WorldWideScience

Sample records for single imaging device

  1. Single-Image Distance Measurement by a Smart Mobile Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shangwen; Fang, Xianyong; Shen, Jianbing; Wang, Linbo; Shao, Ling

    2017-12-01

    Existing distance measurement methods either require multiple images and special photographing poses or only measure the height with a special view configuration. We propose a novel image-based method that can measure various types of distance from single image captured by a smart mobile device. The embedded accelerometer is used to determine the view orientation of the device. Consequently, pixels can be back-projected to the ground, thanks to the efficient calibration method using two known distances. Then the distance in pixel is transformed to a real distance in centimeter with a linear model parameterized by the magnification ratio. Various types of distance specified in the image can be computed accordingly. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. Charge transport through image charged stabilized states in a single molecule single electron transistor device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedegard, Per; Bjornholm, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The present paper gives an elaborate theoretical description of a new molecular charge transport mechanism applying to a single molecule trapped between two macroscopic electrodes in a solid state device. It is shown by a Hubbard type model of the electronic and electrostatic interactions, that the close proximity of metal electrodes may allow electrons to tunnel from the electrode directly into very localized image charge stabilized states on the molecule. Due to this mechanism, an exceptionally large number of redox states may be visited within an energy scale which would normally not allow the molecular HOMO-LUMO gap to be transversed. With a reasonable set of parameters, a good fit to recent experimental values may be obtained. The theoretical model is furthermore used to search for the physical boundaries of this effect, and it is found that a rather narrow geometrical space is available for the new mechanism to work: in the specific case of oligophenylenevinylene molecules recently explored in such devices several atoms in the terminal benzene rings need to be at van der Waal's distance to the electrode in order for the mechanism to work. The model predicts, that chemisorption of the terminal benzene rings too gold electrodes will impede the image charge effect very significantly because the molecule is pushed away from the electrode by the covalent thiol-gold bond

  3. Single Value Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mader, Angelika H.; Dertien, Edwin Christian; Reidsma, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    We live in a world of continuous information overflow, but the quality of information and communication is suffering. Single value devices contribute to the information and communication quality by fo- cussing on one explicit, relevant piece of information. The information is decoupled from a

  4. Electronic portal imaging devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lief, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    The topics discussed include, among others, the following: Role of portal imaging; Port films vs. EPID; Image guidance: Elekta volume view; Delivery verification; Automation tasks of portal imaging; Types of portal imaging (Fluorescent screen, mirror, and CCD camera-based imaging; Liquid ion chamber imaging; Amorpho-silicon portal imagers; Fluoroscopic portal imaging; Kodak CR reader; and Other types of portal imaging devices); QA of EPID; and Portal dosimetry (P.A.)

  5. Evaluating imaging devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollo, F.D.

    1977-01-01

    The performance of any imaging device depends on two principal factors inherent to the device, namely, plane sensitivity and spatial resolution. These factors may be defined as follows: plane sensitivity is the counts per second recorded by the imaging device for each disintegration per second per square centimeter occurring within a plane sheet of radioactivity. Spatial resolution may be defined as the fidelity with which the imaging device reproduces the activity distribution of an object in the image plane. In all imaging devices, a trade-off exists between these two parameters; that is, as sensitivity improves, spatial resolution is degraded, and vice versa. Therefore, to fully evaluate an imaging system a technique should be selected that measures both parameters and reflects the trade-off between the two. In addition, the method should approximate the clinical problem, namely, the detection of a focal lesion within an activity distribution. Several methods have been described to evaluate nuclear imaging devices. The more common techniques include the use of organ phantoms, bar phantoms, line-spread functions, modulation transfer functions, contrast efficiency functions, and performance index functions. Each of these techniques is briefly described in this chapter, and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. In addition, a phantom that can be used to simply and completely measure overall imaging system performance is described

  6. Imaging-Guided Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of Adrenal Metastases: Preliminary Results at a Single Institution with a Single Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrafiello, G.; Lagana, D.; Recaldini, C.; Giorgianni, A.; Ianniello, A.; Lumia, D.; D'Ambrosio, A.; Petulla, M.; Dionigi, G.; Fugazzola, C.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to show the feasibility, safety, imaging appearance, and short-term efficacy of image-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of adrenal metastases (AM). Seven imaging-guided percutaneous RFA treatments were performed in six patients (two men and four women; mean age, 67.2 years; range, 55-74 years) with six AM who were referred to our institution from 2003 to 2006. One patient was treated twice for recurrence after first treatment. The average diameter of the treated AM was 29 mm (range, 15-40 mm). In all patients, the diagnosis was obtained with CT current protocols in use at our institution and confirmed by pathology with an image-guided biopsy. No major complications occurred. In one patient shortly after initiation of the procedure, severe hypertension was noted; another patient developed post-RFA syndrome. In five of six lesions, there was no residual enhancement of the treated tumor. In one patient CT examination showed areas of residual enhancement of the tumor after treatment. Our preliminary results suggest that imaging-guided percutaneous RFA is effective for local control of AM, without major complications and with a low morbidity rate related to the procedure. Long-term follow-up will need to be performed and appropriate patient selection criteria will need to be determined in future randomized trials.

  7. Combined atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence imaging to select single InAs/GaAs quantum dots for quantum photonic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, Luca; Liu, Jin; Song, Jin Dong; Fält, Stefan; Wegscheider, Werner; Badolato, Antonio; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2017-07-24

    We report on a combined photoluminescence imaging and atomic force microscopy study of single, isolated self-assembled InAs quantum dots. The motivation of this work is to determine an approach that allows to assess single quantum dots as candidates for quantum nanophotonic devices. By combining optical and scanning probe characterization techniques, we find that single quantum dots often appear in the vicinity of comparatively large topographic features. Despite this, the quantum dots generally do not exhibit significant differences in their non-resonantly pumped emission spectra in comparison to quantum dots appearing in defect-free regions, and this behavior is observed across multiple wafers produced in different growth chambers. Such large surface features are nevertheless a detriment to applications in which single quantum dots are embedded within nanofabricated photonic devices: they are likely to cause large spectral shifts in the wavelength of cavity modes designed to resonantly enhance the quantum dot emission, thereby resulting in a nominally perfectly-fabricated single quantum dot device failing to behave in accordance with design. We anticipate that the approach of screening quantum dots not only based on their optical properties, but also their surrounding surface topographies, will be necessary to improve the yield of single quantum dot nanophotonic devices.

  8. Single-photon imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Seitz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The acquisition and interpretation of images is a central capability in almost all scientific and technological domains. In particular, the acquisition of electromagnetic radiation, in the form of visible light, UV, infrared, X-ray, etc. is of enormous practical importance. The ultimate sensitivity in electronic imaging is the detection of individual photons. With this book, the first comprehensive review of all aspects of single-photon electronic imaging has been created. Topics include theoretical basics, semiconductor fabrication, single-photon detection principles, imager design and applications of different spectral domains. Today, the solid-state fabrication capabilities for several types of image sensors has advanced to a point, where uncoooled single-photon electronic imaging will soon become a consumer product. This book is giving a specialist´s view from different domains to the forthcoming “single-photon imaging” revolution. The various aspects of single-photon imaging are treated by internati...

  9. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule. PMID:22969345

  10. Single-photon imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, Peter; Theuwissen, Albert J.P.

    2011-01-01

    The acquisition and interpretation of images is a central capability in almost all scientific and technological domains. In particular, the acquisition of electromagnetic radiation, in the form of visible light, UV, infrared, X-ray, etc. is of enormous practical importance. The ultimate sensitivity in electronic imaging is the detection of individual photons. With this book, the first comprehensive review of all aspects of single-photon electronic imaging has been created. Topics include theoretical basics, semiconductor fabrication, single-photon detection principles, imager design and applications of different spectral domains. Today, the solid-state fabrication capabilities for several types of image sensors has advanced to a point, where uncooled single-photon electronic imaging will soon become a consumer product. This book is giving a specialist's view from different domains to the forthcoming ''single-photon imaging'' revolution. The various aspects of single-photon imaging are treated by internationally renowned, leading scientists and technologists who have all pioneered their respective fields. (orig.)

  11. Quantum optics with single quantum dot devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwiller, Valery; Aichele, Thomas; Benson, Oliver

    2004-01-01

    A single radiative transition in a single-quantum emitter results in the emission of a single photon. Single quantum dots are single-quantum emitters with all the requirements to generate single photons at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. It is also possible to generate more than single photons with single quantum dots. In this paper we show that single quantum dots can be used to generate non-classical states of light, from single photons to photon triplets. Advanced solid state structures can be fabricated with single quantum dots as their active region. We also show results obtained on devices based on single quantum dots

  12. Movable collimator for positron annihilation imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.J.

    1982-01-01

    A positron annihilation imaging device has two or more rings of detectors from which three or more slices through the object being scanned can be determined at once. A technique is provided for adjusting the slice widths. One slice may be imaged by all detectors in adjacent planes simultaneously, and reconstructed as if all detectors were in the same plane. The single slice facility is provided without the necessity of rotating the detector array or moving it in any way during data collection, allowing the possibility of doing physiologically gated imaging of a single slice

  13. Nuclear Medicine Imaging Devices. Chapter 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lodge, M. A.; Frey, E. C. [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Imaging forms an important part of nuclear medicine and a number of different imaging devices have been developed. This chapter describes the principles and technological characteristics of the main imaging devices used in nuclear medicine. The two major categories are gamma camera systems and positron emission tomography (PET) systems. The former are used to image γ rays emitted by any nuclide, while the latter exploit the directional correlation between annihilation photons emitted by positron decay. The first section of this chapter discusses the principal components of gamma cameras and how they are used to form 2-D planar images as well as 3-D tomographic images (single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)). The second section describes related instrumentation that has been optimized for PET data acquisition. A major advance in nuclear medicine was achieved with the introduction of multi-modality imaging systems including SPECT/computed tomography (CT) and PET/CT. In these systems, the CT images can be used to provide an anatomical context for the functional nuclear medicine images and allow for attenuation compensation. The third section in this chapter provides a discussion of the principles of these devices.

  14. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2015-11-24

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  15. Device-independent randomness amplification with a single device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plesch, Martin; Pivoluska, Matej

    2014-01-01

    Expansion and amplification of weak randomness with untrusted quantum devices has recently become a very fruitful topic of research. Here we contribute with a procedure for amplifying a single weak random source using tri-partite GHZ-type entangled states. If the quality of the source reaches a fixed threshold R=log 2 ⁡(10), perfect random bits can be produced. This technique can be used to extract randomness from sources that can't be extracted neither classically, nor by existing procedures developed for Santha–Vazirani sources. Our protocol works with a single fault-free device decomposable into three non-communicating parts, that is repeatedly reused throughout the amplification process. - Highlights: • We propose a protocol for device independent randomness amplification. • Our protocol repeatedly re-uses a single device decomposable into three parts. • Weak random sources with min-entropy rate greater than 1/4 log 2 ⁡(10) can be amplified. • Security against all-quantum adversaries is achieved

  16. [Electronic Device for Retinal and Iris Imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drahanský, M; Kolář, R; Mňuk, T

    This paper describes design and construction of a new device for automatic capturing of eye retina and iris. This device has two possible ways of utilization - either for biometric purposes (persons recognition on the base of their eye characteristics) or for medical purposes as supporting diagnostic device. eye retina, eye iris, device, acquisition, image.

  17. Use of mobile devices for medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschorn, David S; Choudhri, Asim F; Shih, George; Kim, Woojin

    2014-12-01

    Mobile devices have fundamentally changed personal computing, with many people forgoing the desktop and even laptop computer altogether in favor of a smaller, lighter, and cheaper device with a touch screen. Doctors and patients are beginning to expect medical images to be available on these devices for consultative viewing, if not actual diagnosis. However, this raises serious concerns with regard to the ability of existing mobile devices and networks to quickly and securely move these images. Medical images often come in large sets, which can bog down a network if not conveyed in an intelligent manner, and downloaded data on a mobile device are highly vulnerable to a breach of patient confidentiality should that device become lost or stolen. Some degree of regulation is needed to ensure that the software used to view these images allows all relevant medical information to be visible and manipulated in a clinically acceptable manner. There also needs to be a quality control mechanism to ensure that a device's display accurately conveys the image content without loss of contrast detail. Furthermore, not all mobile displays are appropriate for all types of images. The smaller displays of smart phones, for example, are not well suited for viewing entire chest radiographs, no matter how small and numerous the pixels of the display may be. All of these factors should be taken into account when deciding where, when, and how to use mobile devices for the display of medical images. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. 21 CFR 892.2040 - Medical image hardcopy device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical image hardcopy device. 892.2040 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2040 Medical image hardcopy device. (a) Identification. A medical image hardcopy device is a device that produces a visible printed record of a medical...

  19. Single ion implantation for single donor devices using Geiger mode detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielejec, E; Seamons, J A; Carroll, M S

    2010-01-01

    Electronic devices that are designed to use the properties of single atoms such as donors or defects have become a reality with recent demonstrations of donor spectroscopy, single photon emission sources, and magnetic imaging using defect centers in diamond. Ion implantation, an industry standard for atom placement in materials, requires augmentation for single ion capability including a method for detecting a single ion arrival. Integrating single ion detection techniques with the single donor device construction region allows single ion arrival to be assured. Improving detector sensitivity is linked to improving control over the straggle of the ion as well as providing more flexibility in lay-out integration with the active region of the single donor device construction zone by allowing ion sensing at potentially greater distances. Using a remotely located passively gated single ion Geiger mode avalanche diode (SIGMA) detector we have demonstrated 100% detection efficiency at a distance of >75 μm from the center of the collecting junction. This detection efficiency is achieved with sensitivity to ∼600 or fewer electron-hole pairs produced by the implanted ion. Ion detectors with this sensitivity and integrated with a thin dielectric, for example a 5 nm gate oxide, using low energy Sb implantation would have an end of range straggle of -1 and 10 -4 for operation temperatures of ∼300 K and ∼77 K, respectively. Low temperature operation and reduced false, 'dark', counts are critical to achieving high confidence in single ion arrival. For the device performance in this work, the confidence is calculated as a probability of >98% for counting one and only one ion for a false count probability of 10 -4 at an average ion number per gated window of 0.015.

  20. A device for multimodal imaging of skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spigulis, Janis; Garancis, Valerijs; Rubins, Uldis; Zaharans, Eriks; Zaharans, Janis; Elste, Liene

    2013-03-01

    A compact prototype device for diagnostic imaging of skin has been developed and tested. Polarized LED light at several spectral regions is used for illumination, and round skin spot of diameter 30mm is imaged by a CMOS sensor via crossoriented polarizing filter. Four consecutive imaging series are performed: (1) RGB image at white LED illumination for revealing subcutaneous structures; (2) four spectral images at narrowband LED illumination (450nm, 540nm, 660nm, 940nm) for mapping of the main skin chromophores; (3) video-imaging under green LED illumination for mapping of skin blood perfusion; (4) autofluorescence video-imaging under UV (365nm) LED irradiation for mapping of the skin fluorophores. Design details of the device as well as preliminary results of clinical tests are presented.

  1. Functionalized Nano-Film Microchannel Plate: A Single High Aspect Ratio Device for High Resolution, Low Noise Astronomical Imaging, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is to apply proven nano-film technology to enable Microchannel plate (MCP) devices to be manufactured on a range of insulating substrates and...

  2. An image scanning device using radiating energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, Daniel.

    1976-01-01

    Said invention relates to an image scanning device using radiating energy. More particularly, it relates to a device for generating a scanning beam of rectangular cross section from a γ or X-ray source. Said invention can be applied to radiographic units of the 'microdose' type used by airline staffs and others for the fast efficient inspection of luggage and parcels in view of detecting hidden things [fr

  3. The Image Transceiver Device: Studies of Improved Physical Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Yitzhak; Efron, Uzi

    2008-07-25

    The Image Transceiver Device (ITD) design is based on combining LCOS micro-display, image processing tools and back illuminated APS imager in single CMOS chip [1]. The device is under development for Head-Mounted Display applications in augmented and virtual reality systems. The main issues with the present design are a high crosstalk of the backside imager and the need to shield the pixel circuitry from the photocharges generated in the silicon substrate. In this publication we present a modified, "deep p-well" ITD pixel design, which provides a significantly reduced crosstalk level, as well as an effective shielding of photo-charges for the pixel circuitry. The simulation performed using Silvaco software [ATLAS Silicon Device Simulator, Ray Trace and Light Absorption programs, Silvaco International, 1998] shows that the new approach provides high photo response and allows increasing the optimal thickness of the die over and above the 10-15 micrometers commonly used for back illuminated imaging devices, thereby improving its mechanical ruggedness following the thinning process and also providing a more efficient absorption of the long wavelength photons. The proposed deep p-well pixel structure is also a technology solution for the fabrication of high performance back illuminated CMOS image sensors.

  4. The Image Transceiver Device: Studies of Improved Physical Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzi Efron

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The Image Transceiver Device (ITD design is based on combining LCOS micro-display, image processing tools and back illuminated APS imager in single CMOS chip [1]. The device is under development for Head-Mounted Display applications in augmented and virtual reality systems. The main issues with the present design are a high crosstalk of the backside imager and the need to shield the pixel circuitry from the photocharges generated in the silicon substrate. In this publication we present a modified, “deep p-well” ITD pixel design, which provides a significantly reduced crosstalk level, as well as an effective shielding of photo-charges for the pixel circuitry. The simulation performed using Silvaco software [ATLAS Silicon Device Simulator, Ray Trace and Light Absorption programs, Silvaco International, 1998] shows that the new approach provides high photo response and allows increasing the optimal thickness of the die over and above the 10-15 micrometers commonly used for back illuminated imaging devices, thereby improving its mechanical ruggedness following the thinning process and also providing a more efficient absorption of the long wavelength photons. The proposed deep p-well pixel structure is also a technology solution for the fabrication of high performance back illuminated CMOS image sensors.

  5. Single-cell magnetic imaging using a quantum diamond microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, D R; Lee, K; Park, H; Weissleder, R; Yacoby, A; Lukin, M D; Lee, H; Walsworth, R L; Connolly, C B

    2015-08-01

    We apply a quantum diamond microscope for detection and imaging of immunomagnetically labeled cells. This instrument uses nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond for correlated magnetic and fluorescence imaging. Our device provides single-cell resolution and a field of view (∼1 mm(2)) two orders of magnitude larger than that of previous NV imaging technologies, enabling practical applications. To illustrate, we quantified cancer biomarkers expressed by rare tumor cells in a large population of healthy cells.

  6. Molecular electronics with single molecules in solid-state devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The ultimate aim of molecular electronics is to understand and master single-molecule devices. Based on the latest results on electron transport in single molecules in solid-state devices, we focus here on new insights into the influence of metal electrodes on the energy spectrum of the molecule...

  7. SINGLE-FACED GRAYQB{trademark} - A RADIATION MAPPING DEVICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, J.; Farfan, E.; Immel, D.; Phillips, M.; Bobbitt, J.; Plummer, J.

    2013-12-12

    GrayQb{trademark} is a novel technology that has the potential to characterize radioactively contaminated areas such as hot cells, gloveboxes, small and large rooms, hallways, and waste tanks. The goal of GrayQb{trademark} is to speed the process of decontaminating these areas, which reduces worker exposures and promotes ALARA considerations. The device employs Phosphorous Storage Plate (PSP) technology as its primary detector material. PSPs, commonly used for medical applications and non-destructive testing, can be read using a commercially available scanner. The goal of GrayQb{trademark} technology is to locate, quantify, and identify the sources of contamination. The purpose of the work documented in this report was to better characterize the performance of GrayQb{trademark} in its ability to present overlay images of the PSP image and the associated visual image of the location being surveyed. The results presented in this report are overlay images identifying the location of hot spots in both controlled and field environments. The GrayQb{trademark} technology has been mainly tested in a controlled environment with known distances and source characteristics such as specific known radionuclides, dose rates, and strength. The original concept for the GrayQb{trademark} device involved utilizing the six faces of a cube configuration and was designed to be positioned in the center of a contaminated area for 3D mapping. A smaller single-faced GrayQb{trademark}, dubbed GrayQb SF, was designed for the purpose of conducting the characterization testing documented in this report. This lighter 2D version is ideal for applications where entry ports are too small for a deployment of the original GrayQb™ version or where only a single surface is of interest. The shape, size, and weight of these two designs have been carefully modeled to account for most limitations encountered in hot cells, gloveboxes, and contaminated areas. GrayQb{trademark} and GrayQb{trademark} SF

  8. Real-time computer treatment of THz passive device images with the high image quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate real-time computer code improving significantly the quality of images captured by the passive THz imaging system. The code is not only designed for a THz passive device: it can be applied to any kind of such devices and active THz imaging systems as well. We applied our code for computer processing of images captured by four passive THz imaging devices manufactured by different companies. It should be stressed that computer processing of images produced by different companies requires using the different spatial filters usually. The performance of current version of the computer code is greater than one image per second for a THz image having more than 5000 pixels and 24 bit number representation. Processing of THz single image produces about 20 images simultaneously corresponding to various spatial filters. The computer code allows increasing the number of pixels for processed images without noticeable reduction of image quality. The performance of the computer code can be increased many times using parallel algorithms for processing the image. We develop original spatial filters which allow one to see objects with sizes less than 2 cm. The imagery is produced by passive THz imaging devices which captured the images of objects hidden under opaque clothes. For images with high noise we develop an approach which results in suppression of the noise after using the computer processing and we obtain the good quality image. With the aim of illustrating the efficiency of the developed approach we demonstrate the detection of the liquid explosive, ordinary explosive, knife, pistol, metal plate, CD, ceramics, chocolate and other objects hidden under opaque clothes. The results demonstrate the high efficiency of our approach for the detection of hidden objects and they are a very promising solution for the security problem.

  9. Metrological characterization of 3D imaging devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, G.

    2013-04-01

    Manufacturers often express the performance of a 3D imaging device in various non-uniform ways for the lack of internationally recognized standard requirements for metrological parameters able to identify the capability of capturing a real scene. For this reason several national and international organizations in the last ten years have been developing protocols for verifying such performance. Ranging from VDI/VDE 2634, published by the Association of German Engineers and oriented to the world of mechanical 3D measurements (triangulation-based devices), to the ASTM technical committee E57, working also on laser systems based on direct range detection (TOF, Phase Shift, FM-CW, flash LADAR), this paper shows the state of the art about the characterization of active range devices, with special emphasis on measurement uncertainty, accuracy and resolution. Most of these protocols are based on special objects whose shape and size are certified with a known level of accuracy. By capturing the 3D shape of such objects with a range device, a comparison between the measured points and the theoretical shape they should represent is possible. The actual deviations can be directly analyzed or some derived parameters can be obtained (e.g. angles between planes, distances between barycenters of spheres rigidly connected, frequency domain parameters, etc.). This paper shows theoretical aspects and experimental results of some novel characterization methods applied to different categories of active 3D imaging devices based on both principles of triangulation and direct range detection.

  10. Positron annihilation imaging device having movable collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    This patent application relates to a positron annihilation imaging device comprising two circular arrays of detectors disposed in spaced apart parallel planes and circumferentially offset by half the detector spacing, axially movable annular outer collimator rings, generally disposed in a pair of opposite planes outside the associated planes of the detectors, each collimator being movable toward the opposite collimator. An inner collimator of annular configuration is disposed between the two rows of detectors and is formed in two rings which may be separated axially. The outer and inner collimators serve to enhance data readout and imaging. (author)

  11. Movable collimator for positron annihilation imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    A positron annihilation imaging device having two circular arrays of detectors disposed in spaced apart parallel planes wherein axially movable annular collimator rings are generally disposed in a pair of opposite planes outside the associated planes of the collimators to each collimator being movable toward the opposite collimator and a central collimator of annular configuration generally disposed between the two rows of detectors but being split into two rings which may be separated, the outer and inner collimators serving to enhance data readout and imaging

  12. Image Quality Characteristics of Handheld Display Devices for Medical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Asumi; Liu, Peter; Cheng, Wei-Chung; Badano, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Handheld devices such as mobile phones and tablet computers have become widespread with thousands of available software applications. Recently, handhelds are being proposed as part of medical imaging solutions, especially in emergency medicine, where immediate consultation is required. However, handheld devices differ significantly from medical workstation displays in terms of display characteristics. Moreover, the characteristics vary significantly among device types. We investigate the image quality characteristics of various handheld devices with respect to luminance response, spatial resolution, spatial noise, and reflectance. We show that the luminance characteristics of the handheld displays are different from those of workstation displays complying with grayscale standard target response suggesting that luminance calibration might be needed. Our results also demonstrate that the spatial characteristics of handhelds can surpass those of medical workstation displays particularly for recent generation devices. While a 5 mega-pixel monochrome workstation display has horizontal and vertical modulation transfer factors of 0.52 and 0.47 at the Nyquist frequency, the handheld displays released after 2011 can have values higher than 0.63 at the respective Nyquist frequencies. The noise power spectra for workstation displays are higher than 1.2×10−5 mm2 at 1 mm−1, while handheld displays have values lower than 3.7×10−6 mm2. Reflectance measurements on some of the handheld displays are consistent with measurements for workstation displays with, in some cases, low specular and diffuse reflectance coefficients. The variability of the characterization results among devices due to the different technological features indicates that image quality varies greatly among handheld display devices. PMID:24236113

  13. Transport mirages in single-molecule devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudenzi, R.; Misiorny, M.; Burzurí, E.; Wegewijs, M. R.; van der Zant, H. S. J.

    2017-03-01

    Molecular systems can exhibit a complex, chemically tailorable inner structure which allows for targeting of specific mechanical, electronic, and optical properties. At the single-molecule level, two major complementary ways to explore these properties are molecular quantum-dot structures and scanning probes. This article outlines comprehensive principles of electron-transport spectroscopy relevant to both these approaches and presents a new, high-resolution experiment on a high-spin single-molecule junction exemplifying these principles. Such spectroscopy plays a key role in further advancing our understanding of molecular and atomic systems, in particular, the relaxation of their spin. In this joint experimental and theoretical analysis, particular focus is put on the crossover between the resonant regime [single-electron tunneling] and the off-resonant regime [inelastic electron (co)tunneling spectroscopy (IETS)]. We show that the interplay of these two processes leads to unexpected mirages of resonances not captured by either of the two pictures alone. Although this turns out to be important in a large fraction of the possible regimes of level positions and bias voltages, it has been given little attention in molecular transport studies. Combined with nonequilibrium IETS—four-electron pump-probe excitations—these mirages provide crucial information on the relaxation of spin excitations. Our encompassing physical picture is supported by a master-equation approach that goes beyond weak coupling. The present work encourages the development of a broader connection between the fields of molecular quantum-dot and scanning probe spectroscopy.

  14. Single-Event Effects in Silicon Carbide Power Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan C.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Ikpe, Stanley; Topper, Alyson D.; Wilcox, Edward P.; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony M.

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging Program Silicon Carbide Power Device Subtask efforts in FY15. Benefits of SiC are described and example NASA Programs and Projects desiring this technology are given. The current status of the radiation tolerance of silicon carbide power devices is given and paths forward in the effort to develop heavy-ion single-event effect hardened devices indicated.

  15. Image reconstruction of dynamic infrared single-pixel imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Qi; Jiang, Yilin; Wang, Haiyan; Guo, Limin

    2018-03-01

    Single-pixel imaging technique has recently received much attention. Most of the current single-pixel imaging is aimed at relatively static targets or the imaging system is fixed, which is limited by the number of measurements received through the single detector. In this paper, we proposed a novel dynamic compressive imaging method to solve the imaging problem, where exists imaging system motion behavior, for the infrared (IR) rosette scanning system. The relationship between adjacent target images and scene is analyzed under different system movement scenarios. These relationships are used to build dynamic compressive imaging models. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method can improve the reconstruction quality of IR image and enhance the contrast between the target and the background in the presence of system movement.

  16. Scaling of ion implanted Si:P single electron devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escott, C C; Hudson, F E; Chan, V C; Petersson, K D; Clark, R G; Dzurak, A S

    2007-01-01

    We present a modelling study on the scaling prospects for phosphorus in silicon (Si:P) single electron devices using readily available commercial and free-to-use software. The devices comprise phosphorus ion implanted, metallically doped (n + ) dots (size range 50-500 nm) with source and drain reservoirs. Modelling results are compared to measurements on fabricated devices and discussed in the context of scaling down to few-electron structures. Given current fabrication constraints, we find that devices with 70-75 donors per dot should be realizable. We comment on methods for further reducing this number

  17. Device simulation of charge collection and single-event upset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, P.E.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper the author reviews the current status of device simulation of ionizing-radiation-induced charge collection and single-event upset (SEU), with an emphasis on significant results of recent years. The author presents an overview of device-modeling techniques applicable to the SEU problem and the unique challenges this task presents to the device modeler. He examines unloaded simulations of radiation-induced charge collection in simple p/n diodes, SEU in dynamic random access memories (DRAM's), and SEU in static random access memories (SRAM's). The author concludes with a few thoughts on future issues likely to confront the SEU device modeler

  18. Spiking neuron devices consisting of single-flux-quantum circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Tetsuya; Asai, Tetsuya; Amemiya, Yoshihito

    2006-01-01

    Single-flux-quantum (SFQ) circuits can be used for making spiking neuron devices, which are useful elements for constructing intelligent, brain-like computers. The device we propose is based on the leaky integrate-and-fire neuron (IFN) model and uses a SFQ pulse as an action signal or a spike of neurons. The operation of the neuron device is confirmed by computer simulator. It can operate with a short delay of 100 ps or less and is the highest-speed neuron device ever reported

  19. Scaling of ion implanted Si:P single electron devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escott, C C [Centre for Quantum Computer Technology, School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, UNSW, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Hudson, F E [Centre for Quantum Computer Technology, School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, UNSW, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Chan, V C [Centre for Quantum Computer Technology, School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, UNSW, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Petersson, K D [Centre for Quantum Computer Technology, School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, UNSW, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Clark, R G [Centre for Quantum Computer Technology, School of Physics, UNSW, Sydney, 2052 (Australia); Dzurak, A S [Centre for Quantum Computer Technology, School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, UNSW, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2007-06-13

    We present a modelling study on the scaling prospects for phosphorus in silicon (Si:P) single electron devices using readily available commercial and free-to-use software. The devices comprise phosphorus ion implanted, metallically doped (n{sup +}) dots (size range 50-500 nm) with source and drain reservoirs. Modelling results are compared to measurements on fabricated devices and discussed in the context of scaling down to few-electron structures. Given current fabrication constraints, we find that devices with 70-75 donors per dot should be realizable. We comment on methods for further reducing this number.

  20. Macroscopic charge quantization in single-electron devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burmistrov, I.S.; Pruisken, A.M.M.

    2010-01-01

    In a recent paper by the authors [I. S. Burmistrov and A. M. M. Pruisken, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 056801 (2008)] it was shown that single-electron devices (single-electron transistor or SET) display "macroscopic charge quantization" which is completely analogous to the quantum Hall effect observed on

  1. Microwave impedance imaging on semiconductor memory devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundhikanjana, Worasom; Lai, Keji; Yang, Yongliang; Kelly, Michael; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2011-03-01

    Microwave impedance microscopy (MIM) maps out the real and imaginary components of the tip-sample impedance, from which the local conductivity and dielectric constant distribution can be derived. The stray field contribution is minimized in our shielded cantilever design, enabling quantitative analysis of nano-materials and device structures. We demonstrate here that the MIM can spatially resolve the conductivity variation in a dynamic random access memory (DRAM) sample. With DC or low-frequency AC bias applied to the tip, contrast between n-doped and p-doped regions in the dC/dV images is observed, and p-n junctions are highlighted in the dR/dV images. The results can be directly compared with data taken by scanning capacitance microscope (SCM), which uses unshielded cantilevers and resonant electronics, and the MIM reveals more information of the local dopant concentration than SCM.

  2. Towards sustainable design for single-use medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Jacob J; Hitchcock, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    Despite their sophistication and value, single-use medical devices have become commodity items in the developed world. Cheap raw materials along with large scale manufacturing and distribution processes have combined to make many medical devices more expensive to resterilize, package and restock than to simply discard. This practice is not sustainable or scalable on a global basis. As the petrochemicals that provide raw materials become more expensive and the global reach of these devices continues into rapidly developing economies, there is a need for device designs that take into account the total life-cycle of these products, minimize the amount of non-renewable materials consumed and consider alternative hybrid reusable / disposable approaches. In this paper, we describe a methodology to perform life cycle and functional analyses to create additional design requirements for medical devices. These types of sustainable approaches can move the medical device industry even closer to the "triple bottom line"--people, planet, profit.

  3. Quality assurance for electronic portal imaging devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalev, S.; Rajapakshe, R.; Gluhchev, G.; Luchka, K.

    1997-01-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDS) are assuming an ever-increasing role in the verification of radiation treatment accuracy. They are used both in a passive capacity, for the determination of field displacement distributions (''setup errors''), and also in an active role whereby the patient setup is corrected on the basis of electronic portal images. In spite of their potential impact on the precision of patient treatment, there are few quality assurance procedures available, and most of the EPIDS in clinical use are subject, at best, to only perfunctory quality assurance. The goals of this work are (a) to develop an objective and reproducible test for EPID image quality on the factory floor and during installation of the EPID on site; (b) to provide the user with a simple and accurate tool for acceptance, commissioning, and routine quality control; and (c) to initiate regional, national and international collaboration in the implementation of standardized, objective, and automated quality assurance procedures. To this end we have developed an automated test in which a simple test object is imaged daily, and the spatial and contrast resolution of the EPID are automatically evaluated in terms of ''acceptable'', ''warning'' and ''stop'' criteria. Our experience over two years shows the test to be highly sensitive, reproducible, and inexpensive in time and effort. Inter-institutional trials are under way in Canada, US and Europe which indicate large variations in EPID image quality from one EPID to another, and from one center to another. We expect the new standardized quality assurance procedure to lead to improved, and consistent image quality, increased operator acceptance of the technology, and agreement on uniform standards by equipment suppliers and health care agencies. (author)

  4. Electrochemically-gated single-molecule electrical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Shaoyin; Artés, Juan Manuel; Díez-Pérez, Ismael

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, single-molecule electrical contacts have emerged as a new experimental platform that allows exploring charge transport phenomena in individual molecular blocks. This novel tool has evolved into an essential element within the Molecular Electronics field to understand charge transport processes in hybrid (bio)molecule/electrode interfaces at the nanoscale, and prospect the implementation of active molecular components into functional nanoscale optoelectronic devices. Within this area, three-terminal single-molecule devices have been sought, provided that they are highly desired to achieve full functionality in logic electronic circuits. Despite the latest experimental developments offer consistent methods to bridge a molecule between two electrodes (source and drain in a transistor notation), placing a third electrode (gate) close to the single-molecule electrical contact is still technically challenging. In this vein, electrochemically-gated single-molecule devices have emerged as an experimentally affordable alternative to overcome these technical limitations. In this review, the operating principle of an electrochemically-gated single-molecule device is presented together with the latest experimental methodologies to built them and characterize their charge transport characteristics. Then, an up-to-date comprehensive overview of the most prominent examples will be given, emphasizing on the relationship between the molecular structure and the final device electrical behaviour

  5. Organic photovoltaic devices with a single layer geometry (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesov, Vladimir A.; Fuentes-Hernandez, Canek; Aizawa, Naoya; Larrain, Felipe A.; Chou, Wen-Fang; Perrotta, Alberto; Graham, Samuel; Kippelen, Bernard

    2016-09-01

    Organic photovoltaics (OPV) can lead to a low cost and short energy payback time alternative to existing photovoltaic technologies. However, to fulfill this promise, power conversion efficiencies must be improved and simultaneously the architecture of the devices and their processing steps need to be further simplified. In the most efficient devices to date, the functions of photocurrent generation, and hole/electron collection are achieved in different layers adding complexity to the device fabrication. In this talk, we present a novel approach that yields devices in which all these functions are combined in a single layer. Specifically, we report on bulk heterojunction devices in which amine-containing polymers are first mixed in the solution together with the donor and acceptor materials that form the active layer. A single-layer coating yields a self-forming bottom electron-collection layer comprised of the amine-containing polymer (e.g. PEIE). Hole-collection is achieved by subsequent immersion of this single layer in a solution of a polyoxometalate (e.g. phosphomolybdic acid (PMA)) leading to an electrically p-doped region formed by the diffusion of the dopant molecules into the bulk. The depth of this doped region can be controlled with values up to tens of nm by varying the immersion time. Devices with a single 500 nm-thick active layer of P3HT:ICBA processed using this method yield power conversion efficiency (PCE) values of 4.8 ± 0.3% at 1 sun and demonstrate a performance level superior to that of benchmark three-layer devices with separate layers of PEIE/P3HT:ICBA/MoOx (4.1 ± 0.4%). Devices remain stable after shelf lifetime experiments carried-out at 60 °C over 280 h.

  6. Molecular electronics with single molecules in solid-state devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-09-01

    The ultimate aim of molecular electronics is to understand and master single-molecule devices. Based on the latest results on electron transport in single molecules in solid-state devices, we focus here on new insights into the influence of metal electrodes on the energy spectrum of the molecule, and on how the electron transport properties of the molecule depend on the strength of the electronic coupling between it and the electrodes. A variety of phenomena are observed depending on whether this coupling is weak, intermediate or strong.

  7. Automated imaging system for single molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, David Charles; Runnheim, Rodney; Forrest, Daniel

    2012-09-18

    There is provided a high throughput automated single molecule image collection and processing system that requires minimal initial user input. The unique features embodied in the present disclosure allow automated collection and initial processing of optical images of single molecules and their assemblies. Correct focus may be automatically maintained while images are collected. Uneven illumination in fluorescence microscopy is accounted for, and an overall robust imaging operation is provided yielding individual images prepared for further processing in external systems. Embodiments described herein are useful in studies of any macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, peptides and proteins. The automated image collection and processing system and method of same may be implemented and deployed over a computer network, and may be ergonomically optimized to facilitate user interaction.

  8. Tiny Devices Project Sharp, Colorful Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Displaytech Inc., based in Longmont, Colorado and recently acquired by Micron Technology Inc. of Boise, Idaho, first received a Small Business Innovation Research contract in 1993 from Johnson Space Center to develop tiny, electronic, color displays, called microdisplays. Displaytech has since sold over 20 million microdisplays and was ranked one of the fastest growing technology companies by Deloitte and Touche in 2005. Customers currently incorporate the microdisplays in tiny pico-projectors, which weigh only a few ounces and attach to media players, cell phones, and other devices. The projectors can convert a digital image from the typical postage stamp size into a bright, clear, four-foot projection. The company believes sales of this type of pico-projector may exceed $1.1 billion within 5 years.

  9. Ghost imaging with a single detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromberg, Yaron; Katz, Ori; Silberberg, Yaron

    2009-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate pseudothermal ghost imaging and ghost diffraction using only a single detector. We achieve this by replacing the high-resolution detector of the reference beam with a computation of the propagating field, following a recent proposal by Shapiro [Phys. Rev. A 78, 061802(R) (2008)]. Since only a single detector is used, this provides experimental evidence that pseudothermal ghost imaging does not rely on nonlocal quantum correlations. In addition, we show the depth-resolving capability of this ghost imaging technique.

  10. Automation of a single-DNA molecule stretching device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kristian Tølbøl; Lopacinska, Joanna M.; Tommerup, Niels

    2015-01-01

    We automate the manipulation of genomic-length DNA in a nanofluidic device based on real-time analysis of fluorescence images. In our protocol, individual molecules are picked from a microchannel and stretched with pN forces using pressure driven flows. The millimeter-long DNA fragments free...

  11. Multimodality imaging of the Essure tubal occlusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, W.L.; Beitia, L.

    2012-01-01

    The Essure device is a permanent birth-control device, which is gaining popularity. The micro-inserts are composed of metallic elements that can be seen on radiography, computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging. Knowledge of the normal location and appearance of the Essure device will ensure appropriate patient care. The purpose of this review is to describe the Essure tubal occlusion device and illustrate its normal and abnormal appearance using various imaging methods.

  12. Single Event Effects in FPGA Devices 2015-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Melanie; LaBel, Kenneth; Pellish, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of single event effects in FPGA devices 2015-2016 including commercial Xilinx V5 heavy ion accelerated testing, Xilinx Kintex-7 heavy ion accelerated testing, mitigation study, and investigation of various types of triple modular redundancy (TMR) for commercial SRAM based FPGAs.

  13. Architectures for single-chip image computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gove, Robert J.

    1992-04-01

    This paper will focus on the architectures of VLSI programmable processing components for image computing applications. TI, the maker of industry-leading RISC, DSP, and graphics components, has developed an architecture for a new-generation of image processors capable of implementing a plurality of image, graphics, video, and audio computing functions. We will show that the use of a single-chip heterogeneous MIMD parallel architecture best suits this class of processors--those which will dominate the desktop multimedia, document imaging, computer graphics, and visualization systems of this decade.

  14. Electric field imaging of single atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Naoya; Seki, Takehito; Sánchez-Santolino, Gabriel; Findlay, Scott D.; Kohno, Yuji; Matsumoto, Takao; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    In scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), single atoms can be imaged by detecting electrons scattered through high angles using post-specimen, annular-type detectors. Recently, it has been shown that the atomic-scale electric field of both the positive atomic nuclei and the surrounding negative electrons within crystalline materials can be probed by atomic-resolution differential phase contrast STEM. Here we demonstrate the real-space imaging of the (projected) atomic electric field distribution inside single Au atoms, using sub-Å spatial resolution STEM combined with a high-speed segmented detector. We directly visualize that the electric field distribution (blurred by the sub-Å size electron probe) drastically changes within the single Au atom in a shape that relates to the spatial variation of total charge density within the atom. Atomic-resolution electric field mapping with single-atom sensitivity enables us to examine their detailed internal and boundary structures. PMID:28555629

  15. Fast Fiber-Coupled Imaging Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockington, Samuel; Case, Andrew; Witherspoon, Franklin

    2018-04-22

    metal pillars in the path of the plasma jets were recorded in a single shot. This new fast imaging system is an attractive alternative to conventional fast framing cameras for applications and experiments where imaging events using existing techniques are inefficient or impossible. The development of HyperV's new diagnostic was split into two tracks: a next generation camera track, in which HyperV built, tested, and demonstrated a prototype 1024 channel camera at its own facility, and a second plasma community beta test track, where selected plasma physics programs received small systems of a few test pixels to evaluate the expected performance of a full scale camera on their experiments. These evaluations were performed as part of an unfunded collaboration with researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of California at Davis. Results from the prototype 1024-pixel camera are discussed, as well as results from the collaborations with test pixel system deployment sites.

  16. Dual isotope, single acquisition parathyroid imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triantafillou, M.; McDonald, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear Medicine parathyroid imaging using Thallium-201(TI) and Technetium-99m(Tc) is an often used imaging modality for the detection of parathyroid adenomas and hyper parathyroidism. The conventional Tl/Tc subtraction technique requires 2 separate injections and acquisitions which are then normalised and subtracted from each other. This lengthy technique is uncomfortable for patients and can result in false positive scan results due to patient movement between and during the acquisition process. We propose a simplified injection and single acquisition technique, that reduces the chance of movement and thus reduces the chance of false positive scan results. The technique involves the injection of Tc followed by the Tl injection 10 minutes later. After a further 10 min wait, imaging is performed using a dual isotope acquisition, with window (W) 1 set on 140 keV 20%W 5% off peak and W2 peaked for 70 keV 20%W., acquired for 10 minutes. We have imaged 27 patients with this technique, 15 had positive parathyroid imaging. Of the 15, 11 had positive ultrasound correlation. Of the remaining 4, 2 have had positive surgical findings for adenomas, the other 2 are awaiting follow-up. Of the 12 patients with negative parathyroid imaging, 2 have been shown to be false - negative with surgery. In conclusion, the single acquisition technique suggested by us is a valid method of imaging parathyroids that reduces the chance of false positive results due to movement

  17. CMOS-compatible photonic devices for single-photon generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong Chunle

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sources of single photons are one of the key building blocks for quantum photonic technologies such as quantum secure communication and powerful quantum computing. To bring the proof-of-principle demonstration of these technologies from the laboratory to the real world, complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS-compatible photonic chips are highly desirable for photon generation, manipulation, processing and even detection because of their compactness, scalability, robustness, and the potential for integration with electronics. In this paper, we review the development of photonic devices made from materials (e.g., silicon and processes that are compatible with CMOS fabrication facilities for the generation of single photons.

  18. Graphene metamaterial spatial light modulator for infrared single pixel imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Kebin; Suen, Jonathan Y; Padilla, Willie J

    2017-10-16

    High-resolution and hyperspectral imaging has long been a goal for multi-dimensional data fusion sensing applications - of interest for autonomous vehicles and environmental monitoring. In the long wave infrared regime this quest has been impeded by size, weight, power, and cost issues, especially as focal-plane array detector sizes increase. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrated a new approach based on a metamaterial graphene spatial light modulator (GSLM) for infrared single pixel imaging. A frequency-division multiplexing (FDM) imaging technique is designed and implemented, and relies entirely on the electronic reconfigurability of the GSLM. We compare our approach to the more common raster-scan method and directly show FDM image frame rates can be 64 times faster with no degradation of image quality. Our device and related imaging architecture are not restricted to the infrared regime, and may be scaled to other bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. The study presented here opens a new approach for fast and efficient single pixel imaging utilizing graphene metamaterials with novel acquisition strategies.

  19. Development of a human body RMN imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint-Jalmes, H.

    1984-03-01

    Imaging device for human body is studied in this thesis. The section images presented are got by a projection-reconstruction method associated to a section plane selection by an oscillating gradient application. Different stages of the machine development are presented: - design and calculation of a resistive magnet for very homogeneous field imaging - design of gradient coils for imaging magnets - realization of control and acquisition interfaces - realization of imaging software in real time [fr

  20. Multimodality imaging of the Essure tubal occlusion device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, W L; Beitia, L

    2012-12-01

    The Essure device is a permanent birth-control device, which is gaining popularity. The micro-inserts are composed of metallic elements that can be seen on radiography, computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging. Knowledge of the normal location and appearance of the Essure device will ensure appropriate patient care. The purpose of this review is to describe the Essure tubal occlusion device and illustrate its normal and abnormal appearance using various imaging methods. Copyright © 2012 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Spin thermoelectric effects in organic single-molecule devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.L.; Wang, M.X.; Qian, C.; Hong, X.K.; Zhang, D.B.; Liu, Y.S.; Yang, X.F., E-mail: xfyang@cslg.edu.cn

    2017-05-25

    Highlights: • A stronger spin thermoelectric performance in a polyacetylene device is observed. • For the antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering, a transport gap is opened. Thus the thermoelectric effects are largely enhanced. - Abstract: The spin thermoelectric performance of a polyacetylene chain bridging two zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) is investigated based on first principles method. Two different edge spin arrangements in ZGNRs are considered. For ferromagnetic (FM) ordering, transmission eigenstates with different spin indices distributed below and above Fermi level are observed, leading directly to a strong spin thermoelectric effect in a wide temperature range. With the edge spins arranged in the antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering, an obvious transport gap appears in the system, which greatly enhances the thermoelectric effects. The presence of a small spin splitting also induces a spin thermoelectric effect greater than the charge thermoelectric effect in certain temperature range. In general, the single-molecule junction exhibits the potential to be used for the design of perfect thermospin devices.

  2. Transumbilical laparoendoscopic single-site donor nephrectomy: Without the use of a single port access device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Dubey

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions : Transumbilical LESS-DN can be cost-effectively performed using conventional laparoscopy instruments and without the need for a single port access device. Warm ischemia times with this technique are comparable with that during conventional multiport laparoscopic donor nephrectomy.

  3. Fast Fourier single-pixel imaging via binary illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zibang; Wang, Xueying; Zheng, Guoan; Zhong, Jingang

    2017-09-20

    Fourier single-pixel imaging (FSI) employs Fourier basis patterns for encoding spatial information and is capable of reconstructing high-quality two-dimensional and three-dimensional images. Fourier-domain sparsity in natural scenes allows FSI to recover sharp images from undersampled data. The original FSI demonstration, however, requires grayscale Fourier basis patterns for illumination. This requirement imposes a limitation on the imaging speed as digital micro-mirror devices (DMDs) generate grayscale patterns at a low refreshing rate. In this paper, we report a new strategy to increase the speed of FSI by two orders of magnitude. In this strategy, we binarize the Fourier basis patterns based on upsampling and error diffusion dithering. We demonstrate a 20,000 Hz projection rate using a DMD and capture 256-by-256-pixel dynamic scenes at a speed of 10 frames per second. The reported technique substantially accelerates image acquisition speed of FSI. It may find broad imaging applications at wavebands that are not accessible using conventional two-dimensional image sensors.

  4. Devices for Evaluating Imaging Systems. Chapter 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirkaya, O.; Al-Mazrou, R. [Department of Biomedical Physics, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-12-15

    A quality management system (QMS) has three main components: (a) Quality assurance (QA); (b) Quality improvement; (c) Quality control (QC). The aim of a QMS is to ensure that the deliverables meet the requirements set forth by the users. The deliverables can be, in general, all the services provided in a nuclear medicine department, and the diagnostic imaging services in particular. In this section, the primary focus is the diagnostic imaging equipment and images produced by them.

  5. Images of interlayer Josephson vortices in single-layer cuprates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moler, K. A.; Kirtley, J. R.; Liang, R.; Bonn, D. A.; Hardy, W. N.; Williams, J. M.; Schlueter, J. A.; Hinks, D.; Villard, G.; Maignan, A.; Nohara, M.; Takagi, H.

    2000-01-01

    The interlayer penetration depth in layered superconductors may be determined from scanning Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) microscope images of interlayer Josephson vortices. The authors compare their findings at 4 K for single crystals of the organic superconductor κ-(BEDT-TTF) 2 Cu(NCS) 2 and three near-optimally doped cuprate superconductors: La 2-x Sr x CuO 4 , (Hg, Cu)Ba 2 CuO 4+δ , and Tl 2 Ba 2 CuO 6+δ

  6. A quantitative image quality comparison of four different image guided radiotherapy devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuetzel, Julia; Oelfke, Uwe; Nill, Simeon

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: A study to quantitatively compare the image quality of four different image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) devices based on phantom measurements with respect to the additional dose delivered to the patient. Methods: Images of three different head-sized phantoms (diameter 16-18 cm) were acquired with the following four IGRT-CT solutions: (i) the Siemens Primatom single slice fan beam computed tomography (CT) scanner with an acceleration voltage of 130 kV, (ii) a Tomotherapy HI-ART II unit using a fan beam scanner with an energy of 3.5 MeV and (iii) the Siemens Artiste prototype, providing the possibility to perform kV (121 kV) and MV (6 MV) cone beam (CB) CTs. For each device three scan protocols (named low, normal, high) were selected to yield the same weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDI w ). Based on the individual inserts of the different phantoms the image quality achieved with each device at a certain dose level was characterized in terms of homogeneity, spatial resolution, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and electron density-to-CT-number conversion. Results: Based on the current findings for head-sized phantoms all devices show an electron density-to-CT-number conversion almost independent of the imaging parameters and hence can be suited for treatment planning purposes. The evaluation of the image quality, however, points out clear differences due to the different energies and geometries. The Primatom standard CT scanner shows throughout the best performance, especially for soft tissue contrast and spatial resolution with low imaging doses. Reasonable soft tissue contrast can be obtained with slightly higher doses compared to the CT scanner with the kVCB and the Tomotherapy unit. In order to get similar results with the MVCB system a much higher dose needs to be applied to the patient. Conclusion: Considering the entire investigations, especially in terms of contrast and spatial resolution, a rough tendency for

  7. 21 CFR 892.2010 - Medical image storage device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical image storage device. 892.2010 Section 892.2010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED..., and digital memory. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  8. Single-Shot MR Spectroscopic Imaging with Partial Parallel Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posse, Stefan; Otazo, Ricardo; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Yoshimoto, Akio Ernesto; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2010-01-01

    An MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) pulse sequence based on Proton-Echo-Planar-Spectroscopic-Imaging (PEPSI) is introduced that measures 2-dimensional metabolite maps in a single excitation. Echo-planar spatial-spectral encoding was combined with interleaved phase encoding and parallel imaging using SENSE to reconstruct absorption mode spectra. The symmetrical k-space trajectory compensates phase errors due to convolution of spatial and spectral encoding. Single-shot MRSI at short TE was evaluated in phantoms and in vivo on a 3 T whole body scanner equipped with 12-channel array coil. Four-step interleaved phase encoding and 4-fold SENSE acceleration were used to encode a 16×16 spatial matrix with 390 Hz spectral width. Comparison with conventional PEPSI and PEPSI with 4-fold SENSE acceleration demonstrated comparable sensitivity per unit time when taking into account g-factor related noise increases and differences in sampling efficiency. LCModel fitting enabled quantification of Inositol, Choline, Creatine and NAA in vivo with concentration values in the ranges measured with conventional PEPSI and SENSE-accelerated PEPSI. Cramer-Rao lower bounds were comparable to those obtained with conventional SENSE-accelerated PEPSI at the same voxel size and measurement time. This single-shot MRSI method is therefore suitable for applications that require high temporal resolution to monitor temporal dynamics or to reduce sensitivity to tissue movement. PMID:19097245

  9. Dual-mode optical microscope based on single-pixel imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Jiménez, Angel David; Clemente Pesudo, Pedro Javier; Tajahuerce, Enrique; Lancis Sáez, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate an inverted microscope that can image specimens in both reflection and transmission modes simultaneously with a single light source. The microscope utilizes a digital micromirror device (DMD) for patterned illumination altogether with two single-pixel photosensors for efficient light detection. The system, a scan-less device with no moving parts, works by sequential projection of a set of binary intensity patterns onto the sample that are codified onto a modified commercial DMD...

  10. Chiral multichromic single crystals for optical devices (LDRD 99406).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, Richard Alan; Felix, Ana M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-12-01

    This report summarizes our findings during the study of a novel system that yields multi-colored materials as products. This system is quite unusual as it leads to multi-chromic behavior in single crystals, where one would expect that only a single color would exist. We have speculated that these novel solids might play a role in materials applications such as non-linear optics, liquid crystal displays, piezoelectric devices, and other similar applications. The system examined consisted of a main-group alkyl compound (a p block element such as gallium or aluminum) complexed with various organic di-imines. The di-imines had substituents of two types--either alkyl or aromatic groups attached to the nitrogen atoms. We observed that single crystals, characterized by X-ray crystallography, were obtained in most cases. Our research during January-July, 2006, was geared towards understanding the factors leading to the multi-chromic nature of the complexes. The main possibilities put forth initially considered (a) the chiral nature of the main group metal, (b) possible reduction of the metal to a lower-valent, radical state, (c) the nature of the ligand(s) attached to the main group metal, and (d) possible degradation products of the ligand leading to highly-colored products. The work carried out indicates that the most likely explanation considered involves degradation of the aromatic ligands (a combination of (c) and (d)), as the experiments performed can clearly rule out (a) and (b).

  11. Single photon imaging. New instrumentation and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehllehner, G.; Colsher, J.

    1981-01-01

    The performance of Anger scintillation cameras continues to be enhanced through a series of small improvements which result in significantly better imaging characteristics. The most recent changes in camera design consist of: (1) the introduction of photomultipliers with better photocathode and electron collection efficiencies, (2) the use of thinner (3/8 or 1/4 in) crystals giving slightly better intrinsic resolution for low gamma-ray energies, (3) inclusion of a spatially varying energy window to compensate for variations of light collection efficiency, (4) event-by-event, real-time distortion removal for uniformity correction, and (5) introduction of new methods to improve the count-rate capability. Whereas some of these improvements are due to better understanding of the fundamentals of camera design, others are the result of technological advances in electronic components such as analogue-to-digital converters, microprocessors and high-density digital memories. The development of single photon tomography has developed along two parallel paths. Multipinhole and rotating slant-hole collimator attachments provide some degree of longitudinal tomography, and are currently being applied to cardiac imaging. At the same time rotating camera systems capable of transverse as well as longitudinal imaging are being refined technically and evaluated clinically. Longitudinal tomography is of limited use in quantitative studies and is likely to be an interim solution to three-dimensional imaging. Rotating camera systems, on the other hand, not only provide equal resolution in all three dimensions but are also capable of providing quantitative accuracy. This is the result of progress in attenuation correction and the design of special collimators. Single photon tomography provides a small but noticeable improvement in diagnostic accuracy which is likely to result in widespread use of rotating camera systems in the future

  12. Positron annihilation imaging device using multiple offset rings of detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    This patent application relates to a positron annihilation imaging device comprising two or more coaxial circular arrays of detectors (2,2'), with the detectors in one array angularly offset with respect to the detectors in the adjacent array to detect more than one tomographic image simultaneously through different cross-sections of a patient. (author)

  13. New antifouling platform characterized by single-molecule imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Ji Young; Song, In Taek; Lau, K H Aaron; Messersmith, Phillip B; Yoon, Tae-Young; Lee, Haeshin

    2014-03-12

    Antifouling surfaces have been widely studied for their importance in medical devices and industry. Antifouling surfaces mostly achieved by methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG) have shown biomolecular adsorption less than 1 ng/cm(2) which was measured by surface analytical tools such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), or optical waveguide lightmode (OWL) spectroscopy. Herein, we utilize a single-molecule imaging technique (i.e., an ultimate resolution) to study antifouling properties of functionalized surfaces. We found that about 600 immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules are adsorbed. This result corresponds to ∼5 pg/cm(2) adsorption, which is far below amount for the detection limit of the conventional tools. Furthermore, we developed a new antifouling platform that exhibits improved antifouling performance that shows only 78 IgG molecules adsorbed (∼0.5 pg/cm(2)). The antifouling platform consists of forming 1 nm TiO2 thin layer, on which peptidomimetic antifouling polymer (PMAP) is robustly anchored. The unprecedented antifouling performance can potentially revolutionize a variety of research fields such as single-molecule imaging, medical devices, biosensors, and others.

  14. New Antifouling Platform Characterized by Single-Molecule Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Antifouling surfaces have been widely studied for their importance in medical devices and industry. Antifouling surfaces mostly achieved by methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG) have shown biomolecular adsorption less than 1 ng/cm2 which was measured by surface analytical tools such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), or optical waveguide lightmode (OWL) spectroscopy. Herein, we utilize a single-molecule imaging technique (i.e., an ultimate resolution) to study antifouling properties of functionalized surfaces. We found that about 600 immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules are adsorbed. This result corresponds to ∼5 pg/cm2 adsorption, which is far below amount for the detection limit of the conventional tools. Furthermore, we developed a new antifouling platform that exhibits improved antifouling performance that shows only 78 IgG molecules adsorbed (∼0.5 pg/cm2). The antifouling platform consists of forming 1 nm TiO2 thin layer, on which peptidomimetic antifouling polymer (PMAP) is robustly anchored. The unprecedented antifouling performance can potentially revolutionize a variety of research fields such as single-molecule imaging, medical devices, biosensors, and others. PMID:24503420

  15. Fast single image dehazing based on image fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haibo; Yang, Jie; Wu, Zhengping; Zhang, Qingnian

    2015-01-01

    Images captured in foggy weather conditions often fade the colors and reduce the contrast of the observed objects. An efficient image fusion method is proposed to remove haze from a single input image. First, the initial medium transmission is estimated based on the dark channel prior. Second, the method adopts an assumption that the degradation level affected by haze of each region is the same, which is similar to the Retinex theory, and uses a simple Gaussian filter to get the coarse medium transmission. Then, pixel-level fusion is achieved between the initial medium transmission and coarse medium transmission. The proposed method can recover a high-quality haze-free image based on the physical model, and the complexity of the proposed method is only a linear function of the number of input image pixels. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can allow a very fast implementation and achieve better restoration for visibility and color fidelity compared to some state-of-the-art methods.

  16. A Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Network Gas Sensing Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Ju Teng

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research was to develop a chemical gas sensing device based on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT networks. The SWCNT networks are synthesized on Al2O3-deposted SiO2/Si substrates with 10 nm-thick Fe as the catalyst precursor layer using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD. The development of interconnected SWCNT networks can be exploited to recognize the identities of different chemical gases by the strength of their particular surface adsorptive and desorptive responses to various types of chemical vapors. The physical responses on the surface of the SWCNT networks cause superficial changes in the electric charge that can be converted into electronic signals for identification. In this study, we tested NO2 and NH3 vapors at ppm levels at room temperature with our self-made gas sensing device, which was able to obtain responses to sensitivity changes with a concentration of 10 ppm for NO2 and 24 ppm for NH3.

  17. [Digital thoracic radiology: devices, image processing, limits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frija, J; de Géry, S; Lallouet, F; Guermazi, A; Zagdanski, A M; De Kerviler, E

    2001-09-01

    In a first part, the different techniques of digital thoracic radiography are described. Since computed radiography with phosphore plates are the most commercialized it is more emphasized. But the other detectors are also described, as the drum coated with selenium and the direct digital radiography with selenium detectors. The other detectors are also studied in particular indirect flat panels detectors and the system with four high resolution CCD cameras. In a second step the most important image processing are discussed: the gradation curves, the unsharp mask processing, the system MUSICA, the dynamic range compression or reduction, the soustraction with dual energy. In the last part the advantages and the drawbacks of computed thoracic radiography are emphasized. The most important are the almost constant good quality of the pictures and the possibilities of image processing.

  18. Parallel Processing of Images in Mobile Devices using BOINC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiel, Mariela; Calle, David F.; Santamaría, Alfredo S.; Suarez, David F.; Flórez, Leonardo

    2018-04-01

    Medical image processing helps health professionals make decisions for the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Since some algorithms for processing images require substantial amounts of resources, one could take advantage of distributed or parallel computing. A mobile grid can be an adequate computing infrastructure for this problem. A mobile grid is a grid that includes mobile devices as resource providers. In a previous step of this research, we selected BOINC as the infrastructure to build our mobile grid. However, parallel processing of images in mobile devices poses at least two important challenges: the execution of standard libraries for processing images and obtaining adequate performance when compared to desktop computers grids. By the time we started our research, the use of BOINC in mobile devices also involved two issues: a) the execution of programs in mobile devices required to modify the code to insert calls to the BOINC API, and b) the division of the image among the mobile devices as well as its merging required additional code in some BOINC components. This article presents answers to these four challenges.

  19. Parallel Processing of Images in Mobile Devices using BOINC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curiel Mariela

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Medical image processing helps health professionals make decisions for the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Since some algorithms for processing images require substantial amounts of resources, one could take advantage of distributed or parallel computing. A mobile grid can be an adequate computing infrastructure for this problem. A mobile grid is a grid that includes mobile devices as resource providers. In a previous step of this research, we selected BOINC as the infrastructure to build our mobile grid. However, parallel processing of images in mobile devices poses at least two important challenges: the execution of standard libraries for processing images and obtaining adequate performance when compared to desktop computers grids. By the time we started our research, the use of BOINC in mobile devices also involved two issues: a the execution of programs in mobile devices required to modify the code to insert calls to the BOINC API, and b the division of the image among the mobile devices as well as its merging required additional code in some BOINC components. This article presents answers to these four challenges.

  20. Informatics in radiology: Efficiency metrics for imaging device productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mengqi; Pavlicek, William; Liu, Patrick T; Zhang, Muhong; Langer, Steve G; Wang, Shanshan; Place, Vicki; Miranda, Rafael; Wu, Teresa Tong

    2011-01-01

    Acute awareness of the costs associated with medical imaging equipment is an ever-present aspect of the current healthcare debate. However, the monitoring of productivity associated with expensive imaging devices is likely to be labor intensive, relies on summary statistics, and lacks accepted and standardized benchmarks of efficiency. In the context of the general Six Sigma DMAIC (design, measure, analyze, improve, and control) process, a World Wide Web-based productivity tool called the Imaging Exam Time Monitor was developed to accurately and remotely monitor imaging efficiency with use of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) combined with a picture archiving and communication system. Five device efficiency metrics-examination duration, table utilization, interpatient time, appointment interval time, and interseries time-were derived from DICOM values. These metrics allow the standardized measurement of productivity, to facilitate the comparative evaluation of imaging equipment use and ongoing efforts to improve efficiency. A relational database was constructed to store patient imaging data, along with device- and examination-related data. The database provides full access to ad hoc queries and can automatically generate detailed reports for administrative and business use, thereby allowing staff to monitor data for trends and to better identify possible changes that could lead to improved productivity and reduced costs in association with imaging services. © RSNA, 2011.

  1. Compact imaging Bragg spectrometer for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertschinger, G.; Biel, W.; Jaegers, H.; Marchuk, O.

    2004-01-01

    A compact imaging x-ray spectrometer has been designed for tokamaks and stellarators to measure the plasma parameters at different spatial chords. It has been optimized for high spectral resolution and high sensitivity. High spectral resolution is obtained by using solid state detectors and minimizing the imaging errors of the spherical crystals. It is shown, that using spherical crystals the solid angle and hence the throughput can be increased significantly, without compromising the spectral resolution. The design is useful for the measurement of the spectra of He- and H-like ions from Si to Kr. The spectral resolution is sufficient for the measurement of plasma parameters. The temporal resolution is high enough for transport studies by gas puff and laser ablation experiments. The design is based on a modified Johann spectrometer mount, utilizing a spherically bent crystal instead of the cylindrically bent crystal in the traditional Johann mount. The astigmatism of the wavelength selective reflection on the spherical crystal is applied to obtain imaging of an extended plasma source on a two-dimensional detector. For each element, a separate crystal is required, only in few cases, a crystal can be used for the spectra of two elements. For the spectra of most of the He-like ions from Si up to Kr, suitable crystal cuts have been found on quartz, silicon and germanium crystals with Bragg angles in a small interval around the design value of 53.5 deg. All of the crystals have the same radius. They are fixed on a rotational table. The distance to the detector is adjusted by an x-y table to fit to the Rowland circle

  2. A new 3-dimensional head fixation device for brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Ryoi; Kawashima, Ryuta; Yoshioka, Seiro; Ono, Shuichi; Ito, Hiroshi; Sato, Kazunori; Akaizawa, Takashi; Koyama, Masamichi; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a new head fixation device for studies of brain function. This device was designed to immobilize subject's heads during image scanning and to precisely reproduce the head position for two different imaging modalities such as MRI and PET. The device consists of a plastic frame, a pillow filled with beads of styrene foam, and a face mask of thermoplastic resin which was originally intended for application in radiotherapy. A bridge for biting was incorporated into the mask for stable fixation. The device enables immobilization of subject's heads with good reproducibility of position at the practical level. Our results indicate that this head fixation system is useful for fixation of head during activation studies using PET. (author)

  3. Quantitative mass imaging of single biological macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Gavin; Hundt, Nikolas; Cole, Daniel; Fineberg, Adam; Andrecka, Joanna; Tyler, Andrew; Olerinyova, Anna; Ansari, Ayla; Marklund, Erik G; Collier, Miranda P; Chandler, Shane A; Tkachenko, Olga; Allen, Joel; Crispin, Max; Billington, Neil; Takagi, Yasuharu; Sellers, James R; Eichmann, Cédric; Selenko, Philipp; Frey, Lukas; Riek, Roland; Galpin, Martin R; Struwe, Weston B; Benesch, Justin L P; Kukura, Philipp

    2018-04-27

    The cellular processes underpinning life are orchestrated by proteins and their interactions. The associated structural and dynamic heterogeneity, despite being key to function, poses a fundamental challenge to existing analytical and structural methodologies. We used interferometric scattering microscopy to quantify the mass of single biomolecules in solution with 2% sequence mass accuracy, up to 19-kilodalton resolution, and 1-kilodalton precision. We resolved oligomeric distributions at high dynamic range, detected small-molecule binding, and mass-imaged proteins with associated lipids and sugars. These capabilities enabled us to characterize the molecular dynamics of processes as diverse as glycoprotein cross-linking, amyloidogenic protein aggregation, and actin polymerization. Interferometric scattering mass spectrometry allows spatiotemporally resolved measurement of a broad range of biomolecular interactions, one molecule at a time. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  4. Perceptually Aware Image Retargeting for Mobile Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yinzuo; Zhang, Luming; Zhang, Chao; Li, Ping; Li, Xuelong

    2018-05-01

    Retargeting aims at adapting an original high-resolution photograph/video to a low-resolution screen with an arbitrary aspect ratio. Conventional approaches are generally based on desktop PCs, since the computation might be intolerable for mobile platforms (especially when retargeting videos). Typically, only low-level visual features are exploited, and human visual perception is not well encoded. In this paper, we propose a novel retargeting framework that rapidly shrinks a photograph/video by leveraging human gaze behavior. Specifically, we first derive a geometry-preserving graph ranking algorithm, which efficiently selects a few salient object patches to mimic the human gaze shifting path (GSP) when viewing a scene. Afterward, an aggregation-based CNN is developed to hierarchically learn the deep representation for each GSP. Based on this, a probabilistic model is developed to learn the priors of the training photographs that are marked as aesthetically pleasing by professional photographers. We utilize the learned priors to efficiently shrink the corresponding GSP of a retargeted photograph/video to maximize its similarity to those from the training photographs. Extensive experiments have demonstrated that: 1) our method requires less than 35 ms to retarget a photograph (or a video frame) on popular iOS/Android devices, which is orders of magnitude faster than the conventional retargeting algorithms; 2) the retargeted photographs/videos produced by our method significantly outperform those of its competitors based on a paired-comparison-based user study; and 3) the learned GSPs are highly indicative of human visual attention according to the human eye tracking experiments.

  5. Fiber bundle probes for interconnecting miniaturized medical imaging devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Vanessa; Hofmann, Jens; Marx, Sebastian; Herter, Jonas; Nguyen, Dennis; Arndt-Staufenbiel, Norbert; Schröder, Henning

    2017-02-01

    Miniaturization of medical imaging devices will significantly improve the workflow of physicians in hospitals. Photonic integrated circuit (PIC) technologies offer a high level of miniaturization. However, they need fiber optic interconnection solutions for their functional integration. As part of European funded project (InSPECT) we investigate fiber bundle probes (FBPs) to be used as multi-mode (MM) to single-mode (SM) interconnections for PIC modules. The FBP consists of a set of four or seven SM fibers hexagonally distributed and assembled into a holder that defines a multicore connection. Such a connection can be used to connect MM fibers, while each SM fiber is attached to the PIC module. The manufacturing of these probes is explored by using well-established fiber fusion, epoxy adhesive, innovative adhesive and polishing techniques in order to achieve reliable, low-cost and reproducible samples. An innovative hydrofluoric acid-free fiber etching technology has been recently investigated. The preliminary results show that the reduction of the fiber diameter shows a linear behavior as a function of etching time. Different etch rate values from 0.55 μm/min to 2.3 μm/min were found. Several FBPs with three different type of fibers have been optically interrogated at wavelengths of 630nm and 1550nm. Optical losses are found of approx. 35dB at 1550nm for FBPs composed by 80μm fibers. Although FBPs present moderate optical losses, they might be integrated using different optical fibers, covering a broad spectral range required for imaging applications. Finally, we show the use of FBPs as promising MM-to-SM interconnects for real-world interfacing to PIC's.

  6. Noise characteristics of neutron images obtained by cooled CCD device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Ryoichi; Sasaki, Ryoya; Okuda, Shuichi; Okamoto, Ken-Ichi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Tsujimoto, Tadashi

    2009-01-01

    The noise characteristics of a cooled CCD device induced by neutron and gamma ray irradiation have been investigated. In the cooled CCD images, characteristic white spot noises (CCD noise) frequently appeared, which have a shape like a pixel in most cases and their brightness is extremely high compared with that of the image pattern. They could be divided into the two groups, fixed pattern noise (FPN) and random noise. The former always appeared in the same position in the image and the latter appeared at any position. In the background image, nearly all of the CCD noises were found to be the FPN, while many of them were the random noise during the irradiation. The random CCD noises increased with irradiation and decreased soon after the irradiation. In the case of large irradiation, a part of the CCD noise remained as the FPN. These facts suggest that the CCD noise is a phenomenon strongly relating to radiation damage of the CCD device.

  7. Making Image More Energy Efficient for OLED Smart Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deguang Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Now, more and more mobile smart devices are emerging massively; energy consumption of these devices has become an important consideration due to the limitation of battery capacity. Displays are the dominant energy consuming component of battery-operated devices, giving rise to organic light-emitting diode (OLED as a new promising display technology, which consumes different power when displaying different content due to their emissive nature. Based on this property, we propose an approach to improve image energy efficiency on OLED displays by perceiving image content. The key idea of our approach is to eliminate undesired details while preserving the region of interest of the image by leveraging the color and spatial information. First, we use edge detection algorithm to extract region of interest (ROI of an image. Next, we gradually change luminance and saturation of region of noninterest (NON-ROI of the image. Then we perform detailed experiment and case study to validate our approach; experiment results show that our approach can save 22.5% energy on average while preserving high quality of the image.

  8. Single-Event Effects in Silicon and Silicon Carbide Power Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan C.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Topper, Alyson D.; Wilcox, Edward P.; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony M.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Electronics Parts and Packaging program-funded activities over the past year on single-event effects in silicon and silicon carbide power devices are presented, with focus on SiC device failure signatures.

  9. Health Care: Reprocessed Medical Single-Use Devices in DoD

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    ... for decontamination and resterilization. The emergence of new materials and sterilization methods, and the increasing costs of health care, resulted in the development of medical single-use devices and the practice of reprocessing the devices...

  10. Single molecule image formation, reconstruction and processing: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Amit; Piestun, Rafael; Stallinga, Sjoerd

    2016-07-01

    The ability to image at the single molecule scale has revolutionized research in molecular biology. This feature issue presents a collection of articles that provides new insights into the fundamental limits of single molecule imaging and reports novel techniques for image formation and analysis.

  11. 77 FR 38829 - Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Institution of Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-850] Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Institution of Investigation AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that a complaint was filed with the U.S. International Trade Commission on May 23, 2012...

  12. Characterisation of a CMOS charge transfer device for TDI imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rushton, J.; Holland, A.; Stefanov, K.; Mayer, F.

    2015-01-01

    The performance of a prototype true charge transfer imaging sensor in CMOS is investigated. The finished device is destined for use in TDI applications, especially Earth-observation, and to this end radiation tolerance must be investigated. Before this, complete characterisation is required. This work starts by looking at charge transfer inefficiency and then investigates responsivity using mean-variance techniques

  13. A Multi-Gradient Generator in a Single Microfluidic Device for Optical Microscopy and Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedrossian, Manuel; Nadeau, Jay; Lindensmith, Chris

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this work was to create a single microfluidic device capable of establishing multiple types of gradients in a quantifiable manner. Many microbial species are known to exhibit directed motility in the presence of stimuli. This phenomenon, known as taxis, can be used as a bio-signature and a means of identifying microorganisms. Directed microbial motility has been seen as a response to the presence of certain chemicals, light, heat, magnetic fields, and other stimuli. Microbial movement along the gradient vector, that cannot be explained by passive hydrodynamics or Brownian motion, can shed light on whether the sample contains living microbes or not. The ability to create multiple types of gradients in a single microfluidic device allows for high throughput testing of heterogeneous samples to detect taxis. There has been increased interest in the search for life within our solar system where liquid water is known to exist. Induced directional motility can serve as a viable method for detecting living organisms that actively respond to their environment. The device developed here includes a chemical, photonic, thermal, and magnetic gradient generator, while maintaining high optical quality in order to be used for microscopy as well as quantitative phase imaging This work was funded by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, who the authors wish to thank for their generosity.

  14. Endoscopic device for functional imaging of the retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga, Simon; Lohani, Sweyta; Martell, Bret; Soliz, Peter; Ts'o, Dan

    2011-03-01

    Non-invasive imaging of retinal function based on the recording of spatially distributed reflectance changes evoked by visual stimuli has to-date been performed primarily using modified commercial fundus cameras. We have constructed a prototype retinal functional imager, using a commercial endoscope (Storz) for the frontend optics, and a low-cost back-end that includes the needed dichroic beam splitter to separate the stimulus path from the imaging path. This device has been tested to demonstrate its performance for the delivery of adequate near infrared (NIR) illumination, intensity of the visual stimulus and reflectance return in the imaging path. The current device was found to be capable of imaging reflectance changes of 0.1%, similar to that observable using the modified commercial fundus camera approach. The visual stimulus (a 505nm spot of 0.5secs) was used with an interrogation illumination of 780nm, and a sequence of imaged captured. At each pixel, the imaged signal was subtracted and normalized by the baseline reflectance, so that the measurement was ΔR/R. The typical retinal activity signal observed had a ΔR/R of 0.3-1.0%. The noise levels were measured when no stimulus was applied and found to vary between +/- 0.05%. Functional imaging has been suggested as a means to provide objective information on retina function that may be a preclinical indicator of ocular diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy. The endoscopic approach promises to yield a significantly more economical retinal functional imaging device that would be clinically important.

  15. Numerical design of in-line X-ray phase-contrast imaging based on ellipsoidal single-bounce monocapillary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Weiyuan; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi; Peng, Song; Ma, Yongzhong; Ding, Xunliang

    2014-01-01

    A new device using an ellipsoidal single-bounce monocapillary X-ray optics was numerically designed to realize in-line X-ray phase-contrast imaging by using conventional laboratory X-ray source with a large spot. Numerical simulation results validated the effectiveness of the proposed device and approach. The ellipsoidal single-bounce monocapillary X-ray optics had potential applications in the in-line phase contrast imaging with polychromatic X-rays

  16. Numerical design of in-line X-ray phase-contrast imaging based on ellipsoidal single-bounce monocapillary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Weiyuan; Liu, Zhiguo [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Sun, Tianxi, E-mail: stx@bnu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Peng, Song [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Ma, Yongzhong [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Beijing, Beijing 100013 (China); Ding, Xunliang [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2014-05-11

    A new device using an ellipsoidal single-bounce monocapillary X-ray optics was numerically designed to realize in-line X-ray phase-contrast imaging by using conventional laboratory X-ray source with a large spot. Numerical simulation results validated the effectiveness of the proposed device and approach. The ellipsoidal single-bounce monocapillary X-ray optics had potential applications in the in-line phase contrast imaging with polychromatic X-rays.

  17. Image timing and detector performance of a matrix ion-chamber electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greer, P.

    1996-01-01

    The Oncology Centre of Auckland Hospital recently purchased a Varian PortalVision TM electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Image acquisition times, input-output characteristics and contrast-detail curves of this matrix liquid ion-chamber EPID have been measured to examine the variation in imaging performance with acquisition mode. The variation in detector performance with acquisition mode has been examined. The HV cycle time can be increased to improve image quality. Consideration should be given to the acquisition mode and HV cycle time used when imaging to ensure adequate imaging performance with reasonable imaging time. (author)

  18. IBIC characterisation of novel detectors for single atom doping of quantum computer devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Changyi; Jamieson, David N.; Pakes, Chris I.; George, Damien P.; Hearne, Sean M.; Dzurak, Andrew S.; Gauja, Eric; Stanley, F.; Clark, R.G.

    2003-01-01

    Single ion implantation and online detection is highly desirable for the emerging application, in which single 31 P ions need to be inserted in prefabricated silicon cells to construct solid-state quantum bits (qubits). In order to fabricate qubit arrays, we have developed novel detectors that employ detector electrodes adjacent to the prefabricated cells that can detect single keV ion strikes appropriate for the fabrication of shallow phosphorus arrays. The method utilises a high purity silicon substrate with very high resistivity, a thin SiO 2 surface layer, nanometer masks for the lateral positioning single phosphorus implantation, biased electrodes applied to the surface of the silicon and sensitive electronics that can detect the charge transient from single keV ion strikes. A TCAD (Technology Computer Aided Design) software package was applied in the optimisation of the device design and simulation of the detector performance. Here we show the characterisation of these detectors using ion beam induced charge (IBIC) with a focused 2 MeV He ions in a nuclear microprobe. The IBIC imaging method in a nuclear microprobe allowed us to measure the dead-layer thickness of the detector structure (required to be very thin for successful detection of keV ions), and the spatial distribution of the charge collection efficiency around the entire region of the detector. We show that our detectors have near 100% charge collection efficiency for MeV ions, extremely thin dead-layer thickness (about 7 nm) and a wide active region extending laterally from the electrodes (10-20 μm) where qubit arrays can be constructed. We demonstrate that the device can be successfully applied in the detection of keV ionisation energy from single events of keV X-rays and keV 31 P ions

  19. IBIC characterisation of novel detectors for single atom doping of quantum computer devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Changyi E-mail: cjy@physics.unimelb.edu.auc.yang@physics.unimelb.edu.au; Jamieson, David N.; Pakes, Chris I.; George, Damien P.; Hearne, Sean M.; Dzurak, Andrew S.; Gauja, Eric; Stanley, F.; Clark, R.G

    2003-09-01

    Single ion implantation and online detection is highly desirable for the emerging application, in which single {sup 31}P ions need to be inserted in prefabricated silicon cells to construct solid-state quantum bits (qubits). In order to fabricate qubit arrays, we have developed novel detectors that employ detector electrodes adjacent to the prefabricated cells that can detect single keV ion strikes appropriate for the fabrication of shallow phosphorus arrays. The method utilises a high purity silicon substrate with very high resistivity, a thin SiO{sub 2} surface layer, nanometer masks for the lateral positioning single phosphorus implantation, biased electrodes applied to the surface of the silicon and sensitive electronics that can detect the charge transient from single keV ion strikes. A TCAD (Technology Computer Aided Design) software package was applied in the optimisation of the device design and simulation of the detector performance. Here we show the characterisation of these detectors using ion beam induced charge (IBIC) with a focused 2 MeV He ions in a nuclear microprobe. The IBIC imaging method in a nuclear microprobe allowed us to measure the dead-layer thickness of the detector structure (required to be very thin for successful detection of keV ions), and the spatial distribution of the charge collection efficiency around the entire region of the detector. We show that our detectors have near 100% charge collection efficiency for MeV ions, extremely thin dead-layer thickness (about 7 nm) and a wide active region extending laterally from the electrodes (10-20 {mu}m) where qubit arrays can be constructed. We demonstrate that the device can be successfully applied in the detection of keV ionisation energy from single events of keV X-rays and keV {sup 31}P ions.

  20. Are Portable Stereophotogrammetric Devices Reliable in Facial Imaging? A Validation Study of VECTRA H1 Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibelli, Daniele; Pucciarelli, Valentina; Cappella, Annalisa; Dolci, Claudia; Sforza, Chiarella

    2018-01-31

    Modern 3-dimensional (3D) image acquisition systems represent a crucial technologic development in facial anatomy because of their accuracy and precision. The recently introduced portable devices can improve facial databases by increasing the number of applications. In the present study, the VECTRA H1 portable stereophotogrammetric device was validated to verify its applicability to 3D facial analysis. Fifty volunteers underwent 4 facial scans using portable VECTRA H1 and static VECTRA M3 devices (2 for each instrument). Repeatability of linear, angular, surface area, and volume measurements was verified within the device and between devices using the Bland-Altman test and the calculation of absolute and relative technical errors of measurement (TEM and rTEM, respectively). In addition, the 2 scans obtained by the same device and the 2 scans obtained by different devices were registered and superimposed to calculate the root mean square (RMS; point-to-point) distance between the 2 surfaces. Most linear, angular, and surface area measurements had high repeatability in M3 versus M3, H1 versus H1, and M3 versus H1 comparisons (range, 82.2 to 98.7%; TEM range, 0.3 to 2.0 mm, 0.4° to 1.8°; rTEM range, 0.2 to 3.1%). In contrast, volumes and RMS distances showed evident differences in M3 versus M3 and H1 versus H1 comparisons and reached the maximum when scans from the 2 different devices were compared. The portable VECTRA H1 device proved reliable for assessing linear measurements, angles, and surface areas; conversely, the influence of involuntary facial movements on volumes and RMS distances was more important compared with the static device. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Electronics Related to Nuclear Medicine Imaging Devices. Chapter 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, R. J. [Joint Department of Physics, Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research, Surrey (United Kingdom); Stephenson, R. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Nuclear medicine imaging is generally based on the detection of X rays and γ rays emitted by radionuclides injected into a patient. In the previous chapter, the methods used to detect these photons were described, based most commonly on a scintillation counter although there are imaging devices that use either gas filled ionization detectors or semiconductors. Whatever device is used, nuclear medicine images are produced from a very limited number of photons, due mainly to the level of radioactivity that can be safely injected into a patient. Hence, nuclear medicine images are usually made from many orders of magnitude fewer photons than X ray computed tomography (CT) images, for example. However, as the information produced is essentially functional in nature compared to the anatomical detail of CT, the apparently poorer image quality is overcome by the nature of the information produced. The low levels of photons detected in nuclear medicine means that photon counting can be performed. Here each photon is detected and analysed individually, which is especially valuable, for example, in enabling scattered photons to be rejected. This is in contrast to X ray imaging where images are produced by integrating the flux entering the detectors. Photon counting, however, places a heavy burden on the electronics used for nuclear medicine imaging in terms of electronic noise and stability. This chapter will discuss how the signals produced in the primary photon detection process can be converted into pulses providing spatial, energy and timing information, and how this information is used to produce both qualitative and quantitative images.

  2. Integrated microfluidic device for single-cell trapping and spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Liberale, Carlo

    2013-02-13

    Optofluidic microsystems are key components towards lab-on-a-chip devices for manipulation and analysis of biological specimens. In particular, the integration of optical tweezers (OT) in these devices allows stable sample trapping, while making available mechanical, chemical and spectroscopic analyses.

  3. Integrated microfluidic device for single-cell trapping and spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Liberale, Carlo; Cojoc, G.; Bragheri, F.; Minzioni, P.; Perozziello, G.; La Rocca, R.; Ferrara, L.; Rajamanickam, V.; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Cristiani, I.

    2013-01-01

    Optofluidic microsystems are key components towards lab-on-a-chip devices for manipulation and analysis of biological specimens. In particular, the integration of optical tweezers (OT) in these devices allows stable sample trapping, while making available mechanical, chemical and spectroscopic analyses.

  4. The optical-mechanical design of DMD modulation imaging device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianting; Xu, Xiping; Qiao, Yang; Li, Lei; Pan, Yue

    2014-09-01

    In order to avoid the phenomenon of some image information were lost, which is due to the jamming signals, such as incident laser, make the pixels dot on CCD saturated. In this article a device of optical-mechanical structure was designed, which utilized the DMD (Digital Micro mirror Device) to modulate the image. The DMD reflection imaging optical system adopts the telecentric light path. However, because the design is not only required to guarantee a 66° angle between the optical axis of the relay optics and the DMD, but also to ensure that the optical axis of the projection system keeps parallel with the perpendicular bisector of the micro-mirror which is in the "flat" state, so the TIR prism is introduced,and making the relay optics and the DMD satisfy the optical institution's requirements. In this paper, a mechanical structure of the imaging optical system was designed and at the meanwhile the lens assembly has been well connected and fixed and fine-tuned by detailed structural design, which included the tilt decentered lens, wedge flanges, prisms. By optimizing the design, the issues of mutual restraint between the inverting optical system and the projecting system were well resolved, and prevented the blocking of the two systems. In addition, the structure size of the whole DMD reflection imaging optical system was minimized; it reduced the energy loss and ensured the image quality.

  5. Analysis of patient setup accuracy using electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onogi, Yuzo; Aoki, Yukimasa; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    1996-01-01

    Radiation therapy is performed in many fractions, and accurate patient setup is very important. This is more significant nowadays because treatment planning and radiation therapy are more precisely performed. Electronic portal imaging devices and automatic image comparison algorithms let us analyze setup deviations quantitatively. With such in mind we developed a simple image comparison algorithm. Using 2459 electronic verification images (335 ports, 123 treatment sites) generated during the past three years at our institute, we evaluated the results of the algorithm, and analyzed setup deviations according to the area irradiated, use of a fixing device (shell), and arm position. Calculated setup deviation was verified visually and their fitness was classified into good, fair, bad, and incomplete. The result was 40%, 14%, 22%, 24% respectively. Using calculated deviations classified as good (994 images), we analyzed setup deviations. Overall setup deviations described in 1 SD along axes x, y, z, was 1.9 mm, 2.5 mm, 1.7 mm respectively. We classified these deviations into systematic and random components, and found that random error was predominant in our institute. The setup deviations along axis y (cranio-caudal direction) showed larger distribution when treatment was performed with the shell. Deviations along y (cranio-caudal) and z (anterior-posterior) had larger distribution when treatment occurred with the patient's arm elevated. There was a significant time-trend error, whose deviations become greater with time. Within all evaluated ports, 30% showed a time-trend error. Using an electronic portal imaging device and automatic image comparison algorithm, we are able to analyze setup deviations more precisely and improve setup method based on objective criteria. (author)

  6. Prospective clinical evaluation of an electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalski, Jeff M.; Graham, Mary V.; Bosch, Walter R.; Wong, John; Gerber, Russell L.; Cheng, Abel; Tinger, Alfred; Valicenti, Richard K.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the clinical implementation of an electronic portal imaging device can improve the precision of daily external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: In 1991, an electronic portal imaging device was installed on a dual energy linear accelerator in our clinic. After training the radiotherapy technologists in the acquisition and evaluation of portal images, we performed a randomized study to determine whether online observation, interruption, and intervention would result in more precise daily setup. The patients were randomized to one of two groups: those whose treatments were actively monitored by the radiotherapy technologists and those that were imaged but not monitored. The treating technologists were instructed to correct the following treatment errors: (a) field placement error (FPE) > 1 cm; (b) incorrect block; (c) incorrect collimator setting; (d) absent customized block. Time of treatment delivery was recorded by our patient tracking and billing computers and compared to a matched set of patients not participating in the study. After the patients radiation therapy course was completed, an offline analysis of the patient setup error was planned. Results: Thirty-two patients were treated to 34 anatomical sites in this study. In 893 treatment sessions, 1,873 fields were treated (1,089 fields monitored and 794 fields unmonitored). Ninety percent of the treated fields had at least one image stored for offline analysis. Eighty-seven percent of these images were analyzed offline. Of the 1,011 fields imaged in the monitored arm, only 14 (1.4%) had an intervention recorded by the technologist. Despite infrequent online intervention, offline analysis demonstrated that the incidence of FPE > 10 mm in the monitored and unmonitored groups was 56 out of 881 (6.1%) and 95 out of 595 (11.2%), respectively; p 10 mm was confined to the pelvic fields. The time to treat patients in this study was 10.78 min (monitored) and 10.10 min (unmonitored

  7. Dual-modality imaging with a ultrasound-gamma device for oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, C.; Pellegrini, R.; Cinti, M. N.; De Vincentis, G.; Lo Meo, S.; Fabbri, A.; Bennati, P.; Cencelli, V. Orsolini; Pani, R.

    2018-06-01

    Recently, dual-modality systems have been developed, aimed to correlate anatomical and functional information, improving disease localization and helping oncological or surgical treatments. Moreover, due to the growing interest in handheld detectors for preclinical trials or small animal imaging, in this work a new dual modality integrated device, based on a Ultrasounds probe and a small Field of View Single Photon Emission gamma camera, is proposed.

  8. Reading device of a radiation image contained in a radioluminescent screen and tomography device containing it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allemand, R.; Cuzin, M.; Parot, P.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is aimed at improving the random access time to a stimulable radioluminescent screen point (and consequently the reading time of the screen image); it is noticeably useful for longitudinal tomography. The reading device contains a source emitting a stimulation radiation beam towards the stimulable radioluminescent screen, a control mean of the stimulation radiation beam and a deflection mean which allows the beam to scan the screen surface. The device is characterized by the use of a very fast acousto-optical type deflection mean [fr

  9. Single-event burnout of power MOSFET devices for satellite application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Yuxiong; Tian Kai; Cao Zhou; Yang Shiyu; Liu Gang; Cai Xiaowu; Lu Jiang

    2008-01-01

    Single-event burnout (SEB) sensitivity was tested for power MOSFET devices, JTMCS081 and JTMCS062, which were made in Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, using californium-252 simulation source. SEB voltage threshold was found for devices under test (DUT). It is helpful for engineers to choose devices used in satellites. (authors)

  10. Photovoltaic device using single wall carbon nanotubes and method of fabricating the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biris, Alexandru S.; Li, Zhongrui

    2012-11-06

    A photovoltaic device and methods for forming the same. In one embodiment, the photovoltaic device has a silicon substrate, and a film comprising a plurality of single wall carbon nanotubes disposed on the silicon substrate, wherein the plurality of single wall carbon nanotubes forms a plurality of heterojunctions with the silicon in the substrate.

  11. Parametric Study of the Device Angle Dependency of a Single Vortex Generator on a Flat Plate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, U.; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan; Sørensen, Niels N.

    A detailed study of the device angle dependency of a single vortex generator (VG) is presented in this paper. A single Vortex Generator on a test section wall case, with four different positions of the device angle to the incoming flow, has been designed and solved by computational methods...

  12. Sweep devices for picosecond image-converter streak cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunin, B.; Miehe, J.A.; Sipp, B.; Schelev, M.Ya.; Serduchenko, J.N.; Thebault, J.

    1979-01-01

    Four different sweep devices based on microwave tubes, avalanche transistors, krytrons, and laser-triggered spark gaps are treated in detail. These control circuits are developed for picosecond image-converter cameras and generate sweep pulses providing streak speeds in the range of 10 7 to 5x10 10 cm/sec with maximum time resolution better than 10 -12 sec. Special low-jitter triggering schemes reduce the jitter to less than 5x10 -11 sec. Some problems arising in the construction and matching of the sweep devices and image-streak tube are discussed. Comparative parameters of nanosecond switching elements are presented. The results described can be used by other authors involved in streak camera development

  13. Theory and applications of structured light single pixel imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokoe, Robert J.; Stockton, Patrick A.; Pezeshki, Ali; Bartels, Randy A.

    2018-02-01

    Many single-pixel imaging techniques have been developed in recent years. Though the methods of image acquisition vary considerably, the methods share unifying features that make general analysis possible. Furthermore, the methods developed thus far are based on intuitive processes that enable simple and physically-motivated reconstruction algorithms, however, this approach may not leverage the full potential of single-pixel imaging. We present a general theoretical framework of single-pixel imaging based on frame theory, which enables general, mathematically rigorous analysis. We apply our theoretical framework to existing single-pixel imaging techniques, as well as provide a foundation for developing more-advanced methods of image acquisition and reconstruction. The proposed frame theoretic framework for single-pixel imaging results in improved noise robustness, decrease in acquisition time, and can take advantage of special properties of the specimen under study. By building on this framework, new methods of imaging with a single element detector can be developed to realize the full potential associated with single-pixel imaging.

  14. Detection of fecal contamination on beef meat surfaces using handheld fluorescence imaging device (HFID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Mirae; Lee, Hoonsoo; Cho, Hyunjeong; Moon, Sang-Ho; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Moon S.

    2016-05-01

    Current meat inspection in slaughter plants, for food safety and quality attributes including potential fecal contamination, is conducted through by visual examination human inspectors. A handheld fluorescence-based imaging device (HFID) was developed to be an assistive tool for human inspectors by highlighting contaminated food and food contact surfaces on a display monitor. It can be used under ambient lighting conditions in food processing plants. Critical components of the imaging device includes four 405-nm 10-W LEDs for fluorescence excitation, a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, optical filter (670 nm used for this study), and Wi-Fi transmitter for broadcasting real-time video/images to monitoring devices such as smartphone and tablet. This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of HFID in enhancing visual detection of fecal contamination on red meat, fat, and bone surfaces of beef under varying ambient luminous intensities (0, 10, 30, 50 and 70 foot-candles). Overall, diluted feces on fat, red meat and bone areas of beef surfaces were detectable in the 670-nm single-band fluorescence images when using the HFID under 0 to 50 foot-candle ambient lighting.

  15. Device for congruent X-ray images of teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegner, H.; Zeumer, H.

    1987-01-01

    This invention has to do with a device for congruent X-ray images of teeth by means of the long-tube parallel technique and the long-tube semi-angle technique. The aim is to have no disturbing lever forces in order to avoid mechanical tensions between patient and X-ray tube assembly and to achieve a true projection of teeth and jaw-bone part also under unfavourable anatomical conditions

  16. [Thoughts on the Witnessed Audit in Medical Device Single Audit Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jing; Xiao, Jiangyi; Wang, Aijun

    2018-02-08

    Medical Device Single Audit Program is one of the key projects in International Medical Device Regulators Forum, which has much experience to be used for reference. This paper briefly describes the procedures and contents of the Witnessed Audit in Medical Device Single Audit Program. Some revelations about the work of Witnessed Audit have been discussed, for reference by the Regulatory Authorities and the Auditing Organizations.

  17. Autostereoscopic image creation by hyperview matrix controlled single pixel rendering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasnick, Armin

    2017-06-01

    Just as the increasing awareness level of the stereoscopic cinema, so the perception of limitations while watching movies with 3D glasses has been emerged as well. It is not only that the additional glasses are uncomfortable and annoying; there are some tangible arguments for avoiding 3D glasses. These "stereoscopic deficits" are caused by the 3D glasses itself. In contrast to natural viewing with naked eyes, the artificial 3D viewing with 3D glasses introduces specific "unnatural" side effects. The most of the moviegoers has experienced unspecific discomfort in 3D cinema, which they may have associated with insufficient image quality. Obviously, quality problems with 3D glasses can be solved by technical improvement. But this simple answer can -and already has- mislead some decision makers to relax on the existing 3D glasses solution. It needs to be underlined, that there are inherent difficulties with the glasses, which can never be solved with modest advancement; as the 3D glasses initiate them. To overcome the limitations of stereoscopy in display applications, several technologies has been proposed to create a 3D impression without the need of 3D glasses, known as autostereoscopy. But even todays autostereoscopic displays cannot solve all viewing problems and still show limitations. A hyperview display could be a suitable candidate, if it would be possible to create an affordable device and generate the necessary content in an acceptable time frame. All autostereoscopic displays, based on the idea of lightfield, integral photography or super-multiview could be unified within the concept of hyperview. It is essential for functionality that every of these display technologies uses numerous of different perspective images to create the 3D impression. Such a calculation of a very high number of views will require much more computing time as for the formation of a simple stereoscopic image pair. The hyperview concept allows to describe the screen image of any 3D

  18. Challenges for single molecule electronic devices with nanographene and organic molecules. Do single molecules offer potential as elements of electronic devices in the next generation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoki, Toshiaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2018-03-01

    Interest in utilizing organic molecules to fabricate electronic materials has existed ever since organic (molecular) semiconductors were first discovered in the 1950s. Since then, scientists have devoted serious effort to the creation of various molecule-based electronic systems, such as molecular metals and molecular superconductors. Single-molecule electronics and the associated basic science have emerged over the past two decades and provided hope for the development of highly integrated molecule-based electronic devices in the future (after the Si-based technology era has ended). Here, nanographenes (nano-sized graphene) with atomically precise structures are among the most promising molecules that can be utilized for electronic/spintronic devices. To manipulate single small molecules for an electronic device, a single molecular junction has been developed. It is a powerful tool that allows even small molecules to be utilized. External electric, magnetic, chemical, and mechanical perturbations can change the physical and chemical properties of molecules in a way that is different from bulk materials. Therefore, the various functionalities of molecules, along with changes induced by external perturbations, allows us to create electronic devices that we cannot create using current top-down Si-based technology. Future challenges that involve the incorporation of condensed matter physics, quantum chemistry calculations, organic synthetic chemistry, and electronic device engineering are expected to open a new era in single-molecule device electronic technology.

  19. Velocity estimation of an airplane through a single satellite image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuxin Zhao; Gongjian Wen; Bingwei Hui; Deren Li

    2012-01-01

    The motion information of a moving target can be recorded in a single image by a push-broom satellite. A push-broom satellite image is composed of many image lines sensed at different time instants. A method to estimate the velocity of a flying airplane from a single image based on the imagery model of the linear push-broom sensor is proposed. Some key points on the high-resolution image of the plane are chosen to determine the velocity (speed and direction). The performance of the method is tested and verified by experiments using a WorldView-1 image.%The motion information of a moving target can be recorded in a single image by a push-broom satellite.A push-broom satellite image is composed of many image lines sensed at different time instants.A method to estimate the velocity of a flying airplane from a single image based on the imagery model of the linear push-broom sensor is proposed.Some key points on the high-resolution image of the plane are chosen to determine the velocity (speed and direction).The performance of the method is tested and verified by experiments using a WorldView-1 image.

  20. High-throughput deterministic single-cell encapsulation and droplet pairing, fusion, and shrinkage in a single microfluidic device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoeman, R.M.; Kemna, Evelien; Wolbers, F.; van den Berg, Albert

    In this article, we present a microfluidic device capable of successive high-yield single-cell encapsulation in droplets, with additional droplet pairing, fusion, and shrinkage. Deterministic single-cell encapsulation is realized using Dean-coupled inertial ordering of cells in a Yin-Yang-shaped

  1. Validation of a new imaging device for telemedical ulcer monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Benjamin Schnack; Frøkjær, Johnny; Bisgaard Jørgensen, Line

    2015-01-01

    between the new portable camera and the iPhone images vs. clinical assessment as the 'gold standard'. The study included 36 foot ulcers. Four specialists rated the ulcers and filled out a questionnaire, which formed the basis of the evaluation. RESULTS: We found fair to very good intra-rater agreement...... for the new PID and iPhone, respectively. The gold standard was evaluated by assessing the ulcer twice by two different specialists. Kappa values were moderate to very good with respect to inter-rater agreement except for two variables. The agreement between standard and new equipment compared to the gold......PURPOSE: To clarify whether a new portable imaging device (PID) providing 3D images for telemedical use constitutes a more correct expression of the clinical situation compared to standard telemedical equipment in this case iPhone 4s. METHOD: We investigated intra- and interindividual variability...

  2. Aberration-free FTIR spectroscopic imaging of live cells in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K L Andrew; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2013-07-21

    The label-free, non-destructive chemical analysis offered by FTIR spectroscopic imaging is a very attractive and potentially powerful tool for studies of live biological cells. FTIR imaging of live cells is a challenging task, due to the fact that cells are cultured in an aqueous environment. While the synchrotron facility has proven to be a valuable tool for FTIR microspectroscopic studies of single live cells, we have demonstrated that high quality infrared spectra of single live cells using an ordinary Globar source can also be obtained by adding a pair of lenses to a common transmission liquid cell. The lenses, when placed on the transmission cell window, form pseudo hemispheres which removes the refraction of light and hence improve the imaging and spectral quality of the obtained data. This study demonstrates that infrared spectra of single live cells can be obtained without the focus shifting effect at different wavenumbers, caused by the chromatic aberration. Spectra of the single cells have confirmed that the measured spectral region remains in focus across the whole range, while spectra of the single cells measured without the lenses have shown some erroneous features as a result of the shift of focus. It has also been demonstrated that the addition of lenses can be applied to the imaging of cells in microfabricated devices. We have shown that it was not possible to obtain a focused image of an isolated cell in a droplet of DPBS in oil unless the lenses are applied. The use of the approach described herein allows for well focused images of single cells in DPBS droplets to be obtained.

  3. Single P-N junction tandem photovoltaic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw [Kensington, CA; Ager, III, Joel W.; Yu, Kin Man [Lafayette, CA

    2011-10-18

    A single P-N junction solar cell is provided having two depletion regions for charge separation while allowing the electrons and holes to recombine such that the voltages associated with both depletion regions of the solar cell will add together. The single p-n junction solar cell includes an alloy of either InGaN or InAlN formed on one side of the P-N junction with Si formed on the other side in order to produce characteristics of a two junction (2J) tandem solar cell through only a single P-N junction. A single P-N junction solar cell having tandem solar cell characteristics will achieve power conversion efficiencies exceeding 30%.

  4. Fabrication of fine imaging devices using an external proton microbeam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, T., E-mail: sakai.takuro@jaea.go.jp [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Yasuda, R.; Iikura, H.; Nojima, T. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Koka, M.; Satoh, T.; Ishii, Y. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Oshima, A. [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    We have successfully fabricated novel microscopic imaging devices made from UV/EB curable resin using an external scanning proton microbeam. The devices are micro-structured fluorescent plates that consist of an array of micro-pillars that align periodically. The base material used in the pillars is UV/EB curable resin and each pillar contains phosphor grains. The pattern exposures were performed using a proton beam writing technique. The height of the pillars depends on the range of the proton beam. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy have been used to characterize the samples. The results show that the fabricated fluorescent plates are expected to be compatible with both spatial resolution and detection efficiency.

  5. 78 FR 68853 - International Medical Device Regulators Forum; Medical Device Single Audit Program International...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... its inaugural meeting in Singapore in 2012, identified a Work Group (WG) to develop specific documents... Assessment Method for the Recognition and Monitoring of Medical Device Auditing Organizations;'' and IMDRF...

  6. Concave omnidirectional imaging device for cylindrical object based on catadioptric panoramic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaojun; Wu, Yumei; Wen, Peizhi

    2018-03-01

    To obtain information on the outer surface of a cylinder object, we propose a catadioptric panoramic imaging system based on the principle of uniform spatial resolution for vertical scenes. First, the influence of the projection-equation coefficients on the spatial resolution and astigmatism of the panoramic system are discussed, respectively. Through parameter optimization, we obtain the appropriate coefficients for the projection equation, and so the imaging quality of the entire imaging system can reach an optimum value. Finally, the system projection equation is calibrated, and an undistorted rectangular panoramic image is obtained using the cylindrical-surface projection expansion method. The proposed 360-deg panoramic-imaging device overcomes the shortcomings of existing surface panoramic-imaging methods, and it has the advantages of low cost, simple structure, high imaging quality, and small distortion, etc. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  7. Safety of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Cardiac Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarian, Saman; Hansford, Rozann; Rahsepar, Amir A; Weltin, Valeria; McVeigh, Diana; Gucuk Ipek, Esra; Kwan, Alan; Berger, Ronald D; Calkins, Hugh; Lardo, Albert C; Kraut, Michael A; Kamel, Ihab R; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Halperin, Henry R

    2017-12-28

    Patients who have pacemakers or defibrillators are often denied the opportunity to undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) because of safety concerns, unless the devices meet certain criteria specified by the Food and Drug Administration (termed "MRI-conditional" devices). We performed a prospective, nonrandomized study to assess the safety of MRI at a magnetic field strength of 1.5 Tesla in 1509 patients who had a pacemaker (58%) or an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (42%) that was not considered to be MRI-conditional (termed a "legacy" device). Overall, the patients underwent 2103 thoracic and nonthoracic MRI examinations that were deemed to be clinically necessary. The pacing mode was changed to asynchronous mode for pacing-dependent patients and to demand mode for other patients. Tachyarrhythmia functions were disabled. Outcome assessments included adverse events and changes in the variables that indicate lead and generator function and interaction with surrounding tissue (device parameters). No long-term clinically significant adverse events were reported. In nine MRI examinations (0.4%; 95% confidence interval, 0.2 to 0.7), the patient's device reset to a backup mode. The reset was transient in eight of the nine examinations. In one case, a pacemaker with less than 1 month left of battery life reset to ventricular inhibited pacing and could not be reprogrammed; the device was subsequently replaced. The most common notable change in device parameters (>50% change from baseline) immediately after MRI was a decrease in P-wave amplitude, which occurred in 1% of the patients. At long-term follow-up (results of which were available for 63% of the patients), the most common notable changes from baseline were decreases in P-wave amplitude (in 4% of the patients), increases in atrial capture threshold (4%), increases in right ventricular capture threshold (4%), and increases in left ventricular capture threshold (3%). The observed changes in lead parameters

  8. Ventricular assist device use in single ventricle congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo, Waldemar F; Villa, Chet R; Lal, Ashwin K; Morales, David L

    2017-11-01

    As VAD have become an effective therapy for end-stage heart failure, their application in congenital heart disease has increased. Single ventricle congenital heart disease introduces unique physiologic challenges for VAD use. However, with regard to the mixed clinical results presented within this review, we suggest that patient selection, timing of implant, and center experience are all important contributors to outcome. This review focuses on the published experience of VAD use in single ventricle patients and details physiologic challenges and novel approaches in this growing pediatric and adult population. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Single Image Super Resolution via Sparse Reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruithof, M.C.; Eekeren, A.W.M. van; Dijk, J.; Schutte, K.

    2012-01-01

    High resolution sensors are required for recognition purposes. Low resolution sensors, however, are still widely used. Software can be used to increase the resolution of such sensors. One way of increasing the resolution of the images produced is using multi-frame super resolution algorithms.

  10. Fast, cheap and in control: spectral imaging with handheld devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Edward A.; Deutsch, Erik R.; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Hajian, Arsen R.

    2017-05-01

    Remote sensing has moved out of the laboratory and into the real world. Instruments using reflection or Raman imaging modalities become faster, cheaper and more powerful annually. Enabling technologies include virtual slit spectrometer design, high power multimode diode lasers, fast open-loop scanning systems, low-noise IR-sensitive array detectors and low-cost computers with touchscreen interfaces. High-volume manufacturing assembles these components into inexpensive portable or handheld devices that make possible sophisticated decision-making based on robust data analytics. Examples include threat, hazmat and narcotics detection; remote gas sensing; biophotonic screening; environmental remediation and a host of other applications.

  11. Single-shot spiral imaging at 7 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Maria; Kasper, Lars; Barmet, Christoph; Schmid, Thomas; Vionnet, Laetitia; Wilm, Bertram; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2018-03-25

    The purpose of this work is to explore the feasibility and performance of single-shot spiral MRI at 7 T, using an expanded signal model for reconstruction. Gradient-echo brain imaging is performed on a 7 T system using high-resolution single-shot spiral readouts and half-shot spirals that perform dual-image acquisition after a single excitation. Image reconstruction is based on an expanded signal model including the encoding effects of coil sensitivity, static off-resonance, and magnetic field dynamics. The latter are recorded concurrently with image acquisition, using NMR field probes. The resulting image resolution is assessed by point spread function analysis. Single-shot spiral imaging is achieved at a nominal resolution of 0.8 mm, using spiral-out readouts of 53-ms duration. High depiction fidelity is achieved without conspicuous blurring or distortion. Effective resolutions are assessed as 0.8, 0.94, and 0.98 mm in CSF, gray matter and white matter, respectively. High image quality is also achieved with half-shot acquisition yielding image pairs at 1.5-mm resolution. Use of an expanded signal model enables single-shot spiral imaging at 7 T with unprecedented image quality. Single-shot and half-shot spiral readouts deploy the sensitivity benefit of high field for rapid high-resolution imaging, particularly for functional MRI and arterial spin labeling. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  12. Micro and nano devices in passive millimetre wave imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, R.

    2013-06-01

    The impact of micro and nano technology on millimetre wave imaging from the post war years to the present day is reviewed. In the 1950s whisker contacted diodes in mixers and vacuum tubes were used to realise both radiometers and radars but required considerable skill to realise the performance needed. Development of planar semiconductor devices such as Gunn and Schottky diodes revolutionised mixer performance and provided considerable improvement. The next major breakthrough was high frequency transistors based on gallium arsenide which were initially used at intermediate frequencies but later after further development at millimeter wave frequencies. More recently Monolithic Microwave Integrated circuits(MMICs) offer exceptional performance and the opportunity for innovative design in passive imaging systems. In the future the use of micro and nano technology will continue to drive system performance and we can expect to see integration of antennae, millimetre wave and sub millimetre wave circuits and signal processing.

  13. Content analysis of Australian direct-to-consumer websites for emerging breast cancer imaging devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreugdenburg, Thomas D; Laurence, Caroline O; Willis, Cameron D; Mundy, Linda; Hiller, Janet E

    2014-09-01

    To describe the nature and frequency of information presented on direct-to-consumer websites for emerging breast cancer imaging devices. Content analysis of Australian website advertisements from 2 March 2011 to 30 March 2012, for three emerging breast cancer imaging devices: digital infrared thermal imaging, electrical impedance scanning and electronic palpation imaging. Type of imaging offered, device safety, device performance, application of device, target population, supporting evidence and comparator tests. Thirty-nine unique Australian websites promoting a direct-to-consumer breast imaging device were identified. Despite a lack of supporting evidence, 22 websites advertised devices for diagnosis, 20 advertised devices for screening, 13 advertised devices for prevention and 13 advertised devices for identifying breast cancer risk factors. Similarly, advertised ranges of diagnostic sensitivity (78%-99%) and specificity (44%-91%) were relatively high compared with published literature. Direct comparisons with conventional screening tools that favoured the new device were highly prominent (31 websites), and one-third of websites (12) explicitly promoted their device as a suitable alternative. Australian websites for emerging breast imaging devices, which are also available internationally, promote the use of such devices as safe and effective solutions for breast cancer screening and diagnosis in a range of target populations. Many of these claims are not supported by peer-reviewed evidence, raising questions about the manner in which these devices and their advertising material are regulated, particularly when they are promoted as direct alternatives to established screening interventions.

  14. Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox in single pairs of images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Eric; Denis, Séverine; Moreau, Paul-Antoine; Devaux, Fabrice

    2015-10-05

    Spatially entangled twin photons provide a test of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox in its original form of position (image plane) versus impulsion (Fourier plane). We show that recording a single pair of images in each plane is sufficient to safely demonstrate an EPR paradox. On each pair of images, we have retrieved the fluctuations by subtracting the fitted deterministic intensity shape and then have obtained an intercorrelation peak with a sufficient signal to noise ratio to safely distinguish this peak from random fluctuations. A 95% confidence interval has been determined, confirming a high degree of paradox whatever the considered single pairs. Last, we have verified that the value of the variance of the difference between twin images is always below the quantum (poissonian) limit, in order to ensure the particle character of the demonstration. Our demonstration shows that a single image pattern can reveal the quantum and non-local behavior of light.

  15. Quantitative reconstruction from a single diffraction-enhanced image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganin, D.M.; Lewis, R.A.; Kitchen, M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: We develop an algorithm for using a single diffraction-enhanced image (DEI) to obtain a quantitative reconstruction of the projected thickness of a single-material sample which is embedded within a substrate of approximately constant thickness. This algorithm is used to quantitatively map inclusions in a breast phantom, from a single synchrotron DEI image. In particular, the reconstructed images quantitatively represent the projected thickness in the bulk of the sample, in contrast to DEI images which greatly emphasise sharp edges (high spatial frequencies). In the context of an ultimate aim of improved methods for breast cancer detection, the reconstructions are potentially of greater diagnostic value compared to the DEI data. Lastly, we point out that the methods of analysis presented here are also applicable to the quantitative analysis of differential interference contrast (DIC) images

  16. Multiflash X ray with Image Detanglement for Single Image Isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-31

    known and separated into individual images. A proof-of- principle study was performed using 4 X-ray flashes and copper masks with sub-millimeter holes...Popular Science article.2 For decades, that basic concept dominated the color television market . Those were the days when a large color television...proof-of- principle study was performed using 4 X-ray flashes and copper masks with sub-millimeter holes that allowed development of the required image

  17. Bi-dimensional arrays of SPAD for time-resolved single photon imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tudisco, S.; Lanzano, L.; Musumeci, F.; Neri, L.; Privitera, S.; Scordino, A.; Condorelli, G.; Fallica, G.; Mazzillo, M.; Sanfilippo, D.; Valvo, G.

    2009-01-01

    Many scientific areas like astronomy, biophysics, biomedicine, nuclear and plasma science, etc. are interested in the development of a new time-resolved single photon imaging device. Such a device represents today one of the most challenging goals in the field of photonics. In collaboration with Catania R and D staff of ST-Microelectronics (STM) we created, during the last few years, a new avalanche photosensor-Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) able to detect and count, with excellent performance, single photons. Further we will discuss the possible realization of a single photon imaging device through the many elements integration (bi-dimensional arrays) of SPADs. In order to achieve the goal, it is also important to develop an appropriate readout strategy able to address the time information of each individual sensor and in order to read a great number of elements easily. First prototypes were designed and manufactured by STM and the results are reported here. In the paper we will discuss in particular: (i) sensor performance (gain, photodetection efficiency, timing, after-pulsing, etc.); (ii) array performance (layout, cross-talk, etc.); (iii) readout strategy (quenching, electronics), and (iv) first imaging results (general performance).

  18. Single-incision laparoscopic distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer through a homemade single port access device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Gang; Zhao, Kun; Liu, Jiang; Ning, Li; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    We presented a series of single-incision laparoscopic distal gastrectomies for early gastric cancer patients through a type of homemade single port access device and some other conventional laparoscopic instruments. A single-incision laparoscopic distal gastrectomy with D1 + α lymph node dissection was performed on a 46 years old male patient who had an early gastric cancer. This single port access device has facilitated the conventional laparoscopic instruments to accomplish the surgery and we made in only 6 minutes. Total operating time for this surgery was 240 minutes. During the operation, there were about 100 milliliters of blood loss, and 17 lymph-nodes were retrieved. This homemade single port access device shows its superiority in economy and convenience for complex single-incision surgeries. Single-incision laparoscopic distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer can be conducted by experienced laparoscopic surgeons. Fully take advantage of both SILS and fast track surgery plan can bring to successful surgeries with minimal postoperative pain, quicker mobilization, early recovery of intestinal function, and better cosmesis effect for the patients.

  19. Prediction Methodology for Proton Single Event Burnout: Application to a STRIPFET Device

    CERN Document Server

    Siconolfi, Sara; Oser, Pascal; Spiezia, Giovanni; Hubert, Guillaume; David, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a single event burnout (SEB) sensitivity characterization for power MOSFETs, independent from tests, through a prediction model issued from TCAD analysis and the knowledge of device topology. The methodology is applied to a STRIPFET device and compared to proton data obtained at PSI, showing a good agreement in the order of magnitude of proton SEB cross section, and thus validating the prediction model as an alternative device characterization with respect to SEB.

  20. A device for taking moessbauer data by a single-board computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Chuanyuan

    1987-01-01

    A device for taking moessbauer data based on a single-board computer is described. The device is simple in construction and to operate. The spectrum is displayed by an oscillograph. So it is very convenient for teaching and research work

  1. Autonomy of image and use of single or multiple sense modalities in original verbal image production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatena, J

    1978-06-01

    The use of a single or of multiple sense modalities in the production of original verbal images as related to autonomy of imagery was explored. 72 college adults were administered Onomatopoeia and Images and the Gordon Test of Visual Imagery Control. A modified scoring procedure for the Gordon scale differentiated imagers who were moderate or low in autonomy. The two groups produced original verbal images using multiple sense modalities more frequently than a single modality.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of single rice kernels during cooking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohoric, A.; Vergeldt, F.J.; Gerkema, E.; Jager, de P.A.; Duynhoven, van J.P.M.; Dalen, van G.; As, van H.

    2004-01-01

    The RARE imaging method was used to monitor the cooking of single rice kernels in real time and with high spatial resolution in three dimensions. The imaging sequence is optimized for rapid acquisition of signals with short relaxation times using centered out RARE. Short scan time and high spatial

  3. Imaging diagnosis of congenital heart disease with single coronary artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Ming; Li Yuhua; Zhong Yumin; Sun Aimin

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To report 56 cases of congenital heart disease with congenital single coronary artery and to evaluate the imaging diagnostic techniques. Methods: All 56 patients with congenital single coronary artery underwent angiocardiography. Contrast enhancement magnetic resonance angiography (CE MRA) was performed in 4 cases. 48 cases were confirmed by operation. Results: In these 56 cases, single left coronary artery was found in 44 cases and single right coronary artery was found in 12. Conclusion: Congenital heart disease with congenital single coronary artery is not rare and correct diagnosis is very important for surgery

  4. Single image interpolation via adaptive nonlocal sparsity-based modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Yaniv; Protter, Matan; Elad, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Single image interpolation is a central and extensively studied problem in image processing. A common approach toward the treatment of this problem in recent years is to divide the given image into overlapping patches and process each of them based on a model for natural image patches. Adaptive sparse representation modeling is one such promising image prior, which has been shown to be powerful in filling-in missing pixels in an image. Another force that such algorithms may use is the self-similarity that exists within natural images. Processing groups of related patches together exploits their correspondence, leading often times to improved results. In this paper, we propose a novel image interpolation method, which combines these two forces-nonlocal self-similarities and sparse representation modeling. The proposed method is contrasted with competitive and related algorithms, and demonstrated to achieve state-of-the-art results.

  5. Sorting on the basis of deformability of single cells in a femtosecond laser fabricated optofluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragheri, F.; Paiè, P.; Yang, T.; Nava, G.; Martınez Vázquez, R.; Di Tano, M.; Veglione, M.; Minzioni, P.; Mondello, C.; Cristiani, I.; Osellame, R.

    2015-03-01

    Optical stretching is a powerful technique for the mechanical phenotyping of single suspended cells that exploits cell deformability as an inherent functional marker. Dual-beam optical trapping and stretching of cells is a recognized tool to investigate their viscoelastic properties. The optical stretcher has the ability to deform cells through optical forces without physical contact or bead attachment. In addition, it is the only method that can be combined with microfluidic delivery, allowing for the serial, high-throughput measurement of the optical deformability and the selective sorting of single specific cells. Femtosecond laser micromachining can fabricate in the same chip both the microfluidic channel and the optical waveguides, producing a monolithic device with a very precise alignment between the components and very low sensitivity to external perturbations. Femtosecond laser irradiation in a fused silica chip followed by chemical etching in hydrofluoric acid has been used to fabricate the microfluidic channels where the cells move by pressure-driven flow. With the same femtosecond laser source two optical waveguides, orthogonal to the microfluidic channel and opposing each other, have been written inside the chip. Here we present an optimized writing process that provides improved wall roughness of the micro-channels allowing high-quality imaging. In addition, we will show results on cell sorting on the basis of mechanical properties in the same device: the different deformability exhibited by metastatic and tumorigenic cells has been exploited to obtain a metastasis-cells enriched sample. The enrichment is verified by exploiting, after cells collection, fluorescence microscopy.

  6. Single-Ion Implantation for the Development of Si-Based MOSFET Devices with Quantum Functionalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C. McCallum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest in single-ion implantation is driven in part by research into development of solid-state devices that exhibit quantum behaviour in their electronic or optical characteristics. Here, we provide an overview of international research work on single ion implantation and single ion detection for development of electronic devices for quantum computing. The scope of international research into single ion implantation is presented in the context of our own research in the Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology in Australia. Various single ion detection schemes are presented, and limitations on dopant placement accuracy due to ion straggling are discussed together with pathways for scale-up to multiple quantum devices on the one chip. Possible future directions for ion implantation in quantum computing and communications are also discussed.

  7. PRESBYOPIA OPTOMETRY METHOD BASED ON DIOPTER REGULATION AND CHARGE COUPLE DEVICE IMAGING TECHNOLOGY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Q; Wu, X X; Zhou, J; Wang, X; Liu, R F; Gao, J

    2015-01-01

    With the development of photoelectric technology and single-chip microcomputer technology, objective optometry, also known as automatic optometry, is becoming precise. This paper proposed a presbyopia optometry method based on diopter regulation and Charge Couple Device (CCD) imaging technology and, in the meantime, designed a light path that could measure the system. This method projects a test figure to the eye ground and then the reflected image from the eye ground is detected by CCD. The image is then automatically identified by computer and the far point and near point diopters are determined to calculate lens parameter. This is a fully automatic objective optometry method which eliminates subjective factors of the tested subject. Furthermore, it can acquire the lens parameter of presbyopia accurately and quickly and can be used to measure the lens parameter of hyperopia, myopia and astigmatism.

  8. Developing a compact multiple laser diode combiner with a single fiber stub output for handheld IoT devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minseok; June, Seunghyeok; Kim, Sehwan

    2018-01-01

    Many biomedical applications require an efficient combination and localization of multiple discrete light sources ( e.g., fluorescence and absorbance imaging). We present a compact 6 channel combiner that couples the output of independent solid-state light sources into a single 400-μm-diameter fiber stub for handheld Internet of Things (IoT) devices. We demonstrate average coupling efficiencies > 80% for each of the 6 laser diodes installed into the prototype. The design supports the use of continuous wave and intensity-modulated laser diodes. This fiber-stub-type beam combiner could be used to construct custom multi-wavelength sources for tissue oximeters, microscopes and molecular imaging technologies. In order to validate its suitability, we applied the developed fiber-stub-type beam combiner to a multi-wavelength light source for a handheld IoT device and demonstrated its feasibility for smart healthcare through a tumor-mimicking silicon phantom.

  9. Optically trapped atomic resonant devices for narrow linewidth spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Lipeng

    This thesis focuses on the development of atomic resonant devices for spectroscopic applications. The primary emphasis is on the imaging properties of optically thick atomic resonant fluorescent filters and their applications. In addition, this thesis presents a new concept for producing very narrow linewidth light as from an atomic vapor lamp pumped by a nanosecond pulse system. This research was motivated by application for missile warning system, and presents an innovative approach to a wide angle, ultra narrow linewidth imaging filter using a potassium vapor cell. The approach is to image onto and collect the fluorescent photons emitted from the surface of an optically thick potassium vapor cell, generating a 2 GHz pass-band imaging filter. This linewidth is narrow enough to fall within a Fraunhefer dark zone in the solar spectrum, thus make the detection solar blind. Experiments are conducted to measure the absorption line shape of the potassium resonant filter, the quantum efficiency of the fluorescent behavior, and the resolution of the fluorescent image. Fluorescent images with different spatial frequency components are analyzed by using a discrete Fourier transform, and the imaging capability of the fluorescent filter is described by its Modulation Transfer Function. For the detection of radiation that is spectrally broader than the linewidth of the potassium imaging filter, the fluorescent image is seen to be blurred by diffuse fluorescence from the slightly off resonant photons. To correct this, an ultra-thin potassium imaging filter is developed and characterized. The imaging property of the ultra-thin potassium imaging cell is tested with a potassium seeded flame, yielding a resolution image of ˜ 20 lines per mm. The physics behind the atomic resonant fluorescent filter is radiation trapping. The diffusion process of the resonant photons trapped in the atomic vapor is theoretically described in this thesis. A Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the

  10. Hip fracture discrimination by the Achilles Insight QUS imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damilakis, John; Papadokostakis, George; Perisinakis, Kostas; Maris, Thomas G.; Karantanas, Apostolos H.

    2007-01-01

    The importance of osteoporosis as a major health problem is well recognized. Its major clinical manifestation is low energy fractures. Considerable effort has been directed towards search of noninvasive methods for assessing osteoporotic fracture risk. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of quantitative ultrasound (QUS) variables measured by a new heel QUS imaging device to discriminate between postmenopausal women with and without hip fracture. The subjects included 30 postmenopausal female patients with hip fracture and 30 age-matched healthy women. Measurements were acquired using the Achilles Insight QUS imaging device. Bone mineral density (BMD) measurements were carried out using the Lunar Prodigy DXA scanner. Achilles Insight provides images of the heel bone and measures broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and speed of sound (SOS) values in a circular region of interest. A third QUS variable, the stiffness index (SI) was also determined. The short-term precision for healthy subjects was 2.05%, 0.17% and 1.91% for BUA, SOS and SI, respectively. Corresponding values for patients with fractures were 1.80%, 0.16% and 2.04%. All QUS variables measured using the Achilles Insight were significant discriminators of hip fractures (area under ROC curve = 0.77, 0.74 and 0.77 for BUA, SOS and SI, respectively). BMD measurements of the hip had the greatest discriminatory ability (area under ROC curve = 0.88). Statistically significant differences were found between the area under the ROC curve of BMD and the corresponding curves of the QUS variables (P < 0.05 for each of the three comparisons). QUS variables measured by Achilles Insight can be expected to be useful as indicators of the risk of hip fracture in postmenopausal women

  11. Technical Validation of ARTSENS–An Image Free Device for Evaluation of Vascular Stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Ravikumar; Kusmakar, Shitanshu; Thrivikraman, Arya Sree; Sivaprakasam, Mohanasankar

    2015-01-01

    Vascular stiffness is an indicator of cardiovascular health, with carotid artery stiffness having established correlation to coronary heart disease and utility in cardiovascular diagnosis and screening. State of art equipment for stiffness evaluation are expensive, require expertise to operate and not amenable for field deployment. In this context, we developed ARTerial Stiffness Evaluation for Noninvasive Screening (ARTSENS), a device for image free, noninvasive, automated evaluation of vascular stiffness amenable for field use. ARTSENS has a frugal hardware design, utilizing a single ultrasound transducer to interrogate the carotid artery, integrated with robust algorithms that extract arterial dimensions and compute clinically accepted measures of arterial stiffness. The ability of ARTSENS to measure vascular stiffness in vivo was validated by performing measurements on 125 subjects. The accuracy of results was verified with the state-of-the-art ultrasound imaging-based echo-tracking system. The relation between arterial stiffness measurements performed in sitting posture for ARTSENS measurement and sitting/supine postures for imaging system was also investigated to examine feasibility of performing ARTSENS measurements in the sitting posture for field deployment. This paper verified the feasibility of the novel ARTSENS device in performing accurate in vivo measurements of arterial stiffness. As a portable device that performs automated measurement of carotid artery stiffness with minimal operator input, ARTSENS has strong potential for use in large-scale screening. PMID:27170892

  12. Automatic analysis of image quality control for Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) devices in external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torfeh, Tarraf

    2009-01-01

    On-board imagers mounted on a radiotherapy treatment machine are very effective devices that improve the geometric accuracy of radiation delivery. However, a precise and regular quality control program is required in order to achieve this objective. Our purpose consisted of developing software tools dedicated to an automatic image quality control of IGRT devices used in external radiotherapy: 2D-MV mode for measuring patient position during the treatment using high energy images, 2D-kV mode (low energy images) and 3D Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) MV or kV mode, used for patient positioning before treatment. Automated analysis of the Winston and Lutz test was also proposed. This test is used for the evaluation of the mechanical aspects of treatment machines on which additional constraints are carried out due to the on-board imagers additional weights. Finally, a technique of generating digital phantoms in order to assess the performance of the proposed software tools is described. Software tools dedicated to an automatic quality control of IGRT devices allow reducing by a factor of 100 the time spent by the medical physics team to analyze the results of controls while improving their accuracy by using objective and reproducible analysis and offering traceability through generating automatic monitoring reports and statistical studies. (author) [fr

  13. Continuous imaging of a single neutral atom in a variant magneto-optical trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Tian; Zhou Shuyu; Chen Peng; Li Lin; Hong Tao; Wang Yuzhu

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate continuous imaging of a single 87 Rb atom confined in a steep magneto-optical trap with an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera and realize a one-dimensional micro-optical trap array with a Dammann grating. We adopt several methods to reduce the noise in the fluorescence signal we obtain with the EMCCD. Step jumping characteristics of the fluorescence demonstrate capturing and losing of individual atoms. (authors)

  14. Image guided placement of temporary anchorage devices for tooth movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahl-Palomo, L.; Bissada, N. [Case Western Reserve Univ. School of Dental Medicine, Dept. of Periodontics, Cleveland, OH (United States); Palomo, J.M.; Hans, M.G. [Case Western Reserve Univ. School of Dental Medicine, Dept. of Orthodontics, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2007-06-15

    The aim of this project is to develop an image guided protocol for placement of a temporary anchorage device without surgically reflecting a mucoperiosteal flap. Eighteen orthodontic cases were selected for skeletal anchorage from the department of orthodontics at Case University. CBCT images of the subjects were taken using the Hitachi CB MercuRay system set at 15 mA, 120 kVp. CBCT images evaluated the ideal location for TAD placement in three dimensions. Horizontal and vertical linear measurements were taken from fixed dental landmarks to clearly define the location for placement. Transverse slices were used to evaluate the thickness of the buccal plate. Using the transverse view, the angle of insertion was determined such that the maximum buccal plate surface area would contact the screw. TADs were placed in the optimum location, with the most appropriate angle of insertion using a closed approach and with minimal local anesthesia and without flap elevation. Results: All TADs were placed without anatomic encroachment and enabled fixed orthodontic anchorage. (orig.)

  15. Image guided placement of temporary anchorage devices for tooth movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahl-Palomo, L.; Bissada, N.; Palomo, J.M.; Hans, M.G.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this project is to develop an image guided protocol for placement of a temporary anchorage device without surgically reflecting a mucoperiosteal flap. Eighteen orthodontic cases were selected for skeletal anchorage from the department of orthodontics at Case University. CBCT images of the subjects were taken using the Hitachi CB MercuRay system set at 15 mA, 120 kVp. CBCT images evaluated the ideal location for TAD placement in three dimensions. Horizontal and vertical linear measurements were taken from fixed dental landmarks to clearly define the location for placement. Transverse slices were used to evaluate the thickness of the buccal plate. Using the transverse view, the angle of insertion was determined such that the maximum buccal plate surface area would contact the screw. TADs were placed in the optimum location, with the most appropriate angle of insertion using a closed approach and with minimal local anesthesia and without flap elevation. Results: All TADs were placed without anatomic encroachment and enabled fixed orthodontic anchorage. (orig.)

  16. 3D Point Cloud Reconstruction from Single Plenoptic Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Murgia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Novel plenoptic cameras sample the light field crossing the main camera lens. The information available in a plenoptic image must be processed, in order to create the depth map of the scene from a single camera shot. In this paper a novel algorithm, for the reconstruction of 3D point cloud of the scene from a single plenoptic image, taken with a consumer plenoptic camera, is proposed. Experimental analysis is conducted on several test images, and results are compared with state of the art methodologies. The results are very promising, as the quality of the 3D point cloud from plenoptic image, is comparable with the quality obtained with current non-plenoptic methodologies, that necessitate more than one image.

  17. Assessment of image quality in x-ray radiography imaging using a small plasma focus device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanani, A.; Shirani, B.; Jabbari, I.; Mokhtari, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper offers a comprehensive investigation of image quality parameters for a small plasma focus as a pulsed hard x-ray source for radiography applications. A set of images were captured from some metal objects and electronic circuits using a low energy plasma focus at different voltages of capacitor bank and different pressures of argon gas. The x-ray source focal spot of this device was obtained to be about 0.6 mm using the penumbra imaging method. The image quality was studied by several parameters such as image contrast, line spread function (LSF) and modulation transfer function (MTF). Results showed that the contrast changes by variations in gas pressure. The best contrast was obtained at a pressure of 0.5 mbar and 3.75 kJ stored energy. The results of x-ray dose from the device showed that about 0.6 mGy is sufficient to obtain acceptable images on the film. The measurements of LSF and MTF parameters were carried out by means of a thin stainless steel wire 0.8 mm in diameter and the cut-off frequency was obtained to be about 1.5 cycles/mm. - Highlights: • We investigated a small plasma focus as pulsed x-ray source for radiography applications. • The image quality was studied by several parameters such as image contrast, LSF and MTF. • The x-ray source focal spot was obtained to be ∼0.6 mm using the penumbra imaging method. • The x-ray dose measurement showed that about 0.6 mGy is sufficient to obtain acceptable images on the film. • The profiles of LSF and MTF showed that the cut-off frequency is about 1.5 cycles/mm

  18. Image quality and stability of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) devices: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, Markus; Pasler, Marlies; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Homolka, Peter; Poetter, Richard; Georg, Dietmar

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Our aim was to implement standards for quality assurance of IGRT devices used in our department and to compare their performances with that of a CT simulator. Materials and methods: We investigated image quality parameters for three devices over a period of 16 months. A multislice CT was used as a benchmark and results related to noise, spatial resolution, low contrast visibility (LCV) and uniformity were compared with a cone beam CT (CBCT) at a linac and simulator. Results: All devices performed well in terms of LCV and, in fact, exceeded vendor specifications. MTF was comparable between CT and linac CBCT. Integral nonuniformity was, on average, 0.002 for the CT and 0.006 for the linac CBCT. Uniformity, LCV and MTF varied depending on the protocols used for the linac CBCT. Contrast-to-noise ratio was an average of 51% higher for the CT than for the linac and simulator CBCT. No significant time trend was observed and tolerance limits were implemented. Discussion: Reasonable differences in image quality between CT and CBCT were observed. Further research and development are necessary to increase image quality of commercially available CBCT devices in order for them to serve the needs for adaptive and/or online planning.

  19. Image quality and stability of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) devices: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Markus; Pasler, Marlies; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Homolka, Peter; Poetter, Richard; Georg, Dietmar

    2009-10-01

    Our aim was to implement standards for quality assurance of IGRT devices used in our department and to compare their performances with that of a CT simulator. We investigated image quality parameters for three devices over a period of 16months. A multislice CT was used as a benchmark and results related to noise, spatial resolution, low contrast visibility (LCV) and uniformity were compared with a cone beam CT (CBCT) at a linac and simulator. All devices performed well in terms of LCV and, in fact, exceeded vendor specifications. MTF was comparable between CT and linac CBCT. Integral nonuniformity was, on average, 0.002 for the CT and 0.006 for the linac CBCT. Uniformity, LCV and MTF varied depending on the protocols used for the linac CBCT. Contrast-to-noise ratio was an average of 51% higher for the CT than for the linac and simulator CBCT. No significant time trend was observed and tolerance limits were implemented. Reasonable differences in image quality between CT and CBCT were observed. Further research and development are necessary to increase image quality of commercially available CBCT devices in order for them to serve the needs for adaptive and/or online planning.

  20. A reliable method for the counting and control of single ions for single-dopant controlled devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinada, T; Kurosawa, T; Nakayama, H; Zhu, Y; Hori, M; Ohdomari, I

    2008-01-01

    By 2016, transistor device size will be just 10 nm. However, a transistor that is doped at a typical concentration of 10 18 atoms cm -3 has only one dopant atom in the active channel region. Therefore, it can be predicted that conventional doping methods such as ion implantation and thermal diffusion will not be available ten years from now. We have been developing a single-ion implantation (SII) method that enables us to implant dopant ions one-by-one into semiconductors until the desired number is reached. Here we report a simple but reliable method to control the number of single-dopant atoms by detecting the change in drain current induced by single-ion implantation. The drain current decreases in a stepwise fashion as a result of the clusters of displaced Si atoms created by every single-ion incidence. This result indicates that the single-ion detection method we have developed is capable of detecting single-ion incidence with 100% efficiency. Our method potentially could pave the way to future single-atom devices, including a solid-state quantum computer

  1. Rapidly-steered single-element ultrasound for real-time volumetric imaging and guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauber, Mark; Western, Craig; Solek, Roman; Salisbury, Kenneth; Hristov, Dmitre; Schlosser, Jeffrey

    2016-03-01

    Volumetric ultrasound (US) imaging has the potential to provide real-time anatomical imaging with high soft-tissue contrast in a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic guidance applications. However, existing volumetric US machines utilize "wobbling" linear phased array or matrix phased array transducers which are costly to manufacture and necessitate bulky external processing units. To drastically reduce cost, improve portability, and reduce footprint, we propose a rapidly-steered single-element volumetric US imaging system. In this paper we explore the feasibility of this system with a proof-of-concept single-element volumetric US imaging device. The device uses a multi-directional raster-scan technique to generate a series of two-dimensional (2D) slices that were reconstructed into three-dimensional (3D) volumes. At 15 cm depth, 90° lateral field of view (FOV), and 20° elevation FOV, the device produced 20-slice volumes at a rate of 0.8 Hz. Imaging performance was evaluated using an US phantom. Spatial resolution was 2.0 mm, 4.7 mm, and 5.0 mm in the axial, lateral, and elevational directions at 7.5 cm. Relative motion of phantom targets were automatically tracked within US volumes with a mean error of -0.3+/-0.3 mm, -0.3+/-0.3 mm, and -0.1+/-0.5 mm in the axial, lateral, and elevational directions, respectively. The device exhibited a mean spatial distortion error of 0.3+/-0.9 mm, 0.4+/-0.7 mm, and -0.3+/-1.9 in the axial, lateral, and elevational directions. With a production cost near $1000, the performance characteristics of the proposed system make it an ideal candidate for diagnostic and image-guided therapy applications where form factor and low cost are paramount.

  2. Assessment of image quality in x-ray radiography imaging using a small plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanani, A.; Shirani, B.; Jabbari, I.; Mokhtari, J.

    2014-08-01

    This paper offers a comprehensive investigation of image quality parameters for a small plasma focus as a pulsed hard x-ray source for radiography applications. A set of images were captured from some metal objects and electronic circuits using a low energy plasma focus at different voltages of capacitor bank and different pressures of argon gas. The x-ray source focal spot of this device was obtained to be about 0.6 mm using the penumbra imaging method. The image quality was studied by several parameters such as image contrast, line spread function (LSF) and modulation transfer function (MTF). Results showed that the contrast changes by variations in gas pressure. The best contrast was obtained at a pressure of 0.5 mbar and 3.75 kJ stored energy. The results of x-ray dose from the device showed that about 0.6 mGy is sufficient to obtain acceptable images on the film. The measurements of LSF and MTF parameters were carried out by means of a thin stainless steel wire 0.8 mm in diameter and the cut-off frequency was obtained to be about 1.5 cycles/mm.

  3. Quantitative imaging of single upconversion nanoparticles in biological tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemarie Nadort

    Full Text Available The unique luminescent properties of new-generation synthetic nanomaterials, upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs, enabled high-contrast optical biomedical imaging by suppressing the crowded background of biological tissue autofluorescence and evading high tissue absorption. This raised high expectations on the UCNP utilities for intracellular and deep tissue imaging, such as whole animal imaging. At the same time, the critical nonlinear dependence of the UCNP luminescence on the excitation intensity results in dramatic signal reduction at (∼1 cm depth in biological tissue. Here, we report on the experimental and theoretical investigation of this trade-off aiming at the identification of optimal application niches of UCNPs e.g. biological liquids and subsurface tissue layers. As an example of such applications, we report on single UCNP imaging through a layer of hemolyzed blood. To extend this result towards in vivo applications, we quantified the optical properties of single UCNPs and theoretically analyzed the prospects of single-particle detectability in live scattering and absorbing bio-tissue using a human skin model. The model predicts that a single 70-nm UCNP would be detectable at skin depths up to 400 µm, unlike a hardly detectable single fluorescent (fluorescein dye molecule. UCNP-assisted imaging in the ballistic regime thus allows for excellent applications niches, where high sensitivity is the key requirement.

  4. Single DNA imaging and length quantification through a mobile phone microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qingshan; Luo, Wei; Chiang, Samuel; Kappel, Tara; Mejia, Crystal; Tseng, Derek; Chan, Raymond Yan L.; Yan, Eddie; Qi, Hangfei; Shabbir, Faizan; Ozkan, Haydar; Feng, Steve; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-03-01

    The development of sensitive optical microscopy methods for the detection of single DNA molecules has become an active research area which cultivates various promising applications including point-of-care (POC) genetic testing and diagnostics. Direct visualization of individual DNA molecules usually relies on sophisticated optical microscopes that are mostly available in well-equipped laboratories. For POC DNA testing/detection, there is an increasing need for the development of new single DNA imaging and sensing methods that are field-portable, cost-effective, and accessible for diagnostic applications in resource-limited or field-settings. For this aim, we developed a mobile-phone integrated fluorescence microscopy platform that allows imaging and sizing of single DNA molecules that are stretched on a chip. This handheld device contains an opto-mechanical attachment integrated onto a smartphone camera module, which creates a high signal-to-noise ratio dark-field imaging condition by using an oblique illumination/excitation configuration. Using this device, we demonstrated imaging of individual linearly stretched λ DNA molecules (48 kilobase-pair, kbp) over 2 mm2 field-of-view. We further developed a robust computational algorithm and a smartphone app that allowed the users to quickly quantify the length of each DNA fragment imaged using this mobile interface. The cellphone based device was tested by five different DNA samples (5, 10, 20, 40, and 48 kbp), and a sizing accuracy of <1 kbp was demonstrated for DNA strands longer than 10 kbp. This mobile DNA imaging and sizing platform can be very useful for various diagnostic applications including the detection of disease-specific genes and quantification of copy-number-variations at POC settings.

  5. Time-of-flight camera via a single-pixel correlation image sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Tianyi; Chen, Qian; He, Weiji; Dai, Huidong; Ye, Ling; Gu, Guohua

    2018-04-01

    A time-of-flight imager based on single-pixel correlation image sensors is proposed for noise-free depth map acquisition in presence of ambient light. Digital micro-mirror device and time-modulated IR-laser provide spatial and temporal illumination on the unknown object. Compressed sensing and ‘four bucket principle’ method are combined to reconstruct the depth map from a sequence of measurements at a low sampling rate. Second-order correlation transform is also introduced to reduce the noise from the detector itself and direct ambient light. Computer simulations are presented to validate the computational models and improvement of reconstructions.

  6. Single image super-resolution based on convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Lamei; Luo, Ming; Yang, Weidong; Li, Peng; Jin, Liujia

    2018-03-01

    We present a deep learning method for single image super-resolution (SISR). The proposed approach learns end-to-end mapping between low-resolution (LR) images and high-resolution (HR) images. The mapping is represented as a deep convolutional neural network which inputs the LR image and outputs the HR image. Our network uses 5 convolution layers, which kernels size include 5×5, 3×3 and 1×1. In our proposed network, we use residual-learning and combine different sizes of convolution kernels at the same layer. The experiment results show that our proposed method performs better than the existing methods in reconstructing quality index and human visual effects on benchmarked images.

  7. Micro-patterned agarose gel devices for single-cell high-throughput microscopy of E. coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, David G; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Yo; Taniguchi, Yuichi

    2017-12-21

    High-throughput microscopy of bacterial cells elucidated fundamental cellular processes including cellular heterogeneity and cell division homeostasis. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic devices provide advantages including precise positioning of cells and throughput, however device fabrication is time-consuming and requires specialised skills. Agarose pads are a popular alternative, however cells often clump together, which hinders single cell quantitation. Here, we imprint agarose pads with micro-patterned 'capsules', to trap individual cells and 'lines', to direct cellular growth outwards in a straight line. We implement this micro-patterning into multi-pad devices called CapsuleHotel and LineHotel for high-throughput imaging. CapsuleHotel provides ~65,000 capsule structures per mm 2 that isolate individual Escherichia coli cells. In contrast, LineHotel provides ~300 line structures per mm that direct growth of micro-colonies. With CapsuleHotel, a quantitative single cell dataset of ~10,000 cells across 24 samples can be acquired and analysed in under 1 hour. LineHotel allows tracking growth of > 10 micro-colonies across 24 samples simultaneously for up to 4 generations. These easy-to-use devices can be provided in kit format, and will accelerate discoveries in diverse fields ranging from microbiology to systems and synthetic biology.

  8. Transmission imaging for registration of ictal and interictal single-photon emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipilae, O. [Epilepsy Unit, Neurology, Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering, Helsinki University of Technology, P.O. Box 2200, FIN-02015 HUT (Finland); Nikkinen, P.; Liewendahl, K. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Laboratory Department, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Savolainen, S. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Laboratory Department, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Department of Radiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Granstroem, M.-L.; Gaily, E. [Epilepsy Unit, Neurology, Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Poutanen, V.-P. [Department of Radiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Pohjonen, H. [Technology Development Centre, P.O. Box 69, 00101 Helsinki (Finland)

    2000-02-01

    A method developed for registration of ictal and interictal single-photon emission tomography (SPET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) is described. For SPET studies, technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) was injected intravenously while the patient was monitored on video-EEG to document the ictal or interictal state. Imaging was performed using a triple-head gamma camera equipped with a transmission imaging device using a gadolinium-153 source. The images (128 x 128 pixels, voxel size 3.7 x 3.7 x 3.6 mm{sup 3}) were reconstructed using an iterative algorithm and postfiltered with a Wiener filter. The gold-plated silver electrodes on the patient's scalp were utilized as markers for registration of the ictal and interictal SPET images, as these metallic markers were clearly seen on the transmission images. Fitting of the marker sets was based on a non-iterative least squares method. The interictal SPET image was subtracted from the ictal image after scaling. The T1-weighted MPRAGE MR images with voxel size of 1.0 x 1.0 x 1.0 mm{sup 3} were obtained with a 1.5-T scanner. For registration of MR and subtraction SPET images, the external marker set of the ictal SPET study was fitted to the surface of the head segmented from MR images. The SPET registration was tested with a phantom experiment. Registration of ictal and interictal SPET in five patient studies resulted in a 2-mm RMS residual of the marker sets. The estimated RMS error of registration in the final result combining locations of the electrodes, subtraction SPET and MR images was 3-5 mm. In conclusion, transmission imaging can be utilized for an accurate and easily implemented registration procedure for ictal and interictal SPET, MRI and EEG. (orig.)

  9. Performance of a malaria microscopy image analysis slide reading device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prescott William R

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viewing Plasmodium in Romanovsky-stained blood has long been considered the gold standard for diagnosis and a cornerstone in management of the disease. This method however, requires a subjective evaluation by trained, experienced diagnosticians and establishing proficiency of diagnosis is fraught with many challenges. Reported here is an evaluation of a diagnostic system (a “device” consisting of a microscope, a scanner, and a computer algorithm that evaluates scanned images of standard Giemsa-stained slides and reports species and parasitaemia. Methods The device was challenged with two independent tests: a 55 slide, expert slide reading test the composition of which has been published by the World Health Organization (“WHO55” test, and a second test in which slides were made from a sample of consenting subjects participating in a malaria incidence survey conducted in Equatorial Guinea (EGMIS test. These subjects’ blood was tested by malaria RDT as well as having the blood smear diagnosis unequivocally determined by a worldwide panel of a minimum of six reference microscopists. Only slides with unequivocal microscopic diagnoses were used for the device challenge, n = 119. Results On the WHO55 test, the device scored a “Level 4” using the WHO published grading scheme. Broken down by more traditional analysis parameters this result was translated to 89% and 70% sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Species were correctly identified in 61% of the slides and the quantification of parasites fell within acceptable range of the validated parasitaemia in 10% of the cases. On the EGMIS test it scored 100% and 94% sensitivity/specificity, with 64% of the species correct and 45% of the parasitaemia within an acceptable range. A pooled analysis of the 174 slides used for both tests resulted in an overall 92% sensitivity and 90% specificity with 61% species and 19% quantifications correct. Conclusions In its

  10. High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of single cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M. Strohm

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic images of stained neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes from a blood smear were acquired using a combined acoustic/photoacoustic microscope. Photoacoustic images were created using a pulsed 532 nm laser that was coupled to a single mode fiber to produce output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm via stimulated Raman scattering. The excitation wavelength was selected using optical filters and focused onto the sample using a 20× objective. A 1000 MHz transducer was co-aligned with the laser spot and used for ultrasound and photoacoustic images, enabling micrometer resolution with both modalities. The different cell types could be easily identified due to variations in contrast within the acoustic and photoacoustic images. This technique provides a new way of probing leukocyte structure with potential applications towards detecting cellular abnormalities and diseased cells at the single cell level.

  11. High resolution imaging of surface patterns of single bacterial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greif, Dominik; Wesner, Daniel; Regtmeier, Jan; Anselmetti, Dario

    2010-01-01

    We systematically studied the origin of surface patterns observed on single Sinorhizobium meliloti bacterial cells by comparing the complementary techniques atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Conditions ranged from living bacteria in liquid to fixed bacteria in high vacuum. Stepwise, we applied different sample modifications (fixation, drying, metal coating, etc.) and characterized the observed surface patterns. A detailed analysis revealed that the surface structure with wrinkled protrusions in SEM images were not generated de novo but most likely evolved from similar and naturally present structures on the surface of living bacteria. The influence of osmotic stress to the surface structure of living cells was evaluated and also the contribution of exopolysaccharide and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by imaging two mutant strains of the bacterium under native conditions. AFM images of living bacteria in culture medium exhibited surface structures of the size of single proteins emphasizing the usefulness of AFM for high resolution cell imaging.

  12. Comprehensive model for predicting perceptual image quality of smart mobile devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Rui; Xu, Haisong; Luo, M R; Li, Haifeng

    2015-01-01

    An image quality model for smart mobile devices was proposed based on visual assessments of several image quality attributes. A series of psychophysical experiments were carried out on two kinds of smart mobile devices, i.e., smart phones and tablet computers, in which naturalness, colorfulness, brightness, contrast, sharpness, clearness, and overall image quality were visually evaluated under three lighting environments via categorical judgment method for various application types of test images. On the basis of Pearson correlation coefficients and factor analysis, the overall image quality could first be predicted by its two constituent attributes with multiple linear regression functions for different types of images, respectively, and then the mathematical expressions were built to link the constituent image quality attributes with the physical parameters of smart mobile devices and image appearance factors. The procedure and algorithms were applicable to various smart mobile devices, different lighting conditions, and multiple types of images, and performance was verified by the visual data.

  13. Development of heavy-ion irradiation technique for single-event in semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Norio; Akutsu, Takao; Matsuda, Sumio [National Space Development Agency of Japan, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Tsukuba Space Center; Naitoh, Ichiro; Itoh, Hisayoshi; Agematsu, Takashi; Kamiya, Tomihiro; Nashiyama, Isamu

    1997-03-01

    Heavy-ion irradiation technique has been developed for the evaluation of single-event effects on semiconductor devices. For the uniform irradiation of high energy heavy ions to device samples, we have designed and installed a magnetic beam-scanning system in a JAERI cyclotron beam course. It was found that scanned area was approximately 4 x 2 centimeters and that the deviation of ion fluence from the average value was less than 7%. (author)

  14. Fabrication of spintronics device by direct synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes from ferromagnetic electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Ambri Mohamed, Nobuhito Inami, Eiji Shikoh, Yoshiyuki Yamamoto, Hidenobu Hori and Akihiko Fujiwara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe an alternative method for realizing a carbon nanotube spin field-effect transistor device by the direct synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs on substrates by alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition. We observed hysteretic magnetoresistance (MR at low temperatures due to spin-dependent transport. In these devices, the maximum ratio in resistance variation of MR was found to be 1.8%.

  15. Single channel double-duct liquid metal electrical generator using a magnetohydrodynamic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaland, Carsten M.; Deeds, W. Edward

    1999-01-01

    A single channel double-duct liquid metal electrical generator using a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) device. The single channel device provides useful output AC electric energy. The generator includes a two-cylinder linear-piston engine which drives liquid metal in a single channel looped around one side of the MHD device to form a double-duct contra-flowing liquid metal MHD generator. A flow conduit network and drive mechanism are provided for moving liquid metal with an oscillating flow through a static magnetic field to produce useful AC electric energy at practical voltages and currents. Variable stroke is obtained by controlling the quantity of liquid metal in the channel. High efficiency is obtained over a wide range of frequency and power output.

  16. Hyperspectral imaging using the single-pixel Fourier transform technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Senlin; Hui, Wangwei; Wang, Yunlong; Huang, Kaicheng; Shi, Qiushuai; Ying, Cuifeng; Liu, Dongqi; Ye, Qing; Zhou, Wenyuan; Tian, Jianguo

    2017-03-01

    Hyperspectral imaging technology is playing an increasingly important role in the fields of food analysis, medicine and biotechnology. To improve the speed of operation and increase the light throughput in a compact equipment structure, a Fourier transform hyperspectral imaging system based on a single-pixel technique is proposed in this study. Compared with current imaging spectrometry approaches, the proposed system has a wider spectral range (400-1100 nm), a better spectral resolution (1 nm) and requires fewer measurement data (a sample rate of 6.25%). The performance of this system was verified by its application to the non-destructive testing of potatoes.

  17. Paper-based device for separation and cultivation of single microalga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Chung; Liu, Yi-Ju; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2015-12-01

    Single-cell separation is among the most useful techniques in biochemical research, diagnosis and various industrial applications. Microalgae species have great economic importance as industrial raw materials. Microalgae species collected from environment are typically a mixed and heterogeneous population of species that must be isolated and purified for examination and further application. Conventional methods, such as serial dilution and a streaking-plate method, are intensive of labor and inefficient. We developed a paper-based device for separation and cultivation of single microalga. The fabrication was simply conducted with a common laser printer and required only a few minutes without lithographic instruments and clean-room. The driving force of the paper device was simple capillarity without a complicated pump connection that is part of most devices for microfluidics. The open-structure design of the paper device makes it operable with a common laboratory micropipette for sample transfer and manipulation with a naked eye or adaptable to a robotic system with functionality of high-throughput retrieval and analysis. The efficiency of isolating a single cell from mixed microalgae species is seven times as great as with a conventional method involving serial dilution. The paper device can serve also as an incubator for microalgae growth on simply rinsing the paper with a growth medium. Many applications such as highly expressed cell selection and various single-cell analysis would be applicable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Microfluidic device for continuous single cells analysis via Raman spectroscopy enhanced by integrated plasmonic nanodimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perozziello, Gerardo; Candeloro, Patrizio; De Grazia, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In this work a Raman flow cytometer is presented. It consists of a microfluidic device that takes advantages of the basic principles of Raman spectroscopy and flow cytometry. The microfluidic device integrates calibrated microfluidic channels-where the cells can flow one-by-one -, allowing single...... cell Raman analysis. The microfluidic channel integrates plasmonic nanodimers in a fluidic trapping region. In this way it is possible to perform Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy on single cell. These allow a label-free analysis, providing information about the biochemical content of membrane and cytoplasm...

  19. Electronic spectrum of a deterministic single-donor device in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuechsle, Martin; Miwa, Jill A.; Mahapatra, Suddhasatta; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.

    2013-01-01

    We report the fabrication of a single-electron transistor (SET) based on an individual phosphorus dopant that is deterministically positioned between the dopant-based electrodes of a transport device in silicon. Electronic characterization at mK-temperatures reveals a charging energy that is very similar to the value expected for isolated P donors in a bulk Si environment. Furthermore, we find indications for bulk-like one-electron excited states in the co-tunneling spectrum of the device, in sharp contrast to previous reports on transport through single dopants

  20. Multiple-Event, Single-Photon Counting Imaging Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xinyu; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Sun, Chao; Wang, Kang L.

    2011-01-01

    The single-photon counting imaging sensor is typically an array of silicon Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes that are monolithically integrated with CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) readout, signal processing, and addressing circuits located in each pixel and the peripheral area of the chip. The major problem is its single-event method for photon count number registration. A single-event single-photon counting imaging array only allows registration of up to one photon count in each of its pixels during a frame time, i.e., the interval between two successive pixel reset operations. Since the frame time can t be too short, this will lead to very low dynamic range and make the sensor merely useful for very low flux environments. The second problem of the prior technique is a limited fill factor resulting from consumption of chip area by the monolithically integrated CMOS readout in pixels. The resulting low photon collection efficiency will substantially ruin any benefit gained from the very sensitive single-photon counting detection. The single-photon counting imaging sensor developed in this work has a novel multiple-event architecture, which allows each of its pixels to register as more than one million (or more) photon-counting events during a frame time. Because of a consequently boosted dynamic range, the imaging array of the invention is capable of performing single-photon counting under ultra-low light through high-flux environments. On the other hand, since the multiple-event architecture is implemented in a hybrid structure, back-illumination and close-to-unity fill factor can be realized, and maximized quantum efficiency can also be achieved in the detector array.

  1. Development of an IMRT quality assurance program using an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, P.; Oliver, L.; Mallik, A.

    2000-01-01

    provided very encouraging results. Direct ionisation chamber measurements have identified two different variables that effect the result. We exposed a simple IMRT beam with two step and shoot strips of equal size and dose fraction. The A-Si recording of the strips varied by altering the number of frames or the beam's dose rate. We found that the dose delivered to each of these strips was not equal whilst the total dose for the whole exposure was correct. The two-strip pattern is a very rigorous test of the dose delivery system. Normally the intensity modulated beam is made of many more segments which spreads this dose fraction error. For 100MU/minute and greater than 30MU per fraction the error was 1.5%. The most optimum data acquisition settings of the A-Si device produced images that agreed to within 1% for l00MU/minute dose rate. We have prepared a simple single-field case study using the Helios software package. The A-Si image agreed with the Helios planning version and the dose profile passing through the phantom was as expected. Ideally, the exposure time should be reduced to a minimum by using the highest suitable dose rate. The A-Si device requires more work at this stage but it has been shown in these initial tests that the A-Si EPID will be a valuable QA tool for viewing and validating the IMRT beam treatments. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  2. The digital radiographic and computed tomography imaging of two types of explosive devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galiano Riveros, Eduardo

    2002-01-01

    Two well-established medical imaging methods, digital radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT), were employed to obtain images of two types of explosive devices, model rocket engines and shotgun shells. The images were evaluated from an airport security perspective. In terms of geometrical shape, the detection probability of the explosive devices appears to be higher with DR imaging, but in terms of the actual explosive compounds in the devices, CT appears to offer a higher detection probability. DR imaging offers a low detection probability for the explosive powder in the shotgun shells, but a rather significant detection probability for the explosive propellant in the model rocket engines

  3. Automatic Blastomere Recognition from a Single Embryo Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Tian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of blastomeres of human day 3 embryos is one of the most important criteria for evaluating embryo viability. However, due to the transparency and overlap of blastomeres, it is a challenge to recognize blastomeres automatically using a single embryo image. This study proposes an approach based on least square curve fitting (LSCF for automatic blastomere recognition from a single image. First, combining edge detection, deletion of multiple connected points, and dilation and erosion, an effective preprocessing method was designed to obtain part of blastomere edges that were singly connected. Next, an automatic recognition method for blastomeres was proposed using least square circle fitting. This algorithm was tested on 381 embryo microscopic images obtained from the eight-cell period, and the results were compared with those provided by experts. Embryos were recognized with a 0 error rate occupancy of 21.59%, and the ratio of embryos in which the false recognition number was less than or equal to 2 was 83.16%. This experiment demonstrated that our method could efficiently and rapidly recognize the number of blastomeres from a single embryo image without the need to reconstruct the three-dimensional model of the blastomeres first; this method is simple and efficient.

  4. Visibility Restoration for Single Hazy Image Using Dual Prior Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingye Ju

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Single image haze removal has been a challenging task due to its super ill-posed nature. In this paper, we propose a novel single image algorithm that improves the detail and color of such degraded images. More concretely, we redefine a more reliable atmospheric scattering model (ASM based on our previous work and the atmospheric point spread function (APSF. Further, by taking the haze density spatial feature into consideration, we design a scene-wise APSF kernel prediction mechanism to eliminate the multiple-scattering effect. With the redefined ASM and designed APSF, combined with the existing prior knowledge, the complex dehazing problem can be subtly converted into one-dimensional searching problem, which allows us to directly obtain the scene transmission and thereby recover visually realistic results via the proposed ASM. Experimental results verify that our algorithm outperforms several state-of-the-art dehazing techniques in terms of robustness, effectiveness, and efficiency.

  5. An agar gel membrane-PDMS hybrid microfluidic device for long term single cell dynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ieong; Atsumi, Shota; Huang, Wei-Chih; Wu, Tung-Yun; Hanai, Taizo; Lam, Miu-Ling; Tang, Ping; Yang, Jian; Liao, James C; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2010-10-21

    Significance of single cell measurements stems from the substantial temporal fluctuations and cell-cell variability possessed by individual cells. A major difficulty in monitoring surface non-adherent cells such as bacteria and yeast is that these cells tend to aggregate into clumps during growth, obstructing the tracking or identification of single-cells over long time periods. Here, we developed a microfluidic platform for long term single-cell tracking and cultivation with continuous media refreshing and dynamic chemical perturbation capability. The design highlights a simple device-assembly process between PDMS microchannel and agar membrane through conformal contact, and can be easily adapted by microbiologists for their routine laboratory use. The device confines cell growth in monolayer between an agar membrane and a glass surface. Efficient nutrient diffusion through the membrane and reliable temperature maintenance provide optimal growth condition for the cells, which exhibited fast exponential growth and constant distribution of cell sizes. More than 24 h of single-cell tracking was demonstrated on a transcription-metabolism integrated synthetic biological model, the gene-metabolic oscillator. Single cell morphology study under alcohol toxicity allowed us to discover and characterize cell filamentation exhibited by different E. coli isobutanol tolerant strains. We believe this novel device will bring new capabilities to quantitative microbiology, providing a versatile platform for single cell dynamic studies.

  6. High-throughput deterministic single-cell encapsulation and droplet pairing, fusion, and shrinkage in a single microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeman, Rogier M; Kemna, Evelien W M; Wolbers, Floor; van den Berg, Albert

    2014-02-01

    In this article, we present a microfluidic device capable of successive high-yield single-cell encapsulation in droplets, with additional droplet pairing, fusion, and shrinkage. Deterministic single-cell encapsulation is realized using Dean-coupled inertial ordering of cells in a Yin-Yang-shaped curved microchannel using a double T-junction, with a frequency over 2000 Hz, followed by controlled droplet pairing with a 100% success rate. Subsequently, droplet fusion is realized using electrical actuation resulting in electro-coalescence of two droplets, each containing a single HL60 cell, with 95% efficiency. Finally, volume reduction of the fused droplet up to 75% is achieved by a triple pitchfork structure. This droplet volume reduction is necessary to obtain close cell-cell membrane contact necessary for final cell electrofusion, leading to hybridoma formation, which is the ultimate aim of this research. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. CMOS SPAD-based image sensor for single photon counting and time of flight imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Dutton, Neale Arthur William

    2016-01-01

    The facility to capture the arrival of a single photon, is the fundamental limit to the detection of quantised electromagnetic radiation. An image sensor capable of capturing a picture with this ultimate optical and temporal precision is the pinnacle of photo-sensing. The creation of high spatial resolution, single photon sensitive, and time-resolved image sensors in complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology offers numerous benefits in a wide field of applications....

  8. RF Device for Acquiring Images of the Human Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, Todd C.; McGrath, William R.

    2010-01-01

    A safe, non-invasive method for forming images through clothing of large groups of people, in order to search for concealed weapons either made of metal or not, has been developed. A millimeter wavelength scanner designed in a unique, ring-shaped configuration can obtain a full 360 image of the body with a resolution of less than a millimeter in only a few seconds. Millimeter waves readily penetrate normal clothing, but are highly reflected by the human body and concealed objects. Millimeter wave signals are nonionizing and are harmless to human tissues when used at low power levels. The imager (see figure) consists of a thin base that supports a small-diameter vertical post about 7 ft (=2.13 m) tall. Attached to the post is a square-shaped ring 2 in. (=5 cm) wide and 3 ft (=91 cm) on a side. The ring is oriented horizontally, and is supported halfway along one side by a connection to a linear bearing on the vertical post. A planar RF circuit board is mounted to the inside of each side of the ring. Each circuit board contains an array of 30 receivers, one transmitter, and digitization electronics. Each array element has a printed-circuit patch antenna coupled to a pair of mixers by a 90 coupler. The mixers receive a reference local oscillator signal to a subharmonic of the transmitter frequency. A single local oscillator line feeds all 30 receivers on the board. The resulting MHz IF signals are amplified and carried to the edge of the board where they are demodulated and digitized. The transmitted signal is derived from the local oscillator at a frequency offset determined by a crystal oscillator. One antenna centrally located on each side of the square ring provides the source illumination power. The total transmitted power is less than 100 mW, resulting in an exposure level that is completely safe to humans. The output signals from all four circuit boards are fed via serial connection to a data processing computer. The computer processes the approximately 1-MB

  9. A graphene/single GaAs nanowire Schottky junction photovoltaic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yanbin; Yan, Xin; Zhang, Jinnan; Li, Bang; Wu, Yao; Lu, Qichao; Jin, Chenxiaoshuai; Zhang, Xia; Ren, Xiaomin

    2018-05-04

    A graphene/nanowire Schottky junction is a promising structure for low-cost high-performance optoelectronic devices. Here we demonstrate a graphene/single GaAs nanowire Schottky junction photovoltaic device. The Schottky junction is fabricated by covering a single layer graphene onto an n-doped GaAs nanowire. Under 532 nm laser excitation, the device exhibits a high responsivity of 231 mA W-1 and a short response/recover time of 85/118 μs at zero bias. Under AM 1.5 G solar illumination, the device has an open-circuit voltage of 75.0 mV and a short-circuit current density of 425 mA cm-2, yielding a remarkable conversion efficiency of 8.8%. The excellent photovoltaic performance of the device is attributed to the strong built-in electric field in the Schottky junction as well as the transparent property of graphene. The device is promising for self-powered high-speed photodetectors and low-cost high-efficiency solar cells.

  10. Single-pixel imaging by Hadamard transform and its application for hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Shibuya, Kyuki; Taguchi, Hiroki; Iwata, Tetsuo; Takaya, Yasuhiro; Yasui, Takeshi

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we report on comparisons of single-pixel imagings using Hadamard Transform (HT) and the ghost imaging (GI) in the view point of the visibility under weak light conditions. For comparing the two methods, we have discussed about qualities of images based on experimental results and numerical analysis. To detect images by the TH method, we have illuminated the Hadamard-pattern mask and calculated by orthogonal transform. On the other hand, the GH method can detect images by illuminating random patterns and a correlation measurement. For comparing two methods under weak light intensity, we have controlled illuminated intensities of a DMD projector about 0.1 in signal-to-noise ratio. Though a process speed of the HT image was faster then an image via the GI, the GI method has an advantage of detection under weak light condition. An essential difference between the HT and the GI method is discussed about reconstruction process. Finally, we also show a typical application of the single-pixel imaging such as hyperspectral images by using dual-optical frequency combs. An optical setup consists of two fiber lasers, spatial light modulated for generating patten illumination, and a single pixel detector. We are successful to detect hyperspectrul images in a range from 1545 to 1555 nm at 0.01nm resolution.

  11. High-energy heavy ion testing of VLSI devices for single event ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    per describes the high-energy heavy ion radiation testing of VLSI devices for single event upset (SEU) ... The experimental set up employed to produce low flux of heavy ions viz. silicon ... through which they pass, leaving behind a wake of elec- ... for use in Bus Management Unit (BMU) and bulk CMOS ... was scheduled.

  12. All-in-polymer injection molded device for single cell capture using multilevel silicon master fabrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanzi, S.; Larsen, S.T.; Matteucci, M.

    2012-01-01

    This work demonstrates a novel all-in-polymer device for single cell capture applicable for biological recordings. The chip is injection molded and comprises a "cornered" (non planar) aperture. It has been demonstrated how cornered apertures are straightforward to mold in PDMS [1,2]. In this stud...

  13. Single atom doping for quantum device development in diamond and silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weis, C.D.; Schuh, A.; Batra, A.; Persaud, A.; Rangelow, I.W.; Bokor, J.; Lo, C.C.; Cabrini, S.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Fuchs, G.D.; Hanson, R.; Awschalom, D.D.; Schenkel, T.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to inject dopant atoms with high spatial resolution, flexibility in dopant species, and high single ion detection fidelity opens opportunities for the study of dopant fluctuation effects and the development of devices in which function is based on the manipulation of quantum states in

  14. A low-temperature sample orienting device for single crystal spectroscopy at the SNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherline, T E; Solomon, L; Roberts, C K II; Bruce, D; Gaulin, B; Granroth, G E, E-mail: sherlinete@ornl.gov

    2010-11-01

    A low temperature sample orientation device providing three axes of rotation has been successfully built and is in testing for use on several spectrometers at the spallation neutron source (SNS). Sample rotation about the vertical ({omega}) axis of nearly 360 deg. and out of plane tilts ({phi} and v) of from -3.4 deg. to 4.4 deg. and from -2.8 deg. to 3.5 deg., respectively, are possible. An off-the-shelf closed cycle refrigerator (CCR) is mounted on a room temperature sealed rotary flange providing {omega} rotations of the sample. Out-of-plane tilts are made possible by piezoelectric actuated angular positioning devices mounted on the low temperature head of the CCR. Novel encoding devices based on magnetoresistive sensors have been developed to measure the tilt stage angles. This combination facilitates single crystal investigations from room temperature to 3.1 K. Commissioning experiments of the rotating CCR for both powder and single crystal samples have been performed on the ARCS spectrometer at the SNS. For the powder sample this device was used to continuously rotate the sample and thus average out any partial orientation of the powder. The powder rings observed in S(Q) are presented. For the single crystal sample, the rotation was used to probe different regions of momentum transfer (Q-space). Laue patterns obtained from a single crystal sample at two rotation angles are presented.

  15. [Introduction of Quality Management System Audit in Medical Device Single Audit Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jing; Xiao, Jiangyi; Wang, Aijun

    2018-01-30

    The audit of the quality management system in the medical device single audit program covers the requirements of several national regulatory authorities, which has a very important reference value. This paper briefly described the procedures and contents of this audit. Some enlightenment on supervision and inspection are discussed in China, for reference by the regulatory authorities and auditing organizations.

  16. A Nanofluidic Mixing Device for High-throughput Fluorescence Sensing of Single Molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathwig, Klaus; Fijen, C.; Fontana, M.; Lemay, S.G.; Hohlbein, J.C.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a nanofluidic mixing device entirely fabricated in glass for the fluorescence detection of single molecules. The design consists of a nanochannel T-junction and allows the continuous monitoring of chemical or enzymatic reactions of analytes as they arrive from two independent inlets.

  17. Low-frequency noise characterization of single CuO nanowire gas sensor devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinhauer, S.; Köck, A.; Gspan, C.; Grogger, W.; Vandamme, L.K.J.; Pogany, D.

    2015-01-01

    Low-frequency noise properties of single CuO nanowire devices were investigated under gas sensor operation conditions in dry and humid synthetic air at 350¿°C. A 1/f noise spectrum was found with the normalized power spectral density of current fluctuations typically a factor of 2 higher for humid

  18. 77 FR 31875 - Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Notice of Receipt of Complaint; Solicitation of Comments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Docket No. 2898] Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Notice of... Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the U.S. International Trade Commission has received a complaint entitled Certain Electronic Imaging Devices, DN 2898; the Commission is...

  19. 77 FR 32995 - Certain Electronic Imaging Devices Corrected: Notice of Receipt of Complaint; Solicitation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Docket No. 2898] Certain Electronic Imaging Devices Corrected.... International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the U.S. International Trade Commission has received a complaint entitled Certain Electronic Imaging Devices, DN 2898; the...

  20. Evaluation of image quality for various electronic portal imaging devices in radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Soon Yong; Choi, Kwan Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Min [Dept. of College of Health Science, Radiologic Science, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2015-12-15

    In megavoltage (MV) radiotherapy, delivering the dose to the target volume is important while protecting the surrounding normal tissue. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the modulation transfer function (MTF), the noise power spectrum (NPS), and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) using an edge block in megavoltage X-ray imaging (MVI). We used an edge block, which consists of tungsten with dimensions of 19 (thickness) × 10 (length) × 1 (width) cm3 and measured the pre-sampling MTF at 6 MV energy. Various radiation therapy (RT) devices such as TrueBeamTM (Varian), BEAMVIEWPLUS (Siemens), iViewGT (Elekta) and Clinac®iX (Varian) were used. As for MTF results, TrueBeamTM(Varian) flattening filter free(FFF) showed the highest values of 0.46 mm-1and1.40mm-1for MTF 0.5 and 0.1. In NPS, iViewGT (Elekta) showed the lowest noise distribution. In DQE, iViewGT (Elekta) showed the best efficiency at a peak DQE and 1 mm-1DQE of 0.0026 and 0.00014, respectively. This study could be used not only for traditional QA imaging but also for quantitative MTF, NPS, and DQE measurement for development of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID)

  1. Imaging large cohorts of single ion channels and their activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia eHiersemenzel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available As calcium is the most important signaling molecule in neurons and secretory cells, amongst many other cell types, it follows that an understanding of calcium channels and their regulation of exocytosis is of vital importance. Calcium imaging using calcium dyes such as Fluo3, or FRET-based dyes that have been used widely has provided invaluable information, which combined with modeling has estimated the sub-types of channels responsible for triggering the exocytotic machinery as well as inferences about the relative distances away from vesicle fusion sites these molecules adopt. Importantly, new super-resolution microscopy techniques, combined with novel Ca2+ indicators and imaginative imaging approaches can now define directly the nanoscale locations of very large cohorts of single channel molecules in relation to single vesicles. With combinations of these techniques the activity of individual channels can be visualized and quantified using novel Ca2+ indicators. Fluorescently labeled specific channel toxins can also be used to localize endogenous assembled channel tetramers. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and other single-photon-resolution spectroscopic approaches offer the possibility to quantify protein-protein interactions between populations of channels and the SNARE protein machinery for the first time. Together with simultaneous electrophysiology, this battery of quantitative imaging techniques has the potential to provide unprecedented detail describing the locations, dynamic behaviours, interactions and conductance activities of many thousands of channel molecules and vesicles in living cells.

  2. Materials challenges for devices based on single, self-assembled InGaN quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, Rachel A; Jarjour, Anas F; Tahraoui, Abbes; Kappers, Menno J; Taylor, Robert A; Humphreys, Colin J

    2007-01-01

    Builiding on earlier studies of single InGaN quantum dots (QDs), we are considering their potential for use in blue- and green-emitting single photon sources. Envisaging a device based on a resonant cavity light emitting diode, we have studied the effect of growing QDs on an underlying AlN/GaN distributed Bragg reflector, and have shown that enhanced single QD emission may be obtained. Additionally, we have studied the effect of the growth and activation of a p-type cap on an underlying QD layer and have shown that the QDs survive the anneal process

  3. Single-word multiple-bit upsets in static random access devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, R.; Pinkerton, S.D.; Lie, T.J.; Crawford, K.B.

    1993-01-01

    Energetic ions and protons can cause single event upsets (SEUs) in static random access memory (SRAM) cells. In some cases multiple bits may be upset as the result of a single event. Space-borne electronics systems incorporating high-density SRAM are vulnerable to single-word multiple-bit upsets (SMUs). The authors review here recent observations of SMU, present the results of a systematic investigation of the physical cell arrangements employed in several currently available SRAM device types, and discuss implications for the occurrence and mitigation of SMU

  4. Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, Whittier R.

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of protons performed in a precession field of 132 (micro)T. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a pulsed 40-300 mT magnetic field prepolarizes the sample spins and an untuned second-order superconducting gradiometer coupled to a low transition temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detects the subsequent 5.6-kHz spin precession. Imaging sequences including multiple echoes and partial Fourier reconstruction are developed. Calculating the SNR of prepolarized SQUID-detected MRI shows that three-dimensional Fourier imaging yields higher SNR than slice-selection imaging. An experimentally demonstrated field-cycling pulse sequence and post-processing algorithm mitigate image artifacts caused by concomitant gradients in low-field MRI. The magnetic field noise of SQUID untuned detection is compared to the noise of SQUID tuned detection, conventional Faraday detection, and the Nyquist noise generated by conducting biological samples. A second-generation microtesla MRI system employing a low-noise SQUID is constructed to increase SNR. A 2.4-m cubic, eddy-current shield with 6-mm thick aluminum walls encloses the experiment to attenuate external noise. The measured noise is 0.75 fT Hz -1/2 referred to the bottom gradiometer loop. Solenoids wound from 30-strand braided wire to decrease Nyquist noise and cooled by either liquid nitrogen or water polarize the spins. Copper wire coils wound on wooden supports produce the imaging magnetic fields and field gradients. Water phantom images with 0.8 x 0.8 x 10 mm 3 resolution have a SNR of 6. Three-dimensional 1.6 x 1.9 x 14 mm 3 images of bell peppers and 3 x 3 x 26 mm 3 in vivo images of the human arm are presented. Since contrast based on the transverse spin relaxation rate (T 1 ) is enhanced at low magnetic fields, microtesla MRI could potentially be used for tumor imaging. The measured T 1 of ex vivo normal and cancerous

  5. Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance ImagingDetected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Whittier Ryan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of protons performed in a precession field of 132 μT. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a pulsed 40-300 mT magnetic field prepolarizes the sample spins and an untuned second-order superconducting gradiometer coupled to a low transition temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detects the subsequent 5.6-kHz spin precession. Imaging sequences including multiple echoes and partial Fourier reconstruction are developed. Calculating the SNR of prepolarized SQUID-detected MRI shows that three-dimensional Fourier imaging yields higher SNR than slice-selection imaging. An experimentally demonstrated field-cycling pulse sequence and post-processing algorithm mitigate image artifacts caused by concomitant gradients in low-field MRI. The magnetic field noise of SQUID untuned detection is compared to the noise of SQUID tuned detection, conventional Faraday detection, and the Nyquist noise generated by conducting biological samples. A second-generation microtesla MRI system employing a low-noise SQUID is constructed to increase SNR. A 2.4-m cubic, eddy-current shield with 6-mm thick aluminum walls encloses the experiment to attenuate external noise. The measured noise is 0.75 fT Hz-1/2 referred to the bottom gradiometer loop. Solenoids wound from 30-strand braided wire to decrease Nyquist noise and cooled by either liquid nitrogen or water polarize the spins. Copper wire coils wound on wooden supports produce the imaging magnetic fields and field gradients. Water phantom images with 0.8 x 0.8 x 10 mm3 resolution have a SNR of 6. Three-dimensional 1.6 x 1.9 x 14 mm3 images of bell peppers and 3 x 3 x 26 mm3 in vivo images of the human arm are presented. Since contrast based on the transverse spin relaxation rate (T1) is enhanced at low magnetic fields, microtesla MRI could potentially be used for tumor imaging. The

  6. Post-operative orbital imaging: a focus on implants and prosthetic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Ashok; Mankad, Kshitij; Poitelea, Cornelia; Verity, David H.; Davagnanam, Indran

    2014-01-01

    Accurate interpretation of orbital imaging in the presence of either orbital implants requires a sound knowledge of both the surgical approach used and the imaging characteristics of the implanted devices themselves. In this article, the radiological appearance of the various devices used in ophthalmology, and their relationship to other orbital structures, is reviewed. In addition, the intended anatomical location, function of these devices, and clinical indications for their use are provided. (orig.)

  7. Role of radionuclide imaging for diagnosis of device and prosthetic valve infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazin, Jean-François; Philippon, François; Trottier, Mikaël; Tessier, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) infection and prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) remain a diagnostic challenge. Cardiac imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of patients with CIED infection or PVE. Over the past few years, cardiac radionuclide imaging has gained a key role in the diagnosis of these patients, and in assessing the need for surgery, mainly in the most difficult cases. Both 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) and radiolabelled white blood cell single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (WBC SPECT/CT) have been studied in these situations. In their 2015 guidelines for the management of infective endocarditis, the European Society of Cardiology incorporated cardiac nuclear imaging as part of their diagnostic algorithm for PVE, but not CIED infection since the data were judged insufficient at the moment. This article reviews the actual knowledge and recent studies on the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT and WBC SPECT/CT in the context of CIED infection and PVE, and describes the technical aspects of cardiac radionuclide imaging. It also discusses their accepted and potential indications for the diagnosis and management of CIED infection and PVE, the limitations of these tests, and potential areas of future research. PMID:27721936

  8. Single event effects and total ionizing dose effects of typical VDMOSFET devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou Jianshe; Cai Nan; Liu Jiaxin; Wu Qinzhi; Wang Jia

    2012-01-01

    In this work, single event effects and total ionizing dose effects of typical VDMOSFET irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays and 252 Cf source were studied. The single event burnout and single event gate rupture (SEB/SEGR) effects were investigated, and the relationship between drain-source breakdown voltage and ionizing dose was obtained. The results showed that the VDMOSFET devices were sensitive to SEB and SEGR, and measures to improve their resistance to SEB and SEGR should be considered seriously for their space applications. The drain-source breakdown voltage was sensitive to total ionizing dose effects as the threshold voltage. In assessing the devices' resistance to the total ionizing dose effects, both the threshold voltage and the drain-source breakdown voltage should be taken into account. (authors)

  9. Single instruction computer architecture and its application in image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laplante, Phillip A.

    1992-03-01

    A single processing computer system using only half-adder circuits is described. In addition, it is shown that only a single hard-wired instruction is needed in the control unit to obtain a complete instruction set for this general purpose computer. Such a system has several advantages. First it is intrinsically a RISC machine--in fact the 'ultimate RISC' machine. Second, because only a single type of logic element is employed the entire computer system can be easily realized on a single, highly integrated chip. Finally, due to the homogeneous nature of the computer's logic elements, the computer has possible implementations as an optical or chemical machine. This in turn suggests possible paradigms for neural computing and artificial intelligence. After showing how we can implement a full-adder, min, max and other operations using the half-adder, we use an array of such full-adders to implement the dilation operation for two black and white images. Next we implement the erosion operation of two black and white images using a relative complement function and the properties of erosion and dilation. This approach was inspired by papers by van der Poel in which a single instruction is used to furnish a complete set of general purpose instructions and by Bohm- Jacopini where it is shown that any problem can be solved using a Turing machine with one entry and one exit.

  10. Deep Joint Rain Detection and Removal from a Single Image

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Wenhan; Tan, Robby T.; Feng, Jiashi; Liu, Jiaying; Guo, Zongming; Yan, Shuicheng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we address a rain removal problem from a single image, even in the presence of heavy rain and rain streak accumulation. Our core ideas lie in the new rain image models and a novel deep learning architecture. We first modify an existing model comprising a rain streak layer and a background layer, by adding a binary map that locates rain streak regions. Second, we create a new model consisting of a component representing rain streak accumulation (where individual streaks cannot b...

  11. Latest developments in image processing for the next generation of devices with a view on DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murari, A.; Vega, J.; Mazon, D.; Arena, P.; Craciunescu, T.; Gabellieri, L.; Gelfusa, M.; Pacella, D.; Palazzo, S.; Romano, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Pattern recognition methods have been successfully applied to retrieve frames in massime databases. ► The technology of Cellular Nonlinear Networks (CNNs) has been upgraded to solve space variant problem. ► The CNNs have then been successfully applied to various tasks, from the real time hot spot detection to the automatic identification of instabilities. ► The method of the optical flow permits to derive information about the speed of the objects moving in the frames of a single camera. ► Since the next generation of devices will emit a lot of SXR radiation, also from the edge, new technologies (Gas Electron Multiplier detectors and policapillary lenses) are being developed to perform imaging over this region of the spectrum for a global view of the entire plasma column. - Abstract: In magnetic confinement fusion devices the use of cameras, both visible and infrared, has increased very significantly in the last years. The large amount of data (in the range of tens of Gbytes per shot) and the difficulty of the analysis tasks (ambiguity, ill posed problems, etc.), require new solutions. The technology of Cellular Nonlinear Networks (CNNs) has been successfully applied to various tasks, from the real time hot spot detection to the automatic identification of instabilities. The accuracy obtained is comparable to the one of more traditional serial algorithms but the CCNs guarantee deterministic computational times independently from the image contents. Moreover the latest developments have allowed obtaining these results also in the case of space variant image analysis, without compromising the computational speed (of the order of ten thousand frames per second). The method of the optical flow permits to derive information about the speed of the objects moving in the frames of a single camera. The results of previous applications have been so successful that the approach has been extended to videos in compressed format (MPEG) to reduce the

  12. CAD2RL: Real Single-Image Flight without a Single Real Image

    OpenAIRE

    Sadeghi, Fereshteh; Levine, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Deep reinforcement learning has emerged as a promising and powerful technique for automatically acquiring control policies that can process raw sensory inputs, such as images, and perform complex behaviors. However, extending deep RL to real-world robotic tasks has proven challenging, particularly in safety-critical domains such as autonomous flight, where a trial-and-error learning process is often impractical. In this paper, we explore the following question: can we train vision-based navig...

  13. SINGLE IMAGE CAMERA CALIBRATION IN CLOSE RANGE PHOTOGRAMMETRY FOR SOLDER JOINT ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Heinemann

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Printed Circuit Boards (PCB play an important role in the manufacturing of electronic devices. To ensure a correct function of the PCBs a certain amount of solder paste is needed during the placement of components. The aim of the current research is to develop an real-time, closed-loop solution for the analysis of the printing process where solder is printed onto PCBs. Close range photogrammetry allows for determination of the solder volume and a subsequent correction if necessary. Photogrammetry is an image based method for three dimensional reconstruction from two dimensional image data of an object. A precise camera calibration is indispensable for an accurate reconstruction. In our certain application it is not possible to use calibration methods with two dimensional calibration targets. Therefore a special calibration target was developed and manufactured, which allows for single image camera calibration.

  14. Enhancing Single Molecule Imaging in Optofluidics and Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas E. Vasdekis

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidics and optofluidics have revolutionized high-throughput analysis and chemical synthesis over the past decade. Single molecule imaging has witnessed similar growth, due to its capacity to reveal heterogeneities at high spatial and temporal resolutions. However, both resolution types are dependent on the signal to noise ratio (SNR of the image. In this paper, we review how the SNR can be enhanced in optofluidics and microfluidics. Starting with optofluidics, we outline integrated photonic structures that increase the signal emitted by single chromophores and minimize the excitation volume. Turning then to microfluidics, we review the compatible functionalization strategies that reduce noise stemming from non-specific interactions and architectures that minimize bleaching and blinking.

  15. Towards single particle imaging of human chromosomes at SACLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, Ian; Schwenke, Joerg; Yusuf, Mohammed; Estandarte, Ana; Zhang, Fucai; Chen, Bo; Clark, Jesse; Song, Changyong; Nam, Daewoong; Joti, Yasumasa; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Ratnasari, Gina; Kaneyoshi, Kohei; Takata, Hideaki; Fukui, Kiichi

    2015-01-01

    Single particle imaging (SPI) is one of the front-page opportunities which were used to motivate the construction of the first x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs). SPI’s big advantage is that it avoids radiation damage to biological samples because the diffraction takes place in femtosecond single shots before any atomic motion can take place in the sample, hence before the onset of radiation damage. This is the ‘diffract before destruction’ theme, destruction being assured from the high x-ray doses used. This article reports our collaboration’s first attempt at SPI using the SACLA XFEL facility in June 2015. The report is limited to experience with the instrumentation and examples of data because we have not yet had time to invert them to images. (paper)

  16. A Synthetic Biology Project - Developing a single-molecule device for screening drug-target interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firman, Keith; Evans, Luke; Youell, James

    2012-07-16

    This review describes a European-funded project in the area of Synthetic Biology. The project seeks to demonstrate the application of engineering techniques and methodologies to the design and construction of a biosensor for detecting drug-target interactions at the single-molecule level. Production of the proteins required for the system followed the principle of previously described "bioparts" concepts (a system where a database of biological parts - promoters, genes, terminators, linking tags and cleavage sequences - is used to construct novel gene assemblies) and cassette-type assembly of gene expression systems (the concept of linking different "bioparts" to produce functional "cassettes"), but problems were quickly identified with these approaches. DNA substrates for the device were also constructed using a cassette-system. Finally, micro-engineering was used to build a magnetoresistive Magnetic Tweezer device for detection of single molecule DNA modifying enzymes (motors), while the possibility of constructing a Hall Effect version of this device was explored. The device is currently being used to study helicases from Plasmodium as potential targets for anti-malarial drugs, but we also suggest other potential uses for the device. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. NOTE: A method for controlling image acquisition in electronic portal imaging devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendinning, A. G.; Hunt, S. G.; Bonnett, D. E.

    2001-02-01

    Certain types of camera-based electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) which initiate image acquisition based on sensing a change in video level have been observed to trigger unreliably at the beginning of dynamic multileaf collimation sequences. A simple, novel means of controlling image acquisition with an Elekta linear accelerator (Elekta Oncology Systems, Crawley, UK) is proposed which is based on illumination of a photodetector (ORP-12, Silonex Inc., Plattsburgh, NY, USA) by the electron gun of the accelerator. By incorporating a simple trigger circuit it is possible to derive a beam on/off status signal which changes at least 100 ms before any dose is measured by the accelerator. The status signal does not return to the beam-off state until all dose has been delivered and is suitable for accelerator pulse repetition frequencies of 50-400 Hz. The status signal is thus a reliable means of indicating the initiation and termination of radiation exposure, and thus controlling image acquisition of such EPIDs for this application.

  18. Nano-imaging of single cells using STIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren Minqin [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Department of Biochemistry, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Kan, J.A. van [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Bettiol, A.A. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Daina, Lim [Department of Anatomy, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Gek, Chan Yee [Department of Anatomy, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Huat, Bay Boon [Department of Anatomy, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Whitlow, H.J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaskyla, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 (Finland); Osipowicz, T. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Watt, F. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)]. E-mail: phywattf@nus.edu.sg

    2007-07-15

    Scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) is a technique which utilizes the energy loss of high energy (MeV) ions passing through a sample to provide structural images. In this paper, we have successfully demonstrated STIM imaging of single cells at the nano-level using the high resolution capability of the proton beam writing facility at the Centre for Ion Beam Applications, National University of Singapore. MCF-7 breast cancer cells (American Type Culture Collection [ATCC]) were seeded on to silicon nitride windows, backed by a Hamamatsu pin diode acting as a particle detector. A reasonable contrast was obtained using 1 MeV protons and excellent contrast obtained using 1 MeV alpha particles. In a further experiment, nano-STIM was also demonstrated using cells seeded on to the pin diode directly, and high quality nano-STIM images showing the nucleus and multiple nucleoli were extracted before the detector was significantly damaged.

  19. Optimized multiple linear mappings for single image super-resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaibing; Li, Jie; Xiong, Zenggang; Liu, Xiuping; Gao, Xinbo

    2017-12-01

    Learning piecewise linear regression has been recognized as an effective way for example learning-based single image super-resolution (SR) in literature. In this paper, we employ an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to further improve the SR performance of our previous multiple linear mappings (MLM) based SR method. In the training stage, the proposed method starts with a set of linear regressors obtained by the MLM-based method, and then jointly optimizes the clustering results and the low- and high-resolution subdictionary pairs for regression functions by using the metric of the reconstruction errors. In the test stage, we select the optimal regressor for SR reconstruction by accumulating the reconstruction errors of m-nearest neighbors in the training set. Thorough experimental results carried on six publicly available datasets demonstrate that the proposed SR method can yield high-quality images with finer details and sharper edges in terms of both quantitative and perceptual image quality assessments.

  20. Effect of single walled carbon nanotubes on the threshold voltage of dye based photovoltaic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, S.; Manik, N.B.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are being widely used in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices as their usage has been reported to enhance the device efficiency along with other related parameters. In this work we have studied the energy (E_c) effect of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) on the threshold voltage (V_t_h) and also on the trap states of dye based photovoltaic devices. SWCNT is added in a series of dyes such as Rose Bengal (RB), Methyl Red (MR), Malachite Green (MG) and Crystal Violet (CV). By analysing the steady state dark current–voltage (I–V) characteristics V_t_h and E_c is estimated for the different devices with and without addition of SWCNT. It is observed that on an average for all the dyes V_t_h is reduced by about 30% in presence of SWCNT. The trap energy E_c also reduces in case of all the dyes. The relation between V_t_h, E_c and total trap density is discussed. From the photovoltaic measurements it is seen that the different photovoltaic parameters change with addition of SWCNT to the dye based devices. Both the short circuit current density and fill factor are found to increase for all the dye based devices in presence of SWCNT.

  1. Device for the track useful signal discrimination during the image scanning form bubble chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osipov, E.A.; Uvarov, V.A.

    1976-01-01

    A device for the image processing from the bubble chambers, developed to increase the reliability of the track useful signal discrimination at the image scanning from the background component is described. The device consists of a low-pass filter, repetition and memory circuit and subtraction circuit. Besides a delay line and extra channel consisting of a differentiating circuit in series with the selective shaping circuit are introduced into the device. The output signal of the selective shaping is the controlling signal of the repetition and memory circuit, at the output of which a signal corresponding the background component is formed. The functional diagram of the device operation is presented

  2. Other origins for the fluorescence modulation of single dye molecules in open-circuit and short-circuit devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teguh, Jefri S; Kurniawan, Michael; Wu, Xiangyang; Sum, Tze Chien; Yeow, Edwin K L

    2013-01-07

    Fluorescence intensity modulation of single Atto647N dye molecules in a short-circuit device and a defective device, caused by damaging an open-circuit device, is due to a variation in the excitation light focus as a result of the formation of an alternating electric current.

  3. A Single Image Dehazing Method Using Average Saturation Prior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenfei Gu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Outdoor images captured in bad weather are prone to yield poor visibility, which is a fatal problem for most computer vision applications. The majority of existing dehazing methods rely on an atmospheric scattering model and therefore share a common limitation; that is, the model is only valid when the atmosphere is homogeneous. In this paper, we propose an improved atmospheric scattering model to overcome this inherent limitation. By adopting the proposed model, a corresponding dehazing method is also presented. In this method, we first create a haze density distribution map of a hazy image, which enables us to segment the hazy image into scenes according to the haze density similarity. Then, in order to improve the atmospheric light estimation accuracy, we define an effective weight assignment function to locate a candidate scene based on the scene segmentation results and therefore avoid most potential errors. Next, we propose a simple but powerful prior named the average saturation prior (ASP, which is a statistic of extensive high-definition outdoor images. Using this prior combined with the improved atmospheric scattering model, we can directly estimate the scene atmospheric scattering coefficient and restore the scene albedo. The experimental results verify that our model is physically valid, and the proposed method outperforms several state-of-the-art single image dehazing methods in terms of both robustness and effectiveness.

  4. Preparation of Single Cells for Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, E S; Fortson, S L; Kulp, K S; Checchi, K D; Wu, L; Felton, J S; Wu, K J

    2007-10-24

    Characterizing chemical changes within single cells is important for determining fundamental mechanisms of biological processes that will lead to new biological insights and improved disease understanding. Imaging biological systems with mass spectrometry (MS) has gained popularity in recent years as a method for creating precise chemical maps of biological samples. In order to obtain high-quality mass spectral images that provide relevant molecular information about individual cells, samples must be prepared so that salts and other cell-culture components are removed from the cell surface and the cell contents are rendered accessible to the desorption beam. We have designed a cellular preparation protocol for imaging MS that preserves the cellular contents for investigation and removes the majority of the interfering species from the extracellular matrix. Using this method, we obtain excellent imaging results and reproducibility in three diverse cell types: MCF7 human breast cancer cells, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, and NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts. This preparation technique allows routine imaging MS analysis of cultured cells, allowing for any number of experiments aimed at furthering scientific understanding of molecular processes within individual cells.

  5. Synchrotron Bragg diffraction imaging characterization of synthetic diamond crystals for optical and electronic power device applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Thi, Thu Nhi; Morse, J; Caliste, D; Fernandez, B; Eon, D; Härtwig, J; Barbay, C; Mer-Calfati, C; Tranchant, N; Arnault, J C; Lafford, T A; Baruchel, J

    2017-04-01

    Bragg diffraction imaging enables the quality of synthetic single-crystal diamond substrates and their overgrown, mostly doped, diamond layers to be characterized. This is very important for improving diamond-based devices produced for X-ray optics and power electronics applications. The usual first step for this characterization is white-beam X-ray diffraction topography, which is a simple and fast method to identify the extended defects (dislocations, growth sectors, boundaries, stacking faults, overall curvature etc. ) within the crystal. This allows easy and quick comparison of the crystal quality of diamond plates available from various commercial suppliers. When needed, rocking curve imaging (RCI) is also employed, which is the quantitative counterpart of monochromatic Bragg diffraction imaging. RCI enables the local determination of both the effective misorientation, which results from lattice parameter variation and the local lattice tilt, and the local Bragg position. Maps derived from these parameters are used to measure the magnitude of the distortions associated with polishing damage and the depth of this damage within the volume of the crystal. For overgrown layers, these maps also reveal the distortion induced by the incorporation of impurities such as boron, or the lattice parameter variations associated with the presence of growth-incorporated nitrogen. These techniques are described, and their capabilities for studying the quality of diamond substrates and overgrown layers, and the surface damage caused by mechanical polishing, are illustrated by examples.

  6. Microfluidic device for continuous single cells analysis via Raman spectroscopy enhanced by integrated plasmonic nanodimers

    KAUST Repository

    Perozziello, Gerardo

    2015-12-11

    In this work a Raman flow cytometer is presented. It consists of a microfluidic device that takes advantages of the basic principles of Raman spectroscopy and flow cytometry. The microfluidic device integrates calibrated microfluidic channels- where the cells can flow one-by-one -, allowing single cell Raman analysis. The microfluidic channel integrates plasmonic nanodimers in a fluidic trapping region. In this way it is possible to perform Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy on single cell. These allow a label-free analysis, providing information about the biochemical content of membrane and cytoplasm of the each cell. Experiments are performed on red blood cells (RBCs), peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and myelogenous leukemia tumor cells (K562). © 2015 Optical Society of America.

  7. Patterning solution-processed organic single-crystal transistors with high device performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Li

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We report on the patterning of organic single-crystal transistors with high device performance fabricated via a solution process under ambient conditions. The semiconductor was patterned on substrates via surface selective deposition. Subsequently, solvent-vapor annealing was performed to reorganize the semiconductor into single crystals. The transistors exhibited field-effect mobility (μFET of up to 3.5 cm2/V s. Good reliability under bias-stress conditions indicates low density of intrinsic defects in crystals and low density of traps at the active interfaces. Furthermore, the Y function method clearly suggests that the variation of μFET of organic crystal transistors was caused by contact resistance. Further improvement of the device with higher μFET with smaller variation can be expected when lower and more uniform contact resistance is achieved.

  8. Pediatric bowel MRI - accelerated parallel imaging in a single breathhold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohl, C.; Honnef, D.; Krombach, G.; Muehlenbruch, G.; Guenther, R.W.; Niendorf, T.; Ocklenburg, C.; Wenzl, T.G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: to compare highly accelerated parallel MRI of the bowel with conventional balanced FFE sequences in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Materials and methods: 20 children with suspected or proven IBD underwent MRI using a 1.5 T scanner after oral administration of 700-1000 ml of a Mannitol solution and an additional enema. The examination started with a 4-channel receiver coil and a conventional balanced FFE sequence in axial (2.5 s/slice) and coronal (4.7 s/slice) planes. Afterwards highly accelerated (R = 5) balanced FFE sequences in axial (0.5 s/slice) and coronal (0.9 s/slice) were performed using a 32-channel receiver coil and parallel imaging (SENSE). Both receiver coils achieved a resolution of 0.88 x 0.88 mm with a slice thickness of 5 mm (coronal) and 6 mm (axial) respectively. Using the conventional imaging technique, 4 - 8 breathholds were needed to cover the whole abdomen, while parallel imaging shortened the acquisition time down to a single breathhold. Two blinded radiologists did a consensus reading of the images regarding pathological findings, image quality, susceptibility to artifacts and bowel distension. The results for both coil systems were compared using the kappa-(κ)-coefficient, differences in the susceptibility to artifacts were checked with the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Statistical significance was assumed for p = 0.05. Results: 13 of the 20 children had inflammatory bowel wall changes at the time of the examination, which could be correctly diagnosed with both coil systems in 12 of 13 cases (92%). The comparison of both coil systems showed a good agreement for pathological findings (κ = 0.74 - 1.0) and the image quality. Using parallel imaging significantly more artifacts could be observed (κ = 0.47)

  9. Nanochannel Device with Embedded Nanopore: a New Approach for Single-Molecule DNA Analysis and Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuning; Reisner, Walter

    2013-03-01

    Nanopore and nanochannel based devices are robust methods for biomolecular sensing and single DNA manipulation. Nanopore-based DNA sensing has attractive features that make it a leading candidate as a single-molecule DNA sequencing technology. Nanochannel based extension of DNA, combined with enzymatic or denaturation-based barcoding schemes, is already a powerful approach for genome analysis. We believe that there is revolutionary potential in devices that combine nanochannels with embedded pore detectors. In particular, due to the fast translocation of a DNA molecule through a standard nanopore configuration, there is an unfavorable trade-off between signal and sequence resolution. With a combined nanochannel-nanopore device, based on embedding a pore inside a nanochannel, we can in principle gain independent control over both DNA translocation speed and sensing signal, solving the key draw-back of the standard nanopore configuration. We demonstrate that we can optically detect successful translocation of DNA from the nanochannel out through the nanopore, a possible method to 'select' a given barcode for further analysis. In particular, we show that in equilibrium DNA will not escape through an embedded sub-persistence length nanopore, suggesting that the pore could be used as a nanoscale window through which to interrogate a nanochannel extended DNA molecule. Furthermore, electrical measurements through the nanopore are performed, indicating that DNA sensing is feasible using the nanochannel-nanopore device.

  10. Schottky junction photovoltaic devices based on CdS single nanobelts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Y; Dai, L; Wu, P C; Liu, C; Sun, T; Ma, R M; Qin, G G

    2009-09-16

    Schottky junction photovoltaic (PV) devices were fabricated on single CdS nanobelts (NBs). Au was used as the Schottky contact, and In/Au was used as the ohmic contact to CdS NB. Typically, the Schottky junction exhibits a well-defined rectifying behavior in the dark with a rectification ratio greater than 10(3) at +/- 0.3 V; and the PV device exhibits a clear PV behavior with an open circuit photovoltage of about 0.16 V, a short circuit current of about 23.8 pA, a maximum output power of about 1.6 pW, and a fill factor of 42%. Moreover, the output power can be multiplied by connecting two or more of the Schottky junction PV devices, made on a single CdS NB, in parallel or in series. This study demonstrates that the 1D Schottky junction PV devices, which have the merits of low cost, easy fabrication and material universality, can be an important candidate for power sources in nano-optoelectronic systems.

  11. Dynamical aspects on FEL interaction in single passage and storage ring devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dattoli, G.; Renieri, A. [ENEA, Frascati (Italy)

    1995-12-31

    The dynamical behaviour of the free-electron lasers is investigated using appropriate scaling relations valid for devices operating in the low and high gain regimes, including saturation. The analysis is applied to both single passage and storage ring configurations. In the latter case the interplay between the interaction of the electron bean with the laser field and with the accelerator environment is investigated. In particular we discuss the effect of FEL interaction on the microwave instability.

  12. Fenestrated atrial septal defect percutaneously occluded by a single device: procedural and financial considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Roie; Dahud, Qarawani; Lorber, Avraham

    2013-06-01

    A 45-year-old patient presented with a cerebrovascular attack and was subsequently found to have a multi-fenestrated atrial septal defect. Various therapeutic options for percutaneous transcatheter closure with their respective benefits and flaws are discussed, as well as procedural and financial considerations. The decision making process leading to a successful result using a single occlusive device is presented, alongside a review of the literature.

  13. Cell biochemistry studied by single-molecule imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashanov, G I; Nenasheva, T A; Peckham, M; Molloy, J E

    2006-11-01

    Over the last decade, there have been remarkable developments in live-cell imaging. We can now readily observe individual protein molecules within living cells and this should contribute to a systems level understanding of biological pathways. Direct observation of single fluorophores enables several types of molecular information to be gathered. Temporal and spatial trajectories enable diffusion constants and binding kinetics to be deduced, while analyses of fluorescence lifetime, intensity, polarization or spectra give chemical and conformational information about molecules in their cellular context. By recording the spatial trajectories of pairs of interacting molecules, formation of larger molecular complexes can be studied. In the future, multicolour and multiparameter imaging of single molecules in live cells will be a powerful analytical tool for systems biology. Here, we discuss measurements of single-molecule mobility and residency at the plasma membrane of live cells. Analysis of diffusional paths at the plasma membrane gives information about its physical properties and measurement of temporal trajectories enables rates of binding and dissociation to be derived. Meanwhile, close scrutiny of individual fluorophore trajectories enables ideas about molecular dimerization and oligomerization related to function to be tested directly.

  14. Metal-free, single-polymer device exhibits resistive memory effect

    KAUST Repository

    Bhansali, Unnat Sampatraj; Khan, Yasser; Cha, Dong Kyu; Almadhoun, Mahmoud N.; Li, Ruipeng; Chen, Long; Amassian, Aram; Odeh, Ihab N.; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2013-01-01

    All-polymer, write-once-read-many times resistive memory devices have been fabricated on flexible substrates using a single polymer, poly(3,4- ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS). Spin-cast or inkjet-printed films of solvent-modified PEDOT:PSS are used as electrodes, while the unmodified or as-is PEDOT:PSS is used as the semiconducting active layer. The all-polymer devices exhibit an irreversible but stable transition from a low resistance state (ON) to a high resistance state (OFF) at low voltages caused by an electric-field-induced morphological rearrangement of PEDOT and PSS at the electrode interface. However, in the metal-PEDOT:PSS-metal devices, we have shown a metal filament formation switching the device from an initial high resistance state (OFF) to the low resistance state (ON). The all-PEDOT:PSS memory device has low write voltages (<3 V), high ON/OFF ratio (>10 3), good retention characteristics (>10 000 s), and stability in ambient storage (>3 months). © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  15. Metal-free, single-polymer device exhibits resistive memory effect

    KAUST Repository

    Bhansali, Unnat Sampatraj

    2013-12-23

    All-polymer, write-once-read-many times resistive memory devices have been fabricated on flexible substrates using a single polymer, poly(3,4- ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS). Spin-cast or inkjet-printed films of solvent-modified PEDOT:PSS are used as electrodes, while the unmodified or as-is PEDOT:PSS is used as the semiconducting active layer. The all-polymer devices exhibit an irreversible but stable transition from a low resistance state (ON) to a high resistance state (OFF) at low voltages caused by an electric-field-induced morphological rearrangement of PEDOT and PSS at the electrode interface. However, in the metal-PEDOT:PSS-metal devices, we have shown a metal filament formation switching the device from an initial high resistance state (OFF) to the low resistance state (ON). The all-PEDOT:PSS memory device has low write voltages (<3 V), high ON/OFF ratio (>10 3), good retention characteristics (>10 000 s), and stability in ambient storage (>3 months). © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  16. Cyclops: single-pixel imaging lidar system based on compressive sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, F.; Correia, M. V.; Farahi, F.; Pereira do Carmo, J.; Araújo, F. M.

    2017-11-01

    Mars and the Moon are envisaged as major destinations of future space exploration missions in the upcoming decades. Imaging LIDARs are seen as a key enabling technology in the support of autonomous guidance, navigation and control operations, as they can provide very accurate, wide range, high-resolution distance measurements as required for the exploration missions. Imaging LIDARs can be used at critical stages of these exploration missions, such as descent and selection of safe landing sites, rendezvous and docking manoeuvres, or robotic surface navigation and exploration. Despite these devices have been commercially available and used for long in diverse metrology and ranging applications, their size, mass and power consumption are still far from being suitable and attractive for space exploratory missions. Here, we describe a compact Single-Pixel Imaging LIDAR System that is based on a compressive sensing technique. The application of the compressive codes to a DMD array enables compression of the spatial information, while the collection of timing histograms correlated to the pulsed laser source ensures image reconstruction at the ranged distances. Single-pixel cameras have been compared with raster scanning and array based counterparts in terms of noise performance, and proved to be superior. Since a single photodetector is used, a better SNR and higher reliability is expected in contrast with systems using large format photodetector arrays. Furthermore, the event of failure of one or more micromirror elements in the DMD does not prevent full reconstruction of the images. This brings additional robustness to the proposed 3D imaging LIDAR. The prototype that was implemented has three modes of operation. Range Finder: outputs the average distance between the system and the area of the target under illumination; Attitude Meter: provides the slope of the target surface based on distance measurements in three areas of the target; 3D Imager: produces 3D ranged

  17. Signal Normalization Reduces Image Appearance Disparity Among Multiple Optical Coherence Tomography Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chieh-Li; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Wollstein, Gadi; Bilonick, Richard A; Kagemann, Larry; Schuman, Joel S

    2017-02-01

    To assess the effect of the previously reported optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal normalization method on reducing the discrepancies in image appearance among spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT) devices. Healthy eyes and eyes with various retinal pathologies were scanned at the macular region using similar volumetric scan patterns with at least two out of three SD-OCT devices at the same visit (Cirrus HD-OCT, Zeiss, Dublin, CA; RTVue, Optovue, Fremont, CA; and Spectralis, Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany). All the images were processed with the signal normalization. A set of images formed a questionnaire with 24 pairs of cross-sectional images from each eye with any combination of the three SD-OCT devices either both pre- or postsignal normalization. Observers were asked to evaluate the similarity of the two displayed images based on the image appearance. The effects on reducing the differences in image appearance before and after processing were analyzed. Twenty-nine researchers familiar with OCT images participated in the survey. Image similarity was significantly improved after signal normalization for all three combinations ( P ≤ 0.009) as Cirrus and RTVue combination became the most similar pair, followed by Cirrus and Spectralis, and RTVue and Spectralis. The signal normalization successfully minimized the disparities in the image appearance among multiple SD-OCT devices, allowing clinical interpretation and comparison of OCT images regardless of the device differences. The signal normalization would enable direct OCT images comparisons without concerning about device differences and broaden OCT usage by enabling long-term follow-ups and data sharing.

  18. Metal surface corrosion grade estimation from single image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yijun; Qi, Lin; Sun, Huyuan; Fan, Hao; Dong, Junyu

    2018-04-01

    Metal corrosion can cause many problems, how to quickly and effectively assess the grade of metal corrosion and timely remediation is a very important issue. Typically, this is done by trained surveyors at great cost. Assisting them in the inspection process by computer vision and artificial intelligence would decrease the inspection cost. In this paper, we propose a dataset of metal surface correction used for computer vision detection and present a comparison between standard computer vision techniques by using OpenCV and deep learning method for automatic metal surface corrosion grade estimation from single image on this dataset. The test has been performed by classifying images and calculating the accuracy for the two different approaches.

  19. Single Nanostructure Electrochemical Devices for Studying Electronic Properties and Structural Changes in Lithiated Si Nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    McDowell, Matthew T.; Cui, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructured Si is a promising anode material for the next generation of Li-ion batteries, but few studies have focused on the electrical properties of the Li-Si alloy phase, which are important for determining power capabilities and ensuring sufficient electrical conduction in the electrode structure. Here, we demonstrate an electrochemical device framework suitable for testing the electrical properties of single Si nanowires (NWs) at different lithiation states and correlating these properties with structural changes via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We fi nd that single Si NWs usually exhibit Ohmic I - V response in the lithiated state, with conductivities two to three orders of magnitude higher than in the delithiated state. After a number of sequential lithiation/delithiation cycles, the single NWs show similar conductivity after each lithiation step but show large variations in conductivity in the delithiated state. Finally, devices with groups of NWs in physical contact were fabricated, and structural changes in the NWs were observed after lithiation to investigate how the electrical resistance of NW junctions and the NWs themselves affect the lithiation behavior. The results suggest that electrical resistance of NW junctions can limit lithiation. Overall, this study shows the importance of investigating the electronic properties of individual components of a battery electrode (single nanostructures in this case) along with studying the nature of interactions within a collection of these component structures. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Single Nanostructure Electrochemical Devices for Studying Electronic Properties and Structural Changes in Lithiated Si Nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    McDowell, Matthew T.

    2011-07-19

    Nanostructured Si is a promising anode material for the next generation of Li-ion batteries, but few studies have focused on the electrical properties of the Li-Si alloy phase, which are important for determining power capabilities and ensuring sufficient electrical conduction in the electrode structure. Here, we demonstrate an electrochemical device framework suitable for testing the electrical properties of single Si nanowires (NWs) at different lithiation states and correlating these properties with structural changes via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We fi nd that single Si NWs usually exhibit Ohmic I - V response in the lithiated state, with conductivities two to three orders of magnitude higher than in the delithiated state. After a number of sequential lithiation/delithiation cycles, the single NWs show similar conductivity after each lithiation step but show large variations in conductivity in the delithiated state. Finally, devices with groups of NWs in physical contact were fabricated, and structural changes in the NWs were observed after lithiation to investigate how the electrical resistance of NW junctions and the NWs themselves affect the lithiation behavior. The results suggest that electrical resistance of NW junctions can limit lithiation. Overall, this study shows the importance of investigating the electronic properties of individual components of a battery electrode (single nanostructures in this case) along with studying the nature of interactions within a collection of these component structures. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Transport Imaging for the Study of Quantum Scattering Phenomena in Next Generation Semiconductor Devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bradley, Frank M

    2005-01-01

    ...) and highly efficient solar cells. A novel technique has been developed utilizing direct imaging of electron/hole recombination via an optical microscope and a high sensitivity charge coupled device coupled to a scanning electron...

  2. Bright photoactivatable fluorophores for single-molecule imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Jonathan B; English, Brian P; Choi, Heejun; Muthusamy, Anand K; Mehl, Brian P; Dong, Peng; Brown, Timothy A; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Liu, Zhe; Lionnet, Timothée; Lavis, Luke D

    2016-12-01

    Small-molecule fluorophores are important tools for advanced imaging experiments. We previously reported a general method to improve small, cell-permeable fluorophores which resulted in the azetidine-containing 'Janelia Fluor' (JF) dyes. Here, we refine and extend the utility of these dyes by synthesizing photoactivatable derivatives that are compatible with live-cell labeling strategies. Once activated, these derived compounds retain the superior brightness and photostability of the JF dyes, enabling improved single-particle tracking and facile localization microscopy experiments.

  3. Real-time Avatar Animation from a Single Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saragih, Jason M; Lucey, Simon; Cohn, Jeffrey F

    2011-01-01

    A real time facial puppetry system is presented. Compared with existing systems, the proposed method requires no special hardware, runs in real time (23 frames-per-second), and requires only a single image of the avatar and user. The user's facial expression is captured through a real-time 3D non-rigid tracking system. Expression transfer is achieved by combining a generic expression model with synthetically generated examples that better capture person specific characteristics. Performance of the system is evaluated on avatars of real people as well as masks and cartoon characters.

  4. Ventilation and perfusion display in a single image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, J.J.P. de; Botelho, M.F.R.; Pereira, A.M.S.; Rafael, J.A.S.; Pinto, A.J.; Marques, M.A.T.; Pereira, M.C.; Baganha, M.F.; Godinho, F.

    1991-01-01

    A new method of ventilation and perfusion display onto a single image is presented. From the data on regions of interest of the lungs, three-dimensional histograms are created, containing as parameters X and Y for the position of the pixels, Z for the perfusion and colour for local ventilation. The perfusion value is supplied by sets of curves having Z proportional to the local perfusion count rate. Ventilation modulates colour. Four perspective views of the histogram are simultaneously displayed to allow visualization of the entire organ. Information about the normal ranges for both ventilation and perfusion is also provided in the histograms. (orig.)

  5. A single-image method of aberration retrieval for imaging systems under partially coherent illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Shuang; Liu, Shiyuan; Zhang, Chuanwei; Wei, Haiqing

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method for retrieving small lens aberrations in optical imaging systems under partially coherent illumination, which only requires to measure one single defocused image of intensity. By deriving a linear theory of imaging systems, we obtain a generalized formulation of aberration sensitivity in a matrix form, which provides a set of analytic kernels that relate the measured intensity distribution directly to the unknown Zernike coefficients. Sensitivity analysis is performed and test patterns are optimized to ensure well-posedness of the inverse problem. Optical lithography simulations have validated the theoretical derivation and confirmed its simplicity and superior performance in retrieving small lens aberrations. (fast track communication)

  6. Single cell analysis of yeast replicative aging using a new generation of microfluidic device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    Full Text Available A major limitation to yeast aging study has been the inability to track mother cells and observe molecular markers during the aging process. The traditional lifespan assay relies on manual micro-manipulation to remove daughter cells from the mother, which is laborious, time consuming, and does not allow long term tracking with high resolution microscopy. Recently, we have developed a microfluidic system capable of retaining mother cells in the microfluidic chambers while removing daughter cells automatically, making it possible to observe fluorescent reporters in single cells throughout their lifespan. Here we report the development of a new generation of microfluidic device that overcomes several limitations of the previous system, making it easier to fabricate and operate, and allowing functions not possible with the previous design. The basic unit of the device consists of microfluidic channels with pensile columns that can physically trap the mother cells while allowing the removal of daughter cells automatically by the flow of the fresh media. The whole microfluidic device contains multiple independent units operating in parallel, allowing simultaneous analysis of multiple strains. Using this system, we have reproduced the lifespan curves for the known long and short-lived mutants, demonstrating the power of the device for automated lifespan measurement. Following fluorescent reporters in single mother cells throughout their lifespan, we discovered a surprising change of expression of the translation elongation factor TEF2 during aging, suggesting altered translational control in aged mother cells. Utilizing the capability of the new device to trap mother-daughter pairs, we analyzed mother-daughter inheritance and found age dependent asymmetric partitioning of a general stress response reporter between mother and daughter cells.

  7. Dual-mode optical microscope based on single-pixel imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, A. D.; Clemente, P.; Tajahuerce, E.; Lancis, J.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate an inverted microscope that can image specimens in both reflection and transmission modes simultaneously with a single light source. The microscope utilizes a digital micromirror device (DMD) for patterned illumination altogether with two single-pixel photosensors for efficient light detection. The system, a scan-less device with no moving parts, works by sequential projection of a set of binary intensity patterns onto the sample that are codified onto a modified commercial DMD. Data to be displayed are geometrically transformed before written into a memory cell to cancel optical artifacts coming from the diamond-like shaped structure of the micromirror array. The 24-bit color depth of the display is fully exploited to increase the frame rate by a factor of 24, which makes the technique practicable for real samples. Our commercial DMD-based LED-illumination is cost effective and can be easily coupled as an add-on module for already existing inverted microscopes. The reflection and transmission information provided by our dual microscope complement each other and can be useful for imaging non-uniform samples and to prevent self-shadowing effects.

  8. Simultaneous application of two independent EIT devices for real-time multi-plane imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schullcke, B; Krueger-Ziolek, S; Gong, B; Mueller-Lisse, U; Moeller, K

    2016-09-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of many lung diseases like cystic fibrosis (CF) or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) could benefit from 3D ventilation information. Applying two EIT systems concurrently is a simple approach without specialized hardware that allows monitoring of regional changes of ventilation distribution inside the thorax at different planes with the high temporal resolution much valued in common single plane EIT. Effects of two simultaneously operated EIT devices on one subject were investigated to monitor rapid processes inside the thorax with a multi-plane approach. Results obtained by simulations with a virtual phantom and measurements with a phantom tank reveal that the distance of electrode planes has an important influence on the signal quality. Band-pass filters adapted according to the distance of the planes, can be used to reduce the crosstalk of the concurrent EIT systems. Besides simulations and phantom tank experiments measurements were also taken from a lung healthy volunteer to demonstrate the operation under realistic conditions. Reconstructed images indicate that it is possible to simultaneously visualize regional ventilation at different planes if settings of the EIT devices are chosen appropriately.

  9. Application range of micro focus radiographic devices associated to image processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappabianca, C.; Ferriani, S.; Verre, F.

    1987-01-01

    X-ray devices having a focus area less than 100 μ are called micro focus X-ray equipment. Here the range of application and the characteristics of these devices including the possibility of employing the coupling with real time image enhancement computers are defined

  10. Extracting 3D layout from a single image using global image structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Zhongyu; Gevers, Theo; Hu, Ninghang

    2015-10-01

    Extracting the pixel-level 3D layout from a single image is important for different applications, such as object localization, image, and video categorization. Traditionally, the 3D layout is derived by solving a pixel-level classification problem. However, the image-level 3D structure can be very beneficial for extracting pixel-level 3D layout since it implies the way how pixels in the image are organized. In this paper, we propose an approach that first predicts the global image structure, and then we use the global structure for fine-grained pixel-level 3D layout extraction. In particular, image features are extracted based on multiple layout templates. We then learn a discriminative model for classifying the global layout at the image-level. Using latent variables, we implicitly model the sublevel semantics of the image, which enrich the expressiveness of our model. After the image-level structure is obtained, it is used as the prior knowledge to infer pixel-wise 3D layout. Experiments show that the results of our model outperform the state-of-the-art methods by 11.7% for 3D structure classification. Moreover, we show that employing the 3D structure prior information yields accurate 3D scene layout segmentation.

  11. Digital tomosynthesis with an on-board kilovoltage imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godfrey, Devon J.; Yin, F.-F.; Oldham, Mark; Yoo, Sua; Willett, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To generate on-board digital tomosynthesis (DTS) and reference DTS images for three-dimensional image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) as an alternative to conventional portal imaging or on-board cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: Three clinical cases (prostate, head-and-neck, and liver) were selected to illustrate the capabilities of on-board DTS for IGRT. Corresponding reference DTS images were reconstructed from digitally reconstructed radiographs computed from planning CT image sets. The effect of scan angle on DTS slice thickness was examined by computing the mutual information between coincident CBCT and DTS images, as the DTS scan angle was varied from 0 o to 165 o . A breath-hold DTS acquisition strategy was implemented to remove respiratory motion artifacts. Results: Digital tomosynthesis slices appeared similar to coincident CBCT planes and yielded substantially more anatomic information than either kilovoltage or megavoltage radiographs. Breath-hold DTS acquisition improved soft-tissue visibility by suppressing respiratory motion. Conclusions: Improved bony and soft-tissue visibility in DTS images is likely to improve target localization compared with radiographic verification techniques and might allow for daily localization of a soft-tissue target. Breath-hold DTS is a potential alternative to on-board CBCT for sites prone to respiratory motion

  12. A Study of Residual Image in Charged-Coupled Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Jin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available For an image sensor CCD, electrons can be trapped at the front-side Si-SiO_2 surface interface in a case of exceeding the full well by bright source. Residual images can be made by the electrons remaining in the interface. These residual images are seen in the front-side-illuminated CCDs especially. It is not easy to find a quantitative analysis for this phenomenon in the domestic reports, although it is able to contaminate observation data. In this study, we find residual images in dark frames which were obtained from the front-side-illuminated CCD at Mt. Lemmon Optical Astronomy Observatory (LOAO, and analyze the effect to contaminated observation data by residual charges.

  13. Image quality comparison between single energy and dual energy CT protocols for hepatic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Yuan; Pelc, Norbert J.; Ng, Joshua M.; Megibow, Alec J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) enables volumetric scans in a single breath hold and is clinically useful for hepatic imaging. For simple tasks, conventional single energy (SE) computed tomography (CT) images acquired at the optimal tube potential are known to have better quality than dual energy (DE) blended images. However, liver imaging is complex and often requires imaging of both structures containing iodinated contrast media, where atomic number differences are the primary contrast mechanism, and other structures, where density differences are the primary contrast mechanism. Hence it is conceivable that the broad spectrum used in a dual energy acquisition may be an advantage. In this work we are interested in comparing these two imaging strategies at equal-dose and more complex settings. Methods: We developed numerical anthropomorphic phantoms to mimic realistic clinical CT scans for medium size and large size patients. MDCT images based on the defined phantoms were simulated using various SE and DE protocols at pre- and post-contrast stages. For SE CT, images from 60 kVp through 140 with 10 kVp steps were considered; for DE CT, both 80/140 and 100/140 kVp scans were simulated and linearly blended at the optimal weights. To make a fair comparison, the mAs of each scan was adjusted to match the reference radiation dose (120 kVp, 200 mAs for medium size patients and 140 kVp, 400 mAs for large size patients). Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of liver against other soft tissues was used to evaluate and compare the SE and DE protocols, and multiple pre- and post-contrasted liver-tissue pairs were used to define a composite CNR. To help validate the simulation results, we conducted a small clinical study. Eighty-five 120 kVp images and 81 blended 80/140 kVp images were collected and compared through both quantitative image quality analysis and an observer study. Results: In the simulation study, we found that the CNR of pre-contrast SE image mostly

  14. Multi-channel imaging cytometry with a single detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locknar, Sarah; Barton, John; Entwistle, Mark; Carver, Gary; Johnson, Robert

    2018-02-01

    Multi-channel microscopy and multi-channel flow cytometry generate high bit data streams. Multiple channels (both spectral and spatial) are important in diagnosing diseased tissue and identifying individual cells. Omega Optical has developed techniques for mapping multiple channels into the time domain for detection by a single high gain, high bandwidth detector. This approach is based on pulsed laser excitation and a serial array of optical fibers coated with spectral reflectors such that up to 15 wavelength bins are sequentially detected by a single-element detector within 2.5 μs. Our multichannel microscopy system uses firmware running on dedicated DSP and FPGA chips to synchronize the laser, scanning mirrors, and sampling clock. The signals are digitized by an NI board into 14 bits at 60MHz - allowing for 232 by 174 pixel fields in up to 15 channels with 10x over sampling. Our multi-channel imaging cytometry design adds channels for forward scattering and back scattering to the fluorescence spectral channels. All channels are detected within the 2.5 μs - which is compatible with fast cytometry. Going forward, we plan to digitize at 16 bits with an A-toD chip attached to a custom board. Processing these digital signals in custom firmware would allow an on-board graphics processing unit to display imaging flow cytometry data over configurable scanning line lengths. The scatter channels can be used to trigger data buffering when a cell is present in the beam. This approach enables a low cost mechanically robust imaging cytometer.

  15. Monitoring of biofilm formation on different material surfaces of medical devices using hyperspectral imaging method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hyun; Kim, Moon S.; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2012-03-01

    Contamination of the inner surface of indwelling (implanted) medical devices by microbial biofilm is a serious problem. Some microbial bacteria such as Escherichia coli form biofilms that lead to potentially lifethreatening infections. Other types of medical devices such as bronchoscopes and duodenoscopes account for the highest number of reported endoscopic infections where microbial biofilm is one of the major causes for these infections. We applied a hyperspectral imaging method to detect biofilm contamination on the surface of several common materials used for medical devices. Such materials include stainless steel, titanium, and stainless-steeltitanium alloy. Potential uses of hyperspectral imaging technique to monitor biofilm attachment to different material surfaces are discussed.

  16. Serial Myocardial Imaging after a Single Dose of Thallium-201

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiko Kamata

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Although thallium-201 exercise scintigraphy has been established for the detection of myocardial ischemia and viability, little is known regarding the myocardial thallium-201 kinetics during angioplasty. Herein, we report a 77-year old man with angina pectoris, in whom serial myocardial imaging after a single dose of thallium-201 was helpful in identifying not only the culprit lesion and myocardial viability, but also the dynamic changes in myocardial perfusion during angioplasty. Thallium-201 images after exercise showed a perfusion defect in the inferior wall, with a trivial redistribution 3 hours after the exercise and a marked improvement 24 hours later. Coronary angiography, performed 27 hours after exercise scintigraphy, showed severe stenosis in the right coronary artery. Guidewire crossing of the lesion interrupted the antegrade flow, which was restored after balloon dilation and stent implantation. Thallium-201 images, 2 hours after angioplasty (i.e., 30 hours after exercise, showed a decreased tracer uptake in the inferior wall, which improved the next day (i.e., 48 hours after exercise. Cardiac biomarkers were negative in the clinical course.

  17. Semiconductor laser engineering, reliability and diagnostics a practical approach to high power and single mode devices

    CERN Document Server

    Epperlein, Peter W

    2013-01-01

    This reference book provides a fully integrated novel approach to the development of high-power, single-transverse mode, edge-emitting diode lasers by addressing the complementary topics of device engineering, reliability engineering and device diagnostics in the same book, and thus closes the gap in the current book literature. Diode laser fundamentals are discussed, followed by an elaborate discussion of problem-oriented design guidelines and techniques, and by a systematic treatment of the origins of laser degradation and a thorough exploration of the engineering means to enhance the optical strength of the laser. Stability criteria of critical laser characteristics and key laser robustness factors are discussed along with clear design considerations in the context of reliability engineering approaches and models, and typical programs for reliability tests and laser product qualifications. Novel, advanced diagnostic methods are reviewed to discuss, for the first time in detail in book literature, performa...

  18. [Definitive contraception with Essure device: Single institutional experience on 517 procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio-Rodríguez-Miñón, Pablo; de la Fuente-Valero, Jesús; Martínez-Laral, Ana; Alonso-García, Ana; Sobrino-Mota, Verónica; Zapardiel-Gutiérrez, Ignacio; Hernández-Aguado, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    To analyse the outcomes of patients undergoing Essure sterilization in a single institution, interns of complications and technique failure. Retrospective descriptive study of 517 patients underwent definitive contraception with Essure device in outpatient hysteroscopy office without anesthesia and controlled at 3 months with abdominal radiography, ultrasonography and hysterosalpingography in selected cases. The success rates of the insertion of Essure was 96.8%, similar to data reported in the literature with 3.7% of vagal reactions, as most prevalent complication. 7 (1.35%) unintended pregnancies were observed. Essure is a permanent birth control device, with high rate of successful insertion and a low rate of complications. Unintended pregnancies in our study are high and we must change the protocols of placement and monitoring, considering hysterosalpingography as a routine control test.

  19. Photovoltaic device on a single ZnO nanowire p–n homojunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Hak Dong; Zakirov, Anvar S; Yuldashev, Shavkat U; Kang, Tae Won; Ahn, Chi Won; Yeo, Yung Kee

    2012-01-01

    A photovoltaic device was successfully grown solely based on the single ZnO p–n homojunction nanowire. The ZnO nanowire p–n diode consists of an as-grown n-type segment and an in situ arsenic-doped p-type segment. This p–n homojunction acts as a good photovoltaic cell, producing a photocurrent almost 45 times larger than the dark current under reverse-biased conditions. Our results demonstrate that the present ZnO p–n homojunction nanowire can be used as a self-powered ultraviolet photodetector as well as a photovoltaic cell, which can also be used as an ultralow electrical power source for nanoscale electronic, optoelectronic and medical devices. (paper)

  20. Properties of a GaAs Single Electron Path Switching Node Device Using a Single Quantum Dot for Hexagonal BDD Quantum Circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Abe, Yuji; Kasai, Seiya; Hasegawa, Hideki; Hashizume, Tamotsu

    2006-01-01

    A new single electron (SE) binary-decision diagram (BDD) node device having a single quantum dot connected to three nanowire branches through tunnel barriers was fabricated using etched AlGaAs/GaAs nanowires and nanometer-sized Schottky wrap gates (WPGs), and their operation was characterized experimentally, for the hexagonal BDD quantum circuit. Fabricated devices showed clear and steep single electron pass switching by applying only an input voltage signal, which was completely different from switching properties in the previous SE BDD node devices composed of two single electron switches. As the possible switching mechanism, the correlation between the probabilities of tunnelling thorough a single quantum dot in exit branches was discussed

  1. Performance assessment of the single photon emission microscope: high spatial resolution SPECT imaging of small animal organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mejia

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The single photon emission microscope (SPEM is an instrument developed to obtain high spatial resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT images of small structures inside the mouse brain. SPEM consists of two independent imaging devices, which combine a multipinhole collimator, a high-resolution, thallium-doped cesium iodide [CsI(Tl] columnar scintillator, a demagnifying/intensifier tube, and an electron-multiplying charge-coupling device (CCD. Collimators have 300- and 450-µm diameter pinholes on tungsten slabs, in hexagonal arrays of 19 and 7 holes. Projection data are acquired in a photon-counting strategy, where CCD frames are stored at 50 frames per second, with a radius of rotation of 35 mm and magnification factor of one. The image reconstruction software tool is based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. Our aim was to evaluate the spatial resolution and sensitivity attainable with the seven-pinhole imaging device, together with the linearity for quantification on the tomographic images, and to test the instrument in obtaining tomographic images of different mouse organs. A spatial resolution better than 500 µm and a sensitivity of 21.6 counts·s-1·MBq-1 were reached, as well as a correlation coefficient between activity and intensity better than 0.99, when imaging 99mTc sources. Images of the thyroid, heart, lungs, and bones of mice were registered using 99mTc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals in times appropriate for routine preclinical experimentation of <1 h per projection data set. Detailed experimental protocols and images of the aforementioned organs are shown. We plan to extend the instrument's field of view to fix larger animals and to combine data from both detectors to reduce the acquisition time or applied activity.

  2. Performance assessment of the single photon emission microscope: high spatial resolution SPECT imaging of small animal organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia, J.; Reis, M.A.; Miranda, A.C.C.; Batista, I.R.; Barboza, M.R.F.; Shih, M.C.; Fu, G.; Chen, C.T.; Meng, L.J.; Bressan, R.A.; Amaro, E. Jr

    2013-01-01

    The single photon emission microscope (SPEM) is an instrument developed to obtain high spatial resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images of small structures inside the mouse brain. SPEM consists of two independent imaging devices, which combine a multipinhole collimator, a high-resolution, thallium-doped cesium iodide [CsI(Tl)] columnar scintillator, a demagnifying/intensifier tube, and an electron-multiplying charge-coupling device (CCD). Collimators have 300- and 450-µm diameter pinholes on tungsten slabs, in hexagonal arrays of 19 and 7 holes. Projection data are acquired in a photon-counting strategy, where CCD frames are stored at 50 frames per second, with a radius of rotation of 35 mm and magnification factor of one. The image reconstruction software tool is based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. Our aim was to evaluate the spatial resolution and sensitivity attainable with the seven-pinhole imaging device, together with the linearity for quantification on the tomographic images, and to test the instrument in obtaining tomographic images of different mouse organs. A spatial resolution better than 500 µm and a sensitivity of 21.6 counts·s -1 ·MBq -1 were reached, as well as a correlation coefficient between activity and intensity better than 0.99, when imaging 99m Tc sources. Images of the thyroid, heart, lungs, and bones of mice were registered using 99m Tc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals in times appropriate for routine preclinical experimentation of <1 h per projection data set. Detailed experimental protocols and images of the aforementioned organs are shown. We plan to extend the instrument's field of view to fix larger animals and to combine data from both detectors to reduce the acquisition time or applied activity

  3. Performance assessment of the single photon emission microscope: high spatial resolution SPECT imaging of small animal organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia, J. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Reis, M.A. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Laboratório Interdisciplinar de Neurociências Clínicas, Departamento de Psiquiatria, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miranda, A.C.C. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Batista, I.R. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Laboratório Interdisciplinar de Neurociências Clínicas, Departamento de Psiquiatria, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Barboza, M.R.F.; Shih, M.C. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fu, G. [GE Global Research, Schenectady, NY (United States); Chen, C.T. [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Meng, L.J. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Bressan, R.A. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Laboratório Interdisciplinar de Neurociências Clínicas, Departamento de Psiquiatria, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Amaro, E. Jr [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-11-06

    The single photon emission microscope (SPEM) is an instrument developed to obtain high spatial resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images of small structures inside the mouse brain. SPEM consists of two independent imaging devices, which combine a multipinhole collimator, a high-resolution, thallium-doped cesium iodide [CsI(Tl)] columnar scintillator, a demagnifying/intensifier tube, and an electron-multiplying charge-coupling device (CCD). Collimators have 300- and 450-µm diameter pinholes on tungsten slabs, in hexagonal arrays of 19 and 7 holes. Projection data are acquired in a photon-counting strategy, where CCD frames are stored at 50 frames per second, with a radius of rotation of 35 mm and magnification factor of one. The image reconstruction software tool is based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. Our aim was to evaluate the spatial resolution and sensitivity attainable with the seven-pinhole imaging device, together with the linearity for quantification on the tomographic images, and to test the instrument in obtaining tomographic images of different mouse organs. A spatial resolution better than 500 µm and a sensitivity of 21.6 counts·s{sup -1}·MBq{sup -1} were reached, as well as a correlation coefficient between activity and intensity better than 0.99, when imaging {sup 99m}Tc sources. Images of the thyroid, heart, lungs, and bones of mice were registered using {sup 99m}Tc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals in times appropriate for routine preclinical experimentation of <1 h per projection data set. Detailed experimental protocols and images of the aforementioned organs are shown. We plan to extend the instrument's field of view to fix larger animals and to combine data from both detectors to reduce the acquisition time or applied activity.

  4. Image-based surveillance and security systems using personal computers for device aiming and digital image comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quiett, S.; Axtell, L.H.

    1987-01-01

    A detection-type security system using enhanced capability cameras or other imaging devices can aid in maintaining security from long distance and/or for large areas. To do so requires that the imaging device(s) be repeatedly and accurately positioned so that no areas are overlooked. Digital control using personal computers is the simplest method of achieving positional accuracy. The monitoring of large areas and/or a large number of areas also requires that a substantial quantity of visual information be catalogued and evaluated for potential security problems. While security personnel alone are typically used for such monitoring, as the quantity of visual information increases, the likelihood that potential security threats will be missed also increases. The ability of an image-based security system to detect potential security problems can be further increased with the use of selected image processing techniques. Utilizing personal computers for both imaging device position control as well as image processing, surveillance of large areas can be performed by a limited number of individuals with a high level of system confidence

  5. Evaluation of usefulness of portal image using Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) in the patients who received pelvic radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Chul; Kim, Heon Jong; Park, Seong Young; Cho, Young Kap; Loh, John J. K.; Park, Won; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Gwi Eon

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of electronic portal imaging device through objective compare of the images acquired using an EPID and a conventional port film. From Apr. to Oct. 1997, a total of 150 sets of images from 20 patients who received radiation therapy in the pelvis area were evaluated in the Inha University Hospital and Severance Hospital. A dual image recording technique was devised to obtain both electronic portal images and port film images simultaneously with one treatment course. We did not perform double exposure. Five to ten images were acquired from each patient. All images were acquired from posteroanterior (PA) view except images from two patients. A dose rate of 100-300 MU/min and a 10-MV X-ray beam were used and 2-10 MUs were required to produce a verification image during treatment. Kodak diagnostic film with metal/film imaging cassette which was located on the top of the EPID detector was used for the port film. The source to detector distance was 140 cm. Eight anatomical landmarks (pelvic brim, sacrum, acetabulum, iliopectineal line, symphysis, ischium, obturator foramen, sacroiliac joint) were assessed. Four radiation oncologist joined to evaluate each image. The individual landmarks in the port film or in the EPID were rated-very clear (1), clear (2), visible (3), notclear (4), not visible (5). Using an video camera based EPID system, there was no difference of image quality between no enhanced EPID images and port film images. However, when we provided some change with window level for the portal image, the visibility of the sacrum and obturator foramen was improved in the portal images than in the port film images. All anatomical landmarks were more visible in the portal images than in the port film when we applied the CLAHE mode enhancement. The images acquired using an matrix ion chamber type EPID were also improved image quality after window level adjustment. The quality of image acquired using an electronic portal imaging device was

  6. Preliminary results on tests of a Cerenkov ring imaging device employing a photoionizing PWC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durkin, S.; Honma, A.; Leith, D.W.G.S.

    1978-08-01

    A brief description of techniques and problems of ring imaging Cerenkov detectors employing photoionizing PWC's is discussed. Preliminary results on a one dimensional ring imaging device tested at SLAC in May and June of 1978 are then presented. These results include rough measurements of the Cerenkov ring in nitrogen, argon, neon, and helium produced by a collimated positron beam.

  7. Sampling device for withdrawing a representative sample from single and multi-phase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apley, Walter J.; Cliff, William C.; Creer, James M.

    1984-01-01

    A fluid stream sampling device has been developed for the purpose of obtaining a representative sample from a single or multi-phase fluid flow. This objective is carried out by means of a probe which may be inserted into the fluid stream. Individual samples are withdrawn from the fluid flow by sampling ports with particular spacings, and the sampling parts are coupled to various analytical systems for characterization of the physical, thermal, and chemical properties of the fluid flow as a whole and also individually.

  8. Calculation of neutron-induced single-event upset cross sections for semiconductor memory devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeuchi, Taketo; Watanabe, Yukinobu; Nakashima, Hideki; Sun, Weili

    2001-01-01

    Neutron-induced single-event upset (SEU) cross sections for semiconductor memory devices are calculated by the Burst Generation Rate (BGR) method using LA150 data and QMD calculation in the neutron energy range between 20 MeV and 10 GeV. The calculated results are compared with the measured SEU cross sections for energies up to 160 MeV, and the validity of the calculation method and the nuclear data used is verified. The kind of reaction products and the neutron energy range that have the most effect on SEU are discussed. (author)

  9. Positron annihilation imaging device using multiple offset rings of detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.J.

    1982-01-01

    A means is provided for recording more than one tomographic image simultaneously through different cross-sections of a patient, using positron emission tomography. Separate rings of detectors are used to construct every odd-numbered slice, and coincident events that occur between adjacent rings of detectors provide a center or even-numbered slice. Detector rings are offset with respect to one another by half the angular separation of the detectors, allowing an image to be reconstructed from the central slice without the necessity of physically rotating the detector array while accumulating data

  10. Three-dimensional image acquisition and reconstruction system on a mobile device based on computer-generated integral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdenebat, Munkh-Uchral; Kim, Byeong-Jun; Piao, Yan-Ling; Park, Seo-Yeon; Kwon, Ki-Chul; Piao, Mei-Lan; Yoo, Kwan-Hee; Kim, Nam

    2017-10-01

    A mobile three-dimensional image acquisition and reconstruction system using a computer-generated integral imaging technique is proposed. A depth camera connected to the mobile device acquires the color and depth data of a real object simultaneously, and an elemental image array is generated based on the original three-dimensional information for the object, with lens array specifications input into the mobile device. The three-dimensional visualization of the real object is reconstructed on the mobile display through optical or digital reconstruction methods. The proposed system is implemented successfully and the experimental results certify that the system is an effective and interesting method of displaying real three-dimensional content on a mobile device.

  11. A simple device for the stereoscopic display of 3D CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haveri, M.; Suramo, I.; Laehde, S.; Karhula, V.; Junila, J.

    1997-01-01

    We describe a simple device for creating true 3D views of image pairs obtained at 3D CT reconstruction. The device presents the images in a slightly different angle of view for the left and the right eyes. This true 3D viewing technique was applied experimentally in the evaluation of complex acetabular fractures. Experiments were also made to determine the optimal angle between the images for each eye. The angle varied between 1 and 7 for different observers and also depended on the display field of view used. (orig.)

  12. Fabrication and interfacing of nanochannel devices for single-molecule studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, H T; Berenschot, J W; De Boer, M J; Tas, N R; Haneveld, J; Elwenspoek, M C; Segers-Nolten, I M

    2009-01-01

    Nanochannel devices have been fabricated using standard micromachining techniques such as optical lithography, deposition and etching. 1D nanochannels with thin glass capping and through-wafer inlet/outlet ports were constructed. 2D nanochannels have been made transparent by oxidation of polysilicon channel wall for optical detection and these fragile channels were successfully connected to macro inlet ports. The interfacing from the macro world to the nanochannels was especially designed for optical observation of filling liquid inside nanochannels using an inverted microscope. Toward single-molecule studies, individual quantum dots were visualized in 150 nm height 1D nanochannels. The potential of 2D nanochannels for single-molecule studies was shown from a filling experiment with a fluorescent dye solution

  13. Focused ion beam patterning to dielectrophoretically assemble single nanowire based devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Ferrara, V; Massera, E; Francia, G Di; Alfano, B

    2010-01-01

    Direct-write processing is increasingly taking place in nanodevice fabrication. In this work, Focused Ion Beam (FIB), a powerful tool in maskless micromachining, is used for electrode patterning onto a silicon/silicon nitride substrate. Then a single palladium nanowire is assembled between electrodes by means of dielectrophoresis (DEP). The nanowire morphology depends on the electrode pattern when DEP conditions are fixed. FIB/DEP combination overcomes the problem of nanowire electrical contamination due to gallium ion bombardment and the as-grown nanowire retains its basic electrical properties. Single nanowire based devices have been fabricated with this novel approach and have been tested as hydrogen sensors, confirming the reliability of this technology.

  14. Using an Elastic Band Device After a Severe Obstetric Pubic Symphyseal Separation: Clinical and Imaging Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasbleiz, Jeremy; Sevestre, François-Xavier; Moquet, Pierre-Yves

    2017-09-01

    Severe separation of the pubic symphysis is a rare delivery complication. Facing this pathology, we decided to study a new elastic band device. To evaluate the elastic band device, clinical (pain-rated) and imaging (magnetic resonance imaging and radiography) evaluations with and without the device were performed. The elastic band device is a European Conformity-certified medical device, which is made of neoprene straps, that reduces the mobility of the pelvis and the use of the internal rotator muscles. Once the elastic band device was in place, on postpartum day 1, radiography showed a decrease of the pubic width from 41 to 12 mm. Furthermore, pain decreased from 10 of 10 to 2 of 10 in 2 days, allowing the patient to ambulate and avoid surgery. After 1 month, the pubic width (6 mm) and anatomy were recovered but minor pain was still present with hip rotatory movements. The elastic band device was worn 24 hours a day from postpartum days 1-90 and 12 hours a day from postpartum days 90 to 150; afterward, the patient returned to normal life without the elastic band device. Use of an elastic band device was associated with a reduction of the pubic width and pain associated after obstetric pubic symphysis separation.

  15. Features Speech Signature Image Recognition on Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Mikhailovich Alyushin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The algorithms fordynamic spectrograms images recognition, processing and soundspeech signature (SS weredeveloped. The software for mobile phones, thatcan recognize speech signatureswas prepared. The investigation of the SS recognition speed on its boundarytypes was conducted. Recommendations on the boundary types choice in the optimal ratio of recognitionspeed and required space were given.

  16. ClearPEM: prototype PET device dedicated to breast imaging

    CERN Multimedia

    Joao Varela

    2009-01-01

    Clinical trials have begun in Portugal on a new breast imaging system (ClearPEM) using positron emission tomography (PET). The system, developed by a Portuguese consortium in collaboration with CERN and laboratories participating in the Crystal Clear collaboration, will detect even the smallest tumours and thus help avoid unnecessary biopsies.

  17. Raspberry Pi: a 35-dollar device for viewing DICOM images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omir Antunes Paiva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Raspberry Pi is a low-cost computer created with educational purposes. It uses Linux and, most of times, freeware applications, particularly a software for viewing DICOM images. With an external monitor, the supported resolution (1920 × 1200 pixels allows for the set up of simple viewing workstations at a reduced cost.

  18. AUTOMATIC INTERPRETATION OF HIGH RESOLUTION SAR IMAGES: FIRST RESULTS OF SAR IMAGE SIMULATION FOR SINGLE BUILDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the all-weather data acquisition capabilities, high resolution space borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR plays an important role in remote sensing applications like change detection. However, because of the complex geometric mapping of buildings in urban areas, SAR images are often hard to interpret. SAR simulation techniques ease the visual interpretation of SAR images, while fully automatic interpretation is still a challenge. This paper presents a method for supporting the interpretation of high resolution SAR images with simulated radar images using a LiDAR digital surface model (DSM. Line features are extracted from the simulated and real SAR images and used for matching. A single building model is generated from the DSM and used for building recognition in the SAR image. An application for the concept is presented for the city centre of Munich where the comparison of the simulation to the TerraSAR-X data shows a good similarity. Based on the result of simulation and matching, special features (e.g. like double bounce lines, shadow areas etc. can be automatically indicated in SAR image.

  19. Orientational imaging of a single plasmonic nanoparticle using dark-field hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Nishir; Mahigir, Amirreza; Veronis, Georgios; Gartia, Manas Ranjan

    2017-08-01

    Orientation of plasmonic nanostructures is an important feature in many nanoscale applications such as catalyst, biosensors DNA interactions, protein detections, hotspot of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), and fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) experiments. However, due to diffraction limit, it is challenging to obtain the exact orientation of the nanostructure using standard optical microscope. Hyperspectral Imaging Microscopy is a state-of-the-art visualization technology that combines modern optics with hyperspectral imaging and computer system to provide the identification and quantitative spectral analysis of nano- and microscale structures. In this work, initially we use transmitted dark field imaging technique to locate single nanoparticle on a glass substrate. Then we employ hyperspectral imaging technique at the same spot to investigate orientation of single nanoparticle. No special tagging or staining of nanoparticle has been done, as more likely required in traditional microscopy techniques. Different orientations have been identified by carefully understanding and calibrating shift in spectral response from each different orientations of similar sized nanoparticles. Wavelengths recorded are between 300 nm to 900 nm. The orientations measured by hyperspectral microscopy was validated using finite difference time domain (FDTD) electrodynamics calculations and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. The combination of high resolution nanometer-scale imaging techniques and the modern numerical modeling capacities thus enables a meaningful advance in our knowledge of manipulating and fabricating shaped nanostructures. This work will advance our understanding of the behavior of small nanoparticle clusters useful for sensing, nanomedicine, and surface sciences.

  20. Computer processing of image captured by the passive THz imaging device as an effective tool for its de-noising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.; Kuchik, Igor E.; Zhang, Cun-lin; Deng, Chao; Zhao, Yuan-meng; Zhang, Xin

    2012-12-01

    As it is well-known, passive THz imaging devices have big potential for solution of the security problem. Nevertheless, one of the main problems, which take place on the way of using these devices, consists in the low image quality of developed passive THz camera. To change this situation, it is necessary to improve the engineering characteristics (resolution, sensitivity and so on) of the THz camera or to use computer processing of the image. In our opinion, the last issue is more preferable because it is more inexpensive. Below we illustrate possibility of suppression of the noise of the image captured by three THz passive camera developed in CNU (Beijing. China). After applying the computer processing of the image, its quality enhances many times. Achieved quality in many cases becomes enough for the detection of the object hidden under opaque clothes. We stress that the performance of developed computer code is enough high and does not restrict the performance of passive THz imaging device. The obtained results demonstrate the high efficiency of our approach for the detection of hidden objects and they are a very promising solution for the security problem. Nevertheless, developing the new spatial filter for treatment of the THz image remains a modern problem at present time.

  1. Theoretical performance model for single image depth from defocus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouvé-Peloux, Pauline; Champagnat, Frédéric; Le Besnerais, Guy; Idier, Jérôme

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we present a performance model for depth estimation using single image depth from defocus (SIDFD). Our model is based on an original expression of the Cramér-Rao bound (CRB) in this context. We show that this model is consistent with the expected behavior of SIDFD. We then study the influence on the performance of the optical parameters of a conventional camera such as the focal length, the aperture, and the position of the in-focus plane (IFP). We derive an approximate analytical expression of the CRB away from the IFP, and we propose an interpretation of the SIDFD performance in this domain. Finally, we illustrate the predictive capacity of our performance model on experimental data comparing several settings of a consumer camera.

  2. A Single-Transistor Active Pixel CMOS Image Sensor Architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guo-An; He Jin; Zhang Dong-Wei; Su Yan-Mei; Wang Cheng; Chen Qin; Liang Hai-Lang; Ye Yun

    2012-01-01

    A single-transistor CMOS active pixel image sensor (1 T CMOS APS) architecture is proposed. By switching the photosensing pinned diode, resetting and selecting can be achieved by diode pull-up and capacitive coupling pull-down of the source follower. Thus, the reset and selected transistors can be removed. In addition, the reset and selected signal lines can be shared to reduce the metal signal line, leading to a very high fill factor. The pixel design and operation principles are discussed in detail. The functionality of the proposed 1T CMOS APS architecture has been experimentally verified using a fabricated chip in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS AMIS technology

  3. Imaging through scattering media by Fourier filtering and single-pixel detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauregui-Sánchez, Y.; Clemente, P.; Lancis, J.; Tajahuerce, E.

    2018-02-01

    We present a novel imaging system that combines the principles of Fourier spatial filtering and single-pixel imaging in order to recover images of an object hidden behind a turbid medium by transillumination. We compare the performance of our single-pixel imaging setup with that of a conventional system. We conclude that the introduction of Fourier gating improves the contrast of images in both cases. Furthermore, we show that the combination of single-pixel imaging and Fourier spatial filtering techniques is particularly well adapted to provide images of objects transmitted through scattering media.

  4. Quantitative control of mitochondria transfer between live single cells using a microfluidic device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-Ichi Wada

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative control of mitochondria transfer between live cells is a promising approach for genetic manipulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA because single mitochondrion transfer to a mtDNA-less (ρ0 cell potentially leads to homoplasmy of mtDNA. In this paper, we describe a method for quantitative control of mitochondria transfer between live single cells. For this purpose, we fabricated novel microfluidic devices having cell paring structures with a 4.1, 5.6 or 10.0 μm-length microtunnel. When cells were fused through a microtunnel using the Sendai virus envelope-based method, a strictured cytoplasmic connection was achieved with a length corresponding to that of the microtunnel. Elongation of the cytoplasmic connection led to a decrease in mitochondria transfer to the fusion partner. Moreover, some cell pairs that fused through a 10.0 μm-length microtunnel showed single mitochondrion transfer. Fused cells were spontaneously disconnected from each other when they were recovered in a normal culture medium. These results suggest that our cell fusion method can perform quantitative control of mitochondria transfer that includes a single mitochondrion transfer.

  5. Single-crystal charge transfer interfaces for efficient photonic devices (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Helena; Pinto, Rui M.; Maçôas, Ermelinda M. S.; Baleizão, Carlos; Santos, Isabel C.

    2016-09-01

    Organic semiconductors have unique optical, mechanical and electronic properties that can be combined with customized chemical functionality. In the crystalline form, determinant features for electronic applications such as molecular purity, the charge mobility or the exciton diffusion length, reveal a superior performance when compared with materials in a more disordered form. Combining crystals of two different conjugated materials as even enable a new 2D electronic system. However, the use of organic single crystals in devices is still limited to a few applications, such as field-effect transistors. In 2013, we presented the first system composed of single-crystal charge transfer interfaces presenting photoconductivity behaviour. The system composed of rubrene and TCNQ has a responsivity reaching 1 A/W, corresponding to an external quantum efficiency of nearly 100%. A similar approach, with a hybrid structure of a PCBM film and rubrene single crystal also presents high responsivity and the possibility to extract excitons generated in acceptor materials. This strategy led to an extended action towards the near IR. By adequate material design and structural organisation of perylediimides, we demonstrate that is possible to improve exciton diffusion efficiency. More recently, we have successfully used the concept of charge transfer interfaces in phototransistors. These results open the possibility of using organic single-crystal interfaces in photonic applications.

  6. Single fiber UV detector based on hydrothermally synthesized ZnO nanorods for wearable computing devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Tae Hoon; Han, Jeong In

    2018-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in zinc oxide (ZnO) based ultraviolet (UV) sensing devices over the last several decades owing to their diverse range of applications. ZnO has extraordinary properties, such as a wide band gap and high exciton binding energy, which make it a beneficial material for UV sensing device. Herein, we show a ZnO UV sensing device fabricated on a cylindrical Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) monofilament. The ZnO active layer was synthesized by hydrothermal synthesis and the Cu electrodes were deposited by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. Cu thin film was deposited uniformly on a single PET fiber by rotating it inside the sputtering chamber. Various characteristics were investigated by changing the concentration of the seed solution and the growth solution. The growth of ZnO nanorods was confirmed by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) to see the surface state and structure, followed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. Also, current-voltage (I-V) curves were obtained to measure photocurrent and conductance. Furthermore, falling response time, rising response time, and responsivity were calculated by analyzing current-time (I-t) curves.

  7. Triggering Mechanism for Neutron Induced Single-Event Burnout in Power Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Tomoyuki; Nishida, Shuichi; Hamada, Kimimori

    2013-04-01

    Cosmic ray neutrons can trigger catastrophic failures in power devices. It has been reported that parasitic transistor action causes single-event burnout (SEB) in power metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) and insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs). However, power diodes do not have an inherent parasitic transistor. In this paper, we describe the mechanism triggering SEB in power diodes for the first time using transient device simulation. Initially, generated electron-hole pairs created by incident recoil ions generate transient current, which increases the electron density in the vicinity of the n-/n+ boundary. The space charge effect of the carriers leads to an increase in the strength of the electric field at the n-/n+ boundary. Finally, the onset of impact ionization at the n-/n+ boundary can trigger SEB. Furthermore, this failure is closely related to diode secondary breakdown. It was clarified that the impact ionization at the n-/n+ boundary is a key point of the mechanism triggering SEB in power devices.

  8. A microfluidic device integrating plasmonic nanodevices for Raman spectroscopy analysis on trapped single living cells

    KAUST Repository

    Perozziello, Gerardo

    2013-11-01

    In this work we developed a microfluidic device integrating nanoplasmonic devices combined with fluidic trapping regions. The microfuidic traps allow to capture single cells in areas where plasmonic sensors are placed. In this way it is possible to perform Enhanced Raman analysis on the cell membranes. Moreover, by changing direction of the flux it is possible to change the orientation of the cell in the trap, so that it is possible to analyze different points of the membrane of the same cell. We shows an innovative procedure to fabricate and assembly the microfluidic device which combine photolithography, focused ion beam machining, and hybrid bonding between a polymer substrate and lid of Calcium fluoride. This procedure is compatible with the fabrication of the plasmonic sensors in close proximity of the microfluidic traps. Moreover, the use of Calcium fluoride as lid allows full compatibility with Raman measurements producing negligible Raman background signal and avoids Raman artifacts. Finally, we performed Raman analysis on cells to monitor their oxidative stress under particular non physiological conditions. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A microfluidic device integrating plasmonic nanodevices for Raman spectroscopy analysis on trapped single living cells

    KAUST Repository

    Perozziello, Gerardo; Catalano, Rossella; Francardi, Marco; Rondanina, Eliana; Pardeo, Francesca; De Angelis, Francesco De; Malara, Natalia Maria; Candeloro, Patrizio; Morrone, Giovanni; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we developed a microfluidic device integrating nanoplasmonic devices combined with fluidic trapping regions. The microfuidic traps allow to capture single cells in areas where plasmonic sensors are placed. In this way it is possible to perform Enhanced Raman analysis on the cell membranes. Moreover, by changing direction of the flux it is possible to change the orientation of the cell in the trap, so that it is possible to analyze different points of the membrane of the same cell. We shows an innovative procedure to fabricate and assembly the microfluidic device which combine photolithography, focused ion beam machining, and hybrid bonding between a polymer substrate and lid of Calcium fluoride. This procedure is compatible with the fabrication of the plasmonic sensors in close proximity of the microfluidic traps. Moreover, the use of Calcium fluoride as lid allows full compatibility with Raman measurements producing negligible Raman background signal and avoids Raman artifacts. Finally, we performed Raman analysis on cells to monitor their oxidative stress under particular non physiological conditions. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of the substitution of F on the photoswitching behavior in single molecular device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Baoan; Zheng, Yapeng; Yuan, Peipei; Liao, Bin; Chen, Wei; An, Xiuhua; Mo, Xiaotong; Ding, Yuqiang

    2017-09-01

    We carry out first-principles calculations based on density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function to investigate the electronic transport properties of a 5-arylidenehydantoin molecule sandwiched between two Au electrodes. A reversible switching behavior between E and Z isomerization can be observed in the device through light irradiation, and their currents display different characteristic. Furthermore, it is found that the substitution of F in the molecule enlarges the switching ratio of device. The different characteristics of currents for E/Z forms and E/Z with the substitution of F are discussed by the transmission spectra and the molecular projected self-consistent Hamiltonian states. We discuss the change of Fermi level alignment due to the substitution of F, and the polarization effect under bias. We find the negative differential resistance effect in the E form with the substitution of F, which is explained by change of molecule-electrode coupling with the varied bias. The results suggest that the 5-arylidenehydantoin molecule with the substitution of F that improves the performance of device, becoming one of the methods for improving single molecular photoswitching performance in the future.

  11. PT-symmetric planar devices for field transformation and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valagiannopoulos, C A; Monticone, F; Alù, A

    2016-01-01

    The powerful tools of transformation optics (TO) allow an effective distortion of a region of space by carefully engineering the material inhomogeneity and anisotropy, and have been successfully applied in recent years to control electromagnetic fields in many different scenarios, e.g., to realize invisibility cloaks and planar lenses. For various field transformations, it is not necessary to use volumetric inhomogeneous materials, and suitably designed ultrathin metasurfaces with tailored spatial or spectral responses may be able to realize similar functionalities within smaller footprints and more robust mechanisms. Here, inspired by the concept of metamaterial TO lenses, we discuss field transformations enabled by parity-time (PT) symmetric metasurfaces, which can emulate negative refraction. We first analyze a simple realization based on homogeneous and local metasurfaces to achieve negative refraction and imaging, and we then extend our results to arbitrary PT-symmetric two-port networks to realize aberration-free planar imaging. (paper)

  12. An initial study on the estimation of time-varying volumetric treatment images and 3D tumor localization from single MV cine EPID images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Pankaj, E-mail: pankaj.mishra@varian.com; Mak, Raymond H.; Rottmann, Joerg; Bryant, Jonathan H.; Williams, Christopher L.; Berbeco, Ross I.; Lewis, John H. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Li, Ruijiang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: In this work the authors develop and investigate the feasibility of a method to estimate time-varying volumetric images from individual MV cine electronic portal image device (EPID) images. Methods: The authors adopt a two-step approach to time-varying volumetric image estimation from a single cine EPID image. In the first step, a patient-specific motion model is constructed from 4DCT. In the second step, parameters in the motion model are tuned according to the information in the EPID image. The patient-specific motion model is based on a compact representation of lung motion represented in displacement vector fields (DVFs). DVFs are calculated through deformable image registration (DIR) of a reference 4DCT phase image (typically peak-exhale) to a set of 4DCT images corresponding to different phases of a breathing cycle. The salient characteristics in the DVFs are captured in a compact representation through principal component analysis (PCA). PCA decouples the spatial and temporal components of the DVFs. Spatial information is represented in eigenvectors and the temporal information is represented by eigen-coefficients. To generate a new volumetric image, the eigen-coefficients are updated via cost function optimization based on digitally reconstructed radiographs and projection images. The updated eigen-coefficients are then multiplied with the eigenvectors to obtain updated DVFs that, in turn, give the volumetric image corresponding to the cine EPID image. Results: The algorithm was tested on (1) Eight digital eXtended CArdiac-Torso phantom datasets based on different irregular patient breathing patterns and (2) patient cine EPID images acquired during SBRT treatments. The root-mean-squared tumor localization error is (0.73 ± 0.63 mm) for the XCAT data and (0.90 ± 0.65 mm) for the patient data. Conclusions: The authors introduced a novel method of estimating volumetric time-varying images from single cine EPID images and a PCA-based lung motion model

  13. First Indian single center experience with pipeline embolization device for complex intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Mathew P; Yadav, Manish Kumar; Mehta, Pankaj; Vijayan, K; Arulselvan, V; Jayabalan, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    Flow diversion is a novel method of therapy wherein an endoluminal sleeve, the flow diverter stent is placed across the neck of complex aneurysms to curatively reconstruct abnormal vasculature. We present the first Indian single center experience with the pipeline embolization device (PED) and 6 months follow-up results of 5 patients. Five complex or recurrent intracranial aneurysms in five patients were treated with PED. The patients were followed-up with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) after 4 weeks and conventional angiography after 6 months. Feasibility, complications, clinical outcome, early 1-month MRA and 6 months conventional angiographic follow-up results were analyzed. Of the five aneurysms treated, four were in the anterior circulation and one in the posterior circulation. All five patients were treated with a single PED in each, and additionally coils were used in one patient. At 1-month MRA follow-up, complete occlusion was seen in 2 (40%) of the five cases. Post 6 months conventional angiography showed complete occlusion of the aneurysm sac in all five cases (100%). Side branch ostia were covered in three patients, all of which were patent (100%). There was no incidence of major neurological morbidity or mortality. One patient (20%) who had basilar top aneurysm experienced minor neurological disability after 5 days which partially improved. Pipeline embolization device for complex and recurrent aneurysms is technically feasible, safe, offers low complication rate, and definitive vascular reconstruction. PED can be used without fear of occlusion of covered eloquent side branches and perforators.

  14. Advanced single-wafer sequential multiprocessing techniques for semiconductor device fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moslehi, M.M.; Davis, C.

    1989-01-01

    Single-wafer integrated in-situ multiprocessing (SWIM) is recognized as the future trend for advanced microelectronics production in flexible fast turn- around computer-integrated semiconductor manufacturing environments. The SWIM equipment technology and processing methodology offer enhanced equipment utilization, improved process reproducibility and yield, and reduced chip manufacturing cost. They also provide significant capabilities for fabrication of new and improved device structures. This paper describes the SWIM techniques and presents a novel single-wafer advanced vacuum multiprocessing technology developed based on the use of multiple process energy/activation sources (lamp heating and remote microwave plasma) for multilayer epitaxial and polycrystalline semiconductor as well as dielectric film processing. Based on this technology, multilayer in-situ-doped homoepitaxial silicon and heteroepitaxial strained layer Si/Ge x Si 1 - x /Si structures have been grown and characterized. The process control and the ultimate interfacial abruptness of the layer-to-layer transition widths in the device structures prepared by this technology will challenge the MBE techniques in multilayer epitaxial growth applications

  15. Automatic Shadow Detection and Removal from a Single Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Salman H; Bennamoun, Mohammed; Sohel, Ferdous; Togneri, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    We present a framework to automatically detect and remove shadows in real world scenes from a single image. Previous works on shadow detection put a lot of effort in designing shadow variant and invariant hand-crafted features. In contrast, our framework automatically learns the most relevant features in a supervised manner using multiple convolutional deep neural networks (ConvNets). The features are learned at the super-pixel level and along the dominant boundaries in the image. The predicted posteriors based on the learned features are fed to a conditional random field model to generate smooth shadow masks. Using the detected shadow masks, we propose a Bayesian formulation to accurately extract shadow matte and subsequently remove shadows. The Bayesian formulation is based on a novel model which accurately models the shadow generation process in the umbra and penumbra regions. The model parameters are efficiently estimated using an iterative optimization procedure. Our proposed framework consistently performed better than the state-of-the-art on all major shadow databases collected under a variety of conditions.

  16. Real-time single-molecule imaging of quantum interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juffmann, Thomas; Milic, Adriana; Müllneritsch, Michael; Asenbaum, Peter; Tsukernik, Alexander; Tüxen, Jens; Mayor, Marcel; Cheshnovsky, Ori; Arndt, Markus

    2012-03-25

    The observation of interference patterns in double-slit experiments with massive particles is generally regarded as the ultimate demonstration of the quantum nature of these objects. Such matter-wave interference has been observed for electrons, neutrons, atoms and molecules and, in contrast to classical physics, quantum interference can be observed when single particles arrive at the detector one by one. The build-up of such patterns in experiments with electrons has been described as the "most beautiful experiment in physics". Here, we show how a combination of nanofabrication and nano-imaging allows us to record the full two-dimensional build-up of quantum interference patterns in real time for phthalocyanine molecules and for derivatives of phthalocyanine molecules, which have masses of 514 AMU and 1,298 AMU respectively. A laser-controlled micro-evaporation source was used to produce a beam of molecules with the required intensity and coherence, and the gratings were machined in 10-nm-thick silicon nitride membranes to reduce the effect of van der Waals forces. Wide-field fluorescence microscopy detected the position of each molecule with an accuracy of 10 nm and revealed the build-up of a deterministic ensemble interference pattern from single molecules that arrived stochastically at the detector. In addition to providing this particularly clear demonstration of wave-particle duality, our approach could also be used to study larger molecules and explore the boundary between quantum and classical physics.

  17. An improved three-dimensional non-scanning laser imaging system based on digital micromirror device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wenze; Han, Shaokun; Lei, Jieyu; Zhai, Yu; Timofeev, Alexander N.

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays, there are two main methods to realize three-dimensional non-scanning laser imaging detection, which are detection method based on APD and detection method based on Streak Tube. However, the detection method based on APD possesses some disadvantages, such as small number of pixels, big pixel interval and complex supporting circuit. The detection method based on Streak Tube possesses some disadvantages, such as big volume, bad reliability and high cost. In order to resolve the above questions, this paper proposes an improved three-dimensional non-scanning laser imaging system based on Digital Micromirror Device. In this imaging system, accurate control of laser beams and compact design of imaging structure are realized by several quarter-wave plates and a polarizing beam splitter. The remapping fiber optics is used to sample the image plane of receiving optical lens, and transform the image into line light resource, which can realize the non-scanning imaging principle. The Digital Micromirror Device is used to convert laser pulses from temporal domain to spatial domain. The CCD with strong sensitivity is used to detect the final reflected laser pulses. In this paper, we also use an algorithm which is used to simulate this improved laser imaging system. In the last, the simulated imaging experiment demonstrates that this improved laser imaging system can realize three-dimensional non-scanning laser imaging detection.

  18. Single photon imaging at ultra-high resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellazzini, R. [INFN sez. Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Spandre, G. [INFN sez. Pisa, Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: Gloria.Spandre@pi.infn.it; Minuti, M.; Brez, A.; Baldini, L.; Latronico, L.; Omodei, N.; Sgro, C.; Bregeon, J.; Razzano, M.; Pinchera, M. [INFN sez. Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Tremsin, A.; McPhate, J.; Vallerga, J.V.; Siegmund, O. [SSL, Berkeley (United States)

    2008-06-11

    We present a detection system capable of imaging both single photon/positive ion and multiple coincidence photons/positive ions with extremely high spatial resolution. In this detector the photoelectrons excited by the incoming photons are multiplied by microchannel plate(s) (MCP). The process of multiplication is spatially constrained within an MCP pore, which can be as small as 4 {mu}m for commercially available MCPs. An electron cloud originated by a single photoelectron is then encoded by a pixellated custom analog ASIC consisting of 105 K charge sensitive pixels of 50 {mu}m in size arranged on a hexagonal grid. Each pixel registers the charge with an accuracy of <100 electrons rms. Computation of the event centroid from the readout charges results in an accurate event position. A large number of simultaneous photons spatially separated by {approx}0.4 mm can be detected simultaneously allowing multiple coincidence operation for the experiments where a large number of incoming photons/positive ions have to be detected simultaneously. The experimental results prove that the spatial resolution of the readout system itself is {approx}3 {mu}m FWHM enabling detection resolution better than 6 {mu}m for the small pore MCPs. An attractive feature of the detection system is its capability to register the timing of each incoming photon/positive ion (in single photon detection mode) or of the first incoming particle (for the multiple coincidence detection) with an accuracy of {approx}130 ps FWHM. There is also virtually no dark count noise in the detection system making it suitable for low count rate applications.

  19. Compact quantum dots for single-molecule imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew M; Nie, Shuming

    2012-10-09

    Single-molecule imaging is an important tool for understanding the mechanisms of biomolecular function and for visualizing the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of molecular behaviors that underlie cellular biology (1-4). To image an individual molecule of interest, it is typically conjugated to a fluorescent tag (dye, protein, bead, or quantum dot) and observed with epifluorescence or total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. While dyes and fluorescent proteins have been the mainstay of fluorescence imaging for decades, their fluorescence is unstable under high photon fluxes necessary to observe individual molecules, yielding only a few seconds of observation before complete loss of signal. Latex beads and dye-labeled beads provide improved signal stability but at the expense of drastically larger hydrodynamic size, which can deleteriously alter the diffusion and behavior of the molecule under study. Quantum dots (QDs) offer a balance between these two problematic regimes. These nanoparticles are composed of semiconductor materials and can be engineered with a hydrodynamically compact size with exceptional resistance to photodegradation (5). Thus in recent years QDs have been instrumental in enabling long-term observation of complex macromolecular behavior on the single molecule level. However these particles have still been found to exhibit impaired diffusion in crowded molecular environments such as the cellular cytoplasm and the neuronal synaptic cleft, where their sizes are still too large (4,6,7). Recently we have engineered the cores and surface coatings of QDs for minimized hydrodynamic size, while balancing offsets to colloidal stability, photostability, brightness, and nonspecific binding that have hindered the utility of compact QDs in the past (8,9). The goal of this article is to demonstrate the synthesis, modification, and characterization of these optimized nanocrystals, composed of an alloyed HgxCd1-xSe core coated with an

  20. Medium-energy heavy-ion single-event-burnout imaging of power MOSFETs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musseau, O.; Torres, A.; Campbell, A.B.; Knudson, A.R.; Buchner, S.; Fischer, B.; Schloegl, M.; Briand, P.

    1999-12-01

    The authors present the first experimental determination of the SEB sensitive area in a power MOSFET irradiated with a high-LET heavy-ion microbeam. They used a spectroscopy technique to perform coincident measurements of the charge collected in both source and drain junctions together, with a non-destructive technique (current limitation). The resulting charge collection images are related to the physical structure of the individual cells. These experimental data reveal the complex 3-dimensional behavior of a real structure, which can not easily be simulated using available tools. As the drain voltage is increased, the onset of burnout is reached, characterized by a sudden change in the charge collection image. Hot spots are observed where the collected charge reaches its maximum value. Those spots, due to burnout triggering events, correspond to areas where the silicon is degraded through thermal effects along a single ion track. This direct observation of SEB sensitive areas as applications for, either device hardening, by modifying doping profiles or layout of the cells, or for code calibration and device simulation.

  1. Single Photon Detection with Semiconductor Pixel Arrays for Medical Imaging Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mikulec, B

    2000-01-01

    This thesis explores the functioning of a single photon counting pixel detector for X-ray imaging. It considers different applications for such a device, but focuses mainly on the field of medical imaging. The new detector comprises a CMOS read-out chip called PCC containing 4096 identical channels each of which counts X-ray hits. The conversion of the X-rays to electric charge takes place in a semiconductor sensor which is segmented into 4096 matching square diodes of side length 170 um, the 'pixels'. The photon counting concept is based on setting a threshold in energy above which a hit is registered. The immediate advantages are the elimination of background and the in principle unlimited dynamic range. Moreover, this approach allows the use of an electronic shutter for arbitrary measurement periods. As the device was intended for operation in the energy range of ~10-70 keV, gallium arsenide was selected as the preferred sensor material. The development of this detector followed on from about 10 years of r...

  2. Classification of team sport activities using a single wearable tracking device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wundersitz, Daniel W T; Josman, Casey; Gupta, Ritu; Netto, Kevin J; Gastin, Paul B; Robertson, Sam

    2015-11-26

    Wearable tracking devices incorporating accelerometers and gyroscopes are increasingly being used for activity analysis in sports. However, minimal research exists relating to their ability to classify common activities. The purpose of this study was to determine whether data obtained from a single wearable tracking device can be used to classify team sport-related activities. Seventy-six non-elite sporting participants were tested during a simulated team sport circuit (involving stationary, walking, jogging, running, changing direction, counter-movement jumping, jumping for distance and tackling activities) in a laboratory setting. A MinimaxX S4 wearable tracking device was worn below the neck, in-line and dorsal to the first to fifth thoracic vertebrae of the spine, with tri-axial accelerometer and gyroscope data collected at 100Hz. Multiple time domain, frequency domain and custom features were extracted from each sensor using 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5s movement capture durations. Features were further screened using a combination of ANOVA and Lasso methods. Relevant features were used to classify the eight activities performed using the Random Forest (RF), Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Logistic Model Tree (LMT) algorithms. The LMT (79-92% classification accuracy) outperformed RF (32-43%) and SVM algorithms (27-40%), obtaining strongest performance using the full model (accelerometer and gyroscope inputs). Processing time can be reduced through feature selection methods (range 1.5-30.2%), however a trade-off exists between classification accuracy and processing time. Movement capture duration also had little impact on classification accuracy or processing time. In sporting scenarios where wearable tracking devices are employed, it is both possible and feasible to accurately classify team sport-related activities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Single-shot magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging with partial parallel imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posse, Stefan; Otazo, Ricardo; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Yoshimoto, Akio Ernesto; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2009-03-01

    A magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) pulse sequence based on proton-echo-planar-spectroscopic-imaging (PEPSI) is introduced that measures two-dimensional metabolite maps in a single excitation. Echo-planar spatial-spectral encoding was combined with interleaved phase encoding and parallel imaging using SENSE to reconstruct absorption mode spectra. The symmetrical k-space trajectory compensates phase errors due to convolution of spatial and spectral encoding. Single-shot MRSI at short TE was evaluated in phantoms and in vivo on a 3-T whole-body scanner equipped with a 12-channel array coil. Four-step interleaved phase encoding and fourfold SENSE acceleration were used to encode a 16 x 16 spatial matrix with a 390-Hz spectral width. Comparison with conventional PEPSI and PEPSI with fourfold SENSE acceleration demonstrated comparable sensitivity per unit time when taking into account g-factor-related noise increases and differences in sampling efficiency. LCModel fitting enabled quantification of inositol, choline, creatine, and N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) in vivo with concentration values in the ranges measured with conventional PEPSI and SENSE-accelerated PEPSI. Cramer-Rao lower bounds were comparable to those obtained with conventional SENSE-accelerated PEPSI at the same voxel size and measurement time. This single-shot MRSI method is therefore suitable for applications that require high temporal resolution to monitor temporal dynamics or to reduce sensitivity to tissue movement.

  4. Improving image reviewing with a new system (Emoss, Memobank and Movicom devices)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, G.; Otto, P.; Gourlez, P.; Taillade, B.

    1991-01-01

    The need is obvious for selecting the relevant images and/or items of information from among the overwhelming amount produced by C/S systems, mainly video cameras. Image reviewing in-field provides timeless while image reviewing at headquarters is used for confirming the validity of the conclusions drawn. There is also, in many cases, a need to improve the quality of the images. The Emoss and Memobank devices developed by Himatom could be the core of this new system, with its optimized digital storage which greatly improves image quality. These devices, which are compatible with existing systems such as MIVS and MUX, have the following advantages: comprehensive storage of scenes is comparable to the video tape recording; intelligent digital storage facilitates in-field reviewing; recoverable disc storage makes it possible to carry out the review at Headquarters; printing of the events helps reviewing. The Emoss and Memobank can be triggered by external information by other systems

  5. Management of single-ventricle patients with Berlin Heart EXCOR Ventricular Assist Device: single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackling, Tracey; Shah, Tejas; Dimas, Vivian; Guleserian, Kristine; Sharma, Mahesh; Forbess, Joseph; Ardura, Monica; Gross-Toalson, Jami; Lee, Ying; Journeycake, Janna; Barnes, Aliessa

    2012-06-01

    There are minimal data regarding chronic management of single-ventricle ventricular assist device (VAD) patients. This study aims to describe our center's multidisciplinary team management of single-ventricle patients supported long term with the Berlin Heart EXCOR Pediatric VAD. Patient #1 was a 4-year-old with double-outlet right ventricle with aortic atresia, L-looped ventricles, and heart block who developed heart failure 1 year after Fontan. She initially required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support and was transitioned to Berlin Heart systemic VAD. She was supported for 363 days (cardiac intensive care unit [CICU] 335 days, floor 28 days). The postoperative course was complicated by intermittent infection including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, intermittent hepatic and renal insufficiencies, and transient antithrombin, protein C, and protein S deficiencies resulting in multiple thrombi. She had a total of five pump changes over 10 months. Long-term medical management included anticoagulation with enoxaparin, platelet inhibition with aspirin and dipyridamole, and antibiotic prophylaxis using trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. She developed sepsis of unknown etiology and subsequently died from multiorgan failure. Patient #2 was a 4-year-old with hypoplastic left heart syndrome who developed heart failure 2 years after bidirectional Glenn shunt. At systemic VAD implantation, he was intubated with renal insufficiency. Post-VAD implantation, his renal insufficiency resolved, and he was successfully extubated to daytime nasal cannula and biphasic positive airway pressure at night. He was supported for 270 days (CICU 143 days, floor 127 days). The pump was upsized to a 50-mL pump in May 2011 for increased central venous pressures (29 mm Hg). Long-term medical management included anticoagulation with warfarin and single-agent platelet inhibition using dipyridamole due to aspirin resistance. He developed increased work of breathing requiring

  6. Single-photon superradiance and cooperative Lamb shift in an optoelectronic device (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirtori, Carlo

    2017-02-01

    Superradiance is one of the many fascinating phenomena predicted by quantum electrodynamics that have first been experimentally demonstrated in atomic systems and more recently in condensed matter systems like quantum dots, superconducting q-bits, cyclotron transitions and plasma oscillations in quantum wells (QWs). It occurs when a dense collection of N identical two-level emitters are phased via the exchange of photons, giving rise to enhanced light-matter interaction, hence to a faster emission rate. Of great interest is the regime where the ensemble interacts with one photon only and therefore all of the atoms, but one, are in the ground state. In this case the quantum superposition of all possible configurations produces a symmetric state that decays radiatively with a rate N times larger than that of the individual oscillators. This phenomenon, called single photon superradiance, results from the exchange of real photons among the N emitters. Yet, to single photon superradiance is also associated another collective effect that renormalizes the emission frequency, known as cooperative Lamb shift. In this work, we show that single photon superradiance and cooperative Lamb shift can be engineered in a semiconductor device by coupling spatially separated plasma resonances arising from the collective motion of confined electrons in QWs. These resonances hold a giant dipole along the growth direction z and have no mutual Coulomb coupling. They thus behave as a collection of macro-atoms on different positions along the z axis. Our device is therefore a test bench to simulate the low excitation regime of quantum electrodynamics.

  7. A review of performance of near-infrared fluorescence imaging devices used in clinical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, B

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) molecular imaging holds great promise as a new “point-of-care” medical imaging modality that can potentially provide the sensitivity of nuclear medicine techniques, but without the radioactivity that can otherwise place limitations of usage. Recently, NIRF imaging devices of a variety of designs have emerged in the market and in investigational clinical studies using indocyanine green (ICG) as a non-targeting NIRF contrast agent to demark the blood and lymphatic vasculatures both non-invasively and intraoperatively. Approved in the USA since 1956 for intravenous administration, ICG has been more recently used off label in intradermal or subcutaneous administrations for fluorescence imaging of the lymphatic vasculature and lymph nodes. Herein, we summarize the devices of a variety of designs, summarize their performance in lymphatic imaging in a tabular format and comment on necessary efforts to develop standards for device performance to compare and use these emerging devices in future, NIRF molecular imaging studies. PMID:25410320

  8. X-ray imaging device for one-dimensional and two-dimensional radioscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The X-ray imaging device for the selectable one-dimensional or two-dimensional pictures of objects illuminated by X-rays, comprising an X-ray source, an X-ray screen, and an opto-electrical picture development device placed behind the screen, is characterized by an anamorphotic optical system, which is positioned with a one-dimensional illumination between the X-ray screen and the opto-electrical device and that a two-dimensional illumination will be developed, and that in view of the lens system which forms part of the opto-electrical device, there is placed an X-ray screen in a specified beam direction so that a magnified image may be formed by equalisation of the distance between the X-ray screen and the lens system. (G.C.)

  9. Anisotropic Thermoelectric Devices Made from Single-Crystal Semimetal Microwires in Glass Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopko, L. A.; Nikolaeva, A. A.; Kobylianskaya, A. K.; Huber, T. E.

    2018-06-01

    Thermoelectric heat conversion based on the Seebeck and Peltier effects generated at the junction between two materials of type- n and type- p is well known. Here, we present a demonstration of an unconventional thermoelectric energy conversion that is based on a single element made of an anisotropic material. In such materials, a heat flow generates a transverse thermoelectric electric field lying across the heat flow. Potentially, in applications involving miniature devices, the anisotropic thermoelectric (AT) effect has the advantage over traditional thermoelectrics that it simplifies the thermoelectric generator architecture. This is because the generator can be made of a single thermoelectric material without the complexity of a series of contacts forming a pile. A feature of anisotropic thermoelectrics is that the thermoelectric voltage is proportional to the element length and inversely proportional to the effective thickness. The AT effect has been demonstrated with artificial anisotropic thin film consisting of layers of alternating thermoelectric type, but there has been no demonstration of this effect in a long single-crystal. Electronic transport measurements have shown that the semimetal bismuth is highly anisotropic. We have prepared an experimental sample consisting of a 10-m-long glass-insulated single-crystal tin-doped bismuth microwire ( d = 4 μm). Crucial for this experiment is the ability to grow the microwire as a single-crystal using a technique of recrystallization with laser heating and under a strong electric field. The sample was wound as a spiral, bonded to a copper disk, and used in various experiments. The sensitivity of the sample to heat flow is as high as 10-2 V/W with a time constant τ of about 0.5 s.

  10. Anisotropic Thermoelectric Devices Made from Single-Crystal Semimetal Microwires in Glass Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopko, L. A.; Nikolaeva, A. A.; Kobylianskaya, A. K.; Huber, T. E.

    2018-04-01

    Thermoelectric heat conversion based on the Seebeck and Peltier effects generated at the junction between two materials of type-n and type-p is well known. Here, we present a demonstration of an unconventional thermoelectric energy conversion that is based on a single element made of an anisotropic material. In such materials, a heat flow generates a transverse thermoelectric electric field lying across the heat flow. Potentially, in applications involving miniature devices, the anisotropic thermoelectric (AT) effect has the advantage over traditional thermoelectrics that it simplifies the thermoelectric generator architecture. This is because the generator can be made of a single thermoelectric material without the complexity of a series of contacts forming a pile. A feature of anisotropic thermoelectrics is that the thermoelectric voltage is proportional to the element length and inversely proportional to the effective thickness. The AT effect has been demonstrated with artificial anisotropic thin film consisting of layers of alternating thermoelectric type, but there has been no demonstration of this effect in a long single-crystal. Electronic transport measurements have shown that the semimetal bismuth is highly anisotropic. We have prepared an experimental sample consisting of a 10-m-long glass-insulated single-crystal tin-doped bismuth microwire (d = 4 μm). Crucial for this experiment is the ability to grow the microwire as a single-crystal using a technique of recrystallization with laser heating and under a strong electric field. The sample was wound as a spiral, bonded to a copper disk, and used in various experiments. The sensitivity of the sample to heat flow is as high as 10-2 V/W with a time constant τ of about 0.5 s.

  11. Single Mode Fiber Optic Transceiver Using Short Wavelength Active Devices In Long Wavelength Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillham, Frederick J.; Campbell, Daniel R.; Corke, Michael; Stowe, David W.

    1990-01-01

    Presently, single mode optical fiber technology is being utilized in systems to supply telephone service to the subscriber. However, in an attempt to be competitive with copper based systems, there are many development programs underway to determine the most cost effective solution while still providing a service that will either satisfy or be upgradeable to satisfy the demands of the consumer for the next 10 to 20 years. One such approach is to combine low cost laser transmitters and silicon receivers, which have been developed for the "compact disc" industry, with fiber that operates in the single mode regime at 1300 nm. In this paper, an optical transceiver will be presented, consisting of a compact disc laser, a silicon detector and a single mode coupler at 1300 nm. A possible system layout is presented which operates at 780 nm bi-directionally for POTS and upgradeable to 1300 nm for video services. There are several important design criteria that have to be considered in the development of such a system which will be addressed. These include: 1. Optimization of coupled power from laser to fiber while maintaining stable launched conditions over a wide range of environmental conditions. 2. Consideration of the multimode operation of the 1300 nm single mode fiber while operating in the 780 nm wavelength region. 3. Development of a low cost pseudo-wavelength division multiplexer for 1300 nm single mode/780 nm multimode operation and a low cost dual mode 50/50, 780 nm splitter using 1300 nm fiber. Details will be given of the design criteria and solution in terms of optimized design. Results of the performance of several prototype devices will be given with indications of the merits of this approach and where further development effort should be applied.

  12. Implementation of synthetic aperture imaging on a hand-held device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Kjeldsen, Thomas; Larsen, Lee

    2014-01-01

    -held devices all with different chipsets and a BK Medical UltraView 800 ultrasound scanner emulating a wireless probe. The wireless transmission is benchmarked using an imaging setup consisting of 269 scan lines x 1472 complex samples (1.58 MB pr. frame, 16 frames per second). The measured data throughput...... reached an average of 28.8 MB/s using a LG G2 mobile device, which is more than the required data throughput of 25.3 MB/s. Benchmarking the processing performance for B-mode imaging showed a total processing time of 18.9 ms (53 frames/s), which is less than the acquisition time (62.5 ms).......This paper presents several implementations of Syn- thetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming (SASB) on commer- cially available hand-held devices. The implementations include real-time wireless reception of ultrasound radio frequency sig- nals and GPU processing for B-mode imaging. The proposed...

  13. Single-atom-resolved fluorescence imaging of an atomic Mott insulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sherson, Jacob; Weitenberg, Christof; Andres, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    in situ images of a quantum fluid in which each underlying quantum particle is detected. Here we report fluorescence imaging of strongly interacting bosonic Mott insulators in an optical lattice with single-atom and single-site resolution. From our images, we fully reconstruct the atom distribution...

  14. Metal-Controlled Magnetoresistance at Room Temperature in Single-Molecule Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragonès, Albert C; Aravena, Daniel; Valverde-Muñoz, Francisco J; Real, José Antonio; Sanz, Fausto; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Ruiz, Eliseo

    2017-04-26

    The appropriate choice of the transition metal complex and metal surface electronic structure opens the possibility to control the spin of the charge carriers through the resulting hybrid molecule/metal spinterface in a single-molecule electrical contact at room temperature. The single-molecule conductance of a Au/molecule/Ni junction can be switched by flipping the magnetization direction of the ferromagnetic electrode. The requirements of the molecule include not just the presence of unpaired electrons: the electronic configuration of the metal center has to provide occupied or empty orbitals that strongly interact with the junction metal electrodes and that are close in energy to their Fermi levels for one of the electronic spins only. The key ingredient for the metal surface is to provide an efficient spin texture induced by the spin-orbit coupling in the topological surface states that results in an efficient spin-dependent interaction with the orbitals of the molecule. The strong magnetoresistance effect found in this kind of single-molecule wire opens a new approach for the design of room-temperature nanoscale devices based on spin-polarized currents controlled at molecular level.

  15. Device for forming the image of a radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosswill, C.H.

    1980-01-01

    An improvement can be made to the space resolution of systems providing the image of a radiation source by means of a slit collimator. In order to do so, a lateral movement of the collimator (with its detectors) is superimposed on the movement of the collimator, in a transversal direction in relation to the transmission direction through the collimator as well as in relation to the walls defining the slits. The total amplitude of the lateral movement is at least equal to the distance between centres of a slit and the following one. In the near field operating system, the lateral movement is a rectilinear movement perpendicular to the walls of the slits. In the distance field operating systems, it is an angular movement about an axis perpendicular to the direction of transmission through the slits [fr

  16. Comparing Single Case Design Overlap-Based Effect Size Metrics from Studies Examining Speech Generating Device Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mo; Hyppa-Martin, Jolene K.; Reichle, Joe E.; Symons, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Meaningfully synthesizing single case experimental data from intervention studies comprised of individuals with low incidence conditions and generating effect size estimates remains challenging. Seven effect size metrics were compared for single case design (SCD) data focused on teaching speech generating device use to individuals with…

  17. Characterization of a direct detection device imaging camera for transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milazzo, Anna-Clare, E-mail: amilazzo@ncmir.ucsd.edu [University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Moldovan, Grigore [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Lanman, Jason [Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Jin, Liang; Bouwer, James C. [University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Klienfelder, Stuart [University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Peltier, Steven T.; Ellisman, Mark H. [University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Kirkland, Angus I. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Xuong, Nguyen-Huu [University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The complete characterization of a novel direct detection device (DDD) camera for transmission electron microscopy is reported, for the first time at primary electron energies of 120 and 200 keV. Unlike a standard charge coupled device (CCD) camera, this device does not require a scintillator. The DDD transfers signal up to 65 lines/mm providing the basis for a high-performance platform for a new generation of wide field-of-view high-resolution cameras. An image of a thin section of virus particles is presented to illustrate the substantially improved performance of this sensor over current indirectly coupled CCD cameras.

  18. Characterization of a direct detection device imaging camera for transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Moldovan, Grigore; Lanman, Jason; Jin, Liang; Bouwer, James C.; Klienfelder, Stuart; Peltier, Steven T.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Kirkland, Angus I.; Xuong, Nguyen-Huu

    2010-01-01

    The complete characterization of a novel direct detection device (DDD) camera for transmission electron microscopy is reported, for the first time at primary electron energies of 120 and 200 keV. Unlike a standard charge coupled device (CCD) camera, this device does not require a scintillator. The DDD transfers signal up to 65 lines/mm providing the basis for a high-performance platform for a new generation of wide field-of-view high-resolution cameras. An image of a thin section of virus particles is presented to illustrate the substantially improved performance of this sensor over current indirectly coupled CCD cameras.

  19. IMRT for Image-Guided Single Vocal Cord Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Sarah O.S.; Astreinidou, Eleftheria; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Keskin-Cambay, Fatma; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Voet, Peter; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We have been developing an image-guided single vocal cord irradiation technique to treat patients with stage T1a glottic carcinoma. In the present study, we compared the dose coverage to the affected vocal cord and the dose delivered to the organs at risk using conventional, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) coplanar, and IMRT non-coplanar techniques. Methods and Materials: For 10 patients, conventional treatment plans using two laterally opposed wedged 6-MV photon beams were calculated in XiO (Elekta-CMS treatment planning system). An in-house IMRT/beam angle optimization algorithm was used to obtain the coplanar and non-coplanar optimized beam angles. Using these angles, the IMRT plans were generated in Monaco (IMRT treatment planning system, Elekta-CMS) with the implemented Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm. The organs at risk included the contralateral vocal cord, arytenoids, swallowing muscles, carotid arteries, and spinal cord. The prescription dose was 66 Gy in 33 fractions. Results: For the conventional plans and coplanar and non-coplanar IMRT plans, the population-averaged mean dose ± standard deviation to the planning target volume was 67 ± 1 Gy. The contralateral vocal cord dose was reduced from 66 ± 1 Gy in the conventional plans to 39 ± 8 Gy and 36 ± 6 Gy in the coplanar and non-coplanar IMRT plans, respectively. IMRT consistently reduced the doses to the other organs at risk. Conclusions: Single vocal cord irradiation with IMRT resulted in good target coverage and provided significant sparing of the critical structures. This has the potential to improve the quality-of-life outcomes after RT and maintain the same local control rates.

  20. IMRT for Image-Guided Single Vocal Cord Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman, Sarah O.S., E-mail: s.osman@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Astreinidou, Eleftheria; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Keskin-Cambay, Fatma; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Voet, Peter; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Levendag, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: We have been developing an image-guided single vocal cord irradiation technique to treat patients with stage T1a glottic carcinoma. In the present study, we compared the dose coverage to the affected vocal cord and the dose delivered to the organs at risk using conventional, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) coplanar, and IMRT non-coplanar techniques. Methods and Materials: For 10 patients, conventional treatment plans using two laterally opposed wedged 6-MV photon beams were calculated in XiO (Elekta-CMS treatment planning system). An in-house IMRT/beam angle optimization algorithm was used to obtain the coplanar and non-coplanar optimized beam angles. Using these angles, the IMRT plans were generated in Monaco (IMRT treatment planning system, Elekta-CMS) with the implemented Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm. The organs at risk included the contralateral vocal cord, arytenoids, swallowing muscles, carotid arteries, and spinal cord. The prescription dose was 66 Gy in 33 fractions. Results: For the conventional plans and coplanar and non-coplanar IMRT plans, the population-averaged mean dose {+-} standard deviation to the planning target volume was 67 {+-} 1 Gy. The contralateral vocal cord dose was reduced from 66 {+-} 1 Gy in the conventional plans to 39 {+-} 8 Gy and 36 {+-} 6 Gy in the coplanar and non-coplanar IMRT plans, respectively. IMRT consistently reduced the doses to the other organs at risk. Conclusions: Single vocal cord irradiation with IMRT resulted in good target coverage and provided significant sparing of the critical structures. This has the potential to improve the quality-of-life outcomes after RT and maintain the same local control rates.

  1. Towards UV imaging sensors based on single-crystal diamond chips for spectroscopic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Sio, A. [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, University of Firenze, Largo E. Fermi 2, 50125 Florence (Italy)], E-mail: desio@arcetri.astro.it; Bocci, A. [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, University of Firenze, Largo E. Fermi 2, 50125 Florence (Italy); Bruno, P.; Di Benedetto, R.; Greco, V.; Gullotta, G. [INAF-Astrophysical Observatory of Catania (Italy); Marinelli, M. [INFN-Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Roma ' Tor Vergata' (Italy); Pace, E. [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, University of Firenze, Largo E. Fermi 2, 50125 Florence (Italy); Rubulotta, D.; Scuderi, S. [INAF-Astrophysical Observatory of Catania (Italy); Verona-Rinati, G. [INFN-Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Roma ' Tor Vergata' (Italy)

    2007-12-11

    The recent improvements achieved in the Homoepitaxial Chemical Vapour Deposition technique have led to the production of high-quality detector-grade single-crystal diamonds. Diamond-based detectors have shown excellent performances in UV and X-ray detection, paving the way for applications of diamond technology to the fields of space astronomy and high-energy photon detection in harsh environments or against strong visible light emission. These applications are possible due to diamond's unique properties such as its chemical inertness and visible blindness, respectively. Actually, the development of linear array detectors represents the main issue for a full exploitation of diamond detectors. Linear arrays are a first step to study bi-dimensional sensors. Such devices allow one to face the problems related to pixel miniaturisation and of signal read-out from many channels. Immediate applications would be in spectroscopy, where such arrays are preferred. This paper reports on the development of imaging detectors made by our groups, starting from the material growth and characterisation, through the design, fabrication and packaging of 2xn pixel arrays, to their electro-optical characterisation in terms of UV sensitivity, uniformity of the response and to the development of an electronic circuit suitable to read-out very low photocurrent signals. The detector and its electronic read-out were then tested using a 2x5 pixel array based on a single-crystal diamond. The results will be discussed in the framework of the development of an imager device for X-UV astronomy applications in space missions.

  2. Nanomechanical DNA origami 'single-molecule beacons' directly imaged by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuya, Akinori; Sakai, Yusuke; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Xu, Yan; Komiyama, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    DNA origami involves the folding of long single-stranded DNA into designed structures with the aid of short staple strands; such structures may enable the development of useful nanomechanical DNA devices. Here we develop versatile sensing systems for a variety of chemical and biological targets at molecular resolution. We have designed functional nanomechanical DNA origami devices that can be used as 'single-molecule beacons', and function as pinching devices. Using 'DNA origami pliers' and 'DNA origami forceps', which consist of two levers ~170 nm long connected at a fulcrum, various single-molecule inorganic and organic targets ranging from metal ions to proteins can be visually detected using atomic force microscopy by a shape transition of the origami devices. Any detection mechanism suitable for the target of interest, pinching, zipping or unzipping, can be chosen and used orthogonally with differently shaped origami devices in the same mixture using a single platform. PMID:21863016

  3. Experimental single-chip color HDTV image acquisition system with 8M-pixel CMOS image sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamoto, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Takayuki; Funatsu, Ryohei; Mitani, Kohji; Nojiri, Yuji

    2006-02-01

    We have developed an experimental single-chip color HDTV image acquisition system using 8M-pixel CMOS image sensor. The sensor has 3840 × 2160 effective pixels and is progressively scanned at 60 frames per second. We describe the color filter array and interpolation method to improve image quality with a high-pixel-count single-chip sensor. We also describe an experimental image acquisition system we used to measured spatial frequency characteristics in the horizontal direction. The results indicate good prospects for achieving a high quality single chip HDTV camera that reduces pseudo signals and maintains high spatial frequency characteristics within the frequency band for HDTV.

  4. Towards the development of a comprehensive model of an electronic portal imaging device using Geant4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, S.; Kuncic, Z.; Vial, P.; Holloway, L.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: This work represents the first stage of an ongoing study to investigate the physical processes occurring within electronic portal imaging devices (EPlDs), including the effects of optical scattering on image quality and dosimetry. The objective of this work was to develop an initial Monte Carlo model of a linear accelerator (Iinac) beam and an EPID. The ability to simulate the radiation transport of both high energy and optical photons in a single Monte Carlo model was tested. Data from the Phase-space database for external beam radiotherapy (International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA) was used with the Geant4 toolkit to construct a model of a Siemens Primus linac 6 MY photon source. Dose profiles and percent depth dose (PDD) curves were extracted from simulations of dose in water and compared to experimental measurements. A preliminary EPID model was developed to incorporate both high energy radiation and optical photon transport. Agreement in dose profiles inside the open beam was within 1.6%. Mean agreement in PDD curves beyond depth of dose maximum was within 6.1 % (local percent difference). The radiation transport of both high energy and optical photons were simulated and visualized in the EPID model. Further work is required to experimentally validate the EPID model. The comparison of simulated dose in water with measurements indicates that the IAEA phase-space may represent an accurate model of a linac source. We have demonstrated the feasibility of developing a comprehensive EPID model incorporating both high energy and optical physics in Geant4. (author)

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of implantable cardiac rhythm devices at 3.0 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimbel, J Rod

    2008-07-01

    A relaxation of the prohibition of scanning cardiac rhythm device patients is underway, largely because of the growing experience of safe scanning events at 1.5T. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3T is becoming more common and may pose a different risk profile and outcome of MRI of cardiac device patients. No restrictions were placed on pacemaker dependency, region scanned, device type, or manufacturer. Sixteen scans at 3T were performed with an electrophysiologist present on 14 patients with a variety of devices from various manufacturers. An "MRI-S" strategy was used. Multimodal monitoring was required. Device interrogation was performed prior to, immediately after, and 1-3 months after the MRI. For nonpacemaker-dependent device patients, attempts were made to turn all device features off (with OOO programming the goal) conceptually rendering the device "invisible." In pacemaker-dependent patients, the device was programmed to asynchronous mode at highest output for the duration of the scan with the goal of rendering the device conceptually "invulnerable" to MRI effects. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was limited to 2W/kg. All patients were successfully scanned. No arrhythmias were noted. No significant change in the programmed parameters, pacing thresholds, sensing, impedance, or battery parameters was noted. The insertable loop recorder (ILR) recorded prolonged artifactual asystole during MRI. One patient noted chest burning during the scan. Device patients may undergo carefully tailored 3T MRI scans when pre-MRI reprogramming of the device occurs in conjunction with extensive monitoring, supervision, and follow-up.

  6. Reference-Frame-Independent and Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution Using One Single Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Zhu, Changhua; Ma, Shuquan; Wei, Kejin; Pei, Changxing

    2018-04-01

    Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) is immune to all detector side-channel attacks. However, practical implementations of MDI-QKD, which require two-photon interferences from separated independent single-photon sources and a nontrivial reference alignment procedure, are still challenging with current technologies. Here, we propose a scheme that significantly reduces the experimental complexity of two-photon interferences and eliminates reference frame alignment by the combination of plug-and-play and reference frame independent MDI-QKD. Simulation results show that the secure communication distance can be up to 219 km in the finite-data case and the scheme has good potential for practical MDI-QKD systems.

  7. Chemiresistor Devices for Chemical Warfare Agent Detection Based on Polymer Wrapped Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, John F; Hamaguchi, Hitoshi; Yoon, Bora; Swager, Timothy M

    2017-04-28

    Chemical warfare agents (CWA) continue to present a threat to civilian populations and military personnel in operational areas all over the world. Reliable measurements of CWAs are critical to contamination detection, avoidance, and remediation. The current deployed systems in United States and foreign militaries, as well as those in the private sector offer accurate detection of CWAs, but are still limited by size, portability and fabrication cost. Herein, we report a chemiresistive CWA sensor using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) wrapped with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) derivatives. We demonstrate that a pendant hexafluoroisopropanol group on the polymer that enhances sensitivity to a nerve agent mimic, dimethyl methylphosphonate, in both nitrogen and air environments to concentrations as low as 5 ppm and 11 ppm, respectively. Additionally, these PEDOT/SWCNT derivative sensor systems experience negligible device performance over the course of two weeks under ambient conditions.

  8. Accurately tracking single-cell movement trajectories in microfluidic cell sorting devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jenny; Frohberg, Nicholas J; Zhou, Enlu; Sulchek, Todd; Qiu, Peng

    2018-01-01

    Microfluidics are routinely used to study cellular properties, including the efficient quantification of single-cell biomechanics and label-free cell sorting based on the biomechanical properties, such as elasticity, viscosity, stiffness, and adhesion. Both quantification and sorting applications require optimal design of the microfluidic devices and mathematical modeling of the interactions between cells, fluid, and the channel of the device. As a first step toward building such a mathematical model, we collected video recordings of cells moving through a ridged microfluidic channel designed to compress and redirect cells according to cell biomechanics. We developed an efficient algorithm that automatically and accurately tracked the cell trajectories in the recordings. We tested the algorithm on recordings of cells with different stiffness, and showed the correlation between cell stiffness and the tracked trajectories. Moreover, the tracking algorithm successfully picked up subtle differences of cell motion when passing through consecutive ridges. The algorithm for accurately tracking cell trajectories paves the way for future efforts of modeling the flow, forces, and dynamics of cell properties in microfluidics applications.

  9. Simultaneous 3D-vibration measurement using a single laser beam device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecher, Christian; Guralnik, Alexander; Baümler, Stephan

    2012-06-01

    Today's commercial solutions for vibration measurement and modal analysis are 3D-scanning laser doppler vibrometers, mainly used for open surfaces in the automotive and aerospace industries and the classic three-axial accelerometers in civil engineering, for most industrial applications in manufacturing environments, and particularly for partially closed structures. This paper presents a novel measurement approach using a single laser beam device and optical reflectors to simultaneously perform 3D-dynamic measurement as well as geometry measurement of the investigated object. We show the application of this so called laser tracker for modal testing of structures on a mechanical manufacturing shop floor. A holistic measurement method is developed containing manual reflector placement, semi-automated geometric modeling of investigated objects and fully automated vibration measurement up to 1000 Hz and down to few microns amplitude. Additionally the fast set up dynamic measurement of moving objects using a tracking technique is presented that only uses the device's own functionalities and does neither require a predefined moving path of the target nor an electronic synchronization to the moving object.

  10. Accurately tracking single-cell movement trajectories in microfluidic cell sorting devices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Jeong

    Full Text Available Microfluidics are routinely used to study cellular properties, including the efficient quantification of single-cell biomechanics and label-free cell sorting based on the biomechanical properties, such as elasticity, viscosity, stiffness, and adhesion. Both quantification and sorting applications require optimal design of the microfluidic devices and mathematical modeling of the interactions between cells, fluid, and the channel of the device. As a first step toward building such a mathematical model, we collected video recordings of cells moving through a ridged microfluidic channel designed to compress and redirect cells according to cell biomechanics. We developed an efficient algorithm that automatically and accurately tracked the cell trajectories in the recordings. We tested the algorithm on recordings of cells with different stiffness, and showed the correlation between cell stiffness and the tracked trajectories. Moreover, the tracking algorithm successfully picked up subtle differences of cell motion when passing through consecutive ridges. The algorithm for accurately tracking cell trajectories paves the way for future efforts of modeling the flow, forces, and dynamics of cell properties in microfluidics applications.

  11. Design And Development Of An Automatic Single Phase Protective Device Using Ssr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of energy safety has been a paramount subject matter. This we can see in todays electrical systems where protective devices such as fuse and circuit breakers are used to prevent fire hazards resulting from overload overvoltage and short circuits. However with all the revolution in technology these options may be considered less smart since the fuse made with wire strands calculated for specific current capacity faults permanently when the specified current rating is exceeded. While the circuit breaker which is made up of mechanical switch fails as a result of carbon forming and the wearing away of the contacts because of arcing. As a means of improvement this paper presents the design and development of an automatic single phase protective device using solid state relay SSR. This study is to ensure automatic cut off from power supply in cases of overvoltage above 240 V AC or when overload and short circuit current above 8amps is detected without permanent damage of a fuse placed along current path. Also the design will ensure that there is an automatic close circuit whenever the trigger switch is momentary switch is closed. The system is achieved via the use of PIC micro-controller current sensor and other discrete components. The system is tested and works well inhibiting the frequent faulting of fuses. It also helps to prevent hazard as a result of overvoltage overload and short circuit and ensures a close circuit when the trigger switch is closed.

  12. Real-space imaging of non-collinear antiferromagnetic order with a single-spin magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, I.; Akhtar, W.; Garcia, V.; Martínez, L. J.; Chouaieb, S.; Garcia, K.; Carrétéro, C.; Barthélémy, A.; Appel, P.; Maletinsky, P.; Kim, J.-V.; Chauleau, J. Y.; Jaouen, N.; Viret, M.; Bibes, M.; Fusil, S.; Jacques, V.

    2017-09-01

    Although ferromagnets have many applications, their large magnetization and the resulting energy cost for switching magnetic moments bring into question their suitability for reliable low-power spintronic devices. Non-collinear antiferromagnetic systems do not suffer from this problem, and often have extra functionalities: non-collinear spin order may break space-inversion symmetry and thus allow electric-field control of magnetism, or may produce emergent spin-orbit effects that enable efficient spin-charge interconversion. To harness these traits for next-generation spintronics, the nanoscale control and imaging capabilities that are now routine for ferromagnets must be developed for antiferromagnetic systems. Here, using a non-invasive, scanning single-spin magnetometer based on a nitrogen-vacancy defect in diamond, we demonstrate real-space visualization of non-collinear antiferromagnetic order in a magnetic thin film at room temperature. We image the spin cycloid of a multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) thin film and extract a period of about 70 nanometres, consistent with values determined by macroscopic diffraction. In addition, we take advantage of the magnetoelectric coupling present in BiFeO3 to manipulate the cycloid propagation direction by an electric field. Besides highlighting the potential of nitrogen-vacancy magnetometry for imaging complex antiferromagnetic orders at the nanoscale, these results demonstrate how BiFeO3 can be used in the design of reconfigurable nanoscale spin textures.

  13. Estimation of four-dimensional dose distribution using electronic portal imaging device in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoguchi, Asumi; Arimura, Hidetaka; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    We are developing a method to evaluate four-dimensional radiation dose distribution in a patient body based upon the animated image of EPID (electronic portal imaging device) which is an image of beam-direction at the irradiation. In the first place, we have obtained the image of the dose which is emitted from patient body at therapy planning using therapy planning CT image and dose evaluation algorism. In the second place, we have estimated the emission dose image at the irradiation using EPID animated image which is obtained at the irradiation. In the third place, we have got an affine transformation matrix including respiratory movement in the body by performing linear registration on the emission dose image at therapy planning to get the one at the irradiation. In the fourth place, we have applied the affine transformation matrix on the therapy planning CT image and estimated the CT image 'at irradiation'. Finally we have evaluated four-dimensional dose distribution by calculating dose distribution in the CT image 'at irradiation' which has been estimated for each frame of the EPID animated-image. This scheme may be useful for evaluating therapy results and risk management. (author)

  14. Features and limitations of mobile tablet devices for viewing radiological images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunert, J H

    2015-03-01

    Mobile radiological image display systems are becoming increasingly common, necessitating a comparison of the features of these systems, specifically the operating system employed, connection to stationary PACS, data security and rang of image display and image analysis functions. In the fall of 2013, a total of 17 PACS suppliers were surveyed regarding the technical features of 18 mobile radiological image display systems using a standardized questionnaire. The study also examined to what extent the technical specifications of the mobile image display systems satisfy the provisions of the Germany Medical Devices Act as well as the provisions of the German X-ray ordinance (RöV). There are clear differences in terms of how the mobile systems connected to the stationary PACS. Web-based solutions allow the mobile image display systems to function independently of their operating systems. The examined systems differed very little in terms of image display and image analysis functions. Mobile image display systems complement stationary PACS and can be used to view images. The impacts of the new quality assurance guidelines (QS-RL) as well as the upcoming new standard DIN 6868 - 157 on the acceptance testing of mobile image display units for the purpose of image evaluation are discussed. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Automatic Prostate Tracking and Motion Assessment in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy With an Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azcona, Juan Diego; Li, Ruijiang; Mok, Edward; Hancock, Steven; Xing, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the prostate intrafraction motion in volumetric modulated arc therapy treatments using cine megavoltage (MV) images acquired with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients were treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy using a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator equipped with an EPID for acquiring cine MV images during treatment. Cine MV images acquisition was scheduled for single or multiple treatment fractions (between 1 and 8). A novel automatic fiducial detection algorithm that can handle irregular multileaf collimator apertures, field edges, fast leaf and gantry movement, and MV image noise and artifacts in patient anatomy was used. All sets of images (approximately 25,000 images in total) were analyzed to measure the positioning accuracy of implanted fiducial markers and assess the prostate movement. Results: Prostate motion can vary greatly in magnitude among different patients. Different motion patterns were identified, showing its unpredictability. The mean displacement and standard deviation of the intrafraction motion was generally less than 2.0 ± 2.0 mm in each of the spatial directions. In certain patients, however, the percentage of the treatment time in which the prostate is displaced more than 5 mm from its planned position in at least 1 spatial direction was 10% or more. The maximum prostate displacement observed was 13.3 mm. Conclusion: Prostate tracking and motion assessment was performed with MV imaging and an EPID. The amount of prostate motion observed suggests that patients will benefit from its real-time monitoring. Megavoltage imaging can provide the basis for real-time prostate tracking using conventional linear accelerators

  16. A general approach to break the concentration barrier in single-molecule imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Loveland, Anna B.; Habuchi, Satoshi; Walter, Johannes C.; van Oijen, Antoine M.

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is often incompatible with physiological protein concentrations, as fluorescence background overwhelms an individual molecule's signal. We solve this problem with a new imaging approach called PhADE (Photo

  17. Simpler Adaptive Optics using a Single Device for Processing and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zovaro, A.; Bennet, F.; Rye, D.; D'Orgeville, C.; Rigaut, F.; Price, I.; Ritchie, I.; Smith, C.

    The management of low Earth orbit is becoming more urgent as satellite and debris densities climb, in order to avoid a Kessler syndrome. A key part of this management is to precisely measure the orbit of both active satellites and debris. The Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the Australian National University have been developing an adaptive optics (AO) system to image and range orbiting objects. The AO system provides atmospheric correction for imaging and laser ranging, allowing for the detection of smaller angular targets and drastically increasing the number of detectable objects. AO systems are by nature very complex and high cost systems, often costing millions of dollars and taking years to design. It is not unusual for AO systems to comprise multiple servers, digital signal processors (DSP) and field programmable gate arrays (FPGA), with dedicated tasks such as wavefront sensor data processing or wavefront reconstruction. While this multi-platform approach has been necessary in AO systems to date due to computation and latency requirements, this may no longer be the case for those with less demanding processing needs. In recent years, large strides have been made in FPGA and microcontroller technology, with todays devices having clock speeds in excess of 200 MHz whilst using a 1kHz) with low latency (general AO applications, such as in 1-3 m telescopes for space surveillance, or even for amateur astronomy.

  18. High efficiency rubrene based inverted top-emission organic light emitting devices with a mixed single layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhaokui; Lou, Yanhui; Naka, Shigeki; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    Inverted top-emission organic light emitting devices (TEOLEDs) with a mixed single layer by mixing of electron transport materials (PyPySPyPy and Alq 3 ), hole transport material (α-NPD) and dope material (rubrene) were investigated. Maximum power efficiency of 3.5 lm/W and maximum luminance of 7000 cd/m 2 were obtained by optimizing the mixing ratio of PyPySPyPy:Alq 3 :α-NPD:rubrene=25:50:25:1. Luminance and power efficiency of mixed single layer device were two times improved compared to bi-layer heterojunction device and tri-layer heterojunction device. Lifetime test also shows that the mixed single layer device exhibits longer operational lifetimes of 343 h, which is three times longer than the 109 h for tri-layer device, and two times longer than the 158 h for bi-layer device. In addition, the maximum luminance and power efficiency were obtained at 20,000 cd/m 2 and 7.5 lm/W, respectively, when a TPD layer of 45 nm was capped onto the top metal electrode.

  19. High-speed digital imaging of cytosolic Ca2+ and contraction in single cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, B; Reibel, D K; Thomas, A P

    1990-07-01

    A charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, with the capacity for simultaneous spatially resolved photon counting and rapid frame transfer, was utilized for high-speed digital image collection from an inverted epifluorescence microscope. The unique properties of the CCD detector were applied to an analysis of cell shortening and the Ca2+ transient from fluorescence images of fura-2-loaded [corrected] cardiomyocytes. On electrical stimulation of the cell, a series of sequential subimages was collected and used to create images of Ca2+ within the cell during contraction. The high photosensitivity of the camera, combined with a detector-based frame storage technique, permitted collection of fluorescence images 10 ms apart. This rate of image collection was sufficient to resolve the rapid events of contraction, e.g., the upstroke of the Ca2+ transient (less than 40 ms) and the time to peak shortening (less than 80 ms). The technique was used to examine the effects of beta-adrenoceptor activation, fura-2 load, and stimulus frequency on cytosolic Ca2+ transients and contractions of single cardiomyocytes. beta-Adrenoceptor stimulation resulted in pronounced increases in peak Ca2+, maximal rates of rise and decay of Ca2+, extent of shortening, and maximal velocities of shortening and relaxation. Raising the intracellular load of fura-2 had little effect on the rising phase of Ca2+ or the extent of shortening but extended the duration of the Ca2+ transient and contraction. In related experiments utilizing differential-interference contrast microscopy, the same technique was applied to visualize sarcomere dynamics in contracting cells. This newly developed technique is a versatile tool for analyzing the Ca2+ transient and mechanical events in studies of excitation-contraction coupling in cardiomyocytes.

  20. Cervical external immobilization devices: evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging issues at 3.0 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Francis L; Tweardy, Lisa; Shellock, Frank G

    2010-02-15

    Laboratory investigation, ex vivo. Currently, no studies have addressed the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) issues for cervical external immobilization devices at 3-Tesla. Under certain conditions significant heating may occur, resulting in patient burns. Furthermore, artifacts can be substantial and prevent the diagnostic use of MRI. Therefore, the objective of this investigation was to evaluate MRI issues for 4 different cervical external immobilization devices at 3-Tesla. Excessive heating and substantial artifacts are 2 potential complications associated with performing MRI at 3-Tesla in patients with cervical external immobilization devices. Using ex vivo testing techniques, MRI-related heating and artifacts were evaluated for 4 different cervical devices during MRI at 3-Tesla. Four cervical external immobilization devices (Generation 80, Resolve Ring and Superstructure, Resolve Ring and Jerome Vest/Jerome Superstructure, and the V1 Halo System; Ossur Americas, Aliso Viejo, CA) underwent MRI testing at 3-Tesla. All devices were made from nonmetallic or nonmagnetic materials. Heating was determined using a gelled-saline-filled skull phantom with fluoroptic thermometry probes attached to the skull pins. MRI was performed at 3-Tesla, using a high level of RF energy. Artifacts were assessed at 3-Tesla, using standard cervical imaging techniques. The Generation 80 and V1 Halo devices exhibited substantial temperature rises (11.6 degrees C and 8.5 degrees C, respectively), with "sparking" evident for the Generation 80 during the MRI procedure. Artifacts were problematic for these devices, as well. By comparison, the 2 Resolve Ring-based cervical external immobilization devices showed little or no heating (Tesla.

  1. Displacement tracking in single human trabecula with metal-plated micro-spheres using X-ray radiography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiroušek, O; Kytýř, D; Doktor, T; Dammer, J; Krejčí, F

    2013-01-01

    This study presents an improved radiographic method for strain measurement in very small samples of a single trabeculae. X-ray micro-radiography was used to track the deformation behaviour of individual trabecula during mechanical loading. As the X-ray micro-radiography images of a single trabecula show no significant features applicable for digital image correlation (DIC) a random pattern of markers was created on the surfaces of the samples to improve the accuracy of tracking. Metal plated borosilicate glassmicro-spheres (mean diameter 10 μm) were used as the markers for trabecular displacement tracking. Two different X-ray imaging setups were used for this purpose. The specimens of isolated trabeculae were loaded by a micro-mechanical testing device developed with respect to radiographical observation. This compact device enables a high precision three-point bending measurement. The specimen was continuously irradiated during the loading procedure by a micro-focus X-ray source. The radiographs were acquired by a single-photon counting silicon pixel detector and s flat panel sensor with CsI flipped scintillator plate. Circular Hough transform was used to locate positions of the spherical markers in the sequence of acquired radiographs and to calculate the strain in the loaded sample. The gold-coated micro-spheres provide clearly visible features in the sequence of radiographs after beam hardening correction, which in conjunction with pattern recognition algorithm enables to substantially improve the accuracy of strain measurements.

  2. Single Photon Counting Performance and Noise Analysis of CMOS SPAD-Based Image Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Neale A. W.; Gyongy, Istvan; Parmesan, Luca; Henderson, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    SPAD-based solid state CMOS image sensors utilising analogue integrators have attained deep sub-electron read noise (DSERN) permitting single photon counting (SPC) imaging. A new method is proposed to determine the read noise in DSERN image sensors by evaluating the peak separation and width (PSW) of single photon peaks in a photon counting histogram (PCH). The technique is used to identify and analyse cumulative noise in analogue integrating SPC SPAD-based pixels. The DSERN of our SPAD image sensor is exploited to confirm recent multi-photon threshold quanta image sensor (QIS) theory. Finally, various single and multiple photon spatio-temporal oversampling techniques are reviewed. PMID:27447643

  3. Possible way for increasing the quality of imaging from THz passive device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.; Deng, Chao; Zhao, Yuan-meng; Zhang, Cun-lin; Zhang, Xin

    2011-11-01

    Using the passive THz imaging system developed by the CNU-THz laboratory, we capture the passive THz image of human body with forbidden objects hidden under opaque clothes. We demonstrate the possibility of significant improving the quality of the image. Our approach bases on the application of spatial filters, developed by us for computer treatment of passive THz imaging. The THz imaging system is constructed with accordance to well known passive THz imaging principles and to the THz quasi-optical theory. It contains a scanning mechanism, which has a detector approximately with 1200μm central wavelength, a data acquisition card and a microcomputer. To get a clear imaging of object we apply a sequence of the spatial filters to the image and spectral transforms of the image. The treatment of imaging from the passive THz device is made by computer code. The performance time of treatment of the image, containing about 5000 pixels, is less than 0.1 second. To illustrate the efficiency of developed approach we detect the liquid explosive, knife, pistol and metal plate hidden under opaque clothes. The results obtained demonstrate the high efficiency of our approach for the detection and recognition of the hidden objects and are very promising for the real security application.

  4. Guide-09-1998. Quality control of darkrooms and image display devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This guide is applicable to process darkrooms relieved and receiving devices and image displays. A number of methods which require the appointed instrumentation described, some of which can be implemented in own radiology services in the country given the low complexity of themselves and others that require specific equipment and can be performed by specialized groups external to these units.

  5. 77 FR 11588 - Certain Electronic Devices for Capturing and Transmitting Images, and Components Thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-831] Certain Electronic Devices for Capturing and Transmitting Images, and Components Thereof AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission... Trade Commission on January 10, 2012, under section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, 19 U.S.C...

  6. 75 FR 39971 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Notice of Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Inv. No. 337-TA-726] In the Matter of Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Notice of Investigation AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of....S. International Trade Commission on May 13, 2010, under section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as...

  7. Detection of fecal contamination on beef meat surfaces using handheld fluorescence imaging device (HFID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current meat inspection in slaughter plants, for food safety and quality attributes including potential fecal contamination, is conducted through by visual examination human inspectors. A handheld fluorescence-based imaging device (HFID) was developed to be an assistive tool for human inspectors by ...

  8. Endovascular Device Testing with Particle Image Velocimetry Enhances Undergraduate Biomedical Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Priya; Ankeny, Casey J.; Ryan, Justin; Okcay, Murat; Frakes, David H.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the use of a new system, HemoFlow™, which utilizes state of the art technologies such as particle image velocimetry to test endovascular devices as part of an undergraduate biomedical engineering curriculum. Students deployed an endovascular stent into an anatomical model of a cerebral aneurysm and measured intra-aneurysmal flow…

  9. A service protocol for post-processing of medical images on the mobile device

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Longjun; Ming, Xing; Xu, Lang; Liu, Qian

    2014-03-01

    With computing capability and display size growing, the mobile device has been used as a tool to help clinicians view patient information and medical images anywhere and anytime. It is uneasy and time-consuming for transferring medical images with large data size from picture archiving and communication system to mobile client, since the wireless network is unstable and limited by bandwidth. Besides, limited by computing capability, memory and power endurance, it is hard to provide a satisfactory quality of experience for radiologists to handle some complex post-processing of medical images on the mobile device, such as real-time direct interactive three-dimensional visualization. In this work, remote rendering technology is employed to implement the post-processing of medical images instead of local rendering, and a service protocol is developed to standardize the communication between the render server and mobile client. In order to make mobile devices with different platforms be able to access post-processing of medical images, the Extensible Markup Language is taken to describe this protocol, which contains four main parts: user authentication, medical image query/ retrieval, 2D post-processing (e.g. window leveling, pixel values obtained) and 3D post-processing (e.g. maximum intensity projection, multi-planar reconstruction, curved planar reformation and direct volume rendering). And then an instance is implemented to verify the protocol. This instance can support the mobile device access post-processing of medical image services on the render server via a client application or on the web page.

  10. Reusable single-port access device shortens operative time and reduces operative costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shussman, Noam; Kedar, Asaf; Elazary, Ram; Abu Gazala, Mahmoud; Rivkind, Avraham I; Mintz, Yoav

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, single-port laparoscopy (SPL) has become an attractive approach for performing surgical procedures. The pitfalls of this approach are technical and financial. Financial concerns are due to the increased cost of dedicated devices and prolonged operating room time. Our aim was to calculate the cost of SPL using a reusable port and instruments in order to evaluate the cost difference between this approach to SPL using the available disposable ports and standard laparoscopy. We performed 22 laparoscopic procedures via the SPL approach using a reusable single-port access system and reusable laparoscopic instruments. These included 17 cholecystectomies and five other procedures. Operative time, postoperative length of stay (LOS) and complications were prospectively recorded and were compared with similar data from our SPL database. Student's t test was used for statistical analysis. SPL was successfully performed in all cases. Mean operative time for cholecystectomy was 72 min (range 40-116). Postoperative LOS was not changed from our standard protocols and was 1.1 days for cholecystectomy. The postoperative course was within normal limits for all patients and perioperative morbidity was recorded. Both operative time and length of hospital stay were shorter for the 17 patients who underwent cholecystectomy using a reusable port than for the matched previous 17 SPL cholecystectomies we performed (p cost difference. Operating with a reusable port ended up with an average cost savings of US$388 compared with using disposable ports, and US$240 compared with standard laparoscopy. Single-port laparoscopic surgery is a technically challenging and expensive surgical approach. Financial concerns among others have been advocated against this approach; however, we demonstrate herein that using a reusable port and instruments reduces operative time and overall operative costs, even beyond the cost of standard laparoscopy.

  11. Fast mega pixels video imaging of a toroidal plasma in KT5D device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Min; Wang Zhijiang; Lu Ronghua; Sun Xiang; Wen Yizhi; Yu Changxuan; Wan Shude; Liu Wandong; Wang Jun; Xiao Delong; Yu Yi; Zhu Zhenghua; Hu Linyin

    2005-01-01

    A direct imaging system, viewing visible light emission from plasmas tangentially or perpendicularly, has been set up on the KT5D toroidal device to monitor the real two-dimensional profiles of purely ECR generated plasmas. This system has a typical spatial resolution of 0.2 mm (1280x1024 pixels) when imaging the whole cross section. Interesting features of ECR plasmas have been found. Different from what classical theories have expected, a resonance layer with two or three bright spots, rather than an even vertical band, has been observed. In addition, images also indicate an intermittent splitting and drifting character of the plasmas

  12. Design and performance of single photon APD focal plane arrays for 3-D LADAR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzler, Mark A.; Entwistle, Mark; Owens, Mark; Patel, Ketan; Jiang, Xudong; Slomkowski, Krystyna; Rangwala, Sabbir; Zalud, Peter F.; Senko, Tom; Tower, John; Ferraro, Joseph

    2010-08-01

    ×We describe the design, fabrication, and performance of focal plane arrays (FPAs) for use in 3-D LADAR imaging applications requiring single photon sensitivity. These 32 × 32 FPAs provide high-efficiency single photon sensitivity for three-dimensional LADAR imaging applications at 1064 nm. Our GmAPD arrays are designed using a planarpassivated avalanche photodiode device platform with buried p-n junctions that has demonstrated excellent performance uniformity, operational stability, and long-term reliability. The core of the FPA is a chip stack formed by hybridizing the GmAPD photodiode array to a custom CMOS read-out integrated circuit (ROIC) and attaching a precision-aligned GaP microlens array (MLA) to the back-illuminated detector array. Each ROIC pixel includes an active quenching circuit governing Geiger-mode operation of the corresponding avalanche photodiode pixel as well as a pseudo-random counter to capture per-pixel time-of-flight timestamps in each frame. The FPA has been designed to operate at frame rates as high as 186 kHz for 2 μs range gates. Effective single photon detection efficiencies as high as 40% (including all optical transmission and MLA losses) are achieved for dark count rates below 20 kHz. For these planar-geometry diffused-junction GmAPDs, isolation trenches are used to reduce crosstalk due to hot carrier luminescence effects during avalanche events, and we present details of the crosstalk performance for different operating conditions. Direct measurement of temporal probability distribution functions due to cumulative timing uncertainties of the GmAPDs and ROIC circuitry has demonstrated a FWHM timing jitter as low as 265 ps (standard deviation is ~100 ps).

  13. Nondestructive measurement of the grid ratio using a single image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasciak, A. S.; Jones, A. Kyle

    2009-01-01

    The antiscatter grid is an essential part of modern radiographic systems. Since the introduction of the antiscatter grid, however, there have been few methods proposed for acceptance testing and verification of manufacturer-supplied grid specifications. The grid ratio (r) is an important parameter describing the antiscatter grid because it affects many other grid quality metrics, such as the contrast improvement ratio (K), primary transmission (T p ), and scatter transmission (T s ). Also, the grid ratio in large part determines the primary clinical use of the grid. To this end, the authors present a technique for the nondestructive measurement of the grid ratio of antiscatter grids. They derived an equation that can be used to calculate the grid ratio from a single off-focus flat field image by exploiting the relationship between grid cutoff and off-focus distance. The calculation can be performed by hand or with included analysis software. They calculated the grid ratios of several different grids throughout the institution, and afterward they destructively measured the grid ratio of a nominal r8 grid previously evaluated with the method. They also studied the sensitivity of the method to technical factors and choice of parameters. With one exception, the results for the grids found in the institution were in agreement with the manufacturer's specifications and international standards. The nondestructive evaluation of the r8 grid indicated a ratio of 7.3, while the destructive measurement indicated a ratio of 7.53±0.28. Repeated evaluations of the same grid yielded consistent results. The technique provides the medical physicist with a new tool for quantitative evaluation of the grid ratio, an important grid performance criterion. The method is robust and repeatable when appropriate choices of technical factors and other parameters are made.

  14. Predictive modeling for corrective maintenance of imaging devices from machine logs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Ravindra B; Patil, Meru A; Ravi, Vidya; Naik, Sarif

    2017-07-01

    In the cost sensitive healthcare industry, an unplanned downtime of diagnostic and therapy imaging devices can be a burden on the financials of both the hospitals as well as the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs). In the current era of connectivity, it is easier to get these devices connected to a standard monitoring station. Once the system is connected, OEMs can monitor the health of these devices remotely and take corrective actions by providing preventive maintenance thereby avoiding major unplanned downtime. In this article, we present an overall methodology of predicting failure of these devices well before customer experiences it. We use data-driven approach based on machine learning to predict failures in turn resulting in reduced machine downtime, improved customer satisfaction and cost savings for the OEMs. One of the use-case of predicting component failure of PHILIPS iXR system is explained in this article.

  15. OC ToGo: bed site image integration into OpenClinica with mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haak, Daniel; Gehlen, Johan; Jonas, Stephan; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2014-03-01

    Imaging and image-based measurements nowadays play an essential role in controlled clinical trials, but electronic data capture (EDC) systems insufficiently support integration of captured images by mobile devices (e.g. smartphones and tablets). The web application OpenClinica has established as one of the world's leading EDC systems and is used to collect, manage and store data of clinical trials in electronic case report forms (eCRFs). In this paper, we present a mobile application for instantaneous integration of images into OpenClinica directly during examination on patient's bed site. The communication between the Android application and OpenClinica is based on the simple object access protocol (SOAP) and representational state transfer (REST) web services for metadata, and secure file transfer protocol (SFTP) for image transfer, respectively. OpenClinica's web services are used to query context information (e.g. existing studies, events and subjects) and to import data into the eCRF, as well as export of eCRF metadata and structural information. A stable image transfer is ensured and progress information (e.g. remaining time) visualized to the user. The workflow is demonstrated for a European multi-center registry, where patients with calciphylaxis disease are included. Our approach improves the EDC workflow, saves time, and reduces costs. Furthermore, data privacy is enhanced, since storage of private health data on the imaging devices becomes obsolete.

  16. The imaging pin detector - a simple and effective new imaging device for soft x-rays and soft beta emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    The development of a new bidimensional imaging detector system for soft X and beta radiations is reported. Based on the detection of the differential induction signals on pickup electrodes placed around a point anode in a gas avalanche detector, the system described has achieved a spatial resolution of better than 1mm fwhm over a field of 30mm diameter while preserving excellent pulse height resolution. The present device offers considerable potential as a cheap and robust imaging system for applications in X-ray diffraction and autoradiography. (author)

  17. Single incision device (TVT Secur) versus retropubic tension-free vaginal tape device (TVT) for the management of stress urinary incontinence in women: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Sue; Tang, Selphee; Schulz, Jane; Murphy, Magnus; Goncalves, Jose; Kaye, Stephen; Dederer, Lorel; Robert, Magali

    2014-12-22

    In 2006, Ethicon Inc. introduced a new minimally invasive single incision sling device for the surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence, the Gynecare TVT Secur®. For device licensing, no new evidence of TVT Secur efficacy and safety was needed: rather evidence was provided of the long-term follow-up of patients who had a procedure using a predecate retropubic tension-free vaginal tape device. Before adopting TVT Secur into our routine clinical practice, we decided to evaluate it. The objective of our Canadian multi-centre pragmatic randomized controlled trial was to compare the effectiveness of the new single-incision device, TVT Secur, to the established TVT device, in terms of objective cure of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) at 12 months postoperatively. Other outcomes included: complications, symptoms, and incontinence-related quality of life. The sample size estimate for our trial was 300, but the trial stopped early because of poor recruitment. 74 women participated (40 allocated to TVT Secur, 34 to TVT). At 12 months postoperatively, 27/33(82%) of TVT Secur group were cured, compared with 25/28(89%) of the TVT group (relative risk 0.92, 95% confidence interval 0.75 to 1.13, p=0.49). Most women reported little or no SUI symptoms (35/37(95%) vs 29/30(97%), >0.999). Quality of life improved significantly from baseline for both groups (IIQ-7 mean change -25 for both groups) but did not differ between groups (p=0.880). Our small randomized trial did not find statistically significant differences in outcomes between women allocated to the TVT Secur device versus those allocated to the TVT device for stress urinary incontinence. Despite the discontinuation of TVT Secur in March 2013 for commercial reasons, the importance of our study lies in making evidence available for the many women who had a TVT Secur device implanted and their physicians who may be considering alternative treatments. Our experience illustrates the difficulty of undertaking research

  18. Polyaniline–titania solid electrolyte for new generation photovoltaic single-layer devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Michael; Bassil, Maria; Demirci, Umit B.; Khoury, Tony; El Haj Moussa, Georges; El Tahchi, Mario; Miele, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Strong interaction between polyaniline and TiO 2 and the formation of a core/shell structure. ► Enhancement of the absorption of TiO 2 in the visible range. ► Diode-like behavior with low polyaniline content. ► Single layer photovoltaic device based on solid polyaniline–TiO 2 composite. - Abstract: In this study, in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of very low quantities of aniline doped with HCl using ammonium persulfate inside an aqueous solution of 10 wt.% of titanium dioxide was used to prepare a novel photovoltaic paint. Photoelectrical properties of the composite have been observed and the operating principle of the photovoltaic device is presented. We report an enhancement of the absorption of TiO 2 powder in the visible range due to the sensitization by conductive polyaniline. Under illumination an open circuit voltage of 593 mV and a short circuit current density of 0.502 A m −2 were recorded. The surface conductivity of PANI–TiO 2 pellets is measured using the four-point probe technique. The percolation theory together with variable range hopping explained the behavior of the surface conductivity of the composites. Morphological analysis using Transmission Electron Microscope showed the core/shell structure of the composites and energy dispersive X-ray showed the homogeneity of the composite. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the chemical adsorption of polyaniline at the surface of TiO 2 . UV–visible spectroscopy showed a shift of the polaron energy inside the polyaniline energy gap. The proposed morphology is showed to be responsible for the photoactivity of the composite.

  19. Development of Single-Event Upset hardened programmable logic devices in deep submicron CMOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonacini, S.

    2007-11-01

    The electronics associated to the particle detectors of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), under construction at CERN, will operate in a very harsh radiation environment. Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components cannot be used in the vicinity of particle collision due to their poor radiation tolerance. This thesis is a contribution to the effort to cover the need for radiation-tolerant SEU-robust (Single Event Upset) programmable components for application in high energy physics experiments. Two components are under development: a Programmable Logic Device (PLD) and a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The PLD is a fuse-based, 10-input, 8-I/O general architecture device in 0.25 μm CMOS technology. The FPGA under development is a 32*32 logic block array, equivalent to ∼ 25 k gates, in 0.13 μm CMOS. The irradiation test results obtained in the CMOS 0.25 μm technology demonstrate good robustness of the circuit up to an LET (Linear Energy Transfer) of 79.6 cm 2 *MeV/mg, which make it suitable for the target environment. The CMOS 0.13 μm circuit has showed robustness to an LET of 37.4 cm 2 *MeV/mg in the static test mode and has increased sensitivity in the dynamic test mode. This work focused also on the research for an SEU-robust register in both the mentioned technologies. The SEU-robust register is employed as a user data flip-flop in the FPGA and PLD designs and as a configuration cell as well in the FPGA design

  20. Display device combining ambient light with magnified virtual images generated in the eye path of the observer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    A display device positions an observer's eye (or eyes) to look in a particular direction (eye path). An electronically controlled image generating element in the eye path generates artificial images which are magnified to create a virtual image for the eye. The image generating element is

  1. A Comparison between Boundary and Continuous Conduction Modes in Single Phase PFC Using 600V Range Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernandez Botella, Juan Carlos; Petersen, Lars Press; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis and comparison of boundary conduction mode (BCM) and continuous conduction mode (CCM) in single phase power factor correction (PFC) applications. The comparison is based on double pulse tester (DPT) characterization results of state-of-the-art superjunction devices...... in the 600V range. The measured switching energy is used to evaluate the devices performance in a conventional PFC. This data is used together with a mathematical model for prediction of the conducted electromagnetic interference (EMI). This allows comparing the different devices in BCM and CCM operation...

  2. A luminescence imaging system for the routine measurement of single-grain OSL dose distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kook, Myung Ho; Lapp, Torben; Murray, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    the potential of an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD), providing extremely low level light detection. We characterize the performance of the device by discussing reproducibility and evaluating uncertainties in OSL signals. Finally we derive a typical single grain natural dose distribution...

  3. Restoration of a single superresolution image from several blurred, noisy, and undersampled measured images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elad, M; Feuer, A

    1997-01-01

    The three main tools in the single image restoration theory are the maximum likelihood (ML) estimator, the maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) estimator, and the set theoretic approach using projection onto convex sets (POCS). This paper utilizes the above known tools to propose a unified methodology toward the more complicated problem of superresolution restoration. In the superresolution restoration problem, an improved resolution image is restored from several geometrically warped, blurred, noisy and downsampled measured images. The superresolution restoration problem is modeled and analyzed from the ML, the MAP, and POCS points of view, yielding a generalization of the known superresolution restoration methods. The proposed restoration approach is general but assumes explicit knowledge of the linear space- and time-variant blur, the (additive Gaussian) noise, the different measured resolutions, and the (smooth) motion characteristics. A hybrid method combining the simplicity of the ML and the incorporation of nonellipsoid constraints is presented, giving improved restoration performance, compared with the ML and the POCS approaches. The hybrid method is shown to converge to the unique optimal solution of a new definition of the optimization problem. Superresolution restoration from motionless measurements is also discussed. Simulations demonstrate the power of the proposed methodology.

  4. Imaging assessment of a portable hemodialysis device: detection of possible failure modes and monitoring of functional performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olorunsola, Olufoladare G; Kim, Steven H; Chang, Ryan; Kuo, Yuo-Chen; Hetts, Steven W; Heller, Alex; Kant, Rishi; Saeed, Maythem; Fissell, William H; Roy, Shuvo; Wilson, Mark W

    2014-03-27

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the utility and limitations of various imaging modalities in the noninvasive assessment of a novel compact hemodialyzer under development for renal replacement therapy, with specific aim towards monitoring its functional performance. The prototype is a 4×3×6 cm aluminum cartridge housing "blood" and "dialysate" flow paths arranged in parallel. A sheet of semipermeable silicon nanopore membranes forms the blood-dialysate interface, allowing passage of small molecules. Blood flow was simulated using a peristaltic pump to instill iodinated contrast through the blood compartment, while de-ionized water was instilled through the dialysate compartment at a matched rate in the countercurrent direction. Images were acquired under these flow conditions using multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), fluoroscopy, high-resolution quantitative computed tomography (HR-QCT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MDCT was used to monitor contrast diffusion efficiency by plotting contrast density as a function of position along the path of flow through the cartridge during steady state infusion at 1 and 20 mL/min. Both linear and exponential regressions were used to model contrast decay along the flow path. Both linear and exponential models of contrast decay appeared to be reasonable approximations, yielding similar results for contrast diffusion during a single pass through the cartridge. There was no measurable difference in contrast diffusion when comparing 1 mL/min and 20 mL/min flow rates. Fluoroscopy allowed a gross qualitative assessment of flow within the device, and revealed flow inhomogeneity within the corner of the cartridge opposite the blood inlet port. MRI and HR-QCT were both severely limited due to the paramagnetic properties and high atomic number of the target material, respectively. During testing, we encountered several causes of device malfunction, including leak formation, trapped gas, and contrast

  5. A newly developed removable dental device for fused 3-D MRI/Meg imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuboki, Takuo [Okayama Univ. (Japan). Dental School; Clark, G T; Akhtari, M; Sutherling, W W

    1999-06-01

    Recently 3-D imaging techniques have been used to shed light on the role of abnormal brain functions in such conditions as nocturnal bruxism and orofacial pain. In order to achieve precise 3-D image fusion between magnetic resonance images (MRI) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) data, we developed a removable dental device which attaches rigidly to the teeth. Using this device, correlation of MEG and MRI data points was achieved by the co-registration of 3 or more fiducial points. Using a Polhemus 3-space digitizer the locations of the points were registered on MEG and then a small amount of high-water-content material was placed at each point for registering these same points on MRI. The mean reproducibility of interpoint distances, determined for 2 subjects, was between 0.59 and 0.82 mm. Using a Monte Carlo statistical analysis we determined that the accuracy of a posterior projection from the fiducial points to any point within the strata of the brain is {+-}3.3 mm. The value of this device is that it permits reasonably precise and repeatable co-registration of these points and yet it is easily removed and replaced by the patient. Obviously such a device could also be adapted for use in diagnosis and analysis of brain functions related with other various sensory and motor functions (e.g., taste, pain, clenching) in maxillofacial region using MRI and MEG. (author)

  6. A newly developed removable dental device for fused 3-D MRI/Meg imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuboki, Takuo; Clark, G.T.; Akhtari, M.; Sutherling, W.W.

    1999-01-01

    Recently 3-D imaging techniques have been used to shed light on the role of abnormal brain functions in such conditions as nocturnal bruxism and orofacial pain. In order to achieve precise 3-D image fusion between magnetic resonance images (MRI) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) data, we developed a removable dental device which attaches rigidly to the teeth. Using this device, correlation of MEG and MRI data points was achieved by the co-registration of 3 or more fiducial points. Using a Polhemus 3-space digitizer the locations of the points were registered on MEG and then a small amount of high-water-content material was placed at each point for registering these same points on MRI. The mean reproducibility of interpoint distances, determined for 2 subjects, was between 0.59 and 0.82 mm. Using a Monte Carlo statistical analysis we determined that the accuracy of a posterior projection from the fiducial points to any point within the strata of the brain is ±3.3 mm. The value of this device is that it permits reasonably precise and repeatable co-registration of these points and yet it is easily removed and replaced by the patient. Obviously such a device could also be adapted for use in diagnosis and analysis of brain functions related with other various sensory and motor functions (e.g., taste, pain, clenching) in maxillofacial region using MRI and MEG. (author)

  7. New diffusion imaging method with a single acquisition sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melki, Ph.S.; Bittoun, J.; Lefevre, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) is related to the molecular diffusion coefficient and to physiologic information: microcirculation in the capillary network, incoherent slow flow, and restricted diffusion. The authors present a new MR imaging sequence that yields computed ADC images in only one acquisition of 9-minutes with a 1.5-T imager (GE Signa). Compared to the previous method, this sequence is at least two times faster and thus can be used as a routine examination to supplement T1-, T2-, and density-weighted images. The method was assessed by measurement of the molecular diffusion in liquids, and the first clinical images obtained in neurologic diseases demonstrate its efficiency for clinical investigation. The possibility of separately imaging diffusion and perfusion is supported by an algorithm

  8. Readout-Segmented Echo-Planar Imaging in Diffusion-Weighted MR Imaging in Breast Cancer: Comparison with Single-Shot Echo-Planar Imaging in Image Quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yun Ju; Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo; Park, Chang Suk; Kim, Hyeon Sook; Son, Yo Han; Porter, David Andrew; Song, Byung Joo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the image quality of standard single-shot echo-planar imaging (ss-EPI) and that of readout-segmented EPI (rs-EPI) in patients with breast cancer. Seventy-one patients with 74 breast cancers underwent both ss-EPI and rs-EPI. For qualitative comparison of image quality, three readers independently assessed the two sets of diffusion-weighted (DW) images. To evaluate geometric distortion, a comparison was made between lesion lengths derived from contrast enhanced MR (CE-MR) images and those obtained from the corresponding DW images. For assessment of image parameters, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), lesion contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. The rs-EPI was superior to ss-EPI in most criteria regarding the qualitative image quality. Anatomical structure distinction, delineation of the lesion, ghosting artifact, and overall image quality were significantly better in rs-EPI. Regarding the geometric distortion, lesion length on ss-EPI was significantly different from that of CE-MR, whereas there were no significant differences between CE-MR and rs-EPI. The rs-EPI was superior to ss-EPI in SNR and CNR. Readout-segmented EPI is superior to ss-EPI in the aspect of image quality in DW MR imaging of the breast

  9. Single Nanorod Devices for Battery Diagnostics: A Case Study on LiMn 2 O 4

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2009-12-09

    This paper presents single nanostructure devices as a powerful new diagnostic tool for batteries with LiMn2O4 nanorod materials as an example. LiMn2O4 and Al-doped LiMn2O4 nanorods were synthesized by a two-step method that combines hydrothermal synthesis of β-MnO2 nanorods and a solid state reaction to convert them to LiMn2O4 nanorods. λ-MnO2 nanorods were also prepared by acid treatment of LiMn2O4 nanorods. The effect of electrolyte etching on these LiMn2O 4-related nanorods is investigated by both SEM and single-nanorod transport measurement, and this is the first time that the transport properties of this material have been studied at the level of an individual singlecrystalline particle. Experiments show that Al dopants reduce the dissolution of Mn3+ ions significantly and make the LiAl 0.1Mn1.9O4 nanorods much more stable than LiMn2O4 against electrolyte etching, which is reflected by the magnification of both size shrinkage and conductance decrease. These results correlate well with the better cycling performance of Al-doped LiMn 2O4 in our Li-ion battery tests: LiAl0.1Mn 1.9O4 nanorods achieve 96% capacity retention after 100 cycles at 1C rate at room temperature, and 80% at 60 °C, whereas LiMn 2O4 shows worse retention of 91% at room temperature, and 69% at 60 °C. Moreover, temperature-dependent I - V measurements indicate that the sharp electronic resistance increase due to charge ordering transition at 290 K does not appear in our LiMn2O4 nanorod samples, suggesting good battery performance at low temperature. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  10. Imaging by the SSFSE single slice method at different viscosities of bile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Hiroya; Usui, Motoki; Fukunaga, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Naruto; Ikegami, Toshimi [Kawasaki Hospital, Kobe (Japan)

    2001-11-01

    The single shot fast spin echo single thick slice method (single slice method) is a technique that visualizes the water component alone using a heavy T{sub 2}. However, this method is considered to be markedly affected by changes in the viscosity of the material because a very long TE is used, and changes in the T{sub 2} value, which are related to viscosity, directly affect imaging. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between the effects of TE and the T{sub 2} value of bile in the single slice method and also examined the relationship between the signal intensity of bile on T{sub 1}- and T{sub 2}-weighted images and imaging by MR cholangiography (MRC). It was difficult to image bile with high viscosities at a usual effective TE level of 700-1,500 ms. With regard to the relationship between the signal intensity of bile and MRC imaging, all T{sub 2} values of the bile samples showing relatively high signal intensities on the T{sub 1}-weighted images suggested high viscosities, and MRC imaging of these bile samples was poor. In conclusion, MRC imaging of bile with high viscosities was poor with the single slice method. Imaging by the single slice method alone of bile showing a relatively high signal intensity on T{sub 1}-weighted images should be avoided, and combination with other MRC sequences should be used. (author)

  11. Imaging by the SSFSE single slice method at different viscosities of bile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Hiroya; Usui, Motoki; Fukunaga, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Naruto; Ikegami, Toshimi

    2001-01-01

    The single shot fast spin echo single thick slice method (single slice method) is a technique that visualizes the water component alone using a heavy T 2 . However, this method is considered to be markedly affected by changes in the viscosity of the material because a very long TE is used, and changes in the T 2 value, which are related to viscosity, directly affect imaging. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between the effects of TE and the T 2 value of bile in the single slice method and also examined the relationship between the signal intensity of bile on T 1 - and T 2 -weighted images and imaging by MR cholangiography (MRC). It was difficult to image bile with high viscosities at a usual effective TE level of 700-1,500 ms. With regard to the relationship between the signal intensity of bile and MRC imaging, all T 2 values of the bile samples showing relatively high signal intensities on the T 1 -weighted images suggested high viscosities, and MRC imaging of these bile samples was poor. In conclusion, MRC imaging of bile with high viscosities was poor with the single slice method. Imaging by the single slice method alone of bile showing a relatively high signal intensity on T 1 -weighted images should be avoided, and combination with other MRC sequences should be used. (author)

  12. The simulation of an imaging gamma-ray Compton backscattering device using GEANT4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flechas, D.; Cristancho, F.; Sarmiento, L.G.; Fajardo, E.

    2014-01-01

    A gamma-backscattering imaging device dubbed Compton Camera, developed at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany) and modified and studied at the Nuclear Physics Group of the National University of Colombia in Bogota, uses the back-to-back emission of two gamma rays in the positron annihilation to construct a bidimensional image that represents the distribution of matter in the field-of-view of the camera. This imaging capability can be used in a host of different situations, for example, to identify and study deposition and structural defects, and to help locating concealed objects, to name just two cases. In order to increase the understanding of the response of the Compton Camera and, in particular, its image formation process, and to assist in the data analysis, a simulation of the camera was developed using the GEANT4 simulation toolkit. In this work, the images resulting from different experimental conditions are shown. The simulated images and their comparison with the experimental ones already suggest methods to improve the present experimental device. (author)

  13. Door and window image-based measurement using a mobile device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guangyao; Janakaraj, Manishankar; Agam, Gady

    2015-03-01

    We present a system for door and window image-based measurement using an Android mobile device. In this system a user takes an image of a door or window that needs to be measured and using interaction measures specific dimensions of the object. The existing object is removed from the image and a 3D model of a replacement is rendered onto the image. The visualization provides a 3D model with which the user can interact. When tested on a mobile Android platform with an 8MP camera we obtain an average measurement error of roughly 0.5%. This error rate is stable across a range of view angles, distances from the object, and image resolutions. The main advantages of our mobile device application for image measurement include measuring objects for which physical access is not readily available, documenting in a precise manner the locations in the scene where the measurements were taken, and visualizing a new object with custom selections inside the original view.

  14. Microfluidic device for continuous single cells analysis via Raman spectroscopy enhanced by integrated plasmonic nanodimers

    KAUST Repository

    Perozziello, Gerardo; Candeloro, Patrizio; De Grazia, Antonio; Esposito, Francesco; Allione, Marco; Coluccio, Maria Laura; Tallerico, Rossana; Valpapuram, Immanuel; Tirinato, Luca; Das, Gobind; Giugni, Andrea; Torre, Bruno; Veltri, Pierangelo; Kruhne, Ulrich; Della Valle, Giuseppe; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2015-01-01

    In this work a Raman flow cytometer is presented. It consists of a microfluidic device that takes advantages of the basic principles of Raman spectroscopy and flow cytometry. The microfluidic device integrates calibrated microfluidic channels- where

  15. Fabrication of a novel silicon single electron transistor for Si:P quantum computer devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angus, S.J.; Smith, C.E.A.; Gauja, E.; Dzurak, A.S.; Clark, R.G.; Snider, G.L.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Quantum computation relies on the successful measurement of quantum states. Single electron transistors (SETs) are known to be able to perform fast and sensitive charge measurements of solid state qubits. However, due to their sensitivity, SETs are also very susceptible to random charge fluctuations in a solid-state materials environment. In previous dc transport measurements, silicon-based SETs have demonstrated greater charge stability than A1/A1 2 O 3 SETs. We have designed and fabricated a novel silicon SET architecture for a comparison of the noise characteristics of silicon and aluminium based devices. The silicon SET described here is designed for controllable and reproducible low temperature operation. It is fabricated using a novel dual gate structure on a silicon-on-insulator substrate. A silicon quantum wire is formed in a 100nm thick high-resistivity superficial silicon layer using reactive ion etching. Carriers are induced in the silicon wire by a back gate in the silicon substrate. The tunnel barriers are created electrostatically, using lithographically defined metallic electrodes (∼40nm width). These tunnel barriers surround the surface of the quantum wire, thus producing excellent electrostatic confinement. This architecture provides independent control of tunnel barrier height and island occupancy, thus promising better control of Coulomb blockade oscillations than in previously investigated silicon SETs. The use of a near intrinsic silicon substrate offers compatibility with Si:P qubits in the longer term

  16. Nanowire decorated, ultra-thin, single crystalline silicon for photovoltaic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurang, Pantea; Turan, Rasit; Unalan, Husnu Emrah

    2017-10-06

    Reducing silicon (Si) wafer thickness in the photovoltaic industry has always been demanded for lowering the overall cost. Further benefits such as short collection lengths and improved open circuit voltages can also be achieved by Si thickness reduction. However, the problem with thin films is poor light absorption. One way to decrease optical losses in photovoltaic devices is to minimize the front side reflection. This approach can be applied to front contacted ultra-thin crystalline Si solar cells to increase the light absorption. In this work, homojunction solar cells were fabricated using ultra-thin and flexible single crystal Si wafers. A metal assisted chemical etching method was used for the nanowire (NW) texturization of ultra-thin Si wafers to compensate weak light absorption. A relative improvement of 56% in the reflectivity was observed for ultra-thin Si wafers with the thickness of 20 ± 0.2 μm upon NW texturization. NW length and top contact optimization resulted in a relative enhancement of 23% ± 5% in photovoltaic conversion efficiency.

  17. On the correct interpretation of the low voltage regime in intrinsic single-carrier devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhr, Jason A; Kirchartz, Thomas; Nelson, Jenny

    2017-05-24

    We discuss the approach of determining the charge-carrier density of a single-carrier device by combining Ohm's law and the Mott-Gurney law. We show that this approach is seldom valid, due to the fact that whenever Ohm's law is applicable the Mott-Gurney law is usually not, and vice versa. We do this using a numerical drift-diffusion solver to calculate the current density-voltage curves and the charge-carrier density, with increasing doping concentration. As this doping concentration is increased to very large values, using Ohm's law becomes a sensible way of measuring the product of mobility and doping density in the sample. However, in the high-doping limit, the current is no longer governed by space-charge and it will no longer be possible to determine the charge-carrier mobility using the Mott-Gurney law. This leaves the value for the mobility as an unknown in the mobility-doping density product in Ohm's law. We also show that, when the charge-carrier mobility for an intrinsic semiconductor is known in advance, the carrier density is underestimated up to many orders of magnitude if Ohm's law is used. We finally seek to establish a window of conditions where the two methods can be combined to yield reasonable results.

  18. On the correct interpretation of the low voltage regime in intrinsic single-carrier devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Röhr, Jason A; Nelson, Jenny; Kirchartz, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the approach of determining the charge-carrier density of a single-carrier device by combining Ohm’s law and the Mott–Gurney law. We show that this approach is seldom valid, due to the fact that whenever Ohm’s law is applicable the Mott–Gurney law is usually not, and vice versa. We do this using a numerical drift-diffusion solver to calculate the current density–voltage curves and the charge-carrier density, with increasing doping concentration. As this doping concentration is increased to very large values, using Ohm’s law becomes a sensible way of measuring the product of mobility and doping density in the sample. However, in the high-doping limit, the current is no longer governed by space-charge and it will no longer be possible to determine the charge-carrier mobility using the Mott–Gurney law. This leaves the value for the mobility as an unknown in the mobility-doping density product in Ohm’s law. We also show that, when the charge-carrier mobility for an intrinsic semiconductor is known in advance, the carrier density is underestimated up to many orders of magnitude if Ohm’s law is used. We finally seek to establish a window of conditions where the two methods can be combined to yield reasonable results. (paper)

  19. Impact of temperature on single event upset measurement by heavy ions in SRAM devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tianqi; Geng Chao; Zhang Zhangang; Gu Song; Tong Teng; Xi Kai; Hou Mingdong; Liu Jie; Zhao Fazhan; Liu Gang; Han Zhengsheng

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of single event upset (SEU) measurement both in commercial bulk and silicon on insulator (SOI) static random access memories (SRAMs) has been investigated by experiment in the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). For commercial bulk SRAM, the SEU cross section measured by 12 C ions is very sensitive to the temperature. The temperature test of SEU in SOI SRAM was conducted by 209 Bi and 12 C ions, respectively, and the SEU cross sections display a remarkable growth with the elevated temperature for 12 C ions but keep constant for 209 Bi ions. The impact of temperature on SEU measurement was analyzed by Monte Carlo simulation. It is revealed that the SEU cross section is significantly affected by the temperature around the threshold linear energy transfer of SEU occurrence. As the SEU occurrence approaches saturation, the SEU cross section gradually exhibits less temperature dependency. Based on this result, the experimental data measured in HIRFL was analyzed, and then a reasonable method of predicting the on-orbit SEU rate was proposed. (semiconductor devices)

  20. Detection of Fusarium in single wheat kernels using spectral Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, G.; Heijden, van der G.W.A.M.; Waalwijk, C.; Young, I.T.

    2005-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a harmful fungal disease that occurs in small grains. Non-destructive detection of this disease is traditionally done using spectroscopy or image processing. In this paper the combination of these two in the form of spectral imaging is evaluated. Transmission spectral

  1. Traceable working standards with SI units of radiance for characterizing the measurement performance of investigational clinical NIRF imaging devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Banghe; Rasmussen, John C.; Litorja, Maritoni; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2017-03-01

    All medical devices for Food and Drug market approval require specifications of performance based upon International System of Units (SI) or units derived from SI for reasons of traceability. Recently, near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging devices of a variety of designs have emerged on the market and in investigational clinical studies. Yet the design of devices used in the clinical studies vary widely, suggesting variable device performance. Device performance depends upon optimal excitation of NIRF imaging agents, rejection of backscattered excitation and ambient light, and selective collection of fluorescence emanating from the fluorophore. There remains no traceable working standards with SI units of radiance to enable prediction that a given molecular imaging agent can be detected in humans by a given NIRF imaging device. Furthermore, as technologies evolve and as NIRF imaging device components change, there remains no standardized means to track device improvements over time and establish clinical performance without involving clinical trials, often costly. In this study, we deployed a methodology to calibrate luminescent radiance of a stable, solid phantom in SI units of mW/cm2/sr for characterizing the measurement performance of ICCD and IsCMOS camera based NIRF imaging devices, such as signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast. The methodology allowed determination of superior SNR of the ICCD over the IsCMOS system; comparable contrast of ICCD and IsCMOS depending upon binning strategies.

  2. Single-Frame Cinema. Three Dimensional Computer-Generated Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheetham, Edward Joseph, II

    This master's thesis provides a description of the proposed art form called single-frame cinema, which is a category of computer imagery that takes the temporal polarities of photography and cinema and unites them into a single visual vignette of time. Following introductory comments, individual chapters discuss (1) the essential physical…

  3. Laparoendoscopic single-site repair of bladder rupture using a home-made single-port device: initial experience of treatment for a traumatic intraperitoneal bladder rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo Yong; Kang, Dong Hyuk; Lee, Seung Wook

    2012-06-01

    We report our initial experience with a laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) repair of a bladder rupture using a home-made single-port device. A 37-year-old man presented to the emergency department with complaints of voiding difficulty and gross hematuria after blunt trauma. Cystography and computed tomography revealed an intraperitoneal bladder rupture. The patient underwent LESS repair of a bladder rupture using the Alexis wound retractor, which was inserted through the umbilical incision. A home-made single-port device was made by fixing 6½ surgical gloves to the outer rim of the retractor and securing the glove finger to the end of 3 trocars with a tie. Using the flexible laparoscopic instruments and rigid instruments, LESS surgery was performed using a procedure similar to conventional laparoscopic surgery. The patient did not have any voiding problem after removal of the urethral Foley catheter on the 10th postoperative day. To our knowledge, this is the first published report of LESS repair of a traumatic bladder rupture using a home-made single-port device in the literature.

  4. Versatile microfluidic total internal reflection (TIR)-based devices: application to microbeads velocity measurement and single molecule detection with upright and inverted microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Nam Cao Hoai; Yokokawa, Ryuji; Dao, Dzung Viet; Nguyen, Thien Duy; Wells, John C; Sugiyama, Susumu

    2009-01-21

    A poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) chip for Total Internal Reflection (TIR)-based imaging and detection has been developed using Si bulk micromachining and PDMS casting. In this paper, we report the applications of the chip on both inverted and upright fluorescent microscopes and confirm that two types of sample delivery platforms, PDMS microchannel and glass microchannel, can be easily integrated depending on the magnification of an objective lens needed to visualize a sample. Although any device configuration can be achievable, here we performed two experiments to demonstrate the versatility of the microfluidic TIR-based devices. The first experiment was velocity measurement of Nile red microbeads with nominal diameter of 500 nm in a pressure-driven flow. The time-sequenced fluorescent images of microbeads, illuminated by an evanescent field, were cross-correlated by a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) program to obtain near-wall velocity field of the microbeads at various flow rates from 500 nl/min to 3000 nl/min. We then evaluated the capabilities of the device for Single Molecule Detection (SMD) of fluorescently labeled DNA molecules from 30 bp to 48.5 kbp and confirm that DNA molecules as short as 1105 bp were detectable. Our versatile, integrated device could provide low-cost and fast accessibility to Total Internal Reflection Fluorescent Microscopy (TIRFM) on both conventional upright and inverted microscopes. It could also be a useful component in a Micro-Total Analysis System (micro-TAS) to analyze nanoparticles or biomolecules near-wall transport or motion.

  5. Design Through Integration of On-Board Calibration Device with Imaging Spectroscopy Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of the Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectroscopy (AVIRIS) project is to "identify, measure, and monitor constituents of the Earth's surface and atmosphere based on molecular absorption and particle scattering signatures." The project designs, builds, and tests various imaging spectroscopy instruments that use On-Board Calibration devices (OBC) to check the accuracy of the data collected by the spectrometers. The imaging instrument records the spectral signatures of light collected during flight. To verify the data is correct, the OBC shines light which is collected by the imaging spectrometer and compared against previous calibration data to track spectral response changes in the instrument. The spectral data has the calibration applied to it based on the readings from the OBC data in order to ensure accuracy.

  6. Ultra-fast quantitative imaging using ptychographic iterative engine based digital micro-mirror device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Aihui; Tian, Xiaolin; Kong, Yan; Jiang, Zhilong; Liu, Fei; Xue, Liang; Wang, Shouyu; Liu, Cheng

    2018-01-01

    As a lensfree imaging technique, ptychographic iterative engine (PIE) method can provide both quantitative sample amplitude and phase distributions avoiding aberration. However, it requires field of view (FoV) scanning often relying on mechanical translation, which not only slows down measuring speed, but also introduces mechanical errors decreasing both resolution and accuracy in retrieved information. In order to achieve high-accurate quantitative imaging with fast speed, digital micromirror device (DMD) is adopted in PIE for large FoV scanning controlled by on/off state coding by DMD. Measurements were implemented using biological samples as well as USAF resolution target, proving high resolution in quantitative imaging using the proposed system. Considering its fast and accurate imaging capability, it is believed the DMD based PIE technique provides a potential solution for medical observation and measurements.

  7. SINGLE FRAME SUPER RESOLUTION OF NONCOOPERATIVE IRIS IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Deshpande

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Image super-resolution, a process to enhance image resolution, has important applications in biometrics, satellite imaging, high definition television, medical imaging, etc. The long range captured iris identification systems often suffer from low resolution and meager focus of the captured iris images. These degrade the iris recognition performance. This paper proposes enhanced iterated back projection (EIBP method to super resolute the long range captured iris polar images. The performance of proposed method is tested and analyzed on CASIA long range iris database by comparing peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR and structural similarity index (SSIM with state-of-the-art super resolution (SR algorithms. It is further analyzed by increasing the up-sampling factor. Performance analysis shows that the proposed method is superior to state-of-the-art algorithms, the peak signal-to-noise ratio improved about 0.1-1.5 dB. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is well suited to super resolve the iris polar images captured at a long distance

  8. Electrical Transport and Low-Frequency Noise in Chemical Vapor Deposited Single-Layer MoS2 Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-18

    PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER Pullickel Ajayan Deepak Sharma, Matin Amani, Abhishek Motayed, Pankaj B. Shah, A. Glen Birdwell, Sina Najmaei, Pulickel...in chemical vapor deposited single-layer MoS2 devices Deepak Sharma1,2, Matin Amani3, Abhishek Motayed2,4, Pankaj B Shah3, A Glen Birdwell3, Sina

  9. Single-cell cloning and expansion of human induced pluripotent stem cells by a microfluidic culture device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Taku; Tatsumi, Kazuya; Noda, Yuichiro; Nakanishi, Naoyuki; Okonogi, Atsuhito; Hirano, Kunio; Li, Liu; Osumi, Takashi; Tada, Takashi; Kotera, Hidetoshi

    2014-10-10

    The microenvironment of cells, which includes basement proteins, shear stress, and extracellular stimuli, should be taken into consideration when examining physiological cell behavior. Although microfluidic devices allow cellular responses to be analyzed with ease at the single-cell level, few have been designed to recover cells. We herein demonstrated that a newly developed microfluidic device helped to improve culture conditions and establish a clonality-validated human pluripotent stem cell line after tracing its growth at the single-cell level. The device will be a helpful tool for capturing various cell types in the human body that have not yet been established in vitro. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dose patient verification during treatment using an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, Lucie

    2006-01-01

    Today, amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (aSi EPID) are currently used to check the accuracy of patient positioning. However, they are not use for dose reconstruction yet and more investigations are required to allow the use of an aSi EPID for routine dosimetric verification. The aim of this work is first to study the dosimetric characteristics of the EPID available at the Institut Curie and then, to check patient dose during treatment using these EPID. First, performance optimization of the Varian aS500 EPID system is studied. Then, a quality assurance system is set up in order to certify the image quality on a daily basis. An additional study on the dosimetric performance of the aS500 EPID is monitored to assess operational stability for dosimetry applications. Electronic portal imaging device is also a useful tool to improve IMRT quality control. The validation and the quality assurance of a portal dose image prediction system for IMRT pre-treatment quality control are performed. All dynamic IMRT fields are verified in clinical routine with the new method based on portal dosimetry. Finally, a new formalism for in vivo dosimetry using transit dose measured with EPID is developed and validated. The absolute dose measurement issue using aSi EPID is described and the midplane dose determination using in vivo dose measurements in combination with portal imaging is used with 3D-conformal-radiation therapy. (author) [fr

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging-compatible tactile sensing device based on a piezoelectric array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Abbi; Masamune, Ken; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho; Lamperth, Michael; Dohi, Takeyoshi

    2012-07-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is a widely used medical technique, one of the drawbacks of which is the loss of direct sense of touch during the operation. Palpation is the use of fingertips to explore and make fast assessments of tissue morphology. Although technologies are developed to equip minimally invasive surgery tools with haptic feedback capabilities, the majority focus on tissue stiffness profiling and tool-tissue interaction force measurement. For greatly increased diagnostic capability, a magnetic resonance imaging-compatible tactile sensor design is proposed, which allows minimally invasive surgery to be performed under image guidance, combining the strong capability of magnetic resonance imaging soft tissue and intuitive palpation. The sensing unit is based on a piezoelectric sensor methodology, which conforms to the stringent mechanical and electrical design requirements imposed by the magnetic resonance environment The sensor mechanical design and the device integration to a 0.2 Tesla open magnetic resonance imaging scanner are described, together with the device's magnetic resonance compatibility testing. Its design limitations and potential future improvements are also discussed. A tactile sensing unit based on a piezoelectric sensor principle is proposed, which is designed for magnetic resonance imaging guided interventions.

  12. Software for X-Ray Images Calculation of Hydrogen Compression Device in Megabar Pressure Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, Nikolay; Bykov, Alexander; Pavlov, Valery

    2007-06-01

    Software for x-ray images simulation is described. The software is a part of x-ray method used for investigation of an equation of state of hydrogen in a megabar pressure range. A graphical interface that clearly and simply allows users to input data for x-ray image calculation: properties of the studied device, parameters of the x-ray radiation source, parameters of the x-ray radiation recorder, the experiment geometry; to represent the calculation results and efficiently transmit them to other software for processing. The calculation time is minimized. This makes it possible to perform calculations in a dialogue regime. The software is written in ``MATLAB'' system.

  13. Study on 3D printer production of auxiliary device for upper limb for medical imaging test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyeong Gyun [Dept. of Radiological Science, Far East University, Eumsung (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Jae Ho [Jukwang Precision Co., Ltd., Gumi (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seong Dae [Dept. of Mechanical system engineering, Kumoh Institute of Technology, Gumi (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    There is a progressive development in the medical imaging technology, especially of descriptive capability for anatomical structure of human body thanks to advancement of information technology and medical devices. But however maintenance of correct posture is essential for the medical imaging checkup on the shoulder joint requiring rotation of the upper limb due to the complexity of human body. In the cases of MRI examination, long duration and fixed posture are critical, as failure to comply with them leads to minimal possibility of reproducibility only with the efforts of the examiner and will of the patient. Thus, this study aimed to develop an auxiliary device that enables rotation of the upper limb as well as fixing it at quantitative angles for medical imaging examination capable of providing diagnostic values. An auxiliary device has been developed based on the results of precedent studies, by designing a 3D model with the CATIA software, an engineering application, and producing it with the 3D printer. The printer is Objet350 Connex from Stratasys, and acrylonitrile- butadiene-styrene(ABS) is used as the material of the device. Dimensions are 120 X 150 X 190 mm, with the inner diameter of the handle being 125.9 mm. The auxiliary device has 4 components including the body (outside), handle (inside), fixture terminal and the connection part. The body and handle have the gap of 2.1 mm for smooth rotation, while the 360 degree of scales have been etched on the handle so that the angle required for observation may be recorded per patient for traceability and dual examination.

  14. Study on 3D printer production of auxiliary device for upper limb for medical imaging test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyeong Gyun; Yoon, Jae Ho; Choi, Seong Dae

    2015-01-01

    There is a progressive development in the medical imaging technology, especially of descriptive capability for anatomical structure of human body thanks to advancement of information technology and medical devices. But however maintenance of correct posture is essential for the medical imaging checkup on the shoulder joint requiring rotation of the upper limb due to the complexity of human body. In the cases of MRI examination, long duration and fixed posture are critical, as failure to comply with them leads to minimal possibility of reproducibility only with the efforts of the examiner and will of the patient. Thus, this study aimed to develop an auxiliary device that enables rotation of the upper limb as well as fixing it at quantitative angles for medical imaging examination capable of providing diagnostic values. An auxiliary device has been developed based on the results of precedent studies, by designing a 3D model with the CATIA software, an engineering application, and producing it with the 3D printer. The printer is Objet350 Connex from Stratasys, and acrylonitrile- butadiene-styrene(ABS) is used as the material of the device. Dimensions are 120 X 150 X 190 mm, with the inner diameter of the handle being 125.9 mm. The auxiliary device has 4 components including the body (outside), handle (inside), fixture terminal and the connection part. The body and handle have the gap of 2.1 mm for smooth rotation, while the 360 degree of scales have been etched on the handle so that the angle required for observation may be recorded per patient for traceability and dual examination

  15. Demonstration of Single-Barium-Ion Sensitivity for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Using Single-Molecule Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, A. D.; Jones, B. J. P.; Nygren, D. R.; Adams, C.; Álvarez, V.; Azevedo, C. D. R.; Benlloch-Rodríguez, J. M.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Botas, A.; Cárcel, S.; Carrión, J. V.; Cebrián, S.; Conde, C. A. N.; Díaz, J.; Diesburg, M.; Escada, J.; Esteve, R.; Felkai, R.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Ferrario, P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Freitas, E. D. C.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; González-Díaz, D.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Guenette, R.; Hafidi, K.; Hauptman, J.; Henriques, C. A. O.; Hernandez, A. I.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Herrero, V.; Johnston, S.; Labarga, L.; Laing, A.; Lebrun, P.; Liubarsky, I.; López-March, N.; Losada, M.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez-Lema, G.; Martínez, A.; Monrabal, F.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Musti, M.; Nebot-Guinot, M.; Novella, P.; Palmeiro, B.; Para, A.; Pérez, J.; Querol, M.; Repond, J.; Renner, J.; Riordan, S.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, J.; Rogers, L.; Santos, F. P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M.; Stiegler, T.; Toledo, J. F.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Webb, R.; White, J. T.; Yahlali, N.; NEXT Collaboration

    2018-03-01

    A new method to tag the barium daughter in the double-beta decay of Xe 136 is reported. Using the technique of single molecule fluorescent imaging (SMFI), individual barium dication (Ba++ ) resolution at a transparent scanning surface is demonstrated. A single-step photobleach confirms the single ion interpretation. Individual ions are localized with superresolution (˜2 nm ), and detected with a statistical significance of 12.9 σ over backgrounds. This lays the foundation for a new and potentially background-free neutrinoless double-beta decay technology, based on SMFI coupled to high pressure xenon gas time projection chambers.

  16. Demonstration of Single-Barium-Ion Sensitivity for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Using Single-Molecule Fluorescence Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, A. D.; Jones, B. J. P.; Nygren, D. R.; Adams, C.; Álvarez, V.; Azevedo, C. D. R.; Benlloch-Rodríguez, J. M.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Botas, A.; Cárcel, S.; Carrión, J. V.; Cebrián, S.; Conde, C. A. N.; Díaz, J.; Diesburg, M.; Escada, J.; Esteve, R.; Felkai, R.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Ferrario, P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Freitas, E. D. C.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; González-Díaz, D.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Guenette, R.; Hafidi, K.; Hauptman, J.; Henriques, C. A. O.; Hernandez, A. I.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Herrero, V.; Johnston, S.; Labarga, L.; Laing, A.; Lebrun, P.; Liubarsky, I.; López-March, N.; Losada, M.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez-Lema, G.; Martínez, A.; Monrabal, F.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Musti, M.; Nebot-Guinot, M.; Novella, P.; Palmeiro, B.; Para, A.; Pérez, J.; Querol, M.; Repond, J.; Renner, J.; Riordan, S.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, J.; Rogers, L.; Santos, F. P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M.; Stiegler, T.; Toledo, J. F.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Webb, R.; White, J. T.; Yahlali, N.

    2018-03-01

    A new method to tag the barium daughter in the double beta decay of $^{136}$Xe is reported. Using the technique of single molecule fluorescent imaging (SMFI), individual barium dication (Ba$^{++}$) resolution at a transparent scanning surface has been demonstrated. A single-step photo-bleach confirms the single ion interpretation. Individual ions are localized with super-resolution ($\\sim$2~nm), and detected with a statistical significance of 12.9~$\\sigma$ over backgrounds. This lays the foundation for a new and potentially background-free neutrinoless double beta decay technology, based on SMFI coupled to high pressure xenon gas time projection chambers.

  17. Development of Measurement Device of Working Radius of Crane Based on Single CCD Camera and Laser Range Finder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nara, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Satoru

    In this paper, what we want to do is to develop an observation device to measure the working radius of a crane truck. The device has a single CCD camera, a laser range finder and two AC servo motors. First, in order to measure the working radius, we need to consider algorithm of a crane hook recognition. Then, we attach the cross mark on the crane hook. Namely, instead of the crane hook, we try to recognize the cross mark. Further, for the observation device, we construct PI control system with an extended Kalman filter to track the moving cross mark. Through experiments, we show the usefulness of our device including new control system of mark tracking.

  18. A versatile nanotechnology to connect individual nano-objects for the fabrication of hybrid single-electron devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernand-Mantel, A; Bouzehouane, K; Seneor, P; Fusil, S; Deranlot, C; Petroff, F; Fert, A; Brenac, A; Notin, L; Morel, R

    2010-01-01

    We report on the high yield connection of single nano-objects as small as a few nanometres in diameter to separately elaborated metallic electrodes, using a 'table-top' nanotechnology. Single-electron transport measurements validate that transport occurs through a single nano-object. The vertical geometry of the device natively allows an independent choice of materials for each electrode and the nano-object. In addition ferromagnetic materials can be used without encountering oxidation problems. The possibility of elaborating such hybrid nanodevices opens new routes for the democratization of spintronic studies in low dimensions.

  19. Discrete Event Simulation Model of the Polaris 2.1 Gamma Ray Imaging Radiation Detection Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    release; distribution is unlimited DISCRETE EVENT SIMULATION MODEL OF THE POLARIS 2.1 GAMMA RAY IMAGING RADIATION DETECTION DEVICE by Andres T...ONLY (Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE June 2016 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DISCRETE EVENT SIMULATION MODEL...modeled. The platform, Simkit, was utilized to create a discrete event simulation (DES) model of the Polaris. After carefully constructing the DES

  20. A device for identification of respective images in orthogonal localization roentgenograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganchev, M.

    1977-01-01

    Some problems which might be solved with the device, originally intended for localization of implanted radioactive wires, include: conjugation check-up of orthogonal localization roentgenograms; localization of partially screened radioactive sources in the patient body; localization of Fletcher's trapezium points in the pelvis; identification of the respective images of contrast filled lymph nodes and localization of some bone hallmarks, visible only on one of two localization roentgenograms. (author)

  1. Reliability of measuring pelvic floor elevation with a diagnostic ultrasonic imaging device

    OpenAIRE

    Ubukata, Hitomi; Maruyama, Hitoshi; Huo, Ming

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability of measuring the amount of pelvic floor elevation during pelvic and abdominal muscle contraction with a diagnostic ultrasonic imaging device. [Subjects] The study group comprised 11 healthy women without urinary incontinence or previous birth experience. [Methods] We measured the displacement elevation of the bladder base during contraction of the abdominal and pelvic floor muscles was measured using a diagnostic ultrasoni...

  2. Real-time volume rendering of digital medical images on an iOS device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noon, Christian; Holub, Joseph; Winer, Eliot

    2013-03-01

    Performing high quality 3D visualizations on mobile devices, while tantalizingly close in many areas, is still a quite difficult task. This is especially true for 3D volume rendering of digital medical images. Allowing this would empower medical personnel a powerful tool to diagnose and treat patients and train the next generation of physicians. This research focuses on performing real time volume rendering of digital medical images on iOS devices using custom developed GPU shaders for orthogonal texture slicing. An interactive volume renderer was designed and developed with several new features including dynamic modification of render resolutions, an incremental render loop, a shader-based clipping algorithm to support OpenGL ES 2.0, and an internal backface culling algorithm for properly sorting rendered geometry with alpha blending. The application was developed using several application programming interfaces (APIs) such as OpenSceneGraph (OSG) as the primary graphics renderer coupled with iOS Cocoa Touch for user interaction, and DCMTK for DICOM I/O. The developed application rendered volume datasets over 450 slices up to 50-60 frames per second, depending on the specific model of the iOS device. All rendering is done locally on the device so no Internet connection is required.

  3. Defect Characterization, Imaging, and Control in Wide-Bandgap Semiconductors and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillson, L. J.; Foster, G. M.; Cox, J.; Ruane, W. T.; Jarjour, A. B.; Gao, H.; von Wenckstern, H.; Grundmann, M.; Wang, B.; Look, D. C.; Hyland, A.; Allen, M. W.

    2018-03-01

    Wide-bandgap semiconductors are now leading the way to new physical phenomena and device applications at nanoscale dimensions. The impact of defects on the electronic properties of these materials increases as their size decreases, motivating new techniques to characterize and begin to control these electronic states. Leading these advances have been the semiconductors ZnO, GaN, and related materials. This paper highlights the importance of native point defects in these semiconductors and describes how a complement of spatially localized surface science and spectroscopy techniques in three dimensions can characterize, image, and begin to control these electronic states at the nanoscale. A combination of characterization techniques including depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy, surface photovoltage spectroscopy, and hyperspectral imaging can describe the nature and distribution of defects at interfaces at both bulk and nanoscale surfaces, their metal interfaces, and inside nanostructures themselves. These features as well as temperature and mechanical strain inside wide-bandgap device structures at the nanoscale can be measured even while these devices are operating. These advanced capabilities enable several new directions for describing defects at the nanoscale, showing how they contribute to device degradation, and guiding growth processes to control them.

  4. Mosaicing of single plane illumination microscopy images using groupwise registration and fast content-based image fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preibisch, Stephan; Rohlfing, Torsten; Hasak, Michael P.; Tomancak, Pavel

    2008-03-01

    Single Plane Illumination Microscopy (SPIM; Huisken et al., Nature 305(5686):1007-1009, 2004) is an emerging microscopic technique that enables live imaging of large biological specimens in their entirety. By imaging the living biological sample from multiple angles SPIM has the potential to achieve isotropic resolution throughout even relatively large biological specimens. For every angle, however, only a relatively shallow section of the specimen is imaged with high resolution, whereas deeper regions appear increasingly blurred. In order to produce a single, uniformly high resolution image, we propose here an image mosaicing algorithm that combines state of the art groupwise image registration for alignment with content-based image fusion to prevent degrading of the fused image due to regional blurring of the input images. For the registration stage, we introduce an application-specific groupwise transformation model that incorporates per-image as well as groupwise transformation parameters. We also propose a new fusion algorithm based on Gaussian filters, which is substantially faster than fusion based on local image entropy. We demonstrate the performance of our mosaicing method on data acquired from living embryos of the fruit fly, Drosophila, using four and eight angle acquisitions.

  5. Treatment of intracranial aneurysms by flow diverter devices: Long-term results from a single center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briganti, Francesco; Napoli, Manuela; Leone, Giuseppe; Marseglia, Mariano; Mariniello, Giuseppe; Caranci, Ferdinando; Tortora, Fabio; Maiuri, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We report the long-term results (2–4 years) with Flow Diverter Devices (FDD) from a single-center. • We recommend the use of FDD for large-neck aneurysms of the ICA syphon. • We think that more sophisticate FDD will reduce the incidence of technical adverse events. - Abstract: Objectives: Flow-Diverter Devices (FDD) are a new generation stents designed for the treatment of the intracranial aneurysms. This article reports the long-term results (2–4 years) of this treatment from a single-center. Methods: From November 2008 to January 2012, 35 patients (29 females and 6 males; mean age 53.9 y) with 39 intracranial aneurysms were treated by FDD. Five patients (14.3%) had ruptured aneurysms and 30 (85.7%) had no previous hemorrhage. The procedures were performed in 5 patients (14.3%) with SILK and in 30 (85.7%) with PED. In 3 patients FDDs were used as a second treatment after failure of previous coiling (2 cases) or stenting (one case). The 39 aneurysms were in supraclinoid ICA in 26 (66.7%), cavernous ICA in 2 (5.1%), PCoA in 4 (10.2%), MCA in 5 (12.9%), SCA in 1 (2.6%) and PICA in 1 (2.6%). The aneurysms were small (<10 mm) in 32 cases (82%), large (11–25 mm) in 6 (15.3%) and giant in 1 (2.6%). The occlusion rate according to the aneurysm location, size and neck and the complications were evaluated. Results: Peri-procedural complications included transient dysarthria (2 patients), vasospasm with acute intra-stent aggregation (one), microwire rupture (one) and failure of the stent opening (one). The follow-up was made between 24 and 62 months (mean 41 months); clinical examination and CTA were performed at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after the procedure. The complete occlusion was confirmed by CTA and DSA. MRI with angiographic-studies was taken every year. Complete occlusion was obtained in 35 aneurysms (92.1%) and subtotal in 3 (7.9%). Complete occlusion occurred at 3 months in 24 cases (68.6%), within 3 and 6 months in 9 (25.7%). The rate and

  6. Treatment of intracranial aneurysms by flow diverter devices: Long-term results from a single center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briganti, Francesco, E-mail: frabriga@unina.it [Unit of Interventional Neuroradiology, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, “Federico II” University, Via S.Pansini 5., 80131 Naples (Italy); Napoli, Manuela, E-mail: napoli.manuela@gmail.com [Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, “Federico II” University, Via S.Pansini 5., 80131 Naples (Italy); Leone, Giuseppe, E-mail: g.leonemd@gmail.com [Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, “Federico II” University, Via S.Pansini 5., 80131 Naples (Italy); Marseglia, Mariano, E-mail: mariano-marseglia@libero.it [Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, “Federico II” University, Via S.Pansini 5., 80131 Naples (Italy); Mariniello, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe.mariniello@unina.it [Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosciences, Reproductive and Odontostomatological Sciences, “Federico II” University, Via S.Pansini 5., 80131 Naples (Italy); Caranci, Ferdinando, E-mail: ferdinando.caranci@unina.it [Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, “Federico II” University, Via S.Pansini 5., 80131 Naples (Italy); Tortora, Fabio, E-mail: fabiotor@libero.it [Chair of Neuroradiology, “Magrassi Lanzara” Clinical-Surgical Department, Second University of Naples, Viale Colli Aminei 21, 80131 Naples (Italy); Maiuri, Francesco, E-mail: frmaiuri@unina.it [Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosciences, Reproductive and Odontostomatological Sciences, “Federico II” University, Via S.Pansini 5., 80131 Naples (Italy)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • We report the long-term results (2–4 years) with Flow Diverter Devices (FDD) from a single-center. • We recommend the use of FDD for large-neck aneurysms of the ICA syphon. • We think that more sophisticate FDD will reduce the incidence of technical adverse events. - Abstract: Objectives: Flow-Diverter Devices (FDD) are a new generation stents designed for the treatment of the intracranial aneurysms. This article reports the long-term results (2–4 years) of this treatment from a single-center. Methods: From November 2008 to January 2012, 35 patients (29 females and 6 males; mean age 53.9 y) with 39 intracranial aneurysms were treated by FDD. Five patients (14.3%) had ruptured aneurysms and 30 (85.7%) had no previous hemorrhage. The procedures were performed in 5 patients (14.3%) with SILK and in 30 (85.7%) with PED. In 3 patients FDDs were used as a second treatment after failure of previous coiling (2 cases) or stenting (one case). The 39 aneurysms were in supraclinoid ICA in 26 (66.7%), cavernous ICA in 2 (5.1%), PCoA in 4 (10.2%), MCA in 5 (12.9%), SCA in 1 (2.6%) and PICA in 1 (2.6%). The aneurysms were small (<10 mm) in 32 cases (82%), large (11–25 mm) in 6 (15.3%) and giant in 1 (2.6%). The occlusion rate according to the aneurysm location, size and neck and the complications were evaluated. Results: Peri-procedural complications included transient dysarthria (2 patients), vasospasm with acute intra-stent aggregation (one), microwire rupture (one) and failure of the stent opening (one). The follow-up was made between 24 and 62 months (mean 41 months); clinical examination and CTA were performed at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after the procedure. The complete occlusion was confirmed by CTA and DSA. MRI with angiographic-studies was taken every year. Complete occlusion was obtained in 35 aneurysms (92.1%) and subtotal in 3 (7.9%). Complete occlusion occurred at 3 months in 24 cases (68.6%), within 3 and 6 months in 9 (25.7%). The rate and

  7. Measuring the energy consumption of single-phase UPS-devices; Energiemessungen von 1-phasigen USV-Anlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, E. [Bush Energie GmbH, Felsberg (Switzerland); Schalcher, M.; Bruggmann, T.; Kuehne, P.; Kammermann, S. [Hochschule fuer Technik und Wirtschaft Chur, Chur (Switzerland)

    2007-11-15

    In the present measuring project, 46 single-phase uninterruptible power supplies (UPS-devices) in the power range from 350 VA up to 3000 VA could be measured with regard to efficiency and energy consumption, at Testlabor S.A.L.T., Chur, Switzerland. The classification into VFD-, VI- and VFI-devices as well as the carrying out of the measuring was accomplished in compliance with IEC 62040-3 with resistive and nonlinear load. As expected, the VFD-devices showed the best efficiency level, followed by VI- and VFI-devices. The efficiency rate at 50%, 75% and 100% of the nominal power differs only slightly and in most cases exceeds 90%. However, at a load of 25% the efficiency decreases considerably (in individual cases to below 80%). There are large differences in the area of standby losses (switched on, without load) which can only partly be explained by the different technologies of the various types of UPS-devices. Compared to the Code of Conduct for UPS-devices with a power of more than 10 kVA, the devices with lower power compare relatively well, especially because of the small power demands for cooling. (author)

  8. Mapping the Salinity Gradient in a Microfluidic Device with Schlieren Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-li Sun

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the use of the schlieren imaging to quantify the salinity gradients in a microfluidic device. By partially blocking the back focal plane of the objective lens, the schlieren microscope produces an image with patterns that correspond to spatial derivative of refractive index in the specimen. Since salinity variation leads to change in refractive index, the fluid mixing of an aqueous salt solution of a known concentration and water in a T-microchannel is used to establish the relation between salinity gradients and grayscale readouts. This relation is then employed to map the salinity gradients in the target microfluidic device from the grayscale readouts of the corresponding micro-schlieren image. For saline solution with salinity close to that of the seawater, the grayscale readouts vary linearly with the salinity gradient, and the regression line is independent of the flow condition and the salinity of the injected solution. It is shown that the schlieren technique is well suited to quantify the salinity gradients in microfluidic devices, for it provides a spatially resolved, non-invasive, full-field measurement.

  9. Trial making of a positive drawing phantom and its application to whole-body imaging devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saegusa, Kenji; Arimizu, Noboru; Nakata, Tsuneo; Toyama, Haruo; Shiina, Isamu.

    1980-01-01

    In whole-body RI imaging, there are more instances of the positive pictures detecting the radioisotopes accumulating in morbid positions, such as Tc-99m bone scanning. The phantoms used to mutually compare RI imaging devices and to test their performance employ negative drawing targets embedded rather than positive ones. A simple positive drawing phantom has been made for trial, and applying this to whole-body scanning devices, the performance and the target drawing ability under different scanning conditions were comparatively examined. Though similar to Rollo's phantom, the phantom made for positive drawing uses acryl plate for its outer structure and target portions. The positive targets are cylindrical, and the diameters are 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 20 mm, and the subject contrasts are 5, 2, 1, 0.5 and 0.2. The aqueous solution of Tc-99m of about 2 mCi was injected into the phantom, and this was scanned with a whole-body camera and a multi-detector type whole-body scanner. With the phantom pictures close to actual clinical condition, the positive drawing phantom is conveniently capable of comparing the respective imaging devices for intended purposes. (J.P.N.)

  10. Single-photon compressive imaging with some performance benefits over raster scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Wen-Kai; Liu, Xue-Feng; Yao, Xu-Ri; Wang, Chao; Zhai, Guang-Jie; Zhao, Qing

    2014-01-01

    A single-photon imaging system based on compressed sensing has been developed to image objects under ultra-low illumination. With this system, we have successfully realized imaging at the single-photon level with a single-pixel avalanche photodiode without point-by-point raster scanning. From analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio in the measurement we find that our system has much higher sensitivity than conventional ones based on point-by-point raster scanning, while the measurement time is also reduced. - Highlights: • We design a single photon imaging system with compressed sensing. • A single point avalanche photodiode is used without raster scanning. • The Poisson shot noise in the measurement is analyzed. • The sensitivity of our system is proved to be higher than that of raster scanning

  11. Urgent surgical management for embolized occluder devices in childhood: single center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokaslan Gokhan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study, we sought to analyze our experience in urgent surgical management for embolized cardiac septal and ductal occluder devices resulting from trans-catheter closure of atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect and patent ductus arteriosus in childhood patient group. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 9 patients (aged 2–15 years who underwent urgent surgery due to cardiac septal and ductal occluder embolization between January 2007 and December 2010. Congenital defects were atrial septal defect (n = 6, ventricular septal defect (n = 1, and patent ductus arteriosus (n = 2. Risk factors for device embolization and urgent surgical management techniques for embolized device removal were discussed. Results Removal of embolized devices in all cases and repair of damaged tricuspid valve in 2 patients were performed. Inevitably, all congenital defects were closed or ligated up to the primary defect. Total circulator arrest necessitated in 1 patient with ascending aortic device embolization. All operations were completed successfully and no hospital mortality or morbidity was encountered. Conclusions Although closure of left to right shunting defects by percutaneous occluder devices has a lot of advantages, device embolization is still a major complication. If embolized device retrieval fails with percutaneous intervention attempts, surgical management is the only method to remove embolized devices. In this circumstance, to provide an uneventful perioperative course, urgent management strategies should be well planned.

  12. An MR-compatible device for delivering smoked marijuana during functional imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Blaise deB; Lindsey, Kimberly P; Nickerson, Lisa D; Ryan, Elizabeth T; Lukas, Scott E

    2007-05-01

    Smoking is the preferred method of administration for two of the most frequently abused drugs, marijuana and nicotine. The high temporal and spatial resolution of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) make it a natural choice for studying the neurobiological effects of smoked drugs if the challenges of smoking in a magnetic resonance (MR) scanner can be overcome. We report on a design for an MR-compatible smoking device that can be used for smoking marijuana (or tobacco) during fMRI examinations. Nine volunteers smoked marijuana cigarettes (3.51% Delta9-THC) on two occasions: with and without the device. The device allowed subjects to smoke while they lay in the scanner, while containing all smoke and odors. Plasma Delta9-THC, subjective reports of intoxication, and heart rate increases are reported, and were all similar in individuals smoking marijuana either with or without the device. The use of this device will help advance research studies on smoked drugs including marijuana, tobacco and crack cocaine.

  13. Single photon imaging and timing array sensor apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. Clayton

    2003-06-24

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for generating a three-dimension image of an object or target. The apparatus is comprised of a photon source for emitting a photon at a target. The emitted photons are received by a photon receiver for receiving the photon when reflected from the target. The photon receiver determines a reflection time of the photon and further determines an arrival position of the photon on the photon receiver. An analyzer is communicatively coupled to the photon receiver, wherein the analyzer generates a three-dimensional image of the object based upon the reflection time and the arrival position.

  14. Measuring diffusion-relaxation correlation maps using non-uniform field gradients of single-sided NMR devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira d'Eurydice, Marcel; Galvosas, Petrik

    2014-11-01

    Single-sided NMR systems are becoming a relevant tool in industry and laboratory environments due to their low cost, low maintenance and capacity to evaluate quantity and quality of hydrogen based materials. The performance of such devices has improved significantly over the last decade, providing increased field homogeneity, field strength and even controlled static field gradients. For a class of these devices, the configuration of the permanent magnets provides a linear variation of the magnetic field and can be used in diffusion measurements. However, magnet design depends directly on its application and, according to the purpose, the field homogeneity may significantly be compromised. This may prevent the determination of diffusion properties of fluids based on the natural inhomogeneity of the field using known techniques. This work introduces a new approach that extends the applicability of diffusion-editing CPMG experiments to NMR devices with highly inhomogeneous magnetic fields, which do not vary linearly in space. Herein, we propose a method to determine a custom diffusion kernel based on the gradient distribution, which can be seen as a signature of each NMR device. This new diffusion kernel is then utilised in the 2D inverse Laplace transform (2D ILT) in order to determine diffusion-relaxation correlation maps of homogeneous multi-phasic fluids. The experiments were performed using NMR MObile Lateral Explore (MOLE), which is a single-sided NMR device designed to maximise the volume at the sweet spot with enhanced depth penetration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. TU-A-12A-02: Novel Lung Ventilation Imaging with Single Energy CT After Single Inhalation of Xenon: Comparison with SPECT Ventilation Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negahdar, M [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Yamamoto, T [UC Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Shultz, D; Gable, L; Shan, X; Mittra, E; Loo, B; Maxim, P [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Diehn, M [Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We propose a novel lung functional imaging method to determine the spatial distribution of xenon (Xe) gas in a single inhalation as a measure of regional ventilation. We compare Xe-CT ventilation to single-photon emission CT (SPECT) ventilation, which is the current clinical reference. Regional lung ventilation information may be useful for the diagnosis and monitoring of pulmonary diseases such as COPD, radiotherapy planning, and assessing the progression of toxicity after radiation therapy. Methods: In an IRB-approved clinical study, Xe-CT and SPECT ventilation scans were acquired for three patients including one patient with severe emphysema and two lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. For Xe- CT, we acquired two breath-hold single energy CT images of the entire lung with inspiration of 100% O2 and a mixture of 70% Xe and 30% O2, respectively. A video biofeedback system was used to achieve reproducible breath-holds. We used deformable image registration to align the breathhold images with each other to accurately subtract them, producing a map of the distribution of Xe as a surrogate of lung ventilation. We divided each lung into twelve parts and correlated the Hounsfield unit (HU) enhancement at each part with the SPECT ventilation count of the corresponding part of the lung. Results: The mean of the Pearson linear correlation coefficient values between the Xe-CT and ventilation SPECT count for all three patients were 0.62 (p<0.01). The Xe-CT image had a higher resolution than SPECT, and did not show central airway deposition artifacts that were present in the SPECT image. Conclusion: We developed a rapid, safe, clinically practical, and potentially widely accessible method for regional lung functional imaging. We demonstrated strong correlations between the Xe-CT ventilation image and SPECT ventilation image as the clinical reference. This ongoing study will investigate more patients to confirm this finding.

  16. TU-A-12A-02: Novel Lung Ventilation Imaging with Single Energy CT After Single Inhalation of Xenon: Comparison with SPECT Ventilation Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negahdar, M; Yamamoto, T; Shultz, D; Gable, L; Shan, X; Mittra, E; Loo, B; Maxim, P; Diehn, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: We propose a novel lung functional imaging method to determine the spatial distribution of xenon (Xe) gas in a single inhalation as a measure of regional ventilation. We compare Xe-CT ventilation to single-photon emission CT (SPECT) ventilation, which is the current clinical reference. Regional lung ventilation information may be useful for the diagnosis and monitoring of pulmonary diseases such as COPD, radiotherapy planning, and assessing the progression of toxicity after radiation therapy. Methods: In an IRB-approved clinical study, Xe-CT and SPECT ventilation scans were acquired for three patients including one patient with severe emphysema and two lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. For Xe- CT, we acquired two breath-hold single energy CT images of the entire lung with inspiration of 100% O2 and a mixture of 70% Xe and 30% O2, respectively. A video biofeedback system was used to achieve reproducible breath-holds. We used deformable image registration to align the breathhold images with each other to accurately subtract them, producing a map of the distribution of Xe as a surrogate of lung ventilation. We divided each lung into twelve parts and correlated the Hounsfield unit (HU) enhancement at each part with the SPECT ventilation count of the corresponding part of the lung. Results: The mean of the Pearson linear correlation coefficient values between the Xe-CT and ventilation SPECT count for all three patients were 0.62 (p<0.01). The Xe-CT image had a higher resolution than SPECT, and did not show central airway deposition artifacts that were present in the SPECT image. Conclusion: We developed a rapid, safe, clinically practical, and potentially widely accessible method for regional lung functional imaging. We demonstrated strong correlations between the Xe-CT ventilation image and SPECT ventilation image as the clinical reference. This ongoing study will investigate more patients to confirm this finding

  17. Synchrotron Bragg diffraction imaging characterization of synthetic diamond crystals for optical and electronic power device applications1 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Thi, Thu Nhi; Morse, J.; Caliste, D.; Fernandez, B.; Eon, D.; Härtwig, J.; Mer-Calfati, C.; Tranchant, N.; Arnault, J. C.; Lafford, T. A.; Baruchel, J.

    2017-01-01

    Bragg diffraction imaging enables the quality of synthetic single-crystal diamond substrates and their overgrown, mostly doped, diamond layers to be characterized. This is very important for improving diamond-based devices produced for X-ray optics and power electronics applications. The usual first step for this characterization is white-beam X-ray diffraction topography, which is a simple and fast method to identify the extended defects (dislocations, growth sectors, boundaries, stacking faults, overall curvature etc.) within the crystal. This allows easy and quick comparison of the crystal quality of diamond plates available from various commercial suppliers. When needed, rocking curve imaging (RCI) is also employed, which is the quantitative counterpart of monochromatic Bragg diffraction imaging. RCI enables the local determination of both the effective misorientation, which results from lattice parameter variation and the local lattice tilt, and the local Bragg position. Maps derived from these parameters are used to measure the magnitude of the distortions associated with polishing damage and the depth of this damage within the volume of the crystal. For overgrown layers, these maps also reveal the distortion induced by the incorporation of impurities such as boron, or the lattice parameter variations associated with the presence of growth-incorporated nitrogen. These techniques are described, and their capabilities for studying the quality of diamond substrates and overgrown layers, and the surface damage caused by mechanical polishing, are illustrated by examples. PMID:28381981

  18. Streak camera imaging of single photons at telecom wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgaier, Markus; Ansari, Vahid; Eigner, Christof; Quiring, Viktor; Ricken, Raimund; Donohue, John Matthew; Czerniuk, Thomas; Aßmann, Marc; Bayer, Manfred; Brecht, Benjamin; Silberhorn, Christine

    2018-01-01

    Streak cameras are powerful tools for temporal characterization of ultrafast light pulses, even at the single-photon level. However, the low signal-to-noise ratio in the infrared range prevents measurements on weak light sources in the telecom regime. We present an approach to circumvent this problem, utilizing an up-conversion process in periodically poled waveguides in Lithium Niobate. We convert single photons from a parametric down-conversion source in order to reach the point of maximum detection efficiency of commercially available streak cameras. We explore phase-matching configurations to apply the up-conversion scheme in real-world applications.

  19. Video-rate confocal microscopy for single-molecule imaging in live cells and superresolution fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinwoo; Miyanaga, Yukihiro; Ueda, Masahiro; Hohng, Sungchul

    2012-10-17

    There is no confocal microscope optimized for single-molecule imaging in live cells and superresolution fluorescence imaging. By combining the swiftness of the line-scanning method and the high sensitivity of wide-field detection, we have developed a, to our knowledge, novel confocal fluorescence microscope with a good optical-sectioning capability (1.0 μm), fast frame rates (fluorescence detection efficiency. Full compatibility of the microscope with conventional cell-imaging techniques allowed us to do single-molecule imaging with a great ease at arbitrary depths of live cells. With the new microscope, we monitored diffusion motion of fluorescently labeled cAMP receptors of Dictyostelium discoideum at both the basal and apical surfaces and obtained superresolution fluorescence images of microtubules of COS-7 cells at depths in the range 0-85 μm from the surface of a coverglass. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 3D FaceCam: a fast and accurate 3D facial imaging device for biometrics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jason; Zhuang, Ping; May, Patrick; Yi, Steven; Tunnell, David

    2004-08-01

    Human faces are fundamentally three-dimensional (3D) objects, and each face has its unique 3D geometric profile. The 3D geometric features of a human face can be used, together with its 2D texture, for rapid and accurate face recognition purposes. Due to the lack of low-cost and robust 3D sensors and effective 3D facial recognition (FR) algorithms, almost all existing FR systems use 2D face images. Genex has developed 3D solutions that overcome the inherent problems in 2D while also addressing limitations in other 3D alternatives. One important aspect of our solution is a unique 3D camera (the 3D FaceCam) that combines multiple imaging sensors within a single compact device to provide instantaneous, ear-to-ear coverage of a human face. This 3D camera uses three high-resolution CCD sensors and a color encoded pattern projection system. The RGB color information from each pixel is used to compute the range data and generate an accurate 3D surface map. The imaging system uses no moving parts and combines multiple 3D views to provide detailed and complete 3D coverage of the entire face. Images are captured within a fraction of a second and full-frame 3D data is produced within a few seconds. This described method provides much better data coverage and accuracy in feature areas with sharp features or details (such as the nose and eyes). Using this 3D data, we have been able to demonstrate that a 3D approach can significantly improve the performance of facial recognition. We have conducted tests in which we have varied the lighting conditions and angle of image acquisition in the "field." These tests have shown that the matching results are significantly improved when enrolling a 3D image rather than a single 2D image. With its 3D solutions, Genex is working toward unlocking the promise of powerful 3D FR and transferring FR from a lab technology into a real-world biometric solution.

  1. Imaging and manipulation of single viruses by atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baclayon, M.; Wuite, G. J. L.; Roos, W. H.

    2010-01-01

    The recent developments in virus research and the application of functional viral particles in nanotechnology and medicine rely on sophisticated imaging and manipulation techniques at nanometre resolution in liquid, air and vacuum. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a tool that combines these

  2. Variational Histogram Equalization for Single Color Image Defogging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Foggy images taken in the bad weather inevitably suffer from contrast loss and color distortion. Existing defogging methods merely resort to digging out an accurate scene transmission in ignorance of their unpleasing distortion and high complexity. Different from previous works, we propose a simple but powerful method based on histogram equalization and the physical degradation model. By revising two constraints in a variational histogram equalization framework, the intensity component of a fog-free image can be estimated in HSI color space, since the airlight is inferred through a color attenuation prior in advance. To cut down the time consumption, a general variation filter is proposed to obtain a numerical solution from the revised framework. After getting the estimated intensity component, it is easy to infer the saturation component from the physical degradation model in saturation channel. Accordingly, the fog-free image can be restored with the estimated intensity and saturation components. In the end, the proposed method is tested on several foggy images and assessed by two no-reference indexes. Experimental results reveal that our method is relatively superior to three groups of relevant and state-of-the-art defogging methods.

  3. Operational Data Augmentation in Classifying Single Aerial Images of Animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okafor, Emmanuel; Smit, Rik; Schomaker, Lambertus; Wiering, Marco

    2017-01-01

    In deep learning, data augmentation is important to increase the amount of training images to obtain higher classification accuracies. Most data-augmentation methods adopt the use of the following techniques: cropping, mirroring, color casting, scaling and rotation for creating additional training

  4. A natural-color mapping for single-band night-time image based on FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yilun; Qian, Yunsheng

    2018-01-01

    A natural-color mapping for single-band night-time image method based on FPGA can transmit the color of the reference image to single-band night-time image, which is consistent with human visual habits and can help observers identify the target. This paper introduces the processing of the natural-color mapping algorithm based on FPGA. Firstly, the image can be transformed based on histogram equalization, and the intensity features and standard deviation features of reference image are stored in SRAM. Then, the real-time digital images' intensity features and standard deviation features are calculated by FPGA. At last, FPGA completes the color mapping through matching pixels between images using the features in luminance channel.

  5. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  6. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems

  7. Spherical gradient-index lenses as perfect imaging and maximum power transfer devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, J M

    2000-08-01

    Gradient-index lenses can be viewed from the perspectives of both imaging and nonimaging optics, that is, in terms of both image fidelity and achievable flux concentration. The simple class of gradient-index lenses with spherical symmetry, often referred to as modified Luneburg lenses, is revisited. An alternative derivation for established solutions is offered; the method of Fermat's strings and the principle of skewness conservation are invoked. Then these nominally perfect imaging devices are examined from the additional vantage point of power transfer, and the degree to which they realize the thermodynamic limit to flux concentration is determined. Finally, the spherical gradient-index lens of the fish eye is considered as a modified Luneburg lens optimized subject to material constraints.

  8. High and tunable spin current induced by magnetic-electric fields in a single-mode spintronic device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bala Kumar, S; Jalil, M B A; Tan, S G; Liang, G-C

    2009-01-01

    We proposed that a viable form of spin current transistor is one to be made from a single-mode device which passes electrons through a series of magnetic-electric barriers built into the device. The barriers assume a wavy spatial profile across the conduction path due to the inevitable broadening of the magnetic fields. Field broadening results in a linearly increasing vector potential across the conduction channel, which increases spin polarization. We have identified that the important factors for generating high spin polarization and conductance modulation are the low source-drain bias, the broadened magnetic fields, and the high number of FM gates within a fixed channel length.

  9. Nd-doped Lu3Al5O12 single-crystal scintillator for X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Makoto; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Yanagida, Takayuki; Totsuka, Daisuke; Chani, Valery; Yokota, Yuui; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2013-01-01

    The optical and scintillation properties of Nd-doped Lu 3 Al 5 O 12 (Nd:LuAG) crystals grown by the Czochralski (Cz) method were examined under X-ray excitation. Their applicability for X-ray imaging was also inspected. The radioluminescence spectrum induced by X-rays showed a broad host emission and sharp Nd 3+ 4f–4f emission peaks in the UV to visible wavelengths. The light output current of the Nd:LuAG was 85% of that of a standard CdWO 4 X-ray scintillator. The afterglow value measured 20 ms after X-ray irradiation was 1.5%. An X-ray radiographic image was successfully obtained using the Nd:LuAG scintillator coupled with the charge coupled device (CCD) photodetector. -- Highlights: ► The Nd:LuAG single crystal was produced to perform X-ray imaging test. ► The sample exhibited the 85% light output current of the standard CdWO 4 . ► The afterglow intensity of the sample was very high compared with the CdWO 4 . ► The X-ray radiographic image was obtained from the Nd:LuAG single crystal

  10. Device model for pixelless infrared image up-converters based on polycrystalline graphene heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhii, V.; Shur, M. S.; Ryzhii, M.; Karasik, V. E.; Otsuji, T.

    2018-01-01

    We developed a device model for pixelless converters of far/mid-infrared radiation (FIR/MIR) images into near-infrared/visible (NIR/VIR) images. These converters use polycrystalline graphene layers (PGLs) immersed in the van der Waals materials integrated with a light emitting diode (LED). The PGL serves as an element of the PGL infrared photodetector (PGLIP) sensitive to the incoming FIR/MIR due to the interband absorption. The spatially non-uniform photocurrent generated in the PGLIP repeats (mimics) the non-uniform distribution (image) created by the incident FIR/MIR. The injection of the nonuniform photocurrent into the LED active layer results in the nonuniform NIR/VIR image reproducing the FIR/MIR image. The PGL and the entire layer structure are not deliberately partitioned into pixels. We analyze the characteristics of such pixelless PGLIP-LED up-converters and show that their image contrast transfer function and the up-conversion efficiency depend on the PGL lateral resistivity. The up-converter exhibits high photoconductive gain and conversion efficiency when the lateral resistivity is sufficiently high. Several teams have successfully demonstrated the large area PGLs with the resistivities varying in a wide range. Such layers can be used in the pixelless PGLIP-LED image up-converters. The PGLIP-LED image up-converters can substantially surpass the image up-converters based on the quantum-well infrared photodetector integrated with the LED. These advantages are due to the use of the interband FIR/NIR absorption and a high photoconductive gain in the GLIPs.

  11. An image compression method for space multispectral time delay and integration charge coupled device camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jin; Jin Long-Xu; Zhang Ran-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Multispectral time delay and integration charge coupled device (TDICCD) image compression requires a low-complexity encoder because it is usually completed on board where the energy and memory are limited. The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) has proposed an image data compression (CCSDS-IDC) algorithm which is so far most widely implemented in hardware. However, it cannot reduce spectral redundancy in multispectral images. In this paper, we propose a low-complexity improved CCSDS-IDC (ICCSDS-IDC)-based distributed source coding (DSC) scheme for multispectral TDICCD image consisting of a few bands. Our scheme is based on an ICCSDS-IDC approach that uses a bit plane extractor to parse the differences in the original image and its wavelet transformed coefficient. The output of bit plane extractor will be encoded by a first order entropy coder. Low-density parity-check-based Slepian—Wolf (SW) coder is adopted to implement the DSC strategy. Experimental results on space multispectral TDICCD images show that the proposed scheme significantly outperforms the CCSDS-IDC-based coder in each band

  12. An open-source, programmable pneumatic setup for operation and automated control of single- and multi-layer microfluidic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara Brower

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidic technologies have been used across diverse disciplines (e.g. high-throughput biological measurement, fluid physics, laboratory fluid manipulation but widespread adoption has been limited in part due to the lack of openly disseminated resources that enable non-specialist labs to make and operate their own devices. Here, we report the open-source build of a pneumatic setup capable of operating both single and multilayer (Quake-style microfluidic devices with programmable scripting automation. This setup can operate both simple and complex devices with 48 device valve control inputs and 18 sample inputs, with modular design for easy expansion, at a fraction of the cost of similar commercial solutions. We present a detailed step-by-step guide to building the pneumatic instrumentation, as well as instructions for custom device operation using our software, Geppetto, through an easy-to-use GUI for live on-chip valve actuation and a scripting system for experiment automation. We show robust valve actuation with near real-time software feedback and demonstrate use of the setup for high-throughput biochemical measurements on-chip. This open-source setup will enable specialists and novices alike to run microfluidic devices easily in their own laboratories. Keywords: Microfluidics, Pneumatics, Laboratory automation, Biochip, BioMEMs, Biohacking, Fluid handling, Micro total analysis systems (μTAS, Quake-style valves

  13. Single-shot spiral imaging enabled by an expanded encoding model: Demonstration in diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilm, Bertram J; Barmet, Christoph; Gross, Simon; Kasper, Lars; Vannesjo, S Johanna; Haeberlin, Max; Dietrich, Benjamin E; Brunner, David O; Schmid, Thomas; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to improve the quality of single-shot spiral MRI and demonstrate its application for diffusion-weighted imaging. Image formation is based on an expanded encoding model that accounts for dynamic magnetic fields up to third order in space, nonuniform static B 0 , and coil sensitivity encoding. The encoding model is determined by B 0 mapping, sensitivity mapping, and concurrent field monitoring. Reconstruction is performed by iterative inversion of the expanded signal equations. Diffusion-tensor imaging with single-shot spiral readouts is performed in a phantom and in vivo, using a clinical 3T instrument. Image quality is assessed in terms of artefact levels, image congruence, and the influence of the different encoding factors. Using the full encoding model, diffusion-weighted single-shot spiral imaging of high quality is accomplished both in vitro and in vivo. Accounting for actual field dynamics, including higher orders, is found to be critical to suppress blurring, aliasing, and distortion. Enhanced image congruence permitted data fusion and diffusion tensor analysis without coregistration. Use of an expanded signal model largely overcomes the traditional vulnerability of spiral imaging with long readouts. It renders single-shot spirals competitive with echo-planar readouts and thus deploys shorter echo times and superior readout efficiency for diffusion imaging and further prospective applications. Magn Reson Med 77:83-91, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  14. Single-image phase retrieval using an edge illumination X-ray phase-contrast imaging setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diemoz, Paul C., E-mail: p.diemoz@ucl.ac.uk; Vittoria, Fabio A. [University College London, London WC1 E6BT (United Kingdom); Research Complex at Harwell, Oxford Harwell Campus, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Hagen, Charlotte K.; Endrizzi, Marco [University College London, London WC1 E6BT (United Kingdom); Coan, Paola [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich 81377 (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Garching 85748 (Germany); Brun, Emmanuel [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Garching 85748 (Germany); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble 38043 (France); Wagner, Ulrich H.; Rau, Christoph [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Oxford Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Robinson, Ian K. [Research Complex at Harwell, Oxford Harwell Campus, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); London Centre for Nanotechnology, London WC1 H0AH (United Kingdom); Bravin, Alberto [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble 38043 (France); Olivo, Alessandro [University College London, London WC1 E6BT (United Kingdom); Research Complex at Harwell, Oxford Harwell Campus, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-25

    A method enabling the retrieval of thickness or projected electron density of a sample from a single input image is derived theoretically and successfully demonstrated on experimental data. A method is proposed which enables the retrieval of the thickness or of the projected electron density of a sample from a single input image acquired with an edge illumination phase-contrast imaging setup. The method assumes the case of a quasi-homogeneous sample, i.e. a sample with a constant ratio between the real and imaginary parts of its complex refractive index. Compared with current methods based on combining two edge illumination images acquired in different configurations of the setup, this new approach presents advantages in terms of simplicity of acquisition procedure and shorter data collection time, which are very important especially for applications such as computed tomography and dynamical imaging. Furthermore, the fact that phase information is directly extracted, instead of its derivative, can enable a simpler image interpretation and be beneficial for subsequent processing such as segmentation. The method is first theoretically derived and its conditions of applicability defined. Quantitative accuracy in the case of homogeneous objects as well as enhanced image quality for the imaging of complex biological samples are demonstrated through experiments at two synchrotron radiation facilities. The large range of applicability, the robustness against noise and the need for only one input image suggest a high potential for investigations in various research subjects.

  15. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction from Single Image Base on Combination of CNN and Multi-Spectral Photometric Stereo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Lu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Multi-spectral photometric stereo can recover pixel-wise surface normal from a single RGB image. The difficulty lies in that the intensity in each channel is the tangle of illumination, albedo and camera response; thus, an initial estimate of the normal is required in optimization-based solutions. In this paper, we propose to make a rough depth estimation using the deep convolutional neural network (CNN instead of using depth sensors or binocular stereo devices. Since high-resolution ground-truth data is expensive to obtain, we designed a network and trained it with rendered images of synthetic 3D objects. We use the model to predict initial normal of real-world objects and iteratively optimize the fine-scale geometry in the multi-spectral photometric stereo framework. The experimental results illustrate the improvement of the proposed method compared with existing methods.

  16. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction from Single Image Base on Combination of CNN and Multi-Spectral Photometric Stereo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Liang; Qi, Lin; Luo, Yisong; Jiao, Hengchao; Dong, Junyu

    2018-01-01

    Multi-spectral photometric stereo can recover pixel-wise surface normal from a single RGB image. The difficulty lies in that the intensity in each channel is the tangle of illumination, albedo and camera response; thus, an initial estimate of the normal is required in optimization-based solutions. In this paper, we propose to make a rough depth estimation using the deep convolutional neural network (CNN) instead of using depth sensors or binocular stereo devices. Since high-resolution ground-truth data is expensive to obtain, we designed a network and trained it with rendered images of synthetic 3D objects. We use the model to predict initial normal of real-world objects and iteratively optimize the fine-scale geometry in the multi-spectral photometric stereo framework. The experimental results illustrate the improvement of the proposed method compared with existing methods. PMID:29498703

  17. Room temperature mid-IR single photon spectral imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Spectral imaging and detection of mid-infrared (mid-IR) wavelengths are emerging as an enabling technology of great technical and scientific interest; primarily because important chemical compounds display unique and strong mid-IR spectral fingerprints revealing valuable chemical information. Whi...... 20 % for polarized incoherent light at 3 \\mum. The proposed method is relevant for existing and new mid-IR applications like gas analysis and medical diagnostics....

  18. A time-gated near-infrared spectroscopic imaging device for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulet, Patrick; Uhring, Wilfried; Hanselmann, Walter; Glazenborg, René; Nouizi, Farouk; Zint, Virginie; Hirschi, Werner

    2013-03-01

    A time-resolved, spectroscopic, diffuse optical tomography device was assembled for clinical applications like brain functional imaging. The entire instrument lies in a unique setup that includes a light source, an ultrafast time-gated intensified camera and all the electronic control units. The light source is composed of four near infrared laser diodes driven by a nanosecond electrical pulse generator working in a sequential mode at a repetition rate of 100 MHz. The light pulses are less than 80 ps FWHM. They are injected in a four-furcated optical fiber ended with a frontal light distributor to obtain a uniform illumination spot directed towards the head of the patient. Photons back-scattered by the subject are detected by the intensified CCD camera. There are resolved according to their time of flight inside the head. The photocathode is powered by an ultrafast generator producing 50 V pulses, at 100 MHz and a width corresponding to a 200 ps FWHM gate. The intensifier has been specially designed for this application. The whole instrument is controlled by an FPGA based module. All the acquisition parameters are configurable via software through an USB plug and the image data are transferred to a PC via an Ethernet link. The compactness of the device makes it a perfect device for bedside clinical applications. The instrument will be described and characterized. Preliminary data recorded on test samples will be presented.

  19. Combined optical and single photon emission imaging: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boschi, Federico; Calderan, Laura; Sbarbati, Andrea [Department of Morphological-Biomedical Sciences, Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Verona, Verona (Italy); Spinelli, Antonello E [Medical Physics Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); D' Ambrosio, Daniela; Marengo, Mario [Medical Physics Department, S. Orsola Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy)], E-mail: federico.boschi@univr.it

    2009-12-07

    In vivo optical imaging instruments are generally devoted to the acquisition of light coming from fluorescence or bioluminescence processes. Recently, an instrument was conceived with radioisotopic detection capabilities (Kodak in Vivo Multispectral System F) based on the conversion of x-rays from the phosphorus screen. The goal of this work is to demonstrate that an optical imager (IVIS 200, Xenogen Corp., Alameda, USA), designed for in vivo acquisitions of small animals in bioluminescent and fluorescent modalities, can even be employed to detect signals due to radioactive tracers. Our system is based on scintillator crystals for the conversion of high-energy rays and a collimator. No hardware modifications are required. Crystals alone permit the acquisition of photons coming from an in vivo 20 g nude mouse injected with a solution of methyl diphosphonate technetium 99 metastable (Tc99m-MDP). With scintillator crystals and collimators, a set of measurements aimed to fully characterize the system resolution was carried out. More precisely, system point spread function and modulation transfer function were measured at different source depths. Results show that system resolution is always better than 1.3 mm when the source depth is less than 10 mm. The resolution of the images obtained with radioactive tracers is comparable with the resolution achievable with dedicated techniques. Moreover, it is possible to detect both optical and nuclear tracers or bi-modal tracers with only one instrument. (letter to the editor)

  20. Single-shot polarimetry imaging of multicore fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivankutty, Siddharth; Andresen, Esben Ravn; Bouwmans, Géraud; Brown, Thomas G; Alonso, Miguel A; Rigneault, Hervé

    2016-05-01

    We report an experimental test of single-shot polarimetry applied to the problem of real-time monitoring of the output polarization states in each core within a multicore fiber bundle. The technique uses a stress-engineered optical element, together with an analyzer, and provides a point spread function whose shape unambiguously reveals the polarization state of a point source. We implement this technique to monitor, simultaneously and in real time, the output polarization states of up to 180 single-mode fiber cores in both conventional and polarization-maintaining fiber bundles. We demonstrate also that the technique can be used to fully characterize the polarization properties of each individual fiber core, including eigen-polarization states, phase delay, and diattenuation.

  1. Demonstration of acoustic source localization in air using single pixel compressive imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jeffrey S.; Rohde, Charles A.; Guild, Matthew D.; Naify, Christina J.; Martin, Theodore P.; Orris, Gregory J.

    2017-12-01

    Acoustic source localization often relies on large sensor arrays that can be electronically complex and have large data storage requirements to process element level data. Recently, the concept of a single-pixel-imager has garnered interest in the electromagnetics literature due to its ability to form high quality images with a single receiver paired with shaped aperture screens that allow for the collection of spatially orthogonal measurements. Here, we present a method for creating an acoustic analog to the single-pixel-imager found in electromagnetics for the purpose of source localization. Additionally, diffraction is considered to account for screen openings comparable to the acoustic wavelength. A diffraction model is presented and incorporated into the single pixel framework. In this paper, we explore the possibility of applying single pixel localization to acoustic measurements. The method is experimentally validated with laboratory measurements made in an air waveguide.

  2. Novel single-cell mega-size chambers for electrochemical etching of panorama position-sensitive polycarbonate ion image detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Mehdi

    2017-11-01

    A novel development is made here by inventing panorama single-cell mega-size electrochemical etching (MS-ECE) chamber systems for processing panorama position-sensitive mega-size polycarbonate ion image detectors (MS-PCIDs) of potential for many neutron and ion detection applications in particular hydrogen ions or proton tracks and images detected for the first time in polycarbonates in this study. The MS-PCID is simply a large polycarbonate sheet of a desired size. The single-cell MS-ECE invented consists of two large equally sized transparent Plexiglas sheets as chamber walls holding a MS-PCID and the ECE chamber components tightly together. One wall has a large flat stainless steel electrode (dry cell) attached to it which is directly in contact with the MS-PCID and the other wall has a rod electrode with two holes to facilitate feeding and draining out the etching solution from the wet cell. A silicon rubber washer plays the role of the wet cell to hold the etchant and the electrical insulator to isolate the dry cell from the wet cell. A simple 50 Hz-HV home-made generator provides an adequate field strength through the two electrodes across the MS-ECE chamber. Two panorama single-cell MS-ECE chamber systems (circular and rectangular shapes) constructed were efficiently applied to processing the MS-PCIDs for 4π ion emission image detection of different gases in particular hydrogen ions or protons in a 3.5 kJ plasma focus device (PFD as uniquely observed by the unaided eyes). The panorama MS-PCID/MS-ECE image detection systems invented are novel with high potential for many applications in particular as applied to 4π panorama ion emission angular distribution image detection studies in PFD space, some results of which are presented and discussed.

  3. Verification of multileaf collimator leaf positions using an electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samant, Sanjiv S.; Zheng Wei; Parra, Nestor Andres; Chandler, Jason; Gopal, Arun; Wu Jian; Jain Jinesh; Zhu Yunping; Sontag, Marc

    2002-01-01

    An automated method is presented for determining individual leaf positions of the Siemens dual focus multileaf collimator (MLC) using the Siemens BEAMVIEW(PLUS) electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Leaf positions are computed with an error of 0.6 mm at one standard deviation (σ) using separate computations of pixel dimensions, image distortion, and radiation center. The pixel dimensions are calculated by superimposing the film image of a graticule with the corresponding EPID image. A spatial correction is used to compensate for the optical distortions of the EPID, reducing the mean distortion from 3.5 pixels (uncorrected) per localized x-ray marker to 2 pixels (1 mm) for a rigid rotation and 1 pixel for a third degree polynomial warp. A correction for a nonuniform dosimetric response across the field of view of the EPID images is not necessary due to the sharp intensity gradients across leaf edges. The radiation center, calculated from the average of the geometric centers of a square field at 0 deg. and 180 deg. collimator angles, is independent of graticule placement error. Its measured location on the EPID image was stable to within 1 pixel based on 3 weeks of repeated extensions/retractions of the EPID. The MLC leaf positions determined from the EPID images agreed to within a pixel of the corresponding values measured using film and ionization chamber. Several edge detection algorithms were tested: contour, Sobel, Roberts, Prewitt, Laplace, morphological, and Canny. These agreed with each other to within ≤1.2 pixels for the in-air EPID images. Using a test pattern, individual MLC leaves were found to be typically within 1 mm of the corresponding record-and-verify values, with a maximum difference of 1.8 mm, and standard deviations of <0.3 mm in the daily reproducibility. This method presents a fast, automatic, and accurate alternative to using film or a light field for the verification and calibration of the MLC

  4. Study of the detective quantum efficiency for the kinestatic charge detector as a megavoltage imaging device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samant, Sanjiv S.; Gopal, Arun; DiBianca, Frank A.

    2003-06-01

    Megavoltage x-ray imaging suffers from relatively poor contrast and spatial resolution compared to diagnostic kilovoltage x-ray imaging due to the dominant Compton scattering in the former. Recently available amorphous silicon/selenium based flat-panel imagers overcome many of the limitations of poor contrast and spatial resolution that affect conventional video based electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). An alternative technology is presented here: kinestatic charge detection (KCD). The KCD uses a slot photon beam, high-pressure gas (xenon, 100 atm) and a multi-ion rectangular chamber in scanning mode. An electric field is used to regulate the cation drift velocity. By matching the scanning speed with that of the cation drift, the cations remain static in the object frame of reference, allowing temporal integration of the signal. KCD imaging is characterized by reduced scatter and a high signal-to-noise ratio. Measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS) and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of a prototype small field of view KCD detector (384 channels, 0.5 mm spacing) were carried out. Measurements yield DQE[0]=0.19 and DQE[0.5cy/mm]=0.01. KCD imaging is compared to film and commercial EPID systems using phantoms, with the KCD requiring an extremely low dose (0.1 cGy) per image. A proposed cylindrical chamber design with a higher ion-collection depth is expected to further improve image quality (DQE[0]>0.25).

  5. DE-BLURRING SINGLE PHOTON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IMAGES USING WAVELET DECOMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neethu M. Sasi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Single photon emission computed tomography imaging is a popular nuclear medicine imaging technique which generates images by detecting radiations emitted by radioactive isotopes injected in the human body. Scattering of these emitted radiations introduces blur in this type of images. This paper proposes an image processing technique to enhance cardiac single photon emission computed tomography images by reducing the blur in the image. The algorithm works in two main stages. In the first stage a maximum likelihood estimate of the point spread function and the true image is obtained. In the second stage Lucy Richardson algorithm is applied on the selected wavelet coefficients of the true image estimate. The significant contribution of this paper is that processing of images is done in the wavelet domain. Pre-filtering is also done as a sub stage to avoid unwanted ringing effects. Real cardiac images are used for the quantitative and qualitative evaluations of the algorithm. Blur metric, peak signal to noise ratio and Tenengrad criterion are used as quantitative measures. Comparison against other existing de-blurring algorithms is also done. The simulation results indicate that the proposed method effectively reduces blur present in the image.

  6. A Single Image Deblurring Algorithm for Nonuniform Motion Blur Using Uniform Defocus Map Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Feng Chang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common artifacts in digital photography is motion blur. When capturing an image under dim light by using a handheld camera, the tendency of the photographer’s hand to shake causes the image to blur. In response to this problem, image deblurring has become an active topic in computational photography and image processing in recent years. From the view of signal processing, image deblurring can be reduced to a deconvolution problem if the kernel function of the motion blur is assumed to be shift invariant. However, the kernel function is not always shift invariant in real cases; for example, in-plane rotation of a camera or a moving object can blur different parts of an image according to different kernel functions. An image that is degraded by multiple blur kernels is called a nonuniform blur image. In this paper, we propose a novel single image deblurring algorithm for nonuniform motion blur images that is blurred by moving object. First, a proposed uniform defocus map method is presented for measurement of the amounts and directions of motion blur. These blurred regions are then used to estimate point spread functions simultaneously. Finally, a fast deconvolution algorithm is used to restore the nonuniform blur image. We expect that the proposed method can achieve satisfactory deblurring of a single nonuniform blur image.

  7. In situ KPFM imaging of local photovoltaic characteristics of structured organic photovoltaic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Fukuchi, Yasumasa; Fukasawa, Masako; Sassa, Takafumi; Kimoto, Atsushi; Tajima, Yusuke; Uchiyama, Masanobu; Yamashita, Takashi; Matsumoto, Mutsuyoshi; Aoyama, Tetsuya

    2014-02-12

    Here, we discuss the local photovoltaic characteristics of a structured bulk heterojunction, organic photovoltaic devices fabricated with a liquid carbazole, and a fullerene derivative based on analysis by scanning kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Periodic photopolymerization induced by an interference pattern from two laser beams formed surface relief gratings (SRG) in the structured films. The surface potential distribution in the SRGs indicates the formation of donor and acceptor spatial distribution. Under illumination, the surface potential reversibly changed because of the generation of fullerene anions and hole transport from the films to substrates, which indicates that we successfully imaged the local photovoltaic characteristics of the structured photovoltaic devices. Using atomic force microscopy, we confirmed the formation of the SRG because of the material migration to the photopolymerized region of the films, which was induced by light exposure through photomasks. The structuring technique allows for the direct fabrication and the control of donor and acceptor spatial distribution in organic photonic and electronic devices with minimized material consumption. This in situ KPFM technique is indispensable to the fabrication of nanoscale electron donor and electron acceptor spatial distribution in the devices.

  8. Evaluation of 600V Superjunction Devices in Single Phase PFC Applications under CCM Operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernandez Botella, Juan Carlos; Petersen, Lars Press; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2014-01-01

    electromagnetic interference (EMI). The dynamic characterization is based on a low inductive double pulse tester (DPT). The measured switching energy is used in order to evaluate the devices performance in a conventional PFC. This data is used together with the mathematical model for prediction of the conducted...... electromagnetic interference. The method allows comparing different devices and evaluating the performance as a function of the PFC power density and efficiency....

  9. Do single-use medical devices containing biopolymers reduce the environmental impacts of surgical procedures compared with their plastic equivalents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Scott R; Hottle, Troy A; Hobbs, Shakira R; Thiel, Cassandra L; Campion, Nicole; Bilec, Melissa M; Landis, Amy E

    2017-01-01

    Background While petroleum-based plastics are extensively used in health care, recent developments in biopolymer manufacturing have created new opportunities for increased integration of biopolymers into medical products, devices and services. This study compared the environmental impacts of single-use disposable devices with increased biopolymer content versus typically manufactured devices in hysterectomy. Methods A comparative life cycle assessment of single-use disposable medical products containing plastic(s) versus the same single-use medical devices with biopolymers substituted for plastic(s) at Magee-Women's Hospital (Magee) in Pittsburgh, PA and the products used in four types of hysterectomies that contained plastics potentially suitable for biopolymer substitution. Magee is a 360-bed teaching hospital, which performs approximately 1400 hysterectomies annually. Results There are life cycle environmental impact tradeoffs when substituting biopolymers for petroplastics in procedures such as hysterectomies. The substitution of biopolymers for petroleum-based plastics increased smog-related impacts by approximately 900% for laparoscopic and robotic hysterectomies, and increased ozone depletion-related impacts by approximately 125% for laparoscopic and robotic hysterectomies. Conversely, biopolymers reduced life cycle human health impacts, acidification and cumulative energy demand for the four hysterectomy procedures. The integration of biopolymers into medical products is correlated with reductions in carcinogenic impacts, non-carcinogenic impacts and respiratory effects. However, the significant agricultural inputs associated with manufacturing biopolymers exacerbate environmental impacts of products and devices made using biopolymers. Conclusions The integration of biopolymers into medical products is correlated with reductions in carcinogenic impacts, non-carcinogenic impacts and respiratory effects; however, the significant agricultural inputs associated

  10. Magneto-electroluminescence effects in the single-layer organic light-emitting devices with macrocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-T. Pham

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Magneto-electroluminescence (MEL effects are observed in single-layer organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs comprising only macrocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs. The fluorescence devices were prepared using synthesized MAHs, namely, [n]cyclo-meta-phenylene ([n]CMP, n = 5, 6. The MEL ratio of the resulting OLED is 1%–2% in the spectral wavelength range of 400-500 nm, whereas it becomes negative (−1.5% to −2% in the range from 650 to 700 nm. The possible physical origins of the sign change in the MEL are discussed. This wavelength-dependent sign change in the MEL ratio could be a unique function for future single-layer OLEDs capable of magnetic-field-induced color changes.

  11. Magneto-electroluminescence effects in the single-layer organic light-emitting devices with macrocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, S.-T.; Ikemoto, K.; Suzuki, K. Z.; Izumi, T.; Taka, H.; Kita, H.; Sato, S.; Isobe, H.; Mizukami, S.

    2018-02-01

    Magneto-electroluminescence (MEL) effects are observed in single-layer organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) comprising only macrocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs). The fluorescence devices were prepared using synthesized MAHs, namely, [n]cyclo-meta-phenylene ([n]CMP, n = 5, 6). The MEL ratio of the resulting OLED is 1%-2% in the spectral wavelength range of 400-500 nm, whereas it becomes negative (-1.5% to -2%) in the range from 650 to 700 nm. The possible physical origins of the sign change in the MEL are discussed. This wavelength-dependent sign change in the MEL ratio could be a unique function for future single-layer OLEDs capable of magnetic-field-induced color changes.

  12. Anti-theft device staining on banknotes detected by mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Deleon Nascimento; Zacca, Jorge Jardim; Rocha, Werickson Fortunato de Carvalho; Borges, Rodrigo; de Souza, Wanderley; Augusti, Rodinei; Eberlin, Marcos Nogueira; Vendramini, Pedro Henrique

    2016-03-01

    We describe the identification and limits of detection of ink staining by mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), as used in anti-theft devices (ATDs). Such ink staining is applied to banknotes during automated teller machine (ATM) explosions. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) coupled with high-resolution and high-accuracy orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS) and a moving stage device were applied to obtain 2D molecular images of the major dyes used for staining, that is, 1-methylaminoanthraquinone (MAAQ), rhodamine B (RB) and rhodamine 6G (R6G). MAAQ could not be detected because of its inefficient desorption by DESI from the banknote cellulose surface. By contrast, ATD staining on banknotes is perceptible by the human naked eye only at concentrations higher than 0.2 μg cm(-2), whereas both RB and R6G at concentrations 200 times lower (as low as 0.001 μg cm(-2)) could be easily detected and imaged by DESI-MSI, with selective and specific identification of each analyte and their spatial distribution on samples from suspects. This technique is non-destructive, and no sample preparation is required, which ensures sample preservation for further forensic investigations. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Determination of the size of an imaging data storage device at a full PACS hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, S. J.; Kim, Y. H.; Hur, G.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the appropriate size of a short and long-term storage device, bearing in mind the design factors involved and the installation costs. The number of radiologic studies quoted is the number of these undertaken during a one-year period at a university hospital with 650 beds, and reflects the actual number of each type of examination performed at a full PACS hospital. The average daily number of outpatients was 1586, while that of inpatients was 639.5. The numbers of radiologic studies performed were as follows : 378 among 189 outpatients, and 165 among 41 inpatients. The average daily number of examinations was 543, comprising 460 CR, 30 ultrasonograms, 25 CT, 8 MRI, 20 others. The total amount of digital images was 17.4 GB per day, while the amount of short-term data with lossless compression was 6.7 GB per day. During 14 days short-term storage, the amount of image data was 93.7 GB in disk array. The amount of data stored mid term (1 year), with lossy compression, was 369.1 GB. The amount of data stored in the form of long-term cache and educational images was 38.7 GB and 30 GB, respectively, The total size of disk array was 531.5 GB. A device suitable for the long-term storage of images, for at least five years, requires a capacity of 1845.5 GB. At a full PACS hospital with 600 beds, the minimum disk space required for the short-and mid-term storage of image data in disk array is 540 GB. The capacity required for long term storage (at least five years) is 1900 GB. (author)

  14. Using an electronic portal imaging device for exit dose measurements in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganowicz, M.; Wozniak, B.; Bekman, A.; Maniakowski, Z.

    2003-01-01

    To present a method of determining the exit dose with the use of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). The device used was the Portal Vision LC250 (Varian). The EPID signals on the central beam axis have been related to the exit dose. The exit dose measurements were performed with the ionisation chamber in the slab phantom at the distance of dose maximum from the exit surface of the phantom. EPID reading was investigated as a function of field size, phantom thickness and source-detector distance. The relation between dose rate and the EPID reading is described with empirical functions applicable to the obtained data. The exit dose is calculated from the EPID reading as a product of the calibration factor and appropriate correction factors. The determination of the exit dose rate from the EPID signal requires the knowledge of many parameters and earlier determination of essential characteristics. (author)

  15. Single exposure optically compressed imaging and visualization using random aperture coding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, A [Electro Optical Unit, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Rivenson, Yair [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Javidi, Bahrain [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-1157 (United States)], E-mail: stern@bgu.ac.il

    2008-11-01

    The common approach in digital imaging follows the sample-then-compress framework. According to this approach, in the first step as many pixels as possible are captured and in the second step the captured image is compressed by digital means. The recently introduced theory of compressed sensing provides the mathematical foundation necessary to combine these two steps in a single one, that is, to compress the information optically before it is recorded. In this paper we overview and extend an optical implementation of compressed sensing theory that we have recently proposed. With this new imaging approach the compression is accomplished inherently in the optical acquisition step. The primary feature of this imaging approach is a randomly encoded aperture realized by means of a random phase screen. The randomly encoded aperture implements random projection of the object field in the image plane. Using a single exposure, a randomly encoded image is captured which can be decoded by proper decoding algorithm.

  16. Integration of single oocyte trapping, in vitro fertilization and embryo culture in a microwell-structured microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chao; Zhang, Qiufang; Ma, Rui; Xie, Lan; Qiu, Tian; Wang, Lei; Mitchelson, Keith; Wang, Jundong; Huang, Guoliang; Qiao, Jie; Cheng, Jing

    2010-11-07

    In vitro fertilization (IVF) therapy is an important treatment for human infertility. However, the methods for clinical IVF have only changed slightly over decades: culture medium is held in oil-covered drops in Petri dishes and manipulation occurs by manual pipetting. Here we report a novel microwell-structured microfluidic device that integrates single oocyte trapping, fertilization and subsequent embryo culture. A microwell array was used to capture and hold individual oocytes during the flow-through process of oocyte and sperm loading, medium substitution and debris cleaning. Different microwell depths were compared by computational modeling and flow washing experiments for their effectiveness in oocyte trapping and debris removal. Fertilization was achieved in the microfluidic devices with similar fertilization rates to standard oil-covered drops in Petri dishes. Embryos could be cultured to blastocyst stages in our devices with developmental status individually monitored and tracked. The results suggest that the microfluidic device may bring several advantages to IVF practices by simplifying oocyte handling and manipulation, allowing rapid and convenient medium changing, and enabling automated tracking of any single embryo development.

  17. A Method for Interactive 3D Reconstruction of Piecewise Planar Objects from Single Images

    OpenAIRE

    Sturm , Peter; Maybank , Steve

    1999-01-01

    International audience; We present an approach for 3D reconstruction of objects from a single image. Obviously, constraints on the 3D structure are needed to perform this task. Our approach is based on user-provided coplanarity, perpendicularity and parallelism constraints. These are used to calibrate the image and perform 3D reconstruction. The method is described in detail and results are provided.

  18. Four-dimensional dose reconstruction through in vivo phase matching of cine images of electronic portal imaging device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jihyung; Jung, Jae Won; Kim, Jong Oh; Yi, Byong Yong; Yeo, Inhwan

    2016-07-01

    A method is proposed to reconstruct a four-dimensional (4D) dose distribution using phase matching of measured cine images to precalculated images of electronic portal imaging device (EPID). (1) A phantom, designed to simulate a tumor in lung (a polystyrene block with a 3 cm diameter embedded in cork), was placed on a sinusoidally moving platform with an amplitude of 1 cm and a period of 4 s. Ten-phase 4D computed tomography (CT) images of the phantom were acquired. A planning target volume (PTV) was created by adding a margin of 1 cm around the internal target volume of the tumor. (2) Three beams were designed, which included a static beam, a theoretical dynamic beam, and a planning-optimized dynamic beam (PODB). While the theoretical beam was made by manually programming a simplistic sliding leaf motion, the planning-optimized beam was obtained from treatment planning. From the three beams, three-dimensional (3D) doses on the phantom were calculated; 4D dose was calculated by means of the ten phase images (integrated over phases afterward); serving as "reference" images, phase-specific EPID dose images under the lung phantom were also calculated for each of the ten phases. (3) Cine EPID images were acquired while the beams were irradiated to the moving phantom. (4) Each cine image was phase-matched to a phase-specific CT image at which common irradiation occurred by intercomparing the cine image with the reference images. (5) Each cine image was used to reconstruct dose in the phase-matched CT image, and the reconstructed doses were summed over all phases. (6) The summation was compared with forwardly calculated 4D and 3D dose distributions. Accounting for realistic situations, intratreatment breathing irregularity was simulated by assuming an amplitude of 0.5 cm for the phantom during a portion of breathing trace in which the phase matching could not be performed. Intertreatment breathing irregularity between the time of treatment and the time of planning CT was

  19. Four-dimensional dose reconstruction through in vivo phase matching of cine images of electronic portal imaging device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jihyung; Jung, Jae Won, E-mail: jungj@ecu.edu [Department of Physics, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27858 (United States); Kim, Jong Oh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States); Yi, Byong Yong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 (United States); Yeo, Inhwan [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California 92354 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: A method is proposed to reconstruct a four-dimensional (4D) dose distribution using phase matching of measured cine images to precalculated images of electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods: (1) A phantom, designed to simulate a tumor in lung (a polystyrene block with a 3 cm diameter embedded in cork), was placed on a sinusoidally moving platform with an amplitude of 1 cm and a period of 4 s. Ten-phase 4D computed tomography (CT) images of the phantom were acquired. A planning target volume (PTV) was created by adding a margin of 1 cm around the internal target volume of the tumor. (2) Three beams were designed, which included a static beam, a theoretical dynamic beam, and a planning-optimized dynamic beam (PODB). While the theoretical beam was made by manually programming a simplistic sliding leaf motion, the planning-optimized beam was obtained from treatment planning. From the three beams, three-dimensional (3D) doses on the phantom were calculated; 4D dose was calculated by means of the ten phase images (integrated over phases afterward); serving as “reference” images, phase-specific EPID dose images under the lung phantom were also calculated for each of the ten phases. (3) Cine EPID images were acquired while the beams were irradiated to the moving phantom. (4) Each cine image was phase-matched to a phase-specific CT image at which common irradiation occurred by intercomparing the cine image with the reference images. (5) Each cine image was used to reconstruct dose in the phase-matched CT image, and the reconstructed doses were summed over all phases. (6) The summation was compared with forwardly calculated 4D and 3D dose distributions. Accounting for realistic situations, intratreatment breathing irregularity was simulated by assuming an amplitude of 0.5 cm for the phantom during a portion of breathing trace in which the phase matching could not be performed. Intertreatment breathing irregularity between the time of treatment and the

  20. Controlled power delivery for super-resolution imaging of biological samples using digital micromirror device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiya Peedikakkal, Liyana; Cadby, Ashley

    2017-02-01

    Localization based super resolution images of a biological sample is generally achieved by using high power laser illumination with long exposure time which unfortunately increases photo-toxicity of a sample, making super resolution microscopy, in general, incompatible with live cell imaging. Furthermore, the limitation of photobleaching reduces the ability to acquire time lapse images of live biological cells using fluorescence microscopy. Digital Light Processing (DLP) technology can deliver light at grey scale levels by flickering digital micromirrors at around 290 Hz enabling highly controlled power delivery to samples. In this work, Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) is implemented in an inverse Schiefspiegler telescope setup to control the power and pattern of illumination for super resolution microscopy. We can achieve spatial and temporal patterning of illumination by controlling the DMD pixel by pixel. The DMD allows us to control the power and spatial extent of the laser illumination. We have used this to show that we can reduce the power delivered to the sample to allow for longer time imaging in one area while achieving sub-diffraction STORM imaging in another using higher power densities.

  1. The effective quality assurance for image guided device using the AMC G-Box

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chong Mi [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    According to the rapid increase recently in image-guided radiation therapy, It is necessary to control of the image guidance system completely. In particular for the main subject to the accuracy of image guided radiation therapy device to be done essentially the quality assurance. We made efficient phantom in AMC for the management of the accurate and efficient. By setting up of five very important as a quality assurance inventory of the Image guidance system, we made (AMC G-Box) phantom for quality assurance efficient and accurate. Quality assurance list were the Iso-center align, the real measurement, the center align of four direction, the accuracy of table movement and the reproducibility of Hounsfield Unit. The rectangular phantom; acrylic with a thickness of 1 cm to 10 cm × 10 cm × 10 cm was inserted the three materials with different densities respectively for measure the CBCT HU. The phantom was to perform a check of consistency centered by creating a marker that indicates the position of the center fixed. By performing the quality assurance using the phantom of existing, comparing the resulting value to the different resulting value using the AMC G-Box, experiment was analyzed time and problems. Therapy equipment was used Varian device. It was measured twice at 1-week intervals. When implemented quality assurance of an image guidance system using AMC G-Box and a phantom existing has been completed, the quality assurance result is similar in 0.2 mm ± 0.1. In the case of the conventional method, it was 45 minutes at 30 minutes. When using AMC G-Box, it takes 20 minutes 15 minutes, and declined to 50% of the time. The consistency and accurate of image guidance system tend to decline using device. Therefore, We need to perform thoroughly on the quality assurance related. It needs to be checked daily to consistency check especially. When using the AMC G-Box, It is possible to enhance the accuracy of the patient care and equipment efficiently performing

  2. Microfluidic electrochemical device and process for chemical imaging and electrochemical analysis at the electrode-liquid interface in-situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Bingwen; Yang, Li; Zhu, Zihua; Marshall, Matthew J.

    2016-03-01

    A microfluidic electrochemical device and process are detailed that provide chemical imaging and electrochemical analysis under vacuum at the surface of the electrode-sample or electrode-liquid interface in-situ. The electrochemical device allows investigation of various surface layers including diffuse layers at selected depths populated with, e.g., adsorbed molecules in which chemical transformation in electrolyte solutions occurs.

  3. A precise pointing nanopipette for single-cell imaging via electroosmotic injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jian; Qian, Ruo-Can; Hu, Yong-Xu; Liu, Shao-Chuang; Cao, Yue; Zheng, Yong-Jie; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-11-24

    The precise transportation of fluorescent probes to the designated location in living cells is still a challenge. Here, we present a new addition to nanopipettes as a powerful tool to deliver fluorescent molecules to a given place in a single cell by electroosmotic flow, indicating favorable potential for further application in single-cell imaging.

  4. Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy Imaging-Guided Confocal Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Desheng; Kaldaras, Leonora; Lu, H. Peter

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an integrated spectroscopy system combining total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy imaging with confocal single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy for two-dimensional interfaces. This spectroscopy approach is capable of both multiple molecules simultaneously sampling and in situ confocal fluorescence dynamics analyses of individual molecules of interest. We have demonstrated the calibration with fluorescent microspheres, and carried out single-molecule spectroscop...

  5. Modeling decision-making in single- and multi-modal medical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canosa, R. L.; Baum, K. G.

    2009-02-01

    This research introduces a mode-specific model of visual saliency that can be used to highlight likely lesion locations and potential errors (false positives and false negatives) in single-mode PET and MRI images and multi-modal fused PET/MRI images. Fused-modality digital images are a relatively recent technological improvement in medical imaging; therefore, a novel component of this research is to characterize the perceptual response to these fused images. Three different fusion techniques were compared to single-mode displays in terms of observer error rates using synthetic human brain images generated from an anthropomorphic phantom. An eye-tracking experiment was performed with naÃve (non-radiologist) observers who viewed the single- and multi-modal images. The eye-tracking data allowed the errors to be classified into four categories: false positives, search errors (false negatives never fixated), recognition errors (false negatives fixated less than 350 milliseconds), and decision errors (false negatives fixated greater than 350 milliseconds). A saliency model consisting of a set of differentially weighted low-level feature maps is derived from the known error and ground truth locations extracted from a subset of the test images for each modality. The saliency model shows that lesion and error locations attract visual attention according to low-level image features such as color, luminance, and texture.

  6. Radio imaging moving poly functional device development R.I.T.M. Medicine and biology applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saoudi, A.

    1994-07-01

    We want to the medicine request. They wish to set out weak dimension nuclear imaging equipment, allowing to be movable indeed exploitable during the operation. We are using radioactive tracers either γ or β. For the postoperatory phases, no efficient and quick method of total ''osteoid-osteoma'' exeresis was existing. The device permitted to see if the extracted pieces included the maximal radioactivity zone, essential information on the surgery therapy quality, before the anatomy pathology tests. 36 refs., 109 figs., 3 tabs., 1 appendix

  7. An MR-compatible device for delivering smoked marijuana during functional imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Frederick, Blaise deB.; Lindsey, Kimberly P.; Nickerson, Lisa D.; Ryan, Elizabeth T.; Lukas, Scott E.

    2007-01-01

    Smoking is the preferred method of administration for two of the most frequently abused drugs, marijuana and nicotine. The high temporal and spatial resolution of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) make it a natural choice for studying the neurobiological effects of smoked drugs if the challenges of smoking in a magnetic resonance (MR) scanner can be overcome. We report on a design for an MR-compatible smoking device that can be used for smoking marijuana (or tobacco) during fMRI ex...

  8. The Design of a Single-Bit CMOS Image Sensor for Iris Recognition Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keunyeol Park

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a single-bit CMOS image sensor (CIS that uses a data processing technique with an edge detection block for simple iris segmentation. In order to recognize the iris image, the image sensor conventionally captures high-resolution image data in digital code, extracts the iris data, and then compares it with a reference image through a recognition algorithm. However, in this case, the frame rate decreases by the time required for digital signal conversion of multi-bit digital data through the analog-to-digital converter (ADC in the CIS. In order to reduce the overall processing time as well as the power consumption, we propose a data processing technique with an exclusive OR (XOR logic gate to obtain single-bit and edge detection image data instead of multi-bit image data through the ADC. In addition, we propose a logarithmic counter to efficiently measure single-bit image data that can be applied to the iris recognition algorithm. The effective area of the proposed single-bit image sensor (174 × 144 pixel is 2.84 mm2 with a 0.18 μm 1-poly 4-metal CMOS image sensor process. The power consumption of the proposed single-bit CIS is 2.8 mW with a 3.3 V of supply voltage and 520 frame/s of the maximum frame rates. The error rate of the ADC is 0.24 least significant bit (LSB on an 8-bit ADC basis at a 50 MHz sampling frequency.

  9. The Design of a Single-Bit CMOS Image Sensor for Iris Recognition Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Keunyeol; Song, Minkyu; Kim, Soo Youn

    2018-02-24

    This paper presents a single-bit CMOS image sensor (CIS) that uses a data processing technique with an edge detection block for simple iris segmentation. In order to recognize the iris image, the image sensor conventionally captures high-resolution image data in digital code, extracts the iris data, and then compares it with a reference image through a recognition algorithm. However, in this case, the frame rate decreases by the time required for digital signal conversion of multi-bit digital data through the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) in the CIS. In order to reduce the overall processing time as well as the power consumption, we propose a data processing technique with an exclusive OR (XOR) logic gate to obtain single-bit and edge detection image data instead of multi-bit image data through the ADC. In addition, we propose a logarithmic counter to efficiently measure single-bit image data that can be applied to the iris recognition algorithm. The effective area of the proposed single-bit image sensor (174 × 144 pixel) is 2.84 mm² with a 0.18 μm 1-poly 4-metal CMOS image sensor process. The power consumption of the proposed single-bit CIS is 2.8 mW with a 3.3 V of supply voltage and 520 frame/s of the maximum frame rates. The error rate of the ADC is 0.24 least significant bit (LSB) on an 8-bit ADC basis at a 50 MHz sampling frequency.

  10. Screening for diabetic retinopathy in rural area using single-field, digital fundus images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruamviboonsuk, Paisan; Wongcumchang, Nattapon; Surawongsin, Pattamaporn; Panyawatananukul, Ekchai; Tiensuwan, Montip

    2005-02-01

    To evaluate the practicability of using single-field, 2.3 million-pixel, digital fundus images for screening of diabetic retinopathy in rural areas. All diabetic patients who regularly attended the diabetic clinic at Kabcheang Community Hospital, located at 15 kilometers from the Thailand-Cambodia border, were appointed to the hospital for a 3-day diabetic retinopathy screening programme. The fundi of all patients were captured in single-field, 45 degrees, 2.3 million-pixel images using nonmydriatic digital fundus camera and then sent to a reading center in Bangkok. The fundi were also examined through dilated pupils by a retinal specialist at this hospital. The grading of diabetic retinopathy from two methods was compared for an exact agreement. The average duration of single digital fundus image capture was 2 minutes. The average file size of each image was 750 kilobytes. The average duration of single image transmission to a reading center in Bangkok via satellite was 3 minutes; via a conventional telephone line was 8 minutes. Of all 150 patients, 130 were assessed for an agreement between dilated fundus examination and digital fundus images in diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy. The exact agreement was 0.87, the weighted kappa statistics was 0.74. The sensitivity of digital fundus images in detecting diabetic retinopathy was 80%, the specificity was 96%. For diabetic macular edema the exact agreement was 0.97, the weighted kappa was 0.43, the sensitivity was 43%, and the specificity was 100%. The image capture of the nonmydriatic digital fundus camera is suitable for screening of diabetic retinopathy and single-field digital fundus images are potentially acceptable tools for the screening. The real-time image transmission via telephone lines to remote reading center, however, may not be practical for routine diabetic retinopathy screening in rural areas.

  11. Ensembles of indium phosphide nanowires: physical properties and functional devices integrated on non-single crystal platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.; Lohn, Andrew; Onishi, Takehiro [University of California, Santa Cruz (United States). Baskin School of Engineering; NASA Ames Research Center, Nanostructured Energy Conversion Technology and Research (NECTAR), Advanced Studies Laboratories, Univ. of California Santa Cruz, Moffett Field, CA (United States); Mathai, Sagi; Li, Xuema; Straznicky, Joseph; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Williams, R.S. [Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, Information and Quantum Systems Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Logeeswaran, V.J.; Islam, M.S. [University of California Davis, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Davis, CA (United States)

    2009-06-15

    A new route to grow an ensemble of indium phosphide single-crystal semiconductor nanowires is described. Unlike conventional epitaxial growth of single-crystal semiconductor films, the proposed route for growing semiconductor nanowires does not require a single-crystal semiconductor substrate. In the proposed route, instead of using single-crystal semiconductor substrates that are characterized by their long-range atomic ordering, a template layer that possesses short-range atomic ordering prepared on a non-single-crystal substrate is employed. On the template layer, epitaxial information associated with its short-range atomic ordering is available within an area that is comparable to that of a nanowire root. Thus the template layer locally provides epitaxial information required for the growth of semiconductor nanowires. In the particular demonstration described in this paper, hydrogenated silicon was used as a template layer for epitaxial growth of indium phosphide nanowires. The indium phosphide nanowires grown on the hydrogenerated silicon template layer were found to be single crystal and optically active. Simple photoconductors and pin-diodes were fabricated and tested with the view towards various optoelectronic device applications where group III-V compound semiconductors are functionally integrated onto non-single-crystal platforms. (orig.)

  12. Ensembles of indium phosphide nanowires: physical properties and functional devices integrated on non-single crystal platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.; Lohn, Andrew; Onishi, Takehiro; Mathai, Sagi; Li, Xuema; Straznicky, Joseph; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Williams, R.S.; Logeeswaran, V.J.; Islam, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    A new route to grow an ensemble of indium phosphide single-crystal semiconductor nanowires is described. Unlike conventional epitaxial growth of single-crystal semiconductor films, the proposed route for growing semiconductor nanowires does not require a single-crystal semiconductor substrate. In the proposed route, instead of using single-crystal semiconductor substrates that are characterized by their long-range atomic ordering, a template layer that possesses short-range atomic ordering prepared on a non-single-crystal substrate is employed. On the template layer, epitaxial information associated with its short-range atomic ordering is available within an area that is comparable to that of a nanowire root. Thus the template layer locally provides epitaxial information required for the growth of semiconductor nanowires. In the particular demonstration described in this paper, hydrogenated silicon was used as a template layer for epitaxial growth of indium phosphide nanowires. The indium phosphide nanowires grown on the hydrogenerated silicon template layer were found to be single crystal and optically active. Simple photoconductors and pin-diodes were fabricated and tested with the view towards various optoelectronic device applications where group III-V compound semiconductors are functionally integrated onto non-single-crystal platforms. (orig.)

  13. Cerebral ischemic lesions detected with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging after carotid artery stenting. Comparison of several anti-embolic protection devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taha, M.M.; Maeda, Masayuki; Sakaida, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Distal embolism is an important periprocedural technical complication with carotid angioplasty and carotid artery stenting (CAS). We evaluated the safety and efficacy of protection devices used during CAS by detecting new cerebral ischemic lesions using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in 95 patients who underwent 98 CAS procedures: 34 using single PercuSurge GuardWire, 31 using double balloon protection, 15 using proximal flow reverse protection devices, 14 using Naviballoon, and 4 using filter anti-embolic devices. Diffusion-weighted imaging was performed preoperatively and postoperatively to evaluate the presence of any new embolic cerebral lesions. Postoperative diffusion-weighted imaging revealed 117 new ischemic lesions. Three patients had new ischemic stroke, two minor and one major, all ipsilateral to the treated carotid artery. The remaining patients had clinically silent ischemia. The incidence of new embolic lesions was lower using the proximal flow reverse protection device than with the double balloon protection (33% vs. 48.4%), but the volume of ipsilateral new ischemic lesions per patient was 136.6 mm 3 vs. 86.9 mm 3 , respectively. Neuroprotection with Naviballoon yielded ipsilateral lesions of large volume (86.6 mm 3 ) and higher number (5.7 lesions per patient) than using the filter anti-embolic device (34.8 mm 3 and 1 lesion per patient). New cerebral ischemic lesions after neuroprotected CAS are usually silent. The lower incidence of distal ischemia using proximal flow reverse and double balloon protection devices is limited by the larger volume and higher number of ischemic lesions. (author)

  14. Cerebral ischemic lesions detected with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging after carotid artery stenting: Comparison of several anti-embolic protection devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Mahmoud M; Maeda, Masayuki; Sakaida, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Kenji; Toma, Naoki; Yamamoto, Akitaka; Hirose, Tomofumi; Miura, Youichi; Fujimoto, Masashi; Matsushima, Satoshi; Taki, Waro

    2009-09-01

    Distal embolism is an important periprocedural technical complication with carotid angioplasty and carotid artery stenting (CAS). We evaluated the safety and efficacy of protection devices used during CAS by detecting new cerebral ischemic lesions using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in 95 patients who underwent 98 CAS procedures: 34 using single PercuSurge GuardWire, 31 using double balloon protection, 15 using proximal flow reverse protection devices, 14 using Naviballoon, and 4 using filter anti-embolic devices. Diffusion-weighted imaging was performed preoperatively and postoperatively to evaluate the presence of any new embolic cerebral lesions. Postoperative diffusion-weighted imaging revealed 117 new ischemic lesions. Three patients had new ischemic stroke, two minor and one major, all ipsilateral to the treated carotid artery. The remaining patients had clinically silent ischemia. The incidence of new embolic lesions was lower using the proximal flow reverse protection device than with the double balloon protection (33% vs. 48.4%), but the volume of ipsilateral new ischemic lesions per patient was 136.6 mm(3) vs. 86.9 mm(3), respectively. Neuroprotection with Naviballoon yielded ipsilateral lesions of large volume (86.6 mm(3)) and higher number (5.7 lesions per patient) than using the filter anti-embolic device (34.8 mm(3) and 1 lesion per patient). New cerebral ischemic lesions after neuroprotected CAS are usually silent. The lower incidence of distal ischemia using proximal flow reverse and double balloon protection devices is limited by the larger volume and higher number of ischemic lesions.

  15. Cryo-imaging of fluorescently labeled single cells in a mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyer, Grant J.; Roy, Debashish; Salvado, Olivier; Stone, Meredith E.; Wilson, David L.

    2009-02-01

    We developed a cryo-imaging system to provide single-cell detection of fluorescently labeled cells in mouse, with particular applicability to stem cells and metastatic cancer. The Case cryoimaging system consists of a fluorescence microscope, robotic imaging positioner, customized cryostat, PC-based control system, and visualization/analysis software. The system alternates between sectioning (10-40 μm) and imaging, collecting color brightfield and fluorescent blockface image volumes >60GB. In mouse experiments, we imaged quantum-dot labeled stem cells, GFP-labeled cancer and stem cells, and cell-size fluorescent microspheres. To remove subsurface fluorescence, we used a simplified model of light-tissue interaction whereby the next image was scaled, blurred, and subtracted from the current image. We estimated scaling and blurring parameters by minimizing entropy of subtracted images. Tissue specific attenuation parameters were found [uT : heart (267 +/- 47.6 μm), liver (218 +/- 27.1 μm), brain (161 +/- 27.4 μm)] to be within the range of estimates in the literature. "Next image" processing removed subsurface fluorescence equally well across multiple tissues (brain, kidney, liver, adipose tissue, etc.), and analysis of 200 microsphere images in the brain gave 97+/-2% reduction of subsurface fluorescence. Fluorescent signals were determined to arise from single cells based upon geometric and integrated intensity measurements. Next image processing greatly improved axial resolution, enabled high quality 3D volume renderings, and improved enumeration of single cells with connected component analysis by up to 24%. Analysis of image volumes identified metastatic cancer sites, found homing of stem cells to injury sites, and showed microsphere distribution correlated with blood flow patterns. We developed and evaluated cryo-imaging to provide single-cell detection of fluorescently labeled cells in mouse. Our cryo-imaging system provides extreme (>60GB), micron

  16. Electrostatic X-ray image recording device with mesh-base photocathode photoelectron discriminator means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    An electrostatic X-ray image recording device having a pair of spaced electrodes with a gas-filled gap therebetween, and including discrimination means, having a conductive mesh supporting a photocathodic material, positioned in the gas-filled gap between a first electrode having a layer of ultraviolet-emitting fluorescent material and a second electrode having a plastic sheet adjacent thereto for receiving photoelectrons emitted by the photocathodic material and accelerated to the second electrode by an applied field. The photoconductor-mesh element discriminates against fast electrons, produced by direct impingement of X-rays upon the photocathode to substantially reduce secondary electron production and amplification, thereby increasing both the signal-to-noise and contrast ratios. The electrostatic image formed on the plastic sheet is developed by zerographic techniques after exposure. (Auth.)

  17. A poly(dimethylsiloxane)-based device enabling time-lapse imaging with high spatial resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Masahiko; Hoshida, Tetsushi; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a regulator-free device that enables long-term incubation of mammalian cells for epi-fluorescence imaging, based on a concept that the size of sample to be gassed and heated is reduced to observation scale. A poly(dimethylsiloxane) block stamped on a coverslip works as a long-lasting supplier of CO 2 -rich gas to adjust bicarbonate-containing medium in a tiny chamber at physiological pH, and an oil-immersion objective warms cells across the coverslip. A time-lapse imaging experiment using HeLa cells stably expressing fluorescent cell-cycle indicators showed that the cells in the chamber proliferated with normal cell-cycle period over 2 days.

  18. Industrial-scale separation of high-purity single-chirality single-wall carbon nanotubes for biological imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yomogida, Yohei; Tanaka, Takeshi; Zhang, Minfang; Yudasaka, Masako; Wei, Xiaojun; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2016-01-01

    Single-chirality, single-wall carbon nanotubes are desired due to their inherent physical properties and performance characteristics. Here, we demonstrate a chromatographic separation method based on a newly discovered chirality-selective affinity between carbon nanotubes and a gel containing a mixture of the surfactants. In this system, two different selectivities are found: chiral-angle selectivity and diameter selectivity. Since the chirality of nanotubes is determined by the chiral angle and diameter, combining these independent selectivities leads to high-resolution single-chirality separation with milligram-scale throughput and high purity. Furthermore, we present efficient vascular imaging of mice using separated single-chirality (9,4) nanotubes. Due to efficient absorption and emission, blood vessels can be recognized even with the use of ∼100-fold lower injected dose than the reported value for pristine nanotubes. Thus, 1 day of separation provides material for up to 15,000 imaging experiments, which is acceptable for industrial use. PMID:27350127

  19. A Theoretical Investigation on Rectifying Performance of a Single Motor Molecular Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Hui; Tan Xun-Qiong

    2015-01-01

    We report ab initio calculations of the transport behavior of a phenyl substituted molecular motor. The calculated results show that the transport behavior of the device is sensitive to the rotation degree of the rotor part. When the rotor part is parallel with the stator part, a better rectifying performance can be found in the current-voltage curve. However, when the rotor part revolves to vertical with the stator part, the currents in the positive bias region decrease slightly. More importantly, the rectifying performance disappears. Thus this offers us a new method to modulate the rectifying behavior in molecular devices. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  20. Automated vessel shadow segmentation of fovea-centered spectral-domain images from multiple OCT devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Gerendas, Bianca S.; Waldstein, Sebastian M.; Simader, Christian; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2014-03-01

    Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) is a non-invasive modality for acquiring high reso- lution, three-dimensional (3D) cross sectional volumetric images of the retina and the subretinal layers. SD-OCT also allows the detailed imaging of retinal pathology, aiding clinicians in the diagnosis of sight degrading diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma.1 Disease diagnosis, assessment, and treatment requires a patient to undergo multiple OCT scans, possibly using different scanning devices, to accurately and precisely gauge disease activity, progression and treatment success. However, the use of OCT imaging devices from different vendors, combined with patient movement may result in poor scan spatial correlation, potentially leading to incorrect patient diagnosis or treatment analysis. Image registration can be used to precisely compare disease states by registering differing 3D scans to one another. In order to align 3D scans from different time- points and vendors using registration, landmarks are required, the most obvious being the retinal vasculature. Presented here is a fully automated cross-vendor method to acquire retina vessel locations for OCT registration from fovea centred 3D SD-OCT scans based on vessel shadows. Noise filtered OCT scans are flattened based on vendor retinal layer segmentation, to extract the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) layer of the retina. Voxel based layer profile analysis and k-means clustering is used to extract candidate vessel shadow regions from the RPE layer. In conjunction, the extracted RPE layers are combined to generate a projection image featuring all candidate vessel shadows. Image processing methods for vessel segmentation of the OCT constructed projection image are then applied to optimize the accuracy of OCT vessel shadow segmentation through the removal of false positive shadow regions such as those caused by exudates and cysts. Validation of segmented vessel shadows uses

  1. Precision analysis for standard deviation measurements of immobile single fluorescent molecule images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSantis, Michael C; DeCenzo, Shawn H; Li, Je-Luen; Wang, Y M

    2010-03-29

    Standard deviation measurements of intensity profiles of stationary single fluorescent molecules are useful for studying axial localization, molecular orientation, and a fluorescence imaging system's spatial resolution. Here we report on the analysis of the precision of standard deviation measurements of intensity profiles of single fluorescent molecules imaged using an EMCCD camera.We have developed an analytical expression for the standard deviation measurement error of a single image which is a function of the total number of detected photons, the background photon noise, and the camera pixel size. The theoretical results agree well with the experimental, simulation, and numerical integration results. Using this expression, we show that single-molecule standard deviation measurements offer nanometer precision for a large range of experimental parameters.

  2. Theoretical and experimental study of single particle tracking in extreme conditions: single photon imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cajgfinger, T.

    2012-10-01

    This manuscript presents my thesis on the high frame rate (500 frames / second) single-photon detector electron-bombarded CMOS (ebCMOS). The first section compares three ultra-sensitive detectors and their methods for improving photon sensitivity: the CMOS low noise (sCMOS), the electron-multiplying CCD (emCCD) with signal multiplication by pixel and the ebCMOS with amplification by applied electric field. The method developed to detect single photon impacts with intra-pixel resolution on the ebCMOS sensor is presented. The second section compares the localization accuracy of these detectors in extreme conditions of very low photon flux (<10 photons/frame). First the theoretical limit is calculated using the Cramer-Rao lower bound for significant parameter sets. An experimental comparison of the detectors is then described. The setup provides one or more point sources controlled in position, signal and background noise. The results allow a comparison of the experimental effectiveness, purity and localization accuracy. The last section describes two experiments with the ebCMOS camera. The first aims at tracking hundreds of quantum dots simultaneously at the Nanoptec center. The second focuses on the swimming of bacteria at the surface at the Joliot Curie Institute. The point sources tracking algorithm using single photons and the Kalman filter implementation developed for these experiments is also described. (author)

  3. Final report on LDRD project : single-photon-sensitive imaging detector arrays at 1600 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, Kenton David; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Klem, John Frederick; Sheng, Josephine Juin-Jye; Patel, Rupal K.; Bolles, Desta; Bauer, Tom M.; Koudelka, Robert

    2006-01-01

    The key need that this project has addressed is a short-wave infrared light detector for ranging (LIDAR) imaging at temperatures greater than 100K, as desired by nonproliferation and work for other customers. Several novel device structures to improve avalanche photodiodes (APDs) were fabricated to achieve the desired APD performance. A primary challenge to achieving high sensitivity APDs at 1550 nm is that the small band-gap materials (e.g., InGaAs or Ge) necessary to detect low-energy photons exhibit higher dark counts and higher multiplication noise compared to materials like silicon. To overcome these historical problems APDs were designed and fabricated using separate absorption and multiplication (SAM) regions. The absorption regions used (InGaAs or Ge) to leverage these materials 1550 nm sensitivity. Geiger mode detection was chosen to circumvent gain noise issues in the III-V and Ge multiplication regions, while a novel Ge/Si device was built to examine the utility of transferring photoelectrons in a silicon multiplication region. Silicon is known to have very good analog and GM multiplication properties. The proposed devices represented a high-risk for high-reward approach. Therefore one primary goal of this work was to experimentally resolve uncertainty about the novel APD structures. This work specifically examined three different designs. An InGaAs/InAlAs Geiger mode (GM) structure was proposed for the superior multiplication properties of the InAlAs. The hypothesis to be tested in this structure was whether InAlAs really presented an advantage in GM. A Ge/Si SAM was proposed representing the best possible multiplication material (i.e., silicon), however, significant uncertainty existed about both the Ge material quality and the ability to transfer photoelectrons across the Ge/Si interface. Finally a third pure germanium GM structure was proposed because bulk germanium has been reported to have better dark count properties. However, significant

  4. Final report on LDRD project : single-photon-sensitive imaging detector arrays at 1600 nm.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childs, Kenton David; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Klem, John Frederick; Sheng, Josephine Juin-Jye; Patel, Rupal K.; Bolles, Desta; Bauer, Tom M.; Koudelka, Robert

    2006-11-01

    The key need that this project has addressed is a short-wave infrared light detector for ranging (LIDAR) imaging at temperatures greater than 100K, as desired by nonproliferation and work for other customers. Several novel device structures to improve avalanche photodiodes (APDs) were fabricated to achieve the desired APD performance. A primary challenge to achieving high sensitivity APDs at 1550 nm is that the small band-gap materials (e.g., InGaAs or Ge) necessary to detect low-energy photons exhibit higher dark counts and higher multiplication noise compared to materials like silicon. To overcome these historical problems APDs were designed and fabricated using separate absorption and multiplication (SAM) regions. The absorption regions used (InGaAs or Ge) to leverage these materials 1550 nm sensitivity. Geiger mode detection was chosen to circumvent gain noise issues in the III-V and Ge multiplication regions, while a novel Ge/Si device was built to examine the utility of transferring photoelectrons in a silicon multiplication region. Silicon is known to have very good analog and GM multiplication properties. The proposed devices represented a high-risk for high-reward approach. Therefore one primary goal of this work was to experimentally resolve uncertainty about the novel APD structures. This work specifically examined three different designs. An InGaAs/InAlAs Geiger mode (GM) structure was proposed for the superior multiplication properties of the InAlAs. The hypothesis to be tested in this structure was whether InAlAs really presented an advantage in GM. A Ge/Si SAM was proposed representing the best possible multiplication material (i.e., silicon), however, significant uncertainty existed about both the Ge material quality and the ability to transfer photoelectrons across the Ge/Si interface. Finally a third pure germanium GM structure was proposed because bulk germanium has been reported to have better dark count properties. However, significant

  5. Device for imaging an object by means of masks of spatially modulable electromagnetic radiation or corpuscular radiation of high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, H.H.

    1979-01-01

    The radiogram of the thyroid is produced by means of a detector device operating similar to a scintillation camera. Between thyroid and detector device there is placed a mask having modulating areas, permeable and impermeable to radiation succeeding each other with decreasing extension. The scanning signal has got the shape of a radar signal with chirp modulation. The filtering unit used for it is a pulse compression filter. The image of the radiation energy distribution on the recording surface of the detector device is thus decoded and compressed to a number of image points giving the picture of the thyroid. (RW) [de

  6. Perfusion imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, B.L.; Hill, T.C.

    1987-01-01

    SPECT with perfusion tracers is useful in a number of circumstances: (1) In acute cerebral infarction while the CT scan may be normal for several days after onset of symptoms, the uptake of SPECT perfusion tracers will be altered immediately after the onset of the stroke. Even when the CT scan has become abnormal, the physiologic abnormality may exceed the anatomic abnormality. One may, therefore be able to measure the extent of the reversibly ischemic tissue early enough to justify more agressive therapeutic interventions. (2) For endarterectomy and other surgical and medical therapies serial measurements of regional cerebral perfusion with SPECT may provide a readily available tool to assess their efficacy. (3) SPECT perfusion imaging may become the method of choice for the diagnosis and evaluation of Alzheimer's disease. (4) In patients with epilepsy, the extent and location of the abnormally perfused focus may be important to medical and surgical management. Follow-up examination may be useful in documenting the effectiveness of therapy

  7. Design of free space optical omnidirectional transceivers for indoor applications using non-imaging optical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Navik; Davis, Christopher C.

    2008-08-01

    Omnidirectional free space optical communication receivers can employ multiple non-imaging collectors, such as compound parabolic concentrators (CPCs), in an array-like fashion to increase the amount of possible light collection. CPCs can effectively channel light collected over a large aperture to a small area photodiode. The aperture to length ratio of such devices can increase the overall size of the transceiver unit, which may limit the practicality of such systems, especially when small size is desired. New non-imaging collector designs with smaller sizes, larger field of view (FOV), and comparable transmission curves to CPCs, offer alternative transceiver designs. This paper examines how transceiver performance is affected by the use of different non-imaging collector shapes that are designed for wide FOV with reduced efficiency compared with shapes such as the CPC that are designed for small FOV with optimal efficiency. Theoretical results provide evidence indicating that array-like transceiver designs using various non-imaging collector shapes with less efficient transmission curves, but a larger FOV will be an effective means for the design of omnidirectional optical transceiver units. The results also incorporate the effects of Fresnel loss at the collector exit aperture-photodiode interface, which is an important consideration for indoor omnidirectional FSO systems.

  8. Single cells as experimentation units in lab-on-a-chip devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    le Gac, Severine; van den Berg, Albert

    'Lab-on-a-chip' technology (LOC) has now reached a mature state and is employed commonly in research in the life sciences. LOC devices make novel experimentation possible while providing a sophisticated environment for cellular investigation. As a next step, we introduce here the concept of a

  9. Influences on the white emission and stability of single layer electroluminescent devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tekin, Emine

    2013-01-01

    A detailed survey about the influences on the white emission color of polyfluorene based polymer light emitting diodes (PLEDs) is reported. First, the effect of active layer thickness was studied. Subsequently keeping the polymer thickness at optimum level, PLEDs were fabricated varying polymer concentrations. All fabricated devices were fully characterized in terms of luminance, current–voltage characteristics, efficiencies, electroluminescent spectra, and CIE color coordinates. It was found that at higher polymer concentrations, electroluminescence spectra shifted to the bathochromic region so that the resulting color becomes warm white. Furthermore, the accelerated lifetimes of the PLEDs were measured and the results are discussed in terms of polymer inter-chain interactions. Consequently, the 8 mg/ml was found to be the optimum level not only for the device performances but also for the device lifetime. Highlights: • Influences on the white color emission of the polymer OLEDs were investigated. • White emission purity was found to be affected by the polymer concentration. • Lifetimes of the white emitting devices depend on the inter-chain interactions

  10. Create positive contraceptive images for strongest impact in single lesson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    Health educators attempting to deliver contraceptive information to adolescents in the classroom must seek ways to make a major impact in a very short period of time. A Planned Parenthood professional from New Jersey has developed a single-shot birth control lesson that, rather than presenting the pros and cons of various contraceptive methods, has teenagers identify themselves as at high, low, or no risk of pregnancy. Students estimate the number of classmates who are in each category and then assess whether they personally are at risk of an unintended pregnancy. In general, teens overestimate the number of classmates who are sexually active. This approach seems to make the ensuing discussion of contraceptive methods more meaningful. This discussion presents the condom and foam, the sponge, and visiting a family planning clinic. After this 40 minute presentation, fewer adolescents report being afraid of contraceptive side effects; they also have more knowledge about the efficacy and availability of different methods. A lesson in preparation is centered around a videotape entitled "Swept Away is Not Okay." It shows a teen couple going to a family planning clinic before they ever have intercourse. This strategy of encouraging adolescents to seek contraception before sexual involvement begins is considered more realistic than pressuring teens to abstain from sex. School officials and teachers have been receptive to this educational approach, viewing it as presenting important public health information.

  11. Visualization of metallodrugs in single cells by secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kui; Jia, Feifei; Zheng, Wei; Luo, Qun; Zhao, Yao; Wang, Fuyi

    2017-07-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry, including nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), has emerged as a powerful tool for biological imaging, especially for single cell imaging. SIMS imaging can provide information on subcellular distribution of endogenous and exogenous chemicals, including metallodrugs, from membrane through to cytoplasm and nucleus without labeling, and with high spatial resolution and chemical specificity. In this mini-review, we summarize recent progress in the field of SIMS imaging, particularly in the characterization of the subcellular distribution of metallodrugs. We anticipate that the SIMS imaging method will be widely applied to visualize subcellular distributions of drugs and drug candidates in single cells, exerting significant influence on early drug evaluation and metabolism in medicinal and pharmaceutical chemistry. Recent progress of SIMS applications in characterizing the subcellular distributions of metallodrugs was summarized.

  12. Three-dimensional atomic-image reconstruction from a single-energy Si(100) photoelectron hologram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, T.; Agui, A.; Yoshigoe, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: J. J. Barton proposed a basic algorithm for three-dimensional atomic-image reconstruction from photoelectron hologram, which is based on the Fourier transform(FT). In the use of a single-energy hologram, the twin-image appears in principle. The twin image disappears in the use of multi-energy hologram, which requires longer measuring time and variable-energy light source. But the reconstruction in the use of a simple FT is difficult because the scattered electron wave is not s-symmetric wave. Many theoretical and experimental approaches based on the FT have been researched. We propose a new algorithm so-called 'scattering pattern matrix', which is not based on the FT. The algorithm utilizes the 'scattering pattern', and iterative gradient method. Real space image can be reconstructed from a single-energy hologram without initial model. In addition, the twin image disappears. We reconstructed the three-dimensional atomic image of Si bulk structure from an experimental single-energy hologram of Si(100) 2s emission, which is shown The experiment was performed with using a Al-K α light source. The experimental setup is shown in. Then we calculated a vertical slice image of the reconstructed Si bulk structure, which is shown. The atomic images appear around the expected positions

  13. Assessment of dosimetrical performance in 11 Varian a-Si500 electronic portal imaging devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavuma, Awusi; Glegg, Martin; Currie, Garry; Elliott, Alex

    2008-01-01

    Dosimetrical characteristics of 11 Varian a-Si-500 electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) in clinical use for periods ranging between 10 and 86 months were investigated for consistency of performance and portal dosimetry implications. Properties studied include short-term reproducibility, signal linearity with monitor units, response to reference beam, signal uniformity across the detector panel, signal dependence on field size, dose-rate influence, memory effects and image profiles as a function of monitor units. The EPID measurements were also compared with those of the ionization chambers' to ensure stability of the linear accelerators. Depending on their clinical installation date, the EPIDs were interfaced with one of the two different acquisition control software packages, IAS2/IDU-II or IAS3/IDU-20. Both the EPID age and image acquisition system influenced the dosimetric characteristics with the newer version (IAS3 with IDU-20) giving better data reproducibility and linearity fit than the older version (IAS2 with IDU-II). The relative signal response (uniformity) after 50 MU was better than 95% of the central value and independent of detector. Sensitivity for all EPIDs reduced continuously with increasing dose rates for the newer image acquisition software. In the dose-rate range 100-600 MU min -1 , the maximum variation in sensitivity ranged between 1 and 1.8% for different EPIDs. For memory effects, the increase in the measured signal at the centre of the irradiated field for successive images was within 1.8% and 1.0% for the older and newer acquisition systems, respectively. Image profiles acquired at a lower MU in the radial plane (gun-target) had gradients in measured pixel values of up to 25% for the older system. Detectors with software/hardware versions IAS3/IDU-20 have a high degree of accuracy and are more suitable for routine quantitative IMRT dosimetrical verification.

  14. Diffractive optical variable image devices generated by maskless interferometric lithography for optical security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Alexandre; Rebordão, José M.

    2011-05-01

    In optical security (protection against forgery and counterfeit of products and documents) the problem is not exact reproduction but the production of something sufficiently similar to the original. Currently, Diffractive Optically Variable Image Devices (DOVID), that create dynamic chromatic effects which may be easily recognized but are difficult to reproduce, are often used to protect important products and documents. Well known examples of DOVID for security are 3D or 2D/3D holograms in identity documents and credit cards. Others are composed of shapes with different types of microstructures yielding by diffraction to chromatic dynamic effects. A maskless interferometric lithography technique to generate DOVIDs for optical security is presented and compared to traditional techniques. The approach can be considered as a self-masking focused holography on planes tilted with respect to the reference optical axes of the system, and is based on the Scheimpflug and Hinge rules. No physical masks are needed to ensure optimum exposure of the photosensitive film. The system built to demonstrate the technique relies on the digital mirrors device MOEMS technology from Texas Instruments' Digital Light Processing. The technique is linear on the number of specified colors and does not depend either on the area of the device or the number of pixels, factors that drive the complexity of dot-matrix based systems. The results confirmed the technique innovation and capabilities in the creation of diffractive optical elements for security against counterfeiting and forgery.

  15. A delivery device for presentation of tactile stimuli during functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, Robert W; Miqueé, Aline; Xerri, Christian; Zennou-Azogui, Yoh'i; Rainville, Constant; Dumoulin, André; Marineau, Daniel

    2007-01-30

    We describe a novel stimulus delivery system designed to present tactile stimuli to a subject in the tunnel of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. Using energy from an air-driven piston to turn a wheel, the device advances a conveyor belt with a pre-determined sequence of stimuli that differ in their spatial features into the tunnel of the MRI. The positioning of one or several stimulus objects in a window near the subject's hand is controlled by a photoelectric device that detects periodic openings in the conveyor belt. Using this electric signal to position each presentation avoids cumulative positioning errors and provides a signal related to the progression of the experiment. We used a series of shapes that differed in their spatial features but the device could carry stimuli with a diversity of shapes and textures. This flexibility allows the experimenter to design a wide variety of psychophysical experiments in the haptic world and possibly to compare and contrast these stimuli with the cognitive treatment of similar stimuli delivered to the other senses. Appropriate experimental design allows separation of motor, sensory and memory storage phases of mental processes.

  16. Augmented reality with image registration, vision correction and sunlight readability via liquid crystal devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Jen; Chen, Po-Ju; Liang, Xiao; Lin, Yi-Hsin

    2017-03-27

    Augmented reality (AR), which use computer-aided projected information to augment our sense, has important impact on human life, especially for the elder people. However, there are three major challenges regarding the optical system in the AR system, which are registration, vision correction, and readability under strong ambient light. Here, we solve three challenges simultaneously for the first time using two liquid crystal (LC) lenses and polarizer-free attenuator integrated in optical-see-through AR system. One of the LC lens is used to electrically adjust the position of the projected virtual image which is so-called registration. The other LC lens with larger aperture and polarization independent characteristic is in charge of vision correction, such as myopia and presbyopia. The linearity of lens powers of two LC lenses is also discussed. The readability of virtual images under strong ambient light is solved by electrically switchable transmittance of the LC attenuator originating from light scattering and light absorption. The concept demonstrated in this paper could be further extended to other electro-optical devices as long as the devices exhibit the capability of phase modulations and amplitude modulations.

  17. High-performance imaging of stem cells using single-photon emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Moats, Rex A.; Hartsough, Neal E.; Meier, Dirk; Hugg, James W.; Yang, Tang; Gazit, Dan; Pelled, Gadi; Patt, Bradley E.

    2011-10-01

    Radiolabeled cells have been imaged for decades in the field of autoradiography. Recent advances in detector and microelectronics technologies have enabled the new field of "digital autoradiography" which remains limited to ex vivo specimens of thin tissue slices. The 3D field-of-view (FOV) of single cell imaging can be extended to millimeters if the low energy (10-30 keV) photon emissions of radionuclides are used for single-photon nuclear imaging. This new microscope uses a coded aperture foil made of highly attenuating elements such as gold or platinum to form the image as a kind of "lens". The detectors used for single-photon emission microscopy are typically silicon detectors with a pixel pitch less than 60 μm. The goal of this work is to image radiolabeled mesenchymal stem cells in vivo in an animal model of tendon repair processes. Single-photon nuclear imaging is an attractive modality for translational medicine since the labeled cells can be imaged simultaneously with the reparative processes by using the dual-isotope imaging technique. The details our microscope's two-layer gold aperture and the operation of the energy-dispersive, pixellated silicon detector are presented along with the first demonstration of energy discrimination with a 57Co source. Cell labeling techniques have been augmented by genetic engineering with the sodium-iodide symporter, a type of reporter gene imaging method that enables in vivo uptake of free 99mTc or an iodine isotope at a time point days or weeks after the insertion of the genetically modified stem cells into the animal model. This microscopy work in animal research may expand to the imaging of reporter-enabled stem cells simultaneously with the expected biological repair process in human clinical trials of stem cell therapies.

  18. Application of image processing and different types of imaging devices for three-dimensional imaging of coal grains

    OpenAIRE

    Oleszko, K.; Mlynarczuk, M.; Sitek, L. (Libor); Staš, L. (Lubomír)

    2015-01-01

    Precise particle size measurements are important in many aspects of engineering geology, e.g. in mineral processing and the study of methane hazard in coal mines. The volume of grains, estimated exclusively on the basis of dimensions of the grains differs tens of percent from the volume obtained from 3D digital measurements. This confirms that full three-dimensional automatic imaging can be used in the measurements of the particles. The paper discusses the technique of three-dimensional imagi...

  19. Application of image processing and different types of imaging devices for three-dimensional imaging of coal grains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oleszko, K.; Mlynarczuk, M.; Sitek, Libor; Staš, Lubomír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 196, September 2015 (2015), s. 286-292 ISSN 0013-7952 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : 3D imaging * computed tomography * grain size * confocal microscope * optical profilometery Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 2.196, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S001379521530020X#

  20. A New Design of a Single-Device 3D Hall Sensor: Cross-Shaped 3D Hall Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Tang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new single-device three-dimensional (3D Hall sensor called a cross-shaped 3D Hall device is designed based on the five-contact vertical Hall device. Some of the device parameters are based on 0.18 μm BCDliteTM technology provided by GLOBALFOUNDRIES. Two-dimensional (2D and 3D finite element models implemented in COMSOL are applied to understand the device behavior under a constant magnetic field. Besides this, the influence of the sensing contacts, active region’s depth, and P-type layers are taken into account by analyzing the distribution of the voltage along the top edge and the current density inside the devices. Due to the short-circuiting effect, the sensing contacts lead to degradation in sensitivities. The P-type layers and a deeper active region in turn are responsible for the improvement of sensitivities. To distinguish the P-type layer from the active region which plays the dominant role in reducing the short-circuiting effect, the current-related sensitivity of the top edge (Stop is defined. It is found that the short-circuiting effect fades as the depth of the active region grows. Despite the P-type layers, the behavior changes a little. When the depth of the active region is 7 μm and the thickness of the P-type layers is 3 μm, the sensitivities in the x, y, and z directions can reach 91.70 V/AT, 92.36 V/AT, and 87.10 V/AT, respectively.