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Sample records for single gantry arc

  1. Volumetric modulated arc therapy: IMRT in a single gantry arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, Karl

    2008-01-01

    In this work a novel plan optimization platform is presented where treatment is delivered efficiently and accurately in a single dynamically modulated arc. Improvements in patient care achieved through image-guided positioning and plan adaptation have resulted in an increase in overall treatment times. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has also increased treatment time by requiring a larger number of beam directions, increased monitor units (MU), and, in the case of tomotherapy, a slice-by-slice delivery. In order to maintain a similar level of patient throughput it will be necessary to increase the efficiency of treatment delivery. The solution proposed here is a novel aperture-based algorithm for treatment plan optimization where dose is delivered during a single gantry arc of up to 360 deg. The technique is similar to tomotherapy in that a full 360 deg. of beam directions are available for optimization but is fundamentally different in that the entire dose volume is delivered in a single source rotation. The new technique is referred to as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf motion and number of MU per degree of gantry rotation is restricted during the optimization so that gantry rotation speed, leaf translation speed, and dose rate maxima do not excessively limit the delivery efficiency. During planning, investigators model continuous gantry motion by a coarse sampling of static gantry positions and fluence maps or MLC aperture shapes. The technique presented here is unique in that gantry and MLC position sampling is progressively increased throughout the optimization. Using the full gantry range will theoretically provide increased flexibility in generating highly conformal treatment plans. In practice, the additional flexibility is somewhat negated by the additional constraints placed on the amount of MLC leaf motion between gantry samples. A series of studies are performed that characterize the relationship

  2. Single-Arc IMRT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortfeld, Thomas; Webb, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The idea of delivering intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a multileaf collimator in a continuous dynamic mode during a single rotation of the gantry has recently gained momentum both in research and industry. In this note we investigate the potential of this Single-Arc IMRT technique at a conceptual level. We consider the original theoretical example case from Brahme et al that got the field of IMRT started. Using analytical methods, we derive deliverable intensity 'landscapes' for Single-Arc as well as standard IMRT and Tomotherapy. We find that Tomotherapy provides the greatest flexibility in shaping intensity landscapes and that it allows one to deliver IMRT in a way that comes close to the ideal case in the transverse plane. Single-Arc and standard IMRT make compromises in different areas. Only in relatively simple cases that do not require substantial intensity modulation will Single-Arc be dosimetrically comparable to Tomotherapy. Compared with standard IMRT, Single-Arc could be dosimetrically superior in certain cases if one is willing to accept the spreading of low dose values over large volumes of normal tissue. In terms of treatment planning, Single-Arc poses a more challenging optimization problem than Tomotherapy or standard IMRT. We conclude that Single-Arc holds potential as an efficient IMRT technique especially for relatively simple cases. In very complex cases, Single-Arc may unduly compromise the quality of the dose distribution, if one tries to keep the treatment time below 2 min or so. As with all IMRT techniques, it is important to explore the tradeoff between plan quality and the efficiency of its delivery carefully for each individual case. (note)

  3. Influence of increment of gantry angle and number of arcs on esophageal volumetric modulated arc therapy planning in Monaco planning system: A planning study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Nithya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the influence of the increment of gantry angle and the number of arcs on esophageal volumetric modulated arc therapy plan. All plans were done in Monaco planning system for Elekta Synergy linear accelerator with 80 multileaf collimator (MLC. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT plans were done with different increment of gantry angle like 15 o , 20 o , 30 o and 40 o . The remaining parameters were similar for all the plans. The results were compared. To compare the plan quality with number of arcs, VMAT plans were done with single and dual arc with increment of gantry angle of 20 o . The dose to gross tumor volume (GTV for 60 Gy and planning target volume (PTV for 48 Gy was compared. The dosimetric parameters D 98% , D 95% , D 50% and D max of GTV were analyzed. The homogeneity index (HI and conformity index (CI of GTV were studied and the dose to 98% and 95% of PTV was analyzed. Maximum dose to spinal cord and planning risk volume of cord (PRV cord was compared. The Volume of lung receiving 10 Gy, 20 Gy and mean dose was analyzed. The volume of heart receiving 30 Gy and 45 Gy was compared. The volume of normal tissue receiving greater than 2 Gy and 5 Gy was compared. The number of monitor units (MU required to deliver the plans were compared. The plan with larger increment of gantry angle proved to be superior to smaller increment of gantry angle plans in terms of dose coverage, HI, CI and normal tissue sparing. The number of arcs did not make any difference in the quality of the plan.

  4. Dosimetric comparison between RapidArc and fixed gantry intensity modulated radiation therapy in treatment of liver carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Changsheng; Yin Yong; Liu Tonghai; Chen Jinhu; Sun Tao; Lin Xiutong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare the dosimetric difference of RapidArc and fixed gantry IMRT for liver carcinoma. Methods: The CT data of 10 liver cancer patients were used to design 3 groups of treatment plan: IMRT plan, single arc RapidArc plan (RA1), and dual arc RapidArc plan (RA2). The planning target volume (PTV) dosimetric distribution, the organs at risk (OAR) dose, the normal tissue dose, mornitor units (MU) and treatment time were compared. Results: The maximum dose of PTV in RA1 and RA2 plans were lower than that of IMRT (Z=-2.0990, -2.666, P 40 of stomach small bowel than IMRT plan, but higher in mean dose of left kidney (Z=-1.988, -2.191, P 5 , V 10 and 15 of healthy tissue in RapidArc plan groups were higher than those in IMRT plan, while the values of V 20 , V 25 and V 30 of healthy tissue in RapidArc plan groups were than those in IMRT plan. The number of computed MU/fraction of Rapid Arc plan was 40% or 46% of IMRT plan and the treatment time was 30% and 40% of IMRT. Conclusions: RapidArc showed improvements in conformity index and healthy tissue sparing with uncompromised target coverage. RapidArc could lead to the less MU and shorter delivery time compared to IMRT. (authors)

  5. Detection and correction for EPID and gantry sag during arc delivery using cine EPID imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Sabet, Mahsheed; O'Connor, Daryl J; McCowan, Peter M; McCurdy, Boyd M C; Greer, Peter B

    2012-02-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have been studied and used for pretreatment and in-vivo dosimetry applications for many years. The application of EPIDs for dosimetry in arc treatments requires accurate characterization of the mechanical sag of the EPID and gantry during rotation. Several studies have investigated the effects of gravity on the sag of these systems but each have limitations. In this study, an easy experiment setup and accurate algorithm have been introduced to characterize and correct for the effect of EPID and gantry sag during arc delivery. Three metallic ball bearings were used as markers in the beam: two of them fixed to the gantry head and the third positioned at the isocenter. EPID images were acquired during a 360° gantry rotation in cine imaging mode. The markers were tracked in EPID images and a robust in-house developed MATLAB code was used to analyse the images and find the EPID sag in three directions as well as the EPID + gantry sag by comparison to the reference gantry zero image. The algorithm results were then tested against independent methods. The method was applied to compare the effect in clockwise and counter clockwise gantry rotations and different source-to-detector distances (SDDs). The results were monitored for one linear accelerator over a course of 15 months and six other linear-accelerators from two treatment centers were also investigated using this method. The generalized shift patterns were derived from the data and used in an image registration algorithm to correct for the effect of the mechanical sag in the system. The Gamma evaluation (3%, 3 mm) technique was used to investigate the improvement in alignment of cine EPID images of a fixed field, by comparing both individual images and the sum of images in a series with the reference gantry zero image. The mechanical sag during gantry rotation was dependent on the gantry angle and was larger in the in-plane direction, although the patterns were not

  6. Investigation of the mechanical performance of Siemens linacs components during arc: gantry, MLC, and electronic portal imaging device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Häring, Peter; Riis, Hans L; Zimmermann, Sune J; Ebert, Martin A

    2015-01-01

    In radiotherapy treatments, it is crucial to monitor the performance of linac components including gantry, collimation system, and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) during arc deliveries. In this study, a simple EPID-based measurement method is suggested in conjunction with an algorithm to investigate the stability of these systems at various gantry angles with the aim of evaluating machine-related errors in treatments. The EPID sag, gantry sag, changes in source-to-detector distance (SDD), EPID and collimator skewness, EPID tilt, and the sag in leaf bank assembly due to linac rotation were separately investigated by acquisition of 37 EPID images of a simple phantom with five ball bearings at various gantry angles. A fast and robust software package was developed for automated analysis of image data. Three Siemens linacs were investigated. The average EPID sag was within 1 mm for all tested linacs. Two machines showed >1 mm gantry sag. Changes in the SDD values were within 7.5 mm. EPID skewness and tilt values were <1° in all machines. The maximum sag in leaf bank assembly was <1 mm. The method and software developed in this study provide a simple tool for effective investigation of the behavior of Siemens linac components with gantry rotation. Such a comprehensive study has been performed for the first time on Siemens machines.

  7. Investigation of the mechanical performance of Siemens linacs components during arc: gantry, MLC, and electronic portal imaging device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowshanfarzad P

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pejman Rowshanfarzad,1 Peter Häring,2 Hans L Riis,3 Sune J Zimmermann,3 Martin A Ebert1,4 1School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia; 2German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ, Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg, Germany; 3Radiofysisk Laboratorium, Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark; 4Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, WA, Australia Background: In radiotherapy treatments, it is crucial to monitor the performance of linac components including gantry, collimation system, and electronic portal imaging device (EPID during arc deliveries. In this study, a simple EPID-based measurement method is suggested in conjunction with an algorithm to investigate the stability of these systems at various gantry angles with the aim of evaluating machine-related errors in treatments. Methods: The EPID sag, gantry sag, changes in source-to-detector distance (SDD, EPID and collimator skewness, EPID tilt, and the sag in leaf bank assembly due to linac rotation were separately investigated by acquisition of 37 EPID images of a simple phantom with five ball bearings at various gantry angles. A fast and robust software package was developed for automated analysis of image data. Three Siemens linacs were investigated. Results: The average EPID sag was within 1 mm for all tested linacs. Two machines showed >1 mm gantry sag. Changes in the SDD values were within 7.5 mm. EPID skewness and tilt values were <1° in all machines. The maximum sag in leaf bank assembly was <1 mm. Conclusion: The method and software developed in this study provide a simple tool for effective investigation of the behavior of Siemens linac components with gantry rotation. Such a comprehensive study has been performed for the first time on Siemens machines. Keywords: linac, Siemens, arc, sag, EPID, gantry

  8. Impact of gantry rotation time on plan quality and dosimetric verification. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) vs. intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasler, Marlies; Wirtz, Holger; Lutterbach, Johannes [Gemeinschaftspraxis fuer Strahlentherapie Singen-Friedrichshafen, Singen (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    To compare plan quality criteria and dosimetric accuracy of step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (ss-IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) using two different gantry rotation times. This retrospective planning study based on 20 patients was comprised of 10 prostate cancer (PC) and 10 head and neck (HN) cancer cases. Each plan contained two target volumes: a primary planning target volume (PTV) and a boost volume. For each patient, one ss-IMRT plan and two VMAT plans at 90 s (VMAT90) and 120 s (VMAT120) per arc were generated with the Pinnacle {sup copyright} planning system. Two arcs were provided for the PTV plans and a single arc for boost volumes. Dosimetric verification of the plans was performed using a 2D ionization chamber array placed in a full scatter phantom. VMAT reduced delivery time and monitor units for both treatment sites compared to IMRT. VMAT120 vs. VMAT90 increased delivery time and monitor units in PC plans without improving plan quality. For HN cases, VMAT120 provided comparable organs at risk sparing and better target coverage and conformity than VMAT90. In the VMAT plan verification, an average of 97.1% of the detector points passed the 3 mm, 3% {gamma} criterion, while in IMRT verification it was 98.8%. VMAT90, VMAT120, and IMRT achieved comparable treatment plans. Slower gantry movement in VMAT120 plans only improves dosimetric quality for highly complex targets.

  9. Impact of gantry rotation time on plan quality and dosimetric verification. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) vs. intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasler, Marlies; Wirtz, Holger; Lutterbach, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    To compare plan quality criteria and dosimetric accuracy of step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (ss-IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) using two different gantry rotation times. This retrospective planning study based on 20 patients was comprised of 10 prostate cancer (PC) and 10 head and neck (HN) cancer cases. Each plan contained two target volumes: a primary planning target volume (PTV) and a boost volume. For each patient, one ss-IMRT plan and two VMAT plans at 90 s (VMAT90) and 120 s (VMAT120) per arc were generated with the Pinnacle copyright planning system. Two arcs were provided for the PTV plans and a single arc for boost volumes. Dosimetric verification of the plans was performed using a 2D ionization chamber array placed in a full scatter phantom. VMAT reduced delivery time and monitor units for both treatment sites compared to IMRT. VMAT120 vs. VMAT90 increased delivery time and monitor units in PC plans without improving plan quality. For HN cases, VMAT120 provided comparable organs at risk sparing and better target coverage and conformity than VMAT90. In the VMAT plan verification, an average of 97.1% of the detector points passed the 3 mm, 3% γ criterion, while in IMRT verification it was 98.8%. VMAT90, VMAT120, and IMRT achieved comparable treatment plans. Slower gantry movement in VMAT120 plans only improves dosimetric quality for highly complex targets.

  10. Letter to the Editor on 'Single-Arc IMRT?'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Karl

    2009-04-21

    In the note 'Single Arc IMRT?' (Bortfeld and Webb 2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 N9-20), Bortfeld and Webb present a theoretical investigation of static gantry IMRT (S-IMRT), single-arc IMRT and tomotherapy. Based on their assumptions they conclude that single-arc IMRT is inherently limited in treating complex cases without compromising delivery efficiency. Here we present an expansion of their work based on the capabilities of the Varian RapidArc single-arc IMRT system. Using the same theoretical framework we derive clinically deliverable single-arc IMRT plans based on these specific capabilities. In particular, we consider the range of leaf motion, the ability to rapidly and continuously vary the dose rate and the choice of collimator angle used for delivery. In contrast to the results of Bortfeld and Webb, our results show that single-arc IMRT plans can be generated that closely match the theoretical optimum. The disparity in the results of each investigation emphasizes that the capabilities of the delivery system, along with the ability of the optimization algorithm to exploit those capabilities, are of particular importance in single-arc IMRT. We conclude that, given the capabilities available with the RapidArc system, single-arc IMRT can produce complex treatment plans that are delivered efficiently (in approximately 2 min).

  11. Dosimetric comparison of RapidArc with fixed gantry dynamic IMRT for loco-regionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Hao; Han Shukui; Sun Yan; Jiang Fan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare the dosimetric difference of RapidArc and fixed gantry angle dynamic IMRT (dIMRT) for loco-regionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods: Ten previously treated patients with loco-regionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma were replanned with RapidArc and dIMRT, respectively. The prescription dose was GTV 70 Gy/33 f and PTV 60 Gy/33 f. All plans met the requirement: 95% of PTV was covered by 60 Gy. Dose-volume histogram data, isodose distribution, monitor units, and treatment time were compared. Results: Dose distribution has no significant difference between the two techniques. RapidArc reduced the dose of the brainstem, mandible, and other normal tissues compared with dIMRT. Mean monitor units were 589.5 and 1381.0 for RapidArc and dIMRT (reduced by 57% relatively). Mean treatment time was 2.33 min and 7.82 min for RapidArc and dIMRT (reduced by 70% relatively). Conclusions: Compared with dIMRT, RapidArc achieves equal target coverage and OAR sparing while using fewer monitor units and less time during radiotherapy for patient with loco-regionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma. (authors)

  12. Roll and pitch set-up errors during volumetric modulated arc delivery: can adapting gantry and collimator angles compensate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmans-Holtzer, Nienke A; Hoffmans, Daan; Dahele, Max; Slotman, Ben J; Verbakel, Wilko F A R

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether adapting gantry and collimator angles can compensate for roll and pitch setup errors during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery. Previously delivered clinical plans for locally advanced head-and-neck (H&N) cancer (n = 5), localized prostate cancer (n = 2), and whole brain with simultaneous integrated boost to 5 metastases (WB + 5M, n = 1) were used for this study. Known rigid rotations were introduced in the planning CT scans. To compensate for these, in-house software was used to adapt gantry and collimator angles in the plan. Doses to planning target volumes (PTV) and critical organs at risk (OAR) were calculated with and without compensation and compared with the original clinical plan. Measurements in the sagittal plane in a polystyrene phantom using radiochromic film were compared by gamma (γ) evaluation for 2 H&N cancer patients. For H&N plans, the introduction of 2°-roll and 3°-pitch rotations reduced mean PTV coverage from 98.7 to 96.3%. This improved to 98.1% with gantry and collimator compensation. For prostate plans respective figures were 98.4, 97.5, and 98.4%. For WB + 5M, compensation worked less well, especially for smaller volumes and volumes farther from the isocenter. Mean comparative γ evaluation (3%, 1 mm) between original and pitched plans resulted in 86% γ plan restored the mean comparison to 96% γ < 1. Preliminary data suggest that adapting gantry and collimator angles is a promising way to correct roll and pitch set-up errors of < 3° during VMAT for H&N and prostate cancer.

  13. TU-CD-304-04: Scanning Field Total Body Irradiation Using Dynamic Arc with Variable Dose Rate and Gantry Speed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, B; Xu, H; Mutaf, Y; Prado, K [Univ. of Maryland School Of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Enable a scanning field total body irradiation (TBI) technique, using dynamic arcs, which is biologically equivalent to a moving couch TBI. Methods: Patient is treated slightly above the floor and the treatment field scans across the patient by a moving gantry. MLC positions change during gantry motion to keep same field opening at the level of the treatment plane (170 cm). This is done to mimic the same geometry as the moving couch TBI technique which has been used in our institution for over 10 years. The dose rate and the gantry speed are determined considering a constant speed of the moving field, variations in SSD and slanted depths resulting from oblique gantry angles. An Eclipse (Varian) planning system is commissioned to accommodate the extended SSD. The dosimetric foundations of the technique have been thoroughly investigated using phantom measurements. Results: Dose uniformity better than 2% across 180 cm length at 10cm depth is achieved by moving the gantry from −55 to +55 deg. Treatment range can be extended by increasing gantry range. No device such as a gravity-oriented compensator is needed to achieve a uniform dose. It is feasible to modify the dose distribution by adjusting the dose rate at each gantry angle to compensate for body thickness differences. Total treatment time for 2 Gy AP/PA fields is 40–50 minutes excluding patient set up time, at the machine dose rate of 100 MU/min. Conclusion: This novel yet transportable moving field technique enables TBI treatment in a small treatment room with less program development preparation than other techniques. Treatment length can be extended per need, and. MLC-based thickness compensation and partial lung blocking are also possible.

  14. Gantry cranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttekes, E.; Rijsenbrij, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Portal crane (1) for loading and/or unloading a ship having a multiplicity of bays for containers (10) comprising a gantry (2) with travelling gear (5) for supporting the gantry on a quay (13), a boom supported by the gantry made up of a horizontal beam (6) and a jib (7) that during loading and/or

  15. An EPID-based method for comprehensive verification of gantry, EPID and the MLC carriage positional accuracy in Varian linacs during arc treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; McGarry, Conor K; Barnes, Michael P; Sabet, Mahsheed; Ebert, Martin A

    2014-01-01

    In modern radiotherapy, it is crucial to monitor the performance of all linac components including gantry, collimation system and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) during arc deliveries. In this study, a simple EPID-based measurement method has been introduced in conjunction with an algorithm to investigate the stability of these systems during arc treatments with the aim of ensuring the accuracy of linac mechanical performance. The Varian EPID sag, gantry sag, changes in source-to-detector distance (SDD), EPID and collimator skewness, EPID tilt, and the sag in MLC carriages as a result of linac rotation were separately investigated by acquisition of EPID images of a simple phantom comprised of 5 ball-bearings during arc delivery. A fast and robust software package was developed for automated analysis of image data. Twelve Varian linacs of different models were investigated. The average EPID sag was within 1 mm for all tested linacs. All machines showed less than 1 mm gantry sag. Changes in SDD values were within 1.7 mm except for three linacs of one centre which were within 9 mm. Values of EPID skewness and tilt were negligible in all tested linacs. The maximum sag in MLC leaf bank assemblies was around 1 mm. The EPID sag showed a considerable improvement in TrueBeam linacs. The methodology and software developed in this study provide a simple tool for effective investigation of the behaviour of linac components with gantry rotation. It is reproducible and accurate and can be easily performed as a routine test in clinics

  16. SU-F-T-457: A Filmless Method for Measurement of Couch Translation Per Gantry Rotation and Couch Speed for Tomotherapy Using ArcCheck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, B; Wong, R; Geng, H; Lam, W; Cheung, K; Yu, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a filmless methodology based on an ArcCheck for QA measurement of the couch translation per gantry rotation and couch speed of a Tomotherapy unit. Methods: Two test plans recommended by TG148 were chosen for this study. A helical plan with 1 cm field size opened the leaves for 180 degrees at the 2nd, 7th and 12th of total 13 rotations and was used to verify if the couch travelled the expected distance per gantry rotation. The other test plan was a static plan with the gantry at 0°, 1cm field width and constant couch movement speed of 0.5mm/s. It was used for couch speed measurement. The ArcCheck was isocentrically set up and recorded movie files which took a snapshot exposure every 50ms. Due to the spiral pattern of diodes distribution, when one of the diodes of the ArcCheck located at the beam center, the dose profile as measured by the row of diodes which surrounded the center diode should have a symmetrical pattern. We divided the profile into left half A and right half B. Then a shape parameter was defined as S=Σ|(A−B)|/Σ(A+B). By searching the local minimum of S parameter, the beam center at different time could be located. The machine trajectory log data were also collected and analyzed for comparison. Results: The mean value of measured couch translation and couch speed by ArcCheck had less than 0.05% deviation from the planned values. For couch speed measurement, our result showed a mean value of 0.5002 with an uncertainty ±0.0031, which agreed very well with both the plan setting of 0.5 mm/s and the machine log data of 0.5005 mm/s. Conclusion: Couch translation measured using ArcCheck is accurate and comparable to the film-based measurement. This filmless method also provides a convenient and independent way for measuring couch speed.

  17. SU-F-T-457: A Filmless Method for Measurement of Couch Translation Per Gantry Rotation and Couch Speed for Tomotherapy Using ArcCheck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, B; Wong, R; Geng, H; Lam, W; Cheung, K; Yu, S [Hong Kong Sanatorium & Hospital, Hong Kong, N/A, Hong Kong (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a filmless methodology based on an ArcCheck for QA measurement of the couch translation per gantry rotation and couch speed of a Tomotherapy unit. Methods: Two test plans recommended by TG148 were chosen for this study. A helical plan with 1 cm field size opened the leaves for 180 degrees at the 2nd, 7th and 12th of total 13 rotations and was used to verify if the couch travelled the expected distance per gantry rotation. The other test plan was a static plan with the gantry at 0°, 1cm field width and constant couch movement speed of 0.5mm/s. It was used for couch speed measurement. The ArcCheck was isocentrically set up and recorded movie files which took a snapshot exposure every 50ms. Due to the spiral pattern of diodes distribution, when one of the diodes of the ArcCheck located at the beam center, the dose profile as measured by the row of diodes which surrounded the center diode should have a symmetrical pattern. We divided the profile into left half A and right half B. Then a shape parameter was defined as S=Σ|(A−B)|/Σ(A+B). By searching the local minimum of S parameter, the beam center at different time could be located. The machine trajectory log data were also collected and analyzed for comparison. Results: The mean value of measured couch translation and couch speed by ArcCheck had less than 0.05% deviation from the planned values. For couch speed measurement, our result showed a mean value of 0.5002 with an uncertainty ±0.0031, which agreed very well with both the plan setting of 0.5 mm/s and the machine log data of 0.5005 mm/s. Conclusion: Couch translation measured using ArcCheck is accurate and comparable to the film-based measurement. This filmless method also provides a convenient and independent way for measuring couch speed.

  18. Under conditions of large geometric miss, tumor control probability can be higher for static gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy compared to volume-modulated arc therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balderson, Michael; Brown, Derek; Johnson, Patricia; Kirkby, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare static gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in terms of tumor control probability (TCP) under scenarios involving large geometric misses, i.e., those beyond what are accounted for when margin expansion is determined. Using a planning approach typical for these treatments, a linear-quadratic–based model for TCP was used to compare mean TCP values for a population of patients who experiences a geometric miss (i.e., systematic and random shifts of the clinical target volume within the planning target dose distribution). A Monte Carlo approach was used to account for the different biological sensitivities of a population of patients. Interestingly, for errors consisting of coplanar systematic target volume offsets and three-dimensional random offsets, static gantry IMRT appears to offer an advantage over VMAT in that larger shift errors are tolerated for the same mean TCP. For example, under the conditions simulated, erroneous systematic shifts of 15 mm directly between or directly into static gantry IMRT fields result in mean TCP values between 96% and 98%, whereas the same errors on VMAT plans result in mean TCP values between 45% and 74%. Random geometric shifts of the target volume were characterized using normal distributions in each Cartesian dimension. When the standard deviations were doubled from those values assumed in the derivation of the treatment margins, our model showed a 7% drop in mean TCP for the static gantry IMRT plans but a 20% drop in TCP for the VMAT plans. Although adding a margin for error to a clinical target volume is perhaps the best approach to account for expected geometric misses, this work suggests that static gantry IMRT may offer a treatment that is more tolerant to geometric miss errors than VMAT.

  19. Under conditions of large geometric miss, tumor control probability can be higher for static gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy compared to volume-modulated arc therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderson, Michael; Brown, Derek; Johnson, Patricia; Kirkby, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare static gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in terms of tumor control probability (TCP) under scenarios involving large geometric misses, i.e., those beyond what are accounted for when margin expansion is determined. Using a planning approach typical for these treatments, a linear-quadratic-based model for TCP was used to compare mean TCP values for a population of patients who experiences a geometric miss (i.e., systematic and random shifts of the clinical target volume within the planning target dose distribution). A Monte Carlo approach was used to account for the different biological sensitivities of a population of patients. Interestingly, for errors consisting of coplanar systematic target volume offsets and three-dimensional random offsets, static gantry IMRT appears to offer an advantage over VMAT in that larger shift errors are tolerated for the same mean TCP. For example, under the conditions simulated, erroneous systematic shifts of 15mm directly between or directly into static gantry IMRT fields result in mean TCP values between 96% and 98%, whereas the same errors on VMAT plans result in mean TCP values between 45% and 74%. Random geometric shifts of the target volume were characterized using normal distributions in each Cartesian dimension. When the standard deviations were doubled from those values assumed in the derivation of the treatment margins, our model showed a 7% drop in mean TCP for the static gantry IMRT plans but a 20% drop in TCP for the VMAT plans. Although adding a margin for error to a clinical target volume is perhaps the best approach to account for expected geometric misses, this work suggests that static gantry IMRT may offer a treatment that is more tolerant to geometric miss errors than VMAT. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. SU-E-P-55: The Reaserch of Cervical Cancer Delivered with Constant Dose Rate and Gantry Speed Arc Therapy(CDR-CAS-IMAT) On Conventional Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R; Bai, W; Chi, Z; Gao, C; Xiaomei, F [The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China); Gao, Y [Hebei General Hospital, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Postoperative cervical cancer patients with large target volume and the target shape is concave, treatmented with static intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is time consuming. The purpose of this study is to investigate using constant dose rate and gantry speed arc therapy(CDR-CAS-IMAT) on conventional linear accelrator, by comparing with the IMRT technology to evaluate the performance of CDR-CAS-IMAT on postoperative cervical cancer patients. Methods: 18 cervical cancer patients treated with IMRT on Varian 23IX were replanted using CDR-CAS-IMAT. The plans were generated on Oncentra v4.1 planning system, PTV was prescribed to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. Plans were evaluated based on the ability to meet the dose volume histogram. The homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI) of target volume, the dose of organs at risk, radiation delivery time and monitor units were also compared. SPSS 19.0 software paired T-test analysis was carried out on the two sets of data. Results: Compared with the IMRT plans PTV’s CI (t= 3.85, P =0.001), CTV’s CI, HI, D90, D95, D98, V95, V98, V100 (t=4.21, −3.18, 2.13, 4.65, 7.79, 2.29, 6.00, 2.13, p=0.001, 0.005, 0.049, 0.000, 0.000, 0.035, 0.000, 0.049), and cord D2 and rectum V40 (t=−2.65, −2.47, p= P =0.017, 0.025), and treatment time and MU (t=−36.0, −6.26, P =0.000, 0.000) were better than that of IMRT group. But the IMRT plans in terms of decreasing bladder V50, bowel V30 (t=2.14, 3.00, P =0.048, 0.008) and low dose irradiation volume were superior to that of CDR-CAS-IMAT plans. There were no significant differences in other statistical index. Conclusion: Cervical cancer patients with CDR-CAS-IMAT on Varian Clinical 23IX can get equivalent or superior dose distribution compared with the IMRT technology. IMAT have much less treatment time and MU can reduce the uncertainty factor and patient discomfort in treatment. This work was supported by the Medical Science Foundation of the health department of Hebei

  1. Commissioning of a proton gantry equipped with dual x-ray imagers and a robotic patient positioner, and evaluation of the accuracy of single-beam image registration for this system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ning; Ghebremedhin, Abiel; Patyal, Baldev

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To check the accuracy of a gantry equipped with dual x-ray imagers and a robotic patient positioner for proton radiotherapy, and to evaluate the accuracy and feasibility of single-beam registration using the robotic positioner. Methods: One of the proton treatment rooms at their institution was upgraded to include a robotic patient positioner (couch) with 6 degrees of freedom and dual orthogonal kilovoltage x-ray imaging panels. The wander of the proton beam central axis, the wander of the beamline, and the orthogonal image panel crosswires from the gantry isocenter were measured for different gantry angles. The couch movement accuracy and couch wander from the gantry isocenter were measured for couch loadings of 50–300 lb with couch rotations from 0° to ±90°. The combined accuracy of the gantry, couch, and imagers was checked using a custom-made 30 × 30 × 30 cm 3 Styrofoam phantom with beekleys embedded in it. A treatment in this room can be set up and registered at a setup field location, then moved precisely to any other treatment location without requiring additional image registration. The accuracy of the single-beam registration strategy was checked for treatments containing multiple beams with different combinations of gantry angles, couch yaws, and beam locations. Results: The proton beam central axis wander from the gantry isocenter was within 0.5 mm with gantry rotations in both clockwise (CW) and counterclockwise (CCW) directions. The maximum wander of the beamline and orthogonal imager crosswire centers from the gantry isocenter were within 0.5 and 0.8 mm, respectively, with the gantry rotations in CW and CCW directions. Vertical and horizontal couch wanders from the gantry isocenter were within 0.4 and 1.3 mm, respectively, for couch yaw from 0° to ±90°. For a treatment with multiple beams with different gantry angles, couch yaws, and beam locations, the measured displacements of treatment beam locations from the one based on the

  2. "Riesenrad" Ion Gantry for Hadron Therapy, 3

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikt, Michael; Holy, P; Pullia, M

    1999-01-01

    When using accelerator beams for cancer therapy, the three-dimensional freedom afforded by a gantry helps the treatment planner to spread out surface doses, avoid directions that intercept vital organs and irradiate a volume that is conformal with the tumour. The general preference is for an iso-centric gantry turning 360° in the vertical plane around the patient bed with sufficient space to be able to orientate the patient through 360° in the horizontal plane. For hadrontherapy, gantries are impressive structures of the order of 10 m in diameter and 100 tons in weight and to date only proton gantries have been demonstrated to operate satisfactorily. The increased magnetic rigidity of say carbon ions will make ion gantries more difficult and costly to build. For this reason, exo-centric gantries and, in particular the so-called 'Riesenrad' gantry with a single 90° bending magnet, merit further attention. The power consumption is reduced and the heavy magnets with their counterbalance weight are reduced and...

  3. Variable dose rate single-arc IMAT delivered with a constant dose rate and variable angular spacing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Grace; Earl, Matthew A; Yu, Cedric X

    2009-01-01

    Single-arc intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) has gained worldwide interest in both research and clinical implementation due to its superior plan quality and delivery efficiency. Single-arc IMAT techniques such as the Varian RapidArc(TM) deliver conformal dose distributions to the target in one single gantry rotation, resulting in a delivery time in the order of 2 min. The segments in these techniques are evenly distributed within an arc and are allowed to have different monitor unit (MU) weightings. Therefore, a variable dose-rate (VDR) is required for delivery. Because the VDR requirement complicates the control hardware and software of the linear accelerators (linacs) and prevents most existing linacs from delivering IMAT, we propose an alternative planning approach for IMAT using constant dose-rate (CDR) delivery with variable angular spacing. We prove the equivalence by converting VDR-optimized RapidArc plans to CDR plans, where the evenly spaced beams in the VDR plan are redistributed to uneven spacing such that the segments with larger MU weighting occupy a greater angular interval. To minimize perturbation in the optimized dose distribution, the angular deviation of the segments was restricted to ≤± 5 deg. This restriction requires the treatment arc to be broken into multiple sectors such that the local MU fluctuation within each sector is reduced, thereby lowering the angular deviation of the segments during redistribution. The converted CDR plans were delivered with a single gantry sweep as in the VDR plans but each sector was delivered with a different value of CDR. For four patient cases, including two head-and-neck, one brain and one prostate, all CDR plans developed with the variable spacing scheme produced similar dose distributions to the original VDR plans. For plans with complex angular MU distributions, the number of sectors increased up to four in the CDR plans in order to maintain the original plan quality. Since each sector was

  4. 'Riesenrad' ion gantry for hadrontherapy: Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedikt, M.; Bryant, P.; Holy, P.; Pullia, M.

    1999-01-01

    When using accelerator beams for cancer therapy, the three-dimensional freedom afforded by a gantry helps the treatment planner to spread out surface doses, avoid directions that intercept vital organs and irradiate a volume that is conformal with the tumour. The general preference is for an iso-centric gantry turning 360 deg. in the vertical plane around the patient bed with sufficient space to be able to orientate the patient through 360 deg. in the horizontal plane. For hadrontherapy, gantries are impressive structures of the order of 10 m in diameter and 100 ton in weight and to date only proton gantries have been demonstrated to operate satisfactorily. The increased magnetic rigidity of say carbon ions will make ion gantries more difficult and costly to build. For this reason, exo-centric gantries and, in particular the so-called 'Riesenrad' gantry with a single 90 deg. bending magnet, merit further attention. The power consumption is reduced and the heavy magnets with their counterbalance weight are reduced and are kept close to the axis. The treatment room, which is lighter, is positioned at a larger radius, but only the patient bed requires careful alignment. An optics module called a 'rotator' is needed to match an incoming dispersion vector to the gantry in order to have an achromatic beam at the patient. A practical design is described that assumes the beam is derived from a slow-extraction scheme in a synchrotron and that the beam sizes are controlled by modules in the transfer line. Magnetic scanning is integrated into the gantry optics for both transverse directions

  5. `Riesenrad' ion gantry for hadrontherapy: Part III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikt, M.; Bryant, P.; Holy, P.; Pullia, M.

    1999-07-01

    When using accelerator beams for cancer therapy, the three-dimensional freedom afforded by a gantry helps the treatment planner to spread out surface doses, avoid directions that intercept vital organs and irradiate a volume that is conformal with the tumour. The general preference is for an iso-centric gantry turning 360° in the vertical plane around the patient bed with sufficient space to be able to orientate the patient through 360° in the horizontal plane. For hadrontherapy, gantries are impressive structures of the order of 10 m in diameter and 100 ton in weight and to date only proton gantries have been demonstrated to operate satisfactorily. The increased magnetic rigidity of say carbon ions will make ion gantries more difficult and costly to build. For this reason, exo-centric gantries and, in particular the so-called `Riesenrad' gantry with a single 90° bending magnet, merit further attention. The power consumption is reduced and the heavy magnets with their counterbalance weight are reduced and are kept close to the axis. The treatment room, which is lighter, is positioned at a larger radius, but only the patient bed requires careful alignment. An optics module called a `rotator' is needed to match an incoming dispersion vector to the gantry in order to have an achromatic beam at the patient. A practical design is described that assumes the beam is derived from a slow-extraction scheme in a synchrotron and that the beam sizes are controlled by modules in the transfer line. Magnetic scanning is integrated into the gantry optics for both transverse directions.

  6. Sci-Thur PM - Colourful Interactions: Highlights 08: ARC TBI using Single-Step Optimized VMAT Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, Alana; Gordon, Deborah; Moore, Roseanne; Balogh, Alex; Pierce, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This work outlines a new TBI delivery technique to replace a lateral POP full bolus technique. The new technique is done with VMAT arc delivery, without bolus, treating the patient prone and supine. The benefits of the arc technique include: increased patient experience and safety, better dose conformity, better organ at risk sparing, decreased therapist time and reduction of therapist injuries. Methods: In this work we build on a technique developed by Jahnke et al. We use standard arc fields with gantry speeds corrected for varying distance to the patient followed by a single step VMAT optimization on a patient CT to increase dose inhomogeneity and to reduce dose to the lungs (vs. blocks). To compare the arc TBI technique to our full bolus technique, we produced plans on patient CTs for both techniques and evaluated several dosimetric parameters using an ANOVA test. Results and Conclusions: The arc technique is able reduce both the hot areas to the body (D2% reduced from 122.2% to 111.8% p<0.01) and the lungs (mean lung dose reduced from 107.5% to 99.1%, p<0.01), both statistically significant, while maintaining coverage (D98% = 97.8% vs. 94.6%, p=0.313, not statistically significant). We developed a more patient and therapist-friendly TBI treatment technique that utilizes single-step optimized VMAT plans. It was found that this technique was dosimetrically equivalent to our previous lateral technique in terms of coverage and statistically superior in terms of reduced lung dose.

  7. Sci-Thur PM - Colourful Interactions: Highlights 08: ARC TBI using Single-Step Optimized VMAT Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, Alana; Gordon, Deborah; Moore, Roseanne; Balogh, Alex; Pierce, Greg [Tom Baker Cancer Centre (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: This work outlines a new TBI delivery technique to replace a lateral POP full bolus technique. The new technique is done with VMAT arc delivery, without bolus, treating the patient prone and supine. The benefits of the arc technique include: increased patient experience and safety, better dose conformity, better organ at risk sparing, decreased therapist time and reduction of therapist injuries. Methods: In this work we build on a technique developed by Jahnke et al. We use standard arc fields with gantry speeds corrected for varying distance to the patient followed by a single step VMAT optimization on a patient CT to increase dose inhomogeneity and to reduce dose to the lungs (vs. blocks). To compare the arc TBI technique to our full bolus technique, we produced plans on patient CTs for both techniques and evaluated several dosimetric parameters using an ANOVA test. Results and Conclusions: The arc technique is able reduce both the hot areas to the body (D2% reduced from 122.2% to 111.8% p<0.01) and the lungs (mean lung dose reduced from 107.5% to 99.1%, p<0.01), both statistically significant, while maintaining coverage (D98% = 97.8% vs. 94.6%, p=0.313, not statistically significant). We developed a more patient and therapist-friendly TBI treatment technique that utilizes single-step optimized VMAT plans. It was found that this technique was dosimetrically equivalent to our previous lateral technique in terms of coverage and statistically superior in terms of reduced lung dose.

  8. Gantry for computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelman, A.L.; O'Dell, W.R.; Brook, R.F.; Hein, P.W.; Brandt, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    A novel design of gantry for use in computed tomography is described in detail. In the new gantry, curved tracks are mounted to the laterally spaced apart sides of the frame which rotates and carries the detector and X-ray source. This permits the frame to be tilted either side of vertical enabling angular slices of body layers to be viewed and allows simplification of the algorithm which the computer uses for image reconstruction. A failsafe, solenoid brake is described which can lock the shaft against rotation. The gantry also contains a hoist mechanism which aids maintenance of the heavy X-ray tube and/or detector arrays. Explicit engineering details are presented. (U.K.)

  9. Gantry for computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelman, A.L.; Peterson, T.E.

    1981-01-01

    A novel design of gantry for use in computed tomography is described in detail. In the new gantry, curved tracks are mounted to the laterally spaced apart sides of the frame which rotates and carries the detector and X-ray source. This permits the frame to be tilted either side of vertical enabling angular slices of body layers to be viewed and allows simplification of the algorithm which the computer uses for image reconstruction. The tracks are supported on rollers which carry the substantial weight. Explicit engineering details are presented especially of the ball bearing races used in the rotation. (U.K.)

  10. Gantry for computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, R.T.; Hein, P.W.

    1981-01-01

    A novel design of gantry for use in computed tomography is described in detail. In the new gantry, curved tracks are mounted to the laterally spaced apart sides of the frame which rotates and carries the detector and X-ray source. This permits the frame to be tilted either side of vertical enabling angular slices of body layers to be viewed and allows simplification of the algorithm which the computer uses for image reconstruction. The tracks are supported on rollers which carry the substantial weight. Explicit engineering details are presented. (U.K.)

  11. VMATc: VMAT with constant gantry speed and dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Fei; Romeijn, H Edwin; Epelman, Marina A; Jiang, Steve B

    2015-01-01

    This article considers the treatment plan optimization problem for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with constant gantry speed and dose rate (VMATc). In particular, we consider the simultaneous optimization of multi-leaf collimator leaf positions and a constant gantry speed and dose rate. We propose a heuristic framework for (approximately) solving this optimization problem that is based on hierarchical decomposition. Specifically, an iterative algorithm is used to heuristically optimize dose rate and gantry speed selection, where at every iteration a leaf position optimization subproblem is solved, also heuristically, to find a high-quality plan corresponding to a given dose rate and gantry speed. We apply our framework to clinical patient cases, and compare the resulting VMATc plans to idealized IMRT, as well as full VMAT plans. Our results suggest that VMATc is capable of producing treatment plans of comparable quality to VMAT, albeit at the expense of long computation time and generally higher total monitor units. (paper)

  12. Feasibility of Single-Isocenter Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiosurgery for Treatment of Multiple Brain Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Grant M.; Popple, Richard A.; Young, P. Edward; Fiveash, John B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the relative plan quality of single-isocenter vs. multi-isocenter volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for radiosurgical treatment of multiple central nervous system metastases. Methods and Materials: VMAT plans were created using RapidArc technology for treatment of simulated patients with three brain metastases. The plans consisted of single-arc/single-isocenter, triple-arc (noncoplanar)/single-isocenter, and triple-arc (coplanar)/triple-isocenter configurations. All VMAT plans were normalized to deliver 100% of the 20-Gy prescription dose to all lesions. The plans were evaluated by calculation of Paddick and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conformity index scores, Paddick gradient index scores, and 12-Gy isodose volumes. Results: All plans were judged clinically acceptable, but differences were observed in the dosimetric parameters, with the use of multiple noncoplanar arcs showing small improvements in the conformity indexes compared with the single-arc/single-isocenter and triple-arc (coplanar)/triple-isocenter plans. Multiple arc plans (triple-arc [noncoplanar]/single-isocenter and triple-arc [coplanar]/triple-isocenter) showed smaller 12-Gy isodose volumes in scenarios involving three metastases spaced closely together, with only small differences noted among all plans involving lesions spaced further apart. Conclusion: Our initial results suggest that single-isocenter VMAT plans can be used to deliver conformity equivalent to that of multiple isocenter VMAT techniques. For targets that are closely spaced, multiple noncoplanar single-isocenter arcs might be required. VMAT radiosurgery for multiple targets using a single isocenter can be efficiently delivered, requiring less than one-half the beam time required for multiple isocenter set ups. VMAT radiosurgery will likely replace multi-isocenter techniques for linear accelerator-based treatment of multiple targets.

  13. The PSI Gantry 2: a second generation proton scanning gantry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroni, Eros; Bearpark, Ralph; Böhringer, Terence; Coray, Adolf; Duppich, Jürgen; Forss, Sven; George, David; Grossmann, Martin; Goitein, Gudrun; Hilbes, Christian; Jermann, Martin; Lin, Shixiong; Lomax, Antony; Negrazus, Marco; Schippers, Marco; Kotle, Goran

    2004-01-01

    PSI is still the only location in which proton therapy is applied using a dynamic beam scanning technique on a very compact gantry. Recently, this system is also being used for the application of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). This novel technical development and the success of the proton therapy project altogether have led PSI in Year 2000 to further expand the activities in this field by launching the project PROSCAN. The first step is the installation of a dedicated commercial superconducting cyclotron of a novel type. The second step is the development of a new gantry, Gantry 2. For Gantry 2 we have chosen an iso-centric compact gantry layout. The diameter of the gantry is limited to 7.5 m, less than in other gantry systems (approximately 10-12 m). The space in the treatment room is comfortably large, and the access on a fixed floor is possible any time around the patient table. Through the availability of a faster scanning system, it will be possible to treat the target volume repeatedly in the same session. For this purpose, the dynamic control of the beam intensity at the ion source and the dynamic variation of the beam energy will be used directly for the shaping of the dose.

  14. Design of a "Riesenrad" Ion Gantry for Hadrontherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Reimoser, S

    2000-01-01

    The benefit of hadrontherapy can be maximized by offering the possibility to deliver the particle beam from any direction in space towards the patient with the help of a medical gantry. For carbon ions, their increased (magnetic) beam rigidity yields considerable structural difficulties and has so far prevented a practical realization of an ion gantry. The concept of a 'Riesenrad' ion gantry promises to provide an effective and efficient solution. The basic idea is to deflect the ion beam with a single 90° dipole, which rotates around the incoming beam axis, and direct it towards the eccentrically positioned patient cabin. Inside the cabin similar conditions as exist in a classical isocentric treatment room prevail. The practical design of such a Riesenrad gantry, its structural principles and its function are presented. The underlying beam optics and its integration into the mechanical structure are explained. Aspects of safety, and flexibility are discussed.

  15. Comparison study of intensity modulated arc therapy using single or multiple arcs to intensity modulated radiation therapy for high-risk prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashamalla, Hani; Tejwani, Ajay; Parameritis, Loannis; Swamy, Uma; Luo, Pei Ching; Guirguis, Adel; Lavaf, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is a form of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) that delivers dose in single or multiple arcs. We compared IMRT plans versus single-arc field (1ARC) and multi-arc fields (3ARC) IMAT plans in high-risk prostate cancer. Sixteen patients were studied. Prostate (PTV P ), right pelvic (PTV RtLN ) and left pelvic lymph nodes (PTV LtLN ), and organs at risk were contoured. PTVP, PTV RtLN , and PTV LtLN received 50.40 Gy followed by a boost to PTV B of 28.80 Gy. Three plans were per patient generated: IMRT, 1ARC, and 3ARC. We recorded the dose to the PTV, the mean dose (D MEAN ) to the organs at risk, and volume covered by the 50% isodose. Efficiency was evaluated by monitor units (MU) and beam on time (BOT). Conformity index (CI), Paddick gradient index, and homogeneity index (HI) were also calculated. Average Radiation Therapy Oncology Group CI was 1.17, 1.20, and 1.15 for IMRT, 1ARC, and 3ARC, respectively. The plans' HI were within 1% of each other. The D MEAN of bladder was within 2% of each other. The rectum D MEAN in IMRT plans was 10% lower dose than the arc plans (p < 0.0001). The GI of the 3ARC was superior to IMRT by 27.4% (p = 0.006). The average MU was highest in the IMRT plans (1686) versus 1ARC (575) versus 3ARC (1079). The average BOT was 6 minutes for IMRT compared to 1.3 and 2.9 for 1ARC and 3ARC IMAT (p < 0.05). For high-risk prostate cancer, IMAT may offer a favorable dose gradient profile, conformity, MU and BOT compared to IMRT.

  16. A bench arc-furnace facility for fullerene and single-wall nanotubes synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber John G

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A metallic-sample arc-furnace was modified to synthesize fullerenes and nanotubes. The (reversible changes and the process for producing single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs are described.

  17. SU-F-T-501: Dosimetric Comparison of Single Arc-Per-Beam and Two Arc-Per-Beam VMAT Optimization in the Monaco Treatment Planning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalet, A; Cao, N; Meyer, J; Dempsey, C [University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA (United States); Richardson, H [Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric and practical effects of the Monaco treatment planning system “max arcs-per-beam” optimization parameter in pelvic radiotherapy treatments. Methods: A total of 17 previously treated patients were selected for this study with a range of pelvic disease site including prostate(9), bladder(1), uterus(3), rectum(3), and cervix(1). For each patient, two plans were generated, one using a arc-per-beam setting of ‘1’ and another with setting of ‘2’. The setting allows the optimizer to add a gantry direction change, creating multiple arc passes per beam sequence. Volumes and constraints established from the initial clinical treatments were used for planning. All constraints and dose coverage objects were kept the same between plans, and all plans were normalized to 99.7% to ensure 100% of the PTV received 95% of the prescription dose. We evaluated the PTV conformity index, homogeneity index, total monitor units, number of control points, and various dose volume histogram (DVH) points for statistical comparison (alpha=0.05). Results: We found for the 10 complex shaped target volumes (small central volumes with extending bilateral ‘arms’ to cover nodal regions) that the use of 2 arcs-per-beam achieved significantly lower average DVH values for the bladder V20 (p=0.036) and rectum V30 (p=0.001) while still meeting the high dose target constraints. DVH values for the simpler, more spherical PTVs were not found significantly different. Additionally, we found a beam delivery time reduction of approximately 25%. Conclusion: In summary, the dosimetric benefit, while moderate, was improved over a 1 arc-per-beam setting for complex PTVs, and equivalent in other cases. The overall reduced delivery time suggests that the use of multiple arcs-per-beam could lead to reduced patient on table time, increased clinical throughput, and reduced medical physics quality assurance effort.

  18. Single Pass Collider Memo: Gradient Perturbations of the SLC arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weng, W.T.; Sands, M.; /SLAC

    2016-12-16

    As the beam passes through the arcs, the gradient it encounters at each magnet differs from the design value. This deviation may be in part random and in part systematic. In this note we make estimates of the effects to be expected from both kinds of errors.

  19. SU-E-J-53: Dosimetric Evaluation at Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Treatment of Prostate Cancer Using Single Or Double Arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, D; Salmon, H; Pavan, G; Nardi, S; Anderson, E; Fairbanks, L; Junior, J; Cursino, F; Colodette, K [GRUPO COI, Rio De Janeiro, Rio De Janeiro (Brazil)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Evaluate and compare retrospective prostate treatment plan using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (RapidArc™ - Varian) technique with single or double arcs at COI Group. Methods: Ten patients with present prostate and seminal vesicle neoplasia were replanned as a target treatment volume and a prescribed dose of 78 Gy. A baseline planning, using single arc, was developed for each case reaching for the best result on PTV, in order to minimize the dose on organs at risk (OAR). Maintaining the same optimization objectives used on baseline plan, two copies for optimizing single and double arcs, have been developed. The plans were performed with 10 MV photon beam energy on Eclipse software, version 11.0, making use of Trilogy linear accelerator with Millenium HD120 multileaf collimator. Comparisons on PTV have been performed, such as: maximum, minimum and mean dose, gradient dose, as well as the quantity of monitor units, treatment time and homogeneity and conformity index. OARs constrains dose have been evaluated, comparing both optimizations. Results: Regarding PTV coverage, the difference of the minimum, maximum and mean dose were 1.28%, 0.7% and 0.2% respectively higher for single arc. When analyzed the index of homogeneity found a difference of 0.99% higher when compared with double arcs. However homogeneity index was 0.97% lower on average by using single arc. The doses on the OARs, in both cases, were in compliance to the recommended limits RTOG 0415. With the use of single arc, the quantity of monitor units was 10,1% lower, as well as the Beam-On time, 41,78%, when comparing double arcs, respectively. Conclusion: Concerning the optimization of patients with present prostate and seminal vesicle neoplasia, the use of single arc reaches similar objectives, when compared to double arcs, in order to decrease the treatment time and the quantity of monitor units.

  20. Carbon/proton therapy: A novel gantry design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Trbojevic

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available A major expense and design challenge in carbon/proton cancer therapy machines are the isocentric gantries. The transport elements of the carbon/proton gantry are presently made of standard conducting dipoles. Because of their large weight, of the order of ∼100   tons, the total weight of the gantry with support structure is ∼600   tons. The novel gantry design that is described here is made of fixed field superconducting magnets, thus dramatically reducing magnet size and weight compared to conventional magnets. In addition, the magnetic field is constant throughout the whole energy region required for tumor treatment. Particles make very small orbit offsets, passing through the beam line. The beam line is built of combined-function dipoles such as a nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient (NS-FFAG structure. The very large momentum acceptance NS-FFAG comes from very strong focusing and very small dispersion. The NS-FFAG small magnets almost completely filled the beam line. They first make a quarter (or close to a quarter of an arc bending upward and an additional half of a circle beam line finishing so that the beam is pointed towards the patient. At the end of the gantry, additional magnets with a fast response are required to allow radial scanning and to provide the required position and spot size. The fixed field combined-function magnets for the carbon gantry could be made of superconducting magnets by using low temperature superconducting cable or by using high temperature superconductors.

  1. Helical Tomotherapy Versus Single-Arc Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy: A Collaborative Dosimetric Comparison Between Two Institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong Yi; Tang, Grace; Welsh, James S.; Mohiuddin, Majid M.; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Yu, Cedric X.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Both helical tomotherapy (HT) and single-arc intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) deliver radiation using rotational beams with multileaf collimators. We report a dual-institution study comparing dosimetric aspects of these two modalities. Methods and Materials: Eight patients each were selected from the University of Maryland (UMM) and the University of Wisconsin Cancer Center Riverview (UWR), for a total of 16 cases. Four cancer sites including brain, head and neck (HN), lung, and prostate were selected. Single-arc IMAT plans were generated at UMM using Varian RapidArc (RA), and HT plans were generated at UWR using Hi-Art II TomoTherapy. All 16 cases were planned based on the identical anatomic contours, prescriptions, and planning objectives. All plans were swapped for analysis at the same time after final approval. Dose indices for targets and critical organs were compared based on dose-volume histograms, the beam-on time, monitor units, and estimated leakage dose. After the disclosure of comparison results, replanning was done for both techniques to minimize diversity in optimization focus from different operators. Results: For the 16 cases compared, the average beam-on time was 1.4 minutes for RA and 4.8 minutes for HT plans. HT provided better target dose homogeneity (7.6% for RA and 4.2% for HT) with a lower maximum dose (110% for RA and 105% for HT). Dose conformation numbers were comparable, with RA being superior to HT (0.67 vs. 0.60). The doses to normal tissues using these two techniques were comparable, with HT showing lower doses for more critical structures. After planning comparison results were exchanged, both techniques demonstrated improvements in dose distributions or treatment delivery times. Conclusions: Both techniques created highly conformal plans that met or exceeded the planning goals. The delivery time and total monitor units were lower in RA than in HT plans, whereas HT provided higher target dose uniformity.

  2. A comprehensive study of the mechanical performance of gantry, EPID and the MLC assembly in Elekta linacs during gantry rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowshanfarzad, P; Riis, H L; Zimmermann, S J; Ebert, M A

    2015-07-01

    In radiotherapy treatments, it is crucial to monitor the performance of linear accelerator (linac) components, including gantry, collimation system and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) during arc deliveries. In this study, a simple EPID-based measurement method is suggested in conjunction with an algorithm to investigate the stability of these systems at various gantry angles with the aim of evaluating machine-related errors in treatments. The EPID sag, gantry sag, changes in source-to-detector distance (SDD), EPID and collimator skewness, EPID tilt and the sag in leaf bank assembly owing to linac rotation were separately investigated by acquisition of 37 EPID images of a simple phantom with 5 ball bearings at various gantry angles. A fast and robust software package was developed for automated analysis of the image data. Nine Elekta AB (Stockholm, Sweden) linacs of different models and number of years in service were investigated. The average EPID sag was within 2 mm for all tested linacs. Some machines showed >1-mm gantry sag. Changes in the SDD values were within 1.3 cm. EPID skewness and tilt values were <1° in all machines. The maximum sag in multileaf collimator leaf bank assemblies was around 1 mm. A meaningful correlation was found between the age of the linacs and their mechanical performance. Conclusions and Advances in knowledge: The method and software developed in this study provide a simple tool for effective investigation of the behaviour of Elekta linac components with gantry rotation. Such a comprehensive study has been performed for the first time on Elekta machines.

  3. Motion planning for gantry mounted manipulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anders Lau; Petersen, Henrik Gordon

    2007-01-01

    We present a roadmap based planner for finding robot motions for gantry mounted manipulators for a line welding application at Odense Steel Shipyard (OSS). The robot motions are planned subject to constraints on when the gantry may be moved. We show that random sampling of gantry configurations...

  4. Conceptual and ion-optical designs of an isocentric gantry for light-ion cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorobiev, L.G.; Weick, H.; Wollnik, H.

    1998-02-01

    Conceptual and ion-optical designs of an isocentric gantry are presented. The gantry is designed for light-ion therapy using a 6 Tm carbon beam. Its main characteristics are: 5 m overall radius, 1.4 m drift to the patient, 20x10 cm 2 treatment field, and two-direction active parallel scanning of a fine focused pencil beam. To achieve these features, the beam scanners are optimally positioned upstream the last 90 bending section consisting of two 45 sector magnets with 4 oblique field boundaries and different apertures. The gantry concept is a compromise between 'barrel' and 'conical' gantry shapes and is likely the most space-saving configuration of single-plane isocentric gantries. This new so-called 'short barrel' configuration features also small aperture quadruple lenses, low intermediate dispersion and a fully achromatic beam transport system. Its overall dimensions stay close to the size of the existing proton gantries. (orig.)

  5. Along and Across Arc Variation of the Central Andes by Single Crystal Trace Element Analaysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelfelder, G.; Sundell, T.; Wilder, A.; Salings, E. E.

    2017-12-01

    Along arc and across arc geochemical variations at continental volcanic arcs are influenced by a number of factors including the composition and thickness of the continental crust, mantle heterogeneity, and fluids from the subducted slab. Whole rock geochemical trends along and across the arc front of the Central Volcanic Zone (CVZ) have been suggested to be primarily influenced by the composition and thickness of the crust. In the CVZ, Pb isotopic domains relate volcanic rock compositions to the crustal basement and systematically varies with crustal age. It has been shown repeatedly that incompatible trace element trends and trace element ratios can be used to infer systematic geochemical changes. However, there is no rule linking magmatic process or chemical heterogeneity/ homogeneity as a result of large crustal magma storage reservoirs such as MASH zones to the observed variation. Here we present a combination of whole rock major- and trace element data, isotopic data and in situ single crystal data from plagioclase, pyroxene and olivine for six stratovolcanoes along the arc front and in the back arc of the CVZ. We compare geochemical trends at the whole and single crystal scale. These volcanoes include lava flows and domes from Cerro Uturuncu in the back-arc, Aucanquilcha, Ollagüe, San Pedro-San Pablo, Lascar, and Lazufre from the arc front. On an arc-wide scale, whole rock samples of silicic lavas from these six composite volcanoes display systematically higher K2O, LILE, REE and HFSE contents and 87Sr/86Sr ratios with increasing distance from the arc-front. In contrast, the lavas have systematically lower Na2O, Sr, and Ba contents; LILE/HFSE ratios; 143Nd/144Nd ratios; and more negative Eu anomalies. Silicic magmas along the arc-front reflecting melting of young, mafic composition source rocks with the continental crust becoming increasingly older and more felsic toward the east. These trends are paralleled in the trace element compositions of plagioclase

  6. "Riesenrad" Ion Gantry for Hadron Therapy, 3

    OpenAIRE

    Benedikt, Michael; Bryant, P J; Holy, P; Pullia, M

    1999-01-01

    When using accelerator beams for cancer therapy, the three-dimensional freedom afforded by a gantry helps the treatment planner to spread out surface doses, avoid directions that intercept vital organs and irradiate a volume that is conformal with the tumour. The general preference is for an iso-centric gantry turning 360° in the vertical plane around the patient bed with sufficient space to be able to orientate the patient through 360° in the horizontal plane. For hadrontherapy, gantries are...

  7. A comprehensive study of the mechanical performance of gantry, EPID and the MLC assembly in Elekta linacs during gantry rotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowshanfarzad, P; Lynggaard Riis, Hans; Zimmermann, S J

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In radiotherapy treatments, it is crucial to monitor the performance of linear accelerator (linac) components, including gantry, collimation system and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) during arc deliveries. In this study, a simple EPID-based measurement method is suggested...... collimator leaf bank assemblies was around 1 mm. A meaningful correlation was found between the age of the linacs and their mechanical performance. Conclusions and Advances in knowledge: The method and software developed in this study provide a simple tool for effective investigation of the behaviour...

  8. The number of beams in IMRT-theoretical investigations and implications for single-arc IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortfeld, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The first purpose of this paper is to shed some new light on the old question of selecting the number of beams in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The second purpose is to illuminate the related issue of discrete static beam angles versus rotational techniques, which has recently re-surfaced due to the advancement of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). A specific objective is to find analytical expressions that allow one to address the points raised above. To make the problem mathematically tractable, it is assumed that the depth dose is flat and that the lateral dose profile can be approximated by polynomials, specifically Chebyshev polynomials of the first kind, of finite degree. The application of methods known from image reconstruction then allows one to answer the first question above as follows: the required number of beams is determined by the maximum degree of the polynomials used in the approximation of the beam profiles, which is a measure of the dose variability. There is nothing to be gained by using more beams. In realistic cases, in which the variability of the lateral dose profile is restricted in several ways, the required number of beams is of the order of 10-20. The consequence of delivering the beams with a 'leaf sweep' technique during continuous rotation of the gantry, as in VMAT, is also derived in an analytical form. The main effect is that the beams fan out, but the effect near the axis of rotation is small. This result can serve as a theoretical justification of VMAT. Overall the analytical derivations in this paper, albeit based on strong simplifications, provide new insights into, and a deeper understanding of, the beam angle problem in IMRT. The decomposition of the beam profiles into well-behaved and easily deliverable smooth functions, such as Chebyshev polynomials, could be of general interest in IMRT treatment planning.

  9. Emplacement Gantry Gap Analysis Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornley, R.

    2005-01-01

    To date, the project has established important to safety (ITS) performance requirements for structures, systems, and components (SSCs) based on the identification and categorization of event sequences that may result in a radiological release. These performance requirements are defined within the ''Nuclear Safety Design Bases for License Application'' (NSDB) (BSC 2005 [DIRS 171512], Table A-11). Further, SSCs credited with performing safety functions are classified as ITS. In turn, assurance that these SSCs will perform as required is sought through the use of consensus codes and standards. This gap analysis is based on the design completed for license application only. Accordingly, identification of ITS SSCs beyond those defined within the NSDB are based on designs that may be subject to further development during detail design. Furthermore, several design alternatives may still be under consideration to satisfy certain safety functions, and final selection will not be determined until further design development has occurred. Therefore, for completeness, alternative designs currently under consideration will be discussed throughout this study. This gap analysis will evaluate each code and standard identified within the ''Emplacement Gantry ITS Standards Identification Study'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173586]) to ensure each ITS performance requirement is fully satisfied. When a performance requirement is not fully satisfied, a gap is highlighted. This study will identify requirements to supplement or augment the code or standard to meet performance requirements. Further, this gap analysis will identify nonstandard areas of the design that will be subject to a design development plan. Nonstandard components and nonstandard design configurations are defined as areas of the design that do not follow standard industry practices or codes and standards. Whereby, assurance that an SSC will perform as required may not be readily sought though the use of consensus standards. This

  10. Preliminary design study for a corkscrew gantry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    For two years or more a group including the author has been working together to study some problems related to the design of a gentry system for flexible direction of a proton beam for clinical treatments. Some consideration was given to the classic gantry geometry. Attempting to reduce the radius of the gantry arm by reducing the drift space after the scattering foils led to an analysis of the significance of inverse square intensity effects. The conclusion reached is that a drift space of about 3 meters is required to preserve some skin sparing for larger targets. To circumvent this problem the scattering foils ere put somewhere inside or even before the gantry system, accepting the fact that magnet apertures would have to be increased. This gantry system has the interesting ability to produce oblong fields of excellent uniformity with reasonable efficiency, preferentially with the long axis of the field parallel to the axis of rotation. It was disappointing, however, to find that the overall size of the gantry with its counterweights remained very large. Another change in geometry was proposed therefore in order to reduce the space taken up by the gantry and its counterweight. The beam is bent 45 0 in the horizontal plane and then again by 45 0 so that it is pointing away from isocenter, but in the plan of rotation of the gantry. The beam is now bent in that plane of rotation until it is pointed at isocenter. This is accomplished by two bends of 135 0 each with a suitable drift space between them so that the beam is pointed vertically downward at isocenter. The three dimensional complexity of the beam trajectory led to the name Corkscrew Gantry

  11. Optical characterization of single-crystal diamond grown by DC arc plasma jet CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, Li-fu; Zhao, Yun; Wei, Jun-jun; Liu, Jin-long; Li, Cheng-ming; Lü, Fan-xiu

    2017-12-01

    Optical centers of single-crystal diamond grown by DC arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were examined using a low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) technique. The results show that most of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) complexes are present as NV- centers, although some H2 and H3 centers and B-aggregates are also present in the single-crystal diamond because of nitrogen aggregation resulting from high N2 incorporation and the high mobility of vacancies under growth temperatures of 950-1000°C. Furthermore, emissions of radiation-induced defects were also detected at 389, 467.5, 550, and 588.6 nm in the PL spectra. The reason for the formation of these radiation-induced defects is not clear. Although a Ni-based alloy was used during the diamond growth, Ni-related emissions were not detected in the PL spectra. In addition, the silicon-vacancy (Si-V)-related emission line at 737 nm, which has been observed in the spectra of many previously reported microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) synthetic diamonds, was absent in the PL spectra of the single-crystal diamond prepared in this work. The high density of NV- centers, along with the absence of Ni-related defects and Si-V centers, makes the single-crystal diamond grown by DC arc plasma jet CVD a promising material for applications in quantum computing.

  12. Computerized tomographic x-ray scanner system and gantry assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyd, D.P.; Lanzara, G.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a scanner assembly. It comprises: a support head, a C-shaped gantry, means for supporting the gantry in the support head for rotating movement, an x-ray source mounted on one side of the gantry for independent movement with respect to a detector array along the gantry, the x-ray source projecting x-rays across the gantry, and a detector array mounted on the other side of a gantry for independent movement with respect to the x-ray source along the gantry, the detector array serving to receive the projected x-rays

  13. Simultaneous synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene in a magnetically-enhanced arc plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Shashurin, Alexey; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Keidar, Michael

    2012-02-02

    Carbon nanostructures such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and graphene attract a deluge of interest of scholars nowadays due to their very promising application for molecular sensors, field effect transistor and super thin and flexible electronic devices(1-4). Anodic arc discharge supported by the erosion of the anode material is one of the most practical and efficient methods, which can provide specific non-equilibrium processes and a high influx of carbon material to the developing structures at relatively higher temperature, and consequently the as-synthesized products have few structural defects and better crystallinity. To further improve the controllability and flexibility of the synthesis of carbon nanostructures in arc discharge, magnetic fields can be applied during the synthesis process according to the strong magnetic responses of arc plasmas. It was demonstrated that the magnetically-enhanced arc discharge can increase the average length of SWCNT (5), narrow the diameter distribution of metallic catalyst particles and carbon nanotubes (6), and change the ratio of metallic and semiconducting carbon nanotubes (7), as well as lead to graphene synthesis (8). Furthermore, it is worthwhile to remark that when we introduce a non-uniform magnetic field with the component normal to the current in arc, the Lorentz force along the J×B direction can generate the plasmas jet and make effective delivery of carbon ion particles and heat flux to samples. As a result, large-scale graphene flakes and high-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes were simultaneously generated by such new magnetically-enhanced anodic arc method. Arc imaging, scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy were employed to analyze the characterization of carbon nanostructures. These findings indicate a wide spectrum of opportunities to manipulate with the properties of nanostructures produced in plasmas by means of controlling the

  14. Electromagnetic MUSIC-type imaging of perfectly conducting, arc-like cracks at single frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Won-Kwang; Lesselier, Dominique

    2009-11-01

    We propose a non-iterative MUSIC (MUltiple SIgnal Classification)-type algorithm for the time-harmonic electromagnetic imaging of one or more perfectly conducting, arc-like cracks found within a homogeneous space R2. The algorithm is based on a factorization of the Multi-Static Response (MSR) matrix collected in the far-field at a single, nonzero frequency in either Transverse Magnetic (TM) mode (Dirichlet boundary condition) or Transverse Electric (TE) mode (Neumann boundary condition), followed by the calculation of a MUSIC cost functional expected to exhibit peaks along the crack curves each half a wavelength. Numerical experimentation from exact, noiseless and noisy data shows that this is indeed the case and that the proposed algorithm behaves in robust manner, with better results in the TM mode than in the TE mode for which one would have to estimate the normal to the crack to get the most optimal results.

  15. SU-F-T-207: Does the Greater Flexibility of Pencil Beam Scanning Reduce the Need for a Proton Gantry?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, S; Depauw, N; Flanz, J; Adams, J; Gorissen, BL; Shih, H; Bortfeld, T; Lu, H [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Gantry-less proton treatment facility could lower the capital cost of proton therapy. This study investigates the dosimetric feasibility of using only coplanar pencil beam scanning (PBS) beams for those patients who had beam angles that would not have been deliverable without the gantry. Those coplanar beams are implemented on gantry-less horizontal beam-line with patients in sitting or standing positions. Methods: We have selected ten patients (seven head-and-neck, one thoracic, one abdominal and one pelvic case) with clinically delivered double scattering (DS) or PBS treatment plans with beam angles that were challenging to achieve without a gantry. After removing these beams angles, PBS plans were optimized for gantry-less intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) or single field optimization (SFO) with multi-criteria optimization (MCO). For head-and-neck patients who were treated by DS, we generated PBS plans with non-coplanar beams for comparison. Dose-volume-histograms (DVHs), target homogeneity index (HI), mean dose, D-2 and D-98 were reported. Robustness analysis was performed with ±2.5 mm setup errors and ±3.5% range uncertainties for three head-and-neck patients. Results: PBS-gantry-less plans provided more homogenous target coverage and significant improvements on organs-at-risk (OARs) sparing, compared to passive scattering treatments with a gantry. The PBS gantry-less treatments reduced the HI for target coverage by 1.3% to 47.2%, except for a suprasellar patient and a liver patient. The PBS-gantry-less plans reduced the D-mean of OARs by 3.6% to 67.4%. The PBS-gantry plans had similar target coverage and only marginal improvements on OAR sparing as compared to the PBS-gantry-less plans. These two PBS plans also had similar robustness relative to range uncertainties and setup errors. Conclusion: The gantry-less plans have with less mean dose to OARs and more homogeneous target coverage. Although the PBS-gantry plans have slightly improved

  16. Accuracy in radiosurgery: The influence of collimator diameters and arc weights on the dose distribution for single target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plazas, M S [National Univ. of Colombia (Colombia); Lefkopoulus, D; Schlienger, M [Service de Radiotherapie, Hopital Tenon, Paris (France). Unite de Radiophysique; Merienne, L [Hopital Sainte Anne, Paris (France). Service de Neurochirurgie

    1996-08-01

    The dosimetric characteristics of mini-beams and dose distributions in beams used for radio surgery defer substantially from beams used in common radiotherapy. The aim of radio surgery is to deliver a high dose to the lesion in one single fraction, while minimizing the dose delivered to the surrounding normal brain tissue. This type of irradiation is performed with a number of continuous arcs located in various corneal (patient sitting) or sagittal (patient in a supine position) inclined planes using a linear accelerator. A treatment planning system should take into account a large number of irradiation parameters such as the collimator diameter, number of arcs, their angular positions, length and weight of the arcs. We analysed the influence of collimator diameters in the range of 6 to 20 mm using 15 MV X-rays and stereo-tactic irradiation of ellipsoidal inclined arterio venous malformations (AVMs) with a single isocenter. Special arc weights were used to obtain an optimized dose distribution with 13 arcs distributed over an angular sector of 120 deg. x 13 deg. In the two studies made we used 3 dimensional dosimetric calculations. The results were used for the treatment of patients and enabled the choice of the optimal irradiation configuration for each patient. (author). 10 refs, 9 figs.

  17. MO-FG-202-04: Gantry-Resolved Linac QA for VMAT: A Comprehensive and Efficient System Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwan, B J [Central Coast Cancer Centre, Gosford, NSW (Australia); University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Barnes, M; Greer, P B [University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Calvary Mater Hospital, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Hindmarsh, J; Seymour, E [Central Coast Cancer Centre, Gosford, NSW (Australia); O’Connor, D J [University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Keall, P J [University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To automate gantry-resolved linear accelerator (linac) quality assurance (QA) for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods: A QA system for VMAT was developed that uses an EPID, frame-grabber assembly and in-house developed image processing software. The system relies solely on the analysis of EPID image frames acquired without the presence of a phantom. Images were acquired at 8.41 frames per second using a frame grabber and ancillary acquisition computer. Each image frame was tagged with a gantry angle from the linac’s on-board gantry angle encoder. Arc-dynamic QA plans were designed to assess the performance of each individual linac component during VMAT. By analysing each image frame acquired during the QA deliveries the following eight machine performance characteristics were measured as a function of gantry angle: MLC positional accuracy, MLC speed constancy, MLC acceleration constancy, MLC-gantry synchronisation, beam profile constancy, dose rate constancy, gantry speed constancy, dose-gantry angle synchronisation and mechanical sag. All tests were performed on a Varian iX linear accelerator equipped with a 120 leaf Millennium MLC and an aS1000 EPID (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA). Results: Machine performance parameters were measured as a function of gantry angle using EPID imaging and compared to machine log files and the treatment plan. Data acquisition is currently underway at 3 centres, incorporating 7 treatment units, at 2 weekly measurement intervals. Conclusion: The proposed system can be applied for streamlined linac QA and commissioning for VMAT. The set of test plans developed can be used to assess the performance of each individual components of the treatment machine during VMAT deliveries as a function of gantry angle. The methodology does not require the setup of any additional phantom or measurement equipment and the analysis is fully automated to allow for

  18. MO-FG-202-04: Gantry-Resolved Linac QA for VMAT: A Comprehensive and Efficient System Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwan, B J; Barnes, M; Greer, P B; Hindmarsh, J; Seymour, E; O’Connor, D J; Keall, P J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To automate gantry-resolved linear accelerator (linac) quality assurance (QA) for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods: A QA system for VMAT was developed that uses an EPID, frame-grabber assembly and in-house developed image processing software. The system relies solely on the analysis of EPID image frames acquired without the presence of a phantom. Images were acquired at 8.41 frames per second using a frame grabber and ancillary acquisition computer. Each image frame was tagged with a gantry angle from the linac’s on-board gantry angle encoder. Arc-dynamic QA plans were designed to assess the performance of each individual linac component during VMAT. By analysing each image frame acquired during the QA deliveries the following eight machine performance characteristics were measured as a function of gantry angle: MLC positional accuracy, MLC speed constancy, MLC acceleration constancy, MLC-gantry synchronisation, beam profile constancy, dose rate constancy, gantry speed constancy, dose-gantry angle synchronisation and mechanical sag. All tests were performed on a Varian iX linear accelerator equipped with a 120 leaf Millennium MLC and an aS1000 EPID (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA). Results: Machine performance parameters were measured as a function of gantry angle using EPID imaging and compared to machine log files and the treatment plan. Data acquisition is currently underway at 3 centres, incorporating 7 treatment units, at 2 weekly measurement intervals. Conclusion: The proposed system can be applied for streamlined linac QA and commissioning for VMAT. The set of test plans developed can be used to assess the performance of each individual components of the treatment machine during VMAT deliveries as a function of gantry angle. The methodology does not require the setup of any additional phantom or measurement equipment and the analysis is fully automated to allow for

  19. Double-Sided Single-Pass Submerged Arc Welding for 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jian; Yuan, Yi; Wang, Xiaoming; Yao, Zongxiang

    2013-09-01

    The duplex stainless steel (DSS), which combines the characteristics of ferritic steel and austenitic steel, is used widely. The submerged arc welding (SAW) method is usually applied to join thick plates of DSS. However, an effective welding procedure is needed in order to obtain ideal DSS welds with an appropriate proportion of ferrite (δ) and austenite (γ) in the weld zone, particularly in the melted zone and heat-affected zone. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a high efficiency double-sided single-pass (DSSP) SAW joining method for thick DSS plates. The effectiveness of the converse welding procedure, characterizations of weld zone, and mechanical properties of welded joint are analyzed. The results show an increasing appearance and continuous distribution feature of the σ phase in the fusion zone of the leading welded seam. The converse welding procedure promotes the σ phase to precipitate in the fusion zone of leading welded side. The microhardness appears to significantly increase in the center of leading welded side. Ductile fracture mode is observed in the weld zone. A mixture fracture feature appears with a shear lip and tears in the fusion zone near the fusion line. The ductility, plasticity, and microhardness of the joints have a significant relationship with σ phase and heat treatment effect influenced by the converse welding step. An available heat input controlling technology of the DSSP formation method is discussed for SAW of thick DSS plates.

  20. Dosimetric comparison of helical tomotherapy, RapidArc, and a novel IMRT and Arc technique for esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Spencer; Chen, Jeff Z.; Rashid Dar, A.; Yartsev, Slav

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare radiotherapy treatment plans for mid- and distal-esophageal cancer with primary involvement of the gastroesophageal (GE) junction using a novel IMRT and Arc technique (IMRT and Arc), helical tomotherapy (HT), and RapidArc (RA1 and RA2). Methods and materials: Eight patients treated on HT for locally advanced esophageal cancer with radical intent were re-planned for RA and IMRT and Arc. RA plans employed single and double arcs (RA1 and RA2, respectively), while IMRT and Arc plans had four fixed-gantry IMRT fields and a conformal arc. Dose-volume histogram statistics, dose uniformity, and dose homogeneity were analyzed to compare treatment plans. Results: RA2 plans showed significant improvement over RA1 plans in terms of OAR dose and PTV dose uniformity and homogeneity. HT plan provided best dose uniformity (p = 0.001) and dose homogeneity (p = 0.002) to planning target volume (PTV), while IMRT and Arc and RA2 plans gave lowest dose to lungs among four radiotherapy techniques with acceptable PTV dose coverage. Mean V 10 of the lungs was significantly reduced by the RA2 plans compared to IMRT and Arc (40.3%, p = 0.001) and HT (66.2%, p 15 of the lungs for the RA2 plans also showed significant improvement over the IMRT and Arc (25.2%, p = 0.042) and HT (34.8%, p = 0.027) techniques. These improvements came at the cost of higher doses to the heart volume compared to HT and IMRT and Arc techniques. Mean lung dose (MLD) for the IMRT and Arc technique (21.2 ± 5.0% of prescription dose) was significantly reduced compared to HT (26.3%, p = 0.004), RA1 (23.3%, p = 0.028), and RA2 (23.2%, p = 0.017) techniques. Conclusion: The IMRT and Arc technique is a good option for treating esophageal cancer with thoracic involvement. It achieved optimal low dose to the lungs and heart with acceptable PTV coverage. HT is a good option for treating esophageal cancer with little thoracic involvement as it achieves superior dose conformality and uniformity. The RA2

  1. New system for linear accelerator radiosurgery with a gantry-mounted video camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunieda, Etsuo; Kitamura, Masayuki; Kawaguchi, Osamu; Ohira, Takayuki; Ogawa, Kouichi; Ando, Yutaka; Nakamura, Kayoko; Kubo, Atsushi

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: We developed a positioning method that does not depend on the positioning mechanism originally annexed to the linac and investigated the positioning errors of the system. Methods and Materials: A small video camera was placed at a location optically identical to the linac x-ray source. A target pointer comprising a convex lens and bull's eye was attached to the arc of the Leksell stereotactic system so that the lens would form a virtual image of the bull's eye (virtual target) at the position of the center of the arc. The linac gantry and target pointer were placed at the side and top to adjust the arc center to the isocenter by referring the virtual target. Coincidence of the target and the isocenter could be confirmed in any combination of the couch and gantry rotation. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the positioning, a tungsten ball was attached to the stereotactic frame as a simulated target, which was repeatedly localized and repositioned to estimate the magnitude of the error. The center of the circular field defined by the collimator was marked on the film. Results: The differences between the marked centers of the circular field and the centers of the shadow of the simulated target were less than 0.3 mm

  2. A direct, single-step plasma arc-vitreous ceramic process for stabilizing spent nuclear fuels, sludges, and associated wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, X.; Einziger, R.E.; Eschenbach, R.C.

    1997-01-01

    A single-step plasma arc-vitreous ceramic (PAVC) process is described for converting spent nuclear fuel (SNF), SNF sludges, and associated wastes into a vitreous ceramic waste form. This proposed technology is built on extensive experience of nuclear waste form development and nuclear waste treatment using the commercially available plasma arc centrifugal (PAC) system. SNF elements will be loaded directly into a PAC furnace with minimum additives and converted into vitreous ceramics with up to 90 wt% waste loading. The vitreous ceramic waste form should meet the functional requirements for borosilicate glasses for permanent disposal in a geologic repository and for interim storage. Criticality safety would be ensured through the use of batch modes, and controlling the amount of fuel processed in one batch. The minimum requirements on SNF characterization and pretreatment, the one-step process, and minimum secondary waste generation may reduce treatment duration, radiation exposure, and treatment cost

  3. Dual-gated volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahimian, Benjamin; Wu, Junqing; Wu, Huanmei; Geneser, Sarah; Xing, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Gated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) is an emerging radiation therapy modality for treatment of tumors affected by respiratory motion. However, gating significantly prolongs the treatment time, as delivery is only activated during a single respiratory phase. To enhance the efficiency of gated VMAT delivery, a novel dual-gated VMAT (DG-VMAT) technique, in which delivery is executed at both exhale and inhale phases in a given arc rotation, is developed and experimentally evaluated. Arc delivery at two phases is realized by sequentially interleaving control points consisting of MUs, MLC sequences, and angles of VMAT plans generated at the exhale and inhale phases. Dual-gated delivery is initiated when a respiration gating signal enters the exhale window; when the exhale delivery concludes, the beam turns off and the gantry rolls back to the starting position for the inhale window. The process is then repeated until both inhale and exhale arcs are fully delivered. DG-VMAT plan delivery accuracy was assessed using a pinpoint chamber and diode array phantom undergoing programmed motion. DG-VMAT delivery was experimentally implemented through custom XML scripting in Varian’s TrueBeam™ STx Developer Mode. Relative to single gated delivery at exhale, the treatment time was improved by 95.5% for a sinusoidal breathing pattern. The pinpoint chamber dose measurement agreed with the calculated dose within 0.7%. For the DG-VMAT delivery, 97.5% of the diode array measurements passed the 3%/3 mm gamma criterion. The feasibility of DG-VMAT delivery scheme has been experimentally demonstrated for the first time. By leveraging the stability and natural pauses that occur at end-inspiration and end-exhalation, DG-VMAT provides a practical method for enhancing gated delivery efficiency by up to a factor of two

  4. Hiding the Complexity: Building a Distributed ATLAS Tier-2 with a Single Resource Interface using ARC Middleware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdie, S; Stewart, G; Skipsey, S; Washbrook, A; Bhimji, W; Filipcic, A; Kenyon, M

    2011-01-01

    Since their inception, Grids for high energy physics have found management of data to be the most challenging aspect of operations. This problem has generally been tackled by the experiment's data management framework controlling in fine detail the distribution of data around the grid and the careful brokering of jobs to sites with co-located data. This approach, however, presents experiments with a difficult and complex system to manage as well as introducing a rigidity into the framework which is very far from the original conception of the grid. In this paper we describe how the ScotGrid distributed Tier-2, which has sites in Glasgow, Edinburgh and Durham, was presented to ATLAS as a single, unified resource using the ARC middleware stack. In this model the ScotGrid 'data store' is hosted at Glasgow and presented as a single ATLAS storage resource. As jobs are taken from the ATLAS PanDA framework, they are dispatched to the computing cluster with the fastest response time. An ARC compute element at each site then asynchronously stages the data from the data store into a local cache hosted at each site. The job is then launched in the batch system and accesses data locally. We discuss the merits of this system compared to other operational models and consider, from the point of view of the resource providers (sites), and from the resource consumers (experiments); and consider issues involved in transitions to this model.

  5. Some considerations concerning volume-modulated arc therapy: a stepping stone towards a general theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, S; McQuaid, D

    2009-01-01

    In this paper it is formally shown that the dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) IMRT delivery technique remains valid if the MLC is supported on a 1D moving platform. It is also shown that, in such circumstances, it is always time preferable to deliver overlapping modulating fields as a single swept field rather than as separate fields. The most general formulism is presented and then related to simpler equations in limiting cases. The paper explains in detail how a 'small-arc approximation' can be invoked to relate the 1D linear theory to the MLC-on-moving-platform-(gantry) delivery technique involving rotation therapy and known as volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). It is explained how volume-modulated arc therapy delivered with open unmodulated fields and which can deliver conformal dose distributions can be interpreted as an IMRT delivery. The (Elekta adopted) term VMAT will be used in a generic sense to include a similar (Varian) method known as RapidArc. Approximate expressions are derived for the 'amount of modulation' possible in a VMAT delivery. This paper does not discuss the actual VMAT planning but gives an insight at a deep level into VMAT delivery. No universal theory of VMAT is known in the sense that there is no theory that can predict precisely the performance of a VMAT delivery in terms of the free parameters available (variable gantry speed, variable fluence-delivery rate, set of MLC shapes, MLC orientation, number of arcs, coplanarity versus non-coplanarity, etc). This is in stark contrast to the situation with several other IMRT delivery techniques where such theoretical analyses are known. In this paper we do not provide such a theory; the material presented is a stepping stone on the path towards this.

  6. An ion-optical design study of a carbon-ion rotating gantry with a superconducting final bending magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokor, J.; Pavlovič, M.

    2016-01-01

    Ion-optical designs of an isocentric ion gantry with a compact curved superconducting final bending magnet are presented. The gantry is designed for transporting carbon-therapy beams with nominal kinetic energy of 400 MeV/u, which corresponds to the penetration range of C"6"+ beam in water of about 28 cm. In contrast to other existing designs, we present a “hybrid” beam transport system containing a single superconducting element – the last bending magnet. All other elements are based on conventional warm technology. Ion-optical properties of such a hybrid system are investigated in case of transporting non-symmetric (i.e. different emittance patterns in the horizontal and vertical plane) beams. Different conditions for transporting the non-symmetric beams are analyzed aiming at finding the optimal, i.e. the most compact, gantry version. The final gantry layout is presented including a 2D parallel scanning. The ion-optical and scanning properties of the final gantry design are described, discussed and illustrated by computer simulations performed by WinAGILE.

  7. Development and engineering design of a novel exocentric carbon-ion gantry for cancer therapy (the 'Riesenrad' gantry)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimoser, S.A.

    2000-10-01

    The objective of the present thesis is to develop a novel gantry concept leading to a viable and efficient design for a carbon-ion gantry. Chapter 1 is meant to give some background information on radiation therapy and on the promises of ion treatment. Chapter 2 presents and summarizes existing gantry systems (in particular for protons) and briefly describes the experimental facilities for ion treatment in order to form an idea in what direction the design of an ion gantry might point. Chapter 3 is dedicated to the definition of the medical, beam-optical and mechanical constraints affecting the design of the ion gantry. The principal processes likely to take place inside the ion gantry are highlighted and the various technical systems and their interdependencies are investigated. As a result of these considerations it was decided to focus on the development of an exocentric gantry system for ion therapy, which was eventually named the 'Riesenrad' gantry. In contrast to conventional isocentric gantries, the main 90 o -bending magnet of the Riesenrad is placed on the axis of gantry rotation, hence minimizing the moment of inertia of the mobile structure and maximizing its rigidity. Several preliminary structural concepts for the Riesenrad gantry were generated, analyzed and compared in chapter 4. Finally, the variant featuring an independent telescopic cabin was chosen for further elaboration in a design phase (chapter 5). In the proposed variant, the bending magnet that sits on the axis and its counterweight (62 ton and 23 ton respectively) are supported by a central 'cage' of about 40 t. This gantry yields a higher efficiency in terms of structural weight to supported load compared to any other possible variant. A patient cabin is smoothly moved towards the desired treatment position by a system that is mechanically de-coupled from the central cage. Any desired position (that corresponds to a particular gantry angle) is achieved by vertical translation and

  8. Single layer and multilayer vacuum-arc coatings based on the nitride TiAlSiYN: composition, structure, properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beresnev, V.M.; Litovchenko, S.V.; Nemchenko, U.S.; Srebnyuk, P.A.; Mazilin, B.A.; Sobol, O.V.; Mejlekhov, A.A.; Barmin, A.E.; Serenko, TA.; Pogrebnyak, A.D.; Ivanov, O.N.; Kritsyna, E.V.; Stolbovoj, V.A.; Novikov, V.Yu.; Malikov, L.V.

    2017-01-01

    Using high-technological vacuum-arc evaporation in the atmosphere of nitrogen with ion bombardment, single- and multilayer coatings based on TiAlSiYN with high mechanical characteristics were obtained: hardness of the coatings reached 49.5 GPa, resistance to wear, with the value of the critical point L_C_5 reaching 184.92 N. The peculiarities of radiation-induced effect at applying bias potential U_b were found: formation of nitride coatings based on fcc metallic lattice with the preferred orientation of crystallites with the texture axis [111], as well as simultaneous growth of hardness. Hardness of both single- and multilayer coatings increases by 40...50% at the increase of U_b from 50 to 200 V. Formation of silicon-containing layers of TiAlSiYN during the deposition contributes to reaching increased hardness, which, in the case of single-layer coating obtained at U_b = -200 V is 49.5 GPa, which corresponds to superhard state. The mechanisms of structure formation, defining the resulting mechanical characteristics of single- and multi-layer coatings based on TiAlSiYN nitride have been discussed.

  9. Intensity-modulated arc therapy simplified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Eugene; Chen, Jeff Z.; Greenland, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: We present a treatment planning strategy for intensity-modulated radiation therapy using gantry arcs with dynamic multileaf collimator, previously termed intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT). Methods and Materials: The planning strategy is an extension of the photon bar arc and asymmetric arc techniques and is classified into three levels of complexity, with increasing number of gantry arcs. This principle allows us to generalize the analysis of the number of arcs required for intensity modulation for a given treatment site. Using a phantom, we illustrate how the current technique is more flexible than the photon bar arc technique. We then compare plans from our strategy with conventional three-dimensional conformal treatment plans for three sites: prostate (prostate plus seminal vesicles), posterior pharyngeal wall, and chest wall. Results: Our strategy generates superior IMAT treatment plans compared to conventional three-dimensional conformal plans. The IMAT plans spare critical organs well, and the trade-off for simplicity is that the dose uniformity in the target volume may not rival that of true inverse treatment plans. Conclusions: The analyses presented in this paper give a better understanding of IMAT plans. Our strategy is easier to understand and more efficient in generating plans than inverse planning systems; our plans are also simpler to modify, and quality assurance is more intuitive

  10. Quantifying the gantry sag on linear accelerators and introducing an MLC-based compensation strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Weiliang; Gao Song; Wang Xiaochun; Kudchadker, Rajat J. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Gantry sag is one of the well-known sources of mechanical imperfections that compromise the spatial accuracy of radiation dose delivery. The objectives of this study were to quantify the gantry sag on multiple linear accelerators (linacs), to investigate a multileaf collimator (MLC)-based strategy to compensate for gantry sag, and to verify the gantry sag and its compensation with film measurements. Methods: The authors used the Winston-Lutz method to measure gantry sag on three Varian linacs. A ball bearing phantom was imaged with megavolt radiation fields at 10 deg. gantry angle intervals. The images recorded with an electronic portal imaging device were analyzed to derive the radiation isocenter and the gantry sag, that is, the superior-inferior wobble of the radiation field center, as a function of the gantry angle. The authors then attempted to compensate for the gantry sag by applying a gantry angle-specific correction to the MLC leaf positions. The gantry sag and its compensation were independently verified using film measurements. Results: Gantry sag was reproducible over a six-month measurement period. The maximum gantry sag was found to vary from 0.7 to 1.0 mm, depending on the linac and the collimator angle. The radiation field center moved inferiorly (i.e., away from the gantry) when the gantry was rotated from 0 deg. to 180 deg. After the MLC leaf position compensation was applied at 90 deg. collimator angle, the maximum gantry sag was reduced to <0.2 mm. The film measurements at gantry angles of 0 deg. and 180 deg. verified the inferior shift of the radiation fields and the effectiveness of MLC compensation. Conclusions: The results indicate that gantry sag on a linac can be quantitatively measured using a simple phantom and an electronic portal imaging device. Reduction of gantry sag is feasible by applying a gantry angle-specific correction to MLC leaf positions at 90 deg. collimator angle.

  11. EMPLACEMENT GANTRY ITS STANDARDS IDENTIFICATION STUDY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voegele, M.

    2005-01-01

    To date, the project has established ITS performance requirements for SSCs based on identification and categorization of event sequences that may result in a radiological release. These performance requirements are defined within the NSDB. Further, SSCs credited with performing safe functions are classified as ITS. In turn, perform confirmation for these SSCs is sought through the use of consensus code and standards. The purpose of this study is to identify applicable codes and standards for the WP Emplacement Gantry ITS SSCs. Further, this study will form the basis for selection and the extent of applicability of each code and standard. This study is based on the design development completed for LA only. Accordingly, identification of ITS SSCs beyond those defined within the NSDB are based on designs that may be subject to further development during detail design. Furthermore, several design alternatives may still be under consideration to satisfy certain safety functions, and that final selection will not be determined until further design development has occurred. Therefore, for completeness, throughout this study alternative designs currently under considered will be discussed. Further, the results of this study will be subject to evaluation as part of a follow-on GAP analysis study. Based on the results of this study the GAP analysis will evaluate each code and standard to ensure each ITS performance requirement is fully satisfied. When a performance requirement is not fully satisfied a ''gap'' is highlighted. Thereafter, the study will identify supplemental requirements to augment the code or standard to meet performance requirements. Further, the GAP analysis will identify non-standard areas of the design that will be subject to a Development Plan. Non-standard components and non-standard design configurations are defined as areas of the design that do not follow standard industry practices or codes and standards. Whereby, performance confirmation cannot be

  12. Dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), DMlC (Dynamic IMRT), and 3DCRT in left breast cancer after breast conserving surgery receiving left breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratibha, Bauskar; Vibhay, Pareek; Rajendra, Bhalavat; Chandra, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the risk of ischemic heart disease is increased as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation in women treated for breast cancer. Alternative radiation techniques, such as dynamic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (DMLC), volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), have been shown to improve dosimetric parameters of the heart and substructures. However, these techniques have not been compared with each other to potentially guide treatment decisions. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a novel extension of conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (c-IMRT), in which an optimized three dimensional dose distribution may be delivered in a single gantry rotation. VMAT is the predecessor to Rapid-Arc (Varian Medical System). This study uses VMAT, DMLC and 3DCRT to compare target volume coverage and doses to organs at risk (OARs), especially lung and heart doses, using these three techniques in whole breast irradiation after breast conserving surgery in left breast cancer cases

  13. Evaluation of a dual-room sliding gantry CT concept for workflow optimisation in polytrauma and regular in- and outpatient management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frellesen, Claudia; Boettcher, Marie; Wichmann, Julian L.; Drieske, Martina; Kerl, J. Matthias; Lehnert, Thomas [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Clinic of the Goethe University, Frankfurt (Germany); Nau, Christoph; Geiger, Emmanuel; Wutzler, Sebastian [Department of Trauma, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery, Clinic of the Goethe University, Frankfurt (Germany); Ackermann, Hanns [Department of Biostatistics and Mathematical Modelling, Clinic of the Goethe University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Vogl, Thomas J. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Clinic of the Goethe University, Frankfurt (Germany); Bauer, Ralf W., E-mail: ralfwbauer@aol.com [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Clinic of the Goethe University, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • A sliding gantry trauma room CT solution facilitates significantly faster polytrauma management. • Faster and more efficient resumption of regularly scheduled patients due to a two room solution is supported. • Sliding gantry CT achieves the same patient throughput as two separate conventional CT devices. - Abstract: Objectives: To reveal the impact on workflow from introducing a dual-room sliding gantry CT to the trauma room for polytrauma and regularly scheduled in- outpatients with regard to efficiency and degree of capacity utilisation. Materials and methods: Time analysis was performed for 30 polytrauma patients each in 2 different trauma room settings, the new trauma room comprising a sliding gantry CT, the old one a stationary single-room CT. Complete trauma room and diagnostic workup times were manually measured and compared for both groups. In a third scenario, the number of CT scans performed with one single sliding gantry CT and the two-room concept was compared to the number of CT scans performed on two separate regular CT units in a 5 days clinical routine sample. Results: Patients demographics and type of CT examinations were comparable for all patient groups. The median time from patient arrival in the trauma room until beginning of CT scanning was 6 min shorter for the sliding gantry CT group (21 vs.15 min). Sliding gantry CT embedded in a two-room solution achieved 252 CT scans in 5 working days, compared to 250 CT scans on two separate regular CT units with the same man power. Conclusions: Sliding gantry CT in the trauma room allows for significant time saving in the diagnostic workup of polytrauma patients and faster resumption of the regular in- outpatient's CT schedule is possible. With the same man power, the dual-room solution is able to generate the same throughput as two separate CT units.

  14. Evaluation of a dual-room sliding gantry CT concept for workflow optimisation in polytrauma and regular in- and outpatient management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frellesen, Claudia; Boettcher, Marie; Wichmann, Julian L.; Drieske, Martina; Kerl, J. Matthias; Lehnert, Thomas; Nau, Christoph; Geiger, Emmanuel; Wutzler, Sebastian; Ackermann, Hanns; Vogl, Thomas J.; Bauer, Ralf W.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A sliding gantry trauma room CT solution facilitates significantly faster polytrauma management. • Faster and more efficient resumption of regularly scheduled patients due to a two room solution is supported. • Sliding gantry CT achieves the same patient throughput as two separate conventional CT devices. - Abstract: Objectives: To reveal the impact on workflow from introducing a dual-room sliding gantry CT to the trauma room for polytrauma and regularly scheduled in- outpatients with regard to efficiency and degree of capacity utilisation. Materials and methods: Time analysis was performed for 30 polytrauma patients each in 2 different trauma room settings, the new trauma room comprising a sliding gantry CT, the old one a stationary single-room CT. Complete trauma room and diagnostic workup times were manually measured and compared for both groups. In a third scenario, the number of CT scans performed with one single sliding gantry CT and the two-room concept was compared to the number of CT scans performed on two separate regular CT units in a 5 days clinical routine sample. Results: Patients demographics and type of CT examinations were comparable for all patient groups. The median time from patient arrival in the trauma room until beginning of CT scanning was 6 min shorter for the sliding gantry CT group (21 vs.15 min). Sliding gantry CT embedded in a two-room solution achieved 252 CT scans in 5 working days, compared to 250 CT scans on two separate regular CT units with the same man power. Conclusions: Sliding gantry CT in the trauma room allows for significant time saving in the diagnostic workup of polytrauma patients and faster resumption of the regular in- outpatient's CT schedule is possible. With the same man power, the dual-room solution is able to generate the same throughput as two separate CT units

  15. MRI-guided single fraction ablative radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer : a brachytherapy versus volumetric modulated arc therapy dosimetry study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charaghvandi, Ramona K; den Hartogh, Mariska D; van Ommen, Anne-Mar L N; de Vries, Wilfred J H; Scholten, Vincent; Moerland, Rien; Philippens, Mariëlle E P; Schokker, Rogier I; van Vulpen, Marco; van Asselen, B; van den Bongard, Desirée H J G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: A radiosurgical treatment approach for early-stage breast cancer has the potential to minimize the patient's treatment burden. The dosimetric feasibility for single fraction ablative radiotherapy was evaluated by comparing volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with an

  16. Single-phase AutoReClosure ARC failure on 400 kV combinedcable/overhead line with permanently connected shunt reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Claus Leth; Søgaard, Kim

    2008-01-01

    consisting of overhead lines, crossbonded cable sections and shunt reactor has been created in PSCAD/EMTDC and verified against measurements with good results. Main focus has been put on the likelihood of having a successful single-phase autoreclosure ARC in such a combined cable/OHL line....

  17. SU-E-T-309: Dosimetric Comparison of Simultaneous Integrated Boost Treatment Plan Between Intensity Modulated Radiotherapies (IMRTs), Dual Arc Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (DA-VMAT) and Single Arc Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (SA-VMAT) for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma (NPC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivakumar, R; Janardhan, N; Bhavani, P; Surendran, J; Saranganathan, B; Ibrahim, S; Jhonson, B; Madhuri, B; Anuradha, C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the plan quality and performance of Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB) Treatment plan between Seven field (7F) and Nine field(9F) Intensity Modulated Radiotherapies and Single Arc (SA) and Dual Arc (DA) Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy( VMAT). Methods: Retrospective planning study of 16 patients treated in Elekta Synergy Platform (mlci2) by 9F-IMRT were replanned with 7F-IMRT, Single Arc VMAT and Dual Arc VMAT using CMS, Monaco Treatment Planning System (TPS) with Monte Carlo simulation. Target delineation done as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Protocols (RTOG 0225&0615). Dose Prescribed as 70Gy to Planning Target Volumes (PTV70) and 61Gy to PTV61 in 33 fraction as a SIB technique. Conformity Index(CI), Homogeneity Index(HI) were used as analysis parameter for Target Volumes as well as Mean dose and Max dose for Organ at Risk(OAR,s).Treatment Delivery Time(min), Monitor unit per fraction (MU/fraction), Patient specific quality assurance were also analysed. Results: A Poor dose coverage and Conformity index (CI) was observed in PTV70 by 7F-IMRT among other techniques. SA-VMAT achieved poor dose coverage in PTV61. No statistical significance difference observed in OAR,s except Spinal cord (P= 0.03) and Right optic nerve (P=0.03). DA-VMAT achieved superior target coverage, higher CI (P =0.02) and Better HI (P=0.03) for PTV70 other techniques (7F-IMRT/9F-IMRT/SA-VMAT). A better dose spare for Parotid glands and spinal cord were seen in DA-VMAT. The average treatment delivery time were 5.82mins, 6.72mins, 3.24mins, 4.3mins for 7F-IMRT, 9F-IMRT, SA-VMAT and DA-VMAT respectively. Significance difference Observed in MU/fr (P <0.001) and Patient quality assurance pass rate were >95% (Gamma analysis (Γ3mm, 3%). Conclusion: DA-VAMT showed better target dose coverage and achieved better or equal performance in sparing OARs among other techniques. SA-VMAT offered least Treatment Time than other techniques but achieved poor target coverage. DA-VMAT offered

  18. SU-E-T-309: Dosimetric Comparison of Simultaneous Integrated Boost Treatment Plan Between Intensity Modulated Radiotherapies (IMRTs), Dual Arc Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (DA-VMAT) and Single Arc Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (SA-VMAT) for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma (NPC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivakumar, R; Janardhan, N; Bhavani, P; Surendran, J; Saranganathan, B; Ibrahim, S; Jhonson, B; Madhuri, B [Omega Hospitals, Hyderabad, Telangana (India); Anuradha, C [Vit University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the plan quality and performance of Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB) Treatment plan between Seven field (7F) and Nine field(9F) Intensity Modulated Radiotherapies and Single Arc (SA) and Dual Arc (DA) Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy( VMAT). Methods: Retrospective planning study of 16 patients treated in Elekta Synergy Platform (mlci2) by 9F-IMRT were replanned with 7F-IMRT, Single Arc VMAT and Dual Arc VMAT using CMS, Monaco Treatment Planning System (TPS) with Monte Carlo simulation. Target delineation done as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Protocols (RTOG 0225&0615). Dose Prescribed as 70Gy to Planning Target Volumes (PTV70) and 61Gy to PTV61 in 33 fraction as a SIB technique. Conformity Index(CI), Homogeneity Index(HI) were used as analysis parameter for Target Volumes as well as Mean dose and Max dose for Organ at Risk(OAR,s).Treatment Delivery Time(min), Monitor unit per fraction (MU/fraction), Patient specific quality assurance were also analysed. Results: A Poor dose coverage and Conformity index (CI) was observed in PTV70 by 7F-IMRT among other techniques. SA-VMAT achieved poor dose coverage in PTV61. No statistical significance difference observed in OAR,s except Spinal cord (P= 0.03) and Right optic nerve (P=0.03). DA-VMAT achieved superior target coverage, higher CI (P =0.02) and Better HI (P=0.03) for PTV70 other techniques (7F-IMRT/9F-IMRT/SA-VMAT). A better dose spare for Parotid glands and spinal cord were seen in DA-VMAT. The average treatment delivery time were 5.82mins, 6.72mins, 3.24mins, 4.3mins for 7F-IMRT, 9F-IMRT, SA-VMAT and DA-VMAT respectively. Significance difference Observed in MU/fr (P <0.001) and Patient quality assurance pass rate were >95% (Gamma analysis (Γ3mm, 3%). Conclusion: DA-VAMT showed better target dose coverage and achieved better or equal performance in sparing OARs among other techniques. SA-VMAT offered least Treatment Time than other techniques but achieved poor target coverage. DA-VMAT offered

  19. Dosimetric comparison of single-beam multi-arc and 2-beam multi-arc VMAT optimization in the Monaco treatment planning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalet, Alan M., E-mail: amkalet@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, Washington (United States); Richardson, Hannah L.; Nikolaisen, Darrin A. [Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, Washington (United States); Cao, Ning [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, Washington (United States); Lavilla, Myra A. [Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, Washington (United States); Dempsey, Claire; Meyer, Juergen; Koh, Wui-Jin; Russell, Kenneth J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, Washington (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric and practical effects of the Monaco treatment planning system “max arcs-per-beam” optimization parameter in pelvic radiotherapy treatments. We selected for this study a total of 17 previously treated patients with a range of pelvic disease sites including prostate (9), bladder (1), uterus (3), rectum (3), and cervix (1). For each patient, 2 plans were generated, one using an arc-per-beam setting of “1” and another with an arc-per-beam setting of “2” using the volumes and constraints established from the initial clinical treatments. All constraints and dose coverage objects were kept the same between plans, and all plans were normalized to 99.7% to ensure 100% of the planning target volume (PTV) received 95% of the prescription dose. Plans were evaluated for PTV conformity, homogeneity, number of monitor units, number of control points, and overall plan acceptability. Treatment delivery time, patient-specific quality assurance procedures, and the impact on clinical workflow were also assessed. We found that for complex-shaped target volumes (small central volumes with extending arms to cover nodal regions), the use of 2 arc-per-beam (2APB) parameter setting achieved significantly lower average dose-volume histogram values for the rectum V{sub 20} (p = 0.0012) and bladder V{sub 30} (p = 0.0036) while meeting the high dose target constraints. For simple PTV shapes, we found reduced monitor units (13.47%, p = 0.0009) and control points (8.77%, p = 0.0004) using 2APB planning. In addition, we found a beam delivery time reduction of approximately 25%. In summary, the dosimetric benefit, although moderate, was improved over a 1APB setting for complex PTV, and equivalent in other cases. The overall reduced delivery time suggests that the use of mulitple arcs per beam could lead to reduced patient-on-table time, increased clinical throughput, and reduced medical physics quality assurance

  20. Effects of single pulse energy on the properties of ceramic coating prepared by micro-arc oxidation on Ti alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jun-Hua [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471023 (China); Faculty of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650500 (China); Wang, Jin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Beijing Key Lab of Precision/Ultra-precision Manufacturing Equipments and Control, Beijing 100084 (China); Lu, Yan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471023 (China); Du, Mao-Hua [Faculty of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650500 (China); Han, Fu-Zhu, E-mail: hanfuzhu@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Beijing Key Lab of Precision/Ultra-precision Manufacturing Equipments and Control, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Single pulse energy remarkably influences the properties of ceramic coating prepared by MAO on Ti alloy. • The accumulative time of impulse width is an important parameter in the scientific and rational measurement of the film forming law of ceramic coating. • The ceramic coating thickness approximately linearly increases with the cumulative time of impulse width. • Larger impulse width resulted in higher single pulse energy, film forming rates and thicker ceramic coating thickness. • The effects of single pulse energy on the micro-hardness and phase composition of ceramic coating are not as evident as those of frequency and duty cycle. - Abstract: The effects of single pulse energy on the properties of ceramic coating fabricated on a Ti–6Al–4V alloy via micro-arc oxidation (MAO) in aqueous solutions containing aluminate, phosphate, and some additives are investigated. The thickness, micro-hardness, surface and cross-sectional morphology, surface roughness, and compositions of the ceramic coating are studied using eddy current thickness meter, micro-hardness tester, JB-4C Precision Surface roughness meter, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Single pulse energy remarkably influences the ceramic coating properties. The accumulative time of impulse width is an important parameter in the scientific and rational measurement of the film forming law of ceramic coating. The ceramic coating thickness approximately linearly increases with the cumulative time of impulse width. Larger impulse width resulted in higher single pulse energy, film forming rates and thicker ceramic coating thickness. The sizes of oxide particles, micro-pores and micro-cracks slightly increase with impulse width and single pulse energy. The main surface conversion products generated during MAO process in aqueous solutions containing aluminate are rutile TiO{sub 2}, anatase TiO{sub 2}, and a large amount of Al{sub 2}TiO{sub 5}. The effects of

  1. Is volumetric modulated arc therapy with constant dose rate a valid option in radiation therapy for head and neck cancer patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didona, Annamaria; Lancellotta, Valentina; Zucchetti, Claudio; Panizza, Bianca Moira; Frattegiani, Alessandro; Iacco, Martina; Di Pilato, Anna Concetta; Saldi, Simonetta; Aristei, Cynthia

    2018-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) improves dose distribution in head and neck (HN) radiation therapy. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), a new form of IMRT, delivers radiation in single or multiple arcs, varying dose rates (VDR-VMAT) and gantry speeds, has gained considerable attention. Constant dose rate VMAT (CDR-VMAT) associated with a fixed gantry speed does not require a dedicated linear accelerator like VDR-VMAT. The present study explored the feasibility, efficiency and delivery accuracy of CDR-VMAT, by comparing it with IMRT and VDR-VMAT in treatment planning for HN cancer. Step and shoot IMRT (SS-IMRT), CDR-VMAT and VDR-VMAT plans were created for 15 HN cancer patients and were generated by Pinnacle 3 TPS (v 9.8) using 6 MV photon energy. Three PTVs were defined to receive respectively prescribed doses of 66 Gy, 60 Gy and 54 Gy, in 30 fractions. Organs at risk (OARs) included the mandible, spinal cord, brain stem, parotids, salivary glands, esophagus, larynx and thyroid. SS-IMRT plans were based on 7 co-planar beams at fixed gantry angles. CDR-VMAT and VDR-VMAT plans, generated by the SmartArc module, used a 2-arc technique: one clockwise from 182° to 178° and the other one anti-clockwise from 178° to 182°. Comparison parameters included dose distribution to PTVs ( D mean , D 2% , D 50% , D 95% , D 98% and Homogeneity Index), maximum or mean doses to OARs, specific dose-volume data, the monitor units and treatment delivery times. Compared with SS-IMRT, CDR-VMAT significantly reduced the maximum doses to PTV1 and PTV2 and significantly improved all PTV3 parameters, except D 98% and D 95% . It significantly spared parotid and submandibular glands and was associated with a lower D mean to the larynx. Compared with VDR-VMAT, CDR-VMAT was linked to a significantly better D mean , to the PTV3 but results were worse for the parotids, left submandibular gland, esophagus and mandible. Furthermore, the D mean to the larynx was also worse

  2. Selective arc-discharge synthesis of Dy2S-clusterfullerenes and their isomer-dependent single molecule magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Hsiang; Krylov, Denis S; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M; Liu, Fupin; Spree, Lukas; Yadav, Ravi; Alvertis, Antonis; Hozoi, Liviu; Nenkov, Konstantin; Kostanyan, Aram; Greber, Thomas; Wolter, Anja U B; Popov, Alexey A

    2017-09-01

    A method for the selective synthesis of sulfide clusterfullerenes Dy 2 S@C 2 n is developed. Addition of methane to the reactive atmosphere reduces the formation of empty fullerenes in the arc-discharge synthesis, whereas the use of Dy 2 S 3 as a source of metal and sulfur affords sulfide clusterfullerenes as the main fullerene products along with smaller amounts of carbide clusterfullerenes. Two isomers of Dy 2 S@C 82 with C s (6) and C 3v (8) cage symmetry, Dy 2 S@C 72 - C s (10528), and a carbide clusterfullerene Dy 2 C 2 @C 82 - C s (6) were isolated. The molecular structure of both Dy 2 S@C 82 isomers was elucidated by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. SQUID magnetometry demonstrates that all of these clusterfullerenes exhibit hysteresis of magnetization, with Dy 2 S@C 82 - C 3v (8) being the strongest single molecule magnet in the series. DC- and AC-susceptibility measurements were used to determine magnetization relaxation times in the temperature range from 1.6 K to 70 K. Unprecedented magnetization relaxation dynamics with three consequent Orbach processes and energy barriers of 10.5, 48, and 1232 K are determined for Dy 2 S@C 82 - C 3v (8). Dy 2 S@C 82 - C s (6) exhibits faster relaxation of magnetization with two barriers of 15.2 and 523 K. Ab initio calculations were used to interpret experimental data and compare the Dy-sulfide clusterfullerenes to other Dy-clusterfullerenes. The smallest and largest barriers are ascribed to the exchange/dipolar barrier and relaxation via crystal-field states, respectively, whereas an intermediate energy barrier of 48 K in Dy 2 S@C 82 - C 3v (8) is assigned to the local phonon mode, corresponding to the librational motion of the Dy 2 S cluster inside the carbon cage.

  3. Perspectives of Single-Wall Carbon Nano-tube Production in the Arc Discharge Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krestinin, A.V.; Kiselev, N.A.; Raevskii, A.V; Ryabenko, A.G.; Zakharov, D.N.; Zvereva, G.I.

    2003-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nano tubes (SWNTs) promise wide applications in many technical fields. As a result purified SWNT material is sold now on the West market at more than 1000 dollars per 1 gram. Thus developing an effective technology for SWNTs production rises to a very important sintofene problem. The perspectives of three existing methods providing raw material in the technology of SWNT production have been analyzed. They are i) pulsed laser evaporation of graphite/metal composites, ii) evaporation of graphite electrodes with metal content in the are discharge process, and iii) catalytic decomposition of the mixture of CO and metal carbonyl catalyst precursor. The observed dynamites of SWNT market points to replacing the laser method of SWNTs production by the are process. The conclusion has been made that the technology based on the are process will be the major one for the fabrication of purified SWNTs at least for the next five years. A reliable estimation of a low price limit of SWNTs was derived from a comparison of two technologies based on the are discharge process: the first one is the production of SWNTs and the second one is the production of a fullerene mixture C 6 0 + C 7 0. The main conclusion was made that the price of purified SWNTs should always be more by 2-3 times the price of fullerene mixture. The parameters of a lab-scale technology for the production of purified SWNTs are listed. A large-scale application of the developed technology is expected to reduce the price of purified SWNTs by approximately ten times. The methods now employed for the characterization of products containing SWNTs are briefly observed. It is concluded that electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, absorption and Raman spectroscopy, measurement of the specific surface aria, optical microscopy - each in separation is not enough for extensive characterization of a sample containing SWNTs, and all these methods should be used together. (author)

  4. Fabrication and dispersion evaluation of single-wall carbon nanotubes produced by FH-arc discharge method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B; Zhao, X; Inoue, S; Ando, Y

    2010-06-01

    In this work, we produced SWNTs by a hydrogen DC arc discharge with evaporation of carbon anode containing 1 at% Fe catalyst in H2-Ar mixture gas. This was named as FH-arc discharge method. The as-grown SWNTs synthesized by FH-arc discharge method have high crystallinity. An oxidation purification process of as-grown SWNTs with H2O2 has been developed to remove the coexisting Fe catalyst nanoparticles. As a result, SWNTs with purity higher than 90 at% have been achieved. To exhibit remarkable characteristics, CNTs should be separated from the bundles and kept in homogeneous and stable suspensions. For this purpose, the SWNTs prepared by FH-arc discharge method also have been treated by Nanomizer process with some surfactants. SPM images showed that the SWNTs bundles had become thinner and shorter.

  5. Arc Interference Behavior during Twin Wire Gas Metal Arc Welding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingjian Ye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study arc interference behavior during twin wire gas metal arc welding process, the synchronous acquisition system has been established to acquire instantaneous information of arc profile including dynamic arc length variation as well as relative voltage and current signals. The results show that after trailing arc (T-arc is added to the middle arc (M-arc in a stable welding process, the current of M arc remains unchanged while the agitation increases; the voltage of M arc has an obvious increase; the shape of M arc changes, with increasing width, length, and area; the transfer frequency of M arc droplet increases and the droplet itself becomes smaller. The wire extension length of twin arc turns out to be shorter than that of single arc welding.

  6. Single-walled nanohorns and other nanocarbons generated by submerged arc discharge between carbon electrodes in liquid argon and other media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasu, K; Pramoda, K; Govindaraj, A; Rao, C N R; Moses, K

    2014-01-01

    Arc discharge between two graphite electrodes submerged in different liquid media yields various dimensional nanocarbon structures such as 1D carbon nanotubes and 2D graphene. Single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) prepared by submerged arc discharge in liquid nitrogen medium are found to have nitrogen impurities. Here, we report the structure and properties of pure and nitrogen-doped SWNHs obtained by submerged arc discharge in a liquid argon medium. The absence of an XPS N 1s signal, which is present in nanohorns obtained in liquid nitrogen, indicate that the nanohorns are free from nitrogen impurities. Raman spectra show a strong defect-induced D band and current–voltage characteristics show a slight nonlinear behavior. N 2 adsorption of pure SWNHs shows type-IV isotherms with a surface area of 300 m 2 g −1 . Adsorption of CO 2 and H 2 in pure SWNHs has also been measured. Arc discharge in other liquid media such as water, ethanol, dimethylformamide (DMF), n-methyl pyrrolidone (NMP), formamide, benzene, heptane and acetone yields different nanocarbon structures including multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), few-layer graphene, carbon onions and carbon nanoparticles. (papers)

  7. On the use of volumetric-modulated arc therapy for single-fraction thoracic vertebral metastases stereotactic body radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokhrel, Damodar, E-mail: damodar.pokhrel@uky.edu; Sood, Sumit; McClinton, Christopher; Shen, Xinglei; Badkul, Rajeev; Jiang, Hongyu; Mallory, Matthew; Mitchell, Mellissa; Wang, Fen; Lominska, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    To retrospectively evaluate quality, efficiency, and delivery accuracy of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for single-fraction treatment of thoracic vertebral metastases using image-guided stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRS) after RTOG 0631 dosimetric compliance criteria. After obtaining credentialing for MD Anderson spine phantom irradiation validation, 10 previously treated patients with thoracic vertebral metastases with noncoplanar hybrid arcs using 1 to 2 3D-conformal partial arcs plus 7 to 9 intensity-modulated radiation therapy beams were retrospectively re-optimized with VMAT using 3 full coplanar arcs. Tumors were located between T2 and T12. Contrast-enhanced T1/T2-weighted magnetic resonance images were coregistered with planning computed tomography and planning target volumes (PTV) were between 14.4 and 230.1 cc (median = 38.0 cc). Prescription dose was 16 Gy in 1 fraction with 6 MV beams at Novalis-TX linear accelerator consisting of micro multileaf collimators. Each plan was assessed for target coverage using conformality index, the conformation number, the ratio of the volume receiving 50% of the prescription dose over PTV, R50%, homogeneity index (HI), and PTV-1600 coverage per RTOG 0631 requirements. Organs-at-risk doses were evaluated for maximum doses to spinal cord (D{sub 0.03} {sub cc}, D{sub 0.35} {sub cc}), partial spinal cord (D{sub 10%}), esophagus (D{sub 0.03} {sub cc} and D{sub 5} {sub cc}), heart (D{sub 0.03} {sub cc} and D{sub 15} {sub cc}), and lung (V{sub 5}, V{sub 10}, and maximum dose to 1000 cc of lung). Dose delivery efficiency and accuracy of each VMAT-SBRS plan were assessed using quality assurance (QA) plan on MapCHECK device. Total beam-on time was recorded during QA procedure, and a clinical gamma index (2%/2 mm and 3%/3 mm) was used to compare agreement between planned and measured doses. All 10 VMAT-SBRS plans met RTOG 0631 dosimetric requirements for PTV coverage. The plans demonstrated highly conformal and

  8. Volumetric modulated arc therapy for delivery of hypofractionated stereotactic lung radiotherapy: A dosimetric and treatment efficiency analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, Samuel D.; Matuszak, Martha M.; Yan Di; Kestin, Larry L.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Grills, Inga S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/objective(s): Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) allows for intensity-modulated radiation delivery during gantry rotation with dynamic MLC motion, variable dose rates and gantry speed modulation. We compared VMAT plans with 3D-CRT for hypofractionated lung radiotherapy. Materials/methods: Twenty-one 3D-CRT plans for Stage IA lung cancer previously treated stereotactically were selected. VMAT plans were generated by optimizing machine aperture shape and radiation intensity at 10 deg. intervals. A partial arc range of 180 deg. was manually selected to coincide with tumor location. The arc was resampled down to 5 deg. intervals to ensure dose calculation accuracy. Identical planning objectives were used for VMAT/3D-CRT. Parameters assessed included dose to PTV and organs-at-risk (OAR), monitor units, and multiple conformity and homogeneity indices. Plans were delivered to a phantom for time comparison. Results: Lung V 20/12.5/10/5 were less with VMAT (relative reduction 4.5%, p = .02; 3.2%, p = .01; 2.6%, p = .01; 4.2%, p = .03, respectively). Mean/maximum-doses to PTV, dose to additional OARs, 95% isodose line conformity, and target volume homogeneity were equivalent. VMAT improved conformity at both the 80% (1.87 vs. 1.93, p = .08) and 50% isodose lines (5.19 vs. 5.65, p = .01). Treatment times were reduced significantly with VMAT (mean 6.1 vs. 11.9 min, p < .01). Conclusions: Single arc VMAT planning achieves highly conformal dose distributions while controlling dose to critical structures, including significant reduction in lung dose volume parameters. Employing a VMAT technique decreases treatment times by 37-63%, reducing the chance of error introduced by intrafraction variation. The quality and efficiency of VMAT is ideally suited for stereotactic lung radiotherapy delivery.

  9. Design of an achromatic and uncoupled medical gantry for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsoupas, N.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.; MacKay, W.W.

    2011-01-01

    We are presenting the layout and the optics of a beam line to be used as a medical gantry in radiation therapy. The optical properties of the gantry's beam line are such as to make the beam line achromatic and uncoupled. These two properties make the beam spot size, which is delivered and focused by the gantry, on the tumor of the patient, independent of the angular orientation of the gantry. In this paper we present the layout of the magnetic elements of the gantry, and also present the theoretical basis for the optics design of such a gantry. A medical gantry, as it is used in the radiation treatment of cancer patients, is the last part of the beam optical system, of the accelerator complex, which delivers and focuses the beam on the tumor. The curved line shown in figure 1 is a schematic diagram of a gantry which can rotate about a horizontal axis. The particle beam (green arrow in fig. 1) enters the gantry, and is guided by the gantry on the tumor (red spot in fig. 1). As the gantry rotates about the axis shown in figure 1, the beam exiting the gantry always lies on a plane normal to the rotation axis at the point of the icocenter. Thus the gantry facilitates the ability of the beam delivery system, to deliver the beam at the tumor, which is placed at the icocenter, from any angle on this vertical plane, which is normal to the rotation angle of the gantry as stated earlier. The gantry consists of dipoles and quadrupoles elements whose median symmetry plane lies on a plane which contains the rotation axis of the gantry. In this paper we define this plane as the 'plane of the gantry'. As the beam is transported along the axis of rotation of the gantry and before it enters the gantry, it is focused by 'normal' quadrupoles and experiences no linear beam coupling. Subsequently the beam enters the gantry, and is transported by the gantry to the delivery point which is the tumor. The transported beam at the tumor is still linearly uncoupled as long as the plane of the

  10. Proposal of cancer therapy system without rotating gantry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodaira, Masanobu

    2002-01-01

    Beam therapy is one of useful methods for cancer therapy. Many results in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) show many abilities of beam therapy for cancer therapy. In Japan, several beam therapy facilities are constructed or under construction. If its construction budget becomes to be smaller, beam therapy may be used as the general cancer therapy. But in the present beam therapy facilities, the budget of its construction is very large. One of the reasons of big budget is the construction of the big buildings equipped with thick shielding walls. Most of space of the facilities with thick shielding walls is devoted to the treatment equipments such as rotating gantries and beam transport lines. This proposal is that using oblique beam line and rotating treatment bed, multi-portal irradiation is realized without rotating gantry. At the same time, we designed adequate beam lines to minimize the total facilities. (author)

  11. Flat panel detector-based cone beam computed tomography with a circle-plus-two-arcs data acquisition orbit: Preliminary phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning Ruola; Tang Xiangyang; Conover, David; Yu Rongfeng

    2003-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been investigated in the past two decades due to its potential advantages over a fan beam CT. These advantages include (a) great improvement in data acquisition efficiency, spatial resolution, and spatial resolution uniformity, (b) substantially better utilization of x-ray photons generated by the x-ray tube compared to a fan beam CT, and (c) significant advancement in clinical three-dimensional (3D) CT applications. However, most studies of CBCT in the past are focused on cone beam data acquisition theories and reconstruction algorithms. The recent development of x-ray flat panel detectors (FPD) has made CBCT imaging feasible and practical. This paper reports a newly built flat panel detector-based CBCT prototype scanner and presents the results of the preliminary evaluation of the prototype through a phantom study. The prototype consisted of an x-ray tube, a flat panel detector, a GE 8800 CT gantry, a patient table and a computer system. The prototype was constructed by modifying a GE 8800 CT gantry such that both a single-circle cone beam acquisition orbit and a circle-plus-two-arcs orbit can be achieved. With a circle-plus-two-arcs orbit, a complete set of cone beam projection data can be obtained, consisting of a set of circle projections and a set of arc projections. Using the prototype scanner, the set of circle projections were acquired by rotating the x-ray tube and the FPD together on the gantry, and the set of arc projections were obtained by tilting the gantry while the x-ray tube and detector were at the 12 and 6 o'clock positions, respectively. A filtered backprojection exact cone beam reconstruction algorithm based on a circle-plus-two-arcs orbit was used for cone beam reconstruction from both the circle and arc projections. The system was first characterized in terms of the linearity and dynamic range of the detector. Then the uniformity, spatial resolution and low contrast resolution were assessed using

  12. Motion control of a gantry crane with a container

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugailo, T. S.; Yushkov, M. P.

    2018-05-01

    The transportation of a container by a gantry crane in a given time from one point of space to another is considered. The system is at rest at the end of the motion. A maximum admissible speed is taken into account. The control force is found using either the Pontryagin maximum principle or the generalized Gauss principle. The advantages of the second method over the first one is demonstrated.

  13. Single crystal growth of pure and Nd-doped Y2O3 by flotating zone method with Xe arc lamp imaging furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuiki, H.; Kitazawa, K.; Fueki, K.; Masumoto, T.; Shiroki, K.

    1980-01-01

    Single crystals of undoped and Nd-doped yttrium oxide were grown by the floating zone method with a Xe arc lamp imaging furnace. The crystals were grown in the and directions. Transparent and subgrain-free single crystals were obtained at a growth rate of 30-60 mm/h for the undoped yttrium oxide. Facets of the cubic [100] and [211] were observed though the high temperature phase of the crystal is hexagonal. Dislocation densities of undoped yttrium oxide are given. (orig./WE)

  14. Dosimetric validation for an automatic brain metastases planning software using single-isocenter dynamic conformal arcsDosimetric validation for an automatic brain metastases planning software using single-isocenter dynamic conformal arcs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haisong; Li, Jun; Pappas, Evangelos; Andrews, David; Evans, James; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Yu, Yan; Dicker, Adam; Shi, Wenyin

    2016-09-08

    An automatic brain-metastases planning (ABMP) software has been installed in our institution. It is dedicated for treating multiple brain metastases with radiosurgery on linear accelerators (linacs) using a single-setup isocenter with noncoplanar dynamic conformal arcs. This study is to validate the calculated absolute dose and dose distribution of ABMP. Three types of measurements were performed to validate the planning software: 1, dual micro ion chambers were used with an acrylic phantom to measure the absolute dose; 2, a 3D cylindrical phantom with dual diode array was used to evaluate 2D dose distribution and point dose for smaller targets; and 3, a 3D pseudo-in vivo patient-specific phantom filled with polymer gels was used to evaluate the accuracy of 3D dose distribution and radia-tion delivery. Micro chamber measurement of two targets (volumes of 1.2 cc and 0.9 cc, respectively) showed that the percentage differences of the absolute dose at both targets were less than 1%. Averaged GI passing rate of five different plans measured with the diode array phantom was above 98%, using criteria of 3% dose difference, 1 mm distance to agreement (DTA), and 10% low-dose threshold. 3D gel phantom measurement results demonstrated a 3D displacement of nine targets of 0.7 ± 0.4 mm (range 0.2 ~ 1.1 mm). The averaged two-dimensional (2D) GI passing rate for several region of interests (ROI) on axial slices that encompass each one of the nine targets was above 98% (5% dose difference, 2 mm DTA, and 10% low-dose threshold). Measured D95, the minimum dose that covers 95% of the target volume, of the nine targets was 0.7% less than the calculated D95. Three different types of dosimetric verification methods were used and proved the dose calculation of the new automatic brain metastases planning (ABMP) software was clinical acceptable. The 3D pseudo-in vivo patient-specific gel phantom test also served as an end-to-end test for validating not only the dose calculation, but the

  15. The development of a mobile CT-scanner gantry for use in the operating room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okudera, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Shigeaki; Koike, Jouji; Harada, Takanobu; Kanemaru, Kei

    1989-01-01

    We report the development of a mobile CT-scanner gantry which uses a gantry platter. This system has been developed for use in the operating room. We designed a small lift to move the gantry unit of the scanner: the gantry carrier. The scanner gantry is fixed to the gantry carrier. A phantom test with a digitalized operating table worked well in the laboratory, and operating-room use showed that there was no deterioration in image quality. The mobile gantry system has been developed to increase the efficiency of the operating CT-scanner system. This system enables us to obtain CT images during surgery of immediately after surgery in the operating room, i.e., in cases that are not transferable to the radiological department. The operability is basically the same as that of a conventional mobile X-ray unit. Theoretically, this unit could be used with any CT scanner and in any operating room. (author)

  16. Fuzzy Controllers for a Gantry Crane System with Experimental Verifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naif B. Almutairi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The control problem of gantry cranes has attracted the attention of many researchers because of the various applications of these cranes in the industry. In this paper we propose two fuzzy controllers to control the position of the cart of a gantry crane while suppressing the swing angle of the payload. Firstly, we propose a dual PD fuzzy controller where the parameters of each PD controller change as the cart moves toward its desired position, while maintaining a small swing angle of the payload. This controller uses two fuzzy subsystems. Then, we propose a fuzzy controller which is based on heuristics. The rules of this controller are obtained taking into account the knowledge of an experienced crane operator. This controller is unique in that it uses only one fuzzy system to achieve the control objective. The validity of the designed controllers is tested through extensive MATLAB simulations as well as experimental results on a laboratory gantry crane apparatus. The simulation results as well as the experimental results indicate that the proposed fuzzy controllers work well. Moreover, the simulation and the experimental results demonstrate the robustness of the proposed control schemes against output disturbances as well as against uncertainty in some of the parameters of the crane.

  17. Gantry Crane Scheduling with Interference Constraints in Railway Container Terminals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Guo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Railway container terminals, where gantry cranes are responsible for loading and unloading containers between freight trains and yards, are important hubs of hinterland logistics transportation. Terminal managers confront the challenge in improving the efficiency of their service. As the most expensive equipment in a terminal, the operational performance of gantry cranes is a crucial factor. In this paper, the gantry crane scheduling problem of railway container terminals is investigated. A mixed integer programming model which considers the effect of dwelling position dependent processing times is formulated. In addition, the safety distances, the travel times and the non-crossing requirement of cranes are incorporated in the mathematical model. A novel discrete artificial bee colony algorithm is presented to solve the intractable scheduling problem. Computational experiments are conducted to evaluate the proposed algorithm on some randomly constructed instances based on typical terminal operational data. Experimental results show that the proposed approach can obtain near optimal solutions for the investigated problem in a reasonable computational time.

  18. Design of 6 MeV X-band electron linac for dual-head gantry radiotherapy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung-wook; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Jong-Chul; Kim, Huisu; Ha, Donghyup; Ghergherehchi, Mitra; Chai, Jongseo; Lee, Byung-no; Chae, Moonsik

    2017-12-01

    A compact 6 MeV electron linac is being developed at Sungkyunkwan University, in collaboration with the Korea atomic energy research institute (KAERI). The linac will be used as an X-ray source for a dual-head gantry radiotherapy system. X-band technology has been employed to satisfy the size requirement of the dual-head gantry radiotherapy machine. Among the several options available, we selected a pi/2-mode, standing-wave, side-coupled cavity. This choice of radiofrequency (RF) cavity design is intended to enhance the shunt impedance of each cavity in the linac. An optimum structure of the RF cavity with a high-performance design was determined by applying a genetic algorithm during the optimization procedure. This paper describes the detailed design process for a single normal RF cavity and the entire structure, including the RF power coupler and coupling cavity, as well as the beam dynamics results.

  19. Robotically Assembled Aerospace Structures: Digital Material Assembly using a Gantry-Type Assembler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Greenfield; Copplestone, Grace; O'Connor, Molly; Hu, Steven; Nowak, Sebastian; Cheung, Kenneth; Jenett, Benjamin; Cellucci, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    This paper evaluates the development of automated assembly techniques for discrete lattice structures using a multi-axis gantry type CNC machine. These lattices are made of discrete components called "digital materials." We present the development of a specialized end effector that works in conjunction with the CNC machine to assemble these lattices. With this configuration we are able to place voxels at a rate of 1.5 per minute. The scalability of digital material structures due to the incremental modular assembly is one of its key traits and an important metric of interest. We investigate the build times of a 5x5 beam structure on the scale of 1 meter (325 parts), 10 meters (3,250 parts), and 30 meters (9,750 parts). Utilizing the current configuration with a single end effector, performing serial assembly with a globally fixed feed station at the edge of the build volume, the build time increases according to a scaling law of n4, where n is the build scale. Build times can be reduced significantly by integrating feed systems into the gantry itself, resulting in a scaling law of n3. A completely serial assembly process will encounter time limitations as build scale increases. Automated assembly for digital materials can assemble high performance structures from discrete parts, and techniques such as built in feed systems, parallelization, and optimization of the fastening process will yield much higher throughput.

  20. Structure of MeCrAlY + AlSi coatings deposited by Arc-PVD method on CMSX4 single crystal alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swadzba, L.; Hetmanczyk, M.; Mendala, B.; Saunders, S.R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Investigations of depositing high temperature resistant coatings on the Ni base superalloys by Arc-PVD method using exothermic reaction processes between Ni and Al with NiAl intermetallic formation are presented in the article. By the diffusion heating at 1050 o C in vacuum, NiAl diffusion coating containing 21% at. Al and 50 μm thick were obtained. In the next stage coatings with more complex chemical composition - MeCrAlY were formed. The MeCrAlY coatings were made from two targets. Good correlation between the chemical composition of the targets and a uniform distribution of elements in the coatings was shown. Then the surface was also covered with aluminium by the Arc-PVD method . In the vacuum chamber of the equipment a synthesis reaction between NiCoCrAlY and Al with the formation of NiAl intermetallics of high Co, Cr, Y content was initiated. The final heat treatment of coatings was conducted in vacuum at 1323 K. Strong segregation of yttrium into the oxide scale in the specimens heated in the air was shown. It was possible to form NiAl and intermetallics phase coatings modified by Co, Cr and Y by the Arc-PVD method. The coatings were formed on a single crystal CMSX-4. The structure, morphology and phase composition of coatings was carried out. (author)

  1. On the impact of dose rate variation upon RapidArc implementation of volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolini, Giorgia; Clivio, Alessandro; Cozzi, Luca; Fogliata, Antonella; Vanetti, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A study was carried out to evaluate the robustness and mutual interplay of two variables concurring to generate modulation patterns of the RapidArc (RapidArc) implementation of volumetric modulated arc therapy. Dose rate (DR) and gantry speed (GS) are free parameters optimized alongside field aperture shape by the RapidArc engine; however, they are limited by machine constraints and mutually compensate in order to deliver the proper MU/deg during the gantry rotation. Methods: Four test cases (one geometrical and three clinical) were selected and RapidArc plans were optimized using maximum allowed dose rates from 100 to 600 MU/min. The maximum gantry speed was fixed at 4.8 deg/s. Qualitative analysis of DR and GS patterns from these cases was summarized together with quantitative assessment of delivery parameters. Pretreatment quality assurance measurements and scoring of plan quality aimed to determine whether preferable initial conditions might be identified or the optimization engine might be invariant to those variables and capable of providing adequate plans independently from the limits applied. Results: The results of the study were: (i) High dynamic range in MU/deg is achievable across all dose rates by means of gantry speed modulation; (ii) there is a robust compensation mechanism between the two variables; (iii) from a machine delivery point-of-view, slightly improved accuracy is achieved when lower DRs are applied; however, this does not have practical consequences since measurements and plan evaluation showed a lack of clinically relevant deviation; and (iv) reduced total treatment time is a major advantage of high DR. Conclusions: A trend toward improved plan quality for clinical cases was observed with high DR but cannot be generalized, due to the limited amount of cases investigated and the consequent limited significance of the observed differences. As a minimum benefit, the reduced total treatment time should be considered as well.

  2. Dynamic analysis of the gantry crane used for transporting BOP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław WOJCIECH

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the dynamic analysis of a gantry crane used for transporting of BOP (BlowOut Preventer is presented. The crane is placed on a drilling platform. Sea waves cause motion of the platform and the load. Description of such systems can be used in the design process of control systems which allows us to compensate waving. Homogenous transformations and joint coordinates are used to describe behavior of the system. Equations of motion are derived using the Lagrange equations of the second order. In the paper the results of numerical calculations are presented as well.

  3. SU-E-T-195: Gantry Angle Dependency of MLC Leaf Position Error

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, S; Hong, C; Kim, M; Chung, K; Kim, J; Han, Y; Ahn, S; Chung, S; Shin, E; Shin, J; Kim, H; Kim, D; Choi, D [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the gantry angle dependency of the multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf position error. Methods: An automatic MLC quality assurance system (AutoMLCQA) was developed to evaluate the gantry angle dependency of the MLC leaf position error using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). To eliminate the EPID position error due to gantry rotation, we designed a reference maker (RM) that could be inserted into the wedge mount. After setting up the EPID, a reference image was taken of the RM using an open field. Next, an EPID-based picket-fence test (PFT) was performed without the RM. These procedures were repeated at every 45° intervals of the gantry angle. A total of eight reference images and PFT image sets were analyzed using in-house software. The average MLC leaf position error was calculated at five pickets (-10, -5, 0, 5, and 10 cm) in accordance with general PFT guidelines using in-house software. This test was carried out for four linear accelerators. Results: The average MLC leaf position errors were within the set criterion of <1 mm (actual errors ranged from -0.7 to 0.8 mm) for all gantry angles, but significant gantry angle dependency was observed in all machines. The error was smaller at a gantry angle of 0° but increased toward the positive direction with gantry angle increments in the clockwise direction. The error reached a maximum value at a gantry angle of 90° and then gradually decreased until 180°. In the counter-clockwise rotation of the gantry, the same pattern of error was observed but the error increased in the negative direction. Conclusion: The AutoMLCQA system was useful to evaluate the MLC leaf position error for various gantry angles without the EPID position error. The Gantry angle dependency should be considered during MLC leaf position error analysis.

  4. ARC Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    coordination on a regular basis. The overall ARC organizational structure is shown below. Organizational Structure Dynamics and Control of Vehicles Human Centered Modeling and Simulation High Performance

  5. Single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (sVMAT) as adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer: Dosimetric comparisons with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xin; Li, Guangjun; Zhang, Yingjie; Bai, Sen; Xu, Feng; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Youling

    2013-01-01

    To compare the dosimetric differences between the single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (sVMAT), 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in treatment planning for gastric cancer as adjuvant radiotherapy. Twelve patients were retrospectively analyzed. In each patient's case, the parameters were compared based on the dose-volume histogram (DVH) of the sVMAT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT plans, respectively. Three techniques showed similar target dose coverage. The maximum and mean doses of the target were significantly higher in the sVMAT plans than that in 3D-CRT plans and in the 3D-CRT/IMRT plans, respectively, but these differences were clinically acceptable. The IMRT and sVMAT plans successfully achieved better target dose conformity, reduced the V 20/30 , and mean dose of the left kidney, as well as the V 20/30 of the liver, compared with the 3D-CRT plans. And the sVMAT technique reduced the V 20 of the liver much significantly. Although the maximum dose of the spinal cord were much higher in the IMRT and sVMAT plans, respectively (mean 36.4 vs 39.5 and 40.6 Gy), these data were still under the constraints. Not much difference was found in the analysis of the parameters of the right kidney, intestine, and heart. The IMRT and sVMAT plans achieved similar dose distribution to the target, but superior to the 3D-CRT plans, in adjuvant radiotherapy for gastric cancer. The sVMAT technique improved the dose sparings of the left kidney and liver, compared with the 3D-CRT technique, but showed few dosimetric advantages over the IMRT technique. Studies are warranted to evaluate the clinical benefits of the VMAT treatment for patients with gastric cancer after surgery in the future

  6. A novel beam optics concept in a particle therapy gantry utilizing the advantages of superconducting magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbershagen, Alexander; Meer, David; Schippers, Jacobus Maarten; Seidel, Mike

    2016-09-01

    A first order design of the beam optics of a superconducting proton therapy gantry beam is presented. The possibilities of superconducting magnets with respect to the beam optics such as strong fields, large apertures and superposition of different multipole fields have been exploited for novel concepts in a gantry. Since various techniques used in existing gantries have been used in our first design steps, some examples of the existing superconducting gantry designs are described and the necessary requirements of such a gantry are explained. The study of a gantry beam optics design is based on superconducting combined function magnets. The simulations have been performed in first order with the conventional beam transport codes. The superposition of strong dipole and quadrupole fields generated by superconducting magnets enables the introduction of locally achromatic bending sections without increasing the gantry size. A rigorous implementation of such beam optics concepts into the proposed gantry design dramatically increases the momentum acceptance compared to gantries with normal conducting magnets. In our design this large acceptance has been exploited by the implementation of a degrader within the gantry and a potential possibility to use the same magnetic field for all energies used in a treatment, so that the superconducting magnets do not have to vary their fields during a treatment. This also enables very fast beam energy changes, which is beneficial for spreading the Bragg peak over the thickness of the tumor. The results show an improvement of its momentum acceptance. Large momentum acceptance in the gantry creates a possibility to implement faster dose application techniques. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  7. Beam-optics study of the gantry beam delivery system for light-ion cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovic, M.

    1995-12-01

    Ion optics considerations on the granty-like beam delivery system for light-ion cancer therapy are presented. A low-angle active beam scanning in two directions is included in the preliminary gantry design. The optical properties of several gantry modifications are discussed. (orig.)

  8. Nanodiamond embedded ta-C composite film by pulsed filtered vacuum arc deposition from a single target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Ajai; Etula, Jarkko; Ge, Yanling; Liu, Xuwen; Koskinen, Jari

    2016-11-01

    Detonation Nanodiamonds (DNDs) are known to have sp3 core, sp2 shell, small size (few nm) and are gaining importance as multi-functional nanoparticles. Diverse methods have been used to form composites, containing detonation nanodiamonds (DNDs) embedded in conductive and dielectric matrices for various applications. Here we show a method, wherein DND-ta-C composite film, consisting of DNDs embedded in ta-C matrix have been co-deposited from the same cathode by pulsed filtered cathodic vacuum arc method. Transmission Electron Microscope analysis of these films revel the presence of DNDs embedded in the matrix of amorphous carbon. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the presence of DNDs does not adversely affect the sp3 content of DND-ta-C composite film compared to ta-C film of same thickness. Nanoindentation and nanowear tests indicate that DND-ta-C composite films possess improved mechanical properties in comparison to ta-C films of similar thickness.

  9. Modular design of a scanning Gantry for animal SPECT, PET and CT applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, J.A.M.; Lerch, M.; Bourke, J.; Rozenfeld, A.B.; Meikle, S.R.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Using the modular design methodology, we have developed a scanning gantry system; custom designed for multi-modality nuclear imaging techniques (NITs) and the CoALA SPECT project. This paper discusses the gantry's flexible modular design and how significant components and functionality have been reused in other medical physics related instrumentation developed at the Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong. The gantry is designed to meet the exacting requirements of researchers in new radiotracer development who require accurate functional and anatomical information-the scanning gantry has a linear stepping accuracy of +/-12.5 microns and an angular accuracy of +/-0.03 degree. The scanning gantry is a precision instrument that is also affordable to research groups working in small laboratories or universities. Copyright (2005) Australian Institute of Physics

  10. Patient-Specific Quality Assurance Using Monte Carlo Dose Calculation and Elekta Log Files for Prostate Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuta, Yoshiyuki; Kadoya, Noriyuki; Fujita, Yukio; Shimizu, Eiji; Matsunaga, Kenichi; Sawada, Kinya; Matsushita, Haruo; Majima, Kazuhiro; Jingu, Keiichi

    2017-12-01

    Log file-based methods are attracting increasing interest owing to their ability to validate volumetric-modulated arc therapy outputs with high resolution in the leaf and gantry positions and in delivered dose. Cross-validation of these methods for comparison with measurement-based methods using the ionization chamber/ArcCHECK-3DVH software (version 3.2.0) under the same conditions of treatment anatomy and plan enables an efficient evaluation of this method. In this study, with the purpose of cross-validation, we evaluate the accuracy of a log file-based method using Elekta log files and an X-ray voxel Monte Carlo dose calculation technique in the case of leaf misalignment during prostate volumetric-modulated arc therapy. In this study, 10 prostate volumetric-modulated arc therapy plans were used. Systematic multileaf collimator leaf positional errors (±0.4 and ±0.8 mm for each single bank) were deliberately introduced into the optimized plans. Then, the delivered 3-dimensional doses to a phantom with a certain patient anatomy were estimated by our system. These doses were compared with the ionization chamber dose and the ArcCHECK-3DVH dose. For the given phantom and patient anatomy, the estimated dose strongly coincided with the ionization chamber/ArcCHECK-3DVH dose ( P < .01). In addition, good agreement between the estimated dose and the ionization chamber/ArcCHECK-3DVH dose was observed. The dose estimation accuracy of our system, which combines Elekta log files and X-ray voxel Monte Carlo dose calculation, was evaluated.

  11. MO-FG-CAMPUS-TeP2-03: Multi-Criteria Optimization Using Taguchi Method for SRS of Multiple Lesions by Single Isocenter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alani, S; Honig, N; Schlocker, A; Corn, B [Tel Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This study utilizes the Taguchi Method to evaluate the VMAT planning parameters of single isocenter treatment plans for multiple brain metastases. An optimization model based on Taguchi and utility concept is employed to optimize the planning parameters including: arc arrangement, calculation grid size, calculation model, and beam energy on multiple performance characteristics namely conformity index and dose to normal brain. Methods: Treatment plans, each with 4 metastatic brain lesions were planned using single isocenter technique. The collimator angles were optimized to avoid open areas. In this analysis four planning parameters (a–d) were considered: (a)-Arc arrangements: set1: Gantry 181cw179 couch0; gantry179ccw0, couch315; and gantry0ccw181, couch45. set2: set1 plus additional arc: Gantry 0cw179, couch270. (b)-Energy: 6-MV; 6MV-FFF (c)-Calculation grid size: 1mm; 1.5mm (d)-Calculation models: AAA; Acuros Treatment planning was performed in Varian Eclipse (ver.11.0.30). A suitable orthogonal array was selected (L8) to perform the experiments. After conducting the experiments with the combinations of planning parameters the conformity index (CI) and the normal brain dose S/N ratio for each parameter was calculated. Optimum levels for the multiple response optimizations were determined. Results: We determined that the factors most affecting the conformity index are arc arrangement and beam energy. These tests were also used to evaluate dose to normal brain. In these evaluations, the significant parameters were grid size and calculation model. Using the utility concept we determined the combination of each of the four factors tested in this study that most significantly influence quality of the resulting treatment plans: (a)-arc arrangement-set2, (b)-6MV, (c)-calc.grid 1mm, (d)-Acuros algorithm. Overall, the dominant significant influences on plan quality are (a)-arcarrangement, and (b)-beamenergy. Conclusion: Results were analyzed using ANOVA and

  12. Dosimetric Comparison of 6 MV and 15 MV Single Arc Rapidarc to Helical TomoTherapy for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Jing; Yue Jinbo; McLawhorn, Robert; Yang Wensha; Wijesooriya, Krishni; Dunlap, Neal E.; Sheng Ke; Yin Fangfang; Benedict, Stanley H.

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a planning study to compare Varian's RapidArc (RA) and helical TomoTherapy (HT) for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Three intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans were generated for 8 patients with pancreatic cancer: one using HT with 6-MV beam (Plan HT6 ), one using single-arc RA with 6-MV beam (Plan RA6 ), and one using single-arc RA with 15-MV beam (Plan RA15 ). Dosimetric indices including high/low conformality index (CI 100% /CI 50% ), heterogeneity index (HI), monitor units (MUs), and doses to organs at risk (OARs) were compared. The mean CI 100% was statistically equivalent with respect to the 2 treatment techniques, as well as beam energy (0.99, 1.01, and 1.02 for Plan HT6 , Plan RA6 , and Plan RA156, respectively). The CI 50% and HI were improved in both RA plans over the HT plan. The RA plans significantly reduced MU (MU RA6 = 697, MU RA15 = 548) compared with HT (MU HT6 = 6177, p = 0.008 in both cases). The mean maximum cord dose was decreased from 29.6 Gy in Plan H T6 to 21.6 Gy (p = 0.05) in Plan RA6 and 21.7 Gy (p = 0.04) in Plan RA15 . The mean bowel dose decreased from 17.2 Gy in Plan HT6 to 15.2 Gy (p = 0.03) in Plan RA6 and 15.0 Gy (p = 0.03) Plan RA15 . The mean liver dose decreased from 8.4 Gy in Plan HT6 to 6.3 Gy (p = 0.04) in Plan RA6 and 6.2 Gy in Plan RA15 . Variations of the mean dose to the duodenum, kidneys, and stomach were statistically insignificant. RA and HT can both deliver conformal dose distributions to target volumes while limiting the dose to surrounding OARs in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Dosimetric advantages might be gained by using RA over HT by reducing the dose to OARs and total MUs used for treatment.

  13. 78 FR 68477 - Overhead and Gantry Cranes; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-14

    ...] Overhead and Gantry Cranes; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of... requirements specified in the Standard on Overhead and Gantry Cranes (29 CFR 1910.179). DATES: Comments must be... information (29 U.S.C. 657). The paperwork provisions of the Standard on Overhead and Gantry Cranes specify...

  14. SU-E-T-160: Characterization and Monitoring of Linear Accelerator Gantry Radiation Isocenter Motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letourneau, D; Amin, N; Wang, K; Norrlinger, B; Jaffray, D; McNiven, A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the motion of the radiation isocenter, over time, as a function of gantry rotation for multiple linear accelerators (linacs). Two semi-automated image-based quality control (QC) test workflows were designed to achieve this goal. Methods: The full QC-test workflow for motion characterization consisted of acquiring 16 megavoltage images at 8 gantry angles of a ball-bearing suspended off the end of the couch. Performance constancy was assessed using a shortened QC-test workflow which consisted of imaging a cube phantom placed on the couch (5 images at 4 gantry angles). Both workflows use an image processing algorithm to determine the field center and phantom position on each image and computed radiation isocenter motion as a function of gantry angle. Motion was characterized for 9 linacs of same model and performance monitored for 2 months on 3 linacs. Results: The maximum isocenter motion determined with the full-workflow for 9 linacs was within 0.38–0.79 mm. The shortened-workflow usually agreed within 0.1 mm with the full-workflow and the time required for these methods was about 4 and 15 min, respectively. For all linacs, the isocenter motion perpendicular to the gantry rotation plane followed a consistent pattern with maximum amplitude of 0.36–0.59 mm. In the gantry rotation plane, the variation among linacs was higher and the beam axis described a circle of up to 0.6 mm radius around the gantry axis of rotation (2 linacs). The radiation isocenter motion was stable as a function of time for the monitored linacs and was within ±0.1 mm of the average. Conclusion: Radiation isocenter motion parallel and perpendicular to the gantry rotation plane was characterized. In the gantry rotation plane, beam spot positioning adjustment might be used to reduce the observed radiation isocenter motion. A shortened-workflow was designed and enables performance monitoring over time

  15. Consolidating NASA's Arc Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboni, John A.; Gokcen, Tahir; Hui, Frank C. L.; Graube, Peter; Morrissey, Patricia; Lewis, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the consolidation of NASA's high powered arc-jet testing at a single location. The existing plasma arc-jet wind tunnels located at the Johnson Space Center were relocated to Ames Research Center while maintaining NASA's technical capability to ground-test thermal protection system materials under simulated atmospheric entry convective heating. The testing conditions at JSC were reproduced and successfully demonstrated at ARC through close collaboration between the two centers. New equipment was installed at Ames to provide test gases of pure nitrogen mixed with pure oxygen, and for future nitrogen-carbon dioxide mixtures. A new control system was custom designed, installed and tested. Tests demonstrated the capability of the 10 MW constricted-segmented arc heater at Ames meets the requirements of the major customer, NASA's Orion program. Solutions from an advanced computational fluid dynamics code were used to aid in characterizing the properties of the plasma stream and the surface environment on the calorimeters in the supersonic flow stream produced by the arc heater.

  16. Use of an amorphous silicon EPID for measuring MLC calibration at varying gantry angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, M F; Budgell, G J

    2008-01-01

    Amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are used to perform routine quality control (QC) checks on the multileaf collimators (MLCs) at this centre. Presently, these checks are performed at gantry angle 0 0 and are considered to be valid for all other angles. Since therapeutic procedures regularly require the delivery of MLC-defined fields to the patient at a wide range of gantry angles, the accuracy of the QC checks at other gantry angles has been investigated. When the gantry is rotated to angles other than 0 0 it was found that the apparent pixel size measured using the EPID varies up to a maximum value of 0.0015 mm per pixel due to a sag in the EPID of up to 9.2 mm. A correction factor was determined using two independent methods at a range of gantry angles between 0 deg. and 360 deg. The EPID was used to measure field sizes (defined by both x-jaws and MLC) at a range of gantry angles and, after this correction had been applied, any residual gravitational sag was studied. It was found that, when fields are defined by the x-jaws and y-back-up jaws, no errors of greater than 0.5 mm were measured and that these errors were no worse when the MLC was used. It was therefore concluded that, provided the correction is applied, measurements of the field size are, in practical terms, unaffected by gantry angle. Experiments were also performed to study how the reproducibility of individual leaves is affected by gantry angle. Measurements of the relative position of each individual leaf (minor offsets) were performed at a range of gantry angles and repeated three times. The position reproducibility was defined by the RMS error in the position of each leaf and this was found to be 0.24 mm and 0.21 mm for the two leaf banks at a gantry angle of 0 0 . When measurements were performed at a range of gantry angles, these reproducibility values remained within 0.09 mm and 0.11 mm. It was therefore concluded that the calibration of the Elekta MLC is stable at

  17. SU-E-T-508: End to End Testing of a Prototype Eclipse Module for Planning Modulated Arc Therapy On the Siemens Platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, L; Sarkar, V; Spiessens, S; Rassiah-Szegedi, P; Huang, Y; Salter, B; Zhao, H; Szegedi, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The latest clinical implementation of the Siemens Artiste linac allows for delivery of modulated arcs (mARC) using full-field flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams. The maximum doserate of 2000 MU/min is well suited for high dose treatments such as SBRT. We tested and report on the performance of a prototype Eclipse TPS module supporting mARC capability on the Artiste platform. Method: our spine SBRT patients originally treated with 12/13 field static-gantry IMRT (SGIMRT) were chosen for this study. These plans were designed to satisfy RTOG0631 guidelines with a prescription of 16Gy in a single fraction. The cases were re-planned as mARC plans in the prototype Eclipse module using the 7MV FFF beam and required to satisfy RTOG0631 requirements. All plans were transferred from Eclipse, delivered on a Siemens Artiste linac and dose-validated using the Delta4 system. Results: All treatment plans were straightforwardly developed, in timely fashion, without challenge or inefficiency using the prototype module. Due to the limited number of segments in a single arc, mARC plans required 2-3 full arcs to yield plan quality comparable to SGIMRT plans containing over 250 total segments. The average (3%/3mm) gamma pass-rate for all arcs was 98.5±1.1%, thus demonstrating both excellent dose prediction by the AAA dose algorithm and excellent delivery fidelity. Mean delivery times for the mARC plans(10.5±1.7min) were 50-70% lower than the SGIMRT plans(26±2min), with both delivered at 2000 MU/min. Conclusion: A prototype Eclipse module capable of planning for Burst Mode modulated arc delivery on the Artiste platform has been tested and found to perform efficiently and accurately for treatment plan development and delivered-dose prediction. Further investigation of more treatment sites is being carried out and data will be presented

  18. The characteristic of twin-electrode TIG coupling arc pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leng Xuesong; Zhang Guangjun; Wu Lin

    2006-01-01

    The coupling arc of twin-electrode TIG (T-TIG) is a particular kind of arc, which is achieved through the coupling of two arcs generated from two insulated electrodes in the same welding torch. It is therefore different from the single arc of conventional TIG in its physical characteristics. This paper studies the distribution of T-TIG coupling arc pressure, and analyses the influences of welding current, arc length, the distance between electrode tips and electrode shape upon arc pressure on the basis of experiment. It is expected that the T-TIG welding method can be applied in high efficiency welding according to its low arc pressure

  19. SU-F-T-649: Dosimetric Evaluation of Non-Coplanar Arc Therapy Using a Novel Rotating Gamma Ray System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldib, A; Chibani, O; Jin, L; Fan, J; Veltchev, I; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mora, G [Universidade de Lisboa, Codex, Lisboa (Portugal); Li, J [Cyber Medical Inc, Xian, Shaanxi (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic intra and extra-cranial body radiation therapy has evolved with advances in treatment accuracy, effective radiation dose, and parameters necessary to maximize machine capabilities. Novel gamma systems with a ring type gantry were developed having the ability to perform oblique arcs. The aim of this study is to explore the dosimetric advantages of this new system. Methods: The rotating Gamma system is named CybeRay (Cyber Medical Corp., Xian, China). It has a treatment head of 16 cobalt-60 sources focused to the isocenter, which can rotate 360° on the ring gantry and swing 35° in the superior direction. Treatment plans were generated utilizing our in-house Monte Carlo treatment planning system. A cylindrical phantom was modeled with 2mm voxel size. Dose inside the cylindrical phantom was calculated for coplanar and non-coplanar arcs. Dosimetric differences between CybeRay cobalt beams and CyberKnife 6MV beams were compared in a lung phantom and for previously treated SBRT patients. Results: The full width at half maxima of cross profiles in the S-I direction for the coplanar setup matched the cone sizes, while for the non-coplanar setup, FWHM was larger by 2mm for a 10mm cone and about 5mm for larger cones. In the coronal and sagittal view, coplanar beams showed elliptical shaped isodose lines, while non-coplanar beams showed circular isodose lines. Thus proper selection of the oblique angle and cone size can aid optimal dose matching to the target volume. Comparing a single 5mm cone from CybeRay to that from CyberKnife showed similar penumbra in a lung phantom but CybeRay had significant lower doses beyond lung tissues. Comparable treatment plans were obtained with CybeRay as that from CyberKnife.ConclusionThe noncoplanar multiple source arrangement of CybeRay will be of great clinical benefits for stereotactic intra and extra-cranial radiation therapy.

  20. Rotational IMRT techniques compared to fixed gantry IMRT and Tomotherapy: multi-institutional planning study for head-and-neck cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutters Gerd

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent developments enable to deliver rotational IMRT with standard C-arm gantry based linear accelerators. This upcoming treatment technique was benchmarked in a multi-center treatment planning study against static gantry IMRT and rotational IMRT based on a ring gantry for a complex parotid gland sparing head-and-neck technique. Methods Treatment plans were created for 10 patients with head-and-neck tumours (oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx using the following treatment planning systems (TPS for rotational IMRT: Monaco (ELEKTA VMAT solution, Eclipse (Varian RapidArc solution and HiArt for the helical tomotherapy (Tomotherapy. Planning of static gantry IMRT was performed with KonRad, Pinnacle and Panther DAO based on step&shoot IMRT delivery and Eclipse for sliding window IMRT. The prescribed doses for the high dose PTVs were 65.1Gy or 60.9Gy and for the low dose PTVs 55.8Gy or 52.5Gy dependend on resection status. Plan evaluation was based on target coverage, conformity and homogeneity, DVHs of OARs and the volume of normal tissue receiving more than 5Gy (V5Gy. Additionally, the cumulative monitor units (MUs and treatment times of the different technologies were compared. All evaluation parameters were averaged over all 10 patients for each technique and planning modality. Results Depending on IMRT technique and TPS, the mean CI values of all patients ranged from 1.17 to 2.82; and mean HI values varied from 0.05 to 0.10. The mean values of the median doses of the spared parotid were 26.5Gy for RapidArc and 23Gy for VMAT, 14.1Gy for Tomo. For fixed gantry techniques 21Gy was achieved for step&shoot+KonRad, 17.0Gy for step&shoot+Panther DAO, 23.3Gy for step&shoot+Pinnacle and 18.6Gy for sliding window. V5Gy values were lowest for the sliding window IMRT technique (3499 ccm and largest for RapidArc (5480 ccm. The lowest mean MU value of 408 was achieved by Panther DAO, compared to 1140 for sliding window IMRT. Conclusions All

  1. Rotational IMRT techniques compared to fixed gantry IMRT and Tomotherapy: multi-institutional planning study for head-and-neck cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiezorek, Tilo; Schubert, Kai; Wagner, Daniela; Wendt, Thomas G; Brachwitz, Tim; Georg, Dietmar; Blank, Eyck; Fotina, Irina; Habl, Gregor; Kretschmer, Matthias; Lutters, Gerd; Salz, Henning

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments enable to deliver rotational IMRT with standard C-arm gantry based linear accelerators. This upcoming treatment technique was benchmarked in a multi-center treatment planning study against static gantry IMRT and rotational IMRT based on a ring gantry for a complex parotid gland sparing head-and-neck technique. Treatment plans were created for 10 patients with head-and-neck tumours (oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx) using the following treatment planning systems (TPS) for rotational IMRT: Monaco (ELEKTA VMAT solution), Eclipse (Varian RapidArc solution) and HiArt for the helical tomotherapy (Tomotherapy). Planning of static gantry IMRT was performed with KonRad, Pinnacle and Panther DAO based on step&shoot IMRT delivery and Eclipse for sliding window IMRT. The prescribed doses for the high dose PTVs were 65.1Gy or 60.9Gy and for the low dose PTVs 55.8Gy or 52.5Gy dependend on resection status. Plan evaluation was based on target coverage, conformity and homogeneity, DVHs of OARs and the volume of normal tissue receiving more than 5Gy (V 5Gy ). Additionally, the cumulative monitor units (MUs) and treatment times of the different technologies were compared. All evaluation parameters were averaged over all 10 patients for each technique and planning modality. Depending on IMRT technique and TPS, the mean CI values of all patients ranged from 1.17 to 2.82; and mean HI values varied from 0.05 to 0.10. The mean values of the median doses of the spared parotid were 26.5Gy for RapidArc and 23Gy for VMAT, 14.1Gy for Tomo. For fixed gantry techniques 21Gy was achieved for step&shoot+KonRad, 17.0Gy for step&shoot+Panther DAO, 23.3Gy for step&shoot+Pinnacle and 18.6Gy for sliding window. V 5Gy values were lowest for the sliding window IMRT technique (3499 ccm) and largest for RapidArc (5480 ccm). The lowest mean MU value of 408 was achieved by Panther DAO, compared to 1140 for sliding window IMRT. All IMRT delivery technologies with their associated TPS

  2. SU-F-T-459: ArcCHECK Machine QA : Highly Efficient Quality Assurance Tool for VMAT, SRS & SBRT Linear Accelerator Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mhatre, V; Patwe, P; Dandekar, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Quality assurance (QA) of complex linear accelerators is critical and highly time consuming. ArcCHECK Machine QA tool is used to test geometric and delivery aspects of linear accelerator. In this study we evaluated the performance of this tool. Methods: Machine QA feature allows user to perform quality assurance tests using ArcCHECK phantom. Following tests were performed 1) Gantry Speed 2) Gantry Rotation 3) Gantry Angle 4)MLC/Collimator QA 5)Beam Profile Flatness & Symmetry. Data was collected on trueBEAM stX machine for 6 MV for a period of one year. The Gantry QA test allows to view errors in gantry angle, rotation & assess how accurately the gantry moves around the isocentre. The MLC/Collimator QA tool is used to analyze & locate the differences between leaf bank & jaw position of linac. The flatness & Symmetry test quantifies beam flatness & symmetry in IEC-y & x direction. The Gantry & Flatness/Symmetry test can be performed for static & dynamic delivery. Results: The Gantry speed was 3.9 deg/sec with speed maximum deviation around 0.3 deg/sec. The Gantry Isocentre for arc delivery was 0.9mm & static delivery was 0.4mm. The maximum percent positive & negative difference was found to be 1.9 % & – 0.25 % & maximum distance positive & negative diff was 0.4mm & – 0.3 mm for MLC/Collimator QA. The Flatness for Arc delivery was 1.8 % & Symmetry for Y was 0.8 % & X was 1.8 %. The Flatness for gantry 0°,270°,90° & 180° was 1.75,1.9,1.8 & 1.6% respectively & Symmetry for X & Y was 0.8,0.6% for 0°, 0.6,0.7% for 270°, 0.6,1% for 90° & 0.6,0.7% for 180°. Conclusion: ArcCHECK Machine QA is an useful tool for QA of Modern linear accelerators as it tests both geometric & delivery aspects. This is very important for VMAT, SRS & SBRT treatments.

  3. SU-F-T-459: ArcCHECK Machine QA : Highly Efficient Quality Assurance Tool for VMAT, SRS & SBRT Linear Accelerator Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mhatre, V; Patwe, P; Dandekar, P [Sir HN RF Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra (India)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Quality assurance (QA) of complex linear accelerators is critical and highly time consuming. ArcCHECK Machine QA tool is used to test geometric and delivery aspects of linear accelerator. In this study we evaluated the performance of this tool. Methods: Machine QA feature allows user to perform quality assurance tests using ArcCHECK phantom. Following tests were performed 1) Gantry Speed 2) Gantry Rotation 3) Gantry Angle 4)MLC/Collimator QA 5)Beam Profile Flatness & Symmetry. Data was collected on trueBEAM stX machine for 6 MV for a period of one year. The Gantry QA test allows to view errors in gantry angle, rotation & assess how accurately the gantry moves around the isocentre. The MLC/Collimator QA tool is used to analyze & locate the differences between leaf bank & jaw position of linac. The flatness & Symmetry test quantifies beam flatness & symmetry in IEC-y & x direction. The Gantry & Flatness/Symmetry test can be performed for static & dynamic delivery. Results: The Gantry speed was 3.9 deg/sec with speed maximum deviation around 0.3 deg/sec. The Gantry Isocentre for arc delivery was 0.9mm & static delivery was 0.4mm. The maximum percent positive & negative difference was found to be 1.9 % & – 0.25 % & maximum distance positive & negative diff was 0.4mm & – 0.3 mm for MLC/Collimator QA. The Flatness for Arc delivery was 1.8 % & Symmetry for Y was 0.8 % & X was 1.8 %. The Flatness for gantry 0°,270°,90° & 180° was 1.75,1.9,1.8 & 1.6% respectively & Symmetry for X & Y was 0.8,0.6% for 0°, 0.6,0.7% for 270°, 0.6,1% for 90° & 0.6,0.7% for 180°. Conclusion: ArcCHECK Machine QA is an useful tool for QA of Modern linear accelerators as it tests both geometric & delivery aspects. This is very important for VMAT, SRS & SBRT treatments.

  4. A Monte Carlo evaluation of RapidArc dose calculations for oropharynx radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, I M; Ansbacher, W; Zavgorodni, S; Popescu, C; Beckham, W A

    2008-01-01

    RapidArc(TM), recently released by Varian Medical Systems, is a novel extension of IMRT in which an optimized 3D dose distribution may be delivered in a single gantry rotation of 360 deg. or less. The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA), the sole algorithm for photon dose calculations of RapidArc(TM) treatment plans. The clinical site chosen was oropharynx and the associated nodes involved. The VIMC-Arc system, which utilizes BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc for particle transport through the linac head and patient CT phantom, was used as a benchmarking tool. As part of this study, the dose for a single static aperture, typical for RapidArc(TM) delivery, was calculated by the AAA, MC and compared with the film. This film measurement confirmed MC modeling of the beam aperture in water. It also demonstrated that the AAA dosimetric error can be as high as 12% near isolated leaf edges and up to 5% at the leaf end. The composite effect of these errors in a full RapidArc(TM) calculation in water involving a C-shaped target and the associated organ at risk produced a 1.5% overprediction of the mean target dose. In our cohort of six patients, the AAA was found, on average, to overestimate the PTV60 coverage at the 95% level in the presence of air cavities by 1.0% (SD = 1.1%). Removing the air cavities from the target volumes reduced these differences by about a factor of 2. The dose to critical structures was also overestimated by the AAA. The mean dose to the spinal cord was higher by 1.8% (SD = 0.8%), while the effective maximum dose (D 2% ) was only 0.2% higher (SD = 0.6%). The mean dose to the parotid glands was overestimated by ∼9%. This study has shown that the accuracy of the AAA for RapidArc(TM) dose calculations, performed at a resolution of 2.5 mm or better, is adequate for clinical use.

  5. Real-Time Dispatching of Rubber Tired Gantry Cranes in Container Terminals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McNary, Bradley S

    2008-01-01

    ... significant growth in container traffic. Efficiently managing of rubber tired gantry cranes and planning container placement within the terminal are two ways to increase the overall efficiency of a terminal...

  6. Influence of gantry angle in helical computed tomography. Usefullness of 1-dimension sharpness filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Toru; Matsuura, Shigeru; Kai, Tsuyoshi; Shimizu, Toshiyuki [Hyuga Hospital of Saiseikai Foundation, Kadogawa, Miyazaki (Japan)

    2001-05-01

    When we let gantry tilt and do scan in helical CT, vertical sharpness deteriorates. We were able to revise it with 1-dimensional sharpness filter which the square sum of difference of MTF was compared, and was designed this time. And the unsharpness was in proportion to sin of gantry angle. As a result, we led several sets of frequency emphasis degree. There is a model to built 1-dimension sharpness filter in a scan plan. It is useful for clinical diagnoses. (author)

  7. Influence of gantry angle in helical computed tomography. Usefullness of 1-dimension sharpness filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Toru; Matsuura, Shigeru; Kai, Tsuyoshi; Shimizu, Toshiyuki

    2001-01-01

    When we let gantry tilt and do scan in helical CT, vertical sharpness deteriorates. We were able to revise it with 1-dimensional sharpness filter which the square sum of difference of MTF was compared, and was designed this time. And the unsharpness was in proportion to sin of gantry angle. As a result, we led several sets of frequency emphasis degree. There is a model to built 1-dimension sharpness filter in a scan plan. It is useful for clinical diagnoses. (author)

  8. A comprehensive formulation for volumetric modulated arc therapy planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dan; Lyu, Qihui; Ruan, Dan; O’Connor, Daniel; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke, E-mail: ksheng@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    .59% and 7.45%, respectively, of the prescription dose. Reductions in max dose and mean dose were as high as 14.5 Gy in the LNG case and 15.3 Gy in the H&N{sub 3PTV} case. PTV coverages measured by D95, D98, and D99 were within 0.25% of the prescription dose. By comprehensively optimizing all beams, the comVMAT optimizer gained the freedom to allow some selected beams to deliver higher intensities, yielding a dose distribution that resembles a static beam IMRT plan with beam orientation optimization. Conclusions: The novel nongreedy VMAT approach simultaneously optimizes all beams in an arc and then directly generates deliverable apertures. The single arc VMAT approach thus fully utilizes the digital Linac’s capability in dose rate and gantry rotation speed modulation. In practice, the new single VMAT algorithm generates plans superior to existing VMAT algorithms utilizing two arcs.

  9. Dosimetry with the scanned proton beam on the PSI gantry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coray, A.; Pedroni, E.; Boehringer, T.; Lin, S.; Lomax, T.; Goitein, G.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The irradiation facility at PSI is designed for the treatment of deep seated tumours with a proton beam energy of up to 270 MeV. The spot scanning technique, which uses a proton pencil beam applied to the patient, is performed on a compact isocentric gantry. An optimal three-dimensional conformation of the dose distribution to the target volume can be realized. A fast steering system and a redundant interlock system are in operation. The dose delivery is controlled by a parallel plate transmission chamber, which is calibrated in terms of number of protons per monitor unit. The therapy planning is based on an empirical model, which takes into account attenuation of primary protons and losses outside the primary beam through secondary products. The therapy plan predicts an absolute dose. The calibration of the primary monitor is done using a reference thimble ionization chamber inside a homogeneous geometrical dose volume. The reference system is calibrated in a cobalt field at the national office of metrology in terms of absorbed dose to water. The dosimetry protocol used up to last year was based on the ICRU Report Nr. 59, we have switched to the IAEA Code of Practice starting this beam period. Data on the monitor calibration for various energies and using two different reference systems will be shown. The calibration of the beam monitor using a Faraday Cup in the static pencil beam results in a good agreement with the ionization chamber measurements, with a deviation of less than 1%. Following the daily setup of the machine, an extensive quality control and safety check of the whole system is performed. The daily dosimetry quality assurance program includes: measurement of dose rate and monitor ratios; check of the beam position monitors; measurement of a depth dose curve; dose measurement in a regular dose field. The doses measured daily in a regular scanned field show a standard deviation of about 1 %. Further daily checks results, which illustrate

  10. The effect of restraints type on the generated stresses in gantry crane beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowa Leszek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper includes an analysis of the mechanical phenomena in the gantry crane beam, because the cranes are currently one of the most common devices for the transporting loads. Designing modern mechanical structures is a complex task that requires the use of appropriate tools. Such a modern tool is the numerical simulation, which uses different numerical methods. One of the best known methods is the finite element method, also used here. Simulations are limited to analysis of the strength of the gantry crane beam that was the loaded of the force load movement along its length. The numerical analysis was made to the gantry crane beam which cross-section was an I-beam and ends were fixed in different ways. As the result of numerical calculations, the stresses and displacements of the structure of gantry were obtained. The influence of the restraints type and changing the loading force position on generate the Huber-Misses stress in the gantry crane beam was estimated. The aim was to ensure that the maximum equivalent stress generated in the gantry crane beam was less than the strength of material, because then the construction is safe.

  11. A novel gantry for proton therapy at the Paul Scherrer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedroni, E.; Boehringer, T.; Coray, A.; Goitein, G.; Grossmann, M.; Lomax, A.; Lin, S.; Jermann, M.

    2001-01-01

    PSI has gained in the last few years the unique experience of using a proton therapy system based on a beam scanning delivery technique and on a compact gantry. This knowledge is now bringing forth new initiatives. We are continuously producing significant modifications and improvements to the present system, gantry 1. The major new step is however the decision of PSI to purchase a dedicated accelerator for the medical project. In the context of the expansion of the medical project of PSI (project PROSCAN) we have also started to plan the realisation of a second proton gantry, gantry 2. In this lecture we present the main ideas for the novel gantry, which will be based on one hand on the experience with the present technology, but on the other hand should be designed as a system more open to further developments and needs. The established and the future requirements for the beam delivery on the new gantry were routed into the specification list for the dedicated accelerator

  12. Single breath hold 3D cardiac cine MRI using kat-ARC: preliminary results at 1.5T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Daniel; Schiebler, Mark L; Lai, Peng; Wang, Kang; Vigen, Karl K; François, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    Validation of a new single breath-hold, three-dimensional, cine balanced steady-state free precession (3D cine bSSFP) cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) sequence for left ventricular function. CMR examinations were performed on fifteen patients and three healthy volunteers on a clinical 1.5T scanner using a two-dimensional (2D) cine balanced SSFP CMR sequence (2D cine bSSFP) followed by an investigational 3D cine bSSFP pulse sequence acquired within a single breath hold. Left ventricular end diastolic volume (LVEDV), end systolic volume (LVESV), ejection fraction (LVEF), and myocardial mass were independently segmented on a workstation by two experienced radiologists. Blood pool to myocardial contrast was evaluated in consensus using a Likert scale. Bland-Altman analysis was used to compare these quantitative and nominal measurements for the two sequences. The average acquisition time was significantly shorter for the 3D cine bSSFP than for 2D cine bSSFP (0.36 ± 0.03 vs. 8.5 ± 2.3 min) p = 0.0002. Bland-Altman analyses [bias and (limits of agreement)] of the data derived from these two methods revealed that the LVEF 0.9% (-4.7, 6.4), LVEDV 4.9 ml (-23.0, 32.8), LVESV -0.2 ml (-22.4, 21.9), and myocardial mass -0.4 g (-23.8, 23.0) were not significantly different. There was excellent intraclass correlation for intra-observer variability (0.981, 0.989, 0.997, 0.985) and inter-observer variability (0.903, 0.954, 0.970, 0.842) for LVEF, LVEDV, LVESV, and myocardial mass respectively. 3D cine bSSFP allows for accurate single breath-hold volumetric cine CMR which enables substantial improvements in scanner time efficiency without sacrificing diagnostic accuracy.

  13. SU-E-P-45: An Analytical Formula for Deriving Mechanical Iso-Center of Rotational Gantry Treatment Unit Rotational Gantry Treatment Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, X; Bues, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To present an analytical formula for deriving mechanical isocenter (MIC) of a rotational gantry treatment unit. The input data to the formula is obtained by a custom-made device. The formula has been implemented and used in an operational proton therapy facility since 2005. Methods: The custom made device consisted of 3 mutually perpendicular dial indicators and 5 clinometers, to obtain displacement data and gantry angle data simultaneously. During measurement, a steel sphere was affixed to the patient couch, and the device was attached to the snout rotating with the gantry. The displacement data and angle data were obtained simultaneously at angular increments of less than 1 degree. The analytical formula took the displacement and angle as input and derived the positions of dial indicator tips (DIT) position in room-fixed coordinate system. The formula derivation presupposes trigonometry and 3-dimentional coordinate transformations. Due to the symmetry properties of the defining equations, the DIT position can be solved for analytically without using mathematical approximations. We define the mean of all points in the DIT trajectory as the MIC. The formula was implemented in computer code, which has been employed during acceptance test, commissioning, as well as routine QA practice in an operational proton facility since 2005. Results: It took one minute for the custom-made device to acquire the measurement data for a full gantry rotation. The DIT trajectory and MIS are instantaneously available after the measurement. The MIC Result agrees well with vendor’s Result, which came from a different measurement setup, as well as different data analysis algorithm. Conclusion: An analytical formula for deriving mechanical isocenter was developed and validated. The formula is considered to be absolutely accurate mathematically. Be analyzing measured data of radial displacements as function of gantry angle, the formula calculates the MI position in room

  14. Single-fraction flattening filter–free volumetric modulated arc therapy for lung cancer: Dosimetric results and comparison with flattened beams technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbiero, Sara [Medical Physics Division, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano (Italy); Specialty School in Medical Physics, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Rink, Alexandra [Radiation Physics Department, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Matteucci, Fabrizio [Radiation Oncology Department, S.Chiara University Hospital, Pisa (Italy); Fedele, David [Radiotherapy Department, Casa di Cura S. Rossore, Pisa (Italy); Paiar, Fabiola; Pasqualetti, Francesco [Radiation Oncology Department, S.Chiara University Hospital, Pisa (Italy); Avanzo, Michele, E-mail: mavanzo@cro.it [Medical Physics Division, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano (Italy)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report on single-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (RT) (SBRT) with flattening filter (FF)–free (FFF) volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for lung cancer and to compare dosimetric results with VMAT with FF. Methods and materials: Overall, 25 patients were treated with 6-MV FFF VMAT (Varian TrueBeam STx LINAC) to a prescribed dose of 24 Gy in a single fraction. Treatment plans were recreated using FF VMAT. Dose-volume indices, monitor units (MU), and treatment times were compared between FFF and FF VMAT techniques. Results: Dose constraints to PTV, spinal cord, and lungs were reached in FFF and FF plans. In FFF plans, average conformity index was 1.13 (95% CI: 1.07 to1.38). Maximum doses to spinal cord, heart, esophagus, and trachea were 2.9 Gy (95% CI: 0.4 to 6.7 Gy), 0.8 Gy (95% CI: 0 to 3.6 Gy), 3.3 Gy (95% CI: 0.02 to 13.9 Gy), and 1.5 Gy (95% CI: 0 to 4.9 Gy), respectively. Average V7 Gy, V7.4 Gy, and mean dose to the healthy lung were 126.5 cc (95% CI: 41.3 to 248.9 cc), 107.3 cc (95% CI: 18.7 to 232.8 cc), and 1.1 Gy (95% CI: 0.3 to 2.2 Gy), respectively. No statistically significant differences were found in dosimetric results and MU between FF and FFF treatments. Treatment time was reduced by an average factor of 2.31 (95% CI: 2.15 to 2.43) from FF treatments to FFF, and the difference was statistically significant. Conclusions: FFF VMAT for lung SBRT provides equivalent dosimetric results to the target and organs at risk as FF VMAT while significantly reducing treatment time.

  15. A new irradiation unit constructed of self-moving gantry-CT and linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuriyama, Kengo; Onishi, Hiroshi; Sano, Naoki; Komiyama, Takafumi; Aikawa, Yoshihito; Tateda, Yoshihito; Araki, Tsutomu; Uematsu, Minoru

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To improve reproducibility in stereotactic irradiation (STI) without using noninvasive immobilization devices or body frames, we have developed an integrated computed tomography (CT)-linac irradiation system connecting CT scanner and linac via a common treatment couch. Methods and Materials: This system consists of a linac, a CT scanner, and a common treatment couch. The linac and the CT gantry are positioned on opposite ends of the couch so that, by rotating the treatment couch, linac radiotherapy or CT scanning can be performed. The rotational axis of the linac gantry is coaxial with that of the CT gantry, and the position of the linac isocenter on the couch matches the origin of the coordinate system for CT scanning when the couch is rotated 180 degree sign toward the CT side. Instead of the couch moving into the gantry, as in conventional CT, in this case the table is fixed and scanning is accomplished by moving the gantry. We evaluated the rotational accuracy of the common couch and the scan-position accuracy of the self-moving gantry CT. Results: The positional accuracy of the common couch was 0.20, 0.18, and 0.39 mm in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions, respectively. The scan-position accuracy of the CT gantry was less than 0.4 mm in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions. Conclusion: This irradiation system has a high accuracy and is useful for noninvasive STI and for verification of the position of a target in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

  16. SU-E-T-130: Are Proton Gantries Needed? An Analysis of 4332 Patient Proton Gantry Treatment Plans From the Past 10 Years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, S; Lu, H; Flanz, J; Depauw, N; Adams, J; Gorissen, BL; Wang, Y; Daartz, J; Bortfeld, T

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To ascertain the necessity of a proton gantry, as compared to the feasibility of using a horizontal fixed proton beam-line for treatment with advanced technology. Methods: To calculate the percentage of patients that can be treated with a horizontal fixed beam-line instead of a gantry, we analyze the distributions of beam orientations of our proton gantry patients treated over the past 10 years. We identify three horizontal fixed beam geometries (FIXED, BEND and MOVE) with the patient in lying and/or sitting positions. The FIXED geometry includes only table/chair rotations and translations. In BEND, the beam can be bent up/down for up to 20 degrees. MOVE allows for patient head/body angle adjustment. Based on the analysis, we select eight patients whose plan involves beams which are still challenging to achieve with a horizontal fixed beam. These beams are removed in the pencil beam scanning (PBS) plan optimized for the fixed beam-line (PBS-fix). We generate non-coplanar PBS-gantry plans for comparison, and perform a robustness analysis. Results: The percentage of patients with head-and-neck/brain tumors that can be treated with horizontal fixed beam is 44% in FIXED, 70% in 20-degrees BEND, and 100% in 90-degrees MOVE. For torso regions, 99% of the patients can be treated in 20-degree BEND. The target coverage is more homogeneous with PBS-fix plans compared to the clinical scattering treatment plans. The PBS-fix plans reduce the mean dose to organs-at-risk by a factor of 1.1–28.5. PBS-gantry plans are as good as PBS-fix plans, sometimes marginally better. Conclusion: The majority of the beam orientations can be realized with a horizontal fixed beam-line. Challenging non-coplanar beams can be eliminated with PBS delivery. Clinical implementation of the proposed fixed beam-line requires use of robotic patient positioning, further developments in immobilization, and image guidance. However, our results suggest that fixed beam-lines can be as effective as

  17. SU-E-T-130: Are Proton Gantries Needed? An Analysis of 4332 Patient Proton Gantry Treatment Plans From the Past 10 Years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, S; Lu, H; Flanz, J; Depauw, N; Adams, J; Gorissen, BL; Wang, Y; Daartz, J; Bortfeld, T [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To ascertain the necessity of a proton gantry, as compared to the feasibility of using a horizontal fixed proton beam-line for treatment with advanced technology. Methods: To calculate the percentage of patients that can be treated with a horizontal fixed beam-line instead of a gantry, we analyze the distributions of beam orientations of our proton gantry patients treated over the past 10 years. We identify three horizontal fixed beam geometries (FIXED, BEND and MOVE) with the patient in lying and/or sitting positions. The FIXED geometry includes only table/chair rotations and translations. In BEND, the beam can be bent up/down for up to 20 degrees. MOVE allows for patient head/body angle adjustment. Based on the analysis, we select eight patients whose plan involves beams which are still challenging to achieve with a horizontal fixed beam. These beams are removed in the pencil beam scanning (PBS) plan optimized for the fixed beam-line (PBS-fix). We generate non-coplanar PBS-gantry plans for comparison, and perform a robustness analysis. Results: The percentage of patients with head-and-neck/brain tumors that can be treated with horizontal fixed beam is 44% in FIXED, 70% in 20-degrees BEND, and 100% in 90-degrees MOVE. For torso regions, 99% of the patients can be treated in 20-degree BEND. The target coverage is more homogeneous with PBS-fix plans compared to the clinical scattering treatment plans. The PBS-fix plans reduce the mean dose to organs-at-risk by a factor of 1.1–28.5. PBS-gantry plans are as good as PBS-fix plans, sometimes marginally better. Conclusion: The majority of the beam orientations can be realized with a horizontal fixed beam-line. Challenging non-coplanar beams can be eliminated with PBS delivery. Clinical implementation of the proposed fixed beam-line requires use of robotic patient positioning, further developments in immobilization, and image guidance. However, our results suggest that fixed beam-lines can be as effective as

  18. Dosimetric comparison of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in total scalp irradiation: a single institutional experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostheimer, Christian; Huebsch, Patrick; Janich, Martin; Gerlach, Reinhard; Vordermark, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Total scalp irradiation (TSI) is a rare but challenging indication. We previously reported that non-coplanar intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) was superior to coplanar IMRT in organ-at-risk (OAR) protection and target dose distribution. This consecutive treatment planning study compared IMRT with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). A retrospective treatment plan databank search was performed and 5 patient cases were randomly selected. Cranial imaging was restored from the initial planning computed tomography (CT) and target volumes and OAR were redelineated. For each patients, three treatment plans were calculated (coplanar/non-coplanar IMRT, VMAT; prescribed dose 50 Gy, single dose 2 Gy). Conformity, homogeneity and dose volume histograms were used for plan. VMAT featured the lowest monitor units and the sharpest dose gradient (1.6 Gy/mm). Planning target volume (PTV) coverage and homogeneity was better in VMAT (coverage, 0.95; homogeneity index [HI], 0.118) compared to IMRT (coverage, 0.94; HI, 0.119) but coplanar IMRT produced the most conformal plans (conformity index [CI], 0.43). Minimum PTV dose range was 66.8% –88.4% in coplanar, 77.5%–88.2% in non-coplanar IMRT and 82.8%–90.3% in VMAT. Mean dose to the brain, brain stem, optic system (maximum dose) and lenses were 18.6, 13.2, 9.1, and 5.2 Gy for VMAT, 21.9, 13.4, 14.5, and 6.3 Gy for non-coplanar and 22.8, 16.5, 11.5, and 5.9 Gy for coplanar IMRT. Maximum optic chiasm dose was 7.7, 8.4, and 11.1 Gy (non-coplanar IMRT, VMAT, and coplanar IMRT). Target coverage, homogeneity and OAR protection, was slightly superior in VMAT plans which also produced the sharpest dose gradient towards healthy tissue

  19. Dosimetric comparison of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in total scalp irradiation: a single institutional experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostheimer, Christian; Huebsch, Patrick; Janich, Martin; Gerlach, Reinhard; Vordermark, Dirk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Total scalp irradiation (TSI) is a rare but challenging indication. We previously reported that non-coplanar intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) was superior to coplanar IMRT in organ-at-risk (OAR) protection and target dose distribution. This consecutive treatment planning study compared IMRT with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). A retrospective treatment plan databank search was performed and 5 patient cases were randomly selected. Cranial imaging was restored from the initial planning computed tomography (CT) and target volumes and OAR were redelineated. For each patients, three treatment plans were calculated (coplanar/non-coplanar IMRT, VMAT; prescribed dose 50 Gy, single dose 2 Gy). Conformity, homogeneity and dose volume histograms were used for plan. VMAT featured the lowest monitor units and the sharpest dose gradient (1.6 Gy/mm). Planning target volume (PTV) coverage and homogeneity was better in VMAT (coverage, 0.95; homogeneity index [HI], 0.118) compared to IMRT (coverage, 0.94; HI, 0.119) but coplanar IMRT produced the most conformal plans (conformity index [CI], 0.43). Minimum PTV dose range was 66.8% –88.4% in coplanar, 77.5%–88.2% in non-coplanar IMRT and 82.8%–90.3% in VMAT. Mean dose to the brain, brain stem, optic system (maximum dose) and lenses were 18.6, 13.2, 9.1, and 5.2 Gy for VMAT, 21.9, 13.4, 14.5, and 6.3 Gy for non-coplanar and 22.8, 16.5, 11.5, and 5.9 Gy for coplanar IMRT. Maximum optic chiasm dose was 7.7, 8.4, and 11.1 Gy (non-coplanar IMRT, VMAT, and coplanar IMRT). Target coverage, homogeneity and OAR protection, was slightly superior in VMAT plans which also produced the sharpest dose gradient towards healthy tissue.

  20. Control Strategy for Automatic Gantry Crane Systems: A Practical and Intelligent Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyudi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of gantry crane systems for transporting payload is very common in building constructions. However, moving the payload using the crane is not an easy task especially when strict specifications on the swing angle and on the transfer time need to be satisfied. Various attempts in controlling gantry cranes system based on open- loop and closed-loop control systems were proposed. However, most of the proposed controllers were designed based on the model and parameter of the crane system. In general, modeling and parameter identifications are troublesome and time consuming task. To overcome this problem, in this paper, a practical and intelligent control method for automatic gantry crane is introduced and evaluated experimentally. The results show that the proposed method is not only effective for controlling the crane but also robust to parameter variation.

  1. Control Strategy for Automatic Gantry Crane Systems: A Practical and Intelligent Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyudi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of gantry crane systems for transporting payload is very common in building constructions. However, moving the payload using the crane is not an easy task especially when strict specifications on the swing angle and on the transfer time need to be satisfied. Various attempts in controlling gantry cranes system based on open- loop and closed-loop control systems were proposed. However, most of the proposed controllers were designed based on the model and parameter of the crane system. In general, modeling and parameter identifications are troublesome and time consuming task. To overcome this problem, in this paper, a practical and intelligent control method for automatic gantry crane is introduced and evaluated experimentally. The results show that the proposed method is not only effective for controlling the crane but also robust to parameter variation.

  2. X-band Linac for a 6 MeV dual-head radiation therapy gantry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Shin, Seung-Wook; Lee, Jongchul; Kim, Hui-Su [WCU Department of Energy Science, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byeong-No; Lee, Byung-Chul [Radiation Instrumentation Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 56212 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyung-dal; Song, Ki-back [Radiation Technology eXcellence (RTX), Daejeon 305-500 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ho-seung; Mun, Sangchul; Ha, Donghyup [School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Chai, Jong-Seo, E-mail: jschai@skku.edu [School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-21

    We developed a design for a 6 MeV X-band linear accelerator for radiation therapy in a dual-head gantry layout. The dual-head gantry has two linacs that can be operated independently. Each X-band linac accelerates electron bunches using high-power RF and generates X-rays for radiation therapy. It requires a versatile RF system and pulse sequence to accomplish various radiation therapy procedures. The RF system consists of 9.3 GHz, 2 MW X-band magnetron and associated RF transmission components. A test linac was assembled and operated to characterize its RF performance without beam. This paper presents these results along with a description of the gantry linacs and their operational requirements.

  3. An improved method to accurately calibrate the gantry angle indicators of the radiotherapy linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Liyun; Ho, S.-Y.; Du, Y.-C.; Lin, C.-M.; Chen Tainsong

    2007-01-01

    The calibration of the gantry angle indicator is an important and basic quality assurance (QA) item for the radiotherapy linear accelerator. In this study, we propose a new and practical method, which uses only the digital level, V-film, and general solid phantoms. By taking the star shot only, we can accurately calculate the true gantry angle according to the geometry of the film setup. The results on our machine showed that the gantry angle was shifted by -0.11 deg. compared with the digital indicator, and the standard deviation was within 0.05 deg. This method can also be used for the simulator. In conclusion, this proposed method could be adopted as an annual QA item for mechanical QA of the accelerator

  4. Interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-arc hybrid welding of magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liming; Chen, Minghua

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents the results of the investigation on the interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-arc hybrid welding on magnesium alloy AZ31B using the spectral diagnose technique. By comparably analyzing the variation in plasma information (the shape, the electron temperature and density) of single tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding with the laser-arc hybrid welding, it is found that the laser affects the arc plasma through the keyhole forming on the workpiece. Depending on the welding parameters there are three kinds of interactions taking place between laser and arc plasma.

  5. Design and Test Results of Superconducting Magnet for Heavy-Ion Rotating Gantry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, S.; Koyanagi, K.; Miyazaki, H.; Takami, S.; Orikasa, T.; Ishii, Y.; Kurusu, T.; Iwata, Y.; Noda, K.; Obana, T.; Suzuki, K.; Ogitsu, T.; Amemiya, N.

    2017-07-01

    Heavy-ion radiotherapy has a high curative effect in cancer treatment and also can reduce the burden on patients. These advantages have been generally recognized. Furthermore, a rotating gantry can irradiate a tumor with ions from any direction without changing the position of the patient. This can reduce the physical dose on normal cells, and is thus commonly used in proton radiotherapy. However, because of the high magnetic rigidity of carbon ions, the weight of the rotating gantry for heavy-ion therapy is about three-times heavier than those used for proton cancer therapy, according to our estimation. To overcome this issue, we developed a small and lightweight rotating gantry in collaboration with the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The compact rotating gantry was composed of ten low-temperature superconducting (LTS) magnets that were designed from the viewpoint of beam optics. These LTS magnets have a surface-winding coil-structure and provide both dipole and quadrupole fields. The maximum dipole and quadrupole magnetic field of the magnets were 2.88 T and 9.3 T/m, respectively. The rotating gantry was installed at NIRS, and beam commissioning is in progress to achieve the required beam quality. In the three years since 2013, in a project supported by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) and the Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED), we have been developing high-temperature superconducting (HTS) magnets with the aim of a further size reduction of the rotating gantry. To develop fundamental technologies for designing and fabricating HTS magnets, a model magnet was manufactured. The model magnet was composed of 24 saddle-shaped HTS coils and generated a magnetic field of 1.2 T. In the presentation, recent progress in this research will be reported.

  6. Beam-transport study of an isocentric rotating ion gantry with minimum number of quadrupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovic, Marius; Griesmayer, Erich; Seemann, Rolf

    2005-01-01

    A beam-transport study of an isocentric gantry for ion therapy is presented. The gantry is designed with the number of quadrupoles down to the theoretical minimum, which is the feature published for the first time in this paper. This feature has been achieved without compromising the ion-optical functions of the beam-transport system that is capable of handling non-symmetric beams (beams with different emittances in vertical and horizontal plane), pencil-beam scanning, double-achromatic optics and beam-size control. Ion-optical properties of the beam-transport system are described, discussed and illustrated by computer simulations performed by the TRANSPORT-code

  7. Arc saw development report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deichelbohrer, P.R.; Beitel, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    The arc saw is one of the key components of the Contaminated Equipment Volume Reduction (CEVR) Program. This report describes the progress of the arc saw from its inception to its current developmental status. History of the arc saw and early contributors are discussed. Particular features of the arc saw and their advantages for CEVR are detailed. Development of the arc saw including theory of operation, pertinent experimental results, plans for the large arc saw and advanced control systems are covered. Associated topics such as potential applications for the arc saw and other arc saw installations in the world is also touched upon

  8. Total body irradiation with an arc and a gravity-oriented compensator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chui, C.-S.; Fontenla, Doracy P.; Mullokandov, Edward; Kapulsky, Alex; Lo, Y.-C.; Lo, C.-J.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To deliver uniform dose distributions for total-body irradiation (TBI) with an arc field and a gravity-oriented compensator. This technique allows the patient to be treated lying on the floor in a small treatment room. Methods and Materials: Through the sweeping motion of the gantry, a continuous arc field can deliver a large field to a patient lying on the floor. The dose profile, however, would not be uniform if no compensator were used, due to the effects of inverse square variation of beam intensity with distance as well as the slanted depth in patient. To solve this problem, a gravity-oriented compensator made of cerrobend alloy was designed. This compensator has a cross-section of an inverted isosceles triangle, with the apex always pointing downward, due to gravity. By properly selecting the thickness of the compensator, the width of the base, and the distance between the pivots to the base, the difference in the path length through the compensator can be made just right to compensate the effects of inverse-square and slanted depth, thus producing a uniform dose profile. Results: Arc fields with a gravity-oriented compensator were used for 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV photon beams. The arc field can cover a patient with a height up to 180 cm. The field width was chosen from 32 to 40 cm at the machine isocenter. The optimal thickness of the compensator was found to be 2.5 cm, and its base was 25 cm wide. The distance from the pivot points to the flat surface of the compensator proximal to the beam ranges from 13 to 14 cm for different beam energies. The dose uniformity at a depth of 10 cm is within ±5% for all beam energies used in this study. Conclusion: Highly uniform dose profiles for TBI treatments can be delivered with an arc and a gravity-oriented compensator. The proposed technique is simple and versatile. A single compensator can be used for all energies, because the amount of compensation can be adjusted by changing the distance to the pivot and

  9. Aperture modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crooks, S M; Wu, Xiaodong; Takita, C; Watzich, M; Xing Lei

    2003-01-01

    We show that it is possible to translate an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plan and deliver it as a single arc. This technique is referred to in this paper as aperture modulation arc therapy (AMAT). During this arc, the MLC leaves do not conform to the projection of the target PTV and the machine output of the accelerator has a constant value. Dose was calculated using the CORVUS 4.0 IMRT system, which uses a pencil beam dose algorithm, and treatments were delivered using a Varian 2100C/D Clinac. Results are presented for a head and neck and a prostate case, showing the equivalence of the IMRT and the translated AMAT delivery. For a prostate AMAT delivery, coronal plane film dose for the IMRT and AMAT deliveries agreed within 7.19 ± 6.62%. For a meningioma the coronal plane dose distributions were similar to a value of 4.6 ± 6.62%. Dose to the isocentre was measured as being within 2% of the planned value in both cases

  10. Continuous Arc Rotation of the Couch Therapy for the Delivery of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Treatment Planning Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaitelman, Simona F.; Kim, Leonard H.; Yan Di; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Vicini, Frank A.; Grills, Inga S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We present a novel form of arc therapy: continuous arc rotation of the couch (C-ARC) and compare its dosimetry with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). C-ARC, like VMAT, uses a modulated beam aperture and dose rate, but with the couch, not the gantry, rotating. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients previously treated with APBI using 3D-CRT were replanned with (1) C-ARC, (2) IMRT, and (3) VMAT. C-ARC plans were designed with one medial and one lateral arc through which the couch rotated while the gantry was held stationary at a tangent angle. Target dose coverage was normalized to the 3D-CRT plan. Comparative endpoints were dose to normal breast tissue, lungs, and heart and monitor units prescribed. Results: Compared with 3D-CRT, C-ARC, IMRT, and VMAT all significantly reduced the ipsilateral breast V50% by the same amount (mean, 7.8%). Only C-ARC and IMRT plans significantly reduced the contralateral breast maximum dose, the ipsilateral lung V5Gy, and the heart V5%. C-ARC used on average 40%, 30%, and 10% fewer monitor units compared with 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT, respectively. Conclusions: C-ARC provides improved dosimetry and treatment efficiency, which should reduce the risks of toxicity and secondary malignancy. Its tangent geometry avoids irradiation of critical structures that is unavoidable using the en face geometry of VMAT.

  11. Two new DOSXYZnrc sources for 4D Monte Carlo simulations of continuously variable beam configurations, with applications to RapidArc, VMAT, TomoTherapy and CyberKnife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo, Julio; Popescu, I Antoniu

    2010-01-01

    We present two new Monte Carlo sources for the DOSXYZnrc code, which can be used to compute dose distributions due to continuously variable beam configurations. These sources support a continuously rotating gantry and collimator, dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) motion, variable monitor unit (MU) rate, couch rotation and translation in any direction, arbitrary isocentre motion with respect to the patient and variable source-to-axis distance (SAD). These features make them applicable to Monte Carlo simulations for RapidArc(TM), Elekta VMAT, TomoTherapy(TM) and CyberKnife(TM). Unique to these sources is the synchronization between the motion in the DOSXYZnrc geometry and the motion within the linac head, represented by a shared library (either a BEAMnrc accelerator with dynamic component modules, or an external library). The simulations are achieved in single runs, with no intermediate phase space files.

  12. 75 FR 44288 - Overhead and Gantry Cranes; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ...] Overhead and Gantry Cranes; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of... requirements specified in the Standard on Overhead and Gantry Cranes (29 CFR 1910.179). DATES: Comments must be... requirements for: Marking the rated load of cranes; preparing certification records to verify the inspection of...

  13. Choreographing Couch and Collimator in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yingli; Zhang Pengpeng; Happersett, Laura; Xiong Jianping; Yang Jie; Chan, Maria; Beal, Kathryn; Mageras, Gig; Hunt, Margie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To design and optimize trajectory-based, noncoplanar subarcs for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) deliverable on both Varian TrueBEAM system and traditional accelerators; and to investigate their potential advantages for treating central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Methods and Materials: To guide the computerized selection of beam trajectories consisting of simultaneous couch, gantry, and collimator motion, a score function was implemented to estimate the geometric overlap between targets and organs at risk for each couch/gantry angle combination. An initial set of beam orientations is obtained as a function of couch and gantry angle, according to a minimum search of the score function excluding zones of collision. This set is grouped into multiple continuous and extended subarcs subject to mechanical limitations using a hierarchical clustering algorithm. After determination of couch/gantry trajectories, a principal component analysis finds the collimator angle at each beam orientation that minimizes residual target-organ at risk overlaps. An in-house VMAT optimization algorithm determines the optimal multileaf collimator position and monitor units for control points within each subarc. A retrospective study of 10 CNS patients compares the proposed method of VMAT trajectory with dynamic gantry, leaves, couch, and collimator motion (Tra-VMAT); a standard noncoplanar VMAT with no couch/collimator motion within subarcs (Std-VMAT); and noncoplanar intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans that were clinically used. Results: Tra-VMAT provided improved target dose conformality and lowered maximum dose to brainstem, optic nerves, and chiasm by 7.7%, 1.1%, 2.3%, and 1.7%, respectively, compared with Std-VMAT. Tra-VMAT provided higher planning target volume minimum dose and reduced maximum dose to chiasm, optic nerves, and cochlea by 6.2%, 1.3%, 6.3%, and 8.4%, respectively, and reduced cochlea mean dose by 8.7%, compared with IMRT. Tra-VMAT averaged

  14. Corrosion Resistance Behavior of Single-Layer Cathodic Arc PVD Nitride-Base Coatings in 1M HCl and 3.5 pct NaCl Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesina, Akeem Yusuf; Gasem, Zuhair M.; Madhan Kumar, Arumugam

    2017-04-01

    The electrochemical behavior of single-layer TiN, CrN, CrAlN, and TiAlN coatings on 304 stainless steel substrate, deposited using state-of-the-art and industrial size cathodic arc PVD machine, were evaluated in 1M HCl and 3.5 pct NaCl solutions. The corrosion behavior of the blank and coated substrates was analyzed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance, and potentiodynamic polarization. Bond-coat layers of pure-Ti, pure-Cr, alloyed-CrAl, and alloyed-TiAl for TiN, CrN, CrAlN, and TiAlN coatings were, respectively, first deposited for improved coating adhesion before the actual coating. The average coating thickness was about 1.80 µm. Results showed that the corrosion potentials ( E corr) of the coated substrates were shifted to more noble values which indicated improvement of the coated substrate resistance to corrosion susceptibility. The corrosion current densities were lower for all coated substrates as compared to the blank substrate. Similarly, EIS parameters showed that these coatings possessed improved resistance to defects and pores in similar solution compared to the same nitride coatings developed by magnetron sputtering. The charge transfer resistance ( R ct) can be ranked in the following order: TiAlN > CrN > TiN > CrAlN in both media except in NaCl solution where R ct of TiN is lowest. While the pore resistance ( R po) followed the order: CrAlN > CrN > TiAlN > TiN in HCl solution and TiAlN > CrN > CrAlN > TiN in NaCl solution. It is found that TiAlN coating has the highest protective efficiencies of 79 and 99 pct in 1M HCl and 3.5 pct NaCl, respectively. SEM analysis of the corroded substrates in both media was also presented.

  15. TH-CD-209-10: Scanning Proton Arc Therapy (SPArc) - The First Robust and Delivery-Efficient Spot Scanning Proton Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, X; Li, X; Zhang, J; Kabolizadeh, P; Stevens, C; Yan, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a delivery-efficient proton spot-scanning arc therapy technique with robust plan quality. Methods: We developed a Scanning Proton Arc(SPArc) optimization algorithm integrated with (1)Control point re-sampling by splitting control point into adjacent sub-control points; (2)Energy layer re-distribution by assigning the original energy layers to the new sub-control points; (3)Energy layer filtration by deleting low MU weighting energy layers; (4)Energy layer re-sampling by sampling additional layers to ensure the optimal solution. A bilateral head and neck oropharynx case and a non-mobile lung target case were tested. Plan quality and total estimated delivery time were compared to original robust optimized multi-field step-and-shoot arc plan without SPArc optimization (Arcmulti-field) and standard robust optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy(IMPT) plans. Dose-Volume-Histograms (DVH) of target and Organ-at-Risks (OARs) were analyzed along with all worst case scenarios. Total delivery time was calculated based on the assumption of a 360 degree gantry room with 1 RPM rotation speed, 2ms spot switching time, beam current 1nA, minimum spot weighting 0.01 MU, energy-layer-switching-time (ELST) from 0.5 to 4s. Results: Compared to IMPT, SPArc delivered less integral dose(−14% lung and −8% oropharynx). For lung case, SPArc reduced 60% of skin max dose, 35% of rib max dose and 15% of lung mean dose. Conformity Index is improved from 7.6(IMPT) to 4.0(SPArc). Compared to Arcmulti-field, SPArc reduced number of energy layers by 61%(276 layers in lung) and 80%(1008 layers in oropharynx) while kept the same robust plan quality. With ELST from 0.5s to 4s, it reduced 55%–60% of Arcmulti-field delivery time for the lung case and 56%–67% for the oropharynx case. Conclusion: SPArc is the first robust and delivery-efficient proton spot-scanning arc therapy technique which could be implemented in routine clinic. For modern proton machine with ELST close

  16. MO-AB-BRA-01: A Global Level Set Based Formulation for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, D; Lyu, Q; Ruan, D; O’Connor, D; Low, D; Sheng, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The current clinical Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) optimization is formulated as a non-convex problem and various greedy heuristics have been employed for an empirical solution, jeopardizing plan consistency and quality. We introduce a novel global direct aperture optimization method for VMAT to overcome these limitations. Methods: The global VMAT (gVMAT) planning was formulated as an optimization problem with an L2-norm fidelity term and an anisotropic total variation term. A level set function was used to describe the aperture shapes and adjacent aperture shapes were penalized to control MLC motion range. An alternating optimization strategy was implemented to solve the fluence intensity and aperture shapes simultaneously. Single arc gVMAT plans, utilizing 180 beams with 2° angular resolution, were generated for a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), lung (LNG), and 2 head and neck cases—one with 3 PTVs (H&N3PTV) and one with 4 PTVs (H&N4PTV). The plans were compared against the clinical VMAT (cVMAT) plans utilizing two overlapping coplanar arcs. Results: The optimization of the gVMAT plans had converged within 600 iterations. gVMAT reduced the average max and mean OAR dose by 6.59% and 7.45% of the prescription dose. Reductions in max dose and mean dose were as high as 14.5 Gy in the LNG case and 15.3 Gy in the H&N3PTV case. PTV coverages (D95, D98, D99) were within 0.25% of the prescription dose. By globally considering all beams, the gVMAT optimizer allowed some beams to deliver higher intensities, yielding a dose distribution that resembles a static beam IMRT plan with beam orientation optimization. Conclusions: The novel VMAT approach allows for the search of an optimal plan in the global solution space and generates deliverable apertures directly. The single arc VMAT approach fully utilizes the digital linacs’ capability in dose rate and gantry rotation speed modulation. Varian Medical Systems, NIH grant R01CA188300, NIH grant R43CA183390.

  17. Stabilizing model predictive control of a gantry crane based on flexible set-membership constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iles, Sandor; Lazar, M.; Kolonic, Fetah; Jadranko, Matusko

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a stabilizing distributed model predictive control of a gantry crane taking into account the variation of cable length. The proposed algorithm is based on the off-line computation of a sequence of 1-step controllable sets and a condition that enables flexible convergence towards

  18. Alternating-gradient canted cosine theta superconducting magnets for future compact proton gantries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weishi Wan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a design of superconducting magnets, optimized for application in a gantry for proton therapy. We have introduced a new magnet design concept, called an alternating-gradient canted cosine theta (AG-CCT concept, which is compatible with an achromatic layout. This layout allows a large momentum acceptance. The 15 cm radius of the bore aperture enables the application of pencil beam scanning in front of the SC-magnet. The optical and dynamic performance of a gantry based on these magnets has been analyzed using the fields derived (via Biot-Savart law from the actual windings of the AG-CCT combined with the full equations of motion. The results show that with appropriate higher order correction, a large 3D volume can be rapidly scanned with little beam shape distortion. A very big advantage is that all this can be done while keeping the AG-CCT fields fixed. This reduces the need for fast field ramping of the superconducting magnets between the successive beam energies used for the scanning in depth and it is important for medical application since this reduces the technical risk (e.g., a quench associated with fast field changes in superconducting magnets. For proton gantries the corresponding superconducting magnet system holds promise of dramatic reduction in weight. For heavier ion gantries there may furthermore be a significant reduction in size.

  19. An Approximate Cone Beam Reconstruction Algorithm for Gantry-Tilted CT Using Tangential Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available FDK algorithm is a well-known 3D (three-dimensional approximate algorithm for CT (computed tomography image reconstruction and is also known to suffer from considerable artifacts when the scanning cone angle is large. Recently, it has been improved by performing the ramp filtering along the tangential direction of the X-ray source helix for dealing with the large cone angle problem. In this paper, we present an FDK-type approximate reconstruction algorithm for gantry-tilted CT imaging. The proposed method improves the image reconstruction by filtering the projection data along a proper direction which is determined by CT parameters and gantry-tilted angle. As a result, the proposed algorithm for gantry-tilted CT reconstruction can provide more scanning flexibilities in clinical CT scanning and is efficient in computation. The performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated with turbell clock phantom and thorax phantom and compared with FDK algorithm and a popular 2D (two-dimensional approximate algorithm. The results show that the proposed algorithm can achieve better image quality for gantry-tilted CT image reconstruction.

  20. The influence of amperage of electric arc on microhardness in the area single and overlapping remeltings of HS 6-5-2 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dziedzic

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The present thesis depicts the microhardness of HV0,065 surface layer of high speed steel HS6-5-2 remelted with the electric arc. There were different surface layer variants of remelting used – the amperage was changed from 50 to 120A with the stable scanning speed of 300mm/min. There was also the influence of overlapping of the remeltings on the microhardness result. The highest average microhardness of the surface layer of high speed steel HS6-5-2 amounting 1100 HV0,065 was achieved by using the amperage of electric arc of 50 A. The overlapping of remeltings is connected with the possibility of occurence of the microhardness decrease in the area of overlapping of the heat influence zone of second remelting (another remelting on the first remelting (the previous one.

  1. Total dural irradiation: RapidArc versus static-field IMRT: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Paul J., E-mail: paulj.kelly@hse.ie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Mannarino, Edward; Lewis, John Henry; Baldini, Elizabeth H.; Hacker, Fred L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare conventional fixed-gantry angle intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with RapidArc for total dural irradiation. We also hypothesize that target volume-individualized collimator angles may produce substantial normal tissue sparing when planning with RapidArc. Five-, 7-, and 9-field fixed-gantry angle sliding-window IMRT plans were generated for comparison with RapidArc plans. Optimization and normal tissue constraints were constant for all plans. All plans were normalized so that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) received at least 100% of the dose. RapidArc was delivered using 350 Degree-Sign clockwise and counterclockwise arcs. Conventional collimator angles of 45 Degree-Sign and 315 Degree-Sign were compared with 90 Degree-Sign on both arcs. Dose prescription was 59.4 Gy in 33 fractions. PTV metrics used for comparison were coverage, V{sub 107}%, D1%, conformality index (CI{sub 95}%), and heterogeneity index (D{sub 5}%-D{sub 95}%). Brain dose, the main challenge of this case, was compared using D{sub 1}%, Dmean, and V{sub 5} Gy. Dose to optic chiasm, optic nerves, globes, and lenses was also compared. The use of unconventional collimator angles (90 Degree-Sign on both arcs) substantially reduced dose to normal brain. All plans achieved acceptable target coverage. Homogeneity was similar for RapidArc and 9-field IMRT plans. However, heterogeneity increased with decreasing number of IMRT fields, resulting in unacceptable hotspots within the brain. Conformality was marginally better with RapidArc relative to IMRT. Low dose to brain, as indicated by V5Gy, was comparable in all plans. Doses to organs at risk (OARs) showed no clinically meaningful differences. The number of monitor units was lower and delivery time was reduced with RapidArc. The case-individualized RapidArc plan compared favorably with the 9-field conventional IMRT plan. In view of lower monitor unit requirements and shorter delivery time, RapidArc

  2. SU-E-J-56: Static Gantry Digital Tomosynthesis From the Beam’s-Eye-View

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partain, L; Kwon, J; Boyd, D; Rottmann, J; Berbeco, R; Zentai, G

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We have designed a novel TumoTrak™ x-ray system that delivers 19 distinct kV views with the linac gantry stationary. It images MV treatment beam above and below the patient with a kV tomosysthesis slice image from the therapy beam’s-eye-view. Results will be high quality images without MLC shadowing for notable improvements relative to conventional fluoroscopic MV imaging and fluoroscopic kV imaging. Methods A complete design has a kV electron beam multisource X-ray tube that fits around the MV treatment beam path, with little interference with normal radiotherapy and unblocked by the multi-leaf-collimator. To simulate digital tomosynthesis, we used cone-beam CT projection data from a lung SBRT patient. These data were acquired at 125 kVp and 11 fps (0.4 mAs per projection). We chose 19 projections evenly spaced over 27° around one of the treatment angles (240°). Digital tomosynthesis reconstruction of a slice through the tumor was performed using iterative reconstruction. The visibility of the lesion was assessed for the reconstructed digital tomosynthesis (DTS), using fluoroscopy MV images acquired during radiation therapy, and a kV single projection image acquired at the same angle as the treatment field (240°). Results The fluoroscopic DTS images provide the best tumor contrast, surpassing the conventional radiographic and the in-treatment MV portal images. The electron beam multisource X-ray tube design has been completed and the tube is being fabricated. The estimated time to cycle through all 19 projections is 700 ms, enabling high frame-rate imaging. While the initial proposed use case is for image guided and gated treatment delivery, the enhanced imaging will also deliver superior radiographic images for patient setup. Conclusion The proposed device will deliver high quality planar images from the beam’s-eye-view without MLC obstruction. The prototype has been designed and is being assembled with first imaging scheduled for May 2015. L

  3. SU-E-J-56: Static Gantry Digital Tomosynthesis From the Beam’s-Eye-View

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partain, L; Kwon, J; Boyd, D [TeleSecurity Sciences, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Rottmann, J; Berbeco, R [Brigham and Woman’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Zentai, G [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose We have designed a novel TumoTrak™ x-ray system that delivers 19 distinct kV views with the linac gantry stationary. It images MV treatment beam above and below the patient with a kV tomosysthesis slice image from the therapy beam’s-eye-view. Results will be high quality images without MLC shadowing for notable improvements relative to conventional fluoroscopic MV imaging and fluoroscopic kV imaging. Methods A complete design has a kV electron beam multisource X-ray tube that fits around the MV treatment beam path, with little interference with normal radiotherapy and unblocked by the multi-leaf-collimator. To simulate digital tomosynthesis, we used cone-beam CT projection data from a lung SBRT patient. These data were acquired at 125 kVp and 11 fps (0.4 mAs per projection). We chose 19 projections evenly spaced over 27° around one of the treatment angles (240°). Digital tomosynthesis reconstruction of a slice through the tumor was performed using iterative reconstruction. The visibility of the lesion was assessed for the reconstructed digital tomosynthesis (DTS), using fluoroscopy MV images acquired during radiation therapy, and a kV single projection image acquired at the same angle as the treatment field (240°). Results The fluoroscopic DTS images provide the best tumor contrast, surpassing the conventional radiographic and the in-treatment MV portal images. The electron beam multisource X-ray tube design has been completed and the tube is being fabricated. The estimated time to cycle through all 19 projections is 700 ms, enabling high frame-rate imaging. While the initial proposed use case is for image guided and gated treatment delivery, the enhanced imaging will also deliver superior radiographic images for patient setup. Conclusion The proposed device will deliver high quality planar images from the beam’s-eye-view without MLC obstruction. The prototype has been designed and is being assembled with first imaging scheduled for May 2015. L

  4. Modelling and Metaheuristic for Gantry Crane Scheduling and Storage Space Allocation Problem in Railway Container Terminals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zeng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The gantry crane scheduling and storage space allocation problem in the main containers yard of railway container terminal is studied. A mixed integer programming model which comprehensively considers the handling procedures, noncrossing constraints, the safety margin and traveling time of gantry cranes, and the storage modes in the main area is formulated. A metaheuristic named backtracking search algorithm (BSA is then improved to solve this intractable problem. A series of computational experiments are carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm under some randomly generated cases based on the practical operation conditions. The results show that the proposed algorithm can gain the near-optimal solutions within a reasonable computation time.

  5. High precision tracking control of a servo gantry with dynamic friction compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yangming; Yan, Peng; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-05-01

    This paper is concerned with the tracking control problem of a voice coil motor (VCM) actuated servo gantry system. By utilizing an adaptive control technique combined with a sliding mode approach, an adaptive sliding mode control (ASMC) law with friction compensation scheme is proposed in presence of both frictions and external disturbances. Based on the LuGre dynamic friction model, a dual-observer structure is used to estimate the unmeasurable friction state, and an adaptive control law is synthesized to effectively handle the unknown friction model parameters as well as the bound of the disturbances. Moreover, the proposed control law is also implemented on a VCM servo gantry system for motion tracking. Simulations and experimental results demonstrate good tracking performance, which outperform traditional control approaches. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Moving gantry method for electron beam dose profile measurement at extended source-to-surface distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Gábor; Fodor, Emese; Pesznyák, Csilla

    2015-03-08

    A novel method has been put forward for very large electron beam profile measurement. With this method, absorbed dose profiles can be measured at any depth in a solid phantom for total skin electron therapy. Electron beam dose profiles were collected with two different methods. Profile measurements were performed at 0.2 and 1.2 cm depths with a parallel plate and a thimble chamber, respectively. 108cm × 108 cm and 45 cm × 45 cm projected size electron beams were scanned by vertically moving phantom and detector at 300 cm source-to-surface distance with 90° and 270° gantry angles. The profiles collected this way were used as reference. Afterwards, the phantom was fixed on the central axis and the gantry was rotated with certain angular steps. After applying correction for the different source-to-detector distances and incidence of angle, the profiles measured in the two different setups were compared. Correction formalism has been developed. The agreement between the cross profiles taken at the depth of maximum dose with the 'classical' scanning and with the new moving gantry method was better than 0.5 % in the measuring range from zero to 71.9 cm. Inverse square and attenuation corrections had to be applied. The profiles measured with the parallel plate chamber agree better than 1%, except for the penumbra region, where the maximum difference is 1.5%. With the moving gantry method, very large electron field profiles can be measured at any depth in a solid phantom with high accuracy and reproducibility and with much less time per step. No special instrumentation is needed. The method can be used for commissioning of very large electron beams for computer-assisted treatment planning, for designing beam modifiers to improve dose uniformity, and for verification of computed dose profiles.

  7. Craniospinal treatment with IMRT multi-isocentric and image-guided linear accelerator based on Gantry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz Beltran, M.; Caballero Perea, B.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, C.; Arminio Diaz, E.; Lopez Fernandez, A.; Gomez Fervienza, J. R.; Crespo Diez, P.; Cantarero Valenzuela, N.; Alvarez Sanchez, M.; Martin Martin, G.; Gomez Fervienza, J. r.; Crespo Diez, P.; Cantarero Valenzuela, N.; Alvarez Sanchez, M.; Martin Martin, G.

    2011-01-01

    The objective is the realization of craniospinal treatment with a linear accelerator equipped with gantry based on MLC, carbon fiber table and Image Guided capability. The great length of treatment (patient l,80m in height) was a great difficulty for want of full length of the longitudinal movement of the table to adequately cover the PTV, plus free metallic screws fastening the head of the table extender preventing further incidents.

  8. Development of a MPPC-based prototype gantry for future MRI-PET scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurei, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Kato, T.; Fujita, T.; Ohshima, T.; Taya, T.; Yamamoto, S.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a high spatial resolution, compact Positron Emission Tomography (PET) module designed for small animals and intended for use in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems. This module consists of large-area, 4 × 4 ch MPPC arrays (S11830-3344MF; Hamamatsu Photonics K.K.) optically coupled with Ce-doped (Lu,Y)2(SiO4)O (Ce:LYSO) scintillators fabricated into 16 × 16 matrices of 0.5 × 0.5 mm2 pixels. We set the temperature sensor (LM73CIMK-0; National Semiconductor Corp.) at the rear of the MPPC acceptance surface, and apply optimum voltage to maintain the gain. The eight MPPC-based PET modules and coincidence circuits were assembled into a gantry arranged in a ring 90 mm in diameter to form the MPPC-based PET system. We have developed two types PET gantry: one made of non-magnetic metal and the other made of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) resins. The PET gantry was positioned around the RF coil of the 4.7 T MRI system. We took an image of a point }22Na source under fast spin echo (FSE) and gradient echo (GE), in order to measure the interference between the MPPC-based PET and MRI. The spatial resolution of PET imaging in a transaxial plane of about 1 mm (FWHM) was achieved in all cases. Operating with PET made of ABS has no effect on MR images, while operating with PET made of non-magnetic metal has a significant detrimental effect on MR images. This paper describes our quantitative evaluations of PET images and MR images, and presents a more advanced version of the gantry for future MRI/DOI-PET systems.

  9. Neogene displacements in the Solomon Islands Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, J.

    1987-02-01

    The geology and present configuration of the Solomon Island arc can be explained in terms of the Neogene displacement of a single linear chain of islands. The central part of an original arc consisting of Bougainville, Choiseul, Santa Ysabel, Guadalcanal and San Cristobal was displaced to the northeast as a consequence of the attempted subduction of the Woodlark spreading system. Malaita arose on the northeastern side of the arc as a result of interaction between the arc and the Pacific Ocean floor and the volcanic islands of the New Georgia group formed to the southwest in response to the subduction of a spreading ridge, thus giving rise to the present double chain structure of the arc.

  10. A comparison of robotic arm versus gantry linear accelerator stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avkshtol, Vladimir; Dong, Yanqun; Hayes, Shelly B; Hallman, Mark A; Price, Robert A; Sobczak, Mark L; Horwitz, Eric M; Zaorsky, Nicholas G

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalent cancer diagnosed in men in the United States besides skin cancer. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT; 6-15 Gy per fraction, up to 45 minutes per fraction, delivered in five fractions or less, over the course of approximately 2 weeks) is emerging as a popular treatment option for prostate cancer. The American Society for Radiation Oncology now recognizes SBRT for select low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients. SBRT grew from the notion that high doses of radiation typical of brachytherapy could be delivered noninvasively using modern external-beam radiation therapy planning and delivery methods. SBRT is most commonly delivered using either a traditional gantry-mounted linear accelerator or a robotic arm-mounted linear accelerator. In this systematic review article, we compare and contrast the current clinical evidence supporting a gantry vs robotic arm SBRT for prostate cancer. The data for SBRT show encouraging and comparable results in terms of freedom from biochemical failure (>90% for low and intermediate risk at 5-7 years) and acute and late toxicity (6 MV). Finally, SBRT (particularly on a gantry) may also be more cost-effective than conventionally fractionated external-beam radiation therapy. Randomized controlled trials of SBRT using both technologies are underway.

  11. Critical Length Criterion and the Arc Chain Model for Calculating the Arcing Time of the Secondary Arc Related to AC Transmission Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cong Haoxi; Li Qingmin; Xing Jinyuan; Li Jinsong; Chen Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The prompt extinction of the secondary arc is critical to the single-phase reclosing of AC transmission lines, including half-wavelength power transmission lines. In this paper, a low-voltage physical experimental platform was established and the motion process of the secondary arc was recorded by a high-speed camera. It was found that the arcing time of the secondary arc rendered a close relationship with its arc length. Through the input and output power energy analysis of the secondary arc, a new critical length criterion for the arcing time was proposed. The arc chain model was then adopted to calculate the arcing time with both the traditional and the proposed critical length criteria, and the simulation results were compared with the experimental data. The study showed that the arcing time calculated from the new critical length criterion gave more accurate results, which can provide a reliable criterion in term of arcing time for modeling and simulation of the secondary arc related with power transmission lines. (paper)

  12. SU-E-T-631: Preliminary Results for Analytical Investigation Into Effects of ArcCHECK Setup Errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, S; Tien, C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: As three-dimensional diode arrays increase in popularity for patient-specific quality assurance for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), it is important to evaluate an array’s susceptibility to setup errors. The ArcCHECK phantom is set up by manually aligning its outside marks with the linear accelerator’s lasers and light-field. If done correctly, this aligns the ArcCHECK cylinder’s central axis (CAX) with the linear accelerator’s axis of rotation. However, this process is prone to error. This project has developed an analytical expression including a perturbation factor to quantify the effect of shifts. Methods: The ArcCHECK is set up by aligning its machine marks with either the sagittal room lasers or the light-field of the linear accelerator at gantry zero (IEC). ArcCHECK has sixty-six evenly-spaced SunPoint diodes aligned radially in a ring 14.4 cm from CAX. The detector response function (DRF) was measured and combined with inverse-square correction to develop an analytical expression for output. The output was calculated using shifts of 0 (perfect alignment), +/−1, +/−2 and +/−5 mm. The effect on a series of simple inputs was determined: unity, 1-D ramp, steps, and hat-function to represent uniform field, wedge, evenly-spaced modulation, and single sharp modulation, respectively. Results: Geometric expressions were developed with perturbation factor included to represent shifts. DRF was modeled using sixth-degree polynomials with correlation coefficient 0.9997. The output was calculated using simple inputs such as unity, 1-D ramp, steps, and hat-function, with perturbation factors of: 0, +/−1, +/−2 and +/−5 mm. Discrepancies have been observed, but large fluctuations have been somewhat mitigated by aliasing arising from discrete diode placement. Conclusion: An analytical expression with perturbation factors was developed to estimate the impact of setup errors on an ArcCHECK phantom. Presently, this has been applied to

  13. SU-G-TeP2-04: Comprehensive Machine Isocenter Evaluation with Separation of Gantry, Collimator, and Table Variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hancock, S [Southeast Missouri Hospital, Cape Girardeau, MO (United States); Clements, C [Radiological Imaging Technology, Colorado Springs, CO (United States); Hyer, D; Nixon, E [University Of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Martin, E; Wang, B [University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Jani, S [Sharp Memorial Hospital, San Diego, CA (United States); Gossman, M [Tri-State Regional Cancer Center, Ashland, KY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and demonstrate application of a method that characterizes deviation of linac x-ray beams from the centroid of the volumetric radiation isocenter as a function of gantry, collimator, and table variables. Methods: A set of Winston-Lutz ball-bearing images was used to determine the gantry radiation isocenter as the midrange of deviation values resulting from gantry and collimator rotation. Also determined were displacement of table axis from gantry isocenter and recommended table axis adjustment. The method, previously reported, has been extended to include the effect of collimator walkout by obtaining measurements with 0 and 180 degree collimator rotation for each gantry angle. Twelve images were used to characterize the volumetric isocenter for the full range of available gantry, collimator, and table rotations. Results: Three Varian True Beam, two Elekta Infinity and four Versa HD linacs at five institutions were tested using identical methodology. Varian linacs exhibited substantially less deviation due to head sag than Elekta linacs (0.4 mm vs. 1.2 mm on average). One linac from each manufacturer had additional isocenter deviation of 0.3 to 0.4 mm due to jaw instability with gantry and collimator rotation. For all linacs, the achievable isocenter tolerance was dependent on adjustment of collimator position offset, transverse position steering, and alignment of the table axis with gantry isocenter, facilitated by these test results. The pattern and magnitude of table axis wobble vs. table angle was reproducible and unique to each machine. Conclusion: This new method provides a comprehensive set of isocenter deviation values including all variables. It effectively facilitates minimization of deviation between beam center and target (ball-bearing) position. This method was used to quantify the effect of jaw instability on isocenter deviation and to identify the offending jaw. The test is suitable for incorporation into a routine machine QA

  14. Observation of Fermi Arc Surface States Induced by Organic Memristive/Memcapacitive Devices with a Double-Helical Polarized Single-Wall Nanotube Membrane for Direct Chelating with Matrix Matelloproteinase-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. T. CHEN

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Matrix Matelloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 plays a key role in many diseases. A new type of dual-functioning device was developed for fast, direct ultrasensitive detection of MMP-2. We report a memristive/memcapacitive device with vertex double-helical polarized biomimetic protein nanotubules forming double membranes with potential gradient mimicking mitochondria’s inner double membrane has developed. We also report Fermi arcs with nodes on the surface of the nanostructured membrane was observed at the first time by using a 3D real-time - energy-current dynamic mapping method based on data obtained from the Cyclic Voltammetry (CV method. The memristive/memcapacitive device comprises a cross- linked organic polymer having single-wall cross-bar polarized nanotube self-assembling membrane (SAM on a gold chip, under an applied potential, a pair of vertex double- helical circular current flow induced the Fermi arcs states occurrence and these Fermi arcs promoted a direct chelating with zinc ions of the MMP-2 to become possible without any antibody, tracer, or reagent used at room temperature was accomplished. We observed the pair of Dirac Cones became alignment and strengthened with each other in the presence of MMP-2 compared without MMP-2. The MMP-2 can be detected with ag/mL level sensitivity and the value of Detection of Limits (DOL reached orders of magnitude lower than published reports with simplified procedures by a Chronoamperometry (CA method and a Double Step Chronopotentiometry (DSCPO method using NIST SRM 965A standard human serum, respectively. The results show a feasible application for developing the commercial fast and real-time MMP monitoring devices for various diseases.

  15. Is medical linac suitable for high-precision stereotactic irradiation? Investigations in geometrical accuracies of gantry and couch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunieda, Etsuo; Kitamura, Masayuki; Kawaguchi, Osamu; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Ando, Yutaka; Kubo, Atsushi; Ohira, Takayuki; Tonai, Takenori; Kawase, Takeshi.

    1998-01-01

    Linac-based radiosurgery has many advantages over the gamma knife, including low initial cost and no need of source replacement. On the other hand, most of the medical linacs currently in use were not originally designed to be applied for radiosurgery, and, therefore, careful quality assurance programs are required. In the gantry-head of a linac, a small CCD video camera is mounted in a position optically identical to that of the x-ray source. The video signal from the camera was digitalized to be evaluated for geometrical errors. A metal ball fixed to the stereotactic base frame via XYZ-sliding rods was used as a simulated target. Displacements of the target from the isocenter were measured during rotation of the gantry. Displacements in the gantry-rotation plane were satisfactorily small, while those perpendicular to it were maximal at gantry position angles of 0deg and 180deg. This error might be caused by gravitational vending of the heavy gantry head. Although other major errors of the linac were within one millimeter, the center of coach rotation around the isocenter did not coincide with the center of gantry rotation, probably owing to gravitational vending. Special care should be taken when very small collimators are employed. (author)

  16. The effect of mandibular position and gantry angle on the evaluation of implant site with implant CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sul Mi; An, Chang Hyeon; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul; Park, Tae Won; Choi, Hang Moon

    2002-01-01

    The altered gantry angle during scanning for some multiplanar reconstruction CT program (CT/MPR) may cause distortion of the image. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether there is a image distortion in a reformatted image when the gantry and the object are equally inclined using ToothPix and DentaScan program.A resin block model with four cylindrical holes and a human dry mandible were used. Two MPR software packages, ToothPix and DentaScan program, were used for reformatted panoramic images. The block and the gantry were equally inclined at 0 degree, 15 degrees, and 30 degrees. With ToothPix program, a resin block model with empty holes and a dry mandible showed inclined images in the reformatted panoramic image. Increasing the gantry angle, the depth and inclination of the holes were increased in the reformatted central panoramic images. However, a resin block model with gutta percha in its holes and a dry mandible with a wire in its mandibular canal didn't show image distortion. With DentaScan program, image distortion was not seen in any situation. ToothPix program may distort the reformatted image when the gantry angle is not at zero degrees. However, with DentaScan program, the patient may be positioned comfortably and the gantry can be adjusted to the patient positioning.

  17. TH-EF-BRB-09: Total Body Irradiation with Uniform MU and Modulated Arc Segments, UMMS-TBI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, B; Chung, H; Mutaf, Y; Prado, K [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To test a novel total body irradiation (TBI) system using conformal partial arc with patient lying on the stationary couch which is biologically equivalent to a moving couch TBI. This improves the scanning field TBI, which is previously presented. Methods: The Uniform MU Modulated arc Segments TBI or UMMS-TBI scans the treatment plane with a constant machine dose rate and a constant gantry rotation speed. A dynamic MLC pattern which moves while gantry rotates has been designed so that the treatment field moves same distance at the treatment plane per each gantry angle, while maintaining same treatment field size (34cm) at the plane. Dose across the plane varies due to the geometric differences including the distance from the source to a point of interest and the different attenuation from the slanted depth which changes the effective depth. Beam intensity is modulated to correct the dose variation across the plane by assigning the number of gantry angles inversely proportional to the uncorrected dose. Results: Measured dose and calculated dose matched within 1 % for central axis and 3% for off axis for various patient scenarios. Dose from different distance does not follow the inverse square relation as it is predicted from calculation. Dose uniformity better than 5% across 180 cm at 10cm depth is achieved by moving the gantry from −55 to +55 deg. Total treatment time for 2 Gy AP/PA fields is 40–50 minutes excluding patient set up time, at the machine dose rate of 200 MU/min. Conclusion: This novel technique, yet accurate but easy to implement enables TBI treatment in a small treatment room with less program development preparation than other techniques. The VMAT function of treatment delivery is not required to modulate beams. One delivery pattern can be used for different patients by changing the monitor units.

  18. Experimental investigation on the initial expansion stage of vacuum arc on cup-shaped TMF contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Xiu, Shixin; Liu, Zixi; Zhang, Yanzhe; Feng, Dingyu

    2018-02-01

    Arc behavior and measures to control it directly affect the properties of vacuum circuit breakers. Nowadays, transverse magnetic field (TMF) contacts are widely used for medium voltages. A magnetic field perpendicular to the current direction between the TMF contacts makes the arc move, transmitting its energy to the whole contact and avoiding excessive local ablation. Previous research on TMF arc behavior concentrated mainly on the arc movement and less on the initial stage (from arc ignition to an unstable arc column). A significant amount of experiment results suggest that there is a short period of arc stagnation after ignition. The duration of this arc stagnation and the arc characteristics during this stage affect the subsequent arc motion and even the breaking property of interrupters. The present study is of the arc characteristics in the initial stage. Experiments were carried out in a demountable vacuum chamber with cup-shaped TMF contacts. Using a high-speed camera, both single-point arc ignition mode and multiple-point arc ignition (MPAI) mode were observed. The experimental data show that the probability of MPAI mode occurring is related to the arc current. The influences of arc-ignition mode, arc current, and contact diameter on the initial expansion process were investigated. In addition, simulations were performed to analyze the multiple arc expansion process mechanically. Based on the experimental phenomena and simulation results, the mechanism of the arc expansion motion was analyzed.

  19. MeV-ion beam analysis of the interface between filtered cathodic arc-deposited a-carbon and single crystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamwanna, T.; Pasaja, N.; Yu, L.D.; Vilaithong, T.; Anders, A.; Singkarat, S.

    2008-01-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) films were deposited on Si(1 0 0) wafers by a filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) plasma source. A negative electrical bias was applied to the silicon substrate in order to control the incident energy of carbon ions. Effects of the electrical bias on the a-C/Si interface characteristics were investigated by using standard Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) in the channeling mode with 2.1-MeV He 2+ ions. The shape of the Si surface peaks of the RBS/channeling spectra reflects the degree of interface disorder due to atomic displacement from the bulk position of the Si crystal. Details of the analysis method developed are described. It was found that the width of the a-C/Si interface increases linearly with the substrate bias voltage but not the thickness of the a-C film.

  20. Monitoring ARC services with GangliARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, D; Karpenko, D

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring of Grid services is essential to provide a smooth experience for users and provide fast and easy to understand diagnostics for administrators running the services. GangliARC makes use of the widely-used Ganglia monitoring tool to present web-based graphical metrics of the ARC computing element. These include statistics of running and finished jobs, data transfer metrics, as well as showing the availability of the computing element and hardware information such as free disk space left in the ARC cache. Ganglia presents metrics as graphs of the value of the metric over time and shows an easily-digestable summary of how the system is performing, and enables quick and easy diagnosis of common problems. This paper describes how GangliARC works and shows numerous examples of how the generated data can quickly be used by an administrator to investigate problems. It also presents possibilities of combining GangliARC with other commonly-used monitoring tools such as Nagios to easily integrate ARC monitoring into the regular monitoring infrastructure of any site or computing centre.

  1. Efficacy of robust optimization plan with partial-arc VMAT for photon volumetric-modulated arc therapy: A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Hideharu; Ozawa, Shuichi; Nagata, Yasushi

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated position dependence in planning target volume (PTV)-based and robust optimization plans using full-arc and partial-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The gantry angles at the periphery, intermediate, and center CTV positions were 181°-180° (full-arc VMAT) and 181°-360° (partial-arc VMAT). A PTV-based optimization plan was defined by 5 mm margin expansion of the CTV to a PTV volume, on which the dose constraints were applied. The robust optimization plan consisted of a directly optimized dose to the CTV under a maximum-uncertainties setup of 5 mm. The prescription dose was normalized to the CTV D 99% (the minimum relative dose that covers 99% of the volume of the CTV) as an original plan. The isocenter was rigidly shifted at 1 mm intervals in the anterior-posterior (A-P), superior-inferior (S-I), and right-left (R-L) directions from the original position to the maximum-uncertainties setup of 5 mm in the original plan, yielding recalculated dose distributions. It was found that for the intermediate and center positions, the uncertainties in the D 99% doses to the CTV for all directions did not significantly differ when comparing the PTV-based and robust optimization plans (P > 0.05). For the periphery position, uncertainties in the D 99% doses to the CTV in the R-L direction for the robust optimization plan were found to be lower than those in the PTV-based optimization plan (P plan's efficacy using partial-arc VMAT depends on the periphery CTV position. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  2. Dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR): a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Anna; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Qiuwen

    2014-01-01

    Compared to other radiation therapy modalities, clinical electron beam therapy has remained practically unchanged for the past few decades even though electron beams with multiple energies are widely available on most linacs. In this paper, we present the concept of dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR), a new conformal electron therapy technique with synchronized couch motion. DEAR utilizes combination of gantry rotation, couch motion, and dose rate modulation to achieve desirable dose distributions in patient. The electron applicator is kept to minimize scatter and maintain narrow penumbra. The couch motion is synchronized with the gantry rotation to avoid collision between patient and the electron cone. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of DEAR delivery and demonstrate the potential of DEAR to improve dose distributions on simple cylindrical phantoms. DEAR was delivered on Varian's TrueBeam linac in Research Mode. In conjunction with the recorded trajectory log files, mechanical motion accuracies and dose rate modulation precision were analyzed. Experimental and calculated dose distributions were investigated for different energies (6 and 9 MeV) and cut-out sizes (1×10 cm 2  and 3×10 cm 2  for a 15×15 cm 2  applicator). Our findings show that DEAR delivery is feasible and has the potential to deliver radiation dose with high accuracy (root mean square error, or RMSE of <0.1 MU, <0.1° gantry, and <0.1 cm couch positions) and good dose rate precision (1.6 MU min −1 ). Dose homogeneity within ±2% in large and curved targets can be achieved while maintaining penumbra comparable to a standard electron beam on a flat surface. Further, DEAR does not require fabrication of patient-specific shields. These benefits make DEAR a promising technique for conformal radiotherapy of superficial tumors. (paper)

  3. Measurements of isocenter path characteristics of the gantry rotation axis with a smartphone application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiefer, H.; Peters, S.; Plasswilm, L.; Ingulfsen, N.; Kluckert, J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: For stereotactic radiosurgery, the AAPM Report No. 54 [AAPM Task Group 42 (AAPM, 1995)] requires the overall stability of the isocenter (couch, gantry, and collimator) to be within a 1 mm radius. In reality, a rotating system has no rigid axis and thus no isocenter point which is fixed in space. As a consequence, the isocenter concept is reviewed here. It is the aim to develop a measurement method following the revised definitions. Methods: The mechanical isocenter is defined here by the point which rotates on the shortest path in the room coordinate system. The path is labeled as “isocenter path.” Its center of gravity is assumed to be the mechanical isocenter. Following this definition, an image-based and radiation-free measurement method was developed. Multiple marker pairs in a plane perpendicular to the assumed gantry rotation axis of a linear accelerator are imaged with a smartphone application from several rotation angles. Each marker pair represents an independent measuring system. The room coordinates of the isocenter path and the mechanical isocenter are calculated based on the marker coordinates. The presented measurement method is by this means strictly focused on the mechanical isocenter. Results: The measurement result is available virtually immediately following completion of measurement. When 12 independent measurement systems are evaluated, the standard deviations of the isocenter path points and mechanical isocenter coordinates are 0.02 and 0.002 mm, respectively. Conclusions: The measurement is highly accurate, time efficient, and simple to adapt. It is therefore suitable for regular checks of the mechanical isocenter characteristics of the gantry and collimator rotation axis. When the isocenter path is reproducible and its extent is in the range of the needed geometrical accuracy, it should be taken into account in the planning process. This is especially true for stereotactic treatments and radiosurgery

  4. Measurements of isocenter path characteristics of the gantry rotation axis with a smartphone application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiefer, H., E-mail: johann.schiefer@kssg.ch; Peters, S.; Plasswilm, L. [Klinik für Radio-Onkologie, Kantonsspital St.Gallen, Rorschacherstrasse 107, St.Gallen CH-9007 (Switzerland); Ingulfsen, N.; Kluckert, J. [Kantonsschule am Burggraben St.Gallen, Burggraben 21, St.Gallen CH-9000 (Switzerland)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: For stereotactic radiosurgery, the AAPM Report No. 54 [AAPM Task Group 42 (AAPM, 1995)] requires the overall stability of the isocenter (couch, gantry, and collimator) to be within a 1 mm radius. In reality, a rotating system has no rigid axis and thus no isocenter point which is fixed in space. As a consequence, the isocenter concept is reviewed here. It is the aim to develop a measurement method following the revised definitions. Methods: The mechanical isocenter is defined here by the point which rotates on the shortest path in the room coordinate system. The path is labeled as “isocenter path.” Its center of gravity is assumed to be the mechanical isocenter. Following this definition, an image-based and radiation-free measurement method was developed. Multiple marker pairs in a plane perpendicular to the assumed gantry rotation axis of a linear accelerator are imaged with a smartphone application from several rotation angles. Each marker pair represents an independent measuring system. The room coordinates of the isocenter path and the mechanical isocenter are calculated based on the marker coordinates. The presented measurement method is by this means strictly focused on the mechanical isocenter. Results: The measurement result is available virtually immediately following completion of measurement. When 12 independent measurement systems are evaluated, the standard deviations of the isocenter path points and mechanical isocenter coordinates are 0.02 and 0.002 mm, respectively. Conclusions: The measurement is highly accurate, time efficient, and simple to adapt. It is therefore suitable for regular checks of the mechanical isocenter characteristics of the gantry and collimator rotation axis. When the isocenter path is reproducible and its extent is in the range of the needed geometrical accuracy, it should be taken into account in the planning process. This is especially true for stereotactic treatments and radiosurgery.

  5. Four-dimensional cone beam CT with adaptive gantry rotation and adaptive data sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jun; Guerrero, Thomas M.; Munro, Peter; Jeung, Andrew; Chi, P.-C. M.; Balter, Peter; Zhu, X. Ronald; Mohan, Radhe; Pan Tinsu

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a new four-dimensional cone beam CT (4D-CBCT) on a Varian image-guided radiation therapy system, which has radiation therapy treatment and cone beam CT imaging capabilities. We adapted the speed of gantry rotation time of the CBCT to the average breath cycle of the patient to maintain the same level of image quality and adjusted the data sampling frequency to keep a similar level of radiation exposure to the patient. Our design utilized the real-time positioning and monitoring system to record the respiratory signal of the patient during the acquisition of the CBCT data. We used the full-fan bowtie filter during data acquisition, acquired the projection data over 200 deg of gantry rotation, and reconstructed the images with a half-scan cone beam reconstruction. The scan time for a 200-deg gantry rotation per patient ranged from 3.3 to 6.6 min for the average breath cycle of 3-6 s. The radiation dose of the 4D-CBCT was about 1-2 times the radiation dose of the 4D-CT on a multislice CT scanner. We evaluated the 4D-CBCT in scanning, data processing and image quality with phantom studies. We demonstrated the clinical applicability of the 4D-CBCT and compared the 4D-CBCT and the 4D-CT scans in four patient studies. The contrast-to-noise ratio of the 4D-CT was 2.8-3.5 times of the contrast-to-noise ratio of the 4D-CBCT in the four patient studies

  6. Evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy for cranial radiosurgery using multiple noncoplanar arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audet, Chantal; Poffenbarger, Brett A.; Chang, Pauling; Jackson, Paul S.; Lundahl, Robert E.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Ray, Gordon R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a commercial volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), using multiple noncoplanar arcs, for linac-based cranial radiosurgery, as well as evaluate the combined accuracy of the VMAT dose calculations and delivery. Methods: Twelve patients with cranial lesions of variable size (0.1-29 cc) and two multiple metastases patients were planned (Eclipse RapidArc AAA algorithm, v8.6.15) using VMAT (1-6 noncoplanar arcs), dynamic conformal arc (DCA, ∼4 arcs), and IMRT (nine static fields). All plans were evaluated according to a conformity index (CI), healthy brain tissue doses and volumes, and the dose to organs at risk. A 2D dose distribution was measured (Varian Novalis Tx, HD120 MLC, 1000 MU/min, 6 MV beam) for the ∼4 arc VMAT treatment plans using calibrated film dosimetry. Results: The CI (0-1 best) average for all plans was best for ∼4 noncoplanar arc VMAT at 0.86 compared with ∼0.78 for IMRT and a single arc VMAT and 0.68 for DCA. The volumes of healthy brain receiving 50% of the prescribed target coverage dose or more (V 50% ) were lowest for the four arc VMAT [RA(4)] and DCA plans. The average ratio of the V 50% for the other plans to the RA(4) V 50% were 1.9 for a single noncoplanar arc VMAT [RA(1nc)], 1.4 for single full coplanar arc VMAT [RA(1f)] and 1.3 for IMRT. The V 50% improved significantly for single isocenter multiple metastases plan when two noncoplanar VMAT arcs were added to a full single coplanar one. The maximum dose to 5 cc of the outer 1 cm rim of healthy brain which one may want to keep below nonconsequential doses of 300-400 cGy, was 2-3 times greater for IMRT, RA(1nc) and RA(1f) plans compared with the multiple noncoplanar arc DCA and RA(4) techniques. Organs at risk near (0-4 mm) to targets were best spared by (i) single noncoplanar arcs when the targets are lateral to the organ at risk and (ii) by skewed nonvertical planes of IMRT fields when the targets are not lateral to the organ at risk. The highest dose gradient

  7. Overview of CMS robotic silicon module assembly hardware based on Aerotech Gantry Positioning system.

    CERN Multimedia

    Honma, Alan

    1999-01-01

    The goal of the robotic silicon module assembly pilot project is to fully automate the gluing and pick and placement of silicon sensors and front-end hybrid onto a carbon-fibre frame. The basis for thesystem is the Aerotech Gantry Positioning System (AGS10000) machineshown in the centre of the picture. To the left is the PC which contains the controller card and runs the user interface. To the rightis the rack of associated electronics which interfaces with the CERNbuilt tooling and vacuum chuck system.

  8. Conditions for reliable time-resolved dosimetry of electronic portal imaging devices for fixed-gantry IMRT and VMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, Inhwan Jason; Patyal, Baldev; Mandapaka, Anant; Jung, Jae Won; Yi, Byong Yong; Kim, Jong Oh

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The continuous scanning mode of electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) that offers time-resolved information has been newly explored for verifying dynamic radiation deliveries. This study seeks to determine operating conditions (dose rate stability and time resolution) under which that mode can be used accurately for the time-resolved dosimetry of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beams.Methods: The authors have designed the following test beams with variable beam holdoffs and dose rate regulations: a 10 × 10 cm open beam to serve as a reference beam; a sliding window (SW) beam utilizing the motion of a pair of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaves outside the 10 × 10 cm jaw; a step and shoot (SS) beam to move the pair in step; a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) beam. The beams were designed in such a way that they all produce the same open beam output of 10 × 10 cm. Time-resolved ion chamber measurements at isocenter and time-resolved and integrating EPID measurements were performed for all beams. The time-resolved EPID measurements were evaluated through comparison with the ion chamber and integrating EPID measurements, as the latter are accepted procedures. For two-dimensional, time-resolved evaluation, a VMAT beam with an infield MLC travel was designed. Time-resolved EPID measurements and Monte Carlo calculations of such EPID dose images for this beam were performed and intercompared.Results: For IMRT beams (SW and SS), the authors found disagreement greater than 2%, caused by frame missing of the time-resolved mode. However, frame missing disappeared, yielding agreement better than 2%, when the dose rate of irradiation (and thus the frame acquisition rates) reached a stable and planned rate as the dose of irradiation was raised past certain thresholds (a minimum 12 s of irradiation per shoot used for SS IMRT). For VMAT, the authors found that dose rate does not affect the frame acquisition rate, thereby causing no frame missing

  9. Automatic Prostate Tracking and Motion Assessment in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy With an Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azcona, Juan Diego; Li, Ruijiang; Mok, Edward; Hancock, Steven; Xing, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the prostate intrafraction motion in volumetric modulated arc therapy treatments using cine megavoltage (MV) images acquired with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients were treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy using a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator equipped with an EPID for acquiring cine MV images during treatment. Cine MV images acquisition was scheduled for single or multiple treatment fractions (between 1 and 8). A novel automatic fiducial detection algorithm that can handle irregular multileaf collimator apertures, field edges, fast leaf and gantry movement, and MV image noise and artifacts in patient anatomy was used. All sets of images (approximately 25,000 images in total) were analyzed to measure the positioning accuracy of implanted fiducial markers and assess the prostate movement. Results: Prostate motion can vary greatly in magnitude among different patients. Different motion patterns were identified, showing its unpredictability. The mean displacement and standard deviation of the intrafraction motion was generally less than 2.0 ± 2.0 mm in each of the spatial directions. In certain patients, however, the percentage of the treatment time in which the prostate is displaced more than 5 mm from its planned position in at least 1 spatial direction was 10% or more. The maximum prostate displacement observed was 13.3 mm. Conclusion: Prostate tracking and motion assessment was performed with MV imaging and an EPID. The amount of prostate motion observed suggests that patients will benefit from its real-time monitoring. Megavoltage imaging can provide the basis for real-time prostate tracking using conventional linear accelerators

  10. Electric arc hydrogen heaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zasypin, I.M.

    2000-01-01

    The experimental data on the electric arc burning in hydrogen are presented. Empirical and semiempirical dependences for calculating the arc characteristics are derived. An engineering method of calculating plasma torches for hydrogen heating is proposed. A model of interaction of a hydrogen arc with a gas flow is outlined. The characteristics of plasma torches for heating hydrogen and hydrogen-bearing gases are described. (author)

  11. Measuring the wobble of radiation field centers during gantry rotation and collimator movement on a linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Weiliang; Gao, Song

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The isocenter accuracy of a linear accelerator is often assessed with star-shot films. This approach is limited in its ability to quantify three dimensional wobble of radiation field centers (RFCs). The authors report a Winston-Lutz based method to measure the 3D wobble of RFCs during gantry rotation, collimator rotation, and collimator field size change. Methods: A stationary ball-bearing phantom was imaged using multileaf collimator-shaped radiation fields at various gantry angles, collimator angles, and field sizes. The center of the ball-bearing served as a reference point, to which all RFCs were localized using a computer algorithm with subpixel accuracy. Then, the gantry rotation isocenter and the collimator rotation axis were derived from the coordinates of these RFCs. Finally, the deviation or wobble of the individual RFC from the derived isocenter or rotation axis was quantified. Results: The results showed that the RFCs were stable as the field size of the multileaf collimator was varied. The wobble of RFCs depended on the gantry angle and the collimator angle and was reproducible, indicating that the mechanical imperfections of the linac were mostly systematic and quantifiable. It was found that the 3D wobble of RFCs during gantry rotation was reduced after compensating for a constant misalignment of the multileaf collimator. Conclusions: The 3D wobble of RFCs can be measured with submillimeter precision using the proposed method. This method provides a useful tool for checking and adjusting the radiation isocenter tightness of a linac.

  12. Measuring the wobble of radiation field centers during gantry rotation and collimator movement on a linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Weiliang; Gao, Song [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, 77030 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: The isocenter accuracy of a linear accelerator is often assessed with star-shot films. This approach is limited in its ability to quantify three dimensional wobble of radiation field centers (RFCs). The authors report a Winston-Lutz based method to measure the 3D wobble of RFCs during gantry rotation, collimator rotation, and collimator field size change. Methods: A stationary ball-bearing phantom was imaged using multileaf collimator-shaped radiation fields at various gantry angles, collimator angles, and field sizes. The center of the ball-bearing served as a reference point, to which all RFCs were localized using a computer algorithm with subpixel accuracy. Then, the gantry rotation isocenter and the collimator rotation axis were derived from the coordinates of these RFCs. Finally, the deviation or wobble of the individual RFC from the derived isocenter or rotation axis was quantified. Results: The results showed that the RFCs were stable as the field size of the multileaf collimator was varied. The wobble of RFCs depended on the gantry angle and the collimator angle and was reproducible, indicating that the mechanical imperfections of the linac were mostly systematic and quantifiable. It was found that the 3D wobble of RFCs during gantry rotation was reduced after compensating for a constant misalignment of the multileaf collimator. Conclusions: The 3D wobble of RFCs can be measured with submillimeter precision using the proposed method. This method provides a useful tool for checking and adjusting the radiation isocenter tightness of a linac.

  13. Klystron Gun Arcing and Modulator Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, S

    2004-01-01

    The demand for 500 kV and 265 amperes peak to power an X-Band klystron brings up protection issues for klystron faults and the energy dumped into the arc from the modulator. This situation is made worse when more than one klystron will be driven from a single modulator, such as the existing schemes for running two and eight klystrons. High power pulsed klystrons have traditionally be powered by line type modulators which match the driving impedance with the load impedance and therefore current limit at twice the operating current. Multiple klystrons have the added problems of a lower modulator source impedance and added stray capacitance, which converts into appreciable energy at high voltages like 500kV. SLAC has measured the energy dumped into klystron arcs in a single and dual klystron configuration at the 400 to 450 kV level and found interesting characteristics in the arc formation. The author will present measured data from klystron arcs powered from line-type modulators in several configurations. The questions arise as to how the newly designed solid-state modulators, running multiple tubes, will react to a klystron arc and how much energy will be dumped into the arc

  14. Development of a superconducting rotating-gantry for heavy-ion therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Y.; Noda, K.; Murakami, T.; Shirai, T.; Furukawa, T.; Fujita, T.; Mori, S.; Mizushima, K.; Shouda, K.; Fujimoto, T.; Ogitsu, T.; Obana, T.; Amemiya, N.; Orikasa, T.; Takami, S.; Takayama, S.

    2013-01-01

    An isocentric superconducting rotating-gantry for heavy-ion therapy is being developed. This rotating gantry can transport heavy ions having 430 MeV/u to an isocenter with irradiation angles of over ±180°, and is further capable of performing fast raster-scanning irradiation. For the magnets, combined-function superconducting-magnets are to be employed. All of the superconducting magnets have been designed, and their magnetic-field distributions were calculated by using a 3D electromagnetic-field solver. With the calculated magnetic-fields, beam-tracking simulations were performed to evaluate the field quality of the superconducting magnets. Beam profiles as well as phase-space distributions at the isocenter, as calculated by simulations, agreed well with those of linear beam-optics calculations, proving validity of the final design for the magnets. Three superconducting magnets were manufactured, and are being tested. In this paper, results of tracking simulations as well as test results for the superconducting magnets are presented

  15. Hadron cancer therapy complex using nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator and gantry design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Keil

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG rings for cancer hadron therapy offer reduced physical aperture and large dynamic aperture as compared to scaling FFAGs. The variation of tune with energy implies the crossing of resonances during acceleration. Our design avoids intrinsic resonances, although imperfection resonances must be crossed. We consider a system of three nonscaling FFAG rings for cancer therapy with 250 MeV protons and 400   MeV/u carbon ions. Hadrons are accelerated in a common radio frequency quadrupole and linear accelerator, and injected into the FFAG rings at v/c=0.1294. H^{+}/C^{6+} ions are accelerated in the two smaller/larger rings to 31 and 250  MeV/68.8 and 400   MeV/u kinetic energy, respectively. The lattices consist of doublet cells with a straight section for rf cavities. The gantry with triplet cells accepts the whole required momentum range at fixed field. This unique design uses either high-temperature superconductors or superconducting magnets reducing gantry magnet size and weight. Elements with a variable field at the beginning and at the end set the extracted beam at the correct position for a range of energies.

  16. A novel constrained H2 optimization algorithm for mechatronics design in flexure-linked biaxial gantry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Chen, Si-Lu; Kamaldin, Nazir; Teo, Chek Sing; Tay, Arthur; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Tan, Kok Kiong

    2017-11-01

    The biaxial gantry is widely used in many industrial processes that require high precision Cartesian motion. The conventional rigid-link version suffers from breaking down of joints if any de-synchronization between the two carriages occurs. To prevent above potential risk, a flexure-linked biaxial gantry is designed to allow a small rotation angle of the cross-arm. Nevertheless, the chattering of control signals and inappropriate design of the flexure joint will possibly induce resonant modes of the end-effector. Thus, in this work, the design requirements in terms of tracking accuracy, biaxial synchronization, and resonant mode suppression are achieved by integrated optimization of the stiffness of flexures and PID controller parameters for a class of point-to-point reference trajectories with same dynamics but different steps. From here, an H 2 optimization problem with defined constraints is formulated, and an efficient iterative solver is proposed by hybridizing direct computation of constrained projection gradient and line search of optimal step. Comparative experimental results obtained on the testbed are presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Spot-Scanning Proton Arc (SPArc) Therapy: The First Robust and Delivery-Efficient Spot-Scanning Proton Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Xuanfeng; Li, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, J. Michele; Kabolizadeh, Peyman; Stevens, Craig; Yan, Di

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To present a novel robust and delivery-efficient spot-scanning proton arc (SPArc) therapy technique. Methods and Materials: A SPArc optimization algorithm was developed that integrates control point resampling, energy layer redistribution, energy layer filtration, and energy layer resampling. The feasibility of such a technique was evaluated using sample patients: 1 patient with locally advanced head and neck oropharyngeal cancer with bilateral lymph node coverage, and 1 with a nonmobile lung cancer. Plan quality, robustness, and total estimated delivery time were compared with the robust optimized multifield step-and-shoot arc plan without SPArc optimization (Arc_m_u_l_t_i_-_f_i_e_l_d) and the standard robust optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan. Dose-volume histograms of target and organs at risk were analyzed, taking into account the setup and range uncertainties. Total delivery time was calculated on the basis of a 360° gantry room with 1 revolutions per minute gantry rotation speed, 2-millisecond spot switching time, 1-nA beam current, 0.01 minimum spot monitor unit, and energy layer switching time of 0.5 to 4 seconds. Results: The SPArc plan showed potential dosimetric advantages for both clinical sample cases. Compared with IMPT, SPArc delivered 8% and 14% less integral dose for oropharyngeal and lung cancer cases, respectively. Furthermore, evaluating the lung cancer plan compared with IMPT, it was evident that the maximum skin dose, the mean lung dose, and the maximum dose to ribs were reduced by 60%, 15%, and 35%, respectively, whereas the conformity index was improved from 7.6 (IMPT) to 4.0 (SPArc). The total treatment delivery time for lung and oropharyngeal cancer patients was reduced by 55% to 60% and 56% to 67%, respectively, when compared with Arc_m_u_l_t_i_-_f_i_e_l_d plans. Conclusion: The SPArc plan is the first robust and delivery-efficient proton spot-scanning arc therapy technique, which could potentially be

  18. Spot-Scanning Proton Arc (SPArc) Therapy: The First Robust and Delivery-Efficient Spot-Scanning Proton Arc Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Xuanfeng, E-mail: Xuanfeng.ding@beaumont.org; Li, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, J. Michele; Kabolizadeh, Peyman; Stevens, Craig; Yan, Di

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To present a novel robust and delivery-efficient spot-scanning proton arc (SPArc) therapy technique. Methods and Materials: A SPArc optimization algorithm was developed that integrates control point resampling, energy layer redistribution, energy layer filtration, and energy layer resampling. The feasibility of such a technique was evaluated using sample patients: 1 patient with locally advanced head and neck oropharyngeal cancer with bilateral lymph node coverage, and 1 with a nonmobile lung cancer. Plan quality, robustness, and total estimated delivery time were compared with the robust optimized multifield step-and-shoot arc plan without SPArc optimization (Arc{sub multi-field}) and the standard robust optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan. Dose-volume histograms of target and organs at risk were analyzed, taking into account the setup and range uncertainties. Total delivery time was calculated on the basis of a 360° gantry room with 1 revolutions per minute gantry rotation speed, 2-millisecond spot switching time, 1-nA beam current, 0.01 minimum spot monitor unit, and energy layer switching time of 0.5 to 4 seconds. Results: The SPArc plan showed potential dosimetric advantages for both clinical sample cases. Compared with IMPT, SPArc delivered 8% and 14% less integral dose for oropharyngeal and lung cancer cases, respectively. Furthermore, evaluating the lung cancer plan compared with IMPT, it was evident that the maximum skin dose, the mean lung dose, and the maximum dose to ribs were reduced by 60%, 15%, and 35%, respectively, whereas the conformity index was improved from 7.6 (IMPT) to 4.0 (SPArc). The total treatment delivery time for lung and oropharyngeal cancer patients was reduced by 55% to 60% and 56% to 67%, respectively, when compared with Arc{sub multi-field} plans. Conclusion: The SPArc plan is the first robust and delivery-efficient proton spot-scanning arc therapy technique, which could potentially be implemented

  19. Effect of process parameters on temperature distribution in twin-electrode TIG coupling arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Guangjun; Xiong, Jun; Gao, Hongming; Wu, Lin

    2012-01-01

    The twin-electrode TIG coupling arc is a new type of welding heat source, which is generated in a single welding torch that has two tungsten electrodes insulated from each other. This paper aims at determining the distribution of temperature for the coupling arc using the Fowler–Milne method under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium. The influences of welding current, arc length, and distance between both electrode tips on temperature distribution of the coupling arc were analyzed. Based on the results, a better understanding of the twin-electrode TIG welding process was obtained. -- Highlights: ► Increasing arc current will increase the coupling arc temperature. ► Arc length seldom affects the peak temperature of the coupling arc. ► Increasing arc length will increase the extension of temperature near the anode. ► Increasing distance will decrease temperatures in the central part of the arc.

  20. Integrated radiotherapy imaging system (IRIS): design considerations of tumour tracking with linac gantry-mounted diagnostic x-ray systems with flat-panel detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbeco, Ross I; Jiang, Steve B; Sharp, Gregory C; Chen, George T; Mostafavi, Hassan; Shirato, Hiroki

    2004-01-21

    The design of an integrated radiotherapy imaging system (IRIS), consisting of gantry mounted diagnostic (kV) x-ray tubes and fast read-out flat-panel amorphous-silicon detectors, has been studied. The system is meant to be capable of three main functions: radiographs for three-dimensional (3D) patient set-up, cone-beam CT and real-time tumour/marker tracking. The goal of the current study is to determine whether one source/panel pair is sufficient for real-time tumour/marker tracking and, if two are needed, the optimal position of each relative to other components and the isocentre. A single gantry-mounted source/imager pair is certainly capable of the first two of the three functions listed above and may also be useful for the third, if combined with prior knowledge of the target's trajectory. This would be necessary because only motion in two dimensions is visible with a single imager/source system. However, with previously collected information about the trajectory, the third coordinate may be derived from the other two with sufficient accuracy to facilitate tracking. This deduction of the third coordinate can only be made if the 3D tumour/marker trajectory is consistent from fraction to fraction. The feasibility of tumour tracking with one source/imager pair has been theoretically examined here using measured lung marker trajectory data for seven patients from multiple treatment fractions. The patients' selection criteria include minimum mean amplitudes of the tumour motions greater than 1 cm peak-to-peak. The marker trajectory for each patient was modelled using the first fraction data. Then for the rest of the data, marker positions were derived from the imager projections at various gantry angles and compared with the measured tumour positions. Our results show that, due to the three dimensionality and irregular trajectory characteristics of tumour motion, on a fraction-to-fraction basis, a 'monoscopic' system (single source/imager) is inadequate for

  1. TH-EF-BRB-04: 4π Dynamic Conformal Arc Therapy Dynamic Conformal Arc Therapy (DCAT) for SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, T; Long, T; Tian, Z.; Yan, Y; Jiang, S; Gu, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Modiri, A; Sawant, A [University of Maryland in Baltimore, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an efficient and effective trajectory optimization methodology for 4π dynamic conformal arc treatment (4π DCAT) with synchronized gantry and couch motion; and to investigate potential clinical benefits for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to breast, lung, liver and spine tumors. Methods: The entire optimization framework for 4π DCAT inverse planning consists of two parts: 1) integer programming algorithm and 2) particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm. The integer programming is designed to find an optimal solution for arc delivery trajectory with both couch and gantry rotation, while PSO minimize a non-convex objective function based on the selected trajectory and dose-volume constraints. In this study, control point interaction is explicitly taken into account. Beam trajectory was modeled as a series of control points connected together to form a deliverable path. With linear treatment planning objectives, a mixed-integer program (MIP) was formulated. Under mild assumptions, the MIP is tractable. Assigning monitor units to control points along the path can be integrated into the model and done by PSO. The developed 4π DCAT inverse planning strategy is evaluated on SBRT cases and compared to clinically treated plans. Results: The resultant dose distribution of this technique was evaluated between 3D conformal treatment plan generated by Pinnacle treatment planning system and 4π DCAT on a lung SBRT patient case. Both plans share the same scale of MU, 3038 and 2822 correspondingly to 3D conformal plan and 4π DCAT. The mean doses for most of OARs were greatly reduced at 32% (cord), 70% (esophagus), 2.8% (lung) and 42.4% (stomach). Conclusion: Initial results in this study show the proposed 4π DCAT treatment technique can achieve better OAR sparing and lower MUs, which indicates that the developed technique is promising for high dose SBRT to reduce the risk of secondary cancer.

  2. Rotational micro-CT using a clinical C-arm angiography gantry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, V.; Hoffmann, K. R.; Ionita, C. N.; Keleshis, C.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2008-01-01

    Rotational angiography (RA) gantries are used routinely to acquire sequences of projection images of patients from which 3D renderings of vascular structures are generated using Feldkamp cone-beam reconstruction algorithms. However, these systems have limited resolution ( 10 lp/mm) but to date have relied either on rotating object imaging or small bore geometry for small animal imaging, and thus are not used for clinical imaging. The authors report here the development and use of a 3D rotational micro-angiography (RMA) system created by mounting a micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF) [35 μm pixel, resolution >10 lp/mm, field of view (FOV)=3.6 cm] on a standard clinical FPD-based RA gantry (Infinix, Model RTP12303J-G9E, Toshiba Medical Systems Corp., Tustin, CA). RA image sequences are obtained using the MAF and reconstructed. To eliminate artifacts due to image truncation, lower-dose (compared to MAF acquisition) full-FOV (FFOV) FPD RA sequences (194 μm pixel, FOV=20 cm) were also obtained to complete the missing data. The RA gantry was calibrated using a helical bead phantom. To ensure high-quality high-resolution reconstruction, the high-resolution images from the MAF were aligned spatially with the lower-dose FPD images, and the pixel values in the FPD image data were scaled to match those of the MAF. Images of a rabbit with a coronary stent placed in an artery in the Circle of Willis were obtained and reconstructed. The MAF images appear well aligned with the FPD images (average correlation coefficient before and after alignment: 0.65 and 0.97, respectively) Greater details without any visible truncation artifacts are seen in 3D RMA (MAF-FPD) images than in those of the FPD alone. The FWHM of line profiles of stent struts (100 μm diameter) are approximately 192±21 and 313±38 μm for the 3D RMA and FPD data, respectively. In addition, for the dual-acquisition 3D RMA, FFOV FPD data need not be of the highest quality, and thus may be acquired at lower dose

  3. Dye laser spectrometer for the analysis of pulsed vacuum arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Robertson, M.M.

    1975-01-01

    A pulsed dye laser spectrometer which is used to obtain detailed single shot spectroscopic measurements of the plasma in a pulsed vacuum arc was developed. The capabilities of this spectrometer are indicated by the detection of laser induced fluorescence signals from 10 6 neutral Ti atoms in the plasma of a pulsed vacuum arc with a Ti anode. (U.S.)

  4. Precedent Research on Compact Laser-plasma based Gantry for Cancer Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hee, Park Seong; Jeong, Young Uk; Lee, Ki Tae; Kim, Kyung Nam; Cha, Young Ho

    2012-03-01

    This is the precedent R and D to develop the technology of next generation compact particle cancer treatment system based on laser-plasma interaction and to deduce a big project. The subject of this project are the survey of application technology of laser-plasma based particle beam and the design of compact laser-plasma based gantry. The survey of characteristic of particle beam for cancer therapy and present status can be adapted to develop new system. The comparison between particle beams from the existing system and new one based on laser-plasma acceleration will be important to new design and design optimization. The project includes design of multi-dimensional laser transfer beamline, minimization of laser-plasma acceleration chamber, design of effective energy separation/selection system, and radiation safety and local shielding

  5. Markerless PET motion correction: tracking in narrow gantries through optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Olesen, Oline Vinter; Benjaminsen, Claus

    2015-01-01

    be accurate while only adding minimal complexity to the workflow. We present: Tracoline 2.0, a surface scanner prototype, which allows for markerless tracking in the clinic. The system uses structured light through optical fibre bundles, which easily fit in narrow gantries. The optical fibres also makes...... the system compatible with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging since all the electronics are moved away from the scanner. We demonstrate the system in a positron emission tomography (PET) study using the Siemens high resolution research tomography (HRRT). With two Ge/Ga-68 line sources fitted in a mannequin head...... for rotations up to ±25º. Based on the tracking results the PET frames were also successfully corrected for motion by aligning 10 s frames without motion for the stepwise experiment and aligning 1 s frames for the experiment with continuous motion. We have demonstrated and evaluated a system for markerless...

  6. Tokamak ARC damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.G.; Gorker, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage

  7. Tokamak ARC damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, J.G.; Gorker, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage.

  8. Commissioning and first clinical application of mARC treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzierma, Yvonne; Nuesken, Frank G.; Kremp, Stephanie; Palm, Jan; Licht, Norbert P.; Ruebe, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The modulated arc (mARC) technique has recently been introduced for Siemens ARTISTE linear accelerators. We present the first experiences with the commissioning of the system and first patient treatments. Treatment planning and delivery are presented for the Prowess Panther treatment planning system or, alternatively, an in-house code. Dosimetric verification is performed both by point dose measurements and in 3D dose distribution. Depending on the target volume, one or two arcs can be used to create highly conformal plans. Dosimetric verification of the converted mARC plans with step-and-shoot plans shows deviations below 1 % in absolute point dose; in the 3D dose distribution, over 95 % of the points pass the 3D gamma criteria (3 % deviation in local dose and 3 mm distance to agreement for doses > 20 % of the maximum). Patient specific verification of the mARC dose distribution with the calculations has a similar pass rate. Treatment times range between 2 and 5 min for a single arc. To our knowledge, this is the first report of clinical application of the mARC technique. The mARC offers the possibility to save significant amounts of time, with single-arc treatments of only a few minutes achieving comparable dose distribution to IMRT plans taking up to twice as long. (orig.) [de

  9. Metal halide arc discharge lamp having short arc length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzeroll, Martin E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A metal halide arc discharge lamp includes a sealed light-transmissive outer jacket, a light-transmissive shroud located within the outer jacket and an arc tube assembly located within the shroud. The arc tube assembly includes an arc tube, electrodes mounted within the arc tube and a fill material for supporting an arc discharge. The electrodes have a spacing such that an electric field in a range of about 60 to 95 volts per centimeter is established between the electrodes. The diameter of the arc tube and the spacing of the electrodes are selected to provide an arc having an arc diameter to arc length ratio in a range of about 1.6 to 1.8. The fill material includes mercury, sodium iodide, scandium tri-iodide and a rare gas, and may include lithium iodide. The lamp exhibits a high color rendering index, high lumen output and high color temperature.

  10. Dosimetric Comparison of Manual and Beam Angle Optimization of Gantry Angles in IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Shiv P.; Das, Indra J.; Kumar, Arvind; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2011-01-01

    Dosimetric comparison of manual beam angle selection (MBS) and beam angle optimization (BAO) for IMRT plans is investigated retrospectively for 15 head and neck and prostate patients. The head and neck and prostate had planning target volumes (PTVs) ranging between 96.0 and 319.9 cm 3 and 153.6 and 321.3 cm 3 , whereas OAR ranged between 8.3 and 47.8 cm 3 and 68.3 and 469.2 cm 3 , respectively. In MBS, a standard coplanar 7-9 fields equally spaced gantry angles were used. In BAO, the selection of gantry angle was optimized by the algorithm for the same number of beams. The optimization and dose-volume constraints were kept the same for both techniques. Treatment planning was performed on the Eclipse treatment planning system. Our results showed that the dose-volume histogram for PTV are nearly identical in both techniques but BAO provided superior sparing of the organs at risk compared with the MBS. Also, MBS produced statistically significant higher monitor units (MU) and segments than the BAO; 13.1 ± 6.6% (p = 0.012) and 10.4 ± 13.6% (p = 0.140), and 14.6 ± 5.6% (p = 1.003E-5) and 12.6 ± 7.4% (p = 0.76E-3) for head and neck and prostate cases, respectively. The reduction in MU translates into the reduction in total body and integral dose. It is concluded that BAO provides advantage over MBS for most intenisty-modulated radiation therapy cases.

  11. SU-E-T-64: CG-Based Radiation Therapy Simulator with Physical Modeling for Avoidance of Collisions Between Gantry and Couch Or Patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanouchi, M; Arimura, H; Yuda, I

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: It is time-consuming and might cause re-planning to check couch-gantry and patient-gantry collisions on a radiotherapy machine when using couch rotations for non-coplanar beam angles. The aim of this study was to develop a computer-graphics (CG)-based radiation therapy simulator with physical modeling for avoidance of collisions between gantry and couch or patient on a radiotherapy machine. Methods: The radiation therapy simulator was three-dimensionally constructed including a radiotherapy machine (Clinac iX, Varian Medical Systems), couch, and radiation treatment room according to their designs by using a physical-modeling-based computer graphics software (Blender, free and open-source). Each patient was modeled by applying a surface rendering technique to their planning computed tomography (CT) images acquired from 16-slice CT scanner (BrightSpeed, GE Healthcare). Immobilization devices for patients were scanned by the CT equipment, and were rendered as the patient planning CT images. The errors in the collision angle of the gantry with the couch or patient between gold standards and the estimated values were obtained by fixing the gantry angle for the evaluation of the proposed simulator. Results: The average error of estimated collision angles to the couch head side was -8.5% for gantry angles of 60 to 135 degree, and -5.5% for gantry angles of 225 to 300 degree. Moreover, the average error of estimated collision angles to the couch foot side was -1.1% for gantry angles of 60 to 135 degree, and 1.4% for gantry angles of 225 to 300 degree. Conclusion: The CG-based radiation therapy simulator could make it possible to estimate the collision angle between gantry and couch or patient on the radiotherapy machine without verifying the collision angles in the radiation treatment room

  12. Vacuum arc anode phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, H.C.

    1976-01-01

    A brief review of anode phenomena in vacuum arcs is presented. Discussed in succession are: the transition of the arc into the anode spot mode; the temperature of the anode before, during and after the anode spot forms; and anode ions. Characteristically the anode spot has a temperature of the order of the atmospheric boiling point of the anode material and is a copious source of vapor and energetic ions. The dominant mechanism controlling the transition of the vacuum arc into the anode spot mode appears to depend upon the electrode geometry, the electrode material, and the current waveform of the particular vacuum arc being considered. Either magnetic constriction in the gap plasma or gross anode melting can trigger the transition; indeed, a combination of the two is a common cause of anode spot formation

  13. Filtered cathodic arc source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45 degree to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures

  14. Electrical and optical investigations on the low voltage vacuum arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braic, M.; Braic, V.; Pavelescu, G.; Balaceanu, M.; Pavelescu, D.; Dumitrescu, G.; Gherendi, F.

    2002-01-01

    Preliminary investigations of a low voltage circuit breaker, adapted from a real industrial device, were carried out by electrical and optical methods. Electrical, parameters were measured in the high current arc period and in zero current moment (C.Z) and corroborated with the arc plasma spectroscopic investigations. For the first time in vacuum arc diagnostics, the paper presents results based on single shot time resolved emission spectroscopy around C.Z. The short-circuit current was produced in a special high power installation in order to reproduce exactly the short-circuit regimes developing in low voltage distribution networks. A stainless steel vacuum chamber with classical Cu-Cr electrodes was used. Tests were performed for different current values in the range 3 - 20 kA rms , the voltages being varied between 200 and 1000 V ac . Interruption processes in the different arc regimes (from the diffuse arc mode to the constricted column mode) were analyzed. The success of the arc interruption was analyzed in terms of electric arc energy achieved in the first current halfperiod. The results obtained were corroborated with arc plasma spectroscopic investigations. The emission spectroscopy setup, using an Acton spectrograph and an intensified CCD camera, allowed the spatial and time-resolved investigation of spectra emitted by the vacuum arc plasma. The first truly time-resolved spectroscopic measurements on a single half-period was proven to be a good method to investigate the vacuum arc. Using single shot time resolved spectroscopy around zero current on partial unsuccessful interruption we concluded that the Cu ions, more that Cr ions were responsible for the arc reignition. The financial support for this work comes from NATO-STI SfP /974083 and CORINT-Romania projects. (authors)

  15. Sweeping-window arc therapy: an implementation of rotational IMRT with automatic beam-weight calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, C

    2005-01-01

    Sweeping-window arc therapy (SWAT) is a variation of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with direct aperture optimization (DAO) that is initialized with a leaf sequence of sweeping windows that move back and forth periodically across the target as the gantry rotates. This initial sequence induces modulation in the dose and is assumed to be near enough to a minimum to allow successful optimization, done with simulated annealing, without requiring excessive leaf speeds. Optimal beam weights are calculated analytically, with easy extension to allow for variable beam weights. In this paper SWAT is tested on a phantom model and clinical prostate case. For the phantom, constant and variable beam weights are used. Although further work (in particular, improving the dose model) is required, the results show SWAT to be a feasible approach to generating deliverable dynamic arc treatments that are optimized

  16. Sweeping-window arc therapy: an implementation of rotational IMRT with automatic beam-weight calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, C [Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Center, 875 Blake Wilbur Drive, Rm G-233, Stanford, CA 94305-5847 (United States)

    2005-09-21

    Sweeping-window arc therapy (SWAT) is a variation of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with direct aperture optimization (DAO) that is initialized with a leaf sequence of sweeping windows that move back and forth periodically across the target as the gantry rotates. This initial sequence induces modulation in the dose and is assumed to be near enough to a minimum to allow successful optimization, done with simulated annealing, without requiring excessive leaf speeds. Optimal beam weights are calculated analytically, with easy extension to allow for variable beam weights. In this paper SWAT is tested on a phantom model and clinical prostate case. For the phantom, constant and variable beam weights are used. Although further work (in particular, improving the dose model) is required, the results show SWAT to be a feasible approach to generating deliverable dynamic arc treatments that are optimized.

  17. Feasibility of a unified approach to intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volume-modulated arc therapy optimization and delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, Douglas A.; Chen, Jeff Z.; MacFarlane, Michael; Wong, Eugene; Battista, Jerry J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of unified intensity-modulated arc therapy (UIMAT) which combines intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) optimization and delivery to produce superior radiation treatment plans, both in terms of dose distribution and efficiency of beam delivery when compared with either VMAT or IMRT alone. Methods: An inverse planning algorithm for UIMAT was prototyped within the PINNACLE treatment planning system (Philips Healthcare). The IMRT and VMAT deliveries are unified within the same arc, with IMRT being delivered at specific gantry angles within the arc. Optimized gantry angles for the IMRT and VMAT phases are assigned automatically by the inverse optimization algorithm. Optimization of the IMRT and VMAT phases is done simultaneously using a direct aperture optimization algorithm. Five treatment plans each for prostate, head and neck, and lung were generated using a unified optimization technique and compared with clinical IMRT or VMAT plans. Delivery verification was performed with an ArcCheck phantom (Sun Nuclear) on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems). Results: In this prototype implementation, the UIMAT plans offered the same target dose coverage while reducing mean doses to organs at risk by 8.4% for head-and-neck cases, 5.7% for lung cases, and 3.5% for prostate cases, compared with the VMAT or IMRT plans. In addition, UIMAT can be delivered with similar efficiency as VMAT. Conclusions: In this proof-of-concept work, a novel radiation therapy optimization and delivery technique that interlaces VMAT or IMRT delivery within the same arc has been demonstrated. Initial results show that unified VMAT/IMRT has the potential to be superior to either standard IMRT or VMAT

  18. Human biomonitoring of aluminium after a single, controlled manual metal arc inert gas welding process of an aluminium-containing worksheet in nonwelders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Jens; Brand, Peter; Hartmann, Laura; Schettgen, Thomas; Kossack, Veronika; Lenz, Klaus; Purrio, Ellwyn; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Several existing field studies evaluate aluminium welding works but no thoroughly controlled exposure scenario for welding fume has been described yet. This study provides information about the uptake and elimination of aluminium from welding fumes under controlled conditions. In the Aachen Workplace Simulation Laboratory, we are able to generate welding fumes of a defined particle mass concentration. We exposed 12, until then occupationally unexposed participants with aluminium-containing welding fumes of a metal inert gas (MIG) welding process of a total dust mass concentration of 2.5 mg/m(3) for 6 h. Room air filter samples were collected, and the aluminium concentration in air derived. Urine and plasma samples were collected directly before and after the 6-h lasting exposure, as well as after 1 and 7 days. Human biomonitoring methods were used to determine the aluminium content of the samples with high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry. Urinary aluminium concentrations showed significant changes after exposure compared to preexposure levels (mean t(1) (0 h) 13.5 µg/L; mean t(2) (6 h) 23.5 µg/L). Plasma results showed the same pattern but pre-post comparison did not reach significance. We were able to detect a significant increase of the internal aluminium burden of a single MIG aluminium welding process in urine, while plasma failed significance. Biphasic elimination kinetic can be observed. The German BAT of 60 µg/g creatinine was not exceeded, and urinary aluminium returned nearly to baseline concentrations after 7 days.

  19. ALICE-ARC integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderlik, C; Gregersen, A R; Kleist, J; Peters, A; Saiz, P

    2008-01-01

    AliEn or Alice Environment is the Grid middleware developed and used within the ALICE collaboration for storing and processing data in a distributed manner. ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) is the Grid middleware deployed across the Nordic countries and gluing together the resources within the Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructure, using the client tools available in AliEn. The inter-operation has two aspects, one is the data management part and the second the job management aspect. The first aspect was solved by using dCache across NDGF to handle data. Therefore, we will concentrate on the second part. Solving it, was somewhat cumbersome, mainly due to the different computing models employed by AliEn and ARC. AliEN uses an Agent based pull model while ARC handles jobs through the more 'traditional' push model. The solution comes as a module implementing the functionalities necessary to achieve AliEn job submission and management to ARC enabled sites

  20. Craniospinal treatment with IMRT multi-isocentric and image-guided linear accelerator based on Gantry; Tratamiento craneoespinal multi-isocentrico con IMRT y guiado por imagen en acelerador lineal basado en Gantry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz Beltran, M.; Caballero Perea, B.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, C.; Arminio Diaz, E.; Lopez Fernandez, A.; Gomez Fervienza, J. R.; Crespo Diez, P.; Cantarero Valenzuela, N.; Alvarez Sanchez, M.; Martin Martin, G.; Gomez Fervienza, J. r.; Crespo Diez, P.; Cantarero Valenzuela, N.; Alvarez Sanchez, M.; Martin Martin, G.

    2011-07-01

    The objective is the realization of craniospinal treatment with a linear accelerator equipped with gantry based on MLC, carbon fiber table and Image Guided capability. The great length of treatment (patient l, 80m in height) was a great difficulty for want of full length of the longitudinal movement of the table to adequately cover the PTV, plus free metallic screws fastening the head of the table extender preventing further incidents.

  1. Commissioning and first clinical application of mARC treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzierma, Yvonne; Nuesken, Frank G.; Kremp, Stephanie; Palm, Jan; Licht, Norbert P.; Ruebe, Christian [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Homburg, Saarland (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    The modulated arc (mARC) technique has recently been introduced for Siemens ARTISTE linear accelerators. We present the first experiences with the commissioning of the system and first patient treatments. Treatment planning and delivery are presented for the Prowess Panther treatment planning system or, alternatively, an in-house code. Dosimetric verification is performed both by point dose measurements and in 3D dose distribution. Depending on the target volume, one or two arcs can be used to create highly conformal plans. Dosimetric verification of the converted mARC plans with step-and-shoot plans shows deviations below 1 % in absolute point dose; in the 3D dose distribution, over 95 % of the points pass the 3D gamma criteria (3 % deviation in local dose and 3 mm distance to agreement for doses > 20 % of the maximum). Patient specific verification of the mARC dose distribution with the calculations has a similar pass rate. Treatment times range between 2 and 5 min for a single arc. To our knowledge, this is the first report of clinical application of the mARC technique. The mARC offers the possibility to save significant amounts of time, with single-arc treatments of only a few minutes achieving comparable dose distribution to IMRT plans taking up to twice as long. (orig.) [German] Die mARC (modulated arc) Technik wurde vor kurzen fuer Siemens ARTISTE Linearbeschleuniger eingefuehrt. Wir zeigen die ersten Erfahrungen mit der Kommissionierung des Systems sowie die ersten Patientenbestrahlungen. Bestrahlungsplanung und Behandlung werden fuer das Prowess Panther Bestrahlungsplanungssystem oder alternativ in einer in-house-Loesung praesentiert. Die dosimetrische Verifikation wurde sowohl mit Punktmessungen als auch fuer die 3D-Dosisverteilung durchgefuehrt. Je nach Zielvolumen koennen mit einem oder zwei Boegen hochkonformale Plaene erzeugt werden. Die dosimetrische Verifikation konvertierter mARC-Plaene gegen step-and-shoot-Plaene weicht in absoluter Dosis um

  2. Operator control systems and methods for swing-free gantry-style cranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feddema, John T.; Petterson, Ben J.; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    1998-01-01

    A system and method for eliminating swing motions in gantry-style cranes while subject to operator control is presented. The present invention comprises an infinite impulse response ("IIR") filter and a proportional-integral ("PI") feedback controller (50). The IIR filter receives input signals (46) (commanded velocity or acceleration) from an operator input device (45) and transforms them into output signals (47) in such a fashion that the resulting motion is swing free (i.e., end-point swinging prevented). The parameters of the IIR filter are updated in real time using measurements from a hoist cable length encoder (25). The PI feedback controller compensates for modeling errors and external disturbances, such as wind or perturbations caused by collision with objects. The PI feedback controller operates on cable swing angle measurements provided by a cable angle sensor (27). The present invention adjusts acceleration and deceleration to eliminate oscillations. An especially important feature of the present invention is that it compensates for variable-length cable motions from multiple cables attached to a suspended payload.

  3. Improved scintimammography using a high-resolution camera mounted on an upright mammography gantry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itti, Emmanuel; Patt, Bradley E.; Diggles, Linda E.; MacDonald, Lawrence; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Mishkin, Fred S.; Khalkhali, Iraj

    2003-01-01

    99m Tc-sestamibi scintimammography (SMM) is a useful adjunct to conventional X-ray mammography (XMM) for the assessment of breast cancer. An increasing number of studies has emphasized fair sensitivity values for the detection of tumors >1 cm, compared to XMM, particularly in situations where high glandular breast densities make mammographic interpretation difficult. In addition, SMM has demonstrated high specificity for cancer, compared to various functional and anatomic imaging modalities. However, large field-of-view (FOV) gamma cameras are difficult to position close to the breasts, which decreases spatial resolution and subsequently, the sensitivity of detection for tumors 2 FOV and an array of 2x2x6 mm 3 discrete crystals coupled to a photon-sensitive photomultiplier tube readout. This camera is mounted on a mammography gantry allowing upright imaging, medial positioning and use of breast compression. Preliminary data indicates significant enhancement of spatial resolution by comparison with standard imaging in the first 10 patients. Larger series will be needed to conclude on sensitivity/specificity issues

  4. Improved scintimammography using a high-resolution camera mounted on an upright mammography gantry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itti, Emmanuel; Patt, Bradley E.; Diggles, Linda E.; MacDonald, Lawrence; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Mishkin, Fred S.; Khalkhali, Iraj E-mail: nephrad@aol.com

    2003-01-21

    {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi scintimammography (SMM) is a useful adjunct to conventional X-ray mammography (XMM) for the assessment of breast cancer. An increasing number of studies has emphasized fair sensitivity values for the detection of tumors >1 cm, compared to XMM, particularly in situations where high glandular breast densities make mammographic interpretation difficult. In addition, SMM has demonstrated high specificity for cancer, compared to various functional and anatomic imaging modalities. However, large field-of-view (FOV) gamma cameras are difficult to position close to the breasts, which decreases spatial resolution and subsequently, the sensitivity of detection for tumors <1 cm. New dedicated detectors featuring small FOV and increased spatial resolution have recently been developed. In this setting, improvement in tumor detection sensitivity, particularly with regard to small cancers is expected. At Division of Nuclear Medicine, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, we have performed over 2000 SMM within the last 9 years. We have recently used a dedicated breast camera (LumaGEM) featuring a 12.8x12.8 cm{sup 2} FOV and an array of 2x2x6 mm{sup 3} discrete crystals coupled to a photon-sensitive photomultiplier tube readout. This camera is mounted on a mammography gantry allowing upright imaging, medial positioning and use of breast compression. Preliminary data indicates significant enhancement of spatial resolution by comparison with standard imaging in the first 10 patients. Larger series will be needed to conclude on sensitivity/specificity issues.

  5. Technical Note: Kinect V2 surface filtering during gantry motion for radiotherapy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Souha; Rihana, Sandy; Visvikis, Dimitris; Fayad, Hadi

    2018-04-01

    In radiotherapy, the Kinect V2 camera, has recently received a lot of attention concerning many clinical applications including patient positioning, respiratory motion tracking, and collision detection during the radiotherapy delivery phase. However, issues associated with such applications are related to some materials and surfaces reflections generating an offset in depth measurements especially during gantry motion. This phenomenon appears in particular when the collimator surface is observed by the camera; resulting in erroneous depth measurements, not only in Kinect surfaces itself, but also as a large peak when extracting a 1D respiratory signal from these data. In this paper, we proposed filtering techniques to reduce the noise effect in the Kinect-based 1D respiratory signal, using a trend removal filter, and in associated 2D surfaces, using a temporal median filter. Filtering process was validated using a phantom, in order to simulate a patient undergoing radiotherapy treatment while having the ground truth. Our results indicate a better correlation between the reference respiratory signal and its corresponding filtered signal (Correlation coefficient of 0.76) than that of the nonfiltered signal (Correlation coefficient of 0.13). Furthermore, surface filtering results show a decrease in the mean square distance error (85%) between the reference and the measured point clouds. This work shows a significant noise compensation and surface restitution after surface filtering and therefore a potential use of the Kinect V2 camera for different radiotherapy-based applications, such as respiratory tracking and collision detection. © 2018 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  6. Vacuum Arc Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, I.

    2013-12-16

    The vacuum arc ion source has evolved into a more or less standard laboratory tool for the production of high-current beams of metal ions, and is now used in a number of different embodiments at many laboratories around the world. Applications include primarily ion implantation for material surface modification research, and good performance has been obtained for the injection of high-current beams of heavy-metal ions, in particular uranium, into particle accelerators. As the use of the source has grown, so also have the operational characteristics been improved in a variety of different ways. Here we review the principles, design, and performance of vacuum arc ion sources.

  7. Poster — Thur Eve — 39: Feasibility of Commissioning HybridArc with the Delta 4 two plane diode phantom: comparisons with Gafchromic Film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojechko, C. [University of Calgary, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tom Baker Cancer Center, Calgary AB (Canada); Ploquin, N. [University of Calgary, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tom Baker Cancer Center, Calgary AB (Canada); University of Calgary, Department of Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Center, Calgary AB (Canada); Hudson, A. [University of Calgary, Department of Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Center, Calgary AB (Canada); Sayous, Y. [Université Paul Sabotier Toulouse (France)

    2014-08-15

    HybridArc is a relatively novel radiation therapy technique which combines optimized dynamic conformai arcs (DCA) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). HybridArc has possible dosimetry and efficiency advantages over stand alone DCA and IMRT treatments and can be readily implemented on any linac capable of DCA and IMRT, giving strong motivation to commission the modality. The Delta4 phantom (Scandidos, Uppsala, Sweden) has been used for IMRT and VMAT clinical dosimetric verification making it a candidate for HybridArc commissioning. However the HybridArc modality makes use of several non co-planar arcs which creates setup issues due to the geometry of the Delta4, resulting in possible phantom gantry collisions for plans with non-zero couch angles. An analysis was done determining the feasibility of using the Delta4 fixed at 0° couch angle compared with results obtained using Gafchromic ETB2 film (Ashland, Covington Kentucky) in an anthropomorphic phantom at the planned couch angles. A gamma index analysis of the measured and planned dose distributions was done using Delta4 and DoseLab Pro (Mobius Medical Systems, Houston Texas) software. For both arc and IMRT sub-fields there is reasonable correlation between the gamma index found from the Delta4 and Gafchromic film. All results show the feasibility of using the Delta4 for HybridArc commissioning.

  8. Poster — Thur Eve — 39: Feasibility of Commissioning HybridArc with the Delta 4 two plane diode phantom: comparisons with Gafchromic Film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojechko, C.; Ploquin, N.; Hudson, A.; Sayous, Y.

    2014-01-01

    HybridArc is a relatively novel radiation therapy technique which combines optimized dynamic conformai arcs (DCA) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). HybridArc has possible dosimetry and efficiency advantages over stand alone DCA and IMRT treatments and can be readily implemented on any linac capable of DCA and IMRT, giving strong motivation to commission the modality. The Delta4 phantom (Scandidos, Uppsala, Sweden) has been used for IMRT and VMAT clinical dosimetric verification making it a candidate for HybridArc commissioning. However the HybridArc modality makes use of several non co-planar arcs which creates setup issues due to the geometry of the Delta4, resulting in possible phantom gantry collisions for plans with non-zero couch angles. An analysis was done determining the feasibility of using the Delta4 fixed at 0° couch angle compared with results obtained using Gafchromic ETB2 film (Ashland, Covington Kentucky) in an anthropomorphic phantom at the planned couch angles. A gamma index analysis of the measured and planned dose distributions was done using Delta4 and DoseLab Pro (Mobius Medical Systems, Houston Texas) software. For both arc and IMRT sub-fields there is reasonable correlation between the gamma index found from the Delta4 and Gafchromic film. All results show the feasibility of using the Delta4 for HybridArc commissioning

  9. A feasibility study of Dynamic Phantom scanner for quality assurance of photon beam profiles at various gantry angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunkai; Hsi, Wen C; Chu, James C H; Bernard, Damian B; Abrams, Ross A

    2005-01-01

    The effect of gantry rotation on beam profiles of photon and electron beams is an important issue in quality assurance for radiotherapy. To address variations in the profiles of photon and electron beams at different gantry angles, a Dynamic Phantom scanner composed of a 20 x 12 x 6 cm3 scanning Lucite block was designed as a cross-beam-profile scanner. To our knowledge, differences between scanned profiles acquired at different gantry angles with a small size Lucite block and those acquired a full-size (60 x 60 x 50 cm3) water phantom have not been previously investigated. We therefore performed a feasibility study for a first prototype Dynamic Phantom scanner without a gantry attachment mount. Radiation beams from a Varian LINAC 21EX and 2100C were used. Photon beams (6 MV and 18 MV) were shaped by either collimator jaws or a Varian 120 Multileaf (MLC) collimator, and electron beams (6 MeV, 12 MeV, and 20 MeV) were shaped by a treatment cone. To investigate the effect on profiles by using a Lucite block, a quantitative comparison of scanned profiles with the Dynamic Phantom and a full-size water phantom was first performed at a 0 degrees gantry angle for both photon and electron beams. For photon beam profiles defined by jaws at 1.0 cm and 5.0 cm depths of Lucite (i.e., at 1.1 cm and 5.7 cm depth of water), a good agreement (less than 1% variation) inside the field edge was observed between profiles scanned with the Dynamic Phantom and with a water phantom. The use of Lucite in the Dynamic Phantom resulted in reduced penumbra width (about 0.5 mm out of 5 mm to 8mm) and reduced (1% to 2%) scatter dose beyond the field edges for both 6 MV and 18 MV beams, compared with the water phantom scanner. For profiles of the MLC-shaped 6 MV photon beam, a similar agreement was observed. For profiles of electron beams scanned at 2.9 cm depth of Lucite (i.e., at 3.3 cm depth of water), larger disagreements in profiles (3% to 4%) and penumbra width (3 mm to 4 mm out of 12 mm

  10. A feasibility study of the Dynamic Phantom scanner for quality assurance of beam profiles at various gantry angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunkai; Hsi, Wen C.; Chu, James C.H.; Bernard, Damian B.; Abrams, Ross A.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of gantry rotation on beam profiles of photon and electron beams is an important issue in quality assurance for radiotherapy. To address variations in the profiles of photon and electron beams at different gantry angles, a Dynamic Phantom scanner composed of a 20×12×6 cm3 scanning Lucite block was designed as a cross‐beam‐profile scanner. To our knowledge, differences between scanned profiles acquired at different gantry angles with a small size Lucite block and those acquired a full‐size (60×60×50 cm3) water phantom have not been previously investigated. We therefore performed a feasibility study for a first prototype Dynamic Phantom scanner without a gantry attachment mount. Radiation beams from a Varian LINAC 21EX and 2100C were used. Photon beams (6 MV and 18 MV) were shaped by either collimator jaws or a Varian 120 Multileaf (MLC) collimator, and electron beams (6 MeV, 12 MeV, and 20 MeV) were shaped by a treatment cone. To investigate the effect on profiles by using a Lucite block, a quantitative comparison of scanned profiles with the Dynamic Phantom and a full‐size water phantom was first performed at a 0° gantry angle for both photon and electron beams. For photon beam profiles defined by jaws at 1.0 cm and 5.0 cm depths of Lucite (i.e., at 1.1 cm and 5.7 cm depth of water), a good agreement (less than 1% variation) inside the field edge was observed between profiles scanned with the Dynamic Phantom and with a water phantom. The use of Lucite in the Dynamic Phantom resulted in reduced penumbra width (about 0.5 mm out of 5 mm to 8 mm) and reduced (1% to 2%) scatter dose beyond the field edges for both 6 MV and 18 MV beams, compared with the water phantom scanner. For profiles of the MLC‐shaped 6 MV photon beam, a similar agreement was observed. For profiles of electron beams scanned at 2.9 cm depth of Lucite (i.e., at 3.3 cm depth of water), larger disagreements in profiles (3% to 4%) and penumbra width (3 mm to 4 mm out of 12 mm

  11. Optimal Performance of a Nonlinear Gantry Crane System via Priority-based Fitness Scheme in Binary PSO Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaafar, Hazriq Izzuan; Ali, Nursabillilah Mohd; Selamat, Nur Asmiza; Kassim, Anuar Mohamed; Mohamed, Z; Abidin, Amar Faiz Zainal; Jamian, J J

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents development of an optimal PID and PD controllers for controlling the nonlinear gantry crane system. The proposed Binary Particle Swarm Optimization (BPSO) algorithm that uses Priority-based Fitness Scheme is adopted in obtaining five optimal controller gains. The optimal gains are tested on a control structure that combines PID and PD controllers to examine system responses including trolley displacement and payload oscillation. The dynamic model of gantry crane system is derived using Lagrange equation. Simulation is conducted within Matlab environment to verify the performance of system in terms of settling time (Ts), steady state error (SSE) and overshoot (OS). This proposed technique demonstrates that implementation of Priority-based Fitness Scheme in BPSO is effective and able to move the trolley as fast as possible to the various desired position

  12. Mechanical analysis and optimisation of large and highly-loaded bearing rollers For the "Riesenrad" Ion Gantry

    CERN Document Server

    Reimoser, S A

    2000-01-01

    A carbon ion gantry would allow the irradiation of cancer patients with carbon ions from any direction in space best suited for therapy. Till today, such a machine has not been built due to the expected size, mass and cost. A novel design, called "Riesenrad" ion gantry, promises to provide a competitive solution. The central part of the Riesenrad, which can rotate ± 90°, is supported (statically determinate) on pendular bearing units with two rollers each. High precision requirements for the structure rule out any plastic deformations in the area of contact. The present report describes the design of the highly-loaded rollers. In order to achieve a large contact area and a uniform distribution of contact stresses, a "barrel shape" for the rollers is proposed. An analysis using the finite element method (FEM) was performed to optimise the roller design, namely to establish the required crown roll (camber radius).

  13. Reducing 4DCBCT imaging time and dose: the first implementation of variable gantry speed 4DCBCT on a linear accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Ricky T; Stankovic, Uros; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Keall, Paul J

    2017-06-07

    Four dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) uses a constant gantry speed and imaging frequency that are independent of the patient's breathing rate. Using a technique called respiratory motion guided 4DCBCT (RMG-4DCBCT), we have previously demonstrated that by varying the gantry speed and imaging frequency, in response to changes in the patient's real-time respiratory signal, the imaging dose can be reduced by 50-70%. RMG-4DCBCT optimally computes a patient specific gantry trajectory to eliminate streaking artefacts and projection clustering that is inherent in 4DCBCT imaging. The gantry trajectory is continuously updated as projection data is acquired and the patient's breathing changes. The aim of this study was to realise RMG-4DCBCT for the first time on a linear accelerator. To change the gantry speed in real-time a potentiometer under microcontroller control was used to adjust the current supplied to an Elekta Synergy's gantry motor. A real-time feedback loop was developed on the microcontroller to modulate the gantry speed and projection acquisition in response to the real-time respiratory signal so that either 40, RMG-4DCBCT 40 , or 60, RMG-4DCBCT 60 , uniformly spaced projections were acquired in 10 phase bins. Images of the CIRS dynamic Thorax phantom were acquired with sinusoidal breathing periods ranging from 2 s to 8 s together with two breathing traces from lung cancer patients. Image quality was assessed using the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and edge response width (ERW). For the average patient, with a 3.8 s breathing period, the imaging time and image dose were reduced by 37% and 70% respectively. Across all respiratory rates, RMG-4DCBCT 40 had a CNR in the range of 6.5 to 7.5, and RMG-4DCBCT 60 had a CNR between 8.7 and 9.7, indicating that RMG-4DCBCT allows consistent and controllable CNR. In comparison, the CNR for conventional 4DCBCT drops from 20.4 to 6.2 as the breathing rate increases from 2 s to 8 s. With RMG-4DCBCT

  14. Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility is an arc heated facility which simulates the true enthalpy of flight over the Mach number range of about 4.7 to 8 for free-jet...

  15. Optimizing 4D cone beam computed tomography acquisition by varying the gantry velocity and projection time interval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Brien, Ricky T; Cooper, Benjamin J; Keall, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Four dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) is an emerging clinical image guidance strategy for tumour sites affected by respiratory motion. In current generation 4DCBCT techniques, both the gantry rotation speed and imaging frequency are constant and independent of the patient’s breathing which can lead to projection clustering. We present a mixed integer quadratic programming (MIQP) model for respiratory motion guided-4DCBCT (RMG-4DCBCT) which regulates the gantry velocity and projection time interval, in response to the patient’s respiratory signal, so that a full set of evenly spaced projections can be taken in a number of phase, or displacement, bins during the respiratory cycle. In each respiratory bin, an image can be reconstructed from the projections to give a 4D view of the patient’s anatomy so that the motion of the lungs, and tumour, can be observed during the breathing cycle. A solution to the full MIQP model in a practical amount of time, 10 s, is not possible with the leading commercial MIQP solvers, so a heuristic method is presented. Using parameter settings typically used on current generation 4DCBCT systems (4 min image acquisition, 1200 projections, 10 respiratory bins) and a sinusoidal breathing trace with a 4 s period, we show that the root mean square (RMS) of the angular separation between projections with displacement binning is 2.7° using existing constant gantry speed systems and 0.6° using RMG-4DCBCT. For phase based binning the RMS is 2.7° using constant gantry speed systems and 2.5° using RMG-4DCBCT. The optimization algorithm presented is a critical step on the path to developing a system for RMG-4DCBCT. (paper)

  16. More than 10 years experience of beam monitoring with the Gantry 1 spot scanning proton therapy facility at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Shixiong; Boehringer, Terence; Coray, Adolf; Grossmann, Martin; Pedroni, Eros

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The beam monitoring equipments developed for the first PSI spot scanning proton therapy facility, Gantry 1, have been successfully used for more than 10 years. The purpose of this article is to summarize the author's experience in the beam monitoring technique for dynamic proton scanning. Methods: The spot dose delivery and verification use two independent beam monitoring and computer systems. In this article, the detector construction, electronic system, dosimetry, and quality assurance results are described in detail. The beam flux monitor is calibrated with a Faraday cup. The beam position monitoring is realized by measuring the magnetic fields of deflection magnets with Hall probes before applying the spot and by checking the beam position and width with an ionization strip chamber after the spot delivery. Results: The results of thimble ionization chamber dosimetry measurements are reproducible (with a mean deviation of less than 1% and a standard deviation of 1%). The resolution in the beam position measurement is of the order of a tenth of a millimeter. The tolerance of the beam position delivery and monitoring during scanning is less than 1.5 mm. Conclusions: The experiences gained with the successful operation of Gantry 1 represent a unique and solid background for the development of a new system, Gantry 2, in order to perform new advanced scanning techniques.

  17. More than 10 years experience of beam monitoring with the Gantry 1 spot scanning proton therapy facility at PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Shixiong; Boehringer, Terence; Coray, Adolf; Grossmann, Martin; Pedroni, Eros [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: The beam monitoring equipments developed for the first PSI spot scanning proton therapy facility, Gantry 1, have been successfully used for more than 10 years. The purpose of this article is to summarize the author's experience in the beam monitoring technique for dynamic proton scanning. Methods: The spot dose delivery and verification use two independent beam monitoring and computer systems. In this article, the detector construction, electronic system, dosimetry, and quality assurance results are described in detail. The beam flux monitor is calibrated with a Faraday cup. The beam position monitoring is realized by measuring the magnetic fields of deflection magnets with Hall probes before applying the spot and by checking the beam position and width with an ionization strip chamber after the spot delivery. Results: The results of thimble ionization chamber dosimetry measurements are reproducible (with a mean deviation of less than 1% and a standard deviation of 1%). The resolution in the beam position measurement is of the order of a tenth of a millimeter. The tolerance of the beam position delivery and monitoring during scanning is less than 1.5 mm. Conclusions: The experiences gained with the successful operation of Gantry 1 represent a unique and solid background for the development of a new system, Gantry 2, in order to perform new advanced scanning techniques.

  18. Electric contact arcing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuthrell, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    Electrical contacts must function properly in many types of components used in nuclear weapon systems. Design, application, and testing of these components require detailed knowledge of chemical and physical phenomena associated with stockpile storage, stockpile testing, and operation. In the past, investigation of these phenomena has led to significant discoveries on the effects of surface contaminants, friction and wear, and the mechanics of closure on contact performance. A recent investigation of contact arcing phenomena which revealed that, preceding contact closure, arcs may occur at voltages lower than had been previously known is described. This discovery is important, since arcing may damage contacts, and repetitive testing of contacts performed as part of a quality assurance program might produce cumulative damage that would yield misleading life-test data and could prevent proper operation of the contacts at some time in the future. This damage can be avoided by determining the conditions under which arcing occurs, and ensuring that these conditions are avoided in contact testing

  19. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  20. Circular arc structures

    KAUST Repository

    Bo, Pengbo; Pottmann, Helmut; Kilian, Martin; Wang, Wen Ping; Wallner, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    and connecting elements as well as repetition of costly parts. This paper proposes so-called circular arc structures as a means to faithfully realize freeform designs without giving up smooth appearance. In contrast to non-smooth meshes with straight edges where

  1. ALICE-ARC integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderlik, Csaba; Gregersen, Anders Rhod; Kleist, Josva

    2008-01-01

    Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructure, using the client tools available in AliEn. The interoperation has two aspects, one is the data...

  2. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malek, Muhamad Hafiz Abd; Saad, Nor Hayati; Abas, Sunhaji Kiyai; Shah, Noriyati Mohd

    2013-01-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  3. THE ARC TRAIL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. The project, carried out by the 1985 Conservation. Team at Durban Girls1 High School, consisted of three main aims- Awareness, Recreation and conservation, which were incorporated into the naming of the ARC trail. The trail is situated in suburban Durban where it was felt that it was important to ...

  4. ARC Software and Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archives RESEARCH ▼ Research Areas Ongoing Projects Completed Projects SOFTWARE CONTACT ▼ Primary Contacts Researchers External Link MLibrary Deep Blue Software Archive Most research conducted at the ARC produce software code and methodologies that are transferred to TARDEC and industry partners. These

  5. ALICE: ARC integration

    CERN Document Server

    Anderlik, C; Kleist, J; Peters, A; Saiz, P

    2008-01-01

    AliEn or Alice Environment is the Grid middleware developed and used within the ALICE collaboration for storing and processing data in a distributed manner. ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) is the Grid middleware deployed across the Nordic countries and gluing together the resources within the Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructure, using the client tools available in AliEn. The inter-operation has two aspects, one is the data management part and the second the job management aspect. The first aspect was solved by using dCache across NDGF to handle data. Therefore, we will concentrate on the second part. Solving it, was somewhat cumbersome, mainly due to the different computing models employed by AliEn and ARC. AliEN uses an Agent based pull model while ARC handles jobs through the more 'traditional' push model. The solution comes as a modu...

  6. Predictive Parameters of Symptomatic Hematochezia Following 5-Fraction Gantry-Based SABR in Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musunuru, Hima Bindu; Davidson, Melanie; Cheung, Patrick; Vesprini, Danny; Liu, Stanley; Chung, Hans; Chu, William; Mamedov, Alexandre; Ravi, Ananth; D'Alimonte, Laura; Commisso, Kristina; Helou, Joelle; Deabreu, Andrea; Zhang, Liying; Loblaw, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study identified predictors of high-grade late hematochezia (HH) following 5-fraction gantry-based stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR). Methods and Materials: Hematochezia data for 258 patients who received 35 to 40 Gy SABR in 5-fractions as part of sequential phase 2 prospective trials was retrieved. Grade 2 or higher late rectal bleeding was labeled HH. Hematochezia needing steroid suppositories, 4% formalin, or 1 to 2 sessions of argon plasma coagulation (APC) was labeled grade 2. More than 2 sessions of APC, blood transfusion, or a course of hyperbaric oxygen was grade 3 and development of visceral fistula, grade 4. Various dosimetric and clinical factors were analyzed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis and recursive partitioning analysis were used to determine clinically valid cut-off points and identify risk groups, respectively. Results: HH was observed in 19.4%, grade ≥3 toxicity in 3.1%. Median follow-up was 29.7 months (interquartile range [IQR]: 20.6-61.7) Median time to develop HH was 11.7 months (IQR: 9.0-15.2) from the start of radiation. At 2 years, cumulative HH was 4.9%, 27.2%, and 42.1% in patients who received 35 Gy to prostate (4-mm planning target volume [PTV] margin), 40 Gy to prostate (5-mm PTV margin), and 40 Gy to prostate/seminal vesicles (5-mm PTV margin), respectively (P 30%. Conclusions: Rectal V38 and 2 clinical factors were strong predictors of HH following 5-fraction SABR. Planning constraints should keep rectal V38 below 2.0 cm"3.

  7. Underwater plasma arc cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leautier, R.; Pilot, G.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the work done to develop underwater plasma arc cutting techniques, to characterise aerosols from cutting operations on radioactive and non-radioactive work-pieces, and to develop suitable ventilation and filtration techniques. The work has been carried out in the framework of a contract between CEA-CEN Cadarache and the Commission of European Communities. Furthermore, this work has been carried out in close cooperation with CEA-CEN Saclay mainly for secondary emissions and radioactive analysis. The contract started in May 1986 and was completed in December 1988 by a supplementary agreement. This report has been compiled from several progress reports submitted during the work period, contains the main findings of the work and encloses the results of comparative tests on plasma arc cutting

  8. Arc cathode spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrade, H.O.

    1989-01-01

    Arc spots are usually highly unstable and jump statistically over the cathode surface. In a magnetic field parallel to the surface, preferably they move in the retrograde direction; i.e., opposite to the Lorentzian rule. If the field is inclined with respect to the surface, the spots drift away at a certain angle with respect to the proper retrograde direction (Robson drift motion). These well-known phenomena are explained by one stability theory

  9. Circular arc structures

    KAUST Repository

    Bo, Pengbo

    2011-07-01

    The most important guiding principle in computational methods for freeform architecture is the balance between cost efficiency on the one hand, and adherence to the design intent on the other. Key issues are the simplicity of supporting and connecting elements as well as repetition of costly parts. This paper proposes so-called circular arc structures as a means to faithfully realize freeform designs without giving up smooth appearance. In contrast to non-smooth meshes with straight edges where geometric complexity is concentrated in the nodes, we stay with smooth surfaces and rather distribute complexity in a uniform way by allowing edges in the shape of circular arcs. We are able to achieve the simplest possible shape of nodes without interfering with known panel optimization algorithms. We study remarkable special cases of circular arc structures which possess simple supporting elements or repetitive edges, we present the first global approximation method for principal patches, and we show an extension to volumetric structures for truly threedimensional designs. © 2011 ACM.

  10. Plasma drifts associated with a system of sun-aligned arcs in the polar cap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mende, S.B.; Doolittle, J.H.; Robinson, R.M.; Vondrak, R.R.; Rich, F.J.

    1988-01-01

    A series of four sun-aligned arcs passed over Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland, on the night of the 17th and 18th of February, 1985. Observations of these arcs were made using the Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar and an intensified all-sky imaging TV system that was operated at the radar site. The first of the four arcs crossed the Sondre Stromfjord meridian just before local midnight moving westward, and the other three arcs followed at approximately half-hour intervals. When we account for the earth's rotation, the arc drift in an inertial frame was eastward, or dusk to dawn. The half-hour interval between meridian crossings of the arcs implies that the mean spacing between the arcs was 180 km. A Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F6 satellite pass at 0110 UT revealed the presence of highly structured electron and ion precipitation throughout the polar cap. The DMSP visible imager detected a single, sun-aligned arc associated with the largest peak in precipitating electron flux. This arc was also observed at Thule, Greenland, with an intensified film camera. These observations suggest that at least one of the arcs that were observed at Sondre Stromfjord extended across a large part of the polar cap. The radar at Sondre Stromfjord measured electron density and ion drift velocities associated with the four arcs. The radar drift measurements were superimposed on the all-sky video images to determine the location of the measurements relative to the arcs. Plasma drifts outside the arcs were found to be both sunward and antisunward, while within the arcs the drifts were predominantly antisunward. The variability of the drifts in the direction parallel to the arcs indicates that the electric fields were highly structured even though the configuration and motion of the arcs were well behaved

  11. SU-F-T-558: ArcCheck for Patient Specific QA in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, P; Tajaldeen, A; Esen, N; Geso, M; Taylor, D; Wanigaratne, D; Roozen, K; Kron, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) is one of the most preferred treatment techniques for early stage lung cancer. This technique has been extended to other treatment sites like Spine, Liver, Scapula, Sternum etc., This has resulted in increased physics QA time on machine. In this study, we’ve tested the feasibility of using ArcCheck as an alternative method to replace film dosimetry. Methods: Twelve patients with varied diagnosis of Lung, Liver, scapula, sternum and Spine undergoing SABR were selected for this study. Pre-treatment QA was performed for all the patients which include ionization chamber and film dosimetry. The required gamma criteria for each SABR plan to pass QA and proceed to treatment is 95% (3%,1mm). In addition to this routine process, the treatment plans were exported on to an ArcCheck phantom. The planned and measured dose from the ArcCheck device were compared using four different gamma criteria: 2%,2 mm, 3%,2 mm, 3%,1 mm and 3%, 3 mm. In addition to this, we’ve also introduced errors to gantry, collimator and couch angle to assess sensitivity of the ArcCheck with potential delivery errors. Results: The ArcCheck mean passing rates for all twelve cases were 76.1%±9.7% for gamma criteria 3%,1 mm, 89.5%±5.3% for 2%,2 mm, 92.6%±4.2% for 3%,2 mm, and 97.6%±2.4% for 3%,3 mm gamma criteria. When SABR spine cases are excluded, we observe ArcCheck passing rates higher than 95% for all the studied cases with 3%, 3mm, and ArcCheck results in acceptable agreement with the film gamma results. Conclusion: Our ArcCheck results at 3%, 3 mm were found to correlate well with our non-SABR spine routine patient specific QA results (3%,1 mm). We observed significant reduction in QA time on using ArcCheck for SABR QA. This study shows that ArcCheck could replace film dosimetry for all sites except SABR spine.

  12. SU-F-T-558: ArcCheck for Patient Specific QA in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramachandran, P [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); RMIT University, Bundoora (Australia); Tajaldeen, A; Esen, N; Geso, M [RMIT University, Bundoora (Australia); Taylor, D; Wanigaratne, D; Roozen, K; Kron, T [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) is one of the most preferred treatment techniques for early stage lung cancer. This technique has been extended to other treatment sites like Spine, Liver, Scapula, Sternum etc., This has resulted in increased physics QA time on machine. In this study, we’ve tested the feasibility of using ArcCheck as an alternative method to replace film dosimetry. Methods: Twelve patients with varied diagnosis of Lung, Liver, scapula, sternum and Spine undergoing SABR were selected for this study. Pre-treatment QA was performed for all the patients which include ionization chamber and film dosimetry. The required gamma criteria for each SABR plan to pass QA and proceed to treatment is 95% (3%,1mm). In addition to this routine process, the treatment plans were exported on to an ArcCheck phantom. The planned and measured dose from the ArcCheck device were compared using four different gamma criteria: 2%,2 mm, 3%,2 mm, 3%,1 mm and 3%, 3 mm. In addition to this, we’ve also introduced errors to gantry, collimator and couch angle to assess sensitivity of the ArcCheck with potential delivery errors. Results: The ArcCheck mean passing rates for all twelve cases were 76.1%±9.7% for gamma criteria 3%,1 mm, 89.5%±5.3% for 2%,2 mm, 92.6%±4.2% for 3%,2 mm, and 97.6%±2.4% for 3%,3 mm gamma criteria. When SABR spine cases are excluded, we observe ArcCheck passing rates higher than 95% for all the studied cases with 3%, 3mm, and ArcCheck results in acceptable agreement with the film gamma results. Conclusion: Our ArcCheck results at 3%, 3 mm were found to correlate well with our non-SABR spine routine patient specific QA results (3%,1 mm). We observed significant reduction in QA time on using ArcCheck for SABR QA. This study shows that ArcCheck could replace film dosimetry for all sites except SABR spine.

  13. Predictive Parameters of Symptomatic Hematochezia Following 5-Fraction Gantry-Based SABR in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musunuru, Hima Bindu [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Davidson, Melanie [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cheung, Patrick; Vesprini, Danny; Liu, Stanley; Chung, Hans; Chu, William [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mamedov, Alexandre [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ravi, Ananth [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); D' Alimonte, Laura [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Commisso, Kristina [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Helou, Joelle [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Deabreu, Andrea [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Zhang, Liying [MacroStat, Inc, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Loblaw, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.loblaw@sunnybrook.ca [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Health Policy, Measurement and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: This study identified predictors of high-grade late hematochezia (HH) following 5-fraction gantry-based stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR). Methods and Materials: Hematochezia data for 258 patients who received 35 to 40 Gy SABR in 5-fractions as part of sequential phase 2 prospective trials was retrieved. Grade 2 or higher late rectal bleeding was labeled HH. Hematochezia needing steroid suppositories, 4% formalin, or 1 to 2 sessions of argon plasma coagulation (APC) was labeled grade 2. More than 2 sessions of APC, blood transfusion, or a course of hyperbaric oxygen was grade 3 and development of visceral fistula, grade 4. Various dosimetric and clinical factors were analyzed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis and recursive partitioning analysis were used to determine clinically valid cut-off points and identify risk groups, respectively. Results: HH was observed in 19.4%, grade ≥3 toxicity in 3.1%. Median follow-up was 29.7 months (interquartile range [IQR]: 20.6-61.7) Median time to develop HH was 11.7 months (IQR: 9.0-15.2) from the start of radiation. At 2 years, cumulative HH was 4.9%, 27.2%, and 42.1% in patients who received 35 Gy to prostate (4-mm planning target volume [PTV] margin), 40 Gy to prostate (5-mm PTV margin), and 40 Gy to prostate/seminal vesicles (5-mm PTV margin), respectively (P<.0001). In the ROC analysis, volume of rectum receiving radiation dose of 38 Gy (V38) was a strong predictor of HH with an area under the curve of 0.65. In multivariate analysis, rectal V38 (≥2.0 cm{sup 3}; odds ratio [OR]: 4.7); use of anticoagulants in the follow-up period (OR: 6.5) and presence of hemorrhoids (OR: 2.7) were the strongest predictors. Recursive partitioning analysis showed rectal V38 < 2.0 cm{sup 3}, and use of anticoagulants or rectal V38 ≥ 2.0 cm{sup 3} plus 1 other risk factor resulted in an HH risk of >30%. Conclusions: Rectal V38 and 2

  14. WE-E-18A-11: Fluoro-Tomographic Images From Projections of On-Board Imager (OBI) While Gantry Is Moving

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, B; Hu, E; Yu, C; Lasio, G [Univ. of Maryland School Of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A method to generate a series of fluoro-tomographic images (FTI) of the slice of interest (SOI) from the projection images of the On-board imager (OBI) while gantry is moving is developed and tested. Methods: Tomographic image via background subtraction, TIBS has been published by our group. TIBS uses a priori anatomical information from a previous CT scan to isolate a SOI from a planar kV image by factoring out the attenuations by tissues outside the SOI (background). We extended the idea to 4D TIBS, which enables to generate from the projection of different gantry angles. A set of background images for different angles are prepared. A background image at a given gantry angle is subtracted from the projection image at the same angle to generate a TIBS image. Then the TIBS image is converted to a reference angle. The 4D TIBS is the set of TIBS that originated from gantry angles other than the reference angle. Projection images of lung patients for CBCT acquisition are used to test the 4D TIBS. Results: Fluoroscopic images of a coronal plane of lung patients are acquired from the CBCT projections at different gantry angles and times. Change of morphology of hilar vessels due to breathing and heart beating are visible in the coronal plane, which are generated from the set of the projection images at gantry angles other than antero-posterior. Breathing surrogate or sorting process is not needed. Unlike tomosynthesis, FTI from 4D TIBS maintains the independence of each of the projections thereby reveals temporal variations within the SOI. Conclusion: FTI, fluoroscopic imaging of a SOI with x-ray projections, directly generated from the x-ray projection images at different gantry angles is tested with a lung case and proven feasible. This technique can be used for on-line imaging of moving targets. NIH Grant R01CA133539.

  15. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) is a combination of laser welding with arc welding that overcomes many of the shortfalls of both processes. This important book gives a comprehensive account of hybrid laser-arc welding technology and applications. The first part of the book reviews...... the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  16. Correlation methods in cutting arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prevosto, L; Kelly, H, E-mail: prevosto@waycom.com.ar [Grupo de Descargas Electricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecanica, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Regional Venado Tuerto, Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto (2600), Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2011-05-01

    The present work applies similarity theory to the plasma emanating from transferred arc, gas-vortex stabilized plasma cutting torches, to analyze the existing correlation between the arc temperature and the physical parameters of such torches. It has been found that the enthalpy number significantly influence the temperature of the electric arc. The obtained correlation shows an average deviation of 3% from the temperature data points. Such correlation can be used, for instance, to predict changes in the peak value of the arc temperature at the nozzle exit of a geometrically similar cutting torch due to changes in its operation parameters.

  17. Correlation methods in cutting arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevosto, L; Kelly, H

    2011-01-01

    The present work applies similarity theory to the plasma emanating from transferred arc, gas-vortex stabilized plasma cutting torches, to analyze the existing correlation between the arc temperature and the physical parameters of such torches. It has been found that the enthalpy number significantly influence the temperature of the electric arc. The obtained correlation shows an average deviation of 3% from the temperature data points. Such correlation can be used, for instance, to predict changes in the peak value of the arc temperature at the nozzle exit of a geometrically similar cutting torch due to changes in its operation parameters.

  18. Gas tungsten arc welder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable grinder, co-axial with the electrode, is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds. The specification also discloses means for loading of the cladding with fuel pellets and for placement of reflectors, gas capsules and end caps. Gravity feed conveyor and inerting means are also described. (author)

  19. Effect of MLC leaf position, collimator rotation angle, and gantry rotation angle errors on intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Sen; Li, Guangjun; Wang, Maojie; Jiang, Qinfeng; Zhang, Yingjie [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Wei, Yuquan, E-mail: yuquawei@vip.sina.com [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China)

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf position, collimator rotation angle, and accelerator gantry rotation angle errors on intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. To compare dosimetric differences between the simulating plans and the clinical plans with evaluation parameters, 6 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were selected for simulation of systematic and random MLC leaf position errors, collimator rotation angle errors, and accelerator gantry rotation angle errors. There was a high sensitivity to dose distribution for systematic MLC leaf position errors in response to field size. When the systematic MLC position errors were 0.5, 1, and 2 mm, respectively, the maximum values of the mean dose deviation, observed in parotid glands, were 4.63%, 8.69%, and 18.32%, respectively. The dosimetric effect was comparatively small for systematic MLC shift errors. For random MLC errors up to 2 mm and collimator and gantry rotation angle errors up to 0.5°, the dosimetric effect was negligible. We suggest that quality control be regularly conducted for MLC leaves, so as to ensure that systematic MLC leaf position errors are within 0.5 mm. Because the dosimetric effect of 0.5° collimator and gantry rotation angle errors is negligible, it can be concluded that setting a proper threshold for allowed errors of collimator and gantry rotation angle may increase treatment efficacy and reduce treatment time.

  20. Optimal starting gantry angles using equiangular-spaced beams with intensity modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer on RTOG 0126: A clinical study of 5 and 7 fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potrebko, Peter S.; McCurdy, Boyd M.C.; Butler, James B.; El-Gubtan, Adel S.; Nugent, Zoann

    2007-01-01

    Background and Purpose: To investigate the effects of starting gantry angle and number of equiangular-spaced beams for prostate cancer radiotherapy on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0126 protocol using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Materials and methods: Ten localized prostate cancer patients were prescribed to 79.2 Gy in 44 fractions. Static IMRT plans using five and seven equiangular-spaced beams were generated. The starting gantry angles were incremented by 5 o resulting in 15 (5 beams) and 11 (7 beams) plans per patient. Constant target coverage was ensured for all plans in order to isolate the variation in the rectal and bladder metrics as a function of starting gantry angle. Results: The variation with starting gantry angle in rectal metrics using 5 beams was statistically significant (p o and 50 o . Statistically insignificant differences were observed for the bladder metrics using 5 beams. There was little dosimetric variation in the rectal and bladder metrics with 7 beams. Nearly equivalent rectal V 75 Gy was achieved between 5 optimal equiangular-spaced beams starting at 20 o (class solution) and 7 equiangular-spaced beams starting at 0 o for most patients. Conclusions: The use of an optimal starting gantry angle for 5 equiangular-spaced beams, as indicated by a class solution in this study, will facilitate rectal sparing and can produce plans that are equivalent to those employing 7 equiangular-spaced beams

  1. Electric arc welding gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  2. Arc-weld pool interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glickstein, S.S.

    1978-08-01

    The mechanisms involved in arc-weld pool interactions are extremely complex and no complete theory is presently available to describe much of the phenomena observed during welding. For the past several years, experimental and analytical studies have been undertaken at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to increase basic understanding of the gas tungsten arc welding process. These studies have included experimental spectral analysis of the arc in order to determine arc temperature and analytical modeling of the arc and weld puddle. The investigations have been directed toward determining the cause and effects of variations in the energy distribution incident upon the weldment. In addition, the effect of weld puddle distortion on weld penetration was investigated, and experimental and analytical studies of weld process variables have been undertaken to determine the effects of the variables upon weld penetration and configuration. A review of the results and analysis of these studies are presented

  3. A study on repainting strategies for treating moderately moving targets with proton pencil beam scanning at the new Gantry 2 at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenklusen, S M; Pedroni, E; Meer, D

    2010-01-01

    Treating moving targets using a scanning gantry for proton therapy is a promising but very challenging, not yet clinically demonstrated treatment modality. The interference of organ motion with the sequence of the beam delivery produces uncontrolled dose inhomogeneities within the target. One promising approach to overcome this difficulty is to increase the speed of scanning in order to apply the dose repeatedly (so-called repainting). To obtain sufficiently high scanning speeds a new, technologically improved gantry-Gantry 2-has been designed and is currently under construction at PSI. As there are many possible repainting strategies, the way repainting will be implemented on Gantry 2 will depend on the result of a careful analysis of the various treatment delivery strategies available. To achieve this aim, and prior to the start of experimental work with Gantry 2, simulations of dose distribution errors due to organ motion under various beam delivery strategies were investigated. The effects of motion on the dose distribution were studied for moderate motion amplitudes (5 mm) for spherical target volumes in a homogeneous medium and with homogeneous dose. In total over 200 000 dose distributions have been simulated and analyzed and selected results are discussed. From the obtained results we are confident to be able to treat moderately moving targets on Gantry 2 using repainted pencil-beam spot scanning. Continuous line scanning seems to be the most elegant solution; it provides higher repainting rates and produces superior results but is probably more difficult to realize. For larger motion amplitudes, continuous line scanning still shows good results, but we plan anyways to use a gating system for these cases, not only to reduce the inhomogeneity within the target volume but also to reduce safety margins.

  4. Kilovoltage Intrafraction Monitoring for Prostate Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy: First Clinical Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Jin Aun; Booth, Jeremy T.; Poulsen, Per R.; Fledelius, Walther; Worm, Esben Schjødt; Eade, Thomas; Hegi, Fiona; Kneebone, Andrew; Kuncic, Zdenka; Keall, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Most linear accelerators purchased today are equipped with a gantry-mounted kilovoltage X-ray imager which is typically used for patient imaging prior to therapy. A novel application of the X-ray system is kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring (KIM), in which the 3-dimensional (3D) tumor position is determined during treatment. In this paper, we report on the first use of KIM in a prospective clinical study of prostate cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT). Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients with implanted fiducial markers undergoing conventionally fractionated IMAT (RapidArc) were enrolled in an ethics-approved study of KIM. KIM involves acquiring kV images as the gantry rotates around the patient during treatment. Post-treatment, markers in these images were segmented to obtain 2D positions. From the 2D positions, a maximum likelihood estimation of a probability density function was used to obtain 3D prostate trajectories. The trajectories were analyzed to determine the motion type and the percentage of time the prostate was displaced ≥3, 5, 7, and 10 mm. Independent verification of KIM positional accuracy was performed using kV/MV triangulation. Results: KIM was performed for 268 fractions. Various prostate trajectories were observed (ie, continuous target drift, transient excursion, stable target position, persistent excursion, high-frequency excursions, and erratic behavior). For all patients, 3D displacements of ≥3, 5, 7, and 10 mm were observed 5.6%, 2.2%, 0.7% and 0.4% of the time, respectively. The average systematic accuracy of KIM was measured at 0.46 mm. Conclusions: KIM for prostate IMAT was successfully implemented clinically for the first time. Key advantages of this method are (1) submillimeter accuracy, (2) widespread applicability, and (3) a low barrier to clinical implementation. A disadvantage is that KIM delivers additional imaging dose to the patient.

  5. Commissioning and Acceptance Testing of the existing linear accelerator upgraded to volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadharajan, Ekambaram; Ramasubramanian, Velayudham

    2013-01-01

    Aim The RapidArc commissioning and Acceptance Testing program will test and ensure accuracy in DMLC position, precise dose-rate control during gantry rotation and accurate control of gantry speed. Background Recently, we have upgraded our linear accelerator capable of performing IMRT which was functional from 2007 with image guided RapidArc facility. The installation of VMAT in the existing linear accelerator is a tedious process which requires many quality assurance procedures before the proper commissioning of the facility and these procedures are discussed in this study. Materials and methods Output of the machine at different dose rates was measured to verify its consistency at different dose rates. Monitor and chamber linearity at different dose rates were checked. DMLC QA comprising of MLC transmission factor measurement and dosimetric leaf gap measurements were performed using 0.13 cm3 and 0.65 cm3 Farmer type ionization chamber, dose 1 dosimeter, and IAEA 30 cm × 30 cm × 30 cm water phantom. Picket fence test, garden fence test, tests to check leaf positioning accuracy due to carriage movement, calibration of the leaves, leaf speed stability effects due to the acceleration and deceleration of leaves, accuracy and calibration of leaves in producing complex fields, effects of interleaf friction, etc. were verified using EDR2 therapy films, Vidar scanner, Omnipro accept software, amorphous silicon based electronic portal imaging device and EPIQA software.1–8 Results All the DMLC related quality assurance tests were performed and evaluated by film dosimetry, portal dosimetry and EPIQA.7 Conclusion Results confirmed that the linear accelerator is capable of performing accurate VMAT. PMID:24416566

  6. Commissioning and Acceptance Testing of the existing linear accelerator upgraded to volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadharajan, Ekambaram; Ramasubramanian, Velayudham

    2013-01-01

    The RapidArc commissioning and Acceptance Testing program will test and ensure accuracy in DMLC position, precise dose-rate control during gantry rotation and accurate control of gantry speed. Recently, we have upgraded our linear accelerator capable of performing IMRT which was functional from 2007 with image guided RapidArc facility. The installation of VMAT in the existing linear accelerator is a tedious process which requires many quality assurance procedures before the proper commissioning of the facility and these procedures are discussed in this study. Output of the machine at different dose rates was measured to verify its consistency at different dose rates. Monitor and chamber linearity at different dose rates were checked. DMLC QA comprising of MLC transmission factor measurement and dosimetric leaf gap measurements were performed using 0.13 cm(3) and 0.65 cm(3) Farmer type ionization chamber, dose 1 dosimeter, and IAEA 30 cm × 30 cm × 30 cm water phantom. Picket fence test, garden fence test, tests to check leaf positioning accuracy due to carriage movement, calibration of the leaves, leaf speed stability effects due to the acceleration and deceleration of leaves, accuracy and calibration of leaves in producing complex fields, effects of interleaf friction, etc. were verified using EDR2 therapy films, Vidar scanner, Omnipro accept software, amorphous silicon based electronic portal imaging device and EPIQA software.(1-8.) All the DMLC related quality assurance tests were performed and evaluated by film dosimetry, portal dosimetry and EPIQA.(7.) Results confirmed that the linear accelerator is capable of performing accurate VMAT.

  7. The GLAaS algorithm for portal dosimetry and quality assurance of RapidArc, an intensity modulated rotational therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolini, Giorgia; Vanetti, Eugenio; Clivio, Alessandro; Fogliata, Antonella; Korreman, Stine; Bocanek, Jiri; Cozzi, Luca

    2008-01-01

    To expand and test the dosimetric procedure, known as GLAaS, for amorphous silicon detectors to the RapidArc intensity modulated arc delivery with Varian infrastructures and to test the RapidArc dosimetric reliability between calculation and delivery. The GLAaS algorithm was applied and tested on a set of RapidArc fields at both low (6 MV) and high (18 MV) beam energies with a PV-aS1000 detector. Pilot tests for short arcs were performed on a 6 MV beam associated to a PV-aS500. RapidArc is a novel planning and delivery method in the category of intensity modulated arc therapies aiming to deliver highly modulated plans with variable MLC shapes, dose rate and gantry speed during rotation. Tests were repeated for entire (360 degrees) gantry rotations on composite dose plans and for short partial arcs (of ~6 or 12 degrees) to assess GLAaS and RapidArc mutual relationships on global and fine delivery scales. The gamma index concept of Low and the Modulation Index concept of Webb were applied to compare quantitatively TPS dose matrices and dose converted PV images. The Gamma Agreement Index computed for a Distance to Agreement of 3 mm and a Dose Difference (ΔD) of 3% was, as mean ± 1 SD, 96.7 ± 1.2% at 6 MV and 94.9 ± 1.3% at 18 MV, over the field area. These findings deteriorated slightly is ΔD was reduced to 2% (93.4 ± 3.2% and 90.1 ± 3.1%, respectively) and improved with ΔD = 4% (98.3 ± 0.8% and 97.3 ± 0.9%, respectively). For all tests a grid of 1 mm and the AAA photon dose calculation algorithm were applied. The spatial resolution of the PV-aS1000 is 0.392 mm/pxl. The Modulation Index for calculations resulted 17.0 ± 3.2 at 6 MV and 15.3 ± 2.7 at 18 MV while the corresponding data for measurements were: 18.5 ± 3.7 and 17.5 ± 3.7. Partial arcs findings were (for ΔD = 3%): GAI = 96.7 ± 0.9% for 6° rotations and 98.0 ± 1.1% for 12° rotations. The GLAaS method can be considered as a valid Quality Assurance tool for the verification of RapidArc fields

  8. Arc fault detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, K.N.

    1999-05-18

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

  9. Arc fault detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Kamal N.

    1999-01-01

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

  10. The ARCS radial collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, M.B.; Abernathy, D.L.; Niedziela, J.L.; Overbay, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    We have designed, installed, and commissioned a scattered beam radial collimator for use at the ARCS Wide Angular Range Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source. The collimator has been designed to work effectively for thermal and epithermal neutrons and with a range of sample environments. Other design considerations include the accommodation of working within a high vacuum environment and having the ability to quickly install and remove the collimator from the scattered beam. The collimator is composed of collimating blades (or septa). The septa are 12 micron thick Kapton foils coated on each side with 39 microns of enriched boron carbide ( 10 B 4 C with 10 B > 96%) in an ultra-high vacuum compatible binder. The collimator blades represent an additional 22 m 2 of surface area. In the article we present collimator's design and performance and methodologies for its effective use

  11. ATLAS DDM integration in ARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrmann, G; Cameron, D; Ellert, M; Kleist, J; Taga, A

    2008-01-01

    The Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF) consists of Grid resources running ARC middleware in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. These resources serve many virtual organisations and contribute a large fraction of total worldwide resources for the ATLAS experiment, whose data is distributed and managed by the DQ2 software. Managing ATLAS data within NDGF and between NDGF and other Grids used by ATLAS (the Enabling Grids for E-sciencE Grid and the Open Science Grid) presents a unique challenge for several reasons. Firstly, the entry point for data, the Tier 1 centre, is physically distributed among heterogeneous resources in several countries and yet must present a single access point for all data stored within the centre. The middleware framework used in NDGF differs significantly from other Grids, specifically in the way that all data movement and registration is performed by services outside the worker node environment. Also, the service used for cataloging the location of data files is different from other Grids but must still be useable by DQ2 and ATLAS users to locate data within NDGF. This paper presents in detail how we solve these issues to allow seamless access worldwide to data within NDGF

  12. Alignment of the stanford linear collider Arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitthan, R.; Bell, B.; Friedsam, H.

    1987-01-01

    The alignment of the Arcs for the Stanford Linear Collider at SLAC has posed problems in accelerator survey and alignment not encountered before. These problems come less from the tight tolerances of 0.1 mm, although reaching such a tight statistically defined accuracy in a controlled manner is difficult enough, but from the absence of a common reference plane for the Arcs. Traditional circular accelerators, including HERA and LEP, have been designed in one plane referenced to local gravity. For the SLC Arcs no such single plane exists. Methods and concepts developed to solve these and other problems, connected with the unique design of SLC, range from the first use of satellites for accelerator alignment, use of electronic laser theodolites for placement of components, computer control of the manual adjustment process, complete automation of the data flow incorporating the most advanced concepts of geodesy, strict separation of survey and alignment, to linear principal component analysis for the final statistical smoothing of the mechanical components

  13. Plasma's sweeping arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichon, Max

    2010-01-01

    Full text: It is purely elemental, returning materials to their basic atoms through extreme heat and then recondensing them in useful ways. Plasma arc gasification is the latest advanced waste treatment (AWT)concept to hit our shores, courtesy of Zenergy Australia. According to its fans, plasma technology can eliminate all domestic waste to landfill and turn it into beneficial by-products. Japan has toyed with it for a decade, but the idea is now creating a bit of buzz, in the US in particular. Consultancy URS last year undertook a review of 16 advanced technologies for the City of Los Angeles and determined plasma arc gasification was one of the most promising. The Waste Management Association of Australia (VVMAA), however, is cautious - too many AWT projects here have failed to live up to their promises. Plasma arc gasification works on the same principle as a welding machine. An inert gas is passed through an electrical arc between two electrodes and becomes ionised (called plasma), reaching temperatures as high as 13,900°C. It is then injected into the plasma converter holding the waste. Zenergy is working with US technology company Plasma Waste Recycling (PWR), which says it can convert 80 per cent of waste to syngas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen that can be used to generate renewable electricity. The inorganic compounds in the waste come out as a solid, either molten metal to be cast as scrap steel or a slag that can be used as a building material aggregate or spun into mineral wool. “The plasma arc process is the next generation for AWT plants as there is no incineration involved, no fly ash, no bottom ash and nothing left to landfill,” said Zenergy Australia's Paul Prasad. He estimates a plant could convert up to 175,000 tonnes of household waste a year into energy or reusable by-products. Technically, it also gets around Australia's fears over incineration, though whether that is really the case in practice remains to be seen. Prasad says

  14. Electric fields and energetic particle precipitation in an auroral arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, T.; Bryant, D.A.; Smith, M.J.; Fahleson, U.; Faelthammer, C.G.; Pedersen, A.

    1975-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented from a rocket flight across a single discrete auroral arc extending from early evening to magnetic midnight. The rocket was fired at the end of the growth phase of an isolated auroral substorm. It carried a separating payload to make simultaneous measurements of electrons (0.6 - 25 keV, pitch angle 0 - 60 0 ) at two points. From the main vehicle measurements were also made of ions (same energy range) as well as of the electric field vector and plasma parameters. The electron spectra were hardest towards the centre of the arc, where the peak intensity was at 9.5 keV. The precipitation structure observed was similar to that of an 'inverted V' but on a smaller scale. The electric field was northward south of the arc, southward within the arc and somewhat north of it, then again northward. At the northern edge of the precipitation region the field was very irregular. The field strength reached a maximum of about 50 mV/m some distance north of the arc. The line integral of the electric field across the arc was of the order of a kilovolt, too small to be responsible for the changes observed in the electron energy spectrum. An electric potential distribution, consistent with the results obtained, is present. (Auth.)

  15. Delivery quality assurance with ArcCHECK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilson, Christopher; Klein, Michael; Barnett, Rob; Yartsev, Slav

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy requires delivery quality assurance (DQA) to ensure that treatment is accurate and closely follows the plan. We report our experience with the ArcCHECK phantom and investigate its potential optimization for the DQA process. One-hundred seventy DQA plans from 84 patients were studied. Plans were classified into 2 groups: those with the target situated on the diodes of the ArcCHECK (D plans) and those with the target situated at the center (C plans). Gamma pass rates for 8 target sites were examined. The parameters used to analyze the data included 3%/3 mm with the Van Dyk percent difference criteria (VD) on, 3%/3 mm with the VD off, 2%/2 mm with the VD on, and x/3 mm with the VD on and the percentage dosimetric agreement “x” for diode plans adjusted. D plans typically displayed maximum planned dose (MPD) on the cylindrical surface containing ArcCHECK diodes than center plans, resulting in inflated gamma pass rates. When this was taken into account by adjusting the percentage dosimetric agreement, C plans outperformed D plans by an average of 3.5%. ArcCHECK can streamline the DQA process, consuming less time and resources than radiographic films. It is unnecessary to generate 2 DQA plans for each patient; a single center plan will suffice. Six of 8 target sites consistently displayed pass rates well within our acceptance criteria; the lesser performance of head and neck and spinal sites can be attributed to marginally lower doses and increased high gradient of plans

  16. Effect of process parameters on temperature distribution in twin-electrode TIG coupling arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangjun; Xiong, Jun; Gao, Hongming; Wu, Lin

    2012-10-01

    The twin-electrode TIG coupling arc is a new type of welding heat source, which is generated in a single welding torch that has two tungsten electrodes insulated from each other. This paper aims at determining the distribution of temperature for the coupling arc using the Fowler-Milne method under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium. The influences of welding current, arc length, and distance between both electrode tips on temperature distribution of the coupling arc were analyzed. Based on the results, a better understanding of the twin-electrode TIG welding process was obtained.

  17. The arc power supply for the TEXTOR neutral injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, U.; Pfister, U.; Goll, O.; Wurslin, R.; Scherer, J.; Haubmann, S.

    1986-01-01

    The 24 single arcs in the plasma source of the TEXTOR neutral injector are supplied with an overall current of 1800 A at an arc voltage of 150 V DC. The current is switched on and off in less than 1 msec. The paper presents a new modular solution for such a power supply. Each arc is powered by a separately switched mode supply module. One single module consists of a diode rectifier bridge with a filter, a fast semiconductor switch, an inductance in series for stabilizing the current and a free-wheeling path. The layout of this power supply system is described in detail based on test results. Design features and technical data are given

  18. Numerical analysis of the heat source characteristics of a two-electrode TIG arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, Y; Hirata, Y; Nomura, K

    2011-01-01

    Various kinds of multi-electrode welding processes are used to ensure high productivity in industrial fields such as shipbuilding, automotive manufacturing and pipe fabrication. However, it is difficult to obtain the optimum welding conditions for a specific product, because there are many operating parameters, and because welding phenomena are very complicated. In the present research, the heat source characteristics of a two-electrode TIG arc were numerically investigated using a 3D arc plasma model with a focus on the distance between the two electrodes. The arc plasma shape changed significantly, depending on the electrode spacing. The heat source characteristics, such as the heat input density and the arc pressure distribution, changed significantly when the electrode separation was varied. The maximum arc pressure of the two-electrode TIG arc was much lower than that of a single-electrode TIG. However, the total heat input of the two-electrode TIG arc was nearly constant and was independent of the electrode spacing. These heat source characteristics of the two-electrode TIG arc are useful for controlling the heat input distribution at a low arc pressure. Therefore, these results indicate the possibility of a heat source based on a two-electrode TIG arc that is capable of high heat input at low pressures.

  19. Arc plasma incineration of surrogate radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girold, C.; Cartier, R.; Taupiac, J.P.; Vandensteendam, C.; Baronnet, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this presentation is to demonstrate the feasibility to substitute a single plasma reactor, where the arc is transferred on a melt glass bath, for several steps in an existing nuclear technological wastes incinerator. The incineration of wastes, the produced gas treatment and the vitrification of ashes issued from waste incineration are the three simultaneous functions of this new kind of reactor. The three steps of the work are described: first, post-combustion in an oxygen plasma of gases generated from the waste pyrolysis, then, vitrification of ashes from the calcination of wastes in the transferred plasma furnace and finally, incineration/vitrification of wastes in the same furnace

  20. Preliminary results for positron emission mammography: real-time functional breast imaging in a conventional mammography gantry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, I.; Majewski, S.; Weisenberger, A.; Markowitz, A.; Aloj, L.; Majewski, L,; Danforth, D.; Mulshine, J.; Cowan, K.; Zujewski, J.; Chow, C.; Jones, E.; Chang, V.; Berg, W.; Frank, J.

    1996-01-01

    In order to optimally integrate radiotracer breast imaging within the breast clinic, anatomy and pathology should be easily correlated with functional nuclear medicine breast images. As a first step in the development of a hybrid functional/anatomic breast imaging platform with biopsy capability, a conventional X-ray mammography gantry was modified to image the compressed brest with positron emitters. Phantom studies with the positron emission mammography (PEM) device showed that a 1-cc hot spot could be detected within 5 min. A preliminary clinical trial demonstrated in vivo visualization of primary breast cancer within 4 min. For sites where positron-emitting radionuclides are available, PEM promises to achieve low-cost directed functional examination of breast abnormalities, with potential for achieving X-ray correlation and image-guided biopsy. (orig.)

  1. On arc efficiency in gas tungsten arc welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Stenbacka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to review the literature on published arc efficiency values for GTAW and, if possible, propose a narrower band. Articles between the years 1955 - 2011 have been found. Published arc efficiency values for GTAW DCEN show to lie on a wide range, between 0.36 to 0.90. Only a few studies covered DCEP - direct current electrode positive and AC current. Specific information about the reproducibility in calorimetric studies as well as in modeling and simulation studies (considering that both random and systematic errors are small was scarce. An estimate of the average arc efficiency value for GTAW DCEN indicates that it should be about 0.77. It indicates anyway that the GTAW process with DCEN is an efficient welding method. The arc efficiency is reduced when the arc length is increased. On the other hand, there are conflicting results in the literature as to the influence of arc current and travel speed.

  2. Compositional Variations of Paleogene and Neogene Tephra From the Northern Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepley, F. J., III; Barth, A. P.; Brandl, P. A.; Hickey-Vargas, R.; Jiang, F.; Kanayama, K.; Kusano, Y.; Li, H.; Marsaglia, K. M.; McCarthy, A.; Meffre, S.; Savov, I. P.; Yogodzinski, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    A primary objective of IODP Expedition 351 was to evaluate arc initiation processes of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) volcanic arc and its compositional evolution through time. To this end, a single thick section of sediment overlying oceanic crust was cored in the Amami Sankaku Basin where a complete sediment record of arc inception and evolution is preserved. This sediment record includes ash and pyroclasts, deposited in fore-arc, arc, and back-arc settings, likely associated with both the ~49-25 Ma emergent IBM volcanic arc and the evolving Ryukyu-Kyushu volcanic arc. Our goal was to assess the major element evolution of the nascent and evolving IBM system using the temporally constrained record of the early and developing system. In all, more than 100 ash and tuff layers, and pyroclastic fragments were selected from temporally resolved portions of the core, and from representative fractions of the overall core ("core catcher"). The samples were prepared to determine major and minor element compositions via electron microprobe analyses. This ash and pyroclast record will allow us to 1) resolve the Paleogene evolutionary history of the northern IBM arc in greater detail; 2) determine compositional variations of this portion of the IBM arc through time; 3) compare the acquired data to an extensive whole rock and tephra dataset from other segments of the IBM arc; 4) test hypotheses of northern IBM arc evolution and the involvement of different source reservoirs; and 5) mark important stratigraphic markers associated with the Neogene volcanic history of the adjacent evolving Ryukyu-Kyushu arc.

  3. Electric arc radius and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, T.M.

    1980-01-01

    The heat transfer equation of an arc discharge has been solved. The arc is assumed to be a cylinder with negligible axial variation and the dominant heat transfer process is conduction radially inside the column and radiation/convection at the outside edge. The symmetric consideration allows a simple one-dimensional formulation. By taking into account proper variation of the electrical conductivity as function of temperature, the heat balance equation has been solved analytically. The radius of the arc and its current-field characteristics have also been obtained. The conventional results that E approx. I 0 5385 and R approx. I 0 7693 with E being the applied field, I the current, and R the radius of the cylindrical arc, have been proved to be simply limiting cases of our more general characteristics. The results can be applied quite widely including, among others, the neutral beam injection project in nuclear fusion and MHD energy conversion

  4. PC-based arc ignition and arc length control system for gas tungsten arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.; Cook, G.E.; Barnett, R.J.; Springfield, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, a PC-based digital control system for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) is presented. This system controls the arc ignition process, the arc length, and the process of welding termination. A DT2818 made by Data Translation is used for interface and A/D and D/A conversions. The digital I/O ports of the DT2818 are used for control of wirefeed, shield gas, cooling water, welding power supply, etc. The DT2818 is housed in a PC. The welding signals and status are displayed on the screen for in-process monitoring. A user can control the welding process by the keyboard

  5. Arc modeling for welding analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glickstein, S.S.

    1978-04-01

    A one-dimensional model of the welding arc that considers heat generation by the Joule effect and heat losses by radiation and conduction has been used to study the effects of various gases and gas mixtures currently employed for welding applications. Minor additions of low ionization potential impurities to these gases are shown to significantly perturb the electrical properties of the parent gas causing gross changes in the radial temperature distribution of the arc discharge. Such changes are reflected in the current density distribution and ultimately in the input energy distribution to the weldment. The result is observed as a variation in weld penetration. Recently published experiments and analyses of welding arcs are also evaluated and shown to contain erroneous data and results. Contrary to previous beliefs, the inclusion of a radiation loss term in the basic energy balance equation is important and cannot be considered as negligible in an argon arc at temperatures as low as 10,000 0 K. The one-dimensional analysis of the welding arc as well as the evaluation of these earlier published reports helps to explain the effects of various gases used for welding, improves our understanding of the physics of the welding arc, and provides a stepping stone for a more elaborate model which can be applied to help optimize welding parameters

  6. Thermal motion of carbon clusters and production of carbon nanotubes by gravity-free arc discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieno, T.; Takeguchi, M.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal and diffusion properties of hot gas around a dc arc discharge under a gravity-free condition are investigated using a jet plane in order to improve the arc production of carbon clusters. Spherically symmetric temperature distribution of He gas around the arc plasma and monotonic slow expansion of the high-temperature region are observed. By means of the passive-type Mie scattering method, random slow diffusion of carbon clusters around the arc plasma is clearly observed under the gravity-free condition. This indicates that carbon clusters including single-walled carbon nanotubes are synthesized around the arc plasma where the He temperature is higher than 1000 K. It is confirmed that large bundles of fatter single-walled carbon nanotubes are produced under the gravity-free condition

  7. Volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivekanandan, Nagarajan; Sriram, Padmanaban; Syam Kumar, S.A.; Bhuvaneswari, Narayanan; Saranya, Kamalakannan

    2012-01-01

    A treatment planning study was performed to evaluate the performance of volumetric arc modulation with RapidArc (RA) against 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques for esophageal cancer. Computed tomgraphy scans of 10 patients were included in the study. 3D-CRT, 4-field IMRT, and single-arc and double-arc RA plans were generated with the aim to spare organs at risk (OAR) and healthy tissue while enforcing highly conformal target coverage. The planning objective was to deliver 54 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) in 30 fractions. Plans were evaluated based on target conformity and dose-volume histograms of organs at risk (lung, spinal cord, and heart). The monitor unit (MU) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated to measure the treatment efficiency. The IMRT plan improves target conformity and spares OAR when compared with 3D-CRT. Target conformity improved with RA plans compared with IMRT. The mean lung dose was similar in all techniques. However, RA plans showed a reduction in the volume of the lung irradiated at V 20Gy and V 30Gy dose levels (range, 4.62–17.98%) compared with IMRT plans. The mean dose and D 35% of heart for the RA plans were better than the IMRT by 0.5–5.8%. Mean V 10Gy and integral dose to healthy tissue were almost similar in all techniques. But RA plans resulted in a reduced low-level dose bath (15–20 Gy) in the range of 14–16% compared with IMRT plans. The average MU needed to deliver the prescribed dose by RA technique was reduced by 20–25% compared with IMRT technique. The preliminary study on RA for esophageal cancers showed improvements in sparing OAR and healthy tissue with reduced beam-on time, whereas only double-arc RA offered improved target coverage compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT plans.

  8. Dosimetric evaluation of the interplay effect in respiratory-gated RapidArc radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, Craig; Yang, Yong; Li, Tianfang; Zhang, Yongqian; Heron, Dwight E.; Huq, M. Saiful

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with gating capability has had increasing adoption in many clinics in the United States. In this new technique, dose rate, gantry rotation speed, and the leaf motion speed of multileaf collimators (MLCs) are modulated dynamically during gated beam delivery to achieve highly conformal dose coverage of the target and normal tissue sparing. Compared with the traditional gated intensity-modulated radiation therapy technique, this complicated beam delivery technique may result in larger dose errors due to the intrafraction tumor motion. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the dosimetric influence of the interplay effect for the respiration-gated VMAT technique (RapidArc, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Our work consisted of two parts: (1) Investigate the interplay effect for different target residual errors during gated RapidArc delivery using a one-dimensional moving phantom capable of producing stable sinusoidal movement; (2) Evaluate the dosimetric influence in ten clinical patients’ treatment plans using a moving phantom driven with a patient-specific respiratory curve. Methods: For the first part of this study, four plans were created with a spherical target for varying residual motion of 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 cm. Appropriate gating windows were applied for each. The dosimetric effect was evaluated using EDR2 film by comparing the gated delivery with static delivery. For the second part of the project, ten gated lung stereotactic body radiotherapy cases were selected and reoptimized to be delivered by the gated RapidArc technique. These plans were delivered to a phantom, and again the gated treatments were compared to static deliveries by the same methods. Results: For regular sinusoidal motion, the dose delivered to the target was not substantially affected by the gating windows when evaluated with the gamma statistics, suggesting the interplay effect has a small role in respiratory-gated RapidArc

  9. Dosimetric evaluation of the interplay effect in respiratory-gated RapidArc radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Craig; Yang, Yong; Li, Tianfang; Zhang, Yongqian; Heron, Dwight E; Huq, M Saiful

    2014-01-01

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with gating capability has had increasing adoption in many clinics in the United States. In this new technique, dose rate, gantry rotation speed, and the leaf motion speed of multileaf collimators (MLCs) are modulated dynamically during gated beam delivery to achieve highly conformal dose coverage of the target and normal tissue sparing. Compared with the traditional gated intensity-modulated radiation therapy technique, this complicated beam delivery technique may result in larger dose errors due to the intrafraction tumor motion. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the dosimetric influence of the interplay effect for the respiration-gated VMAT technique (RapidArc, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Our work consisted of two parts: (1) Investigate the interplay effect for different target residual errors during gated RapidArc delivery using a one-dimensional moving phantom capable of producing stable sinusoidal movement; (2) Evaluate the dosimetric influence in ten clinical patients' treatment plans using a moving phantom driven with a patient-specific respiratory curve. For the first part of this study, four plans were created with a spherical target for varying residual motion of 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 cm. Appropriate gating windows were applied for each. The dosimetric effect was evaluated using EDR2 film by comparing the gated delivery with static delivery. For the second part of the project, ten gated lung stereotactic body radiotherapy cases were selected and reoptimized to be delivered by the gated RapidArc technique. These plans were delivered to a phantom, and again the gated treatments were compared to static deliveries by the same methods. For regular sinusoidal motion, the dose delivered to the target was not substantially affected by the gating windows when evaluated with the gamma statistics, suggesting the interplay effect has a small role in respiratory-gated RapidArc therapy. Varied results were

  10. Stable synthesis of few-layered boron nitride nanotubes by anodic arc discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yao-Wen; Raitses, Yevgeny; Koel, Bruce E; Yao, Nan

    2017-06-08

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) were successfully synthesized by a dc arc discharge using a boron-rich anode as synthesis feedstock in a nitrogen gas environment at near atmospheric pressure. The synthesis was achieved independent of the cathode material suggesting that under such conditions the arc operates in so-called anodic mode with the anode material being consumed by evaporation due to the arc heating. To sustain the arc current by thermionic electron emission, the cathode has to be at sufficiently high temperature, which for a typical arc current density of ~100 A/cm 2 , is above the boron melting point (2350 K). With both electrodes made from the same boron-rich alloy, we found that the arc operation unstable due to frequent sticking between two molten electrodes and formation of molten droplets. Stable and reliable arc operation and arc synthesis were achieved with the boron-rich anode and the cathode made from a refractory metal which has a melting temperature above the melting point of boron. Ex-situ characterization of synthesized BNNTs with electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy revealed that independent of the cathode material, the tubes are primarily single and double walled. The results also show evidence of root-growth of BNNTs produced in the arc discharge.

  11. The Arabidopsis arc5 and arc6 mutations differentially affect plastid morphology in pavement and guard cells in the leaf epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Makoto T; Yasuzawa, Mana; Kojo, Kei H; Niwa, Yasuo; Abe, Tomoko; Yoshida, Shigeo; Nakano, Takeshi; Itoh, Ryuuichi D

    2018-01-01

    of epidermal plastids, and indicate that dysfunctions in ARC5 and ARC6 differentially affect plastid replication among mesophyll cells, PCs, and GCs within a single leaf.

  12. Physically based arc-circuit interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong-Lie, L.

    1984-01-01

    An integral arc model is extended to study the interaction of the gas blast arc with the test circuit in this paper. The deformation in the waveshapes of arc current and voltage around the current zero has been formulated to first approximation by using a simple model of arc voltage based on the arc core energy conservation. By supplementing with the time scale for the radiation, the time rates of arc processes were amended. Both the contributions of various arc processes and the influence of circuit parameters to the arc-circuit interaction have been estimated by this theory. Analysis generated a new method of calculating test circuit parameters which improves the accurate simulation of arc-circuit interaction. The new method agrees with the published experimental results

  13. Ecton mechanism of ion flow generation in vacuum arc

    CERN Document Server

    Mesyats, G A

    2001-01-01

    The basic characteristics of cathode plasma generation in vacuum arc (ion erosion, ion average charge) were studied from the point of an ecton model of a cathode spot in vacuum arc. The estimates of ion parameters obtained for a single cell of a cathode spot show qualitative conformity with the experimental data. One introduces the following mechanism of cathode plasma generation in vacuum arc. In case of explosion-like destruction of a cathode segment under the effect of the Joule heating the cathode matter changes sequentially its state: condensed one, nonideal and ideal plasma ones. During this change one observes formation of plasma charge composition and ion acceleration under the effect of plasma pressure gradient

  14. Motion as perturbation. II. Development of the method for dosimetric analysis of motion effects with fixed-gantry IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelms, Benjamin E. [Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States); Opp, Daniel; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir, E-mail: vladimir.feygelman@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In this work, the feasibility of implementing a motion-perturbation approach to accurately estimate volumetric dose in the presence of organ motion—previously demonstrated for VMAT-–is studied for static gantry IMRT. The method's accuracy is improved for the voxels that have very low planned dose but acquire appreciable dose due to motion. The study describes the modified algorithm and its experimental validation and provides an example of a clinical application. Methods: A contoured region-of-interest is propagated according to the predefined motion kernel throughout time-resolved 4D phantom dose grids. This timed series of 3D dose grids is produced by the measurement-guided dose reconstruction algorithm, based on an irradiation of a staticARCCHECK (AC) helical dosimeter array (Sun Nuclear Corp., Melbourne, FL). Each moving voxel collects dose over the dynamic simulation. The difference in dose-to-moving voxel vs dose-to-static voxel in-phantom forms the basis of a motion perturbation correction that is applied to the corresponding voxel in the patient dataset. A new method to synchronize the accelerator and dosimeter clocks, applicable to fixed-gantry IMRT, was developed. Refinements to the algorithm account for the excursion of low dose voxels into high dose regions, causing appreciable dose increase due to motion (LDVE correction). For experimental validation, four plans using TG-119 structure sets and objectives were produced using segmented IMRT direct machine parameters optimization in Pinnacle treatment planning system (v. 9.6, Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, WI). All beams were delivered with the gantry angle of 0°. Each beam was delivered three times: (1) to the static AC centered on the room lasers; (2) to a static phantom containing a MAPCHECK2 (MC2) planar diode array dosimeter (Sun Nuclear); and (3) to the moving MC2 phantom. The motion trajectory was an ellipse in the IEC XY plane, with 3 and 1.5 cm axes. The period

  15. Geometrical and electromagnetic effects on arc propagation in a railplug ignitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekici, O; Matthews, R D; Ezekoye, O A [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-106 (United States)

    2007-12-21

    Three-dimensional simulation of arc motion is presented for conditions representative of those for a railplug ignitor. A railplug ignitor is a miniature rail-gun used to deliver an arc ignition source for internal combustion engine applications. Computations explored the influence of the railplug geometry, effects of an external magnetic field, and impact of the circuit current on arc velocity. One underlying question about arc motion in railplug systems has been the influence of the expansion velocity associated with energy deposition on arc motion. A single open end muzzle would result in higher velocities if the expansion effects are dominant. This was tested by simulating two types of geometries, single open end and double open end muzzles. The double open end configuration was shown to have faster arc propagation velocities. A discussion of the mechanisms is presented. A simple scaling analysis was found to explain the increased arc propagation velocity associated with application of an external magnetic field. Increasing the circuit current was found to increase the final arc propagation velocity, although the early time velocities were slower for larger currents.

  16. Geometrical and electromagnetic effects on arc propagation in a railplug ignitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekici, O; Matthews, R D; Ezekoye, O A

    2007-01-01

    Three-dimensional simulation of arc motion is presented for conditions representative of those for a railplug ignitor. A railplug ignitor is a miniature rail-gun used to deliver an arc ignition source for internal combustion engine applications. Computations explored the influence of the railplug geometry, effects of an external magnetic field, and impact of the circuit current on arc velocity. One underlying question about arc motion in railplug systems has been the influence of the expansion velocity associated with energy deposition on arc motion. A single open end muzzle would result in higher velocities if the expansion effects are dominant. This was tested by simulating two types of geometries, single open end and double open end muzzles. The double open end configuration was shown to have faster arc propagation velocities. A discussion of the mechanisms is presented. A simple scaling analysis was found to explain the increased arc propagation velocity associated with application of an external magnetic field. Increasing the circuit current was found to increase the final arc propagation velocity, although the early time velocities were slower for larger currents

  17. Deviations from excitation equilibrium in optically thick mercury arc plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karabourniotis, D.; Couris, S.; Damelincourt, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    Up to date mercury arcs at pressure greater than 1 atm have been investigated as plasma systems in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) state. These studies have been motivated by the applications of mercury arcs, e.g., in the lighting industry. The LTE-assumption simplifies the use of spectroscopic diagnostics and the performance of species-concentration calculations. A high pressure mercury arc of about 1 atm had been considered in two possibilities: excitation and gas temperatures are the same, the electron temperature is higher and excitation and electron temperatures are the same, the gas temperature is lower. Recent measurements in mercury arcs reveal the existence of severe departures from thermal equilibrium and suggest the absence of excitation equilibrium in the axis and in the periphery in such an arc. The deviation from equilibrium leads to complicated distributions, such that the system cannot be described correctly by any single temperature. This becomes quite complicated when plasma inhomogeneity and strong reabsorption of the radiation are present

  18. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-01: Radiosurgery of Multiple Brain Metastases with Single-Isocenter VMAT: Optimizing Treatment Geometry to Reduce Normal Brain Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Q; Snyder, K; Liu, C; Huang, Y; Li, H; Chetty, I; Wen, N

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an optimization algorithm to reduce normal brain dose by optimizing couch and collimator angles for single isocenter multiple targets treatment of stereotactic radiosurgery. Methods: Three metastatic brain lesions were retrospectively planned using single-isocenter volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Three matrices were developed to calculate the projection of each lesion on Beam’s Eye View (BEV) by the rotating couch, collimator and gantry respectively. The island blocking problem was addressed by computing the total area of open space between any two lesions with shared MLC leaf pairs. The couch and collimator angles resulting in the smallest open areas were the optimized angles for each treatment arc. Two treatment plans with and without couch and collimator angle optimization were developed using the same objective functions and to achieve 99% of each target volume receiving full prescription dose of 18Gy. Plan quality was evaluated by calculating each target’s Conformity Index (CI), Gradient Index (GI), and Homogeneity index (HI), and absolute volume of normal brain V8Gy, V10Gy, V12Gy, and V14Gy. Results: Using the new couch/collimator optimization strategy, dose to normal brain tissue was reduced substantially. V8, V10, V12, and V14 decreased by 2.3%, 3.6%, 3.5%, and 6%, respectively. There were no significant differences in the conformity index, gradient index, and homogeneity index between two treatment plans with and without the new optimization algorithm. Conclusion: We have developed a solution to the island blocking problem in delivering radiation to multiple brain metastases with shared isocenter. Significant reduction in dose to normal brain was achieved by using optimal couch and collimator angles that minimize total area of open space between any of the two lesions with shared MLC leaf pairs. This technique has been integrated into Eclipse treatment system using scripting API

  19. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-01: Radiosurgery of Multiple Brain Metastases with Single-Isocenter VMAT: Optimizing Treatment Geometry to Reduce Normal Brain Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Snyder, K; Liu, C; Huang, Y; Li, H; Chetty, I; Wen, N [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an optimization algorithm to reduce normal brain dose by optimizing couch and collimator angles for single isocenter multiple targets treatment of stereotactic radiosurgery. Methods: Three metastatic brain lesions were retrospectively planned using single-isocenter volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Three matrices were developed to calculate the projection of each lesion on Beam’s Eye View (BEV) by the rotating couch, collimator and gantry respectively. The island blocking problem was addressed by computing the total area of open space between any two lesions with shared MLC leaf pairs. The couch and collimator angles resulting in the smallest open areas were the optimized angles for each treatment arc. Two treatment plans with and without couch and collimator angle optimization were developed using the same objective functions and to achieve 99% of each target volume receiving full prescription dose of 18Gy. Plan quality was evaluated by calculating each target’s Conformity Index (CI), Gradient Index (GI), and Homogeneity index (HI), and absolute volume of normal brain V8Gy, V10Gy, V12Gy, and V14Gy. Results: Using the new couch/collimator optimization strategy, dose to normal brain tissue was reduced substantially. V8, V10, V12, and V14 decreased by 2.3%, 3.6%, 3.5%, and 6%, respectively. There were no significant differences in the conformity index, gradient index, and homogeneity index between two treatment plans with and without the new optimization algorithm. Conclusion: We have developed a solution to the island blocking problem in delivering radiation to multiple brain metastases with shared isocenter. Significant reduction in dose to normal brain was achieved by using optimal couch and collimator angles that minimize total area of open space between any of the two lesions with shared MLC leaf pairs. This technique has been integrated into Eclipse treatment system using scripting API.

  20. A class solution for RapidArc prostate planning with simultaneous integrated boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolly, David; Alahakone, D.; Meyer, J.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Standardised treatment planning procedures make the planning process for rotational IMRT more efficient and consistent. This may be achieved by applying the same planning strategy, or class solution, for each patient. In doing so it may be possible to achieve acceptable plans for each patient within a relatively short timeframe, whilst time consuming individual optimisation of the planning parameters can be avoided. Methods Tn this work, a robust and streamlined planning strategy is established with an emphasis on treating prostate patients with a simultaneous integrated boost RapidArc plan. This planning strategy outlines the field set up, recommended starting objectives, required user interactions to be made throughout optimisation and post optimisation adjustments. A comparative planning study-with static gantry IMRT -is then presented for ten prostate patients as justification for the planning strategy itself. Results A variety of parameters are evaluated relating to both the planning itself and the plans that result. Results of this comparative study are in line with previously published data and the planning process is streamlined to a point where the RapidArc optimisation and calculation time is 16.7 1.5 min collectively. Discussion and Conclusion Application of this planning strategy reduces the dependence of the produced plan on the experience of the planner and has the potential to streamline the planning process within radiotherapy departments. Modified applications of the strategy have also proved to be useful for the planning of other treatment sites.

  1. Reassessment of the Necessity of the Proton Gantry: Analysis of Beam Orientations From 4332 Treatments at the Massachusetts General Hospital Proton Center Over the Past 10 Years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Susu, E-mail: syan5@mgh.harvard.edu; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Flanz, Jay; Adams, Judith; Trofimov, Alexei; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the beam approaches used in gantry-based proton treatments, and to reassess the practical advantages of the gantry, compared with beam approaches that are achievable without a gantry, in the context of present-day technology. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the proton therapy plans of 4332 patients treated on gantries at our hospital, delivered by the double scattering technique (n=4228) and, more recently, pencil beam scanning (PBS) (n=104). Beam approaches, relative to the patient frame, were analyzed individually to identify cases that could be treated without a gantry. Three treatment configurations were considered, with the patient in lying position, sitting position, or both. The FIXED geometry includes a fixed horizontal portal. The BEND geometry enables a limited vertical inflection of the beam by up to 20°. The MOVE geometry allows for flexibility of the patient head and body setup. Results: The percentage of patients with head and neck tumors that could be treated without a gantry using double scattering was 44% in FIXED, 70% in 20° BEND, and 100% in 90° MOVE. For torso regions, 99% of patients could be treated in 20° BEND. Of 104 PBS treatments, all but 1 could be reproduced with FIXED geometry. The only exception would require a 10° BEND capability. Note here that the PBS treatments were applied to select anatomic sites, including only 2 patients with skull-base tumors. Conclusions: The majority of practical beam approaches can be realized with gantry-less delivery, aided by limited beam bending and patient movements. Practical limitations of the MOVE geometry, and treatments requiring a combination of lying and sitting positions, may lower the percentage of head and neck patients who could be treated without a gantry. Further investigation into planning, immobilization, and imaging is needed to remove the practical limitations and to facilitate proton treatment without a gantry.

  2. Arcing phenomena in fusion devices workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausing, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The workshop on arcing phenomena in fusion devices was organized (1) to review the pesent status of our understanding of arcing as it relates to confinement devices, (2) to determine what informaion is needed to suppress arcing and (3) to define both laboratory and in-situ experiments which can ultimately lead to reduction of impurities in the plasma caused by arcing. The workshop was attended by experts in the area of vacuum arc electrode phenomena and ion source technology, materials scientists, and both theoreticians and experimentalists engaged in assessing the importance of unipolar arcing in today's tokamaks. Abstracts for papers presented at the workshop are included

  3. Equilibrium motion of quict auroral arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyatskij, V.B.; Leont'ev, S.V.

    1981-01-01

    Ionospheric plasma convection across auroral arc is investigated. It is shown that the existence of plasma area of increased concentration adjoining arc results not only from the arc but also is a factor supporting its existence. Under stable conditions the arc and plasma zone connected to it will move at a velocity different from a velocity of plasma convection. Arc velocity will be higher or lower as compared with convection velocity depending on arc orientation relative to an external electric field. At that the plasma zone is located either in front of or behind aurora polaris [ru

  4. A light-weight compact proton gantry design with a novel dose delivery system for broad-energetic laser-accelerated beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, U; Cowan, T E; Enghardt, W; Hofmann, K M; Karsch, L; Kroll, F; Schramm, U; Wilkens, J J; Pawelke, J

    2017-07-07

    Proton beams may provide superior dose-conformity in radiation therapy. However, the large sizes and costs limit the widespread use of proton therapy (PT). The recent progress in proton acceleration via high-power laser systems has made it a compelling alternative to conventional accelerators, as it could potentially reduce the overall size and cost of the PT facilities. However, the laser-accelerated beams exhibit different characteristics than conventionally accelerated beams, i.e. very intense proton bunches with large divergences and broad-energy spectra. For the application of laser-driven beams in PT, new solutions for beam transport, such as beam capture, integrated energy selection, beam shaping and delivery systems are required due to the specific beam parameters. The generation of these beams are limited by the low repetition rate of high-power lasers and this limitation would require alternative solutions for tumour irradiation which can efficiently utilize the available high proton fluence and broad-energy spectra per proton bunch to keep treatment times short. This demands new dose delivery system and irradiation field formation schemes. In this paper, we present a multi-functional light-weight and compact proton gantry design for laser-driven sources based on iron-less pulsed high-field magnets. This achromatic design includes improved beam capturing and energy selection systems, with a novel beam shaping and dose delivery system, so-called ELPIS. ELPIS system utilizes magnetic fields, instead of physical scatterers, for broadening the spot-size of broad-energetic beams while capable of simultaneously scanning them in lateral directions. To investigate the clinical feasibility of this gantry design, we conducted a treatment planning study with a 3D treatment planning system augmented for the pulsed beams with optimizable broad-energetic widths and selectable beam spot sizes. High quality treatment plans could be achieved with such unconventional beam

  5. A light-weight compact proton gantry design with a novel dose delivery system for broad-energetic laser-accelerated beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, U.; Cowan, T. E.; Enghardt, W.; Hofmann, K. M.; Karsch, L.; Kroll, F.; Schramm, U.; Wilkens, J. J.; Pawelke, J.

    2017-07-01

    Proton beams may provide superior dose-conformity in radiation therapy. However, the large sizes and costs limit the widespread use of proton therapy (PT). The recent progress in proton acceleration via high-power laser systems has made it a compelling alternative to conventional accelerators, as it could potentially reduce the overall size and cost of the PT facilities. However, the laser-accelerated beams exhibit different characteristics than conventionally accelerated beams, i.e. very intense proton bunches with large divergences and broad-energy spectra. For the application of laser-driven beams in PT, new solutions for beam transport, such as beam capture, integrated energy selection, beam shaping and delivery systems are required due to the specific beam parameters. The generation of these beams are limited by the low repetition rate of high-power lasers and this limitation would require alternative solutions for tumour irradiation which can efficiently utilize the available high proton fluence and broad-energy spectra per proton bunch to keep treatment times short. This demands new dose delivery system and irradiation field formation schemes. In this paper, we present a multi-functional light-weight and compact proton gantry design for laser-driven sources based on iron-less pulsed high-field magnets. This achromatic design includes improved beam capturing and energy selection systems, with a novel beam shaping and dose delivery system, so-called ELPIS. ELPIS system utilizes magnetic fields, instead of physical scatterers, for broadening the spot-size of broad-energetic beams while capable of simultaneously scanning them in lateral directions. To investigate the clinical feasibility of this gantry design, we conducted a treatment planning study with a 3D treatment planning system augmented for the pulsed beams with optimizable broad-energetic widths and selectable beam spot sizes. High quality treatment plans could be achieved with such unconventional beam

  6. Principles of arc flash protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirschmann, R. B.

    2003-04-01

    Recent developments in NFPA 70E, the electrical safety standards in the United States and Canada, designed to provide for a safe industrial work environment, are discussed. The emphasis in this instance is on arc explosions. Development of an arc flash protective program is discussed under various major components of an electrical safety program. These are: appropriate qualifications and training for workers, safe work practices, appropriate hazard assessment practices for any task exceeding 50V where there is the potential of an arc flash accident, flash protection equipment commensurate with the hazard associated with the task to be performed, layering in protective clothing over all body surfaces, and strict adherence to rules regarding use of safety garments and equipment.

  7. Magnetically enhanced vacuum arc thruster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keidar, Michael; Schein, Jochen; Wilson, Kristi; Gerhan, Andrew; Au, Michael; Tang, Benjamin; Idzkowski, Luke; Krishnan, Mahadevan; Beilis, Isak I

    2005-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model of the vacuum arc thruster and its plume is described. Primarily an effect of the magnetic field on the plume expansion and plasma generation is considered. Two particular examples are investigated, namely the magnetically enhanced co-axial vacuum arc thruster (MVAT) and the vacuum arc thruster with ring electrodes (RVAT). It is found that the magnetic field significantly decreases the plasma plume radial expansion under typical conditions. Predicted plasma density profiles in the plume of the MVAT are compared with experimental profiles, and generally a good agreement is found. In the case of the RVAT the influence of the magnetic field leads to plasma jet deceleration, which explains the non-monotonic dependence of the ion current density, on an axial magnetic field observed experimentally

  8. Magnetically enhanced vacuum arc thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keidar, Michael [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109 MI (United States); Schein, Jochen [Alameda Applied Science Corporation, San Leandro, CA 94577 (United States); Wilson, Kristi [Alameda Applied Science Corporation, San Leandro, CA 94577 (United States); Gerhan, Andrew [Alameda Applied Science Corporation, San Leandro, CA 94577 (United States); Au, Michael [Alameda Applied Science Corporation, San Leandro, CA 94577 (United States); Tang, Benjamin [Alameda Applied Science Corporation, San Leandro, CA 94577 (United States); Idzkowski, Luke [Alameda Applied Science Corporation, San Leandro, CA 94577 (United States); Krishnan, Mahadevan [Alameda Applied Science Corporation, San Leandro, CA 94577 (United States); Beilis, Isak I [Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2005-11-01

    A hydrodynamic model of the vacuum arc thruster and its plume is described. Primarily an effect of the magnetic field on the plume expansion and plasma generation is considered. Two particular examples are investigated, namely the magnetically enhanced co-axial vacuum arc thruster (MVAT) and the vacuum arc thruster with ring electrodes (RVAT). It is found that the magnetic field significantly decreases the plasma plume radial expansion under typical conditions. Predicted plasma density profiles in the plume of the MVAT are compared with experimental profiles, and generally a good agreement is found. In the case of the RVAT the influence of the magnetic field leads to plasma jet deceleration, which explains the non-monotonic dependence of the ion current density, on an axial magnetic field observed experimentally.

  9. Unzipping of the volcano arc, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, R.J.; Smoot, N.C.; Rubin, M.

    1984-01-01

    A working hypothesis for the recent evolution of the southern Volcano Arc, Japan, is presented which calls upon a northward-progressing sundering of the arc in response to a northward-propagating back-arc basin extensional regime. This model appears to explain several localized and recent changes in the tectonic and magrnatic evolution of the Volcano Arc. Most important among these changes is the unusual composition of Iwo Jima volcanic rocks. This contrasts with normal arc tholeiites typical of the rest of the Izu-Volcano-Mariana and other primitive arcs in having alkaline tendencies, high concentrations of light REE and other incompatible elements, and relatively high silica contents. In spite of such fractionated characteristics, these lavas appear to be very early manifestations of a new volcanic and tectonic cycle in the southern Volcano Arc. These alkaline characteristics and indications of strong regional uplift are consistent with the recent development of an early stage of inter-arc basin rifting in the southern Volcano Arc. New bathymetric data are presented in support of this model which indicate: 1. (1) structural elements of the Mariana Trough extend north to the southern Volcano Arc. 2. (2) both the Mariana Trough and frontal arc shoal rapidly northwards as the Volcano Arc is approached. 3. (3) rugged bathymetry associated with the rifted Mariana Trough is replaced just south of Iwo Jima by the development of a huge dome (50-75 km diameter) centered around Iwo Jima. Such uplifted domes are the immediate precursors of rifts in other environments, and it appears that a similar situation may now exist in the southern Volcano Arc. The present distribution of unrifted Volcano Arc to the north and rifted Mariana Arc to the south is interpreted not as a stable tectonic configuration but as representing a tectonic "snapshot" of an arc in the process of being rifted to form a back-arc basin. ?? 1984.

  10. Novel dosimetric phantom for quality assurance of volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letourneau, Daniel; Publicover, Julia; Kozelka, Jakub; Moseley, Douglas J.; Jaffray, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work is to assess the suitability and performance of a new dosimeter system with a novel geometry for the quality assurance (QA) of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The new dosimeter system consists of a hollow cylinder (15 and 25 cm inner and outer diameters) with 124 diodes embedded in the phantom's cylindrical wall forming four rings of detectors. For coplanar beams, the cylindrical geometry and the ring diode pattern offer the advantage of invariant perpendicular incidence on the beam central axis for any gantry angle and also have the benefit of increasing the detector density as both walls of the cylinder sample the beam. Other advantages include real-time readout and reduced weight with the hollow phantom shape. A calibration method taking into account the variation in radiation sensitivity of the diodes as a function of gantry angle was developed and implemented. In this work, the new dosimeter system was used in integrating mode to perform composite dose measurements along the cylindrical surface supporting the diodes. The reproducibility of the dosimeter response and the angular dependence of the diodes were assessed using simple 6 MV photon static beams. The performance of the new dosimeter system for VMAT QA was then evaluated using VMAT plans designed for a head and neck, an abdominal sarcoma, and a prostate patient. These plans were optimized with 90 control points (CPs) and additional versions of each plan were generated by increasing the number of CPs to 180 and 360 using linear interpolation. The relative dose measured with the dosimeter system for the VMAT plans was compared to the corresponding TPS dose map in terms of relative dose difference (%ΔD) and distance to agreement (DTA). The dosimeter system's sensitivity to gantry rotation offset and scaling errors as well as setup errors was also evaluated. For static beams, the dosimeter system offered good reproducibility and demonstrated small residual diode angular

  11. Anti-Swing Control of Gantry and Tower Cranes Using Fuzzy and Time-Delayed Feedback with Friction Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.M. Omar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We designed a feedback controller to automate crane operations by controlling the load position and its swing. First, a PD tracking controller is designed to follow a prescribed trajectory. Then, another controller is added to the control loop to damp the load swing. The anti-swing controller is designed based on two techniques: a time-delayed feedback of the load swing angle and an anti-swing fuzzy logic controller (FLC. The rules of the FLC are generated by mapping the performance of the time-delayed feedback controller. The same mapping method used for generating the rules can be applied to mimic the performance of an expert operator. The control algorithms were designed for gantry cranes and then extended to tower cranes by considering the coupling between the translational and rotational motions. Experimental results show that the controller is effective in reducing load oscillations and transferring the load in a reasonable time. To experimentally validate the theory, we had to compensate for friction. To this end, we estimated the friction and then applied a control action to cancel it. The friction force was estimated by assuming a mathematical model and then estimating the model coefficients using an off-line identification technique, the method of least squares (LS.

  12. Influence of the composition and microstructure on the mechanical properties of single pass weld metal obtained with two-run multipower submerged arc welding of 35 MM Fe 510 quality steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkhout, C.F.; Sipkes, M.P.

    1977-01-01

    For three 35 mm Fe 510 quality steels (with and without niobium) experiments have been carried out to establish a relationship between composition, microstructure and mechanical properties of weldmetal obtained with two-run multipower submerged arc welding. The most striking aspects are summarized in the following. The weldmental composition can influence the toughness both, directly by matrix alloying or indirectly through the grainsize and constituents of the microstructure such as the perlite-cementite and martensite fraction. In the range of compositions investigated Mn for instance has a beneficial, while Nb and N have a detrimental effect on notch toughness. For nitrogen the concentration in the weldmetal is determined by the type of weldingflux used. The unfavourable effect of Nb in the weldmetal depends mainly on the Nb content of the plate material (dilution effect). Niobium introduced by the flux is not active and in all probability only present as non metallic inclusions. Remarkable is the strong interaction found between Nb and N. The influence of Nb decreases when the N content of the weldmetal increases. This effect may probably also be an explanation for the great differences in the interpretation of the influence of Nb on weldmetal ductility as mentioned in the literature. A change in the concentration of these elements does not have any influence on the grainsize of the weldmetal. The influence of Mo is quite remarkable. In the first place it has a grain-refining effect, which strongly predominates its detrimental effect in promoting the martensite formation. From quantitative measurements it also appears that Mo reduces the amount of perlite in the weldmetal and suppresses entirely the influence of Mn on the Charpy-V transition temperature and the uppershelf-energy level

  13. Architectural Surfaces and Structures from Circular Arcs

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Ling

    2013-01-01

    the most attention from geometry researchers. In this thesis, we aim to realize this process with simple geometric primitives, circular arcs. We investigate architectural surfaces and structures consisting of circular arcs. Our focus is lying on how

  14. SU-E-T-422: Fast Analytical Beamlet Optimization for Volumetric Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Kenny S K; Lee, Louis K Y [Department of Clinical Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong SAR (China); Xing, L [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Chan, Anthony T C [Department of Clinical Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong SAR (China); State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To implement a fast optimization algorithm on CPU/GPU heterogeneous computing platform and to obtain an optimal fluence for a given target dose distribution from the pre-calculated beamlets in an analytical approach. Methods: The 2D target dose distribution was modeled as an n-dimensional vector and estimated by a linear combination of independent basis vectors. The basis set was composed of the pre-calculated beamlet dose distributions at every 6 degrees of gantry angle and the cost function was set as the magnitude square of the vector difference between the target and the estimated dose distribution. The optimal weighting of the basis, which corresponds to the optimal fluence, was obtained analytically by the least square method. Those basis vectors with a positive weighting were selected for entering into the next level of optimization. Totally, 7 levels of optimization were implemented in the study.Ten head-and-neck and ten prostate carcinoma cases were selected for the study and mapped to a round water phantom with a diameter of 20cm. The Matlab computation was performed in a heterogeneous programming environment with Intel i7 CPU and NVIDIA Geforce 840M GPU. Results: In all selected cases, the estimated dose distribution was in a good agreement with the given target dose distribution and their correlation coefficients were found to be in the range of 0.9992 to 0.9997. Their root-mean-square error was monotonically decreasing and converging after 7 cycles of optimization. The computation took only about 10 seconds and the optimal fluence maps at each gantry angle throughout an arc were quickly obtained. Conclusion: An analytical approach is derived for finding the optimal fluence for a given target dose distribution and a fast optimization algorithm implemented on the CPU/GPU heterogeneous computing environment greatly reduces the optimization time.

  15. Target tracking using DMLC for volumetric modulated arc therapy: A simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Baozhou; Rangaraj, Dharanipathy; Papiez, Lech; Oddiraju, Swetha; Yang Deshan; Li, H. Harold [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Washington University, 4921 Parkview Place, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Southwestern Medical Center, University of Texas, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Washington University, 4921 Parkview Place, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Target tracking using dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) is a promising approach for intrafraction motion management in radiation therapy. The purpose of this work is to develop a DMLC tracking algorithm capable of delivering volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to the targets that experience two-dimensional (2D) rigid motion in the beam's eye view. Methods: The problem of VMAT delivery to moving targets is formulated as a control problem with constraints. The relationships between gantry speed, gantry acceleration, MLC leaf-velocity, dose rate, and target motion are derived. An iterative search algorithm is developed to find numerical solutions for efficient delivery of a specific VMAT plan to the moving target using 2D DMLC tracking. The delivery of five VMAT lung plans is simulated. The planned and delivered fluence maps in the target-reference frame are calculated and compared. Results: The simulation demonstrates that the 2D tracking algorithm is capable of delivering the VMAT plan to a moving target fast and accurately without violating the machine constraints and the integrity of the treatment plan. The average delivery time is only 29 s longer than that of no-tracking delivery, 101 versus 72 s, respectively. The fluence maps are normalized to 200 MU and the average root-mean-square error between the desired and the delivered fluence is 2.1 MU, compared to 14.8 MU for no-tracking and 3.6 MU for one-dimensional tracking. Conclusions: A locally optimal MLC tracking algorithm for VMAT delivery is proposed, aiming at shortest delivery time while maintaining treatment plan invariant. The inconsequential increase of treatment time due to DMLC tracking is clinically desirable, which makes VMAT with DMLC tracking attractive in treating moving tumors.

  16. New methods for optical distance indicator and gantry angle quality control tests in medical linear accelerators: image processing by using a 3D phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shandiz, Mahdi Heravian; Khalilzadeh, Mohammadmahdi; Anvari, Kazem [Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Layen, Ghorban Safaeian [Mashhad University of Medical Science, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    In order to keep the acceptable level of the radiation oncology linear accelerators, it is necessary to apply a reliable quality assurance (QA) program. The QA protocols, published by authoritative organizations, such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), determine the quality control (QC) tests which should be performed on the medical linear accelerators and the threshold levels for each test. The purpose of this study is to increase the accuracy and precision of the selected QC tests in order to increase the quality of treatment and also increase the speed of the tests to convince the crowded centers to start a reliable QA program. A new method has been developed for two of the QC tests; optical distance indicator (ODI) QC test as a daily test and gantry angle QC test as a monthly test. This method uses an image processing approach utilizing the snapshots taken by the CCD camera to measure the source to surface distance (SSD) and gantry angle. The new method of ODI QC test has an accuracy of 99.95% with a standard deviation of 0.061 cm and the new method for gantry angle QC has a precision of 0.43 degrees. The automated proposed method which is used for both ODI and gantry angle QC tests, contains highly accurate and precise results which are objective and the human-caused errors have no effect on the results. The results show that they are in the acceptable range for both of the QC tests, according to AAPM task group 142.

  17. New methods for optical distance indicator and gantry angle quality control tests in medical linear accelerators: image processing by using a 3D phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shandiz, Mahdi Heravian; Khalilzadeh, Mohammadmahdi; Anvari, Kazem; Layen, Ghorban Safaeian

    2015-01-01

    In order to keep the acceptable level of the radiation oncology linear accelerators, it is necessary to apply a reliable quality assurance (QA) program. The QA protocols, published by authoritative organizations, such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), determine the quality control (QC) tests which should be performed on the medical linear accelerators and the threshold levels for each test. The purpose of this study is to increase the accuracy and precision of the selected QC tests in order to increase the quality of treatment and also increase the speed of the tests to convince the crowded centers to start a reliable QA program. A new method has been developed for two of the QC tests; optical distance indicator (ODI) QC test as a daily test and gantry angle QC test as a monthly test. This method uses an image processing approach utilizing the snapshots taken by the CCD camera to measure the source to surface distance (SSD) and gantry angle. The new method of ODI QC test has an accuracy of 99.95% with a standard deviation of 0.061 cm and the new method for gantry angle QC has a precision of 0.43 degrees. The automated proposed method which is used for both ODI and gantry angle QC tests, contains highly accurate and precise results which are objective and the human-caused errors have no effect on the results. The results show that they are in the acceptable range for both of the QC tests, according to AAPM task group 142.

  18. A rotating arc plasma invertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reusch, M.F.; Jayaram, K.

    1987-02-01

    A device is described for the inversion of direct current to alternating current. The main feature is the use of a rotating plasma arc in crossed electric and magnetic fields as a switch. This device may provide an economic alternative to other inversion methods in some circumstances

  19. Highest performance in 3D metal cutting at smallest footprint: benchmark of a robot based system vs. parameters of gantry systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Torsten; Bastick, André; Michel-Triller, Robert; Manzella, Christon

    2014-02-01

    In the automotive industry as well as in other industries ecological aspects regarding energy savings are driving new technologies and materials, e.g. lightweight materials as aluminium or press hardened steels. Processing such parts especially complex 3D shaped parts laser manufacturing has become the key process offering highest efficiency. The most established systems for 3D cutting applications are based on gantry systems. The disadvantage of those systems is their huge footprint to realize the required stability and work envelope. Alternatively a robot based system might be of advantage if accuracy, speed and overall performance would be capable processing automotive parts. With the BIM "beam in motion" system, JENOPTIK Automatisierungstechnik GmbH has developed a modular robot based laser processing machine, which meets all OEM specs processing press hardened steel parts. A benchmark of the BIM versus a gantry system was done regarding all required parameters to fulfil OEM specifications for press hardened steel parts. As a result a highly productive, accurate and efficient system can be described based on one or multiple robot modules working simultaneously together. The paper presents the improvements on the robot machine concept BIM addressed in 2012 [1] leading to an industrial proven system approach for the automotive industry. It further compares the performance and the parameters for 3D cutting applications of the BIM system versus a gantry system by samples of applied parts. Finally an overview of suitable applications for processing complex 3D parts with high productivity at small footprint is given.

  20. Mechanism and Microstructure of Oxide Fluxes for Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Magnesium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L. M.; Zhang, Z. D.; Song, G.; Wang, L.

    2007-03-01

    Five single oxide fluxes—MgO, CaO, TiO2, MnO2, and Cr2O3—were used to investigate the effect of active flux on the depth/width ratio in AZ31B magnesium alloy. The microstructure and mechanical property of the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding seam were studied. The oxygen content in the weld seam and the arc images during the TIG welding process were analyzed. A series of emission spectroscopy of weld arc for TIG welding for magnesium with and without flux were developed. The results showed that for the five single oxide fluxes, all can increase the weld penetration effectively and grain size in the weld seam of alternating current tungsten inert gas (ACTIG) welding of the Mg alloy. The oxygen content of the welds made without flux is not very different from those produced with oxide fluxes not considering trapped oxide. However, welds that have the best penetration have a relatively higher oxygen content among those produced with flux. It was found that the arc images with the oxide fluxes were only the enlarged form of the arc images without flux; the arc constriction was not observed. The detection of arc spectroscopy showed that the metal elements in the oxides exist as the neutral atom or the first cation in the weld arc. This finding would influence the arc properties. When TIG simulation was carried out on a plate with flux applied only on one side, the arc image video showed an asymmetric arc, which deviated toward the flux free side. The thermal stability, the dissociation energy, and the electrical conductivity of oxide should be considered when studying the mechanism for increased TIG flux weld penetration.

  1. Study of gliding arc discharge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Chi; Lin Lie; Wu Bin

    2006-01-01

    The electric parameters change during discharge is studied and the relationship between non-equilibrium degree and parameters is discussed for gliding arc discharges. Using two-channel model, the rules of arc moving due to effect of the airflow is simulated. The numerical simulation results can help analyzing the generation mechanism of gliding arc non-equilibrium plasma. (authors)

  2. Rapid arc - clinical rationale and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzi, Lucca

    2008-01-01

    The presentation will focus on the background of Intensity modulation volumetric arc therapy Rapid Arc from Varian Medical Systems aiming to highlight the technical and clinical rational also from an historical perspective to the founding pillars of fast delivery with a minimum number of arcs and a minimum number of monitor units

  3. STRUVE arc and EUPOS® stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasmane, Ieva; Kaminskis, Janis; Balodis, Janis; Haritonova, Diana

    2013-04-01

    The Struve Geodetic Arc was developed in Years 1816 to 1855, 200 years ago. Historic information on the points of the Struve Geodetic Arc are included in the UNESCO World Heritage list in 2005. Nevertheless, the sites of many points are still not identified nor included in the data bases nowadays. Originally STRUVE arc consisted of 258 main triangles with 265 triangulation points. Currently 34 of the original station points are identified and included in the in the UNESCO World Heritage list. identified original measurement points of the Meridian Arc are located in Sweden (7 points), Norway (15), Finland (83), Russia (1), Estonia (22), Latvia (16), Lithuania (18), Belorussia (28), Ukraine (59) and Moldova (27). In Year 2002 was initiated another large coverage project - European Position Determination System "EUPOS®". Currently there are about 400 continuously operating GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) stations covering EU countries Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Bulgaria, Romania and East European countries Ukraine and Moldavia. EUPOS® network is a ground based GNSS augmentation system widely used for geodesy, land surveying, geophysics and navigation. It gives the opportunity for fast and accurate position determination never available before. It is an honorable task to use the EUPOS® system for research of the Struve triangulation former sites. Projects with Struve arc can popularize geodesy, geo-information and its meaning in nowadays GIS and GNSS systems. Struve Arc and its points is unique cooperation cross-border object which deserve special attention because of their natural beauty and historical value for mankind. GNSS in geodesy discovers a powerful tool for the verification and validation of the height values of geodetic leveling benchmarks established historically almost 200 years ago. The differential GNSS and RTK methods appear very useful to identify vertical displacement of landscape by means of

  4. Influence of arc current and pressure on non-chemical equilibrium air arc behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, WU; Yufei, CUI; Jiawei, DUAN; Hao, SUN; Chunlin, WANG; Chunping, NIU

    2018-01-01

    The influence of arc current and pressure on the non-chemical equilibrium (non-CE) air arc behavior of a nozzle structure was investigated based on the self-consistent non-chemical equilibrium model. The arc behavior during both the arc burning and arc decay phases were discussed at different currents and different pressures. We also devised the concept of a non-equilibrium parameter for a better understanding of non-CE effects. During the arc burning phase, the increasing current leads to a decrease of the non-equilibrium parameter of the particles in the arc core, while the increasing pressure leads to an increase of the non-equilibrium parameter of the particles in the arc core. During the arc decay phase, the non-CE effect will decrease by increasing the arc burning current and the nozzle pressure. Three factors together—convection, diffusion and chemical reactions—influence non-CE behavior.

  5. SU-E-T-644: Evaluation of Angular Dependence Correction for 2D Array Detector Using for Quality Assurance of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karthikeyan, N; Ganesh, K M; Vikraman, S; Shariff, MH

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the angular dependence correction for Matrix Evolution 2D array detector in quality assurance of volumetric modulated arc therapy(VMAT). Methods: Total ten patients comprising of different sites were planned for VMAT and taken for the study. Each plan was exposed on Matrix Evolution 2D array detector with Omnipro IMRT software based on the following three different methods using 6MV photon beams from Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. First method, VMAT plan was delivered on Matrix Evolution detector as it gantry mounted with dedicated holder with build-up of 2.3cm. Second, the VMAT plan was delivered with the static gantry angle on to the table mounted setup. Third, the VMAT plan was delivered with actual gantry angle on Matrix Evolution detector fixed in Multicube phantom with gantry angle sensor and angular dependence correction were applied to quantify the plan quality. For all these methods, the corresponding QA plans were generated in TPS and the dose verification was done for both point and 2D fluence analysis with pass criteria of 3% dose difference and 3mm distance to agreement. Results: The measured point dose variation for the first method was observed as 1.58±0.6% of mean and SD with TPS calculated. For second and third method, the mean and standard deviation(SD) was observed as 1.67±0.7% and 1.85±0.8% respectively. The 2D fluence analysis of measured and TPS calculated has the mean and SD of 97.9±1.1%, 97.88±1.2% and 97.55±1.3% for first, second and third methods respectively. The calculated two-tailed Pvalue for point dose and 2D fluence analysis shows the insignificance with values of 0.9316 and 0.9015 respectively, among the different methods of QA. Conclusion: The qualitative evaluation of angular dependence correction for Matrix Evolution 2D array detector shows its competency in accuracy of quality assurance measurement of composite dose distribution of volumetric modulated arc therapy

  6. Beam's-Eye-View Dosimetrics-Guided Inverse Planning for Aperture-Modulated Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yunzhi; Popple, Richard; Suh, Tae-Suk; Xing Lei

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To use angular beam's-eye-view dosimetrics (BEVD) information to improve the computational efficiency and plan quality of inverse planning of aperture-modulated arc therapy (AMAT). Methods and Materials: In BEVD-guided inverse planning, the angular space spanned by a rotational arc is represented by a large number of fixed-gantry beams with angular spacing of ∼2.5 degrees. Each beam is assigned with an initial aperture shape determined by the beam's-eye-view (BEV) projection of the planning target volume (PTV) and an initial weight. Instead of setting the beam weights arbitrarily, which slows down the subsequent optimization process and may result in a suboptimal solution, a priori knowledge about the quality of the beam directions derived from a BEVD is adopted to initialize the weights. In the BEVD calculation, a higher score is assigned to directions that allow more dose to be delivered to the PTV without exceeding the dose tolerances of the organs at risk (OARs) and vice versa. Simulated annealing is then used to optimize the segment shapes and weights. The BEVD-guided inverse planning is demonstrated by using two clinical cases, and the results are compared with those of a conventional approach without BEVD guidance. Results: An a priori knowledge-guided inverse planning scheme for AMAT is established. The inclusion of BEVD guidance significantly improves the convergence behavior of AMAT inverse planning and results in much better OAR sparing as compared with the conventional approach. Conclusions: BEVD-guidance facilitates AMAT treatment planning and provides a comprehensive tool to maximally use the technical capacity of the new arc therapeutic modality.

  7. Regulation of activity-regulated cytoskeleton protein (Arc) mRNA after acute and chronic electroconvulsive stimulation in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, M H; Olesen, M; Woldbye, D P D

    2005-01-01

    The temporal profile of Arc gene expression after acute and chronic electroconvulsive stimulations (ECS) was studied using semi-quantitative in situ hybridisation in the rat cortex. A single ECS strongly and temporarily increased Arc mRNA levels in dentate granular cells with maximal induction seen...

  8. The Upper- to Middle-Crustal Section of the Alisitos Oceanic Arc, (Baja, Mexico): an Analog of the Izu-Bonin-Marianas (IBM) Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medynski, S.; Busby, C.; DeBari, S. M.; Morris, R.; Andrews, G. D.; Brown, S. R.; Schmitt, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    The Rosario segment of the Cretaceous Alisitos arc in Baja California is an outstanding field analog for the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) arc, because it is structurally intact, unmetamorphosed, and has superior three-dimensional exposures of an upper- to middle-crustal section through an extensional oceanic arc. Previous work1, done in the pre-digital era, used geologic mapping to define two phases of arc evolution, with normal faulting in both phases: (1) extensional oceanic arc, with silicic calderas, and (2) oceanic arc rifting, with widespread diking and dominantly mafic effusions. Our new geochemical data match the extensional zone immediately behind the Izu arc front, and is different from the arc front and rear arc, consistent with geologic relations. Our study is developing a 3D oceanic arc crustal model, with geologic maps draped on Google Earth images, and GPS-located outcrop information linked to new geochemical, geochronological and petrographic data, with the goal of detailing the relationships between plutonic, hypabyssal, and volcanic rocks. This model will be used by scientists as a reference model for past (IBM-1, 2, 3) and proposed IBM (IBM-4) drilling activities. New single-crystal zircon analysis by TIMS supports the interpretation, based on batch SIMS analysis of chemically-abraded zircon1, that the entire upper-middle crustal section accumulated in about 1.5 Myr. Like the IBM, volcanic zircons are very sparse, but zircon chemistry on the plutonic rocks shows trace element compositions that overlap to those measured in IBM volcanic zircons by A. Schmitt (unpublished data). Zircons have U-Pb ages up to 20 Myr older than the eruptive age, suggesting remelting of older parts of the arc, similar to that proposed for IBM (using different evidence). Like IBM, some very old zircons are also present, indicating the presence of old crustal fragments, or sediments derived from them, in the basement. However, our geochemical data show that the magmas are

  9. Microstructural Study on Oxygen Permeated Arc Beads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Heng Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We simulated short circuit of loaded copper wire at ambient atmosphere and successfully identified various phases of the arc bead. A cuprous oxide flake was formed on the surface of the arc bead in the rapid solidification process, and there were two microstructural constituents, namely, Cu-κ eutectic structure and solutal dendrites. Due to the arc bead formed at atmosphere during the local equilibrium solidification process, the phase of arc bead has segregated to the cuprous oxide flake, Cu-κ eutectic, and Cu phase solutal dendrites, which are the fingerprints of the arc bead permeated by oxygen.

  10. A Failure Detection Strategy for Intrafraction Prostate Motion Monitoring With On-Board Imagers for Fixed-Gantry IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wu; Luxton, Gary; Xing Lei

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To develop methods to monitor prostate intrafraction motion during fixed-gantry intensity-modulated radiotherapy using MV treatment beam imaging together with minimal kV imaging for a failure detection strategy that ensures prompt detection when target displacement exceeds a preset threshold. Methods and Materials: Real-time two-dimensional (2D) marker position in the MV image plane was obtained by analyzing cine-MV images. The marker's in-line movement, and thus its time-varying three-dimensional (3D) position, was estimated by combining the 2D projection data with a previously established correlative relationship between the directional components of prostate motion. A confirmation request for more accurate localization using MV-kV triangulation was triggered when the estimated prostate displacement based on the cine-MV data was greater than 3 mm. An interventional action alert followed on positive MV-kV confirmation. To demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of the proposed method, simulation studies of conventional-fraction intensity-modulated radiotherapy sessions were done using 536 Calypso-measured prostate trajectories from 17 radiotherapy patients. Results: A technique for intrafraction prostate motion management has been developed. The technique, using 'freely available' cine-MV images and minimum on-board kV imaging (on average 2.5 images/fraction), successfully limited 3D prostate movement to within a range of 3 mm relative to the MV beam for 99.4% of the total treatment time. On average, only approximately one intervention/fraction was needed to achieve this level of accuracy. Conclusion: Instead of seeking to accurately and continuously localize the prostate target as existing motion tracking systems do, the present technique effectively uses cine-MV data to provide a clinically valuable way to minimize kV usage, while maintaining high targeting accuracy.

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of state-of-the-art MDCT scanners without gantry tilt in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannas, Peter; Habermann, Christian R.; Jung, Caroline; Bley, Thorsten A.; Ittrich, Harald; Adam, Gerhard; Koops, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Current CT-protocols for staging oral and oropharyngeal cancer include primary transversal slices and secondary tilted slices to avoid artifact-producing regions of dental metalwork. Some of the latest MDCT scanners do not allow gantry tilt. Hence, we assessed the relevance of secondary tilted slices in tumor staging. Materials and methods: Scans of a tiltable 64-row MDCT-scanner of 82 patients with oral or oropharyngeal cancer were retrospectively and independently evaluated twice by three readers: once using the primary transversal scans only, and once taking the transversal and secondary tilted scans into account. Tumor diameters and TN-stage were determined with both methods. Artifacts on transversal scans were analyzed using a 3-point-ranking-scale. Results: Image quality was impaired by severe artifacts in 24% of transversal slices of the oral cavity and in 12% of the oropharynx. The three readers detected an average of 57.7 ± 2.1 of 82 tumors (70%) on transversal CT slices. An average of 6.3 ± 0.6 more tumors (8%) were detected when transversal studies were evaluated in conjunction with secondary tilted slices, leading to a significantly (p = 0.0156–0.0313) increased average detection rate of 64.0 ± 2.0 tumors (78%). Moreover, secondary tilted slices led to a correction of underestimated tumor stages in up to six patients (7.3%). Conclusion: Tilted slices that avoid artifact-producing regions of dental metalwork significantly improve the reader's sensitivity and are of incremental value for staging of oral and oropharyngeal cancers.

  12. Lithospheric Contributions to Arc Magmatism: Isotope Variations Along Strike in Volcanoes of Honshu, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersting; Arculus; Gust

    1996-06-07

    Major chemical exchange between the crust and mantle occurs in subduction zone environments, profoundly affecting the chemical evolution of Earth. The relative contributions of the subducting slab, mantle wedge, and arc lithosphere to the generation of island arc magmas, and ultimately new continental crust, are controversial. Isotopic data for lavas from a transect of volcanoes in a single arc segment of northern Honshu, Japan, have distinct variations coincident with changes in crustal lithology. These data imply that the relatively thin crustal lithosphere is an active geochemical filter for all traversing magmas and is responsible for significant modification of primary mantle melts.

  13. Graphite electrode DC arc furnace. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-05-01

    The Graphite Electrode DC Arc Furnace (DC Arc) is a high-temperature thermal process, which has been adapted from a commercial technology, for the treatment of mixed waste. A DC Arc Furnace heats waste to a temperature such that the waste is converted into a molten form that cools into a stable glassy and/or crystalline waste form. Hazardous organics are destroyed through combustion or pyrolysis during the process and the majority of the hazardous metals and radioactive components are incorporated in the molten phase. The DC Arc Furnace chamber temperature is approximately 593--704 C and melt temperatures are as high as 1,500 C. The DC Arc system has an air pollution control system (APCS) to remove particulate and volatiles from the offgas. The advantage of the DC Arc is that it is a single, high-temperature thermal process that minimizes the need for multiple treatment systems and for extensive sorting/segregating of large volumes of waste. The DC Arc has the potential to treat a wide range of wastes, minimize the need for sorting, reduce the final waste volumes, produce a leach resistant waste form, and destroy organic contaminants. Although the DC arc plasma furnace exhibits great promise for treating the types of mixed waste that are commonly present at many DOE sites, several data and technology deficiencies were identified by the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) regarding this thermal waste processing technique. The technology deficiencies that have been addressed by the current studies include: establishing the partitioning behavior of radionuclides, surrogates, and hazardous metals among the product streams (metal, slag, and offgas) as a function of operating parameters, including melt temperature, plenum atmosphere, organic loading, chloride concentration, and particle size; demonstrating the efficacy of waste product removal systems for slag and metal phases; determining component durability through test runs of extended duration, evaluating the effect of

  14. ATLAS DDM integration in ARC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrmann, Gerd; Cameron, David; Ellert, Mattias

    2008-01-01

    The Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF) consists of Grid resources running ARC middleware in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. These resources serve many virtual organisations and contribute a large fraction of total worldwide resources for the ATLAS experiment, whose data is distributed and mana......The Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF) consists of Grid resources running ARC middleware in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. These resources serve many virtual organisations and contribute a large fraction of total worldwide resources for the ATLAS experiment, whose data is distributed...... and managed by the DQ2 software. Managing ATLAS data within NDGF and between NDGF and other Grids used by ATLAS (the Enabling Grids for E-sciencE Grid and the Open Science Grid) presents a unique challenge for several reasons. Firstly, the entry point for data, the Tier 1 centre, is physically distributed...

  15. The Next Generation ARC Middleware and ATLAS Computing Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipčič, Andrej; Cameron, David; Konstantinov, Aleksandr; Karpenko, Dmytro; Smirnova, Oxana

    2012-01-01

    The distributed NDGF Tier-1 and associated NorduGrid clusters are well integrated into the ATLAS computing environment but follow a slightly different paradigm than other ATLAS resources. The current paradigm does not divide the sites as in the commonly used hierarchical model, but rather treats them as a single storage endpoint and a pool of distributed computing nodes. The next generation ARC middleware with its several new technologies provides new possibilities in development of the ATLAS computing model, such as pilot jobs with pre-cached input files, automatic job migration between the sites, integration of remote sites without connected storage elements, and automatic brokering for jobs with non-standard resource requirements. ARC's data transfer model provides an automatic way for the computing sites to participate in ATLAS’ global task management system without requiring centralised brokering or data transfer services. The powerful API combined with Python and Java bindings can easily be used to build new services for job control and data transfer. Integration of the ARC core into the EMI middleware provides a natural way to implement the new services using the ARC components

  16. Erosion properties of unipolar arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekalin, Eh.K.

    1982-01-01

    Processes modelling the formation of unipolar arcs on the elements of the first wall in limiters of the vacuum chamber and on active elements of tokamak divertor, are experimentally investigated. Erosion, processes that take place at two types of non-stationary cathode spots are considered. Experimental data prove the possibility of reducing erosion intensity by coating the surface of electrodes by oxide films, reduction of the temperature of electrode and discharge current

  17. Effect of arc behaviour on the temperature fluctuation of carbon electrode in DC arc discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, F; Tanaka, M; Choi, S; Watanabe, T

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse and multiple arc-anode attachment modes were observed in a DC arc discharge with a carbon electrode. During the arc discharge, the surface temperature of the electrode was successfully measured by two-colour pyrometry combined with a high-speed camera which employs appropriate band-pass filters. The relationship between the arc-anode attachment mode and the temperature fluctuation of electrode surface was investigated. The diffuse arc-anode attachment mode leads to relatively large temperature fluctuation on anode surface due to the rotation of the arc spot. In the case of diffuse mode, the purity of synthesized multi-wall carbon nanotube was deteriorated with temperature fluctuation

  18. Bifurcation theory of ac electric arcing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christen, Thomas; Peinke, Emanuel

    2012-01-01

    The performance of alternating current (ac) electric arcing devices is related to arc extinction or its re-ignition at zero crossings of the current (so-called ‘current zero’, CZ). Theoretical investigations thus usually focus on the transient behaviour of arcs near CZ, e.g. by solving the modelling differential equations in the vicinity of CZ. This paper proposes as an alternative approach to investigate global mathematical properties of the underlying periodically driven dynamic system describing the electric circuit containing the arcing device. For instance, the uniqueness of the trivial solution associated with the insulating state indicates the extinction of any arc. The existence of non-trivial attractors (typically a time-periodic state) points to a re-ignition of certain arcs. The performance regions of arcing devices, such as circuit breakers and arc torches, can thus be identified with the regions of absence and existence, respectively, of non-trivial attractors. Most important for applications, the boundary of a performance region in the model parameter space is then associated with the bifurcation of the non-trivial attractors. The concept is illustrated for simple black-box arc models, such as the Mayr and the Cassie model, by calculating for various cases the performance boundaries associated with the bifurcation of ac arcs. (paper)

  19. Physical characteristics of welding arc ignition process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Linan; Song, Yonglun; Xiao, Tianjiao; Ran, Guowei

    2012-07-01

    The existing research of welding arc mainly focuses on the stable combustion state and the research on the mechanism of welding arc ignition process is quite lack. The tungsten inert gas(TIG) touch arc ignition process is observed via a high speed camera and the high time resolution spectral diagnosis system. The changing phenomenon of main ionized element provided the electrons in the arc ignition is found. The metallic element is the main contributor to provide the electrons at the beginning of the discharging, and then the excitated shielding gas element replaces the function of the metallic element. The electron density during the period of the arc ignition is calculated by the Stark-broadened lines of Hα. Through the discussion with the repeatability in relaxation phenomenon, the statistical regularity in the arc ignition process is analyzed. The similar rules as above are observed through the comparison with the laser-assisted arc ignition experiments and the metal inert gas(MIG) arc ignition experiments. This research is helpful to further understanding on the generation mechanism of welding arc ignition and also has a certain academic and practical significance on enriching the welding physical theoretical foundation and improving the precise monitoring on automatic arc welding process.

  20. Magmatic control along a strike-slip volcanic arc: The central Aeolian arc (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruch, J.; Vezzoli, L.; De Rosa, R.; Di Lorenzo, R.; Acocella, V.

    2016-02-01

    The regional stress field in volcanic areas may be overprinted by that produced by magmatic activity, promoting volcanism and faulting. In particular, in strike-slip settings, the definition of the relationships between the regional stress field and magmatic activity remains elusive. To better understand these relationships, we collected stratigraphic, volcanic, and structural field data along the strike-slip central Aeolian arc (Italy): here the islands of Lipari and Vulcano separate the extensional portion of the arc (to the east) from the contractional one (to the west). We collected >500 measurements of faults, extension fractures, and dikes at 40 sites. Most structures are NNE-SSW to NNW-SSE oriented, eastward dipping, and show almost pure dip-slip motion, consistent with an E-W extension direction, with minor dextral and sinistral shear. Our data highlight six eruptive periods during the last 55 ka, which allow considering both islands as a single magmatic system, in which tectonic and magmatic activities steadily migrated eastward and currently focus on a 10 km long × 2 km wide active segment. Faulting appears to mostly occur in temporal and spatial relation with magmatic events, supporting that most of the observable deformation derives from transient magmatic activity (shorter term, days to months), rather than from steady longer-term regional tectonics (102-104 years). More in general, the central Aeolian case shows how magmatic activity may affect the structure and evolution of volcanic arcs, overprinting any strike-slip motion with magma-induced extension at the surface.

  1. Magmatic control along a strike-slip volcanic arc: The central Aeolian arc (Italy)

    KAUST Repository

    Ruch, Joel

    2016-01-23

    The regional stress field in volcanic areas may be overprinted by that produced by magmatic activity, promoting volcanism and faulting. In particular, in strike-slip settings, the definition of the relationships between the regional stress field and magmatic activity remains elusive. To better understand these relationships, we collected stratigraphic, volcanic and structural field data along the strike-slip Central Aeolian arc (Italy): here the islands of Lipari and Vulcano separate the extensional portion of the arc (to the east) from the contractional one (to the west). We collected >500 measurements of faults, extension fractures and dikes at 40 sites. Most structures are NNE-SSW to NNW-SSE oriented, eastward dipping, and show almost pure dip-slip motion; consistent with an E-W extension direction, with minor dextral and sinistral shear. Our data highlight six eruptive periods during the last 55 ka, which allow considering both islands as a single magmatic system, in which tectonic and magmatic activity steadily migrated eastward and currently focus on a 10 km long x 2 km wide active segment. Faulting appears to mostly occur in temporal and spatial relation with magmatic events, supporting that most of the observable deformation derives from transient magmatic activity (shorter-term, days to months), rather than from steady longer-term regional tectonics (102-104 years). More in general, the Central Aeolian case shows how magmatic activity may affect the structure and evolution of volcanic arcs, overprinting any strike-slip motion with magma-induced extension at the surface.

  2. Development of a novel quality assurance system based on rolled-up and rolled-out radiochromic films in volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Choi, Kyoung-Sik; Lee, Jung Seok; Kim, You-Hyun; Hong, Semie; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a cylindrical phantom with rolled-up radiochromic films and dose analysis software in the rolled-out plane for quality assurance (QA) in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: The phantom consists of an acrylic cylindrical body wrapped with radiochromic film inserted into an outer cylindrical shell of 5 cm thickness. The rolled-up films with high spatial resolution enable detection of specific dose errors along the arc trajectory of continuously irradiated and modulated beams in VMAT. The developed dose analysis software facilitates dosimetric evaluation in the rolled-up and rolled-out planes of the film; the calculated doses on the corresponding points where the rolled-up film was placed were reconstructed into a rectangular dose matrix equivalent to that of the rolled-out plane of the film. The VMAT QA system was implemented in 3 clinical cases of prostate, nasopharynx, and pelvic metastasis. Each calculated dose on the rolled-out plane was compared with measurement values by modified gamma evaluation. Detected positions of dose disagreement on the rolled-out plane were also distinguished in cylindrical coordinates. The frequency of error occurrence and error distribution were summarized in a histogram and in an axial view of rolled-up plane to intuitively identify the corresponding positions of detected errors according to the gantry angle. Results: The dose matrix reconstructed from the developed VMAT QA system was used to verify the measured dose distribution along the arc trajectory. Dose discrepancies were detected on the rolled-out plane and visualized on the calculated dose matrix in cylindrical coordinates. The error histogram obtained by gamma evaluation enabled identification of the specific error frequency at each gantry angular position. The total dose error occurring on the cylindrical surface was in the range of 5%-8% for the 3 cases. Conclusions: The developed system provides a practical and reliable QA method to

  3. Development of a novel quality assurance system based on rolled-up and rolled-out radiochromic films in volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Choi, Kyoung-Sik; Lee, Jung Seok; Kim, You-Hyun; Hong, Semie; Suh, Tae-Suk [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Health Science, College of Health Science, Korea University, Seoul 136-703 (Korea, Republic of) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul 143-729 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Anyang SAM Hospital, Anyang 430-733 (Korea, Republic of) and Department of Biomedical Engineering and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Anyang SAM Hospital, Anyang 430-733 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiologic Science, College of Health Science, Korea University, Seoul 136-703 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul 143-729 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Engineering and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To develop a cylindrical phantom with rolled-up radiochromic films and dose analysis software in the rolled-out plane for quality assurance (QA) in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: The phantom consists of an acrylic cylindrical body wrapped with radiochromic film inserted into an outer cylindrical shell of 5 cm thickness. The rolled-up films with high spatial resolution enable detection of specific dose errors along the arc trajectory of continuously irradiated and modulated beams in VMAT. The developed dose analysis software facilitates dosimetric evaluation in the rolled-up and rolled-out planes of the film; the calculated doses on the corresponding points where the rolled-up film was placed were reconstructed into a rectangular dose matrix equivalent to that of the rolled-out plane of the film. The VMAT QA system was implemented in 3 clinical cases of prostate, nasopharynx, and pelvic metastasis. Each calculated dose on the rolled-out plane was compared with measurement values by modified gamma evaluation. Detected positions of dose disagreement on the rolled-out plane were also distinguished in cylindrical coordinates. The frequency of error occurrence and error distribution were summarized in a histogram and in an axial view of rolled-up plane to intuitively identify the corresponding positions of detected errors according to the gantry angle. Results: The dose matrix reconstructed from the developed VMAT QA system was used to verify the measured dose distribution along the arc trajectory. Dose discrepancies were detected on the rolled-out plane and visualized on the calculated dose matrix in cylindrical coordinates. The error histogram obtained by gamma evaluation enabled identification of the specific error frequency at each gantry angular position. The total dose error occurring on the cylindrical surface was in the range of 5%-8% for the 3 cases. Conclusions: The developed system provides a practical and reliable QA method to

  4. Arc Shape Characteristics with Ultra-High-Frequency Pulsed Arc Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxuan Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Arc plasma possesses a constriction phenomenon with a pulsed current. The constriction is created by the Lorentz force, the radial electromagnetic force during arc welding, which determines the energy distribution of the arc plasma. Welding experiments were carried out with ultra-high-frequency pulsed arc welding (UHFP-AW. Ultra-high-speed camera observations were produced for arc surveillance. Hue-saturation-intensity (HSI image analysis was used to distinguish the regions of the arc plasma that represented the heat energy distribution. The measurement of arc regions indicated that, with an ultra-high-frequency pulsed arc, the constriction was not only within the decreased arc geometry, but also within the constricted arc core region. This can be checked by the ratio of the core region to the total area. The arc core region expanded significantly at 40 kHz at 60 A. A current level of 80 A caused a decrease in the total region of the arc. Meanwhile, the ratio of the core region to the total increased. It can be concluded that arc constriction depends on the increased area of the core region with the pulsed current (>20 kHz.

  5. Auroral arc classification scheme based on the observed arc-associated electric field pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklund, G.

    1983-06-01

    Radar and rocket electric field observations of auroral arcs have earlier been used to identify essentially four different arc types, namely anticorrelation and correlation arcs (with, respectively, decreased and increased arc-assocaited field) and asymmetric and reversal arcs. In this paper rocket double probe and supplementary observations from the literature, obtained under various geophysical conditions, are used to organize the different arc types on a physical rather than morphological basis. This classification is based on the relative influence on the arc electric field pattern from the two current continuity mechanisms, polarisation electric fields and Birkeland currents. In this context the tangential electric field plays an essential role and it is thus important that it can be obtained with both high accuracy and resolution. In situ observations by sounding rockets are shown to be better suited for this specific task than monostatic radar observations. Depending on the dominating mechanism, estimated quantitatively for a number of arc-crossings, the different arc types have been grouped into the following main categories: Polarisation arcs, Birkeland current arcs and combination arcs. Finally the high altitude potential distributions corresponding to some of the different arc types are presented. (author)

  6. Clustering of arc volcanoes caused by temperature perturbations in the back-arc mantle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changyeol; Wada, Ikuko

    2017-06-29

    Clustering of arc volcanoes in subduction zones indicates along-arc variation in the physical condition of the underlying mantle where majority of arc magmas are generated. The sub-arc mantle is brought in from the back-arc largely by slab-driven mantle wedge flow. Dynamic processes in the back-arc, such as small-scale mantle convection, are likely to cause lateral variations in the back-arc mantle temperature. Here we use a simple three-dimensional numerical model to quantify the effects of back-arc temperature perturbations on the mantle wedge flow pattern and sub-arc mantle temperature. Our model calculations show that relatively small temperature perturbations in the back-arc result in vigorous inflow of hotter mantle and subdued inflow of colder mantle beneath the arc due to the temperature dependence of the mantle viscosity. This causes a three-dimensional mantle flow pattern that amplifies the along-arc variations in the sub-arc mantle temperature, providing a simple mechanism for volcano clustering.

  7. Prototype arc saw design and cutting trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, G.S.

    1980-09-01

    A program was initiated to develop the arc saw as a tool capable of removing the end fittings from spent nuclear fuel bundles. A special arc saw for this purpose was designed, installed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and satisfactorily operated to remove end fittings from simulated, nonradioactive fuel bundles. The design of the arc saw included consideration of the cutting environment, power supply size, control equipment, and work piece size. Several simulated fuel bundles were cut to demonstrate that the arc saw met design specifications. Although the arc saw development program was curtailed before significant performance data could be collected, tests indicate that the arc saw is a good means of cropping spent fuel bundles and is well suited to remote operation and maintenance

  8. Measuring Density Profiles of Electrons and Heavy Particles in a Stable Axially Blown Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstensen, J.; Stoller, P.; Galletti, B.; Doiron, C. B.; Sokolov, A.

    2017-08-01

    Two-color spatial carrier wave interferometry employing pulsed 532- and 671-nm lasers is used to measure the electron-density and heavy-particle-density profiles in the stagnation point of a stable, axially blown arc in argon for currents of 50 to 200 A and stagnation point pressures of 0.2 to 16 bar. This technique takes advantage of the fact that the free-electron contribution to the refractive index depends strongly on the wavelength, while that of the heavy particles does not. The high spatial resolution achieved allows the hot core of the arc to be readily distinguished from the surrounding boundary layer. A custom-built test device is used to ensure flow conditions that lead to a stable, axisymmetric arc; this permits the reconstruction of the density and temperature profiles using a single projection (interferometric image) of the refractive-index distribution through the arc (at two wavelengths). The arc radius determined from the heavy-particle density decreases with increasing stagnation pressure and increases with the current. These measurements are in good agreement with a simple axially blown arc model taking into account Ohmic heating, radiation losses, and enthalpy flow for core temperatures of approximately 16 500 K. The measured electron density at the center of the arc agrees well with a prediction based on local thermodynamic equilibrium.

  9. On the formation of auroral arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stasiewicz, K.

    1984-04-01

    A new mechanism for auroral arc formation is presented. The characteristic linear shape of auroral arcs is determined by magnetically connected plasma clouds in the distant equatorial magnetosphere. These clouds originate as high speed plasma beams in the magnetotail and in the solar wind. It is found that the free energy for driving an auroral arc is provided by the difference of pressure between the cloud and the ambient plasma. (author)

  10. Programming ArcGIS with Python cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Pimpler, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Programming ArcGIS with Python Cookbook, Second Edition, is written for GIS professionals who wish to revolutionize their ArcGIS workflow with Python. Whether you are new to ArcGIS or a seasoned professional, you almost certainly spend time each day performing various geoprocessing tasks. This book will teach you how to use the Python programming language to automate these geoprocessing tasks and make you a more efficient and effective GIS professional.

  11. Arc saw and its application to decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deichelbohrer, P.R.

    1982-01-01

    The arc saw is a toothless, circular saw that cuts by arc erosion. A model was built to study the arc saw's usefulness in cutting up radioactively contaminated metal scrap. It was chosen because it cuts with very little contact to the work piece and because cutting is not affected by material hardness. After installation of several improvements it was found it could cut almost any combination of metals and that clamping or fixturing requirements were minimum. Cutting proceeds rapidly and efficiently

  12. Nomenclature of SLC Arc beamline components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J.; Weng, W.T.

    1986-01-01

    This note defines I and C formal names for beamline components in the Arc as specified in the TRANSPORT decks ARCN FINAL and ARCS FINAL of June 5, 1985. The formal name consists of three fields: the primary name, the zone and the unit number. The general principles and guidelines are explained in Reference 1. The rationale and the final resolutions of the naming conventions for the Arc are explained

  13. Diffuse and spot mode of cathode arc attachments in an atmospheric magnetically rotating argon arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Tang; Wang, Cheng; Liao, Meng-Ran; Xia, Wei-Dong

    2016-01-01

    A model including the cathode, near-cathode region, and arc column was constructed. Specifically, a thermal perturbation layer at the arc fringe was calculated in order to couple sheath/presheath modelling with typical arc column modelling. Comparative investigation of two modes of attachment of a dc (100, 150, 200 A) atmospheric-pressure arc in argon to a thermionic cathode made of pure tungsten was conducted. Computational data revealed that there exists two modes of arc discharge: the spot mode, which has an obvious cathode surface temperature peak in the arc attachment centre; and the diffuse mode, which has a flat cathode surface temperature distribution and a larger arc attachment area. The modelling results of the arc attachment agree with previous experimental observations for the diffuse mode. A further 3D simulation is obviously needed to investigate the non-axisymmetrical features, especially for the spot mode. (paper)

  14. The complex challenge of repairing the gantry steelwork on the first generation magnox storage pond at Sellafield: Legacy Waste Storage, First Generation Magnox Storage Pond - 59133

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, Ian E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper puts into context the challenges that were faced when repairing the Gantry Steelwork of the First Generation Magnox Storage Pond (FGMSP). The First Generation Magnox Fuel Storage Pond (FGMSP) provided fuel storage and de-canning capability from the early 1960's until 1986. A significant programme of work has been underway since the completion of operational activities to support the programmes strategic intent of retrieving and storing all legacy wastes, and remediating the structure of the plant to support decommissioning activities. A key enabler to the retrievals programme is the Pond Skip Handler Machine (SHM), removed from service in 2002 following the discovery of significant signs of corrosion and distress, an inevitable consequence of being located in a coastal, salt laden environment. The SHM provides sole capability to access and retrieve the inventory of over 1000 fuel skips. It is also fundamental to future operations and the deployment of de-sludging equipment to recover significant bulk sludge's from the pond floor. Failure of the SHM steelwork gantry at worst case could potentially result in the Skip Handler Machine being derailed. This has some potential to damage to the pond structure and at worst case may result in local radiological and environmental consequences. This paper will examine the challenges faced by the team as they successfully defined, planned and executed remedial work to a specific aspect of the civil structure, the SHM gantry rail system, using a purpose built refurbishment platform; the Gantry Refurbishment System. The paper will examine how an 'innovative' approach was adopted to resolve the related issues of: - Refurbishing an aged structure to meet extended future operational demands. - The application of pragmatic engineering solutions against current codes and standards including seismic performance; - Provision of safe access for the workforce to undertake the refurbishment work against significant radiological

  15. Determination of the attenuation due to the treatment table according to the angle of gantry for system treatments verification Delta4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares Doblado, R.; Mateo Rodriguez, B.; Perucha Ortega, M.

    2013-01-01

    The optimal solution to the problem of absorption into the table would be to incorporate it into the system of planning as one structure more, but not all planners incorporate this functionality. As an alternative solution, approximate, this paper evaluates through measures in the system mentioned effect, with the aim of obtaining a table of absorption vs. angle of gantry, for different field sizes that will be used to correct the dose values recorded by the QA system. Research on the effect of the corrections in the histograms of dose and gamma. (Author)

  16. View of the moving head of the gantry machine and the working area containingthe supply and assembly platforms (trays in green).

    CERN Multimedia

    Alan Honma

    1999-01-01

    The robotic assembly machine consists of the gantry positioning systemoutfitted with pickup tooling heads and camera+microscope for accurateposition measurements. The procedure is to place the components onthe working platforms and the machine applies glue, picks and placesthe silicon sensors and front-end hybrids onto the frames. The components are held in place by vacuum to prevent movement untilthe glue has cured. Up to four modules can be assembled at one time.The platforms are removable allowing assembly to continue on a newset of modules.

  17. Computed tomography in endocrine orbitopathy: Effects of different gantry tilt and patient positioning on measurements of eye muscle thickness, and possibilities for correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markl, A.; Hilbertz, T.; Mayr, B.; Lissner, J.; Pickardt, C.R.

    1986-01-01

    Thickening of eye muscles in endocrine orbitopathy can be demonstrated particularly impressively in coronary computed tomograms. However, when measuring the height and width of rectus eye muscles manifesting pathologic changes, the measurement is increased by a deviation from the coronary section plane; this is due to different tilting of the gantry. This often leads to an incorrect stage classification and makes objective observation of the course (e.g., under therapy) impossible. By converting the measured values into the actual extent of the muscles by means of the cosine set, appreciable changes in the pattern and frequency of affection of the rectus eye muscles were found in 121 patients examined. (orig.) [de

  18. MO-FG-CAMPUS-TeP2-05: Optimizing Stereotactic Radiosurgery Treatment of Multiple Brain Metastasis Lesions with Individualized Rotational Arc Trajectories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, P; Xing, L; Ma, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Radiosurgery of multiple (n>4) brain metastasis lesions requires 3–4 noncoplanar VMAT arcs with excessively high monitor units and long delivery time. We investigated whether an improved optimization technique would decrease the needed arc numbers and increase the delivery efficiency, while improving or maintaining the plan quality. Methods: The proposed 4pi arc space optimization algorithm consists of two steps: automatic couch angle selection followed by aperture generation for each arc with optimized control points distribution. We use a greedy algorithm to select the couch angles. Starting from a single coplanar arc plan we search through the candidate noncoplanar arcs to pick a single noncoplanar arc that will bring the best plan quality when added into the existing treatment plan. Each time, only one additional noncoplanar arc is considered making the calculation time tractable. This process repeats itself until desired number of arc is reached. The technique is first evaluated in coplanar arc delivery scheme with testing cases and then applied to noncoplanar treatments of a case with 12 brain metastasis lesions. Results: Clinically acceptable plans are created within minutes. For the coplanar testing cases the algorithm yields singlearc plans with better dose distributions than that of two-arc VMAT, simultaneously with a 12–17% reduction in the delivery time and a 14–21% reduction in MUs. For the treatment of 12 brain mets while Paddick conformity indexes of the two plans were comparable the SCG-optimization with 2 arcs (1 noncoplanar and 1 coplanar) significantly improved the conventional VMAT with 3 arcs (2 noncoplanar and 1 coplanar). Specifically V16 V10 and V5 of the brain were reduced by 11%, 11% and 12% respectively. The beam delivery time was shortened by approximately 30%. Conclusion: The proposed 4pi arc space optimization technique promises to significantly reduce the brain toxicity while greatly improving the treatment efficiency.

  19. MO-FG-CAMPUS-TeP2-05: Optimizing Stereotactic Radiosurgery Treatment of Multiple Brain Metastasis Lesions with Individualized Rotational Arc Trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, P; Xing, L [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Ma, L [UCSF Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Radiosurgery of multiple (n>4) brain metastasis lesions requires 3–4 noncoplanar VMAT arcs with excessively high monitor units and long delivery time. We investigated whether an improved optimization technique would decrease the needed arc numbers and increase the delivery efficiency, while improving or maintaining the plan quality. Methods: The proposed 4pi arc space optimization algorithm consists of two steps: automatic couch angle selection followed by aperture generation for each arc with optimized control points distribution. We use a greedy algorithm to select the couch angles. Starting from a single coplanar arc plan we search through the candidate noncoplanar arcs to pick a single noncoplanar arc that will bring the best plan quality when added into the existing treatment plan. Each time, only one additional noncoplanar arc is considered making the calculation time tractable. This process repeats itself until desired number of arc is reached. The technique is first evaluated in coplanar arc delivery scheme with testing cases and then applied to noncoplanar treatments of a case with 12 brain metastasis lesions. Results: Clinically acceptable plans are created within minutes. For the coplanar testing cases the algorithm yields singlearc plans with better dose distributions than that of two-arc VMAT, simultaneously with a 12–17% reduction in the delivery time and a 14–21% reduction in MUs. For the treatment of 12 brain mets while Paddick conformity indexes of the two plans were comparable the SCG-optimization with 2 arcs (1 noncoplanar and 1 coplanar) significantly improved the conventional VMAT with 3 arcs (2 noncoplanar and 1 coplanar). Specifically V16 V10 and V5 of the brain were reduced by 11%, 11% and 12% respectively. The beam delivery time was shortened by approximately 30%. Conclusion: The proposed 4pi arc space optimization technique promises to significantly reduce the brain toxicity while greatly improving the treatment efficiency.

  20. Automatic Control Of Length Of Welding Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iceland, William F.

    1991-01-01

    Nonlinear relationships among current, voltage, and length stored in electronic memory. Conceptual microprocessor-based control subsystem maintains constant length of welding arc in gas/tungsten arc-welding system, even when welding current varied. Uses feedback of current and voltage from welding arc. Directs motor to set position of torch according to previously measured relationships among current, voltage, and length of arc. Signal paths marked "calibration" or "welding" used during those processes only. Other signal paths used during both processes. Control subsystem added to existing manual or automatic welding system equipped with automatic voltage control.

  1. Investigations Of A Pulsed Cathodic Vacuum Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, T. W. H.; Pigott, J.; Denniss, P.; Mckenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    2003-06-01

    Cathodic vacuum arcs are well established as a method for producing thin films for coatings and as a source of metal ions. Research into DC vacuum arcs has been going on for over ten years in the School of Physics at the University of Sydney. Recently a project was undertaken in the school to design and build a pulsed CVA for use in the investigation of plasma sheaths and plasma immersion ion implantation. Pulsed cathodic vacuum arcs generally have a higher current and plasma density and also provide a more stable and reproducible plasma density than their DC counterparts. Additionally it has been shown that if a high repetition frequency can be established the deposition rate of pulsed arcs is equal to or greater than that of DC arcs with a concomitant reduction in the rate of macro-particle formation. We present here results of our investigations into the building of a center-triggered pulsed cathodic vacuum arc. The design of the power supply and trigger mechanism and the geometry of the anode and cathode are examined. Observations of type I and II arc spots using a CCD camera, and cathode spot velocity dependence on arc current will be presented. The role of retrograde motion in a high current pulsed arc is discussed.

  2. The Abundance of Large Arcs From CLASH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bingxiao; Postman, Marc; Meneghetti, Massimo; Coe, Dan A.; Clash Team

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an automated arc-finding algorithm to perform a rigorous comparison of the observed and simulated abundance of large lensed background galaxies (a.k.a arcs). We use images from the CLASH program to derive our observed arc abundance. Simulated CLASH images are created by performing ray tracing through mock clusters generated by the N-body simulation calibrated tool -- MOKA, and N-body/hydrodynamic simulations -- MUSIC, over the same mass and redshift range as the CLASH X-ray selected sample. We derive a lensing efficiency of 15 ± 3 arcs per cluster for the X-ray selected CLASH sample and 4 ± 2 arcs per cluster for the simulated sample. The marginally significant difference (3.0 σ) between the results for the observations and the simulations can be explained by the systematically smaller area with magnification larger than 3 (by a factor of ˜4) in both MOKA and MUSIC mass models relative to those derived from the CLASH data. Accounting for this difference brings the observed and simulated arc statistics into full agreement. We find that the source redshift distribution does not have big impact on the arc abundance but the arc abundance is very sensitive to the concentration of the dark matter halos. Our results suggest that the solution to the "arc statistics problem" lies primarily in matching the cluster dark matter distribution.

  3. Teaching with ArcGIS Pro

    OpenAIRE

    Theller, Larry

    2016-01-01

    For Fall semester 2016 the ABE department moved the course ASM 540 Basic GIS from ArcGIS Desktop 10.2 to ArcGIS Pro 1.3. This software from ESRI has a completely new look and feel, (ribbon-based rather than cascading menus) and is a true 64 bit application, capable of multi-threading, and built on Python 3. After ArcGIS Desktop 10.5 is released, desktop ends and the future release will be ArcGIS Pro; so it makes sense to switch sooner rather than later. This talk will discuss some issues and...

  4. Investigations Of A Pulsed Cathodic Vacuum Arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oates, T.W.H.; Pigott, J.; Denniss, P.; Mckenzie, D.R.; Bilek, M.M.M.

    2003-01-01

    Cathodic vacuum arcs are well established as a method for producing thin films for coatings and as a source of metal ions. Research into DC vacuum arcs has been going on for over ten years in the School of Physics at the University of Sydney. Recently a project was undertaken in the school to design and build a pulsed CVA for use in the investigation of plasma sheaths and plasma immersion ion implantation. Pulsed cathodic vacuum arcs generally have a higher current and plasma density and also provide a more stable and reproducible plasma density than their DC counterparts. Additionally it has been shown that if a high repetition frequency can be established the deposition rate of pulsed arcs is equal to or greater than that of DC arcs with a concomitant reduction in the rate of macro-particle formation. We present here results of our investigations into the building of a center-triggered pulsed cathodic vacuum arc. The design of the power supply and trigger mechanism and the geometry of the anode and cathode are examined. Observations of type I and II arc spots using a CCD camera, and cathode spot velocity dependence on arc current will be presented. The role of retrograde motion in a high current pulsed arc is discussed

  5. The dual-electrode DC arc furnace-modelling brush arc conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, Q.G.

    2012-01-01

    The dual-electrode DC arc furnace, an alternative design using an anode and cathode electrode instead of a hearth anode, was studied at small scale using computational modelling methods. Particular attention was paid to the effect of two key design variables, the arc length and the electrode separation, on the furnace behaviour. It was found that reducing the arc length to brush arc conditions was a valid means of overcoming several of the limitations of the dual-electrode design, namely high...

  6. Plasma arc melting of zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubesing, P.K.; Korzekwa, D.R.; Dunn, P.S.

    1997-01-01

    Zirconium, like some other refractory metals, has an undesirable sensitivity to interstitials such as oxygen. Traditionally, zirconium is processed by electron beam melting to maintain minimum interstitial contamination. Electron beam melted zirconium, however, does not respond positively to mechanical processing due to its large grain size. The authors undertook a study to determine if plasma arc melting (PAM) technology could be utilized to maintain low interstitial concentrations and improve the response of zirconium to subsequent mechanical processing. The PAM process enabled them to control and maintain low interstitial levels of oxygen and carbon, produce a more favorable grain structure, and with supplementary off-gassing, improve the response to mechanical forming

  7. Analogue modeling of arc and backarc deformation in the New Hebrides arc and North Fiji Basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.; Lister, G. S.; Jessell, M. W.

    In most backarc basins, extension is perpendicular to the arc. Thus individual spreading ridges extend approximately parallel to the arc. In the North Fiji Basin, however, several ancient and active spreading ridges strike 70°-90° to the New Hebrides arc. These high-angle spreading ridges relocated

  8. The Next Generation ARC Middleware and ATLAS Computing Model

    CERN Document Server

    Filipcic, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Smirnova, O; Konstantinov, A; Karpenko, D

    2012-01-01

    The distributed NDGF Tier-1 and associated Nordugrid clusters are well integrated into the ATLAS computing model but follow a slightly different paradigm than other ATLAS resources. The current strategy does not divide the sites as in the commonly used hierarchical model, but rather treats them as a single storage endpoint and a pool of distributed computing nodes. The next generation ARC middleware with its several new technologies provides new possibilities in development of the ATLAS computing model, such as pilot jobs with pre-cached input files, automatic job migration between the sites, integration of remote sites without connected storage elements, and automatic brokering for jobs with non-standard resource requirements. ARC's data transfer model provides an automatic way for the computing sites to participate in ATLAS' global task management system without requiring centralised brokering or data transfer services. The powerful API combined with Python and Java bindings can easily be used to build new ...

  9. Discharge modes at the anode of a vacuum arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, H.C.

    1982-01-01

    The two most common anode modes in a vacuum arc are the low current mode, where the anode is basically inert; and the high current mode with a fully developed anode spot. This anode spot is very bright, has a temperature near the boiling point of the anode material, and is a copious source of vapor and energetic ions. However, other anode modes can exist. A low current vacuum arc with electrodes of readily sputterable material will emit a flux of sputtered atoms from the anode. An intermediate currents an anode footpoint can form. This footpoint is luminous, but much cooler than a true anode spot. Finally, a high current mode can exist where several small anode spots are present instead of a single large anode spot

  10. Rapid arc in cancer treatment - a therapeutic perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Suresh

    2013-01-01

    Recently, volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has demonstrated the ability to deliver radiation dose precisely and accurately with a shorter delivery time compared to conventional intensity-modulated fixed-field treatment (IMRT). We applied the hypothesis of VMAT technique at our hospital to determine the superior dose coverage for planning target volume (PTV) with adequate sparing of organs-at-risk (OARs). The delivery time and monitor units (MUs) is reduced in comparison with conventional fixed-field IMRT. Rapid Arc (RA) plans had a pre-treatment quality assurance and results were summarised in terms of the Gamma Agreement Index (GAI) scoring criteria of 3% and 3 mm thresholds. A total of 771 patients were treated between July 2011 and August 2013 of which head and neck cancer were 385, prostate cancer 53, brain tumours 112, cervical and endometrial cancer 77, breast cancer 38, rectal and bladder cancer 56, special technique using SBRT 45 (Liver and Lung) and Cranio-spinal irradiation 5 patients using RA single (177 control points) and double arcs (354 control points). The Average treatment time was 4.8 ±0.2 minutes (220 seconds of beam-on). The number of MU per fraction of 2.0 Gy was 522.5 ± 133.62. VMAT can be a valuable clinical tool that can deliver the prescribed dose efficiently in 1.5-3 minutes (single or double arcs) with high target homogeneity and adequate sparing of organs at risk. It would allow to reduce patient lying time on couch and over all beam on time from 4 hours to one hour. The toxicity (Tracheal fistula) observed in two patients of Carcinoma Lung receiving SRT high lights the need for peer review. (author)

  11. Evaluating optical hazards from plasma arc cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassford, Eric; Burr, Gregory

    2018-01-01

    The Health Hazard Evaluation Program of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health evaluated a steel building materials manufacturer. The employer requested the evaluation because of concerns about optical radiation hazards from a plasma arc cutting system and the need to clarify eye protection requirements for plasma operators, other employees, and visitors. The strength of the ultraviolet radiation, visible radiation (light), and infrared radiation generated by the plasma arc cutter was measured at various distances from the source and at different operating amperages. Investigators also observed employees performing the plasma arc cutting. Optical radiation above safe levels for the unprotected eyes in the ultraviolet-C, ultraviolet-B, and visible light ranges were found during plasma arc cutting. In contrast, infrared and ultraviolet-A radiation levels during plasma arc cutting were similar to background levels. The highest non-ionizing radiation exposures occurred when no welding curtains were used. A plasma arc welding curtain in place did not eliminate optical radiation hazards to the plasma arc operator or to nearby employees. In most instances, the measured intensities for visible light, UV-C, and UV-B resulted in welding shade lens numbers that were lower than those stipulated in the OSHA Filter Lenses for Protection Against Radiant Energy table in 29 CFR 1910.133(a)(5). [1] Investigators recommended using a welding curtain that enclosed the plasma arc, posting optical radiation warning signs in the plasma arc cutter area, installing audible or visual warning cues when the plasma arc cutter was operating, and using welding shades that covered the plasma arc cutter operator's face to protect skin from ultraviolet radiation hazards.

  12. SU-E-T-151: Breathing Synchronized Delivery (BSD) Planning for RapicArc Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, W; Chen, M; Jiang, S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To propose a workflow for breathing synchronized delivery (BSD) planning for RapicArc treatment. Methods: The workflow includes three stages: screening/simulation, planning, and delivery. In the screening/simulation stage, a 4D CT with the corresponding breathing pattern is acquired for each of the selected patients, who are able to follow their own breathing pattern. In the planning stage, one breathing phase is chosen as the reference, and contours are delineated on the reference image. Deformation maps to other phases are performed along with contour propagation. Based on the control points of the initial 3D plan for the reference phase and the respiration trace, the correlation with respiration phases, the leaf sequence and gantry angles is determined. The beamlet matrices are calculated with the corresponding breathing phase and deformed to the reference phase. Using the 4D dose evaluation tool and the original 3D plan DVHs criteria, the leaf sequence is further optimized to meet the planning objectives and the machine constraints. In the delivery stage, the patients are instructed to follow the programmed breathing patterns of their own, and all other parts are the same as the conventional Rapid-Arc delivery. Results: Our plan analysis is based on comparison of the 3D plan with a static target (SD), 3D plan with motion delivery (MD), and the BSD plan. Cyclic motion of range 0 cm to 3 cm was simulated for phantoms and lung CT. The gain of the BSD plan over MD is significant and concordant for both simulation and lung 4DCT, indicating the benefits of 4D planning. Conclusion: Our study shows that the BSD plan can approach the SD plan quality. However, such BSD scheme relies on the patient being able to follow the same breathing curve that is used in the planning stage during radiation delivery. Funded by Varian Medical Systems

  13. production of manual arc welding electrodes with local raw materials

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CHUKSSUCCESS 4 LOVE

    Manual arc welding using flux coated electrodes is carried out by producing an electric arc between ... major objectives: to form fusible slags, to stabilize the arc and to produce an inert gas shielding ... Current fusion welding techniques rely.

  14. Arcing and surface damage in DITE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodall, D.H.J.; McCracken, G.M.

    1977-11-01

    An investigation into the arcing damage on surfaces exposed to plasmas in the DITE tokamak is described. It has been found that arcing occurs on the fixed limiters, on probes inserted into the plasma and on parts of the torus structure. For surfaces parallel to the toroidal field most of the arcs run across the surface orthogonal to the field direction. Observations in the scanning electron microscope show that the arc tracks are formed by a series of melted craters characteristic of cathode arc spots. The amount of metal removed from the surface is consistent with the concentration of metal observed in the plasma. In plasmas with hydrogen gas puffing during the discharge or with injection of low Z impurities, the arc tracks are observed to be much shallower than in normal low density discharges. Several types of surface damage other than arc tracks have also been observed on probes. These phenomena occur less frequently than arcing and appear to be associated with abnormal discharge conditions. (author)

  15. The next-generation ARC middleware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appleton, O.; Cameron, D.; Cernak, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Resource Connector (ARC) is a light-weight, non-intrusive, simple yet powerful Grid middleware capable of connecting highly heterogeneous computing and storage resources. ARC aims at providing general purpose, flexible, collaborative computing environments suitable for a range of use...

  16. The structure and singularities of arc complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penner, Robert

    A classical combinatorial fact is that the simplicial complex consisting of disjointly embedded chords in a convex planar polygon is a sphere. For any surface F with non-empty boundary, there is an analogous complex Arc(F) consisting of suitable equivalence classes of arcs in F connecting its bou...

  17. Verification of Timed-Arc Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lasse; Jacobsen, Morten; Møller, Mikael Harkjær

    2011-01-01

    of interesting theoretical properties distinguishing them from other time extensions of Petri nets. We shall give an overview of the recent theory developed in the verification of TAPN extended with features like read/transport arcs, timed inhibitor arcs and age invariants. We will examine in detail...

  18. Modeling and Simulation of Low Voltage Arcs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghezzi, L.; Balestrero, A.

    2010-01-01

    Modeling and Simulation of Low Voltage Arcs is an attempt to improve the physical understanding, mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of the electric arcs that are found during current interruptions in low voltage circuit breakers. An empirical description is gained by refined electrical

  19. Risk assessment of metal vapor arcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Monika C. (Inventor); Leidecker, Henning W. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method for assessing metal vapor arcing risk for a component is provided. The method comprises acquiring a current variable value associated with an operation of the component; comparing the current variable value with a threshold value for the variable; evaluating compared variable data to determine the metal vapor arcing risk in the component; and generating a risk assessment status for the component.

  20. Implementing RapidArc into clinical routine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Esch, Ann; Huyskens, Dominique P; Behrens, Claus F

    2011-01-01

    With the increased commercial availability of intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) comes the need for comprehensive QA programs, covering the different aspects of this newly available technology. This manuscript proposes such a program for the RapidArc (RA) (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto...

  1. Arc generators of low-temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krolikowski, Cz.; Niewiedzial, R.; Siwiec, J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper is a review of works concerning investigation and use of low-temperature plasma in arc plasma generators made in Electric Power Institute of PP. There are discussed: analytical approach to a problem of volt-current and operational characteristics of DC arc plasma generators, determination of limits of their stable work and possibilities of their use to technological aims. (author)

  2. Electric arc behaviour in dynamic magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Put'ko, V.F.

    2000-01-01

    The behaviour of an electric arc in different time-dependent (dynamic) magnetic fields was investigated. New possibilities were found for spatial and energy stabilisation of a discharge, for intensifying heat exchange, extending the electric arc and distributed control of electric arc plasma. Rotating, alternating and travelling magnetic fields were studied. It was found that under the effect of a relatively low frequency of variations of dynamic magnetic fields (f 1000 Hz) the arc stabilised at the axis of the discharge chamber, the pulsation level decreased and discharge stability increased. The borders between these two arc existence modes were formed by a certain critical field variation frequency the period of which was determined by the heat relaxation time of the discharge. (author)

  3. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawke, R.S.

    1985-08-05

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

  4. Metal transfer during vacuum consumable arc remelting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanner, F.J.

    1977-11-01

    A description of the vacuum consumable arc remelt process as related to solidification and a review of vacuum arc literature is presented. Metal transfer at arc lengths less than or equal to 3 cm was found to occur when liquid metal spikes hanging from the cathode form a low resistance bridge (drop short) by touching the anode and subsequently rupturing. During the bridge lifetime (0.0003 to 0.020 s) the arc is extinguished and all of the electrical power is directed through the molten bridge. The formation and rupture of these molten metal bridges are confirmed with electrical resistance measurements. At long arc lengths (greater than 10 cm) the spikes separate before touching the anode

  5. Stability of alternating current gliding arcs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Salewski, Mirko; Leipold, Frank

    2014-01-01

    on Ohm’s law indicates that the critical length of alternating current (AC) gliding arc discharge columns can be larger than that of a corresponding direct current (DC) gliding arc. This finding is supported by previously published images of AC and DC gliding arcs. Furthermore, the analysis shows......A gliding arc is a quenched plasma that can be operated as a non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure and that is thus suitable for large-scale plasma surface treatment. For its practical industrial use the discharge should be extended stably in ambient air. A simple analytical calculation based...... that the critical length can be increased by increasing the AC frequency, decreasing the serial resistance and lowering the gas flow rate. The predicted dependence of gas flow rate on the arc length is experimentally demonstrated. The gap width is varied to study an optimal electrode design, since the extended non...

  6. Is this an arc or a glow discharge?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puchkarev, V.F.; Bochkarev, M.B.

    1994-01-01

    A well known criterion for distinguishing an arc discharge from a glow discharge is a low voltage drop (10--30 V) and a high current density that varies from a few tens to 10 6 A/cm 2 depending on arc type. The high current density is an attribute of arcs with cathode spots. The authors report here a study of the mechanism of emission in cathode spot arc where they realized a spotless discharge with a low voltage drop (30--50 V) and a high mean current density (10 4 --10 6 A/cm 2 ). The discharge was initiated between a broad cathode and point anode. The cathode was a smooth tungsten sphere electrode of about 100 μm in diameter. The point anode was made of various materials (Mo, Cu, Cd) with initial radius 1 μm. Before the experiment the cathode was cleaned by heating at 2,000 K at high vacuum (10 -8 Torr). The discharge was initiated by self-breakdown when electrodes under the voltage 200--500 V were brought to close proximity with each other. The cathode-anode spacing d at the moment of breakdown was estimated to be < 1 μm. The discharge current was varied within 1--3 A by changing the applied voltage and impedance of coaxial cable generator. The discharge burned during 100--1,000 ns. After the single discharge the cathode and anode were examined with a scanning electron microscope. The cathode surface exposed to the discharge was smooth, i.e. no erosion pits similar to arc craters were found on the cathode surface. The anode was shortened after discharge by 5--50 μm depending on current, material and cone angle. A high current density and low voltage drop implies that this is an arc discharge, while the cold cathode and the absence f cathode spot trace are pertinent to a dense glow discharge. The mechanism of emission involving secondary electron emission is to be discussed

  7. Technical guides/ methodological guide in case of tripping of a radioactivity detection gantry; Guides techniques / guide methodologique en cas de declenchement d'un portique de detection de radioactivite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The most of operators of reprocessing plants or waste disposal plants have equipment to detect radiation as gantry. To answer to a clarification need procedures can be followed during the tripping of a gantry. Procedures have been made by cards, they follow the regulation in force in the area of radiation protection and environment protection. With these cards there are an annexe giving the terms noticed in the cards, a glossary on radioactivity as well a list of organisms approved by the government to proceed to control for the workers protection against the hazards of ionizing radiations. (N.C.)

  8. Edge-carboxylated graphene nanoflakes from nitric acid oxidised arc-discharge material

    OpenAIRE

    NICOLOSI, VALERIA

    2010-01-01

    PUBLISHED Graphene nanoflakes (GNFs) with average diameters of 30 nm have been prepared by a single-step oxidation procedure using single-wall carbon nanotube arc-discharge material and nitric acid. The GNFs are predominately single sheets containing a small number of internal defects. The edges are decorated with primarily carboxylic acid groups which allow facile chemical functionalisation and cross-linking of the fragments using multivalent cations

  9. Alignment of the Stanford Linear Collider Arcs: Concepts and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitthan, R.; Bell, B.; Friedsam, H.; Pietryka, M.; Oren, W.; Ruland, R.

    1987-02-01

    The alignment of the Arcs for the Stanford Linear Collider at SLAC has posed problems in accelerator survey and alignment not encountered before. These problems come less from the tight tolerances of 0.1 mm, although reaching such a tight statistically defined accuracy in a controlled manner is difficult enough, but from the absence of a common reference plane for the Arcs. Traditional circular accelerators, including HERA and LEP, have been designed in one plane referenced to local gravity. For the SLC Arcs no such single plane exists. Methods and concepts developed to solve these and other problems, connected with the unique design of SLC, range from the first use of satellites for accelerator alignment, use of electronic laser theodolites for placement of components, computer control of the manual adjustment process, complete automation of the data flow incorporating the most advanced concepts of geodesy, strict separation of survey and alignment, to linear principal component analysis for the final statistical smoothing of the mechanical components

  10. SU-E-T-212: Influence of the Modulation Index On Daily Quality Assurance in Rapid Arc Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessels, C; Dumas, J-L; Francois, P; Mazal, A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: At our Institute some measured parameters for daily quality assurance (DQA) of dynamic arc therapy plans showed an unexpected behavior, therefore an investigation of the influence of the magnitude of modulation was conducted. Methods: In our clinical practice all DQAs of dynamic arc therapy plans are measured and analyzed prior to treatments using commercial software. For this study these plans were additionally exported to our in-house software written in MATLAB.The developed software extracted the leaf position, gantry angle, cumulative meterset weight of each control point (CP) and the total number of Monitor Units (MU) of each arc. Based on this information we calculated the leaf travel distance, irradiated segment area, number of MUs and dose rate for each CP. These data allowed us to calculate the modulation indexes (MI) of the plans, applying five different definitions of MI. The results were then correlated to the results of our DQA measurements.To validate the software, additional plans of known MIs were created and analyzed. For confirmation, the calculated parameters were compared to the segmented treatment table (STT) coming from the treatment planning system. Results: All calculated CP-parameters matched the STT by 99% or better. For linac 1, the comparison of the MI evaluation and the DQA results showed a slight tendency: 91.3% failed DQA plans had a MI lower than the average value. For this definition we consider that the lower the MI the higher the modulation. The results of the linac 2 present no significant relevance due to the low sample sizes for each DQA software. Conclusion: Available data and given definitions of the modulation index do not bring conclusive results; one cannot find a clear and distinct correlation with the failure of the DQA. The ongoing analysis with an increased sample size might lead to another conclusion

  11. Characterization of duplex stainless steel weld metals obtained by hybrid plasma-gas metal arc welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koray Yurtisik

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite its high efficiency, autogenous keyhole welding is not well-accepted for duplex stainless steels because it causes excessive ferrite in as-welded duplex microstructure, which leads to a degradation in toughness and corrosion properties of the material. Combining the deep penetration characteristics of plasma arc welding in keyhole mode and metal deposition capability of gas metal arc welding, hybrid plasma - gas metal arc welding process has considered for providing a proper duplex microstructure without compromising the welding efficiency. 11.1 mm-thick standard duplex stainless steel plates were joined in a single-pass using this novel technique. Same plates were also subjected to conventional gas metal arc and plasma arc welding processes, providing benchmarks for the investigation of the weldability of the material. In the first place, the hybrid welding process enabled us to achieve less heat input compared to gas metal arc welding. Consequently, the precipitation of secondary phases, which are known to be detrimental to the toughness and corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steels, was significantly suppressed in both fusion and heat affected zones. Secondly, contrary to other keyhole techniques, proper cooling time and weld metal chemistry were achieved during the process, facilitating sufficient reconstructive transformation of austenite in the ferrite phase.

  12. Electric Arc Furnace Modeling with Artificial Neural Networks and Arc Length with Variable Voltage Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Garcia-Segura

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Electric arc furnaces (EAFs contribute to almost one third of the global steel production. Arc furnaces use a large amount of electrical energy to process scrap or reduced iron and are relevant to study because small improvements in their efficiency account for significant energy savings. Optimal controllers need to be designed and proposed to enhance both process performance and energy consumption. Due to the random and chaotic nature of the electric arcs, neural networks and other soft computing techniques have been used for modeling EAFs. This study proposes a methodology for modeling EAFs that considers the time varying arc length as a relevant input parameter to the arc furnace model. Based on actual voltages and current measurements taken from an arc furnace, it was possible to estimate an arc length suitable for modeling the arc furnace using neural networks. The obtained results show that the model reproduces not only the stable arc conditions but also the unstable arc conditions, which are difficult to identify in a real heat process. The presented model can be applied for the development and testing of control systems to improve furnace energy efficiency and productivity.

  13. METHOD OF CONJUGATED CIRCULAR ARCS TRACING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ageyev Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The geometric properties of conjugated circular arcs connecting two points on the plane with set directions of tan- gent vectors are studied in the work. It is shown that pairs of conjugated circular arcs with the same conditions in frontier points create one-parameter set of smooth curves tightly filling all the plane. One of the basic properties of this set is the fact that all coupling points of circular arcs are on the circular curve going through the initially given points. The circle radius depends on the direction of tangent vectors. Any point of the circle curve, named auxiliary in this work, determines a pair of conjugated arcs with given boundary conditions. One more condition of the auxiliary circle curve is that it divides the plane into two parts. The arcs going from the initial point are out of the circle limited by this circle curve and the arcs coming to the final point are inside it. These properties are the basis for the method of conjugated circular arcs tracing pro- posed in this article. The algorithm is rather simple and allows to fulfill all the needed plottings using only the divider and ruler. Two concrete examples are considered. The first one is related to the problem of tracing of a pair of conjugated arcs with the minimal curve jump when going through the coupling point. The second one demonstrates the possibility of trac- ing of the smooth curve going through any three points on the plane under condition that in the initial and final points the directions of tangent vectors are given. The proposed methods of conjugated circular arcs tracing can be applied in solving of a wide variety of problems connected with the tracing of cam contours, for example pattern curves in textile industry or in computer-aided-design systems when programming of looms with numeric control.

  14. The accuracy evaluation according to dose delivery interruption and restart for volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Hyung; Bae, Sun Myung; Kwak, Jung Won; Kang, Tae Young; Bck, Geum Mun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul(Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    The accurate movement of gantry rotation, collimator and correct application of dose rate are very important to approach the successful performance of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT), because it is tightly interlocked with a complex treatment plan. The interruption and restart of dose delivery, however, are able to occur on treatment by various factors of a treatment machine and treatment plan. If unexpected problems of a treat machine or a patient interrupt the VMAT, the movement of treatment machine for delivering the remaining dose will be restarted at the start point. In this investigation, We would like to know the effect of interruptions and restart regarding dose delivery at VMAT. Treatment plans of 10 patients who had been treated at our center were used to measure and compare the dose distribution of each VMAT after converting to a form of digital image and communications in Medicine (DICOM) with treatment planning system (Eclipse V 10.0, Varian, USA). We selected the 6 MV photon energy of Trilogy (Varian, USA) and used OmniPro I'mRT system (V 1.7b, IBA dosimetry, Germany) to analyze the data that were acquired through this measurement with two types of interruptions four times for each case. The door interlock and the beam-off were used to stop and then to restart the dose delivery of VMAT. The gamma index in OmniPro I'mRT system and T-test in Microsoft Excel 2007 were used to evaluate the result of this investigation. The deviations of average gamma index in cases with door interlock, beam-off and without interruption on VMAT are 0.141, 0.128 and 0.1. The standard deviations of acquired gamma values are 0.099, 0.091, 0.071 and The maximum gamma value in each case is 0.413, 0.379, 0.286, respectively. This analysis has a 95-percent confidence level and the P-value of T-test is under 0.05. Gamma pass rate (3%, 3 mm) is acceptable in all of measurements. As a result, We could make sure that the interruption of this investgation are not

  15. Plasma instability of a vacuum arc centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hole, M.J.; Dallaqua, R.S.; Simpson, S.W.; Del Bosco, E.

    2002-01-01

    Ever since conception of the vacuum arc centrifuge in 1980, periodic fluctuations in the ion saturation current and floating potential have been observed in Langmuir probe measurements in the rotation region of a vacuum arc centrifuge. In this work we develop a linearized theoretical model to describe a range of instabilities in the vacuum arc centrifuge plasma column, and then test the validity of the description through comparison with experiment. We conclude that the observed instability is a 'universal' instability, driven by the density gradient, in a plasma with finite conductivity

  16. Arc pressure control in GTA welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, G.E.; Wells, F.M.; Levick, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    Relationships are established between the peak current of a pulsed, rectangular current waveform and the pulse current duty cycle under conditions of constant arc power. By appropriate choice of these interrelated parameters, it is shown that the arc pressure may be varied over a wide range even though the arc power is held constant. The methodology is suggested as a means of countering the effect of gravity in 5-G welding, while maintaining constant heat input to the weld. Combined with appropriate penetration sensors, the methodology is additionally suggested as a means of controlling penetration

  17. Arc saw and its application to decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deichelbohrer, P.R.

    1982-01-01

    The arc saw is a toothless, circular saw that cuts by arc erosion. A model was built to study the arc saw's usefulness in cutting up radioactively contaminated metal scrap. It was chosen because it cuts with very little contact to the work piece and because cutting is not affected by material hardness. After installation of several improvements it was found it could cut almost any combination of metals and that clamping or fixturing requirements were minimum. Cutting proceeds rapidly and efficiently. 10 figures

  18. Implementation av spridningsmodell i ArcGIS

    OpenAIRE

    Jou, Javid

    2012-01-01

    The project involves implementing a finished dispersion model into ArcGIS. The goal of the tool is to show how dangerous and toxic substances will travel in the ground after long periods. The goal of the project is to understand GIS in general, what it is used for and gain an insight into how developing tools for ArcGIS is, what challenges might exists. Understanding the type of data that can be stored and accessed in ArcGIS a long with the tools and functionality offered by the system when u...

  19. Hybrid laser arc welding of a used fuel container

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, C., E-mail: cboyle@nwmo.ca [Nuclear Waste Management Organization, Toronto, ON (Canada); Martel, P. [Novika Solutions, La Pocatiere, QC (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) has designed a novel Used Fuel Container (UFC) optimized for CANDU used nuclear fuel. The Mark II container is constructed of nuclear grade pipe for the body and capped with hemi-spherical heads. The head-to-shell joint fit-up features an integral backing designed for external pressure, eliminating the need for a full penetration closure weld. The NWMO and Novika Solutions have developed a partial penetration, single pass Hybrid Laser Arc Weld (HLAW) closure welding process requiring no post-weld heat treatment. This paper will discuss the joint design, HLAW process, associated welding equipment, and prototype container fabrication. (author)

  20. Across-arc versus along-arc Sr-Nd-Pb isotope variations in the Ecuadorian volcanic arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancellin, Marie-Anne; Samaniego, Pablo; Vlastélic, Ivan; Nauret, François; Gannoun, Adbelmouhcine; Hidalgo, Silvana

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies of the Ecuadorian arc (1°N-2°S) have revealed across-arc geochemical trends that are consistent with a decrease in mantle melting and slab dehydration away from the trench. The aim of this work is to evaluate how these processes vary along the arc in response to small-scale changes in the age of the subducted plate, subduction angle, and continental crustal basement. We use an extensive database of 1437 samples containing 71 new analyses, of major and trace elements as well as Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes from Ecuadorian and South Colombian volcanic centers. Large geochemical variations are found to occur along the Ecuadorian arc, in particular along the front arc, which encompasses 99% and 71% of the total variations in 206Pb/204Pb and 87Sr/86Sr ratios of Quaternary Ecuadorian volcanics, respectively. The front arc volcanoes also show two major latitudinal trends: (1) the southward increase of 207Pb/204Pb and decrease of 143Nd/144Nd reflect more extensive crustal contamination of magma in the southern part (up to 14%); and (2) the increase of 206Pb/204Pb and decrease of Ba/Th away from ˜0.5°S result from the changing nature of metasomatism in the subarc mantle wedge with the aqueous fluid/siliceous slab melt ratio decreasing away from 0.5°S. Subduction of a younger and warmer oceanic crust in the Northern part of the arc might promote slab melting. Conversely, the subduction of a colder oceanic crust south of the Grijalva Fracture Zone and higher crustal assimilation lead to the reduction of slab contribution in southern part of the arc.

  1. A discrete time-varying internal model-based approach for high precision tracking of a multi-axis servo gantry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Yan, Peng; Jiang, Huan; Ye, Peiqing

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we consider the discrete time-varying internal model-based control design for high precision tracking of complicated reference trajectories generated by time-varying systems. Based on a novel parallel time-varying internal model structure, asymptotic tracking conditions for the design of internal model units are developed, and a low order robust time-varying stabilizer is further synthesized. In a discrete time setting, the high precision tracking control architecture is deployed on a Voice Coil Motor (VCM) actuated servo gantry system, where numerical simulations and real time experimental results are provided, achieving the tracking errors around 3.5‰ for frequency-varying signals. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. SU-F-T-529: Dosimetric Investigation of a Rotating Gamma Ray System for ImagedGuided Modulated Arc Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C; Chibani, O; Eldib, A; Chen, L [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Li, J [Cyber Medical Inc, Xian (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Because of their effectiveness and efficiency, rotational arc radiotherapy (MAT) techniques have been developed on both specialty machines such as Tomotherapy and conventional linear accelerators. This work investigates a new rotating Gamma therapy system for image guided MAT and SBRT of intra/extracranial tumors. Methods: The CyberMAT system (Cyber Medical Corp., China) consists of a ring gantry with a gamma source (effective source size 1cm and 1.7cm respectively), a 120-leaf MLC, a kV CBCT and an EPID. The treatment couch provides 6-degrees-of-freedom motion compensation and the kV CBCT system has a spatial resolution of 0.4mm for target localization. The maximum dose rate is >4.0 Gy/min and the maximum field size is 40cm × 40cm. Monte Carlo simulations were used to compute dose distributions and compare with measurements. A retrospective study of 125 previously treated SBRT patients was performed to evaluate the dosimetric characteristics of CyberMAT in comparison with existing VMAT systems. Results: Monte Carlo results confirmed the CyberMAT design parameters including output factors and 3D dose distributions. Its beam penumbra is 5mm to 10mm for field sizes 1cm to 10cm, respectively and its isocenter accuracy is <0.5mm. Compared to the 6 MV photons of Tomotherapy and conventional linacs, Cobalt beams produce lower-energy secondary electrons that exhibit better dose properties in low-density lung tissues. Cobalt beams are ideal for peripheral lung tumors with half-arc arrangements to spare the opposite lung and other critical structures. Superior dose distributions have been obtained for brain, head and neck, breast, spine and lung tumors with half/full arc arrangements. Conclusion: Because of the unique dosimetric properties of Cobalt sources and its accurate stereotaxy/dose delivery CyberMAT is ideally suited for image guided MAT and SBRT. Full-arc arrangements are superior for brain and H&N treatments while half-arc arrangements produce best dose

  3. TU-CD-304-03: Dosimetric Verification and Preliminary Comparison of Dynamic Wave Arc for SBRT Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burghelea, M [UZ BRUSSEL, Brussels (Belgium); BRAINLAB AG, Munich (Germany); Babes Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Poels, K; Gevaert, T; Tournel, K; Dhont, J; De Ridder, M; Verellen, D [UZ BRUSSEL, Brussels (Belgium); Hung, C [BRAINLAB AG, Munich (Germany); Eriksson, K [RAYSEARCH LABORATORIES AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Simon, V [Babes Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential dosimetric benefits and verify the delivery accuracy of Dynamic Wave Arc, a novel treatment delivery approach for the Vero SBRT system. Methods: Dynamic Wave Arc (DWA) combines simultaneous movement of gantry/ring with inverse planning optimization, resulting in an uninterrupted non-coplanar arc delivery technique. Thirteen SBRT complex cases previously treated with 8–10 conformal static beams (CRT) were evaluated in this study. Eight primary centrally-located NSCLC (prescription dose 4×12Gy or 8×7.5Gy) and five oligometastatic cases (2×2 lesions, 10×5Gy) were selected. DWA and coplanar VMAT plans, partially with dual arcs, were generated for each patient using identical objective functions for target volumes and OARs on the same TPS (RayStation, RaySearch Laboratories). Dosimetric differences and delivery time among these three planning schemes were evaluated. The DWA delivery accuracy was assessed using the Delta4 diode array phantom (ScandiDos AB). The gamma analysis was performed with the 3%/3mm dose and distance-to-agreement criteria. Results: The target conformity for CRT, VMAT and DWA were 0.95±0.07, 0.96±0.04 and 0.97±0.04, while the low dose spillage gradient were 5.52±1.36, 5.44±1.11, and 5.09±0.98 respectively. Overall, the bronchus, esophagus and spinal cord maximum doses were similar between VMAT and DWA, but highly reduced compared with CRT. For the lung cases, the mean dose and V20Gy were lower for the arc techniques compares with CRT, while for the liver cases, the mean dose and the V30Gy presented slightly higher values. The average delivery time of VMAT and DWA were 2.46±1.10 min and 4.25±1.67 min, VMAT presenting shorter treatment time in all cases. The DWA dosimetric verification presented an average gamma index passing rate of 95.73±1.54% (range 94.2%–99.8%). Conclusion: Our preliminary data indicated that the DWA is deliverable with clinically acceptable accuracy and has the potential to

  4. TU-CD-304-03: Dosimetric Verification and Preliminary Comparison of Dynamic Wave Arc for SBRT Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burghelea, M; Poels, K; Gevaert, T; Tournel, K; Dhont, J; De Ridder, M; Verellen, D; Hung, C; Eriksson, K; Simon, V

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential dosimetric benefits and verify the delivery accuracy of Dynamic Wave Arc, a novel treatment delivery approach for the Vero SBRT system. Methods: Dynamic Wave Arc (DWA) combines simultaneous movement of gantry/ring with inverse planning optimization, resulting in an uninterrupted non-coplanar arc delivery technique. Thirteen SBRT complex cases previously treated with 8–10 conformal static beams (CRT) were evaluated in this study. Eight primary centrally-located NSCLC (prescription dose 4×12Gy or 8×7.5Gy) and five oligometastatic cases (2×2 lesions, 10×5Gy) were selected. DWA and coplanar VMAT plans, partially with dual arcs, were generated for each patient using identical objective functions for target volumes and OARs on the same TPS (RayStation, RaySearch Laboratories). Dosimetric differences and delivery time among these three planning schemes were evaluated. The DWA delivery accuracy was assessed using the Delta4 diode array phantom (ScandiDos AB). The gamma analysis was performed with the 3%/3mm dose and distance-to-agreement criteria. Results: The target conformity for CRT, VMAT and DWA were 0.95±0.07, 0.96±0.04 and 0.97±0.04, while the low dose spillage gradient were 5.52±1.36, 5.44±1.11, and 5.09±0.98 respectively. Overall, the bronchus, esophagus and spinal cord maximum doses were similar between VMAT and DWA, but highly reduced compared with CRT. For the lung cases, the mean dose and V20Gy were lower for the arc techniques compares with CRT, while for the liver cases, the mean dose and the V30Gy presented slightly higher values. The average delivery time of VMAT and DWA were 2.46±1.10 min and 4.25±1.67 min, VMAT presenting shorter treatment time in all cases. The DWA dosimetric verification presented an average gamma index passing rate of 95.73±1.54% (range 94.2%–99.8%). Conclusion: Our preliminary data indicated that the DWA is deliverable with clinically acceptable accuracy and has the potential to

  5. 3D Quantum Hall Effect of Fermi Arc in Topological Semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. M.; Sun, Hai-Peng; Lu, Hai-Zhou; Xie, X. C.

    2017-09-01

    The quantum Hall effect is usually observed in 2D systems. We show that the Fermi arcs can give rise to a distinctive 3D quantum Hall effect in topological semimetals. Because of the topological constraint, the Fermi arc at a single surface has an open Fermi surface, which cannot host the quantum Hall effect. Via a "wormhole" tunneling assisted by the Weyl nodes, the Fermi arcs at opposite surfaces can form a complete Fermi loop and support the quantum Hall effect. The edge states of the Fermi arcs show a unique 3D distribution, giving an example of (d -2 )-dimensional boundary states. This is distinctly different from the surface-state quantum Hall effect from a single surface of topological insulator. As the Fermi energy sweeps through the Weyl nodes, the sheet Hall conductivity evolves from the 1 /B dependence to quantized plateaus at the Weyl nodes. This behavior can be realized by tuning gate voltages in a slab of topological semimetal, such as the TaAs family, Cd3 As2 , or Na3Bi . This work will be instructive not only for searching transport signatures of the Fermi arcs but also for exploring novel electron gases in other topological phases of matter.

  6. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn may...

  7. Sitka, Alaska 9 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sitka, Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 9 arc-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly for...

  8. Retinal injury from a welding arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidoff, M.A.; Sliney, D.H.

    1974-01-01

    An 18-year-old man stared at a welding arc for approximately ten minutes, sustaining moderate facial erythema, keratoconjunctivitis, marked visual loss, a pupillary abnormality, and a retinal injury accompanied by a dense central scotoma and peripheral field constriction. A residual, partially pigmented foveal lesion remained after 16 months, with normal visual acuity. Since the degree of keratoconjunctivitis and facial erythema was known, we substantiated the duration of exposure to the arc by weighting the known action spectrum of moderate ultraviolet erythema with the ultraviolet spectral irradiance measurements of the arc. From the radiometric measurements of the visible brightness and visible and near infrared spectrum of the arc and from knowledge of pupil size, we calculated the retinal exposure dose rate, which was less than normally considered necessary to produce a chorioretinal burn. This case may provide a clinical example of photic maculopathy recently reported in experimental investigations

  9. Sitka, Alaska 1 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sitka, Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 1 arc-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly for...

  10. Arc tracks on nanostructured surfaces after microbreakdowns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinelnikov, D; Bulgadaryan, D; Kolodko, D; Kurnaev, V; Hwangbo, D; Ohno, N; Kajita, S

    2016-01-01

    Studying of initial steps of unipolar arc ignition process is important for reduction of probability of arcing between the plasma and the wall in thermonuclear devices. Tungsten nano-fuzz surface formed by helium plasma irradiation at high fluences and temperatures is a perfect material for arc ignition. Snowflake-like craters were detected on the fuzzy surfaces after short micro-breakdowns. Such sort of craters have not been observed before on any other metallic surfaces. These specific traces are formed due to unique properties of the fuzz structure. The nano-fuzz could be easily melted and vaporized by micro-breakdown current, due to its porosity and bad thermal conductivity, and formation of low conducting metallic vapour under the cathode spot causes discharge movement to the nearest place. Thus, even low current arc can easily move and leave traces, which could be easily observed by a secondary electron microscope. (paper)

  11. Sitka, Alaska 3 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sitka, Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 3 arc-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly for...

  12. Seward, Alaska 3 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 3 arc-second Seward Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 2.67-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  13. Seldovia, Alaska 1 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Seldovia, Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 1 arc-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly for...

  14. Application of the electron pencil beam redefinition algorithm to electron arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, P.-C.M.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Starkschall, George; Boyd, Robert A.; Tucker, Susan L.; Antolak, John A.

    2006-01-01

    This project investigated the potential of summing fixed-beam dose distributions calculated using the pencil-beam redefinition algorithm (PBRA) at small angular steps (1 deg.) to model an electron arc therapy beam. The PRBA, previously modified to model skin collimation, was modified further by incorporating two correction factors. One correction factor that is energy, SSD (source-to-surface distance), and field-width dependent constrained the calculated dose output to be the same as the measured dose output for fixed-beam geometries within the range of field widths and SSDs encountered in arc therapy. Another correction factor (single field-width correction factor for each energy) compensated for large-angle scattering not being modeled, allowing a more accurate calculation of dose output at mid arc. The PBRA was commissioned to accurately calculate dose in a water phantom for fixed-beam geometries typical of electron arc therapy. Calculated central-axis depth doses agreed with measured doses to within 2% in the low-dose gradient regions and within 1-mm in the high-dose gradient regions. Off-axis doses agreed to within 2 mm in the high-dose gradient regions and within 3% in the low-dose gradient regions. Arced-beam calculations of dose output and depth dose at mid arc were evaluated by comparing to data measured using two cylindrical water phantoms with radii of 12 and 15 cm at 10 and 15 MeV. Dose output was measured for all combinations of phantom radii of curvature, collimator widths (4, 5, and 6 cm), and arc angles (0 deg., 20 deg., 40 deg., 60 deg., 80 deg., and 90 deg.) for both beam energies. Results showed the calculated mid-arc dose output to agree within 2% of measurement for all combinations. For a 90 deg.arc angle and 5x20 cm 2 field size, the calculated mid-arc depth dose in the low-dose gradient region agreed to within 2% of measurement for all depths at 10 MeV and for depths greater than depth of dose maximum R 100 at 15 MeV. For depths in the

  15. Basins in ARC-continental collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.; Busby, Cathy; Azor, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Arc-continent collisions occur commonly in the plate-tectonic cycle and result in rapidly formed and rapidly collapsing orogens, often spanning just 5-15 My. Growth of continental masses through arc-continent collision is widely thought to be a major process governing the structural and geochemical evolution of the continental crust over geologic time. Collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with passive continental margins (a situation in which the arc, on the upper plate, faces the continent) involve a substantially different geometry than collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with active continental margins (a situation requiring more than one convergence zone and in which the arc, on the lower plate, backs into the continent), with variable preservation potential for basins in each case. Substantial differences also occur between trench and forearc evolution in tectonically erosive versus tectonically accreting margins, both before and after collision. We examine the evolution of trenches, trench-slope basins, forearc basins, intra-arc basins, and backarc basins during arc-continent collision. The preservation potential of trench-slope basins is low; in collision they are rapidly uplifted and eroded, and at erosive margins they are progressively destroyed by subduction erosion. Post-collisional preservation of trench sediment and trench-slope basins is biased toward margins that were tectonically accreting for a substantial length of time before collision. Forearc basins in erosive margins are usually floored by strong lithosphere and may survive collision with a passive margin, sometimes continuing sedimentation throughout collision and orogeny. The low flexural rigidity of intra-arc basins makes them deep and, if preserved, potentially long records of arc and collisional tectonism. Backarc basins, in contrast, are typically subducted and their sediment either lost or preserved only as fragments in melange sequences. A substantial proportion of the sediment derived from

  16. An investigation of the dose distribution effect related with collimator angle in volumetric arc therapy of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Tas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the dose-volume variations of planning target volume (PTV and organ at risks (OARs in eleven prostate cancer patients planned with single and double arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT when varying collimator angle. Single and double arc VMAT treatment plans were created using Monaco5.0® with collimator angle set to 0°. All plans were normalized 7600 cGy dose to the 95% of clinical target volume (CTV volume. The single arc VMAT plans were reoptimized with different collimator angles (0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, and 90°, and for double arc VMAT plans (0–0°, 15°–345, 30–330°, 45–315°, 60–300°, 75–285°, 90–270° using the same optimization parameters. For the comparison the parameters of heterogeneity index (HI, dose-volume histogram and minimum dose to the 95% of PTV volume (D95 PTV calculated and analyzed. The best plans were verified using 2 dimensional ion chamber array IBA Matrixx® and three-dimensional IBA Compass® program. The comparison between calculation and measurement were made by the γ-index (3%/3 mm analysis. A higher D95 (PTV were found for single arc VMAT with 15° collimator angle. For double arc, VMAT with 60–300° and 75–285° collimator angles. However, lower rectum doses obtained for 75–285° collimator angles. There was no significant dose difference, based on other OARs which are bladder and femur head. When we compared single and double arc VMAT's D95 (PTV, we determined 2.44% high coverage and lower HI with double arc VMAT. All plans passed the γ-index (3%/3 mm analysis with more than 97% of the points and we had an average γ-index for CTV 0.36, for PTV 0.32 with double arc VMAT. These results were significant by Wilcoxon signed rank test statistically. The results show that dose coverage of target and OAR's doses also depend significantly on the collimator angles due to the geometry of target and OARs. Based on the results we have decided to plan prostate

  17. Comparison of Several Modes in Simple ARC Second-Order Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Rybin

    1994-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the popular, multiple-feedback, ARC single opamp, highpass second-order filter is proposed in several types of modes, namely voltage, current and hybrid ones. These modes are studied and compared in detail. Computer experimental results are given supporting the theory.

  18. Characterization of a high-power/current pulsed magnetized arc discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zielinski, J. J.; van der Meiden, H. J.; Morgan, T. W.; D.C. Schram,; De Temmerman, G.

    2012-01-01

    A high-power pulsed magnetized arc discharge has been developed to allow the superimposition of a dc plasma and a high-power plasma impulse with a single plasma source. A capacitor bank (8400 mu F) is parallel-coupled to the current regulated power supply. The current is transiently increased from

  19. Characterization of a high-power/current pulsed magnetized arc discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zielinski, J.J.; Meiden, van der H.J.; Morgan, T.W.; Schram, D.C.; De Temmerman, G.C.

    2012-01-01

    A high-power pulsed magnetized arc discharge has been developed to allow the superimposition of a dc plasma and a high-power plasma impulse with a single plasma source. A capacitor bank (8400 µF) is parallel-coupled to the current regulated power supply. The current is transiently increased from its

  20. Metal Vapor Arcing Risk Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Monika C.; Leidecker, Henning W.

    2010-01-01

    The Tin Whisker Metal Vapor Arcing Risk Assessment Tool has been designed to evaluate the risk of metal vapor arcing and to help facilitate a decision toward a researched risk disposition. Users can evaluate a system without having to open up the hardware. This process allows for investigating components at risk rather than spending time and money analyzing every component. The tool points to a risk level and provides direction for appropriate action and documentation.

  1. Managing Data and ArcGIS

    OpenAIRE

    Farr, Lucy

    2011-01-01

    Glenn Jobson (CRASSH) produced and edited this video in collaboration with the Incremental project. ESRI's ArcGIS data, and other vector data system, are highly vulnerable to partial or complete data loss over time because as the company makes frequent software updates, and the data themselves have so many moving parts. In this presentation, Lucy Farr (McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research) describes her experiences using ArcGIS, lessons learnt, and recommendations for best practi...

  2. Comparison of RapidArc plans and fixed field intensity modulated radiotherapy planning in cervical cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiangyu; Liu Xianfeng; He Ya'nan; Yin Wenjuan; Wu Yongzhong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the advantages and disadvantages between the RapidArc plans and fixed-field IMRT plan (IMRT). Methods: Ten cases of cervical cancer,aged 55 (36-70), who were to receive post-operative radiotherapy were selected randomly. Single arc (Arc 1), two arcs (Arc 2), and three arc (Arc 3) RapidArc plans and fixed-field IMRT plan were designed respectively in the Eclipse 8.6 planning system. The designing, treatment time, target area, and dose distribution of organs at risk by these 4 planning techniques were compared. Results: The values of average planned treatment time by the Arc 1, Arc 2, and Arc 3 ten cases was 98, 155, 185, and 46 min, respectively. The values of average treatment time in the Varian IX accelerator were 2.15, 3.32, 4.48, and 6.95 min, respectively. The average mean doses were (48.99±1.08),(49.40±0.51), (49.51±0.62), and (48.65±0.92) Gy, respectively. The values of homogeneity index (HI) of target were 1.11±0.07, 1.07±0.02, 1.06±0.02, and 1.12±0.05, respectively. The values of conformal index (CI) of target were 0.73±0.13, 0.87±0.06, 0.87±0.06, and 0.79±0.06, respectively. The doses at rectum, bladder, and small intestine calculated by IMRT plan were the lowest, and the doses at the femoral neck calculated by these 4 plans were similar. Conclusions: The RapidArc plan is superior in dose distribution at target, HI, CI, and treatment time to IMRT, but IMRT plan is superior to RapidArc in planned dose calculation time and protection of organs at risk. However, in general, the RapidArc plan is better in clinical application than IMRT plan. (authors)

  3. Recent ARC developments: Through modularity to interoperability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnova, O; Cameron, D; Ellert, M; Groenager, M; Johansson, D; Kleist, J; Dobe, P; Joenemo, J; Konya, B; Fraagaat, T; Konstantinov, A; Nilsen, J K; Saada, F Ould; Qiang, W; Read, A; Kocan, M; Marton, I; Nagy, Zs; Moeller, S; Mohn, B

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Resource Connector (ARC) middleware introduced by NorduGrid is one of the basic Grid solutions used by scientists worldwide. While being well-proven in daily use by a wide variety of scientific applications at large-scale infrastructures like the Nordic DataGrid Facility (NDGF) and smaller scale projects, production ARC of today is still largely based on conventional Grid technologies and custom interfaces introduced a decade ago. In order to guarantee sustainability, true cross-system portability and standards-compliance based interoperability, the ARC community undertakes a massive effort of implementing modular Web Service (WS) approach into the middleware. With support from the EU KnowARC project, new components were introduced and the existing key ARC services got extended with WS technology based standard-compliant interfaces following a service-oriented architecture. Such components include the hosting environment framework, the resource-coupled execution service, the re-engineered client library, the self-healing storage solution and the peer-to-peer information system, to name a few. Gradual introduction of these new services and client tools into the production middleware releases is carried out together with NDGF and thus ensures a smooth transition to the next generation Grid middleware. Standard interfaces and modularity of the new component design are essential for ARC contributions to the planned Universal Middleware Distribution of the European Grid Initiative.

  4. Recent ARC developments: Through modularity to interoperability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnova, O; Cameron, D; Ellert, M; Groenager, M; Johansson, D; Kleist, J [NDGF, Kastruplundsgade 22, DK-2770 Kastrup (Denmark); Dobe, P; Joenemo, J; Konya, B [Lund University, Experimental High Energy Physics, Institute of Physics, Box 118, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Fraagaat, T; Konstantinov, A; Nilsen, J K; Saada, F Ould; Qiang, W; Read, A [University of Oslo, Department of Physics, P. O. Box 1048, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Kocan, M [Pavol Jozef Safarik University, Faculty of Science, Jesenna 5, SK-04000 Kosice (Slovakia); Marton, I; Nagy, Zs [NIIF/HUNGARNET, Victor Hugo 18-22, H-1132 Budapest (Hungary); Moeller, S [University of Luebeck, Inst. Of Neuro- and Bioinformatics, Ratzeburger Allee 160, D-23538 Luebeck (Germany); Mohn, B, E-mail: oxana.smirnova@hep.lu.s [Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Div. of Nuclear and Particle Physics, Box 535, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-04-01

    The Advanced Resource Connector (ARC) middleware introduced by NorduGrid is one of the basic Grid solutions used by scientists worldwide. While being well-proven in daily use by a wide variety of scientific applications at large-scale infrastructures like the Nordic DataGrid Facility (NDGF) and smaller scale projects, production ARC of today is still largely based on conventional Grid technologies and custom interfaces introduced a decade ago. In order to guarantee sustainability, true cross-system portability and standards-compliance based interoperability, the ARC community undertakes a massive effort of implementing modular Web Service (WS) approach into the middleware. With support from the EU KnowARC project, new components were introduced and the existing key ARC services got extended with WS technology based standard-compliant interfaces following a service-oriented architecture. Such components include the hosting environment framework, the resource-coupled execution service, the re-engineered client library, the self-healing storage solution and the peer-to-peer information system, to name a few. Gradual introduction of these new services and client tools into the production middleware releases is carried out together with NDGF and thus ensures a smooth transition to the next generation Grid middleware. Standard interfaces and modularity of the new component design are essential for ARC contributions to the planned Universal Middleware Distribution of the European Grid Initiative.

  5. SU-F-P-30: Clinical Assessment of Auto Beam-Hold Triggered by Fiducial Localization During Prostate RapidArc Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkinson, P; Chen, Q [Flower Hospital, Sylvania, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the clinical efficacy of auto beam hold during prostate RapidArc delivery, triggered by fiducial localization on kV imaging with a Varian True Beam. Methods: Prostate patients with four gold fiducials were candidates in this study. Daily setup was accomplished by aligning to fiducials using orthogonal kV imaging. During RapidArc delivery, a kV image was automatically acquired with a momentary beam hold every 60 degrees of gantry rotation. The position of each fiducial was identified by a search algorithm and compared to a predetermined 1.4 cm diameter target area. Treatment continued if all the fiducials were within the target area. If any fiducial was outside the target area the beam hold was not released, and the operators determined if the patient needed re-alignment using the daily setup method. Results: Four patients were initially selected. For three patients, the auto beam hold performed seamlessly. In one instance, the system correctly identified misaligned fiducials, stopped treatment, and the patient was re-positioned. The fourth patient had a prosthetic hip which sometimes blocked the fiducials and caused the fiducial search algorithm to fail. The auto beam hold was disabled for this patient and the therapists manually monitored the fiducial positions during treatment. Average delivery time for a 2-arc fraction was increased by 59 seconds. Phantom studies indicated the dose discrepancy related to multiple beam holds is <0.1%. For a plan with 43 fractions, the additional imaging increased dose by an estimated 68 cGy. Conclusion: Automated intrafraction kV imaging can effectively perform auto beam holds due to patient movement, with the exception of prosthetic hip patients. The additional imaging dose and delivery time are clinically acceptable. It may be a cost-effective alternative to Calypso in RapidArc prostate patient delivery. Further study is warranted to explore its feasibility under various clinical conditions.

  6. SU-F-P-30: Clinical Assessment of Auto Beam-Hold Triggered by Fiducial Localization During Prostate RapidArc Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, P; Chen, Q

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical efficacy of auto beam hold during prostate RapidArc delivery, triggered by fiducial localization on kV imaging with a Varian True Beam. Methods: Prostate patients with four gold fiducials were candidates in this study. Daily setup was accomplished by aligning to fiducials using orthogonal kV imaging. During RapidArc delivery, a kV image was automatically acquired with a momentary beam hold every 60 degrees of gantry rotation. The position of each fiducial was identified by a search algorithm and compared to a predetermined 1.4 cm diameter target area. Treatment continued if all the fiducials were within the target area. If any fiducial was outside the target area the beam hold was not released, and the operators determined if the patient needed re-alignment using the daily setup method. Results: Four patients were initially selected. For three patients, the auto beam hold performed seamlessly. In one instance, the system correctly identified misaligned fiducials, stopped treatment, and the patient was re-positioned. The fourth patient had a prosthetic hip which sometimes blocked the fiducials and caused the fiducial search algorithm to fail. The auto beam hold was disabled for this patient and the therapists manually monitored the fiducial positions during treatment. Average delivery time for a 2-arc fraction was increased by 59 seconds. Phantom studies indicated the dose discrepancy related to multiple beam holds is <0.1%. For a plan with 43 fractions, the additional imaging increased dose by an estimated 68 cGy. Conclusion: Automated intrafraction kV imaging can effectively perform auto beam holds due to patient movement, with the exception of prosthetic hip patients. The additional imaging dose and delivery time are clinically acceptable. It may be a cost-effective alternative to Calypso in RapidArc prostate patient delivery. Further study is warranted to explore its feasibility under various clinical conditions.

  7. Applications of a single carbon electrode | Skelskey | SINET ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. A single carbon electrode used with a common arc welder has been successfully used on steel to weld, to surface harden, to spot weld sheet, to pierce holes and to do simple brazing. Key words/phrases: Arc, carbon, dry cell, plasma, welding. SINET: Ethiopian Journal of Science Vol.26(2) 2003: 173-176 ...

  8. Crustal growth of the Izu-Ogasawara arc estimated from structural characteristics of Oligocene arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, N.; Yamashita, M.; Kodaira, S.; Miura, S.; Sato, T.; No, T.; Tatsumi, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) carried out seismic surveys using a multichannel reflection system and ocean bottom seismographs, and we have clarified crustal structures of whole Izu-Ogasawara (Bonin)-Marina (IBM) arc since 2002. These refection images and velocity structures suggest that the crustal evolution in the intra-oceanic island arc accompanies with much interaction of materials between crust and mantle. Slow mantle velocity identified beneath the thick arc crusts suggests that dense crustal materials transformed into the mantle. On the other hand, high velocity lower crust can be seen around the bottom of the crust beneath the rifted region, and it suggests that underplating of mafic materials occurs there. Average crustal production rate of the entire arc is larger than expected one and approximately 200 km3/km/Ma. The production rate of basaltic magmas corresponds to that of oceanic ridge. Repeated crustal differentiation is indispensable to produce much light materials like continental materials, however, the real process cannot still be resolved yet. We, therefore, submitted drilling proposals to obtain in-situ middle crust with P-wave velocity of 6 km/s. In the growth history of the IBM arc, it is known by many papers that boninitic volcanisms preceded current bimodal volcanisms based on basaltic magmas. The current volcanisms accompanied with basaltic magmas have been occurred since Oligocene age, however, the tectonic differences to develop crustal architecture between Oligocene and present are not understood yet. We obtained new refraction/reflection data along an arc strike of N-S in fore-arc region. Then, we estimate crustal structure with severe change of the crustal thickness from refraction data, which are similar to that along the volcanic front. Interval for location of the thick arc crust along N-S is very similar to that along the volcanic front. The refection image indicates that the basement of the fore-arc

  9. THE REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION OF GIANT ARCS IN THE SLOAN GIANT ARCS SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayliss, Matthew B.; Gladders, Michael D.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Oguri, Masamune; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Sharon, Keren; Dahle, Haakon

    2011-01-01

    We measure the redshift distribution of a sample of 28 giant arcs discovered as a part of the Sloan Giant Arcs Survey. Gemini/GMOS-North spectroscopy provides precise redshifts for 24 arcs, and 'redshift desert' constrains for the remaining 4 arcs. This is a direct measurement of the redshift distribution of a uniformly selected sample of bright giant arcs, which is an observable that can be used to inform efforts to predict giant arc statistics. Our primary giant arc sample has a median redshift z = 1.821 and nearly two-thirds of the arcs, 64%, are sources at z ∼> 1.4, indicating that the population of background sources that are strongly lensed into bright giant arcs resides primarily at high redshift. We also analyze the distribution of redshifts for 19 secondary strongly lensed background sources that are not visually apparent in Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging, but were identified in deeper follow-up imaging of the lensing cluster fields. Our redshift sample for the secondary sources is not spectroscopically complete, but combining it with our primary giant arc sample suggests that a large fraction of all background galaxies that are strongly lensed by foreground clusters reside at z ∼> 1.4. Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests indicate that our well-selected, spectroscopically complete primary giant arc redshift sample can be reproduced with a model distribution that is constructed from a combination of results from studies of strong-lensing clusters in numerical simulations and observational constraints on the galaxy luminosity function.

  10. CBCT-Guided Rapid Arc for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) in lung tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fandino, J. M.; Silva, M. C.; Izquierdo, P.; Candal, A.; Diaz, I.; Fernandez, C.; Gesto, C.; Poncet, M.; Soto, M.; Triana, G.; Losada, C.; Marino, A.

    2013-07-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy has emerged as a standard treatment option for stage I non-small cell lung cancer in patients unfit for surgery, or who refuse surgery. An increasing number of prospective phase I/II trials, as well as large single and multicenter studies have reported local control rates to be in excess of 85% for early stage non-small cell lung cancer. Volumetric arc therapy RapidArc with tumor-based image guidance technique will be presented as well as our preliminary observations. (Author)

  11. arcControlTower: the System for Atlas Production and Analysis on ARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipcic, Andrej

    2011-01-01

    PanDA, the Atlas management and distribution system for production and analysis jobs on EGEE and OSG clusters, is based on pilot jobs to increase the throughput and stability of the job execution on grid. The ARC middleware uses a specific approach which tightly connects the job requirements with cluster capabilities like resource usage, software availability and caching of input files. The pilot concept renders the ARC features useless. The arcControlTower is the job submission system which merges the pilot benefits and ARC advantages. It takes the pilot payload from the panda server and submits the jobs to the Nordugrid ARC clusters as regular jobs, with all the job resources known in advance. All the pilot communication with the PanDA server is done by the arcControlTower, so it plays the role of a pilot factory and the pilot itself. There are several advantages to this approach: no grid middleware is needed on the worker nodes, the fair-share between the production and user jobs is tuned with the arcControlTower load parameters, the jobs can be controlled by ARC client tools. The system could be extended to other submission systems using central distribution.

  12. Arc dynamics of a pulsed DC nitrogen rotating gliding arc discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fengsen; Zhang, Hao; Li, Xiaodong; Wu, Angjian; Yan, Jianhua; Ni, Mingjiang; Tu, Xin

    2018-03-01

    In this study, a novel pulsed direct current (DC) rotating gliding arc (RGA) plasma reactor co-driven by an external magnetic field and a tangential gas flow has been developed. The dynamic characteristics of the rotating gliding arc have been investigated by means of numerical simulation and experiment. The simulation results show that a highly turbulent vortex flow can be generated at the bottom of the RGA reactor to accelerate the arc rotation after arc ignition, whereas the magnitude of gas velocity declined significantly along the axial direction of the RGA reactor. The calculated arc rotation frequency (14.4 Hz) is reasonably close to the experimental result (18.5 Hz) at a gas flow rate of 10 l min-1. In the presence of an external magnet, the arc rotation frequency is around five times higher than that of the RGA reactor without using a magnet, which suggests that the external magnetic field plays a dominant role in the maintenance of the arc rotation in the upper zone of the RGA reactor. In addition, when the magnet is placed outside the reactor reversely to form a reverse external magnetic field, the arc can be stabilized at a fixed position in the inner wall of the outer electrode at a critical gas flow rate of 16 l min-1.

  13. Fluorescent Protein Voltage Probes Derived from ArcLight that Respond to Membrane Voltage Changes with Fast Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhou; Jin, Lei; Platisa, Jelena; Cohen, Lawrence B.; Baker, Bradley J.; Pieribone, Vincent A.

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported the discovery of a fluorescent protein voltage probe, ArcLight, and its derivatives that exhibit large changes in fluorescence intensity in response to changes of plasma membrane voltage. ArcLight allows the reliable detection of single action potentials and sub-threshold activities in individual neurons and dendrites. The response kinetics of ArcLight (τ1-on ~10 ms, τ2-on ~ 50 ms) are comparable with most published genetically-encoded voltage probes. However, probes using voltage-sensing domains other than that from the Ciona intestinalis voltage sensitive phosphatase exhibit faster kinetics. Here we report new versions of ArcLight, in which the Ciona voltage-sensing domain was replaced with those from chicken, zebrafish, frog, mouse or human. We found that the chicken and zebrafish-based ArcLight exhibit faster kinetics, with a time constant (τ) less than 6ms for a 100 mV depolarization. Although the response amplitude of these two probes (8-9%) is not as large as the Ciona-based ArcLight (~35%), they are better at reporting action potentials from cultured neurons at higher frequency. In contrast, probes based on frog, mouse and human voltage sensing domains were either slower than the Ciona-based ArcLight or had very small signals. PMID:24312287

  14. Fluorescent protein voltage probes derived from ArcLight that respond to membrane voltage changes with fast kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Han

    Full Text Available We previously reported the discovery of a fluorescent protein voltage probe, ArcLight, and its derivatives that exhibit large changes in fluorescence intensity in response to changes of plasma membrane voltage. ArcLight allows the reliable detection of single action potentials and sub-threshold activities in individual neurons and dendrites. The response kinetics of ArcLight (τ1-on ~10 ms, τ2-on ~ 50 ms are comparable with most published genetically-encoded voltage probes. However, probes using voltage-sensing domains other than that from the Ciona intestinalis voltage sensitive phosphatase exhibit faster kinetics. Here we report new versions of ArcLight, in which the Ciona voltage-sensing domain was replaced with those from chicken, zebrafish, frog, mouse or human. We found that the chicken and zebrafish-based ArcLight exhibit faster kinetics, with a time constant (τ less than 6 ms for a 100 mV depolarization. Although the response amplitude of these two probes (8-9% is not as large as the Ciona-based ArcLight (~35%, they are better at reporting action potentials from cultured neurons at higher frequency. In contrast, probes based on frog, mouse and human voltage sensing domains were either slower than the Ciona-based ArcLight or had very small signals.

  15. Activation of temperature-sensitive TRPV1-like receptors in ARC POMC neurons reduces food intake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hoon Jeong

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Proopiomelanocortin (POMC neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC respond to numerous hormonal and neural signals, resulting in changes in food intake. Here, we demonstrate that ARC POMC neurons express capsaicin-sensitive transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor (TRPV1-like receptors. To show expression of TRPV1-like receptors in ARC POMC neurons, we use single-cell reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, electrophysiology, TRPV1 knock-out (KO, and TRPV1-Cre knock-in mice. A small elevation of temperature in the physiological range is enough to depolarize ARC POMC neurons. This depolarization is blocked by the TRPV1 receptor antagonist and by Trpv1 gene knockdown. Capsaicin-induced activation reduces food intake that is abolished by a melanocortin receptor antagonist. To selectively stimulate TRPV1-like receptor-expressing ARC POMC neurons in the ARC, we generate an adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5 carrying a Cre-dependent channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2-enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP expression cassette under the control of the two neuronal POMC enhancers (nPEs. Optogenetic stimulation of TRPV1-like receptor-expressing POMC neurons decreases food intake. Hypothalamic temperature is rapidly elevated and reaches to approximately 39 °C during treadmill running. This elevation is associated with a reduction in food intake. Knockdown of the Trpv1 gene exclusively in ARC POMC neurons blocks the feeding inhibition produced by increased hypothalamic temperature. Taken together, our findings identify a melanocortinergic circuit that links acute elevations in hypothalamic temperature with acute reductions in food intake.

  16. Operator Bias in the Estimation of Arc Efficiency in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Sikström

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the operator bias in the measurement process of arc efficiency in stationary direct current electrode negative gas tungsten arc welding is discussed. An experimental study involving 15 operators (enough to reach statistical significance has been carried out with the purpose to estimate the arc efficiency from a specific procedure for calorimetric experiments. The measurement procedure consists of three manual operations which introduces operator bias in the measurement process. An additional relevant experiment highlights the consequences of estimating the arc voltage by measuring the potential between the terminals of the welding power source instead of measuring the potential between the electrode contact tube and the workpiece. The result of the study is a statistical evaluation of the operator bias influence on the estimate, showing that operator bias is negligible in the estimate considered here. On the contrary the consequences of neglecting welding leads voltage drop results in a significant under estimation of the arc efficiency.

  17. Method to reduce arc blow during DC arc welding of pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espina-Hernandez, J. H.; Rueda-Morales, G.L.; Caleyo, F.; Hallen, J. M. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, (Mexico); Lopez-Montenegro, A.; Perz-Baruch, E. [Pemex Exploracion y Produccion, Tabasco, (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    Steel pipelines are huge ferromagnetic structures and can be easily subjected to arc blow during the DC arc welding process. The development of methods to avoid arc blow during pipeline DC arc welding is a major objective in the pipeline industry. This study developed a simple procedure to compensate the residual magnetic field in the groove during DC arc welding. A Gaussmeter was used to perform magnetic flux density measurements in pipelines in southern Mexico. These data were used to perform magnetic finite element simulations using FEMM. Different variables were studied such as the residual magnetic field in the groove or the position of the coil with respect to the groove. An empirical predictive equation was developed from these trials to compensate for the residual magnetic field. A new method of compensating for the residual magnetic field in the groove by selecting the number of coil turns and the position of the coil with respect to the groove was established.

  18. Magnetic Method to Characterize the Current Densities in Breaker Arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machkour, Nadia

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to use magnetic induction measurements from a low voltage breaker arc, to reconstruct the arc's current density. The measurements were made using Hall effect sensors, which were placed close to, but outside the breaking device. The arc was modelled as a rectangular current sheet, composed of a mix of threadlike current segments and with a current density varying across the propagation direction. We found the magnetic induction of the arc is a convolution product of the current density, and a function depending on the breaker geometry and arc model. Using deconvolution methods, the current density in the electric arc was determined.The method is used to study the arc behavior into the breaker device. Notably, position, arc size, and electric conductivity could all be determined, and then used to characterize the arc mode, diffuse or concentrated, and study the condition of its mode changing

  19. Free fall plasma-arc reactor for synthesis of carbon nanotubes in microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alford, J. M.; Mason, G. R.; Feikema, D. A.

    2006-01-01

    High temperatures inside the plasma of a carbon arc generate strong buoyancy driven convection which has an effect on the growth and morphology of the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). To study the effect of buoyancy on the arc process, a miniature carbon arc apparatus was designed and developed to synthesize SWNTs in a microgravity environment substantially free from buoyant convective flows. An arc reactor was operated in the 2.2 and 5.18 s drop towers at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The apparatus employed a 4 mm diameter anode and was powered by a portable battery pack capable of providing in excess of 300 A at 30 V to the arc for the duration of a 5 s drop. However, the principal result is that no dramatic difference in sample yield or composition was noted between normal gravity and 2.2 and 5 s long microgravity runs. Much longer duration microgravity time is required for SWNT's growth such as the zero-G aircraft, but more likely will need to be performed on the international space station or an orbiting spacecraft

  20. Emissions of chromium (VI) from arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heung, William; Yun, Myoung-Jin; Chang, Daniel P Y; Green, Peter G; Halm, Chris

    2007-02-01

    The presence of Cr in the +6 oxidation state (Cr[VI]) is still observed in ambient air samples in California despite steps taken to reduce emissions from plating operations. One known source of emission of Cr(VI) is welding, especially with high Cr-content materials, such as stainless steels. An experimental effort was undertaken to expand and update Cr(VI) emission factors by conducting tests on four types of arc-welding operations: gas-metal arc welding (GMAW), shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), fluxcore arc welding, and pulsed GMAW. Standard American Welding Society hood results were compared with a total enclosure method that permitted isokinetic sampling for particle size-cut measurement, as well as total collection of the aerosol. The fraction of Cr(VI) emitted per unit mass of Cr electrode consumed was determined. Consistent with AP-42 data, initial results indicate that a significant fraction of the total Cr in the aerosol is in the +6 oxidation state. The fraction of Cr(VI) and total aerosol mass produced by the different arc welding methods varies with the type of welding process used. Self-shielded electrodes that do not use a shield gas, for example, SMAW, produce greater amounts of Cr(VI) per unit mass of electrode consumed. The formation of Cr(VI) from standard electrode wires used for welding mild steel was below the method detection limit after eliminating an artifact in the analytical method used.

  1. 'LTE-diffusion approximation' for arc calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowke, J J; Tanaka, M

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of the 'LTE-diffusion approximation' for predicting the properties of electric arcs. Under this approximation, local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) is assumed, with a particular mesh size near the electrodes chosen to be equal to the 'diffusion length', based on D e /W, where D e is the electron diffusion coefficient and W is the electron drift velocity. This approximation overcomes the problem that the equilibrium electrical conductivity in the arc near the electrodes is almost zero, which makes accurate calculations using LTE impossible in the limit of small mesh size, as then voltages would tend towards infinity. Use of the LTE-diffusion approximation for a 200 A arc with a thermionic cathode gives predictions of total arc voltage, electrode temperatures, arc temperatures and radial profiles of heat flux density and current density at the anode that are in approximate agreement with more accurate calculations which include an account of the diffusion of electric charges to the electrodes, and also with experimental results. Calculations, which include diffusion of charges, agree with experimental results of current and heat flux density as a function of radius if the Milne boundary condition is used at the anode surface rather than imposing zero charge density at the anode

  2. Vacuum arc ion charge state distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, I.G.; Godechot, X.

    1990-06-01

    We have measured vacuum arc ion charge state spectra for a wide range of metallic cathode materials. The charge state distributions were measured using a time-of-flight diagnostic to monitor the energetic ion beam produced by a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source. We have obtained data for 48 metallic cathode elements: Li, C, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ge, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Pd, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb, Hf, Ta, W, Ir, Pt, Au, Pb, Bi, Th and U. The arc was operated in a pulsed mode with pulse length 0.25 msec; arc current was 100 A throughout. This array of elements extends and completes previous work by us. In this paper the measured distributions are cataloged and compared with our earlier results and with those of other workers. We also make some observations about the performance of the various elements as suitable vacuum arc cathode materials

  3. Vacuum arc ion charge-state distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, I.G.; Godechot, X.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have measured vacuum arc ion charge-state spectra for a wide range of metallic cathode materials. The charge-state distributions were measured using a time-of-flight diagnostic to monitor the energetic ion beam produced by a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source. They have obtained data for 48 metallic cathode elements: Li, C, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ge, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Pd, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb, Hf, Ta, W, Ir, Pt, Au, Pb, Bi, Th, and U. The arc was operated in a pulsed mode with pulse length 0.25 ms; arc current was 100 A throughout. This array of elements extends and completes previous work by the authors. In this paper the measured distributions are cataloged and compared with their earlier results and those of other workers. They also make some observations about the performance of the various elements as suitable vacuum arc cathode materials

  4. Sweden: Autonomous Reactivity Control (ARC) Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qvist, Staffan A.

    2015-01-01

    The next generation of nuclear energy systems must be licensed, constructed, and operated in a manner that will provide a competitively priced supply of energy, keeping in consideration an optimum use of natural resources, while addressing nuclear safety, waste, and proliferation resistance, and the public perception concerns of the countries in which those systems are deployed. These issues are tightly interconnected, and the implementation of passive and inherent safety features is a high priority in all modern reactor designs since it helps to tackle many of the issues at once. To this end, the Autonomous Reactivity Control (ARC) system was developed to ensure excellent inherent safety performance of Generation-IV reactors while having a minimal impact on core performance and economic viability. This paper covers the principles for ARC system design and analysis, the problem of ensuring ARC system response stability and gives examples of the impact of installing ARC systems in well-known fast reactor core systems. It is shown that even with a relatively modest ARC installation, having a near-negligible impact on core performance during standard operation, cores such as the European Sodium Fast Reactor (ESFR) can be made to survive any postulated unprotected transient without coolant boiling or fuel melting

  5. Earthquake location in island arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engdahl, E.R.; Dewey, J.W.; Fujita, K.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive data set of selected teleseismic P-wave arrivals and local-network P- and S-wave arrivals from large earthquakes occurring at all depths within a small section of the central Aleutians is used to examine the general problem of earthquake location in island arcs. Reference hypocenters for this special data set are determined for shallow earthquakes from local-network data and for deep earthquakes from combined local and teleseismic data by joint inversion for structure and location. The high-velocity lithospheric slab beneath the central Aleutians may displace hypocenters that are located using spherically symmetric Earth models; the amount of displacement depends on the position of the earthquakes with respect to the slab and on whether local or teleseismic data are used to locate the earthquakes. Hypocenters for trench and intermediate-depth events appear to be minimally biased by the effects of slab structure on rays to teleseismic stations. However, locations of intermediate-depth events based on only local data are systematically displaced southwards, the magnitude of the displacement being proportional to depth. Shallow-focus events along the main thrust zone, although well located using only local-network data, are severely shifted northwards and deeper, with displacements as large as 50 km, by slab effects on teleseismic travel times. Hypocenters determined by a method that utilizes seismic ray tracing through a three-dimensional velocity model of the subduction zone, derived by thermal modeling, are compared to results obtained by the method of joint hypocenter determination (JHD) that formally assumes a laterally homogeneous velocity model over the source region and treats all raypath anomalies as constant station corrections to the travel-time curve. The ray-tracing method has the theoretical advantage that it accounts for variations in travel-time anomalies within a group of events distributed over a sizable region of a dipping, high

  6. Dosimetric Impact of the Interplay Effect During Stereotactic Lung Radiation Therapy Delivery Using Flattening Filter-Free Beams and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ong, Chin Loon; Dahele, Max; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the dosimetric impact of the interplay effect during RapidArc stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung tumors using flattening filter-free (FFF) beams with different dose rates. Methods and Materials: Seven tumors with motion ≤20 mm, treated with 10-MV FFF RapidArc, were analyzed. A programmable phantom with sinusoidal longitudinal motion (30-mm diameter “tumor” insert; period = 5 s; individualized amplitude from planning 4-dimensional computed tomography) was used for dynamic dose measurements. Measurements were made with GafChromic EBT III films. Plans delivered the prescribed dose to 95% of the planning target volume, created by a 5-mm expansion of the internal target volume. They comprised 2 arcs and maximum dose rates of 400 and 2400 MU/min. For 2400 MU/min plans, measurements were repeated at 3 different initial breathing phases to model interplay over 2 to 3 fractions. For 3 cases, 2 extra plans were created using 1 full rotational arc (with contralateral lung avoidance sector) and 1 partial arc of 224° to 244°. Dynamic and convolved static measurements were compared by use of gamma analysis of 3% dose difference and 1 mm distance-to-agreement. Results: For 2-arc 2400 MU/min plans, maximum dose deviation of 9.4% was found in a single arc; 7.4% for 2 arcs (single fraction) and 99% of the area within the region of interest passed the gamma criteria when all 3 measurements with different initial phases were combined. Single-fraction single-arc plans showed higher dose deviations, which diminished when dose distributions were summed over 2 fractions. All 400 MU/min plans showed good agreement in a single fraction measurement. Conclusion: Under phantom conditions, single-arc and single-fraction 2400 MU/min FFF RapidArc lung stereotactic body radiation therapy is susceptible to interplay. Two arcs and ≥2 fractions reduced the effect to a level that appeared unlikely to be clinically significant

  7. The Chloroplast Division Protein ARC6 Acts to Inhibit Disassembly of GDP-bound FtsZ2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Min Woo; Shaik, Rahamthulla; TerBush, Allan D; Osteryoung, Katherine W; Vitha, Stanislav; Holzenburg, Andreas

    2018-05-16

    Chloroplasts host photosynthesis and fulfill other metabolic functions that are essential to plant life. They have to divide by binary fission to maintain their numbers throughout cycles of cell division. Chloroplast division is achieved by a complex ring-shaped division machinery located on both the inner (stromal) and the outer (cytosolic) side of the chloroplast envelope. The inner division ring (termed the Z ring) is formed by the assembly of tubulin-like FtsZ1 and FtsZ2 proteins. ARC6 is a key chloroplast division protein that interacts with the Z ring. ARC6 spans the inner envelope membrane, is known to stabilize or maintain the Z ring, and anchors the Z ring to the inner membrane through interaction with FtsZ2. The underlying mechanism of Z-ring stabilization is not well understood. Here, biochemical and structural characterization of ARC6 was conducted using light scattering, sedimentation, and light and transmission electron microscopy. The recombinant protein was purified as a dimer. The results indicated that a truncated form of ARC6 (tARC6), representing the stromal portion of ARC6, affects FtsZ2 assembly without forming higher-order structures, and exerts its effect via FtsZ2 dynamics. tARC6 prevented GDP-induced FtsZ2 disassembly and caused a significant net increase in FtsZ2 assembly when GDP was present. Single particle analysis and 3D reconstruction were performed to elucidate the structural basis of ARC6 activity. Together, the data reveal that a dimeric form of tARC6 binds to FtsZ2 filaments and does not increase FtsZ polymerization rates but rather inhibits GDP-associated FtsZ2 disassembly. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Superhydrophobic hybrid membranes by grafting arc-like macromolecular bridges on graphene sheets: Synthesis, characterization and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Zhao-Hua; Luo, Zheng; Huang, Qiang; Deng, Jian-Ping; Wu, Yi-Xian

    2018-05-01

    Grafting single end-tethered polymer chains on the surface of graphene is a conventional way to modify the surface properties of graphene oxide. However, grafting arc-like macromolecular bridges on graphene surfaces has been barely reported. Herein, a novel arc-like polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) macromolecular bridges grafted graphene sheets (GO-g-Arc PDMS) was successfully synthesized via a confined interface reaction at 90 °C. Both the hydrophilic α- and ω-amino groups of linear hydrophobic NH2-PDMS-NH2 macromolecular chains rapidly reacted with epoxy and carboxyl groups on the surfaces of graphene oxide in water suspension to form arc-like PDMS macromolecular bridges on graphene sheets. The grafting density of arc-like PDMS bridges on graphene sheets can reach up to 0.80 mmol g-1 or 1.32 arc-like bridges per nm2 by this confined interface reaction. The water contact angle (WCA) of the hybrid membrane could be increased with increasing both the grafting density and content of covalent arc-like bridges architecture. The superhydrophobic hybrid membrane with a WCA of 153.4° was prepared by grinding of the above arc-like PDMS bridges grafted graphene hybrid, dispersing in ethanol and filtrating by organic filter membrane. This superhydrophobic hybrid membrane shows good self-cleaning and complete oil-water separation properties, which provides potential applications in anticontamination coating and oil-water separation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the synthesis of functional hybrid membranes by grafting arc-like PDMS macromolecular bridges on graphene sheets via a confined interface reaction.

  9. SU-F-J-191: Dosimetric Evaluation of a Left Chestwall Patient Treated with a Compact Proton Pencil Beam Gantry Utilizing Daily Setup CBCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maynard, M; Chen, K; Rosen, L; Wu, H [Willis-Knighton Medical Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the robustness of the gradient technique for treating a multi-isocenter left chest wall patient with a compact proton pencil beam gantry. Both CBCT and stereoscopic imaging are used to facilitate daily treatment setup. Methods: To treat the elongated chest wall planning target volume (PTV) with the compact PBS system, a 28 fraction (5040 CcGE) treatment plan was created using two fields with gradient matching technique. Daily table shifts between treatment field isocenters were obtained from the record and verify system for each treatment fraction. Copies of the initial treatment plan were made for each fraction and the field isocenter coordinates for each plan copy were adjusted to reflect daily table shifts. Doses were re-calculated for each fraction, summed, and compared against the initial plan. Results: The table shifts (average and range) were 2.2 (−5.1–+3.9), 3.0 (−6.0–+4.0) and 3.0 (−10.1–+1.9) millimeters in the anterior-posterior, superior-inferior and right-left directions, respectively. Dose difference to the PTV, heart and ipsilateral lung were evaluated. The percentage of the PTV receiving the prescription dose decreased from 94.6% to 89.1%. The D95 of the PTV increased from 99.6% to 99.9%. The maximum dose in PTV increased from 106.6% to 109.2% and V105 increased from 1.0% to 16.5%. The V20 of the ipsilateral lung increased from 18.5% to 21.0%. The mean heart dose difference was negligible. Conclusion: Observed dose differences to lung and heart tissues due to daily setup variations remained acceptably low while maintaining sufficient dose coverage to the PTV. This initial case study demonstrates the robustness of the gradient technique to treat a large target, multi-isocenter plan with a compact proton pencil beam gantry equipped with CBCT and stereoscopic imaging modalities.

  10. Automatic interactive optimization for volumetric modulated arc therapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tol, Jim P; Dahele, Max; Peltola, Jarkko; Nord, Janne; Slotman, Ben J; Verbakel, Wilko FAR

    2015-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy treatment planning for sites with many different organs-at-risk (OAR) is complex and labor-intensive, making it hard to obtain consistent plan quality. With the aim of addressing this, we developed a program (automatic interactive optimizer, AIO) designed to automate the manual interactive process for the Eclipse treatment planning system. We describe AIO and present initial evaluation data. Our current institutional volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc) planning approach for head and neck tumors places 3-4 adjustable OAR optimization objectives along the dose-volume histogram (DVH) curve that is displayed in the optimization window. AIO scans this window and uses color-coding to differentiate between the DVH-lines, allowing it to automatically adjust the location of the optimization objectives frequently and in a more consistent fashion. We compared RapidArc AIO plans (using 9 optimization objectives per OAR) with the clinical plans of 10 patients, and evaluated optimal AIO settings. AIO consistency was tested by replanning a single patient 5 times. Average V95&V107 of the boost planning target volume (PTV) and V95 of the elective PTV differed by ≤0.5%, while average elective PTV V107 improved by 1.5%. Averaged over all patients, AIO reduced mean doses to individual salivary structures by 0.9-1.6Gy and provided mean dose reductions of 5.6Gy and 3.9Gy to the composite swallowing structures and oral cavity, respectively. Re-running AIO five times, resulted in the aforementioned parameters differing by less than 3%. Using the same planning strategy as manually optimized head and neck plans, AIO can automate the interactive Eclipse treatment planning process and deliver dosimetric improvements over existing clinical plans

  11. Electric arc, water jet cutting of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruening, D.

    1991-01-01

    For thermal dismantling and cutting of metallic components, as electric arc, water jet cutting method was developed that can be used for underwater cutting work up to a depth of 20 m. Short-circuiting of a continuously fed electrode wire in contact with the metal generates an electric arc which induces partial melting of the metal, and the water jet surrounding the wire rinses away the molten material, thus making a continuous kerf in the material. The method was also tested and modified to allow larger area, surface cutting and removal of metallic surface coatings. This is achieved by melting parts of the surface with the electric arc and subsequent rinsing by the water jet. The cutting and melting depth for surface removal can be accurately controlled by the operating parameters chosen. (orig./DG) [de

  12. Theoretical model of polar cap auroral arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, J.R.; Burke, W.J.; USAF, Bedford, MA)

    1985-01-01

    A theory of the polar cap auroral arcs is proposed under the assumption that the magnetic field reconnection occurs in the cusp region on tail field lines during northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. Requirements of a convection model during northward IMF are enumerated based on observations and fundamental theoretical considerations. The theta aurora can be expected to occur on the closed field lines convecting sunward in the central polar cap, while the less intense regular polar cap arcs can occur either on closed or open field lines. The dynamo region for the polar cap arcs is required to be on closed field lines convecting tailward in the plasma sheet which is magnetically connected to the sunward convection in the central polar cap. 43 references

  13. Cathodic Vacuum Arc Plasma of Thallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Anders, Andre

    2006-01-01

    Thallium arc plasma was investigated in a vacuum arc ion source. As expected from previous consideration of cathode materials in the Periodic Table of the Elements, thallium plasma shows lead-like behavior. Its mean ion charge state exceeds 2.0 immediately after arc triggering, reaches the predicted 1.60 and 1.45 after about 100 microsec and 150 microsec, respectively. The most likely ion velocity is initially8000 m/s and decays to 6500 m/s and 6200 m/s after 100 microsec and 150microsec, respectively. Both ion charge states and ion velocities decay further towards steady state values, which are not reached within the 300microsec pulses used here. It is argued that the exceptionally high vapor pressure and charge exchange reactions are associated with the establishment of steady state ion values

  14. Circular arc snakes and kinematic surface generation

    KAUST Repository

    Barton, Michael

    2013-05-01

    We discuss the theory, discretization, and numerics of curves which are evolving such that part of their shape, or at least their curvature as a function of arc length, remains unchanged. The discretization of a curve as a smooth sequence of circular arcs is well suited for such purposes, and allows us to reduce evolution of curves to the evolution of a control point collection in a certain finite-dimensional shape space. We approach this evolution by a 2-step process: linearized evolution via optimized velocity fields, followed by optimization in order to exactly fulfill all geometric side conditions. We give applications to freeform architecture, including "rationalization" of a surface by congruent arcs, form finding and, most interestingly, non-static architecture. © 2013 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Optical diagnostics of a gliding arc

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Z.W.; Zhu, J.J.; Li, Z.S.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic processes in a gliding arc plasma generated between two diverging electrodes in ambient air driven by 31.25 kHz AC voltage were investigated using spatially and temporally resolved optical techniques. The life cycles of the gliding arc were tracked in fast movies using a high-speed camera...... triggered by Townsend breakdown between the two legs of the gliding arc. The emission from the plasma column is shown to pulsate at a frequency of 62.5 kHz, i.e., twice the frequency of the AC power supply. Optical emission spectra of the plasma radiation show the presence of excited N2, NO and OH radicals...... suggesting that ground-state OH is not formed in the plasma column but in its vicinity. ©2013 Optical Society of America...

  16. TH-AB-BRB-01: Trajectory Modulated Arc Therapy: Application to Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hristov, D. [Stanford University Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Current state-of-the art digital C-arm medical linear accelerators are capable of delivering radiation treatments with high level of automation, which affords coordinated motions of gantry, couch, and multileaf collimator (MLC) with dose rate modulations. The new machine capacity has shown the potential to bring substantially improved radiation dosimetry and/or delivery efficiency to many challenging diseases. Combining an integrated beam orientation optimization algorithm with automated machine navigation, markedly improved dose conformity has been achieved using 4ρ therapy. Trajectory modulated radiation therapy (TMAT) can be used to deliver highly conformal dose to partial breast or to carve complex dose distribution for therapy involving extended volumes such as total marrow and total lymph node treatment. Dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR) not only overcomes the deficiencies of conventional electron therapy in dose conformity and homogeneity but also achieves so without patient-specific shields. The combination of MLC and couch tracking provides improved motion management of thoracic and abdominal tumors. A substantial body of work has been done in these technological advances for clinical translation. The proposed symposium will provide a timely review of these exciting opportunities. Learning Objectives: Recognize the potential of using digitally controlled linacs for clinically significant improvements in delivered dose distributions for various treatment sites. Identify existing approaches to treatment planning, optimization and delivery for treatment techniques utilizing the advanced functions of digital linacs and venues for further development and improvement. Understand methods for testing and validating delivery system performance. Identify tools available on current delivery systems for implementation and control for such treatments. Obtain the update in clinical applications, trials and regulatory approval. K. Sheng, NIH U19AI067769, NIH R43

  17. Epid cine acquisition mode for in vivo dosimetry in dynamic arc radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidanzio, Andrea; Mameli, Alessandra; Placidi, Elisa; Greco, Francesca; Stimato, Gerardina; Gaudino, Diego; Ramella, Sara; D'Angelillo, Rolando; Cellini, Francesco; Trodella, Lucio; Cilla, Savino; Grimaldi, Luca; D'Onofrio, Guido; Azario, Luigi; Piermattei, Angelo

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the cine acquisition mode of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been calibrated and tested to determine the in vivo dose for dynamic conformal arc radiation therapy (DCAT). The EPID cine acquisition mode, that allows a frame acquisition rate of one image every 1.66 s, was studied with a monitor unit rate equal to 100 UM/min. In these conditions good signal stability, ±1% (2SD) evaluated during three months, signal reproducibility within ±0.8% (2SD) and linearity with dose and dose rate within ±1% (2SD) were obtained. The transit signal, S t , (due to the transmitted beam below the phantom) measured by the EPID cine acquisition mode was used to determine, (i) a set of correlation functions, F(w,L), defined as the ratio between S t and the dose at half thickness, D m , measured in solid water phantoms of different thicknesses, w and with square fields of side L, (ii) a set of factors, f(d,L), that take into account the different X-ray scatter contribution from the phantom to the S t signal as a function of the variation, d, of the air gap between the phantom and the EPID. The reconstruction of the isocenter dose, D iso , for DCAT was obtained convolving the transit signal values, obtained at different gantry angles, with the respective reconstruction factors determined by a house-made software. The method was tested with cylindrical and anthropomorphic phantoms and the results show that the reconstructed D iso values can be obtained with an accuracy within ±2.5% in cylindrical phantom and within ±3.4% for anthropomorphic phantom. In conclusion, the transit dosimetry by EPID was assessed to be adequate to perform DCAT in vivo dosimetry, that is not realizable with the other traditional techniques. Moreover, the method proposed here could be implemented to supply in vivo dose values in real time

  18. TH-AB-BRB-01: Trajectory Modulated Arc Therapy: Application to Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hristov, D.

    2016-01-01

    Current state-of-the art digital C-arm medical linear accelerators are capable of delivering radiation treatments with high level of automation, which affords coordinated motions of gantry, couch, and multileaf collimator (MLC) with dose rate modulations. The new machine capacity has shown the potential to bring substantially improved radiation dosimetry and/or delivery efficiency to many challenging diseases. Combining an integrated beam orientation optimization algorithm with automated machine navigation, markedly improved dose conformity has been achieved using 4ρ therapy. Trajectory modulated radiation therapy (TMAT) can be used to deliver highly conformal dose to partial breast or to carve complex dose distribution for therapy involving extended volumes such as total marrow and total lymph node treatment. Dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR) not only overcomes the deficiencies of conventional electron therapy in dose conformity and homogeneity but also achieves so without patient-specific shields. The combination of MLC and couch tracking provides improved motion management of thoracic and abdominal tumors. A substantial body of work has been done in these technological advances for clinical translation. The proposed symposium will provide a timely review of these exciting opportunities. Learning Objectives: Recognize the potential of using digitally controlled linacs for clinically significant improvements in delivered dose distributions for various treatment sites. Identify existing approaches to treatment planning, optimization and delivery for treatment techniques utilizing the advanced functions of digital linacs and venues for further development and improvement. Understand methods for testing and validating delivery system performance. Identify tools available on current delivery systems for implementation and control for such treatments. Obtain the update in clinical applications, trials and regulatory approval. K. Sheng, NIH U19AI067769, NIH R43

  19. On the Trail of Joan of Arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Joyce Forristal

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The year 2012 marked the 600th anniversary of the birthday of Joan of Arc (Fr., Jeanne d’Arc (1412–1431. Tributes to this national heroine can be found all over France. There are literally countless statues, streets and restaurants named after her and many sites dedicated to her life. However, despite widespread social and mechanical reproduction and cultural naming in relation to the Maid of Orléans, there is no official network or integrated signage in France to promote cultural heritage tourism to the numerous Joan of Arc sites and festivals, even though her life and death, by any measure, were seminal events in the country’s history. Unfortunately, the pilgrim who wants to follow or intersect with Joan of Arc’s trail through France, for cultural, historical or religious reasons, must do so without much help. Using Actor Network Theory and Site Sacralization Theory as framing devices, this paper explores human actors and tangible and intangible non-human factors that may have contributed to the lack of a unified tourism product despite the existence of an adequate Joan of Arc tourismscape. Insights gleaned from this research include Joan’s conflicted status as both/either saint and/or patriot, the existence of no cooperation or linkage between Joan of Arc sites, and cautious French tourism development policies. Several possible scenarios are suggested as suitable means to help implement or foster the creation of an on-the-ground or virtual Joan of Arc trail or tour.

  20. Sheath and arc-column voltages in high-pressure arc discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benilov, M S; Benilova, L G; Li Heping; Wu Guiqing

    2012-01-01

    Electrical characteristics of a 1 cm-long free-burning atmospheric-pressure argon arc are calculated by means of a model taking into account the existence of a near-cathode space-charge sheath and the discrepancy between the electron and heavy-particle temperatures in the arc column. The computed arc voltage exhibits a variation with the arc current I similar to the one revealed by the experiment and exceeds experimental values by no more than approximately 2 V in the current range 20-175 A. The sheath contributes about two-thirds or more of the arc voltage. The LTE model predicts a different variation of the arc voltage with I and underestimates the experimental values appreciably for low currents but by no more than approximately 2 V for I ≳ 120 A. However, the latter can hardly be considered as a proof of unimportance of the space-charge sheath at high currents: the LTE model overestimates both the resistance of the bulk of the arc column and the resistance of the part of the column that is adjacent to the cathode, and this overestimation to a certain extent compensates for the neglect of the voltage drop in the sheath. Furthermore, if the latter resistance were evaluated in the framework of the LTE model in an accurate way, then the overestimation would be still much stronger and the obtained voltage would significantly exceed those observed in the experiment.

  1. Arc-to-arc mini-sling 1999: a critical analysis of concept and technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Palma

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to critically review the Arc-to-Arc mini-sling (Palma's technique a less invasive mid-urethral sling using bovine pericardium as the sling material. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Arc-to-Arc mini-sling, using bovine pericardium, was the first published report of a mini-sling, in 1999. The technique was identical to the "tension-free tape" operation, midline incision and dissection of the urethra. The ATFP (white line was identified by blunt dissection, and the mini-sling was sutured to the tendinous arc on both sides with 2 polypropylene 00 sutures. RESULTS: The initial results were encouraging, with 9/10 patients cured at the 6 weeks post-operative visit. However, infection and extrusion of the mini-sling resulted in sling extrusion and removal, with 5 patients remaining cured at 12 months. CONCLUSION: The Arc-to-Arc mini-sling was a good concept, but failed because of the poor technology available at that time. Further research using new materials and better technology has led to new and safer alternatives for the management of stress urinary incontinence.

  2. Validation and application of polymer gel dosimetry for the dose verification of an intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergote, K; Deene, Y de; Duthoy, W; Gersem, W de; Neve, W de; Achten, E; Wagter, C de

    2004-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimetry was used to assess an intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) treatment for whole abdominopelvic radiotherapy. Prior to the actual dosimetry experiment, a uniformity study on an unirradiated anthropomorphic phantom was carried out. A correction was performed to minimize deviations in the R2 maps due to radiofrequency non-uniformities. In addition, compensation strategies were implemented to limit R2 deviations caused by temperature drift during scanning. Inter- and intra-slice R2 deviations in the phantom were thereby significantly reduced. This was verified in an investigative study where the same phantom was irradiated with two rectangular superimposed beams: structural deviations between gel measurements and computational results remained below 3% outside high dose gradient regions; the spatial shift in those regions was within 2.5 mm. When comparing gel measurements with computational results for the IMAT treatment, dose deviations were noted in the liver and right kidney, but the dose-volume constraints were met. Root-mean-square differences between both dose distributions were within 5% with spatial deviations not more than 2.5 mm. Dose fluctuations due to gantry angle discretization in the dose computation algorithm were particularly noticeable in the low-dose region

  3. Influence of a transverse magnetic field on arc root movements in a dc plasma torch: Diamagnetic effect of arc column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Keun Su

    2009-01-01

    The effect of a transverse magnetic field on the anodic arc root movement inside a dc plasma torch has been investigated. The arc voltage fluctuation, which represents the degree of the arc instability, was reduced to 28.6% of the original value and the high frequency components in the voltage signal also decreased in their magnitudes. The inherent arc instability in a dc thermal plasma torch seems to be suppressed by a diamagnetic effect of the arc column. Furthermore, the measured voltage wave forms indicated that the arc root attachment mode would be controllable by a transverse magnetic field

  4. Architectural Surfaces and Structures from Circular Arcs

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Ling

    2013-12-01

    In recent decades, the popularity of freeform shapes in contemporary architecture poses new challenges to digital design. One of them is the process of rationalization, i.e. to make freeform skins or structures affordable to manufacture, which draws the most attention from geometry researchers. In this thesis, we aim to realize this process with simple geometric primitives, circular arcs. We investigate architectural surfaces and structures consisting of circular arcs. Our focus is lying on how to employ them nicely and repetitively in architectural design, in order to decrease the cost in manufacturing. Firstly, we study Darboux cyclides, which are algebraic surfaces of order ≤ 4. We provide a computational tool to identify all families of circles on a given cyclide based on the spherical model of M ̈obius geometry. Practical ways to design cyclide patches that pass through certain inputs are presented. In particular, certain triples of circle families on Darboux cyclides may be suitably arranged as 3-webs. We provide a complete classification of all possible 3-webs of circles on Darboux cyclides. We then investigate the circular arc snakes, which are smooth sequences of circu- lar arcs. We evolve the snakes such that their curvature, as a function of arc length, remains unchanged. The evolution of snakes is utilized to approximate given surfaces by circular arcs or to generated freeform shapes, and it is realized by a 2-step pro- cess. More interestingly, certain 6-arc snake with boundary constraints can produce a smooth self motion, which can be employed to build flexible structures. Another challenging topic is approximating smooth freeform skins with simple panels. We contribute to this problem area by approximating a negatively-curved 5 surface with a smooth union of rational bilinear patches. We provide a proof for vertex consistency of hyperbolic nets using the CAGD approach of the rational B ́ezier form. Moreover, we use Darboux transformations for the

  5. Grain refinement control in TIG arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iceland, W. F.; Whiffen, E. L. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A method for controlling grain size and weld puddle agitation in a tungsten electrode inert gas welding system to produce fine, even grain size and distribution is disclosed. In the method the frequency of dc welding voltage pulses supplied to the welding electrode is varied over a preselected frequency range and the arc gas voltage is monitored. At some frequency in the preselected range the arc gas voltage will pass through a maximum. By maintaining the operating frequency of the system at this value, maximum weld puddle agitation and fine grain structure are produced.

  6. Plasma distribution of cathodic ARC deposition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, S.; Raoux, S.; Krishnan, K.; MacGill, R.A.; Brown, I.G.

    1996-01-01

    The plasma distribution using a cathodic arc plasma source with and without magnetic macroparticle filter has been determined by depositing on a transparent plastic substrate and measuring the film absorption. It was found that the width of the distribution depends on the arc current, and it also depends on the cathode material which leads to a spatial separation of the elements when an alloy cathode is used. By applying a magnetic multicusp field near the exit of the magnetic filter, it was possible to modify the plasma distribution and obtain a flat plasma profile with a constant and homogeneous elemental distribution

  7. MOOC Badging and the Learning Arc

    OpenAIRE

    Cross, Simon; Galley, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    The first part of the post expands on some of our thinking behind the digital badging strategy used in the 2012 OLDS MOOC by using a pictorial representation to explain the place of the badges in the course. This is predicated on (a) the idea that a course, just like a novel, a movie or a video game, contains a broad central 'story arc' - a 'learning arc' or journey with a start (beginning of course) and an end, and (b) the idea that there are different types of badge that have different rela...

  8. Real-time 3D internal marker tracking during arc radiotherapy by the use of combined MV-kV imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, W; Wiersma, R D; Mao, W; Luxton, G; Xing, L

    2008-01-01

    To minimize the adverse dosimetric effect caused by tumor motion, it is desirable to have real-time knowledge of the tumor position throughout the beam delivery process. A promising technique to realize the real-time image guided scheme in external beam radiation therapy is through the combined use of MV and onboard kV beam imaging. The success of this MV-kV triangulation approach for fixed-gantry radiation therapy has been demonstrated. With the increasing acceptance of modern arc radiotherapy in the clinics, a timely and clinically important question is whether the image guidance strategy can be extended to arc therapy to provide the urgently needed real-time tumor motion information. While conceptually feasible, there are a number of theoretical and practical issues specific to the arc delivery that need to be resolved before clinical implementation. The purpose of this work is to establish a robust procedure of system calibration for combined MV and kV imaging for internal marker tracking during arc delivery and to demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of the technique. A commercially available LINAC equipped with an onboard kV imager