WorldWideScience

Sample records for single imaging modality

  1. Autonomy of image and use of single or multiple sense modalities in original verbal image production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatena, J

    1978-06-01

    The use of a single or of multiple sense modalities in the production of original verbal images as related to autonomy of imagery was explored. 72 college adults were administered Onomatopoeia and Images and the Gordon Test of Visual Imagery Control. A modified scoring procedure for the Gordon scale differentiated imagers who were moderate or low in autonomy. The two groups produced original verbal images using multiple sense modalities more frequently than a single modality.

  2. Modeling decision-making in single- and multi-modal medical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canosa, R. L.; Baum, K. G.

    2009-02-01

    This research introduces a mode-specific model of visual saliency that can be used to highlight likely lesion locations and potential errors (false positives and false negatives) in single-mode PET and MRI images and multi-modal fused PET/MRI images. Fused-modality digital images are a relatively recent technological improvement in medical imaging; therefore, a novel component of this research is to characterize the perceptual response to these fused images. Three different fusion techniques were compared to single-mode displays in terms of observer error rates using synthetic human brain images generated from an anthropomorphic phantom. An eye-tracking experiment was performed with naÃve (non-radiologist) observers who viewed the single- and multi-modal images. The eye-tracking data allowed the errors to be classified into four categories: false positives, search errors (false negatives never fixated), recognition errors (false negatives fixated less than 350 milliseconds), and decision errors (false negatives fixated greater than 350 milliseconds). A saliency model consisting of a set of differentially weighted low-level feature maps is derived from the known error and ground truth locations extracted from a subset of the test images for each modality. The saliency model shows that lesion and error locations attract visual attention according to low-level image features such as color, luminance, and texture.

  3. Helical CT angiography : A single imaging modality to evaluate a live renal donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waheed Zaman

    2002-01-01

    Conclusions: Helical CT angiography, which is highly specific for arterial and venous anatomy as well as other anatomical and functional details, can become the single imaging modality for preoperative assessment of poten-tial donors in place of conventional angiography and IVU. CTA, being minimally invasive and cost effective, is well accepted by a normal healthy donor

  4. Single-Step Assembly of Multi-Modal Imaging Nanocarriers: MRI and Long-Wavelength Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, Nathalie M.; Gindy, Marian E.; Calero-DdelC, Victoria L.; Wolfson, Theodore; Pagels, Robert F.; Adler, Derek; Gao, Dayuan; Li, Shike; Wang, Ruobing; Zevon, Margot; Yao, Nan; Pacheco, Carlos; Therien, Michael J.; Rinaldi, Carlos; Sinko, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    MRI and NIR-active, multi-modal Composite NanoCarriers (CNCs) are prepared using a simple, one-step process, Flash NanoPrecipitation (FNP). The FNP process allows for the independent control of the hydrodynamic diameter, co-core excipient and NIR dye loading, and iron oxide-based nanocrystal (IONC) content of the CNCs. In the controlled precipitation process, 10 nm IONCs are encapsulated into poly(ethylene glycol) stabilized CNCs to make biocompatible T2 contrast agents. By adjusting the formulation, CNC size is tuned between 80 and 360 nm. Holding the CNC size constant at an intensity weighted average diameter of 99 ± 3 nm (PDI width 28 nm), the particle relaxivity varies linearly with encapsulated IONC content ranging from 66 to 533 mM-1s-1 for CNCs formulated with 4 to 16 wt% IONC. To demonstrate the use of CNCs as in vivo MRI contrast agents, CNCs are surface functionalized with liver targeting hydroxyl groups. The CNCs enable the detection of 0.8 mm3 non-small cell lung cancer metastases in mice livers via MRI. Incorporating the hydrophobic, NIR dye PZn3 into CNCs enables complementary visualization with long-wavelength fluorescence at 800 nm. In vivo imaging demonstrates the ability of CNCs to act both as MRI and fluorescent imaging agents. PMID:25925128

  5. Special imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, W.E.; Fajman, W.A.

    1987-01-01

    Continual advances in technology have made a wide variety of techniques available for diagnostic imaging. The physician caring for the critically ill patient is, therefore, confronted not only with a choice of different procedures, but also frequently with a choice of imaging modalites. Relatively few of these procedures can be performed at the bedside. Consultation between the radiologist and referring physician is necessary not only for choosing the optimum procedure to answer a specific question, but also for expediting movement of the patient with life-support apparatus through a busy radiology department. It is of utmost importance that there be a coordinated effort when a critically ill patient is to be sent to the radiology department; nursing staff and support personnel should be available to accompany the patient to an area where nursing care is generally not available

  6. Established rheumatoid arthritis - new imaging modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, Fiona M; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2007-01-01

    ) and high-resolution computerized tomography. Erosions are very clearly depicted using these modalities and MRI also allows imaging of soft tissues with assessment of joint inflammation. High-resolution ultrasound is a convenient clinical technique for the assessment of erosions, synovitis and tenosynovitis...... in real-time and facilitates diagnostic and therapeutic interventions such as joint aspiration and injection. Exciting experimental modalities are also being developed with the potential to provide not just morphological but functional imaging. Techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET......) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) can reveal actively metabolizing bone and the proliferation of synovial cells via radioactive labeling. Bioluminescence and fluorescence reflectance imaging are other approaches that allow imaging, and potentially the delivery of therapeutic agents...

  7. Clinical utility of simultaneous whole-body 18F-FDG PET/MRI as a single-step imaging modality in the staging of primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Yeh, Chih-Hua; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Ng, Shu-Hang; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Lin, Chien-Yu; Yen-Ming, Tsang; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Huang, Bing-Shen; Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Chang, Kai-Ping; Wang, Hung-Ming; Liao, Chun-Ta

    2018-03-03

    Both head and neck magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) play a crucial role in the staging of primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In this study, we sought to prospectively investigate the clinical utility of simultaneous whole-body 18F-FDG PET/MRI for primary staging of NPC patients. We examined 113 patients with histologically confirmed NPC who underwent pretreatment, simultaneous whole-body PET/MRI and PET/CT for primary tumor staging. The images obtained with the different imaging modalities were interpreted independently and compared with each other. PET/MRI increased the accuracy of head and neck MRI for assessment of primary tumor extent in four patients via addition of FDG uptake information to increase the conspicuity of morphologically subtle lesions. PET/MR images were more discernible than PET/CT images for mapping tumor extension, especially intracranial invasion. Regarding the N staging assessment, the sensitivity of PET/MRI (99.5%) was higher than that of head and neck MRI (94.2%) and PET/CT (90.9%). PET/MRI was particularly useful for distinguishing retropharyngeal nodal metastasis from adjacent nasopharyngeal tumors. For distant metastasis evaluation, PET/MRI exhibited a similar sensitivity (90% vs. 86.7% vs. 83.3%), but higher positive predictive value (93.1% vs. 78.8% vs. 83.3%) than whole-body MRI and PET/CT, respectively. For tumor staging of NPC, simultaneous whole-body PET/MRI was more accurate than head and neck MRI and PET/CT, and may serve as a single-step staging modality.

  8. Image and Dose Simulation in Support of New Imaging Modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruvilla Verghese

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes the highlights of the research performed under the 2-year NEER grant from the Department of Energy. The primary outcome of the work was a new Monte Carlo code, MCMIS-DS, for Monte Carlo for Mammography Image Simulation including Differential Sampling. The code was written to generate simulated images and dose distributions from two different new digital x-ray imaging modalities, namely, synchrotron imaging (SI) and a slot geometry digital mammography system called Fisher Senoscan. A differential sampling scheme was added to the code to generate multiple images that included variations in the parameters of the measurement system and the object in a single execution of the code. The code is to serve multiple purposes; (1) to answer questions regarding the contribution of scattered photons to images, (2) for use in design optimization studies, and (3) to do up to second-order perturbation studies to assess the effects of design parameter variations and/or physical parameters of the object (the breast) without having to re-run the code for each set of varied parameters. The accuracy and fidelity of the code were validated by a large variety of benchmark studies using published data and also using experimental results from mammography phantoms on both imaging modalities

  9. Established rheumatoid arthritis - new imaging modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, Fiona M; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2007-01-01

    New imaging modalities are assuming an increasingly important role in the investigation and management of rheumatoid arthritis. It is now possible to obtain information about all tissues within the joint in three dimensions using tomographic techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI...

  10. Established rheumatoid arthritis - new imaging modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, Fiona M; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2007-01-01

    New imaging modalities are assuming an increasingly important role in the investigation and management of rheumatoid arthritis. It is now possible to obtain information about all tissues within the joint in three dimensions using tomographic techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and...

  11. Rex shunt preoperative imaging: diagnostic capability of imaging modalities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon W Kwan

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic capability of imaging modalities used for preoperative mesenteric-left portal bypass ("Rex shunt" planning. Twenty patients with extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis underwent 57 preoperative planning abdominal imaging studies. Two readers retrospectively reviewed these studies for an ability to confidently determine left portal vein (PV patency, superior mesenteric vein (SMV patency, and intrahepatic left and right PV contiguity. In this study, computed tomographic arterial portography allowed for confident characterization of left PV patency, SMV patency and left and right PV continuity in 100% of the examinations. Single phase contrast-enhanced CT, multi-phase contrast-enhanced CT, multiphase contrast-enhanced MRI, and transarterial portography answered all key diagnostic questions in 33%, 30%, 0% and 8% of the examinations, respectively. In conclusion, of the variety of imaging modalities that have been employed for Rex shunt preoperative planning, computed tomographic arterial portography most reliably allows for assessment of left PV patency, SMV patency, and left and right PV contiguity in a single study.

  12. Seeing double: combined modalities in functional imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Guerra, A. E-mail: delguerra@pi.infn.it; Damiani, C.; Di Domenico, G.; Gambaccini, M.; Motta, A.; Sabba, N.; Zavattini, G

    2001-09-21

    Various dedicated instruments for combined modalities in functional imaging are being developed by our group: a small animal PET/SPECT scanner, two scintimammography apparatus for breast cancer diagnosis, one with RX/PEM and the other with RX/SPECT capability. The performance and the status of development of these devices will be reported.

  13. Cerenkov imaging - a new modality for molecular imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Thorek, Daniel LJ; Robertson, Robbie; Bacchus, Wassifa A; Hahn, Jaeseung; Rothberg, Julie; Beattie, Bradley J; Grimm, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is an emerging hybrid modality that utilizes the light emission from many commonly used medical isotopes. Cerenkov radiation (CR) is produced when charged particles travel through a dielectric medium faster than the speed of light in that medium. First described in detail nearly 100 years ago, CR has only recently applied for biomedical imaging purposes. The modality is of considerable interest as it enables the use of widespread luminescence imaging equipm...

  14. Implementation and applications of dual-modality imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Bruce H.; Barber, William C.; Funk, Tobias; Hwang, Andrew B.; Taylor, Carmen; Sun, Mingshan; Seo, Youngho

    2004-06-01

    In medical diagnosis, functional or physiological data can be acquired using radionuclide imaging with positron emission tomography or with single-photon emission computed tomography. However, anatomical or structural data can be acquired using X-ray computed tomography. In dual-modality imaging, both radionuclide and X-ray detectors are incorporated in an imaging system to allow both functional and structural data to be acquired in a single procedure without removing the patient from the imaging system. In a clinical setting, dual-modality imaging systems commonly are used to localize radiopharmaceutical uptake with respect to the patient's anatomy. This helps the clinician to differentiate disease from regions of normal radiopharmaceutical accumulation, to improve diagnosis or cancer staging, or to facilitate planning for radiation therapy or surgery. While initial applications of dual-modality imaging were developed for clinical imaging on humans, it now is recognized that these systems have potentially important applications for imaging small animals involved in experimental studies including basic investigations of mammalian biology and development of new pharmaceuticals for diagnosis or treatment of disease.

  15. Monte Carlo simulations of medical imaging modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, G.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1998-09-01

    Because continuous-energy Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations can be nearly exact simulations of physical reality (within data limitations, geometric approximations, transport algorithms, etc.), it follows that one should be able to closely approximate the results of many experiments from first-principles computations. This line of reasoning has led to various MCNP studies that involve simulations of medical imaging modalities and other visualization methods such as radiography, Anger camera, computerized tomography (CT) scans, and SABRINA particle track visualization. It is the intent of this paper to summarize some of these imaging simulations in the hope of stimulating further work, especially as computer power increases. Improved interpretation and prediction of medical images should ultimately lead to enhanced medical treatments. It is also reasonable to assume that such computations could be used to design new or more effective imaging instruments.

  16. Modality-Invariant Image Classification Based on Modality Uniqueness and Dictionary Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungryong; Cai, Rui; Park, Kihong; Kim, Sunok; Sohn, Kwanghoon

    2016-12-02

    We present a unified framework for image classification of image sets taken under varying modality conditions. Our method is motivated by a key observation that the image feature distribution is simultaneously influenced by the semantic-class and the modality category label, which limits the performance of conventional methods for that task. With this insight, we introduce modality uniqueness as a discriminative weight that divides each modality cluster from all other clusters. By leveraging the modality uniqueness, our framework is formulated as unsupervised modality clustering and classifier learning based on modality-invariant similarity kernel. Specifically, in the assignment step, each training image is first assigned to the most similar cluster according to its modality. In the update step, based on the current cluster hypothesis, the modality uniqueness and the sparse dictionary are updated. These two steps are formulated in an iterative manner. Based on the final clusters, a modalityinvariant marginalized kernel is then computed, where the similarities between the reconstructed features of each modality are aggregated across all clusters. Our framework enables the reliable inference of semantic-class category for an image, even across large photometric variations. Experimental results show that our method outperforms conventional methods on various benchmarks, such as landmark identification under severely varying weather conditions, domain-adapting image classification, and RGB and near-infrared (NIR) image classification.

  17. Radiolabeled cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic (RGD)-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles as single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dual-modality agents for imaging of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shengming; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Bin; Hong, Ruoyu; Chen, Qing; Dong, Jiajia; Chen, Yinyiin; Chen, Zhiqiang; Wu, Yiwei

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIOs) modified with a novel cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) peptide were made and radiolabeled as single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dual-modality agents for imaging of breast cancer. The probe was tested both in vitro and in vivo to determine its receptor targeting efficacy and feasibility for SPECT and MRI. The radiochemical syntheses of 125I-cRGD-USPIO were accomplished with a radiochemical purity of 96.05 ± 0.33 %. High radiochemical stability was found in fresh human serum and in phosphate-buffered saline. The average hydrodynamic size of 125I-cRGD-USPIO determined by dynamic light scattering was 51.3 nm. Results of in vitro experiments verified the specificity of the radiolabeled nanoparticles to tumor cells. Preliminary biodistribution studies of 125I-radiolabeled cRGD-USPIO in Bcap37-bearing nude mice showed that it had long circulation half-life, high tumor uptake, and high initial blood retention with moderate liver uptake. In vivo tumor targeting and uptake of the radiolabeled nanoparticles in mice model were visualized by SPECT and MRI collected at different time points. Our results strongly indicated that the 125I-cRGD-USPIO could be used as a promising bifunctional radiotracer for early clinical tumor detection with high sensitivity and high spatial resolution by SPECT and MRI.

  18. Chronic granulomatous disease: Value of the newer imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stricof, D.D.; Glazer, M.; Amendola, A.

    1984-01-01

    The contribution of computed tomography (CT), ultrasound (US), and nuclear medicine studies in the evaluation and management of seven patients with chronic granulatous disease was retrospectively reviewed. These modalities proved valuable in detecting sites of infection, particularly in the abdomen. Three patients had liver abscesses, two had suppurative retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy, one had empyema, and one hand a scrotal abscess. Furthermore, CT or US-guided percutaneous aspiration and/or drainage of infected material was successfully performed on three separate occasions in a single patient, obviating the need for surgery. The newer imaging modalities are useful in the prompt diagnosis and in some instances non-operative therapy of complications of chronic granulomatous disease. (orig.)

  19. Accuracy of different imaging modalities prior to biventricular repair ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Accuracy of different imaging modalities prior to biventricular repair in Tetralogy of Fallot. ... Internet Journal of Medical Update - EJOURNAL ... findings of different imaging modalities (e.g. echocardiography, multi-detector Computed Tomography (CT) and invasive angiocardiography) to intraoperative findings to determine ...

  20. Single-photon imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Seitz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The acquisition and interpretation of images is a central capability in almost all scientific and technological domains. In particular, the acquisition of electromagnetic radiation, in the form of visible light, UV, infrared, X-ray, etc. is of enormous practical importance. The ultimate sensitivity in electronic imaging is the detection of individual photons. With this book, the first comprehensive review of all aspects of single-photon electronic imaging has been created. Topics include theoretical basics, semiconductor fabrication, single-photon detection principles, imager design and applications of different spectral domains. Today, the solid-state fabrication capabilities for several types of image sensors has advanced to a point, where uncoooled single-photon electronic imaging will soon become a consumer product. This book is giving a specialist´s view from different domains to the forthcoming “single-photon imaging” revolution. The various aspects of single-photon imaging are treated by internati...

  1. A review of imaging modalities in pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Ascha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension (PH is defined as resting mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25 mmHg measured by right heart catheterization. PH is a progressive, life-threatening disease with a variety of etiologies. Swift and accurate diagnosis of PH and appropriate classification in etiologic group will allow for earlier treatment and improved outcomes. A number of imaging tools are utilized in the evaluation of PH, such as chest X-ray, computed tomography (CT, ventilation/perfusion (V/Q scan, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Newer imaging tools such as dual-energy CT and single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography V/Q scanning have also emerged; however, their place in the diagnostic evaluation of PH remains to be determined. In general, each imaging technique provides incremental information, with varying degrees of sensitivity and specificity, which helps suspect the presence and identify the etiology of PH. The present study aims to provide a comprehensive review of the utility, advantages, and shortcomings of the imaging modalities that may be used to evaluate patients with PH.

  2. Large Margin Multi-Modal Multi-Task Feature Extraction for Image Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong Luo; Yonggang Wen; Dacheng Tao; Jie Gui; Chao Xu

    2016-01-01

    The features used in many image analysis-based applications are frequently of very high dimension. Feature extraction offers several advantages in high-dimensional cases, and many recent studies have used multi-task feature extraction approaches, which often outperform single-task feature extraction approaches. However, most of these methods are limited in that they only consider data represented by a single type of feature, even though features usually represent images from multiple modalities. We, therefore, propose a novel large margin multi-modal multi-task feature extraction (LM3FE) framework for handling multi-modal features for image classification. In particular, LM3FE simultaneously learns the feature extraction matrix for each modality and the modality combination coefficients. In this way, LM3FE not only handles correlated and noisy features, but also utilizes the complementarity of different modalities to further help reduce feature redundancy in each modality. The large margin principle employed also helps to extract strongly predictive features, so that they are more suitable for prediction (e.g., classification). An alternating algorithm is developed for problem optimization, and each subproblem can be efficiently solved. Experiments on two challenging real-world image data sets demonstrate the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed method.

  3. Imaging Modalities for Cervical Spondylotic Stenosis and Myelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Green

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spondylosis is a spectrum of pathology presenting as neck pain, radiculopathy, and myelopathy or all in combination. Diagnostic imaging is essential to diagnosis and preoperative planning. We discuss the modalities of imaging in common practice. We examine the use of imaging to differentiate among central, subarticular, and lateral stenosis and in the assessment of myelopathy.

  4. Deep learning for multi-task medical image segmentation in multiple modalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moeskops, Pim; Wolterink, Jelmer M.; van der Velden, Bas H M; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G A; Leiner, Tim; Viergever, Max A.; Išgum, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Automatic segmentation of medical images is an important task for many clinical applications. In practice,a wide range of anatomical structures are visualised using different imaging modalities. In this paper,we investigate whether a single convolutional neural network (CNN) can be trained to

  5. Development of a Hybrid Nanoprobe for Triple-Modality MR/SPECT/Optical Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madru, Renata; Svenmarker, Pontus; Ingvar, Christian; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Engels, Stefan-Andersson; Knutsson, Linda; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid clinical imaging is an emerging technology, which improves disease diagnosis by combining already existing technologies. With the combination of high-resolution morphological imaging, i.e., MRI/CT, and high-sensitive molecular detection offered by SPECT/PET/Optical, physicians can detect disease progression at an early stage and design patient-specific treatments. To fully exploit the possibilities of hybrid imaging a hybrid probe compatible with each imaging technology is required. Here, we present a hybrid nanoprobe for triple modality MR/SPECT/Fluorescence imaging. Our imaging agent is comprised of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), labeled with 99mTc and an Alexa fluorophore (AF), together forming 99mTc-AF-SPIONs. The agent was stable in human serum, and, after subcutaneous injection in the hind paw of Wistar rats, showed to be highly specific by accumulating in the sentinel lymph node. All three modalities clearly visualized the imaging agent. Our results show that a single imaging agent can be used for hybrid imaging. The use of a single hybrid contrast agent permits simultaneous hybrid imaging and, more conventionally, allow for single modality imaging at different time points. For example, a hybrid contrast agent enables pre-operative planning, intra-operative guidance, and post-operative evaluation with the same contrast agent. PMID:26852675

  6. Instrumentation challenges in multi-modality imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasse, D.; Boisson, F.

    2016-01-01

    Based on different physical principles, imaging procedures currently used in both clinical and preclinical applications present different performance that allow researchers to achieve a large number of studies. However, the relevance of obtaining a maximum of information relating to the same subject is undeniable. The last two decades have thus seen the advent of a full-fledged research axis, the multimodal in vivo imaging. Whether from an instrumentation point of view, for medical research or the development of new probes, all these research works illustrate the growing interest of the scientific community for multimodal imaging, which can be approached with different backgrounds and perspectives from engineers to end-users point of views. In the present review, we discuss the multimodal imaging concept, which focuses not only on PET/CT and PET/MRI instrumentation but also on recent investigations of what could become a possible future in the field.

  7. Optical cell sorting with multiple imaging modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banas, Andrew; Carrissemoux, Caro; Palima, Darwin

    2017-01-01

    Early detection of diseases can save lives. Hence, there is emphasis in sorting rare disease-indicating cells within small dilute quantities such as in the confines of lab-on-a-chip devices. However, before diseased cells can be studied in isolation, it is necessary to identify them against normal...... healthy cells. With the richness of visual information, a lot of microscopy techniques have been developed and have been crucial in biological studies. To utilize their complementary advantages we adopt both fluorescence and brightfield imaging in our optical cell sorter. Brightfield imaging has...... the advantage of being non-invasive, thus maintaining cell viability. Fluorescence imaging, on the other hand, takes advantages of the chemical specificity of fluorescence markers and can validate machine vision results from brightfield images. Visually identified cells are sorted using optical manipulation...

  8. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Teresa; Neelakantan, Prasanna

    2014-01-01

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome

  9. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Teresa; Neelakantan, Prasanna [Dept. of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Saveetha Dental College and Hospitals, Saveetha University, Chennai (India)

    2014-09-15

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome.

  10. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome. PMID:25279337

  11. Modality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinge, Alex; Müller, Henrik Høeg

    Modality: Studies in Form and Function reflects the diversity of theoretical frameworks and the heterogeneity of linguistic phenomena under the general heading of modality. Researchers in the fields of logic, philosophy and linguistics have for many years been pondering the elusive nature of moda...... in discourse. This volume raises new questions and offers re-examination of known phenomena which should provide interesting reading to linguists and students of linguistics of all theoretical persuasions.......Modality: Studies in Form and Function reflects the diversity of theoretical frameworks and the heterogeneity of linguistic phenomena under the general heading of modality. Researchers in the fields of logic, philosophy and linguistics have for many years been pondering the elusive nature...... of modality and grappled with ways of capturing it. The 11 studies included here cover the span from contributions that seek to clarify controversial theoretical constructs to studies which take an empirical approach to linguistic categories and cross-linguistic typological issues. The key concepts addressed...

  12. Rational design of biophysical imaging protocols to measure the level of intensity of massive delocalized infections under severe HIV-induced immunodeficiency: configuration of novel radioimmunoscintigraphy modalities with single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarea, A.D.

    1996-01-01

    Severe immunosupression brought about by critical depletion of CD4 + -lymphocytes in individuals suffering from HIV infection leads inevitably to the onset of multiple-agent opportunistic infections (ARC: the AIDS-related complex). Such opportunistic infections eventually become heterogeneously delocalized (disseminated) and an idea f their variety and number can be gleaned from the listing under clinical category C of the 1993 CDC Revised Classification System for HIV infections. This causes widespread oxygen free radical (principally superoxide and hydroxyl free radical) burst due to the up-switching of the hexose monophosphate (HMP) shunt as a result of the generalized activation, by the massive infection load, of NADPH oxidase, a constitutive enzyme that is present in the cell membranes of all granulocytes and mononuclear phagocytic cells. However the very short (reactive) lifetimes of superoxide and hydroxyl free radicals in the cellular milieu preclude their use as a convenient in vivo biomarkers if the level of phagocytosis (or HMP up-switching) were to be utilized as a correlative measure of the level of intensity of delocalized infections in ARC in any non-invasive whole-body imaging protocol. In the present contribution, we report a rational schema for a molecularly specific an self-consistent correlative measure of the intensity of multiple-agent, delocalized infections arising from severe HIV-induced immunodeficiency. The schema is based on the quantitative parametrization of the level of on-going degranulation activity of neutrophils in the granulocyte population. The rationally designed modalities rest on specificity inherent in radioimmunoscintigraphy, in particular on the ligand of radionuclide-tagged antibodies to the neutrophil proteinases HLE (human leukocytic elastase: EC.3.4.21.37) and cat G (cathepsin G: EC.3.4.21.20). In this work, these molecular probes are specifically configured to lend themselves as convenient in vivo biomarkers both in

  13. Automatic intra-modality brain image registration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, J.M.; Ardekani, B.A.; Braun, M.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: Registration of 3D images of brain of the same or different subjects has potential importance in clinical diagnosis, treatment planning and neurological research. The broad aim of our work is to produce an automatic and robust intra-modality, brain image registration algorithm for intra-subject and inter-subject studies. Our algorithm is composed of two stages. Initial alignment is achieved by finding the values of nine transformation parameters (representing translation, rotation and scale) that minimise the nonoverlapping regions of the head. This is achieved by minimisation of the sum of the exclusive OR of two binary head images, produced using the head extraction procedure described by Ardekani et al. (J Comput Assist Tomogr, 19:613-623, 1995). The initial alignment successfully determines the scale parameters and gross translation and rotation parameters. Fine alignment uses an objective function described for inter-modality registration in Ardekani et al. (ibid.). The algorithm segments one of the images to be aligned into a set of connected components using K-means clustering. Registration is achieved by minimising the K-means variance of the segmentation induced in the other image. Similarity of images of the same modality makes the method attractive for intra-modality registration. A 3D MR image, with voxel dimensions, 2x2x6 mm, was misaligned. The registered image shows visually accurate registration. The average displacement of a pixel from its correct location was measured to be 3.3 mm. The algorithm was tested on intra-subject MR images and was found to produce good qualitative results. Using the data available, the algorithm produced promising qualitative results in intra-subject registration. Further work is necessary in its application to intersubject registration, due to large variability in brain structure between subjects. Clinical evaluation of the algorithm for selected applications is required

  14. Modality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinge, Alex; Müller, Henrik Høeg

    Modality: Studies in Form and Function reflects the diversity of theoretical frameworks and the heterogeneity of linguistic phenomena under the general heading of modality. Researchers in the fields of logic, philosophy and linguistics have for many years been pondering the elusive nature of moda...... in discourse. This volume raises new questions and offers re-examination of known phenomena which should provide interesting reading to linguists and students of linguistics of all theoretical persuasions....

  15. ORIGINAL ARTICLE ORIG ORIG Ultrasound – first imaging modality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    thyroid pathology. Our aim was to show that US can be used as a first imaging modality in the detection of parathyroid adenomas. Introduction. Hyperparathyroidism is a term used to describe the consequences of excessive secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH), either due to pri- mary disease of the parathyroid gland or ...

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF A DUAL MODALITY TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGING SYSTEM FOR BIOLUMINESCENCE AND PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHATZIIOANNOU, ARION

    2011-12-21

    The goal of this proposal was to develop a new hybrid imaging modality capable to simultaneously image optical bioluminescence signals, as well as radionuclide emissions from the annihilation of positrons originating from molecular imaging probes in preclinical mouse models. This new technology enables the simultaneous in-vivo measurements of both emissions that could be produced from a single or a combination of two different biomarkers. It also facilitates establishing the physical limitations of bioluminescence imaging, its tomographic and spectral image reconstruction potential and the quantification of bioluminescence signals.

  17. A MEDICAL MULTI-MODALITY IMAGE FUSION OF CT/PET WITH PCA, DWT METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Guruprasad

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a view on the fusion of different modality images like PET and CT (Positron Emission Tomography & Computed Tomography by two domain methods PCA and DWT methods. The spatial domain is PCA method, and another transformation domain method (DWT. In dwt decomposed coefficients of DWT (discrete wavelet transformation are applied with the IDWT to get fused image information. Before that, choose a detailed part of decomposed coefficients by maximum selection and averaging the approximated part of DWT coefficients. In applying the PCA using eigen values and eigen vector of larger values as principal components and after to reconstruct using addition to these to get the fussed image of two modalities CT & PET. So that adds complimentary features of both anatomic, physiological and metabolic information in one image, provides better visual information in single image of patients in medical field. The analytic parameters like, MSE, PSNR, ENTROPY results are better enough to prove the methods each other.

  18. Imaging modalities in the treatment of congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leeuwen, H. van; Vorstenbosch, E. van [Philips Medical Systems, Best (Netherlands)

    2004-07-01

    Approximately one child in a hundred is born with some form of heart defect. Many of these conditions can now be treated, either by surgery or by less invasive interventional procedures. In almost every case, successful treatment depends on diagnostic imaging, in order to determine the nature, location and severity of the condition. Nowadays, diagnosis and sometimes treatment may start even before birth. This article describes the roles of the various imaging modalities in diagnosis and treatment, including echocardiography, X-ray angiography, MRI and multislice CT. Particular attention is paid to the importance of radiation safety in pediatric imaging. (orig.)

  19. Single-tooth replacement: factors affecting different prosthetic treatment modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Quran, Firas A; Al-Ghalayini, Raed F; Al-Zu'bi, Bashar N

    2011-12-21

    The choice between several treatment options for replacing a single missing tooth is influenced by clinical, dentist- and patient-immanent factors. This study aimed to determine the patient factors that would affect the treatment decision to replace a single missing tooth and to assess the satisfaction with several options. 200 volunteers involved (121 females and 79 males) divided into four groups, Group A: consisted of patients with conventional fixed partial dentures or patients with resin bonded fixed partial dentures. Group B: consisted of patients who received removable partial dentures while Group C: consisted of patients who received a single implant supported crown, and a control group D: consisted of patients who received no treatment. Data were collected using a questionnaire. The highest percentage of males within groups (58%) was within the removable prostheses category. The majority of the subjects in the study reported that the main reason for replacing a missing tooth was for esthetic and function. Most important factor affecting the choice between treatment modalities was damaging the neighboring teeth. Pain, post operative sensitivity and dental phobia were important factors in choosing the prosthesis type and affected the control group patients not to have any treatment. The highest satisfaction percentage among groups studied was recorded for dental implants then FPD groups, while the least percentage were in both the control and RPD groups, for all aspects of function, esthetic and speech efficiency. The final choice between FPD, RPD and implant depended on several factors which affected the decision making; among these is cost and patients' awareness of the different treatment options.

  20. Single-tooth replacement: factors affecting different prosthetic treatment modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Quran Firas A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The choice between several treatment options for replacing a single missing tooth is influenced by clinical, dentist- and patient-immanent factors. This study aimed to determine the patient factors that would affect the treatment decision to replace a single missing tooth and to assess the satisfaction with several options. Method 200 volunteers involved (121 females and 79 males divided into four groups, Group A: consisted of patients with conventional fixed partial dentures or patients with resin bonded fixed partial dentures. Group B: consisted of patients who received removable partial dentures while Group C: consisted of patients who received a single implant supported crown, and a control group D: consisted of patients who received no treatment. Data were collected using a questionnaire. Results The highest percentage of males within groups (58% was within the removable prostheses category. The majority of the subjects in the study reported that the main reason for replacing a missing tooth was for esthetic and function. Most important factor affecting the choice between treatment modalities was damaging the neighboring teeth. Pain, post operative sensitivity and dental phobia were important factors in choosing the prosthesis type and affected the control group patients not to have any treatment. The highest satisfaction percentage among groups studied was recorded for dental implants then FPD groups, while the least percentage were in both the control and RPD groups, for all aspects of function, esthetic and speech efficiency. Conclusions The final choice between FPD, RPD and implant depended on several factors which affected the decision making; among these is cost and patients' awareness of the different treatment options.

  1. Comparison of imaging modalities for diagnosis of thyroid disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfannenstiel, P.; Hirsch, H.; Stein, N.; Maier, R.; Meindl, S.; Voges, K.; Willmann, L.

    1984-01-01

    From 4-1-1980 to 3-30-1983 in more than 10000 patients scanning of the thyroid was performed by a rectiliniear scanner and predominantly by a gamma-camera using a special collimator and a data processing unit for evaluation of global and regional uptake of sup(99m)TcO 4 or 123 I. The functional scans were compared with the structural information provided by real-time ultrasonography of the thyroid, employing in questionable cases specially developed computer aided pattern recognition methods. Other modalities as a multiwire camera, X-ray fluorescence, CT-imaging, NMR-tomography were also evaluated in selected cases. From the data a diagnostic strategy for the use of imaging modalities to diagnose thyroid diseases was derived. (orig.) [de

  2. Cardiac Computed Tomography as an Imaging Modality in Coronary Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karliova, Irem; Fries, Peter; Schmidt, Jörg; Schneider, Ulrich; Shalabi, Ahmad; Schäfers, Hans-Joachim

    2018-01-01

    Coronary artery fistulae and coronary aneurysms are rare anomalies. When they become symptomatic, they require precise anatomic information to allow for planning of the therapeutic procedure. We report a case in which both fistulae and aneurysm were present. The required information could only be obtained by electrocardiogram-gated computed tomography with reformation. This imaging modality should be considered in every case of fistula or coronary aneurysm. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiological Evaluation of Ambiguous Genitalia with Various Imaging Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, N.; Bindushree, Kadakola

    2012-07-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSDs) are congenital conditions in which the development of chromosomal, gonadal, or anatomic sex is atypical. These can be classified broadly into four categories on the basis of gonadal histologic features: female pseudohermaphroditism (46,XX with two ovaries); male pseudohermaphroditism (46,XY with two testes); true hermaphroditism (ovotesticular DSD) (both ovarian and testicular tissues); and gonadal dysgenesis, either mixed (a testis and a streak gonad) or pure (bilateral streak gonads). Imaging plays an important role in demonstrating the anatomy and associated anomalies. Ultrasonography is the primary modality for demonstrating internal organs and magnetic resonance imaging is used as an adjunct modality to assess for internal gonads and genitalia. Early and appropriate gender assignment is necessary for healthy physical and psychologic development of children with ambiguous genitalia. Gender assignment can be facilitated with a team approach that involves a pediatric endocrinologist, geneticist, urologist, psychiatrist, social worker, neonatologist, nurse, and radiologist, allowing timely diagnosis and proper management. We describe case series on ambiguous genitalia presented to our department who were evaluated with multiple imaging modalities.

  4. Improved proton computed tomography by dual modality image reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, David Christoffer; Bassler, Niels; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Proton computed tomography (CT) is a promising image modality for improving the stopping power estimates and dose calculations for particle therapy. However, the finite range of about 33 cm of water of most commercial proton therapy systems limits the sites that can be scanned from a ful....... In the case of limited angles, the use of prior image proton CT greatly improves the resolution and stopping power estimate, but does not fully achieve the quality of a 360◦ proton CT scan. © 2014 American Association of Physicists in Medicine. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1118/1.4864239]...

  5. Dual-Modality PET/Ultrasound imaging of the Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Moses, William W.; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.C.

    2005-11-11

    Functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)will detect malignant tumors in the prostate and/or prostate bed, as well as possibly help determine tumor ''aggressiveness''. However, the relative uptake in a prostate tumor can be so great that few other anatomical landmarks are visible in a PET image. Ultrasound imaging with a transrectal probe provides anatomical detail in the prostate region that can be co-registered with the sensitive functional information from the PET imaging. Imaging the prostate with both PET and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) will help determine the location of any cancer within the prostate region. This dual-modality imaging should help provide better detection and treatment of prostate cancer. LBNL has built a high performance positron emission tomograph optimized to image the prostate.Compared to a standard whole-body PET camera, our prostate-optimized PET camera has the same sensitivity and resolution, less backgrounds and lower cost. We plan to develop the hardware and software tools needed for a validated dual PET/TRUS prostate imaging system. We also plan to develop dual prostate imaging with PET and external transabdominal ultrasound, in case the TRUS system is too uncomfortable for some patients. We present the design and intended clinical uses for these dual imaging systems.

  6. FULLY CONVOLUTIONAL NETWORKS FOR MULTI-MODALITY ISOINTENSE INFANT BRAIN IMAGE SEGMENTATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Dong; Wang, Li; Gao, Yaozong; Shen, Dinggang

    The segmentation of infant brain tissue images into white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) plays an important role in studying early brain development. In the isointense phase (approximately 6-8 months of age), WM and GM exhibit similar levels of intensity in both T1 and T2 MR images, resulting in extremely low tissue contrast and thus making the tissue segmentation very challenging. The existing methods for tissue segmentation in this isointense phase usually employ patch-based sparse labeling on single T1, T2 or fractional anisotropy (FA) modality or their simply-stacked combinations without fully exploring the multi-modality information. To address the challenge, in this paper, we propose to use fully convolutional networks (FCNs) for the segmentation of isointense phase brain MR images. Instead of simply stacking the three modalities, we train one network for each modality image, and then fuse their high-layer features together for final segmentation. Specifically, we conduct a convolution-pooling stream for multimodality information from T1, T2, and FA images separately, and then combine them in high-layer for finally generating the segmentation maps as the outputs. We compared the performance of our approach with that of the commonly used segmentation methods on a set of manually segmented isointense phase brain images. Results showed that our proposed model significantly outperformed previous methods in terms of accuracy. In addition, our results also indicated a better way of integrating multi-modality images, which leads to performance improvement.

  7. Acoustic Angiography: A New Imaging Modality for Assessing Microvasculature Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C. Gessner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide the biomedical imaging community with details of a new high resolution contrast imaging approach referred to as “acoustic angiography.” Through the use of dual-frequency ultrasound transducer technology, images acquired with this approach possess both high resolution and a high contrast-to-tissue ratio, which enables the visualization of microvascular architecture without significant contribution from background tissues. Additionally, volumetric vessel-tissue integration can be visualized by using b-mode overlays acquired with the same probe. We present a brief technical overview of how the images are acquired, followed by several examples of images of both healthy and diseased tissue volumes. 3D images from alternate modalities often used in preclinical imaging, contrast-enhanced micro-CT and photoacoustics, are also included to provide a perspective on how acoustic angiography has qualitatively similar capabilities to these other techniques. These preliminary images provide visually compelling evidence to suggest that acoustic angiography may serve as a powerful new tool in preclinical and future clinical imaging.

  8. Nanogels as imaging agents for modalities spanning the electromagnetic spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Minnie; Almutairi, Adah

    2016-01-21

    In the past few decades, advances in imaging equipment and protocols have expanded the role of imaging in in vivo diagnosis and disease management, especially in cancer. Traditional imaging agents have rapid clearance and low specificity for disease detection. To improve accuracy in disease identification, localization and assessment, novel nanomaterials are frequently explored as imaging agents to achieve high detection specificity and sensitivity. A promising material for this purpose are hydrogel nanoparticles, whose high hydrophilicity, biocompatibility, and tunable size in the nanometer range make them ideal for imaging. These nanogels (10 to 200 nm) can circumvent uptake by the reticuloendothelial system, allowing longer circulation times than small molecules. In addition, their size/surface properties can be further tailored to optimize their pharmacokinetics for imaging of a particular disease. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review of nanogels as imaging agents in various modalities with sources of signal spanning the electromagnetic spectrum, including MRI, NIR, UV-vis, and PET. Many materials and formulation methods will be reviewed to highlight the versatility of nanogels as imaging agents.

  9. Dual-modality brain PET-CT image segmentation based on adaptive use of functional and anatomical information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yong; Eberl, Stefan; Wen, Lingfeng; Fulham, Michael; Feng, David Dagan

    2012-01-01

    Dual medical imaging modalities, such as PET-CT, are now a routine component of clinical practice. Medical image segmentation methods, however, have generally only been applied to single modality images. In this paper, we propose the dual-modality image segmentation model to segment brain PET-CT images into gray matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid. This model converts PET-CT image segmentation into an optimization process controlled simultaneously by PET and CT voxel values and spatial constraints. It is innovative in the creation and application of the modality discriminatory power (MDP) coefficient as a weighting scheme to adaptively combine the functional (PET) and anatomical (CT) information on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Our approach relies upon allowing the modality with higher discriminatory power to play a more important role in the segmentation process. We compared the proposed approach to three other image segmentation strategies, including PET-only based segmentation, combination of the results of independent PET image segmentation and CT image segmentation, and simultaneous segmentation of joint PET and CT images without an adaptive weighting scheme. Our results in 21 clinical studies showed that our approach provides the most accurate and reliable segmentation for brain PET-CT images. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 3D multi-scale FCN with random modality voxel dropout learning for Intervertebral Disc Localization and Segmentation from Multi-modality MR Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaomeng; Dou, Qi; Chen, Hao; Fu, Chi-Wing; Qi, Xiaojuan; Belavý, Daniel L; Armbrecht, Gabriele; Felsenberg, Dieter; Zheng, Guoyan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2018-04-01

    Intervertebral discs (IVDs) are small joints that lie between adjacent vertebrae. The localization and segmentation of IVDs are important for spine disease diagnosis and measurement quantification. However, manual annotation is time-consuming and error-prone with limited reproducibility, particularly for volumetric data. In this work, our goal is to develop an automatic and accurate method based on fully convolutional networks (FCN) for the localization and segmentation of IVDs from multi-modality 3D MR data. Compared with single modality data, multi-modality MR images provide complementary contextual information, which contributes to better recognition performance. However, how to effectively integrate such multi-modality information to generate accurate segmentation results remains to be further explored. In this paper, we present a novel multi-scale and modality dropout learning framework to locate and segment IVDs from four-modality MR images. First, we design a 3D multi-scale context fully convolutional network, which processes the input data in multiple scales of context and then merges the high-level features to enhance the representation capability of the network for handling the scale variation of anatomical structures. Second, to harness the complementary information from different modalities, we present a random modality voxel dropout strategy which alleviates the co-adaption issue and increases the discriminative capability of the network. Our method achieved the 1st place in the MICCAI challenge on automatic localization and segmentation of IVDs from multi-modality MR images, with a mean segmentation Dice coefficient of 91.2% and a mean localization error of 0.62 mm. We further conduct extensive experiments on the extended dataset to validate our method. We demonstrate that the proposed modality dropout strategy with multi-modality images as contextual information improved the segmentation accuracy significantly. Furthermore, experiments conducted on

  11. TU-C-BRD-01: Image Guided SBRT I: Multi-Modality 4D Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, J [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Mageras, G [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Pan, T [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Motion management is one of the critical technical challenges for radiation therapy. 4D imaging has been rapidly adopted as essential tool to assess organ motion associated with respiratory breathing. A variety of 4D imaging techniques have been developed and are currently under development based on different imaging modalities such as CT, MRI, PET, and CBCT. Each modality provides specific and complementary information about organ and tumor respiratory motion. Effective use of each different technique or combined use of different techniques can introduce a comprehensive management of tumor motion. Specifically, these techniques have afforded tremendous opportunities to better define and delineate tumor volumes, more accurately perform patient positioning, and effectively apply highly conformal therapy techniques such as IMRT and SBRT. Successful implementation requires good understanding of not only each technique, including unique features, limitations, artifacts, imaging acquisition and process, but also how to systematically apply the information obtained from different imaging modalities using proper tools such as deformable image registration. Furthermore, it is important to understand the differences in the effects of breathing variation between different imaging modalities. A comprehensive motion management strategy using multi-modality 4D imaging has shown promise in improving patient care, but at the same time faces significant challenges. This session will focuses on the current status and advances in imaging respiration-induced organ motion with different imaging modalities: 4D-CT, 4D-MRI, 4D-PET, and 4D-CBCT/DTS. Learning Objectives: Understand the need and role of multimodality 4D imaging in radiation therapy. Understand the underlying physics behind each 4D imaging technique. Recognize the advantages and limitations of each 4D imaging technique.

  12. Assessment of Cardiac Sarcoidosis with Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Orii

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a chronic systemic disease of unknown etiology that is characterized by the presence of noncaseating epithelioid granulomas, usually in multiple organs. Several studies have shown that sarcoidosis might be the result of an exaggerated granulomatous reaction after exposure to unidentified antigens in genetically susceptible individuals. Cardiac involvement may occur and lead to an adverse outcome: the heart mechanics will be affected and that causes ventricular failure, and the cardiac electrical system will be disrupted and lead to third degree atrioventricular block, malignant ventricular tachycardia, and sudden cardiac death. Thus, early diagnosis and treatment of this potentially devastating disease is critically important. However, sensitive and accurate imaging modalities have not been established. Recent studies have demonstrated the promising potential of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET in the diagnosis and assessment of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, etiology, histological findings, and clinical features of sarcoidosis. We also introduce advanced imaging including 18F-FDG PET and cardiac MRI as more reliable diagnostic modalities for CS.

  13. Modality prediction of biomedical literature images using multimodal feature representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelka, Obioma

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the modelling approaches performed to automatically predict the modality of images found in biomedical literature. Various state-of-the-art visual features such as Bag-of-Keypoints computed with dense SIFT descriptors, texture features and Joint Composite Descriptors were used for visual image representation. Text representation was obtained by vector quantisation on a Bag-of-Words dictionary generated using attribute importance derived from a χ-test. Computing the principal components separately on each feature, dimension reduction as well as computational load reduction was achieved. Various multiple feature fusions were adopted to supplement visual image information with corresponding text information. The improvement obtained when using multimodal features vs. visual or text features was detected, analysed and evaluated. Random Forest models with 100 to 500 deep trees grown by resampling, a multi class linear kernel SVM with C=0.05 and a late fusion of the two classifiers were used for modality prediction. A Random Forest classifier achieved a higher accuracy and computed Bag-of-Keypoints with dense SIFT descriptors proved to be a better approach than with Lowe SIFT.

  14. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging for inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Chamberland, David; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    Arthritis is a leading cause of disability, affecting 46 million of the population in the U.S. Rendering new optical contrast in articular tissues at high spatial and temporal resolution, emerging photoacoustic imaging (PAI) combined with more established ultrasound (US) imaging technologies provides unique opportunities for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. In addition to capturing peripheral bone and soft tissue images, PAI has the capability to quantify hemodynamic properties including regional blood oxygenation and blood volume, both abnormal in synovial tissues affected by arthritis. Therefore, PAI, especially when performed together with US, should be of considerable help for further understanding the pathophysiology of arthritis as well as assisting in therapeutic decisions, including assessing the efficacy of new pharmacological therapies. In this paper, we will review our recent work on the development of PAI for application to the diagnostic imaging and therapeutic monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. We will present the imaging results from a home-built imaging system and another one based on a commercial US. The performance of PAI in evaluating pharmacological therapy on animal model of arthritis will be shown. Moreover, our resent work on PAI and US dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints in vivo will also be presented.

  15. A fully automated and reproducible level-set segmentation approach for generation of MR-based attenuation correction map of PET images in the brain employing single STE-MR imaging modality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazerooni, Anahita Fathi; Aarabi, Mohammad Hadi; Ay, Mohammadreza; Rad, Hamidreza Saligheh

    2014-01-01

    Generating MR-based attenuation correction map (μ-map) for quantitative reconstruction of PET images still remains a challenge in hybrid PET/MRI systems, mainly because cortical bone structures are indistinguishable from proximal air cavities in conventional MR images. Recently, development of short echo-time (STE) MR imaging sequences, has shown promise in differentiating cortical bone from air. However, on STE-MR images, the bone appears with discontinuous boundaries. Therefore, segmentation techniques based on intensity classification, such as thresholding or fuzzy C-means, fail to homogeneously delineate bone boundaries, especially in the presence of intrinsic noise and intensity inhomogeneity. Consequently, they cannot be fully automatized, must be fine-tuned on the case-by-case basis, and require additional morphological operations for segmentation refinement. To overcome the mentioned problems, in this study, we introduce a new fully automatic and reproducible STE-MR segmentation approach exploiting level-set in a clustering-based intensity inhomogeneity correction framework to reliably delineate bone from soft tissue and air.

  16. Imaging of radial wrist pain. I. Imaging modalities and anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ryan Ka Lok; Griffith, James F.; Ng, Alex Wing Hung [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, Shatin (China); Wong, Clara Wing Yee [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Shatin (China)

    2014-06-15

    Radial wrist pain is a common clinical complaint. The relatively complex anatomy in this region, combined with the small size of the anatomical structures and occasionally subtle imaging findings, can pose problems when trying to localize the exact cause of pain. To fully comprehend the underlying pathology, one needs a good understanding of both radial-sided wrist anatomy and the relative merits of the different imaging techniques used to assess these structures. In part I of this review, these aspects will be discussed. (orig.)

  17. Algorithm of imaging modalities in cases of mandibular fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihailova, H.

    2009-01-01

    Mandibular fracture is the most common bone fracture of maxillo-facial trauma. Up to now the main method for examination of the mandible is radiography. The aim of the issue is to present an algorithm of imaging modalities for investigation of patients in cases of mandibular trauma. It consists of series of X ray techniques and views of the facial skull named mandibulo-facial. This standardizes mandibulo-facial series includes exactly determined four projections done by conventional X ray techniques: posterior-anterior view of skull (PA or AP), oblique view of the left mandible; oblique view of the right mandible; occipito-mental view. Using these four planned radiograms is obligatory for each mandibular trauma. Panoramic X-ray is obligatory in cases of apparatus availability; this abolish only oblique views (left and right). Occipito-mental view of the skull gives anatomically better the coronoid process of the mandible, the zygoma complex, the orbital edges and maxillar sinus than Waters projection. So mandibulo-facial series of four planned radiograms is not only for diagnostic of mandibular fractures, but as a screening of mandibulo-facial trauma too. Thus using algorithm of imaging modalities in cases of mandibular fracture leads to optimization of diagnostic process in patients with mandibular trauma. (author)

  18. Multi-modal imaging of adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappia, Marcello; Di Pietto, Francesco; Aliprandi, Alberto; Pozza, Simona; De Petro, Paola; Muda, Alessandro; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2016-06-01

    Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder is a clinical condition characterized by progressive limitation of active and passive mobility of the glenohumeral joint, generally associated with high levels of pain. Although the diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis is based mainly on clinical examination, different imaging modalities including arthrography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance, and magnetic resonance arthrography may help to confirm the diagnosis, detecting a number of findings such as capsular and coracohumeral ligament thickening, poor capsular distension, extracapsular contrast leakage, and synovial hypertrophy and scar tissue formation at the rotator interval. Ultrasound can also be used to guide intra- and periarticular procedures for treating patients with adhesive capsulitis. • Diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis is mainly based on clinical findings. • Imaging may be used to exclude articular or rotator cuff pathology. • Thickening of coracohumeral and inferior glenohumeral ligaments are common findings. • Rotator interval fat pad obliteration has 100 % specificity for adhesive capsulitis. • Ultrasound can be used to guide intra- and periarticular treatments.

  19. Biomedical imaging modality classification using combined visual features and textual terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xian-Hua; Chen, Yen-Wei

    2011-01-01

    We describe an approach for the automatic modality classification in medical image retrieval task of the 2010 CLEF cross-language image retrieval campaign (ImageCLEF). This paper is focused on the process of feature extraction from medical images and fuses the different extracted visual features and textual feature for modality classification. To extract visual features from the images, we used histogram descriptor of edge, gray, or color intensity and block-based variation as global features and SIFT histogram as local feature. For textual feature of image representation, the binary histogram of some predefined vocabulary words from image captions is used. Then, we combine the different features using normalized kernel functions for SVM classification. Furthermore, for some easy misclassified modality pairs such as CT and MR or PET and NM modalities, a local classifier is used for distinguishing samples in the pair modality to improve performance. The proposed strategy is evaluated with the provided modality dataset by ImageCLEF 2010.

  20. Improved proton computed tomography by dual modality image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, David C., E-mail: dch@ki.au.dk; Bassler, Niels [Experimental Clinical Oncology, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Petersen, Jørgen Breede Baltzer [Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Sørensen, Thomas Sangild [Computer Science, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark and Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, 8200 Aarhus N (Denmark)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Proton computed tomography (CT) is a promising image modality for improving the stopping power estimates and dose calculations for particle therapy. However, the finite range of about 33 cm of water of most commercial proton therapy systems limits the sites that can be scanned from a full 360° rotation. In this paper the authors propose a method to overcome the problem using a dual modality reconstruction (DMR) combining the proton data with a cone-beam x-ray prior. Methods: A Catphan 600 phantom was scanned using a cone beam x-ray CT scanner. A digital replica of the phantom was created in the Monte Carlo code Geant4 and a 360° proton CT scan was simulated, storing the entrance and exit position and momentum vector of every proton. Proton CT images were reconstructed using a varying number of angles from the scan. The proton CT images were reconstructed using a constrained nonlinear conjugate gradient algorithm, minimizing total variation and the x-ray CT prior while remaining consistent with the proton projection data. The proton histories were reconstructed along curved cubic-spline paths. Results: The spatial resolution of the cone beam CT prior was retained for the fully sampled case and the 90° interval case, with the MTF = 0.5 (modulation transfer function) ranging from 5.22 to 5.65 linepairs/cm. In the 45° interval case, the MTF = 0.5 dropped to 3.91 linepairs/cm For the fully sampled DMR, the maximal root mean square (RMS) error was 0.006 in units of relative stopping power. For the limited angle cases the maximal RMS error was 0.18, an almost five-fold improvement over the cone beam CT estimate. Conclusions: Dual modality reconstruction yields the high spatial resolution of cone beam x-ray CT while maintaining the improved stopping power estimation of proton CT. In the case of limited angles, the use of prior image proton CT greatly improves the resolution and stopping power estimate, but does not fully achieve the quality of a 360

  1. Deep convolutional neural networks for multi-modality isointense infant brain image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenlu; Li, Rongjian; Deng, Houtao; Wang, Li; Lin, Weili; Ji, Shuiwang; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-03-01

    The segmentation of infant brain tissue images into white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) plays an important role in studying early brain development in health and disease. In the isointense stage (approximately 6-8 months of age), WM and GM exhibit similar levels of intensity in both T1 and T2 MR images, making the tissue segmentation very challenging. Only a small number of existing methods have been designed for tissue segmentation in this isointense stage; however, they only used a single T1 or T2 images, or the combination of T1 and T2 images. In this paper, we propose to use deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) for segmenting isointense stage brain tissues using multi-modality MR images. CNNs are a type of deep models in which trainable filters and local neighborhood pooling operations are applied alternatingly on the raw input images, resulting in a hierarchy of increasingly complex features. Specifically, we used multi-modality information from T1, T2, and fractional anisotropy (FA) images as inputs and then generated the segmentation maps as outputs. The multiple intermediate layers applied convolution, pooling, normalization, and other operations to capture the highly nonlinear mappings between inputs and outputs. We compared the performance of our approach with that of the commonly used segmentation methods on a set of manually segmented isointense stage brain images. Results showed that our proposed model significantly outperformed prior methods on infant brain tissue segmentation. In addition, our results indicated that integration of multi-modality images led to significant performance improvement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cumulative phase delay imaging - A new contrast enhanced ultrasound modality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demi, Libertario, E-mail: l.demi@tue.nl; Sloun, Ruud J. G. van; Mischi, Massimo [Lab. of Biomedical Diagnostics, Dept. of Electrical Eng., Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Wijkstra, Hessel [Lab. of Biomedical Diagnostics, Dept. of Electrical Eng., Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Urology Dept., University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-10-28

    Recently, a new acoustic marker for ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental pressure wave field components is in fact observable for ultrasound propagating through UCAs. This phenomenon is absent in the case of tissue nonlinearity and is dependent on insonating pressure and frequency, UCA concentration, and propagation path length through UCAs. In this paper, ultrasound images based on this marker are presented. The ULA-OP research platform, in combination with a LA332 linear array probe (Esaote, Firenze Italy), were used to image a gelatin phantom containing a PVC plate (used as a reflector) and a cylindrical cavity measuring 7 mm in diameter (placed in between the observation point and the PVC plate). The cavity contained a 240 µL/L SonoVueO{sup ®} UCA concentration. Two insonating frequencies (3 MHz and 2.5 MHz) were used to scan the gelatine phantom. A mechanical index MI = 0.07, measured in water at the cavity location with a HGL-0400 hydrophone (Onda, Sunnyvale, CA), was utilized. Processing the ultrasound signals backscattered from the plate, ultrasound images were generated in a tomographic fashion using the filtered back-projection method. As already observed in previous studies, significantly higher CPD values are measured when imaging at a frequency of 2.5 MHz, as compared to imaging at 3 MHz. In conclusion, these results confirm the applicability of the discussed CPD as a marker for contrast imaging. Comparison with standard contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging modalities will be the focus of future work.

  3. A Cross-Modality Learning Approach for Vessel Segmentation in Retinal Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiaoliang; Feng, Bowei; Xie, LinPei; Liang, Ping; Zhang, Huisheng; Wang, Tianfu

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new supervised method for vessel segmentation in retinal images. This method remolds the task of segmentation as a problem of cross-modality data transformation from retinal image to vessel map. A wide and deep neural network with strong induction ability is proposed to model the transformation, and an efficient training strategy is presented. Instead of a single label of the center pixel, the network can output the label map of all pixels for a given image patch. Our approach outperforms reported state-of-the-art methods in terms of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. The result of cross-training evaluation indicates its robustness to the training set. The approach needs no artificially designed feature and no preprocessing step, reducing the impact of subjective factors. The proposed method has the potential for application in image diagnosis of ophthalmologic diseases, and it may provide a new, general, high-performance computing framework for image segmentation.

  4. Combining Different Modalities for 3D Imaging of Biological Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Tsyganov, E; Kulkarni, P; Mason, R; Parkey, R; Seliuonine, S; Shay, J; Soesbe, T; Zhezher, V; Zinchenko, A I

    2005-01-01

    A resolution enhanced NaI(Tl)-scintillator micro-SPECT device using pinhole collimator geometry has been built and tested with small animals. This device was constructed based on a depth-of-interaction measurement using a thick scintillator crystal and a position sensitive PMT to measure depth-dependent scintillator light profiles. Such a measurement eliminates the parallax error that degrades the high spatial resolution required for small animal imaging. This novel technique for 3D gamma-ray detection was incorporated into the micro-SPECT device and tested with a $^{57}$Co source and $^{98m}$Tc-MDP injected in mice body. To further enhance the investigating power of the tomographic imaging different imaging modalities can be combined. In particular, as proposed and shown in this paper, the optical imaging permits a 3D reconstruction of the animal's skin surface thus improving visualization and making possible depth-dependent corrections, necessary for bioluminescence 3D reconstruction in biological objects. ...

  5. Imaging Modalities to Identity Inflammation in an Atherosclerotic Plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Sunny; Miller, Avraham; Agarwal, Chirag; Zakin, Elina; Acholonu, Michael; Gidwani, Umesh; Sharma, Abhishek; Kulbak, Guy; Shani, Jacob; Chen, On

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, multifocal arterial wall disease caused by local and systemic inflammation responsible for major cardiovascular complications such as myocardial infarction and stroke. With the recent understanding that vulnerable plaque erosion and rupture, with subsequent thrombosis, rather than luminal stenosis, is the underlying cause of acute ischemic events, there has been a shift of focus to understand the mechanisms that make an atherosclerotic plaque unstable or vulnerable to rupture. The presence of inflammation in the atherosclerotic plaque has been considered as one of the initial events which convert a stable plaque into an unstable and vulnerable plaque. This paper systemically reviews the noninvasive and invasive imaging modalities that are currently available to detect this inflammatory process, at least in the intermediate stages, and discusses the ongoing studies that will help us to better understand and identify it at the molecular level.

  6. Imaging Modalities to Identity Inflammation in an Atherosclerotic Plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunny Goel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, multifocal arterial wall disease caused by local and systemic inflammation responsible for major cardiovascular complications such as myocardial infarction and stroke. With the recent understanding that vulnerable plaque erosion and rupture, with subsequent thrombosis, rather than luminal stenosis, is the underlying cause of acute ischemic events, there has been a shift of focus to understand the mechanisms that make an atherosclerotic plaque unstable or vulnerable to rupture. The presence of inflammation in the atherosclerotic plaque has been considered as one of the initial events which convert a stable plaque into an unstable and vulnerable plaque. This paper systemically reviews the noninvasive and invasive imaging modalities that are currently available to detect this inflammatory process, at least in the intermediate stages, and discusses the ongoing studies that will help us to better understand and identify it at the molecular level.

  7. Imaging by multiple modalities of patients with a carotidynia syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Uematsu, Hidemasa; Kimura, Hirohiko; Itoh, Harumi; Sagoh, Tadashi; Noguchi, Masato; Miyayama, Shiro

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to familiarize readers with the clinical syndrome of carotidynia. In the past, the International Headache Society (IHS) described idiopathic carotidynia as a diagnostic entity consisting of a self-limiting neck pain syndrome and tenderness over the carotid bifurcation without structural abnormality and then recently removed it from its classification. Although the clinical criteria of carotidynia in the former classification of the IHS included the absence of structural abnormality, several publications have demonstrated associated radiological findings and have described the usefulness of radiological investigations in diagnosing this syndrome. In this paper, we report four additional cases with a carotidynia clinical syndrome (according to the former classification) and the presence of abnormal soft tissue infiltration surrounding the symptomatic carotid artery as demonstrated by multiple imaging modalities, without any other underlying cause for the carotid pain syndrome. Our findings support the hypothesis that carotidynia could be a distinct disease entity, possibly caused by inflammation. (orig.)

  8. Imaging by multiple modalities of patients with a carotidynia syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Uematsu, Hidemasa; Kimura, Hirohiko; Itoh, Harumi [University of Fukui, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Fukui (Japan); Sagoh, Tadashi; Noguchi, Masato [Fukui Red Cross Hospital, Department of Radiology, Fukui (Japan); Miyayama, Shiro [Fukuiken Saiseikai Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Fukui (Japan)

    2007-09-15

    The purpose of this article is to familiarize readers with the clinical syndrome of carotidynia. In the past, the International Headache Society (IHS) described idiopathic carotidynia as a diagnostic entity consisting of a self-limiting neck pain syndrome and tenderness over the carotid bifurcation without structural abnormality and then recently removed it from its classification. Although the clinical criteria of carotidynia in the former classification of the IHS included the absence of structural abnormality, several publications have demonstrated associated radiological findings and have described the usefulness of radiological investigations in diagnosing this syndrome. In this paper, we report four additional cases with a carotidynia clinical syndrome (according to the former classification) and the presence of abnormal soft tissue infiltration surrounding the symptomatic carotid artery as demonstrated by multiple imaging modalities, without any other underlying cause for the carotid pain syndrome. Our findings support the hypothesis that carotidynia could be a distinct disease entity, possibly caused by inflammation. (orig.)

  9. Breast US as primary imaging modality for diagnosing gynecomastia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telegrafo, M; Introna, T; Coi, L; Cornacchia, I; Rella, L; Stabile Ianora, A A; Angelelli, G; Moschetta, M

    2016-01-01

    To assess the role of breast US in diagnosing and classifying gynecomastia as the primary imaging modality and to compare US findings and classification system with the mammographic ones. 48 patients suspected of having gynecomastia underwent mammography and US. Two radiologists in consensus retrospectively evaluated mammograms and sonograms. Both US and mammographic images were evaluated categorizing gynecomastia into non-mass, nodular and flame shaped patterns. The two category assignations were compared in order to find any difference. The reference standard for both the classification systems was represented by the cytological examination in 18 out of 44 cases (41%) and the six-month US follow-up in the remaining cases. The US examination revealed pseudo-gynecomastia in 4/48 (8%) and true gynecomastia in the remaining 44 (92%). Gynecomastia was bilateral in 25/44 cases (57%) and unilateral in the remaining 19 (43%). The cases of true gynecomastia included non mass shape in 26/44 cases (59%), nodular shape in 12 (27%) and flame shape in 6 (14%). The mammographic examination revealed the same results as compared with US findings. 18/44 (41%) patients affected by nodular or dendritic gynecomastia underwent cytological examination confirming the presence of glandular tissue and the benign nature of the clinical condition. US could be proposed as the primary imaging tool for diagnosing and classifying gynecomastia, avoiding unnecessary Xray examinations or invasive procedures in case of diffuse gynecomastia. In case of nodular or dendritic patterns, biopsy remains mandatory for a definitive diagnosis.

  10. Single-photon source engineering using a Modal Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels

    Solid-state sources of single indistinguishable photons are of great interest for quantum information applications. The semiconductor quantum dot embedded in a host material represents an attractive platform to realize such a single-photon source (SPS). A near-unity efficiency, defined as the num...... nanowire SPSs...

  11. Dual isotope, single acquisition parathyroid imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triantafillou, M.; McDonald, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear Medicine parathyroid imaging using Thallium-201(TI) and Technetium-99m(Tc) is an often used imaging modality for the detection of parathyroid adenomas and hyper parathyroidism. The conventional Tl/Tc subtraction technique requires 2 separate injections and acquisitions which are then normalised and subtracted from each other. This lengthy technique is uncomfortable for patients and can result in false positive scan results due to patient movement between and during the acquisition process. We propose a simplified injection and single acquisition technique, that reduces the chance of movement and thus reduces the chance of false positive scan results. The technique involves the injection of Tc followed by the Tl injection 10 minutes later. After a further 10 min wait, imaging is performed using a dual isotope acquisition, with window (W) 1 set on 140 keV 20%W 5% off peak and W2 peaked for 70 keV 20%W., acquired for 10 minutes. We have imaged 27 patients with this technique, 15 had positive parathyroid imaging. Of the 15, 11 had positive ultrasound correlation. Of the remaining 4, 2 have had positive surgical findings for adenomas, the other 2 are awaiting follow-up. Of the 12 patients with negative parathyroid imaging, 2 have been shown to be false - negative with surgery. In conclusion, the single acquisition technique suggested by us is a valid method of imaging parathyroids that reduces the chance of false positive results due to movement

  12. Imaging modalities for the non-invasive diagnosis of endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisenblat, Vicki; Bossuyt, Patrick M M; Farquhar, Cindy; Johnson, Neil; Hull, M Louise

    2016-02-26

    About 10% of women of reproductive age suffer from endometriosis. Endometriosis is a costly chronic disease that causes pelvic pain and subfertility. Laparoscopy, the gold standard diagnostic test for endometriosis, is expensive and carries surgical risks. Currently, no non-invasive tests that can be used to accurately diagnose endometriosis are available in clinical practice. This is the first review of diagnostic test accuracy of imaging tests for endometriosis that uses Cochrane methods to provide an update on the rapidly expanding literature in this field. • To provide estimates of the diagnostic accuracy of imaging modalities for the diagnosis of pelvic endometriosis, ovarian endometriosis and deeply infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) versus surgical diagnosis as a reference standard.• To describe performance of imaging tests for mapping of deep endometriotic lesions in the pelvis at specific anatomical sites.Imaging tests were evaluated as replacement tests for diagnostic surgery and as triage tests that would assist decision making regarding diagnostic surgery for endometriosis. We searched the following databases to 20 April 2015: MEDLINE, CENTRAL, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Web of Science, LILACS, OAIster, TRIP, ClinicalTrials.gov, MEDION, DARE, and PubMed. Searches were not restricted to a particular study design or language nor to specific publication dates. The search strategy incorporated words in the title, abstracts, text words across the record and medical subject headings (MeSH). We considered published peer-reviewed cross-sectional studies and randomised controlled trials of any size that included prospectively recruited women of reproductive age suspected of having one or more of the following target conditions: endometrioma, pelvic endometriosis, DIE or endometriotic lesions at specific intrapelvic anatomical locations. We included studies that compared the diagnostic test accuracy of one or more imaging modalities versus findings of surgical

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Versus Ultrasound as the Initial Imaging Modality for Pediatric and Young Adult Patients With Suspected Appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imler, Daniel; Keller, Christine; Sivasankar, Shyam; Wang, Nancy Ewen; Vasanawala, Shreyas; Bruzoni, Matias; Quinn, James

    2017-05-01

    While ultrasound (US), given its lack of ionizing radiation, is currently the recommended initial imaging study of choice for the diagnosis of appendicitis in pediatric and young adult patients, it does have significant shortcomings. US is time-intensive and operator dependent and results in frequent inconclusive studies, thus necessitating further imaging and admission for observation or repeat clinical visits. A rapid focused magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for appendicitis has been shown to have definitive sensitivity and specificity, similar to computed tomography but without radiation and offers a potential alternative to US. In this single-center prospective cohort study, we sought to determine the difference in total length of stay and charges between rapid MRI and US as the initial imaging modality in pediatric and young adult patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with suspected appendicitis. We hypothesized that rapid MRI would be more efficient and cost-effective than US as the initial imaging modality in the ED diagnosis of appendicitis. A prospective randomized cohort study of consecutive patients was conducted in patients 2 to 30 years of age in an academic ED with access to both rapid MRI and US imaging modalities 24/7. Prior to the start of the study, the days of the week were randomized to either rapid MRI or US as the initial imaging modality. Physicians evaluated patients with suspected appendicitis per their usual manner. If the physician decided to obtain radiologic imaging, the predetermined imaging modality for the day of the week was used. All decisions regarding other diagnostic testing and/or further imaging were left to the physician's discretion. Time intervals (minutes) between triage, order placement, start of imaging, end of imaging, image result, and disposition (discharge vs. admission), as well as total charges (diagnostic testing, imaging, and repeat ED visits) were recorded. Over a 100-day period, 82 patients were

  14. Imaging modalities used to confirm diaphragmatic hernia in small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.; Leveille, R.; Myer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    When a patient is presented for treatment following a traumatic accident such as being hit by a car, thoracic radiographs are usually an integral part of the overall diagnostic evaluation. Diagnosis at diaphragmatic hernia (DH) is often challenging in small animals. The thorax may contain substantial fluid, thereby masking the presence of cranially displaced abdominal soft tissues (e.g., liver or spleen). The most common cause of decreased radiographic visualization of the diaphragm on survey radiographs is pleural fluid; however, the second most common cause is DH. Obviously, if a gas-filledviscus is identified within the thoracic cavity on survey radiographs, the diagnosis of DH is straightforward and relatively routine. If, however, there is substantial pleural effusion and the herniated structure is a soft tissue parenchymal organ (e.g., liver or spleen), the diagnosis is less clearly defined on survey radiographs. This review discusses the various imaging modalities (survey, positional, and contrast-enhanced radiographs and ultrasonography) that can be used in the diagnosis or confirmation of DH

  15. Acceleration of single pixel imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, K.

    2018-01-01

    A method for single pixel imaging (SPI) is introduced. The method is proposed to accelerate optical measurement. The method is also useful for high-definition imaging. The processing procedure of the method is described and some features of the based on the proposed method is described.

  16. Modal Analysis of a Single-Structure Multiaxis MEMS Gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ali Shah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on designing a single-structure triaxes MEMS capacitive gyroscope which is capable of measuring the three angular velocities on a single drive. A Z-shaped beam for the support of folded coupling spring has been applied to suppress the unwanted mode and decrease the stress effect at the spring ends. The unique coupling spring has changed the driving motion, due to which slide film damping in the driving mode has been reduced. This reduction can lead to higher performance of the sensor with less requirements on vacuum level which decreases the cost of fabrication. Simulation analysis has been performed in COMSOL Multiphysics and Matlab Simulink to finalize the design for fabrication. After finite element analysis, the driving, x-sensing, z-sensing, and y-sensing are, respectively, found to be 13.30 KHz, 13.40 KHz, 13.47 KHz, and 13.51 KHz.

  17. Biomedical Imaging Modality Classification Using Combined Visual Features and Textual Terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Hua Han

    2011-01-01

    extraction from medical images and fuses the different extracted visual features and textual feature for modality classification. To extract visual features from the images, we used histogram descriptor of edge, gray, or color intensity and block-based variation as global features and SIFT histogram as local feature. For textual feature of image representation, the binary histogram of some predefined vocabulary words from image captions is used. Then, we combine the different features using normalized kernel functions for SVM classification. Furthermore, for some easy misclassified modality pairs such as CT and MR or PET and NM modalities, a local classifier is used for distinguishing samples in the pair modality to improve performance. The proposed strategy is evaluated with the provided modality dataset by ImageCLEF 2010.

  18. Cross-Modality Image Synthesis via Weakly Coupled and Geometry Co-Regularized Joint Dictionary Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yawen; Shao, Ling; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2018-03-01

    Multi-modality medical imaging is increasingly used for comprehensive assessment of complex diseases in either diagnostic examinations or as part of medical research trials. Different imaging modalities provide complementary information about living tissues. However, multi-modal examinations are not always possible due to adversary factors, such as patient discomfort, increased cost, prolonged scanning time, and scanner unavailability. In additionally, in large imaging studies, incomplete records are not uncommon owing to image artifacts, data corruption or data loss, which compromise the potential of multi-modal acquisitions. In this paper, we propose a weakly coupled and geometry co-regularized joint dictionary learning method to address the problem of cross-modality synthesis while considering the fact that collecting the large amounts of training data is often impractical. Our learning stage requires only a few registered multi-modality image pairs as training data. To employ both paired images and a large set of unpaired data, a cross-modality image matching criterion is proposed. Then, we propose a unified model by integrating such a criterion into the joint dictionary learning and the observed common feature space for associating cross-modality data for the purpose of synthesis. Furthermore, two regularization terms are added to construct robust sparse representations. Our experimental results demonstrate superior performance of the proposed model over state-of-the-art methods.

  19. VoxelStats: A MATLAB Package for Multi-Modal Voxel-Wise Brain Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathotaarachchi, Sulantha; Wang, Seqian; Shin, Monica; Pascoal, Tharick A; Benedet, Andrea L; Kang, Min Su; Beaudry, Thomas; Fonov, Vladimir S; Gauthier, Serge; Labbe, Aurélie; Rosa-Neto, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    In healthy individuals, behavioral outcomes are highly associated with the variability on brain regional structure or neurochemical phenotypes. Similarly, in the context of neurodegenerative conditions, neuroimaging reveals that cognitive decline is linked to the magnitude of atrophy, neurochemical declines, or concentrations of abnormal protein aggregates across brain regions. However, modeling the effects of multiple regional abnormalities as determinants of cognitive decline at the voxel level remains largely unexplored by multimodal imaging research, given the high computational cost of estimating regression models for every single voxel from various imaging modalities. VoxelStats is a voxel-wise computational framework to overcome these computational limitations and to perform statistical operations on multiple scalar variables and imaging modalities at the voxel level. VoxelStats package has been developed in Matlab(®) and supports imaging formats such as Nifti-1, ANALYZE, and MINC v2. Prebuilt functions in VoxelStats enable the user to perform voxel-wise general and generalized linear models and mixed effect models with multiple volumetric covariates. Importantly, VoxelStats can recognize scalar values or image volumes as response variables and can accommodate volumetric statistical covariates as well as their interaction effects with other variables. Furthermore, this package includes built-in functionality to perform voxel-wise receiver operating characteristic analysis and paired and unpaired group contrast analysis. Validation of VoxelStats was conducted by comparing the linear regression functionality with existing toolboxes such as glim_image and RMINC. The validation results were identical to existing methods and the additional functionality was demonstrated by generating feature case assessments (t-statistics, odds ratio, and true positive rate maps). In summary, VoxelStats expands the current methods for multimodal imaging analysis by allowing the

  20. MR imaging of recurrent hyperparathyroidism in comparison with other imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffermann, W.; Thurnher, S.; Okerland, M.; Levin, K.; Gooding, G.W.; Clark, O.H.; Higgins, C.B.

    1987-01-01

    Thirty patients with recurrent hyperparathyroidism were evaluated with MR imaging, performed using a saddle-shaped surface coil producing 5-mm sections with T1 and T2 weighting. Twenty-six and 22 of these patients also underwent T1-201 scintigraphy and high-resolution US, respectively. MR imaging accurately localized abnormal parathyroid glands in 75% evaluated prospectively and 86% retrospectively. Scintigraphy localized 64% prospectively and 72% retrospectively. US demonstrated 57% prospectively and 67% retrospectively. MR imaging showed three of four mediastinal adenomas evaluated prospectively retrospectively. There were two false-positive studies with MR imaging, two with scintigraphy, and one with US. Thus, MR imaging was the most effective imaging modality for parathyroid localization in recurrent hyperparathyroidism

  1. Emerging roles for integrated imaging modalities in cardiovascular cell-based therapeutics: a clinical perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Psaltis, Peter J.; Simari, Robert D.; Rodriguez-Porcel, Martin [Mayo Clinic, Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Despite preclinical promise, the progress of cell-based therapy to clinical cardiovascular practice has been slowed by several challenges and uncertainties that have been highlighted by the conflicting results of human trials. Most telling has been the revelation that current strategies fall short of achieving sufficient retention and engraftment of cells to meet the ambitious objective of myocardial regeneration. This has sparked novel research into the refinement of cell biology and delivery to overcome these shortcomings. Within this context, molecular imaging has emerged as a valuable tool for providing noninvasive surveillance of cell fate in vivo. Direct and indirect labelling of cells can be coupled with clinically relevant imaging modalities, such as radionuclide single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, to assess their short- and long-term distributions, along with their viability, proliferation and functional interaction with the host myocardium. This review details the strengths and limitations of the different cell labelling and imaging techniques and their potential application to the clinical realm. We also consider the broader, multifaceted utility of imaging throughout the cell therapy process, providing a discussion of its considerable value during cell delivery and its importance during the evaluation of cardiac outcomes in clinical studies. (orig.)

  2. Application prospective of nanoprobes with MRI and FI dual-modality imaging on breast cancer stem cells in tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hetao; Wang, Yu; Wang, Tong; Shi, Dongxing; Sun, Zengrong; Xia, Chunhui; Wang, Baiqi

    2016-06-23

    Breast cancer (BC) is a serious disease to threat lives of women. Numerous studies have proved that BC originates from cancer stem cells (CSCs). But at present, no one approach can quickly and simply identify breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) in solid tumor. Nanotechnology is probably able to realize this goal. But in study process, scientists find it seems that nanomaterials with one modality, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or fluorescence imaging (FI), have their own advantages and drawbacks. They cannot meet practical requirements in clinic. The nanoprobe combined MRI with FI modality is a promising tool to accurately detect desired cells with low amount in tissue. In this work, we briefly describe the MRI and FI development history, analyze advantages and disadvantages of nanomaterials with single modality in cancer cell detection. Then the application development of nanomaterials with dual-modality in cancer field is discussed. Finally, the obstacles and prospective of dual-modal nanoparticles in detection field of BCSCs are also pointed out in order to speed up clinical applications of nanoprobes.

  3. Multi-Modal Curriculum Learning for Semi-Supervised Image Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chen; Tao, Dacheng; Maybank, Stephen J; Liu, Wei; Kang, Guoliang; Yang, Jie

    2016-07-01

    Semi-supervised image classification aims to classify a large quantity of unlabeled images by typically harnessing scarce labeled images. Existing semi-supervised methods often suffer from inadequate classification accuracy when encountering difficult yet critical images, such as outliers, because they treat all unlabeled images equally and conduct classifications in an imperfectly ordered sequence. In this paper, we employ the curriculum learning methodology by investigating the difficulty of classifying every unlabeled image. The reliability and the discriminability of these unlabeled images are particularly investigated for evaluating their difficulty. As a result, an optimized image sequence is generated during the iterative propagations, and the unlabeled images are logically classified from simple to difficult. Furthermore, since images are usually characterized by multiple visual feature descriptors, we associate each kind of features with a teacher, and design a multi-modal curriculum learning (MMCL) strategy to integrate the information from different feature modalities. In each propagation, each teacher analyzes the difficulties of the currently unlabeled images from its own modality viewpoint. A consensus is subsequently reached among all the teachers, determining the currently simplest images (i.e., a curriculum), which are to be reliably classified by the multi-modal learner. This well-organized propagation process leveraging multiple teachers and one learner enables our MMCL to outperform five state-of-the-art methods on eight popular image data sets.

  4. A tri-modality image fusion method for target delineation of brain tumors in radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Guo

    Full Text Available To develop a tri-modality image fusion method for better target delineation in image-guided radiotherapy for patients with brain tumors.A new method of tri-modality image fusion was developed, which can fuse and display all image sets in one panel and one operation. And a feasibility study in gross tumor volume (GTV delineation using data from three patients with brain tumors was conducted, which included images of simulation CT, MRI, and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET examinations before radiotherapy. Tri-modality image fusion was implemented after image registrations of CT+PET and CT+MRI, and the transparency weight of each modality could be adjusted and set by users. Three radiation oncologists delineated GTVs for all patients using dual-modality (MRI/CT and tri-modality (MRI/CT/PET image fusion respectively. Inter-observer variation was assessed by the coefficient of variation (COV, the average distance between surface and centroid (ADSC, and the local standard deviation (SDlocal. Analysis of COV was also performed to evaluate intra-observer volume variation.The inter-observer variation analysis showed that, the mean COV was 0.14(± 0.09 and 0.07(± 0.01 for dual-modality and tri-modality respectively; the standard deviation of ADSC was significantly reduced (p<0.05 with tri-modality; SDlocal averaged over median GTV surface was reduced in patient 2 (from 0.57 cm to 0.39 cm and patient 3 (from 0.42 cm to 0.36 cm with the new method. The intra-observer volume variation was also significantly reduced (p = 0.00 with the tri-modality method as compared with using the dual-modality method.With the new tri-modality image fusion method smaller inter- and intra-observer variation in GTV definition for the brain tumors can be achieved, which improves the consistency and accuracy for target delineation in individualized radiotherapy.

  5. Sidestream Dark Field (SDF) imaging: a novel stroboscopic LED ring-based imaging modality for clinical assessment of the microcirculation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedhart, P. T.; Khalilzada, M.; Bezemer, R.; Merza, J.; Ince, C.

    2007-01-01

    Sidestream Dark Field (SDF) imaging, a stroboscopic LED ring-based imaging modality, is introduced for clinical observation of the microcirculation. SDF imaging is validated by comparison to Orthogonal Polarization Spectral imaging. Nailfold capillary diameters and red blood cell velocities were

  6. IMPACT (Imaging and Molecular Markers for Patients with Lung Cancer: Approaches with Molecular Targets and Complementary, Innovative and Therapeutic Modalities)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hong, Waun K; Herbst, Roy

    2007-01-01

    .... These projects combine targeted approaches using molecular and imaging techniques to validate activity against a target and monitor response using imaging modalities specific to the receptor using...

  7. IMPACT (Imaging and Molecular Markers for Patients with Lung Cancer: Approaches with Molecular Targets and Complementary, Innovative and Therapeutic Modalities)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hong, Waun Ki; Herbst, Roy

    2006-01-01

    .... These projects combine targeted approaches using molecular and imaging techniques to validate activity against a target and monitor response using imaging modalities specific to the receptor using...

  8. IMPACT (Imaging and Molecular Markers for Patients with Lung Cancer: Approaches with Molecular Targets and Complementary, Innovative and Therapeutic Modalities)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hong, Waun K; Herbst, Roy

    2008-01-01

    .... These projects combine targeted approaches using molecular and imaging techniques to validate activity against a target and monitor response using imaging modalities specific to the receptor using...

  9. Full-field modal analysis during base motion excitation using high-speed 3D digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Viedma, Ángel J.; López-Alba, Elías; Felipe-Sesé, Luis; Díaz, Francisco A.

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, many efforts have been made to exploit full-field measurement optical techniques for modal identification. Three-dimensional digital image correlation using high-speed cameras has been extensively employed for this purpose. Modal identification algorithms are applied to process the frequency response functions (FRF), which relate the displacement response of the structure to the excitation force. However, one of the most common tests for modal analysis involves the base motion excitation of a structural element instead of force excitation. In this case, the relationship between response and excitation is typically based on displacements, which are known as transmissibility functions. In this study, a methodology for experimental modal analysis using high-speed 3D digital image correlation and base motion excitation tests is proposed. In particular, a cantilever beam was excited from its base with a random signal, using a clamped edge join. Full-field transmissibility functions were obtained through the beam and converted into FRF for proper identification, considering a single degree-of-freedom theoretical conversion. Subsequently, modal identification was performed using a circle-fit approach. The proposed methodology facilitates the management of the typically large amounts of data points involved in the DIC measurement during modal identification. Moreover, it was possible to determine the natural frequencies, damping ratios and full-field mode shapes without requiring any additional tests. Finally, the results were experimentally validated by comparing them with those obtained by employing traditional accelerometers, analytical models and finite element method analyses. The comparison was performed by using the quantitative indicator modal assurance criterion. The results showed a high level of correspondence, consolidating the proposed experimental methodology.

  10. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE IMAGING AND TREATMENT MODALITIES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF CHOLEDOCHOLITHIASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM The objectives of this study are to compare the investigative modalities used in the diagnosis and to compare the treatment undertaken in the management of patients with choledocholithiasis. MATERIAL AND METHODS Data was collected in prefixed proforma in our hospital between April 2012 to Oct 2014 after considering inclusion and exclusion criteria.  Data regarding imaging studies for diagnosis of choledocholithiasis was collected.  After diagnosis, patients were subjected to different treatment modalities.  The outcomes, complications and morbidity of the procedures were compared analysed. RESULTS  Mean age was more than 50 years. Pain abdomen was the most common preventing complaint.  Ultrasound was the commonest imaging modality done with sensitivity of more than 60% in finding the CBD stone  CT and MRCP in diagnosis of choledocholithiasis were concerned and dilatation of the common bile duct was detected equally by both methods.  ERCP and surgical methods in form of laparoscopic or open surgery were different treatment modalities used; ERCP was the common treatment modality done. Open surgery and laparoscopic cholecystectomy were next commonest treatment modalities done respectively. CONCLUSIONS  Occurrence of choledocholithiasis increases with age.  USG is both cheap and effective with sensitivity more than 60% but MRCP is more preferable as a biliary imaging modality.  Choledochoduodenostomy is an optional method of management following CBD exploration while T-tube drainage and primary closure of the CBD following exploration have comparable results.

  11. Applications of Novel X-Ray Imaging Modalities in Food Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mikkel Schou

    In recent years, the interest for non-destructive imaging of the internal structures in food products has increased. First of all, the food industry shows an increased interest for automated quality inspection of food products. Secondly, food microstructure has become more important within food...... science for understanding and designing food products. In both of these aspects, X-ray imaging methods such as radiography and computed tomography provide a non-destructive solution. However, since the conventional attenuation-based modality suers from poor contrast in soft matter materials, modalities...... with improved contrast are needed. Two possible candidates in this regard are the novel X-ray phase-contrast and X-ray dark-eld imaging modalities. The contrast in phase-contrast imaging is based on dierences in electron density which is especially useful for soft matter materials whereas dark-eld imaging...

  12. Imaging Modalities Relevant to Intracranial Pressure Assessment in Astronauts: A Case-Based Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Kramer, Larry A.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Fogarty, Jennifer; Polk, J. D.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Intracranial pressure (ICP) elevation has been inferred or documented in a number of space crewmembers. Recent advances in noninvasive imaging technology offer new possibilities for ICP assessment. Most International Space Station (ISS) partner agencies have adopted a battery of occupational health monitoring tests including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pre- and postflight, and high-resolution sonography of the orbital structures in all mission phases including during flight. We hypothesize that joint consideration of data from the two techniques has the potential to improve quality and continuity of crewmember monitoring and care. Methods: Specially designed MRI and sonographic protocols were used to image eyes and optic nerves (ON) including the meningeal sheaths. Specific crewmembers multi-modality imaging data were analyzed to identify points of mutual validation as well as unique features of complementary nature. Results and Conclusion: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and high-resolution sonography are both tomographic methods, however images obtained by the two modalities are based on different physical phenomena and use different acquisition principles. Consideration of the images acquired by these two modalities allows cross-validating findings related to the volume and fluid content of the ON subarachnoid space, shape of the globe, and other anatomical features of the orbit. Each of the imaging modalities also has unique advantages, making them complementary techniques.

  13. Ultrasmall Biocompatible WO3- x Nanodots for Multi-Modality Imaging and Combined Therapy of Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ling; Chen, Ling; Zheng, Shimin; Zeng, Jianfeng; Duan, Guangxin; Wang, Yong; Wang, Guanglin; Chai, Zhifang; Li, Zhen; Gao, Mingyuan

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasmall biocompatible WO3 - x nanodots with an outstanding X-ray radiation sensitization effect are prepared, and demonstrated to be applicable for multi-modality tumor imaging through computed tomography and photoacoustic imaging (PAI), and effective cancer treatment combining both photothermal therapy and radiation therapy. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Current breast imaging modalities, advances, and impact on breast care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Evelyn M; Storm, Erik S; Atkinson, Lisa; Kenny, Eileen; Mitchell, Lisa S

    2013-09-01

    Mammography will continue as the breast cancer screening imaging study of choice for the foreseeable future. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are widely available adjunctive studies for women with suspicious mammographic or clinical findings, and MRI is a screening tool for women with specific increased risks for breast cancer. Options for diagnosis will continue to evolve and progress. This article discusses a wide variety of imaging options currently used and in development, their strengths, limitations, and potential future roles in the continuing pursuit of early breast cancer diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Imaging Modalities Relevant to Intracranial Pressure Assessment in Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Kramer, Larry A.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Fogarty, Jennifer; Polk, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Learning Objectives of this slide presentation are: 1: To review the morphological changes in orbit structures caused by elevated Intracranial Pressure (ICP), and their imaging representation. 2: To learn about the similarities and differences between MRI and sonographic imaging of the eye and orbit. 3: To learn about the role of MRI and sonography in the noninvasive assessment of intracranial pressure in aerospace medicine, and the added benefits from their combined interpretation.

  16. Thermal Effects on the Single-Mode Regime of Distributed Modal Filtering Rod Fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coscelli, Enrico; Poli, Federica; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard

    2012-01-01

    Power scaling of fiber laser systems requires the development of innovative active fibers, capable of providing high pump absorption, ultralarge effective area, high-order mode suppression, and resilience to thermal effects. Thermally induced refractive index change has been recently appointed...... rod-type photonic crystal fiber, which exploits resonant coupling with high-index elements to suppress high-order modes, are thoroughly investigated. A computationally efficient model has been developed to calculate the refractive index change due to the thermo-optical effect, and it has been...... integrated into a full-vector modal solver based on the finite-element method to obtain the guided modes, considering different heating conditions. Results have shown that the single-mode regime of the distributed modal filtering fiber is less sensitive to thermal effects with respect to index-guiding fibers...

  17. MO-B-BRC-00: Prostate HDR Treatment Planning - Considering Different Imaging Modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment option for prostate cancer. Initially, prostate brachytherapy was delivered through permanently implanted low dose rate (LDR) radioactive sources; however, high dose rate (HDR) temporary brachytherapy for prostate cancer is gaining popularity. Needle insertion during prostate brachytherapy is most commonly performed under ultrasound (U/S) guidance; however, treatment planning may be performed utilizing several imaging modalities either in an intra- or post-operative setting. During intra-operative prostate HDR, the needles are imaged during implantation, and planning may be performed in real time. At present, the most common imaging modality utilized for intra-operative prostate HDR is U/S. Alternatively, in the post-operative setting, following needle implantation, patients may be simulated with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each imaging modality and workflow provides its share of benefits and limitations. Prostate HDR has been adopted in a number of cancer centers across the nation. In this educational session, we will explore the role of U/S, CT, and MRI in HDR prostate brachytherapy. Example workflows and operational details will be shared, and we will discuss how to establish a prostate HDR program in a clinical setting. Learning Objectives: Review prostate HDR techniques based on the imaging modality Discuss the challenges and pitfalls introduced by the three imagebased options for prostate HDR brachytherapy Review the QA process and learn about the development of clinical workflows for these imaging options at different institutions.

  18. An international review of the frequency of single-bicycle crashes (SBCs) and their relation to bicycle modal share

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schepers, Paul; Agerholm, Niels; Amoros, Emmanuelle

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To study cyclists’ share of transport modes (modal share) and single-bicycle crashes (SBCs) in different countries in order to investigate if the proportion of cyclist injuries resulting from SBCs is affected by variation in modal share. Methods A literature search identified figures...

  19. Robotic 3D scanner as an alternative to standard modalities of medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromy, Adam; Zalud, Ludek

    2014-01-01

    There are special medical cases, where standard medical imaging modalities are able to offer sufficient results, but not in the optimal way. It means, that desired results are produced with unnecessarily high expenses, with redundant informations or with needless demands on patient. This paper deals with one special case, where information useful for examination is the body surface only, inner sight into the body is needless. New specialized medical imaging device is developed for this situation. In the Introduction section, analysis of presently used medical imaging modalities is presented, which declares, that no available imaging device is best fitting for mentioned purposes. In the next section, development of the new specialized medical imaging device is presented, and its principles and functions are described. Then, the parameters of new device are compared with present ones. It brings significant advantages comparing to present imaging systems.

  20. Development of in vivo imaging modalities for experimental oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesnel, S.

    2010-01-01

    Small animal imaging is more and more used in pharmacology to identify and to characterize the activities of new antitumor agents. The first part of my work consisted in the development of new tools to improve the quantitation in bioluminescence. A method, based on spectral characteristics of emitted photons, has been established to correct tissue absorption. The second, using methods of image restoration had for objective to correct tissue scattering to increase the resolution. In a second part, I developed in vivo models of bioluminescent tumors (intracranial glioblastoma, a large cell anaplastic lymphoma and a metastatic neuroblastoma) using the imaging methods described previously. These studies allowed the characterization of the activity of a new antitumor agent. The aim of the last part was to develop imaging probes. The first, a monoclonal antibody antiCD45 labeled with a fluoro chrome allowed the detection of human leukemic cells implanted in the mice using fluorescence imaging. The second was developed to predict the uptake of a antitumor agent, a spermine-podophyllotoxin conjugate, in tumor cells via the polyamine transport system. The synthesized probe is a spermine conjugated to a HYNIC group to bind a radioisotope: the Technetium-99m and to realize a scintigraphic examination. The results showed the feasibility of a preclinical use of this probe. So, at this end of this thesis, the developed methods of bioluminescent signal processing are available to improve the use of optical imaging in pharmacology. Of course, supplementary studies are necessary to define precisely in which context these corrections will be the most appropriate. (author)

  1. Accuracy and reproducibility of tumor positioning during prolonged and multi-modality animal imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mutian; Huang Minming; Le, Carl; Zanzonico, Pat B; Ling, C Clifton; Koutcher, Jason A; Humm, John L; Claus, Filip; Kolbert, Katherine S; Martin, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    Dedicated small-animal imaging devices, e.g. positron emission tomography (PET), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, are being increasingly used for translational molecular imaging studies. The objective of this work was to determine the positional accuracy and precision with which tumors in situ can be reliably and reproducibly imaged on dedicated small-animal imaging equipment. We designed, fabricated and tested a custom rodent cradle with a stereotactic template to facilitate registration among image sets. To quantify tumor motion during our small-animal imaging protocols, 'gold standard' multi-modality point markers were inserted into tumor masses on the hind limbs of rats. Three types of imaging examination were then performed with the animals continuously anesthetized and immobilized: (i) consecutive microPET and MR images of tumor xenografts in which the animals remained in the same scanner for 2 h duration, (ii) multi-modality imaging studies in which the animals were transported between distant imaging devices and (iii) serial microPET scans in which the animals were repositioned in the same scanner for subsequent images. Our results showed that the animal tumor moved by less than 0.2-0.3 mm over a continuous 2 h microPET or MR imaging session. The process of transporting the animal between instruments introduced additional errors of ∼0.2 mm. In serial animal imaging studies, the positioning reproducibility within ∼0.8 mm could be obtained.

  2. High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of single cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M. Strohm

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic images of stained neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes from a blood smear were acquired using a combined acoustic/photoacoustic microscope. Photoacoustic images were created using a pulsed 532 nm laser that was coupled to a single mode fiber to produce output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm via stimulated Raman scattering. The excitation wavelength was selected using optical filters and focused onto the sample using a 20× objective. A 1000 MHz transducer was co-aligned with the laser spot and used for ultrasound and photoacoustic images, enabling micrometer resolution with both modalities. The different cell types could be easily identified due to variations in contrast within the acoustic and photoacoustic images. This technique provides a new way of probing leukocyte structure with potential applications towards detecting cellular abnormalities and diseased cells at the single cell level.

  3. Modal analysis based equivalent circuit model and its verification for a single cMUT cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, S P; Rottenberg, X; Rochus, V; Czarnecki, P; Helin, P; Severi, S; Tilmans, H A C; Nauwelaers, B

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the lumped equivalent circuit model and its verification of both transmission and reception properties of a single cell capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (cMUT), which is operating in a non-collapse small signal region. The derivation of this equivalent circuit model is based on the modal analysis techniques, harmonic modes are included by using the mode superposition method; and thus a wide frequency range response of the cMUT cell can be simulated by our equivalent circuit model. The importance of the cross modal coupling between different eigenmodes of a cMUT cell is discussed by us for the first time. In this paper the development of this model is only illustrated by a single circular cMUT cell under a uniform excitation. Extension of this model and corresponding results under a more generalized excitation will be presented in our upcoming publication (Mao et al 2016 Proc. IEEE Int. Ultrasonics Symp .). This model is verified by both finite element method (FEM) simulation and experimental characterizations. Results predicted by our model are in a good agreement with the FEM simulation results, and this works for a single cMUT cell operated in either transmission or reception. Results obtained from the model also rather match the experimental results of the cMUT cell. This equivalent circuit model provides an easy and precise way to rapidly predict the behaviors of cMUT cells. (paper)

  4. Modal analysis based equivalent circuit model and its verification for a single cMUT cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, S. P.; Rottenberg, X.; Rochus, V.; Czarnecki, P.; Helin, P.; Severi, S.; Nauwelaers, B.; Tilmans, H. A. C.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the lumped equivalent circuit model and its verification of both transmission and reception properties of a single cell capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (cMUT), which is operating in a non-collapse small signal region. The derivation of this equivalent circuit model is based on the modal analysis techniques, harmonic modes are included by using the mode superposition method; and thus a wide frequency range response of the cMUT cell can be simulated by our equivalent circuit model. The importance of the cross modal coupling between different eigenmodes of a cMUT cell is discussed by us for the first time. In this paper the development of this model is only illustrated by a single circular cMUT cell under a uniform excitation. Extension of this model and corresponding results under a more generalized excitation will be presented in our upcoming publication (Mao et al 2016 Proc. IEEE Int. Ultrasonics Symp.). This model is verified by both finite element method (FEM) simulation and experimental characterizations. Results predicted by our model are in a good agreement with the FEM simulation results, and this works for a single cMUT cell operated in either transmission or reception. Results obtained from the model also rather match the experimental results of the cMUT cell. This equivalent circuit model provides an easy and precise way to rapidly predict the behaviors of cMUT cells.

  5. Single-Trial Linear Correlation Analysis: Application to characterization of stimulus modality effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoforos eChristoforou

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A key objective in systems and cognitive neuroscience is to establish associations between behavioral measures and concurrent neuronal activity. Single-trial analysis has been proposed as a novel method for characterizing such correlates by first extracting neural components that maximally discriminate trials on a categorical variable, (e.g., hard vs. easy, correct vs. incorrect etc., and then correlate those components to a continues dependent variable of interest , e.g. reaction time, difficulty Index, etc. However, often times in experiment design it is difficult to either define meaningful categorical variables, or to record enough trials for the method to extract the discriminant components. Experiments designed for the study of the effects of stimulus presentation modality in working memory provide such a scenario, as will be exemplified. In this paper, we proposed a new approach to single-trial analysis in which we directly extract neural activity that maximally correlates to single-trial manual response times; eliminating the need to define an arbitrary categorical variable. We demonstrate our method on real EEG data recordings from the study of stimulus presentation modality effect.

  6. Visual servoing in medical robotics: a survey. Part II: tomographic imaging modalities--techniques and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizian, Mahdi; Najmaei, Nima; Khoshnam, Mahta; Patel, Rajni

    2015-03-01

    Intraoperative application of tomographic imaging techniques provides a means of visual servoing for objects beneath the surface of organs. The focus of this survey is on therapeutic and diagnostic medical applications where tomographic imaging is used in visual servoing. To this end, a comprehensive search of the electronic databases was completed for the period 2000-2013. Existing techniques and products are categorized and studied, based on the imaging modality and their medical applications. This part complements Part I of the survey, which covers visual servoing techniques using endoscopic imaging and direct vision. The main challenges in using visual servoing based on tomographic images have been identified. 'Supervised automation of medical robotics' is found to be a major trend in this field and ultrasound is the most commonly used tomographic modality for visual servoing. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Integration of vibro-acoustography imaging modality with the traditional mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, H Gholam; Alizad, A; Fatemi, M

    2007-01-01

    Vibro-acoustography (VA) is a new imaging modality that has been applied to both medical and industrial imaging. Integrating unique diagnostic information of VA with other medical imaging is one of our research interests. In this work, we establish correspondence between the VA images and traditional X-ray mammogram by adopting a flexible control-point selection technique for image registration. A modified second-order polynomial, which simply leads to a scale/rotation/translation invariant registration, was used. The results of registration were used to spatially transform the breast VA images to map with the X-ray mammography with a registration error of less than 1.65 mm. The fused image is defined as a linear integration of the VA and X-ray images. Moreover, a color-based fusion technique was employed to integrate the images for better visualization of structural information.

  8. A highly sensitive x-ray imaging modality for hepatocellular carcinoma detection in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Danielle; Walsh, Edward G; Derdak, Zoltan; Wands, Jack R; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2015-01-21

    Innovations that improve sensitivity and reduce cost are of paramount importance in diagnostic imaging. The novel x-ray imaging modality called spatial frequency heterodyne imaging (SFHI) is based on a linear arrangement of x-ray source, tissue, and x-ray detector, much like that of a conventional x-ray imaging apparatus. However, SFHI rests on a complete paradigm reversal compared to conventional x-ray absorption-based radiology: while scattered x-rays are carefully rejected in absorption-based x-ray radiology to enhance the image contrast, SFHI forms images exclusively from x-rays scattered by the tissue. In this study we use numerical processing to produce x-ray scatter images of hepatocellular carcinoma labeled with a nanoparticle contrast agent. We subsequently compare the sensitivity of SFHI in this application to that of both conventional x-ray imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although SFHI is still in the early stages of its development, our results show that the sensitivity of SFHI is an order of magnitude greater than that of absorption-based x-ray imaging and approximately equal to that of MRI. As x-ray imaging modalities typically have lower installation and service costs compared to MRI, SFHI could become a cost effective alternative to MRI, particularly in areas of the world with inadequate availability of MRI facilities.

  9. Structured-illumination reflectance imaging as a new modality for food quality detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uniform or diffuse illumination is the standard in implementing many different imaging modalities. This form of illumination, however, has some major limitations in acquisition of useful information from food products because reflectance from the food products is non-uniform due to irregular, curved...

  10. A self-assessed photosensitizer: inducing and dual-modal phosphorescence imaging of mitochondria oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yang; Cao, Qian; Hao, Liang; Yang, Gang-Gang; Hu, Wei-Liang; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2018-01-02

    Two novel Ir(iii)-nitroxide conjugates have been synthesized as mitochondria-targeted multi-functional theranostic photosensitizers, capable of simultaneously inducing and dual-modal phosphorescence imaging of mitochondrial oxidative stress under two-photon excitation, thus realizing the photodynamic therapy of cancer and self-assessment of their PDT efficacies.

  11. Eigenanatomy: sparse dimensionality reduction for multi-modal medical image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Benjamin M; Wang, Danny J J; Gee, James C; Avants, Brian B

    2015-02-01

    Rigorous statistical analysis of multimodal imaging datasets is challenging. Mass-univariate methods for extracting correlations between image voxels and outcome measurements are not ideal for multimodal datasets, as they do not account for interactions between the different modalities. The extremely high dimensionality of medical images necessitates dimensionality reduction, such as principal component analysis (PCA) or independent component analysis (ICA). These dimensionality reduction techniques, however, consist of contributions from every region in the brain and are therefore difficult to interpret. Recent advances in sparse dimensionality reduction have enabled construction of a set of image regions that explain the variance of the images while still maintaining anatomical interpretability. The projections of the original data on the sparse eigenvectors, however, are highly collinear and therefore difficult to incorporate into multi-modal image analysis pipelines. We propose here a method for clustering sparse eigenvectors and selecting a subset of the eigenvectors to make interpretable predictions from a multi-modal dataset. Evaluation on a publicly available dataset shows that the proposed method outperforms PCA and ICA-based regressions while still maintaining anatomical meaning. To facilitate reproducibility, the complete dataset used and all source code is publicly available. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Eigenanatomy: Sparse Dimensionality Reduction for Multi-Modal Medical Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Benjamin M.; Wang, Danny JJ; Gee, James C.; Avants, Brian B.

    2014-01-01

    Rigorous statistical analysis of multimodal imaging datasets is challenging. Mass-univariate methods for extracting correlations between image voxels and outcome measurements are not ideal for multimodal datasets, as they do not account for interactions between the different modalities. The extremely high dimensionality of medical images necessitates dimensionality reduction, such as principal component analysis (PCA) or independent component analysis (ICA). These dimensionality reduction techniques, however, consist of contributions from every region in the brain and are therefore difficult to interpret. Recent advances in sparse dimensionality reduction have enabled construction of a set of image regions that explain the variance of the images while still maintaining anatomical interpretability. The projections of the original data on the sparse eigenvectors, however, are highly collinear and therefore difficult to incorporate into mult-modal image analysis pipelines. We propose here a method for clustering sparse eigenvectors and selecting a subset of the eigenvectors to make interpretable predictions from a multi-modal dataset. Evaluation on a publicly available dataset shows that the proposed method outperforms PCA and ICA-based regressions while still maintaining anatomical meaning. To facilitate reproducibility, the complete dataset used and all source code is publicly available. PMID:25448483

  13. Feature-Fusion Guidelines for Image-Based Multi-Modal Biometric Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dane Brown

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The feature level, unlike the match score level, lacks multi-modal fusion guidelines. This work demonstrates a new approach for improved image-based biometric feature-fusion. The approach extracts and combines the face, fingerprint and palmprint at the feature level for improved human identification accuracy. Feature-fusion guidelines, proposed in our recent work, are extended by adding a new face segmentation method and the support vector machine classifier. The new face segmentation method improves the face identification equal error rate (EER by 10%. The support vector machine classifier combined with the new feature selection approach, proposed in our recent work, outperforms other classifiers when using a single training sample. Feature-fusion guidelines take the form of strengths and weaknesses as observed in the applied feature processing modules during preliminary experiments. The guidelines are used to implement an effective biometric fusion system at the feature level, using a novel feature-fusion methodology, reducing the EER of two groups of three datasets namely: SDUMLA face, SDUMLA fingerprint and IITD palmprint; MUCT Face, MCYT Fingerprint and CASIA Palmprint.

  14. Role of Artificial Intelligence Techniques (Automatic Classifiers) in Molecular Imaging Modalities in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascianelli, Silvia; Scialpi, Michele; Amici, Serena; Forini, Nevio; Minestrini, Matteo; Fravolini, Mario Luca; Sinzinger, Helmut; Schillaci, Orazio; Palumbo, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a very active Computer Science research field aiming to develop systems that mimic human intelligence and is helpful in many human activities, including Medicine. In this review we presented some examples of the exploiting of AI techniques, in particular automatic classifiers such as Artificial Neural Network (ANN), Support Vector Machine (SVM), Classification Tree (ClT) and ensemble methods like Random Forest (RF), able to analyze findings obtained by positron emission tomography (PET) or single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) scans of patients with Neurodegenerative Diseases, in particular Alzheimer's Disease. We also focused our attention on techniques applied in order to preprocess data and reduce their dimensionality via feature selection or projection in a more representative domain (Principal Component Analysis - PCA - or Partial Least Squares - PLS - are examples of such methods); this is a crucial step while dealing with medical data, since it is necessary to compress patient information and retain only the most useful in order to discriminate subjects into normal and pathological classes. Main literature papers on the application of these techniques to classify patients with neurodegenerative disease extracting data from molecular imaging modalities are reported, showing that the increasing development of computer aided diagnosis systems is very promising to contribute to the diagnostic process.

  15. Sustainable Multi-Modal Sensing by a Single Sensor Utilizing the Passivity of an Elastic Actuator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Takuma

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When a robot equipped with compliant joints driven by elastic actuators contacts an object and its joints are deformed, multi-modal information, including the magnitude and direction of the applied force and the deformation of the joint, is used to enhance the performance of the robot such as dexterous manipulation. In conventional approaches, some types of sensors used to obtain the multi-modal information are attached to the point of contact where the force is applied and at the joint. However, this approach is not sustainable for daily use in robots, i.e., not durable or robust, because the sensors can undergo damage due to the application of excessive force and wear due to repeated contacts. Further, multiple types of sensors are required to measure such physical values, which add to the complexity of the device system of the robot. In our approach, a single type of sensor is used and it is located at a point distant from the contact point and the joint, and the information is obtained indirectly by the measurement of certain physical parameters that are influenced by the applied force and the joint deformation. In this study, we employ the McKibben pneumatic actuator whose inner pressure changes passively when a force is applied to the actuator. We derive the relationships between information and the pressures of a two-degrees-of-freedom (2-DoF joint mechanism driven by four pneumatic actuators. Experimental results show that the multi-modal information can be obtained by using the set of pressures measured before and after the force is applied. Further, we apply our principle to obtain the stiffness values of certain contacting objects that can subsequently be categorized by using the aforementioned relationships.

  16. Visual tracking for multi-modality computer-assisted image guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basafa, Ehsan; Foroughi, Pezhman; Hossbach, Martin; Bhanushali, Jasmine; Stolka, Philipp

    2017-03-01

    With optical cameras, many interventional navigation tasks previously relying on EM, optical, or mechanical guidance can be performed robustly, quickly, and conveniently. We developed a family of novel guidance systems based on wide-spectrum cameras and vision algorithms for real-time tracking of interventional instruments and multi-modality markers. These navigation systems support the localization of anatomical targets, support placement of imaging probe and instruments, and provide fusion imaging. The unique architecture - low-cost, miniature, in-hand stereo vision cameras fitted directly to imaging probes - allows for an intuitive workflow that fits a wide variety of specialties such as anesthesiology, interventional radiology, interventional oncology, emergency medicine, urology, and others, many of which see increasing pressure to utilize medical imaging and especially ultrasound, but have yet to develop the requisite skills for reliable success. We developed a modular system, consisting of hardware (the Optical Head containing the mini cameras) and software (components for visual instrument tracking with or without specialized visual features, fully automated marker segmentation from a variety of 3D imaging modalities, visual observation of meshes of widely separated markers, instant automatic registration, and target tracking and guidance on real-time multi-modality fusion views). From these components, we implemented a family of distinct clinical and pre-clinical systems (for combinations of ultrasound, CT, CBCT, and MRI), most of which have international regulatory clearance for clinical use. We present technical and clinical results on phantoms, ex- and in-vivo animals, and patients.

  17. Pixel based focusing for photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Changhan; Yoo, Yangmo; Song, Tai-Kyong; Chang, Jin Ho

    2014-12-01

    It is desired that the same imaging functional modules such as beamformation, envelope detection, and digital scan conversion (DSC) are employed for the efficient development of a cross-sectional photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound (US) dual-modality imaging system. The beamformation can be implemented using either delay-and-sum beamforming (DAS-BF) or adaptive beamforming methods, each with their own advantages and disadvantages for the dual-modality imaging. However, the DSC is always problematic because it causes blurring the fine details of an image, e.g., edges. This paper demonstrates that the pixel based focusing method is suitable for the dual-modality imaging; beamformation is directly conducted on each display pixel and thus DSC is not necessary. As a result, the artifacts by DSC are no longer a problem, so that the proposed method is capable of providing the maximum spatial resolution achievable by DAS-BF. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated through simulation and ex vivo experiments with a microcalcification-contained breast specimen, and the results were compared with those from DAS-BF and adaptive beamforming methods with DSC. The comparison demonstrated that the proposed method effectively overcomes the disadvantages of each beamforming method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Current and future imaging modalities for multiple myeloma and its precursor states

    Science.gov (United States)

    TAN, ESTHER; WEISS, BRENDAN M.; MENA, ESTHER; KORDE, NEHA; CHOYKE, PETER L.; LANDGREN, OLA

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, the skeletal survey has been the standard modality for the detection of osteolytic bone disease in multiple myeloma. In addition to its poor sensitivity for the detection of osteolytic lesions, this modality is not able to identify extramedullary lesions and focal bone marrow involvement, nor measure response to therapy. The application of novel imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and molecular imaging such as fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography CT (18F-FDG PET/CT) and fluorine-18 sodium fluoride positron emission tomography CT (18F-NaF PET/CT) has the potential to overcome these limitations as well as provide prognostic information in precursor states and multiple myeloma. Also promising is the use of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) to measure vascular permeability, an important feature of myelomagenesis. This review summarizes the current status and possible future role of novel imaging modalities in multiple myeloma and its precursor states. PMID:21649546

  19. Image quality and dose distributions of three linac-based imaging modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzierma, Yvonne; Ames, Evemarie; Nuesken, Frank; Palm, Jan; Licht, Norbert; Ruebe, Christian [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    Linac-based patient imaging is possible with a variety of techniques using different photon energies. The purpose of this work is to compare three imaging systems operating at 6 MV, flattening free filter (FFF) 1 MV, and 121 kV. The dose distributions of all pretreatment set-up images (over 1,000) were retrospectively calculated on the planning computed tomography (CT) images for all patients with prostate and head-and-neck cancer treated at our institution in 2013. We analyzed the dose distribution and the dose to organs at risk. For head-and-neck cancer patients, the imaging dose from 6-MV cone beam CT (CBCT) reached maximum values at around 8 cGy. The 1-MV CBCT dose was about 63-79 % of the 6-MV CBCT dose for all organs at risk. Planar imaging reduced the imaging dose from CBCT to 30-40 % for both megavoltage modalities. The dose from the kilovoltage CBCT was 4-10 % of the 6-MV CBCT dose. For prostate cancer patients, the maximum dose from 6-MV CBCT reached 13-15 cGy, and was reduced to 66-73 % for 1 MV. Planar imaging reduces the MV CBCT dose to 10-20 %. The kV CBCT dose is 15-20 % of the 6-MV CBCT dose, slightly higher than the dose from MV axes. The dose distributions differ markedly in response to the different beam profiles and dose-depth characteristics. (orig.) [German] Linac-basierte Bildgebung zur Patientenlagerung ist mit einer Vielzahl von Techniken unterschiedlicher Photonenenergien moeglich. Ziel dieser Arbeit ist der Vergleich dreier Bildgebungssysteme mit 6 MV (Megavolt), FFF 1 MV, und 121 kV (Kilovolt). Fuer alle im Jahr 2013 an unserer Klinik behandelten Prostata- und HNO-Patienten wurden retrospektiv die Dosisverteilungen aller Verifikationsaufnahmen (ueber 1000 insgesamt) auf der Planungs-Computertomographie (CT) berechnet. Wir analysierten die Dosisverteilung und die Dosis an den Risikoorganen. Bei HNO-Patienten erreichte die Dosis von 6 MV ''Cone-beam''-CT (CBCT)Maximalwerte um 8 cGy. Mit 1 MV wird die Dosis auf 63

  20. Multifunctional upconversion nanoparticles for targeted dual-modal imaging in rat glioma xenograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin; Shao, Bin; Zhang, Xiangtong; Cheng, Qian; Lin, Tie; Liu, Enzhong

    2016-09-01

    Achieving a radiographic gross total resection in high-grade gliomas improves overall survival. Many technologies such as intraoperative microscope, intraoperative ultrasound, fluorescence imaging, and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging have been applied to improve tumor resection. However, most commercial available magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents have limited permeability across the blood-brain barrier and are cleared rapidly from circulation. Fluorescence imaging discriminates tumor from normal tissue and provides a promising new strategy to maximize sage surgical resection of tumor. However, the penetration depth of fluorescence imaging is generally low. In this study, a new type of magnetite NaGdF4:Yb(3+),Er(3+),Li(+)@NaGdF4 (UCNPs) core-shell nanoparticles, coated with SiO2 and further functionalized with glioma and blood-brain barrier targeting motifs, was prepared for dual-modal in vivo upconversion imaging and magnetic resonance imaging. The as-prepared multifunctional upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs@SiO2-CX-Lf) were biocompatible, showed strong upconversion luminescence under excitation of 980 nm, and provided high signal-to-noise ratio in vivo. Moreover, UCNPs@SiO2-CX-Lf nanoparticles showed a high relaxivity of 1.25 S(-1 )mM(-1) and were successfully applied as contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging in tumor xenograft rat model with prolonged tumor signal enhancement. In vivo and magnetic resonance imaging Upconversion Luminescence (UCL) imaging results indicated that these particles can across the blood-brain barrier, bind to glioma, gave bright UCL signal and T1 magnetic resonance imaging contrast. Targeted UCL and magnetic resonance imaging dual-modal in vivo imaging using Yb(3+)/Er(3+)/Li(+) codoped NaGdF4 core-shell nanostructure can serve as a platform technology for the next generation of intraoperative probes for image-guided tumor resection. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Optimizing single mode robustness of the distributed modal filtering rod fiber amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mette Marie; Petersen, Sidsel Rübner; Laurila, Marko

    2012-01-01

    High-power fiber amplifiers for pulsed applications require large mode area (LMA) fibers having high pump absorption and near diffraction limited output. Photonic crystal fibers allow realization of short LMA fiber amplifiers having high pump absorption through a pump cladding that is decoupled...... from the outer fiber diameter. However, achieving ultra low NA for single mode (SM) guidance is challenging, thus different design strategies must be applied. The distributed modal filtering (DMF) design enables SM guidance in ultra low NA fibers with very large cores, where large preform tolerances...... can be compensated during the fiber draw. Design optimization of the SM bandwidth of the DMF rod fiber is presented. Analysis of band gap properties results in a fourfold increase of the SM bandwidth compared to previous results, achieved by utilizing the first band of cladding modes, which can cover...

  2. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Rajian, Justin R.; Girish, Gandikota; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul L.; Wang, Xueding

    2013-01-01

    A photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound (US) dual modality system, for imaging human peripheral joints, is introduced. The system utilizes a commercial US unit for both US control imaging and PA signal acquisition. Preliminary in vivo evaluation of the system, on normal volunteers, revealed that this system can recover both the structural and functional information of intra- and extra-articular tissues. Confirmed by the control US images, the system, on the PA mode, can differentiate tendon from surrounding soft tissue based on the endogenous optical contrast. Presenting both morphological and pathological information in joint, this system holds promise for diagnosis and characterization of inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Single Image Super-Resolution via L0 Image Smoothing

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhang; Huang, Qi; Li, Jian; Wang, Qi

    2014-01-01

    We propose a single image super-resolution method based on a L0 smoothing approach. We consider a low-resolution image as two parts: one is the smooth image generated by the L0 smoothing method and the other is the error image between the low-resolution image and the smoothing image. We get an intermediate high-resolution image via a classical interpolation and then generate a high-resolution smoothing image with sharp edges by the L0 smoothing method. For the error image, a...

  4. Empirical gradient threshold technique for automated segmentation across image modalities and cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalfoun, J; Majurski, M; Peskin, A; Breen, C; Bajcsy, P; Brady, M

    2015-10-01

    New microscopy technologies are enabling image acquisition of terabyte-sized data sets consisting of hundreds of thousands of images. In order to retrieve and analyze the biological information in these large data sets, segmentation is needed to detect the regions containing cells or cell colonies. Our work with hundreds of large images (each 21,000×21,000 pixels) requires a segmentation method that: (1) yields high segmentation accuracy, (2) is applicable to multiple cell lines with various densities of cells and cell colonies, and several imaging modalities, (3) can process large data sets in a timely manner, (4) has a low memory footprint and (5) has a small number of user-set parameters that do not require adjustment during the segmentation of large image sets. None of the currently available segmentation methods meet all these requirements. Segmentation based on image gradient thresholding is fast and has a low memory footprint. However, existing techniques that automate the selection of the gradient image threshold do not work across image modalities, multiple cell lines, and a wide range of foreground/background densities (requirement 2) and all failed the requirement for robust parameters that do not require re-adjustment with time (requirement 5). We present a novel and empirically derived image gradient threshold selection method for separating foreground and background pixels in an image that meets all the requirements listed above. We quantify the difference between our approach and existing ones in terms of accuracy, execution speed, memory usage and number of adjustable parameters on a reference data set. This reference data set consists of 501 validation images with manually determined segmentations and image sizes ranging from 0.36 Megapixels to 850 Megapixels. It includes four different cell lines and two image modalities: phase contrast and fluorescent. Our new technique, called Empirical Gradient Threshold (EGT), is derived from this reference

  5. Improved medical image modality classification using a combination of visual and textual features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrovski, Ivica; Kocev, Dragi; Kitanovski, Ivan; Loskovska, Suzana; Džeroski, Sašo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present the approach that we applied to the medical modality classification tasks at the ImageCLEF evaluation forum. More specifically, we used the modality classification databases from the ImageCLEF competitions in 2011, 2012 and 2013, described by four visual and one textual types of features, and combinations thereof. We used local binary patterns, color and edge directivity descriptors, fuzzy color and texture histogram and scale-invariant feature transform (and its variant opponentSIFT) as visual features and the standard bag-of-words textual representation coupled with TF-IDF weighting. The results from the extensive experimental evaluation identify the SIFT and opponentSIFT features as the best performing features for modality classification. Next, the low-level fusion of the visual features improves the predictive performance of the classifiers. This is because the different features are able to capture different aspects of an image, their combination offering a more complete representation of the visual content in an image. Moreover, adding textual features further increases the predictive performance. Finally, the results obtained with our approach are the best results reported on these databases so far. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Management of Suspected Choledocholithiasis: A Decision Analysis for Choosing the Optimal Imaging Modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenberg, Amnon; Enestvedt, Brintha K; Bakis, Gennadiy

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), and endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) all represent viable options to establish the diagnosis of choledocholithiasis. The aim of the study was to assess how the three imaging modalities perform in head-to-head comparisons and in what order to apply them when using these procedures sequentially. A threshold analysis using a decision tree was modeled to compare the costs associated with different imaging techniques of the biliary system in a patient with suspected cholestasis secondary to choledocholithiasis. The main outcome parameter was the pre-test probability of common bile duct (CBD) stones that would guide the physician towards starting the work-up with MRC or EUS versus going straight to ERCP as the primary procedure. For low pre-test probabilities of CBD stones in the common bile duct, MRC represents the procedure of choice. For pre-test probabilities ranging between 40 and 91 %, EUS should be the preferred imaging modality. If CBD stones are suspected with an even higher pre-test probability, patients could go straight to ERCP as their first procedure. Low costs associated with any of the three procedures increase its range of applicability at the expense of the other competing imaging modalities. MRC, EUS, and ERCP should be used in sequence and dependent on the pre-test probability of choledocholithiasis.

  7. Novelty detection of foreign objects in food using multi-modal X-ray imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einarsdottir, Hildur; Emerson, Monica Jane; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a method for novelty detection of foreign objects in food products using grating-based multimodal X-ray imaging. With this imaging technique three modalities are available with pixel correspondence, enhancing organic materials such as wood chips, insects and soft...... plastics not detectable by conventional X-ray absorption radiography. We conduct experiments, where several food products are imaged with common foreign objects typically found in the food processing industry. To evaluate the benefit from using this multi-contrast X-ray technique over conventional X......-ray absorption imaging, a novelty detection scheme based on well known image- and statistical analysis techniques is proposed. The results show that the presented method gives superior recognition results and highlights the advantage of grating-based imaging....

  8. MO-AB-BRA-02: A Novel Scatter Imaging Modality for Real-Time Image Guidance During Lung SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redler, G; Bernard, D; Templeton, A; Chu, J [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Nair, C Kumaran [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Turian, J [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Rush Radiosurgery LLC, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A novel scatter imaging modality is developed and its feasibility for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer patients is assessed using analytic and Monte Carlo models as well as experimental testing. Methods: During treatment, incident radiation interacts and scatters from within the patient. The presented methodology forms an image of patient anatomy from the scattered radiation for real-time localization of the treatment target. A radiographic flat panel-based pinhole camera provides spatial information regarding the origin of detected scattered radiation. An analytical model is developed, which provides a mathematical formalism for describing the scatter imaging system. Experimental scatter images are acquired by irradiating an object using a Varian TrueBeam accelerator. The differentiation between tissue types is investigated by imaging simple objects of known compositions (water, lung, and cortical bone equivalent). A lung tumor phantom, simulating materials and geometry encountered during lung SBRT treatments, is fabricated and imaged to investigate image quality for various quantities of delivered radiation. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code is used for validation and testing by simulating scatter image formation using the experimental pinhole camera setup. Results: Analytical calculations, MCNP simulations, and experimental results when imaging the water, lung, and cortical bone equivalent objects show close agreement, thus validating the proposed models and demonstrating that scatter imaging differentiates these materials well. Lung tumor phantom images have sufficient contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) to clearly distinguish tumor from surrounding lung tissue. CNR=4.1 and CNR=29.1 for 10MU and 5000MU images (equivalent to 0.5 and 250 second images), respectively. Conclusion: Lung SBRT provides favorable treatment outcomes, but depends on accurate target localization. A comprehensive

  9. Image reconstruction of dynamic infrared single-pixel imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Qi; Jiang, Yilin; Wang, Haiyan; Guo, Limin

    2018-03-01

    Single-pixel imaging technique has recently received much attention. Most of the current single-pixel imaging is aimed at relatively static targets or the imaging system is fixed, which is limited by the number of measurements received through the single detector. In this paper, we proposed a novel dynamic compressive imaging method to solve the imaging problem, where exists imaging system motion behavior, for the infrared (IR) rosette scanning system. The relationship between adjacent target images and scene is analyzed under different system movement scenarios. These relationships are used to build dynamic compressive imaging models. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method can improve the reconstruction quality of IR image and enhance the contrast between the target and the background in the presence of system movement.

  10. Simultaneous quadruple modal nonlinear optical imaging for gastric diseases diagnosis and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Jian; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-03-01

    We report the development of a unique simultaneous quadruple-modal nonlinear optical microscopy (i.e., stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), second-harmonic generation (SHG), two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF), and third-harmonic generation (THG)) platform for characterization of the gastric diseases (i.e., gastritis, intestinal metaplasia (IM), intestinal type adenocarcinoma). SRS highlights the goblet cells found in IM. SHG images the distribution of collagen in lamina propria. Collagen is found to aggregate for intestinal type adenocarcinoma. TPEF reveals the cell morphology and can reflect the damage inside glands caused by the diseases. THG visualizes the nuclei with high spatial resolution, which facilitates the identification of neutrophils that are usually used as a feature of inflammation. This work shows that the co-registration of quadruple-modal images can be an effective means for diagnosis and characterization of gastric diseases at the cellular and molecular levels.

  11. Extended feature-fusion guidelines to improve image-based multi-modal biometrics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Brown, Dane

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available be used to help align the global features. These features can also be extracted from palmprints as they share many characteristics of the fingerprint. Facial texture patterns consist of global contour and pore features. Local features, known as facial... to classify different biometric modalities. Global and local features often require algorithms to im- prove their clarity and consistency over multiple samples. This is particularly the case with contours and pores in face images, principal lines in palmprint...

  12. Use of a Simple, Inexpensive Dual-Modality Phantom as a Learning Tool for Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Ultrasound Fusion Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, William R; Burke, Christopher J; Diallo, Mamadou; Adler, Ronald S

    2018-02-15

    We describe an easily constructed, customizable phantom for magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion imaging and demonstrate its role as a learning tool to initiate clinical use of this emerging modality. Magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion can prove unwieldy to integrate into routine practice. We demonstrate real-time fusion with single-sequence magnetic resonance imaging uploaded to the ultrasound console. Phantom training sessions allow radiologists and sonographers to practice fiducial marker selection and improve efficiency with the fusion hardware and software interfaces. Such a tool is useful when the modality is first introduced to a practice and in settings of sporadic use, in which intermittent training may be useful. © 2018 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  13. Quick Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Diffusion-Weighted Imaging as a First Imaging Modality in Pediatric Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, Alison; Murchison, Charles; Wilson, Jenny L

    2018-01-01

    Diagnostic delay hinders management of pediatric arterial ischemic stroke. Quick brain MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging sequences may provide a rapid diagnosis without the ionizing radiation of a computed tomography (CT) scan. This was a single center retrospective chart review of children one month to 18 years old with acute arterial ischemic stroke hospitalized between January 2010 and January 2017. We evaluated sensitivity and the time to diagnostic study based on the first imaging study (CT or quick brain MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging). Twenty-five patients were included. Eleven patients (44%) were initially assessed with CT, 10 (40%) with quick brain MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging, and four (16%) with a full MRI. Compared with children undergoing CT, children with quick brain MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging as first study were younger (5.8 versus 14.1 years, P hospitalized at stroke onset (70% versus 18.2%, P = 0.03). Quick brain MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging was more sensitive for ischemia than CT (100% versus 27.3%). The median time from presentation to diagnostic imaging was 4.3 hours, with no differences between CT and quick brain MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging groups, although the quick brain MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging group had a shorter median time from first imaging to diagnostic imaging (P = 0.002). There were no significant missed findings on quick brain MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging. Quick brain MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging was more sensitive than CT for detecting ischemia and may be considered as the first study for some children presenting with suspected arterial ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Multiflash X ray with Image Detanglement for Single Image Isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-31

    conceived and developed to capture multiple flash X-rays on a single film or phosphor screen and digitally detangle the resulting image into separate images...capability was conceived and developed to capture multiple flash X-rays on a single film or phosphor screen and digitally detangle the resulting image...digital radiograph (ORAD); and 2) an appropriate averaging of the value of the pixels within the exposed region-of-interest on the ORAD needs to be

  15. Interactive, multi-modality image registrations for combined MRI/MRSI-planned HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galen Reed

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study presents the steps and criteria involved in the series of image registrations used clinically during the planning and dose delivery of focal high dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy of the prostate. Material and methods: Three imaging modalities – Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI, and Computed Tomography (CT – were used at different steps during the process. MRSI is used for identification of dominant intraprosatic lesions (DIL. A series of rigid and nonrigid transformations were applied to the data to correct for endorectal-coil-induced deformations and for alignment with the planning CT. Mutual information was calculated as a morphing metric. An inverse planning optimization algorithm was applied to boost dose to the DIL while providing protection to the urethra, penile bulb, rectum, and bladder. Six prostate cancer patients were treated using this protocol. Results: The morphing algorithm successfully modeled the probe-induced prostatic distortion. Mutual information calculated between the morphed images and images acquired without the endorectal probe showed a significant (p = 0.0071 increase to that calculated between the unmorphed images and images acquired without the endorectal probe. Both mutual information and visual inspection serve as effective diagnostics of image morphing. The entire procedure adds less than thirty minutes to the treatment planning. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the utility of image transformations and registrations to HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer.

  16. Role of the multi-modality image archival and communication system in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bela Kari; Adam Mester; Erno Mako; Zoltan Gyorfi; Bela Mihalik; Zsolt; Hegyi

    2004-01-01

    Various non-invasive imaging systems produce increasing amount of diagnostic images day by day in digital format. The direct consequence of this tendency places electronic archives and image transfers in spotlight. Moreover, the digital image archives may support any other activities like simultaneous displaying of multi-modality images, telediagnostics, on-line consultation, construction of standard databases for dedicated organs by regional and/or country wide (e.g. myocardial scintigraphy, mammography, etc....) in order to obtain much more exact diagnosis as well as to support education and training. Our institute started similar research and developing activities few years ago, resulting the construction of our PACS systems -MEDISA LINUX Debian and eRAD ImageMedical TM LINUX Red Hat- together with the telecommunication part. Mass storage unit of PACS is based on hard drives connecting in RAID with l.2Tbyte capacity. The on-line telecommunication system consists of an ISDN Multi-Media System (MMS) and Internet based independent units. MMS was dedicated mainly for on-line teleconferencing and consultation by the simultaneously transferred morphological and functional images obtaining from the central archives by DICOM or any other allowable image formats. MMS has been created as a part and requirements of an EU research project - RETRANSPLANT -. The central archives -PACS- can be accessed by DICOM 3.0 protocol on Internet surface through well maintained and secure access rights. Displaying and post-processing of any retrieved images on individual workstations are supported by eRAD ImageMedical TM PracticeBuilder1-2-3 (Window based) image manager with its unique supports and services. The 'real engine' of PracticeBuilder is Ver.5.0 or newer Internet Explorer. The unique feature of PracticelBuilder1-2-3 is the extremely fast patient and image access from the archives even from very 'far distance' (through continents), due to the exceptional image communication

  17. Cross-modal priming facilitates production of low imageability word strings in a case of deep-phonological dysphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Mary Mccarthy

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Characteristics of repetition in deep-phonological dysphasia include an inability to repeat nonwords, semantic errors in single word repetition (deep dysphasia and in multiple word repetition (phonological dysphasia and better repetition of highly imageable words (Wilshire & Fisher, 2004; Ablinger et al., 2008. Additionally, visual processing of words is often more accurate than auditory processing of words (Howard & Franklin, 1988. We report a case study of LT who incurred a LCVA on 10/3/2009. She initially presented with deep dysphasia and near normal word reading. When enrolled in this study, approximately 24 months post-onset, she presented with phonological dysphasia. We investigated the hypothesis that (1 reproduction of a word string would be more accurate when preceded by a visual presentation of the word string compared to two auditory presentations of the word string, and (2 that this facilitative boost would be observed only for strings of low image words, consistent with the imageability effect in repetition. Method. Three-word strings were created in four conditions which varied the frequency (F and imageability (I of words within a string: HiF-HiI, LoF-HiI, HiF-LoI, LoF-LoI. All strings were balanced for total syllable length and were unrelated semantically and phonologically. The dependent variable was as accuracy of repetition of each word within a string. We created six modality prime conditions each with 24 strings drawn equally from the four frequency-imageability types, randomized within modality condition: Auditory Once (AudOnce – string presented auditorily one time; Auditory Twice (AudAud – string presented auditorily two consecutive times; Visual Once (VisOnce – string presented visually one time; Visual Twice (VisVis – string presented visually two consecutive times; Auditory then Visual (AudVis – string presented once auditorily, then a second time visually; Visual then Auditory (VisAud

  18. Image analysis driven single-cell analytics for systems microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balomenos, Athanasios D; Tsakanikas, Panagiotis; Aspridou, Zafiro; Tampakaki, Anastasia P; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P; Manolakos, Elias S

    2017-04-04

    Time-lapse microscopy is an essential tool for capturing and correlating bacterial morphology and gene expression dynamics at single-cell resolution. However state-of-the-art computational methods are limited in terms of the complexity of cell movies that they can analyze and lack of automation. The proposed Bacterial image analysis driven Single Cell Analytics (BaSCA) computational pipeline addresses these limitations thus enabling high throughput systems microbiology. BaSCA can segment and track multiple bacterial colonies and single-cells, as they grow and divide over time (cell segmentation and lineage tree construction) to give rise to dense communities with thousands of interacting cells in the field of view. It combines advanced image processing and machine learning methods to deliver very accurate bacterial cell segmentation and tracking (F-measure over 95%) even when processing images of imperfect quality with several overcrowded colonies in the field of view. In addition, BaSCA extracts on the fly a plethora of single-cell properties, which get organized into a database summarizing the analysis of the cell movie. We present alternative ways to analyze and visually explore the spatiotemporal evolution of single-cell properties in order to understand trends and epigenetic effects across cell generations. The robustness of BaSCA is demonstrated across different imaging modalities and microscopy types. BaSCA can be used to analyze accurately and efficiently cell movies both at a high resolution (single-cell level) and at a large scale (communities with many dense colonies) as needed to shed light on e.g. how bacterial community effects and epigenetic information transfer play a role on important phenomena for human health, such as biofilm formation, persisters' emergence etc. Moreover, it enables studying the role of single-cell stochasticity without losing sight of community effects that may drive it.

  19. Accuracy of 3 imaging modalities for evaluation of the posterior lens capsule in traumatic cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, Ali; Hasanlou, Narges; Kheirkhah, Ahmad; Mansouri, Mohammadreza; Faghihi, Houshang; Jafari, Hajar; Arefzadeh, Alireza; Moghimi, Sasan

    2014-07-01

    To compare the accuracy of 3 imaging modalities for preoperative evaluation of the posterior lens capsule in traumatic cataract. Farabi Eye Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Case series. The study comprised eyes with traumatic cataract opaque enough to prevent visualization of the posterior lens capsule on slitlamp examination. To detect posterior lens capsule rupture before surgery, imaging was performed with 20 MHz echography (Eye Cubed), anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) (Visante model 1000), and Scheimpflug imaging (Pentacam). All patients subsequently had cataract extraction, and the intraoperative findings of the posterior lens capsule were compared with the preoperative findings of the imaging modalities. The study enrolled 21 eyes of 21 patients (20 men, 1 woman) with a mean age of 31.5 years ± 1.45 (SD). The nature of trauma was blunt (5 eyes) or sharp (16 eyes). To detect posterior lens capsule rupture, the sensitivity and specificity were, respectively, 80% and 86% for 20 MHz echography, 71% and 77% for AS-OCT, and 62% and 57% for Scheimpflug imaging (95% confidence intervals: sensitivity, 30.00-90.32; specificity, 54.81-92.95). Insufficient resolution for posterior lens capsule evaluation occurred in 33.3% cases for AS-OCT and 57.1% cases for Scheimpflug imaging. The accuracy of 20 MHz echography, AS-OCT, and Scheimpflug imaging was 76.1%, 61.9%, and 42.9%, respectively. In the evaluation of the posterior lens capsule in eyes with traumatic cataract, 20 MHz echography had higher accuracy than AS-OCT and Scheimpflug imaging. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2014 ASCRS and ESCRS. All rights reserved.

  20. A deep feature fusion methodology for breast cancer diagnosis demonstrated on three imaging modality datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antropova, Natalia; Huynh, Benjamin Q; Giger, Maryellen L

    2017-10-01

    Deep learning methods for radiomics/computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) are often prohibited by small datasets, long computation time, and the need for extensive image preprocessing. We aim to develop a breast CADx methodology that addresses the aforementioned issues by exploiting the efficiency of pre-trained convolutional neural networks (CNNs) and using pre-existing handcrafted CADx features. We present a methodology that extracts and pools low- to mid-level features using a pretrained CNN and fuses them with handcrafted radiomic features computed using conventional CADx methods. Our methodology is tested on three different clinical imaging modalities (dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI [690 cases], full-field digital mammography [245 cases], and ultrasound [1125 cases]). From ROC analysis, our fusion-based method demonstrates, on all three imaging modalities, statistically significant improvements in terms of AUC as compared to previous breast cancer CADx methods in the task of distinguishing between malignant and benign lesions. (DCE-MRI [AUC = 0.89 (se = 0.01)], FFDM [AUC = 0.86 (se = 0.01)], and ultrasound [AUC = 0.90 (se = 0.01)]). We proposed a novel breast CADx methodology that can be used to more effectively characterize breast lesions in comparison to existing methods. Furthermore, our proposed methodology is computationally efficient and circumvents the need for image preprocessing. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  1. On the Multi-Modal Object Tracking and Image Fusion Using Unsupervised Deep Learning Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaHaye, N.; Ott, J.; Garay, M. J.; El-Askary, H. M.; Linstead, E.

    2017-12-01

    The number of different modalities of remote-sensors has been on the rise, resulting in large datasets with different complexity levels. Such complex datasets can provide valuable information separately, yet there is a bigger value in having a comprehensive view of them combined. As such, hidden information can be deduced through applying data mining techniques on the fused data. The curse of dimensionality of such fused data, due to the potentially vast dimension space, hinders our ability to have deep understanding of them. This is because each dataset requires a user to have instrument-specific and dataset-specific knowledge for optimum and meaningful usage. Once a user decides to use multiple datasets together, deeper understanding of translating and combining these datasets in a correct and effective manner is needed. Although there exists data centric techniques, generic automated methodologies that can potentially solve this problem completely don't exist. Here we are developing a system that aims to gain a detailed understanding of different data modalities. Such system will provide an analysis environment that gives the user useful feedback and can aid in research tasks. In our current work, we show the initial outputs our system implementation that leverages unsupervised deep learning techniques so not to burden the user with the task of labeling input data, while still allowing for a detailed machine understanding of the data. Our goal is to be able to track objects, like cloud systems or aerosols, across different image-like data-modalities. The proposed system is flexible, scalable and robust to understand complex likenesses within multi-modal data in a similar spatio-temporal range, and also to be able to co-register and fuse these images when needed.

  2. Detection ability of FDG-PET/CT comparing with other imaging modalities in multiple myeloma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Min Jeong; Lee, Tae Hyun; Pai, Moon Sun; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo

    2007-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by bone marrow infiltration with malignant plasma cells. It is important to detect involving bone for diagnosis and management of MM. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic ability and limitation of 18F-FDG-PET/CT (PET/CT) comparing other imaging modalities (separated PET and CT, whole body plain X-ray (XR), bone scintigraphy (BS), and MRI) in MM. Twenty PET/CT scans were performed in 16 patients (M: F=6: 10, median age=59 y). PET/CT findings were compared with available other images (n of CT=21, XR=21, BS=8, and MRI=5). Concordance with more than 2 image modalities, laboratory data, symptom, and biopsies were used for diagnosis of detected lesions. PET/CT revealed 256 of total 287 sites (sensitivity, 89.2%; accuracy, 84.8%). The sensitivity and accuracy of separating PET, CT, and XR were 86.3%, 70.4%; 47.4%, 50.3%; and 72.8%, 72.4%, respectively. Available BS identified 67 of 202 sites (sensitivity, 33.2%; accuracy, 44.0%). MRI detected 20 of 24 sites (sensitivity, 83.3%; accuracy, 36.3%). False positive rate (FP) of PET, XR, and MRI was as high as 87.8%, 95.1%, and 100%. PET for rib lesion identified 9 of 10 patients (90.0%) but for skull lesion only 4 of 7 patients (57.2%) with underestimation. 5 patients in MRI showed diffuse marrow signal change but only 3 had marrow involvement. But PET/CT showed higher accuracy than MRI. PET/CT was the most useful tool for detecting involving bone of MM comparing with other imaging modalities. Moreover, PET/CT is expected to overcome the limitations for the small osteolytic bone lesions with diffuse FDG uptake on PET

  3. The effects of stimulus modality and task integrality: Predicting dual-task performance and workload from single-task levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, S. G.; Shively, R. J.; Vidulich, M. A.; Miller, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of stimulus modality and task difficulty on workload and performance was investigated. The goal was to quantify the cost (in terms of response time and experienced workload) incurred when essentially serial task components shared common elements (e.g., the response to one initiated the other) which could be accomplished in parallel. The experimental tasks were based on the Fittsberg paradigm; the solution to a SternBERG-type memory task determines which of two identical FITTS targets are acquired. Previous research suggested that such functionally integrated dual tasks are performed with substantially less workload and faster response times than would be predicted by suming single-task components when both are presented in the same stimulus modality (visual). The physical integration of task elements was varied (although their functional relationship remained the same) to determine whether dual-task facilitation would persist if task components were presented in different sensory modalities. Again, it was found that the cost of performing the two-stage task was considerably less than the sum of component single-task levels when both were presented visually. Less facilitation was found when task elements were presented in different sensory modalities. These results suggest the importance of distinguishing between concurrent tasks that complete for limited resources from those that beneficially share common resources when selecting the stimulus modalities for information displays.

  4. Automated imaging system for single molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, David Charles; Runnheim, Rodney; Forrest, Daniel

    2012-09-18

    There is provided a high throughput automated single molecule image collection and processing system that requires minimal initial user input. The unique features embodied in the present disclosure allow automated collection and initial processing of optical images of single molecules and their assemblies. Correct focus may be automatically maintained while images are collected. Uneven illumination in fluorescence microscopy is accounted for, and an overall robust imaging operation is provided yielding individual images prepared for further processing in external systems. Embodiments described herein are useful in studies of any macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, peptides and proteins. The automated image collection and processing system and method of same may be implemented and deployed over a computer network, and may be ergonomically optimized to facilitate user interaction.

  5. Acoustic and photoacoustic microscopy imaging of single leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric M.; Moore, Michael J.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    An acoustic/photoacoustic microscope was used to create micrometer resolution images of stained cells from a blood smear. Pulse echo ultrasound images were made using a 1000 MHz transducer with 1 μm resolution. Photoacoustic images were made using a fiber coupled 532 nm laser, where energy losses through stimulated Raman scattering enabled output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm. The laser was focused onto the sample using a 20x objective, and the laser spot co-aligned with the 1000 MHz transducer opposite the laser. The blood smear was stained with Wright-Giemsa, a common metachromatic dye that differentially stains the cellular components for visual identification. A neutrophil, lymphocyte and a monocyte were imaged using acoustic and photoacoustic microscopy at two different wavelengths, 532 nm and 600 nm. Unique features in each imaging modality enabled identification of the different cell types. This imaging method provides a new way of imaging stained leukocytes, with applications towards identifying and differentiating cell types, and detecting disease at the single cell level.

  6. Single image super-resolution based on image patch classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ping; Yan, Hua; Li, Jing; Sun, Jiande

    2017-06-01

    This paper proposed a single image super-resolution algorithm based on image patch classification and sparse representation where gradient information is used to classify image patches into three different classes in order to reflect the difference between the different types of image patches. Compared with other classification algorithms, gradient information based algorithm is simpler and more effective. In this paper, each class is learned to get a corresponding sub-dictionary. High-resolution image patch can be reconstructed by the dictionary and sparse representation coefficients of corresponding class of image patches. The result of the experiments demonstrated that the proposed algorithm has a better effect compared with the other algorithms.

  7. Lipid-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for dual-modal imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang J

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Jinying Liang,1–3 Xinxin Zhang,2 Yunqiu Miao,2 Juan Li,1 Yong Gan2 1Department of Pharmaceutics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 2Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3School of Pharmacy, Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The development of noninvasive imaging techniques for the accurate diagnosis of progressive hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is of great clinical significance and has always been desired. Herein, a hepatocellular carcinoma cell-targeting fluorescent magnetic nanoparticle (NP was obtained by conjugating near-infrared fluorescence to the surface of Fe3O4 (NIRF-Fe3O4 NPs, followed by coating the lipids consisting of tumoral hepatocytes-targeting polymer (Gal-P123. This magnetic NP (GPC@NIRF-Fe3O4 with superparamagnetic behavior showed high stability and safety in physiological conditions. In addition, GPC@NIRF-Fe3O4 achieved more specific uptake of human liver cancer cells than free Fe3O4 NPs. Importantly, with superparamagnetic iron oxide and strong NIR absorbance, GPC@NIRF-Fe3O4 NPs demonstrate prominent tumor-contrasted imaging performance both on fluorescent and T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR imaging modalities in a living body. The relative MR signal enhancement of GPC@NIRF-Fe3O4 NPs achieved 5.4-fold improvement compared with NIR-Fe3O4 NPs. Therefore, GPC@NIRF-Fe3O4 NPs may be potentially used as a candidate for dual-modal imaging of tumors with information covalidated and directly compared by combining fluorescence and MR imaging. Keywords: dual-imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, hepatocellular carcinoma, tumor-targeting

  8. Hyperbranched conjugated polyelectrolyte for dual-modality fluorescence and magnetic resonance cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dan; Wang, Guan; Liu, Jianzhao; Li, Kai; Pu, Kan-Yi; Hu, Yong; Ng, Jason C Y; Tang, Ben Zhong; Liu, Bin

    2012-11-19

    Herein is reported the synthesis of gadolinium ion (Gd(III))-chelated hyperbranched conjugated polyelectrolyte (HCPE-Gd) and its application in fluorescence and magnetic resonance (MR) dual imaging in live animals. The synthesized HCPE-Gd forms nanospheres with an average diameter of ∼42 nm measured by laser light scattering and a quantum yield of 10% in aqueous solution. The absorption spectrum of HCPE-Gd has two maxima at 318 and 417 nm, and its photoluminescence maximum centers at 591 nm. Confocal laser scanning microscopy studies indicate that the HCPE-Gd is internalized in MCF-7 cancer cell cytoplasm with good photostability and low cytotoxicity. Further fluorescence and MR imaging studies on hepatoma H22 tumor-bearing mouse model reveal that HCPE-Gd can serve as an efficient optical/MR dual-modal imaging nanoprobe for in vivo cancer diagnosis. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. FD-OCT and IVUS intravascular imaging modalities in peripheral vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiliopoulos, S; Kitrou, P; Katsanos, K; Karnabatidis, D

    2017-02-01

    Intra-Vascular Ultra-Sound (IVUS) and Frequency Domain-Optical Coherence Tomography (FD-OCT), in vivo, intra-vascular, imaging modalities, widely used in the field of coronary disease, have been recently implemented in peripheral endovascular procedures, for procedural assessment, plaque characterization and determination of predictors of treatment outcomes. Their unique characteristics have also been used in order to provide additional features and improve the performance of re-entry devices and atherotomes. Areas covered: Present review focuses on available literature regarding these two promising imaging technologies in the peripheral vasculature, highlighting the added value produced by their use in endovascular therapy, their limitations and their utilization in new endovascular devices. Authors also provide their future perspective and the possible benefits in understanding vascular behavior and lesion characterization in peripheral endovascular interventions. Expert commentary: By providing both quantitative but also qualitative data on vessel and lesion morphology, intravascular imaging modalities offer a valid solution for endovascular treatment evaluation and outcome presentation homogeneity.

  10. Optical and photoacoustic dual-modality imaging guided synergistic photodynamic/photothermal therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xuefeng; Hu, Hao; Lin, Jing; Jin, Albert J.; Niu, Gang; Zhang, Shaoliang; Huang, Peng; Shen, Baozhong; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Phototherapies such as photodynamic therapy (PDT) and photothermal therapy (PTT), due to their specific spatiotemporal selectivity and minimal invasiveness, have been widely investigated as alternative treatments of malignant diseases. Graphene and its derivatives not only have been used as carriers to deliver photosensitizers for PDT, but also as photothermal conversion agents (PTCAs) for PTT. Herein, we strategically designed and produced a novel photo-theranostic platform based on sinoporphyrin sodium (DVDMS) photosensitizer-loaded PEGylated graphene oxide (GO-PEG-DVDMS) for enhanced fluorescence/photoacoustic (PA) dual-modal imaging and combined PDT and PTT. The GO-PEG carrier drastically improves the fluorescence of loaded DVDMS via intramolecular charge transfer. Concurrently, DVDMS significantly enhances the near-infrared (NIR) absorption of GO for improved PA imaging and PTT. The cancer theranostic capability of the as-prepared GO-PEG-DVDMS was carefully investigated both in vitro and in vivo. This novel theranostics is well suited for fluorescence/PA dual-modal imaging and synergistic PDT/PTT.

  11. A dual modality phantom for cone beam CT and ultrasound image fusion in prostate implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Angela; Beiki-Ardakan, Akbar; Tong, Shidong; Moseley, Douglas; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Jaffray, David; Yeung, Ivan W. T.

    2008-01-01

    In transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate seed brachytherapy, TRUS provides good delineation of the prostate while x-ray imaging, e.g., C-arm, gives excellent contrast for seed localization. With the recent availability of cone beam CT (CBCT) technology, the combination of the two imaging modalities may provide an ideal system for intraoperative dosimetric feedback during implantation. A dual modality phantom made of acrylic and copper wire was designed to measure the accuracy and precision of image coregistration between a C-arm based CBCT and 3D TRUS. The phantom was scanned with TRUS and CBCT under the same setup condition. Successive parallel transverse ultrasound (US) images were acquired through manual stepping of the US probe across the phantom at an increment of 1 mm over 7.5 cm. The CBCT imaging was done with three reconstructed slice thicknesses (0.4, 0.8, and 1.6 mm) as well as at three different tilt angles (0 deg., 15 deg., 30 deg. ), and the coregistration between CBCT and US images was done using the Variseed system based on four fiducial markers. Fiducial localization error (FLE), fiducial registration error (FRE), and target registration error (TRE) were calculated for all registered image sets. Results showed that FLE were typically less than 0.4 mm, FRE were less than 0.5 mm, and TRE were typically less than 1 mm within the range of operation for prostate implant (i.e., <6 cm to surface of US probe). An analysis of variance test showed no significant difference in TRE for the CBCT-US fusion among the three slice thicknesses (p=0.37). As a comparison, the experiment was repeated with a US-conventional CT scanner combination. No significant difference in TRE was noted between the US-conventional CT fusion and that for all three CBCT image slice thicknesses (p=0.21). CBCT imaging was also performed at three different C-arm tilt angles of 0 deg., 15 deg., and 30 deg. and reconstructed at a slice thickness of 0.8 mm. There is no significant

  12. Multi-modal spectroscopic imaging with synchrotron light to study mechanisms of brain disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Kelly L.; Fimognari, Nicholas; Hollings, Ashley; Kiernan, Mitchell; Lam, Virginie; Tidy, Rebecca J.; Takechi, Ryu; George, Graham N.; Pickering, Ingrid J.; Mamo, John C.; Harris, Hugh H.; Hackett, Mark J.

    2017-04-01

    The international health care costs associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia have been predicted to reach $2 trillion USD by 2030. As such, there is urgent need to develop new treatments and diagnostic methods to stem an international health crisis. A major limitation to therapy and diagnostic development is the lack of complete understanding about the disease mechanisms. Spectroscopic methods at synchrotron light sources, such as FTIR, XRF, and XAS, offer a "multi-modal imaging platform" to reveal a wealth of important biochemical information in situ within ex vivo tissue sections, to increase our understanding of disease mechanisms.

  13. Medical Students’ Knowledge of Indications for Imaging Modalities and Cost Analysis of Incorrect Requests, Shiraz, Iran 2011-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Islami Parkoohi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Medical imaging has a remarkable role in the practice of clinical medicine. This study intends to evaluate the knowledge of indications of five common medical imaging modalities and estimation of the imposed cost of their non-indicated requests among medical students who attend Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. We conducted across-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire to assess the knowledge of indications of a number of medical imaging modalities among 270 medical students during their externship or internship periods. Knowledge scoring was performed according to a descriptive international grade conversion (fail to excellent using Iranian academic grading (0 to 20. In addition, we estimated the cost for incorrect selection of those modalities according to public and private tariffs in US dollars. The participation and response rate was 200/270 (74%. The mean knowledge score was fair for all modalities. Similar scores were excellent for X-ray, acceptable for Doppler ultrasonography, and fair for ultrasonography, CT scan and MRI. The total cost for non-indicated requests of those modalities equaled $104303 (public tariff and $205581 (private tariff. Medical students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences lacked favorable knowledge about indications for common medical imaging modalities. The results of this study have shown a significant cost for non-indicated requests of medical imaging. Of note, the present radiology curriculum is in need of a major revision with regards to evidence-based radiology and health economy concerns.

  14. Medical students' knowledge of indications for imaging modalities and cost analysis of incorrect requests, shiraz, iran 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islami Parkoohi, Parisa; Jalli, Reza; Danaei, Mina; Khajavian, Shiva; Askarian, Mehrdad

    2014-05-01

    Medical imaging has a remarkable role in the practice of clinical medicine. This study intends to evaluate the knowledge of indications of five common medical imaging modalities and estimation of the imposed cost of their non-indicated requests among medical students who attend Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. We conducted across-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire to assess the knowledge of indications of a number of medical imaging modalities among 270 medical students during their externship or internship periods. Knowledge scoring was performed according to a descriptive international grade conversion (fail to excellent) using Iranian academic grading (0 to 20). In addition, we estimated the cost for incorrect selection of those modalities according to public and private tariffs in US dollars. The participation and response rate was 200/270 (74%). The mean knowledge score was fair for all modalities. Similar scores were excellent for X-ray, acceptable for Doppler ultrasonography, and fair for ultrasonography, CT scan and MRI. The total cost for non-indicated requests of those modalities equaled $104303 (public tariff) and $205581 (private tariff). Medical students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences lacked favorable knowledge about indications for common medical imaging modalities. The results of this study have shown a significant cost for non-indicated requests of medical imaging. Of note, the present radiology curriculum is in need of a major revision with regards to evidence-based radiology and health economy concerns.

  15. Emerging Cardiac Imaging Modalities for the Early Detection of Cardiotoxicity Due to Anticancer Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Fernández, Teresa; Thavendiranathan, Paaladinesh

    2017-06-01

    The undeniable advances in the field of oncology have finally led to a decrease in overall cancer-related mortality. However, this population of long-term cancer survivors is now facing a shift toward a substantial increase in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Because the development of overt cardiotoxicity can be associated with poor outcomes, preclinical identification of cardiac toxicity is important. This will promote early instauration of treatments to prevent overt heart dysfunction and allow oncologists to continue cancer therapy in an uninterrupted manner. Surveillance strategies for the early detection of cardiac injury include cardiac imaging and biomarkers during treatment. In this review, we outline existing cardiac imaging modalities to detect myocardial changes in patients undergoing cancer treatment and in survivors, and their strengths and limitations. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Electric field imaging of single atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Naoya; Seki, Takehito; Sánchez-Santolino, Gabriel; Findlay, Scott D.; Kohno, Yuji; Matsumoto, Takao; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    In scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), single atoms can be imaged by detecting electrons scattered through high angles using post-specimen, annular-type detectors. Recently, it has been shown that the atomic-scale electric field of both the positive atomic nuclei and the surrounding negative electrons within crystalline materials can be probed by atomic-resolution differential phase contrast STEM. Here we demonstrate the real-space imaging of the (projected) atomic electric field distribution inside single Au atoms, using sub-Å spatial resolution STEM combined with a high-speed segmented detector. We directly visualize that the electric field distribution (blurred by the sub-Å size electron probe) drastically changes within the single Au atom in a shape that relates to the spatial variation of total charge density within the atom. Atomic-resolution electric field mapping with single-atom sensitivity enables us to examine their detailed internal and boundary structures. PMID:28555629

  17. Pleomorphic adenoma: Choice of radiographic imaging modality - Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging? Illustration through a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalu Rai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pleomorphic adenoma (PA is the most common benign neoplasm of the major salivary glands arising primarily from the parotid gland. Computed tomography (CT is one of the primary imaging modalities used to assess the tumors of salivary glands. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may provide additional information over CT. Case Report: We report the case of a 60-year-old male with a slowly enlarging, well-defined, round, painless, non-fixated, rubber-like swelling over the left ramus region below the ear, measuring about 4 × 4.5 cm, covering the lower border of the mandible near the angle. A provisional diagnosis of PA was given and CT and MRI were used to study the lesion. Discussion: Through this case, which was suspected to have undergone malignant transformation because of indistinct margins and focal hypodense areas on CT but was later confirmed to be a benign salivary gland tumor on MRI, we illustrate the role of CT and MRI as diagnostic aids in PA and emphasize on what should be the choice of imaging modality for parotid tumors.

  18. Incorporation of a fluoroscopic X-ray modality in a small animal imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.S. Saha; E.L. Bradley; Paul Brewer; K.K. Gleason; Brian Kross; Stanislaw Majewski; Vladimir Popov; Jianguo Qian; Amoreena Ranck; K. Smith; Mark Smith; Andrew Weisenberger; Randolph Wojcik; Robert Welsh

    2003-06-01

    The authors have developed a multimodality system for imaging the biodistribution of biologically interesting ligands tagged with /sup 125/I. By incorporating a small fluoroscope as an additional modality, they have enhanced their small animal nuclear imaging system to include both X-rays and images from two Hamamatsu R3292 5'' diameter position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMT) viewing pixelated scintillators with image co-registration of 1.5 mm or better. Collimators placed between the animal and the scintillators can easily be interchanged and include CuBe parallel-hole collimators with a range of resolution and sensitivity combinations. The small X-ray fluoroscope provides 5 cm diameter images, several of which can readily be combined to provide structural anatomical information from the animal under study. The system has been tested by comparing the uptake of /sup 125/I (in NaI) in control mice and mice previously fed a solution of KI (potassium iodide) designed specific.

  19. Multi-modality image reconstruction for dual-head small-animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chang-Han; Chou, Cheng-Ying [National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2015-05-18

    The hybrid positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) or positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) has become routine practice in clinics. The applications of multi-modality imaging can also benefit research advances. Consequently, dedicated small-imaging system like dual-head small-animal PET (DHAPET) that possesses the advantages of high detection sensitivity and high resolution can exploit the structural information from CT or MRI. It should be noted that the special detector arrangement in DHAPET leads to severe data truncation, thereby degrading the image quality. We proposed to take advantage of anatomical priors and total variation (TV) minimization methods to reconstruct PET activity distribution form incomplete measurement data. The objective is to solve the penalized least-squares function consisted of data fidelity term, TV norm and medium root priors. In this work, we employed the splitting-based fast iterative shrinkage/thresholding algorithm to split smooth and non-smooth functions in the convex optimization problems. Our simulations studies validated that the images reconstructed by use of the proposed method can outperform those obtained by use of conventional expectation maximization algorithms or that without considering the anatomical prior information. Additionally, the convergence rate is also accelerated.

  20. Bone metastases: assessment of therapeutic response through radiological and nuclear medicine imaging modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliou, V; Andreopoulos, D; Frangos, S; Tselis, N; Giannopoulou, E; Lutz, S

    2011-11-01

    Radiological and nuclear medicine imaging modalities used for assessing bone metastases treatment response include plain and digitalised radiography (XR), skeletal scintigraphy (SS), dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), [(18)F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET/CT. Here we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these assessment modalities as evident through different clinical trials. Additionally, we present the more established response criteria of the International Union Against Cancer and the World Health Organization and compare them with newer MD Anderson criteria. Even though serial XR and SS have been used to assess the therapeutic response for decades, several months are required before changes are evident. Newer techniques, such as MRI or PET, may allow an earlier evaluation of response that may be quantified through monitoring changes in signal intensity and standard uptake value, respectively. Moreover, the application of PET/CT, which can follow both morphological and metabolic changes, has yielded interesting and promising results that give a new insight into the natural history of metastatic bone disease. However, only a few studies have investigated the application of these newer techniques and further clinical trials are needed to corroborate their promising results and establish the most suitable imaging parameters and evaluation time points. Last, but not least, there is an absolute need to adopt uniform response criteria for bone metastases through an international consensus in order to better assess treatment response in terms of accuracy and objectivity. Copyright © 2011 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Facile Fabrication of Animal-Specific Positioning Molds For Multi-modality Molecular Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Oh, Ji Eun; Woo, Seung Tae

    2008-01-01

    Recently multi-modal imaging system has become widely adopted in molecular imaging. We tried to fabricate animal-specific positioning molds for PET/MR fusion imaging using easily available molding clay and rapid foam. The animal-specific positioning molds provide immobilization and reproducible positioning of small animal. Herein, we have compared fiber-based molding clay with rapid foam in fabricating the molds of experimental animal. The round bottomed-acrylic frame, which fitted into microPET gantry, was prepared at first. The experimental mice was anesthetized and placed on the mold for positioning. Rapid foam and fiber-based clay were used to fabricate the mold. In case of both rapid foam and the clay, the experimental animal needs to be pushed down smoothly into the mold for positioning. However, after the mouse was removed, the fabricated clay needed to be dried completely at 60 .deg. C in oven overnight for hardening. Four sealed pipe tips containing [ 18 F]FDG solution were used as fiduciary markers. After injection of [ 18 F]FDG via tail vein, microPET scanning was performed. Successively, MRI scanning was followed in the same animal. Animal-specific positioning molds were fabricated using rapid foam and fiber-based molding clay for multimodality imaging. Functional and anatomical images were obtained with microPET and MRI, respectively. The fused PET/MR images were obtained using freely available AMIDE program. Animal-specific molds were successfully prepared using easily available rapid foam, molding clay and disposable pipet tips. Thanks to animal-specific molds, fusion images of PET and MR were co-registered with negligible misalignment

  2. 3D reconstruction of microvascular flow phantoms with hybrid imaging modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jingying; Hsiung, Kevin; Ritenour, Russell; Golzarian, Jafar

    2011-03-01

    Microvascular flow phantoms were built to aid the development of a hemodynamic simulation model for treating hepatocelluar carcinoma. The goal is to predict the blood flow routing for embolotherapy planning. Embolization is to deliver agents (e.g. microspheres) to the vicinity of the tumor to obstruct blood supply and nutrients to the tumor, targeting into 30 - 40 μm arterioles. Due to the size of the catheter, it has to release microspheres at an upper stream location, which may not localize the blocking effect. Accurate anatomical descriptions of microvasculature will help to conduct a reliable simulation and prepare a successful embolization strategy. Modern imaging devices can generate 3D reconstructions with ease. However, with a fixed detector size, larger field of view yields lower resolution. Clinical CT images can't be used to measure micro vessel dimensions, while micro-CT requires more acquisitions to reconstruct larger vessels. A multi-tiered, montage 3D reconstruction method with hybrid-modality imagery is devised to minimize the reconstruction effort. Regular CT is used for larger vessels and micro-CT is used for micro vessels. The montage approach aims to stitch up images with different resolutions and orientations. A resolution-adaptable 3D image registration is developed to assemble the images. We have created vessel phantoms that consist of several tiers of bifurcating polymer tubes in reducing diameters, down to 25 μm. No previous work of physical flow phantom has ventured into this small scale. Overlapping phantom images acquired from clinical CT and micro-CT are used to verify the image registration fidelity.

  3. The guarantee of the consistency of patient information through modality worklist among PACS, RIS and imaging equipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Min; Peng Chenglin; Wang Xiaolin; Luo Song; Lei Wenyong; Wang Kang; Wang Xuejian; Wen Hongyu; Wu Hongxing

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To realize the consistency of patient information through modality worklist among picture archiving and communication system (PACS), radiology information systems (RIS), and imaging equipments. Methods: Many digital modalities including GE Signa 1.5 T MR system, digital mammography, Agfa digital radiography, computed radiography, GE CT, and etc were installed in our hospital. Since the GE PACS system was in English version, the images were saved and the information was managed to PACS without a truly worklist. Two months later, while still using the previous PACS, the consistency of patient information was resolved through modality worklist by adopting the international advanced approach to realize thread worklist of digital imaging and communication in medicine. The information in Chinese will be transformed into information in English in RIS system and saved as the English information to worklist. Results: After the implementation and integration of PACS and RIS was achieved in my hospital, the consistency of patient information was guaranteed through modality worklist between RIS and imaging equipments and the first-rate effect was acquired. The patient information could be checked, edited, and created by using the Chinese RIS system on all diagnostic workstations. Conclusion: The consistency of patient information through modality worklist was realized among PACS, RIS, and imaging equipments, yet at present, the question of guarantee the consistency of patient information must be thought over in PACS building

  4. Multi-modal imaging, model-based tracking, and mixed reality visualisation for orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sing Chun; Fuerst, Bernhard; Tateno, Keisuke; Johnson, Alex; Fotouhi, Javad; Osgood, Greg; Tombari, Federico; Navab, Nassir

    2017-10-01

    Orthopaedic surgeons are still following the decades old workflow of using dozens of two-dimensional fluoroscopic images to drill through complex 3D structures, e.g. pelvis. This Letter presents a mixed reality support system, which incorporates multi-modal data fusion and model-based surgical tool tracking for creating a mixed reality environment supporting screw placement in orthopaedic surgery. A red-green-blue-depth camera is rigidly attached to a mobile C-arm and is calibrated to the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging space via iterative closest point algorithm. This allows real-time automatic fusion of reconstructed surface and/or 3D point clouds and synthetic fluoroscopic images obtained through CBCT imaging. An adapted 3D model-based tracking algorithm with automatic tool segmentation allows for tracking of the surgical tools occluded by hand. This proposed interactive 3D mixed reality environment provides an intuitive understanding of the surgical site and supports surgeons in quickly localising the entry point and orienting the surgical tool during screw placement. The authors validate the augmentation by measuring target registration error and also evaluate the tracking accuracy in the presence of partial occlusion.

  5. An unified framework for Bayesian denoising for several medical and biological imaging modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, João M; Nascimento, Jacinto C; Marques, Jorge S

    2007-01-01

    Multiplicative noise is often present in several medical and biological imaging modalities, such as MRI, Ultrasound, PET/SPECT and Fluorescence Microscopy. Noise removal and preserving the details is not a trivial task. Bayesian algorithms have been used to tackle this problem. They succeed to accomplish this task, however they lead to a computational burden as we increase the image dimensionality. Therefore, a significant effort has been made to accomplish this tradeoff, i.e., to develop fast and reliable algorithms to remove noise without distorting relevant clinical information. This paper provides a new unified framework for Bayesian denoising of images corrupted with additive and multiplicative multiplicative noise. This allows to deal with additive white Gaussian and multiplicative noise described by Poisson and Rayleigh distributions respectively. The proposed algorithm is based on the maximum a posteriori (MAP) criterion, and an edge preserving priors are used to avoid the distortion of the relevant image details. The denoising task is performed by an iterative scheme based on Sylvester/Lyapunov equation. This approach allows to use fast and efficient algorithms described in the literature to solve the Sylvester/Lyapunov equation developed in the context of the Control theory. Experimental results with synthetic and real data testify the performance of the proposed technique, and competitive results are achieved when comparing to the of the state-of-the-art methods.

  6. Evaluation of 3D modality-independent elastography for breast imaging: a simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou, J J; Ong, R E; Yankeelov, T E; Miga, M I

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the development and preliminary testing of a three-dimensional implementation of an inverse problem technique for extracting soft-tissue elasticity information via non-rigid model-based image registration. The modality-independent elastography (MIE) algorithm adjusts the elastic properties of a biomechanical model to achieve maximal similarity between images acquired under different states of static loading. A series of simulation experiments with clinical image sets of human breasts were performed to test the ability of the method to identify and characterize a radiographically occult stiff lesion. Because boundary conditions are a critical input to the algorithm, a comparison of three methods for semi-automated surface point correspondence was conducted in the context of systematic and randomized noise processes. The results illustrate that 3D MIE was able to successfully reconstruct elasticity images using data obtained from both magnetic resonance and x-ray computed tomography systems. The lesion was localized correctly in all cases and its relative elasticity found to be reasonably close to the true values (3.5% with the use of spatial priors and 11.6% without). In addition, the inaccuracies of surface registration performed with thin-plate spline interpolation did not exceed empiric thresholds of unacceptable boundary condition error

  7. System Characterizations and Optimized Reconstruction Methods for Novel X-ray Imaging Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Huifeng

    In the past decade there have been many new emerging X-ray based imaging technologies developed for different diagnostic purposes or imaging tasks. However, there exist one or more specific problems that prevent them from being effectively or efficiently employed. In this dissertation, four different novel X-ray based imaging technologies are discussed, including propagation-based phase-contrast (PB-XPC) tomosynthesis, differential X-ray phase-contrast tomography (D-XPCT), projection-based dual-energy computed radiography (DECR), and tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT). System characteristics are analyzed or optimized reconstruction methods are proposed for these imaging modalities. In the first part, we investigated the unique properties of propagation-based phase-contrast imaging technique when combined with the X-ray tomosynthesis. Fourier slice theorem implies that the high frequency components collected in the tomosynthesis data can be more reliably reconstructed. It is observed that the fringes or boundary enhancement introduced by the phase-contrast effects can serve as an accurate indicator of the true depth position in the tomosynthesis in-plane image. In the second part, we derived a sub-space framework to reconstruct images from few-view D-XPCT data set. By introducing a proper mask, the high frequency contents of the image can be theoretically preserved in a certain region of interest. A two-step reconstruction strategy is developed to mitigate the risk of subtle structures being oversmoothed when the commonly used total-variation regularization is employed in the conventional iterative framework. In the thirt part, we proposed a practical method to improve the quantitative accuracy of the projection-based dual-energy material decomposition. It is demonstrated that applying a total-projection-length constraint along with the dual-energy measurements can achieve a stabilized numerical solution of the decomposition problem, thus overcoming the

  8. High-frequency 3D echodentographic imaging modality for early assessment of periodontal diseases: in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Ngan, Peter; Crout, Richard; Mukdadi, Osama M.

    2009-02-01

    The use of ultrasound in dentistry is still an open growing area of research. Currently, there is a lack of imaging modalities to accurately predict minute structures and defects in the jawbone. In particular, the inability of 2D radiographic images to detect bony periodontal defects resulted from infection of the periodontium. This study investigates the feasibility of high frequency ultrasound to reconstruct high resolution 3D surface images of human jawbone. Methods: A dentate and non-dentate mandibles were used in this study. The system employs high frequency single-element ultrasound focused transducers (15-30 MHz) for scanning. Continuous acquisition using a 1 GHz data acquisition card is synchronized with a high precision two-dimensional stage positioning system of +/-1 μm resolution for acquiring accurate and quantitative measurements of the mandible in vitro. Radio frequency (RF) signals are acquired laterally 44-45.5 μm apart for each frame. Different frames are reconstructed 500 μm apart for the 3D reconstruction. Signal processing algorithms are applied on the received ultrasound signals for filtering, focusing, and envelope detection before frame reconstruction. Furthermore, an edge detection technique is adopted to detect the bone surface in each frame. Finally, all edges are combined together in order to render a 3D surface image of the jawbone. Major anatomical landmarks on the resultant images were confirmed with the anatomical structures on the mandibles to show the efficacy of the system. Comparison were also made with conventional 2D radiographs to show the superiority of the ultrasound imaging system in diagnosing small defects in the lateral, axial and elevation planes of space. Results: The landmarks on all ultrasound images matched with those on the mandible, indicating the efficacy of the system in detecting small structures in human jaw bones. Comparison with conventional 2D radiographic images of the same mandible showed superiority of

  9. Multispectral imaging using a single bucket detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Liheng; Suo, Jinli; Situ, Guohai; Li, Ziwei; Fan, Jingtao; Chen, Feng; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-04-22

    Existing multispectral imagers mostly use available array sensors to separately measure 2D data slices in a 3D spatial-spectral data cube. Thus they suffer from low photon efficiency, limited spectrum range and high cost. To address these issues, we propose to conduct multispectral imaging using a single bucket detector, to take full advantage of its high sensitivity, wide spectrum range, low cost, small size and light weight. Technically, utilizing the detector's fast response, a scene's 3D spatial-spectral information is multiplexed into a dense 1D measurement sequence and then demultiplexed computationally under the single pixel imaging scheme. A proof-of-concept setup is built to capture multispectral data of 64 pixels × 64 pixels × 10 wavelength bands ranging from 450 nm to 650 nm, with the acquisition time being 1 minute. The imaging scheme holds great potentials for various low light and airborne applications, and can be easily manufactured as production-volume portable multispectral imagers.

  10. Multi-modal and targeted imaging improves automated mid-brain segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plassard, Andrew J.; D'Haese, Pierre F.; Pallavaram, Srivatsan; Newton, Allen T.; Claassen, Daniel O.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2017-02-01

    The basal ganglia and limbic system, particularly the thalamus, putamen, internal and external globus pallidus, substantia nigra, and sub-thalamic nucleus, comprise a clinically relevant signal network for Parkinson's disease. In order to manually trace these structures, a combination of high-resolution and specialized sequences at 7T are used, but it is not feasible to scan clinical patients in those scanners. Targeted imaging sequences at 3T such as F-GATIR, and other optimized inversion recovery sequences, have been presented which enhance contrast in a select group of these structures. In this work, we show that a series of atlases generated at 7T can be used to accurately segment these structures at 3T using a combination of standard and optimized imaging sequences, though no one approach provided the best result across all structures. In the thalamus and putamen, a median Dice coefficient over 0.88 and a mean surface distance less than 1.0mm was achieved using a combination of T1 and an optimized inversion recovery imaging sequences. In the internal and external globus pallidus a Dice over 0.75 and a mean surface distance less than 1.2mm was achieved using a combination of T1 and FGATIR imaging sequences. In the substantia nigra and sub-thalamic nucleus a Dice coefficient of over 0.6 and a mean surface distance of less than 1.0mm was achieved using the optimized inversion recovery imaging sequence. On average, using T1 and optimized inversion recovery together produced significantly improved segmentation results than any individual modality (p<0.05 wilcox sign-rank test).

  11. Imaging of tautomerism in a single molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwoński, Hubert; Stupperich, Clemens; Hartschuh, Achim; Sepioł, Jerzy; Meixner, Alfred; Waluk, Jacek

    2005-04-20

    Fluorescence imaging is used to visualize directly the transfer of two inner hydrogen atoms in single porphycene molecules. This reaction leads to a chemically equivalent but differently oriented structure and hence results in a rotation of the transition dipole moments. By probing single immobilized molecules with an azimuthally polarized laser beam in the focal spot of a confocal microscope we observe ring-like emission patterns, possible only for a chromophore with two nearly orthogonal transition dipole moments. Numerical simulations of the observed emission patterns yield a value of 72 degrees for the angle between the S0-S1 transition moments in the two tautomeric forms.

  12. The assessment of stroke multidimensional CT and MR imaging using eye movement analysis: does modality preference enhance observer performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lindsey; Gale, Alastair; Saada, Janak; Gedela, Swamy; Scott, Hazel; Toms, Andoni

    2010-02-01

    Although CT and MR imaging is now commonplace in the radiology department, few studies have examined complex interpretative tasks such as the reading of multidimensional brain CT or MRI scans from the observer performance perspective, especially with reference to Stroke. Modality performance studies have demonstrated a similar sensitivity of less than 50% for both conventional modalities, with neither modality proving superior to the other in Stroke observer performance tasks (Mohr, 1995; Lansberg, 2000; Wintermark, 2007). Visual search studies have not extensively explored stroke imaging and an in-depth, comparative eye-movement study between CT and MRI has not yet been conducted. A computer-based, eye-tracking study was designed to assess diagnostic accuracy and interpretation in stroke CT and MR imagery. Forty eight predetermined clinical cases, with five images per case, were presented to participants (novices, trainees and radiologists; n=28). The presence or absence of abnormalities was rated on a four-point Likert scale and their locations reported. Results highlight differences in visual search patterns amongst novice, trainee and expert observers; the most marked differences occurred between novice readers and experts. In terms of modality differences; novice and expert readers spent longer appraising CT images than MR, compared with trainees, who spent longer appraising MR than CT images. Image analysis trends did not appear to differ between modalities, but time spent within clinical images, accuracy and relative confidence performing the task did differ between CT and MR reader groups. To-date few studies have explored observer performance in neuroradiology and the present study examines multi-slice image appraisal by comparing matched pairs of CT and MRI Stroke cases.

  13. Three-Dimensional Localization of Single Molecules for Super-Resolution Imaging and Single-Particle Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Diezmann, Alex; Shechtman, Yoav; Moerner, W E

    2017-06-14

    Single-molecule super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and single-particle tracking are two imaging modalities that illuminate the properties of cells and materials on spatial scales down to tens of nanometers or with dynamical information about nanoscale particle motion in the millisecond range, respectively. These methods generally use wide-field microscopes and two-dimensional camera detectors to localize molecules to much higher precision than the diffraction limit. Given the limited total photons available from each single-molecule label, both modalities require careful mathematical analysis and image processing. Much more information can be obtained about the system under study by extending to three-dimensional (3D) single-molecule localization: without this capability, visualization of structures or motions extending in the axial direction can easily be missed or confused, compromising scientific understanding. A variety of methods for obtaining both 3D super-resolution images and 3D tracking information have been devised, each with their own strengths and weaknesses. These include imaging of multiple focal planes, point-spread-function engineering, and interferometric detection. These methods may be compared based on their ability to provide accurate and precise position information on single-molecule emitters with limited photons. To successfully apply and further develop these methods, it is essential to consider many practical concerns, including the effects of optical aberrations, field dependence in the imaging system, fluorophore labeling density, and registration between different color channels. Selected examples of 3D super-resolution imaging and tracking are described for illustration from a variety of biological contexts and with a variety of methods, demonstrating the power of 3D localization for understanding complex systems.

  14. Evaluation of a sequential multi-modality imaging algorithm for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in the pregnant female.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Vijay; LeBedis, Christina; Kelly, Jacqueline R; Uyeda, Jennifer; Soto, Jorge A; Anderson, Stephan W

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of a sequential multi-modality imaging algorithm for diagnosing acute appendicitis in pregnancy. This IRB-approved, HIPAA compliant study included 127 consecutive pregnant patients imaged for suspected appendicitis between October 2007 and May 2012; all patients initially underwent ultrasound (US) examination, followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) if results of US were negative or equivocal. Computerized tomography (CT) was reserved for cases with inconclusive US and MRI results. The EMR was reviewed, recording results of imaging examinations and clinical outcomes. The diagnostic performance of this sequential multi-modality imaging algorithm was calculated with pathology correlation. Two (1.9 %) of the 127 US examinations reported suspected appendicitis; 125 (98.4 %) were inconclusive. Of the 125 patients with inconclusive US examinations, 103 underwent MRI, of which eight (6.2 %) demonstrated findings of acute appendicitis. Of the 103 patients that received MRI, nine (8.7 %) underwent CT. One patient had a CT performed directly after an inconclusive US exam. No additional cases of appendicitis were detected with CT. The sensitivity and specificity of US alone was 12.5 and 99.2 %, respectively; MRI was 100 and 93.6 %; the sequential multi-modality modality algorithm including US, CT, and MRI was 100 and 98.3 %. The diagnostic performance of this sequential multi-modality imaging algorithm for diagnosing acute appendicitis in pregnancy is high. Given the low yield of US, MRI should be considered the first-line imaging test. Although CT was employed in a small fraction of inconclusive MRI examinations, it still has a role in the diagnostic work-up of the pregnant patient with suspected appendicitis.

  15. Real-time photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging system facilitated with graphics processing unit and code parallel optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jie; Xu, Guan; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Yu; Carson, Paul L; Wang, Xueding; Liu, Xiaojun

    2013-08-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with highly sensitive optical absorption contrast and excellent spatial resolution comparable to medical ultrasound (US) imaging. We report the development of a fully integrated PAT and US dual-modality imaging system, which performs signal scanning, image reconstruction, and display for both photoacoustic (PA) and US imaging all in a truly real-time manner. The back-projection (BP) algorithm for PA image reconstruction is optimized to reduce the computational cost and facilitate parallel computation on a state of the art graphics processing unit (GPU) card. For the first time, PAT and US imaging of the same object can be conducted simultaneously and continuously, at a real-time frame rate, presently limited by the laser repetition rate of 10 Hz. Noninvasive PAT and US imaging of human peripheral joints in vivo were achieved, demonstrating the satisfactory image quality realized with this system. Another experiment, simultaneous PAT and US imaging of contrast agent flowing through an artificial vessel, was conducted to verify the performance of this system for imaging fast biological events. The GPU-based image reconstruction software code for this dual-modality system is open source and available for download from http://sourceforge.net/projects/patrealtime.

  16. Survival and Failure Outcomes in Primary Thyroid Lymphomas: A Single Centre Experience of Combined Modality Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Ritesh; Khosla, Divya; Kumar, Narendra; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Bera, Anjan; Das, Ashim; Sharma, Suresh Chander

    2013-01-01

    Primary thyroid lymphoma (PTL) is a rare malignancy and represents 2%–5% of all thyroid malignancies and 1%–2.5% of all malignant lymphomas. We present our institute’s experience in combined modality management of 16 successive patients of PTL treated from 2005 to 2010. The median age of the patients was 56.0 years. Five patients were males, and 11 patients were females. An enlarging thyroid mass was the most common presenting symptom. 14 patients had diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and 2 pati...

  17. cRGD-conjugated magnetic-fluorescent liposomes for targeted dual-modality imaging of bone metastasis from prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Chen, Zhongping; Zhu, Li

    2015-01-01

    We reported the development of multifunctional liposomes as a dual-modality probe to facilitate targeted magnetic resonance and fluorescent imaging of bone metastasis from advanced cancer. Multifunctional liposomes consisted of liposomes as a carrier, hydrophobic CdSe QDs in phospholipid bilayer, hydrophilic iron oxide nanoparticles in interior vesicle, lipid-PEG derivative on the surface and cRGDyk peptide conjugated to distal ends of lipid-PEG derivative. Excellent stability, effective detection signal, low toxicity, high resistance to phagocytosis by macrophages and good specificity to tumor of multifunctional liposomes were confirmed by in vitro characterization. The in vivo results demonstrated that multifunctional liposomes accumulated mainly in tumor and liver, indicating that targeted dual-modality imaging was achieved, and the results from two kinds of modalities were consistent and complementary. These findings provide a helpful strategy for detection of bone metastases in a more effective manner for initiation of appropriate therapy.

  18. Comparison of 3D computer-aided with manual cerebral aneurysm measurements in different imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groth, M.; Buhk, J.H.; Schoenfeld, M.; Goebell, E.; Fiehler, J.; Forkert, N.D.

    2013-01-01

    To compare intra- and inter-observer reliability of aneurysm measurements obtained by a 3D computer-aided technique with standard manual aneurysm measurements in different imaging modalities. A total of 21 patients with 29 cerebral aneurysms were studied. All patients underwent digital subtraction angiography (DSA), contrast-enhanced (CE-MRA) and time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF-MRA). Aneurysm neck and depth diameters were manually measured by two observers in each modality. Additionally, semi-automatic computer-aided diameter measurements were performed using 3D vessel surface models derived from CE- (CE-com) and TOF-MRA (TOF-com) datasets. Bland-Altman analysis (BA) and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) were used to evaluate intra- and inter-observer agreement. BA revealed the narrowest relative limits of intra- and inter-observer agreement for aneurysm neck and depth diameters obtained by TOF-com (ranging between ±5.3 % and ±28.3 %) and CE-com (ranging between ±23.3 % and ±38.1 %). Direct measurements in DSA, TOF-MRA and CE-MRA showed considerably wider limits of agreement. The highest ICCs were observed for TOF-com and CE-com (ICC values, 0.92 or higher for intra- as well as inter-observer reliability). Computer-aided aneurysm measurement in 3D offers improved intra- and inter-observer reliability and a reproducible parameter extraction, which may be used in clinical routine and as objective surrogate end-points in clinical trials. (orig.)

  19. Combined EEG/MEG can outperform single modality EEG or MEG source reconstruction in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümit Aydin

    Full Text Available We investigated two important means for improving source reconstruction in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis. The first investigation is about the optimal choice of the number of epileptic spikes in averaging to (1 sufficiently reduce the noise bias for an accurate determination of the center of gravity of the epileptic activity and (2 still get an estimation of the extent of the irritative zone. The second study focuses on the differences in single modality EEG (80-electrodes or MEG (275-gradiometers and especially on the benefits of combined EEG/MEG (EMEG source analysis. Both investigations were validated with simultaneous stereo-EEG (sEEG (167-contacts and low-density EEG (ldEEG (21-electrodes. To account for the different sensitivity profiles of EEG and MEG, we constructed a six-compartment finite element head model with anisotropic white matter conductivity, and calibrated the skull conductivity via somatosensory evoked responses. Our results show that, unlike single modality EEG or MEG, combined EMEG uses the complementary information of both modalities and thereby allows accurate source reconstructions also at early instants in time (epileptic spike onset, i.e., time points with low SNR, which are not yet subject to propagation and thus supposed to be closer to the origin of the epileptic activity. EMEG is furthermore able to reveal the propagation pathway at later time points in agreement with sEEG, while EEG or MEG alone reconstructed only parts of it. Subaveraging provides important and accurate information about both the center of gravity and the extent of the epileptogenic tissue that neither single nor grand-averaged spike localizations can supply.

  20. Combined EEG/MEG can outperform single modality EEG or MEG source reconstruction in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ümit; Vorwerk, Johannes; Dümpelmann, Matthias; Küpper, Philipp; Kugel, Harald; Heers, Marcel; Wellmer, Jörg; Kellinghaus, Christoph; Haueisen, Jens; Rampp, Stefan; Stefan, Hermann; Wolters, Carsten H

    2015-01-01

    We investigated two important means for improving source reconstruction in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis. The first investigation is about the optimal choice of the number of epileptic spikes in averaging to (1) sufficiently reduce the noise bias for an accurate determination of the center of gravity of the epileptic activity and (2) still get an estimation of the extent of the irritative zone. The second study focuses on the differences in single modality EEG (80-electrodes) or MEG (275-gradiometers) and especially on the benefits of combined EEG/MEG (EMEG) source analysis. Both investigations were validated with simultaneous stereo-EEG (sEEG) (167-contacts) and low-density EEG (ldEEG) (21-electrodes). To account for the different sensitivity profiles of EEG and MEG, we constructed a six-compartment finite element head model with anisotropic white matter conductivity, and calibrated the skull conductivity via somatosensory evoked responses. Our results show that, unlike single modality EEG or MEG, combined EMEG uses the complementary information of both modalities and thereby allows accurate source reconstructions also at early instants in time (epileptic spike onset), i.e., time points with low SNR, which are not yet subject to propagation and thus supposed to be closer to the origin of the epileptic activity. EMEG is furthermore able to reveal the propagation pathway at later time points in agreement with sEEG, while EEG or MEG alone reconstructed only parts of it. Subaveraging provides important and accurate information about both the center of gravity and the extent of the epileptogenic tissue that neither single nor grand-averaged spike localizations can supply.

  1. Survival and Failure Outcomes in Primary Thyroid Lymphomas: A Single Centre Experience of Combined Modality Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary thyroid lymphoma (PTL is a rare malignancy and represents 2%–5% of all thyroid malignancies and 1%–2.5% of all malignant lymphomas. We present our institute’s experience in combined modality management of 16 successive patients of PTL treated from 2005 to 2010. The median age of the patients was 56.0 years. Five patients were males, and 11 patients were females. An enlarging thyroid mass was the most common presenting symptom. 14 patients had diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and 2 patients had follicular lymphoma. The most common stage of presentation was stage II comprising 6 (37.5% patients. All patients received CCT, and only 12 patients received involved field RT with a median dose of 36.0 Gy. 10 patients (62.5% had CR, and 6 patients (27.5% had PR. Eight patients had disease progression in subsequent followup and this included the initial 6 patients with PR. The 5-year DFS was 40.0%, and median DFS was 47 months. The 5-year OS was 41.0%, and median OS was 51 months. Most common presentation in our series was locally advanced tumors. Most of these patients require combined modality management. Risk-adapted and multimodality approach is the need of the hour to achieve good control rates while minimizing treatment related toxicity.

  2. On the learning difficulty of visual and auditory modal concepts: Evidence for a single processing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigo, Ronaldo; Doan, Karina-Mikayla C; Doan, Charles A; Pinegar, Shannon

    2018-02-01

    The logic operators (e.g., "and," "or," "if, then") play a fundamental role in concept formation, syntactic construction, semantic expression, and deductive reasoning. In spite of this very general and basic role, there are relatively few studies in the literature that focus on their conceptual nature. In the current investigation, we examine, for the first time, the learning difficulty experienced by observers in classifying members belonging to these primitive "modal concepts" instantiated with sets of acoustic and visual stimuli. We report results from two categorization experiments that suggest the acquisition of acoustic and visual modal concepts is achieved by the same general cognitive mechanism. Additionally, we attempt to account for these results with two models of concept learning difficulty: the generalized invariance structure theory model (Vigo in Cognition 129(1):138-162, 2013, Mathematical principles of human conceptual behavior, Routledge, New York, 2014) and the generalized context model (Nosofsky in J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn 10(1):104-114, 1984, J Exp Psychol 115(1):39-57, 1986).

  3. Single particle raster image analysis of diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longfils, M; Schuster, E; Lorén, N; Särkkä, A; Rudemo, M

    2017-04-01

    As a complement to the standard RICS method of analysing Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy images with estimation of the image correlation function, we introduce the method SPRIA, Single Particle Raster Image Analysis. Here, we start by identifying individual particles and estimate the diffusion coefficient for each particle by a maximum likelihood method. Averaging over the particles gives a diffusion coefficient estimate for the whole image. In examples both with simulated and experimental data, we show that the new method gives accurate estimates. It also gives directly standard error estimates. The method should be possible to extend to study heterogeneous materials and systems of particles with varying diffusion coefficient, as demonstrated in a simple simulation example. A requirement for applying the SPRIA method is that the particle concentration is low enough so that we can identify the individual particles. We also describe a bootstrap method for estimating the standard error of standard RICS. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging in hepatic masses. Comparison with other imaging modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Miho; Sato, Morio; Maeda, Chikahiko

    1987-04-01

    Fifty-six untreated patients with hepatic masses underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The results of MRI were compared with those of the concurrent X-ray computed tomography (CT), angiography (AG), and ultrasonography. Thirty-five were hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC), 8 metastatic tumors, 9 hemangiomas (HG), 2 hepatic abscesses, and 2 hepatic cysts. Significant differences in T1 values were observed not only among the masses but also between masses and either normal tissues or liver cirrhosis. There was, however, no significant difference in T1 values between normal tissues and liver cirrhosis. While MRI was inferior to X-ray CT and AG in detecting HCC, it was slightly superior to X-ray CT in detecting portal invasion of HCC. In the diagnosis of HG, MRI surpassed the other three madalities. In conclusion, MRI may be of great value in the differential diagnosis of hepatic masses. (Namekawa, K.).

  5. The burden of overtreatment: comparison of toxicity between single and combined modality radiation therapy among low risk prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Renjian; Tomaszewski, Jeffrey J; Ward, Kevin C; Uzzo, Robert G; Canter, Daniel J

    2015-02-01

    To compare radiation related toxicities among men with low risk prostate cancer treated with single or multimodal radiation therapy. The SEER-Medicare linked database was used to assess the relationship between treatment type and toxicity among men with low risk prostate cancer treated with brachytherapy (BT), external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), or combined therapy between 2004 and 2007. Inverse probability of treatment weighting was utilized to minimize selection bias and control for confounding. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to explore the relationship between treatment and outcomes. Overall 1915 (43.9%), 1893 (43.4%), and 555 (12.7%) patients were treated with EBRT, BT, and combined therapy, respectively. In univariate analyses, combined modality radiation was more toxic than BT alone for GU incontinence (56.76% versus 49.08%), GU obstruction (21.26% versus 19.70%), and erectile dysfunction (22.52% versus 22.24%) (p combined modality radiation was more toxic for GI bleeding (7.21% versus 6.21%), GU incontinence (56.76% versus 29.24%), GU obstruction (21.26% versus 14.15%), and erectile dysfunction (22.52% versus 15.35%) (p combined modality treatment and lowest for the group treated with EBRT. After multivariate adjustment, EBRT alone demonstrated protective effects against GU obstruction (OR 0.56 [CI 0.50-0.63]), GI bleeding (OR 0.57 [CI 0.48-0.67]), GU incontinence (OR 0.39 [CI 0.36-0.43]), and erectile dysfunction (OR 0.68 [CI 0.61-0.76]) when compared to combined therapy. The use of combined modality radiation therapy in low risk prostate cancer patients is discordant with clinical guidelines and associated with a significantly increased burden of associated toxicity when compared to EBRT monotherapy. Prudent patient selection and judicious use of combined therapy among men with low risk prostate cancer represents a targetable area to reduce the burden of overtreatment.

  6. Multi-modal anatomical optical coherence tomography and CT for in vivo dynamic upper airway imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Santosh; Bu, Ruofei; Price, Hillel; Zdanski, Carlton; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2017-02-01

    We describe a novel, multi-modal imaging protocol for validating quantitative dynamic airway imaging performed using anatomical Optical Coherence Tomography (aOCT). The aOCT system consists of a catheter-based aOCT probe that is deployed via a bronchoscope, while a programmable ventilator is used to control airway pressure. This setup is employed on the bed of a Siemens Biograph CT system capable of performing respiratory-gated acquisitions. In this arrangement the position of the aOCT catheter may be visualized with CT to aid in co-registration. Utilizing this setup we investigate multiple respiratory pressure parameters with aOCT, and respiratory-gated CT, on both ex vivo porcine trachea and live, anesthetized pigs. This acquisition protocol has enabled real-time measurement of airway deformation with simultaneous measurement of pressure under physiologically relevant static and dynamic conditions- inspiratory peak or peak positive airway pressures of 10-40 cm H2O, and 20-30 breaths per minute for dynamic studies. We subsequently compare the airway cross sectional areas (CSA) obtained from aOCT and CT, including the change in CSA at different stages of the breathing cycle for dynamic studies, and the CSA at different peak positive airway pressures for static studies. This approach has allowed us to improve our acquisition methodology and to validate aOCT measurements of the dynamic airway for the first time. We believe that this protocol will prove invaluable for aOCT system development and greatly facilitate translation of OCT systems for airway imaging into the clinical setting.

  7. Observer reliability of arteriovenous malformations grading scales using current imaging modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griessenauer, Christoph J; Miller, Joseph H; Agee, Bonita S; Fisher, Winfield S; Curé, Joel K; Chapman, Philip R; Foreman, Paul M; Fisher, Wilson A M; Witcher, Adam C; Walters, Beverly C

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine observer reliability of frequently used arteriovenous malformation (AVM) grading scales, including the 5-tier Spetzler-Martin scale, the 3-tier Spetzler-Ponce scale, and the Pollock-Flickinger radiosurgery-based scale, using current imaging modalities in a setting closely resembling routine clinical practice. Five experienced raters, including 1 vascular neurosurgeon, 2 neuroradiologists, and 2 senior neurosurgical residents independently reviewed 15 MRI studies, 15 CT angiograms, and 15 digital subtraction angiograms obtained at the time of initial diagnosis. Assessments of 5 scans of each imaging modality were repeated for measurement of intrarater reliability. Three months after the initial assessment, raters reassessed those scans where there was disagreement. In this second assessment, raters were asked to justify their rating with comments and illustrations. Generalized kappa (κ) analysis for multiple raters, Kendall's coefficient of concordance (W), and interclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were applied to determine interrater reliability. For intrarater reliability analysis, Cohen's kappa (κ), Kendall's correlation coefficient (tau-b), and ICC were used to assess repeat measurement agreement for each rater. Interrater reliability for the overall 5-tier Spetzler-Martin scale was fair to good (ICC = 0.69) to extremely strong (Kendall's W = 0.73) on initial assessment and improved on reassessment. Assessment of CT angiograms resulted in the highest agreement, followed by MRI and digital subtraction angiography. Agreement for the overall 3-tier Spetzler-Ponce grade was fair to good (ICC = 0.68) to strong (Kendall's W = 0.70) on initial assessment, improved on reassessment, and was comparable to agreement for the 5-tier Spetzler-Martin scale. Agreement for the overall Pollock-Flickinger radiosurgery-based grade was excellent (ICC = 0.89) to extremely strong (Kendall's W = 0.81). Intrarater reliability for the overall 5

  8. Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of Dual-Modality Glyco-Nanoparticles for Tumor Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Yang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available d-Glucosamine (DG was conjugated to a core-cross linked polymeric micelle (CCPM system equipped with both a near-infrared fluorophore (NIRF and a gamma emitter (111In. The resultant nano-scale tumor-targeting imaging tracer, 111In-DG-NIRF-CCPM, selectively accumulated in a human epithelial carcinoma A-431 xenograft model in mice. At 24 hrs post injection, the tumor uptake was 2.62 ± 0.80 % of the injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g. Tumors were clearly delineated in both single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and optical imaging. The results suggest that the prepared imaging tracer is a promising agent for tumor diagnosis.

  9. Towards simultaneous single emission microscopy and magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Liang

    In recent years, the combined nuclear imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has drawn extensive research effort. They can provide simultaneously acquired anatomical and functional information inside the human/small animal body in vivo. In this dissertation, the development of an ultrahigh resolution MR-compatible SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) system that can be operated inside a pre-existing clinical MR scanner for simultaneous dual-modality imaging of small animals will be discussed. This system is constructed with 40 small pixel CdTe detector modules assembled in a fully stationary ring SPECT geometry. Series of experiments have demonstrated that this system is capable of providing an imaging resolution of CdTe detector module that we recently developed. Each module consists of CdTe detectors having an overall size of 2.2 cm x 1.1 cm, divided into 64 x 32 pixels of 350 mum in size. A novel hybrid pixel-waveform (HPWF) readout system is also designed to alleviate several challenges for using small-pixel CdTe detectors in ultrahigh-resolution SPECT imaging applications. The HPWF system utilizes a modified version of a 2048-channel 2-D CMOS ASIC to readout the anode pixel, and a digitizing circuitry to sample the signal waveform induced on the cathode. The cathode waveform acquired with the HPWF circuitry offers excellent spatial resolution, energy resolution and depth of interaction (DOI) information, even with the presence of excessive charge-sharing/charge-loss between the small anode pixels. The HPWF CdTe detector is designed and constructed with a minimum amount of ferromagnetic materials, to ensure the MR-compatibility. To achieve sub-500?m imaging resolution, two special designed SPECT apertures have been constructed with different pinhole sizes of 300?m and 500?m respectively. It has 40 pinhole inserts that are made of cast platinum (90%)-iridium (10%) alloy, which provides the maximum stopping power and are compatible with MR

  10. Single photon imaging. New instrumentation and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehllehner, G.; Colsher, J.

    1981-01-01

    The performance of Anger scintillation cameras continues to be enhanced through a series of small improvements which result in significantly better imaging characteristics. The most recent changes in camera design consist of: (1) the introduction of photomultipliers with better photocathode and electron collection efficiencies, (2) the use of thinner (3/8 or 1/4 in) crystals giving slightly better intrinsic resolution for low gamma-ray energies, (3) inclusion of a spatially varying energy window to compensate for variations of light collection efficiency, (4) event-by-event, real-time distortion removal for uniformity correction, and (5) introduction of new methods to improve the count-rate capability. Whereas some of these improvements are due to better understanding of the fundamentals of camera design, others are the result of technological advances in electronic components such as analogue-to-digital converters, microprocessors and high-density digital memories. The development of single photon tomography has developed along two parallel paths. Multipinhole and rotating slant-hole collimator attachments provide some degree of longitudinal tomography, and are currently being applied to cardiac imaging. At the same time rotating camera systems capable of transverse as well as longitudinal imaging are being refined technically and evaluated clinically. Longitudinal tomography is of limited use in quantitative studies and is likely to be an interim solution to three-dimensional imaging. Rotating camera systems, on the other hand, not only provide equal resolution in all three dimensions but are also capable of providing quantitative accuracy. This is the result of progress in attenuation correction and the design of special collimators. Single photon tomography provides a small but noticeable improvement in diagnostic accuracy which is likely to result in widespread use of rotating camera systems in the future

  11. Variability of clinical presentation of hepatic artery thrombosis in pediatric liver transplantation: Role of imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pariente, D.; Riou, J.Y.; Schmit, P.; Verlhac, S.; Chaumont, P.; Bernard, O.; Devictor, D.; Gauthier, F.; Houssin, D.

    1990-01-01

    Among a series of 90 pediatric liver transplantations, 9 cases of hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT) in 8 patients are reported. All cases were diagnosed in the first two weeks and confirmed angiographically and surgically. Clinical presentation was often unreliable with only 2 cases showing the typical pattern of massive hepatic necrosis. Five cases presented with biliary complications and in 2 cases, HAT was discovered fortuitously on duplex sonography. The role of imaging modalities is emphasized. Duplex sonography is the best non-invasive screening method and we recommend a routine daily examination in the first 2 weeks. CT is the most useful method to assess the extension of liver infarction. PTC remains necessary to evaluate biliary complications and to plan the best therapeutic approach in this devastating event. Two patients died, 2 had to be retransplanted (one patient twice) and are doing well, 2 are on a waiting list for retransplantation and one underwent an emergency surgical arterial desobstruction and is completely asymptomatic. (orig.)

  12. Machine learning techniques for breast cancer computer aided diagnosis using different image modalities: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassin, Nisreen I R; Omran, Shaimaa; El Houby, Enas M F; Allam, Hemat

    2018-03-01

    The high incidence of breast cancer in women has increased significantly in the recent years. Physician experience of diagnosing and detecting breast cancer can be assisted by using some computerized features extraction and classification algorithms. This paper presents the conduction and results of a systematic review (SR) that aims to investigate the state of the art regarding the computer aided diagnosis/detection (CAD) systems for breast cancer. The SR was conducted using a comprehensive selection of scientific databases as reference sources, allowing access to diverse publications in the field. The scientific databases used are Springer Link (SL), Science Direct (SD), IEEE Xplore Digital Library, and PubMed. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined and applied to each retrieved work to select those of interest. From 320 studies retrieved, 154 studies were included. However, the scope of this research is limited to scientific and academic works and excludes commercial interests. This survey provides a general analysis of the current status of CAD systems according to the used image modalities and the machine learning based classifiers. Potential research studies have been discussed to create a more objective and efficient CAD systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Three Different Imaging Modalities of a Patient with the Aortic Coarctation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Khameneh Bagheri

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The patient was a 19 year-old woman with the diagnosis of resistant hypertension, although she was under treatment of three classes of anti-hypertensive drugs (beta blocker, angiotensin receptor blocker, diuretic for more than one year. In physical examination there was only a significant difference between the systolic blood pressure of upper and lower extremities (200 vs. 120 mmHg, without any other remarkable finding. Three different imaging modalities (echocardiography (Figure 1, CT angiography (Figure 2, conventional aortography (Figure 3 confirmed the aortic coarctation at 30 mm after left subclavian artery origin, with the 3.5-4 mm diameter of the narrowest segment. She underwent implantation of a self-expanding aortic stent and therefore the systolic pressure gradient decreased from 90 to 15 mmHg. After three months, her blood pressure was stable on 110/80 mmHg, while she received only metoprolol 25 mg twice daily and follow-up echocardiography showed 15-20 mmHg pressure gradient through the stent.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging versus Computed Tomography and Different Imaging Modalities in Evaluation of Sinonasal Neoplasms Diagnosed by Histopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Gomaa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The study purpose was to detect the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI compared to computed tomography (CT and different imaging modalities as conventional radiology in evaluation of sinonasal neoplasms diagnosed by Histopathology. Methods Thirty patients (16 males and 14 females were complaining of symptoms related to sinonasal tract. After thorough clinical and local examination, the patients were subjected to the following: conventional radiography, CT, MRI, and histopathological examination. Results The nasal cavity was the most commonly involved site with sinonasal malignancies followed by the maxillary sinuses. The least commonly affected site was the frontal sinuses. Benign sinonasal tumors were present in 14 cases. The most common benign lesion was juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (6 cases, followed by inverted papilloma (3 cases. While malignant sinonasal tumors were present in 16 cases, squamous cell carcinoma was present in 5 cases, and undifferentiated carcinoma, in 3 cases. Lymphoepithelioma and non-Hodgkin lymphomas were present in 2 cases each, while adenocarcinoma, chondrosarcoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma were present in 1 case each. Conclusion MRI with its superior soft tissue contrast and multiplanar capability is superior to CT in pretreatment evaluation of primary malignant tumors of sinonasal cavity.

  15. Application of multi-modality image coregistration in paediatric prosthetic endocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitsos, T.; Chung, D.K.; Howman-Giles, R.; Lau, Y.H.; University of Technology, Sydney, NSW

    2003-01-01

    This is a case where coregistration of Gallium and chest CT scans provided important clinical information which had a significant impact on management decisions. A 13-year-old girl from Noumea was transferred to our hospital for further management of S.haemolyticus bacteraemia. She had a history of complex congenital heart disease, requiring several cardiac surgical procedures. Seven months earlier she had a patch repair of the ventricular septum and formation of a right ventricle to pulmonary artery conduit. On admission she was generally unwell and had hemoptysis. She had fever to 39.9 deg C, oximetry of 83 per cent on room air, finger clubbing and a cardiac murmur. Chest X-ray and CT scans showed widespread pulmonary consolidation with bilateral pleural effusions. An echocardiogram showed no evidence of endocarditis. The crucial diagnostic dilemma was whether she had pneumonia or prosthetic endocarditis: the latter was more ominous and entailed high risk surgery. A Gallium whole body scan with chest SPECT showed focal localisation in the right mid chest. However, its location could not be confidently defined. A specifically developed computer program was used to co-register the Gallium SPECT and chest CT scans. The co-registered images conclusively localised the Gallium scan lesion to the prosthetic pulmonary outflow conduit, consistent with endocarditis. This triggered referral for cardiac MRI, which confirmed the diagnosis. In summary co-registration allowed precise structural localisation of focal Gallium uptake in the prosthetic pulmonary outflow conduit, with profound impact on the patient's diagnosis and subsequent management. This is an example of the potential benefits of co-registering structural and functional imaging modalities. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  16. Fast single image dehazing based on image fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haibo; Yang, Jie; Wu, Zhengping; Zhang, Qingnian

    2015-01-01

    Images captured in foggy weather conditions often fade the colors and reduce the contrast of the observed objects. An efficient image fusion method is proposed to remove haze from a single input image. First, the initial medium transmission is estimated based on the dark channel prior. Second, the method adopts an assumption that the degradation level affected by haze of each region is the same, which is similar to the Retinex theory, and uses a simple Gaussian filter to get the coarse medium transmission. Then, pixel-level fusion is achieved between the initial medium transmission and coarse medium transmission. The proposed method can recover a high-quality haze-free image based on the physical model, and the complexity of the proposed method is only a linear function of the number of input image pixels. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can allow a very fast implementation and achieve better restoration for visibility and color fidelity compared to some state-of-the-art methods.

  17. A study of multi-modality imaging for three-dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajasekar, D.

    2004-01-01

    Integration of information from multiple imaging modalities like CT/MRI/SPECT/PET helps in management of cancer, from tumor detection to assessment of treatment efficacy since each imaging modality provides unique information about the tumor and normal structures. This Ph.D. study has been aimed at evaluation of multi-modality imaging in target localization and radiation treatment planning in patients with malignant glioma undergoing radiotherapy. Variations of gross tumor and the edema volumes delineated by a radiologist on CT and MRI scans were addressed. These scans were registered and transferred to the treatment planning system (TPS) using Windows based automatic image registration software developed in house using AIR routines (Roger Woods, UCLA). QA tests were designed and tested for the 3D automatic target expansion algorithm of the treatment planning system. The influences of variation of target volumes in CT and MRI images on cumulative dose distribution were also analyzed. Software for quantitative analysis of DVHs has been developed (for Isis-3D TPS) and results showed the importance of incorporation of targets from multiple imaging modalities. A novel approach to study the radiation-induced changes in normal appearing white matter (NAWM) using T2 and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) maps was developed. The study demonstrated dose-dependent changes of the MTR values and reversal of MTR values seen for doses <40 Gy. However, the T2 maps did not show any dose depended changes within the time period studied. The following in-house software tools were developed to accomplish various tasks of the thesis work: (a) Windows based automatic image registration (AIR) of multi-modality images suitable for radiotherapy planning, (b) to preprocess 'bitmap' images from film scanner suitable for AIR software, (c) to transfer registered ''tiff'' images into the Isis-3D planning system, (d) quantitative analysis of DVH curves generated by the Isis-3D system, and (e

  18. WE-H-206-02: Recent Advances in Multi-Modality Molecular Imaging of Small Animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsui, B.

    2016-01-01

    Lihong V. Wang: Photoacoustic tomography (PAT), combining non-ionizing optical and ultrasonic waves via the photoacoustic effect, provides in vivo multiscale functional, metabolic, and molecular imaging. Broad applications include imaging of the breast, brain, skin, esophagus, colon, vascular system, and lymphatic system in humans or animals. Light offers rich contrast but does not penetrate biological tissue in straight paths as x-rays do. Consequently, high-resolution pure optical imaging (e.g., confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, and optical coherence tomography) is limited to penetration within the optical diffusion limit (∼1 mm in the skin). Ultrasonic imaging, on the contrary, provides fine spatial resolution but suffers from both poor contrast in early-stage tumors and strong speckle artifacts. In PAT, pulsed laser light penetrates tissue and generates a small but rapid temperature rise, which induces emission of ultrasonic waves due to thermoelastic expansion. The ultrasonic waves, orders of magnitude less scattering than optical waves, are then detected to form high-resolution images of optical absorption at depths up to 7 cm, conquering the optical diffusion limit. PAT is the only modality capable of imaging across the length scales of organelles, cells, tissues, and organs (up to whole-body small animals) with consistent contrast. This rapidly growing technology promises to enable multiscale biological research and accelerate translation from microscopic laboratory discoveries to macroscopic clinical practice. PAT may also hold the key to label-free early detection of cancer by in vivo quantification of hypermetabolism, the quintessential hallmark of malignancy. Learning Objectives: To understand the contrast mechanism of PAT To understand the multiscale applications of PAT Benjamin M. W. Tsui: Multi-modality molecular imaging instrumentation and techniques have been major developments in small animal imaging that has contributed significantly

  19. Modal analysis and dispersion curves of an elliptical W-type single mode fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Y.; Maurya, Jitendra Bahadur; Singh, Vivek; Saini, J. P.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the propagation of electromagnetic waves in W-type elliptical dielectric optical fiber having various cladding layers is presented. The presented fiber has concentric core and cladding which have elliptical cross section and the refractive index of one of the inner cladding (the cladding between first clad and last clad) maximum. Using elliptic cylindrical coordinates, boundary conditions are derived and longitudinal field components for the even and odd modes are obtained. The characteristic equation for the fiber to be studied is determined by solving the Mathieu ( q > 0) and the modified Mathieu functions ( q < 0). In order to study the fundamental mode, the modal index m is put as m = 1. Finally, the cutoff frequencies for several lower order modes have been calculated and their dispersion characteristics are plotted. The effects of elliptical eccentricity e on the mode cutoff frequencies and mode transmissions are also addressed. The analysis shows that one can control the propagation property of optical fiber by increasing the number of inner claddings. These claddings provide additional degree of freedom to control the modes.

  20. Combined Modality Management of Retroperitoneal Sarcomas: A Single-Institution Series of 121 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Andrew J; Zagars, Gunar K; Torres, Keila E; Hunt, Kelly K; Cormier, Janice N; Feig, Barry W; Guadagnolo, B Ashleigh

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate local control, survival outcomes, and complication rates of patients treated with aggressive surgery and radiation therapy (RT) for retroperitoneal sarcomas (RPS). We reviewed the medical records of 121 consecutive patients treated for RPS with surgery and RT between 1965 and 2012. The most common histology was liposarcoma (n = 42; 35%). The median follow-up was 100 months (range: 20-467 months). Eighty-six patients (71%) were treated for initial presentation of RPS, and 35 patients (29%) presented with and were treated for RPS recurrence. RT was preoperative in 88 patients (73%; median dose: 50.4 Gy) and postoperative in 33 patients (27%; median dose: 55 Gy). Five-year local control and overall survival rates were 56% and 57%, respectively. Two factors were associated with higher risk of any intra-abdominal recurrence at 5 years: positive or uncertain margins (58% vs 30% for negative margins, P therapy. Given the complications associated with postoperative radiation therapy, we recommend that preoperative radiation therapy is the preferred strategy when combined modality therapy is recommended. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. What are the advantages and disadvantages of imaging modalities to diagnose wear-related corrosion problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Denis; Barrack, Robert L; Potter, Hollis G

    2014-12-01

    Adverse tissue reactions are known to occur after total hip arthroplasty using both conventional and metal-on-metal (MoM) bearings and after MoM hip resurfacing arthroplasty (SRA). A variety of imaging tools, including ultrasound (US), CT, and MRI, have been used to diagnose problems associated with wear after MoM hip arthroplasty and corrosion at the head-trunnion junction; however, the relative advantages and disadvantages of each remain a source of controversy. The purposes of this review were to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of (1) US; (2) CT; and (3) MRI as diagnostic tools in the assessment of wear-related corrosion problems after hip arthroplasty. A systematic literature review was performed through Medline, EMBASE, Scopus CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library without time restriction using search terms related to THA, SRA, US, CT, MRI, adverse tissue reactions, and corrosion. Inclusion criteria were Level I through IV studies in the English language, whereas expert opinions and case reports were excluded. The quality of included studies was judged by their level of evidence, method of intervention allocation, outcome assessments, and followup of patients. Four hundred ninety unique results were returned and 40 articles were reviewed. The prevalence of adverse local tissue reactions in both asymptomatic and symptomatic patients varies based on the method of evaluation (US, CT, MRI) and imaging protocols. US is accessible and relatively inexpensive, yet has not been used to report synovial thicknesses in the setting of wear-related corrosion. CT scans are highly sensitive and provide information regarding component positioning but are limited in providing enhanced soft tissue contrast and require ionizing radiation. MRI has shown promise in predicting both the presence and severity of adverse local tissue reactions but is more expensive. All three imaging modalities have a role in the assessment of adverse local tissue reactions and tribocorrosion

  2. Combined Modality Management of Retroperitoneal Sarcomas: A Single-Institution Series of 121 Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, Andrew J.; Zagars, Gunar K.; Torres, Keila E.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Cormier, Janice N.; Feig, Barry W.; Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate local control, survival outcomes, and complication rates of patients treated with aggressive surgery and radiation therapy (RT) for retroperitoneal sarcomas (RPS). Methods and Materials: We reviewed the medical records of 121 consecutive patients treated for RPS with surgery and RT between 1965 and 2012. The most common histology was liposarcoma (n=42; 35%). The median follow-up was 100 months (range: 20-467 months). Eighty-six patients (71%) were treated for initial presentation of RPS, and 35 patients (29%) presented with and were treated for RPS recurrence. RT was preoperative in 88 patients (73%; median dose: 50.4 Gy) and postoperative in 33 patients (27%; median dose: 55 Gy). Results: Five-year local control and overall survival rates were 56% and 57%, respectively. Two factors were associated with higher risk of any intra-abdominal recurrence at 5 years: positive or uncertain margins (58% vs 30% for negative margins, P<.001; hazard ratio [HR]: 2.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.6-4.8) and disease recurrence after previous resection (76% vs 31% for de novo RPS, P<.001; HR: 4.4; 95% CI: 2.5-7.5). The 10-year complication rate was 5%, and RT-related complications were associated with postoperative RT (P<.001) and RT dose of ≥60 Gy (P<.001). Conclusions: Intra-abdominal RPS recurrence continues to be a significant challenge despite the use of aggressive surgery and radiation therapy. Given the complications associated with postoperative radiation therapy, we recommend that preoperative radiation therapy is the preferred strategy when combined modality therapy is recommended

  3. Combined Modality Management of Retroperitoneal Sarcomas: A Single-Institution Series of 121 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, Andrew J.; Zagars, Gunar K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Torres, Keila E.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Cormier, Janice N.; Feig, Barry W. [Department of Surgical Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh, E-mail: aguadagn@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Health Services Research, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate local control, survival outcomes, and complication rates of patients treated with aggressive surgery and radiation therapy (RT) for retroperitoneal sarcomas (RPS). Methods and Materials: We reviewed the medical records of 121 consecutive patients treated for RPS with surgery and RT between 1965 and 2012. The most common histology was liposarcoma (n=42; 35%). The median follow-up was 100 months (range: 20-467 months). Eighty-six patients (71%) were treated for initial presentation of RPS, and 35 patients (29%) presented with and were treated for RPS recurrence. RT was preoperative in 88 patients (73%; median dose: 50.4 Gy) and postoperative in 33 patients (27%; median dose: 55 Gy). Results: Five-year local control and overall survival rates were 56% and 57%, respectively. Two factors were associated with higher risk of any intra-abdominal recurrence at 5 years: positive or uncertain margins (58% vs 30% for negative margins, P<.001; hazard ratio [HR]: 2.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.6-4.8) and disease recurrence after previous resection (76% vs 31% for de novo RPS, P<.001; HR: 4.4; 95% CI: 2.5-7.5). The 10-year complication rate was 5%, and RT-related complications were associated with postoperative RT (P<.001) and RT dose of ≥60 Gy (P<.001). Conclusions: Intra-abdominal RPS recurrence continues to be a significant challenge despite the use of aggressive surgery and radiation therapy. Given the complications associated with postoperative radiation therapy, we recommend that preoperative radiation therapy is the preferred strategy when combined modality therapy is recommended.

  4. Evaluation of multiple image-based modalities for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of prostate carcinoma: A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayyas, Essa; Chetty, Indrin J.; Chetvertkov, Mikhail; Wen, Ning; Neicu, Toni; Nurushev, Teamor; Ren Lei; Pradhan, Deepak; Movsas, Benjamin; Elshaikh, Mohamed A.; Lu Mei; Stricker, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Setup errors and prostate intrafraction motion are main sources of localization uncertainty in prostate cancer radiation therapy. This study evaluates four different imaging modalities 3D ultrasound (US), kV planar images, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), and implanted electromagnetic transponders (Calypso/Varian) to assess inter- and intrafraction localization errors during intensity-modulated radiation therapy based treatment of prostate cancer. Methods: Twenty-seven prostate cancer patients were enrolled in a prospective IRB-approved study and treated to a total dose of 75.6 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction). Overall, 1100 fractions were evaluated. For each fraction, treatment targets were localized using US, kV planar images, and CBCT in a sequence defined to determine setup offsets relative to the patient skin tattoos, intermodality differences, and residual errors for each patient and patient cohort. Planning margins, following van Herk's formalism, were estimated based on error distributions. Calypso-based localization was not available for the first eight patients, therefore centroid positions of implanted gold-seed markers imaged prior to and immediately following treatment were used as a motion surrogate during treatment. For the remaining 19 patients, Calypso transponders were used to assess prostate intrafraction motion. Results: The means (μ), and standard deviations (SD) of the systematic (Σ) and random errors (σ) of interfraction prostate shifts (relative to initial skin tattoo positioning), as evaluated using CBCT, kV, and US, averaged over all patients and fractions, were: [μ CBCT = (−1.2, 0.2, 1.1) mm, Σ CBCT = (3.0, 1.4, 2.4) mm, σ CBCT = (3.2, 2.2, 2.5) mm], [μ kV = (−2.9, −0.4, 0.5) mm, Σ kV = (3.4, 3.1, 2.6) mm, σ kV = (2.9, 2.0, 2.4) mm], and [μ US = (−3.6, −1.4, 0.0) mm, Σ US = (3.3, 3.5, 2.8) mm, σ US = (4.1, 3.8, 3.6) mm], in the anterior–posterior (A/P), superior–inferior (S/I), and the left–right (L

  5. Evaluation of multiple image-based modalities for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of prostate carcinoma: A prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayyas, Essa; Chetty, Indrin J.; Chetvertkov, Mikhail; Wen, Ning; Neicu, Toni; Nurushev, Teamor; Ren Lei; Pradhan, Deepak; Movsas, Benjamin; Elshaikh, Mohamed A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Lu Mei [Department of Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit Michigan 48202 (United States); Stricker, Hans [Department of Urology, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Setup errors and prostate intrafraction motion are main sources of localization uncertainty in prostate cancer radiation therapy. This study evaluates four different imaging modalities 3D ultrasound (US), kV planar images, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), and implanted electromagnetic transponders (Calypso/Varian) to assess inter- and intrafraction localization errors during intensity-modulated radiation therapy based treatment of prostate cancer. Methods: Twenty-seven prostate cancer patients were enrolled in a prospective IRB-approved study and treated to a total dose of 75.6 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction). Overall, 1100 fractions were evaluated. For each fraction, treatment targets were localized using US, kV planar images, and CBCT in a sequence defined to determine setup offsets relative to the patient skin tattoos, intermodality differences, and residual errors for each patient and patient cohort. Planning margins, following van Herk's formalism, were estimated based on error distributions. Calypso-based localization was not available for the first eight patients, therefore centroid positions of implanted gold-seed markers imaged prior to and immediately following treatment were used as a motion surrogate during treatment. For the remaining 19 patients, Calypso transponders were used to assess prostate intrafraction motion. Results: The means ({mu}), and standard deviations (SD) of the systematic ({Sigma}) and random errors ({sigma}) of interfraction prostate shifts (relative to initial skin tattoo positioning), as evaluated using CBCT, kV, and US, averaged over all patients and fractions, were: [{mu}{sub CBCT}= (-1.2, 0.2, 1.1) mm, {Sigma}{sub CBCT}= (3.0, 1.4, 2.4) mm, {sigma}{sub CBCT}= (3.2, 2.2, 2.5) mm], [{mu}{sub kV}= (-2.9, -0.4, 0.5) mm, {Sigma}{sub kV}= (3.4, 3.1, 2.6) mm, {sigma}{sub kV}= (2.9, 2.0, 2.4) mm], and [{mu}{sub US}= (-3.6, -1.4, 0.0) mm, {Sigma}{sub US}= (3.3, 3.5, 2.8) mm, {sigma}{sub US}= (4.1, 3.8, 3.6) mm], in the anterior

  6. Single photon emission photography/magnetic resonance imaging (SPECT/MRI) visualization for frontal-lobe-damaged regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokking, Rik; Zuiderveld, Karel J.; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Viergever, Max A.

    1994-09-01

    We present multi-modality visualization strategies to convey information contained in registered Single Photon Emission Photography (SPECT) and Magnetic Resonance (MR) images of the brain. Multi-modality visualization provides a means to retrieve valuable information from the data which might otherwise remain obscured. Here we use MRI as an anatomical framework for functional information acquired with SPECT. This is part of clinical research studying the change of functionality caused by a frontal lobe damaged region. A number of known and newly developed techniques for the integrated visualization of SPECT and MR images will be discussed.

  7. MO-DE-210-03: Ultrasound imaging is an attractive method for image guided radiation treatment (IGRT), by itself or to complement other imaging modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, K. [Johns Hopkins University: Development of Intra-Fraction Soft Tissue Monitoring with Ultrasound Imaging (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Ultrasound imaging is an attractive method for image guided radiation treatment (IGRT), by itself or to complement other imaging modalities. It is inexpensive, portable and provides good soft tissue contrast. For challenging soft tissue targets such as pancreatic cancer, ultrasound imaging can be used in combination with pre-treatment MRI and/or CT to transfer important anatomical features for target localization at time of treatment. The non-invasive and non-ionizing nature of ultrasound imaging is particularly powerful for intra-fraction localization and monitoring. Recognizing these advantages, efforts are being made to incorporate novel robotic approaches to position and manipulate the ultrasound probe during irradiation. These recent enabling developments hold potential to bring ultrasound imaging to a new level of IGRT applications. However, many challenges, not limited to image registration, robotic deployment, probe interference and image acquisition rate, need to be addressed to realize the full potential of IGRT with ultrasound imaging. Learning Objectives: Understand the benefits and limitations in using ultrasound to augment MRI and/or CT for motion monitoring during radiation therapy delivery. Understanding passive and active robotic approaches to implement ultrasound imaging for intra-fraction monitoring. Understand issues of probe interference with radiotherapy treatment. Understand the critical clinical workflow for effective and reproducible IGRT using ultrasound guidance. The work of X.L. is supported in part by Elekta; J.W. and K.D. is supported in part by a NIH grant R01 CA161613 and by Elekta; D.H. is support in part by a NIH grant R41 CA174089.

  8. Screen-detected versus interval cancers: Effect of imaging modality and breast density in the Flemish Breast Cancer Screening Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmermans, Lore; Bacher, Klaus; Thierens, Hubert [Ghent University, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, QCC-Gent, Ghent (Belgium); Bleyen, Luc; Herck, Koen van [Ghent University, Centrum voor Preventie en Vroegtijdige Opsporing van Kanker, Ghent (Belgium); Lemmens, Kim; Ongeval, Chantal van; Steen, Andre van [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Martens, Patrick [Centrum voor Kankeropsporing, Bruges (Belgium); Brabander, Isabel de [Belgian Cancer Registry, Brussels (Belgium); Goossens, Mathieu [UZ Brussel, Dienst Kankerpreventie, Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-09-15

    To investigate if direct radiography (DR) performs better than screen-film mammography (SF) and computed radiography (CR) in dense breasts in a decentralized organised Breast Cancer Screening Programme. To this end, screen-detected versus interval cancers were studied in different BI-RADS density classes for these imaging modalities. The study cohort consisted of 351,532 women who participated in the Flemish Breast Cancer Screening Programme in 2009 and 2010. Information on screen-detected and interval cancers, breast density scores of radiologist second readers, and imaging modality was obtained by linkage of the databases of the Centre of Cancer Detection and the Belgian Cancer Registry. Overall, 67% of occurring breast cancers are screen detected and 33% are interval cancers, with DR performing better than SF and CR. The interval cancer rate increases gradually with breast density, regardless of modality. In the high-density class, the interval cancer rate exceeds the cancer detection rate for SF and CR, but not for DR. DR is superior to SF and CR with respect to cancer detection rates for high-density breasts. To reduce the high interval cancer rate in dense breasts, use of an additional imaging technique in screening can be taken into consideration. (orig.)

  9. Image-guided pro-angiogenic therapy in diabetic stroke mouse models using a multi-modal nanoprobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ying-Ying; Gao, Xihui; Wang, Yuan-Cheng; Peng, Xin-Gui; Chang, Di; Zheng, Shuyan; Li, Cong; Ju, Shenghong

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of pro-angiogenic therapy is difficult to evaluate with current diagnostic modalities. The objectives were to develop a non-invasive imaging strategy to define the temporal characteristics of angiogenesis and to evaluate the response to pro-angiogenic therapy in diabetic stroke mouse models. A home-made ανβ3 integrin-targeted multi-modal nanoprobe was intravenously injected into mouse models at set time points after photothrombotic stroke. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging were carried out at 24 h post-injection. Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) were infused into the mouse models of ischemic stroke to stimulate angiogenesis. The peak signal intensity in the ischemic-angiogenic area of diabetic and wild-type mouse models was achieved on day 10, with significantly lower signal enhancement observed in the diabetic models. Although the signal intensity was significantly higher after EPC treatment in both models, the enhancement was less pronounced in the diabetic animals compared with the wild-type controls. Histological analysis revealed that the microvessel density and expression of β3 integrin were correlated with the signal intensity assessed with MRI and NIRF imaging. The non-invasive imaging method could be used for early and accurate evaluation of the response to pro-angiogenic therapy in diabetic stroke models.

  10. Antiangiogenic agents in the treatment of recurrent or newly diagnosed glioblastoma: Analysis of single-agent and combined modality approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beal, Kathryn; Abrey, Lauren E; Gutin, Philip H

    2011-01-01

    Surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and temozolomide in newly diagnosed glioblastoma can prolong survival, but it is not curative. For patients with disease progression after frontline therapy, there is no standard of care, although further surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy may be used. Antiangiogenic therapies may be appropriate for treating glioblastomas because angiogenesis is critical to tumor growth. In a large, noncomparative phase II trial, bevacizumab was evaluated alone and with irinotecan in patients with recurrent glioblastoma; combination treatment was associated with an estimated 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) rate of 50.3%, a median overall survival of 8.9 months, and a response rate of 37.8%. Single-agent bevacizumab also exceeded the predetermined threshold of activity for salvage chemotherapy (6-month PFS rate, 15%), achieving a 6-month PFS rate of 42.6% (p < 0.0001). On the basis of these results and those from another phase II trial, the US Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval of single-agent bevacizumab for the treatment of glioblastoma that has progressed following prior therapy. Potential antiangiogenic agents-such as cilengitide and XL184-also show evidence of single-agent activity in recurrent glioblastoma. Moreover, the use of antiangiogenic agents with radiation at disease progression may improve the therapeutic ratio of single-modality approaches. Overall, these agents appear to be well tolerated, with adverse event profiles similar to those reported in studies of other solid tumors. Further research is needed to determine the role of antiangiogenic therapy in frontline treatment and to identify the optimal schedule and partnering agents for use in combination therapy

  11. Single- and Multiple- Track Location Shear Wave and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging: Matched Comparison of Contrast, CNR, and Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollender, Peter J.; Rosenzweig, Stephen J.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging and shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) use the dynamic response of tissue to impulsive mechanical stimulus to characterize local elasticity. A variant of conventional, multiple track location SWEI (MTL-SWEI), denoted single track location SWEI (STL-SWEI) offers the promise of creating speckle-free shear wave images. This work compares the three imaging modalities using a high push and track beam density combined acquisition sequence to image inclusions of different sizes and contrasts. STL-SWEI is shown to have significantly higher CNR than MTL-SWEI, allowing for operation at higher resolution. ARFI and STL-SWEI perform similarly in the larger inclusions, with STL-SWEI providing better visualization of small targets ≤2.5 mm in diameter. The processing of each modality introduces different trade-offs between smoothness and resolution of edges and structures; these are discussed in detail. PMID:25701531

  12. A Russian Dolls ordering of the Hadamard basis for compressive single-pixel imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ming-Jie; Meng, Ling-Tong; Edgar, Matthew P; Padgett, Miles J; Radwell, Neal

    2017-06-14

    Single-pixel imaging is an alternate imaging technique particularly well-suited to imaging modalities such as hyper-spectral imaging, depth mapping, 3D profiling. However, the single-pixel technique requires sequential measurements resulting in a trade-off between spatial resolution and acquisition time, limiting real-time video applications to relatively low resolutions. Compressed sensing techniques can be used to improve this trade-off. However, in this low resolution regime, conventional compressed sensing techniques have limited impact due to lack of sparsity in the datasets. Here we present an alternative compressed sensing method in which we optimize the measurement order of the Hadamard basis, such that at discretized increments we obtain complete sampling for different spatial resolutions. In addition, this method uses deterministic acquisition, rather than the randomized sampling used in conventional compressed sensing. This so-called 'Russian Dolls' ordering also benefits from minimal computational overhead for image reconstruction. We find that this compressive approach performs as well as other compressive sensing techniques with greatly simplified post processing, resulting in significantly faster image reconstruction. Therefore, the proposed method may be useful for single-pixel imaging in the low resolution, high-frame rate regime, or video-rate acquisition.

  13. PSMA-Targeted Nano-Conjugates as Dual-Modality (MRI/PET) Imaging Probes for the Non-Invasive Detection of Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sun, Xiankai

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop dual modality imaging probes for the detection of prostate cancer by doping radioisotopes to iron oxide nanoparticles, so that the sensitivity and specificity...

  14. Cone Beam CT vs. Fan Beam CT: A Comparison of Image Quality and Dose Delivered Between Two Differing CT Imaging Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Lawrence; Weidlich, Georg A

    2016-09-12

    A comparison of image quality and dose delivered between two differing computed tomography (CT) imaging modalities-fan beam and cone beam-was performed. A literature review of quantitative analyses for various image quality aspects such as uniformity, signal-to-noise ratio, artifact presence, spatial resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), and low contrast resolution was generated. With these aspects quantified, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) shows a superior spatial resolution to that of fan beam, while fan beam shows a greater ability to produce clear and anatomically correct images with better soft tissue differentiation. The results indicate that fan beam CT produces superior images to that of on-board imaging (OBI) cone beam CT systems, while providing a considerably less dose to the patient.

  15. Geiger mode mapping: A new imaging modality for focused ion microprobes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Changyi; Hougaard, Christiaan R. [School of Physics, ARC Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Bielejec, Edward; Caroll, Malcolm S. [Sandia National Laboratories, POB 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Jamieson, David N., E-mail: d.jamieson@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, ARC Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia)

    2015-04-01

    Geiger mode detectors fabricated in silicon are used to detect incident photons with high sensitivity. They are operated with large internal electric fields so that a single electron–hole pair can trigger an avalanche breakdown which generates a signal in an external circuit. We have applied a modified version of the ion beam induced charge technique in a nuclear microprobe system to investigate the application of Geiger mode detectors to detect discrete ion impacts. Our detectors are fabricated with an architecture based on the avalanche diode structure and operated with a transient bias voltage that activates the Geiger mode. In this mode avalanche breakdown is triggered by ion impact followed by diffusion of an electron–hole pair into the sensitive volume. The avalanche breakdown is quenched by removal of the transient bias voltage which is synchronized with a beam gate. An alternative operation mode is possible at lower bias voltages where the avalanche process self-quenches and the device exhibits linear charge gain as a consequence. Incorporation of such a device into a silicon substrate potentially allows the exceptional sensitivity of Geiger mode to register an electron–hole pair from sub-10 keV donor atom implants for the deterministic construction of shallow arrays of single atoms in the substrate required for emerging quantum technologies. Our characterization system incorporates a fast electrostatic ion beam switcher gated by the transient device bias, duration 800 ns, with a time delay, duration 500 ns, that allows for both the ion time of flight and the diffusion of the electron–hole pairs in the substrate into the sensitive region of the device following ion impact of a scanned 1 MeV H microbeam. We compare images at the micron scale mapping the response of the device to ion impact operated in both Geiger mode and avalanche (linear) mode for silicon devices engineered with this ultimate-sensitivity detector structure.

  16. Unified framework of face hallucination across multiple modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiang; Liu, Junhui; Li, Wenmin

    2015-02-01

    Face hallucination in a single modality environment has been heavily studied, in real-world environments under multiple modalities is still in its early stage. This paper presents a unified framework to solve face hallucination problem across multiple modalities i.e. different expressions, poses, illuminations. Almost all of the state-of-the-art face superresolution methods only generate a single output with the same modality of the low-resolution input. Our proposed framework is able to generate multiple outputs of different new modalities from only a single low-resolution input. It includes a global transformation with diagonal loading for modeling the mappings among different new facial modalities, and a local position-patch based method with weights compensation for incorporating image details. Experimental results illustrate the superiority of our framework.

  17. Graduating 4th year radiology residents' perception of optimal imaging modalities for neoplasm and trauma: a pilot study from four U.S. universities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias Junior, Jorge [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). School of Medicine; Semelka, Richard C.; Altun, Ersan; Thomas, Sarah L., E-mail: richsem@med.unc.ed [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Balci, N. Cem [Saint Louis University, MO (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Hussain, Shahid M. [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Martin, Diego R. [Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Our purpose was to assess 4th year radiology residents' perception of the optimal imaging modality to investigate neoplasm and trauma. Materials and methods: twenty-seven 4th year radiology residents from four residency programs were surveyed. They were asked about the best imaging modality to evaluate the brain and spine, lungs, abdomen, and the musculoskeletal system. Imaging modalities available were MRI, CT, ultrasound, PET, and Xray. All findings were compared to the ACR appropriateness criteria. Results: MRI was chosen as the best imaging modality to evaluate brain, spine, abdominal, and musculoskeletal neoplasm in 96.3%, 100%, 70.4%, and 63% of residents, respectively. CT was chosen by 88.9% to evaluate neoplasm of the lung. Optimal imaging modality to evaluate trauma was CT for brain injuries (100%), spine (92.6%), lung (96.3%), abdomen (92.6%), and major musculoskeletal trauma (74.1%); MRI was chosen for sports injury (96.3%). There was agreement with ACR appropriateness criteria. Conclusion: residents' perception of the best imaging modalities for neoplasm and trauma concurred with the appropriateness criteria by the ACR. (author)

  18. Graduating 4th year radiology residents' perception of optimal imaging modalities for neoplasm and trauma: a pilot study from four U.S. universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Elias Junior

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to assess 4th year radiology residents' perception of the optimal imaging modality to investigate neoplasm and trauma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-seven 4th year radiology residents from four residency programs were surveyed. They were asked about the best imaging modality to evaluate the brain and spine, lungs, abdomen, and the musculoskeletal system. Imaging modalities available were MRI, CT, ultrasound, PET, and X-ray. All findings were compared to the ACR appropriateness criteria. RESULTS: MRI was chosen as the best imaging modality to evaluate brain, spine, abdominal, and musculoskeletal neoplasm in 96.3%, 100%, 70.4%, and 63% of residents, respectively. CT was chosen by 88.9% to evaluate neoplasm of the lung. Optimal imaging modality to evaluate trauma was CT for brain injuries (100%, spine (92.6%, lung (96.3%, abdomen (92.6%, and major musculoskeletal trauma (74.1%; MRI was chosen for sports injury (96.3%. There was agreement with ACR appropriateness criteria. CONCLUSION: Residents' perception of the best imaging modalities for neoplasm and trauma concurred with the appropriateness criteria by the ACR.

  19. Congenital diaphragmatic eventration as a cause of anterior mediastinal mass in the children: imaging modalities and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eren, Suat; Ceviz, Naci; Alper, Fatih

    2004-01-01

    Congenital eventration of the diaphragm, as a cause of mediastinal mass, is an unusual condition and it may be unilateral or bilateral. Although this entity is frequently asymptomatic and firstly detected on the chest radiography, it may be difficult to distinguish a partial eventration from the other diaphragmatic lesions or mediastinal pathologies on the chest radiographs. US may present valuable information about diaphragm integrity with eventration content or the other diaphragmatic pathologies. Although the other imaging modalities such as fluoroscopy, computed tomography, and MR imaging may be performed as adjunct techniques in cases of the diagnosis still in doubt, they are frequently unnecessary after US. Our goal is to present imaging features and management of this entity together with a literature review

  20. Rational chemical design of the next generation of molecular imaging probes based on physics and biology: mixing modalities, colors and signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hisataka; Longmire, Michelle R; Ogawa, Mikako; Choyke, Peter L

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, numerous in vivo molecular imaging probes have been developed. As a consequence, much has been published on the design and synthesis of molecular imaging probes focusing on each modality, each type of material, or each target disease. More recently, second generation molecular imaging probes with unique, multi-functional, or multiplexed characteristics have been designed. This critical review focuses on (i) molecular imaging using combinations of modalities and signals that employ the full range of the electromagnetic spectra, (ii) optimized chemical design of molecular imaging probes for in vivo kinetics based on biology and physiology across a range of physical sizes, (iii) practical examples of second generation molecular imaging probes designed to extract complementary data from targets using multiple modalities, color, and comprehensive signals (277 references). This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  1. Adaptable Optical Fiber Displacement-Curvature Sensor Based on a Modal Michelson Interferometer with a Tapered Single Mode Fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salceda-Delgado, G; Martinez-Rios, A; Selvas-Aguilar, R; Álvarez-Tamayo, R I; Castillo-Guzman, A; Ibarra-Escamilla, B; Durán-Ramírez, V M; Enriquez-Gomez, L F

    2017-06-02

    A compact, highly sensitive optical fiber displacement and curvature radius sensor is presented. The device consists of an adiabatic bi-conical fused fiber taper spliced to a single-mode fiber (SMF) segment with a flat face end. The bi-conical taper structure acts as a modal coupling device between core and cladding modes for the SMF segment. When the bi-conical taper is bent by an axial displacement, the symmetrical bi-conical shape of the tapered structure is stressed, causing a change in the refractive index profile which becomes asymmetric. As a result, the taper adiabaticity is lost, and interference between modes appears. As the bending increases, a small change in the fringe visibility and a wavelength shift on the periodical reflection spectrum of the in-fiber interferometer is produced. The displacement sensitivity and the spectral periodicity of the device can be adjusted by the proper selection of the SMF length. Sensitivities from around 1.93 to 3.4 nm/mm were obtained for SMF length between 7.5 and 12.5 cm. Both sensor interrogations, wavelength shift and visibility contrast, can be used to measure displacement and curvature radius magnitudes.

  2. High-performance imaging of stem cells using single-photon emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Moats, Rex A.; Hartsough, Neal E.; Meier, Dirk; Hugg, James W.; Yang, Tang; Gazit, Dan; Pelled, Gadi; Patt, Bradley E.

    2011-10-01

    Radiolabeled cells have been imaged for decades in the field of autoradiography. Recent advances in detector and microelectronics technologies have enabled the new field of "digital autoradiography" which remains limited to ex vivo specimens of thin tissue slices. The 3D field-of-view (FOV) of single cell imaging can be extended to millimeters if the low energy (10-30 keV) photon emissions of radionuclides are used for single-photon nuclear imaging. This new microscope uses a coded aperture foil made of highly attenuating elements such as gold or platinum to form the image as a kind of "lens". The detectors used for single-photon emission microscopy are typically silicon detectors with a pixel pitch less than 60 μm. The goal of this work is to image radiolabeled mesenchymal stem cells in vivo in an animal model of tendon repair processes. Single-photon nuclear imaging is an attractive modality for translational medicine since the labeled cells can be imaged simultaneously with the reparative processes by using the dual-isotope imaging technique. The details our microscope's two-layer gold aperture and the operation of the energy-dispersive, pixellated silicon detector are presented along with the first demonstration of energy discrimination with a 57Co source. Cell labeling techniques have been augmented by genetic engineering with the sodium-iodide symporter, a type of reporter gene imaging method that enables in vivo uptake of free 99mTc or an iodine isotope at a time point days or weeks after the insertion of the genetically modified stem cells into the animal model. This microscopy work in animal research may expand to the imaging of reporter-enabled stem cells simultaneously with the expected biological repair process in human clinical trials of stem cell therapies.

  3. First-In-Human Dual-Modality OCT and Near-Infrared Autofluorescence Imaging of Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ughi, Giovanni J.; Wang, Hao; Gerbaud, Edouard; Gardecki, Joseph A.; Fard, Ali M.; Hamidi, Ehsan; Vacas-Jacques, Paulino; Rosenberg, Mireille; Jaffer, Farouc A.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We present the first clinical imaging of human coronary arteries in vivo using a multimodality OCT and near-infrared autofluorescence (NIRAF) intravascular imaging system and catheter. BACKGROUND While intravascular OCT is capable of providing microstructural images of coronary atherosclerotic lesions, it is limited in its capability to ascertain compositional/molecular features of plaque, including the definitive presence of a necrotic core. A recent study in cadaver coronary plaque has shown that endogenous NIRAF is elevated in necrotic core lesions. The combination of these two technologies in one device may therefore provide synergistic data to aid in the diagnosis of coronary pathology in vivo. METHODS We developed a dual-modality intravascular imaging system and 2.6-F catheter that can simultaneously acquire OCT and NIRAF data from the same location on the artery wall. This technology was utilized to obtain volumetric OCT-NIRAF images from 12 patients with coronary artery disease undergoing PCI. Images were acquired during a brief, non-occlusive 3-4 ml/sec contrast purge at a speed of 100 frames per second and a pullback rate of 20 or 40 mm/sec. OCT-NIRAF data were analyzed to determine the distribution of the NIRAF signal with respect to OCT-delineated plaque morphological features. RESULTS High quality intracoronary OCT and NIRAF image data (>50 mm pullback length) were successfully acquired without complication in all patients (17 coronary arteries). The maximum NIRAF signal intensity of each plaque was compared to OCT-defined type, showing a statistically significant difference between plaque types (one-way ANOVA, pOCT fibroatheroma, plaque rupture, and fibroatheroma associated with in-stent restenosis. CONCLUSIONS This first-in-human OCT-NIRAF study demonstrates that dual-modality microstructural and fluorescence intracoronary imaging can be safely and effectively conducted in human patients. Our findings show that NIRAF is associated with a

  4. What Modals Are: Modal Verbs, Modal Words, and Auxiliary Modals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazira A. Kakzhanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The modals are a complicated grammatical phenomenon. As of today, the status of modals is still not precisely defined in the linguistics literature, and they are described under different names: modal verbs, modal words, auxiliary modals, or defective verbs. Modals express the result of the conversion of thought processes (deep structure about the realization of actions into surface structure. As articles determine the status of nouns as indefinite or definite things, modals determine the relation of a person to actions or the quality of an action as realizable or unrealizable. Modals cannot truly be ‘modal verbs’, because they lack the morphological characteristics of verbs (aspect, voice, mood, and tense, and the term ‘defective verb’ is flawed for the same reason. Furthermore, they cannot be ‘auxiliary modals’, because they don’t neutralize their main meanings when they become auxiliary. Thus, I propose to refer to these elements only as modals or modal words.

  5. Single breath-hold MR imaging of liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Jeong; Kim, Seong Hee; Kim, Sun Hee; Chae, Yoo Soon; Chung, Chun Phil; Kim, Yang Sook

    1993-01-01

    Single breath-hold gradient echo images with Small Tip Angle Gradient Echo (STAGE) were evaluated in the study of liver in 16 patients (4 normal liver, 5 hepatoma, 5 cholangiocarcinoma, 1 hemangioma, 1 cavernous transformation of portal vein). We obtained one slice of gradient echo during single breath-hold at the level of pathology defined on conventional spin echo image. Single breath-hold gradient echo images were compared with spin echo images for image quality and artifacts. Single breath-hold gradient image showed improved resolution of vascular detail and excellent contrast between lesion and adjacent normal liver in hepatoma. Cholangiocarcinoma showed decreased contrast between lesion and biliary trees but improved contrast between lesion and blood vessel. Cavernous transformation of portal vein was noted as tortuous vessel of high signal intensity. Single breath-hold gradient echo scan increased vascular artifact, but decreased respiratory artifact leading to improved image quality. Single breath-hold technique can reduce imaging time and improve image quality and may be used as complementary method to the spin echo scan

  6. Prospective, longitudinal, multi-modal functional imaging for radical chemo-IMRT treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer: the INSIGHT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Liam; Panek, Rafal; McQuaid, Dualta; Dunlop, Alex; Schmidt, Maria; Riddell, Angela; Koh, Dow-Mu; Doran, Simon; Murray, Iain; Du, Yong; Chua, Sue; Hansen, Vibeke; Wong, Kee H; Dean, Jamie; Gulliford, Sarah; Bhide, Shreerang; Leach, Martin O; Nutting, Christopher; Harrington, Kevin; Newbold, Kate

    2015-05-15

    Radical chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) is an effective organ-sparing treatment option for patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC). Despite advances in treatment for LAHNC, a significant minority of these patients continue to fail to achieve complete response with standard CRT. By constructing a multi-modality functional imaging (FI) predictive biomarker for CRT outcome for patients with LAHNC we hope to be able to reliably identify those patients at high risk of failing standard CRT. Such a biomarker would in future enable CRT to be tailored to the specific biological characteristics of each patients' tumour, potentially leading to improved treatment outcomes. The INSIGHT study is a single-centre, prospective, longitudinal multi-modality imaging study using functional MRI and FDG-PET/CT for patients with LAHNC squamous cell carcinomas receiving radical CRT. Two cohorts of patients are being recruited: one treated with, and another treated without, induction chemotherapy. All patients receive radical intensity modulated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy. Patients undergo functional imaging before, during and 3 months after completion of radiotherapy, as well as at the time of relapse, should that occur within the first two years after treatment. Serum samples are collected from patients at the same time points as the FI scans for analysis of a panel of serum markers of tumour hypoxia. The primary aim of the INSIGHT study is to acquire a prospective multi-parametric longitudinal data set comprising functional MRI, FDG PET/CT, and serum biomarker data from patients with LAHNC undergoing primary radical CRT. This data set will be used to construct a predictive imaging biomarker for outcome after CRT for LAHNC. This predictive imaging biomarker will be used in future studies of functional imaging based treatment stratification for patients with LAHNC. Additional objectives are: defining the reproducibility of FI parameters; determining robust

  7. Status for NEXIM New X-ray Imaging Modalities for safe and high quality food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einarsdottir, Hildur; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Larsen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    . The main focuses are determined to be threefold: 1)Improving the detectability of low density foreign bodies incidentally present in food products. 2)Development of new modalities for assessment of quality traits in food production, for instance connective tissue and fatty acid composition. 3)Develop...... a proof-of-principle of a conveyor belt solution that can form the basis for real product development. In the past year the NEXIM project has focused on these three objectives, studying the applicability of GBI to meat quality assessment and foreign object detection. Some efforts have been put...

  8. A review of functional pelvic floor imaging modalities and their effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Aminah N; Hainsworth, Alison; Williams, Andrew B; Schizas, Alexis M P

    2015-01-01

    The anatomy of the pelvic floor is complex and clinical examination alone is often insufficient to diagnose and assess pathology. With a greater understanding of pelvic floor dysfunction and treatment options, imaging is becoming increasingly common. This review compares three imaging techniques. Ultrasound has the potential for dynamic assessment of the entire pelvic floor. Magnetic resonance imaging is able to rapidly image the entire pelvic floor but it is expensive and tends to underestimate pathology. Dynamic defaecating proctography or cystocolpoproctography is the current gold standard for posterior compartment imaging but requires opacification of the bladder to provide a global view. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cervical porcupine quill foreign body involving the spinal cord of a dog: A description of various imaging modality findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle le Roux

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although porcupine quill injuries are common in dogs, the detailed appearance of the quill on diagnostic ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging has not been sufficiently described. A 4-year-old, intact, female Jack Russel terrier presented with severe neck pain and ataxia after an altercation with a porcupine 2 weeks earlier. Radiology, diagnostic ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were all utilised to identify a quill imbedded in the cervical vertebral canal and cervical musculature and were compared to each other. Surgical removal of the quill, guided by imaging findings, led to the resolution of the clinical signs in the patient. Previous ultrasound imaging reports have just stated that the quill consists of paralell hyperechoic lines, and do not mention the finer hyperechoic lines inbetween and do not try to provide a reason for the appearance. Previous computed tomography (CT reports just mention identifying the quill on CT images (whether or not CT could identify the fragments, but do not go into detail about the attenuating appearance of the quill nor try to relate this to the composition of the quill. This is to the authors’ knowledge the first report with detailed imaging descriptions of a case of cranial cervical vertebral canal porcupine quill foreign body in a dog. This is also the first report to allude to a possible difference in imaging findings related to quill structure because of keratin orientation and melanin content. The ideal imaging modality to use remains elusive, but ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging could all identify the quill.

  10. Cervical porcupine quill foreign body involving the spinal cord of a dog: A description of various imaging modality findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle le Roux

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Although porcupine quill injuries are common in dogs, the detailed appearance of the quill on diagnostic ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging has not been sufficiently described. A 4-year-old, intact, female Jack Russel terrier presented with severe neck pain and ataxia after an altercation with a porcupine 2 weeks earlier. Radiology, diagnostic ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were all utilised to identify a quill imbedded in the cervical vertebral canal and cervical musculature and were compared to each other. Surgical removal of the quill, guided by imaging findings, led to the resolution of the clinical signs in the patient. Previous ultrasound imaging reports have just stated that the quill consists of paralell hyperechoic lines, and do not mention the finer hyperechoic lines inbetween and do not try to provide a reason for the appearance. Previous computed tomography (CT reports just mention identifying the quill on CT images (whether or not CT could identify the fragments, but do not go into detail about the attenuating appearance of the quill nor try to relate this to the composition of the quill. This is to the authors’ knowledge the first report with detailed imaging descriptions of a case of cranial cervical vertebral canal porcupine quill foreign body in a dog. This is also the first report to allude to a possible difference in imaging findings related to quill structure because of keratin orientation and melanin content. The ideal imaging modality to use remains elusive, but ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging could all identify the quill.

  11. Cervical porcupine quill foreign body involving the spinal cord of a dog: A description of various imaging modality findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Christelle; Venter, Frans J; Kirberger, Robert M

    2017-12-08

    Although porcupine quill injuries are common in dogs, the detailed appearance of the quill on diagnostic ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging has not been sufficiently described. A 4-year-old, intact, female Jack Russel terrier presented with severe neck pain and ataxia after an altercation with a porcupine 2 weeks earlier. Radiology, diagnostic ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were all utilised to identify a quill imbedded in the cervical vertebral canal and cervical musculature and were compared to each other. Surgical removal of the quill, guided by imaging findings, led to the resolution of the clinical signs in the patient. Previous ultrasound imaging reports have just stated that the quill consists of paralell hyperechoic lines, and do not mention the finer hyperechoic lines inbetween and do not try to provide a reason for the appearance. Previous computed tomography (CT) reports just mention identifying the quill on CT images (whether or not CT could identify the fragments), but do not go into detail about the attenuating appearance of the quill nor try to relate this to the composition of the quill. This is to the authors' knowledge the first report with detailed imaging descriptions of a case of cranial cervical vertebral canal porcupine quill foreign body in a dog. This is also the first report to allude to a possible difference in imaging findings related to quill structure because of keratin orientation and melanin content. The ideal imaging modality to use remains elusive, but ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging could all identify the quill.

  12. The mystery of defining aortic valve area: what have we learnt from three-dimensional imaging modalities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alskaf, Ebraham; Kardos, Attila

    2018-02-23

    Aortic valve area is one of the main criteria used by echocardiography to determine the degree of valvular aortic stenosis, and it is calculated using the continuity equation which assumes that the flow volume of blood is equal at two points, the aortic valve area and the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT). The main fallacy of this equation is the assumption that the LVOT area which is used to calculate the flow volume at the LVOT level is circular, where it is often an ellipse and sometimes irregular. The aim of this review is to explain the physiology of the continuity equation, the different sources of errors, the added benefits of using three-dimensional imaging modalities to measure LVOT area, the latest recommendations related to valvular aortic stenosis, and to introduce future perspectives. A literature review of studies comparing aortic valve area and LVOT area, after using three-dimensional data, has shown underestimation of both measurements when using the continuity equation. This has more impact on patients with discordant echocardiographic measurements when aortic valve area is disproportionate to haemodynamic measurements in assessing the degree of aortic stenosis. Although fusion imaging modalities of LVOT area can help in certain group of patients to address the issue of aortic valve area underestimation, further research on introducing a correction factor to the conventional continuity equation might be more rewarding, saving patients additional tests and potential radiation, with no clear evidence of cost-effectiveness.

  13. Smartphone-Based Dual-Modality Imaging System for Quantitative Detection of Color or Fluorescent Lateral Flow Immunochromatographic Strips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yafei; Wang, Kan; Xiao, Kun; Qin, Weijian; Lu, Wenting; Tao, Wei; Cui, Daxiang

    2017-12-01

    Nowadays, lateral flow immunochromatographic assays are increasingly popular as a diagnostic tool for point-of-care (POC) test based on their simplicity, specificity, and sensitivity. Hence, quantitative detection and pluralistic popular application are urgently needed in medical examination. In this study, a smartphone-based dual-modality imaging system was developed for quantitative detection of color or fluorescent lateral flow test strips, which can be operated anywhere at any time. In this system, the white and ultra-violet (UV) light of optical device was designed, which was tunable with different strips, and the Sobel operator algorithm was used in the software, which could enhance the identification ability to recognize the test area from the background boundary information. Moreover, this technology based on extraction of the components from RGB format (red, green, and blue) of color strips or only red format of the fluorescent strips can obviously improve the high-signal intensity and sensitivity. Fifty samples were used to evaluate the accuracy of this system, and the ideal detection limit was calculated separately from detection of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The results indicated that smartphone-controlled dual-modality imaging system could provide various POC diagnoses, which becomes a potential technology for developing the next-generation of portable system in the near future.

  14. Smartphone-Based Dual-Modality Imaging System for Quantitative Detection of Color or Fluorescent Lateral Flow Immunochromatographic Strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yafei; Wang, Kan; Xiao, Kun; Qin, Weijian; Lu, Wenting; Tao, Wei; Cui, Daxiang

    2017-04-01

    Nowadays, lateral flow immunochromatographic assays are increasingly popular as a diagnostic tool for point-of-care (POC) test based on their simplicity, specificity, and sensitivity. Hence, quantitative detection and pluralistic popular application are urgently needed in medical examination. In this study, a smartphone-based dual-modality imaging system was developed for quantitative detection of color or fluorescent lateral flow test strips, which can be operated anywhere at any time. In this system, the white and ultra-violet (UV) light of optical device was designed, which was tunable with different strips, and the Sobel operator algorithm was used in the software, which could enhance the identification ability to recognize the test area from the background boundary information. Moreover, this technology based on extraction of the components from RGB format (red, green, and blue) of color strips or only red format of the fluorescent strips can obviously improve the high-signal intensity and sensitivity. Fifty samples were used to evaluate the accuracy of this system, and the ideal detection limit was calculated separately from detection of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The results indicated that smartphone-controlled dual-modality imaging system could provide various POC diagnoses, which becomes a potential technology for developing the next-generation of portable system in the near future.

  15. Modal concord

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeijlstra, H.; Gibson, M.; Friedman, T.

    2008-01-01

    Sentences containing two (or more) modal elements of the same modal type and quantificational force often yield a concord reading, where the semantics of the sentence seems to contain only one modal operator, rather than a cumulative reading. In this paper I have argued that Modal Concord is a

  16. Iodinated silica/porphyrin hybrid nanoparticles for X-ray computed tomography/fluorescence dual-modal imaging of tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Hayashi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Silica nanoparticles containing covalently linked iodine and a near-infrared (NIR fluorescence dye, namely porphyrin, have been synthesized through a one-pot sol–gel reaction. These particles are called iodinated silica/porphyrin hybrid nanoparticles (ISP HNPs. The ISP HNPs have both high X-ray absorption coefficient and NIR fluorescence. The ISP HNPs modified with folic acid (FA and polyethylene glycol (PEG, denoted as FA-PEG-ISP HNPs, enabled the successful visualization of tumors in mice by both X-ray computed tomography (CT and fluorescence imaging (FI. Thus, the FA-PEG-ISP HNPs are useful as contrast agents or probes for CT/FI dual-modal imaging.

  17. Performance study of a fan beam collimator designed for a multi-modality small animal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbir Ahmed, ASM; Kramer, Gary H.; Semmler, Wolfrad; Peter, Jorg

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology to design and conduct the performances of a fan beam collimator. This fan beam collimator was designed to use with a multi-modality small animal imaging device and the performance of the collimator was studied for a 3D geometry. Analytical expressions were formulated to calculate the parameters for the collimator. A Monte Carlo model was developed to analyze the scattering and image noises for a 3D object. The results showed that the performance of the fan beam collimator was strongly dependent on the source distribution and position. The fan beam collimator showed increased counting efficiency in comparison to a parallel hole collimator. Inside attenuating medium, the increased attenuating effect outweighed the fan beam increased counting efficiency.

  18. Quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy: a new imaging modality to identify original cellular biomarkers of diseases

    KAUST Repository

    Marquet, P.

    2016-05-03

    Quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) has recently emerged as a powerful label-free technique in the field of living cell imaging allowing to non-invasively measure with a nanometric axial sensitivity cell structure and dynamics. Since the phase retardation of a light wave when transmitted through the observed cells, namely the quantitative phase signal (QPS), is sensitive to both cellular thickness and intracellular refractive index related to the cellular content, its accurate analysis allows to derive various cell parameters and monitor specific cell processes, which are very likely to identify new cell biomarkers. Specifically, quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy (QP-DHM), thanks to its numerical flexibility facilitating parallelization and automation processes, represents an appealing imaging modality to both identify original cellular biomarkers of diseases as well to explore the underlying pathophysiological processes.

  19. Moving Target Information Extraction Based on Single Satellite Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Shihu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The spatial and time variant effects in high resolution satellite push broom imaging are analyzed. A spatial and time variant imaging model is established. A moving target information extraction method is proposed based on a single satellite remote sensing image. The experiment computes two airplanes' flying speed using ZY-3 multispectral image and proves the validity of spatial and time variant model and moving information extracting method.

  20. Multifunctional dendrimer-based nanoparticles for in vivo MR/CT dual-modal molecular imaging of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li K

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Kangan Li,1,4,5,* Shihui Wen,2,* Andrew C Larson,4,5 Mingwu Shen,2 Zhuoli Zhang,4,5 Qian Chen,3 Xiangyang Shi,2,3 Guixiang Zhang1 1Department of Radiology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, Donghua University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 4Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA; 5Robert H Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, IL, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Development of dual-mode or multi-mode imaging contrast agents is important for accurate and self-confirmatory diagnosis of cancer. We report a new multifunctional, dendrimer-based gold nanoparticle (AuNP as a dual-modality contrast agent for magnetic resonance (MR/computed tomography (CT imaging of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In this study, amine-terminated generation 5 poly(amidoamine dendrimers modified with gadolinium chelate (DOTA-NHS and polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether were used as templates to synthesize AuNPs, followed by Gd(III chelation and acetylation of the remaining dendrimer terminal amine groups; multifunctional dendrimer-entrapped AuNPs (Gd-Au DENPs were formed. The formed Gd-Au DENPs were used for both in vitro and in vivo MR/CT imaging of human MCF-7 cancer cells. Both MR and CT images demonstrate that MCF-7 cells and the xenograft tumor model can be effectively imaged. The Gd-Au DENPs uptake, mainly in the cell cytoplasm, was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The cell cytotoxicity assay, cell morphology observation, and flow cytometry show that the developed Gd-Au DENPs have good biocompatibility in the given concentration range. Our results

  1. A dual-modality photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system for noninvasive sentinel lymph node detection: preliminary clinical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erpelding, Todd N.; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Krumholz, Arie; Ke, Haixin; Maslov, Konstantin; Appleton, Catherine; Margenthaler, Julie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) has emerged as an accurate, less invasive alternative to axillary lymph node dissection, and it has rapidly become the standard of care for patients with clinically node-negative breast cancer. The sentinel lymph node (SLN) hypothesis states that the pathological status of the axilla can be accurately predicted by determining the status of the first (i.e., sentinel) lymph nodes that drain from the primary tumor. Physicians use radio-labeled sulfur colloid and/or methylene blue dye to identify the SLN, which is most likely to contain metastatic cancer cells. However, the surgical procedure causes morbidity and associated expenses. To overcome these limitations, we developed a dual-modality photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system to noninvasively detect SLNs based on the accumulation of methylene blue dye. Ultimately, we aim to guide percutaneous needle biopsies and provide a minimally invasive method for axillary staging of breast cancer. The system consists of a tunable dye laser pumped by a Nd:YAG laser, a commercial ultrasound imaging system (Philips iU22), and a multichannel data acquisition system which displays co-registered photoacoustic and ultrasound images in real-time. Our clinical results demonstrate that real-time photoacoustic imaging can provide sensitive and specific detection of methylene blue dye in vivo. While preliminary studies have shown that in vivo detection of SLNs by using co-registered photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging is feasible, further investigation is needed to demonstrate robust SLN detection.

  2. The role of red blood cell scintigraphy in the multiple-modality imaging diagnosis of a rare case of diffuse hepatic hemangiomatosis in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Cason

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Angiomas are one of the most common primary tumors of the liver. Diffuse hepatic angiomatosis, however, is quite rare and usually observed in pediatric patients. We report a rare case of diffuse hepatic hemangiomatosis in a 33-year-old woman. Case report: The patient presented with abdominal pain and a palpable upper abdominal mass. Abdominal CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings suggested diffuse hepatic hemangiomatosis, but this finding was not confirmed by subsequent contrast-enhanced abdominal ultrasonography (US. The patient then underwent single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT/CT scintigraphy with Tc-99m-labeling of red blood cells (RBC. This examination revealed increased uptake of labeled erythrocytes in several of the hepatic lesions corresponding to CT and RM findings, thereby confirming the clinical hypothesis of diffuse hepatic hemangiomatosis. Discussion: RBC scintigraphy with SPECT/CT can facilitate the comparison of other crosssectional imaging methods such as CT and MRI. This case highlights the importance of a multiple-modality approach in the imaging diagnosis of this condition.

  3. Uni-modal versus joint segmentation for region-based image fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewis, J.J.; Nikolov, S.G.; Canagarajah, C.N.; Bull, D.R.; Toet, A.

    2006-01-01

    A number of segmentation techniques are compared with regard to their usefulness for region-based image and video fusion. In order to achieve this, a new multi-sensor data set is introduced containing a variety of infra-red, visible and pixel fused images together with manually produced 'ground

  4. Expert consensus for multi-modality imaging evaluation of cardiovascular complications of radiotherapy in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Nkomo, Vuyisile T; Badano, Luigi P

    2013-01-01

    . A comprehensive review of potential cardiac complications related to radiotherapy is warranted. An evidence-based review of several imaging approaches used to detect, evaluate, and monitor RIHD is discussed. Recommendations for the early identification and monitoring of cardiovascular complications...... of radiotherapy by cardiac imaging are also proposed....

  5. Single Image Super Resolution via Sparse Reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruithof, M.C.; Eekeren, A.W.M. van; Dijk, J.; Schutte, K.

    2012-01-01

    High resolution sensors are required for recognition purposes. Low resolution sensors, however, are still widely used. Software can be used to increase the resolution of such sensors. One way of increasing the resolution of the images produced is using multi-frame super resolution algorithms.

  6. Multi-modality imaging of tumor phenotype and response to therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyflot, Matthew J.

    2011-12-01

    Imaging and radiation oncology have historically been closely linked. However, the vast majority of techniques used in the clinic involve anatomical imaging. Biological imaging offers the potential for innovation in the areas of cancer diagnosis and staging, radiotherapy target definition, and treatment response assessment. Some relevant imaging techniques are FDG PET (for imaging cellular metabolism), FLT PET (proliferation), CuATSM PET (hypoxia), and contrast-enhanced CT (vasculature and perfusion). Here, a technique for quantitative spatial correlation of tumor phenotype is presented for FDG PET, FLT PET, and CuATSM PET images. Additionally, multimodality imaging of treatment response with FLT PET, CuATSM, and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT is presented, in a trial of patients receiving an antiangiogenic agent (Avastin) combined with cisplatin and radiotherapy. Results are also presented for translational applications in animal models, including quantitative assessment of proliferative response to cetuximab with FLT PET and quantification of vascular volume with a blood-pool contrast agent (Fenestra). These techniques have clear applications to radiobiological research and optimized treatment strategies, and may eventually be used for personalized therapy for patients.

  7. Efficiency of Imaging Modalities in Male Breast Disease: Can Ultrasound Give Additional Information for Assessment of Gynecomastia Evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarıca, Özgür; Kahraman, A. Nedim; Öztürk, Enis; Teke, Memik

    2018-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to present mammography and ultrasound findings of male breast lesions and to investigate the ability of diagnostic modalities in estimating the evolution of gynecomastia. Materials and Methods Sixty-nine male patients who admitted to Taksim and Bakirkoy Education and Research Hospitals and underwent mammography (MG) and ultrasonography (US) imaging were retrospectively evaluated. Duration of symptoms and mammographic types of gynecomastia according to Appelbaum’s classifications were evaluated, besides the sonographic findings in mammographic types of gynecomastia. Results The distribution of 69 cases were as follows: gynecomastia 47 (68.11%), pseudogynecomastia 6 (8.69%) primary breast carcinoma 7 (10.14%), metastatic carcinoma 1 (1.4%), epidermal inclusion cyst 2 (2.8%), abscess 2 (2.8%), lipoma 2 (2.8%), pyogenic granuloma 1 (1.4%), and granulomatous lobular mastitis 1 (1.4%). Gynecomastia patients who had symptoms less than 1 year had nodular gynecomastia (34.6%) as opposed to dendritic gynecomastia (61.5%) (pgynecomastia (70%) had a higher rate than the dendritic type (20%). Patients having the symptoms more than 2 years had diffuse gynecomastia (57.1%) while 42.9% had dendritic gynecomastia (pgynecomastia (92.3%) than noduler type (1.9 %). Patients having symptoms for 1 to 2 years had more dentritic gynecomastia (70%) than diffuse type (30%). Patients having symptoms more than 2 years had diffuse gynecomastia (57.1%) comparable to dendritic gynecomastia (42.9 %). Conclusion Diagnostic imaging modalities are efficient tools for estimation of gynecomastia evolution as well as the diagnosis of other male breast diseases. There seems to be an incongruity between duration of clinical complaints and diagnostic imaging classification of gynecomastia. The use of these high resolution US findings may demonstrate an early phase fibrosis especially in patients visualized by mammography as with nodular phase. PMID:29322116

  8. Single-photon imaging in CMOS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charbon, E.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the architectural design and fabrication of medium and large arrays of single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) for a variety of applications in physics, medicine, and the life sciences. Due to dynamic nature of SPADs, designs featuring a large number of SPADs require careful analysis of

  9. Plectin-1 Targeted Dual-modality Nanoparticles for Pancreatic Cancer Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Chen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biomarker-targeted molecular imaging holds promise for early detection of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to design and evaluate a plectin-1 targeted multi-functional nanoparticle probe for pancreatic cancer imaging. Methods: 1,2-Distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-amino(polyethylene glycol (DSPE-PEG-NH2-modified superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4 nanoparticles (SPION were conjugated with plectin-1 antibody and/or Cy7 to create the multi-functional targeted nanoparticle targeted probe (Plectin-SPION-Cy7 or non-targeted probe (SPION-Cy7. Pancreatic carcinoma cell lines expressing plectin-1 were cultured with the targeted or control probes and then were imaged using confocal laser scanning microscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Accumulations of the nanoparticles in pancreatic tumor xenografted mice were determined by MRI and fluorescence imaging. Results: In vitro optical imaging and MRI showed that the targeted nanoparticles were highly accumulated in MIAPaCa2 and XPA-1 carcinoma cells but not in non-carcinoma MIN6 cells, which was further confirmed by Prussian blue staining. In vivo MRI showed a significant T2 signal reduction. Prussian blue staining further confirmed that the plectin-1 targeted nanoparticles were highly accumulated in the tumor mass but not in normal pancreatic tissues, or in the liver and kidney, and few nanoparticles were observed in the tumors of mice injected with SPION-Cy7. Conclusions: Our data demonstrate that plectin-1 targeted fluorescence and MR dual-functional nanoparticle can visualize pancreatic cancer, and it has great potential to be used with various imaging devices for pancreatic cancer detection. Keywords: Pancreatic cancer, Plectin-1, Magnetic resonance imaging, Optical imaging, Nanoparticle

  10. Dual-modality, fluorescent, PLGA encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles for molecular and cellular fluorescence imaging and computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swy, Eric R; Schwartz-Duval, Aaron S; Shuboni, Dorela D; Latourette, Matthew T; Mallet, Christiane L; Parys, Maciej; Cormode, David P; Shapiro, Erik M

    2014-11-07

    Reports of molecular and cellular imaging using computed tomography (CT) are rapidly increasing. Many of these reports use gold nanoparticles. Bismuth has similar CT contrast properties to gold while being approximately 1000-fold less expensive. Herein we report the design, fabrication, characterization, and CT and fluorescence imaging properties of a novel, dual modality, fluorescent, polymer encapsulated bismuth nanoparticle construct for computed tomography and fluorescence imaging. We also report on cellular internalization and preliminary in vitro and in vivo toxicity effects of these constructs. 40 nm bismuth(0) nanocrystals were synthesized and encapsulated within 120 nm Poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles by oil-in-water emulsion methodologies. Coumarin-6 was co-encapsulated to impart fluorescence. High encapsulation efficiency was achieved ∼70% bismuth w/w. Particles were shown to internalize within cells following incubation in culture. Bismuth nanocrystals and PLGA encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles exhibited >90% and >70% degradation, respectively, within 24 hours in acidic, lysosomal environment mimicking media and both remained nearly 100% stable in cytosolic/extracellular fluid mimicking media. μCT and clinical CT imaging was performed at multiple X-ray tube voltages to measure concentration dependent attenuation rates as well as to establish the ability to detect the nanoparticles in an ex vivo biological sample. Dual fluorescence and CT imaging is demonstrated as well. In vivo toxicity studies in rats revealed neither clinically apparent side effects nor major alterations in serum chemistry and hematology parameters. Calculations on minimal detection requirements for in vivo targeted imaging using these nanoparticles are presented. Indeed, our results indicate that these nanoparticles may serve as a platform for sensitive and specific targeted molecular CT and fluorescence imaging.

  11. Extending and applying active appearance models for automated, high precision segmentation in different image modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Fisker, Rune; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2001-01-01

    , an initialization scheme is designed thus making the usage of AAMs fully automated. Using these extensions it is demonstrated that AAMs can segment bone structures in radiographs, pork chops in perspective images and the left ventricle in cardiovascular magnetic resonance images in a robust, fast and accurate...... object class description, which can be employed to rapidly search images for new object instances. The proposed extensions concern enhanced shape representation, handling of homogeneous and heterogeneous textures, refinement optimization using Simulated Annealing and robust statistics. Finally...

  12. Single Image Super Resolution using a Joint GMM Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandeep, P; Jacob, Tony

    2016-07-07

    Single Image Super Resolution (SR) algorithms based on joint dictionaries and sparse representations of image patches have received significant attention in literature and deliver state of the art results. Recently, Gaussian Mixture Models (GMMs) have emerged as favored prior for natural image patches in various image restoration problems. In this work, we approach the single image SR problem by using a joint GMM learnt from concatenated vectors of high and low resolution patches sampled from a large database of pairs of high resolution and the corresponding low resolution images. Covariance matrices of the learnt Gaussian models capture the inherent correlations between high and low resolution patches which are utilized for inferring high resolution patches from given low resolution patches. The proposed joint GMM method can be interpreted as the GMM analogue of joint dictionary based algorithms for single image SR. We study the performance of the proposed joint GMM method by comparing with various competing algorithms for single image SR. Our experiments on various natural images demonstrate the competitive performance obtained by the proposed method at low computational cost.

  13. Evaluation of photoshop based image analysis in cytologic diagnosis of pleural fluid in comparison with conventional modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarian, Amir Hossein; Tasbandi, Aida; Mohamadian Roshan, Nema

    2018-04-19

    The aim of this study is to investigate and compare the results of digital image analysis in pleural effusion cytology samples with conventional modalities. In this cross-sectional study, 53 pleural fluid cytology smears from Qaem hospital pathology department, located in Mashhad, Iran were investigated. Prior to digital analysis, all specimens were evaluated by two pathologists and categorized into three groups as: benign, suspicious, and malignant. Using an Olympus microscope and Olympus DP3 digital camera, digital images from cytology slides were captured. Appropriate images (n = 130) were separately imported to Adobe Photoshop CS5 and parameters including area and perimeter, circularity, Gray Value mean, integrated density, and nucleus to cytoplasm area ratio were analyzed. Gray Value mean, nucleus to cytoplasm area ratio, and circularity showed the best sensitivity and specificity rates as well as significant differences between all groups. Also, nucleus area and perimeter showed a significant relation between suspicious and malignant groups with benign group. Whereas, there was no such difference between suspicious and malignant groups. We concluded that digital image analysis is welcomed in the field of research on pleural fluid smears as it can provide quantitative data to apply various comparisons and reduce interobserver variation which could assist pathologists to achieve a more accurate diagnosis. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Multi-modal in vivo imaging of brain blood oxygenation, blood flow and neural calcium dynamics during acute seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringuette, Dene; Jeffrey, Melanie A.; Carlen, Peter L.; Levi, Ofer

    2016-03-01

    Dysfunction of the vascular endothelium has been implicated in the development of epilepsy. To better understand the relation between vascular function and seizure and provide a foundation for interpreting results from functional imaging in chronic disease models, we investigate the relationship between intracellular calcium dynamics and local cerebral blood flow and blood oxygen saturation during acute seizure-like events and pharmacological seizure rescue. To probe the relation between the aforementioned physiological markers in an acute model of epilepsy in rats, we integrated three different optical modalities together with electrophysiological recordings: Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) was used to study changes in flow speeds, Intrinsic optical signal imaging (IOSI) was used to monitor changes in oxygenated, de-oxygenated, and total hemoglobin concentration, and Calcium-sensitive dye imaging was used to monitor intracellular calcium dynamics. We designed a dedicated cortical flow chamber to remove superficial blood and dye resulting from the injection procedure, which reduced spurious artifacts. The near infrared light used for IOSI and LSCI was delivered via a light pipe integrated with the flow chamber to minimize the effect of fluid surface movement on illumination stability. Calcium-sensitive dye was injected via a glass electrode used for recording the local field potential. Our system allowed us to observe and correlate increases in intracellular calcium, blood flow and blood volume during seizure-like events and provide a quantitative analysis of neurovascular coupling changes associated with seizure rescue via injection of an anti-convulsive agent.

  15. Preoperative evaluation and monitoring chemotherapy in patients with high-grade osteogenic and Ewing's sarcoma: review of current imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woude, H.-J. van der; Bloem, J.L.; Hogendoorn, P.C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging is pivotal in the initial detection, characterization, staging and post-treatment follow-up of patients with high-grade osteogenic and Ewing's sarcoma. In the present review article, conventional and new imaging modalities are discussed with regard to the monitoring of the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in such patients. Presurgical monitoring of response to chemotherapy may have an impact on modification of neoadjuvant treatment protocols, on patient selection for the performance and timing of limb-salvage surgery and on planning of radiation therapy (in non-operated Ewing's sarcomas) and selection of postoperative chemotherapy regimens. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging, as part of a routine MR protocol, assists in the detection of the most viable parts of the tumour and serves as an initial standard for follow-up of the metabolic activity of the tumour during and after chemotherapy, both in small intraosseous tumours and in tumours with an associated soft tissue mass. In combination with selected morphological features, dynamic imaging parameters are therefore advocated for monitoring the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with osteogenic and Ewing's sarcoma. (orig.)

  16. Image Guided Virtual Autopsy: An Adjunct with Radiographic and Computed Tomography Modalities - An Important Tool in Forensic Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalu Rai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The forensic examination of dead bodies is very helpful in order to identify the person, cause of death, gender, and solving the mysterious cases. It includes a number of techniques, out of which autopsy is the primary investigation that is performed in every medicolegal case. Because of mutilation technologies, traditional autopsy technique is most disturbing in terms of emotions and rituals of relatives. The use of radiology in forensic science comprises performance, interpretation, and reporting of radiographs that is helpful in detecting those changes that are not clinically visible. Forensic radiology plays an important role for identification of humans in mass disasters, criminal investigations, and evaluation of cause of death. The introduction of radiological modalities in autopsy techniques is a complementary tool for forensic identification and is known as virtual autopsy. The advance imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is used in virtual autopsy in order to visualize and reconstruct the internal organs to know the site, type, and depth of injury. This review elaborates the role of maxillofacial imaging in image-guided virtual autopsy.

  17. Imaging modalities and therapy options in patients with acute flank pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosse, A.; Grosse, C.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is the description of imaging techniques for the evaluation of patients with acute flank pain and suspicion of urolithiasis and the impact of these techniques in the therapy management of patients with calculi. (orig.) [de

  18. Endoscopic TriModal imaging and biomarkers for neoplasia conjoined: a feasibility study in Barrett's esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerwinkel, D. F.; Di Pietro, M.; Liu, X.; Shariff, M. K.; Lao-Sirieix, P.; Walker, C. E.; Visser, M.; O' Donovan, M.; Kaye, P.; Bergman, J. J. G. H. M.; Fitzgerald, R. C.

    2014-01-01

    In Barrett's esophagus (BE), the normal squamous lining of the esophagus is replaced by specialized columnar epithelium. Endoscopic surveillance with autofluorescence imaging (AFI) and molecular biomarkers have been studied separately to detect early neoplasia (EN) in BE. The combination of

  19. Quantitative reconstruction from a single diffraction-enhanced image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganin, D.M.; Lewis, R.A.; Kitchen, M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: We develop an algorithm for using a single diffraction-enhanced image (DEI) to obtain a quantitative reconstruction of the projected thickness of a single-material sample which is embedded within a substrate of approximately constant thickness. This algorithm is used to quantitatively map inclusions in a breast phantom, from a single synchrotron DEI image. In particular, the reconstructed images quantitatively represent the projected thickness in the bulk of the sample, in contrast to DEI images which greatly emphasise sharp edges (high spatial frequencies). In the context of an ultimate aim of improved methods for breast cancer detection, the reconstructions are potentially of greater diagnostic value compared to the DEI data. Lastly, we point out that the methods of analysis presented here are also applicable to the quantitative analysis of differential interference contrast (DIC) images

  20. Combined optical and single photon emission imaging: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boschi, Federico; Calderan, Laura; Sbarbati, Andrea [Department of Morphological-Biomedical Sciences, Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Verona, Verona (Italy); Spinelli, Antonello E [Medical Physics Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); D' Ambrosio, Daniela; Marengo, Mario [Medical Physics Department, S. Orsola Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy)], E-mail: federico.boschi@univr.it

    2009-12-07

    In vivo optical imaging instruments are generally devoted to the acquisition of light coming from fluorescence or bioluminescence processes. Recently, an instrument was conceived with radioisotopic detection capabilities (Kodak in Vivo Multispectral System F) based on the conversion of x-rays from the phosphorus screen. The goal of this work is to demonstrate that an optical imager (IVIS 200, Xenogen Corp., Alameda, USA), designed for in vivo acquisitions of small animals in bioluminescent and fluorescent modalities, can even be employed to detect signals due to radioactive tracers. Our system is based on scintillator crystals for the conversion of high-energy rays and a collimator. No hardware modifications are required. Crystals alone permit the acquisition of photons coming from an in vivo 20 g nude mouse injected with a solution of methyl diphosphonate technetium 99 metastable (Tc99m-MDP). With scintillator crystals and collimators, a set of measurements aimed to fully characterize the system resolution was carried out. More precisely, system point spread function and modulation transfer function were measured at different source depths. Results show that system resolution is always better than 1.3 mm when the source depth is less than 10 mm. The resolution of the images obtained with radioactive tracers is comparable with the resolution achievable with dedicated techniques. Moreover, it is possible to detect both optical and nuclear tracers or bi-modal tracers with only one instrument. (letter to the editor)

  1. Single photon image from PET with insertable collimator for boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jooyoung; Suh, Tae Suk; Hong, Key Jo

    2014-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a radiation therapy technique for treating deep-seated brain tumors by irradiation with a thermal neutron in which boron-labelled low molecular weight compounds. Once completed, a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan is conducted to investigate for the region of therapy using an isotope exclusive to SPECT. In the case of an existing PET/SPECT combination system, at least two types of isotopes should be used for each scan with their purposes. Recently, researchers examined the effects of PET/SPECT dual modality on animal imaging systems. They reported that the PET/SPECT combination system was effective for simultaneous achievement of a single event and coincidence. The aim of our proposed system is to confirm the feasibility of extraction of two types of images from one PET module with an insertable collimator for brain tumor treatment during the BNCT. We attempted to acquire the PET and SPECT images simultaneously using only PET without an additional isotope. Single photon images were acquired using an insertable collimator on a PET detector

  2. Single-Molecule Imaging of GPCR Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calebiro, Davide; Sungkaworn, Titiwat

    2018-02-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane receptors and are of great interest as pharmacological targets. Although the occurrence of GPCR signaling nanodomains has long been hypothesized based on indirect evidence, this and other fundamental aspects of GPCR signaling have been difficult to prove. The advent of single-molecule microscopy methods, which allow direct visualization of individual membrane proteins with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution, provides unique opportunities to address several of these open questions. Indeed, recent single-molecule studies have revealed that GPCRs and G proteins transiently interact with each other as well as with structural components of the plasma membrane, leading to the formation of dynamic complexes and 'hot spots' for GPCR signaling. Whereas we are only beginning to understand the implications of this unexpected level of complexity, single-molecule approaches are likely to play a crucial role to further dissect the protein-protein interactions that are at the heart of GPCR signaling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Breast molecular imaging: a retrospective review of one institutions experience with this modality and analysis of its potential role in breast imaging decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Emily; Angelakis, Elizabeth; Morris, Patricia; Pinkus, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Breast Molecular Imaging (or Breast-Specific Gamma Imaging) has been previously shown to be both sensitive and specific for the detection of breast cancer. The purpose of our study was to retrospectively review all cases of Breast Molecular Imaging (BMI) performed at our institution to determine BMI's potential role in Breast Imaging decision making. A total of 416 cases of BMI from January 2007 to November 2009 were analyzed and the following data were collected: indication for examination, BIRADS assignment after BMI, biopsy outcomes, sensitivity and specificity of the modality and patient follow-up. Fifty-six percent of cases were ordered for an indeterminate asymmetry or focal asymmetry, 14% for evaluation of calcifications, and less than 10% each for the remainder of the indications including palpable lumps with negative imaging, evaluation of extent of disease in patients with known breast cancer and screening of high risk patients who could not undergo MRI. BMI was also shown to be helpful in evaluation of lesions that were difficult to biopsy or for patients that desired further testing rather than biopsy or short term follow-up of abnormalities. Seventy percent of BMI cases performed completed the diagnostic evaluation with BIRADS 1 or BIRADS 2 designations. Only 14% of cases ultimately resulted in biopsy. Contra-lateral findings were discovered in 10% of patients, more than half of which were occult malignancies or high-risk lesions. Of the lesions for which biopsy was recommended, 43% were malignant and 15% were high-risk lesions. Sensitivity of the test at our institution was 93% and specificity 78.9%. Our results show that BMI is both a sensitive and specific test which is useful as an adjunct to standard breast imaging modalities for problem solving in indeterminate cases. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. High-frequency annular array with coaxial illumination for dual-modality ultrasonic and photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filoux, Erwan; Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Chitnis, Parag V.; Aristizábal, Orlando; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a combined ultrasound and photoacoustic (PA) imaging (PAI) system used to obtain high-quality, co-registered images of mouse-embryo anatomy and vasculature. High-frequency ultrasound (HFU, >20 MHz) is utilized to obtain high-resolution anatomical images of small animals while PAI provides high-contrast images of the vascular network. The imaging system is based on a 40 MHz, 5-element, 6 mm aperture annular-array transducer with a 800 μm diameter hole through its central element. The transducer was integrated in a cage-plate assembly allowing for a collimated laser beam to pass through the hole so that the optical and acoustic beams were collinear. The assembly was mounted on a two-axis, motorized stage to enable the simultaneous acquisition of co-registered HFU and PA volumetric data. Data were collected from all five elements in receive and a synthetic-focusing algorithm was applied in post-processing to beamform the data and increase the spatial resolution and depth-of-field (DOF) of the HFU and PA images. Phantom measurements showed that the system could achieve high-resolution images (down to 90 μm for HFU and 150 μm for PAI) and a large DOF of >8 mm. Volume renderings of a mouse embryo showed that the scanner allowed for visualizing morphologically precise anatomy of the entire embryo along with corresponding co-registered vasculature. Major head vessels, such as the superior sagittal sinus or rostral vein, were clearly identified as well as limb bud vasculature.

  5. The Use of Endoscopic Ultrasonography and Other Imaging Modalities in the Preoperative Staging of Rectal Villous Tumours: A Case of Overstaging by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Buresi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of a 60-year-old man with recurrent rectal villous adenoma is described. Preoperative staging with endoscopic ultrasound (EUS and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed very discordant results. EUS showed a tumour present in the mucosa with no submucosal invasion, while MRI revealed invasion of the muscularis propria consistent with an invasive stage T2 carcinoma. Based on the MRI findings, the patient underwent a low anterior resection of the tumour. The surgical pathology specimen revealed a villous adenoma with low-grade dysplasia but no carcinoma and no extension into the muscularis propria. The present case highlights the uncertainty that currently exists as to which imaging modality provides the greatest accuracy in the staging of rectal cancer and in guiding the type of surgical procedure performed. Two recent meta-analyses and a systematic review of the literature point to EUS as the imaging modality of choice for determining muscularis propria and perirectal tissue invasion, as well as nodal involvement.

  6. The role of multi modality imaging in selecting patients and guiding lead placement for the delivery of cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Jonathan M; Claridge, Simon; Jackson, Tom; Sieniewicz, Ben; Porter, Bradley; Webb, Jessica; Rajani, Ronak; Kapetanakis, Stamatis; Carr-White, Gerald; Rinaldi, Christopher A

    2017-02-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective pacemaker delivered treatment for selected patients with heart failure with the target of restoring electro-mechanical synchrony. Imaging techniques using echocardiography have as yet failed to find a metric of dyssynchrony to predict CRT response. Current guidelines are thus unchanged in recommending prolonged QRS duration, severe systolic function and refractory heart failure symptoms as criteria for CRT implantation. Evolving strain imaging techniques in 3D echocardiography, cardiac MRI and CT may however, overcome limitations of older methods and yield more powerful CRT response predictors. Areas covered: In this review, we firstly discuss the use of multi modality cardiac imaging in the selection of patients for CRT implantation and predicting the response to CRT. Secondly we examine the clinical evidence on avoiding areas of myocardial scar, targeting areas of dyssynchrony and in doing so, achieving the optimal positioning of the left ventricular lead to deliver CRT. Finally, we present the latest clinical studies which are integrating both clinical and imaging data with X-rays during the implantation in order to improve the accuracy of LV lead placement. Expert commentary: Image integration and fusion of datasets with live X-Ray angiography to guide procedures in real time is now a reality for some implanting centers. Such hybrid facilities will enable users to interact with images, allowing measurement, annotation and manipulation with instantaneous visualization on the catheter laboratory monitor. Such advances will serve as an invaluable adjunct for implanting physicians to accurately deliver pacemaker leads into the optimal position to deliver CRT.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of single rice kernels during cooking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohoric, A.; Vergeldt, F.J.; Gerkema, E.; Jager, de P.A.; Duynhoven, van J.P.M.; Dalen, van G.; As, van H.

    2004-01-01

    The RARE imaging method was used to monitor the cooking of single rice kernels in real time and with high spatial resolution in three dimensions. The imaging sequence is optimized for rapid acquisition of signals with short relaxation times using centered out RARE. Short scan time and high spatial

  8. Supervised Cross-Modal Factor Analysis for Multiple Modal Data Classification

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jingbin

    2015-10-09

    In this paper we study the problem of learning from multiple modal data for purpose of document classification. In this problem, each document is composed two different modals of data, i.e., An image and a text. Cross-modal factor analysis (CFA) has been proposed to project the two different modals of data to a shared data space, so that the classification of a image or a text can be performed directly in this space. A disadvantage of CFA is that it has ignored the supervision information. In this paper, we improve CFA by incorporating the supervision information to represent and classify both image and text modals of documents. We project both image and text data to a shared data space by factor analysis, and then train a class label predictor in the shared space to use the class label information. The factor analysis parameter and the predictor parameter are learned jointly by solving one single objective function. With this objective function, we minimize the distance between the projections of image and text of the same document, and the classification error of the projection measured by hinge loss function. The objective function is optimized by an alternate optimization strategy in an iterative algorithm. Experiments in two different multiple modal document data sets show the advantage of the proposed algorithm over other CFA methods.

  9. Comparison of Ga-67 planar imaging and single photon emission computed tomography in malignant chest disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumeh, S.S.; Rosenthal, D.; Kaplan, W.D.; English, R.E.; Holman, B.L.

    1985-01-01

    To determine the value of Ga-67 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients (pts) with malignant chest disease, the authors compared Ga-67 planar scans (ps) and SPECT with the medical records in twenty-five consecutive patients. Twenty-three examinations were performed on 17 pts with Hodgkin's disease (HD) and three pts with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Five examinations were performed on 5 pts with bronchogenic carcinoma (BC). The two modalities were evaluated for (1) presence or absence of disease, (2) number of foci of abnormal uptake and (3) extent of disease. In pts with lymphoma, SPECT defined the extent of disease better than planar imaging in eight examinations; it demonstrated para-cardial involvement in one pt, separated hilar from mediastinal disease in 4, and demonstrated posterior mediastinal disease in 3. SPECT clarified suspicious foci on planar images in seven examinations, correctly ruled out disease in two pts with equivocal planar images and did not exchange planar image findings in six examinations. In pts with bronchogenic carcinoma, both medalities correctly ruled out mediastinal involvement in three pts. SPECT detected mediastinal lymph node involvement in one pt with equivocal planar images. Both SPECT and planar imaging missed direct tumor extension to the mediastinum in one pt. They conclude that Ga-67 with SPECT is better than planar images for staging of chest lymphoma and BC. Since it defines different lymph node groups it carries a good potential for staging as well as follow up of those pts

  10. Non-traumatic acute abdomen in the adult: a critical review of imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buitrago-Tellez, C.; Boos, S.; Heinemann, F.; Wenz, W.

    1992-01-01

    Two different series collected at the University Hospital of Freiburg are presented as a basis for the critical appraisal of available imaging tests and their correlation with anatomic pain sites. The first series comprises 284 patients of non-traumatic acute abdomen admitted to the emergency department during 1990. The radiological approach revealed an increased use of immediate ultrasound (58%) followed by plain film radiography (53%), contrast studies (15%), and computed tomography (9.8%). Five groups of entities were identified according to the diagnostic imaging procedure prior to surgery. In a second series, the clinical presentation, the distribution and the efficacy of imaging studies for the confirmation of acute mesenteric ischemia were evaluated in 55 patients over a period of 14 years. A reduced mortality rate emphasizes the value of early and agressive diagnosis and angiographic management. (orig.)

  11. Imaging findings in a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: a survey using advanced modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronooh, Pegah; Shakibafar, Ali Reza; Houshyar, Maneli; Nafarzade, Shima

    2011-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an infrequent multi-systemic disease which is characterized by multiple keratocysts in the jaws, calcification of falx cerebri, and basal cell carcinomas. We report a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome in a 23-year-old man with emphasis on image findings of keratocyctic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) on panoramic radiograph, computed tomography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and Ultrasonography (US). In this case, pericoronal lesions were mostly orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) concerning the MR and US study, which tended to recur less. The aim of this report was to clarify the characteristic imaging features of the syndrome-related keratocysts that can be used to differentiate KCOT from OOC. Also, our findings suggested that the recurrence rate of KCOTs might be predicted based on their association to teeth.

  12. Imaging findings in a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: a survey using advanced modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronooh, Pegah [Dental School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shakibafar, Ali Reza [TABA Medical Imaging Center, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Houshyar, Maneli; Nafarzade, Shima [Oral Pathology Department, Babol Dental School, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an infrequent multi-systemic disease which is characterized by multiple keratocysts in the jaws, calcification of falx cerebri, and basal cell carcinomas. We report a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome in a 23-year-old man with emphasis on image findings of keratocyctic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) on panoramic radiograph, computed tomography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and Ultrasonography (US). In this case, pericoronal lesions were mostly orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) concerning the MR and US study, which tended to recur less. The aim of this report was to clarify the characteristic imaging features of the syndrome-related keratocysts that can be used to differentiate KCOT from OOC. Also, our findings suggested that the recurrence rate of KCOTs might be predicted based on their association to teeth.

  13. Single-photon imaging in complementary metal oxide semiconductor processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charbon, E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the basics of single-photon counting in complementary metal oxide semiconductors, through single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs), and the making of miniaturized pixels with photon-counting capability based on SPADs. Some applications, which may take advantage of SPAD image

  14. Determination of optimal fiducial marker across image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) modalities: visibility and artifact analysis of gold, carbon, and polymer fiducial markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handsfield, Lydia L; Yue, Ning J; Zhou, Jinghao; Chen, Ting; Goyal, Sharad

    2012-09-06

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the visibility and artifact created by gold, carbon, and polymer fiducial markers in a simple phantom across computed tomography (CT), kilovoltage (kV), and megavoltage (MV) linear accelerator imaging and MV tomotherapy imaging. Three types of fiducial markers (gold, carbon, and polymer) were investigated for their visibility and artifacts in images acquired with various modalities and with different imaging parameters (kV, mAs, slice thickness). The imaging modalities include kV CT, 2D linac-based kilovoltage and megavoltage X-ray imaging systems, kV cone-beam CT, and normal and fine tomotherapy imaging. The images were acquired on a phantom constructed using Superflab bolus in which markers of each type were inserted into the center layer. The visibility and artifacts produced by each marker were assessed qualitatively and quantitatively. All tested markers could be identified clearly on the acquired CT and linac-based kV images; gold markers demonstrated the highest contrast. On the CT images, gold markers produced a significant artifact, while no artifacts were observed with polymer markers. Only gold markers were visible when using linac-based MV and tomotherapy imaging. For linac-based kV images, the contrast increased with kV and mAs values for all the markers, with the gold being the most pronounced. On CT images, the contrast increased with kV for the gold markers, while decreasing for the polymer and carbon marker. With the bolus phantom used, we found that when kV imaging-based treatment verification equipment is available, polymer and carbon markers may be the preferred choice for target localization and patient treatment positioning verification due to less image artifacts. If MV imaging will be the sole modality for positioning verification, it may be necessary to use gold markers despite the artifacts they create on the simulation CT images.

  15. Single-cell magnetic imaging using a quantum diamond microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, D R; Lee, K; Park, H; Weissleder, R; Yacoby, A; Lukin, M D; Lee, H; Walsworth, R L; Connolly, C B

    2015-08-01

    We apply a quantum diamond microscope for detection and imaging of immunomagnetically labeled cells. This instrument uses nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond for correlated magnetic and fluorescence imaging. Our device provides single-cell resolution and a field of view (∼1 mm(2)) two orders of magnitude larger than that of previous NV imaging technologies, enabling practical applications. To illustrate, we quantified cancer biomarkers expressed by rare tumor cells in a large population of healthy cells.

  16. Single cell magnetic imaging using a quantum diamond microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H.; Weissleder, R.; Yacoby, A.; Lukin, M. D.; Lee, H.; Walsworth, R. L.; Connolly, C. B.

    2015-01-01

    We apply a quantum diamond microscope to detection and imaging of immunomagnetically labeled cells. This instrument uses nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond for correlated magnetic and fluorescence imaging. Our device provides single-cell resolution and two orders of magnitude larger field of view (~1 mm2) than previous NV imaging technologies, enabling practical applications. To illustrate, we quantify cancer biomarkers expressed by rare tumor cells in a large population of healthy cells. PMID:26098019

  17. A Bayesian Spatial Model to Predict Disease Status Using Imaging Data From Various Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqiong Xue

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Relating disease status to imaging data stands to increase the clinical significance of neuroimaging studies. Many neurological and psychiatric disorders involve complex, systems-level alterations that manifest in functional and structural properties of the brain and possibly other clinical and biologic measures. We propose a Bayesian hierarchical model to predict disease status, which is able to incorporate information from both functional and structural brain imaging scans. We consider a two-stage whole brain parcellation, partitioning the brain into 282 subregions, and our model accounts for correlations between voxels from different brain regions defined by the parcellations. Our approach models the imaging data and uses posterior predictive probabilities to perform prediction. The estimates of our model parameters are based on samples drawn from the joint posterior distribution using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC methods. We evaluate our method by examining the prediction accuracy rates based on leave-one-out cross validation, and we employ an importance sampling strategy to reduce the computation time. We conduct both whole-brain and voxel-level prediction and identify the brain regions that are highly associated with the disease based on the voxel-level prediction results. We apply our model to multimodal brain imaging data from a study of Parkinson's disease. We achieve extremely high accuracy, in general, and our model identifies key regions contributing to accurate prediction including caudate, putamen, and fusiform gyrus as well as several sensory system regions.

  18. The role of modern imaging modalities on deep brain stimulation targeting for mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedrak, M; Gorgulho, A; De Salles, A F; Frew, A; Behnke, E; Ishida, W; Klochkov, T; Malkasian, D

    2008-01-01

    The reversible nature of deep brain stimulation (DBS) brought renewed interest on surgery to medically intractable mental illnesses. The explosion of anatomical and functional imaging has allowed the development of new potential targets and the understanding of historical targets. Fifteen patients undergoing stereotactic surgery for movement disorders, at UCLAs interventional MRI operating-room, were studied with fiber tracking. Stereotactic targets and fiber tracking were determined on MRIs using the Schaltenbrand-Wahren atlas for definition in the iPlan software. Cingulate, subcaudate, BA25/CgWM, amygdala, posterior hypothalamus, orbitofrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, anterior limb of the internal capsule and dorsomedial thalamus were studied. DTI parameters used ranged from 10 to 20mm for voxel size in the x/y/z planes, fiber length was kept constant at 36 mm, and fractional anisotropy (FA) threshold varied from 0.20 to 0.25. Reliable interconnectivity of targets were determined with DTI and related to PET imaging. Mental illness targets were observed with functional and fiber tract maps. This confirmation yields reliability to DTI imaging in order to determine novel targets and enhance the understanding of areas not well understood. Currently available imaging techniques, the reversibility of DBS to modulate targets promises to bring a brighter future for surgery of mental illness.

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of different imaging modalities in detection of proximal caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senel, B; Kamburoglu, K; Uçok, O; Yüksel, S P; Ozen, T; Avsever, H

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the in vitro diagnostic ability of visual inspection, film, charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor, photostimulable phosphor (PSP) sensor and cone beam CT in the detection of proximal caries in posterior teeth compared with the histological gold standard. Visual inspection, film, CCD, PSP and cone beam CT images were used to detect proximal caries in the mesial and distal surfaces of 138 teeth (276 surfaces). Visual inspection and evaluation of all intraoral digital and conventional radiographs and cone beam CT images were performed twice by three oral radiologists. Weighted kappa coefficients were calculated to assess intra- and interobserver agreement for each image set, and scores were compared with the histological gold standard using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to evaluate diagnostic ability. Intraobserver kappa coefficients calculated for each observer for each method of detecting caries ranged from 0.739 to 0.928. Strong interobserver agreement ranging from 0.631 to 0.811 was found for all detection methods. The highest Az values for all three observers were obtained with the cone beam CT images; however, differences between detection methods were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Visual inspection, film, CCD, PSP plates and cone beam CT performed similarly in the detection of proximal caries.

  20. Mobile, Multi-modal, Label-Free Imaging Probe Analysis of Choroidal Oximetry and Retinal Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    durability during the experiments. We have identified a suitable material (polyvinyl chloride, PVC ) that has the needed properties for the...and imaging the hemoglobin for calibration, but we have nothing concrete or reliably repeatable to report at this time. Discussion of Goals not Met

  1. Feasibility tests of a dual modality system for imaging using gamma rays and NIR light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzunov, Nikolay; Atroshchenko, Kostiantyn; Baneva, Yanka; Bello, Michele; De Rosa, Matteo; Fontana, Cristiano Lino; Moschini, Giuliano; Rossi, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    We are developing a dual system for small-animal imaging in multimodality studies, which consists of a highspatial resolution gamma-camera and a scanner for Near-Infra-Red (NIR) light. The gamma-camera is assembled from a position-sensitive photomultiplier and a scintillation-crystal with parallel-hole collimator. On the other hand, the NIR imaging is designed for near-object scanning, and features two operational modes: Transmission and Fluorescence. In the Transmission mode, the NIR light, coming from five different wavelength LEDs, crosses the sample and is subsequently measured by an array sensor. In the Fluorescence mode, the emission from nanoparticles, such as singlewalled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) administered in the imaged object, is excited using the laser. The gamma-camera energy and spatial resolutions have been measured. This latter has been assessed by using specially-designed phantoms like capillary tubes or volumes with cavities filled with a radioactive solution. The NIR-scanner spatial resolution has been determined along two perpendicular directions using standards, placed at different distances from the sensor. The results show that both the NIR scanning-system and the gamma-camera feature good imaging-parameters and can be applied to multimodality studies.

  2. Quantitative Imaging of Single, Unstained Viruses with Coherent X Rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Changyong; Jiang Huaidong; Mancuso, Adrian; Amirbekian, Bagrat; Miao Jianwei; Peng Li; Sun Ren; Shah, Sanket S.; Zhou, Z. Hong; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2008-01-01

    We report the recording and reconstruction of x-ray diffraction patterns from single, unstained viruses, for the first time. By separating the diffraction pattern of the virus particles from that of their surroundings, we performed quantitative and high-contrast imaging of a single virion. The structure of the viral capsid inside a virion was visualized. This work opens the door for quantitative x-ray imaging of a broad range of specimens from protein machineries and viruses to cellular organelles. Moreover, our experiment is directly transferable to the use of x-ray free electron lasers, and represents an experimental milestone towards the x-ray imaging of large protein complexes

  3. A method of object recognition for single pixel imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Boxuan; Zhang, Wenwen

    2018-01-01

    Computational ghost imaging(CGI), utilizing a single-pixel detector, has been extensively used in many fields. However, in order to achieve a high-quality reconstructed image, a large number of iterations are needed, which limits the flexibility of using CGI in practical situations, especially in the field of object recognition. In this paper, we purpose a method utilizing the feature matching to identify the number objects. In the given system, approximately 90% of accuracy of recognition rates can be achieved, which provides a new idea for the application of single pixel imaging in the field of object recognition

  4. Single-particle imaging for biosensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorulmaz, Mustafa; Isil, Cagatay; Seymour, Elif; Yurdakul, Celalettin; Solmaz, Berkan; Koc, Aykut; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2017-10-01

    Current state-of-the-art technology for in-vitro diagnostics employ laboratory tests such as ELISA that consists of a multi-step test procedure and give results in analog format. Results of these tests are interpreted by the color change in a set of diluted samples in a multi-well plate. However, detection of the minute changes in the color poses challenges and can lead to false interpretations. Instead, a technique that allows individual counting of specific binding events would be useful to overcome such challenges. Digital imaging has been applied recently for diagnostics applications. SPR is one of the techniques allowing quantitative measurements. However, the limit of detection in this technique is on the order of nM. The current required detection limit, which is already achieved with the analog techniques, is around pM. Optical techniques that are simple to implement and can offer better sensitivities have great potential to be used in medical diagnostics. Interference Microscopy is one of the tools that have been investigated over years in optics field. More of the studies have been performed in confocal geometry and each individual nanoparticle was observed separately. Here, we achieve wide-field imaging of individual nanoparticles in a large field-of-view ( 166 μm × 250 μm) on a micro-array based sensor chip in fraction of a second. We tested the sensitivity of our technique on dielectric nanoparticles because they exhibit optical properties similar to viruses and cells. We can detect non-resonant dielectric polystyrene nanoparticles of 100 nm. Moreover, we perform post-processing applications to further enhance visibility.

  5. A Single Session of rTMS Enhances Small-Worldness in Writer’s Cramp: Evidence from Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Multi-Modal Brain Graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose D. Bharath

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS induces widespread changes in brain connectivity. As the network topology differences induced by a single session of rTMS are less known we undertook this study to ascertain whether the network alterations had a small-world morphology using multi-modal graph theory analysis of simultaneous EEG-fMRI.Method: Simultaneous EEG-fMRI was acquired in duplicate before (R1 and after (R2 a single session of rTMS in 14 patients with Writer’s Cramp (WC. Whole brain neuronal and hemodynamic network connectivity were explored using the graph theory measures and clustering coefficient, path length and small-world index were calculated for EEG and resting state fMRI (rsfMRI. Multi-modal graph theory analysis was used to evaluate the correlation of EEG and fMRI clustering coefficients.Result: A single session of rTMS was found to increase the clustering coefficient and small-worldness significantly in both EEG and fMRI (p < 0.05. Multi-modal graph theory analysis revealed significant modulations in the fronto-parietal regions immediately after rTMS. The rsfMRI revealed additional modulations in several deep brain regions including cerebellum, insula and medial frontal lobe.Conclusion: Multi-modal graph theory analysis of simultaneous EEG-fMRI can supplement motor physiology methods in understanding the neurobiology of rTMS in vivo. Coinciding evidence from EEG and rsfMRI reports small-world morphology for the acute phase network hyper-connectivity indicating changes ensuing low-frequency rTMS is probably not “noise”.

  6. Single atom imaging with an sCMOS camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picken, C. J.; Legaie, R.; Pritchard, J. D.

    2017-10-01

    Single atom imaging requires discrimination of weak photon count events above the background and has typically been performed using electron-multiplying charge-coupled device cameras, photomultiplier tubes, or single photon counting modules. A scientific complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (sCMOS) provides a cost effective and highly scalable alternative to other single atom imaging technologies, offering fast readout and larger sensor dimensions. We demonstrate single atom resolved imaging of two site-addressable optical traps separated by 10 μm using an sCMOS camera, offering a competitive signal-to-noise ratio at intermediate count rates to allow high fidelity readout discrimination (error <10-6) and sub-μm spatial resolution for applications in quantum technologies.

  7. Recent Inferior Myocardial Infarction Complicated with a Right Ventricular Thrombus Detected by Three Cardiac Imaging Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuno, Toshiki; Imaeda, Syohei; Hashimoto, Kenji; Ryuzaki, Toshinobu; Saito, Tetsuya; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Tabei, Ryota; Kodaira, Masaki; Hase, Manabu; Numasawa, Yohei

    2018-03-01

    We report the case of a 71-year-old woman diagnosed with recent inferior myocardial infarction complicated with right ventricular infarction and a right ventricular thrombus. Three-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography, contrast-enhanced computed tomography, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging clearly detected a thrombus. We consider cases with a recent right ventricular infarction to require assessment for thrombus formations in the right ventricle. Fortunately, vigorous anticoagulation therapy resolved the thrombi in both the right ventricle and right coronary artery.

  8. Selective imaging modalities after first pyelonephritis failed to identify significant urological anomalies, despite normal antenatal ultrasounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mola, Gylli; Wenger, Therese Ramstad; Salomonsson, Petra

    2017-01-01

    scintigraphies. Using the European Association of Paediatric Urology guidance would have missed three urological patients, one with initial surgery, and avoided 46 scintigraphies. Investigating patients under two years with ultrasound and scintigraphy, and just ultrasound in children over two years, would have...... identified all patients initially treated with surgery and avoided 65 scintigraphies. CONCLUSION: Dilated VUR was the dominant anomaly in a cohort with first time pyelonephritis and normal antenatal ultrasound. The optimal imaging strategy after pyelonephritis must be identified....

  9. Multi-modality imaging review of congenital abnormalities of kidney and upper urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Subramaniyan; Kumar, Devendra; Khanna, Maneesh; Al Heidous, Mahmoud; Sheikh, Adnan; Virmani, Vivek; Palaniappan, Yegu

    2016-02-28

    Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) include a wide range of abnormalities ranging from asymptomatic ectopic kidneys to life threatening renal agenesis (bilateral). Many of them are detected in the antenatal or immediate postnatal with a significant proportion identified in the adult population with varying degree of severity. CAKUT can be classified on embryological basis in to abnormalities in the renal parenchymal development, aberrant embryonic migration and abnormalities of the collecting system. Renal parenchymal abnormalities include multi cystic dysplastic kidneys, renal hypoplasia, number (agenesis or supernumerary), shape and cystic renal diseases. Aberrant embryonic migration encompasses abnormal location and fusion anomalies. Collecting system abnormalities include duplex kidneys and Pelvi ureteric junction obstruction. Ultrasonography (US) is typically the first imaging performed as it is easily available, non-invasive and radiation free used both antenatally and postnatally. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are useful to confirm the ultrasound detected abnormality, detection of complex malformations, demonstration of collecting system and vascular anatomy and more importantly for early detection of complications like renal calculi, infection and malignancies. As CAKUT are one of the leading causes of end stage renal disease, it is important for the radiologists to be familiar with the varying imaging appearances of CAKUT on US, CT and MRI, thereby helping in prompt diagnosis and optimal management.

  10. Monitoring Lidocaine Single-Crystal Dissolution by Ultraviolet Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Jesper; Ye, Fengbin; Rantanen, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    ) imaging for conducting single‐crystal dissolution studies was performed. Using lidocaine as a model compound, the aim was to develop a setup capable of monitoring and quantifying the dissolution of lidocaine into a phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, under stagnant conditions. A single crystal of lidocaine...... was placed in the quartz dissolution cell and UV imaging was performed at 254 nm. Spatially and temporally resolved mapping of lidocaine concentration during the dissolution process was achieved from the recorded images. UV imaging facilitated the monitoring of lidocaine concentrations in the dissolution...... media adjacent to the single crystals. The concentration maps revealed the effects of natural convection due to density gradients on the dissolution process of lidocaine. UV imaging has great potential for in vitro drug dissolution testing...

  11. 3D Point Cloud Reconstruction from Single Plenoptic Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Murgia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Novel plenoptic cameras sample the light field crossing the main camera lens. The information available in a plenoptic image must be processed, in order to create the depth map of the scene from a single camera shot. In this paper a novel algorithm, for the reconstruction of 3D point cloud of the scene from a single plenoptic image, taken with a consumer plenoptic camera, is proposed. Experimental analysis is conducted on several test images, and results are compared with state of the art methodologies. The results are very promising, as the quality of the 3D point cloud from plenoptic image, is comparable with the quality obtained with current non-plenoptic methodologies, that necessitate more than one image.

  12. Coupled Deep Autoencoder for Single Image Super-Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Kun; Yu, Jun; Wang, Ruxin; Li, Cuihua; Tao, Dacheng

    2017-01-01

    Sparse coding has been widely applied to learning-based single image super-resolution (SR) and has obtained promising performance by jointly learning effective representations for low-resolution (LR) and high-resolution (HR) image patch pairs. However, the resulting HR images often suffer from ringing, jaggy, and blurring artifacts due to the strong yet ad hoc assumptions that the LR image patch representation is equal to, is linear with, lies on a manifold similar to, or has the same support set as the corresponding HR image patch representation. Motivated by the success of deep learning, we develop a data-driven model coupled deep autoencoder (CDA) for single image SR. CDA is based on a new deep architecture and has high representational capability. CDA simultaneously learns the intrinsic representations of LR and HR image patches and a big-data-driven function that precisely maps these LR representations to their corresponding HR representations. Extensive experimentation demonstrates the superior effectiveness and efficiency of CDA for single image SR compared to other state-of-the-art methods on Set5 and Set14 datasets.

  13. Visualization of macro-immune complexes in the antiphospholipid syndrome by multi-modal microscopy imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taatjes, Douglas J; Bouffard, Nicole; von Turkovich, Michele; Quinn, Anthony S; Wu, Xiao-Xuan; Vasovic, Ljiljana V; Rand, Jacob H

    2017-09-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune thrombotic condition that is marked by autoantibodies against phospholipid-binding proteins. The mechanism(s) of thrombogenesis has (have) resisted elucidation since its description over thirty years ago. Nevertheless, a defining aspect of the disorder is positivity for clinical laboratory tests that confirm antibody binding to anionic phospholipids. It is remarkable that, to our knowledge, the binding of proteins from plasmas of APS patients to phospholipid has not been previously imaged. We therefore investigated this with high resolution microscopy-based imaging techniques that have not been previously used to address this question, namely atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Atomic force microscopy imaging of APS plasmas incubated on an anionic planar phospholipid layer revealed the formation of distinct complex three-dimensional structures, which were morphologically dissimilar to structures formed from control plasmas from healthy patients. Likewise, scanning electron microscopy analysis of phospholipid vesicles incubated with APS plasmas in suspension showed formation of layered macro-immune complexes demonstrated by the significant agglomeration of a complex proteinaceous matrix from soluble plasma and aggregation of particles. In contrast, plasmas from healthy control samples bound to phospholipid vesicles in suspension generally displayed a more flattened, mat-like appearance by scanning electron microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy of plasma samples incubated on planar phospholipid layers and previously imaged by atomic force microscopy, corroborated the results obtained by mixing the plasmas with phospholipids in solution. Analysis of the incorporated proteins by silver stained SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated considerable heterogeneity in the composition of the phospholipid vesicle-adsorbed proteins among APS patients. To our knowledge, these results provide

  14. Imaging brain activity during seizures in freely behaving rats using a miniature multi-modal imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigal, Iliya; Koletar, Margaret M; Ringuette, Dene; Gad, Raanan; Jeffrey, Melanie; Carlen, Peter L; Stefanovic, Bojana; Levi, Ofer

    2016-09-01

    We report on a miniature label-free imaging system for monitoring brain blood flow and blood oxygenation changes in awake, freely behaving rats. The device, weighing 15 grams, enables imaging in a ∼ 2 × 2 mm field of view with 4.4 μm lateral resolution and 1 - 8 Hz temporal sampling rate. The imaging is performed through a chronically-implanted cranial window that remains optically clear between 2 to > 6 weeks after the craniotomy. This imaging method is well suited for longitudinal studies of chronic models of brain diseases and disorders. In this work, it is applied to monitoring neurovascular coupling during drug-induced absence-like seizures 6 weeks following the craniotomy.

  15. A Single Imaging Modality in the Diagnosis, Severity, and Prognosis of Pulmonary Embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadice Selimoglu Sen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study aimed to investigate the currency of computerized tomography pulmonary angiography-based parameters as pulmonary artery obstruction index (PAOI, as well as right ventricular diameters for pulmonary embolism (PE risk evaluation and prediction of mortality and intensive care unit (ICU requirement. Materials and Methods. The study retrospectively enrolled 203 patients hospitalized with acute PE. PAOI was calculated according to Qanadli score. Results. Forty-three patients (23.9% were hospitalized in the ICU. Nineteen patients (10.6% died during the 30-day follow-up period. The optimal cutoff value of PAOI for PE 30th day mortality and ICU requirement were found as 36.5% in ROC curve analysis. The pulmonary artery systolic pressure had a significant positive correlation with right/left ventricular diameter ratio (r=0.531, P<0.001, PAOI (r=0.296, P<0.001, and pulmonary artery diameter (r=0.659, P<0.001. The patients with PAOI values higher than 36.5% have a 5.7-times increased risk of death. Conclusion. PAOI is a fast and promising parameter for risk assessment in patients with acute PE. With greater education of clinicians in this radiological scoring, a rapid assessment for diagnosis, clinical risk evaluation, and prognosis may be possible in emergency services without the need for echocardiography.

  16. Cy5.5 conjugated MnO nanoparticles for magnetic resonance/near-infrared fluorescence dual-modal imaging of brain gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ning; Shao, Chen; Li, Shuai; Wang, Zihao; Qu, Yanming; Gu, Wei; Yu, Chunjiang; Ye, Ling

    2015-11-01

    The fusion of molecular and anatomical modalities facilitates more reliable and accurate detection of tumors. Herein, we prepared the PEG-Cy5.5 conjugated MnO nanoparticles (MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 NPs) with magnetic resonance (MR) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging modalities. The applicability of MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 NPs as a dual-modal (MR/NIRF) imaging nanoprobe for the detection of brain gliomas was investigated. In vivo MR contrast enhancement of the MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 nanoprobe in the tumor region was demonstrated. Meanwhile, whole-body NIRF imaging of glioma bearing nude mouse exhibited distinct tumor localization upon injection of MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 NPs. Moreover, ex vivo CLSM imaging of the brain slice hosting glioma indicated the preferential accumulation of MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 NPs in the glioma region. Our results therefore demonstrated the potential of MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 NPs as a dual-modal (MR/NIRF) imaging nanoprobe in improving the diagnostic efficacy by simultaneously providing anatomical information from deep inside the body and more sensitive information at the cellular level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A legal text with a single “Dapat”: Looking for deontic modality in the Filipino translation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janus Ruel T. Cabazares

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Filipino version of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR, only a single deontic modal marker is found, a curious absence given that such a category conveys the performative function crucial to the language used in laws. Regardless of the current attitude against seeking equivalence in translation analysis, questioning the semantics of the target text (TT is a necessary endeavour for the translation of legal texts, whether or not the relevant linguistic features of the TT language contribute to or facilitate the expression of any of the properties of deontic modality (DM. To this end, the paper analyzes the Filipino translation of the UDHR to look for this type of semantic category. The analysis of the TT focuses on three important points: [1] use of the prospective aspect does not contribute to the expression of the necessary features of DM, notwithstanding their shared notion of futurity; [2] volition, an essential part of DM, is implied by the transitivity triggered by the TT verb voice, but the source and perspective of the volition is different; and [3] use of the modal marker dapat (i.e., necessary carries the primary features of DM. The paper suggests that the consistent use of this modal marker can assign a performative function to the TT, a trait that helps define the source text (ST as a legal text. The study can offer helpful points to translators of legal documents and other forms of technical translation. The methods used can help future translation analyses by providing conceptual tools for the semantic comparison of the linguistic traits of an ST and TT, particularly the semantic representation of Filipino sentences including the transitivity of the verb and modality. Ultimately, the study hopes to contribute to quality translations of text as part of promoting the intellectualization of Filipino and other Philippine languages.

  18. Shape memory polymers with enhanced visibility for magnetic resonance- and X-ray imaging modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weems, A C; Szafron, J M; Easley, A D; Herting, S; Smolen, J; Maitland, D J

    2017-05-01

    Currently, monitoring of minimally invasive medical devices is performed using fluoroscopy. The risks associated with fluoroscopy, including increased risk of cancer, make this method especially unsuitable for pediatric device delivery and follow-up procedures. A more suitable method is magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, which makes use of harmless magnetic fields rather than ionizing radiation when imaging the patient; this method is safer for both the patient and the performing technicians. Unfortunately, there is a lack of research available on bulk polymeric materials to enhance MR-visibility for use in medical devices. Here we show the incorporation of both physical and chemical modifying agents for the enhancement of both MR and X-ray visibility. Through the incorporation of these additives, we are able to control shape recovery of the polymer without sacrificing the thermal transition temperatures or the mechanical properties. For long-term implantation, these MR-visible materials do not have altered degradation profiles, and the release of additives is well below significant thresholds for daily dosages of MR-visible compounds. We anticipate our materials to be a starting point for safer, MR-visible medical devices incorporating polymeric components. Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are polymeric materials with unique shape recovery abilities that are being considered for use in biomedical and medical device applications. This paper presents a methodology for the development of MR and X-ray visible SMPs using either a chemically loaded or physical loaded method during polymer synthesis. Such knowledge is imperative for the development and clinical application of SMPs for biomedical devices, specifically for minimally-invasive vascular occlusion treatments, and while there are studies pertaining to the visibility of polymeric particles, little work has been performed on the utility of biomaterials intended for medical devices and the impact of how adding multiple

  19. Optical scatter imaging: a microscopic modality for the rapid morphological assay of living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boustany, Nada N.

    2007-02-01

    Tumors derived from epithelial cells comprise the majority of human tumors and their growth results from the accumulation of multiple mutations affecting cellular processes critical for tissue homeostasis, including cell proliferation and cell death. To understand these processes and address the complexity of cancer cell function, multiple cellular responses to different experimental conditions and specific genetic mutations must be analyzed. Fundamental to this endeavor is the development of rapid cellular assays in genetically defined cells, and in particular, the development of optical imaging methods that allow dynamic observation and real-time monitoring of cellular processes. In this context, we are developing an optical scatter imaging technology that is intended to bridge the gap between light and electron microscopy by rapidly providing morphometric information about the relative size and shape of non-spherical organelles, with sub-wavelength resolution. Our goal is to complement current microscopy techniques used to study cells in-vitro, especially in long-term time-lapse studies of living cells, where exogenous labels can be toxic, and electron microscopy will destroy the sample. The optical measurements are based on Fourier spatial filtering in a standard microscope, and could ultimately be incorporated into existing high-throughput diagnostic platforms for cancer cell research and histopathology of neoplastic tissue arrays. Using an engineered epithelial cell model of tumor formation, we are currently studying how organelle structure and function are altered by defined genetic mutations affecting the propensity for cell death and oncogenic potential, and by environmental conditions promoting tumor growth. This talk will describe our optical scatter imaging technology and present results from our studies on apoptosis, and the function of BCL-2 family proteins.

  20. Imaging Modalities for the Noninvasive Assessment of Fibrosis in Crohn's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasi, Cristina; Falchini, Massimo; Milani, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The development of strictures in Crohn's disease is a main cause of hospitalization and often represent an indication for surgery. The differentiation between inflammatory and fibrotic strictures is useful to determine the optimal treatment. Today, the availability of noninvasive methods to assess the presence and extension of strictures offers new tools for the diagnosis and follow-up of the disease. Bowel ultrasound, power doppler ultrasound, contrast-enhanced ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging offer the additional advantage that they do not expose patients to ionizing radiation. In this paper we provide an update on the accuracy of these noninvasive methods for the diagnosis of Crohn's disease. PMID:22654607

  1. Imaging Modalities for the Noninvasive Assessment of Fibrosis in Crohn's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Stasi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of strictures in Crohn's disease is a main cause of hospitalization and often represent an indication for surgery. The differentiation between inflammatory and fibrotic strictures is useful to determine the optimal treatment. Today, the availability of noninvasive methods to assess the presence and extension of strictures offers new tools for the diagnosis and follow-up of the disease. Bowel ultrasound, power doppler ultrasound, contrast-enhanced ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging offer the additional advantage that they do not expose patients to ionizing radiation. In this paper we provide an update on the accuracy of these noninvasive methods for the diagnosis of Crohn's disease.

  2. Accuracy of diagnostic imaging modalities for peripheral post-traumatic osteomyelitis - a systematic review of the recent literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govaert, Geertje A. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Surgery, Subdivision of Trauma Surgery, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Trauma Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); IJpma, Frank F.; Reininga, Inge H. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Surgery, Subdivision of Trauma Surgery, Groningen (Netherlands); McNally, Martin [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, The Bone Infection Unit, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford (United Kingdom); McNally, Eugene [Oxford Musculoskeletal Radiology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Glaudemans, Andor W. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2017-08-15

    Post-traumatic osteomyelitis (PTO) is difficult to diagnose and there is no consensus on the best imaging strategy. The aim of this study is to present a systematic review of the recent literature on diagnostic imaging of PTO. A literature search of the EMBASE and PubMed databases of the last 16 years (2000-2016) was performed. Studies that evaluated the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), three-phase bone scintigraphy (TPBS), white blood cell (WBC) or antigranulocyte antibody (AGA) scintigraphy, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and plain computed tomography (CT) in diagnosing PTO were considered for inclusion. The review was conducted using the PRISMA statement and QUADAS-2 criteria. The literature search identified 3358 original records, of which 10 articles could be included in this review. Four of these studies had a comparative design which made it possible to report the results of, in total, 17 patient series. WBC (or AGA) scintigraphy and FDG-PET exhibit good accuracy for diagnosing PTO (sensitivity ranged from 50-100%, specificity ranged from 40-97% versus 83-100% and 51%-100%, respectively). The accuracy of both modalities improved when a hybrid imaging technique (SPECT/CT and FDG-PET/CT) was performed. For FDG-PET/CT, sensitivity ranged between 86 and 94% and specificity between 76 and 100%. For WBC scintigraphy + SPECT/CT, this is 100% and 89-97%, respectively. Based on the best available evidence of the last 16 years, both WBC (or AGA) scintigraphy combined with SPECT/CT or FDG-PET combined with CT have the best diagnostic accuracy for diagnosing peripheral PTO. (orig.)

  3. Quantitative imaging of single upconversion nanoparticles in biological tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemarie Nadort

    Full Text Available The unique luminescent properties of new-generation synthetic nanomaterials, upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs, enabled high-contrast optical biomedical imaging by suppressing the crowded background of biological tissue autofluorescence and evading high tissue absorption. This raised high expectations on the UCNP utilities for intracellular and deep tissue imaging, such as whole animal imaging. At the same time, the critical nonlinear dependence of the UCNP luminescence on the excitation intensity results in dramatic signal reduction at (∼1 cm depth in biological tissue. Here, we report on the experimental and theoretical investigation of this trade-off aiming at the identification of optimal application niches of UCNPs e.g. biological liquids and subsurface tissue layers. As an example of such applications, we report on single UCNP imaging through a layer of hemolyzed blood. To extend this result towards in vivo applications, we quantified the optical properties of single UCNPs and theoretically analyzed the prospects of single-particle detectability in live scattering and absorbing bio-tissue using a human skin model. The model predicts that a single 70-nm UCNP would be detectable at skin depths up to 400 µm, unlike a hardly detectable single fluorescent (fluorescein dye molecule. UCNP-assisted imaging in the ballistic regime thus allows for excellent applications niches, where high sensitivity is the key requirement.

  4. Gold Nanocage-Photosensitizer Conjugates for Dual-Modal Image-Guided Enhanced Photodynamic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivatsan, Avinash; Jenkins, Samir V.; Jeon, Mansik; Wu, Zhijin; Kim, Chulhong; Chen, Jingyi; Pandey, Ravindra K.

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated that gold nanocage-photosensitizer conjugates can enable dual image-guided delivery of photosensitizer and significantly improve the efficacy of photodynamic therapy in a murine model. The photosensitizer, 3-devinyl-3-(1'-hexyloxyethyl)pyropheophorbide (HPPH), was noncovalently entrapped in the poly(ethylene glycol) monolayer coated on the surface of gold nanocages. The conjugate is stable in saline solutions, while incubation in protein rich solutions leads to gradual unloading of the HPPH, which can be monitored optically by fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging. The slow nature of the release in turn results in an increase in accumulation of the drug within implanted tumors due to the passive delivery of gold nanocages. Furthermore, the conjugate is found to generate more therapeutic singlet oxygen and have a lower IC50 value than the free drug alone. Thus the conjugate shows significant suppression of tumor growth as compared to the free drug in vivo. Short-term study showed neither toxicity nor phenotypical changes in mice at therapeutic dose of the conjugates or even at 100-fold higher than therapeutic dose of gold nanocages. PMID:24465274

  5. Evaluation of selective arterial embolization effect by chitosan micro-hydrogels in hindlimb sarcoma rodent models using various imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tai Kyoung; Kwon, Jeong Il; Na, Kyung Sook

    2015-01-01

    Embolization is mainly used to reduce the size of locally advanced tumors. In this study, selective arterial catheterization with chitosan micro-hydrogels (CMH) into the femoral artery was performed and the therapeutic effect was validated using different imaging methods. Male SD rats (n = 18, 6 weeks old) were randomly assigned into three groups: Group 1 as control, Group 2 without any ligation of distal femoral artery, and Group 3 with temporary ligation of the distal femoral artery. RR1022 sarcoma cell lines were inoculated into thigh muscle. After 1 week, CMH was injected into the proximal femoral artery. Different imaging modalities were performed during a 3-week follow-up. The tumor size was significantly (P < 0.001) decreased in both Group 2 and Group 3 (P < 0.001) after selective arterial embolization therapy. 18F-FDG-PET/CT revealed decreased intensity of 18F-FDG uptake in tumors. The accumulation status of 125I-CMH near the tumor was verified by gamma camera. Appropriate selective arterial embolization therapy with CMH was

  6. Evaluation of selective arterial embolization effect by chitosan micro-hydrogels in hindlimb sarcoma rodent models using various imaging modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tai Kyoung; Kwon, Jeong Il; Na, Kyung Sook [Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2015-09-15

    Embolization is mainly used to reduce the size of locally advanced tumors. In this study, selective arterial catheterization with chitosan micro-hydrogels (CMH) into the femoral artery was performed and the therapeutic effect was validated using different imaging methods. Male SD rats (n = 18, 6 weeks old) were randomly assigned into three groups: Group 1 as control, Group 2 without any ligation of distal femoral artery, and Group 3 with temporary ligation of the distal femoral artery. RR1022 sarcoma cell lines were inoculated into thigh muscle. After 1 week, CMH was injected into the proximal femoral artery. Different imaging modalities were performed during a 3-week follow-up. The tumor size was significantly (P < 0.001) decreased in both Group 2 and Group 3 (P < 0.001) after selective arterial embolization therapy. 18F-FDG-PET/CT revealed decreased intensity of 18F-FDG uptake in tumors. The accumulation status of 125I-CMH near the tumor was verified by gamma camera. Appropriate selective arterial embolization therapy with CMH was.

  7. Photoacoustic imaging of single circulating melanoma cells in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lidai; Yao, Junjie; Zhang, Ruiying; Xu, Song; Li, Guo; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    Melanoma, one of the most common types of skin cancer, has a high mortality rate, mainly due to a high propensity for tumor metastasis. The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is a potential predictor for metastasis. Label-free imaging of single circulating melanoma cells in vivo provides rich information on tumor progress. Here we present photoacoustic microscopy of single melanoma cells in living animals. We used a fast-scanning optical-resolution photoacoustic microscope to image the microvasculature in mouse ears. The imaging system has sub-cellular spatial resolution and works in reflection mode. A fast-scanning mirror allows the system to acquire fast volumetric images over a large field of view. A 500-kHz pulsed laser was used to image blood and CTCs. Single circulating melanoma cells were imaged in both capillaries and trunk vessels in living animals. These high-resolution images may be used in early detection of CTCs with potentially high sensitivity. In addition, this technique enables in vivo study of tumor cell extravasation from a primary tumor, which addresses an urgent pre-clinical need.

  8. Periacetabular Osteotomy in patients with Hip Dysplasia investigated with Imaging Modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mechlenburg, Inger

    2016-01-01

    The minimal invasive periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) is a joint-preserving procedure that effectively corrects hip dysplasia, provides pain relief, improved radiographic results and a low rate of complications. The aim of this doctoral dissertation was to examine biological changes in bone...... research question “Which biological changes take place in bone and cartilage 2-10 years after PAO?”. In Chapter 3, a precise and efficient method for estimating the thickness of the articular cartilage in the hip joint is developed using stereologic methods and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The method...... 7 investigates the long-term changes in cartilage thickness and volume of subchondral bone cysts measured with MRI and stereology 10 years after PAO. The second research question “What is the level of changes in blood perfusion and bone formation in the acetabular fragment after PAO?” is evaluated...

  9. Mixing of multi-modal images for conformational radiotherapy: application to patient re positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassal, P.

    1998-01-01

    This study shows a procedure of patient re positioning by comparative evaluation between the position of the patient and the theoretical expected position of the patient; the stagger between the two information gives the error of installation in translation and rotation. A correction is calculated and applied to the treatment environment (position and orientation of the patient, position and orientation of the irradiation source). The control system allows to determine the precise position of the tumor volume. The echography allows to determine the position of an organ.The surface captor is used to localize the tumors of the face or of the brain, with the respect to the face, the acquisition and the treatment of information take only few minutes. The X rays imager is applied for the localization of bones structures. (N.C.)

  10. Double jeopardy: multi-modality imaging of monozygotic "twin cap" atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Scott W; Cooper, Robert M; Appleby, Clare; McCann, Caroline; Binukrishnan, Sukumaran; Radu, Maria D; Stables, Rodney H

    2014-11-01

    The investigation of asymptomatic but potentially vulnerable atherosclerosis is not yet a major focus for clinical Cardiologists. We have illustrated the contemporary investigation and treatment of such disease using a clinical case that involved monozygotic twins. One twin (T1) had unfortunately suffered a cardiac arrest whilst jogging and survived only due to bystander CPR and prompt defibrillation. His identical twin brother (T2), on subsequent investigation, harbours a compositionally identical lesion in a proximal coronary vessel that has not yet ruptured or provoked a clinical event. Following the presentation of both non-invasive and invasive images, we discuss the need for active suspicion and intensive treatment for those people with a 'genetic' risk of future myocardial infarction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Is magnetic resonance imaging a viable alternative to ultrasound as the primary imaging modality in the diagnosis of paediatric appendicitis? A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogunmefun, G.; Hardy, M.; Boynes, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdominal pain requiring surgical intervention in paediatric patients. Ultrasound is generally the diagnostic imaging modality of choice, followed by CT, where paediatric appendicitis is suspected. However, high operator dependency and diagnostic restrictions related to anatomical and clinical presentation may limit consistency of application. This paper explores whether MRI is a viable alternative to ultrasound as the primary imaging modality. Method: A systematic review of the literature was undertaken. A search of Medline, Cinahl, PubMed Central and Google Scholar was undertaken supplemented by a review of reference lists, author searching and review of NICE evidence base for existing guidelines. Included studies were assessed for bias using the QUADAS-2 quality assessment tool and data were extracted systematically using a purposefully designed electronic data extraction proforma. Results: Seven studies were included in final review. The age range of participants extended from 0 to 19 years. Only one study with a patient age range of 0–14 used sedation. Sensitivity estimates from the included studies ranged from 92% to 100% while specificity ranged from 89% to 100%. A significant variation in the number and type of sequences was noted between the studies. Conclusion: MRI offers high sensitivity and specificity comparable to contrast enhanced CT and greater than ultrasound as reported in the literature. Where accessibility is not a restriction, MRI is a viable alternative to ultrasound in the assessment and diagnosis of paediatric appendicitis. Clinical practice recommendations have been provided to facilitate the translation of evidence into practice. - Highlights: • MRI may be used as the primary imaging tool to investigate paediatric appendicitis. • Gadolinium is not necessary for MRI evaluation of appendicitis in children. • Sedation for MRI evaluation of appendicitis is not required

  12. Comparison study of four imaging modalities in diagnosis of primary synovial osteochondromatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xulin; Qu Jianli; Li Shuling; Zhang Guowei; Zhang Guanghui; Li Ping; Lu Ning

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the diagnostic value of X-ray, CT, MRI, and ultrasound in primary synovial osteochondromatosis (PSO). Methods: The imaging data of X-ray, CT, MRI, and ultrasound of 42 patients with 44 knees with PSO proved by surgery and pathology were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Results: The Plain X-ray demonstrated 197 calcific nodules in 28 joints, 96 ossific nodules in 24 joints, and 5 mixed type nodules in 3 joints. Compared with the data of surgery and pathology, 36 joints (81.8%, 36/44) were diagnosed correctly by X-ray. The CT showed 8 big cartilaginous nodules in 5 joints, 255 calcific nodules in 30 joints, 146 ossific nodules in 28 joints, and 16 mixed type nodules in 7 joints. Twenty-four knees underwent volume rendering technique reconstruction which displayed the quantity, size, shape, and position of non-cartilaginous nodules clearly. Compared with the data of surgery and pathology, 40 joints (90.9%, 40/44) were diagnosed correctly by CT. The MRI demonstrated 8 big cartilaginous nodules in 5 joints, 70 small cartilaginous nodules in 4 joints, 248 calcific nodules in 29 joints, 146 ossific nodules in 28 joints, and 16 mixed type nodules in 7 joints. All nodules displayed low signal in DWI and there was no enhancement. Compared with the data of surgery and pathology, 43 joints (97.7%, 43/44) were diagnosed correctly by MRI. The ultrasound showed 8 big cartilaginous nodules in 5 joints, 70 small cartilaginous nodules in 4 joints, 232 calcific nodules in 30 joints, 142 ossific nodules in 28 joints, and 16 mixed type nodules in 7 joints. Compared with the data of surgery and pathology, 43 joints (97.7%, 43/44) were diagnosed correctly by ultrasound. Conclusions: The Less common manifestations of the PSO require multimodality imaging to make the diagnosis. Multimodalities (X-ray, CT, MRI and ultrasound) are particularly useful in fully characterising PSO and to allow for appropriate clinical planning. (authors)

  13. Role of correlative diagnostic imaging modalities in the diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, S.; Fouda, M.; El-awadi, A.

    2006-01-01

    Para thyroidectomy with bilateral neck exploration is the classic surgical approach to control primary hyperparathyroidism. Various imaging techniques have been used to detect and localize abnormal parathyroid tissue in order to modify surgical interference, to shorten operating and recovery time and to benefit from a cost- effective analysis. The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy of technetium-99m sestamibi parathyroid scintigraphy (MIBI) in localizing parathyroid diseases and the effect of correlative studies in the improvement of overall lesion detection. The study included 136 patients with proven primary hyperparathyroidism. There were 30 men (22%) and 106 women (78%), their age ranged from 12 to 70 years (mean 38 ±14 year). underwent preoperative localization procedure. All patients, prior to successful para thyroidectomy, were subjected MIBI scan. Additional investigations were carried out included neck ultrasonography (US) in 92 patients (67.7%), computed tomography (CT) in 36 patients (27.9%) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 6 patients (4.4%). The results were compared with operative and histological findings. Solitary parathyroid adenoma was found in 115 patients (84.6%), 3 patients had double adenomas (2.2%) and 18 patients had parathyroid hyperplasia (13.2%). Sensitivity and positive predictive values (PPV) were 91.2% and 100% for MIBI, 85.2% and 94.9% for US, 83.3% and 93.7% for CT and 83.3% and 100% for MRI. Non-significant difference in sensitivity was observed between US, CT or MRI, whereas MIBI sensitivity was significantly higher than the other localizing techniques (P<0.05). The combination of MIBI and US improved the overall sensitivity (93.1%), but the combination of MIBI with either CT or MRI did not improve the overall detection. The sensitivity of MIBI scintigraphy was higher than that of US, CT and MRI. Its higher sensitivity and good positive predictive value suggests that a strategy of initial testing using Tc-99

  14. Magnetically engineered Cd-free quantum dots as dual-modality probes for fluorescence/magnetic resonance imaging of tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ke; Jing, Lihong; Liu, Chunyan; Hou, Yi; Gao, Mingyuan

    2014-02-01

    Magnetically engineered Cd-free CuInS2@ZnS:Mn quantum dots (QDs) were designed, synthesized, and evaluated as potential dual-modality probes for fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of tumors in vivo. The synthesis of Mn-doped core-shell structured CuInS2@ZnS mainly comprised three steps, i.e., the preparation of fluorescent CuInS2 seeds, the particle surface coating of ZnS, and the Mn-doping of the ZnS shells. Systematic spectroscopy studies were carried out to illustrate the impacts of ZnS coating and the following Mn-doping on the optical properties of the QDs. In combination with conventional fluorescence, fluorescence excitation, and time-resolved fluorescence measurements, the structure of CuInS2@ZnS:Mn QDs prepared under optimized conditions presented a Zn gradient CuInS2 core and a ZnS outer shell, while Mn ions were mainly located in the ZnS shell, which well balanced the optical and magnetic properties of the resultant QDs. For the following in vivo imaging experiments, the hydrophobic CuInS2@ZnS:Mn QDs were transferred into water upon ligand exchange reactions by replacing the 1-dodecanethiol ligand with dihydrolipoic acid-poly(ethylene glycol) (DHLA-PEG) ligand. The MTT assays based on HeLa cells were carried out to evaluate the cytotoxicity of the current Cd-free CuInS2@ZnS:Mn QDs for comparing with that of water soluble CdTe QDs. Further in vivo fluorescence and MR imaging experiments suggested that the PEGylated CuInS2@ZnS:Mn QDs could well target both subcutaneous and intraperitoneal tumors in vivo. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Brightness calibrates particle size in single particle fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihe; Sun, Zezhou; Di, Weihua; Qin, Weiping; Yuan, Zhen; Wu, Changfeng

    2015-04-01

    This Letter provides a novel approach to quantify the particle sizes of highly bright semiconductor polymer dots (Pdots) for single-particle imaging and photobleaching studies. A quadratic dependence of single-particle brightness on particle size was determined by single-particle fluorescence imaging and intensity statistics. In terms of the same imaging conditions, the particle diameter can be quantified by comparing the individual brightness intensity with associated calibration curve. Based on this sizing method, photobleaching trajectories and overall photon counts emitted by single particles were analyzed. It is found that photobleaching rate constants of different sized Pdots are not strongly dependent on particle diameter except the sparsely occurring fluorescence blinking in certain dim particles and the rapid photobleaching component in some bright particles. The overall photon counts increase with increasing particle diameter. However, those larger than 30 nm deviate away from the increasing tendency. These results reveal the significance of selecting appropriate Pdots (≤30  nm) for single-particle imaging and tracking applications.

  16. Monitoring the Spatiotemporal Activities of miRNAs in Small Animal Models Using Molecular Imaging Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Baril

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding mRNA targets via sequence complementary inducing translational repression and/or mRNA degradation. A current challenge in the field of miRNA biology is to understand the functionality of miRNAs under physiopathological conditions. Recent evidence indicates that miRNA expression is more complex than simple regulation at the transcriptional level. MiRNAs undergo complex post-transcriptional regulations such miRNA processing, editing, accumulation and re-cycling within P-bodies. They are dynamically regulated and have a well-orchestrated spatiotemporal localization pattern. Real-time and spatio-temporal analyses of miRNA expression are difficult to evaluate and often underestimated. Therefore, important information connecting miRNA expression and function can be lost. Conventional miRNA profiling methods such as Northern blot, real-time PCR, microarray, in situ hybridization and deep sequencing continue to contribute to our knowledge of miRNA biology. However, these methods can seldom shed light on the spatiotemporal organization and function of miRNAs in real-time. Non-invasive molecular imaging methods have the potential to address these issues and are thus attracting increasing attention. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of methods used to detect miRNAs and discusses their contribution in the emerging field of miRNA biology and therapy.

  17. Single-cell Western blotting after whole-cell imaging to assess cancer chemotherapeutic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chi-Chih; Lin, Jung-Ming G; Xu, Zhuchen; Kumar, Sanjay; Herr, Amy E

    2014-10-21

    Intratumor heterogeneity remains a major obstacle to effective cancer therapy and personalized medicine. Current understanding points to differential therapeutic response among subpopulations of tumor cells as a key challenge to successful treatment. To advance our understanding of how this heterogeneity is reflected in cell-to-cell variations in chemosensitivity and expression of drug-resistance proteins, we optimize and apply a new targeted proteomics modality, single-cell western blotting (scWestern), to a human glioblastoma cell line. To acquire both phenotypic and proteomic data on the same, single glioblastoma cells, we integrate high-content imaging prior to the scWestern assays. The scWestern technique supports thousands of concurrent single-cell western blots, with each assay comprised of chemical lysis of single cells seated in microwells, protein electrophoresis from those microwells into a supporting polyacrylamide (PA) gel layer, and in-gel antibody probing. We systematically optimize chemical lysis and subsequent polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) of the single-cell lysate. The scWestern slides are stored for months then reprobed, thus allowing archiving and later analysis as relevant to sparingly limited, longitudinal cell specimens. Imaging and scWestern analysis of single glioblastoma cells dosed with the chemotherapeutic daunomycin showed both apoptotic (cleaved caspase 8- and annexin V-positive) and living cells. Intriguingly, living glioblastoma subpopulations show up-regulation of a multidrug resistant protein, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), suggesting an active drug efflux pump as a potential mechanism of drug resistance. Accordingly, linking of phenotype with targeted protein analysis with single-cell resolution may advance our understanding of drug response in inherently heterogeneous cell populations, such as those anticipated in tumors.

  18. Hyperspectral single-pixel imaging with dual optical combs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Kyuki; Minamikawa, Takeo; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Yasui, Takeshi; Iwata, Tetsuo

    2017-02-01

    Dual comb spectroscopy (DCS) is based on the combination of Fourier transform spectroscopy with an optical frequency comb (OFC), and has a spectral resolution below MHz order over a spectral range over several tens THz. Furthermore, non-mechanical time-delay scanning enables the rapid data acquisition. However, in order to expand DCS into spectral imaging, a CCD or a CMOS camera cannot be used because a high-speed, point detector is indispensable to acquire the fast interferogram signal in DCS. Therefore, the first demonstration of DCS imaging was based on the mechanical scanning of the sample position. If DCS imaging can be achieved without the need for mechanical scanning, the application field of the DCS imaging will be largely expanded. One promising method to achieve the scan-less 2D imaging is a single-pixel imaging (SPI), enabling scan-less 2D imaging by use of pattern illumination on the sample and a point detector. Also, the accumulation effect in the random pattern illumination increases a signal-to-noise ratio. In this paper, we present combination of DCS with SPI, namely a scan-less DCS imaging. Spectral imaging of a sample indicated the effectiveness and potential of scan-less DCS imaging.

  19. A comparison of non-invasive imaging modalities: Infrared thermography, spectrophotometric intracutaneous analysis and laser Doppler imaging for the assessment of adult burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke-Smith, Alexandra; Collier, Jonathan; Jones, Isabel

    2015-12-01

    Currently, the only evidence-based adjunct to clinical evaluation of burn depth is laser Doppler imaging (LDI), although preliminary studies of alternative imaging modalities with instant image acquisition are promising. This is a study to investigate the accuracy of infrared thermography (IRT) and spectrophotometric intracutaneous analysis (SIA) for burn depth assessment, and compare this to the current gold standard: LDI. We include a comparison of the three modalities in terms of cost, reliability and usability. We recruited 20 patients with burns presenting to the Chelsea and Westminster Adult Burns Service. Between 48h and 5 days afterburn we recorded imaging using moorLDI2-BI-VR (LDI), FLIR E60 (IRT) and Scanoskin™ (SIA). Subsequent clinical management and outcome was as normal, and not affected by the extra images taken. 24 burn regions were grouped according to burn wound healing: group A healed within 14 days, group B within 14-21 days, and group C took more than 21 days or underwent grafting. Both LDI and IRT accurately determined healing potential in groups A and C, but failed to distinguish between groups B and C (p>0.05). Scanoskin™ interpretation of SIA was 100% consistent with clinical outcome. FLIR E60 and Scanoskin™ both present advantages to moorLDI2-BI-VR in terms of cost, ease-of-use and acceptability to patients. IRT is unlikely to challenge LDI as the gold standard as it is subject to the systematic bias of evaporative cooling. At present, the LDI colour-coded palette is the easiest method for image interpretation, whereas Scanoskin™ monochrome colour-palettes are more difficult to interpret. However the additional analyses of pigment available using SIA may help more accurately indicate the depth of burn compared with perfusion alone. We suggest development of Scanoskin™ software to include a simplified colour-palette similar to LDI and additional work to further investigate the potential of SIA as an alternative to the current gold

  20. Quantitative Assessment of Single-Image Super-Resolution in Myocardial Scar Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Estner, Heidi L; Herzka, Daniel A; Mcveigh, Elliot R; Halperin, Henry R

    Single-image super resolution is a process of obtaining a high-resolution image from a set of low-resolution observations by signal processing. While super resolution has been demonstrated to improve image quality in scaled down images in the image domain, its effects on the Fourier-based image acquisition technique, such as MRI, remains unknown.We performed high-resolution ex vivo late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) magnetic resonance imaging (0.4 × 0.4 × 0.4 mm 3 ) in postinfarction swine hearts ( n = 24). The swine hearts were divided into the training set ( n = 14) and the test set ( n = 10), and in all hearts, low-resolution images were simulated from the high-resolution images. In the training set, super-resolution dictionaries with pairs of small matching patches of the high- and low-resolution images were created. In the test set, super resolution recovered high-resolution images from low-resolution images using the dictionaries. The same algorithm was also applied to patient LGE ( n = 4) to assess its effects. Compared with interpolated images, super resolution significantly improved basic image quality indices ( P Super resolution using Fourier-based zero padding achieved the best image quality. However, the magnitude of improvement was small in images with zero padding. Super resolution substantially improved the spatial resolution of the patient LGE images by sharpening the edges of the heart and the scar. In conclusion, single-image super resolution significantly improves image errors. However, the magnitude of improvement was relatively small in images with Fourier-based zero padding. These findings provide evidence to support its potential use in myocardial scar imaging.

  1. Educational response in South Korea to recent advances in imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Dal Gwan

    1986-01-01

    Along with the development of new equipment, the progress made in diagnostics utilizing X-ray images has made both qualitative and quantitative analyses possible. Accordingly, the need is being felt for scientific-technological stance to explore new avenues of development through combined use of various apparatus in the interests of improving the absolute quality of our technology. To do so, extention of the school system to 4 years would be essential, but this may have to be modified to better suit the reality of the individual countries involved. As the education of physicians is being carried on by physicians, so should the leadership in the education of radiological technologists remain in the hands of radiological technologists remain in the hands of radiological technologists. Testing technology and clinical services may be the areas where education based on experience may be effective, and productivity of education may be enhanced through emphasis on reverence for human life and love for fellow human beings, so that the overall efforts may be more oriented to cultivation of ability rather than to the success in the national examinations. The post graduate education must lack nothing in re-equipping radiological technologists with basic technology and scientific knowledge. In order to strike a balance between cultivation of reverence for human life on the one hand and development of scientific knowledge and technological expertise on the other in this age of highly developed science and technology, close ties among radiological technologists within smaller units of organization and spirit of mutual cooperation must be emphasized, and greater emphasis may be in order on making information science and total imagenology appear more affractive to the students by effectively linking basic sciences to applied sciences, and to this end, communication and team work among different academic organizations must be actively pursued

  2. Identification, diagnostic assistance and planning methods that use multi-modality imaging for prostate cancer focal therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makni, Nasr

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of death from cancer among men. In In the last decade, new diagnosis procedures and treatment options have been developed and made possible thanks to the recent progress in prostate imaging modalities. The newest challenges in this field are to detect the smallest tumors and to treat locally to minimise the treatment morbidity. In this thesis, we introduce a set of automatic image processing methods for the guidance and assistance of diagnosis and treatment, in laser-based prostate cancer focal therapies. In the first part of this work, segmentation and computer-aided detection algorithms have been developed for the enhancement of image-based diagnosis of prostate cancer. First, we propose a novel approach that combines Markov Random Fields framework with an Active Shape Model, in order to extract three dimensional outlines of the gland from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data. Second, prostate's MRI volume is segmented into peripheral and central zones: we introduce a method that explores features of multispectral MRI, and is based on belief functions and the modelling of an a priori knowledge as an additional source of information. Finally, computer-aided detection of prostate's peripheral zone tumors is investigated by experimenting novel texture features based on fractal geometry-based. These parameters, extracted from morphological MRI, were tested using both supervised and unsupervised classification methods. The results of these different approaches were studied and compared. The second part of this work addresses the guidance of laser-based focal ablation of prostate tumors. A novel non rigid registration method is introduced for fusion of pre-operative MRI and planning data, and per-operative ultrasound imaging. We test and evaluate our algorithms using simulated data and physical phantoms, which enable comparison to ground truth. Patients' data, combined to expert interpretation, are also used

  3. Wavelength-Modulated Differential Photoacoustic (WM-DPA) imaging: a high dynamic range modality towards noninvasive diagnosis of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovlo, Edem; Lashkari, Bahman; Choi, Sung soo Sean; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    This study explores wavelength-modulated differential photo-acoustic (WM-DPA) imaging for non-invasive early cancer detection via sensitive characterization of functional information such as hemoglobin oxygenation (sO2) levels. Well-known benchmarks of tumor formation such as angiogenesis and hypoxia can be addressed this way. While most conventional photo-acoustic imaging has almost entirely employed high-power pulsed lasers, frequency-domain photo-acoustic radar (FD-PAR) has seen significant development as an alternative technique. It employs a continuous wave laser source intensity-modulated and driven by frequency-swept waveforms. WM-DPA imaging utilizes chirp modulated laser beams at two distinct wavelengths for which absorption differences between oxy- and deoxygenated hemoglobin are minimum (isosbestic point, 805 nm) and maximum (680 nm) to simultaneously generate two signals detected using a standard commercial array transducer as well as a single-element transducer that scans the sample. Signal processing is performed using Lab View and Matlab software developed in-house. Minute changes in total hemoglobin concentration (tHb) and oxygenation levels are detectable using this method since background absorption is suppressed due to the out-of-phase modulation of the laser sources while the difference between the two signals is amplified, thus allowing pre-malignant tumors to become identifiable. By regulating the signal amplitude ratio and phase shift the system can be tuned to applications like cancer screening, sO2 quantification and hypoxia monitoring in stroke patients. Experimental results presented demonstrate WM-DPA imaging of sheep blood phantoms in comparison to single-wavelength FD-PAR imaging. Future work includes the functional PA imaging of small animals in vivo.

  4. Role of therapeutic fasting along with other Naturopathy and Yoga Modalities in addressing acne vulgaris – A single case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushparaj Ameya

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A 23 year old female diagnosed as acne vulgaris underwent Therapeutic fasting (TF and other naturopathy and yoga modalities for 30 days. She presented with eruptions all over her face and the face was edematous. She was given a modified diet for initial 3 days which included fresh fruits and juices along with cooked vegetables and sorghum roti. Additionally Naturopathy treatments like Swedish massage, steam bath, warm water enema and hip bath were given along with some yogic postures, pranayam and kriyas (Cleansing procedures. The patient responded well to the therapeutic fasting. By the end of 30 days there were no eruptions in her face and her skin also was clear. All the treatments were based on the principle of naturopathic medicine that the body has its own power to heal itself. TF has shown to attenuate inflammatory status of the body by suppressing pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and decreasing body fat and circulating levels of leukocytes. This is the first study to report the non pharmacological approach towards treating acne. To conclude fasting along with other naturopathy and yoga modalities has shown noteworthy changes in reducing the inflammatory response in acne vulgaris. However large scale studies are warranted.

  5. Role of endoscopy in multi-modality monitoring during aneurysm surgery: A single center experience with 175 consecutive unruptured aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Kato, Yoko; Ishihara, Kohei; Ito, Keisuke; Kaito, Takafumi; Nouri, Mohsen; Oheda, Motoki; Inamasu, Joji; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Unruptured aneurysm surgery is a challenge to all vascular neurosurgeons as the patient is asymptomatic and no even slight neurological deficits should be expected postoperatively. To this aim, multi-modality checking of the vessels during the surgery is highly recommended to assure of the patency of the parent and perforator arteries next to an aneurysm. In this paper, we present our experience in the last 1.5 years with emphasis on the role of endoscope assisted microsurgery. One hundred and seventy-five patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms were operated in our institute in the last 1½ years. All patients underwent endoscope assisted microsurgery with pre- and post-clipping indocyanine green angiography. In selected cases, motor evoked potential monitoring was implemented. No mortality was observed in this period, and only 6 patients (3.4%) suffered new permanent neurological deficits postoperatively. Our illustrative cases show how endoscopy may help the surgeon to visualize hidden vessels behind and medial to an aneurysm. Our results indicated that multi-modality monitoring during unruptured aneurysm surgeries is associated with excellent outcome. Endoscope is able to show blind corners during aneurysm surgery which cannot be routinely observed with microscope and its application in aneurysm surgery assists the surgeon to make certain of complete neck clipping and preservation of perforating arteries around the aneurysm.

  6. Single-Frame Image Super-resolution through Contourlet Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiji CV

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a learning-based, single-image super-resolution reconstruction technique using the contourlet transform, which is capable of capturing the smoothness along contours making use of directional decompositions. The contourlet coefficients at finer scales of the unknown high-resolution image are learned locally from a set of high-resolution training images, the inverse contourlet transform of which recovers the super-resolved image. In effect, we learn the high-resolution representation of an oriented edge primitive from the training data. Our experiments show that the proposed approach outperforms standard interpolation techniques as well as a standard (Cartesian wavelet-based learning both visually and in terms of the PSNR values, especially for images with arbitrarily oriented edges.

  7. Adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and esophago-gastric junction: The effects of single and combined modalities on the survival and patterns of failure following treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittington, R.; Coia, L.R.; Haller, D.G.; Rubenstein, J.H.; Rosato, E.F.

    1990-01-01

    One hundred sixty-five patients with localized adenocarcinomas of the esophagus or esophago-gastric (EG) junction were treated with surgery alone, radiation therapy alone, chemotherapy alone, surgery followed by post-operative radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or chemosensitized radiation therapy, and chemosensitized radiation therapy alone. Patients were retrospectively evaluated for survival, control of tumor within the mediastinum, post-operative swallowing function, patterns of failure, and treatment-related morbidity. Follow-up of survivors ranges from 9-88 months (median 23 months). Chemotherapy and radiation therapy as single modalities were associated with a recurrence rate of 100%. Combined modality therapy significantly reduced the risk of local recurrence in all patient groups. Chemosensitized radiation therapy alone reduced the local recurrence rate to 48%, and surgery followed by radiation therapy reduced the local failure rate to 24%. When chemotherapy or chemosensitization was added to surgery plus radiation, the risk was further reduced to 15%. The use of combined modality therapy was also found to extend the survival of patients without excessive toxicity. Median survival was shortest among the group treated with radiation alone (5 months) and intermediate among patients following chemosensitized radiation alone (10 months) or complete surgical resection alone (15 months). Patients treated with all three modalities had the longest median survival (21 months). Based on this experience, the optimum treatment of these patients appears to include aggressive attempts at surgical resection with chemosensitized radiation therapy. Excellent pallination can also be achieved in unresectable patients with chemosensitized radiation therapy with a smaller chance for long term survival

  8. Automatic Blastomere Recognition from a Single Embryo Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Tian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of blastomeres of human day 3 embryos is one of the most important criteria for evaluating embryo viability. However, due to the transparency and overlap of blastomeres, it is a challenge to recognize blastomeres automatically using a single embryo image. This study proposes an approach based on least square curve fitting (LSCF for automatic blastomere recognition from a single image. First, combining edge detection, deletion of multiple connected points, and dilation and erosion, an effective preprocessing method was designed to obtain part of blastomere edges that were singly connected. Next, an automatic recognition method for blastomeres was proposed using least square circle fitting. This algorithm was tested on 381 embryo microscopic images obtained from the eight-cell period, and the results were compared with those provided by experts. Embryos were recognized with a 0 error rate occupancy of 21.59%, and the ratio of embryos in which the false recognition number was less than or equal to 2 was 83.16%. This experiment demonstrated that our method could efficiently and rapidly recognize the number of blastomeres from a single embryo image without the need to reconstruct the three-dimensional model of the blastomeres first; this method is simple and efficient.

  9. 18F-FDG PET/CT compared to conventional imaging modalities in pediatric primary bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    London, Kevin; Stege, Claudia; Kaspers, Gertjan; Cross, Siobhan; Dalla-Pozza, Luciano; Onikul, Ella; Graf, Nicole; Howman-Giles, Robert

    2012-01-01

    F-Fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is useful in adults with primary bone tumors. Limited published data exist in children. To compare hybrid FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with conventional imaging (CI) modalities in detecting malignant lesions, predicting response to chemotherapy and diagnosing physeal involvement in pediatric primary bone tumors. Retrospective analysis of PET/CT and CI reports with histopathology or follow-up > 6 months as reference standard. Response parameters and physeal involvement at diagnosis were compared to histopathology. A total of 314 lesions were detected in 86 scans. Excluding lung lesions, PET/CT had higher sensitivity and specificity than CI (83%, 98% and 78%, 97%, respectively). In lung lesions, PET/CT had higher specificity than CI (96% compared to 87%) but lower sensitivity (80% compared to 93%). Higher initial SUV max and greater SUV max reduction on PET/CT after chemotherapy predicted a good response. Change in tumor size on MRI did not predict response. Both PET/CT and MRI were very sensitive but of low specificity in predicting physeal tumor involvement. PET/CT appears more accurate than CI in detecting malignant lesions in childhood primary bone tumors, excluding lung lesions. It seems better than MRI at predicting tumor response to chemotherapy. (orig.)

  10. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT compared to conventional imaging modalities in pediatric primary bone tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    London, Kevin [The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Discipline of Paediatrics and Child Health, Sydney Medical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Stege, Claudia; Kaspers, Gertjan [VU Medical Centre, Divisions of Paediatric Oncology/Haematology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cross, Siobhan; Dalla-Pozza, Luciano [The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Oncology, Sydney (Australia); Onikul, Ella [The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Medical Imaging, Sydney (Australia); Graf, Nicole [The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Pathology, Sydney (Australia); Howman-Giles, Robert [The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Discipline of Imaging, Sydney Medical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2012-04-15

    F-Fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is useful in adults with primary bone tumors. Limited published data exist in children. To compare hybrid FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with conventional imaging (CI) modalities in detecting malignant lesions, predicting response to chemotherapy and diagnosing physeal involvement in pediatric primary bone tumors. Retrospective analysis of PET/CT and CI reports with histopathology or follow-up > 6 months as reference standard. Response parameters and physeal involvement at diagnosis were compared to histopathology. A total of 314 lesions were detected in 86 scans. Excluding lung lesions, PET/CT had higher sensitivity and specificity than CI (83%, 98% and 78%, 97%, respectively). In lung lesions, PET/CT had higher specificity than CI (96% compared to 87%) but lower sensitivity (80% compared to 93%). Higher initial SUV{sub max} and greater SUV{sub max} reduction on PET/CT after chemotherapy predicted a good response. Change in tumor size on MRI did not predict response. Both PET/CT and MRI were very sensitive but of low specificity in predicting physeal tumor involvement. PET/CT appears more accurate than CI in detecting malignant lesions in childhood primary bone tumors, excluding lung lesions. It seems better than MRI at predicting tumor response to chemotherapy. (orig.)

  11. Brain Structure and Function Associated with a History of Sport Concussion: A Multi-Modal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Nathan; Hutchison, Michael; Richards, Doug; Leung, General; Graham, Simon; Schweizer, Tom A

    2017-02-15

    There is growing concern about the potential long-term consequences of sport concussion for young, currently active athletes. However, there remains limited information about brain abnormalities associated with a history of concussion and how they relate to clinical factors. In this study, advanced MRI was used to comprehensively describe abnormalities in brain structure and function associated with a history of sport concussion. Forty-three athletes (21 male, 22 female) were recruited from interuniversity teams at the beginning of the season, including 21 with a history of concussion and 22 without prior concussion; both groups also contained a balanced sample of contact and noncontact sports. Multi-modal MRI was used to evaluate abnormalities in brain structure and function. Athletes with a history of concussion showed frontal decreases in brain volume and blood flow. However, they also demonstrated increased posterior cortical volume and elevated markers of white matter microstructure. A greater number of prior concussions was associated with more extensive decreases in cerebral blood flow and insular volume, whereas recovery time from most recent concussion was correlated with reduced frontotemporal volume. White matter showed limited correlations with clinical factors, predominantly in the anterior corona radiata. This study provides the first evidence of the long-term effects of concussion on gray matter volume, blood flow, and white matter microstructure within a single athlete cohort. This was examined for a mixture of male and female athletes in both contact and noncontact sports, demonstrating the relevance of these findings for the overall sporting community.

  12. New Therapeutic and Diagnostic Opportunities for Injured Tissue-Specific Targeting of Complement Inhibitors and Imaging Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holers, V. Michael; Tomlinson, Stephen; Kulik, Liudmila; Atkinson, Carl; Rohrer, Bärbel; Banda, Nirmal; Thurman, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite substantial opportunity and commercial interest in developing drugs that modulate the complement system in a broad range of non-orphan indications, several obstacles remain to be overcome. Among these issues is the biophysical nature of complement proteins, whose circulating levels are typically very high and whose turnover rates are relatively rapid, especially in the setting of chronic inflammatory conditions. This situation necessitates the use of very high levels of therapeutic compounds in order to achieve both multi-pathway and multiple effector mechanism inhibition. In addition, one must avoid infectious complications or the systemic impairment of the other important physiological functions of complement. Herein we focus on the development of a novel therapeutic strategy based on injured tissue-specific targeting of complement inhibitors using the antigen-combining domains of a small subset of natural IgM antibodies, which as endogenous antibodies specifically recognize sites of local damage across a broad range of tissues and locally activate complement C3, resulting in C3 fragment covalent fixation. Because the use of such recombinant tissue-targeting inhibitors precludes the utility of measuring systemic levels of complement biomarkers or function, since a goal of this targeting strategy is to leave those processes intact and unimpeded, we also briefly describe a new method designed to quantitatively measure using imaging modalities the inhibition of generation of fixed C3 fragments at sites of inflammation/injury. In addition to the ability to determine whether complement activation is locally constrained with the use of inhibitors, there is also a broader application of this imaging approach to inflammatory and autoimmune diseases characterized by local complement activation. PMID:27282113

  13. All-in-one interictal presurgical imaging in patients with epilepsy: single-session EEG/PET/(f)MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grouiller, Frederic; Delattre, Benedicte M.A.; Lazeyras, Francois; Ratib, Osman; Vargas, Maria I.; Garibotto, Valentina; Pittau, Francesca; Spinelli, Laurent; Seeck, Margitta; Vulliemoz, Serge; Heinzer, Susanne; Iannotti, Giannina R.

    2015-01-01

    In patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy, resection of the epileptic focus can lead to freedom from seizures or significant improvement in well-selected candidates. Localization of the epileptic focus with multimodal concordance is crucial for a good postoperative outcome. Beyond the detection of epileptogenic lesions on structural MRI and focal hypometabolism on FDG PET, EEG-based Electric Source Imaging (ESI) and simultaneous EEG and functional MRI (EEG-fMRI) are increasingly applied for mapping epileptic activity. We here report presurgical multimodal interictal imaging using a hybrid PET/MR scanner for single-session FDG PET, MRI, EEG-fMRI and ESI. This quadrimodal imaging procedure was performed in a single session in 12 patients using a high-density (256 electrodes) MR-compatible EEG system and a hybrid PET/MR scanner. EEG was used to exclude subclinical seizures during uptake of the PET tracer, to compute ESI on interictal epileptiform discharges and to guide fMRI analysis for mapping haemodynamic changes correlated with interictal epileptiform activity. The whole multimodal recording was performed in less than 2 hours with good patient comfort and data quality. Clinically contributory examinations with at least two modalities were obtained in nine patients and with all modalities in five patients. This single-session quadrimodal imaging procedure provided reliable and contributory interictal clinical data. This procedure avoids multiple scanning sessions and is associated with less radiation exposure than PET-CT. Moreover, it guarantees the same medication level and medical condition for all modalities. The procedure improves workflow and could reduce the duration and cost of presurgical epilepsy evaluations. (orig.)

  14. All-in-one interictal presurgical imaging in patients with epilepsy: single-session EEG/PET/(f)MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grouiller, Frédéric; Delattre, Bénédicte M A; Pittau, Francesca; Heinzer, Susanne; Lazeyras, François; Spinelli, Laurent; Iannotti, Giannina R; Seeck, Margitta; Ratib, Osman; Vargas, Maria I; Garibotto, Valentina; Vulliemoz, Serge

    2015-06-01

    In patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy, resection of the epileptic focus can lead to freedom from seizures or significant improvement in well-selected candidates. Localization of the epileptic focus with multimodal concordance is crucial for a good postoperative outcome. Beyond the detection of epileptogenic lesions on structural MRI and focal hypometabolism on FDG PET, EEG-based Electric Source Imaging (ESI) and simultaneous EEG and functional MRI (EEG-fMRI) are increasingly applied for mapping epileptic activity. We here report presurgical multimodal interictal imaging using a hybrid PET/MR scanner for single-session FDG PET, MRI, EEG-fMRI and ESI. This quadrimodal imaging procedure was performed in a single session in 12 patients using a high-density (256 electrodes) MR-compatible EEG system and a hybrid PET/MR scanner. EEG was used to exclude subclinical seizures during uptake of the PET tracer, to compute ESI on interictal epileptiform discharges and to guide fMRI analysis for mapping haemodynamic changes correlated with interictal epileptiform activity. The whole multimodal recording was performed in less than 2 hours with good patient comfort and data quality. Clinically contributory examinations with at least two modalities were obtained in nine patients and with all modalities in five patients. This single-session quadrimodal imaging procedure provided reliable and contributory interictal clinical data. This procedure avoids multiple scanning sessions and is associated with less radiation exposure than PET-CT. Moreover, it guarantees the same medication level and medical condition for all modalities. The procedure improves workflow and could reduce the duration and cost of presurgical epilepsy evaluations.

  15. All-in-one interictal presurgical imaging in patients with epilepsy: single-session EEG/PET/(f)MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grouiller, Frederic; Delattre, Benedicte M.A.; Lazeyras, Francois; Ratib, Osman; Vargas, Maria I.; Garibotto, Valentina [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Medical Informatics, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Pittau, Francesca; Spinelli, Laurent; Seeck, Margitta; Vulliemoz, Serge [Geneva University Hospital, EEG and Epilepsy Unit, Department of Neurology, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Heinzer, Susanne [Philips AG Healthcare, Zuerich (Switzerland); Iannotti, Giannina R. [Geneva University Hospital, Functional Brain Mapping Laboratory, Department of Fundamental Neurosciences, Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2015-04-17

    In patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy, resection of the epileptic focus can lead to freedom from seizures or significant improvement in well-selected candidates. Localization of the epileptic focus with multimodal concordance is crucial for a good postoperative outcome. Beyond the detection of epileptogenic lesions on structural MRI and focal hypometabolism on FDG PET, EEG-based Electric Source Imaging (ESI) and simultaneous EEG and functional MRI (EEG-fMRI) are increasingly applied for mapping epileptic activity. We here report presurgical multimodal interictal imaging using a hybrid PET/MR scanner for single-session FDG PET, MRI, EEG-fMRI and ESI. This quadrimodal imaging procedure was performed in a single session in 12 patients using a high-density (256 electrodes) MR-compatible EEG system and a hybrid PET/MR scanner. EEG was used to exclude subclinical seizures during uptake of the PET tracer, to compute ESI on interictal epileptiform discharges and to guide fMRI analysis for mapping haemodynamic changes correlated with interictal epileptiform activity. The whole multimodal recording was performed in less than 2 hours with good patient comfort and data quality. Clinically contributory examinations with at least two modalities were obtained in nine patients and with all modalities in five patients. This single-session quadrimodal imaging procedure provided reliable and contributory interictal clinical data. This procedure avoids multiple scanning sessions and is associated with less radiation exposure than PET-CT. Moreover, it guarantees the same medication level and medical condition for all modalities. The procedure improves workflow and could reduce the duration and cost of presurgical epilepsy evaluations. (orig.)

  16. Visibility Restoration for Single Hazy Image Using Dual Prior Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingye Ju

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Single image haze removal has been a challenging task due to its super ill-posed nature. In this paper, we propose a novel single image algorithm that improves the detail and color of such degraded images. More concretely, we redefine a more reliable atmospheric scattering model (ASM based on our previous work and the atmospheric point spread function (APSF. Further, by taking the haze density spatial feature into consideration, we design a scene-wise APSF kernel prediction mechanism to eliminate the multiple-scattering effect. With the redefined ASM and designed APSF, combined with the existing prior knowledge, the complex dehazing problem can be subtly converted into one-dimensional searching problem, which allows us to directly obtain the scene transmission and thereby recover visually realistic results via the proposed ASM. Experimental results verify that our algorithm outperforms several state-of-the-art dehazing techniques in terms of robustness, effectiveness, and efficiency.

  17. A sharp image or a sharp knife: Norms for the modality-exclusivity of 774 concept-property items

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van Dantzig (Saskia); R.A. Cowell (Rosemary A.); R. Zeelenberg (René); D. Pecher (Diane)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAccording to recent embodied cognition theories, mental concepts are represented by modality-specific sensory-motor systems. Much of the evidence for modality-specificity in conceptual processing comes from the property-verification task. When applying this and other tasks, it is

  18. Single Pixel Black Phosphorus Photodetector for Near-Infrared Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Jinshui; Song, Bo; Xu, Zhihao; Cai, Le; Zhang, Suoming; Dong, Lixin; Wang, Chuan

    2018-01-01

    Infrared imaging systems have wide range of military or civil applications and 2D nanomaterials have recently emerged as potential sensing materials that may outperform conventional ones such as HgCdTe, InGaAs, and InSb. As an example, 2D black phosphorus (BP) thin film has a thickness-dependent direct bandgap with low shot noise and noncryogenic operation for visible to mid-infrared photodetection. In this paper, the use of a single-pixel photodetector made with few-layer BP thin film for near-infrared imaging applications is demonstrated. The imaging is achieved by combining the photodetector with a digital micromirror device to encode and subsequently reconstruct the image based on compressive sensing algorithm. Stationary images of a near-infrared laser spot (λ = 830 nm) with up to 64 × 64 pixels are captured using this single-pixel BP camera with 2000 times of measurements, which is only half of the total number of pixels. The imaging platform demonstrated in this work circumvents the grand challenges of scalable BP material growth for photodetector array fabrication and shows the efficacy of utilizing the outstanding performance of BP photodetector for future high-speed infrared camera applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Upconverting nanoparticles: a versatile platform for wide-field two-photon microscopy and multi-modal in vivo imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong Il; Lee, Kang Taek; Suh, Yung Doug; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2015-03-21

    Lanthanide-doped upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) have recently attracted enormous attention in the field of biological imaging owing to their unique optical properties: (1) efficient upconversion photoluminescence, which is intense enough to be detected at the single-particle level with a (nonscanning) wide-field microscope setup equipped with a continuous wave (CW) near-infrared (NIR) laser (980 nm), and (2) resistance to photoblinking and photobleaching. Moreover, the use of NIR excitation minimizes adverse photoinduced effects such as cellular photodamage and the autofluorescence background. Finally, the cytotoxicity of UCNPs is much lower than that of other nanoparticle systems. All these advantages can be exploited simultaneously without any conflicts, which enables the establishment of a novel UCNP-based platform for wide-field two-photon microscopy. UCNPs are also useful for multimodal in vivo imaging because simple variations in the composition of the lattice atoms and dopant ions integrated into the particles can be easily implemented, yielding various distinct biomedical activities relevant to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and positron emission tomography (PET). These multiple functions embedded in a single type of UCNPs play a crucial role in precise disease diagnosis. The application of UCNPs is extended to therapeutic fields such as photodynamic and photothermal cancer therapies through advanced surface conjugation schemes.

  20. Label-Free Imaging of Nanoparticle Uptake Competition in Single Cells by Hyperspectral Stimulated Raman Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bin; Yan, Shuai; Xiao, Lin; Ji, Rong; Yang, Liuyan; Miao, Ai-Jun; Wang, Ping

    2018-03-01

    Imaging and quantification of nanoparticles in single cells in their most natural condition are expected to facilitate the biotechnological applications of nanoparticles and allow for better assessment of their biosafety risks. However, current imaging modalities either require tedious sample preparation or only apply to nanoparticles with specific physicochemical characteristics. Here, the emerging hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, as a label-free and nondestructive imaging method, is used for the first time to investigate the subcellular distribution of nanoparticles in the protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila. The two frequently studied nanoparticles, polyacrylate-coated α-Fe 2 O 3 and TiO 2 , are found to have different subcellular distribution pattern as a result of their dissimilar uptake routes. Significant uptake competition between these two types of nanoparticles is further discovered, which should be paid attention to in future bioapplications of nanoparticles. Overall, this study illustrates the great promise of hyperspectral SRS as an analytical imaging tool in nanobiotechnology and nanotoxicology. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Drift estimation for single marker switching based imaging schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Claudia; Hotz, Thomas; Schönle, Andreas; Hell, Stefan W; Munk, Axel; Egner, Alexander

    2012-03-26

    In recent years, the diffraction barrier in fluorescence imaging has been broken and optical nanoscopes now routinely image with resolutions of down to 20 nm, an improvement of more than 10 fold. Because this allows imaging much smaller features and because all super-resolution approaches trade off speed for spatial resolution, mechanical instabilities of the microscopes become a limiting factor. Here, we propose a fully data-driven statistical registration method for drift detection and drift correction for single marker switching (SMS) imaging schemes, including a guideline for parameter choice and quality checks of the drift analysis. The necessary assumptions about the drift are minimal, allowing a model-free approach, but more specific models can easily be integrated. We determine the resulting performance on standard SMS measurements and show that the drift determination can be routinely brought to the range of precision achievable by fiducial marker-tracking methods.

  2. Single image defogging based on particle swarm optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fan; Zhou, Cong; Liu, Li-jue; Tang, Jin

    2017-11-01

    Due to the lack of enough information to solve the equation of image degradation model, existing defogging methods generally introduce some parameters and set these values fixed. Inappropriate parameter setting leads to difficulty in obtaining the best defogging results for different input foggy images. Therefore, a single image defogging algorithm based on particle swarm optimization (PSO) is proposed in this letter to adaptively and automatically select optimal parameter values for image defogging algorithms. The proposed method is applied to two representative defogging algorithms by selecting the two main parameters and optimizing them using the PSO algorithm. Comparative study and qualitative evaluation demonstrate that the better quality results are obtained by using the proposed parameter selection method.

  3. Imaging large cohorts of single ion channels and their activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia eHiersemenzel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available As calcium is the most important signaling molecule in neurons and secretory cells, amongst many other cell types, it follows that an understanding of calcium channels and their regulation of exocytosis is of vital importance. Calcium imaging using calcium dyes such as Fluo3, or FRET-based dyes that have been used widely has provided invaluable information, which combined with modeling has estimated the sub-types of channels responsible for triggering the exocytotic machinery as well as inferences about the relative distances away from vesicle fusion sites these molecules adopt. Importantly, new super-resolution microscopy techniques, combined with novel Ca2+ indicators and imaginative imaging approaches can now define directly the nanoscale locations of very large cohorts of single channel molecules in relation to single vesicles. With combinations of these techniques the activity of individual channels can be visualized and quantified using novel Ca2+ indicators. Fluorescently labeled specific channel toxins can also be used to localize endogenous assembled channel tetramers. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and other single-photon-resolution spectroscopic approaches offer the possibility to quantify protein-protein interactions between populations of channels and the SNARE protein machinery for the first time. Together with simultaneous electrophysiology, this battery of quantitative imaging techniques has the potential to provide unprecedented detail describing the locations, dynamic behaviours, interactions and conductance activities of many thousands of channel molecules and vesicles in living cells.

  4. Imaging modalities in keratoconus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Matalia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of keratoconus has greatly improved from simple clinical diagnosis with the advent of better diagnostic devices like corneal topographers based on placido disc, elevation based topographers and lately optical coherence tomography (OCT. These instruments are quite sensitive to pick up early keratoconus, which could help refractive surgeons to avoid serious complications like ectasia following keratorefractive surgeries. Each of these instruments has their advantages and disadvantages; in spite of that each one of them has its own place in the clinical practice. Currently, placido disc based topographers are the most commonly used topographers all over the world. There are many different companies making such devices, which follow the different techniques and color for the display. Due to these differences they are not directly comparable to each other. Various quantitative indices based on these topographers have been suggested and validated by different authors to aid in the diagnosis and quantification of keratoconus. OCT with its higher resolution and deeper penetration has created its place in the diagnostic armamentarium for keratoconus.

  5. Comparison of image quality and radiation dose between split-filter dual-energy images and single-energy images in single-source abdominal CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euler, André; Obmann, Markus M; Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt; Mileto, Achille; Zaehringer, Caroline; Falkowski, Anna L; Winkel, David J; Marin, Daniele; Stieltjes, Bram; Krauss, Bernhard; Schindera, Sebastian T

    2018-02-19

    To compare image quality and radiation dose of abdominal split-filter dual-energy CT (SF-DECT) combined with monoenergetic imaging to single-energy CT (SECT) with automatic tube voltage selection (ATVS). Two-hundred single-source abdominal CT scans were performed as SECT with ATVS (n = 100) and SF-DECT (n = 100). SF-DECT scans were reconstructed and subdivided into composed images (SF-CI) and monoenergetic images at 55 keV (SF-MI). Objective and subjective image quality were compared among single-energy images (SEI), SF-CI and SF-MI. CNR and FOM were separately calculated for the liver (e.g. CNR liv ) and the portal vein (CNR pv ). Radiation dose was compared using size-specific dose estimate (SSDE). Results of the three groups were compared using non-parametric tests. Image noise of SF-CI was 18% lower compared to SEI and 48% lower compared to SF-MI (p 0.628). Subjective sharpness was equal between single-energy and monoenergetic images and diagnostic confidence was equal between single-energy and composed images. FOM liv was highest for SF-CI. FOM pv was equal for SEI and SF-MI (p = 0.78). SSDE was significant lower for SF-DECT compared to SECT (p quality at lower radiation dose compared to single-energy CT with ATVS. • Split-filter dual-energy results in 18% lower noise compared to single-energy with ATVS. • Split-filter dual-energy results in 11% lower SSDE compared to single-energy with ATVS. • Spectral shaping of split-filter dual-energy leads to an increased dose-efficiency.

  6. The use of whole body magnetic resonance imaging in detecting bone marrow disorders - a valid alternative to imaging modalities that utilise ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Susanne

    2005-01-01

    Imaging modalities for investigation of bone marrow abnormalities have traditionally involved the use of ionising radiation. Now magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers an alternative to x-rays, computer tomography (CT), nuclear medicine bone scans and bone mineral densitometry. This study attempts to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of whole body MRI in detecting bone marrow abnormalities, using Tl and short tau inversion recovery (STIR) weighted sequences. This was achieved by reviewing already acquired scan data to discover whether this method is more sensitive to marrow changes than conventional radiographic skeletal surveys and other imaging tests, involving ionising radiation. The study involved 10 adult participants all of whom suffered from heamatological malignancies, including multiple myeloma, plasma cell dyscrasia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and acute lymphocytic leukaemia. Most of the study group presented with multiple myeloma. Abnormal skeletal MRI findings were reported in nine out of the 10 participants, i.e., a positive detection rate of 90%, using whole body MRI. All participants in the study who suffered from multiple myeloma or plasma cell dyscrasia showed positive MRI findings regardless of the stage of their disease. Four already had a confirmed diagnosis prior to the MRI scan, which was either visible on x-ray or bone scintigraphy. Three participants had positive serum/urine tests, but negative radiographic findings. The study therefore established that, when investigating possible marrow disorders, MRI was more sensitive to changes in the bone-marrow producing part of the skeleton and that MRI therefore must be considered a more suitable imaging tool. Copyright (2005) Australian Institute of Radiography

  7. Imaging of Herniated Discs of the Cervical Spine: Inter-Modality Differences between 64-Slice Multidetector CT and 1.5-T MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ji Sook; Cha, Jang Gyu [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jong Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Joo [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    To assess inter-modality variability when evaluating cervical intervertebral disc herniation using 64-slice multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Three musculoskeletal radiologists independently reviewed cervical spine 1.5-T MRI and 64-slice MDCT data on C2-3 though C6-7 of 51 patients in the context of intervertebral disc herniation. Interobserver and inter-modality agreements were expressed as unweighted kappa values. Weighted kappa statistics were used to assess the extents of agreement in terms of the number of involved segments (NIS) in disc herniation and epicenter measurements collected using MDCT and MRI. The interobserver agreement rates upon evaluation of disc morphology by the three radiologists were in fair to moderate agreement (k = 0.39-0.53 for MDCT images; k = 0.45-0.56 for MRIs). When the disc morphology was categorized into two and four grades, the inter-modality agreement rates were moderate (k-value, 0.59) and substantial (k-value, 0.66), respectively. The inter-modality agreements for evaluations of the NIS (k-value, 0.78) and the epicenter (k-value, 0.79) were substantial. Also, the interobserver agreements for the NIS (CT; k-value, 0.85 and MRI; k-value, 0.88) and epicenter (CT; k-value, 0.74 and MRI; k-value, 0.70) evaluations by two readers were substantial. MDCT tended to underestimate the extent of herniated disc lesions compared with MRI. Multidetector-row computed tomography and MRI showed a moderate-to-substantial degree of inter-modality agreement for the assessment of herniated cervical discs. MDCT images have a tendency to underestimate the anterior/posterior extent of the herniated disc compared with MRI.

  8. Imaging of Herniated Discs of the Cervical Spine: Inter-Modality Differences between 64-Slice Multidetector CT and 1.5-T MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ji Sook; Han, Jong Kyu; Kim, Hyun-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess inter-modality variability when evaluating cervical intervertebral disc herniation using 64-slice multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods Three musculoskeletal radiologists independently reviewed cervical spine 1.5-T MRI and 64-slice MDCT data on C2-3 though C6-7 of 51 patients in the context of intervertebral disc herniation. Interobserver and inter-modality agreements were expressed as unweighted kappa values. Weighted kappa statistics were used to assess the extents of agreement in terms of the number of involved segments (NIS) in disc herniation and epicenter measurements collected using MDCT and MRI. Results The interobserver agreement rates upon evaluation of disc morphology by the three radiologists were in fair to moderate agreement (k = 0.39-0.53 for MDCT images; k = 0.45-0.56 for MRIs). When the disc morphology was categorized into two and four grades, the inter-modality agreement rates were moderate (k-value, 0.59) and substantial (k-value, 0.66), respectively. The inter-modality agreements for evaluations of the NIS (k-value, 0.78) and the epicenter (k-value, 0.79) were substantial. Also, the interobserver agreements for the NIS (CT; k-value, 0.85 and MRI; k-value, 0.88) and epicenter (CT; k-value, 0.74 and MRI; k-value, 0.70) evaluations by two readers were substantial. MDCT tended to underestimate the extent of herniated disc lesions compared with MRI. Conclusion Multidetector-row computed tomography and MRI showed a moderate-to-substantial degree of inter-modality agreement for the assessment of herniated cervical discs. MDCT images have a tendency to underestimate the anterior/posterior extent of the herniated disc compared with MRI. PMID:26175589

  9. Fast Fourier single-pixel imaging via binary illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zibang; Wang, Xueying; Zheng, Guoan; Zhong, Jingang

    2017-09-20

    Fourier single-pixel imaging (FSI) employs Fourier basis patterns for encoding spatial information and is capable of reconstructing high-quality two-dimensional and three-dimensional images. Fourier-domain sparsity in natural scenes allows FSI to recover sharp images from undersampled data. The original FSI demonstration, however, requires grayscale Fourier basis patterns for illumination. This requirement imposes a limitation on the imaging speed as digital micro-mirror devices (DMDs) generate grayscale patterns at a low refreshing rate. In this paper, we report a new strategy to increase the speed of FSI by two orders of magnitude. In this strategy, we binarize the Fourier basis patterns based on upsampling and error diffusion dithering. We demonstrate a 20,000 Hz projection rate using a DMD and capture 256-by-256-pixel dynamic scenes at a speed of 10 frames per second. The reported technique substantially accelerates image acquisition speed of FSI. It may find broad imaging applications at wavebands that are not accessible using conventional two-dimensional image sensors.

  10. Deep Joint Rain Detection and Removal from a Single Image

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Wenhan; Tan, Robby T.; Feng, Jiashi; Liu, Jiaying; Guo, Zongming; Yan, Shuicheng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we address a rain removal problem from a single image, even in the presence of heavy rain and rain streak accumulation. Our core ideas lie in the new rain image models and a novel deep learning architecture. We first modify an existing model comprising a rain streak layer and a background layer, by adding a binary map that locates rain streak regions. Second, we create a new model consisting of a component representing rain streak accumulation (where individual streaks cannot b...

  11. Wide-field single photon counting imaging with an ultrafast camera and an image intensifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanda, Gianmarco; Sergent, Nicolas; Green, Mark; Levitt, James A.; Petrášek, Zdeněk; Suhling, Klaus

    2012-12-01

    We are reporting a method for wide-field photon counting imaging using a CMOS camera with a 40 kHz frame rate coupled with a three-stage image intensifier mounted on a standard fluorescence microscope. This system combines high frame rates with single photon sensitivity. The output of the phosphor screen, consisting of single-photon events, is collected by a CMOS camera allowing to create a wide-field image with parallel positional and timing information of each photon. Using a pulsed excitation source and a luminescent sample, the arrival time of hundreds of photons can be determined simultaneously in many pixels with microsecond resolution.

  12. Symbol Digit Modalities Test adaptation for Magnetic Resonance Imaging environment: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, P H R; Spedo, C T; Barreira, A A; Leoni, R F

    2018-02-01

    The Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT) is widely used for cognitive evaluation of information processing speed (IPS), required in many cognitive operations. Despite being unspecific for different neurological disorders, it is sensitive to assess impaired performance related to stroke, Parkinson's disease, traumatic brain injury, and multiple sclerosis. However, in addition to evaluate the presence and severity of IPS impairment, it is of interest to determine the localization and integration of brain regions responsible for the functions assessed by the SDMT. To review the studies that adapted the SDMT to the magnetic resonance environment and obtain the brain areas associated with the performance of the task in healthy subjects with a meta-analysis. A systematic review was performed using ten studies published between 1990 and 2017, and selected from four databases. All studies included participants of both genders and age between 18 and 50 years, used Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and SDMT adaptation and reported brain regions associated with the task. Six of them also reported the region coordinates in a standard space, so they were included in a meta-analysis. Activation Likelihood Estimation algorithm, with significance for p < 0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons, was used to identify areas that are robustly related to the performance of the SDMT. The areas predominantly reported in the studies of our meta-analysis were regions of the frontoparietal attentional network and occipital cortex, as well as cuneus, precuneus, and cerebellum. Individually all regions that survived the statistical threshold are consistent with what is expected after reviewing prospective studies. The present study allowed the identification of brain areas activated during the performance of the SDMT in healthy subjects, and therefore it will help understanding the differences in brain activation by this task in clinical populations. Moreover, it may guide future

  13. Perspectives on How Human Simultaneous Multi-Modal Imaging Adds Directionality to Spread Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Neitzel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous animal research suggests that the spread of pathological agents in Alzheimer’s disease (AD follows the direction of signaling pathways. Specifically, tau pathology has been suggested to propagate in an infection-like mode along axons, from transentorhinal cortices to medial temporal lobe cortices and consequently to other cortical regions, while amyloid-beta (Aβ pathology seems to spread in an activity-dependent manner among and from isocortical regions into limbic and then subcortical regions. These directed connectivity-based spread models, however, have not been tested directly in AD patients due to the lack of an in vivo method to identify directed connectivity in humans. Recently, a new method—metabolic connectivity mapping (MCM—has been developed and validated in healthy participants that uses simultaneous FDG-PET and resting-state fMRI data acquisition to identify directed intrinsic effective connectivity (EC. To this end, postsynaptic energy consumption (FDG-PET is used to identify regions with afferent input from other functionally connected brain regions (resting-state fMRI. Here, we discuss how this multi-modal imaging approach allows quantitative, whole-brain mapping of signaling direction in AD patients, thereby pointing out some of the advantages it offers compared to other EC methods (i.e., Granger causality, dynamic causal modeling, Bayesian networks. Most importantly, MCM provides the basis on which models of pathology spread, derived from animal studies, can be tested in AD patients. In particular, future work should investigate whether tau and Aβ in humans propagate along the trajectories of directed connectivity in order to advance our understanding of the neuropathological mechanisms causing disease progression.

  14. Enhancing Single Molecule Imaging in Optofluidics and Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas E. Vasdekis

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidics and optofluidics have revolutionized high-throughput analysis and chemical synthesis over the past decade. Single molecule imaging has witnessed similar growth, due to its capacity to reveal heterogeneities at high spatial and temporal resolutions. However, both resolution types are dependent on the signal to noise ratio (SNR of the image. In this paper, we review how the SNR can be enhanced in optofluidics and microfluidics. Starting with optofluidics, we outline integrated photonic structures that increase the signal emitted by single chromophores and minimize the excitation volume. Turning then to microfluidics, we review the compatible functionalization strategies that reduce noise stemming from non-specific interactions and architectures that minimize bleaching and blinking.

  15. MRI versus computed tomography as an imaging modality for postreduction assessment of irreducible hips in developmental dysplasia of the hip: an interobserver and intraobserver reliability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkatali, Bilal M; Imalingat, Herbert; Childs, James; Baumann, Andreas; Paton, Robin

    2016-11-01

    Following surgical reduction of an irreducible hip in developmental dysplasia of the hip, imaging is required to ascertain successful reduction. Recent studies have compared MRI versus computed tomography (CT) in terms of cost, time, sensitivity and specificity. This is the first study to compare intraobserver and interobserver reliability for both modalities. Nineteen CT scans of 38 hips in 10 patients and nine MRI scans of 18 hips in six patients were reviewed on two separate occasions by three clinicians. Image clarity, confidence of diagnosis, time taken to perform the scan as well as radiation dose for CT were recorded. Intraobserver and interobserver reliability κ values were calculated. There were 14 female patients and one male patient. The mean age at the time of the scan was 12 months (range 3-25 months). Intraobserver reliability was greater than 0.8 (both CT and MRI). Interobserver reliability was greater than 0.8 (both CT and MRI). Image clarity was higher for CT for two out of the three clinicians (9.47 vs. 6.33 P0.05). The mean radiation dose for CT was 91.75 DLP (dose length product, mGy×cm) (95% confidence interval±26.95). Our results show that MRI is equal to CT as an imaging modality in the assessment of postreduction hips in developmental dysplasia of the hip. Intraobserver and interobserver reliability was excellent for both. The image clarity was higher for CT, but this method of imaging carries a significant risk of radiation exposure. We recommend that MRI should supersede CT as an imaging modality for this clinical situation.

  16. Single-image hard copy display of musculoskeletal digital radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, Kevin; Steller Artz, Dorothy E.; Freedman, Matthew T.; Mun, Seong K.

    1995-04-01

    Screen film radiography often fails to optimally display all regions of anatomy on muskuloskeletal exams due to the wide latitude of tissue densities present. Various techniques of image enhancement have been applied to such exams using computerized radiography but with limited success in improving visualization of structures whose final optical density lies at the extremes of the interpretable range of the film. An existing algorithm for compressing optical density extremes known as dynamic range compression has been used to increase the radiodensity of the retrocardiac region of the chest or to decrease the radiodensity of the edge of the breast in digital mammography. In the skeletal system, there are regions where a single image may contain both areas of decreased exposure that result in light images and areas of higher exposure that result in dark regions of the image. Faced with this problem, the senior author asked Fuji to formulate a modification of the DRC process that incorporates a combination of the curves used for chest and breast images. The newly designed algorithm can thus simultaneously lower the optical density of dark regions of the image and increase the optical density of the less exposed regions. The results of this modification of the DRC algorithm are presented in this paper.

  17. Surface chemistry and morphology in single particle optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekiz-Kanik, Fulya; Sevenler, Derin Deniz; Ünlü, Neşe Lortlar; Chiari, Marcella; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2017-05-01

    Biological nanoparticles such as viruses and exosomes are important biomarkers for a range of medical conditions, from infectious diseases to cancer. Biological sensors that detect whole viruses and exosomes with high specificity, yet without additional labeling, are promising because they reduce the complexity of sample preparation and may improve measurement quality by retaining information about nanoscale physical structure of the bio-nanoparticle (BNP). Towards this end, a variety of BNP biosensor technologies have been developed, several of which are capable of enumerating the precise number of detected viruses or exosomes and analyzing physical properties of each individual particle. Optical imaging techniques are promising candidates among broad range of label-free nanoparticle detectors. These imaging BNP sensors detect the binding of single nanoparticles on a flat surface functionalized with a specific capture molecule or an array of multiplexed capture probes. The functionalization step confers all molecular specificity for the sensor's target but can introduce an unforeseen problem; a rough and inhomogeneous surface coating can be a source of noise, as these sensors detect small local changes in optical refractive index. In this paper, we review several optical technologies for label-free BNP detectors with a focus on imaging systems. We compare the surface-imaging methods including dark-field, surface plasmon resonance imaging and interference reflectance imaging. We discuss the importance of ensuring consistently uniform and smooth surface coatings of capture molecules for these types of biosensors and finally summarize several methods that have been developed towards addressing this challenge.

  18. Single-photon imaging in complementary metal oxide semiconductor processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbon, E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the basics of single-photon counting in complementary metal oxide semiconductors, through single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs), and the making of miniaturized pixels with photon-counting capability based on SPADs. Some applications, which may take advantage of SPAD image sensors, are outlined, such as fluorescence-based microscopy, three-dimensional time-of-flight imaging and biomedical imaging, to name just a few. The paper focuses on architectures that are best suited to those applications and the trade-offs they generate. In this context, architectures are described that efficiently collect the output of single pixels when designed in large arrays. Off-chip readout circuit requirements are described for a variety of applications in physics, medicine and the life sciences. Owing to the dynamic nature of SPADs, designs featuring a large number of SPADs require careful analysis of the target application for an optimal use of silicon real estate and of limited readout bandwidth. The paper also describes the main trade-offs involved in architecting such chips and the solutions adopted with focus on scalability and miniaturization. PMID:24567470

  19. Integration of multi-modality imaging for accurate 3D reconstruction of human coronary arteries in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannoglou, George D.; Chatzizisis, Yiannis S.; Sianos, George; Tsikaderis, Dimitrios; Matakos, Antonis; Koutkias, Vassilios; Diamantopoulos, Panagiotis; Maglaveras, Nicos; Parcharidis, George E.; Louridas, George E.

    2006-01-01

    In conventional intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-based three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of human coronary arteries, IVUS images are arranged linearly generating a straight vessel volume. However, with this approach real vessel curvature is neglected. To overcome this limitation an imaging method was developed based on integration of IVUS and biplane coronary angiography (BCA). In 17 coronary arteries from nine patients, IVUS and BCA were performed. From each angiographic projection, a single end-diastolic frame was selected and in each frame the IVUS catheter was interactively detected for the extraction of 3D catheter path. Ultrasound data was obtained with a sheath-based catheter and recorded on S-VHS videotape. S-VHS data was digitized and lumen and media-adventitia contours were semi-automatically detected in end-diastolic IVUS images. Each pair of contours was aligned perpendicularly to the catheter path and rotated in space by implementing an algorithm based on Frenet-Serret rules. Lumen and media-adventitia contours were interpolated through generation of intermediate contours creating a real 3D lumen and vessel volume, respectively. The absolute orientation of the reconstructed lumen was determined by back-projecting it onto both angiographic planes and comparing the projected lumen with the actual angiographic lumen. In conclusion, our method is capable of performing rapid and accurate 3D reconstruction of human coronary arteries in vivo. This technique can be utilized for reliable plaque morphometric, geometrical and hemodynamic analyses

  20. A case of a resectable single hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma with characteristic imaging by ADC map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Hideki; Tochio, Tomomasa; Suga, Daisuke; Kumazawa, Hiroaki; Isono, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Hiroki; Matsusaki, Shimpei; Sase, Tomohiro; Saito, Tomonori; Mukai, Katsumi; Nishimura, Akira; Matsushima, Nobuyoshi; Baba, Youichirou; Murata, Tetsuya; Hamada, Takashi; Taoka, Hiroki

    2015-12-01

    A 47-year-old woman with a single-nodule hepatic tumor was referred to our hospital. She had no symptoms. The tumor was located at the surface of the right lobe of the liver; it showed peripheral low signal intensity on a magnetic resonance imaging apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map, and an influx of blood flow into the peripheral area of the tumor at the early vascular phase on perflubutane microbubble (Sonazoid(®)) contrast-enhanced (CE) ultrasonography. Since we suspected a malignant tumor, the patient underwent surgical resection. The hepatic tumor was resected curatively. Pathological examination revealed that the tumor was composed of epithelioid cells with an epithelioid structure and/or cord-like structure. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for cluster of differentiation 34 and factor VIII-related antigen. Based on the above, a final diagnosis of hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (EHE) was made. Hepatic EHE is a rare hepatic tumor: only a few cases of hepatic EHE with curative resection have been reported. We were unable to reach a diagnosis of hepatic EHE by imaging studies; however, an ADC map was useful in showing the malignant potential of the tumor, and CE ultrasonography was useful in revealing the peripheral blood flow of the tumor. When an unusual hepatic mass is encountered, hepatic EHE should be kept in mind, and the mass should be inspected with more than one imaging modality, including an ADC map, in the process of differential diagnosis.

  1. JJ1017 committee report: image examination order codes--standardized codes for imaging modality, region, and direction with local expansion: an extension of DICOM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Michio; Kuranishi, Makoto; Sukenobu, Yoshiharu; Watanabe, Hiroki; Tani, Shigeki; Sakusabe, Takaya; Nakajima, Takashi; Morimura, Shinya; Kabata, Shun

    2002-06-01

    The digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) standard includes parts regarding nonimage data information, such as image study ordering data and performed procedure data, and is used for sharing information between HIS/RIS and modality systems, which is essential for IHE. To bring such parts of the DICOM standard into force in Japan, a joint committee of JIRA and JAHIS established the JJ1017 management guideline, specifying, for example, which items are legally required in Japan, while remaining optional in the DICOM standard. In Japan, the contents of orders from referring physicians for radiographic examinations include details of the examination. Such details are not used typically by referring physicians requesting radiographic examinations in the United States, because radiologists in the United States often determine the examination protocol. The DICOM standard has code tables for examination type, region, and direction for image examination orders. However, this investigation found that it does not include items that are detailed sufficiently for use in Japan, because of the above-mentioned reason. To overcome these drawbacks, we have generated the JJ1017 code for these 3 codes for use based on the JJ1017 guidelines. This report introduces the JJ1017 code. These codes (the study type codes in particular) must be expandable to keep up with technical advances in equipment. Expansion has 2 directions: width for covering more categories and depth for specifying the information in more detail (finer categories). The JJ1017 code takes these requirements into consideration and clearly distinguishes between the stem part as the common term and the expansion. The stem part of the JJ1017 code partially utilizes the DICOM codes to remain in line with the DICOM standard. This work is an example of how local requirements can be met by using the DICOM standard and extending it.

  2. Optimized multiple linear mappings for single image super-resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaibing; Li, Jie; Xiong, Zenggang; Liu, Xiuping; Gao, Xinbo

    2017-12-01

    Learning piecewise linear regression has been recognized as an effective way for example learning-based single image super-resolution (SR) in literature. In this paper, we employ an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to further improve the SR performance of our previous multiple linear mappings (MLM) based SR method. In the training stage, the proposed method starts with a set of linear regressors obtained by the MLM-based method, and then jointly optimizes the clustering results and the low- and high-resolution subdictionary pairs for regression functions by using the metric of the reconstruction errors. In the test stage, we select the optimal regressor for SR reconstruction by accumulating the reconstruction errors of m-nearest neighbors in the training set. Thorough experimental results carried on six publicly available datasets demonstrate that the proposed SR method can yield high-quality images with finer details and sharper edges in terms of both quantitative and perceptual image quality assessments.

  3. Edge-Guided Single Depth Image Super Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun Xie; Feris, Rogerio Schmidt; Ming-Ting Sun

    2016-01-01

    Recently, consumer depth cameras have gained significant popularity due to their affordable cost. However, the limited resolution and the quality of the depth map generated by these cameras are still problematic for several applications. In this paper, a novel framework for the single depth image superresolution is proposed. In our framework, the upscaling of a single depth image is guided by a high-resolution edge map, which is constructed from the edges of the low-resolution depth image through a Markov random field optimization in a patch synthesis based manner. We also explore the self-similarity of patches during the edge construction stage, when limited training data are available. With the guidance of the high-resolution edge map, we propose upsampling the high-resolution depth image through a modified joint bilateral filter. The edge-based guidance not only helps avoiding artifacts introduced by direct texture prediction, but also reduces jagged artifacts and preserves the sharp edges. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of our method both qualitatively and quantitatively compared with the state-of-the-art methods.

  4. The Multi-modal Australian ScienceS Imaging and Visualisation Environment (MASSIVE high performance computing infrastructure: applications in neuroscience and neuroinformatics research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojtek James eGoscinski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Multi-modal Australian ScienceS Imaging and Visualisation Environment (MASSIVE is a national imaging and visualisation facility established by Monash University, the Australian Synchrotron, the Commonwealth Scientific Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO, and the Victorian Partnership for Advanced Computing (VPAC, with funding from the National Computational Infrastructure and the Victorian Government. The MASSIVE facility provides hardware, software and expertise to drive research in the biomedical sciences, particularly advanced brain imaging research using synchrotron x-ray and infrared imaging, functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, x-ray computer tomography (CT, electron microscopy and optical microscopy. The development of MASSIVE has been based on best practice in system integration methodologies, frameworks, and architectures. The facility has: (i integrated multiple different neuroimaging analysis software components, (ii enabled cross-platform and cross-modality integration of neuroinformatics tools, and (iii brought together neuroimaging databases and analysis workflows. MASSIVE is now operational as a nationally distributed and integrated facility for neuroinfomatics and brain imaging research.

  5. Single- and multiple-track-location shear wave and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging: matched comparison of contrast, contrast-to-noise ratio and resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollender, Peter J; Rosenzweig, Stephen J; Nightingale, Kathryn R; Trahey, Gregg E

    2015-04-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging and shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) use the dynamic response of tissue to impulsive mechanical stimulus to characterize local elasticity. A variant of conventional, multiple-track-location SWEI, denoted single-track-location SWEI, offers the promise of creating speckle-free shear wave images. This work compares the three imaging modalities using a high push and track beam density combined acquisition sequence to image inclusions of different sizes and contrasts. Single-track-location SWEI is found to have a significantly higher contrast-to-noise ratio than multiple-track-location SWEI, allowing for operation at higher resolution. Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging and single-track-location SWEI perform similarly in the larger inclusions, with single-track-location SWEI providing better visualization of small targets ≤ 2.5 mm in diameter. The processing of each modality introduces different trade-offs between smoothness and resolution of edges and structures; these are discussed in detail. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Single-system ureteroceles in infants and children: imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerin, J.M.; Baker, D.R. [Dept. of Radiology, Indiana University Medical Center, James Whitcomb Riley Hospital for Children, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Casale, J.A. [Dept. of Urology, Indiana University Medical Center, James Whitcomb Riley Hospital for Children, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2000-03-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe the clinical and imaging findings in children who have single-system ureteroceles.Materials and methods. We reviewed the urology records and imaging studies in 32 consecutive infants and children who were diagnosed in our department with single-system ureteroceles.Results. There were 35 ureteroceles in the 32 patients - 29 were unilateral (14 right-sided, 15 left-sided) and 3 were bilateral. Twenty-five patients were boys (78 %) and 7 girls. Mean age at presentation was 0.7 years (0-9.2 years). Prenatally detected hydronephrosis or cystic renal dysplasia was the most common presentation (24 patients). Four presented with urinary infection, 2 with abdominal mass, 1 had myelomeningocele, and 1 had hypospadias. Three patients also had multiple non-urologic, congenital anomalies. Thirty-three ureteroceles were intravesical, and 2 were ectopic to the bladder neck. Twenty-four ureteroceles were associated with ipsilateral hydroureteronephrosis and 10 with ipsilateral multicystic dysplastic kidney. One patient had a normal ipsilateral kidney and a contralateral multicystic dysplastic kidney. The ureterocele was identified on at least one imaging study in each patient. Sixteen ureteroceles (47 %) everted at VCUG, mimicking paraureteral diverticula. Other variations included ureterocele prolapse and inadvertent ureterocele catheterization (1 each).Conclusions. Single-system ureterocele is an important, although uncommon cause of hydronephrosis and renal dysplasia in infants and children. Single-system ureterocele is distinguished clinically from the more common duplex-system ureterocele by its frequent occurrence in boys and its association with multicystic dysplastic kidney. Because these ureteroceles are frequently small and have a propensity to evert at VCUG, they can be mistaken for paraureteral diverticula. (orig.)

  7. Preparation of Single Cells for Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, E S; Fortson, S L; Kulp, K S; Checchi, K D; Wu, L; Felton, J S; Wu, K J

    2007-10-24

    Characterizing chemical changes within single cells is important for determining fundamental mechanisms of biological processes that will lead to new biological insights and improved disease understanding. Imaging biological systems with mass spectrometry (MS) has gained popularity in recent years as a method for creating precise chemical maps of biological samples. In order to obtain high-quality mass spectral images that provide relevant molecular information about individual cells, samples must be prepared so that salts and other cell-culture components are removed from the cell surface and the cell contents are rendered accessible to the desorption beam. We have designed a cellular preparation protocol for imaging MS that preserves the cellular contents for investigation and removes the majority of the interfering species from the extracellular matrix. Using this method, we obtain excellent imaging results and reproducibility in three diverse cell types: MCF7 human breast cancer cells, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, and NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts. This preparation technique allows routine imaging MS analysis of cultured cells, allowing for any number of experiments aimed at furthering scientific understanding of molecular processes within individual cells.

  8. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) as a promising new imaging target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Morten; Kjaer, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    modalities such as optical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) and positron emission topography (PET). In this review, we will discuss recent advances in the development of uPAR-targeted imaging ligands according to imaging modality. In addition, we...... will discuss the potential future clinical application for uPAR imaging as a new imaging biomarker....

  9. A fuzzy feature fusion method for auto-segmentation of gliomas with multi-modality diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance images in radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lu; Wang, Ping; Sun, Ranran; Yang, Chengwen; Zhang, Ning; Guo, Yu; Feng, Yuanming

    2018-02-19

    The diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance (MR) images can provide functional information about tumour and enable more sensitive detection of the tumour extent. We aimed to develop a fuzzy feature fusion method for auto-segmentation of gliomas in radiotherapy planning using multi-parametric functional MR images including apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy (FA) and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV). For each functional modality, one histogram-based fuzzy model was created to transform image volume into a fuzzy feature space. Based on the fuzzy fusion result of the three fuzzy feature spaces, regions with high possibility belonging to tumour were generated automatically. The auto-segmentations of tumour in structural MR images were added in final auto-segmented gross tumour volume (GTV). For evaluation, one radiation oncologist delineated GTVs for nine patients with all modalities. Comparisons between manually delineated and auto-segmented GTVs showed that, the mean volume difference was 8.69% (±5.62%); the mean Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC) was 0.88 (±0.02); the mean sensitivity and specificity of auto-segmentation was 0.87 (±0.04) and 0.98 (±0.01) respectively. High accuracy and efficiency can be achieved with the new method, which shows potential of utilizing functional multi-parametric MR images for target definition in precision radiation treatment planning for patients with gliomas.

  10. Modal Indicators for Operational Modal Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, L.; Brincker, Rune; Andersen, P.

    2001-01-01

    modes become more significant than in traditional modal analysis. The two major modal indicators, i.e. Modal Confidence Factor (MCF) and Modal Amplitude Coherence (MAmC) are extended to two-stage time domain modal identification algorithms, together with a newly developed indicator, named as Modal...

  11. Volumetric particle image velocimetry with a single plenoptic camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahringer, Timothy W.; Lynch, Kyle P.; Thurow, Brian S.

    2015-11-01

    A novel three-dimensional (3D), three-component (3C) particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique based on volume illumination and light field imaging with a single plenoptic camera is described. A plenoptic camera uses a densely packed microlens array mounted near a high resolution image sensor to sample the spatial and angular distribution of light collected by the camera. The multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) computed tomography algorithm is used to reconstruct a volumetric intensity field from individual snapshots and a cross-correlation algorithm is used to estimate the velocity field from a pair of reconstructed particle volumes. This work provides an introduction to the basic concepts of light field imaging with a plenoptic camera and describes the unique implementation of MART in the context of plenoptic image data for 3D/3C PIV measurements. Simulations of a plenoptic camera using geometric optics are used to generate synthetic plenoptic particle images, which are subsequently used to estimate the quality of particle volume reconstructions at various particle number densities. 3D reconstructions using this method produce reconstructed particles that are elongated by a factor of approximately 4 along the optical axis of the camera. A simulated 3D Gaussian vortex is used to test the capability of single camera plenoptic PIV to produce a 3D/3C vector field, where it was found that lateral displacements could be measured to approximately 0.2 voxel accuracy in the lateral direction and 1 voxel in the depth direction over a 300× 200× 200 voxel volume. The feasibility of the technique is demonstrated experimentally using a home-built plenoptic camera based on a 16-megapixel interline CCD camera and a 289× 193 array of microlenses and a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. 3D/3C measurements were performed in the wake of a low Reynolds number circular cylinder and compared with measurements made using a conventional 2D/2C PIV system. Overall, single camera

  12. Imaging the chemical activity of single nanoparticles with optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei

    2018-04-03

    Nanomaterials exhibit structural and functional heterogeneity among individual nanoparticles, thus requiring a capability to study single nanoparticles. While electron microscopes often provide static images of their chemical composition, morphology and structure, imaging the chemical activity of single nanoparticles is highly desirable for exploring the structure-activity relationship via a bottom-up strategy, to understand their microscopic reaction mechanisms and kinetics, and to identify a minority subpopulation with extraordinary activity. Recently, various optical microscopes have been emerging as powerful techniques towards this goal, owing to their non-invasive nature, excellent sensitivity, diversified spectroscopic principles and sufficient spatial and temporal resolution. In this review, we first introduce the motivational concept and the strength of using optical microscopy to study the chemical activity of single nanoparticles. In the second section, five types of commonly used optical microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, dark-field microscopy, surface plasmon resonance microscopy, Raman microscopy and photothermal microscopy are described, with an emphasis on their applicable nanomaterials and mechanisms for application. Recent achievements of these techniques in nanosensing, nanoelectrochemistry and nanocatalysis are surveyed and summarized in the subsequent sections, respectively. We finally conclude with our perspective on the remaining challenges and the future trends in this field.

  13. Diagnostic role of (99)Tc(m)-MDP SPECT/CT combined SPECT/MRI Multi modality imaging for early and atypical bone metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Liang; Li, Qian; Cao, Lin; Jiang, Shi-Xi

    2014-01-01

    The bone metastasis appeared early before the bone imaging for most of the above patients. (99)Tc(m)-MDP ((99)Tc(m) marked methylene diphosphonate) bone imaging could diagnosis the bone metastasis with highly sensitivity, but with lower specificity. The aim of this study is to explore the diagnostic value of (99)Tc(m)-MDP SPECT/CT combined SPECT/MRI Multi modality imaging for the early period atypical bone metastases. 15 to 30 mCi (99)Tc(m)-MDP was intravenously injected to the 34 malignant patients diagnosed as doubtful early bone metastases. SPECT, CT and SPECT/CT images were captured and analyzed consequently. For the patients diagnosed as early period atypical bone metastases by SPECT/CT, combining the SPECT/CT and MRI together as the SPECT/MRI integrated image. The obtained SPECT/MRI image was analyzed and compared with the pathogenic results of patients. The results indicated that 34 early period doubtful metastatic focus, including 34 SPECT positive focus, 17 focus without special changes by using CT method, 11 bone metastases focus by using SPECT/CT method, 23 doubtful bone metastases focus, 8 doubtful bone metastases focus, 14 doubtful bone metastases focus and 2 focus without clear image. Totally, SPECT/CT combined with SPECT/MRI method diagnosed 30 bone metastatic focus and 4 doubtfully metastatic focus. In conclusion, (99)Tc(m)-MDP SPECT/CT combined SPECT/MRI Multi modality imaging shows a higher diagnostic value for the early period bone metastases, which also enhances the diagnostic accuracy rate.

  14. Single particle raster image analysis of diffusion for particle mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longfils, M; Röding, M; Altskär, A; Schuster, E; Lorén, N; Särkkä, A; Rudemo, M

    2018-03-01

    Recently we complemented the raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) method of analysing raster images via estimation of the image correlation function with the method single particle raster image analysis (SPRIA). In SPRIA, individual particles are identified and the diffusion coefficient of each particle is estimated by a maximum likelihood method. In this paper, we extend the SPRIA method to analyse mixtures of particles with a finite set of diffusion coefficients in a homogeneous medium. In examples with simulated and experimental data with two and three different diffusion coefficients, we show that SPRIA gives accurate estimates of the diffusion coefficients and their proportions. A simple technique for finding the number of different diffusion coefficients is also suggested. Further, we study the use of RICS for mixtures with two different diffusion coefficents and investigate, by plotting level curves of the correlation function, how large the quotient between diffusion coefficients needs to be in order to allow discrimination between models with one and two diffusion coefficients. We also describe a minor correction (compared to published papers) of the RICS autocorrelation function. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  15. Bright photoactivatable fluorophores for single-molecule imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Jonathan B; English, Brian P; Choi, Heejun; Muthusamy, Anand K; Mehl, Brian P; Dong, Peng; Brown, Timothy A; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Liu, Zhe; Lionnet, Timothée; Lavis, Luke D

    2016-12-01

    Small-molecule fluorophores are important tools for advanced imaging experiments. We previously reported a general method to improve small, cell-permeable fluorophores which resulted in the azetidine-containing 'Janelia Fluor' (JF) dyes. Here, we refine and extend the utility of these dyes by synthesizing photoactivatable derivatives that are compatible with live-cell labeling strategies. Once activated, these derived compounds retain the superior brightness and photostability of the JF dyes, enabling improved single-particle tracking and facile localization microscopy experiments.

  16. Learning to Predict Indoor Illumination from a Single Image

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, Marc-André; Sunkavalli, Kalyan; Yumer, Ersin; Shen, Xiaohui; Gambaretto, Emiliano; Gagné, Christian; Lalonde, Jean-François

    2017-01-01

    We propose an automatic method to infer high dynamic range illumination from a single, limited field-of-view, low dynamic range photograph of an indoor scene. In contrast to previous work that relies on specialized image capture, user input, and/or simple scene models, we train an end-to-end deep neural network that directly regresses a limited field-of-view photo to HDR illumination, without strong assumptions on scene geometry, material properties, or lighting. We show that this can be acco...

  17. Ventilation and perfusion display in a single image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, J.J.P. de; Botelho, M.F.R.; Pereira, A.M.S.; Rafael, J.A.S.; Pinto, A.J.; Marques, M.A.T.; Pereira, M.C.; Baganha, M.F.; Godinho, F.

    1991-01-01

    A new method of ventilation and perfusion display onto a single image is presented. From the data on regions of interest of the lungs, three-dimensional histograms are created, containing as parameters X and Y for the position of the pixels, Z for the perfusion and colour for local ventilation. The perfusion value is supplied by sets of curves having Z proportional to the local perfusion count rate. Ventilation modulates colour. Four perspective views of the histogram are simultaneously displayed to allow visualization of the entire organ. Information about the normal ranges for both ventilation and perfusion is also provided in the histograms. (orig.)

  18. Single-molecule imaging towards precise detection of individual photophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Toshiro; Oda, Masaru; Mashimo, Kei; Tachibana, Fumi; Horiuchi, Hiromi

    2006-01-01

    We present our recent study of single fluorescent molecules with specific structure, i.e. tetramethylrhodamine derivative linked with a propyl chain onto silica glass surface. For fluorescent reagent in its synthesis, we used a mixture of two kinds of isomers, which provides a sample with single molecules photophysically different each other even if chemically the same. The isomeric structural difference so introduced in the molecules will provide rather small but probably distinctive photophysical difference, for example, in non-radiative relaxation rates, which we try to detect out with our improved single-molecule microscope imaging technique. To make clear the detectability of such weak inter- or intra-molecular interactions microscopically is significant for versatile applications of single-molecule detections in life science. Our present observation at room temperatures shows so far that such decoupled contributions can be discriminated in the histograms of the intensities of the observed fluorescent spots as broader but separated multi-component structures in the distribution under specific experimental configurations. We will discuss some of the prerequisite for such detections; suitable spatio-temporal resolutions with sufficient S/N ratio, algorithms for data analysis, etc. but also precise sample operations are inevitable

  19. Feasibility of CBCT-based target and normal structure delineation in prostate cancer radiotherapy: Multi-observer and image multi-modality study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luetgendorf-Caucig, Carola; Fotina, Irina; Stock, Markus; Poetter, Richard; Goldner, Gregor; Georg, Dietmar

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: In-room cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging and adaptive treatment strategies are promising methods to decrease target volumes and to spare organs at risk. The aim of this work was to analyze the inter-observer contouring uncertainties of target volumes and organs at risks (oars) in localized prostate cancer radiotherapy using CBCT images. Furthermore, CBCT contouring was benchmarked against other image modalities (CT, MR) and the influence of subjective image quality perception on inter-observer variability was assessed. Methods and materials: Eight prostate cancer patients were selected. Seven radiation oncologists contoured target volumes and oars on CT, MRI and CBCT. Volumes, coefficient of variation (COV), conformity index (cigen), and coordinates of center-of-mass (COM) were calculated for each patient and image modality. Reliability analysis was performed for the support of the reported findings. Subjective perception of image quality was assessed via a ten-scored visual analog scale (VAS). Results: The median volume for prostate was larger on CT compared to MRI and CBCT images. The inter-observer variation for prostate was larger on CBCT (CIgen = 0.57 ± 0.09, 0.61 reliability) compared to CT (CIgen = 0.72 ± 0.07, 0.83 reliability) and MRI (CIgen = 0.66 ± 0.12, 0.87 reliability). On all image modalities values of the intra-observer reliability coefficient (0.97 for CT, 0.99 for MR and 0.94 for CBCT) indicated high reproducibility of results. For all patients the root mean square (RMS) of the inter-observer standard deviation (σ) of the COM was largest on CBCT with σ(x) = 0.4 mm, σ(y) = 1.1 mm, and σ(z) = 1.7 mm. The concordance in delineating OARs was much stronger than for target volumes, with average CIgen > 0.70 for rectum and CIgen > 0.80 for bladder. Positive correlations between CIgen and VAS score of the image quality were observed for the prostate, seminal vesicles and rectum. Conclusions: Inter-observer variability for target

  20. A nanocomposite of Au-AgI core/shell dimer as a dual-modality contrast agent for x-ray computed tomography and photoacoustic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orza, Anamaria; Wu, Hui; Li, Yuancheng; Mao, Hui, E-mail: hmao@emory.edu, E-mail: Xiangyang.Tang@emory.edu [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences and Center for Systems Imaging, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Yang, Yi; Tang, Xiangyang, E-mail: hmao@emory.edu, E-mail: Xiangyang.Tang@emory.edu [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Feng, Ting; Wang, Xueding [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Yang, Lily [Department of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To develop a core/shell nanodimer of gold (core) and silver iodine (shell) as a dual-modal contrast-enhancing agent for biomarker targeted x-ray computed tomography (CT) and photoacoustic imaging (PAI) applications. Methods: The gold and silver iodine core/shell nanodimer (Au/AgICSD) was prepared by fusing together components of gold, silver, and iodine. The physicochemical properties of Au/AgICSD were then characterized using different optical and imaging techniques (e.g., HR- transmission electron microscope, scanning transmission electron microscope, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, Z-potential, and UV-vis). The CT and PAI contrast-enhancing effects were tested and then compared with a clinically used CT contrast agent and Au nanoparticles. To confer biocompatibility and the capability for efficient biomarker targeting, the surface of the Au/AgICSD nanodimer was modified with the amphiphilic diblock polymer and then functionalized with transferrin for targeting transferrin receptor that is overexpressed in various cancer cells. Cytotoxicity of the prepared Au/AgICSD nanodimer was also tested with both normal and cancer cell lines. Results: The characterizations of prepared Au/AgI core/shell nanostructure confirmed the formation of Au/AgICSD nanodimers. Au/AgICSD nanodimer is stable in physiological conditions for in vivo applications. Au/AgICSD nanodimer exhibited higher contrast enhancement in both CT and PAI for dual-modality imaging. Moreover, transferrin functionalized Au/AgICSD nanodimer showed specific binding to the tumor cells that have a high level of expression of the transferrin receptor. Conclusions: The developed Au/AgICSD nanodimer can be used as a potential biomarker targeted dual-modal contrast agent for both or combined CT and PAI molecular imaging.

  1. Extracting 3D layout from a single image using global image structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Zhongyu; Gevers, Theo; Hu, Ninghang

    2015-10-01

    Extracting the pixel-level 3D layout from a single image is important for different applications, such as object localization, image, and video categorization. Traditionally, the 3D layout is derived by solving a pixel-level classification problem. However, the image-level 3D structure can be very beneficial for extracting pixel-level 3D layout since it implies the way how pixels in the image are organized. In this paper, we propose an approach that first predicts the global image structure, and then we use the global structure for fine-grained pixel-level 3D layout extraction. In particular, image features are extracted based on multiple layout templates. We then learn a discriminative model for classifying the global layout at the image-level. Using latent variables, we implicitly model the sublevel semantics of the image, which enrich the expressiveness of our model. After the image-level structure is obtained, it is used as the prior knowledge to infer pixel-wise 3D layout. Experiments show that the results of our model outperform the state-of-the-art methods by 11.7% for 3D structure classification. Moreover, we show that employing the 3D structure prior information yields accurate 3D scene layout segmentation.

  2. Computational imaging with a single-pixel detector and a consumer video projector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sych, D.; Aksenov, M.

    2018-02-01

    Single-pixel imaging is a novel rapidly developing imaging technique that employs spatially structured illumination and a single-pixel detector. In this work, we experimentally demonstrate a fully operating modular single-pixel imaging system. Light patterns in our setup are created with help of a computer-controlled digital micromirror device from a consumer video projector. We investigate how different working modes and settings of the projector affect the quality of reconstructed images. We develop several image reconstruction algorithms and compare their performance for real imaging. Also, we discuss the potential use of the single-pixel imaging system for quantum applications.

  3. Autostereoscopic image creation by hyperview matrix controlled single pixel rendering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasnick, Armin

    2017-06-01

    technology just with a simple equation. This formula can be utilized to create a specific hyperview matrix for a certain 3D display - independent of the technology used. A hyperview matrix may contain the references to loads of images and act as an instruction for a subsequent rendering process of particular pixels. Naturally, a single pixel will deliver an image with no resolution and does not provide any idea of the rendered scene. However, by implementing the method of pixel recycling, a 3D image can be perceived, even if all source images are different. It will be proven that several millions of perspectives can be rendered with the support of GPU rendering and benefit from the hyperview matrix. In result, a conventional autostereoscopic display, which is designed to represent only a few perspectives can be used to show a hyperview image by using a suitable hyperview matrix. It will be shown that a millions-of-views-hyperview-image can be presented on a conventional autostereoscopic display. For such an hyperview image it is required that all pixels of the displays are allocated by different source images. Controlled by the hyperview matrix, an adapted renderer can render a full hyperview image in real-time.

  4. Use of analyte-modulated modal power distribution in multimode optical fibers for simultaneous single-wavelength evanescent-wave refractometry and spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potyrailo, R A; Ruddy, V P; Hieftje, G M

    1999-11-01

    A new method is described for the simultaneous determination of absorbance and refractive index of a sample medium. The method is based on measurement of the analyte-modulated modal power distribution (MPD) in a multimode waveguide. In turn, the MPD is quantified by the far-field spatial pattern and intensity of light, i.e., the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern (registered on a CCD camera), that emerges from a multimode optical fiber. Operationally, light that is sent down the fiber interacts with the surrounding analyte-containing medium by means of the evanescent wave at the fiber boundary. The light flux in the propagating beam and the internal reflection angles within the fiber are both affected by optical absorption connected with the analyte and by the refractive index of the analyte-containing medium. In turn, these angles are reflected in the angular divergence of the beam as it leaves the fiber. As a result, the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of that beam yields two parameters that can, together, be used to deduce refractive index and absorbance. This MPD based detection offers important advantages over traditional evanescent-wave detection strategies which rely on recording only the total transmitted optical power or its lost fraction. First, simultaneous determination of sample refractive index and absorbance is possible at a single probe wavelength. Second, the sensitivity of refractometric and absorption measurements can be controlled simply, either by adjusting the distance between the end face of the fiber and the CCD detector or by monitoring selected modal groups at the fiber output. As a demonstration of these capabilities, several weakly absorbing solutions were examined, with refractive indices in the range from 1.3330 to 1.4553 and with absorption coefficients in the range 0-16 cm-1. The new detection strategy is likely to be important in applications in which sample coloration varies and when it is necessary to compensate for variations in the

  5. A dual-modal magnetic nanoparticle probe for preoperative and intraoperative mapping of sentinel lymph nodes by magnetic resonance and near infrared fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhengyang; Chen, Hongwei; Lipowska, Malgorzata; Wang, Liya; Yu, Qiqi; Yang, Xiaofeng; Tiwari, Diana; Yang, Lily; Mao, Hui

    2013-07-01

    The ability to reliably detect sentinel lymph nodes for sentinel lymph node biopsy and lymphadenectomy is important in clinical management of patients with metastatic cancers. However, the traditional sentinel lymph node mapping with visible dyes is limited by the penetration depth of light and fast clearance of the dyes. On the other hand, sentinel lymph node mapping with radionucleotide technique has intrinsically low spatial resolution and does not provide anatomic details in the sentinel lymph node mapping procedure. This work reports the development of a dual modality imaging probe with magnetic resonance and near infrared imaging capabilities for sentinel lymph node mapping using magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (10 nm core size) conjugated with a near infrared molecule with emission at 830 nm. Accumulation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in sentinel lymph nodes leads to strong T2 weighted magnetic resonance imaging contrast that can be potentially used for preoperative localization of sentinel lymph nodes, while conjugated near infrared molecules provide optical imaging tracking of lymph nodes with a high signal to background ratio. The new magnetic nanoparticle based dual imaging probe exhibits a significant longer lymph node retention time. Near infrared signals from nanoparticle conjugated near infrared dyes last up to 60 min in sentinel lymph node compared to that of 25 min for the free near infrared dyes in a mouse model. Furthermore, axillary lymph nodes, in addition to sentinel lymph nodes, can be also visualized with this probe, given its slow clearance and sufficient sensitivity. Therefore, this new dual modality imaging probe with the tissue penetration and sensitive detection of sentinel lymph nodes can be applied for preoperative survey of lymph nodes with magnetic resonance imaging and allows intraoperative sentinel lymph node mapping using near infrared optical devices.

  6. Single aflatoxin contaminated corn kernel analysis with fluorescence hyperspectral image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Haibo; Hruska, Zuzana; Kincaid, Russell; Ononye, Ambrose; Brown, Robert L.; Cleveland, Thomas E.

    2010-04-01

    Aflatoxins are toxic secondary metabolites of the fungi Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, among others. Aflatoxin contaminated corn is toxic to domestic animals when ingested in feed and is a known carcinogen associated with liver and lung cancer in humans. Consequently, aflatoxin levels in food and feed are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the US, allowing 20 ppb (parts per billion) limits in food and 100 ppb in feed for interstate commerce. Currently, aflatoxin detection and quantification methods are based on analytical tests including thin-layer chromatography (TCL) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). These analytical tests require the destruction of samples, and are costly and time consuming. Thus, the ability to detect aflatoxin in a rapid, nondestructive way is crucial to the grain industry, particularly to corn industry. Hyperspectral imaging technology offers a non-invasive approach toward screening for food safety inspection and quality control based on its spectral signature. The focus of this paper is to classify aflatoxin contaminated single corn kernels using fluorescence hyperspectral imagery. Field inoculated corn kernels were used in the study. Contaminated and control kernels under long wavelength ultraviolet excitation were imaged using a visible near-infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral camera. The imaged kernels were chemically analyzed to provide reference information for image analysis. This paper describes a procedure to process corn kernels located in different images for statistical training and classification. Two classification algorithms, Maximum Likelihood and Binary Encoding, were used to classify each corn kernel into "control" or "contaminated" through pixel classification. The Binary Encoding approach had a slightly better performance with accuracy equals to 87% or 88% when 20 ppb or 100 ppb was used as classification threshold, respectively.

  7. New Antifouling Platform Characterized by Single-Molecule Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Antifouling surfaces have been widely studied for their importance in medical devices and industry. Antifouling surfaces mostly achieved by methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG) have shown biomolecular adsorption less than 1 ng/cm2 which was measured by surface analytical tools such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), or optical waveguide lightmode (OWL) spectroscopy. Herein, we utilize a single-molecule imaging technique (i.e., an ultimate resolution) to study antifouling properties of functionalized surfaces. We found that about 600 immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules are adsorbed. This result corresponds to ∼5 pg/cm2 adsorption, which is far below amount for the detection limit of the conventional tools. Furthermore, we developed a new antifouling platform that exhibits improved antifouling performance that shows only 78 IgG molecules adsorbed (∼0.5 pg/cm2). The antifouling platform consists of forming 1 nm TiO2 thin layer, on which peptidomimetic antifouling polymer (PMAP) is robustly anchored. The unprecedented antifouling performance can potentially revolutionize a variety of research fields such as single-molecule imaging, medical devices, biosensors, and others. PMID:24503420

  8. Genetic biosensors for imaging nitric oxide in single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroglu, Emrah; Charoensin, Suphachai; Bischof, Helmut; Ramadani, Jeta; Gottschalk, Benjamin; Depaoli, Maria R; Waldeck-Weiermair, Markus; Graier, Wolfgang F; Malli, Roland

    2018-02-01

    Over the last decades a broad collection of sophisticated fluorescent protein-based probes was engineered with the aim to specifically monitor nitric oxide (NO), one of the most important signaling molecules in biology. Here we report and discuss the characteristics and fields of applications of currently available genetically encoded fluorescent sensors for the detection of NO and its metabolites in different cell types. Because of its radical nature and short half-life, real-time imaging of NO on the level of single cells is challenging. Herein we review state-of-the-art genetically encoded fluorescent sensors for NO and its byproducts such as peroxynitrite, nitrite and nitrate. Such probes enable the real-time visualization of NO signals directly or indirectly on the level of single cells and cellular organelles and, hence, extend our understanding of the spatiotemporal dynamics of NO formation, diffusion and degradation. Here, we discuss the significance of NO detection in individual cells and on subcellular level with genetic biosensors. Currently available genetically encoded fluorescent probes for NO and nitrogen species are critically discussed in order to provide insights in the functionality and applicability of these promising tools. As an outlook we provide ideas for novel approaches for the design and application of improved NO probes and fluorescence imaging protocols. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Image quality comparison between single energy and dual energy CT protocols for hepatic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Yuan; Pelc, Norbert J.; Ng, Joshua M.; Megibow, Alec J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) enables volumetric scans in a single breath hold and is clinically useful for hepatic imaging. For simple tasks, conventional single energy (SE) computed tomography (CT) images acquired at the optimal tube potential are known to have better quality than dual energy (DE) blended images. However, liver imaging is complex and often requires imaging of both structures containing iodinated contrast media, where atomic number differences are the primary contrast mechanism, and other structures, where density differences are the primary contrast mechanism. Hence it is conceivable that the broad spectrum used in a dual energy acquisition may be an advantage. In this work we are interested in comparing these two imaging strategies at equal-dose and more complex settings. Methods: We developed numerical anthropomorphic phantoms to mimic realistic clinical CT scans for medium size and large size patients. MDCT images based on the defined phantoms were simulated using various SE and DE protocols at pre- and post-contrast stages. For SE CT, images from 60 kVp through 140 with 10 kVp steps were considered; for DE CT, both 80/140 and 100/140 kVp scans were simulated and linearly blended at the optimal weights. To make a fair comparison, the mAs of each scan was adjusted to match the reference radiation dose (120 kVp, 200 mAs for medium size patients and 140 kVp, 400 mAs for large size patients). Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of liver against other soft tissues was used to evaluate and compare the SE and DE protocols, and multiple pre- and post-contrasted liver-tissue pairs were used to define a composite CNR. To help validate the simulation results, we conducted a small clinical study. Eighty-five 120 kVp images and 81 blended 80/140 kVp images were collected and compared through both quantitative image quality analysis and an observer study. Results: In the simulation study, we found that the CNR of pre-contrast SE image mostly

  10. Combined multi-spectrum and orthogonal Laplacianfaces for fast CB-XLCT imaging with single-view data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haibo; Geng, Guohua; Chen, Yanrong; Qu, Xuan; Zhao, Fengjun; Hou, Yuqing; Yi, Huangjian; He, Xiaowei

    2017-12-01

    Cone-beam X-ray luminescence computed tomography (CB-XLCT) is an attractive hybrid imaging modality, which has the potential of monitoring the metabolic processes of nanophosphors-based drugs in vivo. Single-view data reconstruction as a key issue of CB-XLCT imaging promotes the effective study of dynamic XLCT imaging. However, it suffers from serious ill-posedness in the inverse problem. In this paper, a multi-spectrum strategy is adopted to relieve the ill-posedness of reconstruction. The strategy is based on the third-order simplified spherical harmonic approximation model. Then, an orthogonal Laplacianfaces-based method is proposed to reduce the large computational burden without degrading the imaging quality. Both simulated data and in vivo experimental data were used to evaluate the efficiency and robustness of the proposed method. The results are satisfactory in terms of both location and quantitative recovering with computational efficiency, indicating that the proposed method is practical and promising for single-view CB-XLCT imaging.

  11. Serial Myocardial Imaging after a Single Dose of Thallium-201

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiko Kamata

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Although thallium-201 exercise scintigraphy has been established for the detection of myocardial ischemia and viability, little is known regarding the myocardial thallium-201 kinetics during angioplasty. Herein, we report a 77-year old man with angina pectoris, in whom serial myocardial imaging after a single dose of thallium-201 was helpful in identifying not only the culprit lesion and myocardial viability, but also the dynamic changes in myocardial perfusion during angioplasty. Thallium-201 images after exercise showed a perfusion defect in the inferior wall, with a trivial redistribution 3 hours after the exercise and a marked improvement 24 hours later. Coronary angiography, performed 27 hours after exercise scintigraphy, showed severe stenosis in the right coronary artery. Guidewire crossing of the lesion interrupted the antegrade flow, which was restored after balloon dilation and stent implantation. Thallium-201 images, 2 hours after angioplasty (i.e., 30 hours after exercise, showed a decreased tracer uptake in the inferior wall, which improved the next day (i.e., 48 hours after exercise. Cardiac biomarkers were negative in the clinical course.

  12. Bedside functional brain imaging in critically-ill children using high-density EEG source modeling and multi-modal sensory stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Eytan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute brain injury is a common cause of death and critical illness in children and young adults. Fundamental management focuses on early characterization of the extent of injury and optimizing recovery by preventing secondary damage during the days following the primary injury. Currently, bedside technology for measuring neurological function is mainly limited to using electroencephalography (EEG for detection of seizures and encephalopathic features, and evoked potentials. We present a proof of concept study in patients with acute brain injury in the intensive care setting, featuring a bedside functional imaging set-up designed to map cortical brain activation patterns by combining high density EEG recordings, multi-modal sensory stimulation (auditory, visual, and somatosensory, and EEG source modeling. Use of source-modeling allows for examination of spatiotemporal activation patterns at the cortical region level as opposed to the traditional scalp potential maps. The application of this system in both healthy and brain-injured participants is demonstrated with modality-specific source-reconstructed cortical activation patterns. By combining stimulation obtained with different modalities, most of the cortical surface can be monitored for changes in functional activation without having to physically transport the subject to an imaging suite. The results in patients in an intensive care setting with anatomically well-defined brain lesions suggest a topographic association between their injuries and activation patterns. Moreover, we report the reproducible application of a protocol examining a higher-level cortical processing with an auditory oddball paradigm involving presentation of the patient's own name. This study reports the first successful application of a bedside functional brain mapping tool in the intensive care setting. This application has the potential to provide clinicians with an additional dimension of information to manage

  13. Comparing perceived auditory width to the visual image of a performing ensemble in contrasting bi-modal environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Daniel L; Braasch, Jonas; Myrbeck, Shane A

    2012-01-01

    Despite many studies investigating auditory spatial impressions in rooms, few have addressed the impact of simultaneous visual cues on localization and the perception of spaciousness. The current research presents an immersive audiovisual environment in which participants were instructed to make auditory width judgments in dynamic bi-modal settings. The results of these psychophysical tests suggest the importance of congruent audio visual presentation to the ecological interpretation of an auditory scene. Supporting data were accumulated in five rooms of ascending volumes and varying reverberation times. Participants were given an audiovisual matching test in which they were instructed to pan the auditory width of a performing ensemble to a varying set of audio and visual cues in rooms. Results show that both auditory and visual factors affect the collected responses and that the two sensory modalities coincide in distinct interactions. The greatest differences between the panned audio stimuli given a fixed visual width were found in the physical space with the largest volume and the greatest source distance. These results suggest, in this specific instance, a predominance of auditory cues in the spatial analysis of the bi-modal scene. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America.

  14. India Ink Incorporated Multifunctional Phase-transition Nanodroplets for Photoacoustic/Ultrasound Dual-modality Imaging and Photoacoustic Effect Based Tumor Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Jia; Liu, Chengbo; Gong, Yuping; Su, Lei; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Zhigang; wang, Dong; Zhou, Yu; Xu, Fenfen; Li, Pan; Zheng, Yuanyi; Song, Liang; Zhou, Xiyuan

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo applications of gas-core microbubbles have been limited by gas diffusion, rapid body clearance, and poor vascular permeability. To overcome these limitations, using a modified three-step emulsion process, we have developed a first-of-its-kind India ink incorporated optically-triggerable phase-transition perfluorocarbon nanodroplets (INDs) that can provide not only three types of contrast mechanisms—conventional/thermoelastic photoacoustic, phase-transition/nonlinear photoacoustic, and ultrasound imaging contrasts, but also a new avenue for photoacoustic effect mediated tumor therapy. Upon pulsed laser illumination above a relatively low energy threshold, liquid-gas phase transition of the INDs has been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo, offering excellent contrasts for photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging. With further increased laser energy, the nanodroplets have been shown to be capable of destructing cancer cells in vivo, presumably due to the photoacoustic effect induced shock-wave generation from the carbon particles of the incorporated India ink. The demonstrated results suggest that the developed multifunctional phase-transition nanodroplets have a great potential for many theranostic biomedical applications, including photoacoustic/ultrasound dual-modality molecular imaging and targeted, localized cancer therapy. PMID:25161702

  15. India ink incorporated multifunctional phase-transition nanodroplets for photoacoustic/ultrasound dual-modality imaging and photoacoustic effect based tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Jia; Liu, Chengbo; Gong, Yuping; Su, Lei; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Dong; Zhou, Yu; Xu, Fenfen; Li, Pan; Zheng, Yuanyi; Song, Liang; Zhou, Xiyuan

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo applications of gas-core microbubbles have been limited by gas diffusion, rapid body clearance, and poor vascular permeability. To overcome these limitations, using a modified three-step emulsion process, we have developed a first-of-its-kind India ink incorporated optically-triggerable phase-transition perfluorocarbon nanodroplets (INDs) that can provide not only three types of contrast mechanisms-conventional/thermoelastic photoacoustic, phase-transition/nonlinear photoacoustic, and ultrasound imaging contrasts, but also a new avenue for photoacoustic effect mediated tumor therapy. Upon pulsed laser illumination above a relatively low energy threshold, liquid-gas phase transition of the INDs has been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo, offering excellent contrasts for photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging. With further increased laser energy, the nanodroplets have been shown to be capable of destructing cancer cells in vivo, presumably due to the photoacoustic effect induced shock-wave generation from the carbon particles of the incorporated India ink. The demonstrated results suggest that the developed multifunctional phase-transition nanodroplets have a great potential for many theranostic biomedical applications, including photoacoustic/ultrasound dual-modality molecular imaging and targeted, localized cancer therapy.

  16. AUTOMATIC INTERPRETATION OF HIGH RESOLUTION SAR IMAGES: FIRST RESULTS OF SAR IMAGE SIMULATION FOR SINGLE BUILDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the all-weather data acquisition capabilities, high resolution space borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR plays an important role in remote sensing applications like change detection. However, because of the complex geometric mapping of buildings in urban areas, SAR images are often hard to interpret. SAR simulation techniques ease the visual interpretation of SAR images, while fully automatic interpretation is still a challenge. This paper presents a method for supporting the interpretation of high resolution SAR images with simulated radar images using a LiDAR digital surface model (DSM. Line features are extracted from the simulated and real SAR images and used for matching. A single building model is generated from the DSM and used for building recognition in the SAR image. An application for the concept is presented for the city centre of Munich where the comparison of the simulation to the TerraSAR-X data shows a good similarity. Based on the result of simulation and matching, special features (e.g. like double bounce lines, shadow areas etc. can be automatically indicated in SAR image.

  17. Use of the functional imaging modalities, f MRI r CBV and PET FDG, alters radiation therapy 3-D treatment planning in patients with malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzek, M.; Pardo, F.S.; Busierre, M.; Lev, M.; Fischman, A.; Denny, N.; Hanser, B.; Rosen, B.R.; Smith, A.; Aronen, H.

    1995-01-01

    Background: Malignant gliomas present one of the most difficult challenges to definitive radiation therapy, not only with respect to local control, but also with respect to clinical functional status. While tumor target volume definitions for malignant gliomas are often based on CT and conventional MRI, the functional imaging modalities, echo planar r CBV (regional cerebral blood volume mapping) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET, are more sensitive modalities for the detection of neovascularization, perhaps one of the earliest signs of glial tumor initiation and progression. Methods: In order to address the clinical utility of functional imaging in radiation therapy 3-D treatment planning, we compared tumor target volume definitions and overall dosimetry in patients either undergoing co-registration of conventional Gadolinium-enhanced MRI, or co-registration of functional imaging modalities, prior to radiation therapy 3-D treatment planning. Fourteen patients were planned using 3-D radiation therapy treatment planning, either with or without inclusion of data on functional imaging. All patients received proton beam, as well as megavoltage x-ray radiation therapy, with the ratio of photon:proton optimized to the individual clinical case at hand. Both PET FDG and f MRI scans were obtained postoperatively pre-radiation, during radiation therapy, one month following completion of radiation therapy, and at three month follow-up intervals. Dose volume histograms were constructed in order to assess dose optimization, not only with respect to tumor, but also with respect to normal tissue tolerance (e.g., motor strip, dominant speech area, brainstem, optic nerves). Results: In 5 of 14 cases, functional imaging modalities, as compared with conventional MRI and CT, contributed additional information that was useful in radiation therapy treatment planning. In general, both fMRI rCBV and PET FDG uptake decreased during the course of radiation therapy. In 1 patient, however, fMRI r

  18. Orientational imaging of a single plasmonic nanoparticle using dark-field hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Nishir; Mahigir, Amirreza; Veronis, Georgios; Gartia, Manas Ranjan

    2017-08-01

    Orientation of plasmonic nanostructures is an important feature in many nanoscale applications such as catalyst, biosensors DNA interactions, protein detections, hotspot of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), and fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) experiments. However, due to diffraction limit, it is challenging to obtain the exact orientation of the nanostructure using standard optical microscope. Hyperspectral Imaging Microscopy is a state-of-the-art visualization technology that combines modern optics with hyperspectral imaging and computer system to provide the identification and quantitative spectral analysis of nano- and microscale structures. In this work, initially we use transmitted dark field imaging technique to locate single nanoparticle on a glass substrate. Then we employ hyperspectral imaging technique at the same spot to investigate orientation of single nanoparticle. No special tagging or staining of nanoparticle has been done, as more likely required in traditional microscopy techniques. Different orientations have been identified by carefully understanding and calibrating shift in spectral response from each different orientations of similar sized nanoparticles. Wavelengths recorded are between 300 nm to 900 nm. The orientations measured by hyperspectral microscopy was validated using finite difference time domain (FDTD) electrodynamics calculations and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. The combination of high resolution nanometer-scale imaging techniques and the modern numerical modeling capacities thus enables a meaningful advance in our knowledge of manipulating and fabricating shaped nanostructures. This work will advance our understanding of the behavior of small nanoparticle clusters useful for sensing, nanomedicine, and surface sciences.

  19. Imaging through scattering media by Fourier filtering and single-pixel detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauregui-Sánchez, Y.; Clemente, P.; Lancis, J.; Tajahuerce, E.

    2018-02-01

    We present a novel imaging system that combines the principles of Fourier spatial filtering and single-pixel imaging in order to recover images of an object hidden behind a turbid medium by transillumination. We compare the performance of our single-pixel imaging setup with that of a conventional system. We conclude that the introduction of Fourier gating improves the contrast of images in both cases. Furthermore, we show that the combination of single-pixel imaging and Fourier spatial filtering techniques is particularly well adapted to provide images of objects transmitted through scattering media.

  20. Single Image Super-resolution using Deformable Patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu; Zhang, Yanning; Yuille, Alan L.

    2014-01-01

    We proposed a deformable patches based method for single image super-resolution. By the concept of deformation, a patch is not regarded as a fixed vector but a flexible deformation flow. Via deformable patches, the dictionary can cover more patterns that do not appear, thus becoming more expressive. We present the energy function with slow, smooth and flexible prior for deformation model. During example-based super-resolution, we develop the deformation similarity based on the minimized energy function for basic patch matching. For robustness, we utilize multiple deformed patches combination for the final reconstruction. Experiments evaluate the deformation effectiveness and super-resolution performance, showing that the deformable patches help improve the representation accuracy and perform better than the state-of-art methods. PMID:25473254

  1. Comparison of three thermotherapy modalities for the ablation of mamma carcinoma in situ using thermal imaging and mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaessens, John H. G. M.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf; van Esser, Stijn; Shmatukha, Andriy; de Boorder, Tjeerd; van Hillegersberg, Richard

    2007-02-01

    A larger percentage of small tumors in the breast are being detected due to effective screening programs and improved radiological diagnostic methods. For treatment, less invasive methods are preferred which are still radical but also provide a better aesthetic result. Recently, several ablation techniques have become available to locally ablate tumors in situ. In this study, the effectiveness of three ablation techniques was compared by imaging the thermal distribution and temperature mapping in vitro. The first system (KLS Martin, Trumpf, Germany) uses Nd:YAG laser light delivered through a single diffusing fiber tip which is positioned direct into the tissue or in a water-cooled needle. The second system (Olympus-Celon, Germany) uses bipolar Radio Frequency currents between electrodes in a water-cooled needle. The RF system has a temperature feedback based on tissue impedance to prevent tissue charring. The third system is a focused ultrasound system developed in the Hospital. For all three the techniques, the dynamics of temperature gradients around the probe or focus point are visualized using color Schlieren techniques in a transparent tissue model and recorded using thermocouples. The effective lesion size and tissue temperatures were determined in in vitro bovine mamma tissue. All systems were capable to heat tissue volumes up to 3 cm in diameter. The lesion growth dependent on the power input, temperature gradient around the initial power source and treatment time. Although the three systems are capable to ablate small mamma carcinoma in situ, they differ in precision, MR compatibility, invasiveness, practical use and treatment time. The real clinical effectiveness has to be proven in large patient studies with long term follow up.

  2. Multi-Modality Phantom Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Peng, Qiyu; Moses, William W.

    2009-03-20

    Multi-modality imaging has an increasing role in the diagnosis and treatment of a large number of diseases, particularly if both functional and anatomical information are acquired and accurately co-registered. Hence, there is a resulting need for multi modality phantoms in order to validate image co-registration and calibrate the imaging systems. We present our PET-ultrasound phantom development, including PET and ultrasound images of a simple prostate phantom. We use agar and gelatin mixed with a radioactive solution. We also present our development of custom multi-modality phantoms that are compatible with PET, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), MRI and CT imaging. We describe both our selection of tissue mimicking materials and phantom construction procedures. These custom PET-TRUS-CT-MRI prostate phantoms use agargelatin radioactive mixtures with additional contrast agents and preservatives. We show multi-modality images of these custom prostate phantoms, as well as discuss phantom construction alternatives. Although we are currently focused on prostate imaging, this phantom development is applicable to many multi-modality imaging applications.

  3. Single-image-based Modelling Architecture from a Historical Photograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzwierzynska, Jolanta

    2017-10-01

    Historical photographs are proved to be very useful to provide a dimensional and geometrical analysis of buildings as well as to generate 3D reconstruction of the whole structure. The paper addresses the problem of single historical photograph analysis and modelling of an architectural object from it. Especially, it focuses on reconstruction of the original look of New-Town synagogue from the single historic photograph, when camera calibration is completely unknown. Due to the fact that the photograph faithfully followed the geometric rules of perspective, it was possible to develop and apply the method to obtain a correct 3D reconstruction of the building. The modelling process consisted of a series of familiar steps: feature extraction, determination of base elements of perspective, dimensional analyses and 3D reconstruction. Simple formulas were proposed in order to estimate location of characteristic points of the building in 3D Cartesian system of axes on the base of their location in 2D Cartesian system of axes. The reconstruction process proceeded well, although slight corrections were necessary. It was possible to reconstruct the shape of the building in general, and two of its facades in detail. The reconstruction of the other two facades requires some additional information or the additional picture. The success of the presented reconstruction method depends on the geometrical content of the photograph as well as quality of the picture, which ensures the legibility of building edges. The presented method of reconstruction is a combination of the descriptive method of reconstruction and computer aid; therefore, it seems to be universal. It can prove useful for single-image-based modelling architecture.

  4. Compact quantum dots for single-molecule imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew M; Nie, Shuming

    2012-10-09

    Single-molecule imaging is an important tool for understanding the mechanisms of biomolecular function and for visualizing the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of molecular behaviors that underlie cellular biology (1-4). To image an individual molecule of interest, it is typically conjugated to a fluorescent tag (dye, protein, bead, or quantum dot) and observed with epifluorescence or total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. While dyes and fluorescent proteins have been the mainstay of fluorescence imaging for decades, their fluorescence is unstable under high photon fluxes necessary to observe individual molecules, yielding only a few seconds of observation before complete loss of signal. Latex beads and dye-labeled beads provide improved signal stability but at the expense of drastically larger hydrodynamic size, which can deleteriously alter the diffusion and behavior of the molecule under study. Quantum dots (QDs) offer a balance between these two problematic regimes. These nanoparticles are composed of semiconductor materials and can be engineered with a hydrodynamically compact size with exceptional resistance to photodegradation (5). Thus in recent years QDs have been instrumental in enabling long-term observation of complex macromolecular behavior on the single molecule level. However these particles have still been found to exhibit impaired diffusion in crowded molecular environments such as the cellular cytoplasm and the neuronal synaptic cleft, where their sizes are still too large (4,6,7). Recently we have engineered the cores and surface coatings of QDs for minimized hydrodynamic size, while balancing offsets to colloidal stability, photostability, brightness, and nonspecific binding that have hindered the utility of compact QDs in the past (8,9). The goal of this article is to demonstrate the synthesis, modification, and characterization of these optimized nanocrystals, composed of an alloyed HgxCd1-xSe core coated with an

  5. Dual-Modality Imaging of the Human Finger Joint Systems by Using Combined Multispectral Photoacoustic Computed Tomography and Ultrasound Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yubin; Wang, Yating; Yuan, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    We developed a homemade dual-modality imaging system that combines multispectral photoacoustic computed tomography and ultrasound computed tomography for reconstructing the structural and functional information of human finger joint systems. The fused multispectral photoacoustic-ultrasound computed tomography (MPAUCT) system was examined by the phantom and in vivo experimental tests. The imaging results indicate that the hard tissues such as the bones and the soft tissues including the blood vessels, the tendon, the skins, and the subcutaneous tissues in the finger joints systems can be effectively recovered by using our multimodality MPAUCT system. The developed MPAUCT system is able to provide us with more comprehensive information of the human finger joints, which shows its potential for characterization and diagnosis of bone or joint diseases.

  6. Dual-Modality Imaging of the Human Finger Joint Systems by Using Combined Multispectral Photoacoustic Computed Tomography and Ultrasound Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubin Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed a homemade dual-modality imaging system that combines multispectral photoacoustic computed tomography and ultrasound computed tomography for reconstructing the structural and functional information of human finger joint systems. The fused multispectral photoacoustic-ultrasound computed tomography (MPAUCT system was examined by the phantom and in vivo experimental tests. The imaging results indicate that the hard tissues such as the bones and the soft tissues including the blood vessels, the tendon, the skins, and the subcutaneous tissues in the finger joints systems can be effectively recovered by using our multimodality MPAUCT system. The developed MPAUCT system is able to provide us with more comprehensive information of the human finger joints, which shows its potential for characterization and diagnosis of bone or joint diseases.

  7. Absolute Quantification of Rifampicin by MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry Using Multiple TOF/TOF Events in a Single Laser Shot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Boone M; Chumbley, Chad W; Caprioli, Richard M

    2017-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) allows for the visualization of molecular distributions within tissue sections. While providing excellent molecular specificity and spatial information, absolute quantification by MALDI IMS remains challenging. Especially in the low molecular weight region of the spectrum, analysis is complicated by matrix interferences and ionization suppression. Though tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) can be used to ensure chemical specificity and improve sensitivity by eliminating chemical noise, typical MALDI MS/MS modalities only scan for a single MS/MS event per laser shot. Herein, we describe TOF/TOF instrumentation that enables multiple fragmentation events to be performed in a single laser shot, allowing the intensity of the analyte to be referenced to the intensity of the internal standard in each laser shot while maintaining the benefits of MS/MS. This approach is illustrated by the quantitative analyses of rifampicin (RIF), an antibiotic used to treat tuberculosis, in pooled human plasma using rifapentine (RPT) as an internal standard. The results show greater than 4-fold improvements in relative standard deviation as well as improved coefficients of determination (R 2 ) and accuracy (>93% quality controls, errors). This technology is used as an imaging modality to measure absolute RIF concentrations in liver tissue from an animal dosed in vivo. Each microspot in the quantitative image measures the local RIF concentration in the tissue section, providing absolute pixel-to-pixel quantification from different tissue microenvironments. The average concentration determined by IMS is in agreement with the concentration determined by HPLC-MS/MS, showing a percent difference of 10.6%. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  8. Laser cellulite treatment and laser-assisted lipoplasty of the thighs and buttocks: Combined modalities for single stage contouring of the lower body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petti, Christine; Stoneburner, Jacqueline; McLaughlin, Laura

    2016-01-01

    delivery of laser energy to the dermal-adipose tissue, as well as the deep adipose lipodystrophy is feasible as a safe modality for the simultaneous treatment of cellulite and lipodystrophy in the buttocks and thighs, as a single stage procedure. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. STTARR: a radiation treatment and multi-modal imaging facility for fast tracking novel agent development in small animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeung, Ivan; McKee, Trevor; Jaffray, David; Hill, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Small animal models play a pivotal role in the pipeline development of novel agents and strategies in personalized cancer therapy. The Spatio-Temporal Targeting and Amplification of Radiation Response Program (STTARR) consists of an animal imaging and precision radiation facility designed to provide innovative biologic imaging and targeted radiation treatment strategies in small animals. The design is to mirror the imaging and radiation treatment facility in a modern cancer center. The STTARR features imaging equipment of small animal scale including CT, MRI, PET, SPECT, Optical devices as well as image guided irradiators. The fleet of imaging and irradiation equipment provides a platform for identification of biological targets of the specific molecular pathways that influence both tumor progression and a patient's response to radiation therapy. Examples will be given in the utilization of the imaging facilities for development in novel approaches in cancer therapy including a PET-FAZA study for hypoxia measurement in a pancreatic adenocarcinoma xenograft model. In addition, the cone-beam image guided small animal irradiator developed at our institute will also be described. The animal platform (couch) provides motion in 3 dimensions to position the animal to the isocentre of the beam. A pair of rotational arms supporting the X-ray/detector pair enables acquisition of cone-beam images of the animal which give rise to image guided precision of 0.5 mm. The irradiation energy ranges from 50 to 225 kVp at a dose rate from 10-400 cGy/min. The gantry is able to direct X-ray beam of different directions to give conformal radiation treatment to the animal. A dedicated treatment planning system is able to perform treatment planning and provide commonly used clinical metrics in the animal treatment plan. Examples will be given to highlight the use of the image guided irradiator for research of drug/irradiation regimen in animal models. (author)

  10. Accuracy of diagnostic imaging modalities for peripheral post-traumatic osteomyelitis : a systematic review of the recent literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Govaert, Geertje A.; IJpma, Frank F.; McNally, Martin; McNally, Eugene; Reininga, Inge H.; Glaudemans, Andor W J M

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Post-traumatic osteomyelitis (PTO) is difficult to diagnose and there is no consensus on the best imaging strategy. The aim of this study is to present a systematic review of the recent literature on diagnostic imaging of PTO. Methods: A literature search of the EMBASE and PubMed databases of

  11. A practical one-shot multispectral imaging system using a single image sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monno, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Sunao; Tanaka, Masayuki; Okutomi, Masatoshi

    2015-10-01

    Single-sensor imaging using the Bayer color filter array (CFA) and demosaicking is well established for current compact and low-cost color digital cameras. An extension from the CFA to a multispectral filter array (MSFA) enables us to acquire a multispectral image in one shot without increased size or cost. However, multispectral demosaicking for the MSFA has been a challenging problem because of very sparse sampling of each spectral band in the MSFA. In this paper, we propose a high-performance multispectral demosaicking algorithm, and at the same time, a novel MSFA pattern that is suitable for our proposed algorithm. Our key idea is the use of the guided filter to interpolate each spectral band. To generate an effective guide image, in our proposed MSFA pattern, we maintain the sampling density of the G -band as high as the Bayer CFA, and we array each spectral band so that an adaptive kernel can be estimated directly from raw MSFA data. Given these two advantages, we effectively generate the guide image from the most densely sampled G -band using the adaptive kernel. In the experiments, we demonstrate that our proposed algorithm with our proposed MSFA pattern outperforms existing algorithms and provides better color fidelity compared with a conventional color imaging system with the Bayer CFA. We also show some real applications using a multispectral camera prototype we built.

  12. IMRT for Image-Guided Single Vocal Cord Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman, Sarah O.S., E-mail: s.osman@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Astreinidou, Eleftheria; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Keskin-Cambay, Fatma; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Voet, Peter; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Levendag, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: We have been developing an image-guided single vocal cord irradiation technique to treat patients with stage T1a glottic carcinoma. In the present study, we compared the dose coverage to the affected vocal cord and the dose delivered to the organs at risk using conventional, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) coplanar, and IMRT non-coplanar techniques. Methods and Materials: For 10 patients, conventional treatment plans using two laterally opposed wedged 6-MV photon beams were calculated in XiO (Elekta-CMS treatment planning system). An in-house IMRT/beam angle optimization algorithm was used to obtain the coplanar and non-coplanar optimized beam angles. Using these angles, the IMRT plans were generated in Monaco (IMRT treatment planning system, Elekta-CMS) with the implemented Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm. The organs at risk included the contralateral vocal cord, arytenoids, swallowing muscles, carotid arteries, and spinal cord. The prescription dose was 66 Gy in 33 fractions. Results: For the conventional plans and coplanar and non-coplanar IMRT plans, the population-averaged mean dose {+-} standard deviation to the planning target volume was 67 {+-} 1 Gy. The contralateral vocal cord dose was reduced from 66 {+-} 1 Gy in the conventional plans to 39 {+-} 8 Gy and 36 {+-} 6 Gy in the coplanar and non-coplanar IMRT plans, respectively. IMRT consistently reduced the doses to the other organs at risk. Conclusions: Single vocal cord irradiation with IMRT resulted in good target coverage and provided significant sparing of the critical structures. This has the potential to improve the quality-of-life outcomes after RT and maintain the same local control rates.

  13. IMRT for Image-Guided Single Vocal Cord Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Sarah O.S.; Astreinidou, Eleftheria; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Keskin-Cambay, Fatma; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Voet, Peter; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We have been developing an image-guided single vocal cord irradiation technique to treat patients with stage T1a glottic carcinoma. In the present study, we compared the dose coverage to the affected vocal cord and the dose delivered to the organs at risk using conventional, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) coplanar, and IMRT non-coplanar techniques. Methods and Materials: For 10 patients, conventional treatment plans using two laterally opposed wedged 6-MV photon beams were calculated in XiO (Elekta-CMS treatment planning system). An in-house IMRT/beam angle optimization algorithm was used to obtain the coplanar and non-coplanar optimized beam angles. Using these angles, the IMRT plans were generated in Monaco (IMRT treatment planning system, Elekta-CMS) with the implemented Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm. The organs at risk included the contralateral vocal cord, arytenoids, swallowing muscles, carotid arteries, and spinal cord. The prescription dose was 66 Gy in 33 fractions. Results: For the conventional plans and coplanar and non-coplanar IMRT plans, the population-averaged mean dose ± standard deviation to the planning target volume was 67 ± 1 Gy. The contralateral vocal cord dose was reduced from 66 ± 1 Gy in the conventional plans to 39 ± 8 Gy and 36 ± 6 Gy in the coplanar and non-coplanar IMRT plans, respectively. IMRT consistently reduced the doses to the other organs at risk. Conclusions: Single vocal cord irradiation with IMRT resulted in good target coverage and provided significant sparing of the critical structures. This has the potential to improve the quality-of-life outcomes after RT and maintain the same local control rates.

  14. Open framework for management and processing of multi-modality and multidimensional imaging data for analysis and modelling muscular function

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Juan, David; Delattre, Bénédicte M. A.; Trombella, Sara; Lynch, Sean; Becker, Matthias; Choi, Hon Fai; Ratib, Osman

    2014-03-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) are becoming a big healthcare economical burden in developed countries with aging population. Classical methods like biopsy or EMG used in clinical practice for muscle assessment are invasive and not accurately sufficient for measurement of impairments of muscular performance. Non-invasive imaging techniques can nowadays provide effective alternatives for static and dynamic assessment of muscle function. In this paper we present work aimed toward the development of a generic data structure for handling n-dimensional metabolic and anatomical data acquired from hybrid PET/MR scanners. Special static and dynamic protocols were developed for assessment of physical and functional images of individual muscles of the lower limb. In an initial stage of the project a manual segmentation of selected muscles was performed on high-resolution 3D static images and subsequently interpolated to full dynamic set of contours from selected 2D dynamic images across different levels of the leg. This results in a full set of 4D data of lower limb muscles at rest and during exercise. These data can further be extended to a 5D data by adding metabolic data obtained from PET images. Our data structure and corresponding image processing extension allows for better evaluation of large volumes of multidimensional imaging data that are acquired and processed to generate dynamic models of the moving lower limb and its muscular function.

  15. Development of an imaging modality utilizing 2D optical signals during an EPI-fluorescent optical mapping experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prior, Phillip; Roth, Bradley J [Department of Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, MI 48309 (United States)], E-mail: phil.prior@gmail.com

    2009-05-21

    Optical mapping is a commonly used technique to visualize the electrical activity in the heart. Recently, several groups have attempted to use the signals acquired in optical mapping to image the transmembrane potential in the heart, which would be particularly advantageous when studying the effects of defibrillation-type shocks throughout the wall of the heart. Our work presents an alternative imaging method that makes use of data obtained using multiple wavelengths and therefore multiple optical decay constants. A modified form of the diffusion equation Green's function for a semi-infinite slab of tissue is derived and used to relate the detected optical signals to the source of emission photons. Images using the optical signals are reconstructed using Gaussian quadrature and matrix inversion. Our results show that images can be obtained for source terms located below the tissue surface. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our reconstruction method's susceptibility to noise can be alleviated using sophisticated matrix inverse techniques, such as singular value decomposition. Sources that rapidly decay with depth or are highly localized in the image plane require more sophisticated techniques (e.g., regularization methods) to image the electrical activity in the heart. The work presented here demonstrates the feasibility of a new imaging technique of cardiac electrical activity using optical mapping.

  16. Development and Characterization of Two-Dimensional Gratings for Single-Shot X-ray Phase-Contrast Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Zakharova

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Single-shot grating-based phase-contrast imaging techniques offer additional contrast modalities based on the refraction and scattering of X-rays in a robust and versatile configuration. The utilization of a single optical element is possible in such methods, allowing the shortening of the acquisition time and increasing flux efficiency. One of the ways to upgrade single-shot imaging techniques is to utilize customized optical components, such as two-dimensional (2D X-ray gratings. In this contribution, we present the achievements in the development of 2D gratings with UV lithography and gold electroplating. Absorption gratings represented by periodic free-standing gold pillars with lateral structure sizes from 5 µm to 25 µm and heights from 5 µm to 28 µm have shown a high degree of periodicity and defect-free patterns. Grating performance was tested in a radiographic setup using a self-developed quality assessment algorithm based on the intensity distribution histograms. The algorithm allows the final user to estimate the suitability of a specific grating to be used in a particular setup.

  17. Rapamycin/DiR loaded lipid-polyaniline nanoparticles for dual-modal imaging guided enhanced photothermal and antiangiogenic combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinping; Guo, Fang; Yu, Meng; Liu, Li; Tan, Fengping; Yan, Ran; Li, Nan

    2016-09-10

    Imaging-guided photothermal therapy (PTT) has promising application for treating tumors. Nevertheless, so far imaging-guided photothermal drug-delivery systems have been developed with limited success for tumor chemo-photothermal therapy. In this study, as the proof-of-concept, a stimuli-responsive tumor-targeting rapamycin/DiR loaded lipid-polyaniline nanoparticle (RDLPNP) for dual-modal imaging-guided enhanced PTT efficacy is reported for the first time. In this system, polyaniline (PANI) with π-π electronic conjugated system and effective photothermal efficiency is chosen as the appropriate model receptor of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and loaded cyanine probe (e.g., 1,1-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3-tetramethylindotricarbocyanine iodide, DiR) acts as the donor of near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF). In addition, rapamycin (RAPA), which is used as the antiangiogenesis chemotherapeutic drug, can cutdown the tumor vessels and delay tumor growth obviously. After intravenous treatment of RDLPNPs into Hela tumor bearing mice, fluorescent (from DiR) and enhanced photoacoustic (from DLPNPs) signals were found in tumor site over time, which reached to peak at the 6h time point. After irradiating with an NIR laser, a good anti-tumor effect was observed owing to the enhanced photothermal and antiangiogenic effect of RDLPNPs. These results show that the multifunctional nanoparticle can be used as a promising imaging-guided photothermal drug delivery nanoplatform for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Proceedings of Joint International Symposium on the role of noninvasive imaging modalities in clinical decision making of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mena, I.G.; Strauss, H.W.

    1986-01-01

    This report contains ten papers on the use of noninvasive imaging in clinical diagnosis and decision making. Topics include a cost analysis of magnetic resonance imaging in medical technology, diagnostic uses of MRI in chronic coronary artery disease, clinical applications of cine computed tomography, the use of PET as a clinical tool, and the use of echocardiography in coronary artery disease. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base

  19. Initial in vitro and in vivo assessment of Au@DTDTPA-RGD nanoparticles for Gd-MRI and 68Ga-PET dual modality imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsoukalas, Charalmpos; Laurent, Gautier; Jiménez Sánchez, Gloria; Tsotakos, Theodoros; Bazzi, Rana; Stellas, Dimitris; Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos; Moulopoulos, Lia; Koutoulidis, Vasilis; Paravatou-Petsotas, Maria; Xanthopoulos, Stavros; Roux, Stephane; Bouziotis, Penelope

    2015-01-01

    Gadolinium chelate coated gold nanoparticles (Au@DTDTPA) can be applied as contrast agents for both in vivo X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging. In this work, our aim was to radiolabel and evaluate this gold nanoparticle with Ga-68, in order to produce a dual modality PET/MRI imaging probe. For a typical preparation of 68Ga-labeled nanoparticles, the Au@DTDTPA nanoparticles (Au@DTDTPA/Au@DTDTPA-RGD) were mixed with ammonium acetate buffer, pH 5 and 40 MBq of 68Ga eluate. The mixture was then incubated for 45 min at 65 ÅãC. Radiochemical purity was determined by ITLC. In vitro stability of both radiolabeled species was assessed in saline and serum. In vitro cell binding experiments were performed on integrin ανβ3 receptor-positive U87MG cancer cells. Non-specific Au@DTDTPA was used for comparison. Ex vivo biodistribution studies and in vivo PET and MRI imaging studies in U87MG tumor-bearing SCID mice followed. The Au@DTDTPA nanoparticles were labeled with Gallium-68 at high radiochemical yield (>95%) and were stable at RT, and in the presence of serum, for up to 3 h. The cell binding assay on U87MG glioma cells proved that 68Ga-cRGD-Au@DTDTPA had specific recognition for these cells. Biodistribution studies in U87MG tumor-bearing SCID mice showed that the tumor to muscle ratio increased from 1 to 2 h p.i. (3,71 ± 0.22 and 4,69 ± 0.09 respectively), showing a clear differentiation between the affected and the non-affected tissue. The acquired PET and MRI images were in accordance to the ex vivo biodistribution results. The preliminary results of this study warrant the need for further development of Au@DTDTPA nanoparticles radiolabeled with Ga-68, as possible dual-modality PET/MRI imaging agents.

  20. Single image super-resolution via an iterative reproducing kernel Hilbert space method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Liang-Jian; Guo, Weihong; Huang, Ting-Zhu

    2016-11-01

    Image super-resolution, a process to enhance image resolution, has important applications in satellite imaging, high definition television, medical imaging, etc. Many existing approaches use multiple low-resolution images to recover one high-resolution image. In this paper, we present an iterative scheme to solve single image super-resolution problems. It recovers a high quality high-resolution image from solely one low-resolution image without using a training data set. We solve the problem from image intensity function estimation perspective and assume the image contains smooth and edge components. We model the smooth components of an image using a thin-plate reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) and the edges using approximated Heaviside functions. The proposed method is applied to image patches, aiming to reduce computation and storage. Visual and quantitative comparisons with some competitive approaches show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. The risk assessment of Gd2O3:Yb3+/Er3+ nanocomposites as dual-modal nanoprobes for magnetic and fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Long; Tian, Xiumei; Liu, Jun; Zheng, Cunjing; Xie, Fukang; Li, Li

    2017-02-01

    Our group has synthesized Gd2O3:Yb3+/Er3+ nanocomposites as magnetic/fluorescence imaging successfully in the previous study, which exhibit good uniformity and monodispersibility with a mean size of 7.4 nm. However, their systematic risk assessment remains unknown. In this article, the in vitro biocompatibility of the Gd2O3:Yb3+/Er3+ was assessed on the basis of cell viability and apoptosis. In vivo immunotoxicity was evaluated by monitoring the product of reactive oxygen species (ROS), clusters of differentiation (CD) markers, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in Balb/c mice. No significant differences were found in cell viability, apoptosis, and immunotoxicity between our Gd2O3:Yb3+/Er3+ and gadodiamide which are used commonly in clinical. Few nanoprobes were localized in the phagosomes of the liver, heart, lung, spleen, kidney, brain, and tumor under the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. In addition, our products reveal good T1-weighted contrast enhancement of xenografted murine tumor. Therefore, the above results may contribute to the effective application of Gd2O3:Yb3+/Er3+ as molecular imaging contrast agents and dual-modal nanoprobes for cancer detection.

  2. Designed Synthesis of Au/Fe3O4@C Janus Nanoparticles for Dual-Modal Imaging and Actively Targeted Chemo-Photothermal Synergistic Therapy of Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Lingyu; Li, Shengnan; Chen, Xiangjun; Zhang, Manjie; Wang, Tingting; Li, Lu; Wang, Chungang

    2017-12-06

    Elaborately designed novel multifunctional Janus nanoparticles (JNPs) have attracted considerable attention owing to their anisotropic surface properties and various functionalities that allow them to house several components for the detection and targeting of cancer cells. In this work, we report a novel and facile approach to synthesize Au/Fe 3 O 4 @C JNPs, which were further selectively functionalized with amino-poly(ethylene glycol)thiol (NH 2 -PEG-SH) and folic acid (FA) on the exposed Au domains to achieve high contrast for X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging, excellent stability, good biocompatibility, as well as cancer cell-specific targeting. Meanwhile, the other Fe 3 O 4 @C sides with mesoporous structure served as a drug delivery vehicle for doxorubicin (DOX), an efficient photothermal therapy (PTT) agent, and a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging contrast agent. Taking these features together, these unique multifunctional JNPs provide an intriguing nanoplatform for dual-modal CT and MR imaging-guided actively targeted chemo-photothermal synergistic cancer therapy. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. The risk assessment of Gd2O3:Yb3+/Er3+ nanocomposites as dual-modal nanoprobes for magnetic and fluorescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Long; Tian, Xiumei; Liu, Jun; Zheng, Cunjing; Xie, Fukang; Li, Li

    2017-01-01

    Our group has synthesized Gd 2 O 3 :Yb 3+ /Er 3+ nanocomposites as magnetic/fluorescence imaging successfully in the previous study, which exhibit good uniformity and monodispersibility with a mean size of 7.4 nm. However, their systematic risk assessment remains unknown. In this article, the in vitro biocompatibility of the Gd 2 O 3 :Yb 3+ /Er 3+ was assessed on the basis of cell viability and apoptosis. In vivo immunotoxicity was evaluated by monitoring the product of reactive oxygen species (ROS), clusters of differentiation (CD) markers, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in Balb/c mice. No significant differences were found in cell viability, apoptosis, and immunotoxicity between our Gd 2 O 3 :Yb 3+ /Er 3+ and gadodiamide which are used commonly in clinical. Few nanoprobes were localized in the phagosomes of the liver, heart, lung, spleen, kidney, brain, and tumor under the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. In addition, our products reveal good T 1 -weighted contrast enhancement of xenografted murine tumor. Therefore, the above results may contribute to the effective application of Gd 2 O 3 :Yb 3+ /Er 3+ as molecular imaging contrast agents and dual-modal nanoprobes for cancer detection.

  4. A Robust and Accurate Two-Step Auto-Labeling Conditional Iterative Closest Points (TACICP Algorithm for Three-Dimensional Multi-Modal Carotid Image Registration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengkai Guo

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is among the leading causes of death and disability. Combining information from multi-modal vascular images is an effective and efficient way to diagnose and monitor atherosclerosis, in which image registration is a key technique. In this paper a feature-based registration algorithm, Two-step Auto-labeling Conditional Iterative Closed Points (TACICP algorithm, is proposed to align three-dimensional carotid image datasets from ultrasound (US and magnetic resonance (MR. Based on 2D segmented contours, a coarse-to-fine strategy is employed with two steps: rigid initialization step and non-rigid refinement step. Conditional Iterative Closest Points (CICP algorithm is given in rigid initialization step to obtain the robust rigid transformation and label configurations. Then the labels and CICP algorithm with non-rigid thin-plate-spline (TPS transformation model is introduced to solve non-rigid carotid deformation between different body positions. The results demonstrate that proposed TACICP algorithm has achieved an average registration error of less than 0.2mm with no failure case, which is superior to the state-of-the-art feature-based methods.

  5. MMX-I: A data-processing software for multi-modal X-ray imaging and tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamaschi, A.; Medjoubi, K.; Messaoudi, C.; Marco, S.; Somogyi, A.

    2017-06-01

    Scanning hard X-ray imaging allows simultaneous acquisition of multimodal information, including X-ray fluorescence, absorption, phase and dark-field contrasts, providing structural and chemical details of the samples. Combining these scanning techniques with the infrastructure developed for fast data acquisition at Synchrotron Soleil permits to perform multimodal imaging and tomography during routine user experiments at the Nanoscopium beamline. A main challenge of such imaging techniques is the online processing and analysis of the generated very large volume (several hundreds of Giga Bytes) multimodal data-sets. This is especially important for the wide user community foreseen at the user oriented Nanoscopium beamline (e.g. from the fields of Biology, Life Sciences, Geology, Geobiology), having no experience in such data-handling. MMX-I is a new multi-platform open-source freeware for the processing and reconstruction of scanning multi-technique X-ray imaging and tomographic datasets. The MMX-I project aims to offer, both expert users and beginners, the possibility of processing and analysing raw data, either on-site or off-site. Therefore we have developed a multi-platform (Mac, Windows and Linux 64bit) data processing tool, which is easy to install, comprehensive, intuitive, extendable and user-friendly. MMX-I is now routinely used by the Nanoscopium user community and has demonstrated its performance in treating big data.

  6. Synovial and inflammatory diseases in childhood: role of new imaging modalities in the assessment of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damasio, Maria Beatrice; Malattia, Clara; Martini, Alberto; Toma, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) represents a group of heterogeneous diseases characterized by a chronic inflammatory process primarily targeting the synovial membrane. A persistent synovitis is associated with an increased risk of osteocartilaginous damage. With the advent of effective structure-modifying treatment for JIA, it may be possible to significantly reduce or even completely prevent structural damage and associated functional disability. The trend towards early suppression of inflammation, in order to prevent erosive disease, shifts the emphasis away from conventional radiographic detectable structural damage to the slightest traces of early joint damage, and drives the need for alternative imaging techniques more sensitive in detecting early signs of disease activity and damage. In this regard MRI and US are playing an increasing role in the evaluation of arthritic joints. This article will review the key aspects of the current status and recent important advances of imaging techniques available to investigate the child with rheumatic disease, briefly discussing conventional radiography, and particularly focusing on MRI and US. In this era of advancing imaging technology, knowledge of the relative values of available imaging techniques is necessary to optimize the management of children with JIA. (orig.)

  7. The comparison of measurement accuracy among three different imaging modalities in evaluating elastofibroma dorsi. An analysis of 52 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minarro, Jose Carlos; Urbano-Luque, Maria Teresa; López-Jordan, Alberto; Roman-Torres, Manuel; Carpintero-Benítez, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    Elastofibroma dorsi (ED) is a rare soft-tissue tumour. Diagnosis is made using imaging, mainly magnetic resonance due to its higher sensitivity and specificity in soft tissues. No agreement exists when deciding which imaging test must be used. Often multiple tests are made in the same patient, increasing time and costs. The aim of this paper is to compare the usual imaging exams and evaluate which one is the most accurate when diagnosing and measuring ED. A retrospective review was made of those patients who were diagnosed and operated for ED since January 2006 to December 2013. Fifty-two ED were included (19 men, 25 women), and eight of them were bilaterally affected. They were divided into three different groups according to the imaging test used: ultrasound (US) computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR). After surgery the pieces were sized and compared with the measurements made by imaging exams. Two hundred fourteen measures were analysed (40 US, 33 CT and 34 MR with their pathological equivalent). When CT group and its corresponding AP were analysed, no significant differences between them were founded (p > 0.05). Moreover, we analysed absolute differences between measures. In the US group a mean difference of 2.23 ± 1.87 cm was obtained. In the CT group, the mean difference was 1.22 ± 0.97 cm. Likewise, the difference of the MR group was 1.62 ± 1.15 cm. This study demonstrates that the CT obtains a higher correlation than MR when determining the size of ED.

  8. pH-Responsive Tumor-Targetable Theranostic Nanovectors Based on Core Crosslinked (CCL Micelles with Fluorescence and Magnetic Resonance (MR Dual Imaging Modalities and Drug Delivery Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidan Tian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of novel theranostic nanovectors is of particular interest in treating formidable diseases (e.g., cancers. Herein, we report a new tumor-targetable theranostic agent based on core crosslinked (CCL micelles, possessing tumor targetable moieties and fluorescence and magnetic resonance (MR dual imaging modalities. An azide-terminated diblock copolymer, N3-POEGMA-b-P(DPA-co-GMA, was synthesized via consecutive atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP, where OEGMA, DPA, and GMA are oligo(ethylene glycolmethyl ether methacrylate, 2-(diisopropylaminoethyl methacrylate, and glycidyl methacrylate, respectively. The resulting diblock copolymer was further functionalized with DOTA(Gd (DOTA is 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetrakisacetic acid or benzaldehyde moieties via copper(I-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC chemistry, resulting in the formation of DOTA(Gd-POEGMA-b-P(DPA-co-GMA and benzaldehyde-POEGMA-b-P(DPA-co-GMA copolymers. The resultant block copolymers co-assembled into mixed micelles at neutral pH in the presence of tetrakis[4-(2-mercaptoethoxyphenyl]ethylene (TPE-4SH, which underwent spontaneous crosslinking reactions with GMA residues embedded within the micellar cores, simultaneously switching on TPE fluorescence due to the restriction of intramolecular rotation. Moreover, camptothecin (CPT was encapsulated into the crosslinked cores at neutral pH, and tumor-targeting pH low insertion peptide (pHLIP, sequence: AEQNPIYWARYADWLFTTPLLLLDLALLVDADEGTCG moieties were attached to the coronas through the Schiff base chemistry, yielding a theranostic nanovector with fluorescence and MR dual imaging modalities and tumor-targeting capability. The nanovectors can be efficiently taken up by A549 cells, as monitored by TPE fluorescence. After internalization, intracellular acidic pH triggered the release of loaded CPT, killing cancer cells in a selective manner. On the other hand, the nanovectors labeled with DOTA

  9. Restoration of a single superresolution image from several blurred, noisy, and undersampled measured images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elad, M; Feuer, A

    1997-01-01

    The three main tools in the single image restoration theory are the maximum likelihood (ML) estimator, the maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) estimator, and the set theoretic approach using projection onto convex sets (POCS). This paper utilizes the above known tools to propose a unified methodology toward the more complicated problem of superresolution restoration. In the superresolution restoration problem, an improved resolution image is restored from several geometrically warped, blurred, noisy and downsampled measured images. The superresolution restoration problem is modeled and analyzed from the ML, the MAP, and POCS points of view, yielding a generalization of the known superresolution restoration methods. The proposed restoration approach is general but assumes explicit knowledge of the linear space- and time-variant blur, the (additive Gaussian) noise, the different measured resolutions, and the (smooth) motion characteristics. A hybrid method combining the simplicity of the ML and the incorporation of nonellipsoid constraints is presented, giving improved restoration performance, compared with the ML and the POCS approaches. The hybrid method is shown to converge to the unique optimal solution of a new definition of the optimization problem. Superresolution restoration from motionless measurements is also discussed. Simulations demonstrate the power of the proposed methodology.

  10. Asymmetric Spondylolisthesis as the Cause of Childhood Lumbar Scoliosis—Can New Imaging Modalities Help Clarify the Relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jonathan B.; Wenger, Dennis R.

    2008-01-01

    The etiology of idiopathic scoliosis is likely genetic. Research is proceeding to identify the responsible genes. Although genetics accounts for the majority of idiopathic scoliosis, a subset of curves occur secondary to mechanical “foundation”issues at the lumbosacral junction. The most common mechanical “foundation”issue at the lumbosacral junction is spondylolisthesis. A relationship between lumbar scoliosis and spondylolisthesis has been well documented. Modern imaging studies are providing an opportunity to cast new light on this inter-relationship. First, computerized tomography (CT) studies, and now 3-D CT studies of the lumbosacral area have been performed in an attempt to further elucidate this matter. The purpose of this paper is to provide an introduction to the topic and to present images that suggest an etiologic relationship between lumbar scoliosis and spondylolisthesis with mild asymmetric spondylolisthesis proposed as the cause of the lumbar curve. PMID:19223951

  11. Imaging modalities and therapy options in patients with acute flank pain; Bildgebungsmodalitaeten und Therapieoptionen bei Patienten mit akutem Flankenschmerz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse, A.; Grosse, C. [Universitaet Bern, Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-07-15

    The objective of this article is the description of imaging techniques for the evaluation of patients with acute flank pain and suspicion of urolithiasis and the impact of these techniques in the therapy management of patients with calculi. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Arbeit ist die Eroerterung der bildgebenden Verfahren zur Abklaerung von Patienten mit akutem Flankenschmerz und Verdacht auf Urolithiasis und die Rolle dieser Verfahren im Therapiemanagement von Steinpatienten. (orig.)

  12. Multifunctional polypyrrole@fe3o4 nanoparticles for dual-modal imaging and in vivo photothermal cancer therapy

    KAUST Repository

    Tian, Qiwei

    2013-11-27

    Magnetic Fe3O4 crystals are produced in situ on preformed polypyrrole (PPY) nanoparticles by rationally converting the residual Fe species in the synthetic system. The obtained PPY@Fe3O4 composite nanoparticles exhibit good photostability and biocompatibility, and they can be used as multifunctional probes for MRI, thermal imaging, and photothermal ablation of cancer cells. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Newer Imaging Modalities to Assist With Target Localization in the Radiation Treatment of Prostate Cancer and Possible Lymph Node Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, Subhash S.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Shipley, William U.; Harisinghani, Mukesh G.

    2008-01-01

    Precise localization of prostate cancer and the drainage lymph nodes is mandatory to define an accurate clinical target volume for conformal radiotherapy. Better target definition and delineation on a daily basis is surely important in quality assurance for fractionated radiation therapy. This article reviews the evidence for major emerging techniques that show promise in better identifying the clinical target volume. Partial prostate boost by brachytherapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, or protons has become possible not only with standard imaging techniques but also with the availability of metabolic images obtained by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Even though fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography has not been found to be useful, novel radiolabeled tracers may eventually prove of value in the diagnosis and treatment planning of prostate cancer. For the metastatic lymph nodes, lymphotropic nanoparticle-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles has greater accuracy as compared with conventional techniques and has been instrumental in delineating the lymphatic drainage of the prostate gland. These novel investigational techniques could further help in optimizing conformal radiotherapy for patients with prostate cancer. The concepts of biologic target volume, real target volume, and multidimensional conformal radiotherapy are being explored

  14. Automatic Quantification of Tumour Hypoxia From Multi-Modal Microscopy Images Using Weakly-Supervised Learning Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Gustavo; Peng, Tingying; Bayer, Christine; Navab, Nassir

    2017-07-01

    In recently published clinical trial results, hypoxia-modified therapies have shown to provide more positive outcomes to cancer patients, compared with standard cancer treatments. The development and validation of these hypoxia-modified therapies depend on an effective way of measuring tumor hypoxia, but a standardized measurement is currently unavailable in clinical practice. Different types of manual measurements have been proposed in clinical research, but in this paper we focus on a recently published approach that quantifies the number and proportion of hypoxic regions using high resolution (immuno-)fluorescence (IF) and hematoxylin and eosin (HE) stained images of a histological specimen of a tumor. We introduce new machine learning-based methodologies to automate this measurement, where the main challenge is the fact that the clinical annotations available for training the proposed methodologies consist of the total number of normoxic, chronically hypoxic, and acutely hypoxic regions without any indication of their location in the image. Therefore, this represents a weakly-supervised structured output classification problem, where training is based on a high-order loss function formed by the norm of the difference between the manual and estimated annotations mentioned above. We propose four methodologies to solve this problem: 1) a naive method that uses a majority classifier applied on the nodes of a fixed grid placed over the input images; 2) a baseline method based on a structured output learning formulation that relies on a fixed grid placed over the input images; 3) an extension to this baseline based on a latent structured output learning formulation that uses a graph that is flexible in terms of the amount and positions of nodes; and 4) a pixel-wise labeling based on a fully-convolutional neural network. Using a data set of 89 weakly annotated pairs of IF and HE images from eight tumors, we show that the quantitative results of methods (3) and (4

  15. Readout-Segmented Echo-Planar Imaging in Diffusion-Weighted MR Imaging in Breast Cancer: Comparison with Single-Shot Echo-Planar Imaging in Image Quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yun Ju; Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo; Park, Chang Suk; Kim, Hyeon Sook; Son, Yo Han; Porter, David Andrew; Song, Byung Joo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the image quality of standard single-shot echo-planar imaging (ss-EPI) and that of readout-segmented EPI (rs-EPI) in patients with breast cancer. Seventy-one patients with 74 breast cancers underwent both ss-EPI and rs-EPI. For qualitative comparison of image quality, three readers independently assessed the two sets of diffusion-weighted (DW) images. To evaluate geometric distortion, a comparison was made between lesion lengths derived from contrast enhanced MR (CE-MR) images and those obtained from the corresponding DW images. For assessment of image parameters, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), lesion contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. The rs-EPI was superior to ss-EPI in most criteria regarding the qualitative image quality. Anatomical structure distinction, delineation of the lesion, ghosting artifact, and overall image quality were significantly better in rs-EPI. Regarding the geometric distortion, lesion length on ss-EPI was significantly different from that of CE-MR, whereas there were no significant differences between CE-MR and rs-EPI. The rs-EPI was superior to ss-EPI in SNR and CNR. Readout-segmented EPI is superior to ss-EPI in the aspect of image quality in DW MR imaging of the breast

  16. Mixing of multi-modal images for conformational radiotherapy: application to patient re positioning; Fusion d`images multi-modales pour la radiotherapie conformationnelle: application au repositionnement du patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vassal, P

    1998-06-29

    This study shows a procedure of patient re positioning by comparative evaluation between the position of the patient and the theoretical expected position of the patient; the stagger between the two information gives the error of installation in translation and rotation. A correction is calculated and applied to the treatment environment (position and orientation of the patient, position and orientation of the irradiation source). The control system allows to determine the precise position of the tumor volume. The echography allows to determine the position of an organ.The surface captor is used to localize the tumors of the face or of the brain, with the respect to the face, the acquisition and the treatment of information take only few minutes. The X rays imager is applied for the localization of bones structures. (N.C.)

  17. Imaging by the SSFSE single slice method at different viscosities of bile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Hiroya; Usui, Motoki; Fukunaga, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Naruto; Ikegami, Toshimi

    2001-01-01

    The single shot fast spin echo single thick slice method (single slice method) is a technique that visualizes the water component alone using a heavy T 2 . However, this method is considered to be markedly affected by changes in the viscosity of the material because a very long TE is used, and changes in the T 2 value, which are related to viscosity, directly affect imaging. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between the effects of TE and the T 2 value of bile in the single slice method and also examined the relationship between the signal intensity of bile on T 1 - and T 2 -weighted images and imaging by MR cholangiography (MRC). It was difficult to image bile with high viscosities at a usual effective TE level of 700-1,500 ms. With regard to the relationship between the signal intensity of bile and MRC imaging, all T 2 values of the bile samples showing relatively high signal intensities on the T 1 -weighted images suggested high viscosities, and MRC imaging of these bile samples was poor. In conclusion, MRC imaging of bile with high viscosities was poor with the single slice method. Imaging by the single slice method alone of bile showing a relatively high signal intensity on T 1 -weighted images should be avoided, and combination with other MRC sequences should be used. (author)

  18. Sequential roles of primary somatosensory cortex and posterior parietal cortex in tactile-visual cross-modal working memory: a single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (spTMS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Yixuan; Zhao, Di; Hao, Ning; Hu, Yi; Bodner, Mark; Zhou, Yong-Di

    2015-01-01

    Both monkey neurophysiological and human EEG studies have shown that association cortices, as well as primary sensory cortical areas, play an essential role in sequential neural processes underlying cross-modal working memory. The present study aims to further examine causal and sequential roles of the primary sensory cortex and association cortex in cross-modal working memory. Individual MRI-based single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (spTMS) was applied to bilateral primary somatosensory cortices (SI) and the contralateral posterior parietal cortex (PPC), while participants were performing a tactile-visual cross-modal delayed matching-to-sample task. Time points of spTMS were 300 ms, 600 ms, 900 ms after the onset of the tactile sample stimulus in the task. The accuracy of task performance and reaction time were significantly impaired when spTMS was applied to the contralateral SI at 300 ms. Significant impairment on performance accuracy was also observed when the contralateral PPC was stimulated at 600 ms. SI and PPC play sequential and distinct roles in neural processes of cross-modal associations and working memory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Superparamagnetic PLGA-iron oxide microcapsules for dual-modality US/MR imaging and high intensity focused US breast cancer ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yang; Zheng, Yuanyi; Ran, Haitao; Zhou, Yang; Shen, Hongxia; Chen, Yu; Chen, Hangrong; Krupka, Tianyi M; Li, Ao; Li, Pan; Wang, Zhibiao; Wang, Zhigang

    2012-08-01

    Organic/inorganic, hybrid, multifunctional, material-based platforms combine the merits of diverse functionalities of inorganic nanoparticles and the excellent biocompatibility of organic systems. In this work, superparamagnetic poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microcapsules (Fe(3)O(4)/PLGA) have been developed, as a proof-of-concept, for the application in ultrasound/magnetic resonance dual-modality biological imaging and enhancing the therapeutic efficiency of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) breast cancer surgery in vitro and in vivo. Hydrophobic Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles were successfully integrated into PLGA microcapsules by a typical double emulsion evaporation process. In this process, highly dispersed superparamagnetic Fe(3)O(4)/PLGA composite microcapsules with well-defined spherical morphology were obtained with an average diameter of 885.6 nm. The potential of these microcapsules as dual contrast agents for ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging were demonstrated in vitro and, also, preliminarily in vivo. Meanwhile, the prepared superparamagnetic composite microcapsules were administrated into rabbits bearing breast cancer model for the evaluation of the in vivo HIFU synergistic ablation efficiency caused by the introduction of such microcapsules. Our results showed that the employment of the composite microcapsules could efficiently enhance ultrasound imaging of cancer, and greatly enhance the HIFU ablation of breast cancer in rabbits. In addition, pathological examination was systematically performed to detect the structural changes of the target tissue caused by HIFU ablation. This finding demonstrated that successful introduction of these superparamagnetic microcapsules into HIFU cancer surgery provided an alternative strategy for the highly efficient imaging-guided non-invasive HIFU synergistic therapy of cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Industrial-scale separation of high-purity single-chirality single-wall carbon nanotubes for biological imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yomogida, Yohei; Tanaka, Takeshi; Zhang, Minfang; Yudasaka, Masako; Wei, Xiaojun; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2016-06-01

    Single-chirality, single-wall carbon nanotubes are desired due to their inherent physical properties and performance characteristics. Here, we demonstrate a chromatographic separation method based on a newly discovered chirality-selective affinity between carbon nanotubes and a gel containing a mixture of the surfactants. In this system, two different selectivities are found: chiral-angle selectivity and diameter selectivity. Since the chirality of nanotubes is determined by the chiral angle and diameter, combining these independent selectivities leads to high-resolution single-chirality separation with milligram-scale throughput and high purity. Furthermore, we present efficient vascular imaging of mice using separated single-chirality (9,4) nanotubes. Due to efficient absorption and emission, blood vessels can be recognized even with the use of ~100-fold lower injected dose than the reported value for pristine nanotubes. Thus, 1 day of separation provides material for up to 15,000 imaging experiments, which is acceptable for industrial use.

  1. Diffusion tensor image segmentation of the cerebrum provides a single measure of cerebral small vessel disease severity related to cognitive change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen A. Williams

    2017-01-01

    DSEG θ is a powerful tool for characterising subtle brain change in SVD that has a negative impact on cognition and remains a significant predictor of cognitive change when other MRI markers of brain change are accounted for. DSEG provides an automatic segmentation of the whole cerebrum that is sensitive to a range of SVD related structural changes and successfully predicts cognitive change. Power analysis shows DSEG θ has potential as a monitoring tool in clinical trials. As such it may provide a marker of SVD severity from a single imaging modality (i.e. DTIs.

  2. Detection of Fusarium in single wheat kernels using spectral Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, G.; Heijden, van der G.W.A.M.; Waalwijk, C.; Young, I.T.

    2005-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a harmful fungal disease that occurs in small grains. Non-destructive detection of this disease is traditionally done using spectroscopy or image processing. In this paper the combination of these two in the form of spectral imaging is evaluated. Transmission spectral

  3. Mesoporous composite nanoparticles for dual-modality ultrasound/magnetic resonance imaging and synergistic chemo-/thermotherapy against deep tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Wang, Ronghui; Hao, Junnian; Yang, Yang; Zou, Hongmi; Wang, Zhigang

    2017-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a promising and noninvasive treatment for solid tumors, which has been explored for potential clinical applications. However, the clinical applications of HIFU for large and deep tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are severely limited by unsatisfactory imaging guidance, long therapeutic times, and damage to normal tissue around the tumor due to the high power applied. In this study, we developed doxorubicin/perfluorohexane-encapsulated hollow mesoporous Prussian blue nanoparticles (HMPBs-DOX/PFH) as theranostic agents, which can effectively guide HIFU therapy and enhance its therapeutic effects in combination with chemotherapy, by decreasing the cavitation threshold. We investigated the effects of this agent on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we showed a highly efficient HIFU therapeutic effect against HCC tumors, as well as controlled drug release, owing to the phase-transitional performance of the PFH. We therefore conclude that HMPB-DOX/PFH is a safe and efficient nanoplatform, which holds significant promise for cancer theranostics against deep tumors in clinical settings.

  4. High Resolution Bathymetry Estimation Improvement with Single Image Super-Resolution Algorithm Super-Resolution Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-26

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/5514--17-9692 High Resolution Bathymetry Estimation Improvement with Single Image Super... Single Image Super-Resolution Algorithm “Super-Resolution Forests” Dylan Einsidler,* Kristen Nock, Leslie Smith, David Bonanno, Paul Elmore, Warren Wood...release; distribution is unlimited. *Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Rd., Boca Raton, FL 33431 11 Leslie N. Smith (202) 767-9532 Using the single

  5. Cross-correlated imaging of single-mode photonic crystal rod fiber with distributed mode filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurila, Marko; Barankov, Roman; Jørgensen, Mette Marie

    2013-01-01

    Photonic crystal bandgap fibers employing distributed mode filtering design provide near diffraction-limited light outputs, a critical property of fiber-based high-power lasers. Microstructure of the fibers is tailored to achieve single-mode operation at specific wavelength by resonant mode...... identify regimes of resonant coupling between higher-order core modes and cladding band. We demonstrate a passive fiber design in which the higher-order modal content inside the single-mode guiding regime is suppressed by at least 20 dB even for significantly misaligned input-coupling configurations....

  6. Quantitative Molecular Imaging with a Single Gd-Based Contrast Agent Reveals Specific Tumor Binding and Retention in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Mette L; Gao, Ying; Hutnick, Melanie A; Craig, Sonya E L; Pokorski, Jonathan K; Flask, Chris A; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M

    2017-06-06

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an indispensable tool in the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases, especially cancer. However, the poor sensitivity of MRI relative to other imaging modalities, such as PET, has hindered the development and clinical use of molecular MRI contrast agents that could provide vital diagnostic information by specifically locating a molecular target altered in the disease process. This work describes the specific and sustained in vivo binding and retention of a protein tyrosine phosphatase mu (PTPμ)-targeted, molecular magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent with a single gadolinium (Gd) chelate using a quantitative MRI T 1 mapping technique in glioma xenografts. Quantitative T 1 mapping is an imaging method used to measure the longitudinal relaxation time, the T 1 relaxation time, of protons in a magnetic field after excitation by a radiofrequency pulse. T 1 relaxation times can in turn be used to calculate the concentration of a gadolinium-containing contrast agent in a region of interest, thereby allowing the retention or clearance of an agent to be quantified. In this context, retention is a measure of molecular contrast agent binding. Using conventional peptide chemistry, a PTPμ-targeted peptide was linked to a chelator that had been conjugated to a lysine residue. Following complexation with Gd, this PTPμ-targeted molecular contrast agent containing a single Gd ion showed significant tumor enhancement and a sustained increase in Gd concentration in both heterotopic and orthotopic tumors using dynamic quantitative MRI. This single Gd-containing PTPμ agent was more effective than our previous version with three Gd ions. Differences between nonspecific and specific agents, due to specific tumor binding, can be determined within the first 30 min after agent administration by examining clearance rates. This more facile chemistry, when combined with quantitative MR techniques, allows for widespread adoption by academic

  7. A smart upconversion-based light-triggered polymer for synergetic chemo-photodynamic therapy and dual-modal MR/UCL imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Bin; Han, Shuping; Zhao, Feifei; Lim, Kok Hwa; Xi, Hongwei; Su, Xiangjie; Yao, Hanchun; Zhou, Jie

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a novel nanocomposite to achieve effective therapy and live surveillance of tumor tissue. In this study, fullerene (C 60 ) with iron oxide (Fe 3 O 4 ) nanoparticles and upconversion nanophosphors (UCNPs) was loaded into N-succinyl-N'-4-(2-nitrobenzyloxy)-succinyl-chitosan micelles (SNSC) with good biocompatibility. In addition, hydrophobic anticancer drug docetaxel (DTX) was also loaded into the nanocomposites. The experiments conducted in vitro and in vivo demonstrated that C 60 /Fe 3 O 4 -UCNPs@DTX@SNSC can act synergistically to kill tumor cells by releasing chemotherapy drugs at specific target site as well as generating reactive oxygen using 980nm. In addition, it can also be used for non-invasive deep magnetic resonance and upconversion fluorescence dual-mode imaging. The results indicated that this system provided an efficient method to surmount the drawback of UV or visible light-responsive polymeric systems for controlled drug release and generated reactive oxygen in deep tissues and ultimately realized the integration of dual-modal imaging and treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical usefulness of breast-specific gamma imaging as an adjunct modality to mammography for diagnosis of breast cancer: a systemic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Wei, Wei; Yang, Hua-Wei; Liu, Jian-Lun

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) as an adjunct modality to mammography for detecting breast cancer. Comprehensive searches of MEDLINE (1984 to August 2012) and EMBASE (1994 to August 2012) were performed. A summary receiver operating characteristic curve (SROC) was constructed to summarize the overall test performance of BSGI. The sensitivities for detecting subcentimetre cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) were pooled. The potential of BSGI to complement mammography was also evaluated by identifying mammography-occult breast cancer. Analysis of the studies revealed that the overall validity estimates of BSGI in detecting breast cancer were as follows: sensitivity 95 % (95 % CI 93-96 %), specificity 80 % (95 % CI 78-82 %), positive likelihood ratio 4.63 (95 % CI 3.13-6.85), negative likelihood ratio 0.08 (95 % CI 0.05-0.14), and diagnostic odds ratio 56.67 (95 % CI 26.68-120.34). The area under the SROC was 0.9552 and the Q* point was 0.8977. The pooled sensitivities for detecting subcentimetre cancer and DCIS were 84 % (95 % CI 80-88 %) and 88 % (95 % CI 81-92 %), respectively. Among patients with normal mammography, 4 % were diagnosed with breast cancer by BSGI, and among those with mammography suggestive of malignancy or new biopsy-proven breast cancer, 6 % were diagnosed with additional cancers in the breast by BSGI. BSGI had a high diagnostic performance as an excellent adjunct modality to mammography for detecting breast cancer. The ability to identify subcentimetre cancer and DCIS was also high.

  9. Chitosan-Gated Magnetic-Responsive Nanocarrier for Dual-Modal Optical Imaging, Switchable Drug Release, and Synergistic Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hui [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA; Mu, Qingxin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA; Revia, Richard [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA; Wang, Kui [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA; Zhou, Xuezhe [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA; Pauzauskie, Peter J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA; Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Zhou, Shuiqin [Department of Chemistry, The College of Staten Island, City University of New York, Staten Island NY 10314 USA; Zhang, Miqin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA

    2017-01-25

    In this study, we present a multifunctional yet structurally simple nanocarrier that has a high drug loading capacity, releases drug in response to onset of an AC magnetic field, and can serve as a long-term imaging contrast agent and effectively kills cancer cells by synergistic action. This nanocarrier (HMMC-NC) has a spherical shell structure with a center cavity of 80 nm in diameter. The shell is comprised of two layers: an inner layer of magnetite that exhibits superparamagnetism and an outer layer of mesoporous carbon embedded with carbon dots that exhibit photoluminescence property. Thus in addition to being a drug carrier, HMMC-NC is also a contrast agent for bioimaging. The switchable drug release is enabled by the chitosan molecules attached on the nanocarrier as the switching material which turns on or off the drug release in response to the application or withdrawal of an AC magnetic field.

  10. SINGLE FRAME SUPER RESOLUTION OF NONCOOPERATIVE IRIS IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Deshpande

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Image super-resolution, a process to enhance image resolution, has important applications in biometrics, satellite imaging, high definition television, medical imaging, etc. The long range captured iris identification systems often suffer from low resolution and meager focus of the captured iris images. These degrade the iris recognition performance. This paper proposes enhanced iterated back projection (EIBP method to super resolute the long range captured iris polar images. The performance of proposed method is tested and analyzed on CASIA long range iris database by comparing peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR and structural similarity index (SSIM with state-of-the-art super resolution (SR algorithms. It is further analyzed by increasing the up-sampling factor. Performance analysis shows that the proposed method is superior to state-of-the-art algorithms, the peak signal-to-noise ratio improved about 0.1-1.5 dB. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is well suited to super resolve the iris polar images captured at a long distance

  11. Engineering iodine-doped carbon dots as dual-modal probes for fluorescence and X-ray CT imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang M

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Miaomiao Zhang,1,* Huixiang Ju,2,* Li Zhang,1,* Mingzhong Sun,2 Zhongwei Zhou,2 Zhenyu Dai,3 Lirong Zhang,1 Aihua Gong,1 Chaoyao Wu,1 Fengyi Du1 1School of Medicine, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Clinical Laboratory, Affiliated Yancheng Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Yancheng, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China; 3Radiology Department, Affiliated Yancheng Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Yancheng, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: X-ray computed tomography (CT is the most commonly used imaging technique for noninvasive diagnosis of disease. In order to improve tissue specificity and prevent adverse effects, we report the design and synthesis of iodine-doped carbon dots (I-doped CDs as efficient CT contrast agents and fluorescence probe by a facile bottom-up hydrothermal carbonization process. The as-prepared I-doped CDs are monodispersed spherical nanoparticles (a diameter of ~2.7 nm with favorable dispersibility and colloidal stability in water. The aqueous solution of I-doped CDs showed wavelength-dependent excitation and stable photoluminescence similar to traditional carbon quantum dots. Importantly, I-doped CDs displayed superior X-ray attenuation properties in vitro and excellent biocompatibility. After intravenous injection, I-doped CDs were distributed throughout the body and excreted by renal clearance. These findings validated that I-doped CDs with high X-ray attenuation potency and favorable photoluminescence show great promise for biomedical research and disease diagnosis. Keywords: carbon dots, contrast agents, iodine-doped, CT imaging

  12. Robotic-Assisted Fluorescence Sentinel Lymph Node Mapping Using Multi-Modal Image-Guidance in an Animal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Michael A.; Stroup, Sean P.; Cand, Zhengtao Qin; Hoh, Carl; Hall, David J.; Vera, David R.; Kane, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate PET/CT pre-operative imaging and intraoperative detection of a fluorescent-labeled receptor-targeted radiopharmaceutical in a prostate cancer animal model. Methods Three male Beagle dogs underwent an intra-prostatic injection of fluorescent-tagged tilmanocept radio-labeled with both gallium-68 and technetium-99m. One hour after injection a pelvic PET/CT scan was performed for pre-operative sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping. Definition of SLN was a standardized uptake value (SUV) that exceeded 5% of the lymph node with the highest SUV. Thirty-six hours later we performed robotic-assisted SLN dissection using a fluorescence-capable camera system. Fluorescent lymph nodes were clipped, the abdomen was opened, and the pelvic and retroperitoneal nodes were excised. All excised nodal packets were assayed by in vitro nuclear counting and reported as percent-of-injected dose. Results Pre-operative PET/CT imaging identified a median of three sentinel lymph nodes per animal. All sentinel lymph nodes (100%) identified by the PET/CT were fluorescent during robotic-assisted lymph node dissection. Of all fluorescent nodes visualized by the camera system, 83% (10/12) satisfied the 5%-rule defined by the PET/CT scan. The two lymph nodes that did not qualify accumulated less than 0.002% of the injected dose. Conclusions Fluorescent-labeled tilmanocept has optimal logistical properties to obtain pre-operative PET/CT and subsequent real-time intraoperative confirmation during robotic-assisted sentinel lymph node dissection. PMID:25139676

  13. Demonstration of Single-Barium-Ion Sensitivity for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Using Single-Molecule Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, A. D.; Jones, B. J. P.; Nygren, D. R.; Adams, C.; Álvarez, V.; Azevedo, C. D. R.; Benlloch-Rodríguez, J. M.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Botas, A.; Cárcel, S.; Carrión, J. V.; Cebrián, S.; Conde, C. A. N.; Díaz, J.; Diesburg, M.; Escada, J.; Esteve, R.; Felkai, R.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Ferrario, P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Freitas, E. D. C.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; González-Díaz, D.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Guenette, R.; Hafidi, K.; Hauptman, J.; Henriques, C. A. O.; Hernandez, A. I.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Herrero, V.; Johnston, S.; Labarga, L.; Laing, A.; Lebrun, P.; Liubarsky, I.; López-March, N.; Losada, M.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez-Lema, G.; Martínez, A.; Monrabal, F.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Musti, M.; Nebot-Guinot, M.; Novella, P.; Palmeiro, B.; Para, A.; Pérez, J.; Querol, M.; Repond, J.; Renner, J.; Riordan, S.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, J.; Rogers, L.; Santos, F. P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M.; Stiegler, T.; Toledo, J. F.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Webb, R.; White, J. T.; Yahlali, N.; NEXT Collaboration

    2018-03-01

    A new method to tag the barium daughter in the double-beta decay of Xe 136 is reported. Using the technique of single molecule fluorescent imaging (SMFI), individual barium dication (Ba++ ) resolution at a transparent scanning surface is demonstrated. A single-step photobleach confirms the single ion interpretation. Individual ions are localized with superresolution (˜2 nm ), and detected with a statistical significance of 12.9 σ over backgrounds. This lays the foundation for a new and potentially background-free neutrinoless double-beta decay technology, based on SMFI coupled to high pressure xenon gas time projection chambers.

  14. Demonstration of Single-Barium-Ion Sensitivity for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Using Single-Molecule Fluorescence Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, A. D.; Jones, B. J. P.; Nygren, D. R.; Adams, C.; Álvarez, V.; Azevedo, C. D. R.; Benlloch-Rodríguez, J. M.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Botas, A.; Cárcel, S.; Carrión, J. V.; Cebrián, S.; Conde, C. A. N.; Díaz, J.; Diesburg, M.; Escada, J.; Esteve, R.; Felkai, R.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Ferrario, P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Freitas, E. D. C.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; González-Díaz, D.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Guenette, R.; Hafidi, K.; Hauptman, J.; Henriques, C. A. O.; Hernandez, A. I.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Herrero, V.; Johnston, S.; Labarga, L.; Laing, A.; Lebrun, P.; Liubarsky, I.; López-March, N.; Losada, M.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez-Lema, G.; Martínez, A.; Monrabal, F.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Musti, M.; Nebot-Guinot, M.; Novella, P.; Palmeiro, B.; Para, A.; Pérez, J.; Querol, M.; Repond, J.; Renner, J.; Riordan, S.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, J.; Rogers, L.; Santos, F. P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M.; Stiegler, T.; Toledo, J. F.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Webb, R.; White, J. T.; Yahlali, N.

    2018-03-01

    A new method to tag the barium daughter in the double beta decay of $^{136}$Xe is reported. Using the technique of single molecule fluorescent imaging (SMFI), individual barium dication (Ba$^{++}$) resolution at a transparent scanning surface has been demonstrated. A single-step photo-bleach confirms the single ion interpretation. Individual ions are localized with super-resolution ($\\sim$2~nm), and detected with a statistical significance of 12.9~$\\sigma$ over backgrounds. This lays the foundation for a new and potentially background-free neutrinoless double beta decay technology, based on SMFI coupled to high pressure xenon gas time projection chambers.

  15. TU-AB-BRA-06: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING-THERAPY): An MRI Compatible Externally and Internally Deformable Lung Motion Phantom for Multi-Modality IGRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabouri, P; Sawant, A [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Arai, T [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: MRI has become an attractive tool for tumor motion management. Current MR-compatible phantoms are only capable of reproducing translational motion. This study describes the construction and validation of a more realistic, MRI-compatible lung phantom that is deformable internally as well as externally. We demonstrate a radiotherapy application of this phantom by validating the geometric accuracy of the open-source deformable image registration software NiftyReg (UCL, UK). Methods: The outer shell of a commercially-available dynamic breathing torso phantom was filled with natural latex foam with eleven water tubes. A rigid foam cut-out served as the diaphragm. A high-precision programmable, in-house, MRI-compatible motion platform was used to drive the diaphragm. The phantom was imaged on a 3T scanner (Philips, Ingenia). Twenty seven tumor traces previously recorded from lung cancer patients were programmed into the phantom and 2D+t image sequences were acquired using a sparse-sampling sequence k-t BLAST (accn=3, resolution=0.66×0.66×5mm3; acquisition-time=110ms/slice). The geometric fidelity of the MRI-derived trajectories was validated against those obtained via fluoroscopy using the on board kV imager on a Truebeam linac. NiftyReg was used to perform frame by frame deformable image registration. The location of each marker predicted by using NiftyReg was compared with the values calculated by intensity-based segmentation on each frame. Results: In all cases, MR trajectories were within 1 mm of corresponding fluoroscopy trajectories. RMSE between centroid positions obtained from segmentation with those obtained by NiftyReg varies from 0.1 to 0.21 mm in the SI direction and 0.08 to 0.13 mm in the LR direction showing the high accuracy of deformable registration. Conclusion: We have successfully designed and demonstrated a phantom that can accurately reproduce deformable motion under a variety of imaging modalities including MRI, CT and x-ray fluodoscopy

  16. The impact of different imaging modalities of 67Ga scintigraphy on the image quality and the ability in detection of lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiuqin; Li Wenchan; Zhang Jianfei; Yao Zhiming

    2009-01-01

    Objective: 67 Ga scintigraphy is an important method in detection of active sarcoidosis. The aim of this research was to study the influence of planar and tomography. with and without CT attenuation correction (AC and NAC), on 67 Ga images on the image quality and the ability in detection of lesions. Methods: Thirty one patients (13 male, 18 female, age range: 33-87 years)with sarcoidosis underwent 67 Ga planar and tomographic scans. AC and NAC.The imaging quality and the ability in detection of hyper-radioactive lymph nodes in lung hilar and mediastinal(1esion) among the planar, AC and NAC images were compared. The paired t-test and χ 2 -test were used for data analysis with SPSS 10.0 software. Results: From planar, NAC to AC, the image quality was better and better in proper order (χ 2 = 25.88, P 67 Ga tomographic scintigraphy can impmve the ability in detection of hyperradioactive lung hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes compared with planar image does. CT AC for 67 Ga tomography can improve the tomographic imaging quality. (authors)

  17. Ten-year technical and clinical outcomes in TransAtlantic Inter-Society Consensus II infrainguinal C/D lesions using duplex ultrasound arterial mapping as the sole imaging modality for critical lower limb ischemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sultan, Sherif

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate duplex ultrasound arterial mapping (DUAM) as the sole imaging modality when planning for bypass surgery (BS) and endovascular revascularization (EvR) in patients with critical limb ischemia for TransAtlantic Inter-Society Consensus (TASC) II C\\/D infrainguinal lesions.

  18. Two-color monochromatic x-ray imaging with a single short-pulse laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, H.; Daykin, T.; McLean, H. S.; Chen, H.; Patel, P. K.; Ping, Y.; Pérez, F.

    2017-06-01

    Simultaneous monochromatic crystal imaging at 4.5 and 8.0 keV with x-rays produced by a single short-pulse laser is presented. A layered target consisting of thin foils of titanium and copper glued together is irradiated by the 50 TW Leopard short-pulse laser housed at the Nevada Terawatt Facility. Laser-accelerated MeV fast electrons transmitting through the target induce Kα fluorescence from both foils. Two energy-selective curved crystals in the imaging diagnostic form separate monochromatic images on a single imaging detector. The experiment demonstrates simultaneous two-color monochromatic imaging of the foils on a single detector as well as Kα x-ray production at two different photon energies with a single laser beam. Application of the diagnostic technique to x-ray radiography of a high density plasma is also presented.

  19. Engineering iodine-doped carbon dots as dual-modal probes for fluorescence and X-ray CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miaomiao; Ju, Huixiang; Zhang, Li; Sun, Mingzhong; Zhou, Zhongwei; Dai, Zhenyu; Zhang, Lirong; Gong, Aihua; Wu, Chaoyao; Du, Fengyi

    2015-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is the most commonly used imaging technique for noninvasive diagnosis of disease. In order to improve tissue specificity and prevent adverse effects, we report the design and synthesis of iodine-doped carbon dots (I-doped CDs) as efficient CT contrast agents and fluorescence probe by a facile bottom-up hydrothermal carbonization process. The as-prepared I-doped CDs are monodispersed spherical nanoparticles (a diameter of ~2.7 nm) with favorable dispersibility and colloidal stability in water. The aqueous solution of I-doped CDs showed wavelength-dependent excitation and stable photoluminescence similar to traditional carbon quantum dots. Importantly, I-doped CDs displayed superior X-ray attenuation properties in vitro and excellent biocompatibility. After intravenous injection, I-doped CDs were distributed throughout the body and excreted by renal clearance. These findings validated that I-doped CDs with high X-ray attenuation potency and favorable photoluminescence show great promise for biomedical research and disease diagnosis.

  20. Single-photon compressive imaging with some performance benefits over raster scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Wen-Kai; Liu, Xue-Feng; Yao, Xu-Ri; Wang, Chao; Zhai, Guang-Jie; Zhao, Qing

    2014-01-01

    A single-photon imaging system based on compressed sensing has been developed to image objects under ultra-low illumination. With this system, we have successfully realized imaging at the single-photon level with a single-pixel avalanche photodiode without point-by-point raster scanning. From analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio in the measurement we find that our system has much higher sensitivity than conventional ones based on point-by-point raster scanning, while the measurement time is also reduced. - Highlights: • We design a single photon imaging system with compressed sensing. • A single point avalanche photodiode is used without raster scanning. • The Poisson shot noise in the measurement is analyzed. • The sensitivity of our system is proved to be higher than that of raster scanning

  1. ASSESSMENT OF EFFECTIVE DOSE FROM CONE BEAM CT IMAGING IN SPECT/CT EXAMINATION IN COMPARISON WITH OTHER MODALITIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkopi, Elena; Ross, Andrew A

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess radiation dose from the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) component of single photon emission tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) examinations and to compare it with the radiopharmaceutical related dose as well as dose from multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Effective dose (ED) from computed tomography (CT) was estimated using dose-length product values and anatomy-specific conversion factors. The contribution from the SPECT component was evaluated using ED per unit administered activity for the radiopharmaceuticals listed in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publications 80 and 106. With the exception of cardiac studies (0.11 mSv), the CBCT dose (3.96-6.04 mSv) was similar to that from the radiopharmaceutical accounting for 29-56 % of the total ED from the examination. In comparison with MDCT examinations, the CBCT dose was 48 and 42 % lower for abdomen/pelvis and chest/abdomen/pelvis scans, respectively, while in the chest the CBCT scan resulted in higher dose (23 %). Radiation dose from the CT component should be taken into consideration when evaluating total SPECT/CT patient dose. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Physiological assessment of myocardial perfusion using nuclear cardiology would enhance coronary artery disease patient care. Which imaging modality is best for evaluation of myocardial ischemia? (SPECT-side)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Manabe, Osamu; Tamaki, Nagara

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology has played an important role in both diagnosis and risk assessments of coronary artery disease since early 1970. Among the non-invasive diagnostic tests, the great advantage of nuclear imaging is that this technique can obtain physiological information, such as myocardial perfusion, which is difficult to obtain by other techniques. When patients have inducible myocardial ischemia and sufficient viable myocardium, coronary revascularization treatment should be performed. Both stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and viability imaging provide important information. Another important aspect of stress perfusion imaging is that normal stress perfusion is associated with low risk for future cardiac events. Therefore, stress MPI plays an important role in the selection of an invasive therapeutic regime and also in avoiding unnecessary invasive procedures. As is the case for other imaging techniques, there have been many technical and instrumental developments in recent years in nuclear cardiology imaging, including new single-photon-emission computed tomography tracers, new pharmacological stress agents, a new generation of γ camera, and positron emission tomography. This review will address the advantages of nuclear cardiology in the clinical setting and recent developments in nuclear cardiology. (author)

  3. Multicolour single molecule imaging in cells with near infra-red dyes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Tynan

    Full Text Available The autofluorescence background of biological samples impedes the detection of single molecules when imaging. The most common method of reducing the background is to use evanescent field excitation, which is incompatible with imaging beyond the surface of biological samples. An alternative would be to use probes that can be excited in the near infra-red region of the spectrum, where autofluorescence is low. Such probes could also increase the number of labels that can be imaged in multicolour single molecule microscopes. Despite being widely used in ensemble imaging, there is a currently a shortage of information available for selecting appropriate commercial near infra-red dyes for single molecule work. It is therefore important to characterise available near infra-red dyes relevant to multicolour single molecule imaging.A range of commercially available near infra-red dyes compatible with multi-colour imaging