic and environmental factors. The pathophysiology and the specific genetic susceptibility are poorly understood. Common variants only explain a small part of the heritability of migraine. It is thought that rare genetic variants with bigger effect size may be involved in the disease. Since migraine has a tendency to cluster in families, a family approach might be the way to find these variants. This is also indicated by identification of migraine-associated loci in classical linkage-analyses in migraine families. A single migraine study using a candidate-gene approach was performed in 2010 identifying a rare mutation in the TRESK potassium channel segregating in a large family with migraine with aura, but this finding has later become questioned. The technologies of next-generation sequencing (NGS) now provides an affordable tool to investigate the genetic variation in the entire exome or genome. The family-based study design using NGS is described in this paper. We also review family studies using NGS that have been successful in finding rare variants in other common complex diseases in order to argue the promising application of a family approach to migraine. PubMed was searched to find studies that looked for rare genetic variants in common complex diseases through a family-based design using NGS, excluding studies looking for de-novo mutations, or using a candidate-gene approach and studies on cancer. All issues from Nature Genetics and PLOS genetics 2014, 2015 and 2016 (UTAI June) were screened for relevant papers. Reference lists from included and other relevant papers were also searched. For the description of the family-based study design using NGS an in-house protocol was used. Thirty-two successful studies, which covered 16 different common complex diseases, were included in this paper. We also found a single migraine study. Twenty-three studies found one or a few family specific

  1. Health Locus of Control尺度開発の歴史(社会科学編)

    OpenAIRE

    吉田, 由美; Yumi, YOSHIDA; 千葉県立衛生短期大学(看護学); Chiba College of Health Science

    1994-01-01

    This article describes the origins history of Health Locus of Control scales. First, Rotter's social learing theory, which is the theoretical background of the Health Locus of Control construct, is outlined. The scale and research trends of Locus of Control concept, and those of Health Locus of Control concept which are based on Locus of Control, are then reviewed. Finally, Health Locus of Control is discussed with regard to the implications for health education.

  2. Common variants in the COL4A4 gene confer susceptibility to lattice degeneration of the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguro, Akira; Ideta, Hidenao; Ota, Masao; Ito, Norihiko; Ideta, Ryuichi; Yonemoto, Junichi; Takeuchi, Masaki; Uemoto, Riyo; Nishide, Tadayuki; Iijima, Yasuhito; Kawagoe, Tatsukata; Okada, Eiichi; Shiota, Tomoko; Hagihara, Yuta; Oka, Akira; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Mizuki, Nobuhisa

    2012-01-01

    Lattice degeneration of the retina is a vitreoretinal disorder characterized by a visible fundus lesion predisposing the patient to retinal tears and detachment. The etiology of this degeneration is still uncertain, but it is likely that both genetic and environmental factors play important roles in its development. To identify genetic susceptibility regions for lattice degeneration of the retina, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using a dense panel of 23,465 microsatellite markers covering the entire human genome. This GWAS in a Japanese cohort (294 patients with lattice degeneration and 294 controls) led to the identification of one microsatellite locus, D2S0276i, in the collagen type IV alpha 4 (COL4A4) gene on chromosome 2q36.3. To validate the significance of this observation, we evaluated the D2S0276i region in the GWAS cohort and in an independent Japanese cohort (280 patients and 314 controls) using D2S0276i and 47 single nucleotide polymorphisms covering the region. The strong associations were observed in D2S0276i and rs7558081 in the COL4A4 gene (Pc = 5.8 × 10(-6), OR = 0.63 and Pc = 1.0 × 10(-5), OR = 0.69 in a total of 574 patients and 608 controls, respectively). Our findings suggest that variants in the COL4A4 gene may contribute to the development of lattice degeneration of the retina.

  3. Common variants in the COL4A4 gene confer susceptibility to lattice degeneration of the retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Meguro

    Full Text Available Lattice degeneration of the retina is a vitreoretinal disorder characterized by a visible fundus lesion predisposing the patient to retinal tears and detachment. The etiology of this degeneration is still uncertain, but it is likely that both genetic and environmental factors play important roles in its development. To identify genetic susceptibility regions for lattice degeneration of the retina, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS using a dense panel of 23,465 microsatellite markers covering the entire human genome. This GWAS in a Japanese cohort (294 patients with lattice degeneration and 294 controls led to the identification of one microsatellite locus, D2S0276i, in the collagen type IV alpha 4 (COL4A4 gene on chromosome 2q36.3. To validate the significance of this observation, we evaluated the D2S0276i region in the GWAS cohort and in an independent Japanese cohort (280 patients and 314 controls using D2S0276i and 47 single nucleotide polymorphisms covering the region. The strong associations were observed in D2S0276i and rs7558081 in the COL4A4 gene (Pc = 5.8 × 10(-6, OR = 0.63 and Pc = 1.0 × 10(-5, OR = 0.69 in a total of 574 patients and 608 controls, respectively. Our findings suggest that variants in the COL4A4 gene may contribute to the development of lattice degeneration of the retina.

  4. Estimating the contribution of genetic variants to difference in incidence of disease between population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonesinghe, Ramal; Ioannidis, John P A; Flanders, W Dana; Yang, Quanhe; Truman, Benedict I; Khoury, Muin J

    2012-08-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple genetic susceptibility variants to several complex human diseases. However, risk-genotype frequency at loci showing robust associations might differ substantially among different populations. In this paper, we present methods to assess the contribution of genetic variants to the difference in the incidence of disease between different population groups for different scenarios. We derive expressions for the contribution of a single genetic variant, multiple genetic variants, and the contribution of the joint effect of a genetic variant and an environmental factor to the difference in the incidence of disease. The contribution of genetic variants to the difference in incidence increases with increasing difference in risk-genotype frequency, but declines with increasing difference in incidence between the two populations. The contribution of genetic variants also increases with increasing relative risk and the contribution of joint effect of genetic and environmental factors increases with increasing relative risk of the gene-environmental interaction. The contribution of genetic variants to the difference in incidence between two populations can be expressed as a function of the population attributable risks of the genetic variants in the two populations. The contribution of a group of genetic variants to the disparity in incidence of disease could change considerably by adding one more genetic variant to the group. Any estimate of genetic contribution to the disparity in incidence of disease between two populations at this stage seems to be an elusive goal.

  5. Estimating the contribution of genetic variants to difference in incidence of disease between population groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonesinghe, Ramal; Ioannidis, John PA; Flanders, W Dana; Yang, Quanhe; Truman, Benedict I; Khoury, Muin J

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple genetic susceptibility variants to several complex human diseases. However, risk-genotype frequency at loci showing robust associations might differ substantially among different populations. In this paper, we present methods to assess the contribution of genetic variants to the difference in the incidence of disease between different population groups for different scenarios. We derive expressions for the contribution of a single genetic variant, multiple genetic variants, and the contribution of the joint effect of a genetic variant and an environmental factor to the difference in the incidence of disease. The contribution of genetic variants to the difference in incidence increases with increasing difference in risk-genotype frequency, but declines with increasing difference in incidence between the two populations. The contribution of genetic variants also increases with increasing relative risk and the contribution of joint effect of genetic and environmental factors increases with increasing relative risk of the gene–environmental interaction. The contribution of genetic variants to the difference in incidence between two populations can be expressed as a function of the population attributable risks of the genetic variants in the two populations. The contribution of a group of genetic variants to the disparity in incidence of disease could change considerably by adding one more genetic variant to the group. Any estimate of genetic contribution to the disparity in incidence of disease between two populations at this stage seems to be an elusive goal. PMID:22333905

  6. Combinations of Genetic Variants Occurring Exclusively in Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellerup, Erling Thyge; Møller, Gert Lykke

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to find genetic variants that in combination are significantly associated with bipolar disorder. In previous studies of bipolar disorder, combinations of three and four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) genotypes taken from 803 SNPs were analyzed, and five ...

  7. Comparing genetic variants detected in the 1000 genomes project ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) determined based on SNP arrays from the international HapMap consortium (HapMap) and the genetic variants detected in the 1000 genomes project (1KGP) can serve as two references for genomewide association studies (GWAS). We conducted comparative analyses to provide ...

  8. The role of common genetic variants in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paludan-Muller, Christian; Svendsen, Jesper H.; Olesen, Morten S.

    2016-01-01

    lone AF, has a substantial genetic component. A number of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have indicated that common genetic variants, more precisely the so called single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with AF. Presently more than 10 genomic regions have been identified using...

  9. EL LOCUS DE DISTRIBUCION COMO COROLARIO DEL LOCUS DE CONTROL (THE LOCUS OF DISTRIBUTION AS A COROLLARY TO THE LOCUS OF CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayoral Luisa

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Este es un artículo científico acerca del Locus de Distribución, surgido de un estudio realizado con una población de docentes y alumnos universitarios. Respecto de los primeros, se ha indagado acerca de las atribuciones que se realizaban en torno a las recompensas y sanciones, que ellos distribuían a sus alumnos.Respecto de los segundos, se ha buscado determinar la valoración que estos realizaban de sus profesores, en términos de aquellas atribuciones. Para ello, se utilizaron dos paradigmas clásicamente empleados para verificar la existencia de una norma: el paradigma de la autopresentación (docentes, y el paradigma de los j uicios (alumnos. La cuestión planteada fue determinar si en el caso de los comportamientos distributivos de refuerzos, las causas se atribuían a variables externas -en particular a los receptores de esos refuerzos- y si esas formas de atribución eran conocidas y valoradas o no, por los alumnos. De los resultados, surgió la confirmación de nuestra hipótesis de explicaciones externas en materia de comportamientos distributivos de sanciones en el ámbito de la docencia y la valoración positiva de estas atribuciones por los alumnos.Abstract:This one is a scientific article brings over of the Locus of Distribution, arisen from a study realized with a population of teachers and university pupils. Respect of the first ones, it has been investigated brings over of the attributions that were concerning around the reinforcements which they were distributing to pupils. Respect of the second ones, one has sought to determine the valuation that these realized of the teachers, in terms of those attributions. For it, two paradigms were in use classic used to check the existence of a norm: the paradigm of the auto-presentation (teachers, and the paradigm of the judgments (pupils The raised question was to determine if in case of the distributive behaviours of reinforcements, the reasons were assuming to external

  10. Genome-wide association analysis of young onset stroke identifies a locus on chromosome 10q25 near HABP2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Ching; Stanne, Tara M.; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Ho, Weang Kee; Traylor, Matthew; Amouyel, Philippe; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Malik, Rainer; Xu, Huichun; Kittner, Steven J.; Cole, John W.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Danesh, John; Rasheed, Asif; Zhao, Wei; Engelter, Stefan; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Lathrop, Mark; Leys, Didier; Thijs, Vincent; Metso, Tiina M.; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Pezzini, Alessandro; Parati, Eugenio A.; Norrving, Bo; Bevan, Steve; Rothwell, Peter M; Sudlow, Cathie; Slowik, Agnieszka; Lindgren, Arne; Walters, Matthew R; Jannes, Jim; Shen, Jess; Crosslin, David; Doheny, Kimberly; Laurie, Cathy C.; Kanse, Sandip M.; Bis, Joshua C.; Fornage, Myriam; Mosley, Thomas H.; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Strauch, Konstantin; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Gieger, Christian; Waldenberger, Melanie; Peters, Annette; Meisinger, Christine; Ikram, M. Arfan; Longstreth, WT; Meschia, James F.; Seshadri, Sudha; Sharma, Pankaj; Worrall, Bradford; Jern, Christina; Levi, Christopher; Dichgans, Martin; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B.; Markus, Hugh S.; Debette, Stephanie; Rolfs, Arndt; Saleheen, Danish; Mitchell, Braxton D.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although a genetic contribution to ischemic stroke is well recognized, only a handful of stroke loci have been identified by large-scale genetic association studies to date. Hypothesizing that genetic effects might be stronger for early- versus late-onset stroke, we conducted a two-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), focusing on stroke cases with an age of onset genetic variants at loci with association Pstroke susceptibility locus at 10q25 reached genome-wide significance in the combined analysis of all samples from the Discovery and Follow-up Stages (rs11196288, OR=1.41, P=9.5×10−9). The associated locus is in an intergenic region between TCF7L2 and HABP2. In a further analysis in an independent sample, we found that two SNPs in high linkage disequilibrium with rs11196288 were significantly associated with total plasma factor VII-activating protease levels, a product of HABP2. Conclusions HABP2, which encodes an extracellular serine protease involved in coagulation, fibrinolysis, and inflammatory pathways, may be a genetic susceptibility locus for early-onset stroke. PMID:26732560

  11. Effects of a 17q21 chromosome gene variant, tobacco smoke and furred pets on infant wheeze

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner, E V; Loft, S; Raaschou-Nielsen, O

    2012-01-01

    investigated associations between the rs7216389 polymorphism in the 17q21 locus affecting ORMDL3 expression and the risk for recurrent wheeze and interactions with exposure to tobacco smoke and furred pets during pregnancy and infancy using a birth cohort of 101¿042 infants. Rs7216389 was significantly...... association between pets and wheeze among homozygous wild-type carriers and a negative association among homozygous variant allele carriers. There was no interaction between rs7216389 and tobacco smoke exposure....

  12. Mouse ribosomal RNA genes contain multiple differentially regulated variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung Tseng

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous cytogenetic studies suggest that various rDNA chromosomal loci are not equally active in different cell types. Consistent with this variability, rDNA polymorphism is well documented in human and mouse. However, attempts to identify molecularly rDNA variant types, which are regulated individually (i.e., independent of other rDNA variants and tissue-specifically, have not been successful. We report here the molecular cloning and characterization of seven mouse rDNA variants (v-rDNA. The identification of these v-rDNAs was based on restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs, which are conserved among individuals and mouse strains. The total copy number of the identified variants is less than 100 and the copy number of each individual variant ranges from 4 to 15. Sequence analysis of the cloned v-rDNA identified variant-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the transcribed region. These SNPs were used to develop a set of variant-specific PCR assays, which permitted analysis of the v-rDNAs' expression profiles in various tissues. These profiles show that three v-rDNAs are expressed in all tissues (constitutively active, two are expressed in some tissues (selectively active, and two are not expressed (silent. These expression profiles were observed in six individuals from three mouse strains, suggesting the pattern is not randomly determined. Thus, the mouse rDNA array likely consists of genetically distinct variants, and some are regulated tissue-specifically. Our results provide the first molecular evidence for cell-type-specific regulation of a subset of rDNA.

  13. Identification of a novel locus on chromosome 2q13, which predisposes to clinical vertebral fractures independently of bone density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Nerea; Estrada, Karol; Albagha, Omar M E; Herrera, Lizbeth; Reppe, Sjur; Olstad, Ole K; Gautvik, Kaare M; Ryan, Niamh M; Evans, Kathryn L; Nielson, Carrie M; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Kiel, Douglas P; Markozannes, George; Ntzani, Evangelia E; Evangelou, Evangelos; Feenstra, Bjarke; Liu, Xueping; Melbye, Mads; Masi, Laura; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Riches, Philip; Daroszewska, Anna; Olmos, José Manuel; Valero, Carmen; Castillo, Jesús; Riancho, José A; Husted, Lise B; Langdahl, Bente L; Brown, Matthew A; Duncan, Emma L; Kaptoge, Stephen; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Usategui-Martín, Ricardo; Del Pino-Montes, Javier; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Lewis, Joshua R; Prince, Richard L; D’Amelio, Patrizia; García-Giralt, Natalia; NoguéS, Xavier; Mencej-Bedrac, Simona; Marc, Janja; Wolstein, Orit; Eisman, John A; Oei, Ling; Medina-Gómez, Carolina; Schraut, Katharina E; Navarro, Pau; Wilson, James F; Davies, Gail; Starr, John; Deary, Ian; Tanaka, Toshiko; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gianfrancesco, Fernando; Gennari, Luigi; Lucas, Gavin; Elosua, Roberto; Uitterlinden, André G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ralston, Stuart H

    2018-01-01

    Objectives To identify genetic determinants of susceptibility to clinical vertebral fractures, which is an important complication of osteoporosis. Methods Here we conduct a genome-wide association study in 1553 postmenopausal women with clinical vertebral fractures and 4340 controls, with a two-stage replication involving 1028 cases and 3762 controls. Potentially causal variants were identified using expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) data from transiliac bone biopsies and bioinformatic studies. Results A locus tagged by rs10190845 was identified on chromosome 2q13, which was significantly associated with clinical vertebral fracture (P=1.04×10−9) with a large effect size (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.06 to 2.6). Bioinformatic analysis of this locus identified several potentially functional SNPs that are associated with expression of the positional candidate genes TTL (tubulin tyrosine ligase) and SLC20A1 (solute carrier family 20 member 1). Three other suggestive loci were identified on chromosomes 1p31, 11q12 and 15q11. All these loci were novel and had not previously been associated with bone mineral density or clinical fractures. Conclusion We have identified a novel genetic variant that is associated with clinical vertebral fractures by mechanisms that are independent of BMD. Further studies are now in progress to validate this association and evaluate the underlying mechanism. PMID:29170203

  14. Relation of organizational citizenship behavior and locus of control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnipseed, David L; Bacon, Calvin M

    2009-12-01

    The relation of organizational citizenship behavior and locus of control was assessed in a sample of 286 college students (52% men; M age = 24 yr.) who worked an average of 26 hr. per week. Measures were Spector's Work Locus of Control Scale and Podsakoff, et al.'s Organization Citizenship Behavior scale. Hierarchical multiple regressions indicated positive association of scores on work locus of control with scores on each of the four tested dimensions of organizational citizenship, as well as total organizational citizenship behavior.

  15. Genome-wide association study identifies a single major locus contributing to survival into old age; the APOE locus revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deelen, Joris; Beekman, Marian; Uh, Hae-Won

    2011-01-01

    By studying the loci which contribute to human longevity, we aim to identify mechanisms that contribute to healthy aging. To identify such loci, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) comparing 403 unrelated nonagenarians from long-living families included in the Leiden Longevity Stu...

  16. Predicting effects of noncoding variants with deep learning-based sequence model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Troyanskaya, Olga G

    2015-10-01

    Identifying functional effects of noncoding variants is a major challenge in human genetics. To predict the noncoding-variant effects de novo from sequence, we developed a deep learning-based algorithmic framework, DeepSEA (http://deepsea.princeton.edu/), that directly learns a regulatory sequence code from large-scale chromatin-profiling data, enabling prediction of chromatin effects of sequence alterations with single-nucleotide sensitivity. We further used this capability to improve prioritization of functional variants including expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) and disease-associated variants.

  17. Autism, fever, epigenetics and the locus coeruleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehler, Mark F; Purpura, Dominick P

    2009-03-01

    Some children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) exhibit improved behaviors and enhanced communication during febrile episodes. We hypothesize that febrigenesis and the behavioral-state changes associated with fever in autism depend upon selective normalization of key components of a functionally impaired locus coeruleus-noradrenergic (LC-NA) system. We posit that autistic behaviors result from developmental dysregulation of LC-NA system specification and neural network deployment and modulation linked to the core behavioral features of autism. Fever transiently restores the modulatory functions of the LC-NA system and ameliorates autistic behaviors. Fever-induced reversibility of autism suggests preserved functional integrity of widespread neural networks subserving the LC-NA system and specifically the subsystems involved in mediating the cognitive and behavioral repertoires compromised in ASD. Alterations of complex gene-environmental interactions and associated epigenetic mechanisms during seminal developmental critical periods are viewed as instrumental in LC-NA dysregulation as emphasized by the timing and severity of prenatal maternal stressors on autism prevalence. Our hypothesis has implications for a rational approach to further interrogate the interdisciplinary etiology of ASD and for designing novel biological detection systems and therapeutic agents that target the LC-NA system's diverse network of pre- and postsynaptic receptors, intracellular signaling pathways and dynamic epigenetic remodeling processes involved in their regulation and functional plasticity.

  18. Birth defects and aplastic anemia: differences in polycyclic hydrocarbon toxicity associated with the Ah locus. [Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebert, D.W.; Levitt, R.C.; Jensen, N.M.; Lambert, G.H.; Felton, J.S.

    1977-01-01

    The balance between cytochrome(s) P/sub 1/-450 and other forms of P-450 in the liver, and probably many nonhepatic tissues as well, appears to be important in the toxicity, carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, and teratogenicity of numerous compounds. Thus, allelic differences in a single gene--the Ah locus-- can have profound effects on the susceptibility of mice to drug toxicity and cancer. There is evidence for the Ah lous in the human. Striking increases in the incidence of stillborns, reorptions,and malformations caused by 3-methylcholanthrene or 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene were observed in the aromatic hydrocarbon responsive C57BL/6N,C3H/HeN, and BALB/cAnN inbred strains, compared with the genetically nonresponsive AKR/N. These data suggest that an association exists between the Ah locus and teratogenesis. Although numerous teratogenic differences among inbred mouse strains have been previously reported, this study is unique in that the genetic differences in teratogenicity observed were predicted in advance, on the basis of known differences in polycyclic hydrocarbon metabolism regulated by the Ah locus.

  19. New polymorphisms within the variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) 7 locus of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawzy, Ahmad; Zschöck, Michael; Ewers, Christa; Eisenberg, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    Variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) is a frequently employed typing method of Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP) isolates. Based on whole genome sequencing in a previous study, allelic diversity at some VNTR loci seems to over- or under-estimate the actual phylogenetic variance among isolates. Interestingly, two closely related isolates on one farm showed polymorphism at the VNTR 7 locus, raising concerns about the misleading role that it might play in genotyping. We aimed to investigate the underlying basis of VNTR 7-polymorphism by analyzing sequence data for published genomes and field isolates of MAP and other M. avium complex (MAC) members. In contrast to MAP strains from cattle, strains from sheep displayed an "imperfect" repeat within VNTR 7, which was identical to respective allele types in other MAC genomes. Subspecies- and strain-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and two novel (16 and 56 bp) repeats were detected. Given the combination of the three existing repeats, there are at least five different patterns for VNTR 7. The present findings highlight a higher polymorphism and probable instability of VNTR 7 locus that needs to be considered and challenged in future studies. Until then, sequencing of this locus in future studies is important to correctly assign the underlying allele types.(1). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fixation Probability in a Two-Locus Model by the Ancestral Recombination–Selection Graph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, Sabin; Kermany, Amir R.

    2012-01-01

    We use the ancestral influence graph (AIG) for a two-locus, two-allele selection model in the limit of a large population size to obtain an analytic approximation for the probability of ultimate fixation of a single mutant allele A. We assume that this new mutant is introduced at a given locus into a finite population in which a previous mutant allele B is already segregating with a wild type at another linked locus. We deduce that the fixation probability increases as the recombination rate increases if allele A is either in positive epistatic interaction with B and allele B is beneficial or in no epistatic interaction with B and then allele A itself is beneficial. This holds at least as long as the recombination fraction and the selection intensity are small enough and the population size is large enough. In particular this confirms the Hill–Robertson effect, which predicts that recombination renders more likely the ultimate fixation of beneficial mutants at different loci in a population in the presence of random genetic drift even in the absence of epistasis. More importantly, we show that this is true from weak negative epistasis to positive epistasis, at least under weak selection. In the case of deleterious mutants, the fixation probability decreases as the recombination rate increases. This supports Muller’s ratchet mechanism to explain the accumulation of deleterious mutants in a population lacking recombination. PMID:22095080

  1. A new polymorphic pepsinogen locus (Pg-2) in the rat (Rattus norvegicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, S; Yamada, J; Bender, K; Adams, M

    1987-07-01

    Only two types of pepsinogens, which are products of the Pg-1 locus, are present in rat urine. In gastric mucosa, however, additional pepsinogen isozymes are expressed. We have found a polymorphism for rat gastric mucosa pepsinogen using agarose gel electrophoresis. Some inbred rat strains expressed a pepsinogen band, while others did not. The trait was found to be controlled by a single autosomal locus. We tentatively designated the locus as Pg-2 with two alleles, Pg-2a for the one controlling presence of the band and Pg-2o for the one controlling absence. Linkage analysis using BN and TM strains revealed that Pg-2 was closely linked to Pg-1 (3.7 +/- 1.8 cM), and that it did not belong to LG I (Hbb and p), LG II (Acon-1 and Mup-1), LG IV (Hao-1 and Svp-1), LG V (Es-1 and Es-3), LG VI (Gc and h), LG IX (RT1), LG X (Fh and Pep-3), nor a LG containing Ahd-2 (as yet undetermined).

  2. The Drosophila agnostic Locus: Involvement in the Formation of Cognitive Defects in Williams Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, E A; Medvedeva, A V; Zakharov, G A; Savvateeva-Popova, E V

    2014-04-01

    The molecular basis of the pathological processes that lead to genome disorders is similar both in invertebrates and mammals. Since cognitive impairments in Williams syndrome are caused by LIMK1 hemizygosity, could the spontaneous and mutant variants of the Drosophila limk1 gene serve as a model for studying two diagnostic features from three distinct cognitive defects of the syndrome? These two symptoms are the disturbance of visuospatial orientation and an unusualy strong fixation on the faces of other people during pairwise interaction with a stranger. An experimental approach to the first cognitive manifestation might be an analysis of the locomotor behavior of Drosophila larvae involving visuospatial orientation during the exploration of the surrounding environment. An approach to tackle the second manifestation might be an analysis of the most natural ways of contact between a male and a female during courtship (the first stage of this ritual is the orientation of a male towards a female and following the female with constant fixation on the female's image). The present study of locomotor activity and cognitive repertoire in spontaneous and mutant variants of the Drosophila agnostic locus allows one to bridge alterations in the structure of the limk1 gene and behavior.

  3. A genome-wide association study reveals variants in ARL15 that influence adiponectin levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Brent Richards

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The adipocyte-derived protein adiponectin is highly heritable and inversely associated with risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D and coronary heart disease (CHD. We meta-analyzed 3 genome-wide association studies for circulating adiponectin levels (n = 8,531 and sought validation of the lead single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 5 additional cohorts (n = 6,202. Five SNPs were genome-wide significant in their relationship with adiponectin (P< or =5x10(-8. We then tested whether these 5 SNPs were associated with risk of T2D and CHD using a Bonferroni-corrected threshold of P< or =0.011 to declare statistical significance for these disease associations. SNPs at the adiponectin-encoding ADIPOQ locus demonstrated the strongest associations with adiponectin levels (P-combined = 9.2x10(-19 for lead SNP, rs266717, n = 14,733. A novel variant in the ARL15 (ADP-ribosylation factor-like 15 gene was associated with lower circulating levels of adiponectin (rs4311394-G, P-combined = 2.9x10(-8, n = 14,733. This same risk allele at ARL15 was also associated with a higher risk of CHD (odds ratio [OR] = 1.12, P = 8.5x10(-6, n = 22,421 more nominally, an increased risk of T2D (OR = 1.11, P = 3.2x10(-3, n = 10,128, and several metabolic traits. Expression studies in humans indicated that ARL15 is well-expressed in skeletal muscle. These findings identify a novel protein, ARL15, which influences circulating adiponectin levels and may impact upon CHD risk.

  4. Further support for association between GWAS variant for positive emotion and reward systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, T M; Ihssen, N; Brindley, L M; Linden, D E J

    2017-01-31

    A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified a significant single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) for trait-positive emotion at rs322931 on chromosome 1, which was also associated with brain activation in the reward system of healthy individuals when observing positive stimuli in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study. In the current study, we aimed to further validate the role of variation at rs322931 in reward processing. Using a similar fMRI approach, we use two paradigms that elicit a strong ventral striatum (VS) blood oxygen-level dependency (BOLD) response in a sample of young, healthy individuals (N=82). In the first study we use a similar picture-viewing task to the discovery sample (positive>neutral stimuli) to replicate an effect of the variant on emotion processing. In the second study we use a probabilistic reversal learning procedure to identify reward processing during decision-making under uncertainly (reward>punishment). In a region of interest (ROI) analysis of the bilateral VS, we show that the rs322931 genotype was associated with BOLD in the left VS during the positive>neutral contrast (P ROI-CORRECTED =0.045) and during the reward>punishment contrast (P ROI-CORRECTED =0.018), although the effect of passive picture viewing was in the opposite direction from that reported in the discovery sample. These findings suggest that the recently identified GWAS hit may influence positive emotion via individual differences in activity in the key hubs of the brain's reward system. Furthermore, these effects may not be limited to the passive viewing of positive emotional scenes, but may also be observed during dynamic decision-making. This study suggests that future studies of this GWAS locus may yield further insight into the biological mechanisms of psychopathologies characterised by deficits in reward processing and positive emotion.

  5. Common variants at 1p36 are associated with superior frontal gyrus volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, R; Ikeda, M; Yamashita, F; Ohi, K; Yamamori, H; Yasuda, Y; Fujimoto, M; Fukunaga, M; Nemoto, K; Takahashi, T; Tochigi, M; Onitsuka, T; Yamasue, H; Matsuo, K; Iidaka, T; Iwata, N; Suzuki, M; Takeda, M; Kasai, K; Ozaki, N

    2014-10-21

    The superior frontal gyrus (SFG), an area of the brain frequently found to have reduced gray matter in patients with schizophrenia, is involved in self-awareness and emotion, which are impaired in schizophrenia. However, no genome-wide association studies of SFG volume have investigated in patients with schizophrenia. To identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with SFG volumes, we demonstrated a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of gray matter volumes in the right or left SFG of 158 patients with schizophrenia and 378 healthy subjects. We attempted to bioinformatically ascertain the potential effects of the top hit polymorphism on the expression levels of genes at the genome-wide region. We found associations between five variants on 1p36.12 and the right SFG volume at a widely used benchmark for genome-wide significance (P5.0 × 10(-8)); however, the rs4654899 polymorphism was identified as the locus with the second strongest association with the volume of the left SFG (P=1.5 × 10(-6)). In silico analyses revealed a proxy SNP of rs4654899 had effect on gene expression of two genes, HP1BP3 lying 3' to EIF4G3 (P=7.8 × 10(-6)) and CAPN14 at 2p (P=6.3 × 10(-6)), which are expressed in moderate-to-high levels throughout the adult human SFG. These results contribute to understand genetic architecture of a brain structure possibly linked to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  6. Genome-wide association study for type 2 diabetes in Indians identifies a new susceptibility locus at 2q21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Rubina; Chauhan, Ganesh; Dwivedi, Om Prakash; Mahajan, Anubha; Jaiswal, Alok; Kaur, Ismeet; Bandesh, Khushdeep; Singh, Tejbir; Mathai, Benan John; Pandey, Yogesh; Chidambaram, Manickam; Sharma, Amitabh; Chavali, Sreenivas; Sengupta, Shantanu; Ramakrishnan, Lakshmi; Venkatesh, Pradeep; Aggarwal, Sanjay K; Ghosh, Saurabh; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Srinath, Reddy K; Saxena, Madhukar; Banerjee, Monisha; Mathur, Sandeep; Bhansali, Anil; Shah, Viral N; Madhu, Sri Venkata; Marwaha, Raman K; Basu, Analabha; Scaria, Vinod; McCarthy, Mark I; Venkatesan, Radha; Mohan, Viswanathan; Tandon, Nikhil; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan

    2013-03-01

    Indians undergoing socioeconomic and lifestyle transitions will be maximally affected by epidemic of type 2 diabetes (T2D). We conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study of T2D in 12,535 Indians, a less explored but high-risk group. We identified a new type 2 diabetes-associated locus at 2q21, with the lead signal being rs6723108 (odds ratio 1.31; P = 3.32 × 10⁻⁹). Imputation analysis refined the signal to rs998451 (odds ratio 1.56; P = 6.3 × 10⁻¹²) within TMEM163 that encodes a probable vesicular transporter in nerve terminals. TMEM163 variants also showed association with decreased fasting plasma insulin and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, indicating a plausible effect through impaired insulin secretion. The 2q21 region also harbors RAB3GAP1 and ACMSD; those are involved in neurologic disorders. Forty-nine of 56 previously reported signals showed consistency in direction with similar effect sizes in Indians and previous studies, and 25 of them were also associated (P < 0.05). Known loci and the newly identified 2q21 locus altogether explained 7.65% variance in the risk of T2D in Indians. Our study suggests that common susceptibility variants for T2D are largely the same across populations, but also reveals a population-specific locus and provides further insights into genetic architecture and etiology of T2D.

  7. CDKN2B expression and subcutaneous adipose tissue expandability: Possible influence of the 9p21 atherosclerosis locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Per-Arne; Wahlstrand, Björn; Olsson, Maja [Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Froguel, Philippe; Falchi, Mario [Department of Genomics of Common Disease, School of Public Health, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Bergman, Richard N. [Diabetes and Obesity Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); McTernan, Philip G. [Division of Metabolic and Vascular Health, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Hedner, Thomas; Carlsson, Lena M.S. [Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Jacobson, Peter, E-mail: peter.jacobson@medfak.gu.se [Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • The tumor suppressor gene CDKN2B is highly expressed in human adipose tissue. • Risk alleles at the 9p21 locus modify CDKN2B expression in a BMI-dependent fashion. • There is an inverse relationship between expression of CDKN2B and adipogenic genes. • CDKN2B expression influences to postprandial triacylglycerol clearance. • CDKN2B expression in adipose tissue is linked to markers of hepatic steatosis. - Abstract: Risk alleles within a gene desert at the 9p21 locus constitute the most prevalent genetic determinant of cardiovascular disease. Previous research has demonstrated that 9p21 risk variants influence gene expression in vascular tissues, yet the biological mechanisms by which this would mediate atherosclerosis merits further investigation. To investigate possible influences of this locus on other tissues, we explored expression patterns of 9p21-regulated genes in a panel of multiple human tissues and found that the tumor suppressor CDKN2B was highly expressed in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT). CDKN2B expression was regulated by obesity status, and this effect was stronger in carriers of 9p21 risk alleles. Covariation between expression of CDKN2B and genes implemented in adipogenesis was consistent with an inhibitory effect of CDKN2B on SAT proliferation. Moreover, studies of postprandial triacylglycerol clearance indicated that CDKN2B is involved in down-regulation of SAT fatty acid trafficking. CDKN2B expression in SAT correlated with indicators of ectopic fat accumulation, including markers of hepatic steatosis. Among genes regulated by 9p21 risk variants, CDKN2B appears to play a significant role in the regulation of SAT expandability, which is a strong determinant of lipotoxicity and therefore might contribute to the development of atherosclerosis.

  8. Distribution of Bartonella henselae Variants in Patients, Reservoir Hosts and Vectors in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Horacio; Escudero, Raquel; Pons, Inmaculada; Rodríguez-Vargas, Manuela; García-Esteban, Coral; Rodríguez-Moreno, Isabel; García-Amil, Cristina; Lobo, Bruno; Valcárcel, Félix; Pérez, Azucena; Jiménez, Santos; Jado, Isabel; Juste, Ramón; Segura, Ferrán; Anda, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the diversity of B. henselae circulating in patients, reservoir hosts and vectors in Spain. In total, we have fully characterized 53 clinical samples from 46 patients, as well as 78 B. henselae isolates obtained from 35 cats from La Rioja and Catalonia (northeastern Spain), four positive cat blood samples from which no isolates were obtained, and three positive fleas by Multiple Locus Sequence Typing and Multiple Locus Variable Number Tandem Repeats Analysis. This study represents the largest series of human cases characterized with these methods, with 10 different sequence types and 41 MLVA profiles. Two of the sequence types and 35 of the profiles were not described previously. Most of the B. henselae variants belonged to ST5. Also, we have identified a common profile (72) which is well distributed in Spain and was found to persist over time. Indeed, this profile seems to be the origin from which most of the variants identified in this study have been generated. In addition, ST5, ST6 and ST9 were found associated with felines, whereas ST1, ST5 and ST8 were the most frequent sequence types found infecting humans. Interestingly, some of the feline associated variants never found on patients were located in a separate clade, which could represent a group of strains less pathogenic for humans. PMID:23874563

  9. A locus for isolated cataract on human Xp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, P J; Berry, V; Hardcastle, A J; Maher, E R; Moore, A T; Bhattacharya, S S

    2002-02-01

    To genetically map the gene causing isolated X linked cataract in a large European pedigree. Using the patient registers at Birmingham Women's Hospital, UK, we identified and examined 23 members of a four generation family with nuclear cataract. Four of six affected males also had complex congenital heart disease. Pedigree data were collated and leucocyte DNA extracted from venous blood. Linkage analysis by PCR based microsatellite marker genotyping was used to identify the disease locus and mutations within candidate genes screened by direct sequencing. The disease locus was genetically refined to chromosome Xp22, within a 3 cM linkage interval flanked by markers DXS9902 and DXS999 (Zmax=3.64 at theta=0 for marker DXS8036). This is the first report of a locus for isolated inherited cataract on the X chromosome. The disease interval lies within the Nance-Horan locus suggesting allelic heterogeneity. The apparent association with congenital cardiac anomalies suggests a possible new oculocardiac syndrome.

  10. Multidimensional profiles of health locus of control in Hispanic Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Brian R; Fox, Rina S; Mills, Sarah D; Sadler, Georgia Robins; Malcarne, Vanessa L

    2016-10-01

    Latent profile analysis identified health locus of control profiles among 436 Hispanic Americans who completed the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control scales. Results revealed four profiles: Internally Oriented-Weak, -Moderate, -Strong, and Externally Oriented. The profile groups were compared on sociocultural and demographic characteristics, health beliefs and behaviors, and physical and mental health outcomes. The Internally Oriented-Strong group had less cancer fatalism, religiosity, and equity health attributions, and more alcohol consumption than the other three groups; the Externally Oriented group had stronger equity health attributions and less alcohol consumption. Deriving multidimensional health locus of control profiles through latent profile analysis allows examination of the relationships of health locus of control subtypes to health variables. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. 240 INFLUENCES OF PEER RELATIONS AND LOCUS OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Financial recklessness is a behavior that has far reaching negative .... between consumer financial knowledge, income and locus of control on financial ... Their interactions with their peers increased their internal motivations and thus helped.

  12. Emotional intelligence and locus of control of adult patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-15

    Mar 15, 2011 ... Keywords: breast cancer, treatment, positive psychology, emotional intelligence, locus of control ... branches are organised in a hierarchy with perception of ..... Asian. Development Bank Knowledge Solutions [serial online].

  13. PoCos: Population Covering Locus Sets for Risk Assessment in Complex Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Ayati

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Susceptibility loci identified by GWAS generally account for a limited fraction of heritability. Predictive models based on identified loci also have modest success in risk assessment and therefore are of limited practical use. Many methods have been developed to overcome these limitations by incorporating prior biological knowledge. However, most of the information utilized by these methods is at the level of genes, limiting analyses to variants that are in or proximate to coding regions. We propose a new method that integrates protein protein interaction (PPI as well as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL data to identify sets of functionally related loci that are collectively associated with a trait of interest. We call such sets of loci "population covering locus sets" (PoCos. The contributions of the proposed approach are three-fold: 1 We consider all possible genotype models for each locus, thereby enabling identification of combinatorial relationships between multiple loci. 2 We develop a framework for the integration of PPI and eQTL into a heterogenous network model, enabling efficient identification of functionally related variants that are associated with the disease. 3 We develop a novel method to integrate the genotypes of multiple loci in a PoCo into a representative genotype to be used in risk assessment. We test the proposed framework in the context of risk assessment for seven complex diseases, type 1 diabetes (T1D, type 2 diabetes (T2D, psoriasis (PS, bipolar disorder (BD, coronary artery disease (CAD, hypertension (HT, and multiple sclerosis (MS. Our results show that the proposed method significantly outperforms individual variant based risk assessment models as well as the state-of-the-art polygenic score. We also show that incorporation of eQTL data improves the performance of identified POCOs in risk assessment. We also assess the biological relevance of PoCos for three diseases that have similar biological mechanisms

  14. LOCUS OF CONTROL AND JOB SATISFACTION: PSU EMPLOYEES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshman Vijayashree

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous research studies have demonstrated that internal/external locus of control impacts jobsatisfaction. The present study thus aims to analyze type of locus of control and its relation with jobsatisfaction. The study will be of great help for organization to understand and know what type oflocus of control their employees has and how it has an impact on job satisfaction.The objectives of this study were: 1- To identify the type of Locus of Control (i.e. Internal orExternal present in Public Sector Units (PSU in Bangalore and 2- To analyze the impact of differenttype of Locus of Control on job satisfaction of PSU Employees. Further hypothesis was also set tocheck the relationship between locus of control and job satisfaction. In addition, the relationshipbetween different demographic factors was also examined. The tool used for this study was LocoInventory. The concept of locus of control by Levenson (1972 was used to develop Loco Inventory(Locus of Control in Organization Inventory. The survey used a questionnaire, which had thirty fivestatements which highlights the factors that determine the locus of control and job satisfaction levelof the employees. The Ratio, ANOVA, and Correlation analysis were used as statistical techniquesfor analysis.The results indicate that there is a positive correlation between internal locus of control and jobsatisfaction as well as between External (other locus of control and job satisfaction. And in case ofExternal (Chance locus of control and job satisfaction there exists partial positive correlation. As perthis study Job satisfaction level among the employees is also good as the mean is 17, which is closerto maximum scale value of 25. As per ANOVA table there is a significant variance betweeninternality and age as well as between externality (chance and age. There is no significantrelationship between internality and demographic factors like gender and education. There is nosignificant relationship between

  15. Complexity on Acute Myeloid Leukemia mRNA Transcript Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Cattani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the sequence analysis of acute myeloid leukemia mRNA. Six transcript variants of mlf1 mRNA, with more than 2000 bps, are analyzed by focusing on the autocorrelation of each distribution. Through the correlation matrix, some patches and similarities are singled out and commented, with respect to similar distributions. The comparison of Kolmogorov fractal dimension will be also given in order to classify the six variants. The existence of a fractal shape, patterns, and symmetries are discussed as well.

  16. Simple and complex dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNT) variants: clinical profile, MRI, and histopathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Alexandre R.; Clusmann, Hans; Lehe, Marec von; Schramm, Johannes [University of Bonn Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Bonn (Germany); Niehusmann, Pitt; Becker, Albert J. [University of Bonn Medical Center, Department of Neuropathology, Bonn (Germany); Urbach, Horst [University of Bonn Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNTs) are long-term epilepsy associated tumors subdivided into simple and complex variants. The purpose of this study was to relate different DNT components identified on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to histopathological features and to test the hypothesis that glial nodules as a histopathological feature of complex variants induce an occasional glioma misdiagnosis. Clinical, MRI, and histopathologic features of DNTs operated between 1988 and 2008 were reviewed. From a total of 61 DNTs, 48 simple and 13 complex variants were identified. Multiple or single pseudocysts in a cortical/subcortical location with small cysts sometimes separated from the tumor represented the glioneuronal element and were found in all DNTs. FLAIR hyperintense tissue was found between pseudocysts but - in neocortical DNTs - also circumscript in deeper tumor parts. Calcification and hemorrhages in this location occurred in four of 13 complex variants, and one of these patients was also the only one with tumor growth. Patients with complex variants had earlier seizure onset, and complex variants were more often located outside the temporal lobe. Although complex variants represented a higher diagnostic challenge, misdiagnoses also occurred in simple variants. One of five of DNTs showed contrast enhancement, which varied on follow-up studies with enhancing parts becoming nonenhancing and vice versa. The glioneuronal element is readily identifiable on MRI and should be considered to support the DNT diagnosis. Complex DNT variants have a different clinical profile and a more variable histopathological and MRI appearance; however, misdiagnoses occasionally also occur in simple variants. (orig.)

  17. Analysis of potential protein-modifying variants in 9000 endometriosis patients and 150000 controls of European ancestry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sapkota, Yadav; Vivo, Immaculata De; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur

    2017-01-01

    -modifying variants in endometriosis using exome-array genotyping in 7164 cases and 21005 controls, and a replication set of 1840 cases and 129016 controls of European ancestry. Results in the discovery sample identified significant evidence for association with coding variants in single-variant (rs1801232-CUBN...... sufficient power, our results did not identify any protein-modifying variants (MAF > 0.01) with moderate or large effect sizes in endometriosis, although these variants may exist in non-European populations or in high-risk families. The results suggest continued discovery efforts should focus on genotyping...

  18. The relationship between locus of control and career advancement

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    M.Com. (Industrial Psychology) The objective which career of this study advancement is was to investigate the extent to contingent on the personality construct locus of control. In order to achieve this, empirical research was conducted in a South African organisation. A survey questionnaire measuring career advancement and locus of control was completed by 152 subjects. The hypothesis which was formulated was that people with higher rates of career advancement would be more internal and t...

  19. Science Study For A Low Cost Upper Atmosphere Sounder (LOCUS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, D.; Swinyard, B. M.; Ellison, B. N.; Siddans, R.; Kerridge, B. J.; Plane, J. M. C.; Feng, W.

    2013-12-01

    We present the findings of an initial science study to define the spectral bands for the proposed Mesosphere / Lower Thermosphere (MLT) sounder LOCUS. The LOCUS mission (Fig 1) uses disruptive technologies to make key MLT species detectable globally by satellite remote sensing for the first time. This presentation summarises the technological and scientific foundation on which the current 4-band Terahertz (THz) and sub- millimetre wave (SMW) instrument configuration was conceived.

  20. Prostate cancer risk locus at 8q24 as a regulatory hub by physical interactions with multiple genomic loci across the genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Meijun; Yuan, Tiezheng; Schilter, Kala F; Dittmar, Rachel L; Mackinnon, Alexander; Huang, Xiaoyi; Tschannen, Michael; Worthey, Elizabeth; Jacob, Howard; Xia, Shu; Gao, Jianzhong; Tillmans, Lori; Lu, Yan; Liu, Pengyuan; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Wang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome 8q24 locus contains regulatory variants that modulate genetic risk to various cancers including prostate cancer (PC). However, the biological mechanism underlying this regulation is not well understood. Here, we developed a chromosome conformation capture (3C)-based multi-target sequencing technology and systematically examined three PC risk regions at the 8q24 locus and their potential regulatory targets across human genome in six cell lines. We observed frequent physical contacts of this risk locus with multiple genomic regions, in particular, inter-chromosomal interaction with CD96 at 3q13 and intra-chromosomal interaction with MYC at 8q24. We identified at least five interaction hot spots within the predicted functional regulatory elements at the 8q24 risk locus. We also found intra-chromosomal interaction genes PVT1, FAM84B and GSDMC and inter-chromosomal interaction gene CXorf36 in most of the six cell lines. Other gene regions appeared to be cell line-specific, such as RRP12 in LNCaP, USP14 in DU-145 and SMIN3 in lymphoblastoid cell line. We further found that the 8q24 functional domains more likely interacted with genomic regions containing genes enriched in critical pathways such as Wnt signaling and promoter motifs such as E2F1 and TCF3. This result suggests that the risk locus may function as a regulatory hub by physical interactions with multiple genes important for prostate carcinogenesis. Further understanding genetic effect and biological mechanism of these chromatin interactions will shed light on the newly discovered regulatory role of the risk locus in PC etiology and progression. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Linking genetic variants of the mineralocorticoid receptor and negative memory bias: Interaction with prior life adversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, S.; Gerritsen, L.; Oostrom, I.I.H. van; Arias Vasquez, A.; Rijpkema, M.J.P.; Joels, M.; Franke, B.; Tendolkar, I.; Fernandez, G.S.E.

    2014-01-01

    Substantial research has been conducted investigating the association between life adversity and genetic vulnerability for depression, but clear mechanistic links are rarely identified and investigation often focused on single genetic variants. Complex phenotypes like depression, however, are likely

  2. [Health locus of control of patients in disease management programmes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnee, M; Grikscheit, F

    2013-06-01

    Health locus of control beliefs plays a major role in improving self-management skills of the chronically ill - a main goal in disease management programmes (DMP). This study aims at characterising participants in disease management regarding their health locus of control. Data are based on 4 cross-sectional postal surveys between spring and autumn of 2006 and 2007 within the Health Care Monitor of the Bertelsmann Foundation. Among the 6 285 respondents, 1 266 are chronically ill and not enrolled in a DMP and 327 are participating in a DMP. A high internal locus of control (HLC) occurs significantly less often in DMP patients than in normal chronically ill patients (and healthy people) controlling for age, gender and social class. With increasing age, a high internal locus of control is also significantly less likely. When comparing healthy people, the chronically ill and the DMP participants a social gradient of a high internal locus of control belief can be observed. The weaker internal and higher doctor-related external locus of control of DMP participants should be carefully observed by the physician when trying to strengthen the patients' self-management skills. Evaluators of DMP should take into account the different baselines of DMP patients and relevant control groups and incorporate these differences into the evaluation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Neurolinguistic programming training, trait anxiety, and locus of control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konefal, J; Duncan, R C; Reese, M A

    1992-06-01

    Training in the neurolinguistic programming techniques of shifting perceptual position, visual-kinesthetic dissociation, timelines, and change-history, all based on experiential cognitive processing of remembered events, leads to an increased awareness of behavioral contingencies and a more sensitive recognition of environmental cues which could serve to lower trait anxiety and increase the sense of internal control. This study reports on within-person and between-group changes in trait anxiety and locus of control as measured on the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Wallston, Wallston, and DeVallis' Multiple Health Locus of Control immediately following a 21-day residential training in neurolinguistic programming. Significant with-in-person decreases in trait-anxiety scores and increases in internal locus of control scores were observed as predicted. Chance and powerful other locus of control scores were unchanged. Significant differences were noted on trait anxiety and locus of control scores between European and U.S. participants, although change scores were similar for the two groups. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that this training may lower trait-anxiety scores and increase internal locus of control scores. A matched control group was not available, and follow-up was unfortunately not possible.

  4. DNA modification study of major depressive disorder: beyond locus-by-locus comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Gabriel; Wang, Sun-Chong; Pal, Mrinal; Chen, Zheng Fei; Khare, Tarang; Tochigi, Mamoru; Ng, Catherine; Yang, Yeqing A; Kwan, Andrew; Kaminsky, Zachary A; Mill, Jonathan; Gunasinghe, Cerisse; Tackett, Jennifer L; Gottesman, Irving I; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J C; Vink, Jacqueline M; Slagboom, P Eline; Wray, Naomi R; Heath, Andrew C; Montgomery, Grant W; Turecki, Gustavo; Martin, Nicholas G; Boomsma, Dorret I; McGuffin, Peter; Kustra, Rafal; Petronis, Art

    2015-02-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) exhibits numerous clinical and molecular features that are consistent with putative epigenetic misregulation. Despite growing interest in epigenetic studies of psychiatric diseases, the methodologies guiding such studies have not been well defined. We performed DNA modification analysis in white blood cells from monozygotic twins discordant for MDD, in brain prefrontal cortex, and germline (sperm) samples from affected individuals and control subjects (total N = 304) using 8.1K CpG island microarrays and fine mapping. In addition to the traditional locus-by-locus comparisons, we explored the potential of new analytical approaches in epigenomic studies. In the microarray experiment, we detected a number of nominally significant DNA modification differences in MDD and validated selected targets using bisulfite pyrosequencing. Some MDD epigenetic changes, however, overlapped across brain, blood, and sperm more often than expected by chance. We also demonstrated that stratification for disease severity and age may increase the statistical power of epimutation detection. Finally, a series of new analytical approaches, such as DNA modification networks and machine-learning algorithms using binary and quantitative depression phenotypes, provided additional insights on the epigenetic contributions to MDD. Mapping epigenetic differences in MDD (and other psychiatric diseases) is a complex task. However, combining traditional and innovative analytical strategies may lead to identification of disease-specific etiopathogenic epimutations. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. All rights reserved.

  5. Insertional inactivation of a chromosomal locus that modulates expression of potential virulence determinants in Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, A L; Wolz, C; Yeaman, M R; Bayer, A S

    1995-01-01

    A single insertion of transposon Tn551 into a unique chromosomal locus of Staphylococcus aureus ISP479C has resulted in a pleiotropic effect on the expression of both extracellular and cell wall proteins. In particular, the expression of cell wall protein A and clumping activity with fibrinogen were rendered undetectable in the mutant 1E3 compared with the parent. The secretion of alpha-hemolysin in mutant 1E3 was modestly increased. Southern blot and phenotypic analyses indicated that this l...

  6. Inheritance of allozyme variants in bishop pine (Pinus muricata D.Don)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constance I. Millar

    1985-01-01

    Isozyme phenotypes are described for 45 structural loci and I modifier locus in bishop pine (Pinus muricata D. Don,) and segregation data are presented for a subset of 31 polymorphic loci from 19 enzyme systems. All polymorphic loci had alleles that segregated within single-focus Mendelian expectations, although one pair of alleles at each of three...

  7. Detection of a molecular deletion at the DXS732 locus in a patient with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA), with the identification of a unique junctional fragment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zonana, J.; Gault, J.; Jones, M.; Browne, D.; Litt, M. (Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland (United States)); Davies, K.J.P.; Clarke, A.; Thomas, N.S.T. (Univ. of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom)); Brockdorff, N.; Rastan, S. (Medical Research Council Clinical Research Centre, Harrow (United Kingdom))

    1993-01-01

    X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) has been localized to the Xq12-q13.1. A panel of genomic DNA samples from 80 unrelated males with EDA has been screened for deletions at seven genetic loci within the Xq12-13 region. A single individual was identified with a deletion at the DXS732 locus by hybridization with the mouse genomic probe pcos169E/4. This highly conserved DNA probe is from locus DXCrc169, which is tightly linked to the Ta locus, the putative mouse homologue of EDA. The proband had the classical phenotype of EDA, with no other phenotypic abnormalities, and a normal cytogenetic analysis. A human genomic DNA clone, homologous to pcos169E/4, was isolated from a human X-chromosome cosmid library. On hybridization with the cosmid, the proband was found to be only partially deleted at the DXS732 locus, with a unique junctional fragment identified in the proband and in three of his maternal relatives. This is the first determination of carrier status for EDA in females, by direct mutation analysis. Failure to detect deletion of the other loci tested in the proband suggests that the DXS732 locus is the closest known locus to the EDA gene. Since the DXS732 locus contains a highly conserved sequence, it must be considered to be a candidate locus for the EDA gene itself. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Genetic Variants Associated with Circulating Parathyroid Hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Cohen, Cassianne; Lutsey, Pamela L; Kleber, Marcus E; Nielson, Carrie M; Mitchell, Braxton D; Bis, Joshua C; Eny, Karen M; Portas, Laura; Eriksson, Joel; Lorentzon, Mattias; Koller, Daniel L; Milaneschi, Yuri; Teumer, Alexander; Pilz, Stefan; Nethander, Maria; Selvin, Elizabeth; Tang, Weihong; Weng, Lu-Chen; Wong, Hoi Suen; Lai, Dongbing; Peacock, Munro; Hannemann, Anke; Völker, Uwe; Homuth, Georg; Nauk, Matthias; Murgia, Federico; Pattee, Jack W; Orwoll, Eric; Zmuda, Joseph M; Riancho, Jose Antonio; Wolf, Myles; Williams, Frances; Penninx, Brenda; Econs, Michael J; Ryan, Kathleen A; Ohlsson, Claes; Paterson, Andrew D; Psaty, Bruce M; Siscovick, David S; Rotter, Jerome I; Pirastu, Mario; Streeten, Elizabeth; März, Winfried; Fox, Caroline; Coresh, Josef; Wallaschofski, Henri; Pankow, James S; de Boer, Ian H; Kestenbaum, Bryan

    2017-05-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a primary calcium regulatory hormone. Elevated serum PTH concentrations in primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism have been associated with bone disease, hypertension, and in some studies, cardiovascular mortality. Genetic causes of variation in circulating PTH concentrations are incompletely understood. We performed a genome-wide association study of serum PTH concentrations among 29,155 participants of European ancestry from 13 cohort studies ( n =22,653 and n =6502 in discovery and replication analyses, respectively). We evaluated the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with natural log-transformed PTH concentration adjusted for age, sex, season, study site, and principal components of ancestry. We discovered associations of SNPs from five independent regions with serum PTH concentration, including the strongest association with rs6127099 upstream of CYP24A1 ( P =4.2 × 10 -53 ), a gene that encodes the primary catabolic enzyme for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and 25-dihydroxyvitamin D. Each additional copy of the minor allele at this SNP associated with 7% higher serum PTH concentration. The other SNPs associated with serum PTH concentration included rs4074995 within RGS14 ( P =6.6 × 10 -17 ), rs219779 adjacent to CLDN14 ( P =3.5 × 10 -16 ), rs4443100 near RTDR1 ( P =8.7 × 10 -9 ), and rs73186030 near CASR ( P =4.8 × 10 -8 ). Of these five SNPs, rs6127099, rs4074995, and rs219779 replicated. Thus, common genetic variants located near genes involved in vitamin D metabolism and calcium and renal phosphate transport associated with differences in circulating PTH concentrations. Future studies could identify the causal variants at these loci, and the clinical and functional relevance of these variants should be pursued. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  9. Family studies to find rare high risk variants in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rikke Dyhr; Christensen, Anne Francke; Olesen, Jes

    2017-01-01

    genetic variants with bigger effect size may be involved in the disease. Since migraine has a tendency to cluster in families, a family approach might be the way to find these variants. This is also indicated by identification of migraine-associated loci in classical linkage-analyses in migraine families....... A single migraine study using a candidate-gene approach was performed in 2010 identifying a rare mutation in the TRESK potassium channel segregating in a large family with migraine with aura, but this finding has later become questioned. The technologies of next-generation sequencing (NGS) now provides...... an affordable tool to investigate the genetic variation in the entire exome or genome. The family-based study design using NGS is described in this paper. We also review family studies using NGS that have been successful in finding rare variants in other common complex diseases in order to argue the promising...

  10. TALE nickase mediates high efficient targeted transgene integration at the human multi-copy ribosomal DNA locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yong; Gao, Tieli; Wang, Xiaolin; Hu, Youjin; Hu, Xuyun; Hu, Zhiqing; Pang, Jialun; Li, Zhuo; Xue, Jinfeng; Feng, Mai; Wu, Lingqian; Liang, Desheng

    2014-03-28

    Although targeted gene addition could be stimulated strikingly by a DNA double strand break (DSB) created by either zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) or TALE nucleases (TALENs), the DSBs are really mutagenic and toxic to human cells. As a compromised solution, DNA single-strand break (SSB) or nick has been reported to mediate high efficient gene addition but with marked reduction of random mutagenesis. We previously demonstrated effective targeted gene addition at the human multicopy ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus, a genomic safe harbor for the transgene with therapeutic potential. To improve the transgene integration efficiency by using TALENs while lowering the cytotoxicity of DSBs, we created both TALENs and TALE nickases (TALENickases) targeting this multicopy locus. A targeting vector which could integrate a GFP cassette at the rDNA locus was constructed and co-transfected with TALENs or TALENickases. Although the fraction of GFP positive cells using TALENs was greater than that using TALENickases during the first few days after transfection, it reduced to a level less than that using TALENickases after continuous culture. Our findings showed that the TALENickases were more effective than their TALEN counterparts at the multi-copy rDNA locus, though earlier studies using ZFNs and ZFNickases targeting the single-copy loci showed the reverse. Besides, TALENickases mediated the targeted integration of a 5.4 kb fragment at a frequency of up to 0.62% in HT1080 cells after drug selection, suggesting their potential application in targeted gene modification not being limited at the rDNA locus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Data-variant kernel analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Motai, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Describes and discusses the variants of kernel analysis methods for data types that have been intensely studied in recent years This book covers kernel analysis topics ranging from the fundamental theory of kernel functions to its applications. The book surveys the current status, popular trends, and developments in kernel analysis studies. The author discusses multiple kernel learning algorithms and how to choose the appropriate kernels during the learning phase. Data-Variant Kernel Analysis is a new pattern analysis framework for different types of data configurations. The chapters include

  12. Functionally significant, rare transcription factor variants in tetralogy of Fallot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Töpf

    Full Text Available Rare variants in certain transcription factors involved in cardiac development cause Mendelian forms of congenital heart disease. The purpose of this study was to systematically assess the frequency of rare transcription factor variants in sporadic patients with the cardiac outflow tract malformation tetralogy of Fallot (TOF.We sequenced the coding, 5'UTR, and 3'UTR regions of twelve transcription factor genes implicated in cardiac outflow tract development (NKX2.5, GATA4, ISL1, TBX20, MEF2C, BOP/SMYD1, HAND2, FOXC1, FOXC2, FOXH, FOXA2 and TBX1 in 93 non-syndromic, non-Mendelian TOF cases. We also analysed Illumina Human 660W-Quad SNP Array data for copy number variants in these genes; none were detected. Four of the rare variants detected have previously been shown to affect transactivation in in vitro reporter assays: FOXC1 p.P297S, FOXC2 p.Q444R, FOXH1 p.S113T and TBX1 p.P43_G61del PPPPRYDPCAAAAPGAPGP. Two further rare variants, HAND2 p.A25_A26insAA and FOXC1 p.G378_G380delGGG, A488_491delAAAA, affected transactivation in in vitro reporter assays. Each of these six functionally significant variants was present in a single patient in the heterozygous state; each of the four for which parental samples were available were maternally inherited. Thus in the 93 TOF cases we identified six functionally significant mutations in the secondary heart field transcriptional network.This study indicates that rare genetic variants in the secondary heart field transcriptional network with functional effects on protein function occur in 3-13% of patients with TOF. This is the first report of a functionally significant HAND2 mutation in a patient with congenital heart disease.

  13. Diverse Functional Properties of Wilson Disease ATP7B Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huster, Dominik; Kühne, Angelika; Bhattacharjee, Ashima; Raines, Lily; Jantsch, Vanessa; Noe, Johannes; Schirrmeister, Wiebke; Sommerer, Ines; Sabri, Osama; Berr, Frieder; Mössner, Joachim; Stieger, Bruno; Caca, Karel; Lutsenko, Svetlana

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Wilson disease is a severe disorder of copper metabolism caused by mutations in ATP7B, which encodes a copper-transporting adenosine triphosphatase. The disease presents with a variable phenotype that complicates the diagnostic process and treatment. Little is known about the mechanisms that contribute to the different phenotypes of the disease. METHODS We analyzed 28 variants of ATP7B from patients with Wilson disease that affected different functional domains; the gene products were expressed using the baculovirus expression system in Sf9 cells. Protein function was analyzed by measuring catalytic activity and copper (64Cu) transport into vesicles. We studied intracellular localization of variants of ATP7B that had measurable transport activities and were tagged with green fluorescent protein in mammalian cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. RESULTS Properties of ATP7B variants with pathogenic amino-acid substitution varied greatly even if substitutions were in the same functional domain. Some variants had complete loss of catalytic and transport activity, whereas others lost transport activity but retained phosphor-intermediate formation or had partial losses of activity. In mammalian cells, transport-competent variants differed in stability and subcellular localization. CONCLUSIONS Variants in ATP7B associated with Wilson disease disrupt the protein’s transport activity, result in its mislocalization, and reduce its stability. Single assays are insufficient to accurately predict the effects of ATP7B variants the function of its product and development of Wilson disease. These findings will contribute to our understanding of genotype–phenotype correlation and mechanisms of disease pathogenesis. PMID:22240481

  14. Screening for common copy-number variants in cancer genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Jess; Majerus, Tamsin M O; Walker, Susan; Armour, John A L

    2010-12-01

    For most cases of colorectal cancer that arise without a family history of the disease, it is proposed that an appreciable heritable component of predisposition is the result of contributions from many loci. Although progress has been made in identifying single nucleotide variants associated with colorectal cancer risk, the involvement of low-penetrance copy number variants is relatively unexplored. We have used multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization (MAPH) in a fourfold multiplex (QuadMAPH), positioned at an average resolution of one probe per 2 kb, to screen a total of 1.56 Mb of genomic DNA for copy number variants around the genes APC, AXIN1, BRCA1, BRCA2, CTNNB1, HRAS, MLH1, MSH2, and TP53. Two deletion events were detected, one upstream of MLH1 in a control individual and the other in APC in a colorectal cancer patient, but these do not seem to correspond to copy number polymorphisms with measurably high population frequencies. In summary, by means of our QuadMAPH assay, copy number measurement data were of sufficient resolution and accuracy to detect any copy number variants with high probability. However, this study has demonstrated a very low incidence of deletion and duplication variants within intronic and flanking regions of these nine genes, in both control individuals and colorectal cancer patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Canine parvovirus: the worldwide occurrence of antigenic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Carla; Thompson, Gertrude

    2016-09-01

    The most important enteric virus infecting canids is canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2). CPV is the aetiologic agent of a contagious disease, mainly characterized by clinical gastroenteritis signs in younger dogs. CPV-2 emerged as a new virus in the late 1970s, which could infect domestic dogs, and became distributed in the global dog population within 2 years. A few years later, the virus's original type was replaced by a new genetic and antigenic variant, called CPV-2a. Around 1984 and 2000, virus variants with the single change to Asp or Glu in the VP2 residue 426 were detected (sometimes termed CPV-2b and -2c). The genetic and antigenic changes in the variants have also been correlated with changes in their host range; in particular, in the ability to replicate in cats and also host range differences in canine and other tissue culture cells. CPV-2 variants have been circulating among wild carnivores and have been well-documented in several countries around the world. Here, we have reviewed and summarized the current information about the worldwide distribution and evolution of CPV-2 variants since they emerged, as well as the host ranges they are associated with.

  16. Discovery and functional annotation of SIX6 variants in primary open-angle glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Ulmer Carnes

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG is the most common subtype and is a complex trait with multigenic inheritance. Genome-wide association studies have previously identified a significant association between POAG and the SIX6 locus (rs10483727, odds ratio (OR = 1.32, p = 3.87×10(-11. SIX6 plays a role in ocular development and has been associated with the morphology of the optic nerve. We sequenced the SIX6 coding and regulatory regions in 262 POAG cases and 256 controls and identified six nonsynonymous coding variants, including five rare and one common variant, Asn141His (rs33912345, which was associated significantly with POAG (OR = 1.27, p = 4.2×10(-10 in the NEIGHBOR/GLAUGEN datasets. These variants were tested in an in vivo Danio rerio (zebrafish complementation assay to evaluate ocular metrics such as eye size and optic nerve structure. Five variants, found primarily in POAG cases, were hypomorphic or null, while the sixth variant, found only in controls, was benign. One variant in the SIX6 enhancer increased expression of SIX6 and disrupted its regulation. Finally, to our knowledge for the first time, we have identified a clinical feature in POAG patients that appears to be dependent upon SIX6 genotype: patients who are homozygous for the SIX6 risk allele (His141 have a statistically thinner retinal nerve fiber layer than patients homozygous for the SIX6 non-risk allele (Asn141. Our results, in combination with previous SIX6 work, lead us to hypothesize that SIX6 risk variants disrupt the development of the neural retina, leading to a reduced number of retinal ganglion cells, thereby increasing the risk of glaucoma-associated vision loss.

  17. GCPII Variants, Paralogs and Orthologs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlouchová, Klára; Navrátil, Václav; Tykvart, Jan; Šácha, Pavel; Konvalinka, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 9 (2012), s. 1316-1322 ISSN 0929-8673 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/12/0847 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : PSMA * GCPIII * NAALADase L * splice variants * homologs * PSMAL Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.070, year: 2012

  18. Odontogenic keratocyst: a peripheral variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vij, H; Vij, R; Gupta, V; Sengupta, S

    2011-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocyst, which is developmental in nature, is an intraosseous lesion though on rare occasions it may occur in an extraosseous location. The extraosseous variant is referred to as peripheral odontogenic keratocyst. Though, clinically, peripheral odontogenic keratocyst resembles the gingival cyst of adults, it has histologic features that are pathognomonic of odontogenic keratocyst. This article presents a case of this uncommon entity.

  19. Common and rare variants in SCN10A modulate the risk of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Javad; Olesen, Morten S; Yuan, Lei

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies have shown that the common single nucleotide polymorphism rs6800541 located in SCN10A, encoding the voltage-gated Nav1.8 sodium channel, is associated with PR-interval prolongation and atrial fibrillation (AF). Single nucleotide polymorphism rs6800541...... is in high linkage disequilibrium with the nonsynonymous variant in SCN10A, rs6795970 (V1073A, r(2)=0.933). We therefore sought to determine whether common and rare SCN10A variants are associated with early onset AF. METHODS AND RESULTS: SCN10A was sequenced in 225 AF patients in whom there was no evidence...... of other cardiovascular disease or dysfunction (lone AF). In an association study of the rs6795970 single nucleotide polymorphism variant, we included 515 AF patients and 2 control cohorts of 730 individuals free of AF and 6161 randomly sampled individuals. Functional characterization of SCN10A variants...

  20. Efficient utilization of rare variants for detection of disease-related genomic regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available When testing association between rare variants and diseases, an efficient analytical approach involves considering a set of variants in a genomic region as the unit of analysis. One factor complicating this approach is that the vast majority of rare variants in practical applications are believed to represent background neutral variation. As a result, analyzing a single set with all variants may not represent a powerful approach. Here, we propose two alternative strategies. In the first, we analyze the subsets of rare variants exhaustively. In the second, we categorize variants selectively into two subsets: one in which variants are overrepresented in cases, and the other in which variants are overrepresented in controls. When the proportion of neutral variants is moderate to large we show, by simulations, that the both proposed strategies improve the statistical power over methods analyzing a single set with total variants. When applied to a real sequencing association study, the proposed methods consistently produce smaller p-values than their competitors. When applied to another real sequencing dataset to study the difference of rare allele distributions between ethnic populations, the proposed methods detect the overrepresentation of variants between the CHB (Chinese Han in Beijing and YRI (Yoruba people of Ibadan populations with small p-values. Additional analyses suggest that there is no difference between the CHB and CHD (Chinese Han in Denver datasets, as expected. Finally, when applied to the CHB and JPT (Japanese people in Tokyo populations, existing methods fail to detect any difference, while it is detected by the proposed methods in several regions.

  1. The Role of Constitutional Copy Number Variants in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Logan C.; Wiggins, George A.R.; Pearson, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Constitutional copy number variants (CNVs) include inherited and de novo deviations from a diploid state at a defined genomic region. These variants contribute significantly to genetic variation and disease in humans, including breast cancer susceptibility. Identification of genetic risk factors for breast cancer in recent years has been dominated by the use of genome-wide technologies, such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-arrays, with a significant focus on single nucleotide variants. To date, these large datasets have been underutilised for generating genome-wide CNV profiles despite offering a massive resource for assessing the contribution of these structural variants to breast cancer risk. Technical challenges remain in determining the location and distribution of CNVs across the human genome due to the accuracy of computational prediction algorithms and resolution of the array data. Moreover, better methods are required for interpreting the functional effect of newly discovered CNVs. In this review, we explore current and future application of SNP array technology to assess rare and common CNVs in association with breast cancer risk in humans. PMID:27600231

  2. Mutation at the Human D1S80 Minisatellite Locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuppareddi Balamurugan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the general biology of minisatellites. The purpose of this study is to examine repeat mutations from the D1S80 minisatellite locus by sequence analysis to elucidate the mutational process at this locus. This is a highly polymorphic minisatellite locus, located in the subtelomeric region of chromosome 1. We have analyzed 90,000 human germline transmission events and found seven (7 mutations at this locus. The D1S80 alleles of the parentage trio, the child, mother, and the alleged father were sequenced and the origin of the mutation was determined. Using American Association of Blood Banks (AABB guidelines, we found a male mutation rate of 1.04×10-4 and a female mutation rate of 5.18×10-5 with an overall mutation rate of approximately 7.77×10-5. Also, in this study, we found that the identified mutations are in close proximity to the center of the repeat array rather than at the ends of the repeat array. Several studies have examined the mutational mechanisms of the minisatellites according to infinite allele model (IAM and the one-step stepwise mutation model (SMM. In this study, we found that this locus fits into the one-step mutation model (SMM mechanism in six out of seven instances similar to STR loci.

  3. TERT-CLPTM1 locus polymorphism (rs401681 is associated with the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee HW

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Hye Won Lee,1,* Won-Jin Park,2,* Yu-Ran Heo,2 Tae In Park,3 Soo Young Park,4 Jae-Ho Lee2,* 1Department of Pathology, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Republic of Korea; 2Department of Anatomy, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Republic of Korea; 3Department of Pathology, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu, Republic of Korea; 4Department of Internal Medicine, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Telomere length is associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, and recent studies have focused on the genetic alteration or polymorphism in telomere-maintaining genes. We examined the clinicopathologic and prognostic value of rs401681 polymorphism, located in the TERT-CLPTM1L locus, in HCC. The relationship between rs401681 variants and telomere length was also analyzed in 156 HCC patients. The rs401681 polymorphism had the following genotype frequencies: C/C in 51.3% of the samples, C/T in 39.7%, and T/T in 9.0%. Telomeres in the tumor samples were 4.04-fold longer, on average, than the telomeres in matched normal samples (SD =1.32, and there were no differences in telomere length according to rs401681 polymorphism (p=0.802. Our results indicate that the rs401681 C allele was significantly associated with increased T and International Union for Cancer Control stages (p<0.01. Univariate and multivariate survival analyses showed that HCC with C allele had poorer prognosis (p<0.01. In conclusion, our findings suggest that rs401681 is a possible prognostic biomarker for HCC patients. Keywords: CLPTM1L polymorphism, hepatocellular carcinoma, TERT-CLPTM1L locus, telomere length

  4. Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Information on Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Virus Language: English (US) Español Recommend ...

  5. Quantitative Trait Locus and Brain Expression of HLA-DPA1 Offers Evidence of Shared Immune Alterations in Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Z. Morgan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies of schizophrenia encompassing the major histocompatibility locus (MHC were highly significant following genome-wide correction. This broad region implicates many genes including the MHC complex class II. Within this interval we examined the expression of two MHC II genes (HLA-DPA1 and HLA-DRB1 in brain from individual subjects with schizophrenia (SZ, bipolar disorder (BD, major depressive disorder (MDD, and controls by differential gene expression methods. A third MHC II mRNA, CD74, was studied outside of the MHC II locus, as it interacts within the same immune complex. Exon microarrays were performed in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC in BD compared to controls, and both HLA-DPA1 and CD74 were decreased in expression in BD. The expression of HLA-DPA1 and CD74 were both reduced in hippocampus, amygdala, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex regions in SZ and BD compared to controls by specific qPCR assay. We found several novel HLA-DPA1 mRNA variants spanning HLA-DPA1 exons 2-3-4 as suggested by exon microarrays. The intronic rs9277341 SNP was a significant cis expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL that was associated with the total expression of HLA-DPA1 in five brain regions. A biomarker study of MHC II mRNAs was conducted in SZ, BD, MDD, and control lymphoblastic cell lines (LCL by qPCR assay of 87 subjects. There was significantly decreased expression of HLA-DPA1 and CD74 in BD, and trends for reductions in SZ in LCLs. The discovery of multiple splicing variants in brain for HLA-DPA1 is important as the HLA-DPA1 gene is highly conserved, there are no reported splicing variants, and the functions in brain are unknown. Future work on the function and localization of MHC Class II proteins in brain will help to understand the role of alterations in neuropsychiatric disorders. The HLA-DPA1 eQTL is located within a large linkage disequilibrium block that has an irrefutable association with schizophrenia. Future

  6. AIDS Health Locus of Control, Self-Efficacy for Safer Sexual Practices, and Future Time Orientation as Predictors of Condom Use in African American College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Myron J.; Dillon, Frank R.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between self-reported frequency of condom use (by self or partner during the past 6 months and lifetime), locus of control, self-efficacy, and future time orientation among African American college students who were single and sexually active during the past year. Data were collected from 106 undergraduate…

  7. A candidate type 2 diabetes polymorphism near the HHEX locus affects acute glucose-stimulated insulin release in European populations: results from the EUGENE2 study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staiger, Harald; Stancáková, Alena; Zilinskaite, Jone

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In recent genome-wide association studies, two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near the HHEX locus were shown to be more frequent in type 2 diabetic patients than in control subjects. Based on HHEX's function during embryonic development of the ventral pancreas in mice, we inves...

  8. Unraveling of the polymorphic C lambda 2-C lambda 3 amplification and the Ke+Oz- polymorphism in the human Ig lambda locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van der Burg (Mirjam); B.H. Barendregt (Barbara); E.J. van Gastel-Mol (Ellen); T. Tümkaya (Talip); A.W. Langerak (Anton); J.J.M. van Dongen (Jacques)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractTwo polymorphisms of the human Ig(lambda) (IGL) locus have been described. The first polymorphism concerns a single, 2- or 3-fold amplification of 5.4 kb of DNA in the C(lambda)2-C(lambda)3 region. The second polymorphism is the Mcg(-)Ke(+)Oz(-) isotype, which has

  9. Germline Variants in Targeted Tumor Sequencing Using Matched Normal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Kasmintan A; Cheng, Donavan T; Joseph, Vijai; Prasad, Meera; Walsh, Michael; Zehir, Ahmet; Ni, Ai; Thomas, Tinu; Benayed, Ryma; Ashraf, Asad; Lincoln, Annie; Arcila, Maria; Stadler, Zsofia; Solit, David; Hyman, David M; Hyman, David; Zhang, Liying; Klimstra, David; Ladanyi, Marc; Offit, Kenneth; Berger, Michael; Robson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Tumor genetic sequencing identifies potentially targetable genetic alterations with therapeutic implications. Analysis has concentrated on detecting tumor-specific variants, but recognition of germline variants may prove valuable as well. To estimate the burden of germline variants identified through routine clinical tumor sequencing. Patients with advanced cancer diagnoses eligible for studies of targeted agents at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center are offered tumor-normal sequencing with MSK-IMPACT, a 341-gene panel. We surveyed the germline variants seen in 187 overlapping genes with Mendelian disease associations in 1566 patients who had undergone tumor profiling between March and October 2014. The number of presumed pathogenic germline variants (PPGVs) and variants of uncertain significance per person in 187 genes associated with single-gene disorders and the proportions of individuals with PPGVs in clinically relevant gene subsets, in genes consistent with known tumor phenotypes, and in genes with evidence of second somatic hits in their tumors. The mean age of the 1566 patients was 58 years, and 54% were women. Presumed pathogenic germline variants in known Mendelian disease-associated genes were identified in 246 of 1566 patients (15.7%; 95% CI, 14.0%-17.6%), including 198 individuals with mutations in genes associated with cancer susceptibility. Germline findings in cancer susceptibility genes were concordant with the individual's cancer type in only 81 of 198 cases (40.9%; 95% CI, 34.3%-47.9%). In individuals with PPGVs retained in the tumor, somatic alteration of the other allele was seen in 39 of 182 cases (21.4%; 95% CI, 16.1%-28.0%), of which 13 cases did not show a known correlation of the germline mutation and a known syndrome. Mutations in non-cancer-related Mendelian disease genes were seen in 55 of 1566 cases (3.5%; 95% CI, 27.1%-45.4%). Almost every individual had more than 1 variant of uncertain significance (1565 of 1566 patients; 99

  10. Genetic variants of 17q21 are associated with childhood-onset asthma and related phenotypes in a northeastern Han Chinese population: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, X; Yu, C; Ren, Z; Deng, Y; Song, J; Zhang, H; Zhou, H

    2014-05-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) suggested that variants on chromosome 17q21 were associated with childhood-onset asthma in white populations. Two replication studies had been conducted in southern Han Chinese population in 2009 and 2012. However, these two Chinese replication results were inconsistent. To further confirm the role of 17q21 common variants, an association study of 17q21 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with the risk of childhood-onset asthma was performed in a Han population from northeastern China. In this study, rs3894194, rs12603332 and rs11650680 were genotyped in 435 asthmatic children and 601 healthy controls by using a SNaPshot method. Our data showed that the allelic frequency of rs12603332 and rs11650680 showed significant differences between asthmatic cases and healthy controls, with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.36 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12-1.65, P=0.002] and an OR of 1.36 (95% CI 1.07-1.74, P=0.01). Genotype distribution analysis also showed the significant associations of the above two loci with childhood asthma under dominant, recessive and additive model (dominant OR=1.57, 95% CI 1.04-2.36, P=0.032; recessive OR=1.41, 95% CI 1.09-1.83, P=0.009; additive OR=1.97, 95% CI 1.24-3.14, P=0.004; recessive OR=1.50, 95% CI 1.13-1.98, P=0.005). Besides, linear regression analysis showed that rs3894194 and rs12603332 were also significantly associated with asthma phenotypes such as log10 -transformed immunoglobulin E (IgE) level (IU/ml) and log10 -transformed eosinophil percentage (dominant, P=0.04; additive, P=0.01; recessive, P=0.04; recessive, P=0.03; additive, P=0.02). Collectively, our findings suggest that orosomucoid 1-like 3 (ORMDL3) locus on chromosome 17q21 is a risk factor for childhood-onset asthma in northeastern Han Chinese population. Further studies will be needed to elucidate the pathogenesis that ORMDL3 locus predisposes to childhood-onset asthma. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Single-peak solitary wave solutions for the variant Boussinesq ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ear dispersive waves in shallow water. This equation has attracted a lot of attention ... which is a model for water waves (a = 0), where u(x, t) is the velocity, H(x, t) is the total depth and the subscripts denote partial ... cusped solitary wave solutions of the osmosis K(2, 2) equation. Zhang and Chen [6] obtained new types of ...

  12. Genetic variant in the 3'-untranslated region of VEGFR1 gene influences chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer development in Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Yang, Lei; Deng, Jieqiong; Wang, Bo; Yang, Xiaorong; Yang, Rongrong; Cheng, Mei; Fang, Wenxiang; Qiu, Fuman; Zhang, Xin; Ji, Weidong; Ran, Pixin; Zhou, Yifeng; Lu, Jiachun

    2014-09-01

    Lung inflammation and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) are two pathogenic features for the two contextual diseases: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. VEGFR1 (or FLT1) plays a certain role in promoting tumour growth, inflammation and EMT. To simultaneously test the association between the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in VEGFR1 and risk of COPD and lung cancer would reveal genetic mechanisms shared by these two diseases and joint aetiology. We conducted a two-population hospital-based case-control study. Three potential functional SNPs (rs664393, rs7326277 and rs9554314) were genotyped in southern Chinese and validated in eastern Chinese to explore their associations with COPD risk in 1511 COPD patients and 1677 normal lung function controls, and with lung cancer risk in 1559 lung cancer cases and 1679 cancer-free controls. We also detected the function of the promising SNP. Individuals carrying the rs7326277C (CT+CC) variant genotypes of VEGFR1 had a significant decrease in risk of both COPD (OR = 0.78; 95% CI = 0.68-0.90) and lung cancer (OR = 0.79; 95% CI = 0.64-0.98), compared with those carrying the rs7326277TT genotype. Functional assays further showed that the rs7326277C genotypes had lower transcriptional activity and caused decreased VEGFR expression, compared with the rs7326277TT genotype. However, no significant association was observed for the other two SNPs (rs664393 and rs9554314) and either COPD or lung cancer risk. Our data suggested that the rs7326277C variant of VEGFR1 could reduce both COPD and lung cancer risk by lowering VEGFR1 mRNA expression; the SNP might be a common susceptible locus for both COPD and lung cancer. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Genetic Variants at BCL11A and HBS1L-MYB loci Influence Hb F Levels in Chinese Zhuang β-Thalassemia Intermedia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yunli; Chen, Yun; Chen, Biyan; Zheng, Haiyang; Yi, Sheng; Li, Guojian; Wei, Hongwei; He, Sheng; Zheng, Chenguang

    2016-11-01

    Increased Hb F levels can ameliorate the symptoms of β-thalassemia (β-thal). Due to the genetic heterogenicity of β-thal, the relationship between genetic variants in modifier genes and Hb F level has been studied in different populations. The Chinese Zhuang has the second largest population in China and has 6.78% prevalence of β-thal. However, the effects of these single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variants on the Hb F levels of β-thal intermedia (β-TI) patients in this population have not been reported. To explore the association between modifier loci (β-globin gene cluster, HBS1L-MYB intergenic region and BCL11A) and Hb F levels in Chinese Zhuang β-TI patients, 96 unrelated β-TI patients (50 males and 46 females) with different Hb F levels were recruited and genotyped by mass spectrometry. A total of 13 SNPs were confirmed to be in a significant relationship with Hb F levels in this population. Of these, high-risk genotypes of six Hb F-associated SNPs, rs9376090, rs7776054, rs9399137, rs9389268, rs9402685 in the HBS1L-MYB intergenic region and rs189984760 in the BCL11A locus, showed association with high Hb F levels, especially for SNPs in linkage disequilibrium. One novel Hb F-associated SNP, rs189984760, was identified in our study. Our findings will be of valuable reference for correlation between modifier genes and Hb F in Chinese Zhuang populations and may lead to better understand the modifying mechanisms for β-thal.

  14. [Observation and analysis on mutation of routine STR locus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiu-yang; Feng, Wei-jun; Yang, Qin-gen

    2005-05-01

    To observe and analyze the characteristic of mutation at STR locus. 27 mutant genes observed in 1211 paternity testing cases were checked by PAGE-silver stained and PowerPlex 16 System Kit and validated by sequencing. Mutant genes locate on 15 loci. The pattern of mutation was accord with stepwise mutation model. The mutation ratio of male-to-female was 8:1 and correlated to the age of father. Mutation rate is correlated to the geometric mean of the number of homogeneous repeats of locus. The higher the mean, the higher the mutation rate. These loci are not so appropriate for use in paternity testing.

  15. Genetic and physical maps around the sex-determining M-locus of the dioecious plant asparagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telgmann-Rauber, Alexa; Jamsari, Ari; Kinney, Michael S; Pires, J Chris; Jung, Christian

    2007-09-01

    Asparagus officinalis L. is a dioecious plant. A region called the M-locus located on a pair of homomorphic sex chromosomes controls the sexual dimorphism in asparagus. The aim of this work was to clone the region determining sex in asparagus from its position in the genome. The structure of the region encompassing M should be investigated and compared to the sex-determining regions in other dioecious model species. To establish an improved basis for physical mapping, a high-resolution genetic map was enriched with AFLP markers closely linked to the target locus by carrying out a bulked segregant analysis. By screening a BAC library with AFLP- and STS-markers followed by chromosome walking, a physical map with eight contigs could be established. However, the gaps between the contigs could not be closed due to a plethora of repetitive elements. Surprisingly, two of the contigs on one side of the M-locus did not overlap although they have been established with two markers, which mapped in a distance as low as 0.25 cM flanking the sex locus. Thus, the clustering of the markers indicates a reduced recombination frequency within the M-region. On the opposite side of the M-locus, a contig was mapped in a distance of 0.38 cM. Four closely linked BAC clones were partially sequenced and 64 putative ORFs were identified. Interestingly, only 25% of the ORFs showed sequence similarity to known proteins and ESTs. In addition, an accumulation of repetitive sequences and a low gene density was revealed in the sex-determining region of asparagus. Molecular cytogenetic and sequence analysis of BACs flanking the M-locus indicate that the BACs contain highly repetitive sequences that localize to centromeric and pericentromeric locations on all asparagus chromosomes, which hindered the localization of the M-locus to the single pair of sex chromosomes. We speculate that dioecious Silene, papaya and Asparagus species may represent three stages in the evolution of XX, XY sex

  16. MTNR1B G24E variant associates With BMI and fasting plasma glucose in the general population in studies of 22,142 Europeans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ehm A; Holst, Birgitte; Sparsø, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Common variants in the melatonin receptor type 1B (MTNR1B) locus have been shown to increase fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and the risk of type 2 diabetes. The aims of this study were to evaluate whether nonsynonymous variants in MTNR1B associate with monogenic forms of hyperglycemia...... specific, and none of the investigated MTNR1B variants associated with type 2 diabetes. The common 24E variant associated with increased prevalence of obesity (odds ratio 1.20 [1.08-1.34]; P = 8.3 x 10(-4)) and increased BMI (beta = 0.5 kg/m(2); P = 1.2 x 10(-5)) and waist circumference (beta = 1.2 cm; P...

  17. Coronary artery anatomy and variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malago, Roberto; Pezzato, Andrea; Barbiani, Camilla; Alfonsi, Ugolino; Nicoli, Lisa; Caliari, Giuliana; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto [Policlinico G.B. Rossi, University of Verona, Department of Radiology, Verona (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    Variants and congenital anomalies of the coronary arteries are usually asymptomatic, but may present with severe chest pain or cardiac arrest. The introduction of multidetector CT coronary angiography (MDCT-CA) allows the detection of significant coronary artery stenosis. Improved performance with isotropic spatial resolution and higher temporal resolution provides a valid alternative to conventional coronary angiography (CCA) in many patients. MDCT-CA is now considered the ideal tool for three-dimensional visualization of the complex and tortuous anatomy of the coronary arteries. With multiplanar and volume-rendered reconstructions, MDCT-CA may even outperform CCA in determining the relative position of vessels, thus providing a better view of the coronary vascular anatomy. The purpose of this review is to describe the normal anatomy of the coronary arteries and their main variants based on MDCT-CA with appropriate reconstructions. (orig.)

  18. Intronic variants in the dopa decarboxylase (DDC) gene are associated with smoking behavior in European-Americans and African-Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi; Panhuysen, Carolien; Kranzler, Henry R; Hesselbrock, Victor; Rounsaville, Bruce; Weiss, Roger; Brady, Kathleen; Farrer, Lindsay A; Gelernter, Joel

    2006-07-15

    We report here a study considering association of alleles and haplotypes at the DOPA decarboxylase (DDC) locus with the DSM-IV diagnosis of nicotine dependence (ND) or a quantitative measure for ND using the Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND). We genotyped 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning a region of approximately 210 kb that includes DDC and the genes immediately flanking DDC in 1,590 individuals from 621 families of African-American (AA) or European-American (EA) ancestry. Evidence of association (family-based tests) was observed with several SNPs for both traits (0.0002DDC lacking exons 10-15. Haplotype analysis did not reveal any SNP combination with stronger evidence for association than rs12718541 alone. Although sequence analysis suggests that rs12718541 may be an intronic splicing enhancer, further studies are needed to determine whether a direct link exists between an alternatively spliced form of DDC and predisposition to ND. These findings confirm a previous report of association of DDC with ND, localize the causative variants to the 3' end of the coding region and extend the association to multiple population groups.

  19. Inheritance of late flowering in natural variants of soybean cultivars under short-day conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Carpentieri-Pipolo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the inheritance of the long juvenile period trait in natural variants of the Doko, BR 9 (Savana, Davis, Embrapa 1 (IAS 5RC, and BR 16 soybean cultivars. Complete diallel crosses were made between the Doko and BR 16 cultivars and their variants. A 3:1 segregation ratio was observed in the F2 populations of the 'Doko' x Doko-18T, 'Doko' x Doko-Milionária, 'Davis' x São Carlos, and 'BR 9 (Savana' x MABR92-836 (Savanão crosses, indicating that the long juvenile period trait is controlled by a pair of recessive genes. The difference in late flowering between the Doko cultivar and both of its variants was caused by a recessive spontaneous mutation at the same genetic locus. However, the variants Doko-18T and Doko-Milionária are identical mutants that share a pair of genes that control the long juvenile period under short-day conditions. These mutants can be used in breeding programs to develop cultivars adapted to low-latitude tropical regions.

  20. MSX1 gene variant - its presence in tooth absence - a case control genetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Naveen Admala; Adusumilli, Gopinath; Devanna, Raghu; Pichai, Saravanan; Rohra, Mayur Gobindram; Arjunan, Sharmila

    2013-10-01

    Non Syndromic tooth agenesis is a congenital anomaly with significant medical, psychological and social ramifications. There is sufficient evidence to hypothesize that locus for this condition can be identified by candidate genes. The aim of this study was to test whether MSX1 671 T>C gene variant was involved in etiology of Non Syndromic tooth agenesis in Raichur Patients. Blood samples were collected with informed consent from 50 subjects having Non Syndromic tooth agenesis and 50 controls. Genomic DNA was extracted from the blood samples, Polymerase Chain Reaction was performed (PCR) and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) was performed for digestion products that were evaluated. The RESULTS showed positive correlation between MSX1671 T>C gene variant and Non Syndromic tooth agenesis in Raichur Patients. MSX1 671 T>C gene variant may be a good screening marker for Non Syndromic tooth agenesis in Raichur Patients . How to cite this article:Reddy NA, Adusumilli G, Devanna R, Pichai S, Rohra MG, Arjunan S. Msx1 Gene Variant - Its Presence in Tooth Absence - A Case Control Genetic Study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):20-6.

  1. Microcystic Variant of Urothelial Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Kodzo-Grey Venyo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Microcystic variant of urothelial carcinoma is one of the new variants of urothelial carcinoma that was added to the WHO classification in 2004. Aims. To review the literature on microcystic variant of urothelial carcinoma. Methods. Various internet search engines were used to identify reported cases of the tumour. Results. Microscopic features of the tumour include: (i Conspicuous intracellular and intercellular lumina/microcysts encompassed by malignant urothelial or squamous cells. (ii The lumina are usually empty; may contain granular eosinophilic debris, mucin, or necrotic cells. (iii The cysts may be variable in size; round, or oval, up to 2 mm; lined by urothelium which are either flattened cells or low columnar cells however, they do not contain colonic epithelium or goblet cells; are infiltrative; invade the muscularis propria; mimic cystitis cystica and cystitis glandularis; occasionally exhibit neuroendocrine differentiation. (iv Elongated and irregular branching spaces are usually seen. About 17 cases of the tumour have been reported with only 2 patients who have survived. The tumour tends to be of high-grade and high-stage. There is no consensus opinion on the best option of treatment of the tumour. Conclusions. It would prove difficult at the moment to be dogmatic regarding its prognosis but it is a highly aggressive tumour. New cases of the tumour should be reported in order to document its biological behaviour.

  2. Heterotic trait locus (HTL) mapping identifies intra-locus interactions that underlie reproductive hybrid vigor in Sorghum bicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Israel, Imri; Kilian, Benjamin; Nida, Habte; Fridman, Eyal

    2012-01-01

    Identifying intra-locus interactions underlying heterotic variation among whole-genome hybrids is a key to understanding mechanisms of heterosis and exploiting it for crop and livestock improvement. In this study, we present the development and first use of the heterotic trait locus (HTL) mapping approach to associate specific intra-locus interactions with an overdominant heterotic mode of inheritance in a diallel population using Sorghum bicolor as the model. This method combines the advantages of ample genetic diversity and the possibility of studying non-additive inheritance. Furthermore, this design enables dissecting the latter to identify specific intra-locus interactions. We identified three HTLs (3.5% of loci tested) with synergistic intra-locus effects on overdominant grain yield heterosis in 2 years of field trials. These loci account for 19.0% of the heterotic variation, including a significant interaction found between two of them. Moreover, analysis of one of these loci (hDPW4.1) in a consecutive F2 population confirmed a significant 21% increase in grain yield of heterozygous vs. homozygous plants in this locus. Notably, two of the three HTLs for grain yield are in synteny with previously reported overdominant quantitative trait loci for grain yield in maize. A mechanism for the reproductive heterosis found in this study is suggested, in which grain yield increase is achieved by releasing the compensatory tradeoffs between biomass and reproductive output, and between seed number and weight. These results highlight the power of analyzing a diverse set of inbreds and their hybrids for unraveling hitherto unknown allelic interactions mediating heterosis.

  3. The DAOA/G30 locus and affective disorders: haplotype based association study in a polydiagnostic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knapp Michael

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The DAOA/G30 (D-amino acid oxidase activator gene complex at chromosomal region 13q32-33 is one of the most intriguing susceptibility loci for the major psychiatric disorders, although there is no consensus about the specific risk alleles or haplotypes across studies. Methods In a case-control sample of German descent (affective psychosis: n = 248; controls: n = 188 we examined seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs around DAOA/G30 (rs3916966, rs1935058, rs2391191, rs1935062, rs947267, rs3918342, and rs9558575 for genetic association in a polydiagnostic approach (ICD 10; Leonhard's classification. Results No single marker showed evidence of overall association with affective disorder neither in ICD10 nor Leonhard's classification. Haplotype analysis revealed no association with recurrent unipolar depression or bipolar disorder according to ICD10, within Leonhard's classification manic-depression was associated with a 3-locus haplotype (rs2391191, rs1935062, and rs3916966; P = 0.022 and monopolar depression with a 5-locus combination at the DAOA/G30 core region (P = 0.036. Conclusion Our data revealed potential evidence for partially overlapping risk haplotypes at the DAOA/G30 locus in Leonhard's affective psychoses, but do not support a common genetic contribution of the DAOA/G30 gene complex to the pathogenesis of affective disorders.

  4. An LL-diaminopimelate aminotransferase defines a novel variant of the lysine biosynthesis pathway in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, André O; Singh, Bijay K; Leustek, Thomas; Gilvarg, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Although lysine (Lys) biosynthesis in plants is known to occur by way of a pathway that utilizes diaminopimelic acid (DAP) as a central intermediate, the available evidence suggests that none of the known DAP-pathway variants found in nature occur in plants. A new Lys biosynthesis pathway has been identified in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that utilizes a novel transaminase that specifically catalyzes the interconversion of tetrahydrodipicolinate and LL-diaminopimelate, a reaction requiring three enzymes in the DAP-pathway variant found in Escherichia coli. The LL-DAP aminotransferase encoded by locus At4g33680 was able to complement the dapD and dapE mutants of E. coli. This result, in conjunction with the kinetic properties and substrate specificity of the enzyme, indicated that LL-DAP aminotransferase functions in the Lys biosynthetic direction under in vivo conditions. Orthologs of At4g33680 were identified in all the cyanobacterial species whose genomes have been sequenced. The Synechocystis sp. ortholog encoded by locus sll0480 showed the same functional properties as At4g33680. These results demonstrate that the Lys biosynthesis pathway in plants and cyanobacteria is distinct from the pathways that have so far been defined in microorganisms.

  5. Adaptation to diverse nitrogen-limited environments by deletion or extrachromosomal element formation of the GAP1 locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gresham, D.; Usaite, Renata; Germann, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    and deletions at the GAP1 locus. GAP1 encodes the general amino acid permease, which transports amino acids across the plasma membrane. We identified a self-propagating extrachromosomal circular DNA molecule that results from intrachromosomal recombination between long terminal repeats (LTRs) flanking GAP1....... Extrachromosomal DNA circles (GAP1(circle)) contain GAP1, the replication origin ARS1116, and a single hybrid LTR derived from recombination between the two flanking LTRs. Formation of the GAP1(circle) is associated with deletion of chromosomal GAP1 (gap1 Delta) and production of a single hybrid LTR at the GAP1...

  6. Identification of candidate regions for a novel Usher syndrome type II locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Rebeh, Imen; Benzina, Zeineb; Dhouib, Houria; Hadjamor, Imen; Amyere, Mustapha; Ayadi, Leila; Turki, Khalil; Hammami, Bouthaina; Kmiha, Noureddine; Kammoun, Hassen; Hakim, Bochra; Charfedine, Ilhem; Vikkula, Miikka; Ghorbel, Abdelmonem; Ayadi, Hammadi; Masmoudi, Saber

    2008-09-19

    Chronic diseases affecting the inner ear and the retina cause severe impairments to our communication systems. In more than half of the cases, Usher syndrome (USH) is the origin of these double defects. Patients with USH type II (USH2) have retinitis pigmentosa (RP) that develops during puberty, moderate to severe hearing impairment with downsloping pure-tone audiogram, and normal vestibular function. Four loci and three genes are known for USH2. In this study, we proposed to localize the gene responsible for USH2 in a consanguineous family of Tunisian origin. Affected members underwent detailed ocular and audiologic characterization. One Tunisian family with USH2 and 45 healthy controls unrelated to the family were recruited. Two affected and six unaffected family members attended our study. DNA samples of eight family members were genotyped with polymorphic markers. Two-point and multipoint LOD scores were calculated using Genehunter software v2.1. Sequencing was used to investigate candidate genes. Haplotype analysis showed no significant linkage to any known USH gene or locus. A genome-wide screen, using microsatellite markers, was performed, allowing the identification of three homozygous regions in chromosomes 2, 4, and 15. We further confirmed and refined these three regions using microsatellite and single-nucleotide polymorphisms. With recessive mode of inheritance, the highest multipoint LOD score of 1.765 was identified for the candidate regions on chromosomes 4 and 15. The chromosome 15 locus is large (55 Mb), underscoring the limited number of meioses in the consanguineous pedigree. Moreover, the linked, homozygous chromosome 15q alleles, unlike those of the chromosome 2 and 4 loci, are infrequent in the local population. Thus, the data strongly suggest that the novel locus for USH2 is likely to reside on 15q. Our data provide a basis for the localization and the identification of a novel gene implicated in USH2, most likely localized on 15q.

  7. Characterization of form variants of Xenorhabdus luminescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritsen, L J; de Raay, G; Smits, P H

    1992-01-01

    From Xenorhabdus luminescens XE-87.3 four variants were isolated. One, which produced a red pigment and antibiotics, was luminescent, and could take up dye from culture media, was considered the primary form (XE-red). A pink-pigmented variant (XE-pink) differed from the primary form only in pigmentation and uptake of dye. Of the two other variants, one produced a yellow pigment and fewer antibiotics (XE-yellow), while the other did not produce a pigment or antibiotics (XE-white). Both were less luminescent, did not take up dye, and had small cell and colony sizes. These two variants were very unstable and shifted to the primary form after 3 to 5 days. It was not possible to separate the primary form and the white variant completely; subcultures of one colony always contained a few colonies of the other variant. The white variant was also found in several other X. luminescens strains. DNA fingerprints showed that all four variants are genetically identical and are therefore derivatives of the same parent. Protein patterns revealed a few differences among the four variants. None of the variants could be considered the secondary form. The pathogenicity of the variants decreased in the following order: XE-red, XE-pink, XE-yellow, and XE-white. The mechanism and function of this variability are discussed. Images PMID:1622273

  8. Linkage Analysis in Autoimmune Addison's Disease: NFATC1 as a Potential Novel Susceptibility Locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna L Mitchell

    Full Text Available Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD is a rare, highly heritable autoimmune endocrinopathy. It is possible that there may be some highly penetrant variants which confer disease susceptibility that have yet to be discovered.DNA samples from 23 multiplex AAD pedigrees from the UK and Norway (50 cases, 67 controls were genotyped on the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array. Linkage analysis was performed using Merlin. EMMAX was used to carry out a genome-wide association analysis comparing the familial AAD cases to 2706 UK WTCCC controls. To explore some of the linkage findings further, a replication study was performed by genotyping 64 SNPs in two of the four linked regions (chromosomes 7 and 18, on the Sequenom iPlex platform in three European AAD case-control cohorts (1097 cases, 1117 controls. The data were analysed using a meta-analysis approach.In a parametric analysis, applying a rare dominant model, loci on chromosomes 7, 9 and 18 had LOD scores >2.8. In a non-parametric analysis, a locus corresponding to the HLA region on chromosome 6, known to be associated with AAD, had a LOD score >3.0. In the genome-wide association analysis, a SNP cluster on chromosome 2 and a pair of SNPs on chromosome 6 were associated with AAD (P <5x10-7. A meta-analysis of the replication study data demonstrated that three chromosome 18 SNPs were associated with AAD, including a non-synonymous variant in the NFATC1 gene.This linkage study has implicated a number of novel chromosomal regions in the pathogenesis of AAD in multiplex AAD families and adds further support to the role of HLA in AAD. The genome-wide association analysis has also identified a region of interest on chromosome 2. A replication study has demonstrated that the NFATC1 gene is worthy of future investigation, however each of the regions identified require further, systematic analysis.

  9. Linkage Analysis in Autoimmune Addison's Disease: NFATC1 as a Potential Novel Susceptibility Locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Anna L; Bøe Wolff, Anette; MacArthur, Katie; Weaver, Jolanta U; Vaidya, Bijay; Erichsen, Martina M; Darlay, Rebecca; Husebye, Eystein S; Cordell, Heather J; Pearce, Simon H S

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is a rare, highly heritable autoimmune endocrinopathy. It is possible that there may be some highly penetrant variants which confer disease susceptibility that have yet to be discovered. DNA samples from 23 multiplex AAD pedigrees from the UK and Norway (50 cases, 67 controls) were genotyped on the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array. Linkage analysis was performed using Merlin. EMMAX was used to carry out a genome-wide association analysis comparing the familial AAD cases to 2706 UK WTCCC controls. To explore some of the linkage findings further, a replication study was performed by genotyping 64 SNPs in two of the four linked regions (chromosomes 7 and 18), on the Sequenom iPlex platform in three European AAD case-control cohorts (1097 cases, 1117 controls). The data were analysed using a meta-analysis approach. In a parametric analysis, applying a rare dominant model, loci on chromosomes 7, 9 and 18 had LOD scores >2.8. In a non-parametric analysis, a locus corresponding to the HLA region on chromosome 6, known to be associated with AAD, had a LOD score >3.0. In the genome-wide association analysis, a SNP cluster on chromosome 2 and a pair of SNPs on chromosome 6 were associated with AAD (P <5x10-7). A meta-analysis of the replication study data demonstrated that three chromosome 18 SNPs were associated with AAD, including a non-synonymous variant in the NFATC1 gene. This linkage study has implicated a number of novel chromosomal regions in the pathogenesis of AAD in multiplex AAD families and adds further support to the role of HLA in AAD. The genome-wide association analysis has also identified a region of interest on chromosome 2. A replication study has demonstrated that the NFATC1 gene is worthy of future investigation, however each of the regions identified require further, systematic analysis.

  10. Targeted resequencing and analysis of the Diamond-Blackfan anemia disease locus RPS19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Martinez Barrio

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The Ribosomal protein S19 gene locus (RPS19 has been linked to two kinds of red cell aplasia, Diamond-Blackfan Anemia (DBA and Transient Erythroblastopenia in Childhood (TEC. Mutations in RPS19 coding sequences have been found in 25% of DBA patients, but not in TEC patients. It has been suggested that non-coding RPS19 sequence variants contribute to the considerable clinical variability in red cell aplasia. We therefore aimed at identifying non-coding variations associated with DBA or TEC phenotypes.We targeted a region of 19'980 bp encompassing the RPS19 gene in a cohort of 89 DBA and TEC patients for resequencing. We provide here a catalog of the considerable, previously unrecognized degree of variation in this region. We identified 73 variations (65 SNPs, 8 indels that all are located outside of the RPS19 open reading frame, and of which 67.1% are classified as novel. We hypothesize that specific alleles in non-coding regions of RPS19 could alter the binding of regulatory proteins or transcription factors. Therefore, we carried out an extensive analysis to identify transcription factor binding sites (TFBS. A series of putative interaction sites coincide with detected variants. Sixteen of the corresponding transcription factors are of particular interest, as they are housekeeping genes or show a direct link to hematopoiesis, tumorigenesis or leukemia (e.g. GATA-1/2, PU.1, MZF-1.Specific alleles at predicted TFBSs may alter the expression of RPS19, modify an important interaction between transcription factors with overlapping TFBS or remove an important stimulus for hematopoiesis. We suggest that the detected interactions are of importance for hematopoiesis and could provide new insights into individual response to treatment.

  11. Signatures of natural selection at the FTO (fat mass and obesity associated locus in human populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuanshi Liu

    Full Text Available Polymorphisms in the first intron of FTO have been robustly replicated for associations with obesity. In the Sorbs, a Slavic population resident in Germany, the strongest effect on body mass index (BMI was found for a variant in the third intron of FTO (rs17818902. Since this may indicate population specific effects of FTO variants, we initiated studies testing FTO for signatures of selection in vertebrate species and human populations.First, we analyzed the coding region of 35 vertebrate FTO orthologs with Phylogenetic Analysis by Maximum Likelihood (PAML, ω = dN/dS to screen for signatures of selection among species. Second, we investigated human population (Europeans/CEU, Yoruba/YRI, Chinese/CHB, Japanese/JPT, Sorbs SNP data for footprints of selection using DnaSP version 4.5 and the Haplotter/PhaseII. Finally, using ConSite we compared transcription factor (TF binding sites at sequences harbouring FTO SNPs in intron three.PAML analyses revealed strong conservation in coding region of FTO (ω<1. Sliding-window results from population genetic analyses provided highly significant (p<0.001 signatures for balancing selection specifically in the third intron (e.g. Tajima's D in Sorbs = 2.77. We observed several alterations in TF binding sites, e.g. TCF3 binding site introduced by the rs17818902 minor allele.Population genetic analysis revealed signatures of balancing selection at the FTO locus with a prominent signal in intron three, a genomic region with strong association with BMI in the Sorbs. Our data support the hypothesis that genes associated with obesity may have been under evolutionary selective pressure.

  12. Family and population-based studies of variation within the ghrelin receptor locus in relation to measures of obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjesing, Anette P.; Larsen, Lesli Hingstrup; Torekov, Signe Sørensen

    2010-01-01

    -carriers (mean BMI: 28+/-5 kg/m(2)) (p>0.05) could be shown. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In a population-based study sample of 15,854 Danes no association between GHSR genotypes and measures of obesity and overweight was found. Also, analyses of GHSR haplotypes lack consistent associations with obesity related......BACKGROUND: The growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) is mediating hunger sensation when stimulated by its natural ligand ghrelin. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that common and rare variation in the GHSR locus are related to increased prevalence of obesity and overweight...... among Whites. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a population-based study sample of 15,854 unrelated, middle-aged Danes, seven variants were genotyped to capture common variation in an 11 kbp region including GHSR. These were investigated for their individual and haplotypic association with obesity...

  13. A novel RAD21 variant associated with intrafamilial phenotypic variation in Cornelia de Lange syndrome - review of the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyle, M I; Jespersgaard, C; Nazaryan-Petersen, Lusine

    2017-01-01

    In a patient with CdLS (IV.16) we identifed a novel single basepair deletion (c.704delG) in RAD21, which encodes a cohesin pathway protein. The variant is predicted to result in a premature stop codon [p.(Ser235Ilefs*19)] and hereby would have a deleterious effect. RAD21 variants have previously ...

  14. Rank-based characterization of pollen assemblages collected by honey bees using a multi-locus metabarcoding approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Rodney T; Lin, Chia-Hua; Quijia, Juan O; Riusech, Natalia S; Goodell, Karen; Johnson, Reed M

    2015-11-01

    Difficulties inherent in microscopic pollen identification have resulted in limited implementation for large-scale studies. Metabarcoding, a relatively novel approach, could make pollen analysis less onerous; however, improved understanding of the quantitative capacity of various plant metabarcode regions and primer sets is needed to ensure that such applications are accurate and precise. We applied metabarcoding, targeting the ITS2, matK, and rbcL loci, to characterize six samples of pollen collected by honey bees, Apis mellifera. Additionally, samples were analyzed by light microscopy. We found significant rank-based associations between the relative abundance of pollen types within our samples as inferred by the two methods. Our findings suggest metabarcoding data from plastid loci, as opposed to the ribosomal locus, are more reliable for quantitative characterization of pollen assemblages. Furthermore, multilocus metabarcoding of pollen may be more reliable than single-locus analyses, underscoring the need for discovering novel barcodes and barcode combinations optimized for molecular palynology.

  15. FISH-mapping of the 5S rDNA locus in chili peppers (Capsicum-Solanaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Patricia M; Debat, Humberto J; Scaldaferro, Marisel A; Martí, Dardo A; Grabiele, Mauro

    2016-03-01

    We present here the physical mapping of the 5S rDNA locus in six wild and five cultivated taxa of Capsicum by means of a genus-specific FISH probe. In all taxa, a single 5S locus per haploid genome that persistently mapped onto the short arm of a unique metacentric chromosome pair at intercalar position, was found. 5S FISH signals of almost the same size and brightness intensity were observed in all the analyzed taxa. This is the first cytological characterization of the 5S in wild taxa of Capsicum by using a genus-derived probe, and the most exhaustive and comprehensive in the chili peppers up to now. The information provided here will aid the cytomolecular characterization of pepper germplasm to evaluate variability and can be instrumental to integrate physical, genetic and genomic maps already generated in the genus.

  16. In situ mapping of the hsp70 locus in seven species of the willistoni group of Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonorino, C.B.C.; Valente, V.L.S.; Pereira, M.; Alonso, C.E.V.; Abdelhay, E.

    1993-01-01

    The hsp70 locus was mapped by in situ hybridization of a biotinylated probe (p PW 229) to the polythene chromosomes of seven species of the willistoni group of Drosophila. In all of them, the probe hybridized mainly at a single site of the third chromosome, corresponding in each case to a heat-induced puff site. Southern blot analysis comparing the Eco RI digested DNA of the willistoni species with D. melanogaster revealed that a large segment of DNA homologous to the hsp 70 probe detected in D. melanogaster does not exist in the willistoni group. These results suggested that this locus is not duplicated in the willistoni group as it is in the melanogaster. (author)

  17. Locus of Control and Technology Adoption in Developing Country Agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abay, Kibrom Araya; Blalock, Garrick; Berhane, Guush

    2017-01-01

    and psychological explanations for the low rates of adoption of profitable agricultural technologies in Sub-Saharan Africa. Our results highlight that improving farmers’ non-cognitive skills (locus of control) may facilitate technology adoption and agricultural transformation. More generally, the results suggest...

  18. AUTOMATIC GENERATION OF ROOT LOCUS PLOTS FOR LINEAR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design and analysis of control systems often become difficult due to the complexity of the system model and the design techniques involved. This paper presents the development of a Tools Box in Microsoft Excel for control engineer that uses root locus as a time domain technique for system design and analysis. The Tool ...

  19. Male-pattern baldness susceptibility locus at 20p11.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richards, J.B.; Yuan, X.; Geller, F.; Waterworth, D.; Bataille, V.; Glass, D.; Song, K.; Waeber, G.; Vollenweider, P.; Aben, K.K.H.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Walters, B.; Soranzo, N.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Kong, A.; Rafnar, T.; Deloukas, P.; Sulem, P.; Stefansson, H.; Stefansson, K.; Spector, T.D.; Mooser, V.

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study for androgenic alopecia in 1,125 men and identified a newly associated locus at chromosome 20p11.22, confirmed in three independent cohorts (n = 1,650; OR = 1.60, P = 1.1 x 10(-14) for rs1160312