WorldWideScience

Sample records for single infectious agent

  1. Novel infectious agents causing uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairallah, Moncef; Chee, Soon Phaik; Rathinam, Sivakumar R; Attia, Sonia; Nadella, Venu

    2010-10-01

    In any patient with uveitis, an infectious cause should be ruled out first. The differential diagnosis includes multiple well-known diseases including herpes, syphilis, toxoplasmosis, tuberculosis, bartonellosis, Lyme disease, and others. However, clinician should be aware of emerging infectious agents as potential causes of systemic illness and also intraocular inflammation. Air travel, immigration, and globalization of business have overturned traditional pattern of geographic distribution of infectious diseases, and therefore one should work locally but think globally. This review recapitulates the systemic and ocular manifestations of several emergent infectious diseases relevant to the ophthalmologist including Rickettsioses, West Nile virus infection, Rift valley fever, Dengue fever, and Chikungunya. Retinitis, chorioretinitis, retinal vasculitis, and optic nerve involvement have been associated with these emergent infectious diseases. The diagnosis of any of these infections is usually based on pattern of uveitis, systemic symptoms and signs, and specific epidemiological data and confirmed by detection of specific antibody in serum. A systematic ocular examination, showing fairly typical fundus findings, may help establish an early clinical diagnosis, which allows prompt, appropriate management.

  2. Anti-Infectious Agents against MRSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhiro Koyama

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinically useful antibiotics, β-lactams and vancomycin, are known to inhibit bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan synthesis. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has a unique cell wall structure consisting of peptidoglycan and wall teichoic acid. In recent years, new anti-infectious agents (spirohexaline, tripropeptin C, DMPI, CDFI, cyslabdan, 1835F03, and BPH-652 targeting MRSA cell wall biosynthesis have been discovered using unique screening methods. These agents were found to inhibit important enzymes involved in cell wall biosynthesis such as undecaprenyl pyrophosphate (UPP synthase, FemA, flippase, or UPP phosphatase. In this review, the discovery, the mechanism of action, and the future of these anti-infectious agents are described.

  3. [Environmental factors: the contribution of infectious agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Satoshi

    2014-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a multifactorial disease resulting from complex interactions between predisposing genetic and environmental factors. Among the many potential environmental risk factors, several common infectious agents such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus-6 and Chlamydia pneumoniae(C. pneumoniae) have been causatively implicated in the onset of MS. However, with the exception of EBV, consistent data are yet to be obtained regarding the involvement of infectious agents. With respect to the Japanese population, we found that EBV infection is a risk factor for the subgroup of Japanese MS patients not harboring the HLA-DRB1*0405 allele, a known genetic risk factor for MS in this ethnic group. By contrast, bacterial infections such as Helicobacter pylori and C. pneumoniae are risk factors for Japanese neuromyelitis optica, especially in patients with anti-aquaporin 4 antibodies.

  4. Prophylaxis of post-ERC infectious complications in patients with biliary obstruction by adding antimicrobial agents into ERC contrast media- a single center retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobser, Hella; Gunesch, Agnetha; Klebl, Frank

    2017-01-13

    Patients with biliary obstruction are at high risk to develop septic complications after endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC). We evaluated the benefits of local application of antimicrobial agents into ERC contrast media in preventing post-ERC infectious complications in a high-risk study population. Patients undergoing ERC at our tertiary referral center were retrospectively included. Addition of vancomycin, gentamicin and fluconazol into ERC contrast media was evaluated in a case-control design. Outcomes comprised infectious complications within 3 days after ERC. In total, 84 ERC cases were analyzed. Primarily indications for ERC were sclerosing cholangitis (75%) and malignant stenosis (9.5%). Microbial testing of collected bile fluid in the treatment group was positive in 91.4%. Detected organisms were sensitive to the administered antimicrobials in 93%. The use of antimicrobials in contrast media was associated with a significant decrease in post-ERC infectious complications compared to non-use (14.3% vs. 33.3%; odds ratio [OR]: 0.33, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.114-0.978). After adjusting for the variables acute cholangitis prior to ERC and incomplete biliary drainage, the beneficial effect of intraductal antibiotic prophylaxis was even more evident (OR = 0.153; 95% CI: 0.039-0.598, p = 0.007). Patients profiting most obviously from intraductal antimicrobials were those with secondary sclerosing cholangitis. Local application of a combination of antibiotic and antimycotic agents to ERC contrast media efficiently reduced post-ERC infectious events in patients with biliary obstruction. This is the first study that evaluates ERC-related infectious complications in patients with secondary sclerosing cholangitis. Our first clinical results should now be prospectively evaluated in a larger patient cohort to improve the safety of ERC, especially in patients with secondary sclerosing cholangitis.

  5. Infectious disease agents mediate interaction in food webs and ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selakovic, S.; Ruiter, de P.C.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious agents are part of food webs and ecosystems via the relationship with their host species that, in turn, interact with both hosts and non-hosts. Through these interactions, infectious agents influence food webs in terms of structure, functioning and stability. The present literature shows

  6. Infectious disease agents mediate interaction in food webs and ecosystems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selakovic, Sanja; de Ruiter, P.C.; Heesterbeek, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Infectious agents are part of food webs and ecosystems via the relationship with their host species that, in turn, interact with both hosts and non-hosts. Through these interactions, infectious agents influence food webs in terms of structure, functioning and stability. The present literature shows

  7. The Role of Infectious Agents in the Etiology of Ocular Adnexal Neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Varun; Shen, Defen; Sieving, Pamela C.; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2008-01-01

    Given the fact that infectious agents contribute to around 18% of human cancers worldwide, it would seem prudent to explore their role in neoplasms of the ocular adnexa: primary malignancies of the conjunctiva, lacrimal glands, eyelids, and orbit. By elucidating the mechanisms by which infectious agents contribute to oncogenesis, the management, treatment, and prevention of these neoplasms may one day parallel what is already in place for cancers such as cervical cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric adenocarcinoma. Antibiotic treatment and vaccines against infectious agents may herald a future with a curtailed role for traditional therapies of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Unlike other malignancies for which large epidemiological studies are available, analyzing ocular adnexal neoplasms is challenging as they are relatively rare. Additionally, putative infectious agents seemingly display an immense geographic variation that has led to much debate regarding the relative importance of one organism versus another. This review discusses the pathogenetic role of several microorganisms in different ocular adnexal malignancies, including human papilloma virus in conjunctival papilloma and squamous cell carcinoma, human immunodeficiency virus in conjunctival squamous carcinoma, Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus or human herpes simplex virus-8 (KSHV/HHV-8) in conjunctival Kaposi sarcoma, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori,), Chlamydia, and hepatitis C virus in ocular adnexal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas. Unlike cervical cancer where a single infectious agent, human papilloma virus, is found in greater than 99% of lesions, multiple organisms may play a role in the etiology of certain ocular adnexal neoplasms by acting through similar mechanisms of oncogenesis, including chronic antigenic stimulation and the action of infectious oncogenes. However, similar to other human malignancies

  8. Infectious Agents as Stimuli of Trained Innate Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusek, Paulina; Wala, Mateusz; Druszczyńska, Magdalena; Fol, Marek

    2018-02-03

    The discoveries made over the past few years have modified the current immunological paradigm. It turns out that innate immunity cells can mount some kind of immunological memory, similar to that observed in the acquired immunity and corresponding to the defense mechanisms of lower organisms, which increases their resistance to reinfection. This phenomenon is termed trained innate immunity. It is based on epigenetic changes in innate immune cells (monocytes/macrophages, NK cells) after their stimulation with various infectious or non-infectious agents. Many infectious stimuli, including bacterial or fungal cells and their components (LPS, β-glucan, chitin) as well as viruses or even parasites are considered potent inducers of innate immune memory. Epigenetic cell reprogramming occurring at the heart of the phenomenon may provide a useful basis for designing novel prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to prevent and protect against multiple diseases. In this article, we present the current state of art on trained innate immunity occurring as a result of infectious agent induction. Additionally, we discuss the mechanisms of cell reprogramming and the implications for immune response stimulation/manipulation.

  9. Nucleic acid in-situ hybridization detection of infectious agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Curtis T.

    2000-04-01

    Limitations of traditional culture methods and newer polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for detection and speciation of infectious agents demonstrate the need for more rapid and better diagnostics. Nucleic acid hybridization is a detection technology that has gained wide acceptance in cancer and prenatal cytogenetics. Using a modification of the nucleic acid hybridization technique known as fluorescence in-situ hybridization, infectious agents can be detected in a variety of specimens with high sensitivity and specificity. The specimens derive from all types of human and animal sources including body fluids, tissue aspirates and biopsy material. Nucleic acid hybridization can be performed in less than one hour. The result can be interpreted either using traditional fluorescence microscopy or automated platforms such as micro arrays. This paper demonstrates proof of concept for nucleic acid hybridization detection of different infectious agents. Interpretation within a cytologic and histologic context is possible with fluorescence microscopic analysis, thereby providing confirmatory evidence of hybridization. With careful probe selection, nucleic acid hybridization promises to be a highly sensitive and specific practical diagnostic alternative to culture, traditional staining methods, immunohistochemistry and complicated nucleic acid amplification tests.

  10. Altered Antibody Profiles against Common Infectious Agents in Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbelo, Peter D.; Ching, Kathryn H.; Morse, Caryn G.; Alevizos, Ilias; Bayat, Ahmad; Cohen, Jeffrey I.; Ali, Mir A.; Kapoor, Amit; Browne, Sarah K.; Holland, Steven M.; Kovacs, Joseph A.; Iadarola, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the important diagnostic value of evaluating antibody responses to individual human pathogens, antibody profiles against multiple infectious agents have not been used to explore health and disease mainly for technical reasons.  We hypothesized that the interplay between infection and chronic disease might be revealed by profiling antibodies against multiple agents. Here, the levels of antibodies against a panel of 13 common infectious agents were evaluated with the quantitative Luciferase Immunoprecipitation Systems (LIPS) in patients from three disease cohorts including those with pathogenic anti-interferon-γ autoantibodies (IFN-γ AAB), HIV and Sjögren’s syndrome (SjS) to determine if their antibody profiles differed from control subjects.  The IFN-γ AAB patients compared to controls demonstrated statistically higher levels of antibodies against VZV (p=0.0003), EBV (p=0.002), CMV (p=0.003), and C. albicans (p=0.03), but lower antibody levels against poliovirus (p=0.04). Comparison of HIV patients with blood donor controls revealed that the patients had higher levels of antibodies against CMV (p=0.0008), HSV-2 (p=0.0008), EBV (p=0.001), and C. albicans (p=0.01), but showed decreased levels of antibodies against coxsackievirus B4 (p=0.0008), poliovirus (p=0.0005),   and HHV-6B (p=0.002). Lastly, SjS patients had higher levels of anti-EBV antibodies (p=0.03), but lower antibody levels against several enteroviruses including a newly identified picornavirus, HCoSV-A (p=0.004), coxsackievirus B4 (p=0.04), and poliovirus (p=0.02). For the IFN-γ AAB and HIV cohorts, principal component analysis revealed unique antibody clusters that showed the potential to discriminate patients from controls.  The results suggest that antibody profiles against these and likely other common infectious agents may yield insight into the interplay between exposure to infectious agents, dysbiosis, adaptive immunity and disease activity. PMID:24312567

  11. The mosaic of environment involvement in autoimmunity: the abrogation of viral latency by stress, a non-infectious environmental agent, is an intrinsic prerequisite prelude before viruses can rank as infectious environmental agents that trigger autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temajo, Norbert O; Howard, Neville

    2014-06-01

    An autoimmune disease (AD), organ-specific or systemic, results from an aberrant response in which the protective immune system normally schooled to recognize and destroy invading infectious agents (viruses, etc.) instead fails to distinguish self-antigens and proceeds to attack and destroy the host's organs. There can be familial aggregation in which a single AD may occur in members of a family, or a single family may be afflicted with multiple ADs. Finally, sometimes multiple ADs co-occur in a single individual: the kaleidoscope of autoimmunity. Autoimmunity is a multifactorial process in which genetic, hormonal, immunological and environmental factors act in concert to materialize the mosaic of autoimmunity phenomenon. A genetically primed individual may yet not develop an AD: the contribution by an environmental factor (non-infectious or infectious) is essential for completion of the act. Of the non-infectious factors, stress plays a determinative step in autoimmunity in that it abrogates viral latency and thereby ordains the viruses to qualify as infectious environmental factors that trigger ADs. This is note-worthy as viruses rank first as the most important environmental triggers of ADs. Furthermore, all these viruses experience going through latency. Hence the hypothesis: "The abrogation of viral latency by stress, a non-infectious environmental agent, is an intrinsic prerequisite prelude before viruses can rank as infectious environmental agents that trigger autoimmune diseases". There is collaboration here between non-infectious- and infectious-agent to achieve the cause of autoimmunity. We say viral latency and stress have a covenant: continued perpetration of autoimmunity is dependent on the intervention by stress to reactivate latent infections. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Are infectious agents involved in the pathogenesis of postpartum psychosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Witte, Lot D; Snijders, Gijsje; Litjens, Manja; Kamperman, Astrid M; Kushner, Steven A; Kahn, René S; Bergink, Veerle

    2018-03-15

    Since postpartum psychosis has been linked to activation of the immune system, it has been hypothesized that infectious agents may be involved in the pathogenesis of this disorder. We therefore investigated whether exposure to pathogens that can infect the central nervous system is increased in patients with postpartum psychosis. We measured the prevalence and titers of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and M (IgM) to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Toxoplasma Gondii (TG) in a cohort of patients with postpartum psychosis (n = 81) and compared these to matched postpartum controls. We did not find significant differences in seroprevalence or antibody titers for any of these pathogens. Limitations of this study include the indirect measurement of infectious disease and the cross-sectional design. Our results do not support the hypothesis that exposure to these neurotropic pathogens is involved in postpartum psychosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Optimizing agent-based transmission models for infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willem, Lander; Stijven, Sean; Tijskens, Engelbert; Beutels, Philippe; Hens, Niel; Broeckhove, Jan

    2015-06-02

    Infectious disease modeling and computational power have evolved such that large-scale agent-based models (ABMs) have become feasible. However, the increasing hardware complexity requires adapted software designs to achieve the full potential of current high-performance workstations. We have found large performance differences with a discrete-time ABM for close-contact disease transmission due to data locality. Sorting the population according to the social contact clusters reduced simulation time by a factor of two. Data locality and model performance can also be improved by storing person attributes separately instead of using person objects. Next, decreasing the number of operations by sorting people by health status before processing disease transmission has also a large impact on model performance. Depending of the clinical attack rate, target population and computer hardware, the introduction of the sort phase decreased the run time from 26% up to more than 70%. We have investigated the application of parallel programming techniques and found that the speedup is significant but it drops quickly with the number of cores. We observed that the effect of scheduling and workload chunk size is model specific and can make a large difference. Investment in performance optimization of ABM simulator code can lead to significant run time reductions. The key steps are straightforward: the data structure for the population and sorting people on health status before effecting disease propagation. We believe these conclusions to be valid for a wide range of infectious disease ABMs. We recommend that future studies evaluate the impact of data management, algorithmic procedures and parallelization on model performance.

  14. APPROUSH TO SPECIFIC DIAGNOSTICS OF CAUSATIVE AGENTS OF INFECTIOUS ENDOCARDIDIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsapov D.V.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Increased level of morbidity of infective endocarditis (IE connected with new risk factors: intravenous drug use, cardiosurgical interventions, hemodialysis brought new clinical forms of the disease. As it shown in a literature main pathogenetic factors of IE are bacteraemia, trauma of endocardium and invasive medical procedures. Very typical pathogens are streptococci and staphylococci. Most typically mitral and aortal valves are affected with spreading of vegetations on surrounding media. Discussion. IE is polyetiologic disease caused by more than 128 microorganisms, and still a challenge for medical professionals. Detection a causative agent is critical for proper specific treatment. In different sources data on percentage of proven cases very according to country and different medical centres reflecting different local epidemiology of IE, diagnostic criteria and protocols. Culture negative infectious endocarditis (CNIE is considered in case of obtaining of three negative results of cultivation of samples on a standard blood agar during 7 days and subculturing. CNIE incidence very form 2% to 33% according to different researches and higher in cases of community acquired infection and reseeding antibacterial treatment. Some of cases of CNIE caused by gram - negative fastidious microorganisms - Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Actinobacillus, Actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, Kingella kingae, with united in HACEK group according to their properties to colonize oropharynx and requirement in special conditions and duration of incubation. Detection of some intracellular bacteria, such as C. burnetti and Bartonella spp. require immunological methods of detection, histological methods and of PCR. Conclusion. In case of diagnostics of patients with CNIE it is necessary to use a combination of prolonged subculturing of serum, emboli and histologic material on blood agar with microscopy by Warthin

  15. Airborne spread of infectious agents in the indoor environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jianjian; Li, Yuguo

    2016-09-02

    Since the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic, scientific exploration of infection control is no longer restricted to microbiologists or medical scientists. Many studies have reported on the release, transport, and exposure of expiratory droplets because of respiratory activities. This review focuses on the airborne spread of infectious agents from mucus to mucus in the indoor environment and their spread as governed by airflows in the respiratory system, around people, and in buildings at different transport stages. We critically review the literature on the release of respiratory droplets, their transport and dispersion in the indoor environment, and the ultimate exposure of a susceptible host, as influenced by airflows. These droplets or droplet nuclei are transported by expired airflows, which are sometimes affected by the human body plume and use of a face mask, as well as room airflow. Room airflow is affected by human activities such as walking and door opening, and some droplets are eventually captured by a susceptible individual because of his or her inspired flows; such exposure can eventually lead to long-range spread of airborne pathogens. Direct exposure to the expired fine droplets or droplet nuclei results in short-range airborne transmission. Deposition of droplets and direct personal exposure to expired large droplets can lead to the fomite route and the droplet-borne route, respectively. We have shown the opportunities for infection control at different stages of the spread. We propose that the short-range airborne route may be important in close contact, and its control may be achieved by face masks for the source patients and use of personalized ventilation. Our discussion of the effect of thermal stratification and expiratory delivery of droplets leads to the suggestion that displacement ventilation may not be applicable to hospital rooms where respiratory infection is a concern. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in

  16. Early-life exposures to infectious agents and later cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedham, Vidya; Verma, Mukesh; Mahabir, Somdat

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing understanding that several infectious agents are acquired in early life and this is the reason why available vaccines target the new born, infants, and adolescents. Infectious agents are associated with cancer development and it is estimated that about 20% of the world's cancer burden is attributed to infectious agents. There is a growing evidence that certain infectious agents acquired in early life can give rise to cancer development, but estimates of the cancer burden from this early-life acquisition is unknown. In this article, we have selected five cancers (cervical, liver, Burkitt's lymphoma-leukemia, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma) and examine their links to infectious agents (HPV, HBV, HCV, EBV, and HTLV-1) acquired in early life. For these agents, the acquisition in early life is from mother-to-child transmission, perinatal contact (with genital tract secretions, amniotic fluids, blood, and breast milk), saliva, sexual intercourse, and blood transfusion. We also discuss prevention strategies, address future directions, and propose mechanisms of action after a long latency period from the time of acquisition of the infectious agent in early life to cancer development. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Non-infectious plasmid engineered to simulate multiple viral threat agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Monica; Sagripanti, Jose-Luis

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to design and construct a non-virulent simulant to replace several pathogenic viruses in the development of detection and identification methods in biodefense. A non-infectious simulant was designed and engineered to include the nucleic acid signature of VEEV (Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis virus), Influenza virus, Rift Valley Fever virus, Machupo virus, Lassa virus, Yellow Fever virus, Ebola virus, Eastern Equine Encephalitis virus, Junin virus, Marburg virus, Dengue virus, and Crimean-Congo virus, all in a single construct. The nucleic acid sequences of all isolates available for each virus species were aligned using ClustalW software in order to obtain conserved regions of the viral genomes. Specific primers were designed to permit the identification and differentiation between viral threat agents. A chimera of 3143 base pairs was engineered to produce 13 PCR amplicons of different sizes. PCR amplification of the simulant with virus-specific primers revealed products of the predicted length, in bands of similar intensity, and without detectable unspecific products by electrophoresis analysis. The simulant described could reduce the need to use infectious viruses in the development of detection and diagnostic methods, and could also be useful as a non-virulent positive control in nucleic acid-based tests against biological threat agents.

  18. Serosurveillance of infectious agents in equines of the Central Valley of Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Jim?nez, D.; Romero-Zu?iga, J.J.; Dolz, G.

    2014-01-01

    Blood samples from 181 equines from the Central Valley of Costa Rica were collected in the year 2012 to determine the presence of antibodies against selected infectious agents in horses and to determine the risk factors associated with these agents. The presence of antibodies against Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV), Equine Herpes Virus 1 and 4 (EHV-1 and EHV-4), West Nile Virus (WNV), Influenza A Virus (IAV), Equine Viral Arteritis Virus (EVAV), Babesia caballi, Theileria equi, Neospora...

  19. Serosurveillance of infectious agents in equines of the Central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence of antibodies against Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV), Equine Herpes Virus 1 and 4 (EHV-1 and EHV-4), West Nile Virus (WNV), Influenza A Virus (IAV), Equine Viral Arteritis Virus (EVAV), Babesia caballi, Theileria equi, Neospora caninum and Chlamydia abortus was determined using commercial ...

  20. Emerging and re-emerging infectious agents of nosocomial diseases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... now referred to as Healthcare-associated infections, HCAIs) are diseases that essentially originate from the hospital and may be disseminated via biologic or inanimate agents in the healthcare center. They occur globally and constitute major hazards in healthcare institutions resulting in significant morbidity, mortality and ...

  1. A mobile biosafety microanalysis system for infectious agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniac, Daniel R; Hiebert, Shannon L; Siemens, Christine G; Corbett, Cindi R; Booth, Tim F

    2015-03-30

    Biological threats posed by pathogens such as Ebola virus must be quickly diagnosed, while protecting the safety of personnel. Scanning electron microscopy and microanalysis requires minimal specimen preparation and can help to identify hazardous agents or substances. Here we report a compact biosafety system for rapid imaging and elemental analysis of specimens, including powders, viruses and bacteria, which is easily transportable to the site of an incident.

  2. A mobile biosafety microanalysis system for infectious agents

    OpenAIRE

    Beniac, Daniel R.; Hiebert, Shannon L.; Siemens, Christine G.; Corbett, Cindi R.; Booth, Tim F.

    2015-01-01

    Biological threats posed by pathogens such as Ebola virus must be quickly diagnosed, while protecting the safety of personnel. Scanning electron microscopy and microanalysis requires minimal specimen preparation and can help to identify hazardous agents or substances. Here we report a compact biosafety system for rapid imaging and elemental analysis of specimens, including powders, viruses and bacteria, which is easily transportable to the site of an incident.

  3. A gastrointestinal anti-infectious biotherapeutic agent: the heat-treated Lactobacillus LB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Experimental in vitro and in vivo studies support the hypothesis that heat-treated, lyophilized Lactobacillus acidophilus LB cells and concentrated, neutralized spent culture medium conserve the variety of pharmacological, antimicrobial activities of the live probiotic strain against several infectious agents involved in well-established acute and persistent watery diarrhoea and gastritis. Heat-treated cells and heat-stable secreted molecules trigger multiple strain-specific activities explaining the therapeutic efficacy of L. acidophilus LB. This review discusses the current body of knowledge on the antimicrobial mechanisms of action exerted by L. acidophilus LB demonstrated in in vitro and in vivo experimental studies, and the evidence for the therapeutic efficacy of this anti-infectious biotherapeutic agent proved in randomized clinical trials for the treatment of acute and persistent watery diarrhoea associated with several intestinal infectious diseases in humans.

  4. CONTEMPORARY PERSPECTIVES ON INFECTIOUS DISEASE AGENTS IN SEWAGE SLUDGE AND MANURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USEPA and the USDA convened a three-day Workshop on Emerging Infectious Disease Agents and Issues Associated with Sewage Sludge, Animal Manures, and Other Organic By-Products on June 4-6, 2001 in Cincinnati, Ohio. The purpose of the workshop was to review and discuss the effe...

  5. Deep sequencing approach for investigating infectious agents causing fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilawati, T N; Jex, A R; Cantacessi, C; Pearson, M; Navarro, S; Susianto, A; Loukas, A C; McBride, W J H

    2016-07-01

    Acute undifferentiated fever (AUF) poses a diagnostic challenge due to the variety of possible aetiologies. While the majority of AUFs resolve spontaneously, some cases become prolonged and cause significant morbidity and mortality, necessitating improved diagnostic methods. This study evaluated the utility of deep sequencing in fever investigation. DNA and RNA were isolated from plasma/sera of AUF cases being investigated at Cairns Hospital in northern Australia, including eight control samples from patients with a confirmed diagnosis. Following isolation, DNA and RNA were bulk amplified and RNA was reverse transcribed to cDNA. The resulting DNA and cDNA amplicons were subjected to deep sequencing on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Bioinformatics analysis was performed using the program Kraken and the CLC assembly-alignment pipeline. The results were compared with the outcomes of clinical tests. We generated between 4 and 20 million reads per sample. The results of Kraken and CLC analyses concurred with diagnoses obtained by other means in 87.5 % (7/8) and 25 % (2/8) of control samples, respectively. Some plausible causes of fever were identified in ten patients who remained undiagnosed following routine hospital investigations, including Escherichia coli bacteraemia and scrub typhus that eluded conventional tests. Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Alteromonas macleodii and Enterobacteria phage were prevalent in all samples. A deep sequencing approach of patient plasma/serum samples led to the identification of aetiological agents putatively implicated in AUFs and enabled the study of microbial diversity in human blood. The application of this approach in hospital practice is currently limited by sequencing input requirements and complicated data analysis.

  6. Molecular survey of infectious agents associated with bovine respiratory disease in a beef cattle feedlot in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headley, Selwyn A; Okano, Werner; Balbo, Luciana C; Marcasso, Rogério A; Oliveira, Thalita E; Alfieri, Alice F; Negri Filho, Luiz C; Michelazzo, Mariana Z; Rodrigues, Silvio C; Baptista, Anderson L; Saut, João Paulo E; Alfieri, Amauri A

    2018-03-01

    We investigated the occurrence of infectious pathogens during an outbreak of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in a beef cattle feedlot in southern Brazil that has a high risk of developing BRD. Nasopharyngeal swabs were randomly collected from steers ( n = 23) and assessed for the presence of infectious agents of BRD by PCR and/or RT-PCR assays. These included: Histophilus somni, Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, Mycoplasma bovis, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine coronavirus (BCoV), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine alphaherpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1), and bovine parainfluenza virus 3 (BPIV-3). Pulmonary sections of one steer that died with clinical BRD were submitted for pathology and molecular testing. The frequencies of the pathogens identified from the nasopharyngeal swabs were: H. somni 39% (9 of 23), BRSV 35% (8 of 23), BCoV 22% (5 of 23), and M. haemolytica 13% (3 of 23). PCR or RT-PCR assays did not identify P. multocida, M. bovis, BoHV-1, BVDV, or BPIV-3 from the nasopharyngeal swabs. Single and concomitant associations of infectious agents of BRD were identified. Fibrinous bronchopneumonia was diagnosed in one steer that died; samples were positive for H. somni and M. haemolytica by PCR. H. somni, BRSV, and BCoV are important disease pathogens of BRD in feedlot cattle in Brazil, but H. somni and BCoV are probably under-reported.

  7. Identification of infectious agents in onychomycoses by PCR-terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, Julie; Pronina, Marina; Peter, Corinne; Bontems, Olympia; Fratti, Marina; Salamin, Karine; Schürch, Stéphanie; Gindro, Katia; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Harshman, Keith; Monod, Michel

    2012-03-01

    A fast and reliable assay for the identification of dermatophyte fungi and nondermatophyte fungi (NDF) in onychomycosis is essential, since NDF are especially difficult to cure using standard treatment. Diagnosis is usually based on both direct microscopic examination of nail scrapings and macroscopic and microscopic identification of the infectious fungus in culture assays. In the last decade, PCR assays have been developed for the direct detection of fungi in nail samples. In this study, we describe a PCR-terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) assay to directly and routinely identify the infecting fungi in nails. Fungal DNA was easily extracted using a commercial kit after dissolving nail fragments in an Na(2)S solution. Trichophyton spp., as well as 12 NDF, could be unambiguously identified by the specific restriction fragment size of 5'-end-labeled amplified 28S DNA. This assay enables the distinction of different fungal infectious agents and their identification in mixed infections. Infectious agents could be identified in 74% (162/219) of cases in which the culture results were negative. The PCR-TRFLP assay described here is simple and reliable. Furthermore, it has the possibility to be automated and thus routinely applied to the rapid diagnosis of a large number of clinical specimens in dermatology laboratories.

  8. Serosurveillance of infectious agents in equines of the Central Valley of Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, D; Romero-Zuñiga, J J; Dolz, G

    2014-01-01

    Blood samples from 181 equines from the Central Valley of Costa Rica were collected in the year 2012 to determine the presence of antibodies against selected infectious agents in horses and to determine the risk factors associated with these agents. The presence of antibodies against Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV), Equine Herpes Virus 1 and 4 (EHV-1 and EHV-4), West Nile Virus (WNV), Influenza A Virus (IAV), Equine Viral Arteritis Virus (EVAV), Babesia caballi, Theileria equi, Neospora caninum and Chlamydia abortus was determined using commercial assays, and risk factors associated with seropositivity to the different infectious agents was established. The most seroprevalent agent detected was EHV-4 (96.7%), followed by WNV (44.2%), and IAV (41.8%). Horses >3 years, used for work or sports, and with access to pastures, had significantly increased probability to be seropositive to WNV, whereas horses used for breeding and recreational purposes, being stabled, and without access to pastures, had significantly greater probability to be seropositive to IAV. Seroprevalence to B. caballi (19.9%) was lower than to T. equi (38.1%). For B. caballi, access to pastures was determined as a risk factor, whereas being older than 3 years was established as a risk factor for T. equi. Low seroprevalences were determined for EHV-1 (5.0%), EVAV (5.0%), C. abortus (4.8%), and N. caninum (4.4%). Mares having history of abortion were more likely to be seropositive to EHV-1, whereas horses >3 years, used for work and sports, and mares having multiple parturitions, were more likely to be seropositive to N. caninum. None of the horses were seropositive to EIAV. Earlier, only diseases caused by EIAV, WNV and piroplasmosis were reported in Costa Rica. The present study however, determined the presence of carriers for EHV-1, EHV-4, and EIAV.

  9. Serosurveillance of infectious agents in equines of the Central Valley of Costa Rica

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    D. Jiménez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Blood samples from 181 equines from the Central Valley of Costa Rica were collected in the year 2012 to determine the presence of antibodies against selected infectious agents in horses and to determine the risk factors associated with these agents. The presence of antibodies against Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV, Equine Herpes Virus 1 and 4 (EHV-1 and EHV-4, West Nile Virus (WNV, Influenza A Virus (IAV, Equine Viral Arteritis Virus (EVAV, Babesia caballi, Theileria equi, Neospora caninum and Chlamydia abortus was determined using commercial assays, and risk factors associated with seropositivity to the different infectious agents was established. The most seroprevalent agent detected was EHV-4 (96.7%, followed by WNV (44.2%, and IAV (41.8%. Horses >3 years, used for work or sports, and with access to pastures, had significantly increased probability to be seropositive to WNV, whereas horses used for breeding and recreational purposes, being stabled, and without access to pastures, had significantly greater probability to be seropositive to IAV. Seroprevalence to B. caballi (19.9% was lower than to T. equi (38.1%. For B. caballi, access to pastures was determined as a risk factor, whereas being older than 3 years was established as a risk factor for T. equi. Low seroprevalences were determined for EHV-1 (5.0%, EVAV (5.0%, C. abortus (4.8%, and N. caninum (4.4%. Mares having history of abortion were more likely to be seropositive to EHV-1, whereas horses >3 years, used for work and sports, and mares having multiple parturitions, were more likely to be seropositive to N. caninum. None of the horses were seropositive to EIAV. Earlier, only diseases caused by EIAV, WNV and piroplasmosis were reported in Costa Rica. The present study however, determined the presence of carriers for EHV-1, EHV-4, and EIAV.

  10. An unbiased metagenomic search for infectious agents using monozygotic twins discordant for chronic fatigue

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    Jacks Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic fatigue syndrome is an idiopathic syndrome widely suspected of having an infectious or immune etiology. We applied an unbiased metagenomic approach to try to identify known or novel infectious agents in the serum of 45 cases with chronic fatigue syndrome or idiopathic chronic fatigue. Controls were the unaffected monozygotic co-twins of cases, and serum samples were obtained at the same place and time. Results No novel DNA or RNA viral signatures were confidently identified. Four affected twins and no unaffected twins evidenced viremia with GB virus C (8.9% vs. 0%, p = 0.019, and one affected twin had previously undetected hepatitis C viremia. An excess of GB virus C viremia in cases with chronic fatigue requires confirmation. Conclusions Current, impairing chronic fatigue was not robustly associated with viremia detectable in serum.

  11. AGENTES INFECCIOSOS ISOLADOS DE Chinchilla laniger INFECTIOUS AGENTS ISOLATED FROM Chinchilla laniger

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    Andrea Maria Lazzari

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Este relato descreve a infecção por Pseudomonas aeruginosa e surtos ocasionados por Bordetella bronchiseptica em chinchilas pertencentes a criatórios da região de Santa Maria, RS, Brasil. Os animais afetados apresentavam apatia, anorexia e dificuldade respiratória, acompanhada de secreção nasal mucopurulenta. O isolamento de Pseudomonas aeruginosa foi realizado pela cultura de amostra de tecido pulmonar, enquanto a Bordetella bronchiseptica foi isolada de pulmão, fígado e swab de secreção traqueal. São relatados e discutidos os dados clínicos e achados patológicos, assim como o isolamento e identificação desses agentes.This report describes a case of infection for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and outbreaks caused by Bordetella bronchiseptica in chinchila farms from the region of Santa Maria, Southern Brazil. The affected animals presented apathy, anorexia, respiratory impairment and nasal secretion. The isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was carried out through the culture of samples of lung whereas Bordetella bronchiseptica was obtainedfrom lung, liver and swab of traqueal secretion. In this report, the clinical data and the pathological findings as well as the isolation and identification of these agents are described.

  12. Specific B lymphocyte suppression by infectious bursal agent (Gumboro disease virus) in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, L; Pattison, M; Thantrey, N

    1975-10-01

    Chickens infected experimentally with infectious bursal agent (IBA) during embryonation or early after hatching show a severe depression of bursa-dependent lymphoid components, and associated immune functions. Data presented here and elsewhere show that the degree of B cell suppression correlates with the time of infection. This would be compatible with a virus-induced block in B lymphocyte differentiation. Accordingly, the virus may be cytopathic for early (bursal) but not late (circulating) B lymphocytes or, more likely, the virus inactivates those non-lymphoid bursal cells mediating lymphocyte differentiation.

  13. Life-threatening infectious diseases of childhood: single-gene inborn errors of immunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaïs, Alexandre; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Thaler, David S; Schurr, Erwin; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2010-12-01

    The hypothesis that inborn errors of immunity underlie infectious diseases is gaining experimental support. However, the apparent modes of inheritance of predisposition or resistance differ considerably among diseases and among studies. A coherent genetic architecture of infectious diseases is lacking. We suggest here that life-threatening infectious diseases in childhood, occurring in the course of primary infection, result mostly from individually rare but collectively diverse single-gene variations of variable clinical penetrance, whereas the genetic component of predisposition to secondary or reactivation infections in adults is more complex. This model is consistent with (i) the high incidence of most infectious diseases in early childhood, followed by a steady decline; (ii) theoretical modeling of the impact of monogenic or polygenic predisposition on the incidence distribution of infectious diseases before reproductive age; (iii) available molecular evidence from both monogenic and complex genetics of infectious diseases in children and adults; (iv) current knowledge of immunity to primary and secondary or latent infections; (v) the state of the art in the clinical genetics of noninfectious pediatric and adult diseases; and (vi) evolutionary data for the genes underlying single-gene and complex disease risk. With the recent advent of new-generation deep resequencing, this model of single-gene variations underlying severe pediatric infectious diseases is experimentally testable. © 2010 New York Academy of Sciences.

  14. SIS evolutionary game model and multi-agent simulation of an infectious disease emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Yang, Qing; Liu, Xingxing; Wang, Pan

    2015-01-01

    Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible (SIS) infectious disease outbreaks are hazardous events. However, if governments sectors do not adequately supervise such outbreaks, these infectious diseases could spread significantly, resulting in large economic losses and social issues. In this paper, an evolutionary game and simulation model based on the interactions between strategies and states was proposed, and the game between the public and government sectors and its impact on epidemic situations was discussed. Replicator dynamics equations and the multi-agent model simulation were used for analysis. According to replicator dynamics equations as well as the multi-agent model simulation, the public all eventually adopted the mobility strategy. In addition, the supervision strength of the governmental sectors was equal to 0 after the strength fluctuated at a low level under the trigger strategy. Ultimately, the entire public shifted to the S state throughout the course of the emergency. Social order was maintained and social loss was controlled to a certain extent in the final analysis.

  15. [Evaluation of the safety of innovative drugs against viruses and infectious agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tetsu; Yusa, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Nana

    2013-01-01

    Recently, several novel cellular therapy products and biological drugs are being developed to treat various previously untreatable diseases. One of the most important issues regarding these innovations is how to ensure safety over infectious agents, including viruses and prions, in the earliest treatments with these products. The object of this study is a risk assessment of cases of human infectious with the agents and to present a sample risk management plan based on a collaboration among the National Institute of Health Sciences, universities, marketing authorization holders, and scientific societies. There are three subjects of study: (1) the viral safety of cellular therapy products, (2) the viral safety of biological drugs, and (3) the safety of prions. In this report, we describe the objects of the study, the project members, the study plan outline, and the ongoing plans. The results of the viral risk identification and the risk analysis of cellular therapy products will also be described, based on a review of the literature and case reports obtained during the first year of this project.

  16. Prevalence of selected infectious disease agents in stray cats in Catalonia, Spain

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    Sara Ravicini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The objective of the current study was to investigate the prevalence rates of the following infectious agents in 116 stray cats in the Barcelona area of Spain: Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Bartonella species, Borrelia burgdorferi, Chlamydia felis, Dirofilaria immitis, Ehrlichia species, feline calicivirus (FCV, feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1, feline leukaemia virus (FeLV, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV, haemoplasmas, Mycoplasma species and Rickettsia species. Methods Serum antibodies were used to estimate the prevalence of exposure to A phagocytophilum, Bartonella species, B burgdorferi, Ehrlichia species and FIV; serum antigens were used to assess for infection by D immitis and FeLV; and molecular assays were used to amplify nucleic acids of Anaplasma species, Bartonella species, C felis, D immitis, Ehrlichia species, FCV, FHV-1, haemoplasmas, Mycoplasma species and Rickettsia species from blood and nasal or oral swabs. Results Of the 116 cats, 63 (54.3% had evidence of infection by Bartonella species, FeLV, FIV or a haemoplasma. Anaplasma species, Ehrlichia species or Rickettsia species DNA was not amplified from these cats. A total of 18/116 cats (15.5% were positive for FCV RNA (six cats, Mycoplasma species DNA (six cats, FHV-1 DNA (three cats or C felis DNA (three cats. Conclusions and relevance This study documents that shelter cats in Catalonia are exposed to many infectious agents with clinical and zoonotic significance, and that flea control is indicated for cats in the region.

  17. Pityriasis lichenoides chronica: case reports – the role of infectious agents?

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    Anca Chiriac

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. pityriasis lichenoides chronica (PLC, which is a benign eruption with lymphocytic infiltrates of the skin, presents as a persistent, erythematous, papular eruption with scale. Patients may have guttate, hypopigmented macules with scale in addition to papules. It is related histopathologically to pityriasis lichenoides et varioliformis acuta (PLEVA, which presents as a recurrent papulonecrotic eruption. The PLC is a cutaneous disease of unknown etiology that most commonly affects children and young adults. The highly variable presentation of this condition often poses a diagnostic challenge. Objective. Presentation of two adults with PLC probably induced by infectious agents. Case reports. A woman presented with scaly, pruritic, erythematous-to-brown flattened papules, which varied in size from 3 mm to 1 cm, on the trunk and extremities, being first diagnosed as guttate psoriasis. A man sought medical advice for a disseminated eruption on the trunk and extremities, observed for 2 months before the consultation. He was in a good medical state, with no comorbidities and no medication. He complained of discrete pruritus and urethral discharge for many days. Conclusions. Pityriasis lichenoides may have arisen secondarily to these infections or there were two simultaneous diseases. Further studies must elucidate the role of infectious agents in this pathology.

  18. Coinfection with EBV/CMV and other respiratory agents in children with suspected infectious mononucleosis

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    Wei Cong

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous studies have shown that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and cytomegalovirus (CMV can infect immunocompetent patients simultaneously with other agents. Nonetheless, multiple infections with other agents in EBV/CMV-infected children have received little attention. We conducted a retrospective study of children with suspected infectious mononucleosis. Peripheral blood samples were analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence to detect EBV, CMV and other respiratory agents including respiratory syncytial virus; adenovirus; influenza virus types A and B; parainfluenza virus types 1, 2 and 3; Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. A medical history was collected for each child. Results The occurrence of multipathogen infections was 68.9%, 81.3% and 63.6% in the children with primary EBV, CMV or EBV/CMV, respectively, which was significantly higher than that in the past-infected group or the uninfected group (p C. pneumoniae in children with primary infection was as high as 50%, significantly higher than in the other groups (p Conclusion Our study suggests that there is a high incidence of multipathogen infections in children admitted with EBV/CMV primary infection and that the distribution of these pathogens is not random.

  19. Infectious Agents and Xenobiotics in the Etiology of Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Carlo; De Santis, Maria; Cavaciocchi, Francesca; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2010-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC)is a chronic autoimmune cholestatic liver disease that manifests a latitudinal gradient in prevalence and incidence. The mechanisms leading to the initiation and perpetuation of PBC remain largely enigmatic, although it is established that a combination of genetic predisposition and environmental stimulation is required. PBC is also characterized by a high concordance rate in monozygotic twins and is considered a model autoimmune disease because of several features common to other conditions and the relatively homogeneous serological and biochemical features. From a diagnostic standpoint, PBC is characterized by the highest specificity of serum autoantibodies directed at mitochondrial proteins. Several risk factors have been suggested to be associated with PBC, including exposure to infectious agents and chemical xenobiotics that will be critically discussed in the present review article. PMID:21297248

  20. Predicting the characteristics of the aetiological agent for Kawasaki disease from other paediatric infectious diseases in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Y; Urabe, C; Nakamura, H; Hatano, N

    2016-02-01

    Although Kawasaki disease (KD), which was first reported in the 1960s, is assumed to be infectious, its aetiological agent(s) remains unknown. We compared the geographical distribution of the force of infection and the super-annual periodicity of KD and seven other paediatric infectious diseases in Japan. The geographical distribution of the force of infection, which was estimated as the inverse of the mean patient age, was similar in KD and other paediatric viral infections. This similarity was due to the fact that the force of infection was determined largely by the total fertility rate. This finding suggests that KD shares a transmission route, i.e. sibling-to-sibling infection, with other paediatric infections. The super-annual periodicity, which is positively associated with the sum of an infectious disease's incubation period and infectious period, was much longer for KD and exanthema subitum than other paediatric infectious diseases. The virus for exanthema subitum is known to persist across the host's lifespan, which suggests that the aetiological agent for KD may also be capable of persistent infection. Taken together, these findings suggest that the aetiological agent for KD is transmitted through close contact and persists asymptomatically in most hosts.

  1. Serologic screening for 13 infectious agents in roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) in Flanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavernier, Paul; Sys, Stanislas U; De Clercq, Kris; De Leeuw, Ilse; Caij, Anne Brigitte; De Baere, Miet; De Regge, Nick; Fretin, David; Roupie, Virginie; Govaerts, Marc; Heyman, Paul; Vanrompay, Daisy; Yin, Lizi; Kalmar, Isabelle; Suin, Vanessa; Brochier, Bernard; Dobly, Alexandre; De Craeye, Stéphane; Roelandt, Sophie; Goossens, Els; Roels, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of roe deer in the maintenance and transmission of infectious animal and human diseases in Flanders, we conducted a serologic screening in 12 hunting areas. Roe deer sera collected between 2008 and 2013 (n=190) were examined for antibodies against 13 infectious agents, using indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, virus neutralisation, immunofluorescence, or microagglutination test, depending on the agent. High numbers of seropositives were found for Anaplasma phagocytophilum (45.8%), Toxoplasma gondii (43.2%) and Schmallenberg virus (27.9%), the latter with a distinct temporal distribution pattern following the outbreak in domestic ruminants. Lower antibody prevalence was found for Chlamydia abortus (6.7%), tick-borne encephalitis virus (5.1%), Neospora caninum (4.8%), and Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (4.1%). The lowest prevalences were found for Leptospira (1.7%), bovine viral diarrhoea virus 1 (1.3%), and Coxiella burnetii (1.2%). No antibodies were found against Brucella sp., bovine herpesvirus 1, and bluetongue virus. A significant difference in seroprevalence between ages (higher in adults >1 year) was found for N. caninum. Four doubtful reacting sera accounted for a significant difference in seroprevalence between sexes for C. abortus (higher in females). Despite the more intensive landscape use in Flanders, the results are consistent with other European studies. Apart from maintaining C. abortus and MAP, roe deer do not seem to play an important role in the epidemiology of the examined zoonotic and domestic animal pathogens. Nevertheless, their meaning as sentinels should not be neglected in the absence of other wild cervid species.

  2. Enzymatic treatment of specimens before DNA extraction directly influences molecular detection of infectious agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Goldschmidt

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Biological samples, pharmaceuticals or food contain proteins, lipids, polymers, ammoniums and macromolecules that alter the detection of infectious agents by DNA amplification techniques (PCR. Moreover the targeted DNA has to be released from the complex cell walls and the compact nucleoprotein matrixes and cleared from potential inhibitors. The goal of the present work was to assess the efficiency of enzymatic pretreatments on infectious agents to make DNA available for further extraction and amplification. METHODS: Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus mitis, Propionibacterium acnes, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger and Fusarium solani were mixed with an internal control virus and treated with: 1 proteinase K; 2 lyticase and 3 lyticase followed by proteinase K. DNAs was manually extracted using the QIAmp DNA Mini kit or the MagNA Pure Compact automate. DNA extraction yields and the inhibitors were assessed with a phocid Herpesvirus. Bacterial detection was performed using TaqMan real-time PCR and yeasts and filamentous Fungi with HRM (real-time PCR followed by high-resolution melting analysis. RESULTS: Viral DNA was released, extracted and detected using manual and automatic methods without pre enzymatic treatments. Either the manual or the automatic DNA extraction systems did not meet the sensitivity expectations if enzymatic treatments were not performed before: lyticase for Fungi and Proteinase K for Bacteria. The addition of lyticase and proteinase K did not improve results. For Fungi the detection after lyticase was higher than for Proteinase K, for which melting analysis did not allow fungal specification. DISCUSSION: Columns and magnetic beads allowed collecting DNA and separate PCR inhibitors. Detection rates cannot be related to DNA-avidity of beads or to elution but to the lack of proteolysis.

  3. Serologic screening for 13 infectious agents in roe deer (Capreolus capreolus in Flanders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Tavernier

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In order to investigate the role of roe deer in the maintenance and transmission of infectious animal and human diseases in Flanders, we conducted a serologic screening in 12 hunting areas. Materials and methods: Roe deer sera collected between 2008 and 2013 (n=190 were examined for antibodies against 13 infectious agents, using indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, virus neutralisation, immunofluorescence, or microagglutination test, depending on the agent. Results and discussion: High numbers of seropositives were found for Anaplasma phagocytophilum (45.8%, Toxoplasma gondii (43.2% and Schmallenberg virus (27.9%, the latter with a distinct temporal distribution pattern following the outbreak in domestic ruminants. Lower antibody prevalence was found for Chlamydia abortus (6.7%, tick-borne encephalitis virus (5.1%, Neospora caninum (4.8%, and Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (4.1%. The lowest prevalences were found for Leptospira (1.7%, bovine viral diarrhoea virus 1 (1.3%, and Coxiella burnetii (1.2%. No antibodies were found against Brucella sp., bovine herpesvirus 1, and bluetongue virus. A significant difference in seroprevalence between ages (higher in adults >1 year was found for N. caninum. Four doubtful reacting sera accounted for a significant difference in seroprevalence between sexes for C. abortus (higher in females. Conclusions: Despite the more intensive landscape use in Flanders, the results are consistent with other European studies. Apart from maintaining C. abortus and MAP, roe deer do not seem to play an important role in the epidemiology of the examined zoonotic and domestic animal pathogens. Nevertheless, their meaning as sentinels should not be neglected in the absence of other wild cervid species.

  4. The evolution of infectious agents in relation to sex in animals and humans: brief discussions of some individual organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, David L.; Currier, Russell W.; Walton, Shelley F.; Conrad, Melissa; Sullivan, Steven A.; Carlton, Jane M.; Read, Timothy D.; Severini, Alberto; Tyler, Shaun; Eberle, R.; Johnson, Welkin E.; Silvestri, Guido; Clarke, Ian N.; Lagergård, Teresa; Lukehart, Sheila A.; Unemo, Magnus; Shafer, William M.; Beasley, R. Palmer; Bergström, Tomas; Norberg, Peter; Davison, Andrew J.; Sharp, Paul M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Blomberg, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    The following series of concise summaries addresses the evolution of infectious agents in relation to sex in animals and humans from the perspective of three specific questions: (1) what have we learned about the likely origin and phylogeny, up to the establishment of the infectious agent in the genital econiche, including the relative frequency of its sexual transmission; (2) what further research is needed to provide additional knowledge on some of these evolutionary aspects; and (3) what evolutionary considerations might aid in providing novel approaches to the more practical clinical and public health issues facing us currently and in the future? PMID:21824167

  5. New International Initiatives on Enhancement of Biosafety and Biosecurity Regulations for Laboratories Handling Infectious Agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Netesov, S. V.; Drozdov, I. G.

    2007-01-01

    Before we entered the era of antibiotics, development of antiseptics rules and reliable water purification systems the infectious pathogens had played a major role in morbidity and mortality of global human population. The advances in revealing the nature of dangerous infections and studying their causative agents during the recent years have led not only to big progress in their control but also to the study of their potential as weapons. During the last fifty years, several attempts have been made to use them for criminal or terrorist purposes that demonstrated that even primitively organized terrorist attacks may lead to quite significant consequences. The October 2001 events showed that bioterrorism attacks may be prepared, probably, as a result of theft of the pathogen from a lab. All this led to the revision and radical improvement of current national rules and international recommendations in the field of handling, storage and transportation of infectious agents. As a result, during the past two years these rules have been significantly revised by both the World Health Organization and some countries. However, their harmonization of is still far from what is desired. Therefore, biosafety professionals in some countries, including those of the European Union, are establishing professional biosafety associations. In addition, new initiatives are being proposed to develop internationally harmonized biosecurity rules to govern dangerous pathogens handling and storage. The most important of them are as follows: 1. Development, under the auspices of WHO, of new recommendations concerning a set of requirements to provide physical security of both biological agents and laboratories involved in research on extremely hazardous infections; 2. Enhacement, under the auspices of WHO, of current international recommendations on inventory procedures and regulations, inventory monitoring, and transportation of specimens and strains of extremely hazardous infections; 3

  6. Exploring DNA topoisomerases as targets of novel therapeutic agents in the treatment of infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse-Dinh, Y-C

    2007-03-01

    DNA topoisomerases are ubiquitous enzymes needed to overcome topological problems encountered during DNA replication, transcription, recombination and maintenance of genomic stability. They have proved to be valuable targets for therapy, in part because some anti-topoisomerase agents act as poisons. Bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV (type IIA topoisomerases) are targets of fluoroquinolones while human topoisomerase I (a type IB topoisomerase) and topoisomerase II are targets of various anticancer drugs. Bacterial type IA topoisomerase share little sequence homology to type IB or type IIA topoisomerases, but all topoisomerases have the potential of having the covalent phosphotyrosine DNA cleavage intermediate trapped by drug action. Recent studies have demonstrated that stabilization of the covalent complex formed by bacterial topoisomerase I and cleaved DNA can lead to bacterial cell death, supporting bacterial topoisomerase I as a promising target for the development of novel antibiotics. For current antibacterial therapy, the prevalence of fluoroquinolone-resistant bacterial pathogens has become a major public health concern, and efforts are directed towards identifying novel inhibitors of bacterial type IIA topoisomerases that are not affected by fluoroquinolone resistant mutations on the gyrase or topoisomerase IV genes. For anti-viral therapy, poxviruses encode their own type IB topoisomerases; these enzymes differ in drug sensitivity from human topoisomerase I. To confront potential threat of small pox as a weapon in terrorist attacks, vaccinia virus topoisomerase I has been targeted for discovery of anti-viral agents. These new developments of DNA topoisomerases as targets of novel therapeutic agents being reviewed here represent excellent opportunities for drug discovery in the treatment of infectious diseases.

  7. Does Animal Behavior Underlie Covariation Between Hosts' Exposure to Infectious Agents and Susceptibility to Infection? Implications for Disease Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hawley, Dana M.; Etienne, Rampal S.; Ezenwa, Vanessa O.; Jolles, Anna E.

    2011-01-01

    Animal behavior is unique in influencing both components of the process of transmission of disease: exposure to infectious agents, and susceptibility to infection once exposed. To date, the influence of behavior on exposure versus susceptibility has largely been considered separately. Here, we ask

  8. Using data on social contacts to estimate age-specific transmission parameters for respiratory-spread infectious agents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallinga, Jacco; Teunis, Peter F M; Kretzschmar, Mirjam

    2006-01-01

    The estimation of transmission parameters has been problematic for diseases that rely predominantly on transmission of pathogens from person to person through small infectious droplets. Age-specific transmission parameters determine how such respiratory agents will spread among different age groups

  9. Agricultural pathogen decontamination technology-reducing the threat of infectious agent spread.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betty, Rita G.; Bieker, Jill Marie; Tucker, Mark David

    2005-10-01

    Outbreaks of infectious agricultural diseases, whether natural occurring or introduced intentionally, could have catastrophic impacts on the U.S. economy. Examples of such agricultural pathogens include foot and mouth disease (FMD), avian influenza (AI), citrus canker, wheat and soy rust, etc. Current approaches to mitigate the spread of agricultural pathogens include quarantine, development of vaccines for animal diseases, and development of pathogen resistant crop strains in the case of plant diseases. None of these approaches is rapid, and none address the potential persistence of the pathogen in the environment, which could lead to further spread of the agent and damage after quarantine is lifted. Pathogen spread in agricultural environments commonly occurs via transfer on agricultural equipment (transportation trailers, tractors, trucks, combines, etc.), having components made from a broad range of materials (galvanized and painted steel, rubber tires, glass and Plexiglas shields, etc), and under conditions of heavy organic load (mud, soil, feces, litter, etc). A key element of stemming the spread of an outbreak is to ensure complete inactivation of the pathogens in the agricultural environment and on the equipment used in those environments. Through the combination of enhanced agricultural pathogen decontamination chemistry and a validated inactivation verification methodology, important technologies for incorporation as components of a robust response capability will be enabled. Because of the potentially devastating economic impact that could result from the spread of infectious agricultural diseases, the proposed capability components will promote critical infrastructure protection and greater border and food supply security. We investigated and developed agricultural pathogen decontamination technologies to reduce the threat of infectious-agent spread, and thus enhance agricultural biosecurity. Specifically, enhanced detergency versions of the patented

  10. Serum antibodies against genitourinary infectious agents in prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia patients: a case-control study

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    Brabec Marek

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection plays a role in the pathogenesis of many human malignancies. Whether prostate cancer (PCa - an important health issue in the aging male population in the Western world - belongs to these conditions has been a matter of research since the 1970 s. Persistent serum antibodies are a proof of present or past infection. The aim of this study was to compare serum antibodies against genitourinary infectious agents between PCa patients and controls with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH. We hypothesized that elevated serum antibody levels or higher seroprevalence in PCa patients would suggest an association of genitourinary infection in patient history and elevated PCa risk. Methods A total of 434 males who had undergone open prostate surgery in a single institution were included in the study: 329 PCa patients and 105 controls with BPH. The subjects' serum samples were analysed by means of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, complement fixation test and indirect immunofluorescence for the presence of antibodies against common genitourinary infectious agents: human papillomavirus (HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, 31 and 33, herpes simplex virus (HSV 1 and 2, human cytomegalovirus (CMV, Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Treponema pallidum. Antibody seroprevalence and mean serum antibody levels were compared between cases and controls. Tumour grade and stage were correlated with serological findings. Results PCa patients were more likely to harbour antibodies against Ureaplasma urealyticum (odds ratio (OR 2.06; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.08-4.28. Men with BPH were more often seropositive for HPV 18 and Chlamydia trachomatis (OR 0.23; 95% CI 0.09-0.61 and OR 0.45; 95% CI 0.21-0.99, respectively and had higher mean serum CMV antibody levels than PCa patients (p = 0.0004. Among PCa patients, antibodies against HPV 6 were associated with a higher Gleason score (p = 0.0305. Conclusions

  11. Emerging infectious diseases: a guide to diseases, causative agents, and surveillance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beltz, Lisa A

    2011-01-01

    "This important resource offers a comprehensive introduction to emerging and reemerging infectious disease, including the underlying mechanisms of microbial emergence, the technology used to detect...

  12. Antimicrobial agents of plant origin for the treatment of phlogistic-infectious diseases of the lower female genital tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Gon

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The phlogistic-infectious diseases of the lower female genital tract are one of the most widespread obstetricgynecologic issues, due to treatment failures that cause frequent relapses and to the adverse effects of some commonly used drugs.The most common vaginal syndromes are due to uncontrolled growth of bacteria or fungi which replace the normal vaginal flora, causing phlogistic and infectious based diseases. These infections are treated with anti-inflammatory and antibiotic therapy; however, the emergence of resistant strains and the ability of many microorganisms to grow inside biofilms severely reduce the repertoire of useful agents.Thus, in the last years increasing interest has been focused toward compounds of plant origin with anti-microbial properties. In the present work, we studied the antimicrobial activity of fractions obtained from endemic plants of Sardinia towards microorganisms that frequently are involved in vaginal infectious diseases: Streptococcus agalactiae, Gardnerella vaginalis and Candida albicans.

  13. Determination of buoyant density and sensitivity to chloroform and freon for the etiological agent of infectious salmonid anaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, K.E.; Hjeltnes, B.; Uglenes , I.; Winton, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    Plasma was collected from Atlantic salmon Salrno salar with acute infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) and used to challenge Atlantic salmon parr by intraperitoneal injection. Treatment of plasma with the lipid solvent, chloroform, showed that the etiological agent of ISA contained essential lipids, probably as a viral envelope. Some infectivity remained following treatment with freon. Injection challenges using fractions from equilibrium density gradient centrifugation of plasma from fish with acute ISA revealed a band of infectivity in the range 1.184 to 1.262 g cm-3. The band was believed to conta~n both complete ISA-virus particles and infectious particles lacking a complete envelope, nucleocapsid or genome. Density gradient centrifugation of infectious plasma for enrichment of the putative ISA virus appeared to offer a suitable method for obtaining virus-specific nucleic acid for use in the construction of cDNA libraries. 

  14. Etiology of Infectious Complications and Antibiotic-Resistance of Major Causative Agents in Victims with Severe Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Vasina

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the spectrum of major pathogens of infectious complications in patients with concomitant injury.Materials and methods. 560 biological samples taken from 331 patients were bacteriologically studied. A significant reduction in the isolation frequency of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and an increase in etiological role of Staphylococcus aureus were ascertained in victims with severe injury and concomitant infectious complications during long-term 1982—1984 and 2002—2004 follow-ups.Results. The significant pathogens of infectious complications in concomitant injuries are Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella and Escherichia coli. Vancomycin, imipenem/cilastatin, and amikacin are shown to be the most effective drugs for early antibiotic therapy. Thus, the findings reflect structural changes in the leading causative agents of infectious complications in victims with severe injury. If their principal pathogen was Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the 1990s, Staphylococcus aureus and representatives in the colibacillus group prevail today. This supports and generates a need for continuous microbiological monitoring of the causative agents of pyoin-flammatory complications in intensive care units wherein patients with immunosuppression are also present. Pathogen monitoring makes it possible to apply of a well-grounded and rational package of preventive and therapeutic measures and to perform early target antibiotic therapy. 

  15. A Review of Infectious Agents in Polar Bears (Ursus maritimus) and Their Long-Term Ecological Relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagre, Anna C; Patyk, Kelly A; Nol, Pauline; Atwood, Todd; Hueffer, Karsten; Duncan, Colleen

    2015-09-01

    Disease was a listing criterion for the polar bear (Ursus maritimus) as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 2008; it is therefore important to evaluate the current state of knowledge and identify any information gaps pertaining to diseases in polar bears. We conducted a systematic literature review focused on infectious agents and associated health impacts identified in polar bears. Overall, the majority of reports in free-ranging bears concerned serosurveys or fecal examinations with little to no information on associated health effects. In contrast, most reports documenting illness or pathology referenced captive animals and diseases caused by etiologic agents not representative of exposure opportunities in wild bears. As such, most of the available infectious disease literature has limited utility as a basis for development of future health assessment and management plans. Given that ecological change is a considerable risk facing polar bear populations, future work should focus on cumulative effects of multiple stressors that could impact polar bear population dynamics.

  16. Efficacy of ATR inhibitors as single agents in Ewing sarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieto-Soler, Maria; Morgado-Palacin, Isabel; Lafarga, Vanesa

    2016-01-01

    Ewing sarcomas (ES) are pediatric bone tumors that arise from a driver translocation, most frequently EWS/FLI1. Current ES treatment involves DNA damaging agents, yet the basis for the sensitivity to these therapies remains unknown. Oncogene-induced replication stress (RS) is a known source...... efficacy in ES xenografts as single agents. Expression of EWS/FLI1 or EWS/ERG oncogenic translocations sensitizes non-ES cells to ATR inhibitors. Our data shed light onto the sensitivity of ES to genotoxic agents, and identify ATR inhibitors as a potential therapy for Ewing Sarcomas....

  17. WORKSHOP ON EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASE AGENTS AND ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH ANIMAL MANURES, BIOSOLIDS, AND OTHER SIMILAR BY-PRODUCTS: THE REST OF THE STORY

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation will:Discuss the purpose of the workshopDiscussion publication of "Contemporary Perspectives on Infectious Disease Agents in Sewage Sludge and Manure.Present Table of ContentsDiscuss summaryDiscuss synthesis document

  18. Expanding the Hygiene Hypothesis: Early Exposure to Infectious Agents Predicts Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity to Candida among Children in Kilimanjaro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wander, Katherine; O'Connor, Kathleen; Shell-Duncan, Bettina

    2012-01-01

    Background Multiple lines of evidence suggest that infections in early life prevent the development of pathological immune responses to allergens and autoantigens (the hygiene hypothesis). Early infections may also affect later immune responses to pathogen antigen. Methods To evaluate an association between early infections and immune responses to pathogen antigen, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to Candida albicans was evaluated among 283 2- to 7-year-old children in Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. A questionnaire and physical examination were used to characterize variables reflecting early exposure to infectious agents (family size, house construction materials, BCG vaccination, hospitalization history). Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between early exposure to infectious agents and DTH to C. albicans. Results Triceps skinfold thickness (OR: 1.11; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.22) and age (OR: 1.27; 95% CI: 1.04, 1.55) were positively associated with DTH to C. albicans. Adjusted for age and sex, large family size (OR: 2.81; 95% CI: 1.04, 7.61), BCG vaccination scar (OR: 3.10; 95% CI: 1.10, 8.71), and hospitalization during infancy with an infectious disease (OR: 4.67; 95% CI: 1.00, 21.74) were positively associated with DTH to C. albicans. Conclusions Early life infections were positively associated with later DTH to C. albicans. This result supports an expansion of the hygiene hypothesis to explain not only pathological immune responses to allergens, but also appropriate immune responses to pathogens. Immune system development may be responsive to early infections as an adaptive means to tailor reactivity to the local infectious disease ecology. PMID:22616000

  19. Epistemic planning for single- and multi-agent systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolander, Thomas; Andersen, Mikkel Birkegaard

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the use of event models for automated planning. Event models are the action defining structures used to define a semantics for dynamic epistemic logic. Using event models, two issues in planning can be addressed: Partial observability of the environment and knowledge...... the specification of a more complex class of planning domains, than those simply concerned with simple facts about the world. We show how to model multi-agent planning problems using Kripke-models for representing world states, and event models for representing actions. Our mechanism makes use of slight....... In planning, partial observability gives rise to an uncertainty about the world. For single-agent domains, this uncertainty can come from incomplete knowledge of the starting situation and from the nondeterminism of actions. In multi-agent domains, an additional uncertainty arises from the fact that other...

  20. Serosurvey for selected infectious agents in two sympatric species of cormorants (Phalacrocorax atriceps and Phalacrocorax magellanicus) from coastal Patagonia, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Luciana; Quintana, Flavio; Uhart, Marcela

    2013-07-01

    We conducted a serologic survey for selected infectious agents on two sympatric cormorants, the Imperial Cormorant (Phalacrocorax atriceps) and the Rock Shag (Phalacrocorax magellanicus). Blood was collected from 267 Imperial Cormorants and 106 Rock Shags at 17 colonies along the Patagonia Atlantic shore during nine breeding seasons (1994, 1999-2001-2005-2008-2010). Antibodies to four pathogens were common to both species and frequently observed: avian paramyxovirus type 1 (56% of Imperial Cormorants and 56% of Rock Shags); avian adenovirus (67% of Imperial Cormorants and 40% of Rock Shags); infectious bronchitis virus serotypes IBV-41, IBV-46, IBV-99, and IBV-JMK (53% of Imperial Cormorants and 64% of Rock Shags); and Salmonella pullorum (18% of Imperial Cormorants and 7% of Rock Shags). Antibody prevalence for these pathogens varied significantly between species, except for avian paramyxovirus type 1. Exposure to avian paramyxovirus type 1 and all serotypes of infectious bronchitis virus varied significantly among seasons in both species. In contrast, the sporadic occurrence of positive titers suggest that cormorants had occasional exposure to Aspergillus spp. (3% of Rock Shags, only in 2000), avian paramyxovirus type 3 (5% of Rock Shags, only in 2008), Chlamydophila spp. (1% of Imperial Cormorants, only in 2010), and avian reovirus (1% of Rock Shags, only in 1999; 29% of Imperial Cormorants, in 2008 and 2010). Both species were antibody negative for avian encephalomyelitis virus, avian influenza virus, avian laryngotracheitis virus, avian paramyxovirus type 2, and infectious bursal disease virus. We provide the first information on pathogen exposure, indicated by detection of antibody in blood samples, for two sympatric species of South Atlantic cormorants. To determine major causes of morbidity and mortality in these birds future efforts should focus on necropsy surveys in cormorant colonies.

  1. [Evaluation of the efficacy of medical screening of blood donors on preventing blood transfusion-transmitted infectious agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seck, M; Dièye, B; Guèye, Y B; Faye, B F; Senghor, A B; Toure, S A; Dieng, N; Sall, A; Toure, A O; Dièye, T N; Diop, S

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of medical screening to retain blood donors in window period by comparing the seroprevalence of infectious agents (HIV, hepatitis B and C, syphilis) in deferred versus accepted blood donors. This prospective and transversal study was performed during 4 months in the National Blood Transfusion Center in Dakar (Senegal). We conducted a convenience sampling comparing the seroprevalence of infectious agents (HIV, HBsAg, HCV and syphilis) in deferred versus accepted blood donors after medical selection. In total, 8219 blood donors were included. Medical selection had authorized 8048 donors (97.92%) and deferred donors were 171 (2.08%). The prevalence of HIV was higher in the deferred than in accepted blood donors (1.75% vs. 0.05%) (P=0.0003; OR=35.91), as well as for HBsAg (12.87% vs. 7.35%) (P=0.006; OR=1.86). HCV antibodies were present in 0.71% of accepted blood donors and 0.58% in deferred blood donors (P=0.65; OR=0.82). Only accepted donors had brought the infection of syphilis (0.34%) (P=0.56; OR=0). Medical selection is efficient to exclude blood donors at high risk of HIV transmission and to a lesser extent of HBV. However, current medical screening procedures do not allow us to exclude donors asymptomatic carriers of HCV and syphilis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of the infectious reservoir of malaria with an agent-based model calibrated to age-stratified parasite densities and infectiousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardin, Jaline; Ouédraogo, André Lin; McCarthy, Kevin A; Eckhoff, Philip A; Wenger, Edward A

    2015-06-03

    Elimination of malaria can only be achieved through removal of all vectors or complete depletion of the infectious reservoir in humans. Mechanistic models can be built to synthesize diverse observations from the field collected under a variety of conditions and subsequently used to query the infectious reservoir in great detail. The EMOD model of malaria transmission was calibrated to prevalence, incidence, asexual parasite density, gametocyte density, infection duration, and infectiousness data from nine study sites. The infectious reservoir was characterized by age and parasite detectability with diagnostics of varying sensitivity over a range of transmission intensities with and without case management and vector control. Mass screen-and-treat drug campaigns were tested for likelihood of achieving elimination. The composition of the infectious reservoir is similar over a range of transmission intensities, and higher intensity settings are biased towards infections in children. Recent ramp-ups in case management and use of insecticide-treated bed nets (ITNs) reduce the infectious reservoir and shift the composition towards sub-microscopic infections. Mass campaigns with anti-malarial drugs are highly effective at interrupting transmission if deployed shortly after ITN campaigns. Low-density infections comprise a substantial portion of the infectious reservoir. Proper timing of vector control, seasonal variation in transmission intensity and mass drug campaigns allows lingering population immunity to help drive a region towards elimination.

  3. The Potential of Bdellovibrio For the Biocontrol of the Infectious Agent Vibrio cholerae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Olsson Markelova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Members of the genus Bdellovibrio are small and highly motile Gram-negative predators of other Gram-negative bacteria. Bdellovibrio enters the prey cell, transforming it into a structure that is referred to as a bdelloplast. It then grows and divides inside the bdelloplast, ending in lysis and the release of the Bdellovibrio progeny. Because of this capability, Bdellovibrio is a potential antibacterial agent. In this article, we report the results of studies on the interactions of Bdellovibrio with actively growing and viable but nonculturable (VBNC Vibrio cholerae. A significant observation was that Bdellovibrio attacked both VBNC and actively growing V. cholerae. These results indicate that Bdellovibrio, a “living antibiotic,” has potential as an antibacterial agent in environmental and public health bioprotection.

  4. Animals living in polluted environments are potential source of antimicrobials against infectious agents

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Simon; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    The antimicrobials crisis is a ticking time bomb which could lead to millions of people dying from untreatable infections. With the worsening trends of antimicrobial resistance, we are heading towards a pre-antibiotic era. Thus, there is a need for newer and more powerful antibiotic agents. The search for new antibiotic compounds originating from natural resources is a promising research area. Animals living in germ-infested environments are a potent source of antimicrobials. Under polluted m...

  5. Dual infection by chikungunya virus and other imported infectious agent in a traveller returning from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzedine, Khaled; Cazanave, Charles; Pistone, Thierry; Receveur, Marie-Catherine; Neau, Didier; Ragnaud, Jean-Marie; Malvy, Denis

    2008-05-01

    Chikungunya virus infection is a vector-borne self-limiting disease. Recent outbreaks in the Indian Ocean islands have drawn attention to the condition. Nevertheless, only a few reports of co-infection with other communicable agents have been reported. The case described now is of a traveller returning from India with concomitant documented chikungunya virus infection associated with systemic amoebiasis. This report highlights the multifaceted pathology that can be encountered with tropical infections.

  6. Development of a set of multiplex standard polymerase chain reaction assays for the identification of infectious agents from aborted bovine clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramuta, Clara; Lacerenza, Daniela; Zoppi, Simona; Goria, Mariella; Dondo, Alessandro; Ferroglio, Ezio; Nebbia, Patrizia; Rosati, Sergio

    2011-07-01

    The current study describes the development of a set of 5 multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) assays for the simultaneous detection of abortive infection agents in bovine fetal tissues, including Brucella spp., Leptospira spp., and Campylobacter fetus (mPCR1); Hammondia heydorni, Neospora caninum, and Toxoplasma gondii (mPCR2); Coxiella burnetii and Chlamydophila psittaci (mPCR3); Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma bovigenitalium, and Ureaplasma diversum (mPCR4); and Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and Bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1; mPCR5). The protocol was tested on different tissue samples collected from 50 aborted bovine fetuses, and it showed that out of the 50 fetuses, 7 (14%, mPCR2) were PCR-positive for N. caninum, 4 (8%, mPCR5) were PCR-positive for BVDV, and 2 (4%, mPCR4) were PCR-positive for U. diversum. The results obtained by using each multiplex PCR were 100% concordant with those obtained by using the respective PCR assays targeting single genes on the same specimens. Moreover, all multiplex PCR assays on clinical samples were compared with reference methods, obtaining a perfect accordance in all samples and confirming the validity of the set of multiplex PCR assays. The proposed set of multiplex PCR assays is, therefore, suitable for the simultaneous detection of the main infectious agents responsible for bovine abortion.

  7. Role of mechanical ventilation in the airborne transmission of infectious agents in buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luongo, J C; Fennelly, K P; Keen, J A; Zhai, Z J; Jones, B W; Miller, S L

    2016-10-01

    Infectious disease outbreaks and epidemics such as those due to SARS, influenza, measles, tuberculosis, and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus have raised concern about the airborne transmission of pathogens in indoor environments. Significant gaps in knowledge still exist regarding the role of mechanical ventilation in airborne pathogen transmission. This review, prepared by a multidisciplinary group of researchers, focuses on summarizing the strengths and limitations of epidemiologic studies that specifically addressed the association of at least one heating, ventilating and/or air-conditioning (HVAC) system-related parameter with airborne disease transmission in buildings. The purpose of this literature review was to assess the quality and quantity of available data and to identify research needs. This review suggests that there is a need for well-designed observational and intervention studies in buildings with better HVAC system characterization and measurements of both airborne exposures and disease outcomes. Studies should also be designed so that they may be used in future quantitative meta-analyses. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Marking an antibacterial agent by Tc-99m: development of a radiotracer for the detection of infectious foci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghali, Wafa

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear imaging is a non-invasive exploration technique, used for rapid diagnostic of infections disease thus, for osteoarticular infection scintigraphic techniques were proposed to ameliorate the diagnostic sensibility and the use of radiolabeled antibiotics as imaging agents of infectious loci become more ana more recognized. In this work, a new sulfanilamide derivative, The N-sulfanilamide-ferrocene-carboxamide (SFC) was chemically synthesized then labeled with technetium-99m, with a radiochemical yield, >87 pour cent. In vitro investigations were conducted, and the label's stability in serum was found as more than 20 hours at 37 degree. then uptake of labeled compound was determined by counting radioactivity in bacterial pellet of about 69 pour cent for the E.coli strain and 61,9 pour cent for S. Aureus strain, was estimated. A biodistribution study of technetium-99m - SFC allowed the comprehension of radiotracer kinetics and ways of biotransformation. And a significantly higher (p<0.05) accumulation of technetium-99m - SFC was seen at sites of S. aureus-infected animals (T/NT ratio, 2.88±0.5) compared with others radiotracers. So with all those founded results could establish that SFC may be a bacterial infection-seeking agent in staphylococcus aureus-induced infections.

  9. Single-shot echo-planar MR sequences in the diagnosis of intracranial infectious diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro; Katase, Shichiro; Yoshino, Ayako; Yamakami, Norio; Hachiya, Junichi

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to present our preliminary experience in the application of echo-planar-imaging (EPI) MR sequences for the diagnosis of intracranial infectious diseases and to assess the value of these sequences. We reviewed single-shot EPI MR images obtained at 1.5 T in 17 patients and compared these images with conventional or fast spin-echo (SE) or fluid attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) images. The clinical diagnoses for the 17 patients were meningitis (2 patients), encephalitis or meningoencephalitis (7 patients), brain abscess (5 patients), epidural empyema (2 patients) and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (1 patient). We obtained EPI-T 2 -weighted (T 2 W) images in 8 patients, EPI-FLAIR images in 13 patients and EPI-diffusion-weighted (DW) images in 14 patients. Among the 8 patients for whom EPI-T 2 W imaging was performed, EPI-T 2 W imaging yielded superior results compared with SE-T 2 W imaging in 3 patients as a consequence of patient motion and equal results compared with SE-T 2 W imaging in 5 patients. Among the 13 patients for whom EPI-FLAIR imaging was performed, the EPI-FLAIR images were superior to conventional FLAIR images in 3 unstable patients. In the remaining 10 patients for whom EPI-FLAIR imaging was performed, EPI-FLAIR images were equivalent or inferior to conventional FLAIR images. In 6 patients with encephalitis or meningoencephalitis, the encephalitic lesions showed hyperintensity in EPI-DW images to a greater extent than in images obtained with the other techniques. In 3 patients, EPI-DW images also demonstrated hyperintensity for the contents of abscesses or areas of empyema that was not seen with the other imaging techniques. The value of EPI-T 2 W and EPI-FLAIR imaging is limited in uncooperative patients. EPI-DW imaging was found to be of value for the evaluation of several intracranial infectious diseases. (author)

  10. Single-shot echo-planar MR sequences in the diagnosis of intracranial infectious diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro; Katase, Shichiro; Yoshino, Ayako; Yamakami, Norio; Hachiya, Junichi [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to present our preliminary experience in the application of echo-planar-imaging (EPI) MR sequences for the diagnosis of intracranial infectious diseases and to assess the value of these sequences. We reviewed single-shot EPI MR images obtained at 1.5 T in 17 patients and compared these images with conventional or fast spin-echo (SE) or fluid attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) images. The clinical diagnoses for the 17 patients were meningitis (2 patients), encephalitis or meningoencephalitis (7 patients), brain abscess (5 patients), epidural empyema (2 patients) and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (1 patient). We obtained EPI-T{sub 2}-weighted (T{sub 2}W) images in 8 patients, EPI-FLAIR images in 13 patients and EPI-diffusion-weighted (DW) images in 14 patients. Among the 8 patients for whom EPI-T{sub 2}W imaging was performed, EPI-T{sub 2}W imaging yielded superior results compared with SE-T{sub 2}W imaging in 3 patients as a consequence of patient motion and equal results compared with SE-T{sub 2}W imaging in 5 patients. Among the 13 patients for whom EPI-FLAIR imaging was performed, the EPI-FLAIR images were superior to conventional FLAIR images in 3 unstable patients. In the remaining 10 patients for whom EPI-FLAIR imaging was performed, EPI-FLAIR images were equivalent or inferior to conventional FLAIR images. In 6 patients with encephalitis or meningoencephalitis, the encephalitic lesions showed hyperintensity in EPI-DW images to a greater extent than in images obtained with the other techniques. In 3 patients, EPI-DW images also demonstrated hyperintensity for the contents of abscesses or areas of empyema that was not seen with the other imaging techniques. The value of EPI-T{sub 2}W and EPI-FLAIR imaging is limited in uncooperative patients. EPI-DW imaging was found to be of value for the evaluation of several intracranial infectious diseases. (author)

  11. The potential transmission of infectious agents by semen packaging during storage for artificial insemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, P H; Lyaruu, V H; Millar, J D; Curry, M R; Watson, P F

    1997-07-01

    Plastic straws, of a type widely used for semen cryopreservation, sealed using three different methods, (PVA powder, plastic spheres and plasticine modelling clay) were tested for leakage of low molecular weight dye (methylene blue), bacteria (Escherichia coli) and virus (Newcastle disease virus). Leakage was found to be dependent on the method used to fill the straws. Straws filled using a traditional 'dip and wipe' method and sealed with PVA powder demonstrated a significant degree of methylene blue leakage (0.0269% of the total straw contents) probably associated with contamination of the powder sealing plug. Straws filled using an aseptic filling technique showed no detectable leakage of any agent with any of the sealing methods. This study highlights the need to establish good-practice guidelines for the packaging of semen collected for freezing and future AI from non-domestic livestock where disease-free status cannot be guaranteed and unsophisticated technology is used.

  12. Animals living in polluted environments are potential source of antimicrobials against infectious agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Simon; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2012-08-01

    The antimicrobials crisis is a ticking time bomb which could lead to millions of people dying from untreatable infections. With the worsening trends of antimicrobial resistance, we are heading towards a pre-antibiotic era. Thus, there is a need for newer and more powerful antibiotic agents. The search for new antibiotic compounds originating from natural resources is a promising research area. Animals living in germ-infested environments are a potent source of antimicrobials. Under polluted milieus, organisms such as cockroaches encounter different types of bacteria, including superbugs. Such creatures survive the onslaught of superbugs and are able to ward off disease by producing antimicrobial substances which show potent activity in the nervous system. We hope that the discovery of antimicrobial activity in the cockroach brain will stimulate research in finding antimicrobials from unusual sources, and has potential for the development of novel antibiotics. Nevertheless, intensive research in the next few years will be required to approach or realize these expectations.

  13. Parasites and other infectious agents in marine finfish and shellfish species posing a hazard to human health (ToR b)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alfjorden, A.; Podolska, M.; Karaseva, T.

    2015-01-01

    Several parasites and other infectious agents frequently reported by the WGPDMO in the annual update of disease trends (ICES WGPDMO reports 1999–2015) have the potential to be harmful to human health if ingested in unprocessed or inadequate-ly/partly processed seafood. These include, but are not ...

  14. Radiological Findings in Children with Acute Pneumonia: Age More Important Than Infectious Agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahlgren, H.; Mortensson, W.; Eriksson, M.; Finkel, Y.; Forsgren, M.; Leinonen, M. [Astrid Lindgren' s Children' s Hospital, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Depts. of Pediatric Radiology and Pediatrics

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether radiological findings and healing time in children with pneumonia are correlated to etiologic agent. Material and Methods: A total of 346 children with radiologically verified acute pneumonia, and with accomplished serological tests for bacteria and viruses, were included in the study. Five etiological groups were analysed: children with bacterial etiology only, with viral etiology only, with mixed bacterial and viral etiology, with Mycoplasma only, and children with no etiology. Results: The chest films of each etiological group were analysed and the findings were correlated to the children's age. The radiological findings did not differ between the etiological groups. Radiological findings correlated significantly with the patient's age. The radiological healing frequency at check-up X-ray was found to be significantly lower in children with mixed bacterial and viral etiology compared to children in each of the other groups and to the material as a whole. Conclusion: Conclusions about the etiology could not be drawn from the chest X-ray findings.

  15. A SINGLE CENTRE RETROSPECTIVE 5 YEAR SURVEY OF INFECTIOUS COMPLICATION IN 85 CHILDREN WITH COMBINED IMMUNODEFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghamohammadi

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Children with primary Tslymphocyte deficiency arc more ."I/."'clptihfe to infection hy organisms such (15: bacteria, fungi. prolo:o(J lind virus, 1711.' isniatian oj all opponuniuic ory;ani."m or an IImallally severe infection with higher grade pathogens, provide a clue (0 diagnosis of immunodeficiency, To determine the microorganisms causing recurrent or severe infections in children with T•(rmpllOcy!e doflcicncy, we carried out II retrospective case review oj H5 patients with 1'../ympllOC'te deficiency who wuc investigated at the Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, NHS Trust, OH'r the 5 year period between June I, 1188 and June I, 1193. Tuc /:mllp of patients included 53 mules anti 32 [cmales, among which 23 and 62 were diagnosed to prewnt SClf (/",1 elf subtypes respectively, Among the 174 organisms isolated. these included bacteria (97 isolates], viruses (43 isolates}, funJ:i (25 isolates] and parasites (9 isolates}, 17lC predominant ."ites of infections were mainly the gll. rointe. itwl (60 out of 174 and respiratory tracts (49 out of 174. 171£' most common bacterial infections, were with aerobic gram negative organisms (28 isolatcs, P.H'UdOmOnllS aeruginosa (17 isolates], Enterococcus (/2 isolates, C. difficile (10 isolates], Analysis: of 43 viral infection showed that Homvirus (10 isolates], Adenovirus (9 isolates], Herpes simplex (6 isolates], am!"nC}loml'!:altH'iTlH (6 isalatcs, Wi'rl! prrdominutu pathogens. Candida albicans was IIII' most commonly isolated fungi. Parasitic infections included P. curini and Cryp(o."poridillm, 3 and (j opt of 9 cases. In our }iTOUp of pmients 16 patients' died before hone maTOOW transplantation, due to infectimu complication. Based on this . lldy. we ,wgge.lt thai pronytaxis aJjllin.rt bacterial, viral, Jllngal ami protozoa agents is a necessity to minimize infectious complication." in 7~/ympilOcyte deficient patients, awaiting a hone

  16. Diagnosis of single and multi-agent plans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Witteveen (Cees); N. Roos; R.P.J. van der Krogt; M.M. de Weerdt (Mathijs)

    2005-01-01

    htmlabstractWe discuss the application of Model Based Diagnosis in agent-based planning. We model a plan as a system to be diagnosed and assume that agents can monitor the execution of the plan by making partial observations during plan execution. These observations are used by the agents to explain

  17. The potential role of infectious agents and pelvic inflammatory disease in ovarian carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingerslev, Kasper; Hogdall, Estrid; Schnack, Tine Henrichsen; Skovrider-Ruminski, Wojciech; Hogdall, Claus; Blaakaer, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The etiological cause of ovarian cancer is poorly understood. It has been theorized that bacterial or viral infection as well as pelvic inflammatory disease could play a role in ovarian carcinogenesis. To review the literature on studies examining the association between ovarian cancer and bacterial or viral infection or pelvic inflammatory disease. Database search through MEDLINE, applying the medical subject headings: "Ovarian neoplasms", AND "Chlamydia infections", " Neisseria gonorrhoeae ", " Mycoplasma genitalium ", "Papillomaviridae", or "pelvic inflammatory disease". Corresponding searches were performed in EMBASE, and Web of Science. The literature search identified 935 articles of which 40 were eligible for inclusion in this review. Seven studies examined the association between bacterial infection and ovarian cancer. A single study found a significant association between chlamydial infection and ovarian cancer, while another study identified Mycoplasma genitalium in a large proportion of ovarian cancer cases. The remaining studies found no association. Human papillomavirus detection rates varied from 0 to 67% and were generally higher in the Asian studies than in studies from Western countries. Cytomegalovirus was the only other virus to be detected and was found in 50% of cases in a case-control study. The association between ovarian cancer and pelvic inflammatory disease was examined in seven epidemiological studies, two of which, reported a statistically significant association. Data indicate a potential association between pelvic inflammatory disease and ovarian cancer. An association between ovarian cancer and high-risk human papillomavirus genotypes may exist in Asia, whereas an association in Western countries seems unlikely due to the low reported prevalence. Potential carcinogenic bacteria were found, but results were inconsistent, and further research is warranted.

  18. Infectious Agents and Cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) -. I. Adult T-cell leukaemia/ lymphoma. Hepatoccllular carcinoma. Hepatocellular carcinoma. Cervical cancer, other anogenital cancers, laryngeal / cancer, oral cavity cancers. Oncorna virus - Lymphomas, leukaemia. Human herpes virus type 8 - Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma.

  19. Chronic disease mortality associated with infectious agents: a comparative cohort study of migrants from the Former Soviet Union in Israel and Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Jördis J; Paltiel, Ari M; Winkler, Volker; Becher, Heiko

    2008-04-09

    Prevalence of infectious diseases in migrant populations has been addressed in numerous studies. However, information is sparse on their mortality due to chronic diseases that are aetiologically associated with an infectious agent. This study investigates mortality related to infectious diseases with a specific focus on cancers of possibly infectious origin in voluntary migrants from the Former Soviet Union residing in Israel and in Germany. Both groups of migrants arrived from the Former Soviet Union in their destination countries between 1990 and 2001. Population-based data on migrants in Israel were obtained from the Israel Central Bureau of Statistics. Data for migrants in Germany were obtained from a representative sample of all migrants from the Former Soviet Union in Germany. Cause of death information was available until 2003 for the Israeli cohort and until 2005 for the German cohort. Standardized mortality ratios were calculated relative to the destination country for selected causes of death for which infectious agents may be causally involved. Multivariate Poisson regression was applied to assess differences in mortality by length of residence in the host country. Both in Israel and in Germany these migrants have lower overall mortality than the population in their destination countries. However, they have significantly elevated mortality from viral hepatitis and from stomach and liver cancer when compared to the destination populations. Regression analysis shows that in Israel stomach cancer mortality is significantly higher among migrants at shorter durations of residence when compared to durations of more than nine years. Higher mortality from cancers associated with infection and from viral hepatitis among migrants from the Former Soviet Union might result from higher prevalence of infections which were acquired in earlier years of life. The results highlight new challenges posed by diseases of infectious origin in migrants and call attention to the

  20. Infectious mutants of cassava latent virus generated in vivo from intact recombinant DNA clones containing single copies of the genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, J; Townsend, R

    1986-08-11

    Intact recombinant DNAs containing single copies of either component of the cassava latent virus genome can elicit infection when mechanically inoculated to host plants in the presence of the appropriate second component. Characterisation of infectious mutant progeny viruses, by analysis of virus-specific supercoiled DNA intermediates, indicates that most if not all of the cloning vector has been deleted, achieved at least in some cases by intermolecular recombination in vivo between DNAs 1 and 2. Significant rearrangements within the intergenic region of DNA 2, predominantly external to the common region, can be tolerated without loss of infectivity suggesting a somewhat passive role in virus multiplication for the sequences in question. Although packaging constraints might impose limits on the amount of DNA within geminate particles, isolation of an infectious coat protein mutant defective in virion production suggests that packaging is not essential for systemic spread of the viral DNA.

  1. Antiangiogenic agents in the treatment of recurrent or newly diagnosed glioblastoma: Analysis of single-agent and combined modality approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beal, Kathryn; Abrey, Lauren E; Gutin, Philip H

    2011-01-01

    Surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and temozolomide in newly diagnosed glioblastoma can prolong survival, but it is not curative. For patients with disease progression after frontline therapy, there is no standard of care, although further surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy may be used. Antiangiogenic therapies may be appropriate for treating glioblastomas because angiogenesis is critical to tumor growth. In a large, noncomparative phase II trial, bevacizumab was evaluated alone and with irinotecan in patients with recurrent glioblastoma; combination treatment was associated with an estimated 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) rate of 50.3%, a median overall survival of 8.9 months, and a response rate of 37.8%. Single-agent bevacizumab also exceeded the predetermined threshold of activity for salvage chemotherapy (6-month PFS rate, 15%), achieving a 6-month PFS rate of 42.6% (p < 0.0001). On the basis of these results and those from another phase II trial, the US Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval of single-agent bevacizumab for the treatment of glioblastoma that has progressed following prior therapy. Potential antiangiogenic agents-such as cilengitide and XL184-also show evidence of single-agent activity in recurrent glioblastoma. Moreover, the use of antiangiogenic agents with radiation at disease progression may improve the therapeutic ratio of single-modality approaches. Overall, these agents appear to be well tolerated, with adverse event profiles similar to those reported in studies of other solid tumors. Further research is needed to determine the role of antiangiogenic therapy in frontline treatment and to identify the optimal schedule and partnering agents for use in combination therapy

  2. Lung pathology and infectious agents in fatal feedlot pneumonias and relationship with mortality, disease onset, and treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Robert W; Blood, K Shawn; Panciera, Roger J; Payton, Mark E; Ridpath, Julia F; Confer, Anthony W; Saliki, Jeremiah T; Burge, Lurinda T; Welsh, Ronald D; Johnson, Bill J; Reck, Amy

    2009-07-01

    This study charted 237 fatal cases of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) observed from May 2002 to May 2003 in a single Oklahoma feed yard. Postmortem lung samples were used for agent identification and histopathology. Late in the study, 94 skin samples (ear notches) were tested for Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Bovine respiratory disease morbidity was 14.7%, and the mortality rate of all causes was 1.3%, with more than half (53.8%) attributed to BRD (0.7% total of all causes). The agents isolated were the following: Mannheimia haemolytica (25.0%), Pasteurella multocida (24.5%), Histophilus somni (10.0%), Arcanobacterium pyogenes (35.0%), Salmonella spp. (0.5%), and Mycoplasma spp. (71.4%). Viruses recovered by cell culture were BVDV-1a noncytopathic (NCP; 2.7%), BVDV-1a cytopathic (CP) vaccine strain (1.8%), BVDV-1b NCP (2.7%), BVDV-2a NCP (3.2%), BVDV-2b CP (0.5%), and Bovine herpesvirus 1 (2.3%). Gel-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were 4.6% positive for Bovine respiratory syncytial virus and 10.8% positive for Bovine coronavirus. Bovine viral diarrhea virus IHC testing was positive in 5.3% of the animals. The mean values were determined for the treatment data: fatal disease onset (32.65 days), treatment interval (29.15 days), number of antibiotic treatments (2.65), number of different antibiotics (1.89), and day of death (61.81 days). Lesions included the following: 1) duration: acute (21%), subacute (15%), chronic (40.2%), healing (2.8%), normal (18.1%), and autolyzed (2.8%); 2) type of pneumonia: lobar bronchopneumonia (LBP; 27.1%), LBP with pleuritis (49.1%), interstitial pneumonia (5.1%), bronchointerstitial pneumonia (1.4%), septic (0.9%), embolic foci (0.5%), other (2.8%), normal (10.3%), and autolyzed (2.8%); and 3) bronchiolar lesions: bronchiolitis obliterans (39.7%), bronchiolar necrosis (26.6%), bronchiolitis obliterans/bronchiolar necrosis (1.4%), other bronchiolar lesions (6.5%), and bronchiolar lesion

  3. Transmission of infectious agents from the donor to the recipient. Do we need change in the risk assessment?

    OpenAIRE

    S. V. Zhuravel; N. K. Kuznetsova; T. V. Chernenkaya; I. I. Utkina

    2015-01-01

    The article discusses the possible risks of infection by bacterial, fungal and viral infections the recipient of donor organs. Identified infectious diseases in which the reserve of donor organs is contraindicated for the recipient and the diseases for which it is possible to use donor organs.

  4. Novel technologies applied to the nucleotide sequencing and comparative sequence analysis of the genomes of infectious agents in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granberg, F; Bálint, Á; Belák, S

    2016-04-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS), also referred to as deep, high-throughput or massively parallel sequencing, is a powerful new tool that can be used for the complex diagnosis and intensive monitoring of infectious disease in veterinary medicine. NGS technologies are also being increasingly used to study the aetiology, genomics, evolution and epidemiology of infectious disease, as well as host-pathogen interactions and other aspects of infection biology. This review briefly summarises recent progress and achievements in this field by first introducing a range of novel techniques and then presenting examples of NGS applications in veterinary infection biology. Various work steps and processes for sampling and sample preparation, sequence analysis and comparative genomics, and improving the accuracy of genomic prediction are discussed, as are bioinformatics requirements. Examples of sequencing-based applications and comparative genomics in veterinary medicine are then provided. This review is based on novel references selected from the literature and on experiences of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Collaborating Centre for the Biotechnology-based Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases in Veterinary Medicine, Uppsala, Sweden.

  5. EPR and DNP Properties of Certain Novel Single Electron Contrast Agents Intended for Oximetric Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ardenkjær-Larsen, J. H.; Laursen, I; Leunbach, I.

    1998-01-01

    Parameters of relevance to oximetry with Overhauser magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI) have been measured for three single electron contrast agents of the triphenylmethyl type. The single electron contrast agents are stable and water soluble. Magnetic resonance properties of the agents have been...... examined with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.5 mT in water, isotonic saline, plasma, and blood at 23 and 37°C. The relaxivities of the agents are about 0.2–0.4 mM−1s−1and the DNP enhancements extrapolate close...... than 1 μT in water at room temperature. The longitudinal electron spin relaxation rate is calculated from the DNP enhancement curves. The oxygen broadening in water is about 50 μT/mM O2at 37°C. These agents have good properties for oximetry with OMRI....

  6. Dembo-PCR technique for the detection of bovine abortion, diarrhea, and respiratory disease complex infectious agents in potential vectors and reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahpaya, Sayed Samim; Tsuchiaka, Shinobu; Kishimoto, Mai; Oba, Mami; Katayama, Yukie; Nunomura, Yuki; Kokawa, Saki; Kimura, Takashi; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Kirino, Yumi; Okabayashi, Tamaki; Nonaka, Nariaki; Mekata, Hirohisa; Aoki, Hiroshi; Shiokawa, Mai; Umetsu, Moeko; Morita, Tatsushi; Hasebe, Ayako; Otsu, Keiko; Asai, Tetsuo; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Makino, Shinji; Murata, Yoshiteru; Abi, Ahmad Jan; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Mizutani, Tetsuya

    2017-12-28

    The bovine abortion, diarrhea, and respiratory disease complexes, caused by infectious agents, result in high and significant economic losses for the cattle industry. These pathogens are likely transmitted by various vectors and reservoirs including insects, birds and rodents. However, experimental data that supports this possibility are scarce. We collected total 117 samples and screened for 44 bovine abortive, diarrheal and respiratory disease complex pathogens by using Dembo-PCR, based on TaqMan real-time PCR. Fifty-seven samples showed positive for at least one pathogen, including bovine viral diarrhea virus, bovine enterovirus, Salmonella enterica ser. Dublin, salmonella enterica ser. Typhimurium, and Neospora caninum ; some samples contained multiple pathogens. Bovine viral diarrhea virus and bovine enterovirus represented the most frequently detected pathogens, especially in flies, suggesting the important role of flies in the transmission of these viruses. Additionally, we detected the N. caninum genome from a cockroach sample for the first time. Our data suggests that insects (particularly flies), birds, and rodents are potential vectors and reservoirs of the abortion, diarrhea, and respiratory infectious agents and that they may transmit more than one pathogen at the same time.

  7. Queratitis infecciosa no viral: factores predisponentes, agentes etiológicos y diagnóstico de laboratorio Non viral infectious keratitis: predisposing factors, etiologic agents and laboratory diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Nicola

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Las queratitis infecciosas poseen una elevada morbilidad, poniendo en riesgo la visión en casos graves. Dada la eficaz protección que brinda el epitelio corneal, para que ocurra una infección se requiere la presencia de factores condicionantes. El principal predisponente para las queratitis infecciosas es el uso de lentes de contacto, seguido por traumatismos y cirugías oculares y luego diversas afecciones locales o generales. Los agentes etiológicos abarcan una enorme diversidad de microorganismos, incluyendo bacterias, micobacterias, virus, hongos y parásitos. Para poder instaurar un tratamiento acotado se necesita un diagnóstico etiológico, lo que requiere una correcta toma de muestra y un exhaustivo análisis microbiológico.Infectious keratitis cause significant morbidity and, if it is not promptly and appropriately treated, can lead to severe ocular disability. Almost all cases of keratitis are associated to predisposing conditions. In occident, the main risk factor is contact lens wear, but previous ocular surgery or trauma are also important, as well as various ocular surface diseases. An enormous diversity of etiologic agents for infectious keratitis exist, including virus, bacteria, mycobacteria, fungi and parasites. This review provides literature and personal based information about main predisposing factors, etiologic agents and pathophysiology of infectious keratitis, excluding those of viral origin. Focus is made on microbiologic procedures, describing stains and media that should be used, and highlighting their utility. A special mention on particular situations is made, including laboratory diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis, utility of lens cases analysis, keratitis in patients with previous treatment, as well as molecular biology techniques described in ophthalmology.

  8. A framework for the integration of ecosystem and human health in public policy: two case studies with infectious agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koren, H.S.; Crawford-Brown, Douglas

    2004-01-01

    Despite that a significant body of published literature exists in the complex area of interconnection among the environment, ecosystems, and human activity, relatively little attention has been paid to the integration and analysis of ecological and human health data in the form of a conceptual model. Human and ecological health protection generally have been treated as separate domains of policy, with significant differences in both the analytic methods used to characterize risks and the policies developed for risk reduction. Understanding the relationships among population growth, development, natural resource use, the environment, human health, and ecosystems is an important area of both scientific inquiry and environmental policy. The present paper focuses on the development of a conceptual model for understanding disease causation, particularly infectious disease, and the implications of such a model for public policy. The conceptual model incorporates ecological and human health risk assessment information applied to case studies of two infectious diseases. This article takes an initial step toward formalizing the conceptual model so that research and assessment procedures can be developed

  9. Publishing E-RDF linked data for many agents by single third-party server

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Dongsheng; Zhang, Yongyuan; Wang, Zhengjun

    2017-01-01

    do not have the ability or do not want to make an additional effort to publish linked data. Thus, for agents who are willing to open part of their data but do not want to make an effort, the task can be undertaken by a professional third-party server (together with professional experts......) that publishes linked data for these agents. Consequently, when a single third-party server is on behalf of multiple agents, it is also responsible to organize these multiple-source URIs (data) in a systematic way to make them referable, satisfying the 4-star data principles, as well as protect the confidential...

  10. Dairy cow abortion associated with Neospora caninum and other infectious agents Aborto em vacas leiteiras associado a Neospora caninum e a outros agentes infecciosos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P.M.E. Santos

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Trinta e cinco vacas de rebanhos leiteiros da região Norte do estado do Paraná, com histórico de abortamento, foram pesquisadas sorologicamente para verificar a presença de anticorpos contra Neospora caninum, Toxoplasma gondii, Leptospira spp., Brucella abortus, BHV-1 e BVDV. Vinte e uma vacas apresentaram títulos sorológicos compatíveis com infecção. Todas elas, soropositivas para N. caninum, foram também soropositivas para outros agentes infecciosos, sugerindo a possibilidade de associação desses agentes nos problemas reprodutivos de bovinos, no estado do Paraná.

  11. The ability to form a biofilm by odontogenic infectious agents obtained from patients with odontogenic pyoinflammatory processes of various prevalence

    OpenAIRE

    Kabanova, Arina; Pohodenko-chudakova, Irina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the biofilm formation by bacteria agents causing odontogenic infections. 117 patients with pyoinflammatory diseases of the maxillofacial region were examined. During the study it was revealed that the odontogenic infection pathogens were able to form the microbial biofilm in a varying degree, P. аeruginosa had the strongest biofilm formation ability and S. epidermidis had the least biofilm formation ability.

  12. African Journal of Infectious Diseases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Journal of Infectious Diseases accepts original research papers on the pathogenesis, diagnosis, epidemiology and treatment of infectious diseases, impact of infectious agents on the environment and related disciplines. Reports of research related to any aspect of the fields of microbiology, parasitology, ...

  13. A Multiplex PCR/LDR Assay for the Simultaneous Identification of Category A Infectious Pathogens: Agents of Viral Hemorrhagic Fever and Variola Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchita Das

    Full Text Available CDC designated category A infectious agents pose a major risk to national security and require special action for public health preparedness. They include viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF syndrome as well as variola virus, the agent of smallpox. VHF is characterized by hemorrhage and fever with multi-organ failure leading to high morbidity and mortality. Smallpox, a prior scourge, has been eradicated for decades, making it a particularly serious threat if released nefariously in the essentially non-immune world population. Early detection of the causative agents, and the ability to distinguish them from other pathogens, is essential to contain outbreaks, implement proper control measures, and prevent morbidity and mortality. We have developed a multiplex detection assay that uses several species-specific PCR primers to generate amplicons from multiple pathogens; these are then targeted in a ligase detection reaction (LDR. The resultant fluorescently-labeled ligation products are detected on a universal array enabling simultaneous identification of the pathogens. The assay was evaluated on 32 different isolates associated with VHF (ebolavirus, marburgvirus, Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Lassa fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus, Dengue virus, and Yellow fever virus as well as variola virus and vaccinia virus (the agent of smallpox and its vaccine strain, respectively. The assay was able to detect all viruses tested, including 8 sequences representative of different variola virus strains from the CDC repository. It does not cross react with other emerging zoonoses such as monkeypox virus or cowpox virus, or six flaviviruses tested (St. Louis encephalitis virus, Murray Valley encephalitis virus, Powassan virus, Tick-borne encephalitis virus, West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus.

  14. A Multiplex PCR/LDR Assay for the Simultaneous Identification of Category A Infectious Pathogens: Agents of Viral Hemorrhagic Fever and Variola Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sanchita; Rundell, Mark S; Mirza, Aashiq H; Pingle, Maneesh R; Shigyo, Kristi; Garrison, Aura R; Paragas, Jason; Smith, Scott K; Olson, Victoria A; Larone, Davise H; Spitzer, Eric D; Barany, Francis; Golightly, Linnie M

    2015-01-01

    CDC designated category A infectious agents pose a major risk to national security and require special action for public health preparedness. They include viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) syndrome as well as variola virus, the agent of smallpox. VHF is characterized by hemorrhage and fever with multi-organ failure leading to high morbidity and mortality. Smallpox, a prior scourge, has been eradicated for decades, making it a particularly serious threat if released nefariously in the essentially non-immune world population. Early detection of the causative agents, and the ability to distinguish them from other pathogens, is essential to contain outbreaks, implement proper control measures, and prevent morbidity and mortality. We have developed a multiplex detection assay that uses several species-specific PCR primers to generate amplicons from multiple pathogens; these are then targeted in a ligase detection reaction (LDR). The resultant fluorescently-labeled ligation products are detected on a universal array enabling simultaneous identification of the pathogens. The assay was evaluated on 32 different isolates associated with VHF (ebolavirus, marburgvirus, Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Lassa fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus, Dengue virus, and Yellow fever virus) as well as variola virus and vaccinia virus (the agent of smallpox and its vaccine strain, respectively). The assay was able to detect all viruses tested, including 8 sequences representative of different variola virus strains from the CDC repository. It does not cross react with other emerging zoonoses such as monkeypox virus or cowpox virus, or six flaviviruses tested (St. Louis encephalitis virus, Murray Valley encephalitis virus, Powassan virus, Tick-borne encephalitis virus, West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus).

  15. Single agent lenalidomide activity in multiple myeloma relapse evidenced uniquely by CT/PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Gozzetti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A71 year old female with multiple myeloma presented with back pain seven year after autologous stem cell transplant. Skeletal bone survey and magnetic resonance imaging did not show a relapse that was evidenced by CT/PET. Lenalidomide as single agent induced a complete disappearance of the lesions 6 months later at CT/PET

  16. Current Status of Single-Agent Phase I Trials in Japan: Toward Globalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizugaki, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Noboru; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamada, Yasuhide; Tamura, Tomohide

    2015-06-20

    In Japan, phase I trials, except first-in-human trials, are usually initiated from approximately 50% of the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) or maximum administered dose (MAD) determined during the initial phase I trials in North America and Europe (the West). However, the key findings of phase I trials in Japan and the West, such as dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) profiles and MTD or MAD levels, have not been compared. We retrospectively analyzed data for patients enrolled onto single-agent phase I trials at the National Cancer Center Hospital between 1995 and 2012. DLT profiles, MTDs, and MADs of single-agent phase I trials in Japan were compared with those from trials in the West that were obtained from the literature. A total of 777 patients were enrolled onto 54 single-agent phase I trials, including five first-in-human trials. DLTs were observed in 11.1% of the patients. Importantly, 66.4% of the DLTs were observed within a dose range (80% to 120%) similar to those reported for the trials in the West. The majority of MTDs or MADs could be considered similar between patients, and 80.3% of the drugs had similar MTDs or MADs in the West. The toxicity profiles of single-agent phase I agents determined from trials conducted in Japan were comparable to those obtained from trials in the West. We believe that phase I trials in Japan could be conducted over timelines similar to those in the West, allowing for global or parallel phase I clinical trials. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  17. Detection of oncogenic viruses in water environments by a Luminex-based multiplex platform for high throughput screening of infectious agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bonito, P; Iaconelli, M; Gheit, T; Tommasino, M; Della Libera, S; Bonadonna, L; La Rosa, G

    2017-10-15

    Recent studies documented the detection of viruses strongly associated with human cancer in urban sewages and other water environments worldwide. The aim of this study was to estimate the occurrence of human oncogenic viruses in environmental samples (sewage, river, marine, and pool/spa water) using highly sensitive and specific multiplex bead-based assays (Luminex technology). A total of 33 samples were analysed for 140 oncogenic viral agents, including mucosal and cutaneous human papillomaviruses (HPVs), human polyomaviruses (HPyV), human herpesviruses (HHV) and mouse mammary tumour virus (MMTV). Eighty-eight percent of the samples tested positive for at least one viral pathogen and the simultaneous presence of more than one virus was frequent (mean number of positivities/sample = 3.03). A total of 30 different Alpha, Beta and Gamma HPVs were detected, including mucosal and cutaneous types. The high-risk type HPV16 was the most frequently detected virus, identified in 73% of the samples. Of the 12 HPyVs tested, only two (BKPyV and MCPyV) were detected. At least one of these two was present in 48% of the samples. MMTV was detected in 21% of the samples, while herpesviruses - HHV-6 and HHV-1 - were detected in two samples (6%). The present study is the first to provide a comprehensive picture of the occurrence of oncogenic viruses belonging to different families and species in diverse water environments, and the first to successfully use, in environmental samples, a Luminex-based multiplex platform for high throughput screening of infectious agents. Our findings, showing that oncogenic viruses are ubiquitous in water environments, pave the way for future studies on the fate of these pathogens in water environments as well as on their potential for transmission via the waterborne route. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Anti-Infective Activities of Lactobacillus Strains in the Human Intestinal Microbiota: from Probiotics to Gastrointestinal Anti-Infectious Biotherapeutic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY A vast and diverse array of microbial species displaying great phylogenic, genomic, and metabolic diversity have colonized the gastrointestinal tract. Resident microbes play a beneficial role by regulating the intestinal immune system, stimulating the maturation of host tissues, and playing a variety of roles in nutrition and in host resistance to gastric and enteric bacterial pathogens. The mechanisms by which the resident microbial species combat gastrointestinal pathogens are complex and include competitive metabolic interactions and the production of antimicrobial molecules. The human intestinal microbiota is a source from which Lactobacillus probiotic strains have often been isolated. Only six probiotic Lactobacillus strains isolated from human intestinal microbiota, i.e., L. rhamnosus GG, L. casei Shirota YIT9029, L. casei DN-114 001, L. johnsonii NCC 533, L. acidophilus LB, and L. reuteri DSM 17938, have been well characterized with regard to their potential antimicrobial effects against the major gastric and enteric bacterial pathogens and rotavirus. In this review, we describe the current knowledge concerning the experimental antibacterial activities, including antibiotic-like and cell-regulating activities, and therapeutic effects demonstrated in well-conducted, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials of these probiotic Lactobacillus strains. What is known about the antimicrobial activities supported by the molecules secreted by such probiotic Lactobacillus strains suggests that they constitute a promising new source for the development of innovative anti-infectious agents that act luminally and intracellularly in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:24696432

  19. Anti-infective activities of lactobacillus strains in the human intestinal microbiota: from probiotics to gastrointestinal anti-infectious biotherapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Servin, Alain L

    2014-04-01

    A vast and diverse array of microbial species displaying great phylogenic, genomic, and metabolic diversity have colonized the gastrointestinal tract. Resident microbes play a beneficial role by regulating the intestinal immune system, stimulating the maturation of host tissues, and playing a variety of roles in nutrition and in host resistance to gastric and enteric bacterial pathogens. The mechanisms by which the resident microbial species combat gastrointestinal pathogens are complex and include competitive metabolic interactions and the production of antimicrobial molecules. The human intestinal microbiota is a source from which Lactobacillus probiotic strains have often been isolated. Only six probiotic Lactobacillus strains isolated from human intestinal microbiota, i.e., L. rhamnosus GG, L. casei Shirota YIT9029, L. casei DN-114 001, L. johnsonii NCC 533, L. acidophilus LB, and L. reuteri DSM 17938, have been well characterized with regard to their potential antimicrobial effects against the major gastric and enteric bacterial pathogens and rotavirus. In this review, we describe the current knowledge concerning the experimental antibacterial activities, including antibiotic-like and cell-regulating activities, and therapeutic effects demonstrated in well-conducted, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials of these probiotic Lactobacillus strains. What is known about the antimicrobial activities supported by the molecules secreted by such probiotic Lactobacillus strains suggests that they constitute a promising new source for the development of innovative anti-infectious agents that act luminally and intracellularly in the gastrointestinal tract.

  20. Rates of abnormalities and infectious agents in cervical smears from female inmates in Texas: comparison with private and university clinic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logrono, R; Wong, J Y

    1999-09-01

    Inmates are generally considered a high-risk population for gynecologic neoplasia and sexually transmitted diseases. Cervical smears from prisoners of the Texas Department of Corrections (TDC) were expected initially to have higher rates of cellular abnormalities and infectious agents than do smears from the general population. The cytologic findings from 25,522 TDC gynecologic smears were compared with those of 6883 cases from The University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) affiliated physician private clinics, and with 56,178 from the UTMB hospital clinics. The period of study was from September 1995 to February 1998. This study revealed a 5.23% higher rate of abnormalities for TDC gynecologic smears as compared with that for the private clinic smears. However, the TDC rate of abnormalities was unexpectedly 1.08% lower than that for the UTMB clinic smears. These unexpected findings were probably the result of a more selected high-risk population referred to the UTMB clinics. The TDC smears showed also the highest incidence of trichomoniasis.

  1. Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... But some of them can make you sick. Infectious diseases are diseases that are caused by germs. There ... many different ways that you can get an infectious disease: Through direct contact with a person who is ...

  2. Vasculitis and infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satta, R; Biondi, G

    2015-04-01

    Vasculitis usually presents without a well-known underline cause (idiopathic vasculitis), nevertheless, it is sometimes possible to find out one or more causative agents (secondary vasculitis). Nowadays, thanks to the increasing amount of precise diagnostic tools, a piece of idiopathic vasculitis is reclassified as associated with probable etiology, which can be set off by several factors, such as infections. Infections are considered to be the most common cause of secondary vasculitis. Virtually, every infectious agent can trigger a vasculitis by different mechanisms which can be divided in two main categories: direct and indirect. In the former, infectious agents destroy directly the vascular wall leading, eventually, to a subsequent inflammatory response. In the latter, indirect form, they stimulate an immune response against blood vessels. Different infectious agents are able to directly damage the vascular wall. Among these, it is possible to recognize Staphylococcus spp, Streptococcus spp, Salmonella spp, Treponema spp, Rickettsia spp, Cytomegalovirus, Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and 2, and many others which have a peculiar tropism for endothelial cells. Conversely, another group of microbial agents, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae, Hepatits B Virus, Human Immunodeficiency Virus and others, trigger vasculitis in the indirect way. This is due to the fact that they can share epitopes with the host or modify self-antigens, thus leading to a cross-self reaction of the immune system. These mechanism, in turn, leads to immunological responses classified as type I-IV by Gell-Coombs. Nevertheless, it is difficult to strictly separate the direct and indirect forms, because most infectious agents can cause vasculitis in both ways (mixed forms). This paper will analyze the link between infectious agents and vasculitis, focusing on direct and indirect secondary vasculitis, and on a group of probable infection-related idiopathic vasculitis, and finally

  3. Distributed MPC based consensus for single-integrator multi-agent systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhaomeng; Fan, Ming-Can; Zhang, Hai-Tao

    2015-09-01

    This paper addresses model predictive control schemes for consensus in multi-agent systems (MASs) with discrete-time single-integrator dynamics under switching directed interaction graphs. The control horizon is extended to be greater than one which endows the closed-loop system with extra degree of freedom. We derive sufficient conditions on the sampling period and the interaction graph to achieve consensus by using the property of infinite products of stochastic matrices. Consensus can be achieved asymptotically if the sampling period is selected such that the interaction graph among agents has a directed spanning tree jointly. Significantly, if the interaction graph always has a spanning tree, one can select an arbitrary large sampling period to guarantee consensus. Finally, several simulations are conducted to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Chemiresistor Devices for Chemical Warfare Agent Detection Based on Polymer Wrapped Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, John F.; Hamaguchi, Hitoshi; Yoon, Bora; Swager, Timothy M.

    2017-01-01

    Chemical warfare agents (CWA) continue to present a threat to civilian populations and military personnel in operational areas all over the world. Reliable measurements of CWAs are critical to contamination detection, avoidance, and remediation. The current deployed systems in United States and foreign militaries, as well as those in the private sector offer accurate detection of CWAs, but are still limited by size, portability and fabrication cost. Herein, we report a chemiresistive CWA sensor using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) wrapped with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) derivatives. We demonstrate that a pendant hexafluoroisopropanol group on the polymer that enhances sensitivity to a nerve agent mimic, dimethyl methylphosphonate, in both nitrogen and air environments to concentrations as low as 5 ppm and 11 ppm, respectively. Additionally, these PEDOT/SWCNT derivative sensor systems experience negligible device performance over the course of two weeks under ambient conditions. PMID:28452929

  5. Population structure of the soft tick Ornithodoros maritimus and its associated infectious agents within a colony of its seabird host Larus michahellis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Dupraz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of vector-borne zoonoses depends on the movement of both hosts and vectors, which can differ greatly in intensity across spatial scales. Because of their life history traits and small size, vector dispersal may be frequent, but limited in distance. However, little information is available on vector movement patterns at local spatial scales, and particularly for ticks, transmitting the greatest diversity of recognized infectious agents. To test the degree to which ticks can disperse and disseminate pathogens at local scales, we investigated the temporal dynamics and population structure of the soft tick Ornithodoros maritimus within a colony of its seabird host, the Yellow-legged gull Larus michahellis. Ticks were repeatedly sampled at a series of nests during the host breeding season. In half of the nests, ticks were collected (removal sampling, in the other half, ticks were counted and returned to the nest. A subsample of ticks was screened for known bacteria, viruses and parasites using a high throughput real-time PCR system to examine their distribution within the colony. The results indicate a temporal dynamic in the presence of tick life stages over the season, with the simultaneous appearance of juvenile ticks and hatched chicks, but no among-nest spatial structure in tick abundance. Removal sampling significantly reduced tick numbers, but only from the fourth visit onward. Seven bacterial isolates, one parasite species and one viral isolate were detected but no spatial structure in their presence within the colony was found. These results suggest weak isolation among nests and that tick dispersal is likely frequent enough to quickly recolonize locally-emptied patches and disseminate pathogens across the colony. Vector-mediated movements at local scales may therefore play a key role in pathogen emergence and needs to be considered in conjunction with host movements for predicting pathogen circulation and for establishing

  6. Morbillivirus and Toxoplasma exposure and association with hematological parameters for southern Beaufort Sea polar bears: potential response to infectious agents in a sentinel species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Cassandra M; Amstrup, Steven; Swor, Rhonda; Holcomb, Darce; O'Hara, Todd M

    2010-09-01

    Arctic temperatures are increasing in response to greenhouse gas forcing and polar bears have already responded to changing conditions. Declines in body stature and vital rates have been linked to warming-induced loss of sea-ice. As food webs change and human activities respond to a milder Arctic, exposure of polar bears and other arctic marine organisms to infectious agents may increase. Because of the polar bear's status as arctic ecosystem sentinel, polar bear health could provide an index of changing pathogen occurrence throughout the Arctic, however, exposure and monitoring protocols have yet to be established. We examine prevalence of antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii, and four morbilliviruses (canine distemper [CDV], phocine distemper [PDV], dolphin morbillivirus [DMV], porpoise morbillivirus [PMV]) including risk factors for exposure. We also examine the relationships between antibody levels and hematologic values established in the previous companion article. Antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii and morbilliviruses were found in both sample years. We found a significant inverse relationship between CDV titer and total leukocytes, neutrophils, monocytes, and eosinophils, and a significant positive relationship between eosinophils and Toxoplasma gondii antibodies. Morbilliviral prevalence varied significantly among age cohorts, with 1-2 year olds least likely to be seropositive and bears aged 5-7 most likely. Data suggest that the presence of CDV and Toxoplasma gondii antibodies is associated with polar bear hematologic values. We conclude that exposure to CDV-like antigen is not randomly distributed among age classes and suggest that differing behaviors among life history stages may drive probability of specific antibody presence.

  7. Morbillivirus and Toxoplasma exposure and association with hematological parameters for southern Beaufort Sea polar bears: potential response to infectious agents in a sentinel species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Cassandra M.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Swor, Rhonda; Holcomb, Darce; O'Hara, Todd M.

    2010-01-01

    Arctic temperatures are increasing in response to greenhouse gas forcing and polar bears have already responded to changing conditions. Declines in body stature and vital rates have been linked to warming-induced loss of sea-ice. As food webs change and human activities respond to a milder Arctic, exposure of polar bears and other arctic marine organisms to infectious agents may increase. Because of the polar bear’s status as arctic ecosystem sentinel, polar bear health could provide an index of changing pathogen occurrence throughout the Arctic, however, exposure and monitoring protocols have yet to be established. We examine prevalence of antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii, and four morbilliviruses (canine distemper [CDV], phocine distemper [PDV], dolphin morbillivirus [DMV], porpoise morbillivirus [PMV]) including risk factors for exposure. We also examine the relationships between antibody levels and hematologic values established in the previous companion article. Antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii and morbilliviruses were found in both sample years. We found a significant inverse relationship between CDV titer and total leukocytes, neutrophils, monocytes, and eosinophils, and a significant positive relationship between eosinophils and Toxoplasma gondii antibodies. Morbilliviral prevalence varied significantly among age cohorts, with 1–2 year olds least likely to be seropositive and bears aged 5–7 most likely. Data suggest that the presence of CDV and Toxoplasma gondii antibodies is associated with polar bear hematologic values. We conclude that exposure to CDV-like antigen is not randomly distributed among age classes and suggest that differing behaviors among life history stages may drive probability of specific antibody presence.

  8. Screening for infectious diseases among asylum seekers newly arrived in Germany in 2015: a systematic single-centre analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortas, A Z; Polenz, J; von Hayek, J; Rüdiger, S; Rottbauer, W; Storr, U; Wibmer, T

    2017-12-01

    During the migrant crisis in 2015, Germany was the largest single recipient of new asylum seekers in Europe. The German asylum law requires a screening examination for certain infectious diseases in asylum seekers upon arrival. The aim of this work was to analyse the rate of certain infectious diseases among asylum seekers screened at a reception centre in Southern Germany. Retrospective medical record review. Medical records of 2602 asylum seekers screened by a local public health authority in Germany in 2015 were systematically analysed. The majority of screened subjects came from Afghanistan and Syria. The mean age was 22.1 (±12.0) years. The majority of subjects were male (75.4%). Most individuals were of normal weight or overweight, more subjects were obese than underweight. A total of 78 (3.9%) individuals were infected with hepatitis B and eight (0.4%) with HIV. In 31 cases, chest radiographs suggested active tuberculosis (1.6%), which was confirmed in four cases (0.2%). The physical examination uncovered 44 (1.7%) cases of scabies, nine (0.3%) cases of lice, eight (0.3%) of upper respiratory tract infections, two (0.1%) of varicella and 13 (0.5%) of other skin infections. In the majority of subjects none of the screened infectious diseases were found. No evidence was found that the overall prevalence of certain infectious diseases screened for in the present analysis was considerably higher than in previous migration studies. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The serological screening of deceased tissue donors within the English Blood Service for infectious agents--a review of current outcomes and a more effective strategy for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, A D; Gillan, H L

    2010-04-01

    The overall effectiveness of the NHSBT screening programme for infectious agents in deceased tissue donors is examined and evaluated in terms of current outcomes and how to improve upon these outcomes. The screening results and any subsequent confirmatory results from a total of 1659 samples from NHSBT deceased donors referred to NTMRL for screening for infectious agents were included in the analysis. Overall 1566/1659 (94.4%) of the samples were screen negative. A total of 93 were repeat reactive on screening for one or more of the mandatory markers screened for, of which only 12 (13%) were subsequently confirmed to be positive on confirmatory testing. The majority of the repeat reactive samples were demonstrating non-specific reactivity with the screening assays in use. Overall, the NHSBT screening programme for infectious agents in deceased tissue donors is very effective with a relatively low overall loss of donors because of non-specific reactivity. However, unnecessary loss of tissue products is not acceptable, and although this programme compares favourably with the outcomes of other such programmes, the confirmatory results obtained demonstrate both the need and the potential for improving the outcomes. This is particularly important as one donor may donate more than one product, and can be achieved very easily with a change to the screening algorithm followed, using the confirmatory data obtained to support and validate this change. CONTENTS SUMMARY: Critical analysis of the NHSBT screening programme for infectious agents in deceased tissue donors and a strategy involving the design and use of a different screening algorithm to improve these outcomes.

  10. Malassezia pachydermatis e outros agentes infecciosos nas otites externas e dermatites em cães Malassezia pachydermatis and other infectious agents in external otitis and dermatitis in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Nobre

    1998-09-01

    purpose of this work was to evaluate the prevalence of M. pachydermatis infection and other infectious agents in external otitis and dog dermatitis as well. We also examined 78 samples of dogs suffering from otitis, 36 samples of dogs having normal auditive tube and 24 having dermatitis. All samples were submitted to direct microscopic examination. They were cultured in blood agar, also in Sabouraud agar dextrose with cloranfenicol and cicloheximide. By direct examination showed that 50% of the samples on dogs with otitis and dermatitis 16.6% showed several cels resembling M. pachydermatis. However from healthy ear sample 83.3% did not present cells with this form. M. pachydermatis was isolated on 80.7% of otitis samples, on 25% of normal auditive tube samples and finally, 37.5% of dog dermatitis samples. It was isolated Staphylococcus intermedius, S. aureus, S. epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus sp, Streptococcus sp and Otodectes cynotis from samples of animals with otitis. Cases of dermatites allowed also the isolation of Staphylococcus intermedius, S. aureus, S. epidermidis, Microsporum canis, M. gypseum, Trychophyton mentagophytes and Demodex canis. M. pachydermatis was the most prevalent agent in cases of external otitis and dermatitis, being an opportunistic agent, that cause otitis and dermatitis when thereis a change in the microenvironment

  11. Infectious disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane L.

    1990-01-01

    This is a collection of viewgraphs on the Johnson Space Center's work on infectious disease. It addresses their major concern over outbreaks of infectious disease that could jeopardize the health, safety and/or performance of crew members engaged in long duration space missions. The Antarctic environment is seen as an analogous location on Earth and a good place to carry out such infectious disease studies and methods for proposed studies as suggested.

  12. A phase II trial of single-agent bevacizumab in patients with recurrent anaplastic glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreisl, Teri N; Zhang, Weiting; Odia, Yazmin; Shih, Joanna H; Butman, John A; Hammoud, Dima; Iwamoto, Fabio M; Sul, Joohee; Fine, Howard A

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the activity of single-agent bevacizumab in patients with recurrent anaplastic glioma and assess correlative advanced imaging parameters. Patients with recurrent anaplastic glioma were treated with bevacizumab 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks. Complete patient evaluations were repeated every 4 weeks. Correlative dynamic contrast-enhanced MR and (18)fluorodeoxyglucose PET imaging studies were obtained to evaluate physiologic changes in tumor and tumor vasculature at time points including baseline, 96 h after the first dose, and after the first 4 weeks of therapy. Median overall survival was 12 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 6.08-22.8). Median progression-free survival was 2.93 months (95% CI: 2.01-4.93), and 6-month progression-free survival was 20.9% (95% CI: 10.3%-42.5%). Thirteen (43%) patients achieved a partial response. The most common grade ≥ 3 treatment-related toxicities were hypertension, hypophosphatemia, and thromboembolism. Single-agent bevacizumab produces significant radiographic response in patients with recurrent anaplastic glioma but did not meet the 6-month progression-free survival endpoint. Early change in enhancing tumor volume at 4 days after start of therapy was the most significant prognostic factor for overall and progression-free survival.

  13. Modulation of associated ovarian carcinoma antigens by 5 cytokines used as single agents or in combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbert-Marcille, B M; Thédrez, P; Saï-Maurel, C; François, C; Auget, J L; Benard, J; Jacques, Y; Imai, S; Chatal, J F

    1994-05-01

    Optimization of intraperitoneal radioimmunotherapy of ovarian cancer depends on increasing the antigenic expression of tumor cells. For this purpose, we studied the effect of 5 cytokines (IFN-alpha, IFN-beta, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha and TGF-beta), used as single agents or in combination, on 4 ovarian cancer cell lines which present different antigenic profiles with the monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) tested (OC125, OVTL-3, MOv 18 and MOv 19). Analyses were performed by flow cytometry and the Scatchard technique in order to study antigenic modulation. The effect on proliferation was determined by cell counting. Expression of O3 antigen, recognized by the OVTL3 MAb, was increased up to 2.5 times after IFNs and TNF-alpha (used as single agent) on the 2 lines presenting low basal expression (SHIN-3 and IGROVI). The expression of CA125 antigen and the antigens recognized by MOv 18 and MOv 19 MAbs was not increased by any of the cytokines tested. The combination IFN-gamma+TNF-alpha was synergistic on cytotoxicity and enhanced O3 expression, providing 10 times as many sites per cell on the SHIN-3 line. For 3 other associations (IFN-alpha+IFN-gamma, IFN-beta+IFN-gamma and IFN-alpha+TNF-alpha), there was an additive effect on O3 expression and on cell cytotoxicity.

  14. Arterial hypertension: second-line treatment. Try other single-agent treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    (1) Reliable evidence supports the use of thiazide diuretics (chlortalidone or hydrochlorothiazide) as first-line treatment for uncomplicated arterial hypertension. (2) When patients fail to reach blood pressure targets with well-conducted treatment with thiazide diuretics, or this treatment is poorly tolerated, what are the best second-line options? To answer this question, we reviewed the available evidence, based on our standard in-house methodology. (3) We found no published trials specifically designed to evaluate second-line antihypertensive treatments in cardiovascular prevention. There were no available trials of dual- versus single-agent therapy after failure of a thiazide diuretic. (4) When the blood pressure target is not reached, inadequate drug efficacy is only one of several possible causes. Various other factors affecting blood pressure should also be investigated. (5) Dual-agent therapy carries an increased risk of adverse effects and drug interactions compared to monotherapy. (6) There is no consensus among clinical practice guidelines on second-line antihypertensive therapy. However, to minimise the risk of adverse effects, it is clearly better to select single-agent therapy with a drug that has been shown to prevent cardiovascular events in first-line treatment of otherwise healthy hypertensive patients. Possible options include: angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II antagonists, calcium channel blockers or betablockers. In patients over the age of 60, betablockers seem less effective that the other drugs in preventing strokes. (7) There is too little evidence to choose a specific third-line combination rather than another. However, any adverse effects that the patient experienced during prior treatments should be taken into account.

  15. Composting of Sewage Sludge Using Recycled Matured Compost as a Single Bulking Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangyang; Ren, Jian; Niu, Huasi; Wu, Xingwu

    2010-11-01

    Pretreatment (bulking agent choice and mixing) is an essential phase of dewatered raw sludge (RS) composting affecting its industrialization significantly. In this paper recycled compost (RC) was chosen as a single bulking agent in the composting experiment instead of other agents such as sawdust, rice straw, MSW, and the mixing machine was developed for mixing of SS and RC. According to the mixing experiment, SS and RC can be mixed uniformly and formed into small particles of 10˜15 mm in diameter, which improved the availability of oxygen during composting. The effect of different volumetric ratios of RS to RC, 1:1 (Exp.1), 1:2 (Exp.2) and 1:4 (Exp.3), on the performance of composting was investigated in detail. Temperature, oxygen consumption rate, organic matter, C/N ratio and moisture content were monitored in each experiment. In despite of low initial C/N of the mixture, intensive fermentation happened in all the experiments. Exp.1 and Exp.2 achieved stability and sanitization, but Exp 1 took more days to accomplish the fermentation. Exp 3 maintained thermophilic temperatures for a shortest time and did not satisfy the necessary sanitation requirements because more RC was recycled. In all experiments, the moisture content of their final composts were too high to be used as bulking agents before extra moisture was reduced. RS: RC = 1:2 (v/v) was the optimum and advisable proportion for the industrialization of sewage sludge composting of, the composting period was about 10 days, and the aeration rate 0.05 m3/(m3ṡmin) was appropriate in this study.

  16. A single center 14 years study of infectious complications leading to hospitalization of patients with primary antibody deficiencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setareh Mamishi

    Full Text Available Primary antibody deficiencies (PADs are a heterogeneous group of disorders, characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia and increased susceptibility to bacterial infections, leading to hospitalizations. This study was performed to determine the main infectious causes of hospital admissions in selective Iranian patients with PADs. Forty patients with PADs, who were admitted to the Infectious Ward of Children's Medical Center Hospital during a 14-year period, were reviewed in this study. There were 115 documented episodes of hospital admission during a 14-year period. The average length of hospital stay was 33.30 ± 25.72 days. Pneumonia was the most prominent infection leading to hospitalization among these patients (n = 48, followed by gastroenteritis (n = 23. Other less frequent causes of hospitalization were fever and neutropenia, septic arthritis, encephalitis, orbital cellulitis, sepsis, urinary tract infection, meningitis, oral ulcer, and lung abscess. The most common causative organisms of diarrhea were: Giardia lamblia, followed by Candida albicans, and Salmonella sp. Many patients with PADs suffer from repeated infections leading to hospitalization, in spite of immunoglobulin replacement therapy. Respiratory tract infections were the prominent cause of hospitalization among studied patients, followed by gastrointestinal infections.

  17. Infectious complications as the leading cause of death after kidney transplantation: analysis of more than 10,000 transplants from a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro Rodrigues Ferreira, Flávio; Cristelli, Marina Pontello; Paula, Mayara Ivani; Proença, Henrique; Felipe, Claudia Rosso; Tedesco-Silva, Helio; Medina-Pestana, José Osmar

    2017-08-01

    To identify specific causes of graft failure in a large sample of kidney transplant patients from a middle-income, developing country. Retrospective cohort study analyzing all consecutive single kidney transplants (KTs) performed at a single center in Brazil between January 1st 1998 and December 31st 2013. The database closing date was December 31st 2014. Out of 10,400 KTs, there were 1191 (11.45%) deaths with a functioning graft, 40 cases (0.38%) of primary non-function (PNF) and 1417 cases (13.62%) of graft loss excluding death and PNF as the cause. Infectious complications (404 cases, 34% of all deaths) were the major cause of death. Most deaths due to infection occurred within the first year after transplantation (157 deaths, 38.86%). Immunologic mechanisms, comprising acute rejection and immune-mediated interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy (IF/TA), were responsible for 52% of all cases of graft failure not involving recipient death. Half of the losses by acute rejection occurred late after transplantation. Contrary to what is observed in developed countries, infectious complications are the main challenge with kidney transplantation in Brazil. Non-adherence to treatment also appears to contribute significantly to long-term kidney graft loss. Strategies for improvement should focus on better compliance and a greater safety profile of immunosuppressive treatment.

  18. Infectious Diseases

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    While recent infectious disease events have helped mobilize large amounts of funding and expertise to address pandemic preparedness and vaccine research, many infectious diseases, particularly those affecting the poor, have been neglected. The complexity of environmental diseases like Chagas and dengue defy ...

  19. Potential new approaches for the development of brain imaging agents for single-photon applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Srivastava, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes new strategies for the brain-specific delivery of radionuclides that can be used to evaluate regional cerebral perfusion by single photon imaging techniques. A description of several examples of interesting new strategies that have recently been reported is presented. A new approach at this institution for the brain-specific delivery of radioiodinated iodophenylalkyl-substituted dihyronicotinamide systems is described which shows good brain uptake and retention in preliminary studies in rats. Following transport into the brain these agents appear to undergo facile intracerebral oxidation to the quaternized analogues which do not recross the intact blood-brain barrier and so are effectively trapped in the brain. 49 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Mediating Dynamic Supply Chain Formation by Collaborative Single Machine Earliness/Tardiness Agents in Supply Mesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, a trend of forming dynamic supply chains with different trading partners over different e-marketplaces has emerged. These supply chains, which are called “supply mesh,” generally refer to heterogeneous electronic marketplaces in which dynamic supply chains, as per project (often make-to-order, are formed across different parties. Conceptually, in a supply mesh a dynamic supply chain is formed vertically, mediating several companies for a project. Companies that are on the same level horizontally are either competitors or cohorts. A complex scenario such as this makes it challenging to find the right group of members for a dynamic supply chain. Earlier on, a multiagent model called the collaborative single machine earliness/tardiness (CSET model was proposed for the optimal formation of make-to-order supply chains. This paper contributes the particular agent designs, for enabling the mediation of CSET in a supply mesh, and the possibilities are discussed. It is demonstrated via a computer simulation, based on samples from the U.S. textile industry, that by using intelligent agents under the CSET model it is possible to automatically find an ideal group of trading partners from a supply mesh.

  1. Single Agent Polysaccharopeptide Delays Metastases and Improves Survival in Naturally Occurring Hemangiosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy Cimino Brown

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The 2008 World Health Organization World Cancer Report describes global cancer incidence soaring with many patients living in countries that lack resources for cancer control. Alternative treatment strategies that can reduce the global disease burden at manageable costs must be developed. Polysaccharopeptide (PSP is the bioactive agent from the mushroom Coriolus versicolor. Studies indicate PSP has in vitro antitumor activities and inhibits the growth of induced tumors in animal models. Clear evidence of clinically relevant benefits of PSP in cancer patients, however, is lacking. The investment of resources required to complete large-scale, randomized controlled trials of PSP in cancer patients is more easily justified if antitumor and survival benefits are documented in a complex animal model of a naturally occurring cancer that parallels human disease. Because of its high metastatic rate and vascular origin, canine hemangiosarcoma is used for investigations in antimetastatic and antiangiogenic therapies. In this double-blind randomized multidose pilot study, high-dose PSP significantly delayed the progression of metastases and afforded the longest survival times reported in canine hemangiosarcoma. These data suggest that, for those cancer patients for whom advanced treatments are not accessible, PSP as a single agent might offer significant improvements in morbidity and mortality.

  2. Activity of single-agent decitabine in atypical chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Heidi; Bhatt, Vijaya R; Yuan, Ji; Maness, Lori J; Ganti, Apar K

    2016-12-01

    Atypical chronic myeloid leukemia is a rare entity that presents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Traditionally utilized therapeutic agents such as hydroxyurea or interferon result in a median survival of approximately two years, thus warranting identification of better options. We report a 49-year-old Caucasian female, who presented with extreme leukocytosis (white blood cells of 148,300/µL) with left shift, severe anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Following a diagnosis of atypical chronic myeloid leukemia, she was started on intravenous decitabine. She subsequently developed paraneoplastic vasculitis of large arteries, which responded to high-dose glucocorticoid. Decitabine therapy resulted in an excellent hematologic response, transfusion independence, and successful transition to an allogeneic peripheral stem cell transplantation. However, the patient subsequently succumbed to the complications of acute graft-versus-host-disease. This case illustrates an association between atypical chronic myeloid leukemia and steroid-responsive paraneoplastic vasculitis and highlights the single-agent disease activity of decitabine in atypical chronic myeloid leukemia, which may be utilized as a bridging therapy to allogeneic stem cell transplantation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Progressing single biomolecule force spectroscopy measurements for the screening of DNA binding agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenke; Barbagallo, Romina; Madden, Claire; Roberts, Clive J.; Woolford, Alison; Allen, Stephanie

    2005-10-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the force-extension properties of single molecules of double stranded (ds) DNA are sensitive to the presence of small molecule DNA binding agents, and also to their mode of binding. These observations raise the possibility of using this approach as a highly sensitive tool for the screening of such agents. However, particularly for studies employing the atomic force microscope (AFM), several non-trivial barriers hinder the progress of this approach to the non-specialist arena and hence also the full realization of this possibility. In this paper, we therefore address a series of key reproducibility and metrological issues associated with this type of measurement. Specifically, we present an improved immobilization method that covalently anchors one end (5' end) of a dual labelled (5'-thiol, 3'-biotin) p53 DNA molecule onto a gold substrate via gold-thiol chemistry, whilst the biotinylated 3' end is available for 'pick-up' using a streptavidin modified AFM tip. We also show that co-surface immobilization of DNA with 6-mercapto-1-hexanol (MCH) can also lead to a further increase the measured contour length. We demonstrate the impact of these improved protocols through the observation of the cooperative transition plateau in a DNA fragment of approximately 118 bp, a significantly smaller fragment than previously investigated. The results of a comparative study of the effects of a model minor groove binder (Hoechst 33258) and an intercalating drug (proflavine), alone, as a mixture and under different buffer conditions, are also presented.

  4. Infectious neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Papp, Jessica

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this review is to address bacterial, viral, and other infectious causes of neuropathy or neuronopathy, with an emphasis on clinical manifestations and treatment. Most infectious neuropathies have been well described for some time and treatments are well established. An exception is HIV-associated distal symmetric polyneuropathy, which is an area of active research. Current work in this area focuses on epidemiology, risk factors, and underlying mechanisms. Infectious diseases are an important part of the differential diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders because they are among the most amenable to treatment. However, diagnosis of infectious peripheral neuropathy may be challenging because of variability in a number of factors, including the pattern of deficits, geographic distribution of pathogens, length of time from the onset of infection to the development of neuropathy, and mechanism of nerve injury.

  5. Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as undercooked hamburger or unpasteurized fruit juice. Risk factors While anyone can catch infectious diseases, you may ... only minor complications. But some infections — such as pneumonia, AIDS and ... increased risk of cancer: Human papillomavirus is linked to cervical ...

  6. Infectious Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ...

  7. Quantitative Molecular Imaging with a Single Gd-Based Contrast Agent Reveals Specific Tumor Binding and Retention in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Mette L; Gao, Ying; Hutnick, Melanie A; Craig, Sonya E L; Pokorski, Jonathan K; Flask, Chris A; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M

    2017-06-06

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an indispensable tool in the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases, especially cancer. However, the poor sensitivity of MRI relative to other imaging modalities, such as PET, has hindered the development and clinical use of molecular MRI contrast agents that could provide vital diagnostic information by specifically locating a molecular target altered in the disease process. This work describes the specific and sustained in vivo binding and retention of a protein tyrosine phosphatase mu (PTPμ)-targeted, molecular magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent with a single gadolinium (Gd) chelate using a quantitative MRI T 1 mapping technique in glioma xenografts. Quantitative T 1 mapping is an imaging method used to measure the longitudinal relaxation time, the T 1 relaxation time, of protons in a magnetic field after excitation by a radiofrequency pulse. T 1 relaxation times can in turn be used to calculate the concentration of a gadolinium-containing contrast agent in a region of interest, thereby allowing the retention or clearance of an agent to be quantified. In this context, retention is a measure of molecular contrast agent binding. Using conventional peptide chemistry, a PTPμ-targeted peptide was linked to a chelator that had been conjugated to a lysine residue. Following complexation with Gd, this PTPμ-targeted molecular contrast agent containing a single Gd ion showed significant tumor enhancement and a sustained increase in Gd concentration in both heterotopic and orthotopic tumors using dynamic quantitative MRI. This single Gd-containing PTPμ agent was more effective than our previous version with three Gd ions. Differences between nonspecific and specific agents, due to specific tumor binding, can be determined within the first 30 min after agent administration by examining clearance rates. This more facile chemistry, when combined with quantitative MR techniques, allows for widespread adoption by academic

  8. A Single-Machine Two-Agent Scheduling Problem by a Branch-and-Bound and Three Simulated Annealing Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangchia Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the field of distributed decision making, different agents share a common processing resource, and each agent wants to minimize a cost function depending on its jobs only. These issues arise in different application contexts, including real-time systems, integrated service networks, industrial districts, and telecommunication systems. Motivated by its importance on practical applications, we consider two-agent scheduling on a single machine where the objective is to minimize the total completion time of the jobs of the first agent with the restriction that an upper bound is allowed the total completion time of the jobs for the second agent. For solving the proposed problem, a branch-and-bound and three simulated annealing algorithms are developed for the optimal solution, respectively. In addition, the extensive computational experiments are also conducted to test the performance of the algorithms.

  9. Pathological findings in the red fox (Vulpes vulpes), stone marten (Martes foina) and raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides), with special emphasis on infectious and zoonotic agents in Northern Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lempp, Charlotte; Jungwirth, Nicole; Grilo, Miguel L; Reckendorf, Anja; Ulrich, Arlena; van Neer, Abbo; Bodewes, Rogier; Pfankuche, Vanessa M; Bauer, Christian; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Siebert, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    Anthropogenic landscape changes contributed to the reduction of availability of habitats to wild animals. Hence, the presence of wild terrestrial carnivores in urban and peri-urban sites has increased considerably over the years implying an increased risk of interspecies spillover of infectious

  10. Combination chemotherapy versus single-agent therapy as first- and second-line treatment in metastatic breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensuu, H; Holli, K; Heikkinen, M

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: We report results of a randomized prospective study that compared single agents of low toxicity given both as the first-line and second-line chemotherapy with combination chemotherapy in advanced breast cancer with distant metastases. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients in the single-agent arm...... three times per week (CEF) followed by M 8 mg/m2 plus vinblastine (V) 6 mg/m2 every 4 weeks. Exclusion criteria included age greater than 70 years, World Health Organization (WHO) performance status greater than 2, prior chemotherapy for metastatic disease, and presence of liver metastases in patients...

  11. Emergent infectious uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairallah, Moncef; Jelliti, Bechir; Jenzeri, Salah

    2009-10-01

    Infectious causes should always be considered in all patients with uveitis and it should be ruled out first. The differential diagnosis includes multiple well-known diseases including herpes, syphilis, toxoplasmosis, tuberculosis, bartonellosis, Lyme disease, and others. However, clinicians should be aware of emerging infectious agents as potential causes of systemic illness and also intraocular inflammation. Air travel, immigration, and globalization of business have overturned traditional pattern of geographic distribution of infectious diseases, and therefore one should work locally but think globally, though it is not possible always. This review recapitulates the systemic and ocular mainfestations of several emergent infectious diseases relevant to the ophthalmologist including Rickettsioses, West Nile virus infection, Rift valley fever, dengue fever, and chikungunya. Retinitis, chorioretinitis, retinal vasculitis, and optic nerve involvement have been associated with these emergent infectious diseases. The diagnosis of any of these infections is usually based on pattern of uveitis, systemic symptoms and signs, and specific epidemiological data and confirmed by detection of specific antibody in serum. A systematic ocular examination, showing fairly typical fundus findings, may help in establishing an early clinical diagnosis, which allows prompt, appropriate management.

  12. Virtual agent-mediated appraisal training: a single case series among Dutch firefighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Ursula M; Neerincx, Mark A; Morina, Nexhmedin; Brinkman, Willem-Paul

    2017-01-01

    Background : First responders are a prime example of professionals that are at a high risk of being exposed to traumatic experiences. Reappraisal as a coping strategy might help first responders to better cope with their emotional responses to traumatic events. Objective : This study investigated the effects of repeated sessions of a digital reappraisal training among seven firefighters. The training consisted of four sessions supported by a virtual agent, conducted at home or at work, over a two-week period in a single case series. Method : Sixteen data points were collected from each participant in the eight days pre- and post-training. Results : Significantly more themes were used at post-training than at pre-training, implying more flexibility and confirming the main hypothesis of the study. Negative side effects were not reported during or in the week after the training. Conclusions : More controlled studies into the short- and long-term effects of a training of this nature are needed. Furthermore, it provides a reference for developers in this field.

  13. Atypical Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in previously untreated patients with CLL on single-agent ibrutinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Inhye E; Jerussi, Theresa; Farooqui, Mohammed; Tian, Xin; Wiestner, Adrian; Gea-Banacloche, Juan

    2016-10-13

    Ibrutinib is not known to confer risk for Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP). We observed 5 cases of PCP in 96 patients receiving single-agent ibrutinib, including 4 previously untreated. Clinical presentations included asymptomatic pulmonary infiltrates, chronic cough, and shortness of breath. The diagnosis was often delayed. Median time from starting ibrutinib to occurrence of PCP was 6 months (range, 2-24). The estimated incidence of PCP was 2.05 cases per 100 patient-years (95% confidence interval, 0.67-4.79). At the time of PCP, all patients had CD4 T-cell count >500/μL (median, 966/μL) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) >500 mg/dL (median, 727 mg/dL). All patients underwent bronchoalveolar lavage. P jirovecii was identified by polymerase chain reaction in all 5 cases; direct fluorescence antibody staining was positive in 1. All events were grade ≤2 and resolved with oral therapy. Secondary prophylaxis was not given to 3 patients; after 61 patient-months of follow up, no recurrence occurred. Lack of correlation with CD4 count and IgG level suggests that susceptibility to PCP may be linked to Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibition. If confirmed, this association could result in significant changes in surveillance and/or prophylaxis, possibly extending to other BTK inhibitors. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01500733 and #NCT02514083.

  14. Plasma gasification of refuse derived fuel in a single-stage system using different gasifying agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agon, N; Hrabovský, M; Chumak, O; Hlína, M; Kopecký, V; Masláni, A; Bosmans, A; Helsen, L; Skoblja, S; Van Oost, G; Vierendeels, J

    2016-01-01

    The renewable evolution in the energy industry and the depletion of natural resources are putting pressure on the waste industry to shift towards flexible treatment technologies with efficient materials and/or energy recovery. In this context, a thermochemical conversion method of recent interest is plasma gasification, which is capable of producing syngas from a wide variety of waste streams. The produced syngas can be valorized for both energetic (heat and/or electricity) and chemical (ammonia, hydrogen or liquid hydrocarbons) end-purposes. This paper evaluates the performance of experiments on a single-stage plasma gasification system for the treatment of refuse-derived fuel (RDF) from excavated waste. A comparative analysis of the syngas characteristics and process yields was done for seven cases with different types of gasifying agents (CO2+O2, H2O, CO2+H2O and O2+H2O). The syngas compositions were compared to the thermodynamic equilibrium compositions and the performance of the single-stage plasma gasification of RDF was compared to that of similar experiments with biomass and to the performance of a two-stage plasma gasification process with RDF. The temperature range of the experiment was from 1400 to 1600 K and for all cases, a medium calorific value syngas was produced with lower heating values up to 10.9 MJ/Nm(3), low levels of tar, high levels of CO and H2 and which composition was in good agreement to the equilibrium composition. The carbon conversion efficiency ranged from 80% to 100% and maximum cold gas efficiency and mechanical gasification efficiency of respectively 56% and 95%, were registered. Overall, the treatment of RDF proved to be less performant than that of biomass in the same system. Compared to a two-stage plasma gasification system, the produced syngas from the single-stage reactor showed more favourable characteristics, while the recovery of the solid residue as a vitrified slag is an advantage of the two-stage set-up. Copyright

  15. Single induction dose of etomidate versus other induction agents for endotracheal intubation in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder, Eric A; Ball, Ian M; Ridi, Stacy; Pickett, William; Hohl, Corinne

    2015-01-08

    The use of etomidate for emergency airway interventions in critically ill patients is very common. In one large registry trial, etomidate was the most commonly used agent for this indication. Etomidate is known to suppress adrenal gland function, but it remains unclear whether or not this adrenal gland dysfunction affects mortality. The primary objective was to assess, in populations of critically ill patients, whether a single induction dose of etomidate for emergency airway intervention affects mortality.The secondary objectives were to address, in populations of critically ill patients, whether a single induction dose of etomidate for emergency airway intervention affects adrenal gland function, organ dysfunction, or health services utilization (as measured by intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay (LOS), duration of mechanical ventilation, or vasopressor requirements).We repeated analyses within subgroups defined by the aetiologies of critical illness, timing of adrenal gland function measurement, and the type of comparator drug used. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE; CINAHL; EMBASE; LILACS; International Pharmaceutical Abstracts; Web of Science; the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE); and ISI BIOSIS Citation index(SM) on 8 February 2013. We reran the searches in August 2014. We will deal with any studies of interest when we update the review.We also searched the Scopus database of dissertations and conference proceedings and the US Food and Drug Administration Database. We handsearched major emergency medicine, critical care, and anaesthesiology journals.We handsearched the conference proceedings of major emergency medicine, anaesthesia, and critical care conferences from 1990 to current, and performed a grey literature search of the following: Current Controlled Trials; National Health Service - The National Research Register; ClinicalTrials.gov; NEAR website. We included randomized controlled

  16. Pathological findings in the red fox (Vulpes vulpes), stone marten (Martes foina) and raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides), with special emphasis on infectious and zoonotic agents in Northern Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempp, Charlotte; Jungwirth, Nicole; Grilo, Miguel L; Reckendorf, Anja; Ulrich, Arlena; van Neer, Abbo; Bodewes, Rogier; Pfankuche, Vanessa M; Bauer, Christian; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Siebert, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    Anthropogenic landscape changes contributed to the reduction of availability of habitats to wild animals. Hence, the presence of wild terrestrial carnivores in urban and peri-urban sites has increased considerably over the years implying an increased risk of interspecies spillover of infectious diseases and the transmission of zoonoses. The present study provides a detailed characterisation of the health status of the red fox (Vulpes vulpes), stone marten (Martes foina) and raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) in their natural rural and peri-urban habitats in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany between November 2013 and January 2016 with focus on zoonoses and infectious diseases that are potentially threatening to other wildlife or domestic animal species. 79 red foxes, 17 stone martens and 10 raccoon dogs were collected from traps or hunts. In order to detect morphological changes and potential infectious diseases, necropsy and pathohistological work-up was performed. Additionally, in selected animals immunohistochemistry (influenza A virus, parvovirus, feline leukemia virus, Borna disease virus, tick-borne encephalitis, canine adenovirus, Neospora caninum, Toxoplasma gondii and Listeria monocytogenes), next-generation sequencing, polymerase chain reaction (fox circovirus) and serum-neutralisation analysis (canine distemper virus) were performed. Furthermore, all animals were screened for fox rabies virus (immunofluorescence), canine distemper virus (immunohistochemistry) and Aujeszky's disease (virus cultivation). The most important findings included encephalitis (n = 16) and pneumonia (n = 20). None of the investigations revealed a specific cause for the observed morphological alterations except for one animal with an elevated serum titer of 1:160 for canine distemper. Animals displayed macroscopically and/or histopathologically detectable infections with parasites, including Taenia sp., Toxocara sp. and Alaria alata. In summary, wildlife predators carry zoonotic

  17. Pathological findings in the red fox (Vulpes vulpes), stone marten (Martes foina) and raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides), with special emphasis on infectious and zoonotic agents in Northern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo, Miguel L.; Reckendorf, Anja; Ulrich, Arlena; van Neer, Abbo; Bodewes, Rogier; Pfankuche, Vanessa M.; Bauer, Christian; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Siebert, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    Anthropogenic landscape changes contributed to the reduction of availability of habitats to wild animals. Hence, the presence of wild terrestrial carnivores in urban and peri-urban sites has increased considerably over the years implying an increased risk of interspecies spillover of infectious diseases and the transmission of zoonoses. The present study provides a detailed characterisation of the health status of the red fox (Vulpes vulpes), stone marten (Martes foina) and raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) in their natural rural and peri-urban habitats in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany between November 2013 and January 2016 with focus on zoonoses and infectious diseases that are potentially threatening to other wildlife or domestic animal species. 79 red foxes, 17 stone martens and 10 raccoon dogs were collected from traps or hunts. In order to detect morphological changes and potential infectious diseases, necropsy and pathohistological work-up was performed. Additionally, in selected animals immunohistochemistry (influenza A virus, parvovirus, feline leukemia virus, Borna disease virus, tick-borne encephalitis, canine adenovirus, Neospora caninum, Toxoplasma gondii and Listeria monocytogenes), next-generation sequencing, polymerase chain reaction (fox circovirus) and serum-neutralisation analysis (canine distemper virus) were performed. Furthermore, all animals were screened for fox rabies virus (immunofluorescence), canine distemper virus (immunohistochemistry) and Aujeszky’s disease (virus cultivation). The most important findings included encephalitis (n = 16) and pneumonia (n = 20). None of the investigations revealed a specific cause for the observed morphological alterations except for one animal with an elevated serum titer of 1:160 for canine distemper. Animals displayed macroscopically and/or histopathologically detectable infections with parasites, including Taenia sp., Toxocara sp. and Alaria alata. In summary, wildlife predators carry zoonotic

  18. Infectious Bursal Disease Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, María Cecilia; Zanetti, Flavia Adriana; Terebiznik, Mauricio R; Colombo, María Isabel; Delgui, Laura Ruth

    2018-03-14

    Birnaviruses are unconventional members of the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses group that are characterized by the lack of a transcriptionally active inner core. Instead, the birnaviral particles organize their genome in ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) composed by dsRNA segments, the dsRNA-binding VP3 protein, and the viral encoded RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp). This and other structural features suggests that birnaviruses may follow a completely different replication program from that followed by members of the Reoviridae family, supporting the hypothesis that birnaviruses are the evolutionary link between single-stranded positive RNA (+ssRNA) and dsRNA viruses. Here, we demonstrated that the Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV), a prototypical member of the Birnaviridae family, hijacks endosomal membranes of infected cells through the interaction of viral protein, VP3, with the phospholipids on the cytosolic leaflet of these compartments for replication. Employing a mutagenesis approach, we demonstrated that VP3 domain PATCH 2 (P2) mediates the association of VP3 with the endosomal membranes. To determine the role of VP3 P2 in the context of virus replication cycle, we used avian cells stably overexpressing VP3 P2 for IBDV infection. Importantly, the intra- and extra-cellular virus yields, as well as the intracellular levels of VP2 viral capsid protein, significantly diminished in VP3 P2 stably overexpressing cells. Altogether, our results indicate that the association of VP3 with endosomes has a relevant role in IBDV replication cycle. This report provides direct experimental evidence for membranous compartments such as endosomes being required by a dsRNA virus for its replication. The results also support the previously proposed role of birnaviruses as an evolutionary link between +ssRNA and dsRNA viruses. IMPORTANCE Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD, also called Gumboro disease) is an acute, highly contagious immunosuppressive disease that affects

  19. Identificação de agentes infecciosos pulmonares em autópsias de pacientes com a síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida Identification of infectious agents in the lungs in autopsies of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanivia Aparecida de Lima Pereira

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available As afecções pulmonares são freqüentes em indivíduos infectados pelo vírus da imunodeficiência humana. Neste trabalho, procurou-se identificar através de histoquímica e imunohistoquímica, agentes infecciosos nos pulmões de indivíduos portadores da síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida (SIDA, autopsiados entre março de 1990 e julho de 2000 na FMTM. Fragmentos de pulmão de 40 indivíduos com SIDA autopsiados foram analisados histologicamente. Foram identificados agentes infecciosos em 34 (85% casos dos 40 analisados, sendo que bactérias foram encontradas em 22 (55% casos. Entre os agentes fúngicos o Pneumocystis carinii foi encontrado em oito (19,1% casos; Cryptococcus sp em quatro (9,5%, Histoplasma sp em dois (4,8% e Candida sp em um (2,4% caso. Detectou-se também associação entre Pneumocystis carinii, Citomegalovirus e Cryptococcus sp; CMV e Toxoplasma gondii. Em cinco casos, Candida sp, CMV e Pneumocystis carinii estiveram associados a bactérias. Entre as infecções não bacterianas, os fungos foram os agentes infecciosos mais isolados dos pulmões em autópsias de indivíduos com SIDA, sendo o Pneumocystis carinii o mais freqüente.Lung diseases are frequently observed in individuals infected with HIV. The aim of this study was to identify infectious agents in the lungs in the autopsied individuals with AIDS performed between march 1990 and july 2000 at the school of medicine (Uberaba- Brazil, using histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques. Analysis was made on lungs obtained from 40 individuals with AIDS. Infectious agents were observed in 34 (85% cases of the 40 analyzed. Regarding fungis, Pneumocystis carinii was found in 8 (19.1%cases; Cryptococcus sp in 4 (9.5%cases, Histoplasma sp in 2 (4.8%cases and Candida sp in 1 (2.4%case. Association of Pneumocystis carinii, Citomegalovirus and Cryptococcus sp, was observed in one case, and in another, the association of CMV, and Toxoplasma gondii. There were 5 cases

  20. Marine infectious disease ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2017-01-01

    To put marine disease impacts in context requires a broad perspective on the roles infectious agents have in the ocean. Parasites infect most marine vertebrate and invertebrate species, and parasites and predators can have comparable biomass density, suggesting they play comparable parts as consumers in marine food webs. Although some parasites might increase with disturbance, most probably decline as food webs unravel. There are several ways to adapt epidemiological theory to the marine environment. In particular, because the ocean represents a three-dimensional moving habitat for hosts and parasites, models should open up the spatial scales at which infective stages and host larvae travel. In addition to open recruitment and dimensionality, marine parasites are subject to fishing, filter feeders, dosedependent infection, environmental forcing, and death-based transmission. Adding such considerations to marine disease models will make it easier to predict which infectious diseases will increase or decrease in a changing ocean.

  1. Infectious Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonuleit, Helmut; Schmitt, Edgar; Kakirman, Hacer; Stassen, Michael; Knop, Jürgen; Enk, Alexander H.

    2002-01-01

    Regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells (Treg) are mandatory for maintaining immunologic self-tolerance. We demonstrate that the cell-cell contact–mediated suppression of conventional CD4+ T cells by human CD25+ Treg cells is fixation resistant, independent from membrane-bound TGF-β but requires activation and protein synthesis of CD25+ Treg cells. Coactivation of CD25+ Treg cells with Treg cell–depleted CD4+ T cells results in anergized CD4+ T cells that in turn inhibit the activation of conventional, freshly isolated CD4+ T helper (Th) cells. This infectious suppressive activity, transferred from CD25+ Treg cells via cell contact, is cell contact–independent and partially mediated by soluble transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. The induction of suppressive properties in conventional CD4+ Th cells represents a mechanism underlying the phenomenon of infectious tolerance. This explains previously published conflicting data on the role of TGF-β in CD25+ Treg cell–induced immunosuppression. PMID:12119350

  2. Single Pathogen Challenge with Agents of the Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurel J Gershwin

    Full Text Available Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in cattle; costing the dairy and beef industries millions of dollars annually, despite the use of vaccines and antibiotics. BRDC is caused by one or more of several viruses (bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpes type 1 also known as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, and bovine viral diarrhea virus, which predispose animals to infection with one or more bacteria. These include: Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica, Mycoplasma bovis, and Histophilus somni. Some cattle appear to be more resistant to BRDC than others. We hypothesize that appropriate immune responses to these pathogens are subject to genetic control. To determine which genes are involved in the immune response to each of these pathogens it was first necessary to experimentally induce infection separately with each pathogen to document clinical and pathological responses in animals from which tissues were harvested for subsequent RNA sequencing. Herein these infections and animal responses are described.

  3. Efficacy of ultra-short single agent regimen antibiotic chemo-prophylaxis in reducing the risk of meningitis in patients undergoing endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somma, Teresa; Maraolo, Alberto Enrico; Esposito, Felice; Cavallo, Luigi Maria; Tosone, Grazia; Orlando, Raffaele; Cappabianca, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    The study aims to evaluate the incidence of infectious complications (namely meningitis) within 30 days after endoscopic endonasal transspheinodal neurosurgery (EETS) in patients receiving an ultra-short peri-operative chemo-prophylaxis regimen with 2 doses of 1st generation cephalosporin or macrolide. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical records of 145 patients who received an ultra-short chemoprophylaxis with two doses of an antibiotic, given 30 min before and 8h after EETS, over a 30-month time-frame. Ninety-seven patients (66.89%) received endovenous cefazolin, a 1st generation cephalosporin, administered at a dosage of 1000 mg, and 48 patients (33.10%) with an history of allergy to various agents, received endovenous clarithromycin at a dosage of 500 mg. No case of peri- and post-operative meningitis occurred in patients receiving the 2 doses of antibiotic. Only one patient (0.68%) developed cerebral fluid leakage on the 7th postoperative day, which required the switching to a broad-spectrum antibiotic prophylaxis for one week; this patient received the ultrashort prophylaxis with a macrolide. In addition, 7 patients (4.82%) developed minor infectious complications such as low-grade fever (3 cases, all of them receiving cefazolin), enlarged submandibular and cervical lymphnodes (3 cases, all of them receiving cefazolin), and upper and lower respiratory tract infection (1 case receiving clarithromycin). The cost of this prophylaxis regimen ranged from 7.76 Euro (cefazolin) to 39.54 Euro (clarithromycin). This study suggested that an ultra-short single-antibiotic prophylaxis is a safe, cheap and effective regimen to prevent post-operative meningitis in patients undergoing EETS and who do not require lumbar drainage after surgery. In these patients also the rate of minor infective complications was acceptable when compared with the previous more expensive regimen based on 3rd generation cephalosporin plus aminoglycoside or alone, that could be suitable only

  4. Sports: The Infectious Hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minooee, Arezou; Wang, Jeff; Gupta, Geeta K

    2015-10-01

    Although the medical complications of sports are usually traumatic in nature, infectious hazards also arise. While blood-borne pathogens such as HIV, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C, cause significant illness, the risk of acquiring these agents during sporting activities is minimal. Skin infections are more commonplace, arising from a variety of microbial agents including bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens. Sports involving water contact can lead to enteric infections, eye infections, or disseminated infections such as leptospirosis. Mumps, measles, and influenza are vaccine-preventable diseases that have been transmitted during sporting events, both in players and in spectators. Prevention is the key to many of these infections. Players should be vaccinated and should not participate in sports if their infection can be spread by contact, airborne, or droplet transmission.

  5. A Holistic View of Emerging Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himgauri K. Kulkarni

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Emerging Infectious Diseases: A Guide to Diseases, Causative Agents, and Surveillance; Lisa A. Beltz; (2011. Jossey-Bass, John Wiley and Sons, Inc. San Francisco, CA. 700 pages.

  6. A detailed heterogeneous agent model for a single asset financial market with trading via an order book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota Navarro, Roberto; Larralde, Hernán

    2017-01-01

    We present an agent based model of a single asset financial market that is capable of replicating most of the non-trivial statistical properties observed in real financial markets, generically referred to as stylized facts. In our model agents employ strategies inspired on those used in real markets, and a realistic trade mechanism based on a double auction order book. We study the role of the distinct types of trader on the return statistics: specifically, correlation properties (or lack thereof), volatility clustering, heavy tails, and the degree to which the distribution can be described by a log-normal. Further, by introducing the practice of "profit taking", our model is also capable of replicating the stylized fact related to an asymmetry in the distribution of losses and gains.

  7. First-line single agent treatment with gefitinib in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Yong-Qian

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer is a malignant carcinoma which has the highest morbidity and mortality in Chinese population. Gefitinib, a tyrosine kinase (TK inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, displays anti-tumor activity. The present data regarding first-line treatment with single agent gefitinib against non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC in Chinese population are not sufficient. Purpose To assess the efficacy and toxicity of gefitinib in Chinese patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC, a study of single agent treatment with gefitinib in Chinese patients was conducted. Methods 45 patients with advanced NSCLC were treated with gefitinib (250 mg daily until the disease progression or intolerable toxicity. Results Among the 45 patients, 15 patients achieved partial response (PR, 17 patients experienced stable disease (SD, and 13 patients developed progression disease (PD. None of the patients achieved complete response (CR. The tumor response rate and disease control rate was 33% and 71.1%, respectively. Symptom remission rate was 72.5%, and median remission time was 8 days. Median overall survival and median progression-free survival was 15.3 months and 6.0 months, respectively. The main induced toxicities by gefitinib were skin rash and diarrhea (53.3% and 33.3%, respectively. The minor induced toxicities included dehydration and pruritus of skin (26.7% and 22.2%, respectively. In addition, hepatic toxicity and oral ulceration occurred in few patients (6.7% and 4.4%2, respectively. Conclusions Single agent treatment with gefitinib is effective and well tolerated in Chinese patients with advanced NSCLC.

  8. Molecular Sleds and More: Novel Antiviral Agents via Single-Molecule Biology (441st Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangel, Wally (Ph.D., Biology Department)

    2008-10-15

    Vaccines are effective against viruses such as polio and measles, but vaccines against other important viruses, such as HIV and flu viruses, may be impossible to obtain. These viruses change their genetic makeup each time they replicate so that the immune system cannot recognize all their variations. Hence it is important to develop new antiviral agents that inhibit virus replication. During this lecture, Dr. Mangel will discuss his group's work with a model system, the human adenovirus, which causes, among other ailments, pink eye, blindness and obesity. Mangel's team has developed a promising drug candidate that works by inihibiting adenovirus proteinase, an enzyme necessary for viral replication.

  9. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as stabilizing agents in red phosphorus Li-ion battery anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Smajic, Jasmin

    2017-08-16

    Phosphorus boasts extremely high gravimetric and volumetric capacities but suffers from poor electrochemical stability with significant capacity loss immediately after the first cycle. We propose to circumvent this issue by mixing amorphous red phosphorus with single-walled carbon nanotubes. Employing a non-destructive sublimation–deposition method, we have synthesized composites where the synergetic effect between red phosphorus and single-walled carbon nanotubes allows for a considerable improvement in the electrochemical stability of battery anodes. In contrast to the average 40% loss of capacity after 50 cycles for other phosphorus–carbon composites in the literature, our material shows losses of just 22% under analogous cycling conditions.

  10. Evaluation of a 99Tcm bound brain scanning agent for single photon emission computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A R; Hasselbalch, S G; Paulson, O B

    1986-01-01

    D,L HM-PAO-99Tcm (PAO) is a lipophilic tracer complex which is avidly taken up by the brain. We have compared the regional distribution of PAO with regional cerebral blood flow (CBF). CBF was measured by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) by Tomomatic 64 after 133Xe inhalation in 41...

  11. Molecular dosimetry of DNA damage caused by alkylation. I. Single-strand breaks induced by ethylating agents in cultured mammalian cells in relation to survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbondandolo, A.; Dogliotti, E.; Lohman, P.H.M.; Berends, F.

    1982-01-01

    Cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells were treated with ethylating agents. DNA lesions giving rise to single-strand breaks (ssb) or alkali-labile sites were measured by centrifugation in alkaline sucrose gradients after lysis in alkali. 4 agents with different tendencies to ethylate preferentially

  12. Evaluation of a 99Tcm bound brain scanning agent for single photon emission computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A R; Hasselbalch, S G; Paulson, O B

    1986-01-01

    D,L HM-PAO-99Tcm (PAO) is a lipophilic tracer complex which is avidly taken up by the brain. We have compared the regional distribution of PAO with regional cerebral blood flow (CBF). CBF was measured by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) by Tomomatic 64 after 133Xe inhalation in ...... of the (decay corrected) brain counts were lost during 24 hours....

  13. Estimation of single-kidney glomerular filtration rate without exogenous contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiang; Aghayev, Ayaz; Gumus, Serter; Ty Bae, K

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of single-kidney filtration fraction and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) without exogenous contrast is clinically important to assess renal function and pathophysiology, especially for patients with comprised renal function. The objective of this study is to develop a novel MR-based tool for noninvasive quantification of renal function using conventional MR arterial spin labeling water as endogenous tracer. The regional differentiation of the arterial spin labeling water between the glomerular capsular space and the renal parenchyma was characterized and measured according to their MR relaxation properties (T1ρ or T2 ), and applied to the estimation of filtration fraction and single-kidney GFR. The proposed approach was tested to quantify GFR in healthy volunteers at baseline and after a protein-loading challenge. Biexponential decay of the cortical arterial spin labeling water MR signal was observed. The major component decays the same as parenchyma water; the minor component decays much slower as expected from glomerular ultra-filtrates. The mean single-kidney GFR was estimated to be 49 ± 9 mL/min at baseline and increased by 28% after a protein-loading challenge. We developed an arterial spin labeling-based MR imaging method that allows us to estimate renal filtration fraction and singe-kidney GFR without use of exogenous contrast. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Imaging in Vivo Extracellular pH with a Single Paramagnetic Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanshu Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of extracellular pH (pHe has potential utility for cancer diagnoses and for assessing the therapeutic effects of pH-dependent therapies. A single magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent that is detected through paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST was designed to measure tumor pHe throughout the range of physiologic pH and with magnetic resonance saturation powers that are not harmful to a mouse model of cancer. The chemical characterization and modeling of the contrast agent Yb3+-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-triacetic acid, 10-o-aminoanilide (Yb-DO3A-oAA suggested that the aryl amine of the agent forms an intramolecular hydrogen bond with a proximal carboxylate ligand, which was essential for generating a practical chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST effect from an amine. A ratio of CEST effects from the aryl amine and amide was linearly correlated with pH throughout the physiologic pH range. The pH calibration was used to produce a parametric pH map of a subcutaneous flank tumor on a mouse model of MCF-7 mammary carcinoma. Although refinements in the in vivo CEST MRI methodology may improve the accuracy of pHe measurements, this study demonstrated that the PARACEST contrast agent can be used to generate parametric pH maps of in vivo tumors with saturation power levels that are not harmful to a mouse model of cancer.

  15. Therapeutic Effect of Novel Single-Stranded RNAi Agent Targeting Periostin in Eyes with Retinal Neovascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahito Nakama

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Retinal neovascularization (NV due to retinal ischemia remains one of the principal causes of vision impairment in patients with ischemic retinal diseases. We recently reported that periostin (POSTN may play a role in the development of preretinal fibrovascular membranes, but its role in retinal NV has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to examine the expression of POSTN in the ischemic retinas of a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinal NV. We also studied the function of POSTN on retinal NV using Postn KO mice and human retinal endothelial cells (HRECs in culture. In addition, we used a novel RNAi agent, NK0144, which targets POSTN to determine its effect on the development of retinal NV. Our results showed that the expression of POSTN was increased in the vascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and M2 macrophages in ischemic retinas. POSTN promoted the ischemia-induced retinal NV by Akt phosphorylation through integrin αvβ3. NK0144 had a greater inhibitory effect than canonical double-stranded siRNA on preretinal pathological NV in vivo and in vitro. These findings suggest a causal relationship between POSTN and retinal NV, and indicate a potential therapeutic role of intravitreal injection of NK0144 for retinal neovascular diseases.

  16. Electron spin resonance of Gd in the nuclear cooling agent: PrNi5 single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, R.; Davidov, D.; Grayevsky, A.; Shaltiel, D.; Zevin, V.

    1980-01-01

    The ESR of Gd in single crystals of PrNi 5 is observed to exhibit significant angular dependence of the resonance position and linewidth at low temperatures. This is interpreted in terms of the axial spin Hamiltonian which takes the anisotropic susceptibility and the Gd-Pr exchange into consideration. From lineshape analysis the axial crystal field parameter and isotropic Gd-Pr exchange are derived. The Gd ESR linewidth increases with temperature; the thermal broadening is angularly dependent. This is similar to that observed for the Pr NMR in PrNi 5 single crystals. Both the NMR and ESR thermal broadenings are attributed to low-frequency fluctuations of the Pr ions induced by the Pr-Pr exchange coupling. A model for hexagonal Van-Vleck compounds is given and with the linewidth enables the Pr-Pr exchange coupling, under the assumption of a Gaussian or a Lorenzian distribution of the low-frequency fluctuation spectra, to be extracted. It is suggested that the angular dependence of the ESR thermal broadening is due to the Gd-Pr exchange coupling. (UK)

  17. The effects of radioprotective agents on the radiation-induced DNA single strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhiu, Sung Ryul; Ko, Kyung Hwan; Jung, In Yong; Cho, Chul Ku; Kim, Tae Hwan; Park, Woo Wiun; Kim, Sung Ho; Ji, Young Hoon; Kim, Kyung Jung; Bang, Hio Chang; Jung, Young Suk; Choi, Moon Sik

    1992-04-01

    With the increased use of atomic energy in science, industry, medicine and public power production, the probability of nuclear accidents certainly appears to be on the increase. Therefore, early medical diagnosis and first-aid are needed urgently to establish an efficient treatment. We carried out the studies of radiation protector such as DDC, MEA, WR-2721 and variety of decontaminator with a view to establishing the protective measure and diagnostic standards for safety of worker and neighbors living around the radiation area in case of occurring the accidental contamination. In this experiment, we examined radiation-induced DNA single strand breaks as one of the study on molecular biology of the response of cells to radiation because an understanding of the radiation-induced damage in molecular level would add to our knowledge of radiation protection and treatment. (Author)

  18. Detection of single bacteria – causative agents of meningitis using Raman microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baikova, T V; Alushin, M V; Gonchukov, S A; Minaeva, S A; Bagratashvili, V N; Sundukov, A V; Svistunova, T S

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnostics of meningitis is a very topical problem as it is a fulminant disease with a high level of mortality. The progress of this disease is, as a rule, accompanied by the appearance of bacteria in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) composition. The examination of the CSF is well known to be the only reliable approach to the identification of meningitis. However, the traditional biochemical analyses are time consuming and not always reliable, simple, and inexpensive, whereas the optical methods are poorly developed. This work is devoted to the study of Raman spectra of several bacterial cultures which are mainly present during meningitis. Raman microscopy is a prompt and noninvasive technique capable of providing reliable information about molecular-level alterations of biological objects at their minimal quantity and size. It was shown that there are characteristic lines in Raman spectra which can be the reliable markers for determination of bacterial form of meningitis at a level of a single bacterium

  19. Detection of single bacteria - causative agents of meningitis using raman microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikova, T. V.; Minaeva, S. A.; Sundukov, A. V.; Svistunova, T. S.; Bagratashvili, V. N.; Alushin, M. V.; Gonchukov, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    Early diagnostics of meningitis is a very topical problem as it is a fulminant disease with a high level of mortality. The progress of this disease is, as a rule, accompanied by the appearance of bacteria in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) composition. The examination of the CSF is well known to be the only reliable approach to the identification of meningitis. However, the traditional biochemical analyses are time consuming and not always reliable, simple, and inexpensive, whereas the optical methods are poorly developed. This work is devoted to the study of Raman spectra of several bacterial cultures which are mainly present during meningitis. Raman microscopy is a prompt and noninvasive technique capable of providing reliable information about molecular-level alterations of biological objects at their minimal quantity and size. It was shown that there are characteristic lines in Raman spectra which can be the reliable markers for determination of bacterial form of meningitis at a level of a single bacterium.

  20. A Meta Analysis of Doublets Versus Single-agent Chemotherapy 
for Elderly Patients with Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong’an XU

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It remains disputed whether doublets are more effective than single-agent chemotherapy for elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of doublets and single-agent chemotherapy for elderly patients with NSCLC. Methods Data from all published, randomized trials that compared doublets and single-agent chemotherapy in elderly patients were collected from electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CNKI and the CBMdice. Meta-analysis was completed using software Stata 11.0. Results The results of the meta-analysis, including 12 eligible trials (2,306 patients, showed that the doublets significantly increased the overall response rate (OR=1.80, 95%CI:1.50-2.17, P<0.000,1 and one-year survival rate (OR=1.45, 95%CI: 1.22-1.72, P<0.000,1 compared with single-agent chemotherapy. The results of one-year survival rate in platinum-based doublet chemotherapy arms (OR=1.55, 95%CI: 1.18-2.03, P=0.001 and non platinum-based ones (OR=1.38, 95%CI: 1.10-1.73, P=0.006 were both significantly higher than that of single-agent chemotherapy. However, grade 3/4 anemia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia and neurotoxicity (P<0.05 were significantly associated with doublet chemotherapy. The incidence of toxicity effect in non platinum-based chemotherapy was similar to that of single-agent chemotherapy. Conclusion Compared with single-agent chemotherapy, doublet chemotherapy could increase the overall response rate and one-year survival rate significantly. Therefore, doublet chemotherapy would be more appropriate for elderly patients with advanced NSCLC as the first-line chemotherapy regimen. However, further prospective randomized controlled trials in elderly NSCLC patients is needed to verify the findings in this study.

  1. Preclinical evaluation of Sunitinib as a single agent in the prophylactic setting in a mouse model of bone metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schem Christian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A substantial number of breast cancer patients are identified as being at high risk of developing metastatic disease. With increasing number of targeted therapeutics entering clinical trials, chronic administration of these agents may be a feasible approach for the prevention of metastases within this subgroup of patients. In this preclinical study we examined whether Sunitinib, a multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor which has anti-angiogenic and anti-resorptive activity, is effective in the prevention of bone metastases. Method Sunitinib was administered daily with the first dose commencing prior to tumor cell inoculation. Intracardiac injection was performed with MDA-MB23 bone-seeking cells, which were stably transfected with DsRed2. In vivo plain radiography and fluorescent imaging (Berthold NightOwl was used in the analysis of bone metastases. Histomorphometry was used for the quantification of TRAP+ cells from bone sections and immunohistochemistry was performed using an antibody reactive to CD34 for quantification of microvessel density. Results Preventive dosing administration of Sunitinib does not inhibit colonization of tumor cells to bone or reduce the size of osteolytic lesions. There was a decrease in the number of TRAP+ cells with Sunitinib treatment but this did not reach significance. Sunitinib inhibited tumor growth as determined by imaging of fluorescent tumor area. Immunohistochemical analyses of microvessel density revealed a concomitant decrease in the number of tumor blood vessels. Conclusions The findings suggest that Sunitinib can be used as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of bone metastases but as a single agent it is not effective in terms of prevention. Therefore a combination approach with other cytostatic drugs should be pursued.

  2. Tickborne infectious diseases: diagnosis and management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cunha, Burke A

    2000-01-01

    ... to particular flora and fauna. The purpose of Tickborne Infectious Diseases: Diagnosis and Management is to condense in a single book different approaches and paradigms of tickborne infectious diseases. Three chapters are devoted to background information, including the natural history of ticks, the diagnostic procedures of tickborne diseases, and the new tick-transm...

  3. [Current therapeutics in infectious dermatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascaux, A S; Chosidow, O

    NEW AGENTS: Among new treatments used for infectious dermatology diseases, new agents for genital herpes, valaciclovir and famciclovir, have greatly simplified therapeutic schemes. Cidofovir has also been shown to be effective against aciclovir-resistant cutaneous and mucosal herpetic lesions and for the treatment of molluscum contagiosum. NEW ADMINISTRATION ROUTES: For genital papillomavirus infections, trials using systemic or intralesional administered interferon have not provided conclusive evidence but imiquimode appears to be quite promising. Itaconazole and fluconazole are effective for onchomycoses. NEW POSSIBILITIES: Ivermectine is effective against scabies, but must be reserved for particularly severe forms. Finally, the emergence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains resistant to fluoroquinolones is disquieting.

  4. Influence of Essential Oils on Infectious Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piątkowska, Elżbieta; Rusiecka-Ziółkowska, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    Essential oils are substances of plant origin used to produce cosmetics, to preserve and aromatize food. Recently, they have become more popular among scientists and doctors due to their germicidal, antifungal, antiviral and anti-parasitic properties. As a consequence, essential oils are regarded as the source of new therapeutic substances. Numerous publications have been written regarding their effect on microorganisms in vitro. There have also been reports regarding their use in therapy as an additive to the traditional medical treatment. Essential oils may have other properties with positive effect on health because they may have an influence on the central nervous system and human mental state. It should be, however, kept in mind that compounds of essential oils might also have side effects and lead, like antibiotics, to the selection of resistant pathogens. It is necessary to develop quality standards of obtaining and using these plant preparations, so that they may provide safe and effective assistance in the fight against human pathogens.

  5. Base damage within single-strand DNA underlies in vivo hypermutability induced by a ubiquitous environmental agent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin Chan

    Full Text Available Chromosomal DNA must be in single-strand form for important transactions such as replication, transcription, and recombination to occur. The single-strand DNA (ssDNA is more prone to damage than double-strand DNA (dsDNA, due to greater exposure of chemically reactive moieties in the nitrogenous bases. Thus, there can be agents that damage regions of ssDNA in vivo while being inert toward dsDNA. To assess the potential hazard posed by such agents, we devised an ssDNA-specific mutagenesis reporter system in budding yeast. The reporter strains bear the cdc13-1 temperature-sensitive mutation, such that shifting to 37°C results in telomere uncapping and ensuing 5' to 3' enzymatic resection. This exposes the reporter region, containing three closely-spaced reporter genes, as a long 3' ssDNA overhang. We validated the ability of the system to detect mutagenic damage within ssDNA by expressing a modified human single-strand specific cytosine deaminase, APOBEC3G. APOBEC3G induced a high density of substitutions at cytosines in the ssDNA overhang strand, resulting in frequent, simultaneous inactivation of two reporter genes. We then examined the mutagenicity of sulfites, a class of reactive sulfur oxides to which humans are exposed frequently via respiration and food intake. Sulfites, at a concentration similar to that found in some foods, induced a high density of mutations, almost always as substitutions at cytosines in the ssDNA overhang strand, resulting in simultaneous inactivation of at least two reporter genes. Furthermore, sulfites formed a long-lived adducted 2'-deoxyuracil intermediate in DNA that was resistant to excision by uracil-DNA N-glycosylase. This intermediate was bypassed by error-prone translesion DNA synthesis, frequently involving Pol ζ, during repair synthesis. Our results suggest that sulfite-induced lesions in DNA can be particularly deleterious, since cells might not possess the means to repair or bypass such lesions

  6. The role of infectious disease in marine communities: chapter 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Harvell, C. Drew

    2014-01-01

    Marine ecologists recognize that infectious diseases play and important role in ocean ecosystems. This role may have increased in some host taxa over time (Ward and Lafferty 2004). We begin this chapter by introducing infectious agents and their relationships with their hosts in marine systems. We then put infectious disease agents with their hosts in marine systems. We then put infectious disease agents in the perspective of marine biodiversity and discuss the various factors that affect parasites. Specifically, we introduce some basin epidemiological concepts, including the effects of stress and free-living diversity on parasites. Following this, we give brief consideration to communities of parasites within their hosts, particularly as these can lead to general insights into community ecology. We also give examples of how infectious diseases affect host populations, scaling up to marine communities. Finally, we present examples of marine infectious disease that impair conservation and fisheries.

  7. Equine Infectious Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Hoopes, Karl H.

    2017-01-01

    This fact sheet gives information on equine infectious anemia, a blood-borne infectious viral disease of horses, donkeys, and mules. It describes transmission, clinical disease, diagnosis and control.

  8. Deforestation and avian infectious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, R. N. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this time of unprecedented global change, infectious diseases will impact humans and wildlife in novel and unknown ways. Climate change, the introduction of invasive species, urbanization, agricultural practices and the loss of biodiversity have all been implicated in increasing the spread of infectious pathogens. In many regards, deforestation supersedes these other global events in terms of its immediate potential global effects in both tropical and temperate regions. The effects of deforestation on the spread of pathogens in birds are largely unknown. Birds harbor many of the same types of pathogens as humans and in addition can spread infectious agents to humans and other wildlife. It is thought that avifauna have gone extinct due to infectious diseases and many are presently threatened, especially endemic island birds. It is clear that habitat degradation can pose a direct threat to many bird species but it is uncertain how these alterations will affect disease transmission and susceptibility to disease. The migration and dispersal of birds can also change with habitat degradation, and thus expose populations to novel pathogens. Some recent work has shown that the results of landscape transformation can have confounding effects on avian malaria, other haemosporidian parasites and viruses. Now with advances in many technologies, including mathematical and computer modeling, genomics and satellite tracking, scientists have tools to further research the disease ecology of deforestation. This research will be imperative to help predict and prevent outbreaks that could affect avifauna, humans and other wildlife worldwide. PMID:20190120

  9. Deforestation and avian infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, R N M

    2010-03-15

    In this time of unprecedented global change, infectious diseases will impact humans and wildlife in novel and unknown ways. Climate change, the introduction of invasive species, urbanization, agricultural practices and the loss of biodiversity have all been implicated in increasing the spread of infectious pathogens. In many regards, deforestation supersedes these other global events in terms of its immediate potential global effects in both tropical and temperate regions. The effects of deforestation on the spread of pathogens in birds are largely unknown. Birds harbor many of the same types of pathogens as humans and in addition can spread infectious agents to humans and other wildlife. It is thought that avifauna have gone extinct due to infectious diseases and many are presently threatened, especially endemic island birds. It is clear that habitat degradation can pose a direct threat to many bird species but it is uncertain how these alterations will affect disease transmission and susceptibility to disease. The migration and dispersal of birds can also change with habitat degradation, and thus expose populations to novel pathogens. Some recent work has shown that the results of landscape transformation can have confounding effects on avian malaria, other haemosporidian parasites and viruses. Now with advances in many technologies, including mathematical and computer modeling, genomics and satellite tracking, scientists have tools to further research the disease ecology of deforestation. This research will be imperative to help predict and prevent outbreaks that could affect avifauna, humans and other wildlife worldwide.

  10. Rate of serious infection in patients who are prescribed systemic biologic or nonbiologic agents for psoriasis: A large, single center, retrospective, observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Chantelle; Bloom, Romi; Ibler, Erin; Majewski, Sara; Sable, Kimberly A; Guido, Nicholas J; Day, Jennifer; Nocadello, Salvatore; Florek, Aleksandra G; West, Dennis P; Nardone, Beatrice

    2017-09-01

    Systemic biologic and nonbiologic agents used to treat psoriasis may or may not contribute to serious infection (SI) risk. Safety data, particularly for biologic agents, and associated risk for SI, are scarce. The study's aim was to explore the risk for SI in psoriasis patients exposed to systemic biologic or nonbiologic agents. A large, single-center electronic medical record repository was searched between January 2010 and December 2014. Records for patients prescribed a systemic agent for psoriasis (SAP) with psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis diagnoses were included (ICD-9 codes 696.1 and 696.0, respectively). SIs were those who required hospitalization, and/or injectable antibacterial, antiviral or antifungal therapy. SIs occurring within 120 days after exposure to a SAP, were included for study. A total of 1,346 patients were exposed to a SAP between January 2010 and December 2014; 27 (2%) had a SI. Comparing biologic and nonbiologic agent exposure, no statistically significant difference for risk of SI was detectable (p = .83). In this population, the SI rate for biologic and nonbiologic systemic agents was clinically indistinguishable, thereby supporting consideration of the entire spectrum of available systemic therapeutic agents, both biologic and nonbiologic agents, for management of moderate to severe psoriasis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Theoretical investigation of nerve agent DMMP adsorption onto Stone–Wales defected single-walled carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadian, Nasim; Ganji, Masoud Darvish; Laffafchy, Mozayyan

    2012-01-01

    To find a suitable sensitivity sensor for dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) as nerve agent, we studied the adsorption behavior of DMMP on the exterior surface of defected semiconducting (10,0) single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) by means of first-principles van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) calculations. The obtained results of adsorption energies reveal that the defect embedded within the (10,0) SWCNT does not promote binding capability in this system. Notably, analyzing the electronic structures and Mulliken population for the energetically most favorable complex supports that the defect changes slightly the electronic properties of SWCNT, indicating there is no considerable hybridization between the corresponding orbitals and the weak interaction obtained quantitatively in terms of binding energies. -- Highlights: ► State of the art ab initio DFT calculations on the Periodic system. ► We have considered the defected CNT for the adsorption capability. ► Full geometrical relaxation has been performed in our work. ► Electronics analysis were carried out for the structures of the considered complexes.

  12. The ALK inhibitor PF-06463922 is effective as a single agent in neuroblastoma driven by expression of ALK and MYCN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Guan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The first-in-class inhibitor of ALK, c-MET and ROS1, crizotinib (Xalkori, has shown remarkable clinical efficacy in treatment of ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer. However, in neuroblastoma, activating mutations in the ALK kinase domain are typically refractory to crizotinib treatment, highlighting the need for more potent inhibitors. The next-generation ALK inhibitor PF-06463922 is predicted to exhibit increased affinity for ALK mutants prevalent in neuroblastoma. We examined PF-06463922 activity in ALK-driven neuroblastoma models in vitro and in vivo. In vitro kinase assays and cell-based experiments examining ALK mutations of increasing potency show that PF-06463922 is an effective inhibitor of ALK with greater activity towards ALK neuroblastoma mutants. In contrast to crizotinib, single agent administration of PF-06463922 caused dramatic tumor inhibition in both subcutaneous and orthotopic xenografts as well as a mouse model of high-risk neuroblastoma driven by Th-ALKF1174L/MYCN. Taken together, our results suggest PF-06463922 is a potent inhibitor of crizotinib-resistant ALK mutations, and highlights an important new treatment option for neuroblastoma patients.

  13. Expert Statement on the Single-Agent Use of Inhaled Bronchodilator in the Treatment of Stable Mild-Moderate Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesco Miranda, Juan Antonio; Alcázar, Bernardino; Alfageme, Inmaculada; Casanova, Ciro; Celli, Bartolomé; de-Torres, Juan P; Jiménez Ruiz, Carlos A

    2017-10-01

    To describe the evidence- and experience-based expert consensus on the use of single-agent bronchodilators in patients with stable mild-moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Using Delphi methodology, a panel of 7 respiratory medicine experts was established, who, in the first nominal group meeting defined the scope, users, and document sections. The panel drew up 14 questions on the use of single-agent bronchodilators in patients with mild-moderate stable COPD to be answered with a systematic review of the literature. The results of the review were discussed in a second nominal group meeting and 17 statements were generated. Agreement/disagreement with the statements was tested among16 different experts including respiratory medicine experts and primary care physicians. Statements were scored from1 (total disagreement) to10 (total agreement). Agreement was considered if at least 70% voted ≥7. The level of evidence and grade of recommendation of the systematic literature review was assessed using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine levels. A total of 12 of the 17 statements were selected. Specific statements were generated on different profiles of patients with stable mild-moderate COPD in whom single-agent bronchodilators could be prescribed. These statements on the use of single-agent bronchodilators might improve the outcomes and prognosis of patients with stable mild-moderate COPD. Copyright © 2017 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. System for identification of microorganism and detection of infectious disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for the identification of microorganisms or infectious disorders are disclosed, comprising obtaining a suitable sample from sources such as persons, animals, plants, food, water or soil. The methods also comprise providing tailored nucleic acid substrate(s) designed to react with a type 1...... topoisomerase from one or more microorganism(s) or infectious agent(s), and incubating said substrate with said sample, or extracts or preparations from the sample, so that the substrate is processed by said topoisomerase if said microorganism(s) or infectious agent(s) is present in the sample. Finally......, processed substrates are identified and potentially quantified by one or more of a range of standard molecular biology methods and read-out systems. The identification and potential quantification of microorganisms and infectious agents, including but not limited to Plasmodium falciparum and Mycobacterium...

  15. OCCURRENCY OF MALASSEZIA PACHYDERMATIS AND OTHER INFECTIOUS AGENTS AS CAUSE OF EXTERNAL OTITIS IN DOGS FROM RIO GRANDE DO SUL STATE, BRAZIL (1996/1997 Ocorrência de Malassezia pachydermatis e de outros agentes etiológicos de otite externa em cães no estado do Rio Grande do Sul, BR (1996-1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia de Oliveira Nobre

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to evaluate the frequency of Malassezia pachydermatis infection and other infectious agents in dogs with external otitis and with healthy auditory tubes. Clinical manifestations of external otitis were evaluated. Samples from the auditory tube of 102 dogs with otitis and from 32 healthy dogs were submitted to direct microscopic examination and cultured in blood agar and Sabouraud dextrose agar with chloramphenicol and cycloheximide. Direct examination showed more than ten cells of M. pachydermatis in 52.0% of the samples from dogs with otitis, but in only 21.8% of the healthy auditory tube samples. M. pachydermatis was isolated in 37.5% of the samples from dogs with healthy auditory tube and 76.5% (p0.05. Infection by M. pachydermatis was prevalent in the following breeds: Cocker Spainel, German Shepherd and Brazilian Fila. No differences were found in frequency of the infection in relation to age, sex and ear anatomy of the dogs. Otomycosis were predominantly ceruminous and erythematous. M. pachydermatis was the most frequent agent in external otitis.Este trabalho teve como objetivos estudar a ocorrência da Malassezia pachydermatis e de outros agentes etiológicos em cães com otite externa e com conduto auditivo externo hígido; caracterizar a otomicose por M. pachydermatis. Foram analisadas 32 amostras de cães com o conduto auditivo hígido e 102 de otite externa. Todas as amostras foram submetidas ao exame direto, cultivo em ágar sangue e em ágar Sabouraud dextrose acrescido de cloranfenicol e cicloheximida. Ao exame direto 52.0% das amostras de otite apresentaram mais de dez células de M. pachydermatis. Somente 21.8% das amostras de orelhas hígidas apresentaram no exame direto células com esta morfologia (uma a dez células. M. pachydermatis foi isolada em 37.5% das amostras do conduto auditivo hígido e em 76.5% das amostras de otite (p0.05. A infecção por M. pachydermatis foi prevalente em cães da ra

  16. A phase I study of single-agent perifosine for recurrent or refractory pediatric CNS and solid tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oren J Becher

    Full Text Available The PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway is aberrantly activated in various pediatric tumors. We conducted a phase I study of the Akt inhibitor perifosine in patients with recurrent/refractory pediatric CNS and solid tumors. This was a standard 3+3 open-label dose-escalation study to assess pharmacokinetics, describe toxicities, and identify the MTD for single-agent perifosine. Five dose levels were investigated, ranging from 25 to 125 mg/m2/day for 28 days per cycle. Twenty-three patients (median age 10 years, range 4-18 years with CNS tumors (DIPG [n = 3], high-grade glioma [n = 5], medulloblastoma [n = 2], ependymoma [n = 3], neuroblastoma (n = 8, Wilms tumor (n = 1, and Ewing sarcoma (n = 1 were treated. Only one DLT occurred (grade 4 hyperuricemia at dose level 4. The most common grade 3 or 4 toxicity at least possibly related to perifosine was neutropenia (8.7%, with the remaining grade 3 or 4 toxicities (fatigue, hyperglycemia, fever, hyperuricemia, and catheter-related infection occurring in one patient each. Pharmacokinetics was dose-saturable at doses above 50 mg/m2/day with significant inter-patient variability, consistent with findings reported in adult studies. One patient with DIPG (dose level 5 and 4 of 5 patients with high-grade glioma (dose levels 2 and 3 experienced stable disease for two months. Five subjects with neuroblastoma (dose levels 1 through 4 achieved stable disease which was prolonged (≥11 months in three. No objective responses were noted. In conclusion, the use of perifosine was safe and feasible in patients with recurrent/refractory pediatric CNS and solid tumors. An MTD was not defined by the 5 dose levels investigated. Our RP2D is 50 mg/m2/day.

  17. A 12-Month-Interval Dosing Study in Adults Indicates That a Single Dose of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine Induces a Robust Neutralizing Antibody Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Anna P; Kirkpatrick, Beth D; Pierce, Kristen K; Carmolli, Marya P; Tibery, Cecilia M; Grier, Palmtama L; Hynes, Noreen; Opert, Kari; Jarvis, Adrienne P; Sabundayo, Beulah P; McElvany, Benjamin D; Sendra, Eli A; Larsson, Catherine J; Jo, Matthew; Lovchik, Janece M; Luke, Catherine J; Walsh, Mary C; Fraser, Ellen A; Subbarao, Kanta; Whitehead, Stephen S

    2016-09-15

    The ideal dengue vaccine will provide protection against all serotypes of dengue virus and will be economical and uncomplicated in its administration. To determine the ability of a single dose of the live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine TV003 to induce a suitable neutralizing antibody response, a placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed in 48 healthy adults who received 2 doses of vaccine or placebo administered 12 months apart. Evaluation of safety, vaccine viremia, and neutralizing antibody response after each dose indicated that the first dose of vaccine was capable of preventing infection with the second dose, thus indicating that multiple doses are unnecessary. NCT01782300. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  18. Does biodiversity protect humans against infectious disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chelsea L; Lafferty, Kevin D; DeLeo, Giulio; Young, Hillary S; Hudson, Peter J; Kuris, Armand M

    2014-04-01

    Control of human infectious disease has been promoted as a valuable ecosystem service arising from the conservation of biodiversity. There are two commonly discussed mechanisms by which biodiversity loss could increase rates of infectious disease in a landscape. First, loss of competitors or predators could facilitate an increase in the abundance of competent reservoir hosts. Second, biodiversity loss could disproportionately affect non-competent, or less competent reservoir hosts, which would otherwise interfere with pathogen transmission to human populations by, for example, wasting the bites of infected vectors. A negative association between biodiversity and disease risk, sometimes called the "dilution effect hypothesis," has been supported for a few disease agents, suggests an exciting win-win outcome for the environment and society, and has become a pervasive topic in the disease ecology literature. Case studies have been assembled to argue that the dilution effect is general across disease agents. Less touted are examples in which elevated biodiversity does not affect or increases infectious disease risk for pathogens of public health concern. In order to assess the likely generality of the dilution effect, we review the association between biodiversity and public health across a broad variety of human disease agents. Overall, we hypothesize that conditions for the dilution effect are unlikely to be met for most important diseases of humans. Biodiversity probably has little net effect on most human infectious diseases but, when it does have an effect, observation and basic logic suggest that biodiversity will be more likely to increase than to decrease infectious disease risk.

  19. A Single Amino Acid Difference within the α-2 Domain of Two Naturally Occurring Equine MHC Class I Molecules Alters the Recognition of Gag and Rev Epitopes by Equine Infectious Anemia Virus-Specific CTL1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mealey, Robert H.; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Leib, Steven R.; Littke, Matt H.; McGuire, Travis C.

    2012-01-01

    Although CTL are critical for control of lentiviruses, including equine infectious anemia virus, relatively little is known regarding the MHC class I molecules that present important epitopes to equine infectious anemia virus-specific CTL. The equine class I molecule 7-6 is associated with the equine leukocyte Ag (ELA)-A1 haplotype and presents the Env-RW12 and Gag-GW12 CTL epitopes. Some ELA-A1 target cells present both epitopes, whereas others are not recognized by Gag-GW12-specific CTL, suggesting that the ELA-A1 haplotype comprises functionally distinct alleles. The Rev-QW11 CTL epitope is also ELA-A1-restricted, but the molecule that presents Rev-QW11 is unknown. To determine whether functionally distinct class I molecules present ELA-A1-restricted CTL epitopes, we sequenced and expressed MHC class I genes from three ELA-A1 horses. Two horses had the 7-6 allele, which when expressed, presented Env-RW12, Gag-GW12, and Rev-QW11 to CTL. The other horse had a distinct allele, designated 141, encoding a molecule that differed from 7-6 by a single amino acid within the α-2 domain. This substitution did not affect recognition of Env-RW12, but resulted in more efficient recognition of Rev-QW11. Significantly, CTL recognition of Gag-GW12 was abrogated, despite Gag-GW12 binding to 141. Molecular modeling suggested that conformational changes in the 141/Gag-GW12 complex led to a loss of TCR recognition. These results confirmed that the ELA-A1 haplotype is comprised of functionally distinct alleles, and demonstrated for the first time that naturally occurring MHC class I molecules that vary by only a single amino acid can result in significantly different patterns of epitope recognition by lentivirus-specific CTL. PMID:17082657

  20. Bone and Gallium Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography-Computed Tomography is Equivalent to Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Diagnosis of Infectious Spondylodiscitis: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Alexander S; Abele, Jonathan T

    2017-02-01

    Spondylodiscitis has historically been a difficult clinical diagnosis. Two imaging techniques that address this problem are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and combined bone ( 99m Tc-methylene diphosphonate) and gallium-67 single-photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT). Their accuracies have not been adequately compared. The purpose of this study is to compare the sensitivities and specificities of bone and gallium SPECT-CT and MRI in infectious spondylodiscitis. This retrospective study assessed all patients who underwent a bone or gallium SPECT-CT of the spine to assess for infectious spondylodiscitis from January 1, 2010, to May 2, 2012, at a single tertiary care centre. Thirty-four patients (23 men; average 62 ± 14 years of age) were included. The results of the bone or gallium SPECT-CT were compared against MRI for all patients in the cohort who underwent an MRI within 12 weeks of the SPECT-CT. A diagnosis of spondylodiscitis in the discharge summary was considered the reference standard, and was based on a combination of clinical scenario, response to therapy, imaging, or microbiology. Spondylodiscitis was diagnosed in 18 patients and excluded in 16. Bone or gallium SPECT-CT and MRI had similar (P > .05; κ = 0.74) sensitivities (0.94 vs 0.94), specificities (1.00 vs 1.00), positive predictive values (1.00 vs 1.00), negative predictive values (0.94 vs 0.80), and accuracies (0.97 vs 0.95) when compared to the reference standard. Although MRI remains the initial modality of choice in diagnosing spondylodiscitis, bone and gallium SPECT-CT appears diagnostically equivalent and should be considered a viable supplementary or alternative imaging modality particularly if there is contraindication or inaccessibility to MRI. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The peptide motif of the single dominantly expressed class I molecule of the chicken MHC can explain the response to a molecular defined vaccine of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butter, Colin; Staines, Karen; van Hateren, Andrew; Davison, T Fred; Kaufman, Jim

    2013-08-01

    In contrast to typical mammals, the chicken MHC (the BF-BL region of the B locus) has strong genetic associations with resistance and susceptibility to infectious pathogens as well as responses to vaccines. We have shown that the chicken MHC encodes a single dominantly expressed class I molecule whose peptide-binding motifs can determine resistance to viral pathogens, such as Rous sarcoma virus and Marek's disease virus. In this report, we examine the response to a molecular defined vaccine, fp-IBD1, which consists of a fowlpox virus vector carrying the VP2 gene of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) fused with β-galactosidase. We vaccinated parental lines and two backcross families with fp-IBD1, challenged with the virulent IBDV strain F52/70, and measured damage to the bursa. We found that the MHC haplotype B15 from line 15I confers no protection, whereas B2 from line 61 and B12 from line C determine protection, although another locus from line 61 was also important. Using our peptide motifs, we found that many more peptides from VP2 were predicted to bind to the dominantly expressed class I molecule BF2*1201 than BF2*1501. Moreover, most of the peptides predicted to bind BF2*1201 did in fact bind, while none bound BF2*1501. Using peptide vaccination, we identified one B12 peptide that conferred protection to challenge, as assessed by bursal damage and viremia. Thus, we show the strong genetic association of the chicken MHC to a T cell vaccine can be explained by peptide presentation by the single dominantly expressed class I molecule.

  2. Designing a Single-Molecule Biophysics Tool for Characterising DNA Damage for Techniques that Kill Infectious Pathogens Through DNA Damage Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Helen; Wollman, Adam J M; Leake, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics such as the quinolones and fluoroquinolones kill bacterial pathogens ultimately through DNA damage. They target the essential type IIA topoisomerases in bacteria by stabilising the normally transient double-strand break state which is created to modify the supercoiling state of the DNA. Here we discuss the development of these antibiotics and their method of action. Existing methods for DNA damage visualisation, such as the comet assay and immunofluorescence imaging can often only be analysed qualitatively and this analysis is subjective. We describe a putative single-molecule fluorescence technique for quantifying DNA damage via the total fluorescence intensity of a DNA origami tile fully saturated with an intercalating dye, along with the optical requirements for how to implement these into a light microscopy imaging system capable of single-molecule millisecond timescale imaging. This system promises significant improvements in reproducibility of the quantification of DNA damage over traditional techniques.

  3. Infectious causes of cancer and their detection

    OpenAIRE

    Dalton-Griffin, Lucy; Kellam, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Molecular techniques for identifying pathogens associated with cancer continue to be developed, including one reported recently in BMC Medical Genomics. Identifying a causal infectious agent helps in understanding the biology of these cancers and can lead ultimately to the development of antimicrobial drugs and vaccines for their treatment and prevention.

  4. The role of the epoxy resin: Curing agent ratio in composite interfacial strength by single fibre microbond test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minty, Ross; Thomason, James L.; Petersen, Helga Nørgaard

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on an investigation into the role of the epoxy resin: curing agent ratio in composite interfacial shear strength of glass fibre composites. The procedure involved changing the percentage of curing agent (Triethylenetetramine [TETA]) used in the mixture with several different...... percentages used, ranging from 4% up to 30%, including the stoichiometric ratio. It was found by using the microbond test, that there may exist a relationship between the epoxy resin to curing agent ratio and the level of adhesion between the reinforcing fibre and the polymer matrix of the composite....

  5. Early Childhood Caries (ECC): an infectious transmissible oral disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poureslami, H.R.; van Amerongen, W.E.

    2009-01-01

    Dental caries in babies and toddlers is called Early Childhood Caries (ECC). It is an infectious and transmissible die-to-bacterial disease. Detailed knowledge regarding the acquisition and transmission of infectious agents facilitates a more comprehensive approach toward prevention. Mutans

  6. [Infectious diseases research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carratalà, Jordi; Alcamí, José; Cordero, Elisa; Miró, José M; Ramos, José Manuel

    2008-12-01

    There has been a significant increase in research activity into infectious diseases in Spain in the last few years. The Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) currently has ten study groups, with the cooperation of infectious diseases specialists and microbiologists from different centres, with significant research activity. The program of Redes Temáticas de Investigación Cooperativa en Salud (Special Topics Cooperative Health Research Networks) is an appropriate framework for the strategic coordination of research groups from the Spanish autonomous communities. The Spanish Network for Research in Infectious Diseases (REIPI) and the Network for Research in AIDS (RIS) integrate investigators in Infectious Diseases from multiple groups, which continuously perform important research projects. Research using different experimental models in infectious diseases, in numerous institutions, is an important activity in our country. The analysis of the recent scientific production in Infectious Diseases shows that Spain has a good position in the context of the European Union. The research activity in Infectious Diseases carried out in our country is a great opportunity for the training of specialists in this area of knowledge.

  7. Overview of Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Overview of Infectious Diseases Page Content Article Body I nfectious diseases are ... worms Last Updated 11/21/2015 Source Immunizations & Infectious Diseases: An Informed Parent's Guide (Copyright © 2006 American Academy ...

  8. A vaccinia virus recombinant transcribing an alphavirus replicon and expressing alphavirus structural proteins leads to packaging of alphavirus infectious single cycle particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana M Sánchez-Puig

    Full Text Available Poxviruses and Alphaviruses constitute two promising viral vectors that have been used extensively as expression systems, or as vehicles for vaccine purposes. Poxviruses, like vaccinia virus (VV are well-established vaccine vectors having large insertion capacity, excellent stability, and ease of administration. In turn, replicons derived from Alphaviruses like Semliki Forest virus (SFV are potent protein expression and immunization vectors but stocks are difficult to produce and maintain. In an attempt to demonstrate the use of a Poxvirus as a means for the delivery of small vaccine vectors, we have constructed and characterized VV/SFV hybrid vectors. A SFV replicon cDNA was inserted in the VV genome and placed under the control of a VV early promoter. The replicon, transcribed from the VV genome as an early transcript, was functional, and thus capable of initiating its own replication and transcription. Further, we constructed a VV recombinant additionally expressing the SFV structural proteins under the control of a vaccinia synthetic early/late promoter. Infection with this recombinant produced concurrent transcription of the replicon and expression of SFV structural proteins, and led to the generation of replicon-containing SFV particles that were released to the medium and were able to infect additional cells. This combined VV/SFV system in a single virus allows the use of VV as a SFV delivery vehicle in vivo. The combination of two vectors, and the possibility of generating in vivo single-cycle, replicon containing alphavirus particles, may open new strategies in vaccine development or in the design of oncolytic viruses.

  9. A vaccinia virus recombinant transcribing an alphavirus replicon and expressing alphavirus structural proteins leads to packaging of alphavirus infectious single cycle particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Puig, Juana M; Lorenzo, María M; Blasco, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Poxviruses and Alphaviruses constitute two promising viral vectors that have been used extensively as expression systems, or as vehicles for vaccine purposes. Poxviruses, like vaccinia virus (VV) are well-established vaccine vectors having large insertion capacity, excellent stability, and ease of administration. In turn, replicons derived from Alphaviruses like Semliki Forest virus (SFV) are potent protein expression and immunization vectors but stocks are difficult to produce and maintain. In an attempt to demonstrate the use of a Poxvirus as a means for the delivery of small vaccine vectors, we have constructed and characterized VV/SFV hybrid vectors. A SFV replicon cDNA was inserted in the VV genome and placed under the control of a VV early promoter. The replicon, transcribed from the VV genome as an early transcript, was functional, and thus capable of initiating its own replication and transcription. Further, we constructed a VV recombinant additionally expressing the SFV structural proteins under the control of a vaccinia synthetic early/late promoter. Infection with this recombinant produced concurrent transcription of the replicon and expression of SFV structural proteins, and led to the generation of replicon-containing SFV particles that were released to the medium and were able to infect additional cells. This combined VV/SFV system in a single virus allows the use of VV as a SFV delivery vehicle in vivo. The combination of two vectors, and the possibility of generating in vivo single-cycle, replicon containing alphavirus particles, may open new strategies in vaccine development or in the design of oncolytic viruses.

  10. Prognostic value and kinetics of circulating endothelial cells in patients with recurrent glioblastoma randomised to bevacizumab plus lomustine, bevacizumab single agent or lomustine single agent. A report from the Dutch Neuro-Oncology Group BELOB trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beije, N.; Kraan, J.; Taal, W.; van der Holt, B.; Oosterkamp, H. M.; Walenkamp, A. M.; Beerepoot, L.; Hanse, M.; van Linde, M. E.; Otten, A.; Vernhout, R. M.; de Vos, F. Y. F.; Gratama, J. W.; Sleijfer, S.; van den Bent, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Angiogenesis is crucial for glioblastoma growth, and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents are widely used in recurrent glioblastoma patients. The number of circulating endothelial cells (CECs) is a surrogate marker for endothelial damage. We assessed their kinetics and explored

  11. Macrolides: A Canadian Infectious Disease Society Position Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S McKenna

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of erythromycin in 1965, no new compounds from the macrolide antimicrobial class were licensed in Canada until the 1990s. Clarithromycin and azithromycin, since their introduction, have become important agents for treating a number of common and uncommon infectious diseases. They have become prime agents in the treatment of respiratory tract infections, and have revolutionized the management of both genital chlamydial infections, by the use of single-dose therapy with azithromycin, and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections, by the use of clarithromycin. The improvement of clarithromycin and azithromycin over the gastrointestinal intolerability of erythromycin has led to supplanting the use of the latter for many primary care physicians. Unfortunately, the use of these agents has also increased the likelihood for misuse and has raised concerns about a resultant increase in the rates of macrolide resistance in many important pathogens, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. This paper reviews the pharmacology and evidence for the current indications for use of these newer agents, and provides recommendations for appropriate use.

  12. Functionalized TiO2nanoparticles by single-step hydrothermal synthesis: the role of the silane coupling agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalod, Antoine R M; Henriksen, Lars; Grande, Tor; Einarsrud, Mari-Ann

    2017-01-01

    A simple, robust and versatile hydrothermal synthesis route to in situ functionalized TiO 2 nanoparticles was developed using titanium(IV) isopropoxide as Ti-precursor and selected silane coupling agents (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), 3-(2-aminoethylamino)propyldimethoxymethylsilane (AEAPS), and n -decyltriethoxysilane (DTES)). Spherical nanoparticles (ca. 9 nm) with narrow size distribution were obtained by using DTES or by synthesis performed without silane coupling agents. Rod-like nanoparticles along with 9 nm spherical nanoparticles were formed using aminosilane coupling agents because of a combination of oriented attachment of nanoparticles and specific adsorption of the aminosilane on crystallographic faces of anatase nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were functionalized in situ and became hydrophobic as silanes reacted to form covalent bonds on the surface of TiO 2 . The versatility of the aqueous synthesis route was demonstrated, and by selecting the type of silane coupling agent the surface properties of the TiO 2 nanoparticles could be tailored. This synthesis route has been further developed into a two-step synthesis to TiO 2 -SiO 2 core-shell nanoparticles. Combustion of the silane coupling agents up to 700 °C leads to the formation of a nanometric amorphous SiO 2 layer, preventing growth and phase transition of the in situ functionalized nanoparticles.

  13. Global biogeography of human infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Kris A; Preston, Nicholas; Allen, Toph; Zambrana-Torrelio, Carlos; Hosseini, Parviez R; Daszak, Peter

    2015-10-13

    The distributions of most infectious agents causing disease in humans are poorly resolved or unknown. However, poorly known and unknown agents contribute to the global burden of disease and will underlie many future disease risks. Existing patterns of infectious disease co-occurrence could thus play a critical role in resolving or anticipating current and future disease threats. We analyzed the global occurrence patterns of 187 human infectious diseases across 225 countries and seven epidemiological classes (human-specific, zoonotic, vector-borne, non-vector-borne, bacterial, viral, and parasitic) to show that human infectious diseases exhibit distinct spatial grouping patterns at a global scale. We demonstrate, using outbreaks of Ebola virus as a test case, that this spatial structuring provides an untapped source of prior information that could be used to tighten the focus of a range of health-related research and management activities at early stages or in data-poor settings, including disease surveillance, outbreak responses, or optimizing pathogen discovery. In examining the correlates of these spatial patterns, among a range of geographic, epidemiological, environmental, and social factors, mammalian biodiversity was the strongest predictor of infectious disease co-occurrence overall and for six of the seven disease classes examined, giving rise to a striking congruence between global pathogeographic and "Wallacean" zoogeographic patterns. This clear biogeographic signal suggests that infectious disease assemblages remain fundamentally constrained in their distributions by ecological barriers to dispersal or establishment, despite the homogenizing forces of globalization. Pathogeography thus provides an overarching context in which other factors promoting infectious disease emergence and spread are set.

  14. Review of Infectious Disease Report in Great Britain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.D. Sorokhan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with an analysis of infectious disease report in Great Britain that is a member of the European Union. There are listed the infectious diseases and infectious agents of these diseases. There are described in detail how to fill the notification form and the methods and terms of sending it to Public Health England. Attention is focused on the importance of the analysis of infectious disease report in the European Union in the light of cooperation between Ukraine and the EU after the economic component of the Association Agreement has been signed.

  15. Infectious particles, stress, and induced prion amyloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Transmissible encephalopathies (TSEs) are believed by many to arise by spontaneous conversion of host prion protein (PrP) into an infectious amyloid (PrP-res, PrPSc) without nucleic acid. Many TSE agents reside in the environment, with infection controlled by public health measures. These include the disappearance of kuru with the cessation of ritual cannibalism, the dramatic reduction of epidemic bovine encephalopathy (BSE) by removal of contaminated feed, and the lack of endemic scrapie in geographically isolated Australian sheep with susceptible PrP genotypes. While prion protein modeling has engendered an intense focus on common types of protein misfolding and amyloid formation in diverse organisms and diseases, the biological characteristics of infectious TSE agents, and their recognition by the host as foreign entities, raises several fundamental new directions for fruitful investigation such as: (1) unrecognized microbial agents in the environmental metagenome that may cause latent neurodegenerative disease, (2) the evolutionary social and protective functions of different amyloid proteins in diverse organisms from bacteria to mammals, and (3) amyloid formation as a beneficial innate immune response to stress (infectious and non-infectious). This innate process however, once initiated, can become unstoppable in accelerated neuronal aging. PMID:23633671

  16. Producing infectious enterovirus type 71 in a rapid strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin E-De

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is an etiologic agent of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD, and recent HFMD epidemics worldwide have been associated with a severe form of brainstem encephalitis associated with pulmonary edema and high case-fatality rates. EV71 contains a positive-sense single-stranded genome RNA of approximately 7400 bp in length which encodes a polyprotein with a single open reading frame (ORF, which is flanked by untranslated regions at both the 5' and 3' ends. Results A long distance RT-PCR assay was developed to amplify the full length genome cDNA of EV71 by using specific primes carrying a SP6 promoter. Then the in vitro synthesized RNA transcripts from the RT-PCR amplicons were then transfected into RD cells to produce the rescued virus. The rescued virus was further characterized by RT-PCR and indirect fluorescent-antibody (IFA assay in comparison with the wild type virus. The rescued viruses were infectious on RD cells and neurovirulent when intracerebrally injected into suckling mice. Conclusions Thus, we established a rapid method to produce the infectious full length cDNA of EV71 directly from RNA preparations and specific mutations can be easily engineered into the rescued enterovirus genome by this method.

  17. Producing infectious enterovirus type 71 in a rapid strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-Feng; Cao, Rui-Yuan; Tian, Xue; Yu, Man; Qin, E-De; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2010-06-04

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is an etiologic agent of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD), and recent HFMD epidemics worldwide have been associated with a severe form of brainstem encephalitis associated with pulmonary edema and high case-fatality rates. EV71 contains a positive-sense single-stranded genome RNA of approximately 7400 bp in length which encodes a polyprotein with a single open reading frame (ORF), which is flanked by untranslated regions at both the 5' and 3' ends. A long distance RT-PCR assay was developed to amplify the full length genome cDNA of EV71 by using specific primes carrying a SP6 promoter. Then the in vitro synthesized RNA transcripts from the RT-PCR amplicons were then transfected into RD cells to produce the rescued virus. The rescued virus was further characterized by RT-PCR and indirect fluorescent-antibody (IFA) assay in comparison with the wild type virus. The rescued viruses were infectious on RD cells and neurovirulent when intracerebrally injected into suckling mice. Thus, we established a rapid method to produce the infectious full length cDNA of EV71 directly from RNA preparations and specific mutations can be easily engineered into the rescued enterovirus genome by this method.

  18. GENETICS OF SUSCEPTIBILITY TO INFECTIOUS DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Suspitsin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic characteristics of host organism may cause susceptibility to a variety of bacteria, viruses and fungi, as well as influence the course of infectious diseases. Multiple studies indicate the existence of alleles predisposing to infections. Furthermore, there are about 300 nosological entities of primary immunodeficiencies (PID, i.e., inherited defects of immunity. Timely diagnosis of such conditions is quite challenging; however, it is vital for improving quality of patient care. Modern methods of DNA analysis allow establishing genetic causes of vulnerability to certain infectious agents in many individuals

  19. Infectious keratitis after keratoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Jose R; Mian, Shahzad I

    2016-07-01

    Infectious keratitis is an uncommon but serious complication after corneal transplantation that threatens the visual potential of corneal grafts. Several large retrospective studies from sites worldwide have documented the experiences of corneal surgeons with this sight-threatening complication. The present review synthesizes and compares incidence rates, risk factors, common microorganisms, treatments, and visual prognoses of patients with postkeratoplasty infectious keratitis. In 2012, endothelial keratoplasty replaced penetrating keratoplasty as the most commonly performed corneal transplantation procedure in the United States. Although reported rates of infectious keratitis after endothelial keratoplasty appear to be less than after penetrating keratoplasty, there are still too few publications documenting infectious keratitis after endothelial keratoplasty or anterior lamellar keratoplasty to adequately assess outcomes. Infectious keratitis continues to be a serious complication among all types of keratoplasty, threatening the viability of the grafted tissues and visual outcomes of patients. Reports from various sites worldwide indicate differences in incidence rates and common infecting microorganisms between high- and middle-income countries. Most reports agree that suture-related problems and factors contributing to a suboptimal ocular surface are the primary risk factors for developing infectious keratitis. In general, patients with infectious keratitis following keratoplasty have a poor visual prognosis because of the difficulty of successful treatment without residual scarring.

  20. Global Dynamics of Infectious Disease with Arbitrary Distributed Infectious Period on Complex Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoguang Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the current epidemic models assume that the infectious period follows an exponential distribution. However, due to individual heterogeneity and epidemic diversity, these models fail to describe the distribution of infectious periods precisely. We establish a SIS epidemic model with multistaged progression of infectious periods on complex networks, which can be used to characterize arbitrary distributions of infectious periods of the individuals. By using mathematical analysis, the basic reproduction number R0 for the model is derived. We verify that the R0 depends on the average distributions of infection periods for different types of infective individuals, which extend the general theory obtained from the single infectious period epidemic models. It is proved that if R0<1, then the disease-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable; otherwise the unique endemic equilibrium exists such that it is globally asymptotically attractive. Finally numerical simulations hold for the validity of our theoretical results is given.

  1. Defining the risk of toxicity in phase I oncology trials of novel molecularly targeted agents: A single-center experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fehrmann, Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    Background: Phase I oncology trials are designed to define the maximum tolerated dose and toxicity of new drugs. This study aims to define the risk of toxicity in phase I trials of novel molecularly targeted agents (MTA), as this therapeutic approach is becoming increasingly relevant. Methods: We

  2. Defining the risk of toxicity in phase I oncology trials of novel molecularly targeted agents : a single centre experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molife, L R; Alam, S; Olmos, D; Puglisi, M; Shah, K; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Trani, L; Tjokrowidjaja, A; de Bono, J S; Banerji, U; Kaye, S B

    BACKGROUND: This study defined the risk of serious toxicity in phase I trials of molecularly targeted agents (MTA). PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis of toxicity data from patients treated in phase I trials of MTAs was carried out to define the rate of treatment-related grade 3/4 toxic

  3. A meta-analysis of combination therapy versus single-agent therapy in anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated metastatic breast cancer: results from nine randomized Phase III trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu L

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Liang Xu,1,2,* Xiaobo Wu,3,* Chun Hu,1,2 Zhiying Zhang,4 Le Zhang,1,2 Shujing Liang,1,2 Yingchun Xu,5 Fengchun Zhang1,2 1Department of Oncology, Suzhou Kowloon Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Suzhou, 2Department of Oncology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 3Prevention and Cure Center of Breast Disease, Third Hospital of Nanchang, Nanchang, 4Graduate School, Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, 5Department of Oncology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Nowadays, the philosophy of treating metastatic breast cancer (MBC is slowly evolving. Especially for the anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated MBC patients, no standard therapy exists in this setting. Whether to choose doublet agents or single agent as salvage treatment remains fiercely debated. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to resolve this problem. Databases including PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library were searched for Phase III randomized clinical trials (published before August 2015 comparing the efficacy and adverse effects between the combination therapy and single-agent therapy in anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated MBC patients. The primary end point was the overall survival (OS, and the secondary end points were the progression-free survival (PFS, overall response rate (ORR, and grade 3 or 4 toxicities. The pooled hazard ratio (HR and pooled risk ratio (RR were used to evaluate the efficacy. Analyses were also performed to estimate the side effects and safety of both groups. In all, nine eligible randomized clinical trials were included in this meta-analysis. Improvements were proven in the doublet agents group on OS (HR 0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84–0.96, P=0.002, PFS (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.76–0.88, P<0.001, and ORR (RR 1.72, 95% CI 1.34–2.21, P<0.001. Notably, subgroup analysis

  4. Non-Infectious Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Vaccine Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Non-Infectious Meningitis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On This Page Causes and How it Spreads Signs and Symptoms Causes ...

  5. Comparison of perinatal outcomes between long-term and short-term use of tocolytic agent: a historical cohort study in a single perinatal hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Masamitsu; Hasegawa, Junichi; Arakaki, Tatsuya; Hamada, Shoko; Takita, Hiroko; Oba, Tomohiro; Koide, Keiko; Matsuoka, Ryu; Sekizawa, Akihiko

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of long-term use of tocolytic agents to prevent preterm delivery and improve perinatal outcome. A historical cohort study was performed in a single perinatal center. The maternal characteristics, frequency of preterm labor and prescribed dose of tocolytic agents were compared before and after changing the management protocol for threatened premature delivery. A total of 1548 deliveries were carried out before changing the protocol for the use of tocolytic agents for threatened premature delivery and 1444 deliveries afterwards. There was no significant difference in the maternal characteristics before and after the revision except for maternal age. The total number of ritodrine hydrochloride ampules used was reduced from 4654 to 514, and the total vials of magnesium sulfate used were reduced from 1574 to 193, but perinatal outcomes, such as rate of preterm birth, neonatal weight, and rate of NICU hospitalization were not different between the groups. There was no significant change in the frequency of preterm delivery before and after changing of the protocol for threatened premature delivery. Because a decrease in the given dose of tocolytic agents did not affect the timing of delivery and neonatal outcomes, long-term tocolysis in patients with threatened premature delivery should be restricted to prevent maternal and fetal adverse side-effects. © 2016 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  6. Nedaplatin as a Single-Agent Chemotherapy May Support Palliative Therapy for Patients with Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Hirakawa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC is a rare form of adenocarcinoma, which is a broad term describing any cancer that begins in the glandular tissues. It can be found in the head and neck. We report a patient with recurrent ACC arising from the submandibular gland, treated with 100 mg/m2 nedaplatin every 4 weeks. Although our patient’s lactate dehydrogenase levels, which is produced by ACC, showed a rising trend throughout the treatment, the level decreased for approximately 2 weeks immediately after administration of nedaplatin every 4 weeks. Thus, there is a possibility that the agent may be effective. Complications such as anorexia and nausea were observed, but they were tolerated and manageable. Nedaplatin may be considered as a supportive agent during palliative therapy for patients with ACC. More clinical trials regarding nedaplatin are necessary, as this study may indicate that a medical approach works well for ACC.

  7. Clinical features and outcomes of plasma cell leukemia: a single-institution experience in the era of novel agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampaolo Talamo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell leukemia (PCL is a rare hematologic malignancy with aggressive clinical and biologic features. Data regarding its prognosis with the use of the novel agents, i.e., the immunomodulatory drugs thalidomide and lenalidomide, and the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, are limited. We retrospectively reviewed clinical outcomes, response to therapy, and survival of 17 patients seen at the Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute since the availability of novel agents (2006-2011. Twelve patients had primary PCL (pPCL, and 5 second- ary PCL (sPCL. PCL was associated with aggressive clinicobiological features, such as high-risk cytogenetics, elevated serum beta-2-microglobulin and lactate dehydrogenase, International Staging System stage III, and rapid relapse after therapy. With the use of thalidomide, lenalidomide, and bortezomib in 53%, 53%, and 88% patients, respectively, median overall survival (OS was 18 months in the whole group (95% confidence interval, 11-21 months, and 21 and 4 months in pPCL and sPCL, respectively (P=0.015. OS was inferior to that of 313 consecutive patients with multiple myeloma (MM treated in the same period, even when compared with a subset of 47 MM with high-risk cytogenetics. Although our data are limited by the small sample size, we conclude that novel agents may modestly improve survival in patients with PCL, when compared to historical controls. Novel therapies do not seem to overcome the negative prognosis of PCL as compared with MM.

  8. Infectious Discitis and Spondylodiscitis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principi, Nicola; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-04-09

    In children, infectious discitis (D) and infectious spondylodiscitis (SD) are rare diseases that can cause significant clinical problems, including spinal deformities and segmental instabilities. Moreover, when the infection spreads into the spinal channel, D and SD can cause devastating neurologic complications. Early diagnosis and treatment may reduce these risks. The main aim of this paper is to discuss recent concepts regarding the epidemiology, microbiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric D and SD. It is highlighted that particular attention must be paid to the identification of the causative infectious agent and its sensitivity to antibiotics, remembering that traditional culture frequently leads to negative results and modern molecular methods can significantly increase the detection rate. Several different bacterial pathogens can cause D and SD, and, in some cases, particularly those due to Staphylococcus aureus, Kingella kingae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Brucella spp., the appropriate choice of drug is critical to achieve cure.

  9. Emerging and Neglected Infectious Diseases: Insights, Advances, and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Israel Nii-Trebi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases are a significant burden on public health and economic stability of societies all over the world. They have for centuries been among the leading causes of death and disability and presented growing challenges to health security and human progress. The threat posed by infectious diseases is further deepened by the continued emergence of new, unrecognized, and old infectious disease epidemics of global impact. Over the past three and half decades at least 30 new infectious agents affecting humans have emerged, most of which are zoonotic and their origins have been shown to correlate significantly with socioeconomic, environmental, and ecological factors. As these factors continue to increase, putting people in increased contact with the disease causing pathogens, there is concern that infectious diseases may continue to present a formidable challenge. Constant awareness and pursuance of effective strategies for controlling infectious diseases and disease emergence thus remain crucial. This review presents current updates on emerging and neglected infectious diseases and highlights the scope, dynamics, and advances in infectious disease management with particular focus on WHO top priority emerging infectious diseases (EIDs and neglected tropical infectious diseases.

  10. Metastatic Extramammary Paget’s Disease of Scrotum Responds Completely to Single Agent Trastuzumab in a Hemodialysis Patient: Case Report, Molecular Profiling and Brief Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Barth

    2015-01-01

    metastatic the prognosis of EMPD is poor and treatment options are limited. We report a case of a complete response to single agent trastuzumab in a hemodialysis patient with metastatic Her2/neu overexpressed EMPD of the scrotum. Molecular profiling of his case as well as 12 other EMPD and 8 mammary Paget disease (MPD cases was completed and revealed multiple biomarker aberrations. Overexpression of Her2 was frequently noted (30%–40% in both EMPD and MPD patients and when present can be effectively treated with Her2 targeted agents. Trastuzumab therapy can be safely utilized in a hemodialysis patient. In addition, multiple protein overexpression and loss were seen in EMPD including PD-1, PD-L1, PTEN, and AR as well as PIK3CA mutation. These findings may lead to possible therapeutic interventions targeting these pathways in a disease with few effective treatment options.

  11. Clinical evaluation of 209 all-ceramic single crowns cemented on natural and implant-supported abutments with different luting agents: a 6-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Roberto; Galasso, Luigi; Tetè, Stefano; De Simone, Giorgio; Zarone, Fernando

    2012-04-01

    The Procera AllCeram™ system (Nobel Biocare AB, Göteborg, Sweden) is a valid alternative to metal-ceramic restorations. However, limited long-term data of its use for single crowns on natural and implant-supported abutments are available. The present study aimed at evaluating the clinical performances of Procera AllCeram single crowns in both anterior and posterior regions of the oral cavity either on natural tooth or implant abutments over a period of 6 years. Two hundred nine single crowns were fabricated and used in 112 patients. Zinc phosphate and resin luting agents were used to cement the restorations. The crowns were evaluated according to the California Dental Association's quality assessment system. Three crowns were lost at follow-up. Of the 206 restorations, which completed the 6-year follow-up, 9 crowns were affected by mechanical complications and 7 crowns failed. All surviving crowns were ranked as either excellent or acceptable. Cumulative survival and success rates of 95.2 and 90.9%, respectively, were recorded. Within the limitations of the present study, Procera AllCeram crowns proved to be a reliable clinical option to restore both anterior and posterior missing teeth either on natural or implant abutments. The resin cement used in the present study performed better than the zinc phosphate luting agent. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Optical imaging for monitoring tumor oxygenation response after initiation of single-agent bevacizumab followed by cytotoxic chemotherapy in breast cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeto Ueda

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Optical imaging techniques for measuring tissue hemoglobin concentration have been recently accepted as a way to assess tumor vascularity and oxygenation. We investigated the correlation between early optical response to single-agent bevacizumab and treatment outcome. METHODS: Seven patients with advanced or metastatic breast cancer were treated with single-agent bevacizumab followed by addition of weekly paclitaxel. Optical imaging of patient's breasts was performed to measure tumor total hemoglobin concentration (tHb and oxygen saturation (stO2 at baseline and on days 1, 3, 6, 8, and 13 after the first infusion of bevacizumab. To assess early metabolic response, 2-deoxy-2-(18F-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT, 18F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO-PET/CT, and magnetic resonance imaging were performed at baseline and after two cycles of the regimen. RESULTS: Seven patients were grouped as responders (n = 4 and nonresponders (n = 3 on the basis of metabolic response measured by FDG-PET/CT. The responders showed remarkable tumor shrinkage and low accumulations of FMISO tracer relative to those of the nonresponders at the completion of two cycles of chemotherapy. Tumors of both groups showed remarkable attenuation of mean tHb as early as day 1 after therapy initiation. The nonresponders had lower baseline stO2 levels compared with adjacent breast tissue stO2 levels along with a pattern of steadily low stO2 levels during the observation window. On the other hand, the responders appeared to sustain high stO2 levels with temporal fluctuation. CONCLUSIONS: Low tumor stO2 level after single-agent bevacizumab treatment was characteristic of the nonresponders. Tumor stO2 level could be a predictor of an additional benefit of bevacizumab over that provided by paclitaxel.

  13. Second-line single-agent chemotherapy in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative metastatic breast cancer: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, Fabio; Rea, Daniel; Kroes, Michel A; Pronzato, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    No 'gold standard' exists for single-agent chemotherapy of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HER2-negative) metastatic breast cancer (MBC) in the second-line. The objective of this systematic review is to identify and appraise overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), time to progression (TTP) and Grade ≥3 adverse event evidence for single-agent chemotherapy in this setting. MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched to October 2013, and PubMed October 2013 to November 2014. Electronic database searches were supplemented with hand searching of reference lists and conferences. Eligible randomised controlled trials (RCTs) employed at least one single-agent chemotherapy treatment, enrolled HER2-negative or unselected MBC patients who had progressed following first-line chemotherapy within the metastatic setting, and reported outcomes of interest for the second-line setting. Fifty-three RCTs were included in total, with most containing mixed populations by HER2 status and treatment line. Fourteen studies reported data specifically for second- and later-line treatment within the metastatic setting. Median overall survival (OS) in most trials was 8-13 months. Only one trial reported a significant difference between studied interventions in the second-line metastatic setting: nab-paclitaxel (n=131) conferred a statistically significant OS advantage vs. three-weekly paclitaxel (n=136) (median OS 13.0 vs. 10.7 months, respectively; hazard ratio 0.73, p=0.024) and improved overall safety. One RCT demonstrated significant benefit in this setting in confirmed HER2-negative MBC alongside favourable safety. Treatment line terminology was imprecise. To reliably inform patient treatment decisions, quality-of-life data are needed and precise OS estimation according to underlying patient characteristics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Causes of infectious abortion in the Mediterranean buffalo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Galiero

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria and viruses can cause abortion in buffaloes. This review describes the abortigenic infectious agents found in Mediterranean buffalo cows and the microbiological methods used for their diagnosis. The abortigenic agents are: Brucella spp., Arcanobacterium pyogenes, Chlamydophila spp., Coxiella burnetii, Bacillus licheniformis, E.coli, Leptospira spp., Bubaline Herpes Virus-1 (BuHV-1, Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus.

  15. A Single Case of Rosai-Dorfman Disease Marked by Pathologic Fractures, Kidney Failure, and Liver Cirrhosis Treated with Single-Agent Cladribine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji eSasaki

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD is a proliferative histiocytic disorder of unknown etiology which is characterized by sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy. In most cases, RDD has a benign course and treatment is not necessary. However, severe cases of RDD require treatment, and the treatment strategy is determined on the basis of the severity of the disease or the extranodal involvement of vital organs. We report a single case of RDD with atypical presentation of persistent constitutional symptoms, progressing pathologic fractures, and end-organ dysfunction, including acute kidney failure and liver cirrhosis with esophageal varices.

  16. Forecasting Infectious Disease Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaman, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic models of infectious disease systems abound and are used to study the epidemiological characteristics of disease outbreaks, the ecological mechanisms affecting transmission, and the suitability of various control and intervention strategies. The dynamics of disease transmission are non-linear and consequently difficult to forecast. Here, we describe combined model-inference frameworks developed for the prediction of infectious diseases. We show that accurate and reliable predictions of seasonal influenza outbreaks can be made using a mathematical model representing population-level influenza transmission dynamics that has been recursively optimized using ensemble data assimilation techniques and real-time estimates of influenza incidence. Operational real-time forecasts of influenza and other infectious diseases have been and are currently being generated.

  17. Infectious Chronic Rhinosinusitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Sumit; Grammer, Leslie C.; Peters, Anju T.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a persistent inflammatory disease that affects a multitude of people worldwide. The pathogenesis of CRS involves many factors including genetics, status of the sinonasal microbiome, infections and environmental influences. Comorbidities associated with CRS include asthma, allergic rhinitis, bronchiectasis and certain kinds of immunodeficiency. CRS can be divided into different subtypes based on endotypes and phenotypes. Infectious CRS is one such category. The etiology of infectious CRS is usually secondary to chronic bacterial infection which commonly begins with a viral upper respiratory tract infection. Humoral antibody deficiencies can underlie difficult-to-treat or recurrent CRS. Infectious CRS can be treated with antimicrobials, topical or oral corticosteroids and nasal saline irrigations. Patients with CRS and humoral immunodeficiency may require an aggressive treatment approach including immunoglobulin replacement therapy. Despite advancements in the field of CRS, targeted therapies and reliable biomarkers are still lacking. PMID:27393772

  18. Recent trends: Medical management of infectious keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sneha Solanki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This review article highlights the newer diagnostic modalities and approaches in the medical management of infectious keratitis. A Medline literature search conducted to March 2014 has been included. Recent studies or publications were selected from international indexed journals using suitable key words. Development of specular microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR has a promising role as diagnostic modalities in infectious keratitis, especially in refractory cases. Previously fortified antibiotics have been the mainstay of treatment for bacterial keratitis. Recently, the advent of fourth-generation fluoroquinolones monotherapy has shown promising results in the management of bacterial keratitis. Corneal collagen cross-linking is being considered in the refractory cases. Topical natamycin and amphotericin B should be considered as the first choice anti-fungal agents in suspected filamentous or yeast infection respectively. Voriconazole and newer routes of administration such as intrastromal and intracameral injection of conventional anti-fungal agents have demonstrated a positive clinical response. Ganciclovir is a newer anti-viral agent with promising results in herpes simplex keratitis. Thus, introduction of newer diagnostic modalities and collagen cross-linking along with fourth-generation fluoroquinolones and newer azoles have a promising role in the management of infectious keratitis.

  19. Study of preparation of radioiodinated allyl diprenorphine as an single photon emission computed tomographic imaging agent for mapping opioid receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xiaokun; Wang Rongfu; Zhang Chunli

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To prepare and evaluate radioiodinated allyl diprenorphine (DPN) as a new opioid receptor imaging agent for SPECT study. Methods: 7α-O-stannyl-DPN was obtained from DPN by acetylated it to protect the phenolic 3-OH group of DPN and then introduced the vinylstannane into the tertiary alcohol of the 7α-side chain. [ 125 I]-7α-O-iodoallyl diprenorphine (7α-O-IA-DPN) was prepared by radioiododestannylation under acidic condition using iodobead as an oxidant reagent, and in vitro and in vivo opioid receptor binding assays, metabolism were performed with Kunming mouse brains. Study of distribution in the Wistar rat's brain and naloxone inhibition was carried out. The data were analyzed by statistical method. Results: The radiochemical yields of I-125-7α-O-IA-DPN were more than 90%. In TLC, Rf of 7α-O-IA-DPN and I-125-7α-O-IA-DPN was 0.83 and 0.93, respectively. In ambient temperature the radiochemical purity of I-125-7α-O-IA-DPN in rats showed higher in anterior and posterior colliculi, striatum and hippocampus. It was low in frontal lobe, temporal lobe and brain stem and was low in cerebellum and the other parts of the brain. Among the clearance from the structures in brain, it was fastest in cerebellum. At 20 min when the uptake reached to the peak, the ratio of anterior and posterior colliculi, striatum and hippocampus to the cerebellum was 4.36, 3.7 and 3.12, respectively. There were significant differences between the inhibition experimental group using the naloxone and control. Conclusions: I-125-7α-O-IA-DPN appears to be a potential opioid receptor imaging agent for SPECT study. (authors)

  20. Single-dose safety and pharmacokinetic evaluation of fluorocoxib A: pilot study of novel cyclooxygenase-2-targeted optical imaging agent in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekanova, Maria; Uddin, Md Jashim; Legendre, Alfred M; Galyon, Gina; Bartges, Joseph W; Callens, Amanda; Martin-Jimenez, Tomas; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2012-11-01

    We evaluated preclinical single-dose safety, pharmacokinetic properties, and specific uptake of the new optical imaging agent fluorocoxib A in dogs. Fluorocoxib A, N-[(5-carboxy-X-rhodaminyl)but-4-yl]-2-[1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl]acetamide, selectively binds and inhibits the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme, which is overexpressed in many cancers. Safety pilot studies were performed in research dogs following intravenous (i.v.) administration of 0.1 and 1  mg/kg fluorocoxib A. Blood and urine samples collected three days after administration of each dose of fluorocoxib A revealed no evidence of toxicity, and no clinically relevant adverse events were noted on physical examination of exposed dogs over that time period. Pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed in additional research dogs from plasma collected at several time points after i.v. administration of fluorocoxib A using high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. The pharmacokinetic studies using 1  mg/kg showed a peak of fluorocoxib A (92±28  ng/ml) in plasma collected at 0.5 h. Tumor specific uptake of fluorocoxib A was demonstrated using a dog diagnosed with colorectal cancer expressing COX-2. Our data support the safe single-dose administration and in vivo efficacy of fluorocoxib A, suggesting a high potential for successful translation to clinical use as an imaging agent for improved tumor detection in humans.

  1. Infectious waste feed system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulthard, E. James

    1994-01-01

    An infectious waste feed system for comminuting infectious waste and feeding the comminuted waste to a combustor automatically without the need for human intervention. The system includes a receptacle for accepting waste materials. Preferably, the receptacle includes a first and second compartment and a means for sealing the first and second compartments from the atmosphere. A shredder is disposed to comminute waste materials accepted in the receptacle to a predetermined size. A trough is disposed to receive the comminuted waste materials from the shredder. A feeding means is disposed within the trough and is movable in a first and second direction for feeding the comminuted waste materials to a combustor.

  2. Genetically engineered T cells bearing chimeric nanoconstructed receptors harboring TAG-72-specific camelid single domain antibodies as targeting agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharifzadeh, Zahra; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad A

    2013-01-01

    Despite the preclinical success of adoptive therapy with T cells bearing chimeric nanoconstructed antigen receptors (CARs), certain limitations of this therapeutic approach such as the immunogenicity of the antigen binding domain, the emergence of tumor cell escape variants and the blocking...... expressing tumor cells, the combination of CD3ζ, OX40, CD28 as well as the CH3-CH2-hinge-hinge domains most efficiently triggered T cell activation. Importantly, CAR mediated functions were not blocked by the soluble TAG-72 antigen at a supraphysiological concentration. Our approach may have the potential...... capacity of soluble antigen still remain. Here, we address these issues using a novel CAR binding moiety based on the oligoclonal camelid single domain antibodies. A unique set of 13 single domain antibodies were selected from an immunized camel phage library based on their target specificity and binding...

  3. [Infectious burdens of reproduction of female dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, K; Stellmacher, H

    1996-02-01

    The results of gynecological investigations in 142 bitches were evaluated and the complexity of infectious affections is discussed. High proportions of infectious cases were found in cases of limitation of fertility (67.5%), in vaginal discharge in the estrus (60.8%), in cases of mastitis/pseudopregnancy (61.5%) and in mortality of newborn puppies. St. aureus and E. coli were often isolated. There is a high etiological correlation in epidemiology of diseases of the reproductive tract in the single bitch and especially in kennel bitches.

  4. Dynamics of infectious diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rock, Kat; Brand, Sam; Moir, Jo; Keeling, Matt J

    2014-01-01

    Modern infectious disease epidemiology has a strong history of using mathematics both for prediction and to gain a deeper understanding. However the study of infectious diseases is a highly interdisciplinary subject requiring insights from multiple disciplines, in particular a biological knowledge of the pathogen, a statistical description of the available data and a mathematical framework for prediction. Here we begin with the basic building blocks of infectious disease epidemiology—the SIS and SIR type models—before considering the progress that has been made over the recent decades and the challenges that lie ahead. Throughout we focus on the understanding that can be developed from relatively simple models, although accurate prediction will inevitably require far greater complexity beyond the scope of this review. In particular, we focus on three critical aspects of infectious disease models that we feel fundamentally shape their dynamics: heterogeneously structured populations, stochasticity and spatial structure. Throughout we relate the mathematical models and their results to a variety of real-world problems. (review article)

  5. Infectious uveitis in Virginia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engelhard SB

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie B Engelhard,1 Zeina Haddad,1 Asima Bajwa,1 James Patrie,2 Wenjun Xin,2 Ashvini K Reddy1 1Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA Purpose: To report the causes, clinical features, and outcomes of infectious uveitis in patients managed in a mid-Atlantic tertiary care center.Methods: Retrospective, observational study of infectious uveitis patients seen at the University of Virginia from 1984 to 2014.Results: Seventy-seven of 491 patients (15.7% were diagnosed with infectious uveitis (mean age 58 years, 71.4% female, 76.6% Caucasian. The mean follow-up was 5 years. Anterior uveitis was the most common anatomic classification (39 patients, 50.6% followed by panuveitis (20 patients, 26.0% and posterior uveitis (18 patients, 23.4%. The most common infectious etiology was herpetic anterior uveitis (37 patients, 48.1% followed by toxoplasma uveitis (14 patients, 18.2%. The most prevalent viral pathogen was varicella-zoster virus (21 patients, 27.3% followed by herpes simplex virus (20 patients, 26.0%. Acute retinal necrosis (ARN was diagnosed in 14 patients (18.2%. Aqueous humor yielded an etiologic diagnosis in seven (50% of ARN patients, four of whom tested positive for cytomegalovirus and three for varicella-zoster virus. On presentation, 43 patients (55.8% had a visual acuity (VA better than 20/40 and 17 (22.1% had a VA worse than 20/200. VA at the final follow-up was better than 20/40 in 39 patients (50.6% and worse than 20/200 in 22 patients (28.6%. In all, 16 (20.8% and 10 (13.0% patients required cataract and vitrectomy surgery, respectively. A total of 14 patients (18.2% were on glaucoma topical treatment and four (5.2% required glaucoma surgery.Conclusion: The most common type of infectious uveitis seen over the study period was herpetic anterior uveitis secondary to varicella-zoster virus or herpes simplex virus, found to be most prevalent in patients

  6. Imaging methods for detection of infectious foci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couret, I.; Rossi, M.; Weinemann, P.; Moretti, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    Several tracers can be used for imaging infection. None is a worthwhile agent for all infectious foci, but each one has preferential applications, depending on its uptake mechanism by the infectious and/or inflammatory focus. Autologous leucocytes labeled in vitro with indium-111 (In-111) or with technetium-99-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (Tc-99m HMPAO) were applied with success in the detection of peripheral bone infection, focal vascular graft infection and inflammatory bowel disease. Labeling with In-111 is of interest in chronic bone infection, while labeling with Tc-99m HMPAO gets the advantage of a better dosimetry and imaging. The interest of in vivo labeled leucocytes with a Tc-99m labeled monoclonal antigranulocyte antibody anti-NCA 95 (BW 250/183) was proved in the same principal type of infectious foci than in vitro labeled leucocytes. Sites of chronic infection in the spine and the pelvis, whether active or healed, appear as photopenic defects on both in vitro labeled leucocytes and Tc-99m monoclonal antigranulocyte antibody (BW 250/183) scintigraphies. With gallium-67 results showed a high sensitivity with a low specificity. This tracer demonstrated good performance to delineate foci of infectious spondylitis. In-111 and Tc-99m labeled polyclonal human immunoglobulin (HIG) was applied with success in the assessment of various infectious foci, particularly in chronic sepsis. As labeled leucocytes, labeled HIG showed cold defects in infectious sepsis of the spine. Research in nuclear medicine is very active in the development of more specific tracers of infection, mainly involved in Tc-99m or In-111 labeled chemotactic peptides, antigranulocyte antibody fragments, antibiotic derivatives and interleukins. (authors). 70 refs

  7. Effectiveness of a new non-hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent after single use - a double-blind placebo-controlled short-term study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhgan Bizhang

    Full Text Available Abstract Tooth whitening represents perhaps the most common aesthetic procedure in dentistry worldwide. The efficacy of bleaching depends on three aspects: bleaching agent, bleaching method, and tooth color. Objective: This in vivo study aimed to examine whitening effects on frontal teeth of the upper and lower jaws using an over-the-counter (OTC non-hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent in comparison to a placebo after one single use. Material and methods: Forty subjects (25 female; 15 male participated in this double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial. The subjects were randomly allocated to two groups (n=20. The test group received the OTC product (iWhite Instant and the placebo group received an identically composed product except for the active agents. Each subject was treated with a prefilled tray containing iWhite Instant or the placebo for 20 minutes. The tooth shade of the front teeth (upper and lower jaws was assessed before (E_0, immediately after (E_1 and 24 h after treatment (E_2, using a shade guide (VITA classical. Statistical testing was accomplished using the Mann-Whitney U test (p<0.001. The dropout rate was 0%. Results: There were no significant differences at E_0 between placebo and test groups regarding the tooth color. Differences in tooth color changes immediately after (ΔE1_0 and 24 h after treatment (ΔE2_0 were calculated for both groups. The mean values (standard deviations of tooth color changes for ΔE1_0 were 2.26 (0.92 in the test group and 0.01 (0.21 in the placebo group. The color changes for ΔE2_0 showed mean values of 2.15 (1.10 in the test group and 0.07 (0.35 in the placebo group. For ΔE1_0 and ΔE2_0 significant differences were found between the groups. Conclusion: In this short-term study, the results showed that a non-hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent has significant whitening effects immediately and 24 h after a single-use treatment.

  8. Biodistribution and dosimetry of 195mPt-cisplatin in normal volunteers. Imaging agent for single photon emission computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathekge, M; Wagener, J; Smith, S V; Soni, N; Marjanovic-Painter, B; Zinn, C; Van de Wiele, C; D'Asseler, Y; Perkins, G; Zeevaart, J R

    2013-12-13

    195mPt-cisplatin is regarded as a promising imaging agent for optimizing dosage in patients receiving cisplatin chemotherapy. We investigated the whole-body distribution and radiation dosimetry of 195mPt-cisplatin in humans. Whole-body scans were obtained up to 144 h after intravenous injection of 112.4 MBq 195mPt-cisplatin in each of five subjects. Blood samples were taken at various times up to 144 h after injection. Urine was collected up to 114 h after injection for calculation of renal clearance and whole-body clearance. Time/activity curves were generated by fitting the organ-specific geometric mean counts, obtained from regions of interest, on the respective images as a function of the time after injection. OLINDA software package was applied to calculate the absorbed radiation dose for various organs. Most of the activity (32 ± 4%) was excreted in the urine during the first 5 h. The effective clearance half-life derived from extrapolation of the whole-body curve was 40 hours (1.7 days). On average, the highest dose was received by the kidneys (mean dose received 2.68 ± 1.5 mGy/MBq), followed by the spleen (mean dose received 1.6 ± 0.8 mGy/MBq) followed by the liver (mean dose received 1.45 ± 0.38 mGy/MBq). The estimated mean effective dose for the adult subject was 0.185 ± 0.034 mSv/MBq. 195mPt-cisplatin proved a safe radiopharmaceutical with a favourable biodistribution for early and delayed imaging of pathology above the diaphragm. The ED obtained was 0.185 ± 0.034 mSv/MBq. The highest organ dose was received by the kidneys (2.68 ± 1.5 mGy/MBq).

  9. Reproductive Outcomes After Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasia. A Comparison Between Single-Agent and Multiagent Chemotherapy: Retrospective Analysis From the MITO-9 Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioffi, Raffaella; Bergamini, Alice; Gadducci, Angiolo; Cormio, Gennaro; Giorgione, Veronica; Petrone, Micaela; Rabaiotti, Emanuela; Pella, Francesca; Candiani, Massimo; Mangili, Giorgia

    2018-02-01

    Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia affects women of reproductive age and is usually treated by chemotherapy. Major concerns related to chemotherapy in young women are the possible infertility, risk of early menopause, and teratogenic effects on subsequent pregnancies. The study's aim was to analyze menstrual and reproductive outcomes of women treated with single-agent versus multiagent chemotherapy for gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. One-hundred fifty-one patients were treated. Seventy-six patients older than 45 years, with a placental site or epithelioid trophoblastic tumor, undergoing hysterectomy for patient choice, or undergoing human chorionic gonadotropin follow-up at the time of the analysis were excluded. Seventy-five patients were divided into subgroups according to International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics score: patients scoring less than 7, receiving single-agent chemotherapy (group A, n = 42); patients scoring 7 or greater, receiving combination treatment (group B, n = 33). Patients' outcomes were compared by univariate and multivariate analyses. Temporary amenorrhea occurred in 33% of group A patients and 66.7% of group B (P = 0.01). Premature menopause occurred in 3 patients in group B (0% vs 9%, P = 0.02). Ten patients in group B underwent salvage hysterectomy. Pregnancy desire did not differ between the 2 groups (P = 0.555). In group A, 57.1% became pregnant; in group B, 36.4% did (P = 0.060). Instead, pregnancy rate was 52.2% among high-risk patients not undergoing hysterectomy (57.1% vs 52.2%, P = 0.449). There was no difference in miscarriage (P = 0.479) and premature birth (P = 0.615) rates. In a multivariate analysis that included age, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics score, chemotherapy type, use of assisted reproductive technologies, previous pregnancies, and pregnancy desire, only age (P = 0.006) and pregnancy desire (P = 0.002) had a significant impact on the probability to have subsequent pregnancies

  10. Isolating the Roles of Different Forcing Agents in Global Stratospheric Temperature Changes Using Model Integrations with Incrementally Added Single Forcings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquila, V.; Swartz, W. H.; Waugh, D. W.; Colarco, P. R.; Pawson, S.; Polvani, L. M.; Stolarski, R. S.

    2016-01-01

    Satellite instruments show a cooling of global stratospheric temperatures over the whole data record (1979-2014). This cooling is not linear and includes two descending steps in the early 1980s and mid-1990s. The 1979-1995 period is characterized by increasing concentrations of ozone depleting substances (ODS) and by the two major volcanic eruptions of El Chichon (1982) and Mount Pinatubo (1991). The 1995-present period is characterized by decreasing ODS concentrations and by the absence of major volcanic eruptions. Greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations increase over the whole time period. In order to isolate the roles of different forcing agents in the global stratospheric temperature changes, we performed a set of AMIP-style simulations using the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model (GEOSCCM). We find that in our model simulations the cooling of the stratosphere from 1979 to present is mostly driven by changes in GHG concentrations in the middle and upper stratosphere and by GHG and ODS changes in the lower stratosphere. While the cooling trend caused by increasing GHGs is roughly constant over the satellite era, changing ODS concentrations cause a significant stratospheric cooling only up to the mid-1990s, when they start to decrease because of the implementation of the Montreal Protocol. Sporadic volcanic events and the solar cycle have a distinct signature in the time series of stratospheric temperature anomalies but do not play a statistically significant role in the long-term trends from 1979 to 2014. Several factors combine to produce the step-like behavior in the stratospheric temperatures: in the lower stratosphere, the flattening starting in the mid-1990s is due to the decrease in ozone-depleting substances; Mount Pinatubo and the solar cycle cause the abrupt steps through the aerosol-associated warming and the volcanically induced ozone depletion. In the middle and upper stratosphere, changes in solar irradiance are largely

  11. Detection of a nerve agent simulant using single-walled carbon nanotube networks: dimethyl-methyl-phosphonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeonju; Lee, Seunghyun; Choi, Hyang Hee; Noh, Jin-Seo; Lee, Wooyoung

    2010-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks were used to detect hazardous dimethyl-methyl-phosphonate (DMMP) gas in real time, employing two different metals as electrodes. Random networks of SWNTs were simply obtained by drop-casting a SWNT-containing solution onto a surface-oxidized Si substrate. Although the electrical responses to DMMP at room temperature were reversible for both metals, the Pd-contacting SWNT network sensors exhibited a higher response and a shorter response time than those of the Au-contacting SWNT network sensors at the same DMMP concentration, due to the stronger interactions between the SWNTs and Pd surface atoms. In Pd-contacting SWNT network sensors, the response increased linearly with increasing DMMP concentration and reproducible response curves were obtained for DMMP levels as low as 1 ppm. These results indicate that SWNT networks in contact with Pd electrodes can function as good DMMP sensors at room temperature with scalable and fast response and excellent recovery.

  12. Sensitive simultaneous detection of seven sexually transmitted agents in semen by multiplex-PCR and of HPV by single PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrícia Gimenes

    Full Text Available Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs may impair sperm parameters and functions thereby promoting male infertility. To date limited molecular studies were conducted to evaluate the frequency and type of such infections in semen Thus, we aimed at conceiving and validating a multiplex PCR (M-PCR assay for the simultaneous detection of the following STD pathogens in semen: Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis, Herpes virus simplex (HSV -1 and -2, and Treponema pallidum; We also investigated the potential usefulness of this M-PCR assay in screening programs for semen pathogens. In addition, we aimed: to detect human Papillomavirus (HPV and genotypes by single PCR (sPCR in the same semen samples; to determine the prevalence of the seven STDs, HPV and co-infections; to assess the possibility that these infections affect semen parameters and thus fertility. The overall validation parameters of M-PCR were extremely high including agreement (99.2%, sensitivity (100.00%, specificity (99.70%, positive (96.40% and negative predictive values (100.00% and accuracy (99.80%. The prevalence of STDs was very high (55.3%. Furthermore, associations were observed between STDs and changes in semen parameters, highlighting the importance of STD detection in semen. Thus, this M-PCR assay has great potential for application in semen screening programs for pathogens in infertility and STD clinics and in sperm banks.

  13. Detection of a nerve agent simulant using single-walled carbon nanotube networks: dimethyl-methyl-phosphonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeonju; Lee, Seunghyun; Choi, Hyang Hee; Noh, Jin-Seo; Lee, Wooyoung

    2010-12-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks were used to detect hazardous dimethyl-methyl-phosphonate (DMMP) gas in real time, employing two different metals as electrodes. Random networks of SWNTs were simply obtained by drop-casting a SWNT-containing solution onto a surface-oxidized Si substrate. Although the electrical responses to DMMP at room temperature were reversible for both metals, the Pd-contacting SWNT network sensors exhibited a higher response and a shorter response time than those of the Au-contacting SWNT network sensors at the same DMMP concentration, due to the stronger interactions between the SWNTs and Pd surface atoms. In Pd-contacting SWNT network sensors, the response increased linearly with increasing DMMP concentration and reproducible response curves were obtained for DMMP levels as low as 1 ppm. These results indicate that SWNT networks in contact with Pd electrodes can function as good DMMP sensors at room temperature with scalable and fast response and excellent recovery.

  14. Determination of residual 1,4-dioxane in surfactants and cleaning agents using headspace single-drop microextraction followed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraji, M; Shirvani, N

    2017-02-01

    Polyethoxylated surfactants are widely used in the formulation of different cleaning agents such as shampoo, dish washing and hand washing products and lotion formulation. During the production of polyethoxylated surfactants, 1,4-dioxane as a toxic and carcinogenic by-product is formed. A simple low-cost method based on headspace single-drop microextraction combined with gas chromatography-flame ionization detection was developed for the determination of 1,4-dioxane in surfactants and cleaning agents. In this method, 1,4-dioxane was extracted from 8.0 mL sample solution into a microdrop of an organic solvent, and then, it was injected to gas chromatography. The effects of such parameters as the solvent type, salt addition, microdrop volume, stirring rate, equilibrium time, extraction time and the temperature of sample solution on the extraction performance were studied and optimized. An ethoxylated surfactant containing 1,4-dioxane was used as the sample for the optimization of the extraction parameters. The linear range, determination coefficient, limit of detection and relative standard deviation of the method were 0.5-100 μg g -1 , 0.9977, 0.4 μg g -1 and 7.2% (n = 5), respectively. Different real samples including sodium lauryl ether sulphate, sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), four brands of shampoo, and hand washing and dish washing liquids were analysed by the method. 1,4-Dioxane was detected at the concentration range of 2.4-201 μg g -1 in the samples, except dish washing liquid and SLS. A new method with the merits of simplicity, low cost, low organic solvent consumption, short analysis time, good repeatability and suitable detection limit was developed for the analysis of 1,4-dioxane in surfactants and cleaning agents. © 2016 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  15. Single-Step Fabrication of Gd2O3@SiO2 Nanoparticles for use as MRI Contrast Agents by Pulsed Laser Ablation in Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ning-Qi; Huang, Zhan-Yun; Li, Li; Shao, Yuan-Zhi; Chen, Di-Hu

    2013-03-01

    Gd2O3@SiO2 nanoparticles with a core-shell structure are synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) in single steps. A Gd2O3 target immersed in tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) is ablated by a microsecond Nd:YAG laser, which induces the generation of a Gd2O3 plasma plume and pyrolysis of the TEOS. We propose that the moment Gd2O3 nanoparticles are formed they will be coated immediately by SiO2 and directly synthesized Gd2O3@SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles. These particles obtain high r1 relaxivity of 5.26s-1mM-1 and are used as T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents. It is shown that the PLAL technique is promising for fabricating core-shell structure nanomaterial with potential medical applications.

  16. Early relapse after single auto-SCT for multiple myeloma is a major predictor of survival in the era of novel agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Zepeda, V H; Reece, D E; Trudel, S; Chen, C; Tiedemann, R; Kukreti, V

    2015-02-01

    The role of auto-SCT in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) in the era of novel agents continues to evolve. It is now clear that the depth of response and clinical outcomes have significantly improved as a result of the combination of these strategies. However, not all patients with MM who undergo auto-SCT are able to sustain a meaningful response and 20% of patients relapse shortly after auto-SCT. In this study, we aimed to assess the impact of early relapse (ER) after auto-SCT on OS for MM patients undergoing single auto-SCT who had received novel agent-based induction regimens. All consecutive patients with MM undergoing single auto-SCT from January 2002 to September 2012 who had novel induction therapy were evaluated. A total of 184 patients were identified. The median OS and PFS for the group of transplanted patients were 93 and 25.4 months, respectively. Median time to relapse was 17.2 months with 40% having relapsed at the time of analysis. ER (SCT) was seen in 27 (36%) out of 75 patients who had relapsed, and median OS was significantly shorter than in those with non-ER. Multivariate analysis showed ER as the major independent prognostic factor for OS. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that not only attainment of a good response, but sustainability of it, appears to be a major prognostic variable in MM in the era of novel therapy. Patients with ER post auto-SCT should biologically be characterized in prospective studies to better understand the mechanisms of resistance associated with this particular entity.

  17. PQR309 Is a Novel Dual PI3K/mTOR Inhibitor with Preclinical Antitumor Activity in Lymphomas as a Single Agent and in Combination Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantelli, Chiara; Gaudio, Eugenio; Arribas, Alberto J; Kwee, Ivo; Hillmann, Petra; Rinaldi, Andrea; Cascione, Luciano; Spriano, Filippo; Bernasconi, Elena; Guidetti, Francesca; Carrassa, Laura; Pittau, Roberta Bordone; Beaufils, Florent; Ritschard, Reto; Rageot, Denise; Sele, Alexander; Dossena, Barbara; Rossi, Francesca Maria; Zucchetto, Antonella; Taborelli, Monica; Gattei, Valter; Rossi, Davide; Stathis, Anastasios; Stussi, Georg; Broggini, Massimo; Wymann, Matthias P; Wicki, Andreas; Zucca, Emanuele; Cmiljanovic, Vladimir; Fabbro, Doriano; Bertoni, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Activation of the PI3K/mTOR signaling pathway is recurrent in different lymphoma types, and pharmacologic inhibition of the PI3K/mTOR pathway has shown activity in lymphoma patients. Here, we extensively characterized the in vitro and in vivo activity and the mechanism of action of PQR309 (bimiralisib), a novel oral selective dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor under clinical evaluation, in preclinical lymphoma models. Experimental Design: This study included preclinical in vitro activity screening on a large panel of cell lines, both as single agent and in combination, validation experiments on in vivo models and primary cells, proteomics and gene-expression profiling, and comparison with other signaling inhibitors. Results: PQR309 had in vitro antilymphoma activity as single agent and in combination with venetoclax, panobinostat, ibrutinib, lenalidomide, ARV-825, marizomib, and rituximab. Sensitivity to PQR309 was associated with specific baseline gene-expression features, such as high expression of transcripts coding for the BCR pathway. Combining proteomics and RNA profiling, we identified the different contribution of PQR309-induced protein phosphorylation and gene expression changes to the drug mechanism of action. Gene-expression signatures induced by PQR309 and by other signaling inhibitors largely overlapped. PQR309 showed activity in cells with primary or secondary resistance to idelalisib. Conclusions: On the basis of these results, PQR309 appeared as a novel and promising compound that is worth developing in the lymphoma setting. Clin Cancer Res; 24(1); 120-9. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. African horse sickness virus (AHSV) with a deletion of 77 amino acids in NS3/NS3a protein is not virulent and a safe promising AHS Disabled Infectious Single Animal (DISA) vaccine platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijn, Piet A; Maris-Veldhuis, Mieke A; Potgieter, Christiaan A; van Gennip, René G P

    2018-04-05

    African horse sickness virus (AHSV) is a virus species in the genus Orbivirus of the family Reoviridae. Currently, nine serotypes have been defined showing limited cross neutralization. AHSV is transmitted by species of Culicoides biting midges and causes African Horse Sickness (AHS) in equids with a mortality up to 95% in naïve domestic horses. AHS has become a serious threat for countries outside Africa, since endemic Culicoides species in moderate climates are competent vectors of closely related bluetongue virus. AHS outbreaks cause huge economic losses in developing countries. In the developed world, outbreaks will result in losses in the equestrian industry and will have an enormous emotional impact on owners of pet horses. Live-attenuated vaccine viruses (LAVs) have been developed, however, safety of these LAVs are questionable due to residual virulence, reversion to virulence, and risk on virulent variants by reassortment between LAVs or with field AHSV. Research aims vaccines with improved profiles. Reverse genetics has recently being developed for AHSV and has opened endless possibilities including development of AHS vaccine candidates, such as Disabled Infectious Single Animal (DISA) vaccine. Here, virulent AHSV5 was recovered and its high virulence was confirmed by experimental infection of ponies. 'Synthetically derived' virulent AHSV5 with an in-frame deletion of 77 amino acids codons in genome segment 10 encoding NS3/NS3a protein resulted in similar in vitro characteristics as published NS3/NS3a knockout mutants of LAV strain AHSV4LP. In contrast to its highly virulent ancestor virus, this deletion AHSV5 mutant (DISA5) was completely safe for ponies. Two vaccinations with DISA5 as well as two vaccinations with DISA vaccine based on LAV strain AHSV4LP showed protection against lethal homologous AHSV. More research is needed to further improve efficacy, to explore the AHS DISA vaccine platform for all nine serotypes, and to study the vaccine profile

  19. Effect of PVP as a capping agent in single reaction synthesis of nanocomposite soft/hard ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, H.A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, UPM, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Saiden, N.M., E-mail: nlaily@upm.edu.my [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, UPM, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Saion, E.; Azis, R.S.; Mamat, M.S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, UPM, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Hashim, M. [Advanced Material and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Institute of Advanced Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, UPM, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2017-04-15

    Nanocomposite magnets consist of soft and hard ferrite phases are known as an exchange spring magnet when they are sufficiently spin exchange coupled. Hard and soft ferrites offer high value of coercivity, H{sub c} and saturation magnetization, M{sub s} respectively. In order to obtain a better permanent magnet, both soft and hard ferrite phases need to be “exchange coupled”. The nanoparticles were prepared by a simple one-pot technique of 80% soft phase and 20% hard phase. This technique involves a single reaction mixture of metal nitrates and aqueous solution of varied amounts of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The heat treatment applied was at 800 °C for 3 h. The synthesized composites were characterized by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), Fourier Transform Infra-red (FT-IR), Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The coexistence of two phases, Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} were observed by XRD patterns. It also verified by the EDX that no impurities detected. The magnetic properties of nanocomposite ferrites for 0.06 g/ml PVP gives a better properties of H{sub c} 932 G and M{sub s} 39.0 emu/g with average particle size obtained from FESEM was 49.2 nm. The concentration of PVP used gives effect on the magnetic properties of the samples. - Highlights: • Amount of PVP play important roles in controlling the particle size distribution and magnetic properties. • This is a novel technique to produce nanocomposite ferrites effectively. • This study contributes better understanding on magnetic properties in nanoparticle composite magnets.

  20. Efficacy and safety of topical depigmenting agent in healthy human fair skin female volunteers: A single-arm study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Saurabh; Chew, Soon-Keong

    2017-11-28

    Skin hyperpigmentation is the darkening of skin due to the increased production of melanin in the body. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a botanical-based Rosa E pigmentation serum in healthy fair skin female volunteers with wrinkles, skin tone, and pigmentation. This was a single-arm, open label study conducted in healthy Indian females; 18 subjects aged 30-55, having fair Caucasian-like skin with at least 2 dark skin pigments with facial wrinkles diagnosed by dermatologist were selected. Rosa E pigmentation serum was applied twice a day for 84 days. Effect was evaluated by (i) instrumental technique (spectrophotometer ® 2600D), (ii) clinically by dermatologist regarding product efficacy (skin tone, antiwrinkle, pigmentation), and (iii) volunteers self-evaluation. The L* value of spectrophotometer reading represents lightness in the skin pigment. Reduction in the pigment was reported from day 14, with significant reductions observed till day 84 compared with baseline. Significant (P < .0001) skin pigmentation lightening was seen on day 14 (1.11) vastly improving on day 84 (1.94) based on photographic assessments. The significant reduction in skin pigment was 76.85%, Felix von Luschan skin color score was 30.24% (P < .0001) with a 7.38-fold reduction in skin tone and 57% reduction in facial wrinkles at day 84 from baseline. Rosa E pigmentation serum was found safe and effective in significant reduction in skin pigments, improvement of skin tone, and antiwrinkle properties instrumentally, clinically, and self-evaluation by volunteers. In these evaluations, best results were seen the longer the Rosa E was used. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Acute Infectious Disease,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-23

    intracelLular proteins such as metallothionine, hemosiderin , and ferritin.3 𔃻 6𔃼 1𔃽 5 A large variety of proteins must be produced during infection for...acute infections.50 On the other hand, iron is sequestered through its incorporation into hemosiderin .6,7,16 and ferritin in various tissue storage... hemosiderin and ferritin during infectious or inflammatory states. Concomitantly, plas1a ir. • - concentrations decline, sometimes to almost nondectable

  2. 3D pulmonary perfusion MRI and MR angiography of pulmonary embolism in pigs after a single injection of a blood pool MR contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, Christian; Ley, Sebastian; Puderbach, Michael; Plathow, Christian; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [Department of Radiology, Innovative Cancer Diagnostic and Therapy, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120, Heidelberg (Germany); Bock, Michael [Department of Medical Physics in Radiology, Innovative Cancer Diagnostic and Therapy, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of contrast-enhanced 3D perfusion MRI and MR angiography (MRA) of pulmonary embolism (PE) in pigs using a single injection of the blood pool contrast Gadomer. PE was induced in five domestic pigs by injection of autologous blood thrombi. Contrast-enhanced first-pass 3D perfusion MRI (TE/TR/FA: 1.0 ms/2.2 ms/40 ; voxel size: 1.3 x 2.5 x 4.0 mm{sup 3}; TA: 1.8 s per data set) and high-resolution 3D MRA (TE/TR/FA: 1.4 ms/3.4 ms/40 ; voxel size: 0.8 x 1.0 x 1.6 mm{sup 3}) was performed during and after a single injection of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight of Gadomer. Image data were compared to pre-embolism Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI and post-embolism thin-section multislice CT (n=2). SNR measurements were performed in the pulmonary arteries and lung. One animal died after induction of PE. In all other animals, perfusion MRI and MRA could be acquired after a single injection of Gadomer. At perfusion MRI, PE could be detected by typical wedge-shaped perfusion defects. While the visualization of central PE at MRA correlated well with the CT, peripheral PE were only visualized by CT. Gadomer achieved a higher peak SNR of the lungs compared to Gd-DTPA (21{+-}8 vs. 13{+-}3). Contrast-enhanced 3D perfusion MRI and MRA of PE can be combined using a single injection of the blood pool contrast agent Gadomer. (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of a Phylogenetic Marker Based on Genomic Segment B of Infectious Bursal Disease Virus: Facilitating a Feasible Incorporation of this Segment to the Molecular Epidemiology Studies for this Viral Agent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulahi Alfonso-Morales

    Full Text Available Infectious bursal disease (IBD is a highly contagious and acute viral disease, which has caused high mortality rates in birds and considerable economic losses in different parts of the world for more than two decades and it still represents a considerable threat to poultry. The current study was designed to rigorously measure the reliability of a phylogenetic marker included into segment B. This marker can facilitate molecular epidemiology studies, incorporating this segment of the viral genome, to better explain the links between emergence, spreading and maintenance of the very virulent IBD virus (vvIBDV strains worldwide.Sequences of the segment B gene from IBDV strains isolated from diverse geographic locations were obtained from the GenBank Database; Cuban sequences were obtained in the current work. A phylogenetic marker named B-marker was assessed by different phylogenetic principles such as saturation of substitution, phylogenetic noise and high consistency. This last parameter is based on the ability of B-marker to reconstruct the same topology as the complete segment B of the viral genome. From the results obtained from B-marker, demographic history for both main lineages of IBDV regarding segment B was performed by Bayesian skyline plot analysis. Phylogenetic analysis for both segments of IBDV genome was also performed, revealing the presence of a natural reassortant strain with segment A from vvIBDV strains and segment B from non-vvIBDV strains within Cuban IBDV population.This study contributes to a better understanding of the emergence of vvIBDV strains, describing molecular epidemiology of IBDV using the state-of-the-art methodology concerning phylogenetic reconstruction. This study also revealed the presence of a novel natural reassorted strain as possible manifest of change in the genetic structure and stability of the vvIBDV strains. Therefore, it highlights the need to obtain information about both genome segments of IBDV for

  4. Pasteurella multocida infectious arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnuolo, P J

    1978-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida, a small gram-negative rod, is a domestic animal saprophyte that occasionally causes disease in humans. Infectious arthritis may develop from a superficial animal bite or scratch. Nine previous cases of infectious arthritis due to this organism have been documented in the literature, and a tenth case is reported here. Most patients had recent animal exposure, and half the patients had underlying chronic rheumatoid arthritis. Clinical signs of inflammation were consistently present; however, systemic infection was infrequent. The lack of positive synovial fluid gram-stain smears may make differentiation from other forms of infectious arthritis difficult. Penicillin in moderate doses is effective therapy, with osteomyelitis developing in only two patients. The tendency for this syndrome to affect patients with rheumatoid arthritis may reflect deficient local defense mechanisms, chronic steroid therapy, or increased ownership of pets. The mechanism of spread of infection to the joint space appears to be through contiguous spread from a skin site rather than by the hematogenous route in most cases.

  5. Microwave pyrolysis using self-generated pyrolysis gas as activating agent: An innovative single-step approach to convert waste palm shell into activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yek, Peter Nai Yuh; Keey Liew, Rock; Shahril Osman, Mohammad; Chung Wong, Chee; Lam, Su Shiung

    2017-11-01

    Waste palm shell (WPS) is a biomass residue largely available from palm oil industries. An innovative microwave pyrolysis method was developed to produce biochar from WPS while the pyrolysis gas generated as another product is simultaneously used as activating agent to transform the biochar into waste palm shell activated carbon (WPSAC), thus allowing carbonization and activation to be performed simultaneously in a single-step approach. The pyrolysis method was investigated over a range of process temperature and feedstock amount with emphasis on the yield and composition of the WPSAC obtained. The WPSAC was tested as dye adsorbent in removing methylene blue. This pyrolysis approach provided a fast heating rate (37.5°/min) and short process time (20 min) in transforming WPS into WPSAC, recording a product yield of 40 wt%. The WPSAC was detected with high BET surface area (≥ 1200 m2/g), low ash content (recording high adsorption efficiency of 440 mg of dye/g. The desirable process features (fast heating rate, short process time) and the recovery of WPSAC suggest the exceptional promise of the single-step microwave pyrolysis approach to produce high-grade WPSAC from WPS.

  6. CISH and susceptibility to infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, Chiea C; Vannberg, Fredrik O; Chapman, Stephen J; Guo, Haiyan; Wong, Sunny H; Walley, Andrew J; Vukcevic, Damjan; Rautanen, Anna; Mills, Tara C; Chang, Kwok-Chiu; Kam, Kai-Man; Crampin, Amelia C; Ngwira, Bagrey; Leung, Chi-Chiu; Tam, Cheuk-Ming; Chan, Chiu-Yeung; Sung, Joseph J Y; Yew, Wing-Wai; Toh, Kai-Yee; Tay, Stacey K H; Kwiatkowski, Dominic; Lienhardt, Christian; Hien, Tran-Tinh; Day, Nicholas P; Peshu, Nobert; Marsh, Kevin; Maitland, Kathryn; Scott, J Anthony; Williams, Thomas N; Berkley, James A; Floyd, Sian; Tang, Nelson L S; Fine, Paul E M; Goh, Denise L M; Hill, Adrian V S

    2010-06-03

    The interleukin-2-mediated immune response is critical for host defense against infectious pathogens. Cytokine-inducible SRC homology 2 (SH2) domain protein (CISH), a suppressor of cytokine signaling, controls interleukin-2 signaling. Using a case-control design, we tested for an association between CISH polymorphisms and susceptibility to major infectious diseases (bacteremia, tuberculosis, and severe malaria) in blood samples from 8402 persons in Gambia, Hong Kong, Kenya, Malawi, and Vietnam. We had previously tested 20 other immune-related genes in one or more of these sample collections. We observed associations between variant alleles of multiple CISH polymorphisms and increased susceptibility to each infectious disease in each of the study populations. When all five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (at positions -639, -292, -163, +1320, and +3415 [all relative to CISH]) within the CISH-associated locus were considered together in a multiple-SNP score, we found an association between CISH genetic variants and susceptibility to bacteremia, malaria, and tuberculosis (P=3.8x10(-11) for all comparisons), with -292 accounting for most of the association signal (P=4.58x10(-7)). Peripheral-blood mononuclear cells obtained from adult subjects carrying the -292 variant, as compared with wild-type cells, showed a muted response to the stimulation of interleukin-2 production--that is, 25 to 40% less CISH expression. Variants of CISH are associated with susceptibility to diseases caused by diverse infectious pathogens, suggesting that negative regulators of cytokine signaling have a role in immunity against various infectious diseases. The overall risk of one of these infectious diseases was increased by at least 18% among persons carrying the variant CISH alleles. 2010 Massachusetts Medical Society

  7. [Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, A; Meier, H P; Straub, R; Gerber, V

    2009-04-01

    Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) is a reportable, eradicable epizootic disease caused by the equine lentivirus of the retrovirus family which affects equids only and occurs worldwide. The virus is transmitted by blood, mainly by sanguivorous insects. The main symptoms of the disease are pyrexia, apathy, loss of body condition and weight, anemia, edema and petechia. However, infected horses can also be inapparent carriers without any overt signs. The disease is diagnosed by serological tests like the Coggins test and ELISA tests. Presently, Switzerland is offi cially free from EIA. However, Switzerland is permanently at risk of introducing the virus as cases of EIA have recently been reported in different European countries.

  8. [Keratitis - Infectious or Autoimmune?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messmer, E M

    2016-07-01

    Histopathological evaluation of ocular tissues is important in differentiating between infectious and autoimmune disease. Inflammation, necrosis and keratolysis are common to most forms of keratitis. Histopathology can be of great help in identifying the causative organism, establishing a final diagnosis and/or managing the patient with herpes simplex virus keratitis, mycotic keratitis, acanthamoeba keratitis or microsporidia keratoconjunctivitis. Important pathogenetic knowledge with therapeutic relevance has been gained from histopathological studies in nummular keratitis after epidemic keratoconjunctivitis and atopic keratoconjunctivitis. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Globalization and infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenk, Julio; Gómez-Dantés, Octavio; Knaul, Felicia M

    2011-09-01

    This article discusses the nature of the health challenges created by globalization and proposes new forms of international cooperation to confront them. The discussion of global health challenges includes both the transfer of health risks, with an emphasis on infectious diseases, and the international dissemination of health opportunities, including the transfer of knowledge and technology. The authors argue that the health-related challenges and opportunities of an increasingly interdependent world demand new forms of international cooperation. The authors suggest the promotion of 3 elements that, in their essence, contain the idea of collaboration: exchange, evidence, and empathy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Infectious abdominal emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porcel, A.; Arrive, L.; Mehdi, M.; Monnier-Cholley, L.; Ayadi, K.; Tubiana, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Infectious disease is a common cause of acute abdomen. The diagnosis is based on clinical examination and basic laboratory tests. However, medical imaging routinely performed according to the clinical findings is frequently useful. Hepatic and splenic abscesses are correctly demonstrated by ultrasonography and computed tomography. Ultrasonography is the reference standard for the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis. The US examination is also performed for the diagnosis of appendicitis and its complications. Ultrasonography and barium enema are commonly performed for the evaluation of sigmoid diverticulitis. Computed tomography is the reference standard to determine medical or surgical procedures. (authors). 20 refs., 15 figs

  11. Current outlook of infectious diseases in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, M

    1998-06-01

    The "emerging" infectious diseases have received global attention. Taiwan is a country which is going through the process of becoming "developed" from being "developing". If we compare five leading causes of death in 1952 and in 1993, three were infectious diseases in 1952 and there was none in 1993. And yet today, infectious diseases remain a major problem in this country as well in every country in the world, whether developing or developed. Some of the problems Taiwan faces are old problems with old faces. They have never been adequately solved because the societal and environmental sanitary infrastructure does not ensure proper sewage disposal, safe potable water and freedom from dangerous vectors. Examples are the diarrheal diseases, parasitic diseases, scrub typhus and Japanese encephalitis. Some of the Taiwan's problems are caused by old agents which present a new face. Mortality from tuberculosis took a dramatic and gratifying plunge in the last fifty years. Yet tuberculosis is ever present and a constant public health threat. Dengue has become a problem again because of a world breakdown in the control of the mosquito, Aedes egypti, and it is partly contributed to by increased urbanization and world travel. The problem of antibiotic resistant bacteria causing hospital acquired and community acquired infections is probably the most serious "new" problem. The most important cause is excessive and indiscriminate use of antibiotics in the community and in hospitals. We propose the establishment of "Bacterial Infections Reference Laboratory" at the National Health Research Institutes to be a national facility to study the epidemiology and control of antibiotic resistance. All infectious diseases require a rigorous system of surveillance, and precise etiological diagnosis before they can be treated or prevented. This should be kept clearly in mind when one considers the changing role of the infectious disease physician in Taiwan in the face of unsolved disease

  12. Anti-CD20 single chain variable antibody fragment-apolipoprotein A-I chimera containing nanodisks promote targeted bioactive agent delivery to CD20-positive lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Natasha M; Ghosh, Mistuni; Su, Betty; Beckstead, Jennifer A; Kamei, Ayako; Simonsen, Jens B; Luo, Bing; Gordon, Leo I; Forte, Trudy M; Ryan, Robert O

    2015-08-01

    A fusion protein comprising an α-CD20 single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody, a spacer peptide, and human apolipoprotein (apo) A-I was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. The lipid interaction properties intrinsic to apoA-I as well as the antigen recognition properties of the scFv were retained by the chimera. scFv•apoA-I was formulated into nanoscale reconstituted high-density lipoprotein particles (termed nanodisks; ND) and incubated with cultured cells. α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND bound to CD20-positive non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) cells (Ramos and Granta) but not to CD20-negative T lymphocytes (i.e., Jurkat). Binding to NHL cells was partially inhibited by pre-incubation with rituximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against CD20. Confocal fluorescence microscopy analysis of Granta cells following incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND formulated with the intrinsically fluorescent hydrophobic polyphenol, curcumin, revealed α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I localizes to the cell surface, while curcumin off-loads and gains entry to the cell. Compared to control incubations, viability of cultured NHL cells was decreased upon incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND harboring curcumin. Thus, formulation of curcumin ND with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I as the scaffold component confers cell targeting and enhanced bioactive agent delivery, providing a strategy to minimize toxicity associated with chemotherapeutic agents.

  13. [Globalization and infectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirski, Tomasz; Bartoszcze, Michał; Bielawska-Drózd, Agata

    2011-01-01

    Globalization is a phenomenon characteristic of present times. It can be considered in various aspects: economic, environmental changes, demographic changes, as well as the development of new technologies. All these aspects of globalization have a definite influence on the emergence and spread of infectious diseases. Economic aspects ofglobalization are mainly the trade development, including food trade, which has an impact on the spread of food-borne diseases. The environmental changes caused by intensive development of industry, as a result of globalization, which in turn affects human health. The demographic changes are mainly people migration between countries and rural and urban areas, which essentially favors the global spread of many infectious diseases. While technological advances prevents the spread of infections, for example through better access to information, it may also increase the risk, for example through to create opportunities to travel into more world regions, including the endemic regions for various diseases. The phenomenon ofglobalization is also closely associated with the threat of terrorism, including bioterrorism. It forces the governments of many countries to develop effective programs to protect and fight against this threat.

  14. Human genetics of infectious diseases: between proof of principle and paradigm

    OpenAIRE

    Alcaïs, Alexandre; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2009-01-01

    The observation that only a fraction of individuals infected by infectious agents develop clinical disease raises fundamental questions about the actual pathogenesis of infectious diseases. Epidemiological and experimental evidence is accumulating to suggest that human genetics plays a major role in this process. As we discuss here, human predisposition to infectious diseases seems to cover a continuous spectrum from monogenic to polygenic inheritance. Although many studies have provided proo...

  15. Utilisation of radiolabeled antibiotic for the diagnosis of infectious foci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khammassi, Sabrine; Gharbi, Sabrine

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear imaging is a non-invasive exploration technique, used for rapid diagnostic of infectious disease .Thus, for osteoarticular infection scintigraphic techniques were proposed to ameliorate the diagnostic sensibility and the use of radiolabeled antibiotics as imaging agents of infectious loci become more and more recognized. In this work, a new sulfanil amid derivative, the N sulfanilamide-ferrocene-carboxamide was chemically synthesized then labeled with technetium-99m, with a radiochemical yield, 87 pour cent. In in-vitro studies were done with E.coli. first , the up-take of labeled molecule was estimated as 40 pour cent. Then, the bacteriostatic al effect of the molecule was de terminated by considering the Optical Density at 600 nm. The obtained results, encourage us to do more, with biodistribution on normal and infected mice; with Staphylococcus aureus. Then to carry out scintigraphic imaging with gamma camera to check out the potentiality of the molecule as an infectious imaging agent. (Author)

  16. Infectious complications in Kidney Transplant Recipients: Review of the Literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoury, J. A.; Brennan, D. C.

    2005-01-01

    Since the initial successful kidney transplantations in humans, the field of renal transplantation has made significant progress. Patient survival and graft survival have improved tremendously. Our armamentarium of immunosuppressive drugs and antimicrobial agents has expanded, as our understanding of their effects and proper utilization. Enhanced surgical techniques also improved the overall survival of kidney recipients. However, infectious complications remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality in this patient population. In this article, we provide an overview of infections in kidney transplant recipients, a detailed illustration of specific infectious agents with a focus on cytomegalovirus, and finally we lay some general principles for limiting the burden of infectious complications in kidney transplants through proper infection control measures. (author)

  17. International adoption: infectious diseases issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurie C

    2005-01-15

    Nearly 220,000 children have been adopted from other countries by American parents since 1986. Approximately 65,000 children have arrived from China and Russia, mostly in the past 6 years. Most of these children reside in orphanages before adoption, where they may experience malnutrition, environmental deprivation, neglect, and exposure to infectious diseases. After arrival to the United States, international adoptees should undergo specialized screening evaluation for infectious diseases and other conditions. Infectious conditions of special concern include hepatitis B and C, syphilis, human immunodeficiency virus infection, tuberculosis, and presence of intestinal parasites. Before the adoption occurs, the infectious disease consultant may be asked to assist the primary care provider and the adoptive family with advice about travel and review of preadoptive medical records. After the adoption, the infectious diseases consultant may be asked to assess the adequacy of the child's vaccination record from the birth country and to assist in screening, evaluation, and management of infectious diseases.

  18. Machine learning-assisted hyperspectral analysis of plasmonic contrast agent microbiodistribution with single-particle sensitivity and sub-cellular resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    SoRelle, Elliott D.; Liba, Orly; Campbell, Jos L.; Dalal, Roopa; Zavaleta, Cristina L.; de la Zerda, Adam

    2017-02-01

    Nanoparticles have been explored extensively as potential biomedical imaging and therapeutic agents. One critical aspect of in vivo nanoparticle use is the characterization of biodistribution profiles. Such studies improve our understanding of particle uptake, specificity, and clearance mechanisms. Currently, the most prevalent nanoparticle biodistribution methods provide either aspatial quantification of whole-organ particle accumulation or nanometerresolution images of uptake in single cells. Few existing techniques are well-suited to study particle uptake on the micron to millimeter scales relevant to sub-tissue physiology. Here we demonstrate a new method called Hyperspectral Microscopy with Adaptive Detection (HSM-AD) that uses machine learning classification of hyperspectral dark-field images to study interactions between tissues and administered nanoparticles. This label-free, non-destructive method enables quantitative particle identification in histological sections and detailed observations of sub-organ accumulation patterns consistent with organ-specific clearance mechanisms, particle size, and the molecular specificity of the nanoparticle surface. Unlike studies with electron microscopy, HSM-AD is readily applied for large fields of view. HSM-AD achieves excellent detection sensitivity (99.4%) and specificity (99.7%) and can identify single nanoparticles. To demonstrate HSM-AD's potential for novel nanoparticle uptake studies, we collected the first data on the sub-organ localization of large gold nanorods (LGNRs) in mice. We also observed differences in particle accumulation and localization patterns in tumors as a function of conjugated molecular targeting moieties. Thus, HSM-AD affords new degrees of detail for the study of nanoparticle uptake at physiological scales. HSM-AD may offer an auxiliary or alternative approach to study the biodistribution profiles of existing and novel nanoparticles.

  19. Combined magnetic resonance imaging of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary arteries after a single injection of a blood pool contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansch, Andreas; Neumann, Steffi; Baltzer, Pascal; Waginger, Matthias; Kaiser, Werner A.; Mentzel, Hans-Joachim [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Jena (Germany); Betge, Stefan; Poehlmann, Gunther [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Internal Medicine I, Jena (Germany); Pfeil, Alexander; Wolf, Gunter [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Internal Medicine III, Jena (Germany); Boettcher, Joachim [SRH Klinikum Gera, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Gera (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    Agreement rate between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Doppler ultrasound (DUS) for the detection of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the lower extremities was attempted by using the intravascular MRI contrast agent gadofosveset trisodium. The potential of this method to detect pulmonary embolism (PE) was also evaluated. Forty-three consecutive inpatients with ultrasound-confirmed DVT but no clinical signs of PE were prospectively enrolled in this feasibility study. MRI was performed after a single injection of gadofosveset trisodium. The pulmonary arteries were imaged using a 3D Fast Low Angle Shot (FLASH) gradient recalled echo sequence. Additionally, pulmonary arteries, abdominal veins, pelvic and leg veins were imaged using a fat-suppressed 3D gradient echo Volume Interpolated Breath-hold Examination (VIBE FS). Gadofosveset trisodium-enhanced MRI detected more thrombi in the pelvic region, upper leg and lower leg than the initial DUS. In addition, PE was detected in 16 of the 43 DVT patients (37%). This study shows the feasibility of a combined protocol for the MRI diagnosis of DVT and PE using gadofosveset trisodium. This procedure is not only more sensitive in detecting DVT compared to standard DUS, but is also able to detect PE in asymptomatic patients. (orig.)

  20. Attenuation values of the intracranial arterial and venous vessels by bolus injection of various contrast agents. A study with a single-detector helical CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagahata, Morio; Abe, Yoshinao; Ono, Shuichi; Yamaguchi, Hikaru; Miura, Hiroyuki; Ohata, Takashi; Tsushima, Fumiyasu; Morimoto, Kohei; Seino, Hiroko

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the arteriovenous contrast on the source images of intracranial three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) angiography (3D-CTA) using a high-concentration (370 mgI/ml) contrast agent in comparison with intermediate-concentration (300 mgI/ml) contrast. With a fixed intravenous injection rate and scanning delay, 3D-CTA was performed using a single-detector helical CT scanner in 30 consecutive patients. We used 100 ml of iohexol 300 for 10 patients, 100 ml of iopamidol 300 for 10 patients, and 80 ml of iopamidol 370 for 10 patients. Attenuation values of the bilateral internal carotid arteries, bilateral middle cerebral arteries, basilar artery trunk, bilateral cavernous sinuses, bilateral basal veins, and Galenic vein were measured quantitatively on the axial CT angiographic source images. High-concentration contrast significantly increased the attenuation values of the intracranial arterial system without increasing the attenuation of the venous system. High-concentration contrast is helpful for obtaining valuable arteriovenous contrast on source images with intracranial 3D-CTA. (author)

  1. The dataset from administration of single or combined immunomodulation agents to modulate anti-FVIII antibody responses in FVIII plasmid or protein primed hemophilia A mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Lien Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A mice with pre-existing inhibitory antibodies against factor VIII (FVIII were treated with single agents, AMD3100 and GCS-F, respectively. Inhibitor titers in treated mice and control HemA inhibitors mice were followed over time. Total B cells and plasma cells (PCs were characterized by flow cytometry. HemA inhibitor mice were then treated with a combination regimen of IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes plus rapamycin and AMD3100. Finally, HemA inhibitor mice were treated with a new combination therapy using include IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes + Anti-CD20+AMD3100+G-CSF. The timeline of combination therapy was illustrated. Inhibitor titers following treatment in FVIII plasmid or protein induced inhibitor mice were evaluated overtime. A representative figure and gating strategies to characterize the subsets of Treg cells and B cells are presented. Please see http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cellimm.2016.01.005 [1] for interpretation and discussion of these data and results.

  2. Dendrimer-encapsulated naphthalocyanine as a single agent-based theranostic nanoplatform for near-infrared fluorescence imaging and combinatorial anticancer phototherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taratula, Olena; Schumann, Canan; Duong, Tony; Taylor, Karmin L.; Taratula, Oleh

    2015-02-01

    Multifunctional theranostic platforms capable of concurrent near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging and phototherapies are strongly desired for cancer diagnosis and treatment. However, the integration of separate imaging and therapeutic components into nanocarriers results in complex theranostic systems with limited translational potential. A single agent-based theranostic nanoplatform, therefore, was developed for concurrent NIR fluorescence imaging and combinatorial phototherapy with dual photodynamic (PDT) and photothermal (PTT) therapeutic mechanisms. The transformation of a substituted silicon naphthalocyanine (SiNc) into a biocompatible nanoplatform (SiNc-NP) was achieved by SiNc encapsulation into the hydrophobic interior of a generation 5 polypropylenimine dendrimer following surface modification with polyethylene glycol. Encapsulation provides aqueous solubility to SiNc and preserves its NIR fluorescence, PDT and PTT properties. Moreover, an impressive photostability in the dendrimer-encapsulated SiNc has been detected. Under NIR irradiation (785 nm, 1.3 W cm-2), SiNc-NP manifested robust heat generation capability (ΔT = 40 °C) and efficiently produced reactive oxygen species essential for PTT and PDT, respectively, without releasing SiNc from the nanopaltform. By varying the laser power density from 0.3 W cm-2 to 1.3 W cm-2 the therapeutic mechanism of SiNc-NP could be switched from PDT to combinatorial PDT-PTT treatment. In vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that phototherapy mediated by SiNc can efficiently destroy chemotherapy resistant ovarian cancer cells. Remarkably, solid tumors treated with a single dose of SiNc-NP combined with NIR irradiation were completely eradicated without cancer recurrence. Finally, the efficiency of SiNc-NP as an NIR imaging agent was confirmed by recording the strong fluorescence signal in the tumor, which was not photobleached during the phototherapeutic procedure.Multifunctional theranostic platforms capable of

  3. Infectious myocarditis (Clinic, diagnostics, principles of treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Finogeev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infective myocarditis can be considered as a case of myocardial damage caused by different infectious agents. Traditionally discusses the questions of diagnostics and treatment infectious myocarditis. The paper has repeatedly stressed the difficulty of clinical diagnosis, and the laboriousness and economic costs of laboratory tests and additional researches. Endomyocardial biopsy findings remain the gold standard for unequivocally establishing the diagnosis. However, it is technically extremely invasive test and can be performed only in specialized cardiology centers. The paper analyzes in detail not only own materials, but also results of researches published in numerous domestic and foreign sources of literature. Publication of «Infectious myocarditis» is necessary due to the fact that patients with a diagnosis of «Myocarditis » account for 11% of all cardiovascular disease in the world. Article is timely and necessary for many professionals, senior students of medical universities.

  4. Histopathology for the diagnosis of infectious diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta E

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Histopathological examination of tissue biopsies for the identification of infectious organisms is a very important diagnostic tool. Conventional culture confirmation of tissue biopsies often fail to identify any pathogen as, first of all, invariably most of the tissue samples that are collected and sent for culture isolation are inappropriately collected in formalin, which prevents pathogen growth in culture media. Inadequate processing like grinding, etc. further hinders isolation. Presence of inhibitors like dead tissue debris, fibers, etc. also delays isolation. Microbiologists often lack expertise in identifying infectious pathogens directly from tissue biopsies by microscopic visualization. This review therefore acquaints microbiologists with the various methods available for detecting infectious agents by using histological stains. On histopathological examination of the tissue biopsy once, it is determined that a disease is likely to be due to an infection and has characterized the inflammatory response and hence associated microorganisms should be thoroughly looked for. Although some microorganisms or their cytopathic effects may be clearly visible on routine haematoxylin- and eosin-stained sections, additional histochemical stains are often needed for their complete characterization. Highly specific molecular techniques, such as immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization and nucleic acid amplification, may be needed in certain instances to establish the diagnosis of infection. Through appropriate morphologic diagnoses and interlaboratory communication and collaboration, direct microscopic visualization of tissue samples can thus be very helpful in reaching a correct and rapid diagnosis.

  5. 76 FR 22112 - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Preclinical Services Development of Interventional Agents. Date: May 3, 2011. Time: 12 p.m. to 4...

  6. Wetlands and infectious diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Zimmerman

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a historical association between wetlands and infectious disease that has led to the modification of wetlands to prevent disease. At the same time there has been the development of water resources projects that increase the risk of disease. The demand for more water development projects and the increased pressure to make natural wetlands economically beneficial creates the need for an ecological approach to wetland management and health assessment. The environmental and health interactions are many. There is a need to take into account the landscape, spatial boundaries, and cross-boundary interactions in water development projects as well as alternative methods to provide water for human needs. The research challenges that need to be addressed are discussed.

  7. 75 FR 8084 - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... Panel, Oral Radionuclide Decorporation Agents C1 (51). Date: March 5, 2010. Time: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m..., Immunology, and Transplantation Research; 93.856, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Research, National...

  8. APITHERAPEUTICAL FUNDS: NEW DEVELOPMENT AND PROSPECTS OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES IN PERSON (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radchenko EA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the development, the study of antimicrobialproperties of pharmacological agents that are based onphenolic propolis and hydrophilic drug shows promise forthe use of complex treatment of infectious diseases.

  9. Safety and efficacy of single-agent bevacizumab-containing therapy in elderly patients with platinum-resistant recurrent ovarian cancer : Subgroup analysis of the randomised phase III AURELIA trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorio, Roberto; Roemer-Becuwe, Célia; Hilpert, Felix; Gibbs, Emma; García, Yolanda; Kaern, Janne; Huizing, Manon; Witteveen, Petronella|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/17530808X; Zagouri, Flora; Coeffic, David; Lück, Hans-Joachim; González-Martín, Antonio; Kristensen, Gunnar; Levaché, Charles-Briac; Lee, Chee Khoon; Gebski, Val; Pujade-Lauraine, Eric

    BACKGROUND: The AURELIA trial demonstrated significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) with bevacizumab added to chemotherapy for platinum-resistant ovarian cancer (PROC). METHODS: Patients with PROC were randomised to receive investigator-selected single-agent chemotherapy alone or with

  10. Global climate change and infectious diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shope, R. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States))

    1991-12-01

    The effects of global climate change on infectious diseases are hypothetical until more is known about the degree of change in temperature and humidity that will occur. Diseases most likely to increase in their distribution and severity have three-factor (agent, vector, and human being) and four-factor (plus vertebrate reservoir host) ecology. Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes may move northward and have more rapid metamorphosis with global warming. These mosquitoes transmit dengue virus, and Aedes aegypti transmits yellow fever virus. The faster metamorphosis and a shorter extrinsic incubation of dengue and yellow fever viruses could lead to epidemics in North America. Vibrio cholera is harbored persistently in the estuaries of the U.S. Gulf Coast. Over the past 200 years, cholera has become pandemic seven times with spread from Asia to Europe, Africa, and North America. Global warming may lead to changes in water ecology that could enhance similar spread of cholera in North America. Some other infectious diseases such as LaCrosse encephalitis and Lyme disease are caused by agents closely dependent on the integrity of their environment. These diseases may become less prominent with global warming because of anticipated modification of their habitats. Ecological studies will help as to understand more fully the possible consequences of global warming. New and more effective methods for control of vectors will be needed. 12 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Infectious Diseases in Day Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleator, Esther K.

    Discussed in this publication are infectious illnesses for which children attending day care appear to be at special risk. Also covered are the common cold, some infectious disease problems receiving media attention, and some other annoying but not serious diseases, such as head lice, pinworms, and contagious skin conditions. Causes,…

  12. Infectious Disease (ID) Learning Unit:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westlake, Amanda A; Eisenberg, Mark P

    2017-01-01

    In the context of an escalating opioid epidemic, infectious disease clinicians increasingly treat the infectious complications of injection drug use. In this learning unit, we review the history, pharmacology, and clinical use of buprenorphine as maintenance therapy for opioid use disorder, and we describe the process by which clinicians can obtain a buprenorphine waiver.

  13. Infectious diseases affect marine fisheries and aquaculture economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D; Harvell, C Drew; Conrad, Jon M; Friedman, Carolyn S; Kent, Michael L; Kuris, Armand M; Powell, Eric N; Rondeau, Daniel; Saksida, Sonja M

    2015-01-01

    Seafood is a growing part of the economy, but its economic value is diminished by marine diseases. Infectious diseases are common in the ocean, and here we tabulate 67 examples that can reduce commercial species' growth and survivorship or decrease seafood quality. These impacts seem most problematic in the stressful and crowded conditions of aquaculture, which increasingly dominates seafood production as wild fishery production plateaus. For instance, marine diseases of farmed oysters, shrimp, abalone, and various fishes, particularly Atlantic salmon, cost billions of dollars each year. In comparison, it is often difficult to accurately estimate disease impacts on wild populations, especially those of pelagic and subtidal species. Farmed species often receive infectious diseases from wild species and can, in turn, export infectious agents to wild species. However, the impact of disease export on wild fisheries is controversial because there are few quantitative data demonstrating that wild species near farms suffer more from infectious diseases than those in other areas. The movement of exotic infectious agents to new areas continues to be the greatest concern.

  14. Infectious diseases affect marine fisheries and aquaculture economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Harvell, C. Drew; Conrad, Jonathan M.; Friedman, Carolyn S.; Kent, Michael L.; Kuris, Armand M.; Powell, Eric N.; Rondeau, Daniel; Saksida, Sonja M.

    2015-01-01

    Seafood is a growing part of the economy, but its economic value is diminished by marine diseases. Infectious diseases are common in the ocean, and here we tabulate 67 examples that can reduce commercial species' growth and survivorship or decrease seafood quality. These impacts seem most problematic in the stressful and crowded conditions of aquaculture, which increasingly dominates seafood production as wild fishery production plateaus. For instance, marine diseases of farmed oysters, shrimp, abalone, and various fishes, particularly Atlantic salmon, cost billions of dollars each year. In comparison, it is often difficult to accurately estimate disease impacts on wild populations, especially those of pelagic and subtidal species. Farmed species often receive infectious diseases from wild species and can, in turn, export infectious agents to wild species. However, the impact of disease export on wild fisheries is controversial because there are few quantitative data demonstrating that wild species near farms suffer more from infectious diseases than those in other areas. The movement of exotic infectious agents to new areas continues to be the greatest concern.

  15. Neoadjuvant Treatment With Single-Agent Cetuximab Followed by 5-FU, Cetuximab, and Pelvic Radiotherapy: A Phase II Study in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolini, Federica; Chiara, Silvana; Bengala, Carmelo; Antognoni, Paolo; Dealis, Cristina; Zironi, Sandra; Malavasi, Norma; Scolaro, Tindaro; Depenni, Roberta; Jovic, Gordana; Sonaglio, Claudia; Rossi, Aldo; Luppi, Gabriele; Conte, Pier Franco

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery represents the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Cetuximab has proved activity in advanced colorectal cancer, and its incorporation in preoperative treatment may increase tumor downstaging. Methods and Materials: After biopsy and staging, uT3/uT4 N0/+ LARC received single-agent cetuximab in three doses, followed by weekly cetuximab plus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), concomitantly with RT. Sample size was calculated according to Bryant and Day test, a two-stage design with at least 10 pathologic complete remissions observed in 60 patients (pts) able to complete the treatment plan. Results: Forty pts with LARC were entered: male/female = 34/6; median age: 61 (range, 28-77); 12 uT3N0 Ed(30%); 25 uT3N1 (62%); 3 uT4N1 (8%); all Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group = 0. Thirty-five pts completed neoadjuvant treatment; 5 (12%) withdrew therapy after one cetuximab administration: three for hypersensitivity reactions, one for rapid progression, and one for purulent arthritis. They continued 5-FU in continuous infusion in association with RT. Thirty-one pts (77%) presented with acnelike rash; dose reduction/interruption of treatment was necessary in six pts (15%): two for Grade 3 acnelike rash, two for Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity, and two for refusal. Thirty-eight pts were evaluable for pathological response (one patient refused surgery, and one was progressed during neoadjuvant treatment). Pathological staging was: pT0N0 three pts (8%), pT1N0 1 pt (3%); pT2N0 13 pts (34%), and pT3 19 pts (50%) (N0:9, N1:5; N2:5); pT4 2 pts (5%). Conclusions: Preoperative treatment with 5-FU, cetuximab, and pelvic RT is feasible with acceptable toxicities; however, the rate of pathologic responses is disappointingly low

  16. Infectious particles, stress, and induced prion amyloids: a unifying perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuelidis, Laura

    2013-07-01

    Transmissible encephalopathies (TSEs) are believed by many to arise by spontaneous conversion of host prion protein (PrP) into an infectious amyloid (PrP-res, PrP (Sc) ) without nucleic acid. Many TSE agents reside in the environment, with infection controlled by public health measures. These include the disappearance of kuru with the cessation of ritual cannibalism, the dramatic reduction of epidemic bovine encephalopathy (BSE) by removal of contaminated feed, and the lack of endemic scrapie in geographically isolated Australian sheep with susceptible PrP genotypes. While prion protein modeling has engendered an intense focus on common types of protein misfolding and amyloid formation in diverse organisms and diseases, the biological characteristics of infectious TSE agents, and their recognition by the host as foreign entities, raises several fundamental new directions for fruitful investigation such as: (1) unrecognized microbial agents in the environmental metagenome that may cause latent neurodegenerative disease, (2) the evolutionary social and protective functions of different amyloid proteins in diverse organisms from bacteria to mammals, and (3) amyloid formation as a beneficial innate immune response to stress (infectious and non-infectious). This innate process however, once initiated, can become unstoppable in accelerated neuronal aging.

  17. Selective breeding can increase resistance of Atlantic salmon to furunculosis, infectious salmon anaemia and infectious pancreatic necrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøglum, Sissel; Henryon, Mark; Aasmundstad, Torunn

    2008-01-01

    We reasoned that by challenging large numbers of Atlantic salmon families with the causative agents of furunculosis, infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) and infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN), we could show unequivocally that resistance to these diseases expresses moderate-to-high levels of additive...... genetic variation, and that the resistances are weakly correlated genetically. We tested this reasoning by challenging Atlantic salmon from 920 (approximately) full-sib families with the causative agents of furunculosis and ISA, and fish from 265 of these families with the causative agent of IPN. Additive...... genetic variation and genetic correlations were estimated by fitting a threshold liability model to the resistances assessed as binary traits. Resistance to furunculosis, ISA and IPN was moderate â€"to highly heritable. The marginal posterior means for heritability on the underlying liability scale were 0...

  18. What Is a Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... teen years. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialists Have? Pediatric infectious diseases specialists are medical ...

  19. Infectious Diseases in the Homeless

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-08-26

    In this podcast, Ted Pestorius speaks with Dr. Marian McDonald, Associate Director for Minority and Women’s Health at CDC about an article in September 2008 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases on infectious diseases in the homeless. There are an estimated 100 million homeless people worldwide today, and this number is likely to grow. The homeless population is vulnerable to many diseases, including HIV, hepatitis, and tuberculosis. Dr. McDonald discusses why this population is so vulnerable.  Created: 8/26/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 8/27/2008.

  20. Equine infectious anemia virus in China

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hua-Nan; Rao, Dan; Fu, Xian-Qiu; Hu, Ming-Ming; Dong, Jian-Guo

    2017-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia is an equine disease caused by equine infectious anemia virus, which was first reported in 1840. Equine infectious anemia virus research in China started in the 1960s, focusing on etiology, pathology, diagnosis, and immunology. Notably, in 1978 an attenuated vaccine was successfully developed for equine infectious anemia virus, effectively preventing equine infectious anemia virus in China. This article will review equine infectious anemia virus in China, including pa...

  1. Is irritable bowel syndrome an infectious disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, John Richard

    2016-01-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common of all gastroenterological diseases. While many mechanisms have been postulated to explain its etiology, no single mechanism entirely explains the heterogeneity of symptoms seen with the various phenotypes of the disease. Recent data from both basic and clinical sciences suggest that underlying infectious disease may provide a unifying hypothesis that better explains the overall symptomatology. The presence of small intestinal bowel overgrowth (SIBO) has been documented in patients with IBS and reductions in SIBO as determined by breath testing correlate with IBS symptom improvement in clinical trials. The incidence of new onset IBS symptoms following acute infectious gastroenteritis also suggests an infectious cause. Alterations in microbiota-host interactions may compromise epithelial barrier integrity, immune function, and the development and function of both central and enteric nervous systems explaining alterations in the brain-gut axis. Clinical evidence from treatment trials with both probiotics and antibiotics also support this etiology. Probiotics appear to restore the imbalance in the microflora and improve IBS-specific quality of life. Antibiotic trials with both neomycin and rifaximin show improvement in global IBS symptoms that correlates with breath test normalization in diarrhea-predominant patients. The treatment response to two weeks of rifaximin is sustained for up to ten weeks and comparable results are seen in symptom reduction with retreatment in patients who develop recurrent symptoms.

  2. Microparticles and infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delabranche, X; Berger, A; Boisramé-Helms, J; Meziani, F

    2012-08-01

    Membrane shedding with microvesicle (MV) release after membrane budding due to cell stimulation is a highly conserved intercellular interplay. MV can be released by micro-organisms or by host cells in the course of infectious diseases. Host MVs are divided according to cell compartment origin in microparticles (MPs) from plasma membrane and exosomes from intracellular membranes. MPs are cell fragments resulting from plasma membrane reorganization characterized by phosphatidylserine (PhtdSer) content and parental cell antigens on membrane. The role of MPs in physiology and pathophysiology is not yet well elucidated; they are a pool of bioactive molecules able to transmit a pro-inflammatory message to neighboring or target cells. The first acknowledged function of MP was the dissemination of a procoagulant potential via PhtdSer and it is now obvious than MPs bear tissue factor (TF). Such MPs have been implicated in the coagulation disorders observed during sepsis and septic shock. MPs have been implicated in the regulation of vascular tone and cardiac dysfunction in experimental sepsis. Beside a non-specific role, pathogens such as Neisseria meningitidis and Ebola Virus can specifically activate blood coagulation after TF-bearing MPs release in the bloodstream with disseminated intravascular coagulopathy and Purpura fulminans. The role of MPs in host-pathogen interactions is also fundamental in Chagas disease, where MPs could allow immune evasion by inhibiting C3 convertase. During cerebral malaria, MPs play a complex role facilitating the activation of brain endothelium that contributes to amplify vascular obstruction by parasitized erythrocytes. Phagocytosis of HIV induced MPs expressing PhtdSer by monocytes/macrophages results in cellular infection and non-inflammatory response via up-regulation of TGF-β. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Sample preparation and detection device for infectious agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Robin R.; Wang, Amy W.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Lemoff, Asuncion V.; Bettencourt, Kerry A.; Yu, June

    2003-06-10

    A sample preparation and analysis device which incorporates both immunoassays and PCR assays in one compact, field-portable microchip. The device provides new capabilities in fluid and particle control which allows the building of a fluidic chip with no moving parts, thus decreasing fabrication cost and increasing the robustness of the device. The device can operate in a true continuous (not batch) mode. The device incorporates magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumps to move the fluid through the system, acoustic mixing and fractionation, dielectropheretic (DEP) sample concentration and purification, and on-chip optical detection capabilities.

  4. Using genomics for surveillance of veterinary infectious agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathijs, E; Vandenbussche, F; Van Borm, S

    2016-04-01

    Factors such as globalisation, climate change and agricultural intensification can increase the risk of microbial emergence. As a result, there is a growing need for flexible laboratory-based surveillance tools to rapidly identify, characterise and monitor global (re-)emerging diseases. Although many tools are available, novel sequencing technologies have launched a new era in pathogen surveillance. Here, the authors review the potential applications of high-throughput genomic technologies for the surveillance of veterinary pathogens. They focus on the two types of surveillance that will benefit most from these new tools: hazard-specific surveillance (pathogen identification and typing) and early-warning surveillance (pathogen discovery). The paper reviews how the resulting sequencing data can be used to improve diagnosis and concludes by highlighting the major challenges that hinder the routine use of this technology in the veterinary field.

  5. Human genetics of infectious diseases: between proof of principle and paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaïs, Alexandre; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2009-09-01

    The observation that only a fraction of individuals infected by infectious agents develop clinical disease raises fundamental questions about the actual pathogenesis of infectious diseases. Epidemiological and experimental evidence is accumulating to suggest that human genetics plays a major role in this process. As we discuss here, human predisposition to infectious diseases seems to cover a continuous spectrum from monogenic to polygenic inheritance. Although many studies have provided proof of principle that infectious diseases may result from various types of inborn errors of immunity, the genetic determinism of most infectious diseases in most patients remains unclear. However, in the future, studies in human genetics are likely to establish a new paradigm for infectious diseases.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha

    1998-01-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha [The Catholic Univ., College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  8. Multiple sclerosis after infectious mononucleosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine Rasmussen; Rostgaard, Klaus; Nielsen, Nete Munk

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infectious mononucleosis caused by the Epstein-Barr virus has been associated with increased risk of multiple sclerosis. However, little is known about the characteristics of this association. OBJECTIVE: To assess the significance of sex, age at and time since infectious mononucleosis......, and attained age to the risk of developing multiple sclerosis after infectious mononucleosis. DESIGN: Cohort study using persons tested serologically for infectious mononucleosis at Statens Serum Institut, the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish National Hospital Discharge Register, and the Danish...... Multiple Sclerosis Registry. SETTING: Statens Serum Institut. PATIENTS: A cohort of 25 234 Danish patients with mononucleosis was followed up for the occurrence of multiple sclerosis beginning on April 1, 1968, or January 1 of the year after the diagnosis of mononucleosis or after a negative Paul...

  9. 78 FR 7674 - Foreign Quarantine; Import Regulations for Infectious Biological Agents, Infectious Substances...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... as the commenter suggests that the importer should bear no legal responsibility under these... place the responsibility for compliance with all applicable laws and regulations concerning the... suggests that the shipper comply with all applicable legal requirements relating to the packaging, labeling...

  10. Incidence and relative risk of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma with single-agent BRAF inhibitor and dual BRAF/MEK inhibitors in cancer patients: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ling; Wang, Yina; Hong, Yun; Ye, Xianghua; Shi, Peng; Zhang, Junyan; Zhao, Qiong

    2017-10-10

    BRAF inhibitor and dual BRAF/MEK inhibitors have been approved for the treatment of BRAF-mutated melanoma. Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cuSCC) is an adverse event associated with these drugs. The contribution of BRAF inhibitor and dual BRAF/MEK inhibitors to cuSCC are still unknown. We performed this meta-analysis to determine the overall incidence and relative risk of cuSCC in cancer patients treated with these drugs. A total of 7,442 patients from 24 primary studies were included. The incidences of all-grade and high-grade cuSCC in cancer patients treated with BRAF inhibitor were 12.5% (95% CI: 10.8-14.6%) and 11.6% (95% CI: 9.8-13.8%), and dual BRAF/MEK inhibitors were 3.0% (95% CI: 2.0-4.5%) and 2.8% (95% CI: 1.9-4.0%), respectively. On subgroup analysis and meta-regression, the incidence of cuSCC did not vary with tumor type, study design and specific drug used. The use of single agent BRAF inhibitor significantly increased the risk of developing cuSCC comparing with dual BRAF/MEK inhibitors for all-grade (RR 4.72, 95% CI: 2.42-9.20) and high-grade (RR 4.92, 95% CI: 2.64-9.16) in cancer patients. The databases of PubMed, Embase and abstracts published in ASCO proceedings were searched for relevant studies from January 2000 to June 2017. Summary incidences, relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by using either random effects or fixed effect models according to the heterogeneity of included studies. BRAF inhibitor significantly increases the risk of developing cuSCC compared with dual BRAF/MEK inhibitors in cancer patients. Clinicians should be aware of the risks of cuSCC with the administration of these drugs in cancer patients.

  11. Cardiac imaging in infectious endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Niels Eske; Habib, Gilbert; Thuny, Franck

    2014-01-01

    Infectious endocarditis remains both a diagnostic and a treatment challenge. A positive outcome depends on a rapid diagnosis, accurate risk stratification, and a thorough follow-up. Imaging plays a key role in each of these steps and echocardiography remains the cornerstone of the methods in use....... infectious foci. A flowchart for the use of imaging in both left-sided and right-sided endocarditis is suggested....

  12. To Investigate the Therapeutic Efforts of the COX-2 Inhibitor NS-398 as a Single Agent, and in Combination with Vitamin D, in Vitro and in Vivo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Yi-Fen

    2008-01-01

    .... We have identified a cross-talk between vitamin D and COX-2 inhibitor, two chemopreventative agents for prostate cancer, and conducted series investigations of their anti-prostate cancer effects...

  13. Logics for Intelligent Agents and Multi-Agent Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, John-Jules Charles

    2014-01-01

    This chapter presents the history of the application of logic in a quite popular paradigm in contemporary computer science and artificial intelligence, viz. the area of intelligent agents and multi-agent systems. In particular we discuss the logics that have been used to specify single agents, the

  14. INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS IN CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnnaMaria Nosari

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Infectious complications have been known to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in CLL patients who are predisposed to infections because of both the humoral immunodepression inherent to hematologic disease, which is related to stage and duration of CLL, and to further immunosuppression related to therapy. The majority of infections in CLL patients treated with alkilating agents is of bacterial origin. The immunodeficiency and natural infectious history of alkylator-resistant, corticosteroid-treated patients appears to have changed with the administration of purine analogs, which has been complicated by very severe and unusual infections and also more viral infections due to sustained reduction of CD4-positive T lymphocytes. The following introduction of monoclonal antibody therapies, in particular alemtuzumab, further increased the immunodepression, increasing also infections which appeared more often in patients with recurrent neutropenia due to chemotherapy cycles. Epidemiological data regarding fungal infections in lymphoproliferative disorders are scarce. Italian SEIFEM group in a retrospective multicentre study regarding CLL patients reported an incidence of mycoses 0.5%; however, chronic lymphoproliferative disorders emerged as second haematological underlying disease after acute leukemia in a French study on aspergillosis; in particular CLL with aspergillosis accounted for a third of these chronic lymphoproliferative diseases presenting mould infection.

  15. Biosafety in the Laboratory: Prudent Practices for the Handling and Disposal of Infectious Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-01

    altered by diseases such in the specimens that they process. The infectious as chronic dermatitis, eczema, and psoriasis . Per- agents that potentially...may be required for work with these materials by direct skin contact with infective stages of the para - hypersensitive individuals, sites listed. Agent

  16. Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification of Infectious Prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moda, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, or prion diseases, are a group of incurable disorders caused by the accumulation of an abnormally folded prion protein (PrP Sc ) in the brain. According to the "protein-only" hypothesis, PrP Sc is the infectious agent able to propagate the disease by acting as a template for the conversion of the correctly folded prion protein (PrP C ) into the pathological isoform. Recently, the mechanism of PrP C conversion has been mimicked in vitro using an innovative technique named protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA). This technology represents a great tool for studying diverse aspects of prion biology in the field of basic research and diagnosis. Moreover, PMCA can be expanded for the study of the misfolding process associated to other neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Model of two infectious diseases in nettle caterpillar population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdausi, F. Z.; Nuraini, N.

    2016-04-01

    Palm oil is a vital commodity to the economy of Indonesia. The area of oil palm plantations in Indonesia has increased from year to year. However, the effectiveness of palm oil production is reduced by pest infestation. One of the pest which often infests oil palm plantations is nettle caterpillar. The pest control used in this study is biological control, viz. biological agents given to oil palm trees. This paper describes a mathematical model of two infectious diseases in nettle caterpillar population. The two infectious diseases arise due to two biological agents, namely Bacillus thuringiensis bacterium and parasite which usually attack nettle caterpillars. The derivation of the model constructed in this paper is obtained from ordinary differential equations without time delay. The equilibrium points are analyzed. Two of three equilibrium points are stable if the Routh-Hurwitz criteria are fulfilled. In addition, this paper also presents the numerical simulation of the model which has been constructed.

  18. General principles for the treatment of non-infectious uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Llopis, Manuel; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto; García-Delpech, Salvador; Salom-Alonso, David

    2009-09-01

    Ocular inflammatory disorders constitute a sight-threatening group of diseases that might be managed according to their severity. Their treatment guidelines experience constant changes with new agents that improve the results obtained with former drugs. Nowadays we can make use of a five step protocol in which topical, periocular and systemic corticosteroids remain as the main therapy for non infectious uveitis. In addition, immunosuppresive drugs can be added in order to enhance the anti-inflammatory effects and to develop the role of corticosteroid-saving agents. These can be organized in four other steps: Cyclosporine and Methotrexate in a second one; Azathioprine, Mycophenolate Mofetil and Tacrolimus in a third step; biological anti-TNF drugs in fourth position; and a theoretical last one with Cyclophosphamide and Chlorambucil. In the present review we go through the main characteristics and complications of all these treatments and make a rational of this five-step treatment protocol for non infectious posterior uveitis.

  19. Simultaneous demonstration of infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) and Flavobacterium psychrophilum in paraffin-embedded specimens of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss fry by use of paired immunohistochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evensen, Ø.; Lorenzen, Ellen

    1997-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Flavobacterium psychrophilum, which is the causative agent of rainbow trout fry syndrome (RTFS), and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), the causative agent of infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN), are both highly pathogenic for rainbow trout fry. Several...

  20. Equine infectious anemia virus in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua-Nan; Rao, Dan; Fu, Xian-Qiu; Hu, Ming-Ming; Dong, Jian-Guo

    2018-01-02

    Equine infectious anemia is an equine disease caused by equine infectious anemia virus, which was first reported in 1840. Equine infectious anemia virus research in China started in the 1960s, focusing on etiology, pathology, diagnosis, and immunology. Notably, in 1978 an attenuated vaccine was successfully developed for equine infectious anemia virus, effectively preventing equine infectious anemia virus in China. This article will review equine infectious anemia virus in China, including past and recent research, and commemorate scientists who have made great contributions to equine infectious anemia virus prevention.

  1. Infectious disease risks in xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Jay A

    2018-03-07

    Hurdles exist to clinical xenotransplantation including potential infectious transmission from nonhuman species to xenograft recipients. In anticipation of clinical trials of xenotransplantation, the associated infectious risks have been investigated. Swine and immunocompromised humans share some potential pathogens. Swine herpesviruses including porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV) and porcine lymphotropic herpesvirus (PLHV) are largely species-specific and do not, generally, infect human cells. Human cellular receptors exist for porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV), which infects certain human-derived cell lines in vitro. PERV-inactivated pigs have been produced recently. Human infection due to PERV has not been described. A screening paradigm can be applied to exclude potential human pathogens from "designated pathogen free" breeding colonies. Various microbiological assays have been developed for screening and diagnosis including antibody-based tests and qualitative and quantitative molecular assays for viruses. Additional assays may be required to diagnose pig-specific organisms in human xenograft recipients. Significant progress has been made in the evaluation of the potential infectious risks of clinical xenotransplantation. Infectious risk would be amplified by intensive immunosuppression. The available data suggest that risks of xenotransplant-associated recipient infection are manageable and that clinical trials can be performed safely. Possible infectious risks of xenotransplantation to the community at large are undefined but merit consideration. © 2018 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  2. Biomarkers for serum diagnosis of infectious diseases and their potential application in novel sensor platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulart, Luiz R; Vieira, Carlos U; Freschi, Ana Paula P; Capparelli, Fausto E; Fujimura, Patricia T; Almeida, Juliana F; Ferreira, Lucas F; Goulart, Isabela M B; Brito-Madurro, Ana Graci; Madurro, Joao M

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnological tools and biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis, as well as strategies for disease control and monitoring populations at higher risk, are continuous worldwide challenges for infectious diseases. Phage display and monoclonal antibody combinatorial libraries are important sources for biomarker discovery and for improved diagnostic strategies. Mimetic peptides were selected against polyclonal antibodies from patients with dengue fever, leprosy, and leishmaniasis as model diseases, and from immunized chickens with total antigens from all three pathogens. Selected single or combined multi-epitope peptide biomarkers were further associated with four different sensor platforms, classified as affinity biosensors, that may be suitable as general protocols for field diagnosis. We have also developed two methods for nanoparticle agglutination assays (a particle gel agglutination test and a magnetic microparticle [MMP]-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]) and two electrochemical biosensors (impedimetric and amperometric) for DNA and antibody detection. For the agglutination tests, micro- and nanoparticles were coupled with filamentous bacteriophages displaying the selected mimotopes on their surfaces, which has favored the formation of the antigen-antibody or peptide-protein complexes, amplifying the optical detection in ELISA assays or after the chromatographic separation of the microagglutinates. We have also demonstrated a proof-of-concept for the electrochemical biosensors by using electrodes modified with novel functionalized polymers. These electrochemical biosensors have proven to be fast, very sensitive, and specific for the detection of pathogen DNA and circulating antibodies of patients, which may become important in a wide range of diagnostic devices for many infectious agents.

  3. Infectious Disease, Endangerment, and Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPhee, Ross D. E.; Greenwood, Alex D.

    2013-01-01

    Infectious disease, especially virulent infectious disease, is commonly regarded as a cause of fluctuation or decline in biological populations. However, it is not generally considered as a primary factor in causing the actual endangerment or extinction of species. We review here the known historical examples in which disease has, or has been assumed to have had, a major deleterious impact on animal species, including extinction, and highlight some recent cases in which disease is the chief suspect in causing the outright endangerment of particular species. We conclude that the role of disease in historical extinctions at the population or species level may have been underestimated. Recent methodological breakthroughs may lead to a better understanding of the past and present roles of infectious disease in influencing population fitness and other parameters. PMID:23401844

  4. Holonic multi-agent systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gerber, Christian; Siekmann, Jörg; Vierke, Gero

    1999-01-01

    A holonic multi-agent paradigm is proposed, where agents give up parts of their autonomy and merge into a super-agent"(a holon), that acts - when seen from the outside - just as a single agent again. We explore the spectrum of this new paradigm, ranging from definitorial issues over classification of possible application domains, an algebraic characterization of the merge operation, to implementational aspects: We propose algorithms for holon formation and on-line re-configuration. Based on s...

  5. 42 CFR 73.3 - HHS select agents and toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... have been genetically modified. (d) HHS select agents or toxins that meet any of the following criteria..., and Recombinant Organisms: (1) Nucleic acids that can produce infectious forms of any of the select...

  6. How infectious is SARS virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. How infectious is SARS virus. Influenza: 1 patient infects ten people. SARS: 1 patient infects 2-4 people. Incubation period 10 days. Are there `silent´ cases ? Is quarantine enough ? How will it behave if and when it returns ?

  7. Emerging Infectious Diseases Cover Art

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-07-26

    Byron Breedlove, managing editor of the EID Journal, discusses his approach to cover art.  Created: 7/26/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 7/26/2017.

  8. Avian infectious bronchitis virus in Africa: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khataby, Khadija; Fellahi, Siham; Loutfi, Chafiqa; Mustapha, Ennaji Moulay

    2016-06-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is worldwide in distribution, highly infectious, and extremely difficult to control because it has extensive genetic diversity, a short generation time, and a high mutation rate. IBV is a Gammacoronavirus, single-stranded, and positive-sense RNA virus. Avian infectious bronchitis is well studied in European countries with identification of a large number of IBV variants, whereas in African countries epidemiological and scientific data are poor and not updated. However, previous studies reported that an IBV variant continues to appear regularly in Africa, as currently described in Morocco. No cross-protection between IBV strains was reported, some being unique to a particular country, others having a more general distribution. This review aims to provide a general overview on IB disease distribution in African countries and an update on the available studies of IBV variants in each country.

  9. Human genetics of infectious diseases: a unified theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Abel, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Since the early 1950s, the dominant paradigm in the human genetics of infectious diseases postulates that rare monogenic immunodeficiencies confer vulnerability to multiple infectious diseases (one gene, multiple infections), whereas common infections are associated with the polygenic inheritance of multiple susceptibility genes (one infection, multiple genes). Recent studies, since 1996 in particular, have challenged this view. A newly recognised group of primary immunodeficiencies predisposing the individual to a principal or single type of infection is emerging. In parallel, several common infections have been shown to reflect the inheritance of one major susceptibility gene, at least in some populations. This novel causal relationship (one gene, one infection) blurs the distinction between patient-based Mendelian genetics and population-based complex genetics, and provides a unified conceptual frame for exploring the molecular genetic basis of infectious diseases in humans. PMID:17255931

  10. Infectious salmon anemia virus--genetics and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottet, Luis; Rivas-Aravena, Andrea; Cortez-San Martin, Marcelo; Sandino, Ana María; Spencer, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    The infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) is the causative agent of the ISA syndrome that affects mainly Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and has caused high mortality epidemics in Norway, Scotland, Canada, the United States and Chile. It is classified as an Orthomyxoviridae, its genome is composed of 8 single-strand RNA segments with negative polarity that code for 11 polypeptides. Through functional studies of the coded proteins it has been established that RNA segments 5 and 6 code for a fusion protein and hemagglutinin, respectively, while two polypeptides coded by segments 7 and 8 inhibit interferon induction. The functions of the rest of the possible proteins coded by the viral genome have been assigned by comparison with the corresponding ones of the influenza virus genome. As to its pathogenicity, some growth parameters such as incubation period, resistance to chemical and physical factors, establishment of the infection in other marine species, and dissemination ability among the different organs have been evaluated in several salmonids. Genomic analysis has shown (i) the existence of a high polymorphism region (HPR) in segment 6, and (ii) sequence insertion in segment 5. More than 20 HPR variants have been determined, all originating from HPR0, which is associated with low pathogenicity, while 4 different sequence insertions in segment 5 have not been related with some characteristic of the virus infection. Much progress has been made in the characterization of the virus in 20 years of study, but more detailed knowledge of the specific function of the proteins coded by all the viral genes is still missing, including the pathogenicity mechanism at the molecular level. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of single injection of local anesthetic agents on intervertebral disc degeneration: ex vivo and long-term in vivo experimental study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Iwasaki

    Full Text Available Analgesic discography (discoblock can be used to diagnose or treat discogenic low back pain by injecting a small amount of local anesthetics. However, recent in vitro studies have revealed cytotoxic effects of local anesthetics on intervertebral disc (IVD cells. Here we aimed to investigate the deteriorative effects of lidocaine and bupivacaine on rabbit IVDs using an organotypic culture model and an in vivo long-term follow-up model.For the organotypic culture model, rabbit IVDs were harvested and cultured for 3 or 7 days after intradiscal injection of local anesthetics (1% lidocaine or 0.5% bupivacaine. Nucleus pulposus (NP cell death was measured using confocal microscopy. Histological and TUNEL assays were performed. For in vivo study, each local anesthetic was injected into rabbit lumbar IVDs under a fluoroscope. Six or 12 months after the injection, each IVD was prepared for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and histological analysis.In the organotypic culture model, both anesthetic agents induced time-dependent NP cell death; when compared with injected saline solution, significant effects were detected within 7 days. Compared with the saline group, TUNEL-positive NP cells were significantly increased in the bupivacaine group. In the in vivo study, MRI analysis did not show any significant difference. Histological analysis revealed that IVD degeneration occurred to a significantly level in the saline- and local anesthetics-injected groups compared with the untreated control or puncture-only groups. However, there was no significant difference between the saline and anesthetic agents groups.In the in vivo model using healthy IVDs, there was no strong evidence to suggest that discoblock with local anesthetics has the potential of inducing IVD degeneration other than the initial mechanical damage of the pressurized injection. Further studies should be performed to investigate the deteriorative effects of the local injection of analgesic agents

  12. An Experimental Analysis of the Molecular Effects of Trastuzumab (Herceptin and Fulvestrant (Falsodex, as Single Agents or in Combination, on Human HR+/HER2+ Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Mouse Tumor Xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Chen

    Full Text Available To investigate the effects of trastuzumab (herceptin and fulvestrant (falsodex either in combination or alone, on downstream cell signaling pathways in lab-cultured human HR+/HER2+ breast cancer cell lines ZR-75-1 and BT-474, as well as on protein expression levels in mouse xenograft tissue.Cells were cultivated in the presence of trastuzumab or fulvestrant or both. Molecular events that resulted in an inhibition of cell proliferation and cell cycle progression or in an increased rate of apoptosis were studied. The distribution and abundance of the proteins p-Akt and p-Erk expressed in these cells in response to single agents or combinatorial treatment were also investigated. In addition, the effects of trastuzumab and fulvestrant, either as single agents or in combination on tumor growth as well as on expression of the protein p-MED1 expressed in in vivo mouse xenograft models was also examined.Cell proliferation was increasingly inhibited by trastuzumab or fulvestrant or both, with a CI1 in both human cell lines. The rate of apoptosis increased only in the BT-474 cell line and not in the ZR-75-1 cell line upon treatment with fulvestrant and not trastuzumab as a single agent (P0.05. Cell accumulation in the G1 phase of cell cycle was investigated in all treatment groups (P<0.05, and the combination of trastuzumab and fulvestrant reversed the effects of fulvestrant alone on p-Akt and p-Erk protein expression levels. Using ZR-75-1 or BT-474 to generate in vivo tumor xenografts in BALB/c athymic mouse models, we showed that a combination of both drugs resulted in a stronger inhibition of tumor growth (P<0.05 and a greater decrease in the levels of activated MED1 (p-MED1 expressed in tumor issues compared with the use of either drug as a single agent.We demonstrate that the administration of trastuzumab and fulvestrant in combination results in positive synergistic effects on both, ZR-75-1 and BT-474 cell lines. This combinatorial approach is

  13. Heterocycles 36. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes-Bound N,N-Diethyl Ethanolamine as Mild and Efficient Racemisation Agent in the Enzymatic DKR of 2-Arylthiazol-4-yl-alanines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denisa Leonte

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the chemoenzymatic synthesis of enantiopure l-2-arylthiazol-4-yl alanines starting from their racemic N-acetyl derivatives; by combining the lipase-catalysed dynamic kinetic resolution of oxazol-5(4H-ones with a chemical and an enzymatic enantioselective hydrolytic step affording the desired products in good yields (74%–78% and high enantiopurities (ee > 99%. The developed procedure exploits the utility of the single-walled carbon nanotubes-bound diethylaminoethanol as mild and efficient racemisation agent for the dynamic kinetic resolution of the corresponding oxazolones.

  14. Molecular imaging: Moving towards infectious diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Hongxiu; Ingraham, Christopher R.; Yang, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging has been advanced into the field of infectious diseases, which provides not only new insights for basic science, but also new strategies for the effective management of infectious diseases in clinical practice.

  15. African Journal of Infectious Diseases: Journal Sponsorship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Infectious Diseases: Journal Sponsorship. Journal Home > About the Journal > African Journal of Infectious Diseases: Journal Sponsorship. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  16. Immunological Response to Single Pathogen Challenge with Agents of the Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex: An RNA-Sequence Analysis of the Bronchial Lymph Node Transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polyana C Tizioto

    Full Text Available Susceptibility to bovine respiratory disease (BRD is multi-factorial and is influenced by stress in conjunction with infection by both bacterial and viral pathogens. While vaccination is broadly used in an effort to prevent BRD, it is far from being fully protective and cases diagnosed from a combination of observed clinical signs without any attempt at identifying the causal pathogens are usually treated with antibiotics. Dairy and beef cattle losses from BRD are profound worldwide and genetic studies have now been initiated to elucidate host loci which underlie susceptibility with the objective of enabling molecular breeding to reduce disease prevalence. In this study, we employed RNA sequencing to examine the bronchial lymph node transcriptomes of controls and beef cattle which had individually been experimentally challenged with bovine respiratory syncytial virus, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, bovine viral diarrhea virus, Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica or Mycoplasma bovis to identify the genes that are involved in the bovine immune response to infection. We found that 142 differentially expressed genes were located in previously described quantitative trait locus regions associated with risk of BRD. Mutations affecting the expression or amino acid composition of these genes may affect disease susceptibility and could be incorporated into molecular breeding programs. Genes involved in innate immunity were generally found to be differentially expressed between the control and pathogen-challenged animals suggesting that variation in these genes may lead to a heritability of susceptibility that is pathogen independent. However, we also found pathogen-specific expression profiles which suggest that host genetic variation for BRD susceptibility is pathogen dependent.

  17. Immunological Response to Single Pathogen Challenge with Agents of the Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex: An RNA-Sequence Analysis of the Bronchial Lymph Node Transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tizioto, Polyana C; Kim, JaeWoo; Seabury, Christopher M; Schnabel, Robert D; Gershwin, Laurel J; Van Eenennaam, Alison L; Toaff-Rosenstein, Rachel; Neibergs, Holly L; Taylor, Jeremy F

    2015-01-01

    Susceptibility to bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is multi-factorial and is influenced by stress in conjunction with infection by both bacterial and viral pathogens. While vaccination is broadly used in an effort to prevent BRD, it is far from being fully protective and cases diagnosed from a combination of observed clinical signs without any attempt at identifying the causal pathogens are usually treated with antibiotics. Dairy and beef cattle losses from BRD are profound worldwide and genetic studies have now been initiated to elucidate host loci which underlie susceptibility with the objective of enabling molecular breeding to reduce disease prevalence. In this study, we employed RNA sequencing to examine the bronchial lymph node transcriptomes of controls and beef cattle which had individually been experimentally challenged with bovine respiratory syncytial virus, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, bovine viral diarrhea virus, Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica or Mycoplasma bovis to identify the genes that are involved in the bovine immune response to infection. We found that 142 differentially expressed genes were located in previously described quantitative trait locus regions associated with risk of BRD. Mutations affecting the expression or amino acid composition of these genes may affect disease susceptibility and could be incorporated into molecular breeding programs. Genes involved in innate immunity were generally found to be differentially expressed between the control and pathogen-challenged animals suggesting that variation in these genes may lead to a heritability of susceptibility that is pathogen independent. However, we also found pathogen-specific expression profiles which suggest that host genetic variation for BRD susceptibility is pathogen dependent.

  18. [Persistant fevers of infectious origin in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Marie; Wagner, Noémie

    2018-02-14

    Prolonged fevers in children are a regular challenge for the paediatrician or any physician caring for these children (emergency physicians, pediatric infectious diseases specialists). The causes are multiple, classified into three major families : infectious, inflammatory and oncological. Infectious causes are the most common and account for more than 50 % of cases. The objective of this review is to guide physicians in charge of these patients throughout their management by focusing on the quest of infectious causes.

  19. HOMOSEXUAL TRANSMISSION OF INFECTIOUS SYPHILIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, C. Colin

    1963-01-01

    Homosexuality is more prevalent in our society than many suspect. The incidence of infectious syphilis is increasing and the homosexual is playing an increasing role in its epidemiology. Fifteen per cent to 70 per cent of homosexuals practice analism. The diagnosis of venereal disease should always be kept in mind when dealing with anorectal problems. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:13957193

  20. Emerging Infectious Diseases in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigi, Richard H

    2017-05-01

    It has been recognized for centuries that pregnant women have unique susceptibilities to many infectious diseases that predispose them to untoward outcomes compared with the general adult population. It is thought a combination of adaptive alterations in immunity to allow for the fetal allograft combined with changes in anatomy and physiology accompanying pregnancy underlie these susceptibilities. Emerging infectious diseases are defined as those whose incidence in humans has increased in the past two decades or threaten to increase in the near future. The past decade alone has witnessed many such outbreaks, each with its own unique implications for pregnant women and their unborn fetuses as well as lessons for the health care community regarding response and mitigation. Examples of such outbreaks include, but are not limited to, severe acute respiratory syndrome, the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza, Ebola virus, and, most recently, the Zika virus. Although each emerging pathogen has unique features requiring specific considerations, there are many underlying principles that are shared in the recognition, communication, and mitigation of such infectious outbreaks. Some of these key principles include disease-specific delineation of transmission dynamics, understanding of pathogen-specific effects on both mothers and fetuses, and advance planning and contemporaneous management that prioritize communication among public health experts, clinicians, and patients. The productive and effective working collaboration among the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine has been a key partnership in the successful communication and management of such outbreaks for women's health care providers and patients alike. Going forward, the knowledge gained over the past decade will undoubtedly continue to inform future responses and will serve to optimize the education and care given

  1. Single Agent Antihypertensive Therapy and Orthostatic Blood Pressure Behaviour in Older Adults Using Beat-to-Beat Measurements: The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Canney

    Full Text Available Impaired blood pressure (BP stabilisation after standing, defined using beat-to-beat measurements, has been shown to predict important health outcomes. We aimed to define the relationship between individual classes of antihypertensive agent and BP stabilisation among hypertensive older adults.Cross-sectional analysis from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing, a cohort study of Irish adults aged 50 years and over. Beat-to-beat BP was recorded in participants undergoing an active stand test. We defined grade 1 hypertension according to European Society of Cardiology criteria (systolic BP [SBP] 140-159 mmHg ± diastolic BP [DBP] 90-99 mmHg. Outcomes were: (i initial orthostatic hypotension (IOH (SBP drop ≥40 mmHg ± DBP drop ≥20 mmHg within 15 seconds [s] of standing accompanied by symptoms; (ii sustained OH (SBP drop ≥20 mmHg ± DBP drop ≥10 mmHg from 60 to 110 s inclusive; (iii impaired BP stabilisation (SBP drop ≥20 mmHg ± DBP drop ≥10 mmHg at any 10 s interval during the test. Outcomes were assessed using multivariable-adjusted logistic regression.A total of 536 hypertensive participants were receiving monotherapy with a renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system inhibitor (n = 317, 59.1%, beta-blocker (n = 89, 16.6%, calcium channel blocker (n = 89, 16.6% or diuretic (n = 41, 7.6%. A further 783 untreated participants met criteria for grade 1 hypertension. Beta-blockers were associated with increased odds of initial OH (OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.31-3.21 and sustained OH (OR 3.36, 95% CI 1.87-6.03 versus untreated grade 1 hypertension. Multivariable adjustment did not attenuate the results. Impaired BP stabilisation was evident at 20 s (OR 2.59, 95% CI 1.58-4.25 and persisted at 110 s (OR 2.90, 95% CI 1.64-5.11. No association was found between the other agents and any study outcome.Beta-blocker monotherapy was associated with a >2-fold increased odds of initial OH and a >3-fold increased odds of sustained OH and impaired BP stabilisation

  2. Acute tonsillitis at infectious patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. P. Finogeev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined 1824 patients with diphtheria treated in Clinical Infectious Diseases Hospital Botkin (St. Petersburg in 1993 – 1994, and more than 500 patients referred to the clinic with a diagnosis of «angina». Based on published data and our own research observations investigated the etiology of acute tonsillitis. Bacterial tonsillitis should be treated with antibiotics, and this is important aetiological interpretation of these diseases. Streptococcal tonsillitis should always be a sore throat syndrome as a diagnostic sign of support. For other forms of lymphoma lesion of the tonsils should not be defined as «angina», and called «tonsillitis». Аngina as β-hemolytic streptococcus group A infection is recognized as the leader in the development of rheumatic fever. On the basis of a large clinical material briefly analyzed the clinical manifestations of various forms of diphtheria with membranous tonsillitis. Also presented with a syndrome of infectious diseases as tonsillitis, therapeutic and surgical «mask» of infectious diseases.

  3. CT evaluation of infectious colitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiki, Noriyuki; Maruyama, Masataka; Fujita, Yoshiyuki; Suzuki, Yuko; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Imoto, Ichiro; Adachi, Yukihiko

    2002-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is useful for evaluating the diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease, such as infectious colitis, in patients with severe pain and bloody diarrhea. During the 7 years between November 1993 and October 2000, 34 patients with infectious colitis (18 male, 16 female; mean age 42±19 yrs), received emergency CT and colonoscopy because of severe abdominal pain and dysentery. The following organisms were isolated: pathogenic Escherichia coli (12), 6 of which were O157: H7 (O-157), Salmonella species (11), Campylobacter species (5), Vibrio parahaemolyticus (3), Yersinia enterocolotica (2) and Shigella species (1). Thickening of the intestinal wall greater than 10 mm was seen in the ascending colon in the 6 cases with E. coli O157, in 5/11 cases with Salmonella, 4/5 with Campylobacter and 1/6 with non-O157 pathogenic E. Coli. marked intestinal wall thickening, greater than 20 mm, was seen in the ascending colon of the 4 of the patients with an O-157 infection. In all patients with O-157 colitis, slight ascites was noted in the pelvic space. In additions, ascites was also seen in 3/13 patients with Salmonella and 1/5 patients with Campylobacter colitis. The CT findings, in the patients with infectious colitis, are non-specific but knowledge and recognition of the findings will help in patient evaluation and proper treatment. (author)

  4. CT evaluation of infectious colitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiki, Noriyuki; Maruyama, Masataka; Fujita, Yoshiyuki; Suzuki, Yuko [Saint Luke' s International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Imoto, Ichiro [National Mie Chuo Hospital, Hisai (Japan); Adachi, Yukihiko [Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is useful for evaluating the diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease, such as infectious colitis, in patients with severe pain and bloody diarrhea. During the 7 years between November 1993 and October 2000, 34 patients with infectious colitis (18 male, 16 female; mean age 42{+-}19 yrs), received emergency CT and colonoscopy because of severe abdominal pain and dysentery. The following organisms were isolated: pathogenic Escherichia coli (12), 6 of which were O157: H7 (O-157), Salmonella species (11), Campylobacter species (5), Vibrio parahaemolyticus (3), Yersinia enterocolotica (2) and Shigella species (1). Thickening of the intestinal wall greater than 10 mm was seen in the ascending colon in the 6 cases with E. coli O157, in 5/11 cases with Salmonella, 4/5 with Campylobacter and 1/6 with non-O157 pathogenic E. Coli. marked intestinal wall thickening, greater than 20 mm, was seen in the ascending colon of the 4 of the patients with an O-157 infection. In all patients with O-157 colitis, slight ascites was noted in the pelvic space. In additions, ascites was also seen in 3/13 patients with Salmonella and 1/5 patients with Campylobacter colitis. The CT findings, in the patients with infectious colitis, are non-specific but knowledge and recognition of the findings will help in patient evaluation and proper treatment. (author)

  5. Nitric oxide induced by Indian ginseng root extract inhibits Infectious Bursal Disease virus in chicken embryo fibroblasts in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Bhaskar; Umapathi, Vijaypillai; Rastogi, Sunil Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Infectious Bursal Disease is a severe viral disease of chicken responsible for serious economic losses to poultry farmers. The causative agent, Infectious Bursal Disease virus, is inhibited by nitric oxide. Root extract of the Indian ginseng, Withania somnifera , inhibits Infectious Bursal Disease virus in vitro. Also, Withania somnifera root extract is known to induce nitric oxide production in vitro. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to determine if the inhibitory activity of Withania somnifera against Infectious Bursal Disease virus was based on the production of nitric oxide. We show that besides other mechanisms, the inhibition of Infectious Bursal Disease virus by Withania somnifera involves the production of nitric oxide. Our results also highlight the paradoxical role of nitric oxide in the pathogenesis of Infectious Bursal Disease.

  6. Single- and multistep resistance selection studies on the activity of retapamulin compared to other agents against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia; Clark, Catherine; Credito, Kim; McGhee, Pamela; Dewasse, Bonifacio; Bogdanovich, Tatiana; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2006-02-01

    Retapamulin had the lowest rate of spontaneous mutations by single-step passaging and the lowest parent and selected mutant MICs by multistep passaging among all drugs tested for all Staphylococcus aureus strains and three Streptococcus pyogenes strains which yielded resistant clones. Retapamulin has a low potential for resistance selection in S. pyogenes, with a slow and gradual propensity for resistance development in S. aureus.

  7. Infectious disease outbreaks in competitive sports, 2005-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Cathal James; O'Connell, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Old, evolving, and new infectious agents continually threaten the participation of competitors in sports. To provide an update of the medical literature on infectious disease outbreaks in sport for the last 5 years (May 2005-November 2010). A total of 21 outbreaks or clusters were identified. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (n = 7, 33%; mainly community acquired) and tinea (trichophytosis: n = 6, 29%) were the most common pathogens responsible for outbreaks. Skin and soft tissue was the most common site of infection (n = 15, 71%). The majority of outbreaks reported occurred in close-contact sports, mainly combat sports (ie, wrestling, judo) and American football. Twelve outbreaks (57%) involved high school or collegiate competitors. Common community outbreak pathogens, such as influenza virus and norovirus, have received little attention.

  8. Infectious Mononucleosis and Cholestatic Hepatitis: A Rare Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Salgado

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Infectious mononucleosis is one of the major clinical manifestations of Epstein-Barr virus infection. In this syndrome, elevation of liver transaminase levels is common but cholestasis is rare, with few cases described in the literature. We present the case of a 14-year-old female adolescent, admitted to the Emergency Room with fever, odynophagia and cervical adenomegaly. She was treated with amoxicillin and two days later he presented with jaundice. The analytical evaluation was compatible with cholestatic hepatitis and abdominal ultrasound revealed hepatosplenomegaly without dilatation of the bile ducts. The diagnosis of Epstein-Barr virus infection was confirmed by the presence of serological markers. This case aims to raise awareness of a rare manifestation of a common infectious agent and, consequently, to the inclusion of acute Epstein-Barr virus infection in the differential diagnosis of pediatric cholestatic hepatitis.

  9. What Makes a Prion: Infectious Proteins From Animals to Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLea, K S

    2017-01-01

    While philosophers in ancient times had many ideas for the cause of contagion, the modern study of infective agents began with Fracastoro's 1546 proposal that invisible "spores" spread infectious disease. However, firm categorization of the pathogens of the natural world would need to await a mature germ theory that would not arise for 300 years. In the 19th century, the earliest pathogens described were bacteria and other cellular microbes. By the close of that century, the work of Ivanovsky and Beijerinck introduced the concept of a virus, an infective particle smaller than any known cell. Extending into the early-mid-20th century there was an explosive growth in pathogenic microbiology, with a cellular or viral cause identified for nearly every transmissible disease. A few occult pathogens remained to be discovered, including the infectious proteins (prions) proposed by Prusiner in 1982. This review discusses the prions identified in mammals, yeasts, and other organisms, focusing on the amyloid-based prions. I discuss the essential biochemical properties of these agents and the application of this knowledge to diseases of protein misfolding and aggregation, as well as the utility of yeast as a model organism to study prion and amyloid proteins that affect human and animal health. Further, I summarize the ideas emerging out of these studies that the prion concept may go beyond proteinaceous infectious particles and that prions may be a subset of proteins having general nucleating or seeding functions involved in noninfectious as well as infectious pathogenic protein aggregation. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pathology of infectious diseases: what does the future hold?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Paul; Lucas, Sebastian; Jouvion, Grégory; Tauziède-Espariat, Arnault; Chrétien, Fabrice; Cathomas, Gieri

    2017-05-01

    The demand for expertise in pathology for the diagnosis of infectious diseases (ID) is continually growing, due to an increase in ID in immunocompromised patients and in the (re)-emergence of common and uncommon diseases, including tropical infections and infections with newly identified microbes. The microbiology laboratory plays a crucial role in diagnosing infections, identifying the responsible infectious agents and establishing sensitivity of pathogens to drug therapy. Pathology, however, is the only way to correlate the presence of an infectious agent with the reaction it evokes at cell and tissue level. For pathologists working in the field of ID pathology, it is essential to dispose of competence in cell and tissue pathology as well as in microbiology. Expertise in ID includes understanding of taxonomy and classification of pathogens as well as morphological criteria supporting their identification. Moreover, ID pathologists must master the methods used to detect pathogens in fixed cell and tissue samples, notably immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization and the polymerase chain reaction. Paradoxically, the increasing frequency of lesions caused by pathogens and diagnosed in a pathology laboratory appears to be paralleled by a gradual loss of expertise of pathologists in the field of infectious and tropical diseases. We contend that this may be due at least in part to the continuously increasing number of samples of tumor tissue pathologists deal with and the rapidly expanding number of tissue based biomarkers with predictive value for new anti-cancer therapies. In this review, we highlight current and future issues pertaining to ID pathology, in order to increase awareness of its importance for surgical and molecular pathology. The intention is to contribute to the development of best practice in ID pathology.

  11. Evolution of systemic treatment for hormone-sensitive breast cancer: from sequential use of single agents to the upfront administration of drug combinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Imyanitov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current standards of treatment of endocrine-dependent cancers (breast cancer (BC, prostate cancer imply sequential use of endocrine therapy and cytotoxic agents: it is believed, that steroid hormone antagonists cease the division of transformed cells and therefore make them resistant to other therapeutic modalities. It is important to recognize that conceptual investigations in this field were carried out dozens of years ago, and often involved relatively non-efficient drugs, imperfect laboratory tests, etc. There are several recent examples of combined use of endocrine therapy and other compounds. The addition of docetaxel (6 cycles to androgen deprivation resulted in significant improvement of overall survival in men with metastatic prostate cancer. Clinical trial involving the combined use of exemestane and everolimus demonstrated promising results. There are ongoing studies on inhibitors of cycline-dependent kinases. Use of these drugs in the beginning of endocrine therapy may significantly delay resistance to the antagonists of estrogen signaling.

  12. Myalgic encephalomyelitis, chronic fatigue syndrome: An infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, R A

    2015-12-01

    The etiology of myalgic encephalomyelitis also known as chronic fatigue syndrome or ME/CFS has not been established. Controversies exist over whether it is an organic disease or a psychological disorder and even the existence of ME/CFS as a disease entity is sometimes denied. Suggested causal hypotheses have included psychosomatic disorders, infectious agents, immune dysfunctions, autoimmunity, metabolic disturbances, toxins and inherited genetic factors. Clinical, immunological and epidemiological evidence supports the hypothesis that: ME/CFS is an infectious disease; the causal pathogen persists in patients; the pathogen can be transmitted by casual contact; host factors determine susceptibility to the illness; and there is a population of healthy carriers, who may be able to shed the pathogen. ME/CFS is endemic globally as sporadic cases and occasional cluster outbreaks (epidemics). Cluster outbreaks imply an infectious agent. An abrupt flu-like onset resembling an infectious illness occurs in outbreak patients and many sporadic patients. Immune responses in sporadic patients resemble immune responses in other infectious diseases. Contagion is shown by finding secondary cases in outbreaks, and suggested by a higher prevalence of ME/CFS in sporadic patients' genetically unrelated close contacts (spouses/partners) than the community. Abortive cases, sub-clinical cases, and carrier state individuals were found in outbreaks. The chronic phase of ME/CFS does not appear to be particularly infective. Some healthy patient-contacts show immune responses similar to patients' immune responses, suggesting exposure to the same antigen (a pathogen). The chronicity of symptoms and of immune system changes and the occurrence of secondary cases suggest persistence of a causal pathogen. Risk factors which predispose to developing ME/CFS are: a close family member with ME/CFS; inherited genetic factors; female gender; age; rest/activity; previous exposure to stress or toxins

  13. Antibiotic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Superbugs and Drugs" Home | Contact Us General Background: Antibiotic Agents What is an antibacterial and how are ... with the growth and reproduction of bacteria. While antibiotics and antibacterials both attack bacteria, these terms have ...

  14. MICROBIOLOGICAL METHODS APPLICATION EXPERIENCE IN THE SEVERE INJURIES INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Svistunov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern clinical medicine and surgery problems are associated with infections complications after medical care. In recent years, surgery has made substantial progress related to the new organizational approaches and medical technology specialized medical care to the wounded and injured. However, these gains are offset by a high rate of infectious complications that require finding effective measures emerging infectious complications timely diagnosis and their prevention. Clinical manifestations are often nosocomial in patients with severe injuries and are largely determined by the influence of clinical and pathogenetic risk factors. Such infectious complications require a comprehensive assessment, including microbiological testing. The main causative agents of infectious complications in surgical hospitals are S. aureus, K. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp., which can cause bloodstream infections, soft tissue, respiratory and urinary tract infections, especially in debilitated and immunocompromised patients and patients in intensive care units. These micro organisms are dangerous to patients and medical staff, as they can survive for a long time in the hospital environment, as well as to spread from patient to patient in violation of isolation restrictive measures and requirements for hygiene of medical workers hands. Clinical patterns of infection associated with medical care for severe injuries are to the possibility of serial and parallel development, both in different and in the same time frame of local, visceral and generalized infection with prevalence of combined forms of patients surgical hospital with a high risk of nosocomial infection against the background of factors, diagnostic and treatment process and hospital environment, introduction of the agent. Early etiological diagnosis allows timely assign empirical causal treatment and arrange for infection control to prevent the spread of microorganisms in the hospital. The

  15. Investigative modalities in infectious keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Noopur

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard recommended guidelines for diagnosis of infectious keratitis do exist. Based on an extensive Medline literature search, the various investigative modalities available for aiding the diagnosis of microbial keratitis have been reviewed and described briefly. Preferred practice patterns have been outlined and the importance of routine pre-treatment cultures in the primary management of infectious keratitis has been highlighted. Corneal scraping, tear samples and corneal biopsy are few of the specimens needed to carry out the investigative procedures for diagnosis and for initiating therapy in cases of microbial keratitis. In bacterial, fungal and amoebic keratitis, microscopic examination of smears is essential for rapid diagnosis. Potassium hydroxide (KOH wet mount, Gram′s stain and Giemsa stain are widely used and are important for clinicians to start empirical therapy before microbial culture results are available. The usefulness of performing corneal cultures in all cases of suspected infectious keratitis has been well established. In cases of suspected viral keratitis, therapy can be initiated on clinical judgment alone. If a viral culture is needed, scrapings should directly be inoculated into the viral transport media. In vivo confocal microscopy is a useful adjunct to slit lamp bio-microscopy for supplementing diagnosis in most cases and establishing early diagnosis in many cases of non-responding fungal and amoebic keratitis. This is a non-invasive, high resolution technique which allows rapid detection of Acanthamoeba cysts and trophozoites and fungal hyphae in the cornea long before laboratory cultures give conclusive results. Other new modalities for detection of microbial keratitis include molecular diagnostic techniques like polymerase chain reaction, and genetic finger printing by pulsed field gel electrophoresis.

  16. Infectious disease risk in asbestos abatement workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, John H; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Cegolon, Luca

    2012-08-16

    The current literature reports increased infectious disease occurrence in various construction occupations, as an important contributor to morbidity and mortality arising from employment.These observations should be expanded to asbestos abatement workers, as the abatement can create an environment favorable for bacterial, viral and fungal infections. Asbestos abatement work employs activities resulting in cuts, blisters and abrasions to the skin, work in a dirty environment and exposure to dust, mists and fumes.Furthermore, this population exhibits a high smoking rate which increases the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and respiratory infections.In addition, these workers also commonly employ respirators, which can accumulate dirt and debris magnifying exposure to microbes. Use of respirators and related types of personal protective equipment, especially if shared and in the close environment experienced by workers, may enhance communicability of these agents, including viruses. Abatement workers need to be provided with information on hazards and targeted by appropriate health education to reduce the infection risk. Epidemiological studies to investigate this risk in asbestos removers are recommended.

  17. Current applications of nanoparticles in infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazo, Hinojal; Colino, Clara I; Lanao, José M

    2016-02-28

    For decades infections have been treated easily with drugs. However, in the 21st century, they may become lethal again owing to the development of antimicrobial resistance. Pathogens can become resistant by means of different mechanisms, such as increasing the time they spend in the intracellular environment, where drugs are unable to reach therapeutic levels. Moreover, drugs are also subject to certain problems that decrease their efficacy. This requires the use of high doses, and frequent administrations must be implemented, causing adverse side effects or toxicity. The use of nanoparticle systems can help to overcome such problems and increase drug efficacy. Accordingly, there is considerable current interest in their use as antimicrobial agents against different pathogens like bacteria, virus, fungi or parasites, multidrug-resistant strains and biofilms; as targeting vectors towards specific tissues; as vaccines and as theranostic systems. This review begins with an overview of the different types and characteristics of nanoparticles used to deliver drugs to the target, followed by a review of current research and clinical trials addressing the use of nanoparticles within the field of infectious diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Etiology and immunology of infectious bronchitis virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LF Caron

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV of chickens is currently one of the main diseases associated with respiratory syndrome in domestic poultry, as well as with losses related to egg production. The etiological agent is a coronavirus, which presents structural differences in the field, mainly in the S1 spike protein. The immune response against this virus is complicated by the few similarities among serotypes. Environmental and management factors, as well as the high mutation rate of the virus, render it difficult to control the disease and compromise the efficacy of the available vaccines. Bird immune system capacity to respond to challenges depend on the integrity of the mucosae, as an innate compartment, and on the generation of humoral and cell-mediated adaptive responses, and may affect the health status of breeding stocks in the medium run. Vaccination of day-old chicks in the hatchery on aims at eliciting immune responses, particularly cell-mediated responses that are essential when birds are first challenged. Humoral response (IgY and IgA are also important for virus clearance in subsequent challenges. The presence of antibodies against the S1 spike protein in 3- to 4-week-old birds is important both in broilers and for immunological memory in layers and breeders.

  19. Functionality testing of stem cell grafts to predict infectious complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, J; Granrot, I; Mattsson, J; Omazic, B; Uhlin, M; Thunberg, S

    2017-07-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a routine clinical procedure performed to treat patients with haematological malignancies, primary immune deficiencies or metabolic disorders. Infections during lymphopenia after allogeneic HSCT are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Typical infectious agents are Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus and fungi. The study aim was to evaluate whether measurement of the responses of antigen-specific T-cells, recognizing infectious pathogens would correlate to protective functions in the stem cell recipient post-transplant. Twenty-one grafts were analysed by flow cytometry and cells were stimulated in vitro with relevant infectious antigens, followed by evaluation of T-cell proliferation and cytokine production. Results were compared to the recipients' clinical records 1-year post-transplantation. We show that an extensive repertoire of transferred antigen-specific T-cells from allogeneic donor grafts against infectious agents, involved in post-transplant infections, are linked to an absence of infectious complications for the recipient up-to 1-year post-transplant. The protective effect was associated with antigen-specific T-cell proliferation and IL-1β secretion. Our results suggest that assaying T-cell function before HSCT could determine individual risks for infectious complications and thus aid in clinical decision-making regarding prophylactic and pre-emptive anti-infective therapy. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  20. Update in Infectious Diseases 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candel, F J; Peñuelas, M; Lejárraga, C; Emilov, T; Rico, C; Díaz, I; Lázaro, C; Viñuela-Prieto, J M; Matesanz, M

    2017-09-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in complex models of continuous infection is a current issue. The update 2017 course addresses about microbiological, epidemiological and clinical aspects useful for a current approach to infectious disease. During the last year, nosocomial pneumonia approach guides, recommendations for management of yeast and filamentous fungal infections, review papers on the empirical approach to peritonitis and extensive guidelines on stewardship have been published. HIV infection is being treated before and more intensively. The implementation of molecular biology, spectrometry and inmunology to traditional techniques of staining and culture achieve a better and faster microbiological diagnosis. Finally, the infection is increasingly integrated, assessing non-antibiotic aspects in the treatment.

  1. Reaction of the (111) faces of single-crystal indium phosphide with alkylating agents: evidence for selective reaction of the p-rich face

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spool, A.M.; Daube, K.A.; Mallouk, T.E.; Belmont, J.A.; Wrighton, M.S.

    1986-05-28

    We wish to report that the P-rich, (111)B, face of single-crystal InP, but not the In-rich, (111)A, face of the same crystal, reacts with molecular reagents to yield surface-bound material derived from the apparent alkylation of a surface P atom. Exploitation of surface functional groups has been demonstrated to be very important in the attachment of molecular reagents and polymers to electrode surfaces. Electrodes derivatized with molecules have potential uses in analysis, fuel cells, electrosynthetic cells, and photoelectrochemical cells. We now wish to present evidence showing that an important photoelectrode material, InP, can be functionalized with molecules by reaction of the P-rich, (111)B, face with alkylating reagents.

  2. Comparison of single-agent chemotherapy and targeted therapy to first-line treatment in patients aged 80 years and older with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang QQ

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Qianqian Zhang,1 Zhehai Wang,2 Jun Guo,2 Liyan Liu,2 Xiao Han,2 Minmin Li,1 Shu Fang,1 Xiang Bi,1 Ning Tang,1 Yang Liu1 1School of Medicine and Life Sciences, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, University of Jinan, 2Department of Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, People’s Republic of China Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare single-agent chemotherapy with targeted therapy in initial treatment and to explore a better choice of treatment for patients aged 80 years and older with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC.Patients and methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted for 136 patients aged 80 years and older who were cytopathologically diagnosed and staged as advanced (stage IIIB or IV NSCLC. The patient population was divided into two treatment groups: 78 patients were allocated to the chemotherapy group (group A, pemetrexed or gemcitabine or docetaxel as a single agent, and 60 patients were allocated to another group and received epidermal growth factor-receptor tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (group B, erlotinib or gefitinib as a single agent. The primary end points were overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS, and the secondary end points were response rate, disease-control rate, safety, and quality of life.Results: In group A and group B, respectively, the median PFS was 2 versus 4 months (P=0.013, and the median OS was 8 versus 16 months (P=0.025. The 1- and 2-year survival rates of the two groups were 23.7% (group A, 18 of 76 versus 76.7% (group B, 46 of 60 and 13.2% (group A, ten of 76 versus 10% (group B, six of 60, respectively. The response rate and disease-control rate were 28.9% versus 36.7% (P=0.39 and 57.9% versus 76.7% (P=0.022 in group A and group B, respectively.Conclusion: Elders aged 80 years and over with advanced NSCLC in group B had longer PFS and OS compared with group A. It was well tolerated in group B because of the mild adverse effects. Targeted therapy can be

  3. Autoimmunity, infectious immunity, and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Eiji; Kobayashi, Kazuko; Matsunami, Yukana; Shen, Lianhua; Quan, Nanhu; Makarova, Marina; Suchkov, Sergey V; Ayada, Kiyoshi; Oguma, Keiji; Lopez, Luis R

    2009-11-01

    Vascular inflammation is common in certain systemic autoimmune diseases and contributes to the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and oxLDL/beta2-glycoprotein I (beta2GPI) complex formation. These complexes have been implicated as proatherogenic autoantigens that participate in the development of atherosclerotic disease. We have demonstrated that the in vitro macrophage uptake of oxLDL/beta2GPI complexes increases in the presence of IgG anti-beta2GPI antibodies and that IgG immune complexes containing oxLDL/beta2GPI upregulate the expression of both scavenger and Fcgamma receptors to activate beta2GPI specific T cells. Some persistent infections may cause immune responses that promote atherogenesis. Cellular immunity (Th1) against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) derived heat shock protein 60 (Hp-HSP60) cross-reacts with endogenous HSP60 to cause cardiovascular disease likely by molecular mimicry. Infectious cellular response may be proatherogenic,while the humoral response (antibody production) maybe protective. We review the recent progress in our understanding of autoimmunity and infectious immunity that promote atherosclerosis.

  4. Infectious Risks of Traveling Abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin H; Blair, Barbra M

    2015-08-01

    A popular leisure activity, international travel can be associated with some infections. The most common travel-related illnesses appear to be gastrointestinal, dermatologic, respiratory, and systemic febrile syndromes. The pretravel medical consultation includes immunizations, malaria chemoprophylaxis, self-treatment for traveler's diarrhea, and advice on the prevention of a myriad of other infectious causes including dengue, chikungunya, rickettsiosis, leptospirosis, schistosomiasis, and strongyloidiasis. Travel to locations experiencing outbreaks such as Ebola virus disease, Middle East respiratory syndrome, avian influenza, and chikungunya call for specific alerts on preventive strategies. After travel, evaluation of an ill traveler must explore details of exposure, including destinations visited; activities; ingestion of contaminated food or drinks; contact with vectors, animals, fresh water, or blood and body fluids; and other potential exposures. Knowledge of the geographic distribution of infectious diseases is important in generating the differential diagnoses and testing accordingly. Empiric treatment is sometimes necessary when suspicion of a certain diagnosis is strong and confirmatory tests are delayed or lacking, particularly for infections that are rapidly progressive (for example, malaria) or for which timing of testing is prolonged (such as leptospirosis).

  5. Infectious Considerations in Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddon, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Slightly more than 500 people have flown in space, most of them for short periods of time. The total number of person years in space is small. Given this fact, and given rigorous astronaut screening, it is not surprising that the accumulated infectious disease experience in space is also small, and mostly, theoretical. As the human space presence expands, we may expect mission length, total accumulated person years and the environmental complexity to increase. Add to the mix both changes in human immunity and microbial virulence, and it becomes realistic to consider infectious scenarios and the means to mitigate them. This lecture will cover the inhabited space environment from the perspective of host-microbe interactions, current relevant research, and the current countermeasures used. Future challenges will be discussed and there will be opportunity to ask questions about Space Operations. The audience is encouraged to think about what medical tools you would choose to have in different types of mission, what you would be willing to leave behind, and how you would compensate for the necessary trade offs in mission design.

  6. Climate change and infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flahault, Antoine; de Castaneda, Rafael Ruiz; Bolon, Isabelle

    Global changes are major determinants for infectious diseases, although attributable, part of climate change remains debatable. Vector-borne diseases are prone to be impacted by global warming, although other factors may play a substantial role, evidenced by the dramatic decrease in malaria in the last decades in places where climate change has deep and significant effects. There is now evidence that in some areas of the world, e.g. Horn of Africa, warm El Niño Southern Oscillations (ENSO), which are observed in the South Pacific Ocean, are associated with higher risk of emergence of Rift Valley fever, cholera and malaria and during cold La Niña events, dengue fever, chikungunya and yellow fever. This has been observed for these and other diseases in other parts of the world. For example, seasonal influenza outbreaks have been more intense (i.e. higher number) and more severe (i.e. higher mortality) when concomitant with La Niña events. Since climate scientists have recently observed that climate change is tied to more frequent and more intense ENSO events, we may foresee increases in frequency and severity in emerging infectious diseases in the world.

  7. Infectious diseases in cinema: virus hunters and killer microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Georgios; Seitaridis, Savvas; Akritidis, Nikolaos; Tsianos, Epaminondas

    2003-10-01

    The world of infectious diseases has been rarely presented in the cinema with accuracy. Apart from random biographies of scientists and retellings of stories about great epidemics from the past, most films focus on the dangers presented by outbreaks of unknown agents that originate from acts of bioterrorism, from laboratory accidents, or even from space. We review these films and underline the possible effect that they have on the public's perception of infection--a perception that, when misguided, could prove to be problematic in times of epidemics.

  8. Age-specific infectious period shapes dynamics of pneumonia in bighorn sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plowright, Raina K; Manlove, Kezia R; Besser, Thomas E; Páez, David J; Andrews, Kimberly R; Matthews, Patrick E; Waits, Lisette P; Hudson, Peter J; Cassirer, E Frances

    2017-10-01

    Superspreading, the phenomenon where a small proportion of individuals contribute disproportionately to new infections, has profound effects on disease dynamics. Superspreading can arise through variation in contacts, infectiousness or infectious periods. The latter has received little attention, yet it drives the dynamics of many diseases of critical public health, livestock health and conservation concern. Here, we present rare evidence of variation in infectious periods underlying a superspreading phenomenon in a free-ranging wildlife system. We detected persistent infections of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae, the primary causative agent of pneumonia in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis), in a small number of older individuals that were homozygous at an immunologically relevant genetic locus. Interactions among age-structure, genetic composition and infectious periods may drive feedbacks in disease dynamics that determine the magnitude of population response to infection. Accordingly, variation in initial conditions may explain divergent population responses to infection that range from recovery to catastrophic decline and extirpation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  9. Antitumor efficacy of IPI-504, a selective heat shock protein 90 inhibitor against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive human xenograft models as a single agent and in combination with trastuzumab or lapatinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, Ching Ching; Chesebrough, Jon; Coffman, Karen T; Fazenbaker, Christine A; Gooya, John; Weng, David; Coats, Steve; Jackson, Dowdy; Jallal, Bahija; Chang, Yong

    2009-08-01

    IPI-504 is a novel, highly soluble small-molecule inhibitor of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), a protein chaperone essential for regulating homeostasis of oncoproteins and cell signaling proteins. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2; ErbB2) oncoprotein, expressed in a subset of metastatic breast cancers, is a Hsp90 client protein. In this study, we investigated the antitumor activity and the mechanism of action of IPI-504 in HER2(+), trastuzumab-sensitive and trastuzumab-refractory cell lines in vitro and in vivo. IPI-504 exhibited potent antiproliferative activities (range of IC(50), 10-40 nmol/L) against several tumor cell lines examined, whereby mechanism of action was mediated through HER2 and Akt degradation. Both intravenous and oral administration of IPI-504 assessed in multiple schedules showed potent tumor growth inhibition in vivo with corresponding degradation of HER2. The tolerability and efficacy of IPI-504 combined with either trastuzumab or lapatinib were also investigated in HER2(+) tumor xenograft models. Combination of IPI-504 with trastuzumab significantly enhanced tumor growth delay and induced greater responses when compared with either agent alone. Although, as expected, trastuzumab alone did not exhibit any significant antitumor activity in the trastuzumab-resistant JIMT-1 model, IPI-504 administered in combination with trastuzumab yielded greater antitumor efficacy than either agent alone. Finally, combination of IPI-504 and lapatinib was well tolerated up to 50 mg/kg IPI-504 and 100 mg/kg lapatinib and resulted in significant delay in tumor growth, including partial and complete tumor responses. These lines of evidence support the development of IPI-504 in HER2-positive breast cancers as a single agent and in combination with either trastuzumab or lapatinib

  10. [Infectious diseases - a specialty of internal medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fätkenheuer, G; Jung, N; Kern, W V; Fölsch, U R; Salzberger, B

    2018-04-01

    Infectious diseases have recently gained wide public interest. Emerging infections and rising rates of antibiotic resistance are determining this trend. Both challenges will need to be addressed in international and local collaborations between different specialties in medicine and basic science. Infectious diseases as a clinical specialty in this scenario is directly responsible for the care of patients with infectious diseases. Its involvement in the care of patients with complicated infections has proved to be highly effective. Antibiotic stewardship programmes are effective measures in slowing the development of antibiotic resistance and have been widely implemented. But antibiotic stewardship specialists should not be confused with or taken as an alternative to infectious disease experts. Infectious diseases requires appropriate and specific training. It mainly uses the instrumentarium of internal medicine. With the current challenges in modern medicine, infectious diseases in Germany should thus be upgraded from a subspecialty to a clinical specialty, ideally within Internal Medicine.

  11. Pharmacological treatment for infectious corneal ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Darlene

    2013-04-01

    Cornea ulceration and infectious keratitis are leading causes of corneal morbidity and blindness. Infectious causes are among the most frequent and most severe. Management strategies for bacterial corneal ulcers have changed significantly over the last decades, however with a more limited progress in the treatment and management of nonbacterial, infectious ulcers. This paper provides an overview of the current principles, strategies and treatment choices for infectious corneal ulcers in adults. Topical application with a broad-spectrum antimicrobial remains the preferred method for the pharmacological management of infectious corneal ulcers. Increasing reports of clinical failures and in vitro resistance to antibiotics to treat the most common infectious (bacterial) corneal ulcers are increasing concerns. New approaches for improvement in the pharmacological management of corneal ulcers should focus on strategies for a more rational and evidence-based use of current antimicrobials and development of products to modulate the host immune response and to neutralize microbial toxins and other immune modulators.

  12. [Management of infectious diarrhea in nursing homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferahta, Nabila; Héquet, Delphine; Bizzozzero, Tosca; Major, Kristof; Petignat, Christiane

    2018-04-11

    Infectious diarrheas are of great concern in nursing homes and can engender outbreaks. Their importance in terms of morbidity, mortality and health economics justify the implementation of prevention and control measures. Although past studies emphasize the importance of infectious diarrheas occurring during hospitalization, data on nursing homes epidemiology remain scarce. This article is founded on recent data of the literature, on recommendations for the management of infectious diarrheas and for prevention and control of outbreaks in nursing homes.

  13. First evidence of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haenen, Olga; Schuetze, H.; Cieslak, M.; S., Oldenburg; Spierenburg, M.; Roozenburg-Hengst, R.E.M.; Voorbergen-Laarman, H.A.; Engelsma, M.Y.; Olesen, N.

    2016-01-01

    In spring 2008, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was detected for the first time in the Netherlands. The virus was isolated from rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), from a put-and-take fishery with angling ponds. IHNV is the causative agent of a serious fish disease,

  14. Waste Water Management and Infectious Disease. Part II: Impact of Waste Water Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Robert C.

    1975-01-01

    The ability of various treatment processes, such as oxidation ponds, chemical coagulation and filtration, and the soil mantle, to remove the agents of infectious disease found in waste water is discussed. The literature concerning the efficiency of removal of these organisms by various treatment processes is reviewed. (BT)

  15. Infectious Disease Clinical Research Program (IDCRP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Our mission is to conduct infectious disease clinical research of importance to the military through a unique, adaptive, and collaborative network, to inform health...

  16. Using biological networks to improve our understanding of infectious diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola J. Mulder

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases are the leading cause of death, particularly in developing countries. Although many drugs are available for treating the most common infectious diseases, in many cases the mechanism of action of these drugs or even their targets in the pathogen remain unknown. In addition, the key factors or processes in pathogens that facilitate infection and disease progression are often not well understood. Since proteins do not work in isolation, understanding biological systems requires a better understanding of the interconnectivity between proteins in different pathways and processes, which includes both physical and other functional interactions. Such biological networks can be generated within organisms or between organisms sharing a common environment using experimental data and computational predictions. Though different data sources provide different levels of accuracy, confidence in interactions can be measured using interaction scores. Connections between interacting proteins in biological networks can be represented as graphs and edges, and thus studied using existing algorithms and tools from graph theory. There are many different applications of biological networks, and here we discuss three such applications, specifically applied to the infectious disease tuberculosis, with its causative agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis and host, Homo sapiens. The applications include the use of the networks for function prediction, comparison of networks for evolutionary studies, and the generation and use of host–pathogen interaction networks.

  17. Infectious diseases -- new and ancient threats to world health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshansky, S J; Carnes, B; Rogers, R G; Smith, L

    1997-07-01

    Infectious and parasitic diseases remain a leading cause of death and disability in developing countries and are re-emerging as a serious health problem in developed countries. Outbreaks of Ebola, dengue hemorrhagic fever, cholera, and bubonic plague have occurred in low-income countries and multidrug-resistant organisms have surfaced throughout the world. Since 1973, over 28 new disease-causing microbes have been identified. This issue of "Population Bulletin" analyzes the impact of factors such as population growth, urbanization, migration, poverty, travel, agricultural practices, climate changes, natural disasters, and medical technology on the resurgence of infectious and parasitic diseases as well as the influence of diseases such as AIDS on population dynamics and socioeconomic development. Most of these diseases could be prevented, cured, or eradicated with known public health measures. National governments can help reduce poverty, step up immunization programs, and lessen the chances of introducing new diseases. Nongovernmental organizations can disseminate preventive knowledge and monitor disease outbreaks. The medical profession can strengthen infection control precautions and institute surveillance of the use of antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents. Since the geographic isolation that used to contain disease outbreaks has been replaced by permeable international borders, the campaign against infectious and parasitic diseases must be global.

  18. Circulating microRNAs as Potential Biomarkers of Infectious Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Carolina N.; Nalpas, Nicolas C.; McLoughlin, Kirsten E.; Browne, John A.; Gordon, Stephen V.; MacHugh, David E.; Shaughnessy, Ronan G.

    2017-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding endogenous RNA molecules that regulate a wide range of biological processes by post-transcriptionally regulating gene expression. Thousands of these molecules have been discovered to date, and multiple miRNAs have been shown to coordinately fine-tune cellular processes key to organismal development, homeostasis, neurobiology, immunobiology, and control of infection. The fundamental regulatory role of miRNAs in a variety of biological processes suggests that differential expression of these transcripts may be exploited as a novel source of molecular biomarkers for many different disease pathologies or abnormalities. This has been emphasized by the recent discovery of remarkably stable miRNAs in mammalian biofluids, which may originate from intracellular processes elsewhere in the body. The potential of circulating miRNAs as biomarkers of disease has mainly been demonstrated for various types of cancer. More recently, however, attention has focused on the use of circulating miRNAs as diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers of infectious disease; for example, human tuberculosis caused by infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, sepsis caused by multiple infectious agents, and viral hepatitis. Here, we review these developments and discuss prospects and challenges for translating circulating miRNA into novel diagnostics for infectious disease. PMID:28261201

  19. Grass Plants Bind, Retain, Uptake, and Transport Infectious Prions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Pritzkow

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Prions are the protein-based infectious agents responsible for prion diseases. Environmental prion contamination has been implicated in disease transmission. Here, we analyzed the binding and retention of infectious prion protein (PrPSc to plants. Small quantities of PrPSc contained in diluted brain homogenate or in excretory materials (urine and feces can bind to wheat grass roots and leaves. Wild-type hamsters were efficiently infected by ingestion of prion-contaminated plants. The prion-plant interaction occurs with prions from diverse origins, including chronic wasting disease. Furthermore, leaves contaminated by spraying with a prion-containing preparation retained PrPSc for several weeks in the living plant. Finally, plants can uptake prions from contaminated soil and transport them to aerial parts of the plant (stem and leaves. These findings demonstrate that plants can efficiently bind infectious prions and act as carriers of infectivity, suggesting a possible role of environmental prion contamination in the horizontal transmission of the disease.

  20. Grass plants bind, retain, uptake, and transport infectious prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritzkow, Sandra; Morales, Rodrigo; Moda, Fabio; Khan, Uffaf; Telling, Glenn C; Hoover, Edward; Soto, Claudio

    2015-05-26

    Prions are the protein-based infectious agents responsible for prion diseases. Environmental prion contamination has been implicated in disease transmission. Here, we analyzed the binding and retention of infectious prion protein (PrP(Sc)) to plants. Small quantities of PrP(Sc) contained in diluted brain homogenate or in excretory materials (urine and feces) can bind to wheat grass roots and leaves. Wild-type hamsters were efficiently infected by ingestion of prion-contaminated plants. The prion-plant interaction occurs with prions from diverse origins, including chronic wasting disease. Furthermore, leaves contaminated by spraying with a prion-containing preparation retained PrP(Sc) for several weeks in the living plant. Finally, plants can uptake prions from contaminated soil and transport them to aerial parts of the plant (stem and leaves). These findings demonstrate that plants can efficiently bind infectious prions and act as carriers of infectivity, suggesting a possible role of environmental prion contamination in the horizontal transmission of the disease. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Infectious bursal disease (Gumboro disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, T P; Eterradossi, N; Toquin, D; Meulemans, G

    2000-08-01

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) (Gumboro disease) has been described throughout the world, and the socio-economic significance of the disease is considerable world-wide. Various forms of the disease have been described, but typing remains unclear, since antigenic and pathotypic criteria are used indiscriminately, and the true incidence of different types is difficult to determine. Moreover, the infection, when not fatal, leads to a degree of immunosuppression which is often difficult to measure. Finally, the control measures used are subject to variations, and seldom follow a specific or standardised plan. In the context of expanding international trade, the authors provide an overview of existing knowledge on the subject to enhance available information on the epidemiology of IBD, the identification of reliable viral markers for diagnosis, and the implementation of specific control measures to ensure a global and co-ordinated approach to the disease.

  2. The return of infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, L

    1996-11-01

    This article presents the history of efforts to control the spread of infectious disease from the post-antibiotic era to 1995. Since World War II, public health strategy has focused on the eradication of microbes using powerful medical weaponry. The goal was to push humanity through a ¿health transition,¿ leaving the age of infectious disease permanently behind. But recent developments have shown that this grandiose optimism was premature. As people move across international borders, unwanted microbial hitch-hikers tag along, as happened in the case of Ebola. In large cities, sex industries arise and multiple-partner sex becomes more common, prompting rapid increases in sexually transmitted disease. Moreover, the practice of sharing syringes is a ready vehicle for the transmission of microbes while unhygienic health facilities become centers for the dissemination of disease rather than its control. Black market access to antimicrobials has led to overuse or outright misuse of the drugs and the emergence of resistant bacteria and parasites. Consequently, old organisms, aided by mankind's misuse of disinfectants and drugs, may take on new and more lethal forms. Even when allegations of biological warfare are not flying, it is often difficult to obtain accurate information about outbreaks of disease, particularly in countries dependent on foreign investment or tourism or both. Unfortunately, only 6 laboratories in the world meet security and safety standards that would make them suitable sites for research on the world's deadliest microbes. National security warrants bolder steps involving focusing not only on microbes directly dangerous to humans, but also on those that could pose major threats to crops or livestock. Unfortunately, economic crises have led to budget cuts, particularly in health care, at all levels of government in the US.

  3. The program for eradication of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis/infectious pustular vulvovaginitis in the Republic of Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazić Sava

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious bovine rhinotracheitis/infectious pustular vulvovaginitis (IBR/IPV are diseases that affect cattle population of all breeds, categories and age. Both diseases, especially infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR, poses severe health threat and causes major economic losses and is considered one of the “most costly” disease in cattle industry. The causal agent of the disease is a virus and any detection of IBR/IPV specific antibodies in non-vaccinated cattle, either in blood or milk, indicates that animal is infected and represents the source of infection. Countries with developed and intensive cattle breeding have been developed and implemented their national eradication programs to control IBR/IPV in accordance with international regulations. In this article, we outlined the needs and program for the eradication of IBR/IPV in the Republic of Serbia. The eradication program for IBR/IPV is an extensive process that requires systematic strategy involving different phases and activities. The eradication process from the moment of implementation until obtaining IBR/IPV-free status can last over several years and requires joint work and considerable financial resources that will be compansated with the elimination of IBR/IPV from the herd. This article gives an overview of all stages and activities regarding eradication of the disease and certification and maintaining of IBR/IPV-free herd status.

  4. Infectious diseases in Poland in 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadkowska-Todys, Małgorzata; Zieliński, Andrzej; Czarkowski, Mirosław P

    The aim of the study is to assess epidemiological situation of infectious and parasitic diseases in Poland in 2014, and an indication of the potential health risks from communicable diseases occurring in other areas of the globe. This paper is a summary of the analysis and evaluation of the results of epidemiological surveillance of infectious diseases in Poland in 2014, and those elements of European and global epidemiological background, which in this period had an impact on the epidemiological situation in Poland or constituted a threat. The main source of data for this study are statistical reports included in annual bulletins “Infectious diseases and poisoning in Poland in 2014” and “Immunizations in Poland in 2014” (NIPH-PZH, GIS, Warsaw 2015) and the data contained in the articles of „Epidemiological chronicle” presented in the Data on deaths are based on the statement of the Department for Demographic Research and Labour Market CSO presenting numbers of deaths from infectious and parasitic diseases registered in Poland in 2014, and in the previous years. Upper respiratory tract infection classified as “suspected flu and the flu season” in the since many years are the largest position among the diseases subject to disease surveillance. In the last decade, particularly large increase in the incidence of upper respiratory tract infection was reported in the flu season 2013., when the increase in comparison to the median of years 2008-2012 amounted to 189.8%. In 2014. Number of reported cases was 3 137 056 which represented a nonsignificant decrease of 0.8% compared with the previous year. However, compared to the median of the years 2008-2012 it was an increase of 187.4%. Better then based on calendar year is a picture obtained by examining the incidence of seasonal periods in the annual, but counted from 1 September to 31 August of the following year. In such a setup, in the 2012/2013 season were recorded 3 025 258 of cases, and in the season

  5. POSTOPERATIVE INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH URINARY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ch. Usupbaev

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The large proportion of postoperative infectious complications in urological hospitals makes extremely urgent the problem of its control. The high level of these complications in the postoperative period in patients with urolithiasis is caused by various endo- and exogenous factors.Purpose. To determine the frequency, structure, and features of postoperative infectious complications in patients with urolithiasis in urological hospitals.Materials and methods. As an object of research we used a medical card 232 of the operated patients with urolithiasis, which were copied out in individual registration card. Of 232 patients with urolithiasis 48.3% were men, their average age was 44.5 ± 9.4 years. Female patients were slightly larger (51.7%, respectively, the average age was 44.9 ± 8.1 years.Results. The most common postoperative infectious complications in urolithiasis was infection in the area of surgical intervention (36,2%, acute urethritis (20,7%, acute pyelonephritis (14.7 per cent, paranephritis (9,5%, acute orhoepididimit (7,8%, acute cystitis (6%, pionephrosis (3,4%, urosepsis (1.7 percent. In the etiological structure of infectious agents associated with medical care with the highest frequency, microorganisms of genera Escherichia coli (43%, Proteus (9.5%, Staphilococcus spp were isolated. (8.3% and Staphilococcus aureus (8.3%, and in 11.9% of cases, the Association of microorganisms. Analysis of the etiological structure of genera of the family Enterobacteriaceae resistant to β-lactam antibiotics showed that 63.2% of the amount to the genus strain of E. coli, 21% Proteus and 15.8% Klebsiella.Conclusion. The data obtained indicate the need for research on the prevalence of resistant strains of microorganisms, the introduction of more specifi c, sensitive methods and monitoring. This will increase the effectiveness of treatment, reduce the risk of the spread of resistant strains and increase nosocomial infections.

  6. The landscape genetics of infectious disease emergence and spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biek, Roman; Real, Leslie A

    2010-09-01

    The spread of parasites is inherently a spatial process often embedded in physically complex landscapes. It is therefore not surprising that infectious disease researchers are increasingly taking a landscape genetics perspective to elucidate mechanisms underlying basic ecological processes driving infectious disease dynamics and to understand the linkage between spatially dependent population processes and the geographic distribution of genetic variation within both hosts and parasites. The increasing availability of genetic information on hosts and parasites when coupled to their ecological interactions can lead to insights for predicting patterns of disease emergence, spread and control. Here, we review research progress in this area based on four different motivations for the application of landscape genetics approaches: (i) assessing the spatial organization of genetic variation in parasites as a function of environmental variability, (ii) using host population genetic structure as a means to parameterize ecological dynamics that indirectly influence parasite populations, for example, gene flow and movement pathways across heterogeneous landscapes and the concurrent transport of infectious agents, (iii) elucidating the temporal and spatial scales of disease processes and (iv) reconstructing and understanding infectious disease invasion. Throughout this review, we emphasize that landscape genetic principles are relevant to infection dynamics across a range of scales from within host dynamics to global geographic patterns and that they can also be applied to unconventional 'landscapes' such as heterogeneous contact networks underlying the spread of human and livestock diseases. We conclude by discussing some general considerations and problems for inferring epidemiological processes from genetic data and try to identify possible future directions and applications for this rapidly expanding field.

  7. Infectious prion diseases in humans: cannibalism, iatrogenicity and zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haïk, Stéphane; Brandel, Jean-Philippe

    2014-08-01

    In contrast with other neurodegenerative disorders associated to protein misfolding, human prion diseases include infectious forms (also called transmitted forms) such as kuru, iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The transmissible agent is thought to be solely composed of the abnormal isoform (PrP(Sc)) of the host-encoded prion protein that accumulated in the central nervous system of affected individuals. Compared to its normal counterpart, PrP(Sc) is β-sheet enriched and aggregated and its propagation is based on an autocatalytic conversion process. Increasing evidence supports the view that conformational variations of PrP(Sc) encoded the biological properties of the various prion strains that have been isolated by transmission studies in experimental models. Infectious forms of human prion diseases played a pivotal role in the emergence of the prion concept and in the characterization of the very unconventional properties of prions. They provide a unique model to understand how prion strains are selected and propagate in humans. Here, we review and discuss how genetic factors interplay with strain properties and route of transmission to influence disease susceptibility, incubation period and phenotypic expression in the light of the kuru epidemics due to ritual endocannibalism, the various series iatrogenic diseases secondary to extractive growth hormone treatment or dura mater graft and the epidemics of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease linked to dietary exposure to the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. 25 CFR 140.26 - Infectious plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Infectious plants. 140.26 Section 140.26 Indians BUREAU... Infectious plants. Traders shall not introduce into, sell, or spread within Indian reservations any plant, plant product, seed, or any type of vegetation, which is infested, or infected or which might act as a...

  9. Atypical Pyoderma Gangrenosum Mimicking an Infectious Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek To

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG, which involved the patient’s arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  10. Atypical pyoderma gangrenosum mimicking an infectious process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Derek; Wong, Aaron; Montessori, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG), which involved the patient's arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  11. Infectious diseases | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-12-13

    Dec 13, 2010 ... Many infectious diseases are rooted in environmental conditions and mediated by social and individual determinants. ... Responding to the challenge, the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) supports ecohealth research and networks to make a difference in addressing intractable infectious ...

  12. African Journal of Infectious Diseases: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The African Journal of Infectious Diseases (AJID) is a new journal that publishes papers which make an original contribution to the understanding of infectious diseases. Any paper relating to impact, care, prevention and social planning will be considered for publication. Reports of research related to any ...

  13. Microbiological and therapeutic challenges in infectious spondylodiscitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Theis; Roed-Petersen, Casper; Dragsted, Casper

    2013-01-01

    The microbiological diagnosis of infectious spondylodiscitis is often difficult to establish and the disease requires prolonged antibiotic treatment. We analyzed the medical records of 100 patients admitted for infectious spondylodiscitis from 2006 to 2011 with an emphasis on (1) the diagnostic...

  14. Emerging Infectious Disease Journal Cover Art

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-04

    Polyxeni Potter discusses the art used on the covers of the Emerging Infectious Diseases journal.  Created: 4/4/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/5/2012.

  15. Breeding against infectious diseases in animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rashidi, H.

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases in farm animals are of major concern because of animal welfare, production costs, and public health. Farms undergo huge economic losses due to infectious disease. The costs of infections in farm animals are mainly due to production losses, treatment of infected animals, and

  16. AAV VECTORS VACCINES AGAINST INFECTIOUS DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen eNieto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since their discovery as a tool for gene transfer, vectors derived from the Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV have been used for gene therapy applications and attracted scientist to this field for their exceptional properties of efficiency of in vivo gene transfer and the level and duration of transgene expression. For many years, AAVs have been considered as low immunogenic vectors due to their ability to induce long term expression of non-self-proteins in contrast to what has been observed with other viral vectors, such as adenovirus (Ad, for which strong immune responses against the same transgene products were documented. The perceived low immunogenicity likely explains why the use of AAV vectors for vaccination was not seriously considered before the early 2000s. Indeed, while analyses conducted using a variety of transgenes and animal species slowly changed the vision of the immunological properties of AAVs, an increasing number of studies were also performed in the field of vaccination. Even if the comparison with other modes of vaccination was not systemically performed, the analyses conducted so far in the field of active immunotherapy strongly suggest that AAVs possess some interesting features to be used as tools to produce an efficient and sustained antibody (Ab response. In addition, recent studies also highlighted the potential of AAVs for passive immunotherapy. This review summarizes the main studies conducted to evaluate the potential of AAV vectors for vaccination against infectious agents and discusses their advantages and drawbacks. Altogether, the variety of studies conducted in this field contributes to the understanding of the immunological properties of this versatile virus and to the definition of its possible future applications.

  17. Contiguous spinal metastasis mimicking infectious spondylodiscitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chul Min; Lee, Seung Hun; Bae, Ji Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Differential diagnosis between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis is one of the occasional challenges in daily clinical practice. We encountered an unusual case of spinal metastasis in a 75-year-old female breast cancer patient that mimicked infectious spondylodiscitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse bone marrow infiltrations with paraspinal soft tissue infiltrative changes in 5 contiguous cervical vertebrae without significant compression fracture or cortical destruction. These MRI findings made it difficult to differentiate between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis. Infectious spondylodiscitis such as tuberculous spondylodiscitis was regarded as the more appropriate diagnosis due to the continuous involvement of > 5 cervical vertebrae. The patient's clinical presentation also supported the presumptive diagnosis of infectious spondylodiscitis rather than spinal metastasis. Intravenous antibiotics were administered, but clinical symptoms worsened despite treatment. After pathologic confirmation by computed tomography-guided biopsy, we were able to confirm a final diagnosis of spinal metastasis

  18. Contiguous spinal metastasis mimicking infectious spondylodiscitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chul Min; Lee, Seung Hun [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Ji Yoon [Dept. of Pathology, National Police Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Differential diagnosis between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis is one of the occasional challenges in daily clinical practice. We encountered an unusual case of spinal metastasis in a 75-year-old female breast cancer patient that mimicked infectious spondylodiscitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse bone marrow infiltrations with paraspinal soft tissue infiltrative changes in 5 contiguous cervical vertebrae without significant compression fracture or cortical destruction. These MRI findings made it difficult to differentiate between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis. Infectious spondylodiscitis such as tuberculous spondylodiscitis was regarded as the more appropriate diagnosis due to the continuous involvement of > 5 cervical vertebrae. The patient's clinical presentation also supported the presumptive diagnosis of infectious spondylodiscitis rather than spinal metastasis. Intravenous antibiotics were administered, but clinical symptoms worsened despite treatment. After pathologic confirmation by computed tomography-guided biopsy, we were able to confirm a final diagnosis of spinal metastasis.

  19. Structural predestination of individual diversity in the course and severity of infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumyantsev, Sergey N

    2002-01-23

    Infectious diseases can be manifested by a spectrum of clinical signs and resultant clinical courses that range from acute to chronic and possible persistence in the victim in a latent form. Until recently, the origins of this kind of biodiversity were poorly understood, but advances in immunology--especially in identifying the constitutional mechanisms of immunity--have contributed to our understanding of the origins of biodiversity in infectious diseases. Infectious diseases affect only focal areas in the affected organisms, and the amounts and distribution of infectious lesions vary from patient to patient. In a population attacked by an infectious agent, individuals can be conveniently divided into three categories: totally resistant organisms which contain no susceptible structures and are not affected; mildly susceptible organisms in which a few foci appear and in which the infection runs a benign course; organisms in which the number of constitutionally susceptible structures is high and the infectious process develops in a severe form. The diversity is determined by the differences in susceptibility of various parts of the organism under consideration.

  20. Structural Predestination of Individual Diversity in the Course and Severity of Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey N. Rumyantsev

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases can be manifested by a spectrum of clinical signs and resultant clinical courses that range from acute to chronic and possible persistence in the victim in a latent form. Until recently, the origins of this kind of biodiversity were poorly understood, but advances in immunology — especially in identifying the constitutional mechanisms of immunity — have contributed to our understanding of the origins of biodiversity in infectious diseases. Infectious diseases affect only focal areas in the affected organisms, and the amounts and distribution of infectious lesions vary from patient to patient. In a population attacked by an infectious agent, individuals can be conveniently divided into three categories: totally resistant organisms which contain no susceptible structures and are not affected; mildly susceptible organisms in which a few foci appear and in which the infection runs a benign course; organisms in which the number of constitutionally susceptible structures is high and the infectious process develops in a severe form. The diversity is determined by the differences in susceptibility of various parts of the organism under consideration.

  1. Inpatient infectious disease consultations requested by surgeons at a comprehensive cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Ichiro; Kurai, Hanako

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the value of infectious disease specialist consultations for surgeons at comprehensive cancer centers. A total of 151 cancer surgery inpatients were retrospectively assessed during a 12-month period. We focused on the characteristics of the infectious disease consultations from surgical departments: the referring surgical divisions, the referral phases, and the reasons for the infectious disease consultations. Three-quarters of all consultation requests were made after the day of surgery. Approximately, 60 % of these requests were made within 30 days after surgery for cancer. The reasons for the infectious disease consultations could be classified into three categories: diagnosis and management (54 %), management of established infections (44 %), and surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis (3 %). The most requested reason for consultations was the diagnosis and management of fever or elevated inflammatory markers of unknown etiology. Among the management of established infections, the antimicrobial management of surgical site infections was most frequently requested. Many surgeons would prefer infectious disease specialists to assume a more direct role in the care of difficult or perplexing cases (such as fevers of unknown origin) while also maintaining a traditional relationship in which the consultant recommends antimicrobial agents during a perioperative period. Particularly at cancer centers where oncology specialists account for a significant proportion of the providers, the knowledge and skill of infectious disease physicians are valued.

  2. Evolution, revolution and heresy in the genetics of infectious disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Adrian V S

    2012-03-19

    Infectious pathogens have long been recognized as potentially powerful agents impacting on the evolution of human genetic diversity. Analysis of large-scale case-control studies provides one of the most direct means of identifying human genetic variants that currently impact on susceptibility to particular infectious diseases. For over 50 years candidate gene studies have been used to identify loci for many major causes of human infectious mortality, including malaria, tuberculosis, human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, bacterial pneumonia and hepatitis. But with the advent of genome-wide approaches, many new loci have been identified in diverse populations. Genome-wide linkage studies identified a few loci, but genome-wide association studies are proving more successful, and both exome and whole-genome sequencing now offer a revolutionary increase in power. Opinions differ on the extent to which the genetic component to common disease susceptibility is encoded by multiple high frequency or rare variants, and the heretical view that most infectious diseases might even be monogenic has been advocated recently. Review of findings to date suggests that the genetic architecture of infectious disease susceptibility may be importantly different from that of non-infectious diseases, and it is suggested that natural selection may be the driving force underlying this difference.

  3. Animal venoms as antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumal Samy, Ramar; Stiles, Bradley G; Franco, Octavio L; Sethi, Gautam; Lim, Lina H K

    2017-06-15

    Hospitals are breeding grounds for many life-threatening bacteria worldwide. Clinically associated gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus/methicillin-resistant S. aureus and many others increase the risk of severe mortality and morbidity. The failure of antibiotics to kill various pathogens due to bacterial resistance highlights the urgent need to develop novel, potent, and less toxic agents from natural sources against various infectious agents. Currently, several promising classes of natural molecules from snake (terrestrial and sea), scorpion, spider, honey bee and wasp venoms hold promise as rich sources of chemotherapeutics against infectious pathogens. Interestingly, snake venom-derived synthetic peptide/snake cathelicidin not only has potent antimicrobial and wound-repair activity but is highly stable and safe. Such molecules are promising candidates for novel venom-based drugs against S. aureus infections. The structure of animal venom proteins/peptides (cysteine rich) consists of hydrophobic α-helices or β-sheets that produce lethal pores and membrane-damaging effects on bacteria. All these antimicrobial peptides are under early experimental or pre-clinical stages of development. It is therefore important to employ novel tools for the design and the development of new antibiotics from the untapped animal venoms of snake, scorpion, and spider for treating resistant pathogens. To date, snail venom toxins have shown little antibiotic potency against human pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Infectious and rearing-system related risk factors for chronic pleuritis in slaughter pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enøe, Claes; Mousing, Jan; Schirmer, Anna Luise

    2002-01-01

    Chronic pleuritis (CP) in Danish pigs for slaughter is by far the most frequent finding at the routine post-mortem meat inspection. An initial investigation published in 1990 demonstrated infectious and management-related risk factors. Serological testing for additional infectious agents, as well...... of the pig, the weight of the carcass, and the herd of origin were also recorded. Individual blood samples were examined for seropositivity for Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (AP) serotypes 2, 6, 7, 12, Haemophilus parasuis, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (MYC) and swine influenza (SI). Herd-level information...

  5. Intravenous immunoglobulin for infectious diseases: back to the pre-antibiotic and passive prophylaxis era?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayry, Jagadeesh; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Kazatchkine, Michel D; Kaveri, Srini V

    2004-06-01

    The dramatic increase in both the number of novel infectious agents and resistance to antimicrobial drugs has incited the need for adjunct therapies in the war against infectious diseases. Exciting recent studies have demonstrated the use of antibodies in the form of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) against infections. By virtue of the diverse repertoire of immunoglobulins that possess a wide spectrum of antibacterial and antiviral specificities, IVIg provides antimicrobial efficacy independently of pathogen resistance and represents a promising alternative strategy for the treatment of diseases for which a specific therapy is not yet available.

  6. Trading Agents

    CERN Document Server

    Wellman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Automated trading in electronic markets is one of the most common and consequential applications of autonomous software agents. Design of effective trading strategies requires thorough understanding of how market mechanisms operate, and appreciation of strategic issues that commonly manifest in trading scenarios. Drawing on research in auction theory and artificial intelligence, this book presents core principles of strategic reasoning that apply to market situations. The author illustrates trading strategy choices through examples of concrete market environments, such as eBay, as well as abst

  7. Epidemic Spreading in Unidirectional Mobile Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Takashi; Ichinose, Genki; Tainaka, Kei-ichi

    2017-11-01

    We present an epidemic model combined with a traffic cellular automaton. Each agent or individual is either susceptible (S) or infected (I). An agent with a certain density moves to a fixed direction on one-dimensional lattice. Simulations for SIS model show that the epidemic spreads via migration. We find a dynamical phase transition between infectious and non-infectious phases. If the density exceeds the critical limit ρC, the epidemic spreads into the population. The value of ρC decreases along with the recovery rate as predicted by mean-field theory. However, this theory cannot explain the simulation result that a traffic jam strongly affects the phase transition. It is found that the minimum value of ρC corresponds to the critical value of the jamming transition.

  8. Cytotoxicity of dentin bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cal, Ebru; Guneri, Pelin; Atay, Ayse; Cetintas, Vildan Bozok

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate the cytotoxicity of 5 dentin bonding agents (Admira Bond, Adper Single Bond Plus, Clearfil SE Bond, Clearfil S3 Bond, and Heliobond) by XTT assay using human gingival fibroblast cells. Samples of dentin bonding agents were prepared on a black 96-well microplate, and the cytotoxicity of each bonding material was measured every 24 hours for 7 days, then on Days 14, 21, and 28. One-way ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc tests were used for statistical analyses. All 5 materials were evaluated as severely cytotoxic (P agents showed severe cytotoxicity with viability results exception of Adper Single Bond Plus, toxicity continued to Day 28 for all compounds. The utmost care must be considered during the clinical utilization of dentin bonding agents to keep them within the area of restoration and prevent their contact with adjacent tissues.

  9. Infectious spondylitis and its differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlemann, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Infectious spondylitis can be diagnosed early and reliably by MRI, given that the most important diagnostic criteria are present. These criteria are bone marrow edema adjacent to two contiguous vertebral end plates, disk space of high signal intensity and enhancement of bone adjacent to two contiguous vertebral end plates and of the disk space. If not all of these criteria are present, diagnostic accuracy decreases. Erosive osteochondritis, spondylarthritis, osteoporotic fractures of two contiguous vertebral end plates, active Schmorl's nodes as well as neuropathic spine may mimic an infectious spondylitis. This paper presents typical and atypical morphologic patterns of infectious spondylitis as well as the differentiation criteria from the above mentioned diseases. (orig.)

  10. Imaging procedures in spinal infectious diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodiek, S.O.

    2001-01-01

    A targeted successful treatment of spinal infectious diseases requires clinical and laboratory data that are completed by the contribution of imaging procedures. Neuroimaging only provides essential informations on the correct topography, localisation, acuity and differential diagnosis of spinal infectious lesions. MRI with its sensitivity concerning soft tissue lesions is a useful tool in detecting infectious alterations of spinal bone marrow, intervertebral disks, leptomeninges and the spinal cord itself. Crucial imaging patterns of typical spinal infections are displayed and illustrated by clinical case studies. We present pyogenic, granulomatous and postoperative variants of spondylodicitis, spinal epidural abscess, spinal meningitis and spinal cord infections. The importance of intravenous contrastmedia application is pointed out. (orig.) [de

  11. Health and epidemiological approaches of Trypanosoma evansi and equine infectious anemia virus in naturally infected horses at southern Pantanal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreira, Daniela R; Jansen, Ana M; Abreu, Urbano G P; Macedo, Gabriel C; Silva, Antônia R S; Mazur, Carlos; Andrade, Gisele B; Herrera, Heitor M

    2016-11-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) and Trypanossoma evansi are endemic in Brazilian Pantanal Biome, an important area for livestock production. In this sense, we evaluated the epidemiological single and co-infection effects of T. evansi and EIAV in naturally infected horses in the southern Pantanal wetland by serological tests and hematological assays. Both higher seroprevalence and heath poor condition of the sampled animals were associated with differences in horse management between farms. We found that the negative animals for both infectious agents (NN) represented the major group in F1 (37%), and the smallest group in F2 (19%). Furthermore, we recorded higher EIAV seroprevalence (56%) in F2, compared to F1 (38%). We observed that T. evansi infection was mostly related to young horses, as seen by their higher seroprevalence, ranging from 70.7% in the beginning of the rainy season to 81% in the end of flood period, in comparison with the values of 42% and 68%, respectively, in working animals. on the other hand, working animals showed a higher seroprevalence for EIAV (48%) in both seasons than young horses. We observed that the management of working horses could be a risk factor of EIAV infection. On the other hand, as T. evansi is maintained in the study region by many species of wild mammals, the mechanical transmission through blood-sucking vectors ensures the infection to horses since early. Our results showed that single or co-infection by EIAV and T. evansi caused different degree of anemia in the infected animals. Moreover, the health of horses in Brazilian Pantanal is also influenced by differences in horse management and environmental circumstances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. First-Line XELOX Plus Bevacizumab Followed by XELOX Plus Bevacizumab or Single-Agent Bevacizumab as Maintenance Therapy in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: The Phase III MACRO TTD Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-España, Auxiliadora; Massutí, Bartomeu; Sastre, Javier; Abad, Albert; Valladares, Manuel; Rivera, Fernando; Safont, Maria J.; Martínez de Prado, Purificación; Gallén, Manuel; González, Encarnación; Marcuello, Eugenio; Benavides, Manuel; Fernández-Martos, Carlos; Losa, Ferrán; Escudero, Pilar; Arrivi, Antonio; Cervantes, Andrés; Dueñas, Rosario; López-Ladrón, Amelia; Lacasta, Adelaida; Llanos, Marta; Tabernero, Jose M.; Antón, Antonio; Aranda, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this phase III trial was to compare the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab alone with those of bevacizumab and capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (XELOX) as maintenance treatment following induction chemotherapy with XELOX plus bevacizumab in the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Patients and Methods. Patients were randomly assigned to receive six cycles of bevacizumab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin every 3 weeks followed by XELOX plus bevacizumab or bevacizumab alone until progression. The primary endpoint was the progression-free survival (PFS) interval; secondary endpoints were the overall survival (OS) time, objective response rate (RR), time to response, duration of response, and safety. Results. The intent-to-treat population comprised 480 patients (XELOX plus bevacizumab, n = 239; bevacizumab, n = 241); there were no significant differences in baseline characteristics. The median follow-up was 29.0 months (range, 0–53.2 months). There were no statistically significant differences in the median PFS or OS times or in the RR between the two arms. The most common grade 3 or 4 toxicities in the XELOX plus bevacizumab versus bevacizumab arms were diarrhea, hand–foot syndrome, and neuropathy. Conclusion. Although the noninferiority of bevacizumab versus XELOX plus bevacizumab cannot be confirmed, we can reliably exclude a median PFS detriment >3 weeks. This study suggests that maintenance therapy with single-agent bevacizumab may be an appropriate option following induction XELOX plus bevacizumab in mCRC patients. PMID:22234633

  13. Pre-clinical efficacy and synergistic potential of the MDM2-p53 antagonists, Nutlin-3 and RG7388, as single agents and in combined treatment with cisplatin in ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanjirband, Maryam; Edmondson, Richard J.; Lunec, John

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related female deaths. Due to serious side effects, relapse and resistance to standard chemotherapy, better and more targeted approaches are required. Mutation of the TP53 gene accounts for 50% of all human cancers. In the remaining malignancies, non-genotoxic activation of wild-type p53 by small molecule inhibition of the MDM2-p53 binding interaction is a promising therapeutic strategy. Proof of concept was established with the cis-imidazoline Nutlin-3, leading to the development of RG7388 and other compounds currently in early phase clinical trials. This preclinical study evaluated the effect of Nutlin-3 and RG7388 as single agents and in combination with cisplatin in a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines. Median-drug-effect analysis showed Nutlin-3 or RG7388 combination with cisplatin was additive to, or synergistic in a p53-dependent manner, resulting in increased p53 activation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, associated with increased p21WAF1 protein and/or caspase-3/7 activity compared to cisplatin alone. Although MDM2 inhibition activated the expression of p53-dependent DNA repair genes, the growth inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effects of p53 dominated the response. These data indicate that combination treatment with MDM2 inhibitors and cisplatin has synergistic potential for the treatment of ovarian cancer, dependent on cell genotype. PMID:27223080

  14. Radiolabeled cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic (RGD)-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles as single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dual-modality agents for imaging of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shengming; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Bin; Hong, Ruoyu; Chen, Qing; Dong, Jiajia; Chen, Yinyiin; Chen, Zhiqiang; Wu, Yiwei

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIOs) modified with a novel cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) peptide were made and radiolabeled as single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dual-modality agents for imaging of breast cancer. The probe was tested both in vitro and in vivo to determine its receptor targeting efficacy and feasibility for SPECT and MRI. The radiochemical syntheses of 125I-cRGD-USPIO were accomplished with a radiochemical purity of 96.05 ± 0.33 %. High radiochemical stability was found in fresh human serum and in phosphate-buffered saline. The average hydrodynamic size of 125I-cRGD-USPIO determined by dynamic light scattering was 51.3 nm. Results of in vitro experiments verified the specificity of the radiolabeled nanoparticles to tumor cells. Preliminary biodistribution studies of 125I-radiolabeled cRGD-USPIO in Bcap37-bearing nude mice showed that it had long circulation half-life, high tumor uptake, and high initial blood retention with moderate liver uptake. In vivo tumor targeting and uptake of the radiolabeled nanoparticles in mice model were visualized by SPECT and MRI collected at different time points. Our results strongly indicated that the 125I-cRGD-USPIO could be used as a promising bifunctional radiotracer for early clinical tumor detection with high sensitivity and high spatial resolution by SPECT and MRI.

  15. [Equine infectious anemia--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    This article combines essential facts of equine infectious anemia. Beside etiology and epidemiology, emphasis is put on the clinical course and laboratory diagnosis. Finally, control measures and prophylactic issues are discussed.

  16. Global Climate Change and Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EK Shuman

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is occurring as a result of warming of the earth’s atmosphere due to human activity generating excess amounts of greenhouse gases. Because of its potential impact on the hydrologic cycle and severe weather events, climate change is expected to have an enormous effect on human health, including on the burden and distribution of many infectious diseases. The infectious diseases that will be most affected by climate change include those that are spread by insect vectors and by contaminated water. The burden of adverse health effects due to these infectious diseases will fall primarily on developing countries, while it is the developed countries that are primarily responsible for climate change. It is up to governments and individuals to take the lead in halting climate change, and we must increase our understanding of the ecology of infectious diseases in order to protect vulnerable populations.

  17. Radioprotective Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilker Kelle

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since1949, a great deal of research has been carried out on the radioprotective activity of various chemical substances. Thiol compounds, compounds which contain –SH radical, different classes of pharmacological agents and other compounds such as vitamine C and WR-2721 have been shown to reduce mortality when administered prior to exposure to a lethal dose of radiation. Recently, honey bee venom as well as that of its components melittin and histamine have shown to be valuable in reduction of radiation-induced damage and also provide prophylactic alternative treatment for serious side effects related with radiotherapy. It has been suggested that the radioprotective activity of bee venom components is related with the stimulation of the hematopoetic system.

  18. Infectious Urethritis in Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meares, Edwin M.

    1975-01-01

    Acute and recurrent infectious urethritis in men and women is commonly seen by physicians. Since specific therapy varies widely with the type of urethritis present, the proper diagnosis must be clearly established if curative drug therapy is to be selected. It is valuable, therefore, to review the diagnosis and therapy of the various forms of infectious urethritis that are recognized today in both men and women. PMID:1199099

  19. CISH and Susceptibility to Infectious Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Khor, CC; Vannberg, FO; Chapman, SJ; Guo, H; Wong, SH; Walley, AJ; Vukcevic, D; Rautanen, A; Mills, TC; Chang, K-C; Kam, K-M; Crampin, AC; Ngwira, B; Leung, C-C; Tam, C-M

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The interleukin-2-mediated immune response is critical for host defense against infectious pathogens. Cytokine-inducible SRC homology 2 (SH2) domain protein (CISH), a suppressor of cytokine signaling, controls interleukin-2 signaling. METHODS Using a case-control design, we tested for an association between CISH polymorphisms and susceptibility to major infectious diseases (bacteremia, tuberculosis, and severe malaria) in blood samples from 8402 persons in Gambia, Hong Kong, Kenya,...

  20. A macroecological characterization of infectious disease transmission:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen-Ranberg, Emilie Ulrikka

    2017-01-01

    Presentation: Per M. Jensen*, Miguel L. Grilo, Christian B. Pipper, Emilie U. Andersen-Ranberg. A macroecological characterization of infectious disease transmission: the cases of Mycobacterium and Leptospira sp. The 2017 OIKOS meeting, 10th -11th March 2017, Copenhagen, Denmark......Presentation: Per M. Jensen*, Miguel L. Grilo, Christian B. Pipper, Emilie U. Andersen-Ranberg. A macroecological characterization of infectious disease transmission: the cases of Mycobacterium and Leptospira sp. The 2017 OIKOS meeting, 10th -11th March 2017, Copenhagen, Denmark...

  1. Epidemiological profile of infectious keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Farias

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the epidemiologic aspects of cornea ulcers in a referred ophthalmology private practice center. Methods: Retrospective study over electronic files of patients treated for corneal ulcers during a period of 7 years by the same physician (RJMF at Centro de Olhos São Francisco, between june 2007 and june 2014. These patients were evaluated for risk factors such as: trauma causes, co-morbidities and contact lenses use. They were also evaluated by the microorganism found at the smears, treatment and patient's outcome. Patients that didn't return with the smears results or that didn´t have a complete follow-up were excluded from the study. Results: A total of 242 patients were fully treated during this period. 55 patients were excluded and 187 patients were included. 28.88% (54/187 were positive for gram negative bacteria, 27.81% (52/187 for filamentous fungi, 16.04% (29/187 for gram positive bacteria and only 1.07% for acanthamoeba. Twenty-four patients had negative cultures and 21 patients had combined infections (bacteria + fungi or other combination. Corneal collagen Cross-linking was effective on melting arrest in 16 of the 16 patients that we have submitted to this procedure during 2008 and 2009. Among all the patients that had corneal infection and were previously using contact lenses, 81% were infected by pseudomonas or pseudomonas associated with other gram negative bacteria. Filamentous fungi had a strong association with physical trauma. While use of saline solution for contact lenses cleaning had a strong association with gram negative bacteria and biological trauma, a strong association with combined infection. Conclusion: Gram negative bacteria (Pseudomonas followed by filamentous fungi (Fusarium sp were the most frequent etiologic agent found in our study. Cross-link was effective on corneal melting arrest. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most frequent isolated agent on hydrophilic contact lenses wearers.

  2. Acute Infectious Morbidity in Multiple Gestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K. Dotters-Katz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Physiologic and immunologic changes in pregnancy result in increased susceptibility to infection. These shifts are more pronounced in pregnancies complicated by multiple gestation. The objective of this study was to determine the association between multiple gestation and risk of infectious morbidity. Study Design. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample for the years 2008–2010 was used to identify pregnant women during admission for delivery with International Classification of Diseases codes. Logistic regression was used to compute odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for demographic data, preexisting medical conditions, and acute medical and infectious complications for women with multiple versus singleton gestations. Results. Among women with multiple gestation, 38.4 per 1,000 women had an infectious complication compared to 12.8 per 1,000 women with singletons. The most significant infectious morbidity associated with multiple gestation was intestinal infections, pyelonephritis, influenza, and pneumonia. After controlling for confounding variables, infectious complications at delivery persisted for women with multiples, though the association was dependent on mode of delivery. Conclusions. Women with multiple gestations are at increased risk for infectious morbidity identified at the time of delivery. This association was diminished among women who had a cesarean suggesting that operative delivery is not responsible for this association.

  3. [Associated vaccination of poultry against infectious bronchitis, Newcastle disease and infectious bursitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholakova, R

    1985-01-01

    The effectiveness of immunity was studied following a mixed vaccination with live vaccines against infectious bronchitis (strains H120 and H52), Newcastle disease (strain La Sota), and infectious bursitis (strain Th75Vn82). The three vaccines were applied simultaneously via the drinking water, through the spray method, and nasally. Experiments were carried out with a total of 31,466 birds: broilers, growing layers, broiler parents--all without preliminary treatment with biopreparations. Immunity against Newcastle disease was followed up through the hemagglutination-inhibition test and challenging with a virulent virus; against infectious bursitis--through immunodiffusion in agar gel after Ouchterlony; and against infectious bronchitis--through virus-neutralization with strain Beaudette. The birds were treated with mixed vaccines in the following combinations: infectious bronchitis--Newcastle disease; infectious bursitis--Gumboro; infectious bronchitis, Newcastle disease, Gumboro. The simultaneous application of live vaccines against infectious bronchitis, Newcastle disease, and infectious bursitis was shown to be well tolerated with no harmful aftereffects whatever. The immunity built up with the simultaneous use of the three vaccines was not inferior in effectiveness to that conferred with the use of two vaccines or only one of them.

  4. Executive summary of imported infectious diseases after returning from foreign travel: Consensus document of the Spanish Society for Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Arellano, José Luis; Górgolas-Hernández-Mora, Miguel; Salvador, Fernando; Carranza-Rodríguez, Cristina; Ramírez-Olivencia, Germán; Martín-Echeverría, Esteban; Rodríguez-Guardado, Azucena; Norman, Francesca; Velasco-Tirado, Virginia; Zubero-Sulibarría, Zuriñe; Rojo-Marcos, Gerardo; Muñoz-Gutierrez, José; Ramos-Rincón, José Manuel; Sánchez-Seco-Fariñas, M Paz; Velasco-Arribas, María; Belhassen-García, Moncef; Lago-Nuñez, Mar; Cañas García-Otero, Elías; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2018-03-01

    In a global world, knowledge of imported infectious diseases is essential in daily practice, both for the microbiologist-parasitologist and the clinician who diagnoses and treats infectious diseases in returned travelers. Tropical and subtropical countries where there is a greater risk of contracting an infectious disease are among the most frequently visited tourist destinations. The SEIMC considers it appropriate to produce a consensus document that will be useful to primary care physicians as well as specialists in internal medicine, infectious diseases and tropical medicine who help treat travelers returning from tropical and sub-tropical areas with infections. Preventive aspects of infectious diseases and infections imported by immigrants are explicitly excluded here, since they have been dealt with in other SEIMC documents. Various types of professionals (clinicians, microbiologists, and parasitologists) have helped produce this consensus document by evaluating the available evidence-based data in order to propose a series of key facts about individual aspects of the topic. The first section of the document is a summary of some of the general aspects concerning the general assessment of travelers who return home with potential infections. The main second section contains the key facts (causative agents, diagnostic procedures and therapeutic measures) associated with the major infectious syndromes affecting returned travelers [gastrointestinal syndrome (acute or persistent diarrhea); febrile syndrome with no obvious source of infection; localized cutaneous lesions; and respiratory infections]. Finally, the characteristics of special traveler subtypes, such as pregnant women and immunocompromised travelers, are described. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  5. Agent Building Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    AgentBuilder is a software component developed under an SBIR contract between Reticular Systems, Inc., and Goddard Space Flight Center. AgentBuilder allows software developers without experience in intelligent agent technologies to easily build software applications using intelligent agents. Agents are components of software that will perform tasks automatically, with no intervention or command from a user. AgentBuilder reduces the time and cost of developing agent systems and provides a simple mechanism for implementing high-performance agent systems.

  6. Proteomic analysis of host brain components that bind to infectious particles in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipkorir, Terry; Colangelo, Christopher M; Manuelidis, Laura

    2015-09-01

    Transmissible encephalopathies (TSEs), such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and scrapie, are caused by infectious agents that provoke strain-specific patterns of disease. Misfolded host prion protein (PrP-res amyloid) is believed to be the causal infectious agent. However, particles that are stripped of PrP retain both high infectivity and viral proteins not detectable in uninfected mouse controls. We here detail host proteins bound with FU-CJD agent infectious brain particles by proteomic analysis. More than 98 proteins were differentially regulated, and 56 FU-CJD exclusive proteins were revealed after PrP, GFAP, C1q, ApoE, and other late pathologic response proteins were removed. Stripped FU-CJD particles revealed HSC70 (144× the uninfected control), cyclophilin B, an FU-CJD exclusive protein required by many viruses, and early endosome-membrane pathways known to facilitate viral processing, replication, and spread. Synaptosomal elements including synapsin-2 (at 33×) and AP180 (a major FU-CJD exclusive protein) paralleled the known ultrastructural location of 25 nm virus-like TSE particles and infectivity in synapses. Proteins without apparent viral or neurodegenerative links (copine-3), and others involved in viral-induced protein misfolding and aggregation, were also identified. Human sCJD brain particles contained 146 exclusive proteins, and heat shock, synaptic, and viral pathways were again prominent, in addition to Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington aggregation proteins. Host proteins that bind TSE infectious particles can prevent host immune recognition and contribute to prolonged cross-species transmissions (the species barrier). Our infectious particle strategy, which reduces background sequences by >99%, emphasizes host targets for new therapeutic initiatives. Such therapies can simultaneously subvert common pathways of neurodegeneration. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Current status of vaccines against infectious bursal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Hermann; Mundt, Egbert; Eterradossi, Nicolas; Islam, M Rafiqul

    2012-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is the aetiological agent of the acute and highly contagious infectious bursal disease (IBD) or "Gumboro disease". IBD is one of the economically most important diseases that affects commercially produced chickens worldwide. Along with strict hygiene management of poultry farms, vaccination programmes with inactivated and live attenuated viruses have been used to prevent IBD. Live vaccines show a different degree of attenuation; many of them may cause bursal atrophy and thus immunosuppression with poor immune response to vaccination against other pathogens and an increase in vulnerability to various types of infections as possible consequences. Depending on their intrinsic characteristics or on the vaccination procedures, some of the vaccines may not induce full protection against the very virulent IBDV strains and antigenic variants observed in the last three decades. As chickens are most susceptible to IBDV in their first weeks of life, active immunity to the virus has to be induced early after hatching. However, maternally derived IBDV-specific antibodies may interfere with early vaccination with live vaccines. Thus new technologies and second-generation vaccines including rationally designed and subunit vaccines have been developed. Recently, live viral vector vaccines have been licensed in several countries and are reaching the market. Here, the current status of IBD vaccines is discussed.

  8. Key points in the presentation of the infectious bursal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Andrés Jaimes-Olaya

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The infectious bursal disease or Gumboro disease is an immunosuppressive pathology of birds, which has great importance in the poultry industry due to large economic losses that it produces not only for its direct effect, but because of the susceptibility to secondary infections, interference with commercial vaccines, reducing the effective use of them. The disease is produced by the infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV, which is an RNA genome birnavirus, with high capacity for mutation, so the agent is continually evolving. The pathology has three types of clinical presentation: a subclinical form, a mild or moderate clinical form and a severe clinical form. However, the type of manifestation is determined mainly by three factors: the age of birds at the time of infection, the type of strain or acting or genetic variability of it, and the immunity degree. In this article, we discuss each of these factors and their importance in the presentation of the disease. These elements are vital in order to establish effective prevention and control programs.

  9. Infectious Disease risks associated with exposure to stressful environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Ichard T.; Smith, Morey; Sams, Clarence

    1993-01-01

    Multiple environmental factors asociated with space flight can increase the risk of infectious illness among crewmembers thereby adversely affecting crew health and mission success. Host defences can be impaired by multiple physiological and psychological stressors including: sleep deprivation, disrupted circadian rhythms, separation from family, perceived danger, radiation exposure, and possibly also by the direct and indirect effects of microgravity. Relevant human immunological data from isolated or stressful environments including spaceflight will be reviewed. Long-duration missions should include reliable hardware which supports sophisticated immunodiagnostic capabilities. Future advances in immunology and molecular biology will continue to provide therapeutic agents and biologic response modifiers which should effectively and selectively restore immune function which has been depressed by exposure to environmental stressors.

  10. Competing agents in agent-mediated institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Plaza, Enric; Arcos, Josep Ll.; Noriega, Pablo; Sierra, Carles

    1998-01-01

    Social processes and agent interaction always take place in a specific context. A school of thought in social studies analyses them in the framework of institutions. We present in this paper the notion of agentmediated institutions and show how it is relevant for multi-agent systems (MAS) in general and, more specifically, for MAS that include human agents and software agents involved in socioeconomic interactions. We show how the social interactions of human and software agents taking place ...

  11. Electrochemical properties of surface-confined films of single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalised with cobalt(II)tetra-aminophthalocyanine: Electrocatalysis of sulfhydryl degradation products of V-type nerve agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillay, Jeseelan; Ozoemena, Kenneth I.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes detailed comparative electrochemical and electrocatalytic behaviours of basal plane pyrolytic graphite electrodes (BPPGEs) modified with single-wall carbon nanotube (BPPGE-SWCNT) and SWCNTs functionalised with cobalt(II) tetra-aminophthalocyanine by physical (BPPGE-SWCNT-CoTAPc (mix) ), chemical (BPPGE-SWCNT-CoTAPc (cov) ) and electrochemical adsorption (BPPGE-SWCNT-CoTAPc (ads) ) processes. SWCNT improves both solution and surface electrochemistry of CoTAPc. Electrochemical kinetics of the SWCNT-CoTAPc modified BPPGE yielded different k s values, indicative of different rate-determining steps for the cathodic and anodic reactions. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analyses in the presence of [Fe(CN) 6 ] 3-/4- as a redox probe revealed that the SWCNT and SWCNT-CoTAPc (mix) films have comparable data in terms of solution resistance (R s ), electron transfer resistance (R et ), Warburg impedance (Z w ) and electron-transfer rate constant (k app ). Also, these surface-confined films showed comparable electrocatalytic responses towards the detection of V-type nerve agent sulfhydryl hydrolysis products, dimethylaminoethanethiol (DMAET) and diethylaminoethanethiol (DEAET). Using the BPPGE-SWCNT-CoTAPc (mix) , the estimated catalytic rate constants and diffusion coefficients were higher for DEAET than for the DMAET. Also, the detection limits of approximately 8.0 and 3.0 μM for DMAET and DEAET were obtained with sensitivities of 5.0 and 6.0 x 10 -2 A M -1 for DMAET and DEAET, respectively. BPPGE-SWCNT-CoTAPc showed better potential discrimination for detection of these sulfhydryl analytes than the BPPGE-SWCNT, the latter exhibited enhanced catalytic response for the sulfhydryls than the former

  12. Immunosuppressive agent leflunomide: a SWNTs-immobilized dihydroortate dehydrogenase inhibitory effect and computational study of its adsorption properties on zigzag single walled (6,0) carbon and boron nitride nanotubes as controlled drug delivery devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raissi, Heidar; Mollania, Fariba

    2014-06-02

    Leflunomide [HWA 486 or RS-34821, 5-methyl-N-(4trifluoromethylphenyl)-4-isoxazole carboximide] is an immunosuppressive agent effective in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Dihydroortate dehydrogenase (DHODH, EC 1.3.3.1) immobilization on the nanotubes was carried out and biochemical characterization of free and immobilized enzyme was determined. In comparison with free enzyme, the immobilized DHODH showed improved stability and reusability for investigation of inhibition pattern of drugs such as leflunomide. The experimental data showed that, DHODH was inhibited by the active metabolite of leflunomide (RS-61980) with a Ki and KI of 0.82 and 0.06 mM, respectively. Results exhibited mixed-type inhibition kinetics towards dihydroorotate as a substrate in the free and immobilized enzyme. Furthermore, the behavior of anticancer drug leflunomide adsorbed on the external surface of zigzag single walled (6,0) carbon and boron nitride nanotubes (SWCNT and SWBNNT) was studied by means of DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G(*) level of theory. The larger adsorption energies and charges transfer showed that the adsorption of leflunomide onto SWBNNT is more stable than that the adsorption of leflunomide onto SWCNT. Frontier molecular orbitals (HOMO and LUMO) suggest that adsorption of leflunomide onto SWBNNT behave as charge transfer compounds with leflunomide as an electron donor and SWBNNT as an electron acceptor. Thus, nanotubes (NTs) have been proposed and actively explored as multipurpose innovative carriers for drug delivery and diagnostic application. The AIM theory has been also applied to analyze the properties of the bond critical points: their electron densities and their laplacians. Also, the natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations were performed to derive natural atomic orbital occupancies, and partial charges of the interacting atoms in the equilibrium tube-molecule distance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical and cerebrospinal fluid findings contribute to the early differentiation between infectious and noninfectious encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Wilken

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Early recognition and prompt specific treatment are crucial factors influencing the outcome of patients with acute encephalitis. The aim of this study was to determine the main causes of acute encephalitis in our population and to find predictors that may lead to specific diagnosis. Adult patients admitted to our hospital with suspected diagnosis of encephalitis in the period 2006-2013 were included. One hundred and five medical records were analyzed. Eighty-two patients with infectious encephalitis were identified (78% of total cases, 53 (65% men and 29 (35% women, mean age 47.8 years. The most common microorganisms identified were: HSV-1 (11%, VZV (10%, HSV-2 (5% and EBV (5%. Twenty-three patients (22% of the series had non-infectious encephalitis. Headache (p < 0.0001 and fever (p = 0.008 were more frequent in encephalitis of infectious origin. Protein levels and white blood cell counts in the cerebrospinal fluid were significantly higher in patients affected by infectious encephalitis than in those affected by noninfectious encephalitis (OR 95% CI 12.3 [2.9-51.7] and OR 95% CI 7.4 [2-27], respectively. Identifying specific causal agents of acute encephalitis remains a major challenge. Cerebrospinal fluid markers, as well as specific clinical findings, may however contribute to initial differentiation between infectious and noninfectious causes.

  14. Impact of climate change on human infectious diseases: Empirical evidence and human adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoxu; Lu, Yongmei; Zhou, Sen; Chen, Lifan; Xu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Climate change refers to long-term shifts in weather conditions and patterns of extreme weather events. It may lead to changes in health threat to human beings, multiplying existing health problems. This review examines the scientific evidences on the impact of climate change on human infectious diseases. It identifies research progress and gaps on how human society may respond to, adapt to, and prepare for the related changes. Based on a survey of related publications between 1990 and 2015, the terms used for literature selection reflect three aspects--the components of infectious diseases, climate variables, and selected infectious diseases. Humans' vulnerability to the potential health impacts by climate change is evident in literature. As an active agent, human beings may control the related health effects that may be effectively controlled through adopting proactive measures, including better understanding of the climate change patterns and of the compound disease-specific health effects, and effective allocation of technologies and resources to promote healthy lifestyles and public awareness. The following adaptation measures are recommended: 1) to go beyond empirical observations of the association between climate change and infectious diseases and develop more scientific explanations, 2) to improve the prediction of spatial-temporal process of climate change and the associated shifts in infectious diseases at various spatial and temporal scales, and 3) to establish locally effective early warning systems for the health effects of predicated climate change. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. [Epidemiology of toxic and infectious risk related to shellfish consumption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desenclos, J C

    1996-10-01

    For feeding purposes shellfish filter large amounts of water but also concentrate infectious agents and toxins that are present in the marine environment either naturally or because of pollution. Thus, the consumption of raw or undercooked shellfish is a substantial source of foodborne poisoning, mostly epidemic and sometimes sporadic. Most of shellfish-borne infectious diseases are linked to fecal contamination of the marine environment; they include: thyphoid fever, salmonellosis, shigellosis, campylobacteriosis, cholera, Norwalk or Norwalk-like gastroenteritis and hepatitis A. In warm climates, shellfish contains naturally occurring halopilic Vibrios and may cause severe sporadic infections (septicemias) among very susceptible consumers (immunocompromised). Shellfish also causes outbreaks of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) and diarrheic shellfish poisoning (DSP) when they are contaminated by toxins produced when Dinophisis, a marine plancton, proliferates. Chemical compounds (heavy metals and organic toxins) that are dumped in the environment (soil, air, and water) also reach shellfish harvesting waters where they are cocentrated. Although acute or chronic effects of the chemical contamination of shellfish have not been clearly documented, the cadmium pollution of some shellfish harvesting waters raises a serious problem. Since it is impossible to prevent completely the contamination of coastal waters by any of the agents cited above, the prevention of shellfish-borne diseases requires monitoring of the marine environment and shellfish flesh (coliform count, Dinophysis toxins, heavy metals...). This surveillance allows the classification of growing areas as suitable or not for harvesting and distribution of shellfish. However, this surveillance is not always sensitive enough. Indicators of fecal pollution are particularly not reliable for shellfish viral contamination. A better knowledge of marine biology, the limitation of coastal waters pollution, improved

  16. Thymus Atrophy and Double-Positive Escape Are Common Features in Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana de Meis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The thymus is a primary lymphoid organ in which bone marrow-derived T-cell precursors undergo differentiation, leading to migration of positively selected thymocytes to the T-cell-dependent areas of secondary lymphoid organs. This organ can undergo atrophy, caused by several endogenous and exogenous factors such as ageing, hormone fluctuations, and infectious agents. This paper will focus on emerging data on the thymic atrophy caused by infectious agents. We present data on the dynamics of thymus lymphocytes during acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection, showing that the resulting thymus atrophy comprises the abnormal release of thymic-derived T cells and may have an impact on host immune response.

  17. ASPEK-ASPEK EKOLOGI DAN SOSIAL DALAM PENANGGULANGAN "EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Soewasti S.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ecological and social fators play very important roles in the control of emerging infectious diseases, beside case management, surveillance and laboratory examinations. The ecological factors include physical environmental factors such as altitude, latitude, climate, season, temperature, humidity, water, air, food and land; as well as biological environmental factors such as flora, fauna, agent, vector, host and biological agents used for vector control. The social factors include: education, economic status, behaviour, attitude, habit, religion, culture, population migration and density. Intervention to ecological and social factors could be done as preventive measures. We should learn from the failures as well as successes in the control of infectious diseases which gave considerations on ecological and social factors. For new diseases, studies should also be conducted to know what kinds of ecological and social factors have important roles in the control of these diseases.

  18. Visible-light-responsive ZnCuO nanoparticles: benign photodynamic killers of infectious protozoans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadhman, Akhtar; Nazir, Samina; Khan, Malik Ihsanullah; Ayub, Attiya; Muhammad, Bakhtiar; Khan, Momin; Shams, Dilawar Farhan; Yasinzai, Masoom

    2015-01-01

    Human beings suffer from several infectious agents such as viruses, bacteria, and protozoans. Recently, there has been a great interest in developing biocompatible nanostructures to deal with infectious agents. This study investigated benign ZnCuO nanostructures that were visible-light-responsive due to the resident copper in the lattice. The nanostructures were synthesized through a size-controlled hot-injection process, which was adaptable to the surface ligation processes. The nanostructures were then characterized through transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, diffused reflectance spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, and photoluminescence analysis to measure crystallite nature, size, luminescence, composition, and band-gap analyses. Antiprotozoal efficiency of the current nanoparticles revealed the photodynamic killing of Leishmania protozoan, thus acting as efficient metal-based photosensitizers. The crystalline nanoparticles showed good biocompatibility when tested for macrophage toxicity and in hemolysis assays. The study opens a wide avenue for using toxic material in resident nontoxic forms as an effective antiprotozoal treatment.

  19. Multi-agent Cooperation in a Planning Framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Weerdt, M.M.; Bos, A.; Tonino, J.F.M.; Witteveen, C.

    2000-01-01

    The promise of multi-agent systems is that multiple agents can solve problems more efficiently than single agents can. In this paper we propose a method to implement cooperation between agents in the planning phase, in order to achive more cost-effective solutions than without cooperation. Two

  20. Impact of vitamin D on infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Malcolm D; Alvarez, Jessica A; Seidel, Natan; Tangpricha, Vin

    2015-03-01

    Observational studies have linked vitamin D status and infectious disease. This association is supported by the presence of the vitamin D receptor and CYP27B1 in immune cells. This review aims to consolidate data from clinical trials that used vitamin D for the treatment or prevention of infectious disease. The authors searched the term "(vitamin D OR ergocalciferol OR cholecalciferol OR vitamin D2 OR vitamin D3 OR calcitriol) AND (infection OR tuberculosis OR sepsis OR pneumonia)" with limits preset to manuscripts published in English and with human subjects. They identified controlled trials that measured infectious outcomes (eg, incidence and severity of disease, time to disease resolution or recurrence, measures of clinical improvement, mortality). Studies that used analog, topical or micronutrient formulations of vitamin D, assessed only vitamin D status or lacked a comparison group were excluded. The references from eligible manuscripts and from 2 recent reviews were scanned for additional manuscripts. One thousand two hundred eighty-four manuscripts were identified with our search terms, with 60 papers still eligible after review of the title and abstract. Full review of these papers, their references and 2 related reviews yielded 38 manuscripts. Although some prospective studies show positive results regarding vitamin D on infectious disease, several robust studies are negative. Factors such as high variability between studies, the difference in individual responsiveness to vitamin D and study designs that do not primarily investigate infectious outcomes may mask the effects of vitamin D on infections.

  1. The efficacy of the direct clinical intervention for infectious diseases by a pediatric infectious disease specialist in the pediatric ward of a tertiary medical facility without a pediatric antimicrobial stewardship program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshina, T; Yamamoto, N; Ogawa, M; Nakamoto, T; Kusuhara, K

    2017-08-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) have been introduced in most hospital complexes; however, they are not always useful for pediatric patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the efficacy of direct clinical intervention for infectious diseases by a pediatric infectious disease specialist in a tertiary medical facility without pediatric ASP. This retrospective study included 1,821 patients who were hospitalized in the pediatric ward of a large metropolitan hospital from 2010 to 2015. The clinical course, the use of intravenous antimicrobial agents and the results of a microbiological analysis were compared between the period after the beginning of direct intervention by the specialist (post-intervention period) and the previous period (pre-intervention period). In the post-intervention period, the proportion of the patients who received intravenous antimicrobial agents, the number of antimicrobial agents used for each episode, and the proportion of episodes in which an antimicrobial agent was re-administrated were significantly lower (P = 0.006, P = 0.004, P = 0.036, respectively), and the duration of antimicrobial treatment was significantly shorter (P infectious diseases specialist is useful for the treatment of infectious diseases in the pediatric ward of a tertiary medical facility without a pediatric ASP. The creation of a pediatric ASP is recommended in hospital complexes.

  2. Deforestation-driven food-web collapse linked to emerging tropical infectious disease, Mycobacterium ulcerans

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, A. L.; Guégan, Jean-François; Andreou, D.; Marsollier, L.; Carolan, K.; Le Croller, M.; Sanhueza, D.; Gozlan, Rodolphe

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Generalist microorganisms are the agents of many emerging infectious diseases (EIDs), but their natural life cyclesare difficult to predict due to the multiplicity of potential hosts and environmental reservoirs. Among 250 knownhuman EIDs, many have been traced to tropical rain forests and specifically freshwater aquatic systems, which act asan interface between microbe-rich sediments or substrates and terrestrial habitats. Along with the rapid urbanizationof developin...

  3. Infectious diseases and the use of antibiotics in outpatients at the emergency department of the University Hospital of Leon, Nicaragua

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Engelsen, C.; van der Werf, C.; Matute, A. J.; Delgado, E.; Schurink, C. A. M.; Hoepelman, A. I. M.

    Background: In order to develop guidelines for the use of antimicrobial agents, it is necessary to obtain detailed information on the prevalence of infectious diseases and antibiotic usage. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted among outpatients with acute infections visiting the emergency

  4. Biodiversity loss and infectious diseases: chapter 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    When conservation biologists think about infectious diseases, their thoughts are mostly negative. Infectious diseases have been associated with the extinction and endangerment of some species, though this is rare, and other factors like habitat loss and poorly regulated harvest still are the overwhelming drivers of endangerment. Parasites are pervasive and play important roles as natural enemies on par with top predators, from regulating population abundances to maintaining species diversity. Sometimes, parasites themselves can be endangered. However, it seems unlikely that humans will miss extinct parasites. Parasites are often sensitive to habitat loss and degradation, making them positive indicators of ecosystem “health”. Conservation biologists need to carefully consider infectious diseases when planning conservation actions. This can include minimizing the movement of domestic and invasive species, vaccination, and culling.

  5. Infectious diseases and securitization: WHO's dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jiyong; Karackattu, Joe Thomas

    2011-06-01

    The threat posed by infectious diseases has been increasingly framed as a security issue. The UN Security Council's Resolution 1308, which designated HIV/AIDS as a threat to international security, evidenced the securitization process. Using securitization theory as a theoretical tool, this article explores the securitization of infectious diseases in the World Health Organization (WHO). While WHO has tended to securitize infectious diseases since 2000, it has encountered a dilemma in the process because of the inherent asymmetry of interest between developed and developing countries. The act of securitization in WHO currently remains mostly a rhetorical device, since WHO's norms emblematic of securitization have not been backed by operational measures for verification or enforcement due to these asymmetric interests.

  6. Infectious diseases in Greenlanders of Upernavik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, P

    1985-01-01

    During one year, 1979-80, all the contacts between the 836 inhabitants of Upernavik town and the local medical officers were recorded. In the 737 native Greenlanders 1006 contacts (41%) were caused by infectious diseases, representing 705 episodes of disease. The number of contacts per episode...... infections during winter was noted. The contact rate for all infectious diseases together was slightly higher than in Danish general practice, and infectious diseases also accounted for a larger proportion of all registered contacts. Contacts due to chronic respiratory infections, skin infections...... of disease was similar in all age groups. Of these contacts 26% were caused by acute upper respiratory tract infections, 8% by other acute respiratory infections, 10% by chronic respiratory infections, 24% by non-traumatic skin infections, 7% by post-traumatic skin infections, 8% by sexually transmitted...

  7. Survey of Infectious Etiologies of Bovine Abortion during Mid- to Late Gestation in Dairy Herds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkallah, Mohamed; Slima, Ahlem Ben; Mallek, Zouhir; Gautier, Michel; Greub, Gilbert; Gdoura, Radhouane; Fendri, Imen

    2014-01-01

    Bovine abortion of unknown infectious etiology still remains a major economic problem. Thus, we investigated whether Brucella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp. and Coxiella burnetii are associated with abortion and/or stillbirth in Tunisian dairy cattle. Using a pan-Chlamydiales PCR, we also investigated the role of Chlamydiaceae, Waddlia chondrophila, Parachlamydia acanthamoebae and other members of the Chlamydiales order in this setting. Veterinary samples taken from mid to late-term abortions from twenty dairy herds were tested. From a total of 150 abortion cases collected, infectious agents were detected by PCR in 73 (48.66%) cases, 13 (8.66%) of which represented co-infections with two infectious agents. Detected pathogens include Brucella spp (31.3%), Chlamydiaceae (4.66%), Waddlia chondrophila (8%), Parachlamydia acanthamoebae (5.33%), Listeria monocytogenes (4.66%) and Salmonella spp. (3.33%). In contrast, Campylobacter spp. and Coxiella burnetii DNA were not detected among the investigated veterinary samples. This demonstrates that different bacterial agents may cause bovine abortion in Tunisia. This is the first report suggesting the role of Parachlamydia acanthamoebae in bovine abortion in Africa. Further studies with a larger number of samples are necessary to confirm whether this emerging pathogen is directly linked to abortion in cattle. PMID:24662769

  8. Prevalence of infectious keratitis in Central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The baseline data pertaining to the national epidemiological survey of infectious keratitis remain scarce in China, and currently there is no corneal blindness control strategy developed by the nation. Methods Geographically defined cluster sampling was used to randomly select a cross-section of residents from representative urban and rural populations in Hubei Province. Participants were selected from village registers, followed by door-to-door household visits. The assessment items included a structured interview, visual acuity testing, external eye examination, and anterior segment examination using slit lamp. Causes and sequelae of corneal disease were identified according to uniform customized protocol. Results The prevalence of presenting corneal diseases was 0.8% (211/26 305), while the prevalence of infectious keratitis was 0.148% (39/26 305). The prevalences of viral, bacterial, and fungal keratitis were 0.065, 0.068, and 0.015%, respectively. There were no significant differences found between the prevalences of viral (accounting for 43.6%) and bacterial (accounting for 46.2%) corneal ulcers. cases of Acanthamoeba keratitis were not found. Infectious keratitis was the leading cause of corneal blindness (85.7%), and the prevalence of blindness in at least one eye resulting from infected corneas was 0.091% (95% CI: 0.067-0.127%). Conclusions Viral and bacterial mechanisms constitute the most important risk factors for infectious corneal ulcers in Central China. To reduce the rate and severity of infectious keratitis, he public health care policy should be focused on designing cost-effective strategies and operational programs for the prevention and prompt treatment of infectious corneal ulcers. PMID:24690368

  9. Effective multiple oral administration of reverse genetics engineered infectious bursal disease virus in mice in the presence of neutralizing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornyák, Ákos; Lipinski, Kai S; Bakonyi, Tamás; Forgách, Petra; Horváth, Ernő; Farsang, Attila; Hedley, Susan J; Palya, Vilmos; Bakács, Tibor; Kovesdi, Imre

    2015-01-01

    Despite spectacular successes in hepatitis B and C therapies, severe hepatic impairment is still a major treatment problem. The clinically tested infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) superinfection therapy promises an innovative, interferon-free solution to this great unmet need, provided that a consistent manufacturing process preventing mutations or reversions to virulent strains is obtained. To address safety concerns, a tissue culture adapted IBDV vaccine strain V903/78 was cloned into cDNA plasmids ensuring reproducible production of a reverse engineered virus R903/78. The therapeutic drug candidate was characterized by immunocytochemistry assay, virus particle determination and immunoblot analysis. The biodistribution and potential immunogenicity of the IBDV agent was determined in mice, which is not a natural host of this virus, by quantitative detection of IBDV RNA by a quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and virus neutralization test, respectively. Several human cell lines supported IBDV propagation in the absence of visible cytopathic effect. The virus was stable from pH 8 to pH 6 and demonstrated significant resistance to low pH and also proved to be highly resistant to high temperatures. No pathological effects were observed in mice. Single and multiple oral administration of IBDV elicited antibodies with neutralizing activities in vitro. Repeat oral administration of R903/78 was successful despite the presence of neutralizing antibodies. Single oral and intravenous administration indicated that IBDV does not replicate in mammalian liver alleviating some safety related concerns. These data supports the development of an orally delivered anti-hepatitis B virus/ anti-hepatitis C virus viral agent for human use. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Effect of Experience of Internal Medicine Residents during Infectious Disease Elective on Future Infectious Disease Fellowship Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-04

    Experience of !ntcrnal Medicine Residents during Infectious Disease Elective on Future lntCctious Di~casc Fcllo\\vship Application Sb. GRANT N_UMBER...Internal Medidne Residents during Infectious Disease Elective on Future Infectious Disease Fello\\\\/shlp Application Blyth Dl’vl, Barsournian 1\\E, Yun I-IC...Medicine Residents during Infectious Disease Elective on Fut ure Infectious Disease Fellowship Application ~ Poeter# 1440 .,...._,: OVfil"S~ ti

  11. Sibship structure and risk of infectious mononucleosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Klaus; Nielsen, Trine Rasmussen; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Present understanding of increased risk of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related infectious mononucleosis among children of low birth order or small sibships is mainly based on old and indirect evidence. Societal changes and methodological limitations of previous studies call for new data...... of blood donors followed up retrospectively for self-reported infectious mononucleosis. CONCLUSIONS: Younger siblings, and to a lesser degree older siblings, seem to be important in the transmission of EBV within families. Apparently the dogma of low birth order in a sibship as being at the highest risk...

  12. Careers in Infectious Diseases: Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Arjun

    2017-09-15

    Public health offers infectious disease physicians a variety of rewarding career options. Our training and skills make us well suited to a variety of roles in public health. This article summarizes some of the options for careers in public health and describes why ID physicians are so well suited to them. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. A clonal strain of Trichomonas gallinae is the aetiologic agent of an emerging avian epidemic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Becki; Cunningham, Andrew A; Chantrey, Julian; Hughes, Laura A; John, Shinto K; Bunbury, Nancy; Bell, Diana J; Tyler, Kevin M

    2011-10-01

    Trichomonas gallinae is a protozoan parasite that is well characterised as a cause of trichomonosis in columbid and raptor species world-wide. The parasite emerged as a novel infection of British passerines in 2005, leading to epidemic mortality associated with significant declines of breeding populations of greenfinches (Carduelis chloris) and chaffinches (Fringilla coelebs). We characterised the extent of T. gallinae genotypic heterogeneity within the affected wild British avifauna by analysing individual isolates from 17 of the species affected. To do so, we employed improved platform-based multilocus typing tools as well as the hydrogenosomal Fe-hydrogenase gene as a single marker locus for fine-typing. We found no evidence of heterogeneity amongst the parasites infecting British passerines, indicating that a clonal strain of T. gallinae is the causative agent of this emerging infectious disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Clustering of contacts relevant to the spread of infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiong; van Hoek, Albert Jan; Kenward, Michael G; Melegaro, Alessia; Jit, Mark

    2016-12-01

    Infectious disease spread depends on contact rates between infectious and susceptible individuals. Transmission models are commonly informed using empirically collected contact data, but the relevance of different contact types to transmission is still not well understood. Some studies select contacts based on a single characteristic such as proximity (physical/non-physical), location, duration or frequency. This study aimed to explore whether clusters of contacts similar to each other across multiple characteristics could better explain disease transmission. Individual contact data from the POLYMOD survey in Poland, Great Britain, Belgium, Finland and Italy were grouped into clusters by the k medoids clustering algorithm with a Manhattan distance metric to stratify contacts using all four characteristics. Contact clusters were then used to fit a transmission model to sero-epidemiological data for varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in each country. Across the five countries, 9-15 clusters were found to optimise both quality of clustering (measured using average silhouette width) and quality of fit (measured using several information criteria). Of these, 2-3 clusters were most relevant to VZV transmission, characterised by (i) 1-2 clusters of age-assortative contacts in schools, (ii) a cluster of less age-assortative contacts in non-school settings. Quality of fit was similar to using contacts stratified by a single characteristic, providing validation that single stratifications are appropriate. However, using clustering to stratify contacts using multiple characteristics provided insight into the structures underlying infection transmission, particularly the role of age-assortative contacts, involving school age children, for VZV transmission between households. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Exploring Risk Perceptions of Emerging Infectious Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. de Zwart (Onno)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis is about risk perception of infectious diseases, with a special focus on the emerging infections SARS and avian influenza, and explores potential determinants of risk perception and the relation of risk perception with precautionary behaviours. In this first chapter I discuss

  16. Linking Emerging Infectious Diseases Research and Policy ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project presents a new phase of APEIR research on emerging threats from antimicrobial resistance and wildlife trade. ... activities in the health field, this new phase of work will help APEIR build and support regional capacity to communicate and share knowledge to promptly address emerging infectious disease threats.

  17. African Journal of Infectious Diseases: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Journal of Infectious Diseases (AJID) will accept manuscripts submitted as e-mail attachments. For all ... is suitable for recording the results of complete small investigations or giving details of new models or hypotheses, identification, innovative methods, techniques, clinical trials and epidemiological studies.

  18. Infectious Disease Transmission during Transfusion and Transplantation

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-08-13

    Dr. Matthew Kuehnert, Director of the Office of Blood, Organ, and Other Tissue Safety, discusses infections in transplants.  Created: 8/13/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/15/2012.

  19. Eight challenges in modelling infectious livestock diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brooks-Pollock, E.; Jong, de M.; Keeling, M.J.; Klinkenberg, D.; Wood, J.L.N.

    2015-01-01

    The transmission of infectious diseases of livestock does not differ in principle from disease transmission in any other animals, apart from that the aim of control is ultimately economic, with the influence of social, political and welfare constraints often poorly defined. Modelling of livestock

  20. Characteristics of Hodgkin's lymphoma after infectious mononucleosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjalgrim, Henrik; Askling, Johan; Rostgaard, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infectious mononucleosis-related Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection has been associated with an increased risk of Hodgkin's lymphoma in young adults. Whether the association is causal remains unclear. METHODS: We compared the incidence rates of Hodgkin's lymphoma in two population-bas...

  1. Personalized Medicine and Infectious Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Slade O; van Hal, Sebastiaan J

    2017-11-01

    A recent study identified pathogen factors associated with an increased mortality risk in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia, using predictive modelling and a combination of genotypic, phenotypic, and clinical data. This study conceptually validates the benefit of personalized medicine and highlights the potential use of whole genome sequencing in infectious disease management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Neutropenic enterocolitis (typhlitis) associated with infectious mononucleosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigirci, Ahmet [Inonu University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Turgut Ozal Medical Centre, Malatya (Turkey); Akinci, Aysehan; Oezgen, Uensal; Oezen, Metehan [Inonu University School of Medicine, Department of Paediatrics, Turgut Ozal Medical Centre, Malatya (Turkey)

    2006-02-01

    Neutropenic enterocolitis (typhlitis) is an unusual acute complication of neutropenia, most often associated with leukaemia and lymphoma and characterized by segmental caecal and ascending colonic ulceration that may progress to necrosis, perforation, and septicaemia. We present a unique case of an 8-year-old girl with recently diagnosed infectious mononucleosis having findings consistent with typhlitis on abdominal CT. (orig.)

  3. Extreme weather events and infectious disease outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Human-driven climatic changes will fundamentally influence patterns of human health, including infectious disease clusters and epidemics following extreme weather events. Extreme weather events are projected to increase further with the advance of human-driven climate change. Both recent and historical experiences indicate that infectious disease outbreaks very often follow extreme weather events, as microbes, vectors and reservoir animal hosts exploit the disrupted social and environmental conditions of extreme weather events. This review article examines infectious disease risks associated with extreme weather events; it draws on recent experiences including Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and the 2010 Pakistan mega-floods, and historical examples from previous centuries of epidemics and 'pestilence' associated with extreme weather disasters and climatic changes. A fuller understanding of climatic change, the precursors and triggers of extreme weather events and health consequences is needed in order to anticipate and respond to the infectious disease risks associated with human-driven climate change. Post-event risks to human health can be constrained, nonetheless, by reducing background rates of persistent infection, preparatory action such as coordinated disease surveillance and vaccination coverage, and strengthened disaster response. In the face of changing climate and weather conditions, it is critically important to think in ecological terms about the determinants of health, disease and death in human populations.

  4. Infectious Disease Risk Associated with Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane L.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation opens with views of the shuttle in various stages of preparation for launch, a few moments after launch prior to external fuel tank separation, a few pictures of the earth,and several pictures of astronomical interest. The presentation reviews the factors effecting the risks of infectious disease during space flight, such as the crew, water, food, air, surfaces and payloads and the factors that increase disease risk, the factors affecting the risk of infectious disease during spaceflight, and the environmental factors affecting immunity, such as stress. One factor in space infectious disease is latent viral reactivation, such as herpes. There are comparisons of the incidence of viral reactivation in space, and in other analogous situations (such as bed rest, or isolation). There is discussion of shingles, and the pain and results of treatment. There is a further discussion of the changes in microbial pathogen characteristics, using salmonella as an example of the increased virulence of microbes during spaceflight. A factor involved in the risk of infectious disease is stress.

  5. THE PATHOLOGY OF INFECTIOUS BURSAL DISEASE IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An outbreak of infectious bursal disease (IBD) occurred in a flock of 11-week old crossbreeds of Harco cocks and indigenous Nigerian hens (referred to as exotic and locals respectively in the text). Clinical signs observed include depression, anorexia, ruffled feathers and diarrhoea. Haemorrhages were present in the bursa ...

  6. Post-infectious encephalopathy simulating functional psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spihtle, B J; Fliegner, J; Faed, J A; Hannah, J B; James, B

    1977-03-09

    Three cases of post-infectious encephalopathy are presented in which behaviour changes occurred in the absence of neurological abnormality during convalescence from an influenza-like illness. The symptoms included aggresive behaviour, sleep reversal, sexual disinbition and a catatonic schizophrenia-like state. The prognosis was good.

  7. Population dynamics and infectious diseases in Asia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sleigh, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    ... such as SARS. David J BRADLEY is Ross Professor of Tropical Hygiene Emeritus at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and Leverhulme Emeritus Fellow in the Department of Zoology, Oxford University. He has worked on the epidemiology and control of vector-borne and infectious diseases, water in relation to health, and concepts in international h...

  8. International adoption: issues in infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staat, Dana D; Klepser, Michael E

    2006-09-01

    International adoptions have become increasingly common in the United States. Children awaiting international adoption and families traveling to adopt these children can be exposed to a variety of infectious diseases. Compared with the United States, foreign countries often have different immunization practices and methods of diagnosing, treating, and monitoring disease. Reporting of medical conditions can also differ from that of the United States. The prevalence of infectious diseases varies from country to country and may or may not be common among adopted children. The transmission of tuberculosis, hepatitis B, and measles from adopted children to family members has been documented. Furthermore, infectious organisms (e.g., intestinal parasites), bacterial pathogens (e.g., Bordetella pertussis and Treponema pallidum), and viruses (e.g., human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis viruses) may cause clinically significant morbidity and mortality among infected children. Diseases such as severe acute respiratory syndrome or avian influenza have not been reported among international adoptees, but transmission is possible if infection is present. Family members may be infected by others during travel or by their adopted child after returning home. Families preparing to adopt a child from abroad should pay special attention to the infectious diseases they may encounter and to the precautions they should take on returning home.

  9. Infectious diseases in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumate, J

    1997-01-01

    Infecto-contagious diseases in the twenty-first century with respect to precedent will see themselves deprived of smallpox, dracunculiasis and very probably of paralyzing poliomyelitis. Vaccination-preventable diseases, such as measles, whooping cough, diphtheria, tetanus, rabies, some forms of meningitis, yellow fever and episodes of disseminated tuberculosis will greatly diminish in their rates of morbi-lethality; the elimination of some, and the eradication of measles, are expected. Other diseases such as diarrhea (including cholera), geo-helminthiasis, some severe respiratory tract infections and the majority of vector-transmitted infectious diseases will decrease due to improvements in potable water services, drainage, sanitary food control, living quarters, and individual and community anti-vector action. Leprosy, onchocerciasis and several parasitoses will be controlled by the available antimicrobial drugs. Infectious diseases will continue to be an important health problem due to: Reduction in the immunocompetence resulting from the aging of the population, chemotherapies necessary for neoplasms, and autoimmune pathology and the survival of persons with primary immunodeficiencies; lifestyles prone to infectious pathology, such as mega-city urbanization, children in day care centers, industrialized foods, intravenous drug addiction, sexual liberation, global commerce, and tourism; antibiotic-multiresistant microbial flora; environmental disturbances as a result of global warming, deforestation, the settling of virgin areas, dams, the large-scale use of pesticides, fertilizers and antimicrobials, and natural/social disasters generators of poverty, violence and deprivation will result in emergence or re-emergence of infectious diseases already controlled in the past.

  10. Translational medicine policy issues in infectious disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fears, R.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Meulen, V. ter

    2010-01-01

    The European Academies Science Advisory Council has published a series of reports on infectious disease policy issues, analyzing priorities for building the science base as part of public health strategy. Among current challenges facing the European Union are the needs to tackle antibiotic

  11. ABO system of blood groups in people and their resistance to certain infectious diseases (prognosis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skripal', I G

    1996-01-01

    Natural resistance to many infectious disease which to certain extent depends on the blood group of a person is inherent in people. As is known, human erythrocytes possess the surface antigens A, B, AB that determine the groups of blood. Blood group O erythrocytes do not possess these antigens but blood serum of such people have antibodies to A and B antigens. In people with blood group A there are antibodies to antigen B and vice versa. Human blood of AB group does not contain antibodies to erythrocyte antigens of other blood groups. This determines natural resistance of people to many infectious diseases whose agents have antigens on the surface of their cells that are similar to antigens of one or another group of blood. Thus antigens similar to those of blood group A erythrocytes are localized on the agents' cells, such agents are neutralized by natural antibodies of blood groups O and B. When antigens similar to those of blood group B erythrocytes are localized on the agents' cells, that is the obstacle for them when affecting people with blood group A and B whose serum includes a lot of antibodies to these antigens. Only people with blood group AB are most sensitive to infectious diseases which agents carry antigens A, B or both A and B on their cells, since blood of such people does not contain the corresponding natural antibodies. To illustrate the above said the author gives a prognosis of possible affection of people by most pathogenic mycoplasmas whose cells possess antigens similar to those of erythrocytes of one or another blood group.

  12. Infectious disease risks from dead bodies following natural disasters Riesgo de transmisión de enfermedades infecciosas por contacto con cadáveres después de desastres naturales

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver Morgan

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review existing literature to assess the risks of infection from dead bodies after a natural disaster occurs, including who is most at risk, what precautions should be taken, and how to safely dispose of the bodies. METHODS: Disease transmission requires the presence of an infectious agent, exposure to that agent, and a susceptible host. These elements were considered to characterize the infectious disease risk from dead bodies. Using the PubMed on-line databases of the National...

  13. Agility: Agent - Ility Architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thompson, Craig

    2002-01-01

    ...., object and web technologies). The objective of the Agility project is to develop an open agent grid architecture populated with scalable, deployable, industrial strength agent grid components, targeting the theme 'agents for the masses...

  14. Mobile Agent Security

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jansen, Wayne

    1998-01-01

    Mobile agent technology offers a new computing paradigm in which a program, in the form of a software agent, can suspend its execution on a host computer, transfer itself to another agent-enabled host...

  15. Interacting agents in finance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommes, C.; Durlauf, S.N.; Blume, L.E.

    2008-01-01

    Interacting agents in finance represent a behavioural, agent-based approach in which financial markets are viewed as complex adaptive systems consisting of many boundedly rational agents interacting through simple heterogeneous investment strategies, constantly adapting their behaviour in response

  16. Meta-genomic analysis of toilet waste from long distance flights; a step towards global surveillance of infectious diseases and antimicrobial resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Thomas Nordahl; Rasmussen, Simon; Hasman, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Human populations worldwide are increasingly confronted with infectious diseases and antimicrobial resistance spreading faster and appearing more frequently. Knowledge regarding their occurrence and worldwide transmission is important to control outbreaks and prevent epidemics. Here, we performed...... in samples from North America. Our study provides a first step towards a potential novel strategy for global surveillance enabling simultaneous detection of multiple human health threatening genetic elements, infectious agents and resistance genes....

  17. Outcomes of Infectious versus Sterile Perforated Corneal Ulcers after Therapeutic Penetrating Keratoplasty in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Sloan W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the long-term outcomes of infectious versus sterile perforated corneal ulcers after therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty in the United States. Methods. The charts of 45 consecutive eyes that underwent primary therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty for a perforated corneal ulcer at a single center were retrospectively reviewed. The perforated ulcers were classified as infectious or sterile and the underlying demographics, clinical features, and 36-month outcomes were compared among the two groups. Results. Mean follow-up among subjects was 38.6 (±6.9) months. Patients presenting with sterile perforated ulcers were more likely to have a peripheral perforation location (p = 0.0333) and recurrence of the underlying disease condition (p = 0.0321), require adjunctive surgical measures in the immediate postoperative period (p ulcer group. Conclusions. Sterile perforated corneal ulcers have a worse prognosis and may be more frequent than those caused by infectious disease in the United States compared to the developing world. PMID:28070416

  18. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of avian infectious bronchitis virus main protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jun; Shen, Wei [Laboratory of Structural Biology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liao, Ming, E-mail: mliao@scau.edu.cn [Laboratory of Avian Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China); Bartlam, Mark, E-mail: mliao@scau.edu.cn [Laboratory of Structural Biology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2007-01-01

    The avian infectious bronchitis virus main protease has been crystallized; crystals diffract to 2.7 Å resolution. Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is the prototype of the genus Coronavirus. It causes a highly contagious disease which affects the respiratory, reproductive, neurological and renal systems of chickens, resulting great economic losses in the poultry industry worldwide. The coronavirus (CoV) main protease (M{sup pro}), which plays a pivotal role in viral gene expression and replication through a highly complex cascade involving the proteolytic processing of replicase polyproteins, is an attractive target for antiviral drug design. In this study, IBV M{sup pro} was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Crystals suitable for X-ray crystallography have been obtained using microseeding techniques and belong to space group P6{sub 1}22. X-ray diffraction data were collected in-house to 2.7 Å resolution from a single crystal. The unit-cell parameters were a = b = 119.1, c = 270.7 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. Three molecules were predicted to be present in the asymmetric unit from a calculated self-rotation function.

  19. Investigating risk factors and possible infectious aetiologies of mummified fetuses on a large piggery in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dron, N; Hernández-Jover, M; Doyle, R E; Holyoake, P K

    2014-12-01

    To investigate risk factors and potential infectious aetiologies of an increased mummification rate (>2%) identified over time on a 1200-sow farrow-to-finish farm in Australia. Association of potential non-infectious risk factors and the mummification rate was investigated using 15 years of breeding herd data (40,940 litters) and logistic regression analysis. Samples from a limited number of mummified fetuses were taken to identify potential infectious aetiologies (porcine parvovirus, Leptospira pomona, porcine circovirus type 2, Bungowannah virus and enterovirus). Logistic regression analysis suggested that the mummification rate was significantly associated with sow breed and parity, year and total born and stillborn piglets per litter. The mummification rate was lower (P < 0.001) in Landrace (3.4%) and Large White (2.6%) sows than in Duroc sows (4.9%). Gilts (2.9%) had a lower (P < 0.001) mummification rate than older sows. The mummification rate increased with total born litter size and decreased with the number of stillborn piglets (P < 0.001). A clustering effect within individual sows was identified, indicating that some sows with mummified fetuses in a litter were more likely to have repeated mummifications in subsequent litters. No infectious agents were identified in the samples taken. Results from this study suggest that the increased mummification rate identified over time on this farm is likely to be a non-infectious multifactorial problem predisposing the occurrence of mummification. Further research is required to better understand the pathophysiology of mummification and the role that different non-infectious factors play in the occurrence of mummified fetuses. © 2014 Australian Veterinary Association.

  20. Using internet search queries for infectious disease surveillance: screening diseases for suitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinovich, Gabriel J; Avril, Simon M R; Clements, Archie C A; Brownstein, John S; Tong, Shilu; Hu, Wenbiao

    2014-12-31

    Internet-based surveillance systems provide a novel approach to monitoring infectious diseases. Surveillance systems built on internet data are economically, logistically and epidemiologically appealing and have shown significant promise. The potential for these systems has increased with increased internet availability and shifts in health-related information seeking behaviour. This approach to monitoring infectious diseases has, however, only been applied to single or small groups of select diseases. This study aims to systematically investigate the potential for developing surveillance and early warning systems using internet search data, for a wide range of infectious diseases. Official notifications for 64 infectious diseases in Australia were downloaded and correlated with frequencies for 164 internet search terms for the period 2009-13 using Spearman's rank correlations. Time series cross correlations were performed to assess the potential for search terms to be used in construction of early warning systems. Notifications for 17 infectious diseases (26.6%) were found to be significantly correlated with a selected search term. The use of internet metrics as a means of surveillance has not previously been described for 12 (70.6%) of these diseases. The majority of diseases identified were vaccine-preventable, vector-borne or sexually transmissible; cross correlations, however, indicated that vector-borne and vaccine preventable diseases are best suited for development of early warning systems. The findings of this study suggest that internet-based surveillance systems have broader applicability to monitoring infectious diseases than has previously been recognised. Furthermore, internet-based surveillance systems have a potential role in forecasting emerging infectious disease events, especially for vaccine-preventable and vector-borne diseases.

  1. Causal inference regarding infectious aetiology of chronic conditions: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Orrskog

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The global burden of disease has shifted from communicable diseases in children to chronic diseases in adults. This epidemiologic shift varies greatly by region, but in Europe, chronic conditions account for 86% of all deaths, 77% of the disease burden, and up to 80% of health care expenditures. A number of risk factors have been implicated in chronic diseases, such as exposure to infectious agents. A number of associations have been well established while others remain uncertain. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We assessed the body of evidence regarding the infectious aetiology of chronic diseases in the peer-reviewed literature over the last decade. Causality was assessed with three different criteria: First, the total number of associations documented in the literature between each infectious agent and chronic condition; second, the epidemiologic study design (quality of the study; third, evidence for the number of Hill's criteria and Koch's postulates that linked the pathogen with the chronic condition. We identified 3136 publications, of which 148 were included in the analysis. There were a total of 75 different infectious agents and 122 chronic conditions. The evidence was strong for five pathogens, based on study type, strength and number of associations; they accounted for 60% of the associations documented in the literature. They were human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus, Helicobacter pylori, hepatitis B virus, and Chlamydia pneumoniae and were collectively implicated in the aetiology of 37 different chronic conditions. Other pathogens examined were only associated with very few chronic conditions (≤ 3 and when applying the three different criteria of evidence the strength of the causality was weak. CONCLUSIONS: Prevention and treatment of these five pathogens lend themselves as effective public health intervention entry points. By concentrating research efforts on these promising areas, the human, economic, and societal

  2. Severe infectious diseases of childhood as monogenic inborn errors of immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the developments that have occurred in the field of human genetics of infectious diseases from the second half of the 20th century onward. In particular, it stresses and explains the importance of the recently described monogenic inborn errors of immunity underlying resistance or susceptibility to specific infections. The monogenic component of the genetic theory provides a plausible explanation for the occurrence of severe infectious diseases during primary infection. Over the last 20 y, increasing numbers of life-threatening infectious diseases striking otherwise healthy children, adolescents, and even young adults have been attributed to single-gene inborn errors of immunity. These studies were inspired by seminal but neglected findings in plant and animal infections. Infectious diseases typically manifest as sporadic traits because human genotypes often display incomplete penetrance (most genetically predisposed individuals remain healthy) and variable expressivity (different infections can be allelic at the same locus). Infectious diseases of childhood, once thought to be archetypal environmental diseases, actually may be among the most genetically determined conditions of mankind. This nascent and testable notion has interesting medical and biological implications. PMID:26621750

  3. Severe infectious diseases of childhood as monogenic inborn errors of immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-12-22

    This paper reviews the developments that have occurred in the field of human genetics of infectious diseases from the second half of the 20th century onward. In particular, it stresses and explains the importance of the recently described monogenic inborn errors of immunity underlying resistance or susceptibility to specific infections. The monogenic component of the genetic theory provides a plausible explanation for the occurrence of severe infectious diseases during primary infection. Over the last 20 y, increasing numbers of life-threatening infectious diseases striking otherwise healthy children, adolescents, and even young adults have been attributed to single-gene inborn errors of immunity. These studies were inspired by seminal but neglected findings in plant and animal infections. Infectious diseases typically manifest as sporadic traits because human genotypes often display incomplete penetrance (most genetically predisposed individuals remain healthy) and variable expressivity (different infections can be allelic at the same locus). Infectious diseases of childhood, once thought to be archetypal environmental diseases, actually may be among the most genetically determined conditions of mankind. This nascent and testable notion has interesting medical and biological implications.

  4. Biological material for microslides to diagnose human infectious and parasitic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Arakelian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The material for microscopic examination were blood, bone marrow, cerebrospinal fluid, lymph node puncture, feces, duodenal contents and bile, urine, sputum, urogenital tract secretions, tissue biopsies, smears from the mucous membranes of the mouth, tonsils, nose, etc. The final diagnosis of helminth infections can be established only on the basis of the positive findings of laboratory research. The basic method of laboratory diagnosis of these invasions is the detection of helminth eggs or larvae. The material for the research is the feces, the contents of the duodenum, blood, sputum, tissue biopsies, and other materials. Slides of blood microscopy are usually prepared on glass slides, their quality and purity greatly impact the effectiveness of detection and identification of blood parasites. The material from leishmaniasis patients is studied under immersion; Leishmania locate mainly outside the cell, but often they are found in the cytoplasm of mononuclear cells and neutrophils. The number of Leishmania in a single cell can reach several tens. They are in the form of small round or oval cells ranging in size from 2.5 to 5 microns. The cytoplasm is gray-blue co­lored, the nucleus are red or red-purple, kinetoplasts are dark purple color. The presence of a nucleus and kinetoplasts is the main feature that distinguishes Leishmania from platelets, cocci, and yeast cells. In a laboratory study (painting by Romanovsky — ­Giemsa, microfilaria are colored in dark blue and resemble crimped fibers. Inside the larvae nuclear grain is easy visible. The causative agents of parasitic and infectious diseases can also be found in other biological substances of the human body: the urine, cerebrospinal fluid, bone marrow, secretion of urinary organs, duodenal contents, bile, and phlegm.

  5. Phenanthrenequinone antiretroviral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, G A; Melekhov, A; Carpenter, S; Wannemuhler, Y; Petrich, J

    2000-01-03

    Compounds 3 and 5 are the first phenanthrenequinones to exhibit significant virucidal activity against the retrovirus equine infectious anemia virus. They differ from hypericin in that their virucidal activity is not light dependent.

  6. A receptor for infectious and cellular prion protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.R. Martins

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Prions are an unconventional form of infectious agents composed only of protein and involved in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in humans and animals. The infectious particle is composed by PrPsc which is an isoform of a normal cellular glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI anchored protein, PrPc, of unknown function. The two proteins differ only in conformation, PrPc is composed of 40% a helix while PrPsc has 60% ß-sheet and 20% a helix structure. The infection mechanism is trigged by interaction of PrPsc with cellular prion protein causing conversion of the latter's conformation. Therefore, the infection spreads because new PrPsc molecules are generated exponentially from the normal PrPc. The accumulation of insoluble PrPsc is probably one of the events that lead to neuronal death. Conflicting data in the literature showed that PrPc internalization is mediated either by clathrin-coated pits or by caveolae-like membranous domains. However, both pathways seem to require a third protein (a receptor or a prion-binding protein either to make the connection between the GPI-anchored molecule to clathrin or to convert PrPc into PrPsc. We have recently characterized a 66-kDa membrane receptor which binds PrPc in vitro and in vivo and mediates the neurotoxicity of a human prion peptide. Therefore, the receptor should have a role in the pathogenesis of prion-related diseases and in the normal cellular process. Further work is necessary to clarify the events triggered by the association of PrPc/PrPsc with the receptor.

  7. National Infectious Diseases Surveillance data of South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunhee; Cho, Eunhee

    2014-01-01

    The Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC) operate infectious disease surveillance systems to monitor national disease incidence. Since 1954, Korea has collected data on various infectious diseases in accordance with the Infectious Disease Control and Prevention Act. All physicians (including those working in Oriental medicine) who diagnose a patient with an infectious disease or conduct a postmortem examination of an infectious disease case are obliged to report the disease to the system. These reported data are incorporated into the database of the National Infectious Disease Surveillance System, which has been providing web-based real-time surveillance data on infectious diseases since 2001. In addition, the KCDC analyzes reported data and publishes the Infectious Disease Surveillance Yearbook annually.

  8. U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID). The dedicated members of the USAMRIID staff ... military personnel and civilians from the threat of infectious diseases. We participate in support of emerging disease investigations, ...

  9. Non-infectious Complications of Peritoneal Dialysis among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) is known to be associated with various infectious and non-infectious complications. The latter term includes anatomical/mechanical complications as well as hemoperitoneum, inflow pain, electrolyte disturbances, metabolic derangements and ...

  10. INFECTIOUS-DISEASE TESTING FOR BLOOD-TRANSFUSIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DESFORGES, JF; ATHARI, F; COOPER, ES; JOHNSON, CS; LEMON, SM; LINDSAY, KL; MCCULLOUGH, J; MCINTOSH, K; ROSS, RK; WHITSETT, CF; WITTES, J; WRIGHT, TL

    1995-01-01

    Objective.-To provide physicians and other transfusion medicine professionals with a current consensus on infectious disease testing for blood transfusions. Participants.-A nonfederal, nonadvocate, 12-member consensus panel representing the fields of hematology, infectious disease, transfusion

  11. Emerging infectious disease outbreaks: estimating disease risk in Australian blood donors travelling overseas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coghlan, A; Hoad, V C; Seed, C R; Flower, R Lp; Harley, R J; Herbert, D; Faddy, H M

    2018-01-01

    International travel assists spread of infectious pathogens. Australians regularly travel to South-eastern Asia and the isles of the South Pacific, where they may become infected with infectious agents, such as dengue (DENV), chikungunya (CHIKV) and Zika (ZIKV) viruses that pose a potential risk to transfusion safety. In Australia, donors are temporarily restricted from donating for fresh component manufacture following travel to many countries, including those in this study. We aimed to estimate the unmitigated transfusion-transmission (TT) risk from donors travelling internationally to areas affected by emerging infectious diseases. We used the European Up-Front Risk Assessment Tool, with travel and notification data, to estimate the TT risk from donors travelling to areas affected by disease outbreaks: Fiji (DENV), Bali (DENV), Phuket (DENV), Indonesia (CHIKV) and French Polynesia (ZIKV). We predict minimal risk from travel, with the annual unmitigated risk of an infected component being released varying from 1 in 1·43 million to infectious disease outbreak areas to source plasma collection provides a simple and effective risk management approach. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  12. Impact of genetic variations in C-C chemokine receptors and ligands on infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qidwai, Tabish; Khan, M Y

    2016-10-01

    Chemokine receptors and ligands are crucial for extensive immune response against infectious diseases such as malaria, leishmaniasis, HIV and tuberculosis and a wide variety of other diseases. Role of chemokines are evidenced in the activation and regulation of immune cell migration which is important for immune response against diseases. Outcome of disease is determined by complex interaction among pathogen, host genetic variability and surrounding milieu. Variation in expression or function of chemokines caused by genetic polymorphisms could be associated with attenuated immune responses. Exploration of chemokine genetic polymorphisms in therapeutic response, gene regulation and disease outcome is important. Infectious agents in human host alter the expression of chemokines via epigenetic alterations and thus contribute to disease pathogenesis. Although some fragmentary data are available on chemokine genetic variations and their contribution in diseases, no unequivocal conclusion has been arrived as yet. We therefore, aim to investigate the association of CCR5-CCL5 and CCR2-CCL2 genetic polymorphisms with different infectious diseases, transcriptional regulation of gene, disease severity and response to therapy. Furthermore, the role of epigenetics in genes related to chemokines and infectious disease are also discussed. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mobile agent location in distributed environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountoukis, S. G.; Argyropoulos, I. P.

    2012-12-01

    An agent is a small program acting on behalf of a user or an application which plays the role of a user. Artificial intelligence can be encapsulated in agents so that they can be capable of both behaving autonomously and showing an elementary decision ability regarding movement and some specific actions. Therefore they are often called autonomous mobile agents. In a distributed system, they can move themselves from one processing node to another through the interconnecting network infrastructure. Their purpose is to collect useful information and to carry it back to their user. Also, agents are used to start, monitor and stop processes running on the individual interconnected processing nodes of computer cluster systems. An agent has a unique id to discriminate itself from other agents and a current position. The position can be expressed as the address of the processing node which currently hosts the agent. Very often, it is necessary for a user, a processing node or another agent to know the current position of an agent in a distributed system. Several procedures and algorithms have been proposed for the purpose of position location of mobile agents. The most basic of all employs a fixed computing node, which acts as agent position repository, receiving messages from all the moving agents and keeping records of their current positions. The fixed node, responds to position queries and informs users, other nodes and other agents about the position of an agent. Herein, a model is proposed that considers pairs and triples of agents instead of single ones. A location method, which is investigated in this paper, attempts to exploit this model.

  14. [Antibiotic treatment for prevention of infectious complications in joint replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahoda, D; Nyc, O; Pokorný, D; Landor, I; Sosna, A

    2006-04-01

    used only in indicated cases when deep infection is suspected and no assessment of the causative agent is available. Otherwise this approach carries a high risk of infectious complications in aseptic revision arthroplasty. Long-term, unjustified administration of antibiotics leads to an increase in resistance to the antibiotic involved. Some studies show that a day's course is as effective as a seven-day one. A shorter antibiotic course decreases the costs, reduces side-effects and minimizes the development of resistance. An optimal duration of antibiotic treatment has not been defined yet, and is still a hot issue for discussion. Many authors recommend one pre-operative antibiotic dose and, according to the kind of antibiotic, agree to its 24-hour administration in order to lower the toxic effect of antibiotic and to prevent selection of resistant microorganisms. The choice of suitable antibiotics for prophylactic treatment should be based on the range of agents causing joint replacement infections and the pharmacological properties of the drug. This should have minimal toxicity, should be well tolerated by the patient and, from the epidemiological point of view, should have a low risk of inducing resistance because of frequent use. Naturally, it is not possible to include all antibiotics against all causative agents and therefore attention should be paid, in the first place, to Gram-positive bacteria, i. e., staphylococci and streptococci, which are the most common causes of infectious complications associated with joint replacement. Because of difficulties related to the right choice of antibiotic, it is recommended to keep a record of complications in each patient in order to provide feedback and to facilitate the establishment of reliable antibiotic-based prevention. The prevention of infection in orthopedics is a comprehensive issue. It cannot be expected that prophylactic antibiotic treatment will compensate for mistakes made in operative protocols, for

  15. Progress and Challenges in Infectious Disease Cartography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Moritz U G; Hay, Simon I; Pigott, David M; Smith, David L; Wint, G R William; Golding, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Quantitatively mapping the spatial distributions of infectious diseases is key to both investigating their epidemiology and identifying populations at risk of infection. Important advances in data quality and methodologies have allowed for better investigation of disease risk and its association with environmental factors. However, incorporating dynamic human behavioural processes in disease mapping remains challenging. For example, connectivity among human populations, a key driver of pathogen dispersal, has increased sharply over the past century, along with the availability of data derived from mobile phones and other dynamic data sources. Future work must be targeted towards the rapid updating and dissemination of appropriately designed disease maps to guide the public health community in reducing the global burden of infectious disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. 76 FR 27070 - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases;

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ... Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal... Infectious Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, NIAID Peer Review Meeting 1. Date: June 1, 2011. Time: 8 a.m. to... Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, NIAID Peer Review Meeting 2. Date: June...

  17. Art in Science: Selections from Emerging Infectious Diseases

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-12

    Polyxeni Potter, retired managing editor of the Emerging Infectious Diseases journal, discusses the history of the journal and her new book, Art in Science: Selections from Emerging Infectious Diseases.  Created: 2/12/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/13/2014.

  18. Strengthening health security at the Hajj mass gatherings: characteristics of the infectious diseases surveillance systems operational during the 2015 Hajj.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Badriah M; Yezli, Saber; Bin Saeed, Abdul-Aziz A; Turkestani, Abdulhafeez; Alawam, Amnah H; Bieh, Kingsley L

    2017-05-01

    Hajj is one of the largest and the most ethnically and culturally diverse mass gatherings worldwide. The use of appropriate surveillance systems ensures timely information management for effective planning and response to infectious diseases threats during the pilgrimage. The literature describes infectious diseases prevention and control strategies for Hajj but with limited information on the operations and characteristics of the existing Hajj infectious diseases surveillance systems. We reviewed documents, including guidelines and reports from the Saudi Ministry of Health's database, to describe the characteristics of the infectious diseases surveillance systems that were operational during the 2015 Hajj, highlighting best practices and gaps and proposing strategies for strengthening and improvement. Using Pubmed and Embase online search engines and a combination of search terms including, 'mass gatherings' 'Olympics' 'surveillance' 'Hajj' 'health security', we explored the existing literature and highlighted some lessons learnt from other international mass gatherings. A regular indicator-based infectious disease surveillance system generates routine reports from health facilities within the Kingdom to the regional and central public health directorates all year round. During Hajj, enhanced indicator-based notifiable diseases surveillance systems complement the existing surveillance tool to ensure timely reporting of event information for appropriate action by public health officials. There is need to integrate the existing Hajj surveillance data management systems and to implement syndromic surveillance as an early warning system for infectious disease control during Hajj. International engagement is important to strengthen Hajj infectious diseases surveillance and to prevent disease transmission and globalization of infectious agents which could undermine global health security. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2017. Published by Oxford University

  19. Asymptomatic deer excrete infectious prions in feces

    OpenAIRE

    Tamg?ney, G?ltekin; Miller, Michael W.; Wolfe, Lisa L.; Sirochman, Tracey M.; Glidden, David V.; Palmer, Christina; Lemus, Azucena; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2009-01-01

    Infectious prion diseases 1 ? scrapie of sheep 2 and chronic wasting disease (CWD) of several species in the deer family 3,4 ? are transmitted naturally within affected host populations. Although several possible sources of contagion have been identified in excretions and secretions from symptomatic animals 5?8 , the biological importance of these sources in sustaining epidemics remains unclear. Here we show that asymptomatic CWD-infected mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) excrete CWD prions in ...

  20. Asymptomatic deer excrete infectious prions in faeces

    OpenAIRE

    Tamgüney, G; Miller, MW; Wolfe, LL; Sirochman, TM; Glidden, DV; Palmer, C; Lemus, A; Dearmond, SJ; Prusiner, SB

    2009-01-01

    Infectious prion diseasesĝ€"scrapie of sheep and chronic wasting disease (CWD) of several species in the deer familyĝ€" are transmitted naturally within affected host populations. Although several possible sources of contagion have been identified in excretions and secretions from symptomatic animals, the biological importance of these sources in sustaining epidemics remains unclear. Here we show that asymptomatic CWD-infected mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) excrete CWD prions in their faeces...

  1. Military Infectious Diseases Update on Vaccine Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    arthropods . 2011 MHS Conference Infectious Diseases… Can cause more casualties than enemy fire Are present wherever the military is deployed...Level 4 Containment Accredited Lab Animal Facilities Clinical Trials Units 2011 MHS Conference 26% of top 100 authors are Army and Navy  Investigators...peridomestic mosquito species Aedes aegypti – Daytime feeding – Domestic /Peridomestic habits • Breeds in freshwater containers • Thrives in urban

  2. PATHOGENIC PROPERTIES OF INFECTIOUS BURSAL DISEASE VACCINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iftikhar Hussain, Atif Nisar Ahmad, M. Ashfaque, M.Shahid Mahmood and Masood Akhtar1

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to test the pathogenic effect of six commercially available infectious bursal disease (IBD vaccines claimed to be intermediate in their pathogenicity. Three week old chickens were inoculated with these vaccines. The pathogenic effects of the IBD vaccines were evaluated by hemorrhages on the thigh and breast muscles, bursa weight to body weight ratio and virulence; two of the strain were found to be highly virulent; two others were moderate and two could be classified as mild.

  3. LABORATORY DIAGNOSIS OF INFECTIOUS SALMON ANEMIA (ISA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schyth, Brian Dall; Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Østergaard, Peter

    The first outbreak of ISA on the Faroe Islands was diagnosed in March 2000. Despite intensive surveillance, control and eradication of ISA, the disease has since spread to most of the Faroe Islands affecting about half of the 23 aquaculture farms. Sampling and laboratory diagnosis of ISA is perfo...... characterisation of the virus causing infectious salmon anemia in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L): an orthomyxo-like virus in a teleost....

  4. Global Transport Networks and Infectious Disease Spread

    OpenAIRE

    Tatem, A.J.; Rogers, D.J.; Hay, S.I.

    2006-01-01

    Air, sea and land transport networks continue to expand in reach, speed of travel and volume of passengers and goods carried. Pathogens and their vectors can now move further, faster and in greater numbers than ever before. Three important consequences of global transport network expansion are infectious disease pandemics, vector invasion events and vector-borne pathogen importation. This review briefly examines some of the important historical examples of these disease and vector movements, ...

  5. Networks and the epidemiology of infectious disease

    OpenAIRE

    Danon, Leon; Ford, Ashley; House, Thomas; Jewell, Christopher Parry; Keeling, Matt; Roberts, Gareth; Ross, Joshua; Vernon, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The science of networks has revolutionised research into the dynamics of interacting elements. It could be argued that epidemiology in particular has embraced the potential of network theory more than any other discipline. Here we review the growing body of research concerning the spread of infectious diseases on networks, focusing on the interplay between network theory and epidemiology. The review is split into four main sections, which examine: the types of network relevant to epidemiology...

  6. Infectious diseases in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Tadao; Ishida, Sadamu; Matsushita, Hiroshi.

    1976-01-01

    Incidences of various infectious diseases in 986 autopsy cases at Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Hospital and Hiroshima Red Cross Hospital from 1965 to 1975 were compared according to the distance from the explosion place, and the following results were obtained. There was not a significant difference at incidences of most infectious diseases between each exposured group and not-exposured group. Incidence of old tuberculosis focus was a little higher in exposured groups, but incidences of main lesions such as tuberculosis, active tuberculosis, and miliary tuberculosis were lower in exposured groups and effect of exposure was negative. Out of urinary tract infections, the nearer the distance to the explosion place was, the higher incidence of cistitis in female was. Incidence of cystitis of female was higher than that of male in the group exposured near to the explosion place. With respect to stomach cancer, leukemia, malignant lymphoma, and cerebrovascular disorder, the nearer the distance to the explosion place was, the higher incidences of various infectious diseases were. (Tsunoda, M.)

  7. Homeostatic Agent for General Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Naoto

    2018-03-01

    One of the essential aspect in biological agents is dynamic stability. This aspect, called homeostasis, is widely discussed in ethology, neuroscience and during the early stages of artificial intelligence. Ashby's homeostats are general-purpose learning machines for stabilizing essential variables of the agent in the face of general environments. However, despite their generality, the original homeostats couldn't be scaled because they searched their parameters randomly. In this paper, first we re-define the objective of homeostats as the maximization of a multi-step survival probability from the view point of sequential decision theory and probabilistic theory. Then we show that this optimization problem can be treated by using reinforcement learning algorithms with special agent architectures and theoretically-derived intrinsic reward functions. Finally we empirically demonstrate that agents with our architecture automatically learn to survive in a given environment, including environments with visual stimuli. Our survival agents can learn to eat food, avoid poison and stabilize essential variables through theoretically-derived single intrinsic reward formulations.

  8. A double blind, randomised placebo controlled trial of topical 2% viscous lidocaine in improving oral intake in children with painful infectious mouth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Sandy M; Babl, Franz E; McCarthy, Michelle; Tancharoen, Chasari; Lee, Katherine J; Oakley, Ed

    2011-11-21

    Painful infectious mouth conditions are a common presentation to emergency departments. Although self limiting, painful ulcerative lesions and inflamed mucosa can decrease oral intake and can lead to dehydration. Oral analgesia is of limited efficacy and is often refused by the patient. Despite widespread use of oral 2% viscous lidocaine for many years, there is little evidence for its efficacy as an analgesic and in aiding oral intake in children with painful infectious mouth conditions. This study aims to establish the effectiveness of 2% viscous lidocaine in increasing oral intake in these children by comparing it with placebo. This study is a randomised double-blind placebo controlled trial of children between 6 months and 8 years of age with painful infectious mouth conditions defined as gingivostomatitis (herpetic or non herpetic), ulcerative pharyngitis, herpangina and hand foot and mouth disease as assessed by the treating clinician in association with a history of poor oral fluid intake. It will be conducted at a single tertiary paediatric emergency department in Melbourne Australia.20 patients have already been randomised to receive 2% lidocaine or placebo in a pilot study to determine the sample size in a preplanned adaptive design. A further 80 patients will be randomised to receive either 2% lidocaine or placebo. The placebo agent is identical to lidocaine in terms of appearance, flavour and smell. All clinical and research staff involved, patients and their parents will be blinded to treatment allocation.The primary endpoint is the amount of fluid ingested by each child, expressed in ml/kg, within 60 minutes from the time of administration of the study mixture. Secondary endpoints are the proportion of patients ingesting 5 ml/kg and 10 ml/kg at 30 and 60 minutes after drug administration and the incidence of adverse events. Longer term outcomes will include the proportion of patients requiring hospital admission and length of emergency department stay

  9. A double blind, randomised placebo controlled trial of topical 2% viscous lidocaine in improving oral intake in children with painful infectious mouth conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopper Sandy M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Painful infectious mouth conditions are a common presentation to emergency departments. Although self limiting, painful ulcerative lesions and inflamed mucosa can decrease oral intake and can lead to dehydration. Oral analgesia is of limited efficacy and is often refused by the patient. Despite widespread use of oral 2% viscous lidocaine for many years, there is little evidence for its efficacy as an analgesic and in aiding oral intake in children with painful infectious mouth conditions. This study aims to establish the effectiveness of 2% viscous lidocaine in increasing oral intake in these children by comparing it with placebo. Methods/Design This study is a randomised double-blind placebo controlled trial of children between 6 months and 8 years of age with painful infectious mouth conditions defined as gingivostomatitis (herpetic or non herpetic, ulcerative pharyngitis, herpangina and hand foot and mouth disease as assessed by the treating clinician in association with a history of poor oral fluid intake. It will be conducted at a single tertiary paediatric emergency department in Melbourne Australia. 20 patients have already been randomised to receive 2% lidocaine or placebo in a pilot study to determine the sample size in a preplanned adaptive design. A further 80 patients will be randomised to receive either 2% lidocaine or placebo. The placebo agent is identical to lidocaine in terms of appearance, flavour and smell. All clinical and research staff involved, patients and their parents will be blinded to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint is the amount of fluid ingested by each child, expressed in ml/kg, within 60 minutes from the time of administration of the study mixture. Secondary endpoints are the proportion of patients ingesting 5 ml/kg and 10 ml/kg at 30 and 60 minutes after drug administration and the incidence of adverse events. Longer term outcomes will include the proportion of patients requiring

  10. Recommended Curriculum for Training in Pediatric Transplant Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danziger-Isakov, Lara; Allen, Upton; Englund, Janet; Herold, Betsy; Hoffman, Jill; Green, Michael; Gantt, Soren; Kumar, Deepali; Michaels, Marian G

    2015-03-01

    A working group representing the American Society of Transplantation, Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, and International Pediatric Transplant Association has developed a collaborative effort to identify and develop core knowledge in pediatric transplant infectious diseases. Guidance for patient care environments for training and core competencies is included to help facilitate training directed at improving the experience for pediatric infectious diseases trainees and practitioners in the area of pediatric transplant infectious diseases. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Advances in infectious foci imaging using 99mTc radiolabelled antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyedeh Fatemeh Mirshojaei

    2015-01-01

    Conventional methods of infection diagnosis, relying on experimental tests and culture of organisms from infected foci have continued to developing new technologies and automation. Nuclear medicine is a reliable diagnostic technique capable to detect infectious foci in human disease. A wide range of radiolabeled agents have been evaluated for demonstrating their ability to distinguish microbial infectious lesions. New researches continue to be made on the use of radiolabeled antibiotics which as well as being highly specific in the diagnosis of infection would be useful in monitoring of disease treatment. Here, the new approaches of infection scintigraphic imaging by radiolabeled antibiotics are thoroughly discussed in order to assess and compare their diagnostic value as targeting imaging radiopharmaceuticals. (author)

  12. Prion remains infectious after passage through digestive system of American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos.

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    Kurt C VerCauteren

    Full Text Available Avian scavengers, such as American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos, have potential to translocate infectious agents (prions of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE diseases including chronic wasting disease, scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. We inoculated mice with fecal extracts obtained from 20 American crows that were force-fed material infected with RML-strain scrapie prions. These mice all evinced severe neurological dysfunction 196-231 d postinoculation (x =198; 95% CI: 210-216 and tested positive for prion disease. Our results suggest a large proportion of crows that consume prion-positive tissue are capable of passing infectious prions in their feces (ˆp=1.0; 95% CI: 0.8-1.0. Therefore, this common, migratory North American scavenger could play a role in the geographic spread of TSE diseases.

  13. On the possible role of robustness in the evolution of infectious diseases

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    Ogbunugafor, C. Brandon; Pease, James B.; Turner, Paul E.

    2010-06-01

    Robustness describes the capacity for a biological system to remain canalized despite perturbation. Genetic robustness affords maintenance of phenotype despite mutational input, necessarily involving the role of epistasis. Environmental robustness is phenotypic constancy in the face of environmental variation, where epistasis may be uninvolved. Here we discuss genetic and environmental robustness, from the standpoint of infectious disease evolution, and suggest that robustness may be a unifying principle for understanding how different disease agents evolve. We focus especially on viruses with RNA genomes due to their importance in the evolution of emerging diseases and as model systems to test robustness theory. We present new data on adaptive constraints for a model RNA virus challenged to evolve in response to UV radiation. We also draw attention to other infectious disease systems where robustness theory may prove useful for bridging evolutionary biology and biomedicine, especially the evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacteria, immune evasion by influenza, and malaria parasite infections.

  14. Human infectious disease burdens decrease with urbanization but not with biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chelsea L; McInturff, Alex; Young, Hillary S; Kim, DoHyung; Lafferty, Kevin D

    2017-06-05

    Infectious disease burdens vary from country to country and year to year due to ecological and economic drivers. Recently, Murray et al. (Murray CJ et al 2012 Lancet 380 , 2197-2223. (doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(12)61689-4)) estimated country-level morbidity and mortality associated with a variety of factors, including infectious diseases, for the years 1990 and 2010. Unlike other databases that report disease prevalence or count outbreaks per country, Murray et al. report health impacts in per-person disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), allowing comparison across diseases with lethal and sublethal health effects. We investigated the spatial and temporal relationships between DALYs lost to infectious disease and potential demographic, economic, environmental and biotic drivers, for the 60 intermediate-sized countries where data were available and comparable. Most drivers had unique associations with each disease. For example, temperature was positively associated with some diseases and negatively associated with others, perhaps due to differences in disease agent thermal optima, transmission modes and host species identities. Biodiverse countries tended to have high disease burdens, consistent with the expectation that high diversity of potential hosts should support high disease transmission. Contrary to the dilution effect hypothesis, increases in biodiversity over time were not correlated with improvements in human health, and increases in forestation over time were actually associated with increased disease burden. Urbanization and wealth were associated with lower burdens for many diseases, a pattern that could arise from increased access to sanitation and healthcare in cities and increased investment in healthcare. The importance of urbanization and wealth helps to explain why most infectious diseases have become less burdensome over the past three decades, and points to possible levers for further progress in improving global public health.This article is part

  15. Dynamics of three-agent games

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mungan, Muhittin; Rador, Tonguc

    2008-01-01

    We study the dynamics and resulting score distribution of three-agent games where after each competition a single agent wins and scores a point. A single competition is described by a triplet of numbers p, t and q denoting the probabilities that the team with the highest, middle or lowest accumulated score wins. The three-agent game can be regarded as a social model where a player can be favored or disfavored for advancement, based on his/her accumulated score. We study the full family of solutions in the regime, where the number of agents and competitions is large, which can be regarded as a hydrodynamic limit. Depending on the parameter values (p, q, t), we find six qualitatively different asymptotic score distributions and we provide a qualitative explanation of these results. We also compare our analytical results against numerical simulations of the microscopic model and find these to be in excellent agreement. It is possible to decide the outcome of a three-agent game through a mini-tournament of two-agent competitions among the participating players and it turns out that the resulting possible score distributions are a subset of those obtained for the general three-agent games. We discuss how one can add a steady and democratic decline rate to the model and present a simple geometric construction that allows one to obtain the score evolution equations for n-agent games

  16. Nivolumab versus standard, single-agent therapy of investigator's choice in recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (CheckMate 141): health-related quality-of-life results from a randomised, phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Kevin J; Ferris, Robert L; Blumenschein, George; Colevas, A Dimitrios; Fayette, Jérôme; Licitra, Lisa; Kasper, Stefan; Even, Caroline; Vokes, Everett E; Worden, Francis; Saba, Nabil F; Kiyota, Naomi; Haddad, Robert; Tahara, Makoto; Grünwald, Viktor; Shaw, James W; Monga, Manish; Lynch, Mark; Taylor, Fiona; DeRosa, Michael; Morrissey, Laura; Cocks, Kim; Gillison, Maura L; Guigay, Joël

    2017-08-01

    Patients with platinum-refractory recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck have few treatment options and poor prognosis. Nivolumab significantly improved survival of this patient population when compared with standard single-agent therapy of investigator's choice in Checkmate 141; here we report the effect of nivolumab on patient-reported outcomes (PROs). CheckMate 141 was a randomised, open-label, phase 3 trial in patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck who progressed within 6 months after platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients were randomly assigned (2:1) to nivolumab 3 mg/kg every 2 weeks (n=240) or investigator's choice (n=121) of methotrexate (40-60 mg/m 2 of body surface area), docetaxel (30-40 mg/m 2 ), or cetuximab (250 mg/m 2 after a loading dose of 400 mg/m 2 ) until disease progression, intolerable toxicity, or withdrawal of consent. On Jan 26, 2016, the independent data monitoring committee reviewed the data at the planned interim analysis and declared overall survival superiority for nivolumab over investigator's choice therapy (primary endpoint; described previously). The protocol was amended to allow patients in the investigator's choice group to cross over to nivolumab. All patients not on active therapy are being followed for survival. As an exploratory endpoint, PROs were assessed at baseline, week 9, and every 6 weeks thereafter using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 (QLQ-C30), the EORTC head and neck cancer-specific module (EORTC QLQ-H&N35), and the three-level European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) questionnaire. Differences within and between treatment groups in PROs were analysed by ANCOVA among patients with baseline and at least one other assessment. All randomised patients were included in the time to clinically meaningful deterioration analyses. Median time to clinically meaningful

  17. Prevalence of infectious diseases in Sonali chickens at Bogra Sadar Upazila, Bogra, Bangladesh

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    Md. Lipon Talukdar

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: It is concluded that several infectious diseases are commonly present in Sonali chicken in the study area of Bangladesh. Mixed infections are more prevalent as compared to single infection. Proper hygienic management and appropriate vaccination should be taken in consideration for effective control the diseases. Further microbiological and molecular diagnoses are suggested for detail studies of these diseases and their pathogens. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2017; 4(1.000: 39-44

  18. Biocontained carcass composting for control of infectious disease outbreak in livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Tim; Xu, Weiping; Alexander, Trevor W; Gilroyed, Brandon H; Inglis, G Douglas; Larney, Francis J; Stanford, Kim; McAllister, Tim A

    2010-05-06

    Intensive livestock production systems are particularly vulnerable to natural or intentional (bioterrorist) infectious disease outbreaks. Large numbers of animals housed within a confined area enables rapid dissemination of most infectious agents throughout a herd. Rapid containment is key to controlling any infectious disease outbreak, thus depopulation is often undertaken to prevent spread of a pathogen to the larger livestock population. In that circumstance, a large number of livestock carcasses and contaminated manure are generated that require rapid disposal. Composting lends itself as a rapid-response disposal method for infected carcasses as well as manure and soil that may harbor infectious agents. We designed a bio-contained mortality composting procedure and tested its efficacy for bovine tissue degradation and microbial deactivation. We used materials available on-farm or purchasable from local farm supply stores in order that the system can be implemented at the site of a disease outbreak. In this study, temperatures exceeded 55 degrees C for more than one month and infectious agents implanted in beef cattle carcasses and manure were inactivated within 14 days of composting. After 147 days, carcasses were almost completely degraded. The few long bones remaining were further degraded with an additional composting cycle in open windrows and the final mature compost was suitable for land application. Duplicate compost structures (final dimensions 25 m x 5 m x 2.4 m; L x W x H) were constructed using barley straw bales and lined with heavy black silage plastic sheeting. Each was loaded with loose straw, carcasses and manure totaling approximately 95,000 kg. A 40-cm base layer of loose barley straw was placed in each bunker, onto which were placed 16 feedlot cattle mortalities (average weight 343 kg) aligned transversely at a spacing of approximately 0.5 m. For passive aeration, lengths of flexible, perforated plastic drainage tubing (15 cm diameter) were

  19. How to make epidemiological training infectious.

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    Steve E Bellan

    Full Text Available Modern infectious disease epidemiology builds on two independently developed fields: classical epidemiology and dynamical epidemiology. Over the past decade, integration of the two fields has increased in research practice, but training options within the fields remain distinct with few opportunities for integration in the classroom. The annual Clinic on the Meaningful Modeling of Epidemiological Data (MMED at the African Institute for Mathematical Sciences has begun to address this gap. MMED offers participants exposure to a broad range of concepts and techniques from both epidemiological traditions. During MMED 2010 we developed a pedagogical approach that bridges the traditional distinction between classical and dynamical epidemiology and can be used at multiple educational levels, from high school to graduate level courses. The approach is hands-on, consisting of a real-time simulation of a stochastic outbreak in course participants, including realistic data reporting, followed by a variety of mathematical and statistical analyses, stemming from both epidemiological traditions. During the exercise, dynamical epidemiologists developed empirical skills such as study design and learned concepts of bias while classical epidemiologists were trained in systems thinking and began to understand epidemics as dynamic nonlinear processes. We believe this type of integrated educational tool will prove extremely valuable in the training of future infectious disease epidemiologists. We also believe that such interdisciplinary training will be critical for local capacity building in analytical epidemiology as Africa continues to produce new cohorts of well-trained mathematicians, statisticians, and scientists. And because the lessons draw on skills and concepts from many fields in biology--from pathogen biology, evolutionary dynamics of host--pathogen interactions, and the ecology of infectious disease to bioinformatics, computational biology, and

  20. Public health surveillance and infectious disease detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Stephen S

    2012-03-01

    Emerging infectious diseases, such as HIV/AIDS, SARS, and pandemic influenza, and the anthrax attacks of 2001, have demonstrated that we remain vulnerable to health threats caused by infectious diseases. The importance of strengthening global public health surveillance to provide early warning has been the primary recommendation of expert groups for at least the past 2 decades. However, despite improvements in the past decade, public health surveillance capabilities remain limited and fragmented, with uneven global coverage. Recent initiatives provide hope of addressing this issue, and new technological and conceptual advances could, for the first time, place capability for global surveillance within reach. Such advances include the revised International Health Regulations (IHR 2005) and the use of new data sources and methods to improve global coverage, sensitivity, and timeliness, which show promise for providing capabilities to extend and complement the existing infrastructure. One example is syndromic surveillance, using nontraditional and often automated data sources. Over the past 20 years, other initiatives, including ProMED-mail, GPHIN, and HealthMap, have demonstrated new mechanisms for acquiring surveillance data. In 2009 the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) began the Emerging Pandemic Threats (EPT) program, which includes the PREDICT project, to build global capacity for surveillance of novel infections that have pandemic potential (originating in wildlife and at the animal-human interface) and to develop a framework for risk assessment. Improved understanding of factors driving infectious disease emergence and new technological capabilities in modeling, diagnostics and pathogen identification, and communications, such as using the increasing global coverage of cellphones for public health surveillance, can further enhance global surveillance.