WorldWideScience

Sample records for single column model

  1. Single-Column Model Simulations of Subtropical Marine Boundary-Layer Cloud Transitions Under Weakening Inversions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neggers, R.A.J.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Angevine, W. M.; Bazile, Eric; Beau, I.; Blossey, P. N.; Boutle, I. A.; de Bruijn, C.; cheng, A; van der Dussen, J.J.; Fletcher, J.; Dal Gesso, S.; Jam, A.; Kawai, H; Cheedela, S. K.; Larson, V. E.; Lefebvre, Marie Pierre; Lock, A. P.; Meyer, N. R.; de Roode, S.R.; de Rooy, WC; Sandu, I; Xiao, H; Xu, K. M.

    2017-01-01

    Results are presented of the GASS/EUCLIPSE single-column model intercomparison study on the subtropical marine low-level cloud transition. A central goal is to establish the performance of state-of-the-art boundary-layer schemes for weather and climate models for this cloud regime, using

  2. Simulating the 2012 High Plains Drought Using Three Single Column Models (SCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, I. D.; Baker, I. T.; Denning, S.; Dazlich, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The impact of changes in the frequency and severity of drought on fresh water sustainability is a great concern for many regions of the world. One such location is the High Plains, where the local economy is primarily driven by fresh water withdrawals from the Ogallala Aquifer, which accounts for approximately 30% of total irrigation withdrawals from all U.S. aquifers combined. Modeling studies that focus on the feedback mechanisms that control the climate and eco-hydrology during times of drought are limited, and have used conventional General Circulation Models (GCMs) with grid length scales ranging from one hundred to several hundred kilometers. Additionally, these models utilize crude statistical parameterizations of cloud processes for estimating sub-grid fluxes of heat and moisture and have a poor representation of land surface heterogeneity. For this research, we focus on the 2012 High Plains drought and perform numerical simulations using three single column model (SCM) versions of BUGS5 (Colorado State University (CSU) GCM coupled to the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB3)). In the first version of BUGS5, the model is used in its standard bulk setting (single atmospheric column coupled to a single instance of SiB3), secondly, the Super-Parameterized Community Atmospheric Model (SP-CAM), a cloud resolving model (CRM) (CRM consists of 32 atmospheric columns), replaces the single CSU GCM atmospheric parameterization and is coupled to a single instance of SiB3, and for the third version of BUGS5, an instance of SiB3 is coupled to each CRM column of the SP-CAM (32 CRM columns coupled to 32 instances of SiB3). To assess the physical realism of the land-atmosphere feedbacks simulated by all three versions of BUGS5, differences in simulated energy and moisture fluxes are computed between the 2011 and 2012 period and are compared to those calculated using observational data from the AmeriFlux Tower Network for the same period at the ARM Site in Lamont, OK. This research

  3. The ARM-GCSS Intercomparison Study of Single-Column Models and Cloud System Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederwall, R.T.; Rodriques, D.J.; Krueger, S.K.; Randall, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    The Single-Column Model (SCM) Working Group (WC) and the Cloud Working Group (CWG) in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program have begun a collaboration with the GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) WGs. The forcing data sets derived from the special ARM radiosonde measurements made during the SCM Intensive Observation Periods (IOPs), the wealth of cloud and related data sets collected by the ARM Program, and the ARM infrastructure support of the SCM WG are of great value to GCSS. In return, GCSS brings the efforts of an international group of cloud system modelers to bear on ARM data sets and ARM-related scientific questions. The first major activity of the ARM-GCSS collaboration is a model intercomparison study involving SCMs and cloud system models (CSMs), also known as cloud-resolving or cloud-ensemble models. The SCM methodologies developed in the ARM Program have matured to the point where an intercomparison will help identify the strengths and weaknesses of various approaches. CSM simulations will bring much additional information about clouds to evaluate cloud parameterizations used in the SCMs. CSMs and SCMs have been compared successfully in previous GCSS intercomparison studies for tropical conditions. The ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site offers an opportunity for GCSS to test their models in continental, mid-latitude conditions. The Summer 1997 SCM IOP has been chosen since it provides a wide range of summertime weather events that will be a challenging test of these models

  4. Improving the Amazonian Hydrologic Cycle in a Coupled Land-Atmosphere, Single Column Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, A. B.; Denning, S.; Baker, I.; Prihodko, L.; Branson, M.

    2006-12-01

    We have coupled a land-surface model, the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB3), to a single column of the Colorado State University General Circulation Model (CSU-GCM) in the Amazon River Basin. This is a preliminary step in the broader goal of improved simulation of Basin-wide hydrology. A previous version of the coupled model (SiB2) showed drought and catastrophic dieback of the Amazon rain forest. SiB3 includes updated soil hydrology and root physiology. Our test area for the coupled single column model is near Santarem, Brazil, where measurements from the km 83 flux tower in the Tapajos National Forest can be used to evaluate model output. The model was run for 2001 using NCEP2 Reanalysis as driver data. Preliminary results show that the updated biosphere model coupled to the GCM produces improved simulations of the seasonal cycle of surface water balance and precipitation. Comparisons of the diurnal and seasonal cycles of surface fluxes are also being made.

  5. Implementation of the GFS physical package in the GRAPES regional model: single column experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baode; Huang, Wei; Bao, Jian-wen

    2015-04-01

    There is a growing concern about coupling among physical components in NWP models. The Physics package of the NCEP Global Forecast System (GFS) has been considerably turned and connection among various components is well considered. Thus, the full GFS physical package was implemented into the GRAPES-MESO and its single column version as well. Using the data collected at ARM Southern Great Plain site during the summer 1997 Intensive Observing Period, several experiments of single-column model (SCM) were conducted to test performance of a set of original physical processes of GRAPES(CTL experiment) and the GFS physics package implemented(GFS experiment). Temperature, moisture, radiation, surface heat flux, surface air temperature and precipitation are evaluated. It is found that potential temperature and vapor mixing ratio simulated by GFS experiment is more accurate than that of CTL experiment. Errors of surface downward solar and long-wave radiation simulated by GFS experiment are less than that of CTL experiment and upward latent and sensible heat flux are also better agreeing with observation. The maximum and minimum 2-m air temperatures of the GFS experiment are close to observation compared with that of CTL experiment. Analysis of precipitation simulated shows that both sets of physical processes well reproduce heavy rainfall events. Failure and delay of moderate rainfall events and over predictions of drizzle events are commonly found for two sets of experiments. For the case of three rainfall events, the errors of potential temperature and vapor mixing ratio simulated by GFS experiment were smaller than that of CTL experiment. It is shown that the late occurrences of rainfall are resulted from a more stable temperature profile and lower moisture simulated in boundary layer than those from the observation prior to rainfall. When the simulated rainfall occurs, the simulated temperature and moisture become more favorable to the precipitation than observation.

  6. A Single-column Model Ensemble Approach Applied to the TWP-ICE Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, L.; Jakob, C.; Cheung, K.; DelGenio, A.; Hill, A.; Hume, T.; Keane, R. J.; Komori, T.; Larson, V. E.; Lin, Y.; hide

    2013-01-01

    Single-column models (SCM) are useful test beds for investigating the parameterization schemes of numerical weather prediction and climate models. The usefulness of SCM simulations are limited, however, by the accuracy of the best estimate large-scale observations prescribed. Errors estimating the observations will result in uncertainty in modeled simulations. One method to address the modeled uncertainty is to simulate an ensemble where the ensemble members span observational uncertainty. This study first derives an ensemble of large-scale data for the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) based on an estimate of a possible source of error in the best estimate product. These data are then used to carry out simulations with 11 SCM and two cloud-resolving models (CRM). Best estimate simulations are also performed. All models show that moisture-related variables are close to observations and there are limited differences between the best estimate and ensemble mean values. The models, however, show different sensitivities to changes in the forcing particularly when weakly forced. The ensemble simulations highlight important differences in the surface evaporation term of the moisture budget between the SCM and CRM. Differences are also apparent between the models in the ensemble mean vertical structure of cloud variables, while for each model, cloud properties are relatively insensitive to forcing. The ensemble is further used to investigate cloud variables and precipitation and identifies differences between CRM and SCM particularly for relationships involving ice. This study highlights the additional analysis that can be performed using ensemble simulations and hence enables a more complete model investigation compared to using the more traditional single best estimate simulation only.

  7. A comparison of single column model simulations of summertime midlatitude continental convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghan, Steven [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington (United States); Randall, David [Department of Atmospospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado (United States); Xu, Kuan-Man [Department of Atmospospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado (United States); Cederwall, Richard [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States); Cripe, Douglas [Department of Atmospospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado (United States); Hack, James [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado (United States); Iacobellis, Sam [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, La Jolla (United States); Klein, Stephen [Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey (United States); Krueger, Steven [Department of Meterology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Lohmann, Ulrike [Department of Physics and Oceanography, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)] (and others)

    2000-01-27

    Eleven different single-column models (SCMs) and one cloud ensemble model (CEM) are driven by boundary conditions observed at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program southern Great Plains site for a 17 day period during the summer of 1995. Comparison of the model simulations reveals common signatures identifiable as products of errors in the boundary conditions. Intermodel differences in the simulated temperature, humidity, cloud, precipitation, and radiative fluxes reflect differences in model resolution or physical parameterizations, although sensitive dependence on initial conditions can also contribute to intermodel differences. All models perform well at times but poorly at others. Although none of the SCM simulations stands out as superior to the others, the simulation by the CEM is in several respects in better agreement with the observations than the simulations by the SCMs. Nudging of the simulated temperature and humidity toward observations generally improves the simulated cloud and radiation fields as well as the simulated temperature and humidity but degrades the precipitation simulation for models with large temperature and humidity biases without nudging. Although some of the intermodel differences have not been explained, others have been identified as model problems that can be or have been corrected as a result of the comparison. (c) 2000 American Geophysical Union.

  8. A comparison of single column model simulations of summertime midlatitude continental convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghan, Steven; Randall, David; Xu, Kuan-Man; Cederwall, Richard; Cripe, Douglas; Hack, James; Iacobellis, Sam; Klein, Stephen; Krueger, Steven; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2000-01-01

    Eleven different single-column models (SCMs) and one cloud ensemble model (CEM) are driven by boundary conditions observed at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program southern Great Plains site for a 17 day period during the summer of 1995. Comparison of the model simulations reveals common signatures identifiable as products of errors in the boundary conditions. Intermodel differences in the simulated temperature, humidity, cloud, precipitation, and radiative fluxes reflect differences in model resolution or physical parameterizations, although sensitive dependence on initial conditions can also contribute to intermodel differences. All models perform well at times but poorly at others. Although none of the SCM simulations stands out as superior to the others, the simulation by the CEM is in several respects in better agreement with the observations than the simulations by the SCMs. Nudging of the simulated temperature and humidity toward observations generally improves the simulated cloud and radiation fields as well as the simulated temperature and humidity but degrades the precipitation simulation for models with large temperature and humidity biases without nudging. Although some of the intermodel differences have not been explained, others have been identified as model problems that can be or have been corrected as a result of the comparison. (c) 2000 American Geophysical Union

  9. Modeling Stone Columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Jorge

    2017-07-11

    This paper reviews the main modeling techniques for stone columns, both ordinary stone columns and geosynthetic-encased stone columns. The paper tries to encompass the more recent advances and recommendations in the topic. Regarding the geometrical model, the main options are the "unit cell", longitudinal gravel trenches in plane strain conditions, cylindrical rings of gravel in axial symmetry conditions, equivalent homogeneous soil with improved properties and three-dimensional models, either a full three-dimensional model or just a three-dimensional row or slice of columns. Some guidelines for obtaining these simplified geometrical models are provided and the particular case of groups of columns under footings is also analyzed. For the latter case, there is a column critical length that is around twice the footing width for non-encased columns in a homogeneous soft soil. In the literature, the column critical length is sometimes given as a function of the column length, which leads to some disparities in its value. Here it is shown that the column critical length mainly depends on the footing dimensions. Some other features related with column modeling are also briefly presented, such as the influence of column installation. Finally, some guidance and recommendations are provided on parameter selection for the study of stone columns.

  10. Can We Use Single-Column Models for Understanding the Boundary Layer Cloud-Climate Feedback?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Gesso, S.; Neggers, R. A. J.

    2018-02-01

    This study explores how to drive Single-Column Models (SCMs) with existing data sets of General Circulation Model (GCM) outputs, with the aim of studying the boundary layer cloud response to climate change in the marine subtropical trade wind regime. The EC-EARTH SCM is driven with the large-scale tendencies and boundary conditions as derived from two different data sets, consisting of high-frequency outputs of GCM simulations. SCM simulations are performed near Barbados Cloud Observatory in the dry season (January-April), when fair-weather cumulus is the dominant low-cloud regime. This climate regime is characterized by a near equilibrium in the free troposphere between the long-wave radiative cooling and the large-scale advection of warm air. In the SCM, this equilibrium is ensured by scaling the monthly mean dynamical tendency of temperature and humidity such that it balances that of the model physics in the free troposphere. In this setup, the high-frequency variability in the forcing is maintained, and the boundary layer physics acts freely. This technique yields representative cloud amount and structure in the SCM for the current climate. Furthermore, the cloud response to a sea surface warming of 4 K as produced by the SCM is consistent with that of the forcing GCM.

  11. A single-column model intercomparison on the stratocumulus representation in present-day and future climate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dal Gesso, S.; Van der Dussen, J.J.; Siebesma, A.P.; De Roode, S.R.; Boutle, I.A.; Kamae, Y.; Roehrig, R.; Vial, J.

    2015-01-01

    Six Single-Column Model (SCM) versions of climate models are evaluated on the basis of their representation of the dependence of the stratocumulus-topped boundary layer regime on the free tropospheric thermodynamic conditions. The study includes two idealized experiments corresponding to the

  12. Single-Column Modeling, GCM Parameterizations and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somerville, R.C.J.; Iacobellis, S.F.

    2005-01-01

    Our overall goal is identical to that of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: the development of new and improved parameterizations of cloud-radiation effects and related processes, using ARM data at all three ARM sites, and the implementation and testing of these parameterizations in global and regional models. To test recently developed prognostic parameterizations based on detailed cloud microphysics, we have first compared single-column model (SCM) output with ARM observations at the Southern Great Plains (SGP), North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Topical Western Pacific (TWP) sites. We focus on the predicted cloud amounts and on a suite of radiative quantities strongly dependent on clouds, such as downwelling surface shortwave radiation. Our results demonstrate the superiority of parameterizations based on comprehensive treatments of cloud microphysics and cloud-radiative interactions. At the SGP and NSA sites, the SCM results simulate the ARM measurements well and are demonstrably more realistic than typical parameterizations found in conventional operational forecasting models. At the TWP site, the model performance depends strongly on details of the scheme, and the results of our diagnostic tests suggest ways to develop improved parameterizations better suited to simulating cloud-radiation interactions in the tropics generally. These advances have made it possible to take the next step and build on this progress, by incorporating our parameterization schemes in state-of-the-art 3D atmospheric models, and diagnosing and evaluating the results using independent data. Because the improved cloud-radiation results have been obtained largely via implementing detailed and physically comprehensive cloud microphysics, we anticipate that improved predictions of hydrologic cycle components, and hence of precipitation, may also be achievable. We are currently testing the performance of our ARM-based parameterizations in state-of-the--art global and regional

  13. Evaluation of meteorological parameters over a coniferous forest in a single-column chemistry-climate model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganzeveld, L.N.; Klemm, O.; Rappenglück, B.; Valverde-Canossa, J.

    2006-01-01

    The simulated micrometerology by a single-column chemistry-climate model (SCM) has been evaluated by comparison with BEWA2000 field campaign measurements over a coniferous forest, July-August 2001. This comparison indicates the limitations in the representation of the SCM's micrometeorological

  14. Single-Column Modeling of Convection During the CINDY2011/DYNAMO Field Campaign With the CNRM Climate Model Version 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Lathif, Ahmat Younous; Roehrig, Romain; Beau, Isabelle; Douville, Hervé

    2018-03-01

    A single-column model (SCM) approach is used to assess the CNRM climate model (CNRM-CM) version 6 ability to represent the properties of the apparent heat source (Q1) and moisture sink (Q2) as observed during the 3 month CINDY2011/DYNAMO field campaign, over its Northern Sounding Array (NSA). The performance of the CNRM SCM is evaluated in a constrained configuration in which the latent and sensible heat surface fluxes are prescribed, as, when forced by observed sea surface temperature, the model is strongly limited by the underestimate of the surface fluxes, most probably related to the SCM forcing itself. The model exhibits a significant cold bias in the upper troposphere, near 200 hPa, and strong wet biases close to the surface and above 700 hPa. The analysis of the Q1 and Q2 profile distributions emphasizes the properties of the convective parameterization of the CNRM-CM physics. The distribution of the Q2 profile is particularly challenging. The model strongly underestimates the frequency of occurrence of the deep moistening profiles, which likely involve misrepresentation of the shallow and congestus convection. Finally, a statistical approach is used to objectively define atmospheric regimes and construct a typical convection life cycle. A composite analysis shows that the CNRM SCM captures the general transition from bottom-heavy to mid-heavy to top-heavy convective heating. Some model errors are shown to be related to the stratiform regimes. The moistening observed during the shallow and congestus convection regimes also requires further improvements of this CNRM-CM physics.

  15. Improving Wind Predictions in the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer through Parameter Estimation in a Single-Column Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jared A.; Hacker, Joshua P.; Delle Monache, Luca; Kosović, Branko; Clifton, Andrew; Vandenberghe, Francois; Rodrigo, Javier Sanz

    2016-12-14

    A current barrier to greater deployment of offshore wind turbines is the poor quality of numerical weather prediction model wind and turbulence forecasts over open ocean. The bulk of development for atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) parameterization schemes has focused on land, partly due to a scarcity of observations over ocean. The 100-m FINO1 tower in the North Sea is one of the few sources worldwide of atmospheric profile observations from the sea surface to turbine hub height. These observations are crucial to developing a better understanding and modeling of physical processes in the marine ABL. In this study, we use the WRF single column model (SCM), coupled with an ensemble Kalman filter from the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART), to create 100-member ensembles at the FINO1 location. The goal of this study is to determine the extent to which model parameter estimation can improve offshore wind forecasts.

  16. CGILS : Results from the first phase of an international project to understand the physical mechanisms of low cloud feedbacks in single column models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, M.; Bretherton, C.S.; Blossey, P.N.; Austin, P.H.; Bacmeister, J.T.; Bony, S.; Brient, F.; Cheedela, S.K.; Cheng, A.; Del Genio, A.D.; De Roode, S.R.; Endo, S.; Franklin, C.N.; Golaz, J.C.; Hannay, C.; Heus, T.; Isotta, F.A.; Dufresne, J.L.; Kang, I.S.; Kawai, H.; Köhler, M.; Larson, V.E.; Liu, Y.; Lock, A.P.; Lohmann, U.; Khairoutdinov, M.F.; Molod, A.M.; Neggers, R.A.J.; Rasch, P.; Sandu, I.; Senkbeil, R.; Siebesma, A.P.; Siegenthaler-Le Drian, C.; Stevens, B.; Suarez, M.J.; Xu, K.M.; Von Salzen, K.; Webb, M.J.; Wolf, A.; Zhao, M.

    2013-01-01

    CGILS—the CFMIP-GASS Intercomparison of Large Eddy Models (LESs) and single column models (SCMs)—investigates the mechanisms of cloud feedback in SCMs and LESs under idealized climate change perturbation. This paper describes the CGILS results from 15 SCMs and 8 LES models. Three cloud regimes over

  17. Intercomparison of single-column models for GABLS3: preliminary results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosveld, F.C.; Bruijn, de E.I.F.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    The GEWEX Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Study (GABLS) focus on the representation of stable boundary layers in atmospheric models (Holtslag, 2006). One of the main goals of GABLS is to provide a mondial platform for the atmospheric boundary layer research community through the organisation of model

  18. Coupled atmosphere and land-surface assimilation of surface observations with a single column model and ensemble data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostkier-Edelstein, Dorita; Hacker, Joshua P.; Snyder, Chris

    2014-05-01

    Numerical weather prediction and data assimilation models are composed of coupled atmosphere and land-surface (LS) components. If possible, the assimilation procedure should be coupled so that observed information in one module is used to correct fields in the coupled module. There have been some attempts in this direction using optimal interpolation, nudging and 2/3DVAR data assimilation techniques. Aside from satellite remote sensed observations, reference height in-situ observations of temperature and moisture have been used in these studies. Among other problems, difficulties in coupled atmosphere and LS assimilation arise as a result of the different time scales characteristic of each component and the unsteady correlation between these components under varying flow conditions. Ensemble data-assimilation techniques rely on flow dependent observations-model covariances. Provided that correlations and covariances between land and atmosphere can be adequately simulated and sampled, ensemble data assimilation should enable appropriate assimilation of observations simultaneously into the atmospheric and LS states. Our aim is to explore assimilation of reference height in-situ temperature and moisture observations into the coupled atmosphere-LS modules(simultaneously) in NCAR's WRF-ARW model using the NCAR's DART ensemble data-assimilation system. Observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) are performed using the single column model (SCM) version of WRF. Numerical experiments during a warm season are centered on an atmospheric and soil column in the South Great Plains. Synthetic observations are derived from "truth" WRF-SCM runs for a given date,initialized and forced using North American Regional Reanalyses (NARR). WRF-SCM atmospheric and LS ensembles are created by mixing the atmospheric and soil NARR profile centered on a given date with that from another day (randomly chosen from the same season) with weights drawn from a logit-normal distribution. Three

  19. Simulating the 2012 High Plains Drought Using Three Single Column Model Versions of the Community Earth System Model (SCM-CESM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, I. D.; Denning, S.

    2014-12-01

    The impact of changes in the frequency and severity of drought on fresh water sustainability is a great concern for many regions of the world. One such location is the High Plains, where the local economy is primarily driven by fresh water withdrawals from the Ogallala Aquifer, which accounts for approximately 30% of total irrigation withdrawals from all U.S. aquifers combined. Modeling studies that focus on the feedback mechanisms that control the climate and eco-hydrology during times of drought are limited in the sense that they use conventional General Circulation Models (GCMs) with grid length scales ranging from one hundred to several hundred kilometers. Additionally, these models utilize crude statistical parameterizations of cloud processes for estimating sub-grid fluxes of heat and moisture and have a poor representation of land surface heterogeneity. For this research, we focus on the 2012 High Plains drought, and will perform numerical simulations using three single column model versions of the Community Earth System Model (SCM-CESM) at multiple sites overlying the Ogallala Aquifer for the 2010-2012 period. In the first version of SCM-CESM, CESM will be used in standard mode (Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) coupled to a single instance of the Community Land Model (CLM)), secondly, CESM will be used in Super-Parameterized mode (SP-CESM), where a cloud resolving model (CRM consists of 32 atmospheric columns) replaces the standard CAM atmospheric parameterization and is coupled to a single instance of CLM, and thirdly, CESM is used in "Multi Instance" SP-CESM mode, where an instance of CLM is coupled to each CRM column of SP-CESM (32 CRM columns coupled to 32 instances of CLM). To assess the physical realism of the land-atmosphere feedbacks simulated at each site by all versions of SCM-CESM, differences in simulated energy and moisture fluxes will be computed between years for the 2010-2012 period, and will be compared to differences calculated using

  20. Numerical investigation with a coupled single-column lake-atmosphere model: An application to Western Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyette, Stéphane

    2017-04-01

    The potential of a novel atmospheric single-column model (SCM) developed in the framework of the Canadian Regional Climate Model, CRCM, driven by NCEP-NCAR reanalyses is investigated. The approach to solve the model equations and the technique described here may be implemented in any RCM system environment as a model option. The working hypothesis underlying this SCM formulation is that a substantial portion of the variability simulated in the column can be reproduced by processes operating in the vertical dimension and a lesser portion comes from processes operating in the horizontal dimension. This SCM offers interesting prospects as the horizontal and vertical resolution of the RCM is ever increasing. Due to its low computational cost, multiple simulations may be carried out in a short period of time. In this paper, a range of possible results from changing the lower boundary from land to open water surface, and varying model parameters are shown for western Switzerland. The benefit of using Newtonian relaxation, or "nudging", is demonstrated. Results show that air temperature, moisture and windspeed profiles are modified in a coherent manner in the lowest levels. Such changes are consistent with those of the surface vertical sensible, latent heat and momentum fluxes. Compared to atmospheric profiles over land, switching to and open water surface representative of Lake Geneva over the annual cycle of 1990, air temperature is increased by up to 1°C during the autumn and winter seasons, and by 0.5°C during the spring and summer seasons. Specific humidity is increased by up to 0.2 g kg-1 during the autumn and winter seasons and decreased by 0.3 g kg-1 during the spring and summer seasons. The increased windspeed at the surface, often more than 1.5 m s-1, is due to the smaller roughness height. The surface radiation and energy budgets are also modified subsequent to the different partionning of the latent end sensible heat fluxes, but also the solar and thermal

  1. A new first-order turbulence mixing model for the stable atmospheric boundary-layer: development and testing in large-eddy and single column models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J.; Bou-Zeid, E.; Golaz, J.

    2011-12-01

    Parameterization of the stably-stratified atmospheric boundary-layer is of crucial importance to different aspects of numerical weather prediction at regional scales and climate modeling at global scales, such as land-surface temperature forecasts, fog and frost prediction, and polar climate. It is well-known that most operational climate models require excessive turbulence mixing of the stable boundary-layer to prevent decoupling of the atmospheric component from the land component under strong stability, but the performance of such a model is unlikely to be satisfactory under weakly and moderately stable conditions. In this study we develop and test a general turbulence mixing model of the stable boundary-layer which works under different stabilities and for steady as well as unsteady conditions. A-priori large-eddy simulation (LES) tests are presented to motivate and verify the new parameterization. Subsequently, an assessment of this model using the GFDL single-column model (SCM) is performed. Idealized test cases including continuously varying stability, as well as stability discontinuity, are used to test the new SCM against LES results. A good match of mean and flux profiles is found when the new parameterization is used, while other traditional first-order turbulence models using the concept of stability function perform poorly. SCM spatial resolution is also found to have little impact on the performance of the new turbulence closure, but temporal resolution is important and a numerical stability criterion based on the model time step is presented.

  2. Modeling of column apparatus processes

    CERN Document Server

    Boyadjiev, Christo; Boyadjiev, Boyan; Popova-Krumova, Petya

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a new approach for the modeling of chemical and interphase mass transfer processes in industrial column apparatuses, using convection-diffusion and average-concentration models. The convection-diffusion type models are used for a qualitative analysis of the processes and to assess the main, small and slight physical effects, and then reject the slight effects. As a result, the process mechanism can be identified. It also introduces average concentration models for quantitative analysis, which use the average values of the velocity and concentration over the cross-sectional area of the column. The new models are used to analyze different processes (simple and complex chemical reactions, absorption, adsorption and catalytic reactions), and make it possible to model the processes of gas purification with sulfur dioxide, which form the basis of several patents.

  3. SPEEDUPtrademark ion exchange column model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hang, T.

    2000-01-01

    A transient model to describe the process of loading a solute onto the granular fixed bed in an ion exchange (IX) column has been developed using the SpeedUptrademark software package. SpeedUp offers the advantage of smooth integration into other existing SpeedUp flowsheet models. The mathematical algorithm of a porous particle diffusion model was adopted to account for convection, axial dispersion, film mass transfer, and pore diffusion. The method of orthogonal collocation on finite elements was employed to solve the governing transport equations. The model allows the use of a non-linear Langmuir isotherm based on an effective binary ionic exchange process. The SpeedUp column model was tested by comparing to the analytical solutions of three transport problems from the ion exchange literature. In addition, a sample calculation of a train of three crystalline silicotitanate (CST) IX columns in series was made using both the SpeedUp model and Purdue University's VERSE-LC code. All test cases showed excellent agreement between the SpeedUp model results and the test data. The model can be readily used for SuperLigtrademark ion exchange resins, once the experimental data are complete

  4. Cloud Properties Simulated by a Single-Column Model. Part II: Evaluation of Cumulus Detrainment and Ice-phase Microphysics Using a Cloud Resolving Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yali; Krueger, Steven K.; Xu, Kuan-Man

    2005-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series in which kilometer-scale-resolving observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program and a cloud-resolving model (CRM) are used to evaluate the single-column model (SCM) version of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction Global Forecast System model. Part I demonstrated that kilometer-scale cirrus properties simulated by the SCM significantly differ from the cloud radar observations while the CRM simulation reproduced most of the cirrus properties as revealed by the observations. The present study describes an evaluation, through a comparison with the CRM, of the SCM's representation of detrainment from deep cumulus and ice-phase microphysics in an effort to better understand the findings of Part I. It is found that detrainment occurs too infrequently at a single level at a time in the SCM, although the detrainment rate averaged over the entire simulation period is somewhat comparable to that of the CRM simulation. Relatively too much detrained ice is sublimated when first detrained. Snow falls over too deep of a layer due to the assumption that snow source and sink terms exactly balance within one time step in the SCM. These characteristics in the SCM parameterizations may explain many of the differences in the cirrus properties between the SCM and the observations (or between the SCM and the CRM). A possible improvement for the SCM consists of the inclusion of multiple cumulus cloud types as in the original Arakawa-Schubert scheme, prognostically determining the stratiform cloud fraction and snow mixing ratio. This would allow better representation of the detrainment from deep convection, better coupling of the volume of detrained air with cloud fraction, and better representation of snow field.

  5. Expanded Large-Scale Forcing Properties Derived from the Multiscale Data Assimilation System and Its Application to Single-Column Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, S.; Li, Z.; Liu, Y.; Lin, W.; Toto, T.; Vogelmann, A. M.; Fridlind, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    We present an approach to derive large-scale forcing that is used to drive single-column models (SCMs) and cloud resolving models (CRMs)/large eddy simulation (LES) for evaluating fast physics parameterizations in climate models. The forcing fields are derived by use of a newly developed multi-scale data assimilation (MS-DA) system. This DA system is developed on top of the NCEP Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) System and is implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model at a cloud resolving resolution of 2 km. This approach has been applied to the generation of large scale forcing for a set of Intensive Operation Periods (IOPs) over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The dense ARM in-situ observations and high-resolution satellite data effectively constrain the WRF model. The evaluation shows that the derived forcing displays accuracies comparable to the existing continuous forcing product and, overall, a better dynamic consistency with observed cloud and precipitation. One important application of this approach is to derive large-scale hydrometeor forcing and multiscale forcing, which is not provided in the existing continuous forcing product. It is shown that the hydrometeor forcing poses an appreciable impact on cloud and precipitation fields in the single-column model simulations. The large-scale forcing exhibits a significant dependency on domain-size that represents SCM grid-sizes. Subgrid processes often contribute a significant component to the large-scale forcing, and this contribution is sensitive to the grid-size and cloud-regime.

  6. Assessment of the aerosol optics component of the coupled WRF-CMAQ model using CARES field campaign data and a single column model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Chuen Meei; Binkowski, Francis; Pleim, Jonathan; Xing, Jia; Wong, David; Mathur, Rohit; Gilliam, Robert

    2015-08-01

    The Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES), a field campaign held in central California in June 2010, provides a unique opportunity to assess the aerosol optics modeling component of the two-way coupled Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) - Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. This campaign included comprehensive measurements of aerosol composition and optical properties at two ground sites and aloft from instrumentation on-board two aircraft. A single column model (SCM) was developed to evaluate the accuracy and consistency of the coupled model using both observation and model information. Two cases (June 14 and 24, 2010) are examined in this study. The results show that though the coupled WRF-CMAQ estimates of aerosol extinction were underestimated relative to these measurements, when measured concentrations and characteristics of ambient aerosols were used as input to constrain the SCM calculations, the estimated extinction profiles agreed well with aircraft observations. One of the possible causes of the WRF-CMAQ extinction errors is that the simulated sea-salt (SS) in the accumulation mode in WRF-CMAQ is very low in both cases while the observations indicate a considerable amount of SS. Also, a significant amount of organic carbon (OC) is present in the measurement. However, in the current WRF-CMAQ model all OC is considered to be insoluble whereas most secondary organic aerosol is water soluble. In addition, the model does not consider external mixing and hygroscopic effects of water soluble OC which can impact the extinction calculations. In conclusion, the constrained SCM results indicate that the scattering portion of the aerosol optics calculations is working well, although the absorption calculation could not be effectively evaluated. However, a few factors such as greatly underestimated accumulation mode SS, misrepresentation of water soluble OC, and incomplete mixing state representation in the full coupled model

  7. Oscillating water column structural model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, Guild [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bull, Diana L [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jepsen, Richard Alan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gordon, Margaret Ellen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    An oscillating water column (OWC) wave energy converter is a structure with an opening to the ocean below the free surface, i.e. a structure with a moonpool. Two structural models for a non-axisymmetric terminator design OWC, the Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB) are discussed in this report. The results of this structural model design study are intended to inform experiments and modeling underway in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated Reference Model Project (RMP). A detailed design developed by Re Vision Consulting used stiffeners and girders to stabilize the structure against the hydrostatic loads experienced by a BBDB device. Additional support plates were added to this structure to account for loads arising from the mooring line attachment points. A simplified structure was designed in a modular fashion. This simplified design allows easy alterations to the buoyancy chambers and uncomplicated analysis of resulting changes in buoyancy.

  8. RACORO Continental Boundary Layer Cloud Investigations: 3. Separation of Parameterization Biases in Single-Column Model CAM5 Simulations of Shallow Cumulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wuyin; Liu, Yangang; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann; Endo, Satoshi; Song, Hua; Feng, Sha; Toto, Tami; Li, Zhijin; Zhang, Minghua

    2015-01-01

    Climatically important low-level clouds are commonly misrepresented in climate models. The FAst-physics System TEstbed and Research (FASTER) Project has constructed case studies from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plain site during the RACORO aircraft campaign to facilitate research on model representation of boundary-layer clouds. This paper focuses on using the single-column Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (SCAM5) simulations of a multi-day continental shallow cumulus case to identify specific parameterization causes of low-cloud biases. Consistent model biases among the simulations driven by a set of alternative forcings suggest that uncertainty in the forcing plays only a relatively minor role. In-depth analysis reveals that the model's shallow cumulus convection scheme tends to significantly under-produce clouds during the times when shallow cumuli exist in the observations, while the deep convective and stratiform cloud schemes significantly over-produce low-level clouds throughout the day. The links between model biases and the underlying assumptions of the shallow cumulus scheme are further diagnosed with the aid of large-eddy simulations and aircraft measurements, and by suppressing the triggering of the deep convection scheme. It is found that the weak boundary layer turbulence simulated is directly responsible for the weak cumulus activity and the simulated boundary layer stratiform clouds. Increased vertical and temporal resolutions are shown to lead to stronger boundary layer turbulence and reduction of low-cloud biases.

  9. Single column and two-column H-D-T distillation experiments at TSTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanishi, T.; Yoshida, H.; Hirata, S.; Naito, T.; Naruse, Y.; Sherman, R.H.; Bartlit, J.R.; Anderson, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Cryogenic distillation experiments were peformed at TSTA with H-D-T system by using a single column and a two-column cascade. In the single column experiment, fundamental engineering data such as the liquid holdup and the HETP were measured under a variety of operational condtions. The liquid holdup in the packed section was about 10 /approximately/ 15% of its superficial volume. The HETP values were from 4 to 6 cm, and increased slightly with the vapor velocity. The reflux ratio had no effect on the HETP. For the wo-colunn experiemnt, dynamic behavior of the cascade was observed. 8 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Development of fine-resolution analyses and expanded large-scale forcing properties: 2. Scale awareness and application to single-column model experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Sha; Li, Zhijin; Liu, Yangang; Lin, Wuyin; Zhang, Minghua; Toto, Tami; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Endo, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    three-dimensional fields have been produced using the Community Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) data assimilation system for the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains region. The GSI system is implemented in a multiscale data assimilation framework using the Weather Research and Forecasting model at a cloud-resolving resolution of 2 km. From the fine-resolution three-dimensional fields, large-scale forcing is derived explicitly at grid-scale resolution; a subgrid-scale dynamic component is derived separately, representing subgrid-scale horizontal dynamic processes. Analyses show that the subgrid-scale dynamic component is often a major component over the large-scale forcing for grid scales larger than 200 km. The single-column model (SCM) of the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 is used to examine the impact of the grid-scale and subgrid-scale dynamic components on simulated precipitation and cloud fields associated with a mesoscale convective system. It is found that grid-scale size impacts simulated precipitation, resulting in an overestimation for grid scales of about 200 km but an underestimation for smaller grids. The subgrid-scale dynamic component has an appreciable impact on the simulations, suggesting that grid-scale and subgrid-scale dynamic components should be considered in the interpretation of SCM simulations.

  11. CGILS: Results from the First Phase of an International Project to Understand the Physical Mechanisms of Low Cloud Feedbacks in Single Column Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minghua; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Blossey, Peter N.; Austin, Phillip H.; Bacmeister, Julio T.; Bony, Sandrine; Brient, Florent; Cheedela, Suvarchal K.; Cheng, Anning; DelGenio, Anthony; hide

    2013-01-01

    1] CGILS-the CFMIP-GASS Intercomparison of Large Eddy Models (LESs) and single column models (SCMs)-investigates the mechanisms of cloud feedback in SCMs and LESs under idealized climate change perturbation. This paper describes the CGILS results from 15 SCMs and 8 LES models. Three cloud regimes over the subtropical oceans are studied: shallow cumulus, cumulus under stratocumulus, and well-mixed coastal stratus/stratocumulus. In the stratocumulus and coastal stratus regimes, SCMs without activated shallow convection generally simulated negative cloud feedbacks, while models with active shallow convection generally simulated positive cloud feedbacks. In the shallow cumulus alone regime, this relationship is less clear, likely due to the changes in cloud depth, lateral mixing, and precipitation or a combination of them. The majority of LES models simulated negative cloud feedback in the well-mixed coastal stratus/stratocumulus regime, and positive feedback in the shallow cumulus and stratocumulus regime. A general framework is provided to interpret SCM results: in a warmer climate, the moistening rate of the cloudy layer associated with the surface-based turbulence parameterization is enhanced; together with weaker large-scale subsidence, it causes negative cloud feedback. In contrast, in the warmer climate, the drying rate associated with the shallow convection scheme is enhanced. This causes positive cloud feedback. These mechanisms are summarized as the "NESTS" negative cloud feedback and the "SCOPE" positive cloud feedback (Negative feedback from Surface Turbulence under weaker Subsidence-Shallow Convection PositivE feedback) with the net cloud feedback depending on how the two opposing effects counteract each other. The LES results are consistent with these interpretations

  12. Single-Column Model Simulations of Subtropical Marine Boundary-Layer Cloud Transitions Under Weakening Inversions: SCM SIMULATIONS OF CLOUD TRANSITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neggers, R. A. J. [Institute for Geophysics and Meteorology, Department of Geosciences, University of Cologne, Cologne Germany; Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute, De Bilt The Netherlands; Ackerman, A. S. [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York NY USA; Angevine, W. M. [CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder CO USA; NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder CO USA; Bazile, E. [Météo France/CNRM, Toulouse France; Beau, I. [Météo France/ENM, Toulouse France; Blossey, P. N. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Boutle, I. A. [Met Office, Exeter UK; de Bruijn, C. [Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute, De Bilt The Netherlands; Cheng, A. [NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Environmental Modeling Center, College Park MD USA; van der Dussen, J. [Department of Geoscience and Remote Sensing, Delft University of Technology, Delft The Netherlands; Fletcher, J. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; University of Leeds, Leeds UK; Dal Gesso, S. [Institute for Geophysics and Meteorology, Department of Geosciences, University of Cologne, Cologne Germany; Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute, De Bilt The Netherlands; Jam, A. [Météo-France/CNRM & CNRS/IPSL/LMD, Toulouse France; Kawai, H. [Meteorological Research Institute, Climate Research Department, Japan Meteorological Agency, Tsukuba Japan; Cheedela, S. K. [Department of Atmosphere in the Earth System, Max-Planck Institut für Meteorologie, Hamburg Germany; Larson, V. E. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee WI USA; Lefebvre, M. -P. [Météo-France/CNRM & CNRS/IPSL/LMD, Toulouse France; Lock, A. P. [Met Office, Exeter UK; Meyer, N. R. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee WI USA; de Roode, S. R. [Department of Geoscience and Remote Sensing, Delft University of Technology, Delft The Netherlands; de Rooy, W. [Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute, De Bilt The Netherlands; Sandu, I. [Section of Physical Aspects, European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading UK; Xiao, H. [University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles CA USA; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Xu, K. -M. [NASA Langley Research Centre, Hampton VI USA

    2017-10-01

    Results are presented of the GASS/EUCLIPSE single-column model inter-comparison study on the subtropical marine low-level cloud transition. A central goal is to establish the performance of state-of-the-art boundary-layer schemes for weather and climate mod- els for this cloud regime, using large-eddy simulations of the same scenes as a reference. A novelty is that the comparison covers four different cases instead of one, in order to broaden the covered parameter space. Three cases are situated in the North-Eastern Pa- cific, while one reflects conditions in the North-Eastern Atlantic. A set of variables is considered that reflects key aspects of the transition process, making use of simple met- rics to establish the model performance. Using this method some longstanding problems in low level cloud representation are identified. Considerable spread exists among models concerning the cloud amount, its vertical structure and the associated impact on radia- tive transfer. The sign and amplitude of these biases differ somewhat per case, depending on how far the transition has progressed. After cloud breakup the ensemble median ex- hibits the well-known “too few too bright” problem. The boundary layer deepening rate and its state of decoupling are both underestimated, while the representation of the thin capping cloud layer appears complicated by a lack of vertical resolution. Encouragingly, some models are successful in representing the full set of variables, in particular the verti- cal structure and diurnal cycle of the cloud layer in transition. An intriguing result is that the median of the model ensemble performs best, inspiring a new approach in subgrid pa- rameterization.

  13. Separation of hydrogen isotopes via single column pressure swing adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Y.W.; Hill, F.B.

    1981-01-01

    Separation of hydrogen isotopes based on kinetic isotope effects was studied. The mixture separated was hydrogen containing a trace of tritium as HT and the hydride was vanadium monohydride. The separation was achieved using the single-column pressure swing process. Stage separation factors are larger and product cuts smaller than for a two-column pressure swing process operated in the same monohydride phase

  14. A single-column particle-resolved model for simulating the vertical distribution of aerosol mixing state: WRF-PartMC-MOSAIC-SCM v1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jeffrey H.; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew

    2017-11-01

    The PartMC-MOSAIC particle-resolved aerosol model was previously developed to predict the aerosol mixing state as it evolves in the atmosphere. However, the modeling framework was limited to a zero-dimensional box model approach without resolving spatial gradients in aerosol concentrations. This paper presents the development of stochastic particle methods to simulate turbulent diffusion and dry deposition of aerosol particles in a vertical column within the planetary boundary layer. The new model, WRF-PartMC-MOSAIC-SCM, resolves the vertical distribution of aerosol mixing state. We verified the new algorithms with analytical solutions for idealized test cases and illustrate the capabilities with results from a 2-day urban scenario that shows the evolution of black carbon mixing state in a vertical column.

  15. An Ensemble Three-Dimensional Constrained Variational Analysis Method to Derive Large-Scale Forcing Data for Single-Column Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shuaiqi

    Atmospheric vertical velocities and advective tendencies are essential as large-scale forcing data to drive single-column models (SCM), cloud-resolving models (CRM) and large-eddy simulations (LES). They cannot be directly measured or easily calculated with great accuracy from field measurements. In the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, a constrained variational algorithm (1DCVA) has been used to derive large-scale forcing data over a sounding network domain with the aid of flux measurements at the surface and top of the atmosphere (TOA). We extend the 1DCVA algorithm into three dimensions (3DCVA) along with other improvements to calculate gridded large-scale forcing data. We also introduce an ensemble framework using different background data, error covariance matrices and constraint variables to quantify the uncertainties of the large-scale forcing data. The results of sensitivity study show that the derived forcing data and SCM simulated clouds are more sensitive to the background data than to the error covariance matrices and constraint variables, while horizontal moisture advection has relatively large sensitivities to the precipitation, the dominate constraint variable. Using a mid-latitude cyclone case study in March 3rd, 2000 at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, we investigate the spatial distribution of diabatic heating sources (Q1) and moisture sinks (Q2), and show that they are consistent with the satellite clouds and intuitive structure of the mid-latitude cyclone. We also evaluate the Q1 and Q2 in analysis/reanalysis, finding that the regional analysis/reanalysis all tend to underestimate the sub-grid scale upward transport of moist static energy in the lower troposphere. With the uncertainties from large-scale forcing data and observation specified, we compare SCM results and observations and find that models have large biases on cloud properties which could not be fully explained by the uncertainty from the large-scale forcing

  16. Dependence of stratocumulus-topped boundary-layer entrainment on cloud-water sedimentation: Impact on global aerosol indirect effect in GISS ModelE3 single column model and global simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, A. S.; Kelley, M.; Cheng, Y.; Fridlind, A. M.; Del Genio, A. D.; Bauer, S.

    2017-12-01

    Reduction in cloud-water sedimentation induced by increasing droplet concentrations has been shown in large-eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulation (DNS) to enhance boundary-layer entrainment, thereby reducing cloud liquid water path and offsetting the Twomey effect when the overlying air is sufficiently dry, which is typical. Among recent upgrades to ModelE3, the latest version of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM), are a two-moment stratiform cloud microphysics treatment with prognostic precipitation and a moist turbulence scheme that includes an option in its entrainment closure of a simple parameterization for the effect of cloud-water sedimentation. Single column model (SCM) simulations are compared to LES results for a stratocumulus case study and show that invoking the sedimentation-entrainment parameterization option indeed reduces the dependence of cloud liquid water path on increasing aerosol concentrations. Impacts of variations of the SCM configuration and the sedimentation-entrainment parameterization will be explored. Its impact on global aerosol indirect forcing in the framework of idealized atmospheric GCM simulations will also be assessed.

  17. Mathematical modeling of alcohol distillation columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ones Osney Pérez

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available New evaluation modules are proposed to extend the scope of a modular simulator oriented to the sugar cane industry, called STA 4.0, in a way that it can be used to carry out x calculation and analysis in ethanol distilleries. Calculation modules were developed for the simulation of the columns that are combined in the distillation area. Mathematical models were supported on materials and energy balances, equilibrium relations and thermodynamic properties of the ethanol-water system. Ponchon-Savarit method was used for the evaluation of the theoretical stages in the columns. A comparison between the results using Ponchon- Savarit method and those obtained applying McCabe-Thiele method was done for a distillation column. These calculation modules for ethanol distilleries were applied to a real case for validation.

  18. Interfacing a one-dimensional lake model with a single-column atmospheric model: 2. Thermal response of the deep Lake Geneva, Switzerland under a 2 × CO2 global climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perroud, Marjorie; Goyette, StéPhane

    2012-06-01

    In the companion to the present paper, the one-dimensional k-ɛ lake model SIMSTRAT is coupled to a single-column atmospheric model, nicknamed FIZC, and an application of the coupled model to the deep Lake Geneva, Switzerland, is described. In this paper, the response of Lake Geneva to global warming caused by an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration (i.e., 2 × CO2) is investigated. Coupling the models allowed for feedbacks between the lake surface and the atmosphere and produced changes in atmospheric moisture and cloud cover that further modified the downward radiation fluxes. The time evolution of atmospheric variables as well as those of the lake's thermal profile could be reproduced realistically by devising a set of adjustable parameters. In a "control" 1 × CO2 climate experiment, the coupled FIZC-SIMSTRAT model demonstrated genuine skills in reproducing epilimnetic and hypolimnetic temperatures, with annual mean errors and standard deviations of 0.25°C ± 0.25°C and 0.3°C ± 0.15°C, respectively. Doubling the CO2 concentration induced an atmospheric warming that impacted the lake's thermal structure, increasing the stability of the water column and extending the stratified period by 3 weeks. Epilimnetic temperatures were seen to increase by 2.6°C to 4.2°C, while hypolimnion temperatures increased by 2.2°C. Climate change modified components of the surface energy budget through changes mainly in air temperature, moisture, and cloud cover. During summer, reduced cloud cover resulted in an increase in the annual net solar radiation budget. A larger water vapor deficit at the air-water interface induced a cooling effect in the lake.

  19. Sensitivity of Cirrus and Mixed-phase Clouds to the Ice Nuclei Spectra in McRAS-AC: Single Column Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, R. Morales; Lee, D.; Oreopoulos, L.; Sud, Y. C.; Barahona, D.; Nenes, A.

    2012-01-01

    The salient features of mixed-phase and ice clouds in a GCM cloud scheme are examined using the ice formation parameterizations of Liu and Penner (LP) and Barahona and Nenes (BN). The performance of LP and BN ice nucleation parameterizations were assessed in the GEOS-5 AGCM using the McRAS-AC cloud microphysics framework in single column mode. Four dimensional assimilated data from the intensive observation period of ARM TWP-ICE campaign was used to drive the fluxes and lateral forcing. Simulation experiments where established to test the impact of each parameterization in the resulting cloud fields. Three commonly used IN spectra were utilized in the BN parameterization to described the availability of IN for heterogeneous ice nucleation. The results show large similarities in the cirrus cloud regime between all the schemes tested, in which ice crystal concentrations were within a factor of 10 regardless of the parameterization used. In mixed-phase clouds there are some persistent differences in cloud particle number concentration and size, as well as in cloud fraction, ice water mixing ratio, and ice water path. Contact freezing in the simulated mixed-phase clouds contributed to transfer liquid to ice efficiently, so that on average, the clouds were fully glaciated at T approximately 260K, irrespective of the ice nucleation parameterization used. Comparison of simulated ice water path to available satellite derived observations were also performed, finding that all the schemes tested with the BN parameterization predicted 20 average values of IWP within plus or minus 15% of the observations.

  20. Evaluating cloud processes in large-scale models: Of idealized case studies, parameterization testbeds and single-column modelling on climate time-scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neggers, Roel

    2016-04-01

    Boundary-layer schemes have always formed an integral part of General Circulation Models (GCMs) used for numerical weather and climate prediction. The spatial and temporal scales associated with boundary-layer processes and clouds are typically much smaller than those at which GCMs are discretized, which makes their representation through parameterization a necessity. The need for generally applicable boundary-layer parameterizations has motivated many scientific studies, which in effect has created its own active research field in the atmospheric sciences. Of particular interest has been the evaluation of boundary-layer schemes at "process-level". This means that parameterized physics are studied in isolated mode from the larger-scale circulation, using prescribed forcings and excluding any upscale interaction. Although feedbacks are thus prevented, the benefit is an enhanced model transparency, which might aid an investigator in identifying model errors and understanding model behavior. The popularity and success of the process-level approach is demonstrated by the many past and ongoing model inter-comparison studies that have been organized by initiatives such as GCSS/GASS. A red line in the results of these studies is that although most schemes somehow manage to capture first-order aspects of boundary layer cloud fields, there certainly remains room for improvement in many areas. Only too often are boundary layer parameterizations still found to be at the heart of problems in large-scale models, negatively affecting forecast skills of NWP models or causing uncertainty in numerical predictions of future climate. How to break this parameterization "deadlock" remains an open problem. This presentation attempts to give an overview of the various existing methods for the process-level evaluation of boundary-layer physics in large-scale models. This includes i) idealized case studies, ii) longer-term evaluation at permanent meteorological sites (the testbed approach

  1. Assessment of the Aerosol Optics Component of the Coupled WRF-CMAQ Model usingCARES Field Campaign data and a Single Column Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES), a field campaign held in central California in June 2010, provides a unique opportunity to assess the aerosol optics modeling component of the two-way coupled Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) – Community Multisc...

  2. Mass transfer model liquid phase catalytic exchange column simulation applicable to any column composition profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busigin, A. [NITEK USA Inc., Ocala, FL (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange (LPCE) is a key technology used in water detritiation systems. Rigorous simulation of LPCE is complicated when a column may have both hydrogen and deuterium present in significant concentrations in different sections of the column. This paper presents a general mass transfer model for a homogenous packed bed LPCE column as a set of differential equations describing composition change, and equilibrium equations to define the mass transfer driving force within the column. The model is used to show the effect of deuterium buildup in the bottom of an LPCE column from non-negligible D atom fraction in the bottom feed gas to the column. These types of calculations are important in the design of CECE (Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange) water detritiation systems.

  3. Simulating the 2012 High Plains drought using three single column versions (SCM) of BUGS5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, I. D.; Denning, S.

    2013-12-01

    The impact of changes in the frequency and severity of drought on fresh water sustainability is a great concern for many regions of the world. One such location is the High Plains, where the local economy is primarily driven by fresh water withdrawals from the Ogallala Aquifer, which accounts for approximately 30% of total irrigation withdrawals from all U.S. aquifers combined. Modeling studies that focus on the feedback mechanisms that control the climate and eco-hydrology during times of drought are limited, and have used conventional General Circulation Models (GCMs) with grid length scales ranging from one hundred to several hundred kilometers. Additionally, these models utilize crude statistical parameterizations of cloud processes for estimating sub-grid fluxes of heat and moisture and have a poor representation of land surface heterogeneity. For this research, we will focus on the 2012 High Plains drought and will perform numerical simulations using three single column versions (SCM) of BUGS5 (Colorado State University (CSU) GCM coupled to the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB3)) at multiple sites overlying the Ogallala Aquifer for the 2011-2012 periods. In the first version of BUGS5, the model will be used in its standard bulk setting (single atmospheric column coupled to a single instance of SiB3), secondly, the Super-Parameterized Community Atmospheric Model (SP-CAM), a cloud resolving model (CRM consists of 64 atmospheric columns), will replace the single CSU GCM atmospheric parameterization and will be coupled to a single instance of SiB3, and for the third version of BUGS5, an instance of SiB3 will be coupled to each CRM column of the SP-CAM (64 CRM columns coupled to 64 instances of SiB3). To assess the physical realism of the land-atmosphere feedbacks simulated at each site by all versions of BUGS5, differences in simulated energy and moisture fluxes will be computed between the 2011 and 2012 period and will be compared to differences calculated using

  4. SPR Hydrostatic Column Model Verification and Validation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettin, Giorgia [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lord, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rudeen, David Keith [Gram, Inc. Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    A Hydrostatic Column Model (HCM) was developed to help differentiate between normal "tight" well behavior and small-leak behavior under nitrogen for testing the pressure integrity of crude oil storage wells at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. This effort was motivated by steady, yet distinct, pressure behavior of a series of Big Hill caverns that have been placed under nitrogen for extended period of time. This report describes the HCM model, its functional requirements, the model structure and the verification and validation process. Different modes of operation are also described, which illustrate how the software can be used to model extended nitrogen monitoring and Mechanical Integrity Tests by predicting wellhead pressures along with nitrogen interface movements. Model verification has shown that the program runs correctly and it is implemented as intended. The cavern BH101 long term nitrogen test was used to validate the model which showed very good agreement with measured data. This supports the claim that the model is, in fact, capturing the relevant physical phenomena and can be used to make accurate predictions of both wellhead pressure and interface movements.

  5. Rasch models with exchangeable rows and columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Steffen Lilholt

    The article studies distributions of doubly infinite binary matrices with exchangeable rows and columns which satify the further property that the probability of any $m \\times n$ submatrix is a function of the row- and column sums of that matrix. We show that any such distribution is a (unique...

  6. Conceptual analysis of single-feed heterogeneous distillation columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Arturo Martinez Riascos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Separation in heterogeneous distillation columns is attained by interaction of two liquid and one vapor phases, interaction of three phases involves complexities due to the determination of vapor-liquid-liquid equilibrium and hence, in the design of separation units. Nevertheless, the liquid-liquid equilibrium allows developing separations that may be unfeasible by vapor-liquid equilibrium. In this way, heterogeneous azeotropic distillation is a useful operation for the separation of azeotropic and close-boiling mixtures. In this work, a new methodology for evaluating the feasibility of this process is developed. This methodology is an extension of that proposed by Castillo et al. (1998 for homogeneous systems. Operation leaves for heterogeneous systems are calculated using the concept of pinch point curves in order to establish the process feasibility. Heterogeneous columns with external decanter are considered as the only heterogeneous stage (OHED: only heterogeneous external decanter. The initialization process for the column calculation requires the selection of the distillate composition using thermodynamic criteria in order to guarantee homogeneous phases within the column. A system with industrial and academic relevance was considered as case study: water-acetic acid-amyl acetate. Results show that the developed shortcut method allows evaluating process feasibility and estimating design parameters, without the use of trial and error procedures implemented, with the aid of simulation tools.

  7. Graph Modelling Approach: Application to a Distillation Column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovelaque, V.; Commault, C.; Bahar, Mehrdad

    1997-01-01

    Introduction, structured systems and digraphs, distillation column model, generic input-output decoupling problem, generic disturbance rejection problem, concluding remarks.......Introduction, structured systems and digraphs, distillation column model, generic input-output decoupling problem, generic disturbance rejection problem, concluding remarks....

  8. A Benchmark Study of a Seismic Analysis Program for a Single Column of a HTGR Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ji Ho [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    A seismic analysis program, SAPCOR (Seismic Analysis of Prismatic HTGR Core), was developed in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. The program is used for the evaluation of deformed shapes and forces on the graphite blocks which using point-mass rigid bodies with Kelvin-Voigt impact models. In the previous studies, the program was verified using theoretical solutions and benchmark problems. To validate the program for more complicated problems, a free vibration analysis of a single column of a HTGR core was selected and the calculation results of the SAPCOR and a commercial FEM code, Abaqus, were compared in this study.

  9. A Modeling Framework for Conventional and Heat Integrated Distillation Columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thomas; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Abildskov, Jens

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a generic, modular model framework for describing fluid separation by distillation is presented. At present, the framework is able to describe a conventional distillation column and a heat-integrated distillation column, but due to a modular structure the database can be further...

  10. Modeling of Crystalline Silicotitanate Ion Exchange Columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.D.

    1999-01-01

    Non-elutable ion exchange is being considered as a potential replacement for the In-Tank Precipitation process for removing cesium from Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste. Crystalline silicotitanate (CST) particles are the reference ion exchange medium for the process. A major factor in the construction cost of this process is the size of the ion exchange column required to meet product specifications for decontaminated waste. To validate SRS column sizing calculations, SRS subcontracted two reknowned experts in this field to perform similar calculations: Professor R. G. Anthony, Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A ampersand 038;M University, and Professor S. W. Wang, Department of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University. The appendices of this document contain reports from the two subcontractors. Definition of the design problem came through several meetings and conference calls between the participants and SRS personnel over the past few months. This document summarizes the problem definition and results from the two reports

  11. Bubble column fermenter modeling: a comparison for pressure effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shioya, S; Dang, N D.P.; Dunn, I J

    1978-01-01

    Two models which describe the oxygen transfer, oxygen uptake, and axial mixing in a bubble column fermenter are described. Model I includes no pressure effects and can be solved analytically. Model II incorporates the influence of hydrostatic pressure on oxygen solubility and gas expansion and must be solved numerically. The liquid phase oxygen concentration profiles from both models are compared to ascertain for what parametric conditions and for what maximum column height Model I is valid. Results show that for many situations Model I can approximate the oxygen profiles in a 10 m column within 20%. As the transfer and uptake rates increase, the deviation of Model I can reach 80% for a 10 m column. 7 figures.

  12. A Modelling Framework for Conventional and Heat Integrated Distillation Columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thomas; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Abildskov, Jens

    2013-01-01

    of hydrocarbons such as separations of equimolar mixtures of benzene/toluene or propane/propene described by simple models, a generic, modular, model framework is presented in this work. At present, the framework is able to describe a conventional distillation column, a mechanical vapor recompression column......Diabatic operation of distillation columns can lead to signicant reductions in energy utilization and operation cost compared to conventional (adiabatic) distillation columns, at an expense of an increased complexity of design and operation. The earliest diabatic distillation conguration dates back...... to the late 70s, and various dierent congurations have appeared since. However, at present, no full-scale diabatic distillation columns are currently operating in the industry. Current studies related to alternative distillation congurations report very dierent gures for potential energy savings which...

  13. Uncertainty modelling of critical column buckling for reinforced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    for columns, having major importance to a building's safety, are considered stability limits. ... Various research works have been carried out for uncertainty analysis in ... need appropriate material models, advanced structural simulation tools.

  14. Modeling atrazine transport in soil columns with HYDRUS-1D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Leju Celestino Ladu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Both physical and chemical processes affect the fate and transport of herbicides. It is useful to simulate these processes with computer programs to predict solute movement. Simulations were run with HYDRUS-1D to identify the sorption and degradation parameters of atrazine through calibration from the breakthrough curves (BTCs. Data from undisturbed and disturbed soil column experiments were compared and analyzed using the dual-porosity model. The study results show that the values of dispersivity are slightly lower in disturbed columns, suggesting that the more heterogeneous the structure is, the higher the dispersivity. Sorption parameters also show slight variability, which is attributed to the differences in soil properties, experimental conditions and methods, or other ecological factors. For both of the columns, the degradation rates were similar. Potassium bromide was used as a conservative non-reactive tracer to characterize the water movement in columns. Atrazine BTCs exhibited significant tailing and asymmetry, indicating non-equilibrium sorption during solute transport. The dual-porosity model was verified to best fit the BTCs of the column experiments. Greater or lesser concentration of atrazine spreading to the bottom of the columns indicated risk of groundwater contamination. Overall, HYDRUS-1D successfully simulated the atrazine transport in soil columns.

  15. Model predictive control of a crude oil distillation column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Hovd

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available The project of designing and implementing model based predictive control on the vacuum distillation column at the Nynäshamn Refinery of Nynäs AB is described in this paper. The paper describes in detail the modeling for the model based control, covers the controller implementation, and documents the benefits gained from the model based controller.

  16. An Analytical Method for Determining the Load Distribution of Single-Column Multibolt Connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirut Konkong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to investigate the effect of geometric variables on the bolt load distributions of a cold-formed steel bolt connection. The study was conducted using an experimental test, finite element analysis, and an analytical method. The experimental study was performed using single-lap shear testing of a concentrically loaded bolt connection fabricated from G550 cold-formed steel. Finite element analysis with shell elements was used to model the cold-formed steel plate while solid elements were used to model the bolt fastener for the purpose of studying the structural behavior of the bolt connections. Material nonlinearities, contact problems, and a geometric nonlinearity procedure were used to predict the failure behavior of the bolt connections. The analytical method was generated using the spring model. The bolt-plate interaction stiffness was newly proposed which was verified by the experiment and finite element model. It was applied to examine the effect of geometric variables on the single-column multibolt connection. The effects were studied of varying bolt diameter, plate thickness, and the plate thickness ratio (t2/t1 on the bolt load distribution. The results of the parametric study showed that the t2/t1 ratio controlled the efficiency of the bolt load distribution more than the other parameters studied.

  17. Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidaspow, D. [IIT Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this investigation is to convert a {open_quotes}learning gas-solid-liquid{close_quotes} fluidization model into a predictive design model. This model is capable of predicting local gas, liquid and solids hold-ups and the basic flow regimes: the uniform bubbling, the industrially practical churn-turbulent (bubble coalescence) and the slugging regimes. Current reactor models incorrectly assume that the gas and the particle hold-ups (volume fractions) are uniform in the reactor. They must be given in terms of empirical correlations determined under conditions that radically differ from reactor operation. In the proposed hydrodynamic approach these hold-ups are computed from separate phase momentum balances. Furthermore, the kinetic theory approach computes the high slurry viscosities from collisions of the catalyst particles. Thus particle rheology is not an input into the model.

  18. Single-column data assimilation for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louis, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    The main purpose of the ARM program is to provide the necessary data to develop, test and validate the parameterization of clouds and of their interactions with the radiation field, and the computation of radiative transfer in climate models. For various reasons, much of the ARM observations will be imperfect, incomplete, redundant, indirect and unrepresentative. Various techniques of data assimilation have been developed to deal with these problems. The variational data assimilation and adjoint method applied to a single column model is described here. A model is used to simulate the evolution of the atmosphere during an assimilation period. As the model is run, a cost function is computed which is essentially a measure of simulation errors. The method then consists in adjusting some model parameters to minimize the cost function. Optimization of the model parameters needs to be done with a much longer series of data, to cover different meteorological situations. Once parameters are set, nudging terms are used as control variables. The Derber nudging method will require considerable tuning, especially in defining the vertical profiles of the nudging terms. Extensive tests are currently underway of both model optimization and data assimilation

  19. Single-larger-portion-size and dual-column nutrition labeling may help consumers make more healthful food choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lando, Amy M; Lo, Serena C

    2013-02-01

    The Food and Drug Administration is considering changes to the Nutrition Facts label to help consumers make more healthful choices. To examine the effects of modifications to the Nutrition Facts label on foods that can be listed as having 1 or 2 servings per container, but are reasonably consumed at a single eating occasion. Participants were randomly assigned to study conditions that varied on label format, product, and nutrition profile. Data were collected via an online consumer panel. Adults aged 18 years and older were recruited from Synovate's online household panel. Data were collected during August 2011. A total of 32,897 invitations were sent for a final sample of 9,493 interviews. Participants were randomly assigned to one of 10 label formats classified into three groups: listing 2 servings per container with a single column, listing 2 servings per container with a dual column, and listing a single serving per container. Within these groups there were versions that enlarged the font size for "calories," removed "calories from fat," and changed the wording for serving size declaration. The single product task measured product healthfulness, the amount of calories and various nutrients per serving and per container, and label perceptions. The product comparison task measured ability to identify the healthier product and the product with fewer calories per container and per serving. Analysis of covariance models with Tukey-Kramer tests were used. Covariates included general label use, age, sex, level of education, and race/ethnicity. Single-serving and dual-column formats performed better and scored higher on most outcome measures. For products that contain 2 servings but are customarily consumed at a single eating occasion, using a single-serving or dual-column labeling approach may help consumers make healthier food choices. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Supervisory Model Predictive Control of the Heat Integrated Distillation Column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Kristian; Bisgaard, Thomas; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted

    2017-01-01

    This paper benchmarks a centralized control system based on model predictive control for the operation of the heat integrated distillation column (HIDiC) against a fully decentralized control system using the most complete column model currently available in the literature. The centralized control...... system outperforms the decentralized system, because it handles the interactions in the HIDiC process better. The integral absolute error (IAE) is reduced by a factor of 2 and a factor of 4 for control of the top and bottoms compositions, respectively....

  1. Fabrication of single-walled carbon nanohorns incorporated a monolithic column for capillary electrochromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyan; Wang, Yizhou; Cheng, Heyong; Wang, Yuanchao

    2017-08-01

    Single-walled carbon nanohorns have received great interest for their unique properties and diverse potential applications. Herein, we demonstrated the feasibility of single-walled carbon nanohorns incorporated poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) monolith as the stationary phase for capillary electrochromatography, which were prepared by one-step in situ copolymerization. Single-walled carbon nanohorns were dispersed in styrene to give a stable and homogeneous suspension. The monolithic column gave effective separation for a wide range of aromatic compounds, which was based on hydrophobicity and π-π electrostatic stacking of single-walled carbon nanohorns. The precisions of migration time and peak area varied in the ranges of 1.4-1.9% for intraday trials and 1.7-3.5% for interday trials, and 3.2-6.7% for intraday trials and 4.1-7.4% for interday trials, and 3.6-7.2% for inter-column trials and 5.2-21.3% for inter-column trials, respectively, indicating the good reproducibility of single-walled carbon nanohorns embedded monolithic columns. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Stage wise modeling of liquid-extraction column (RDC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastani, B.

    2004-01-01

    Stage wise forward mixing model considering coalescence and re dispersion of drops was used to predict the performance of Rotating Disk Liquid Extraction Contactors. Experimental data previously obtained in two RDC columns of 7-62 cm diameter, 73.6 cm height and 21.9 cm diameter,150 cm height were used to evaluate the model predications. Drops-side mass transfer coefficients were predicted applying Hand los-baron drop model and onley's model was used to predict velocities. According to the results obtained the followings could be concluded: (1) If the height of coalescence and re dispersion i.e.:h=h p Q p / Q could be estimated, the stage wise forward mixing with coalescence and re dispersion model will predict the column height and efficiency with the acceptable accuracy, (2) The stage wise modeling predictions are highly dependent on the number of stages used when the number of stages is less than 10 and (3) Application of continuous phase mass transfer axial dispersion coefficients (k c and E c ) obtained from the solute concentration profile along the column height will predict the column performance more accurately than the Calder bank and moo-young (for K c ) and Kumar-Heartland (for E c ) correlations

  3. Metabolic modeling of synthesis gas fermentation in bubble column reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; Gomez, Jose A; Höffner, Kai; Barton, Paul I; Henson, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    A promising route to renewable liquid fuels and chemicals is the fermentation of synthesis gas (syngas) streams to synthesize desired products such as ethanol and 2,3-butanediol. While commercial development of syngas fermentation technology is underway, an unmet need is the development of integrated metabolic and transport models for industrially relevant syngas bubble column reactors. We developed and evaluated a spatiotemporal metabolic model for bubble column reactors with the syngas fermenting bacterium Clostridium ljungdahlii as the microbial catalyst. Our modeling approach involved combining a genome-scale reconstruction of C. ljungdahlii metabolism with multiphase transport equations that govern convective and dispersive processes within the spatially varying column. The reactor model was spatially discretized to yield a large set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) in time with embedded linear programs (LPs) and solved using the MATLAB based code DFBAlab. Simulations were performed to analyze the effects of important process and cellular parameters on key measures of reactor performance including ethanol titer, ethanol-to-acetate ratio, and CO and H2 conversions. Our computational study demonstrated that mathematical modeling provides a complementary tool to experimentation for understanding, predicting, and optimizing syngas fermentation reactors. These model predictions could guide future cellular and process engineering efforts aimed at alleviating bottlenecks to biochemical production in syngas bubble column reactors.

  4. Results of the eruptive column model inter-comparison study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Antonio; Suzuki, Yujiro; Cerminara, M.; Devenish, Ben J.; Esposti Ongaro, T.; Herzog, Michael; Van Eaton, Alexa; Denby, L.C.; Bursik, Marcus; de' Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Engwell, S.; Neri, Augusto; Barsotti, Sara; Folch, Arnau; Macedonio, Giovanni; Girault, F.; Carazzo, G.; Tait, S.; Kaminski, E.; Mastin, Larry G.; Woodhouse, Mark J.; Phillips, Jeremy C.; Hogg, Andrew J.; Degruyter, Wim; Bonadonna, Costanza

    2016-01-01

    This study compares and evaluates one-dimensional (1D) and three-dimensional (3D) numerical models of volcanic eruption columns in a set of different inter-comparison exercises. The exercises were designed as a blind test in which a set of common input parameters was given for two reference eruptions, representing a strong and a weak eruption column under different meteorological conditions. Comparing the results of the different models allows us to evaluate their capabilities and target areas for future improvement. Despite their different formulations, the 1D and 3D models provide reasonably consistent predictions of some of the key global descriptors of the volcanic plumes. Variability in plume height, estimated from the standard deviation of model predictions, is within ~ 20% for the weak plume and ~ 10% for the strong plume. Predictions of neutral buoyancy level are also in reasonably good agreement among the different models, with a standard deviation ranging from 9 to 19% (the latter for the weak plume in a windy atmosphere). Overall, these discrepancies are in the range of observational uncertainty of column height. However, there are important differences amongst models in terms of local properties along the plume axis, particularly for the strong plume. Our analysis suggests that the simplified treatment of entrainment in 1D models is adequate to resolve the general behaviour of the weak plume. However, it is inadequate to capture complex features of the strong plume, such as large vortices, partial column collapse, or gravitational fountaining that strongly enhance entrainment in the lower atmosphere. We conclude that there is a need to more accurately quantify entrainment rates, improve the representation of plume radius, and incorporate the effects of column instability in future versions of 1D volcanic plume models.

  5. Controllable preparation of copper phthalocyanine single crystal nano column and its chlorine gas sensing properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhong Zhao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The unsubstituted copper phthalocyanine (CuPc single crystal nano columns were fabricated for the first time as chlorine (Cl2 gas sensors in this paper. The nano columns of CuPc have been prepared on different substrates via template-free physical vapor deposition (PVD approach. The growth mechanism of CuPc nano column on quartz was explored and the same condition used on other substrates including glass, sapphire (C-plane, M-plane, R-plane, Si and SiO2/Si came to a same conclusion, which confirmed that the aligned growth of CuPc nano column is not substrate-dependent. And then the CuPc nano column with special morphology was integrated as in-situ sensor device which exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity towards Cl2 at room temperature with a minimum detection limit as low as 0.08 ppm. The response of sensor was found to increase linearly (26∼659% with the increase for Cl2 within concentration range (0.08∼4.0ppm. These results clearly demonstrate the great potential of the nano column growth and device integration approach for sensor device.

  6. Pressure Control in Distillation Columns: A Model-Based Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Bisgaard, Thomas; Kristensen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of pressure control in distillation columns is presented, including the consequences for composition control and energy consumption. Two types of representative control structures are modeled, analyzed, and benchmarked. A detailed simulation test, based on a real...... industrial distillation column, is used to assess the differences between the two control structures and to demonstrate the benefits of pressure control in the operation. In the second part of the article, a thermodynamic analysis is carried out to establish the influence of pressure on relative volatility...

  7. Modeling shoreline bioremediation: Continuous flow and seawater exchange columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramstad, S.; Sveum, P.; Bech, C.; Faksness, L.G.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the design and use of the columns in the study of bioremediation processes, and gives some results from an experiment designed to study the effects of different additives (fish meal, stick water, and Max Bac) on biodegradation of crude oil. There is significant difference in oil degradation(nC 17 /pristane ratio) between the column with additives and those without. Open system models in this type of open column give valuable data o how the chemical and biological parameters, including oil degradation, are affected by the additives, and simultaneously by the dilutive effect of seawater washing through the sediment, and for optimizing formulations. The system is designed with a large number of units and provides a good first approximation for mesocosm studies and field experiments, thus reducing the need for large numbers of such resource-demanding experiments

  8. Simulation of a Novel Single-column Cryogenic Air Separation Process Using LNG Cold Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jieyu, Zheng; Yanzhong, Li; Guangpeng, Li; Biao, Si

    In this paper, a novel single-column air separation process is proposed with the implementation of heat pump technique and introduction of LNG coldenergy. The proposed process is verifiedand optimized through simulation on the Aspen Hysys® platform. Simulation results reveal that thepower consumption per unit mass of liquid productis around 0.218 kWh/kg, and the total exergy efficiency of the systemis 0.575. According to the latest literatures, an energy saving of 39.1% is achieved compared with those using conventional double-column air separation units.The introduction of LNG cold energy is an effective way to increase the system efficiency.

  9. Mathematical Modeling of Column-Base Connections under Monotonic Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Abdollahzadeh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Some considerable damage to steel structures during the Hyogo-ken Nanbu Earthquake occurred. Among them, many exposed-type column bases failed in several consistent patterns, such as brittle base plate fracture, excessive bolt elongation, unexpected early bolt failure, and inferior construction work, etc. The lessons from these phenomena led to the need for improved understanding of column base behavior. Joint behavior must be modeled when analyzing semi-rigid frames, which is associated with a mathematical model of the moment–rotation curve. The most accurate model uses continuous nonlinear functions. This article presents three areas of steel joint research: (1 analysis methods of semi-rigid joints; (2 prediction methods for the mechanical behavior of joints; (3 mathematical representations of the moment–rotation curve. In the current study, a new exponential model to depict the moment–rotation relationship of column base connection is proposed. The proposed nonlinear model represents an approach to the prediction of M–θ curves, taking into account the possible failure modes and the deformation characteristics of the connection elements. The new model has three physical parameters, along with two curve-fitted factors. These physical parameters are generated from dimensional details of the connection, as well as the material properties. The M–θ curves obtained by the model are compared with published connection tests and 3D FEM research. The proposed mathematical model adequately comes close to characterizing M–θ behavior through the full range of loading/rotations. As a result, modeling of column base connections using the proposed mathematical model can give crucial beforehand information, and overcome the disadvantages of time consuming workmanship and cost of experimental studies.

  10. Two-fluid model LES of a bubble column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brahma N Reddy Vanga; Martin A Lopez de Bertodano; Eckhard Krepper; Alexandr Zaruba; Horst-Michael Prasser

    2005-01-01

    The hydrodynamics of a rectangular bubble column operating in the dispersed bubbly regime has been numerically investigated using a two-fluid model Large Eddy Simulation (LES). Experimental data were obtained to validate the model. LES computational fluid dynamic calculations of the transient flow for the bubble column were performed to account for the turbulence in the liquid phase. The computational mesh is of the same scale as the bubble size. The sub grid-scale Reynolds stresses were calculated with the Smagorinsky model. Furthermore, the effect of the bubbles on the turbulence in the continuous phase was modeled using Sato's eddy viscosity model for bubble-induced turbulence. Mean quantities were computed by averaging over a time period that was longer than the dynamic time scales of the turbulence, in particular the void fraction and the average velocity of the bubbles. A systematic analysis of the effect of the interfacial momentum transfer terms on these quantities has been conducted. The bubble column was locally aerated using a sparger located in the center of the bottom plate. The experimental studies involve wire-mesh tomography measurements for void fraction and bubble size distributions and digital image processing of high speed camera images for estimation of bubble velocities, size distributions and flow patterns. Experiments were performed for various aspect ratios (height of water column to width ratio) and superficial gas velocities. It was found that the non-drag bubble forces play a very prominent role in the predicting the correct flow pattern and void fraction distributions. In the calculations, the lift force and the wall force were considered. A 'wall peak' in the time averaged void fraction distribution has been experimentally observed and this cannot be predicted without including these non-drag forces in the numerical calculations. In this paper, experimental data are compared with the results of the numerical simulations. (authors)

  11. Charge collection measurements in single-type column 3D sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaringella, M.; Polyakov, A.; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Bruzzi, M.; Tosi, C.; Boscardin, M.; Piemonte, C.; Pozza, A.; Ronchin, S.; Zorzi, N.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.

    2007-01-01

    We report on charge collection studies on 3D silicon detectors of single-type column n-diffusions in p-substrate, configured either as strip or as pad detectors. The charge is generated by penetrating beta particles from a 90 Sr source which, together with a scintillation counter, serves as an electron telescope. The charge collection as a function of bias voltage is compared with the depletion thickness derived from the measured C-V characteristics

  12. Uranium Release from Acidic Weathered Hanford Sediments: Single-Pass Flow-Through and Column Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong; Wang, Zheming; Reinoso-Maset, Estela; Washton, Nancy M; Mueller, Karl T; Perdrial, Nicolas; O'Day, Peggy A; Chorover, Jon

    2017-10-03

    The reaction of acidic radioactive waste with sediments can induce mineral transformation reactions that, in turn, control contaminant fate. Here, sediment weathering by synthetic uranium-containing acid solutions was investigated using bench-scale experiments to simulate waste disposal conditions at Hanford's cribs (Hanford, WA). During acid weathering, the presence of phosphate exerted a strong influence over uranium mineralogy and a rapidly precipitated, crystalline uranium phosphate phase (meta-ankoleite [K(UO 2 )(PO 4 )·3H 2 O]) was identified using spectroscopic and diffraction-based techniques. In phosphate-free system, uranium oxyhydroxide minerals such as K-compreignacite [K 2 (UO 2 ) 6 O 4 (OH) 6 ·7H 2 O] were formed. Single-pass flow-through (SPFT) and column leaching experiments using synthetic Hanford pore water showed that uranium precipitated as meta-ankoleite during acid weathering was strongly retained in the sediments, with an average release rate of 2.67 × 10 -12 mol g -1 s -1 . In the absence of phosphate, uranium release was controlled by dissolution of uranium oxyhydroxide (compreignacite-type) mineral with a release rate of 1.05-2.42 × 10 -10 mol g -1 s -1 . The uranium mineralogy and release rates determined for both systems in this study support the development of accurate U-release models for the prediction of contaminant transport. These results suggest that phosphate minerals may be a good candidate for uranium remediation approaches at contaminated sites.

  13. Uranium Release from Acidic Weathered Hanford Sediments: Single-Pass Flow-Through and Column Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guohui [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Um, Wooyong [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, South Korea; Wang, Zheming [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Reinoso-Maset, Estela [Sierra; Washton, Nancy M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Mueller, Karl T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Perdrial, Nicolas [Department; Department; O’Day, Peggy A. [Sierra; Chorover, Jon [Department

    2017-09-21

    The reaction of acidic radioactive waste with sediments can induce mineral transformation reactions that, in turn, control contaminant fate. Here, sediment weathering by synthetic uranium-containing acid solutions was investigated using bench-scale experiments to simulate waste disposal conditions at Hanford’s cribs, USA. During acid weathering, the presence of phosphate exerted a strong influence over uranium mineralogy and a rapidly precipitated, crystalline uranium phosphate phase (meta-ankoleite [K(UO2)(PO4)·3H2O]) was identified using spectroscopic and diffraction-based techniques. In phosphate-free system, uranium oxyhydroxide minerals such as K-compreignacite [K2(UO2)6O4(OH)6·7H2O] were formed. Single-pass flow-through (SPFT) and column leaching experiments using synthetic Hanford pore water showed that uranium precipitated as meta-ankoleite during acid weathering was strongly retained in the sediments, with an average release rate of 2.67E-12 mol g-1 s-1. In the absence of phosphate, uranium release was controlled by dissolution of uranium oxyhydroxide (compreignacite-type) mineral with a release rate of 1.05-2.42E-10 mol g-1 s-1. The uranium mineralogy and release rates determined for both systems in this study support the development of accurate U-release models for prediction of contaminant transport. These results suggest that phosphate minerals may be a good candidate for uranium remediation approaches at contaminated sites.

  14. Single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation in surgical treatment for single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Hao; Wang, Xiyang; Zhang, Penghui; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Yupeng; Liu, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility and efficacy of surgical management of single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis (TB) by using single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation.Methods: Seventeen cases of single-segment lumbar TB were treated with single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reco...

  15. Model Predictive Control of Mineral Column Flotation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahui Tian

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Column flotation is an efficient method commonly used in the mineral industry to separate useful minerals from ores of low grade and complex mineral composition. Its main purpose is to achieve maximum recovery while ensuring desired product grade. This work addresses a model predictive control design for a mineral column flotation process modeled by a set of nonlinear coupled heterodirectional hyperbolic partial differential equations (PDEs and ordinary differential equations (ODEs, which accounts for the interconnection of well-stirred regions represented by continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTRs and transport systems given by heterodirectional hyperbolic PDEs, with these two regions combined through the PDEs’ boundaries. The model predictive control considers both optimality of the process operations and naturally present input and state/output constraints. For the discrete controller design, spatially varying steady-state profiles are obtained by linearizing the coupled ODE–PDE model, and then the discrete system is obtained by using the Cayley–Tustin time discretization transformation without any spatial discretization and/or without model reduction. The model predictive controller is designed by solving an optimization problem with input and state/output constraints as well as input disturbance to minimize the objective function, which leads to an online-solvable finite constrained quadratic regulator problem. Finally, the controller performance to keep the output at the steady state within the constraint range is demonstrated by simulation studies, and it is concluded that the optimal control scheme presented in this work makes this flotation process more efficient.

  16. Hydrodynamics of Bubble Columns: Turbulence and Population Balance Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Braga Vieira

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an in-depth numerical analysis on the hydrodynamics of a bubble column. As in previous works on the subject, the focus here is on three important parameters characterizing the flow: interfacial forces, turbulence and inlet superficial Gas Velocity (UG. The bubble size distribution is taken into account by the use of the Quadrature Method of Moments (QMOM model in a two-phase Euler-Euler approach using the open-source Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD code OpenFOAM (Open Field Operation and Manipulation. The interfacial forces accounted for in all the simulations presented here are drag, lift and virtual mass. For the turbulence analysis in the water phase, three versions of the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS k-ε turbulence model are examined: namely, the standard, modified and mixture variants. The lift force proves to be of major importance for a trustworthy prediction of the gas volume fraction profiles for all the (superficial gas velocities tested. Concerning the turbulence, the mixture k-ε model is seen to provide higher values of the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate in comparison to the other models, and this clearly affects the prediction of the gas volume fraction in the bulk region, and the bubble-size distribution. In general, the modified k-ε model proves to be a good compromise between modeling simplicity and accuracy in the study of bubble columns of the kind undertaken here.

  17. Single-column ion chromatography with determination of hydrazoic acid produced in spent nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Guilan; Tan Shuping

    2006-01-01

    The reaction of hydrazine and its derivative with ammonium metavanadate may produce hydrazoic acid (HN 3 ). A single-column ion chromatography is used for the determination of HN 3 after neutralizing the rest acid in the sample with sodium hydroxide. Chromatography separation of HN 3 is carried out on a 25 cm x 0.46 cm (inside diameter) stainless steel column packed with Vydac IC302 ion Chromatography packing. The eluent is 1 mmol/L o-phthalic acid, and the ion is detected by conductivity detector. The detection limit in the presence chromatography is 5 μg/mL, the linear range is from 5 to 201 μg/mL, the linear correlation coefficient is 0.9994, respectively. The analysis accuracy is 2% for standard sample, and the detection limit is 51 μg/mL for HN 3 in the real sample. (authors)

  18. Multivariable model predictive control design of reactive distillation column for Dimethyl Ether production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahid, A.; Putra, I. G. E. P.

    2018-03-01

    Dimethyl ether (DME) as an alternative clean energy has attracted a growing attention in the recent years. DME production via reactive distillation has potential for capital cost and energy requirement savings. However, combination of reaction and distillation on a single column makes reactive distillation process a very complex multivariable system with high non-linearity of process and strong interaction between process variables. This study investigates a multivariable model predictive control (MPC) based on two-point temperature control strategy for the DME reactive distillation column to maintain the purities of both product streams. The process model is estimated by a first order plus dead time model. The DME and water purity is maintained by controlling a stage temperature in rectifying and stripping section, respectively. The result shows that the model predictive controller performed faster responses compared to conventional PI controller that are showed by the smaller ISE values. In addition, the MPC controller is able to handle the loop interactions well.

  19. The Computational Properties of a Simplified Cortical Column Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Nicholas; Iyer, Ramakrishnan; Koch, Christof; Mihalas, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    The mammalian neocortex has a repetitious, laminar structure and performs functions integral to higher cognitive processes, including sensory perception, memory, and coordinated motor output. What computations does this circuitry subserve that link these unique structural elements to their function? Potjans and Diesmann (2014) parameterized a four-layer, two cell type (i.e. excitatory and inhibitory) model of a cortical column with homogeneous populations and cell type dependent connection probabilities. We implement a version of their model using a displacement integro-partial differential equation (DiPDE) population density model. This approach, exact in the limit of large homogeneous populations, provides a fast numerical method to solve equations describing the full probability density distribution of neuronal membrane potentials. It lends itself to quickly analyzing the mean response properties of population-scale firing rate dynamics. We use this strategy to examine the input-output relationship of the Potjans and Diesmann cortical column model to understand its computational properties. When inputs are constrained to jointly and equally target excitatory and inhibitory neurons, we find a large linear regime where the effect of a multi-layer input signal can be reduced to a linear combination of component signals. One of these, a simple subtractive operation, can act as an error signal passed between hierarchical processing stages.

  20. Decaffeination process characteristic of Robusta coffee in single column reactor using ethyl acetate solvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukrisno Widyotomo

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Consumers drink coffee not as nutrition source, but as refreshment drink. For coffee consumers who have high tolerance for caffeine, coffee may warm up and refresh their bodies. High caffeine content in coffee beans may cause several complaints to consumers who are susceptible to caffeine. One of the efforts, for coffee market expansion is product diversification to decaffeinated coffee. Decaffeination process is one of process to reduce caffeine content from agricultural products. Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute in collaboration with Bogor Agricultural University has developed a single column reactor for coffee beans decaffeination. The aim of this research is to study process characteristic of coffee decaffeination in single column reactor using ethyl acetate (C4H8O2 solvent. Treatments applicated in the research were time and temperature process. Temperature treatment were 50—60OC, 60—70OC, 70—80OC, 80—90OC and 90—100OC. Time treatment were 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 8 h, 10 h, and 12 h Size of Robusta coffee beans used were less than 5.5 mm (A4, between 5.5 mm and 6.5 mm (A3, between 6.5 mm and 7.5 mm (A2, and more than 7.5 mm (A1. The result showed that decaffeination process with ethyl acetate solvent will be faster when its temperature was higher and smaller bean size. For bean size less than 5,5 mm, decaffeination process by 10% ethyl acetat can be done 8—10 hours in 90—100OC solvent temperature or 12 hours in 60—70OC solvent temperature for 0.3% caffein content. Organoleptic test showed that 90—100OC temperature solvent treatment decreased coffee flavor, which aroma, bitterness and body values were 1.9 each . Key words : Coffee, caffeine, decaffeination, quality, single column.

  1. Single-column extraction chromatographic separation of U, Pu, Np and Am

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgenstern, A.; Apostolidis, C.; Carlos-Marquez, R.; Mayer, K.; Molinet, R. [Commission of the European Communities, Karlsruhe (Germany). European Inst. for Transuranium Elements

    2002-07-01

    A rapid, single-column extraction chromatographic method using commercially available UTEVA resin has been developed for the separation of uranium, plutonium, neptunium and americium. The method yields recoveries superior to 90% and allows direct loading of separated fractions on filaments for subsequent analysis by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The use of reagents compatible with robotized equipment allows automation of the separation process for routine analysis of nuclear materials. The redox reactions between plutonium, neptunium and hydrogen peroxide involved in the separation process were studied by UV/Vis/NIR absorption spectroscopy. (orig.)

  2. Mathematical modelling of a continuous biomass torrefaction reactor: TORSPYDTM column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratte, J.; Fardet, E.; Mateos, D.; Hery, J.-S.

    2011-01-01

    Torrefaction is a soft thermal process usually applied to cocoa or coffee beans to obtain the Maillard reaction to produce aromatics and enhance the flavour. In the case of biomass the main interest of torrefaction it is to break the fibers. To do so, Thermya company has developed and patented a biomass torrefaction/depolymerisation process called TORSPYD TM . It is a homogeneous 'soft' thermal process that takes place in an inert atmosphere. The process progressively eliminates the biomass water content transforms a portion of the biomass organic matter and breaks the biomass structure by depolymerisation of the fibers. This produces a high performance solid fuel, called Biocoal, which offers a range of benefits over and above that of normal biomass fuel. To develop such a process, this company has developed two main tools: - a continuous torrefaction laboratory pilot with a capacity to produce 3 - 8 kg/h of torrefied biomass; - a mathematical model dedicated to the design and optimisation of the TORSPYD reactor. The mathematical model is able to describe the chemical and physical processes that take place in the torrefaction column at two different scales, namely: the particle, and the surrounding gas. The model enables the gas temperature profiles inside the column to be predicted, and the results of the model are then validated through experiment in the laboratory pilot. The model also allows us to estimate the thermal power necessary to torrefy any type of biomass for a given moisture content. -- Highlights: → We model a patented torrefaction/depolymerisation biomass process: TORPSPYD. → We compare simulated results to experimental data obtained from our torrefaction pilot plant. → We describe phenomenon that occurs in our torrefaction reactor and discuss about the influence of moisture of the input biomass.

  3. Enhanced phytoremediation in the vadose zone: Modeling and column studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, K.; Chang, Y.; Corapcioglu, M.; Cho, C.

    2002-05-01

    Phytoremediation is a plant-based technique with potential for enhancing the remediation of vadoese zone soils contaminated by pollutants. The use of deep-rooted plants is an alternative to conventional methodologies. However, when the phytoremediation is applied to the vadose zone, it might have some restrictions since it uses solely naturally driven energy and mechanisms in addition to the complesxity of the vadose zone. As a more innovative technique than conventional phytoremediation methods, air injected phytoremediation technique is introduced to enhance the remediation efficiency or to apply at the former soil vapor extraction or bio venting sites. Effects of air injection, vegetation treatment, and air injection with vegetation treatments on the removal of hydrocarbon were investigated by column studies to simulate the field situation. Both the removal efficiency and the microbial activity were highest in air-injected and vegetated column soils. It was suggested that increased microorganisms activity stimulated by plant root exudates enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbon compounds. Air injection provided sufficient opportunity for promoting the microbial activity at depths where the conditions are anaerobic. Air injection can enhance the physicochemical properties of the medium and contaminant and increase the bioavailability i.e., the plant and microbial accessibility to the contaminant. A mathematical model that can be applied to phytoremediation, especially to air injected phytoremediation, for simulating the fate and the transport of a diesel contaminant in the vadose zone is developed. The approach includes a two-phase model of water flow in vegetated and unplanted vadose zone soil. A time-specific root distribution model and a microbial growth model in the rhizosphere of vegetated soil were combined with an unsaturated soil water flow equation as well as with a contaminant transport equation. The proposed model showed a satisfactory representation of

  4. COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul C.K. Lam; Isaac K. Gamwo; Dimitri Gidaspow

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a predictive experimentally verified computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for gas-liquid-solid flow. A three dimensional transient computer code for the coupled Navier-Stokes equations for each phase was developed and is appended in this report. The principal input into the model is the viscosity of the particulate phase which was determined from a measurement of the random kinetic energy of the 800 micron glass beads and a Brookfield viscometer. The details are presented in the attached paper titled ''CFD Simulation of Flow and Turbulence in a Slurry Bubble Column''. This phase of the work is in press in a referred journal (AIChE Journal, 2002) and was presented at the Fourth International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF 2001) in New Orleans, May 27-June 1, 2001 (Paper No. 909). The computed time averaged particle velocities and concentrations agree with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements of velocities and concentrations, obtained using a combination of gamma-ray and X-ray densitometers, in a slurry bubble column, operated in the bubbly-coalesced fluidization regime with continuous flow of water. Both the experiment and the simulation show a down-flow of particles in the center of the column and up-flow near the walls and nearly uniform particle concentration. Normal and shear Reynolds stresses were constructed from the computed instantaneous particle velocities. The PIV measurement and the simulation produced instantaneous particle velocities. The PIV measurement and the simulation produced similar nearly flat horizontal profiles of turbulent kinetic energy of particles. To better understand turbulence we studied fluidization in a liquid-solid bed. This work was also presented at the Fourth International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF 2001, Paper No. 910). To understand turbulence in risers, measurements were done in the IIT riser with 530 micron glass beads using a PIV

  5. A New Two-fluid Radiation-hydrodynamical Model for X-Ray Pulsar Accretion Columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, Brent F. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States); Wolfram, Kenneth D. [Naval Research Laboratory (retired), Washington, DC (United States); Becker, Peter A., E-mail: bwest@usna.edu, E-mail: kswolfram@gmail.com, E-mail: pbecker@gmu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA USA (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Previous research centered on the hydrodynamics in X-ray pulsar accretion columns has largely focused on the single-fluid model, in which the super-Eddington luminosity inside the column decelerates the flow to rest at the stellar surface. This type of model has been relatively successful in describing the overall properties of the accretion flows, but it does not account for the possible dynamical effect of the gas pressure. On the other hand, the most successful radiative transport models for pulsars generally do not include a rigorous treatment of the dynamical structure of the column, instead assuming an ad hoc velocity profile. In this paper, we explore the structure of X-ray pulsar accretion columns using a new, self-consistent, “two-fluid” model, which incorporates the dynamical effect of the gas and radiation pressures, the dipole variation of the magnetic field, the thermodynamic effect of all of the relevant coupling and cooling processes, and a rigorous set of physical boundary conditions. The model has six free parameters, which we vary in order to approximately fit the phase-averaged spectra in Her X-1, Cen X-3, and LMC X-4. In this paper, we focus on the dynamical results, which shed new light on the surface magnetic field strength, the inclination of the magnetic field axis relative to the rotation axis, the relative importance of gas and radiation pressures, and the radial variation of the ion, electron, and inverse-Compton temperatures. The results obtained for the X-ray spectra are presented in a separate paper.

  6. Separation of Be and Al for AMS using single-step column chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binnie, Steven A., E-mail: sbinnie@uni-koeln.de [Institute for Geology und Mineralogy, University of Cologne, 4-6 Greinstrasse, Cologne D-50939 (Germany); Dunai, Tibor J.; Voronina, Elena; Goral, Tomasz [Institute for Geology und Mineralogy, University of Cologne, 4-6 Greinstrasse, Cologne D-50939 (Germany); Heinze, Stefan; Dewald, Alfred [University of Cologne, Institut für Kernphysik, Zülpicher Str. 77, Cologne D-50937 (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    With the aim of simplifying AMS target preparation procedures for TCN measurements we tested a new extraction chromatography approach which couples an anion exchange resin (WBEC) to a chelating resin (Beryllium resin) to separate Be and Al from dissolved quartz samples. Results show that WBEC–Beryllium resin stacks can be used to provide high purity Be and Al separations using a combination of hydrochloric/oxalic and nitric acid elutions. {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al concentrations from quartz samples prepared using more standard procedures are compared with results from replicate samples prepared using the coupled WBEC–Beryllium resin approach and show good agreement. The new column procedure is performed in a single step, reducing sample preparation times relative to more traditional methods of TCN target production.

  7. Separation of Be and Al for AMS using single-step column chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnie, Steven A.; Dunai, Tibor J.; Voronina, Elena; Goral, Tomasz; Heinze, Stefan; Dewald, Alfred

    2015-10-01

    With the aim of simplifying AMS target preparation procedures for TCN measurements we tested a new extraction chromatography approach which couples an anion exchange resin (WBEC) to a chelating resin (Beryllium resin) to separate Be and Al from dissolved quartz samples. Results show that WBEC-Beryllium resin stacks can be used to provide high purity Be and Al separations using a combination of hydrochloric/oxalic and nitric acid elutions. 10Be and 26Al concentrations from quartz samples prepared using more standard procedures are compared with results from replicate samples prepared using the coupled WBEC-Beryllium resin approach and show good agreement. The new column procedure is performed in a single step, reducing sample preparation times relative to more traditional methods of TCN target production.

  8. Study of the signal formation in single-type column 3D silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piemonte, Claudio; Boscardin, Maurizio; Bosisio, Luciano; Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco; Pozza, Alberto; Ronchin, Sabina; Zorzi, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    Because of their superior radiation resistance, three-dimensional (3D) silicon sensors are receiving more and more interest for application in the innermost layers of tracker systems for experiments running in very high luminosity colliders. Their short electrode distance allows for both a low depletion voltage and a high charge collection efficiency even at extremely high radiation fluences. In order to fully understand the properties of a 3D detector, a thorough characterization of the signal formation mechanism is of paramount importance. In this work the shape of the current induced by localized and uniform charge depositions in a single-type column 3D detector is studied. A first row estimation is given applying the Ramo theorem, then a more complete TCAD simulation is used to provide a more realistic pulse shape

  9. A SINGLE-COLUMN PROCEDURE ON BOND ELUT CERTIFY FOR SYSTEMATIC TOXICOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF DRUGS IN PLASMA AND URINE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CHEN, XH; WIJSBEEK, J; FRANKE, JP; DEZEEUW, RA

    A single-column solid-phase extraction procedure was developed for the screening of acidic, neutral, and basic drugs from plasma. The recoveries of all 25 tested drugs exceeded 82%. After the plasma had been diluted with phosphate buffer (pH 6.0), the drugs were extracted using a single Bond Elut

  10. REALIGNED MODEL PREDICTIVE CONTROL OF A PROPYLENE DISTILLATION COLUMN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Hinojosa

    Full Text Available Abstract In the process industry, advanced controllers usually aim at an economic objective, which usually requires closed-loop stability and constraints satisfaction. In this paper, the application of a MPC in the optimization structure of an industrial Propylene/Propane (PP splitter is tested with a controller based on a state space model, which is suitable for heavily disturbed environments. The simulation platform is based on the integration of the commercial dynamic simulator Dynsim® and the rigorous steady-state optimizer ROMeo® with the real-time facilities of Matlab. The predictive controller is the Infinite Horizon Model Predictive Control (IHMPC, based on a state-space model that that does not require the use of a state observer because the non-minimum state is built with the past inputs and outputs. The controller considers the existence of zone control of the outputs and optimizing targets for the inputs. We verify that the controller is efficient to control the propylene distillation system in a disturbed scenario when compared with a conventional controller based on a state observer. The simulation results show a good performance in terms of stability of the controller and rejection of large disturbances in the composition of the feed of the propylene distillation column.

  11. Modeling and analysis of conventional and heat-integrated distillation columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thomas; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Abildskov, Jens

    2015-01-01

    A generic model that can cover diabatic and adiabatic distillation column configurations is presented, with the aim ofproviding a consistent basis for comparison of alternative distillation column technologies. Both a static and a dynamic formulation of the model, together with a model catalogue...... consisting of the conventional, the heat-integrated and the mechanical vapor recompression distillation columns are presented. The solution procedure of the model is outlined and illustrated in three case studies. One case study being a benchmark study demonstrating the size of the model and the static...... properties of two different heat-integrated distillation column (HIDiC) schemes and the mechanical vapor recompression column. The second case study exemplifies the difference between a HIDiC and a conventional distillation column in the composition profiles within a multicomponent separation, whereas...

  12. Modelling aging effects on a thermal cycling absorption process column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laquerbe, C.; Contreras, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique - CEA/Valduc, F-21121 Is sur Tille (France); Baudouin, O. [ProSim SA, Stratege Bat. A, BP 27210, F-31672 Labege Cedex (France); Demoment, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique - CEA/Valduc, F-21121 Is sur Tille (France)

    2008-07-15

    Palladium coated on alumina is used in hydrogen separation systems operated at CEA/Valduc, and more particularly in Thermal Cycling Absorption Process columns. With such materials, tritium decay is known to induce aging effects which have direct side effects on hydrogen isotopes absorption isotherms. Furthermore in a TCAP column, aging occurs in an heterogeneous way. The possible impacts of these intrinsic material evolutions on the separation performances are investigated here through a numerical approach. (authors)

  13. Fingerprinting of traditional Chinese medicines on the C18-Diol mixed-mode column in online or offline two-dimensional liquid chromatography on the single column modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Tong, Ling; Yao, Lin; Zhang, Peng; Xu, Li

    2016-06-05

    In the present study, a mixed-mode stationary phase, C18-Diol, was applied for fingerprint analysis of traditional Chinese medicines. Hydrophobic, hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions were demonstrated to contribute the retention separately or jointly, which endowed the C18-Diol stationary phase with distinct selectivity compared to the bare C18 one. The separation of total alkaloids extracted from Fritillaria hupehensis was compared on the C18-Diol and conventional C18 column with the greater resolving power and better symmetry responses on the former one. Besides, a novel two-dimensional liquid chromatography on the single column (2D-LC-1C) was realized on C18-Diol with the offline mode for the alcohol extract of Fritillaria hupehensis and online mode for Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort. The early co-eluted extracted components with great polarity on the first dimension were reinjected on the same column and well separated on the second dimension. The results exhibited that the two complementary RPLC and HILIC modes on C18-Diol stationary phase enhanced the separation capacity and revealed more abundant chemical information of the sample, which was a powerful tool in analyzing complex herbal medicines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Combined Transverse Steel-External FRP Confinement Model for Rectangular Reinforced Concrete Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al-Rahmani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the need to increase the strength of reinforced concrete members has become a subject that civil engineers are interested in tackling. Of the many proposed solutions, fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP materials have attracted attention due to their superior properties, such as high strength-to-weight ratio, high energy absorption and excellent corrosion resistance. FRP wrapping of concrete columns is done to enhance the ultimate strength due to the confinement effect, which is normally induced by steel ties. The existence of the two confinement systems changes the nature of the problem, thus necessitating specialized nonlinear analysis to obtain the column’s ultimate capacity. Existing research focused on a single confinement system. Furthermore, very limited research on rectangular sections was found in the literature. In this work, a model to estimate the combined behavior of the two systems in rectangular columns is proposed. The calculation of the effective lateral pressure is based on the Lam and Teng model and the Mander model for FRP wraps and steel ties, respectively. The model then generates stress-strain diagrams for both the concrete core and the cover. The model was developed for the analysis in extreme load events, where all possible contributions to the column’s ultimate capacity should be accounted for without any margin of safety. The model was validated against experiments, and the results obtained showed good agreement with almost all of the available experimental data.

  15. Survey of simulation methods for modeling pulsed sieve-plate extraction columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhart, L.

    1979-03-01

    The report first considers briefly the use of liquid-liquid extraction in nuclear fuel reprocessing and then describes the operation of the pulse column. Currently available simulation models of the column are reviewed, and followed by an analysis of the information presently available from which the necessary parameters can be obtained for use in a model of the column. Finally, overall conclusions are given regarding the information needed to develop an accurate model of the column for materials accountability in fuel reprocessing plants. 156 references

  16. Column-Parallel Single Slope ADC with Digital Correlated Multiple Sampling for Low Noise CMOS Image Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Y.; Theuwissen, A.J.P.; Chae, Y.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a low noise CMOS image sensor (CIS) using 10/12 bit configurable column-parallel single slope ADCs (SS-ADCs) and digital correlated multiple sampling (CMS). The sensor used is a conventional 4T active pixel with a pinned-photodiode as photon detector. The test sensor was

  17. Modeling Distillation Column Using ARX Model Structure and Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Pirmoradi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Distillation is a complex and highly nonlinear industrial process. In general it is not always possible to obtain accurate first principles models for high-purity distillation columns. On the other hand the development of first principles models is usually time consuming and expensive. To overcome these problems, empirical models such as neural networks can be used. One major drawback of empirical models is that the prediction is valid only inside the data domain that is sufficiently covered by measurement data. Modeling distillation columns by means of neural networks is reported in literature by using recursive networks. The recursive networks are proper for modeling purpose, but such models have the problems of high complexity and high computational cost. The objective of this paper is to propose a simple and reliable model for distillation column. The proposed model uses feed forward neural networks which results in a simple model with less parameters and faster training time. Simulation results demonstrate that predictions of the proposed model in all regions are close to outputs of the dynamic model and the error in negligible. This implies that the model is reliable in all regions.

  18. Discrete bubble modeling for a micro-structured bubble column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jain, D.; Lau, Y.M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Deen, N.G.

    2013-01-01

    Gas–liquid flows with solid catalyst particles are encountered in many applications in the chemical, petrochemical, pharmaceutical industries, etc. Most commonly, two reactor types are applied for large scale in the industry. They are slurry bubble column and trickle bed reactors. Both of these

  19. Modeling Separation Dynamics in a Multi-Tray Bio-Ethanol Distillation Column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løhndorf, Petar Durdevic; Pedersen, Simon; Yang, Zhenyu

    2015-01-01

    the product quality and energy consumption in a typical bio-ethanol distillation column is proposed in this paper. The proposed model is derived based on mass and energy balance principles, with an empirical model of the evaporation dynamics of liquids on column trays. The model parameters are identified......The high energy consumption of popularly used distillation columns has motivated development of energytracking dynamic models with the ultimate objective for potential better energy and quality control of these separation facilities. A dynamic model being able to explicitly describe both...

  20. Numerical modelling and experimental validation of hydrodynamics of an emulsion in an extraction column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paisant, Jean-Francois

    2014-01-01

    Industrial reprocessing of spent fuel is based on chemical separation processes by liquid-liquid extraction into pulsed column. The current context of sustainable development and acceptance of nuclear energy drive the industry to improve the efficiency of this process. Pulsed column efficiency is bound to the amount of available exchange surface, which depends on the geometrical parameters of the column and the operating conditions. A better design would improve the efficiency. In this context, the work presented in this manuscript revolves around physical and numerical modelling of the hydrodynamics of the emulsion coupled with the evolution of the interfacial area, as well as an experimental characterization of the quantities which describe the emulsion. The emulsion is modelled based on the work of D. LHUILLIER. It is an Eulerian approach which describes each phase as a continuous medium as well as the interface which is thought as a third phase moving continuously in the flow field. This thesis contributes to describe of the hydrodynamics of dispersed and continuous phases, in order to determine the slip velocity needed for the design. The written transport equation for interfacial area is based on the thesis of T. RANDRIAMANANTENA. The simulation of this physical model was performed using the method of finite elements (FEM) and implementation was carried out under the software CAST3M. The numerical simulation have shown their abilities to correctly reproduce the expected physical behaviour, in particular, they allow to obtain the slip velocity which is essential to the scale up. In a first experimental approach, the single phase flow has been studied in a pulsed column using particle image velocimetry (PIV), for different amplitude and frequency parameters. A method of synchronization between the recording and the pulsation cycle was used in order to achieve this study. The average behavior, for different regimes of pulsation, has been studied by this way. In

  1. Application of coalescence and breakup models in a discrete bubble model for bubble columns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hengel, E.I.V.; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, a discrete bubble model (DBM) is used to investigate the hydrodynamics, coalescence, and breakup occurring in a bubble column. The DBM, originally developed by Delnoij et al. (Chem. Eng. Sci. 1997, 52, 1429-1458; Chem. Eng. Sci. 1999, 54, 2217-2226),1,2 was extended to incorporate

  2. Modeling of high-strength concrete-filled FRP tube columns under cyclic load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Kee-Yen; Ma, Chau-Khun; Apandi, Nazirah Mohd; Awang, Abdullah Zawawi; Omar, Wahid

    2018-05-01

    The behavior of high-strength concrete (HSC) - filled fiber-reinforced-polymer (FRP) tubes (HSCFFTs) column subjected to cyclic lateral loading is presented in this paper. As the experimental study is costly and time consuming, a finite element analysis (FEA) is chosen for the study. Most of the previous studies have focused on examining the axial load behavior of HSCFFT column instead of seismic behavior. The seismic behavior of HSCFFT columns has been the main interest in the industry. The key objective of this research is to develop a reliable numerical non-linear FEA model to represent the seismic behavior of such column. A FEA model was developed using the Concrete Damaged Plasticity Model (CDPM) available in the finite element software package (ABAQUS). Comparisons between experimental results from previous research and the predicted results were made based on load versus displacement relationships and ultimate strength of the column. The results showed that the column increased in ductility and able to deform to a greater extent with the increase of the FRP confinement ratio. With the increase of confinement ratio, HSCFFT column achieved a higher moment resistance, thus indicated a higher failure strength in the column under cyclic lateral load. It was found that the proposed FEA model can regenerate the experimental results with adequate accuracy.

  3. Single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation in surgical treatment for single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hao; Wang, Xiyang; Zhang, Penghui; Peng, Wei; Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Yupeng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility and efficacy of surgical management of single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis (TB) by using single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation. Seventeen cases of single-segment lumbar TB were treated with single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation. The mean follow-up was 36.9 months (range: 24-62 months). The kyphotic angle ranged from 15.2-35.1° preoperatively, with an average measurement of 27.8°. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) score system was used to evaluate the neurological deficits and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) used to judge the activity of TB. Spinal TB was completely cured in all 17 patients. There was no recurrent TB infection. The postoperative kyphotic angle was 6.6-10.2°, 8.1° in average, and there was no significant loss of the correction at final follow-up. Solid fusion was achieved in all cases. Neurological condition in all patients was improved after surgery. Single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation can be a feasible and effective method the in treatment of single-segment lumbar spinal TB.

  4. Development of a mathematical model of a packed column for benzene removal from salt solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgeton, G.K.

    1989-01-01

    A mathematical model of a packed column was developed to describe the removal of benzene from radioactive salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. The model was developed from existing, generalized mass transfer correlations for randomly dumped packing, and the correlations were adapted for structured packing. Thermophysical data specific to the solutions of interest were incorporated into the model. Verification of the code was completed using operating data from stripping columns at other locations

  5. Mathematical model and simulation of the hydrodynamic of air-pulsed sieve plate columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannappel, J.; Pfeifer, W.; Rathjen, E.

    1979-02-01

    In this work the dynamic flow events in an air pulsed sieve plate column are described by a simulation model. The model consists of a system of differential equations. The pressure built up by the pulsed air is brought to equilibrium with the pressure losses of the oscillating liquid column in the pulsation tube and in the column. In case of definition of the a) column geometry, b) integral holdup of the column, c) density of the participating phases, d) control times of the pulsed air valves, e) pulse repetition frequency and pulsed air reservoir pressure the height of oscillation and hence the intensity of pulsation are calculated. It is shown by a concrete example that 1) the oscillation of the liquid column in the pulsation tube and in the column is sinusoidal in all cases; 2) generation of a defined pulsation is restricted to the range between 0.3 and 3 Hz; 3) the amount of air needed for pulsation depends on the geometry of the column and in the intensity of pulsation. It can be optimized by appropriate selection of the diameter of the pulsation tube. (orig.) [de

  6. The Hysteresis Performance and Restoring Force Model for Corroded Reinforced Concrete Frame Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guifeng Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical simulation of the hysteresis performance of corroded reinforced concrete (RC frame columns was conducted. Moreover, the results obtained were compared with experimental data. On this basis, a degenerated three-linearity (D-TRI restoring force model was established which could reflect the hysteresis performance of corroded RC frame columns through theoretical analysis and data fitting. Results indicated that the hysteretic bearing capacity of frame columns decreased significantly due to corrosion of the rebar. In view of the characteristics of the hysteresis curve, the plumpness of the hysteresis loop for frame columns decreased and shrinkage increased with increasing rebar corrosion. All these illustrated that the seismic energy dissipation performance of frame columns reduced but their brittleness increased. As for the features of the skeleton curve, the trends for corroded and noncorroded members were basically consistent and roughly corresponded to the features of a trilinear equivalent model. Thereby, the existing Clough hysteresis rule can be used to establish the restoring force model applicable to corroded RC frame columns based on that of the noncorroded RC members. The calculated skeleton curve and hysteresis curve of corroded RC frame columns using the D-TRI model are closer to the experimental results.

  7. Application of a two-dimensional model for predicting the pressure-flow and compression properties during column packing scale-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Justin T; Cecchini, Douglas; Chu, Cathy; Liu, Wei-Han; Spann, Andrew

    2007-03-23

    A two-dimensional model was formulated to describe the pressure-flow behavior of compressible stationary phases for protein chromatography at different temperatures and column scales. The model was based on the assumption of elastic deformation of the solid phase and steady-state Darcy flow. Using a single fitted value for the empirical modulus parameters, the model was applied to describe the pressure-flow behavior of several adsorbents packed using both fluid flow and mechanical compression. Simulations were in agreement with experimental data and accurately predicted the pressure-flow and compression behavior of three adsorbents over a range of column scales and operating temperatures. Use of the described theoretical model potentially improves the accuracy of the column scale-up process, allowing the use of limited laboratory scale data to predict column performance in large scale applications.

  8. Impact on Model Uncertainty of Diabatization in Distillation Columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thomas; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Abildskov, Jens

    2014-01-01

    index. Error propagation of uncertain parameters to second-law efficiency, the operation expenditures, the capital expenditures , and the dominant time constant for separations of benzene-toluene and benzene-flourobenzene are investigated . Conclusions favoring the HIDiC over the CDiC w.r.t. operation...... expenditures in the benzene-toluene separation can not made within 95 % confidence. The sensitivity of overall heat transfer coefficient decreases on all indicators as the separation becomes more difficult......This work provides uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of design of conventional and heat integrated distillation columns using Monte Carlo simulations. Selected uncertain parameters are relative volatility, heat of vaporization, the overall heat transfer coefficient , tray hold-up, and adiabat ic...

  9. Posterior instrumentation, anterior column reconstruction with single posterior approach for treatment of pyogenic osteomyelitis of thoracic and lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorensek, M; Kosak, R; Travnik, L; Vengust, R

    2013-03-01

    Surgical treatment of thoracolumbar osteomyelitis consists of radical debridement, reconstruction of anterior column either with or without posterior stabilization. The objective of present study is to evaluate a case series of patients with osteomyelitis of thoracic and lumbar spine treated by single, posterior approach with posterior instrumentation and anterior column reconstruction. Seventeen patients underwent clinical and radiological evaluation pre and postoperatively with latest follow-up at 19 months (8-56 months) after surgery. Parameters assessed were site of infection, causative organism, angle of deformity, blood loss, duration of surgery, ICU stay, deformity correction, time to solid bony fusion, ambulatory status, neurologic status (ASIA impairment scale), and functional outcome (Kirkaldy-Willis criteria). Mean operating time was 207 min and average blood loss 1,150 ml. Patients spent 2 (1-4) days in ICU and were able to walk unaided 1.6 (1-2) days after surgery. Infection receded in all 17 patients postoperatively. Solid bony fusion occurred in 15 out of 17 patients (88 %) on average 6.3 months after surgery. Functional outcome was assessed as excellent or good in 82 % of cases. Average deformity correction was 8 (1-18) degrees, with loss of correction of 4 (0-19) degrees at final follow-up. Single, posterior approach addressing both columns poses safe alternative in treatment of pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis of thoracic and lumbar spine. It proved to be less invasive resulting in faster postoperative recovery.

  10. Experimental and modelling studies of radionuclide uptake in vegetated soil columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchant, J. K.; Butler, A. P.

    1995-01-01

    Investigations are currently being conducted at Imperial College into the upward migration of radionuclides from a contaminated water table and their subsequent uptake by plant root systems. This programme includes both experimental studies and related mathematical modelling. Previous work has been primarily with lysimeters. However, these experiments are expensive and somewhat lengthy and the alteration of key features is difficult. Therefore, an experimental research programme using smaller scale columns where conditions can be readily altered has been set up under a NERC studentship. This paper presents both the observed and simulated results from some preliminary column experiments involving the movement of two different radionuclides. It will be shown that physically-based mathematical models developed for field scale problems are readily applicable at the scale of the experimental columns. Work is currently in hand to demonstrate the validity of the column experiments for determining parameters associated with various soil, plant and radionuclide types. (author)

  11. Thermal Modeling Analysis Of CST Media In The Small Column Ion Exchange Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.

    2010-01-01

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium in a column configuration and distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program which is focused on processing dissolved, high-sodium salt waste for the removal of specific radionuclides (including Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides) within a High Level Waste (HLW) storage tank at the Savannah River Site. The SCIX design includes CST columns inserted and supported in the tank top risers for cesium removal. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated with a focus on process upset conditions. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach for the in-column ion-exchange domain was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results would provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on CST. One salt processing scenario includes the transport of the loaded (and possibly ground) CST media to the treatment tank floor. Therefore, additional thermal modeling calculations were conducted using a three-dimensional approach to evaluate temperature distributions for the entire in-tank domain including distribution of the spent CST media either as a mound or a flat layer on the tank floor. These calculations included mixtures of CST with HLW sludge or loaded Monosodium Titanate (MST) media used for strontium/actinide sorption. The current full-scale design for the CST column includes one central cooling pipe and four outer cooling tubes. Most calculations assumed that the fluid within the column was stagnant (i.e. no buoyancy-induced flow) for a conservative estimate. A primary objective of these calculations was to estimate temperature distributions across packed CST beds

  12. Comparison of AOD, AAOD and column single scattering albedo from AERONET retrievals and in situ profiling measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Elisabeth; Ogren, John A.; Kinne, Stefan; Samset, Bjorn

    2017-05-01

    Here we present new results comparing aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) and column single scattering albedo (SSA) obtained from in situ vertical profile measurements with AERONET ground-based remote sensing from two rural, continental sites in the US. The profiles are closely matched in time (within ±3 h) and space (within 15 km) with the AERONET retrievals. We have used Level 1.5 inversion retrievals when there was a valid Level 2 almucantar retrieval in order to be able to compare AAOD and column SSA below AERONET's recommended loading constraint (AOD > 0.4 at 440 nm). While there is reasonable agreement for the AOD comparisons, the direct comparisons of in situ-derived to AERONET-retrieved AAOD (or SSA) reveal that AERONET retrievals yield higher aerosol absorption than obtained from the in situ profiles for the low aerosol optical depth conditions prevalent at the two study sites. However, it should be noted that the majority of SSA comparisons for AOD440 > 0.2 are, nonetheless, within the reported SSA uncertainty bounds. The observation that, relative to in situ measurements, AERONET inversions exhibit increased absorption potential at low AOD values is generally consistent with other published AERONET-in situ comparisons across a range of locations, atmospheric conditions and AOD values. This systematic difference in the comparisons suggests a bias in one or both of the methods, but we cannot assess whether the AERONET retrievals are biased towards high absorption or the in situ measurements are biased low. Based on the discrepancy between the AERONET and in situ values, we conclude that scaling modeled black carbon concentrations upwards to match AERONET retrievals of AAOD should be approached with caution as it may lead to aerosol absorption overestimates in regions of low AOD. Both AERONET retrievals and in situ measurements suggest there is a systematic relationship between SSA and aerosol amount (AOD or aerosol light

  13. Perspectives of data-driven LPV modeling of high-purity distillation columns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bachnas, A.A.; Toth, R.; Mesbah, A.; Ludlage, J.H.A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract—This paper investigates data-driven, Linear- Parameter-Varying (LPV) modeling of a high-purity distillation column. Two LPV modeling approaches are studied: a local approach, corresponding to the interpolation of Linear Time- Invariant (LTI) models identified at steady-state purity levels,

  14. Establishing column batch repeatability according to Quality by Design (QbD) principles using modeling software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rácz, Norbert; Kormány, Róbert; Fekete, Jenő; Molnár, Imre

    2015-04-10

    Column technology needs further improvement even today. To get information of batch-to-batch repeatability, intelligent modeling software was applied. Twelve columns from the same production process, but from different batches were compared in this work. In this paper, the retention parameters of these columns with real life sample solutes were studied. The following parameters were selected for measurements: gradient time, temperature and pH. Based on calculated results, batch-to-batch repeatability of BEH columns was evaluated. Two parallel measurements on two columns from the same batch were performed to obtain information about the quality of packing. Calculating the average of individual working points at the highest critical resolution (R(s,crit)) it was found that the robustness, calculated with a newly released robustness module, had a success rate >98% among the predicted 3(6) = 729 experiments for all 12 columns. With the help of retention modeling all substances could be separated independently from the batch and/or packing, using the same conditions, having high robustness of the experiments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A multicomponent ion-exchange equilibrium model for chabazite columns treating ORNL wastewaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perona, J.J.

    1993-06-01

    Planned near-term and long-term upgrades of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) will use chabazite columns to remove 90 Sr and 137 Cs from process wastewater. A valid equilibrium model is required for the design of these columns and for evaluating their performance when influent wastewater composition changes. The cations exchanged, in addition to strontium and cesium, are calcium, magnesium, and sodium. A model was developed using the Wilson equation for the calculation of the solid-phase activity coefficients. The model was tested against chabazite column runs on two different wastewaters and found to be valid. A sensitivity analysis was carried out for the projected wastewater compositions, in which the model was used to predict changes in relative separation factors for strontium and cesium subject to changes in calcium, magnesium, and sodium concentrations

  16. Modelling of microwave sustained capillary plasma columns at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pencheva, M; Petrova, Ts; Benova, E; Zhelyazkov, I

    2006-01-01

    In this work we present a model of argon microwave sustained discharge at high pressure (1 atm), which includes two self-consistently linked parts - electrodynamic and kinetic ones. The model is based on a steady-state Boltzmann equation in an effective field approximation coupled with a collisional-radiative model for high-pressure argon discharge numerically solved together with Maxwell's equation for an azimuthally symmetric TM surface wave and wave energy balance equation. It is applied for the purpose of theoretical description of the discharge in a stationary state. The phase diagram, the electron energy distribution function as well as the dependences of the electron and heavy particles densities and the mean input power per electron on the electron number density and wave number are presented

  17. Mechanistic model for dispersion coefficients in bubble column

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Skosana, PJ

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available predicts axial and radial dispersion coefficients that are of the same order of magnitude as the reported data. Whereas the model is based on a description of the underlying physical phenomena, its validity and extrapolation is expected to be more reliable...

  18. Analysis of trace inorganic anions in weak acid salts by single pump cycling-column-switching ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhongping; Ni, Chengzhu; Zhu, Zhuyi; Pan, Zaifa; Wang, Lili; Zhu, Yan

    2015-05-01

    The application of ion chromatography with the single pump cycling-column-switching technique was described for the analysis of trace inorganic anions in weak acid salts within a single run. Due to the hydrogen ions provided by an anion suppressor electrolyzing water, weak acid anions could be transformed into weak acids, existing as molecules, after passing through the suppressor. Therefore, an anion suppressor and ion-exclusion column were adopted to achieve on-line matrix elimination of weak acid anions with high concentration for the analysis of trace inorganic anions in weak acid salts. A series of standard solutions consisting of target anions of various concentrations from 0.005 to 10 mg/L were analyzed, with correlation coefficients r ≥ 0.9990. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.67 to 1.51 μg/L, based on the signal-to-noise ratio of 3 and a 25 μL injection volume. Relative standard deviations for retention time, peak area, and peak height were all less than 2.01%. A spiking study was performed with satisfactory recoveries between 90.3 and 104.4% for all anions. The chromatographic system was successfully applied to the analysis of trace inorganic anions in five weak acid salts. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Relating pressure tuned coupled column ensembles with the solvation parameter model for tunable selectivity in gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Khan M; Kulsing, Chadin; Chin, Sung-Tong; Marriott, Philip J

    2016-07-15

    The differential pressure drop of carrier gas by tuning the junction point pressure of a coupled column gas chromatographic system leads to a unique selectivity of the overall separation, which can be tested using a mixture of compounds with a wide range of polarity. This study demonstrates a pressure tuning (PT) GC system employing a microfluidic Deans switch located at the mid-point of the two capillary columns. This PT system allowed variations of inlet-outlet pressure differences of the two columns in a range of 52-17psi for the upstream column and 31-11psi for the downstream column. Peak shifting (differential migration) of compounds due to PT difference are related to a first order regression equation in a Plackett-Burman factorial study. Increased first (upstream) column pressure drop makes the second column characteristics more significant in the coupled column retention behavior, and conversely increased second (downstream) column pressure drop makes the first column characteristics more apparent; such variation can result in component swapping between polar and non-polar compounds. The coupled column system selectivity was evaluated in terms of linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) parameters, and their relation with different pressure drop effects has been constructed by applying multivariate principle component analysis (PCA). It has been found that the coupled column PT system descriptors provide a result that shows a clear clustering of different pressure settings, somewhat intermediate between those of the two commercial columns. This is equivalent to that obtained from a conventional single-column GC analysis where the interaction energy contributed from the stationary phases can be significantly adjusted by choice of midpoint PT. This result provides a foundation for pressure differentiation for selectivity enhancement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of Humidity Swings on Adsorption Columns for Air Revitalization: Modeling and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVan, M. Douglas; Finn, John E.

    1997-01-01

    Air purification systems are necessary to provide clean air in the closed environments aboard spacecraft. Trace contaminants are removed using adsorption. One major factor concerning the removal of trace contaminants is relative humidity. Water can reduce adsorption capacity and, due to constant fluctuations, its presence is difficult to incorporate into adsorption column designs. The purpose of the research was to allow for better design techniques in trace contaminant adsorption systems, especially for feeds with water present. Experiments and mathematical modeling research on effects of humidity swings on adsorption columns for air revitalization were carried out.

  1. Modeling chromatographic columns. Non-equilibrium packed-bed adsorption with non-linear adsorption isotherms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özdural, A.R.; Alkan, A.; Kerkhof, P.J.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    In this work a new mathematical model, based on non-equilibrium conditions, describing the dynamic adsorption of proteins in columns packed with spherical adsorbent particles is used to study the performance of chromatographic systems. Simulations of frontal chromatography, including axial

  2. Energy efficiency optimisation for distillation column using artificial neural network models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osuolale, Funmilayo N.; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a neural network based strategy for the modelling and optimisation of energy efficiency in distillation columns incorporating the second law of thermodynamics. Real-time optimisation of distillation columns based on mechanistic models is often infeasible due to the effort in model development and the large computation effort associated with mechanistic model computation. This issue can be addressed by using neural network models which can be quickly developed from process operation data. The computation time in neural network model evaluation is very short making them ideal for real-time optimisation. Bootstrap aggregated neural networks are used in this study for enhanced model accuracy and reliability. Aspen HYSYS is used for the simulation of the distillation systems. Neural network models for exergy efficiency and product compositions are developed from simulated process operation data and are used to maximise exergy efficiency while satisfying products qualities constraints. Applications to binary systems of methanol-water and benzene-toluene separations culminate in a reduction of utility consumption of 8.2% and 28.2% respectively. Application to multi-component separation columns also demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method with a 32.4% improvement in the exergy efficiency. - Highlights: • Neural networks can accurately model exergy efficiency in distillation columns. • Bootstrap aggregated neural network offers improved model prediction accuracy. • Improved exergy efficiency is obtained through model based optimisation. • Reductions of utility consumption by 8.2% and 28.2% were achieved for binary systems. • The exergy efficiency for multi-component distillation is increased by 32.4%.

  3. Modelling and dynamics of an air separation rectification column as part of an IGCC power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seliger, B.; Hanke-Rauschenbach, R.; Hannemann, F.; Sundmacher, K. [Otto Von Guericke University, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2006-04-15

    An Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle plant (IGCC) opens the well-proven and highly efficient combined cycle process to fossil fuels, like coal or heavy refinery residues. Such a plant thereby possesses a novel linkage of typical energy engineering related units, e.g. a gas turbine and typical process engineering parts, which in the present case is an air separation plant. Different responses from the connected components can cause undesired mass flow fluctuations within the system especially during changing load demands. The cryogenic rectification column, as the core of the air separation plant, strongly affects the system's transient behaviour. The upper part of such a heat-integrated double column, a packed column with structured packing, has therefore been more closely investigated in the present paper. For this purpose, a dynamic model of such a column has been developed which is also able to describe the pressure dynamics supposedly responsible for these mass flow fluctuations. The transient behaviour of the uncontrolled column is analysed and discussed with special regard to pressure dynamics. The column pressure responds to disturbances on two different time scales. The short-term response, which is in the range of 100-200 s, is governed by the transient behaviour of the fluid dynamics and is discussed in detail. The long-term response is dominated by the nonlinear dynamics of the concentration profiles. The time constant of this response depends strongly on the direction and intensity of the disturbance and takes from 10,000 up to several 100,000 s.

  4. Can the human lumbar posterior columns be stimulated by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation? A modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Simon M; Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Ladenbauer, Josef; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2011-03-01

    Stimulation of different spinal cord segments in humans is a widely developed clinical practice for modification of pain, altered sensation, and movement. The human lumbar cord has become a target for modification of motor control by epidural and, more recently, by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation. Posterior columns of the lumbar spinal cord represent a vertical system of axons and when activated can add other inputs to the motor control of the spinal cord than stimulated posterior roots. We used a detailed three-dimensional volume conductor model of the torso and the McIntyre-Richard-Grill axon model to calculate the thresholds of axons within the posterior columns in response to transcutaneous lumbar spinal cord stimulation. Superficially located large-diameter posterior column fibers with multiple collaterals have a threshold of 45.4 V, three times higher than posterior root fibers (14.1 V). With the stimulation strength needed to activate posterior column axons, posterior root fibers of large and small diameters as well as anterior root fibers are coactivated. The reported results inform on these threshold differences, when stimulation is applied to the posterior structures of the lumbar cord at intensities above the threshold of large-diameter posterior root fibers. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2011, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Adaptation of Boynton's mathematical model to hydrogen isotope separation column by cryogenic distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Masahiro; Naruse, Yuji

    1981-08-01

    Boynton's mathematical simulation procedure for multi-component distillation calculations has the advantage that the Jacobian matrix is calculated analytically. The purpose of the present study is to adapt this procedure to hydrogen isotope separation columns by cryogenic distillation. The Boynton's model is modified so that the model can incorporate decay heat of tritium, nonideality of the hydrogen isotope solutions, multiple feeds and multiple sidestreams. Basic equations are derived and the mathematical simulation procedure is briefly explained. (author)

  6. Modeling Of A Reactive Distillation Column: Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (Mtbe Simulation Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Mohd Saaid Abdul Rahman Mohamed and Subhash Bhatia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A process simulation stage-wise reactive distillation column model formulated from equilibrium stage theory was developed. The algorithm for solving mathematical model represented by sets of differential-algebraic equations was based on relaxation method. Numerical integration scheme based on backward differentiation formula was selected for solving the stiffness of differential-algebraic equations. Simulations were performed on a personal computer (PC Pentium processor through a developed computer program using FORTRAN90 programming language. The proposed model was validated by comparing the simulated results with the published simulation results and with the pilot plant data from the literature. The model was capable of predicting high isobutene conversion for heterogeneous system, as desirable in industrial MTBE production process. The comparisons on temperature profiles, liquid composition profile and operating conditions of reactive distillation column also showed promising results. Therefore the proposed model can be used as a tool for the development and simulation of reactive distillation column.Keywords: Modeling, simulation, reactive distillation, relaxation method, equilibrium stage, heterogeneous, MTBE

  7. Modelling soil water content variations under drought stress on soil column cropped with winter wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csorba Szilveszter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical models are effective tools for evaluating the impact of predicted climate change on agricultural production, but it is difficult to test their applicability to future weather conditions. We applied the SWAP model to assess its applicability to climate conditions, differing from those, for which the model was developed. We used a database obtained from a winter wheat drought stress experiment. Winter wheat was grown in six soil columns, three having optimal water supply (NS, while three were kept under drought-stressed conditions (S. The SWAP model was successfully calibrated against measured values of potential evapotranspiration (PET, potential evaporation (PE and total amount of water (TSW in the soil columns. The Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient (N-S for TWS for the stressed columns was 0.92. For the NS treatment, we applied temporally variable soil hydraulic properties because of soil consolidation caused by regular irrigation. This approach improved the N-S values for the wetting-drying cycle from -1.77 to 0.54. We concluded that the model could be used for assessing the effects of climate change on soil water regime. Our results indicate that soil water balance studies should put more focus on the time variability of structuredependent soil properties.

  8. Non-equilibrium mass transfer absorption model for the design of boron isotopes chemical exchange column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Peng; Fan, Kaigong; Guo, Xianghai; Zhang, Haocui

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose a non-equilibrium mass transfer absorption model instead of a distillation equilibrium model to calculate boron isotopes separation. • We apply the model to calculate the needed column height to meet prescribed separation requirements. - Abstract: To interpret the phenomenon of chemical exchange in boron isotopes separation accurately, the process is specified as an absorption–reaction–desorption hybrid process instead of a distillation equilibrium model, the non-equilibrium mass transfer absorption model is put forward and a mass transfer enhancement factor E is introduced to find the packing height needed to meet the specified separation requirements with MATLAB.

  9. The possibility of a fully automated procedure for radiosynthesis of fluorine-18-labeled fluoromisonidazole using a simplified single, neutral alumina column purification procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandy, Saikat; Rajan, M.G.R.; Korde, A.; Krishnamurthy, N.V.

    2010-01-01

    A novel fully automated radiosynthesis procedure for [ 18 F]Fluoromisonidazole using a simple alumina cartridge-column for purification instead of conventionally used semi-preparative HPLC was developed. [ 18 F]FMISO was prepared via a one-pot, two-step synthesis procedure using a modified nuclear interface synthesis module. Nucleophilic fluorination of the precursor molecule 1-(2'-nitro-1'-imidazolyl) -2-O-tetrahydropyranyl-3-O-toluenesulphonylpropanediol (NITTP) with no-carrier added [ 18 F]fluoride followed by hydrolysis of the protecting group with 1 M HCl. Purification was carried out using a single neutral alumina cartridge-column instead of semi-preparative HPLC. The maximum overall radiochemical yield obtained was 37.49±1.68% with 10 mg NITTP (n=3, without any decay correction) and the total synthesis time was 40±1 min. The radiochemical purity was greater than 95% and the product was devoid of other chemical impurities including residual aluminum and acetonitrile. The biodistribution study in fibrosarcoma tumor model showed maximum uptake in tumor, 2 h post injection. Finally, PET/CT imaging studies in normal healthy rabbit, showed clear uptake in the organs involved in the metabolic process of MISO. No bone uptake was observed excluding the presence of free [ 18 F]fluoride. The reported method can be easily adapted in any commercial FDG synthesis module.

  10. Prediction model for exhausted point of ion exchange resin column of moderator purification circuit at Korean CANDU plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Wook; Kang, Duck-Won; Ahn, Hyun Kyoung; Rhee, In Hyoung

    2005-01-01

    Most of the carbon-14 produced at CANDU plants are removed by an Ion eXchange (IX) resin column of the moderator purification circuit, and a column is replaced based on an empirical guideline. Since the amount of carbon-14 released from CANDU plants is governed by the performance of a column, optimal operation of IX resin columns through the timely replacement based on an objective criterion is very important. For this, the model for predicting the exhausted point of an IX resin column has been developed based on local chemical equilibrium. The performance evaluation at Wolsong Unit 3 showed that the model was able to simulate the removal of species by an IX resin column to such a high degree that the model could provide an objective criterion to replace an IX resin column timely. The derived maximum service time of a fresh IX resin column was 4,080 h, about twice that of the existing empirical guideline (up to 2,000h). Accordingly, if the maximum service time derived in this paper is applied to Wolsong Unit 3, it is expected to reduce the cost needed for the replacement of IX resin column by about 50%. (author)

  11. Detailed modeling of hydrodynamics mass transfer and chemical reactions in a bubble column using a discrete bubble model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darmana, D.; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    A 3D discrete bubble model is adopted to investigate complex behavior involving hydrodynamics, mass transfer and chemical reactions in a gas¿liquid bubble column reactor. In this model a continuum description is adopted for the liquid phase and additionally each individual bubble is tracked in a

  12. Modeling of mass transfer and chemical reactions in a bubble column reactor using a discrete bubble model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darmana, D.; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    A 3D discrete bubble model is adopted to investigate complex behavior involving hydrodynamics, mass transfer and chemical reactions in a gas-liquid bubble column reactor. In this model a continuum description is adopted for the liquid phase and additionally each individual bubble is tracked in a

  13. Detailed modeling of hydrodynamics mass transfer and chemical reactions in a bubble column using a discrete bubble model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darmana, D.; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    A 3D discrete bubble model is adopted to investigate complex behavior involving hydrodynamics, mass transfer and chemical reactions in a gas–liquid bubble column reactor. In this model a continuum description is adopted for the liquid phase and additionally each individual bubble is tracked in a

  14. European column buckling curves and finite element modelling including high strength steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jeppe; Stan, Tudor-Cristian

    2017-01-01

    Eurocode allows for finite element modelling of plated steel structures, however the information in the code on how to perform the analysis or what assumptions to make is quite sparse. The present paper investigates the deterministic modelling of flexural column buckling using plane shell elements...... imperfections may be very conservative if considered by finite element analysis as described in the current Eurocode code. A suggestion is given for a slightly modified imperfection formula within the Ayrton-Perry formulation leading to adequate inclusion of modern high grade steels within the original four...... bucking curves. It is also suggested that finite element or frame analysis may be performed with equivalent column bow imperfections extracted directly from the Ayrton-Perry formulation....

  15. Adsorption of zinc ions on bone char using helical coil-packed bed columns and its mass transfer modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreno-Pérez, J.; Bonilla-Petriciolet, A.; Rojas-Mayorga, C. K.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the assessment of helical coil-packed bed columns for Zn2+ adsorption on bone char. Zn2+ adsorption breakthrough curves have been obtained using helical coil columns with different characteristics and a comparison has been conducted with respect to the results of straight fixed-bed...... columns. Results showed that the helical coil adsorption columns may offer an equivalent removal performance than that obtained for the traditional packed bed columns but using a compact structure. However, the coil diameter, number of turns, and feed flow appear to be crucial parameters for obtaining...... the best performance in this packed-bed geometry. A mass transfer model for a mobile fluid flowing through a porous media was used for fitting and predicting the Zn2+ breakthrough curves in helical coil bed columns. Results of adsorbent physicochemical characterization showed that Zn2+ adsorption on bone...

  16. The three-dimensional model for helical columns on type-J synchronous counter-current chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Y H; van den Heuvel, Remco

    2011-08-05

    Unlike the existing 2-D pseudo-ring model for helical columns undergoing synchronous type-J planetary motion of counter-current chromatograph (CCC), the 3-D "helix" model developed in this work shows that there is a second normal force (i.e. the binormal force) applied virtually in the axial direction of the helical column. This force alternates in the two opposite directions and intensifies phase mixing with increasing the helix angle. On the contrary, the 2-D spiral column operated on the same CCC device lacks this third-dimensional mixing force. The (principal) normal force quantified by this "helix" model has been the same as that by the pseudo-ring model. With β>0.25, this normal centrifugal force has been one-directional and fluctuates cyclically. Different to the spiral column, this "helix" model shows that the centrifugal force (i.e. the hydrostatic force) does not contribute to stationary phase retention in the helical column. Between the popular helical columns and the emerging spiral columns for type-J synchronous CCC, this work has thus illustrated that the former is associated with better phase mixing yet poor retention for the stationary phase whereas the latter has potential for better retention for the stationary phase yet poor phase mixing. The methodology developed in this work may be regarded as a new platform for designing optimised CCC columns for analytical and engineering applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Modeling of 1-D nitrate transport in single layer soils | Dike | Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The transport of nitrate in laboratory single soil columns of sand, laterite and clay were investigated after 21 days. The 1-D contaminant transport model by Notodarmojo et al (1991) for single layer soils were calibrated and verified using field data collected from a refuse dump site at avu, owerri, Imo state. The experimental ...

  18. FE Modelling of the Seismic Behavior of Wide Beam-Column Joints Strengthened with CFRP Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Santarsiero

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A large share of reinforced concrete (RC framed buildings is provided with wide beams being a type of beam allowing greater freedom in the architectural arrangement of interiors, beyond further advantage due to fewer formworks needed during the construction. Nevertheless, little attention has been devoted to the seismic vulnerability of this kind of framed RC buildings as well as to the study of strengthening systems purposely developed for wide beams and wide beam-column connections. Under these premises, this paper proposes simple strengthening solutions made by Fibre Reinforced Polymers (FRP systems able to effectively improve seismic capacity through feasible arrangement suitable in case a wide beam is present. On the basis of wide beam-column joints previously tested without strengthening system, detailed nonlinear finite element models were calibrated. Then, an FRP strengthening intervention based on a brand new arrangement was modeled in order to perform additional simulations under seismic actions. This way, the effectiveness of the strengthening intervention was assessed finding out that significant strength and ductility increments were achieved with a relatively simple and cheap strengthening arrangement. Additional research would be desirable in the form of experimental tests on the simulated wide beam-column joints.

  19. Numerical modelling techniques of soft soil improvement via stone columns: A brief review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukri, Azhani; Nazir, Ramli

    2018-04-01

    There are a number of numerical studies on stone column systems in the literature. Most of the studies found were involved with two-dimensional analysis of the stone column behaviour, while only a few studies used three-dimensional analysis. The most popular software utilised in those studies was Plaxis 2D and 3D. Other types of software that used for numerical analysis are DIANA, EXAMINE, ZSoil, ABAQUS, ANSYS, NISA, GEOSTUDIO, CRISP, TOCHNOG, CESAR, GEOFEM (2D & 3D), FLAC, and FLAC 3. This paper will review the methodological approaches to model stone column numerically, both in two-dimensional and three-dimensional analyses. The numerical techniques and suitable constitutive model used in the studies will also be discussed. In addition, the validation methods conducted were to verify the numerical analysis conducted will be presented. This review paper also serves as a guide for junior engineers through the applicable procedures and considerations when constructing and running a two or three-dimensional numerical analysis while also citing numerous relevant references.

  20. Simplified mathematical models for interpreting the results of tests carried out by labelling the whole piezometric column in water wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munera, H.A.

    1974-01-01

    Approximate methods used to interpret the results of tests based on radioactive tracer dilution in a single water well by labelling the whole piezometric column are described; these simple mathematical models have been used to obtain semi-quantitative data on the apparent velocity (horizontal) in non-homogeneous aquifers with flow rates of metres daily. Measurements have also been made in a homogeneous aquifer with velocities of centimetres daily. Interpretation is based on determination of the average concentration for the various well zones; this involves recognition of a mean velocity for each region. All the tracer dilution effects that are not due to horizontal or vertical flow between two zones, i.e. convection, artificial mixing, diffusion and so on, are grouped together as a single term, which is taken arbitrarily to be proportional to the difference in concentration between the regions under consideration; its value is obtained from the experimental dilution curve. The model was applied to the solution of the three cases encountered most frequently during our measurements in Colombia: (a) when the well penetrates a permeable zone and adjacent impermeable zone; (b) when the well penetrates a permeable zone contained between impermeable regions; and (c) when the well traverses an aquifer with two adjacent zones of different permeability contained between impermeable zones. The shape of the dilution curve (logarithm of concentration versus time, usually with two or more slopes) is predicted by the model, the approximate nature of which is consistent with the fact that the method of labelling the whole piezometric column is semi-quantitative. The results obtained for measurements made when there are considerable vertical flows are apparently correct, but there is no other experimental measurement available to confirm them. (author) [es

  1. Characterization of wide-pore reversed-phase columns for biopolymer separations. I. Single-parametric evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bede, A; Rippel, G; Szepesy, L; Claessens, H.A.

    1996-01-01

    Nine prepacked wide-pore columns recommended for protein separation were studied. The stationary phases investigated were widely different with respect to the type of ligands. In order to characterize the columns, measurements were made with six different test mixtures containing two different

  2. MODELING A ROCKET ELASTIC STRUCTURE AS A BECK’S COLUMN UNDER FOLLOWER FORCE

    OpenAIRE

    Brejão, Leandro Forne; Brasil, Reyolando M. L. R. F.

    2017-01-01

    It is intended, in this paper, to develop a mathematical model of an elastic space rocket structure as a Beck’s column excited by a follower (or circulatory) force. This force represents the rocket motor thrust that should be always in the direction of the tangent to the structure deformed axis at the base of the vehicle. We present a simplified two degree of freedom rigid bars discrete model. Its system of two second order nonlinear ordinary differential equations of motion are derived via L...

  3. Model predictive control in light naphtha distillation column of gasoline hydrogenation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornkrit Chiewchanchairat

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The main scope of this research is for designing and implementing of model predictive control (MPC on the light naphtha distillation column of gasoline hydrogenation process. This model is designed by using robust multivariable predictive control technology (RMPCT. The performance of MPC controller is better than PID controllers 32.1 % those are comparing by using as the same of objective function and also in the MPC controller can be used for steam optimization that is shown in this research, stream consumption is reduced 6.6 Kg/ m3 of fresh feed.

  4. Behavior and Three-Dimensional Finite Element Modeling of Circular Concrete Columns Partially Wrapped with FRP Strips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Zeng

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP jacketing/wrapping has become an attractive strengthening technique for concrete columns. Wrapping an existing concrete column with continuous FRP jackets with the fiber in the jacket being oriented in the hoop direction is referred to as FRP full wrapping strengthening technique. In practice, however, strengthening concrete columns with vertically discontinuous FRP strips is also favored and this technique is referred to as FRP partial wrapping strengthening technique. Existing research has demonstrated that FRP partial wrapping strengthening technique is a promising and economical alternative to the FRP full wrapping strengthening technique. Although extensive experimental investigations have hitherto been conducted on partially FRP-confined concrete columns, the confinement mechanics of confined concrete in partially FRP-confined circular columns remains unclear. In this paper, an experimental program consisting of fifteen column specimens was conducted and the test results were presented. A reliable three-dimensional (3D finite element (FE approach for modeling of partially FRP-confined circular columns was established. In the proposed FE approach, an accurate plastic-damage model for concrete under multiaxial compression is employed. The accuracy of the proposed FE approach was verified by comparisons between the numerical results and the test results. Numerical results from the verified FE approach were then presented to gain an improved understanding of the behavior of confined concrete in partially FRP-confined concrete columns.

  5. Surfactant-enhanced solubilization of residual dodecane in soil columns. 2. Mathematical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abriola, L.M.; Dekker, T.J.; Pennell, K.D.

    1993-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe surfactant-enhanced solubilization of nonaqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) in porous media. The model incorporates aqueous-phase transport equations for organic and surfactant components as well as a mass balance for the organic phase. Rate-limited solubilization and surfactant sorption are represented by a linear driving force expression and a Langmuir isotherm, respectively. The model is implemented in a one-dimensional Galerkin finite element simulator which idealizes the entrapped residual organic as a collection of spherical globules. Soil column data for the solubilization of residual dodecane by an aqueous solution of polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monooleate are used to evaluate the conceptual model. Input parameters were obtained, where possible, from independent batch experiments. Calibrated model simulations exhibit good agreement with measured effluent concentrations, supporting the utility of the conceptual modeling approach. Sensitivity analyses explore the influence of surfactant concentration and flushing strategy on NAPL recovery. 45 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  6. On the Mechanical Modeling of Tensegrity Columns Subject to Impact Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada Amendola

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A physical model of a tensegrity columns is additively manufactured in a titanium alloy. After removing sacrificial supports, such a model is post-tensioned through suitable insertion of Spectra® cables. The wave dynamics of the examined system is first experimentally investigated by recording the motion through high-speed cameras assisted by a digital image correlation algorithm, which returns time-histories of the axial displacements of the bases of each prism of the column. Next, the experimental response is mechanically simulated by means of two different models: a stick-and-spring model accounting for the presence of bending-stiff connections between the 3D-printed elements (mixed bending-stretching response, and a tensegrity model accounting for a purely stretching response. The comparison of theory and experiment reveals that the presence of bending-stiff connections weakens the nonlinearity of the wave dynamics of the system. A stretching-dominated response instead supports highly compact solitary waves in the presence of small prestress and negligible bending stiffness of connections.

  7. On the mechanical modeling of tensegrity columns subject to impact loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendola, Ada; Favata, Antonino; Micheletti, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    A physical model of a tensegrity columns is additively manufactured in a titanium alloy. After removing sacrificial supports, such a model is post-tensioned through suitable insertion of Spectra cables. The wave dynamics of the examined system is first experimentally investigated by recording the motion through high-speed cameras assisted by a digital image correlation algorithm, which returns time-histories of the axial displacements of the bases of each prism of the column. Next, the experimental response is mechanically simulated by means of two different models: a stick-and-spring model accounting for the presence of bending-stiff connections between the 3D-printed elements (mixed bending-stretching response), and a tensegrity model accounting for a purely stretching response. The comparison of theory and experiment reveals that the presence of bending-stiff connections weakens the nonlinearity of the wave dynamics of the system. A stretching-dominated response instead supports highly compact solitary waves in the presence of small prestress and negligible bending stiffness of connections.

  8. Modeling and Circumventing the Effect of Sediments and Water Column on Receiver Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audet, P.

    2017-12-01

    Teleseismic P-wave receiver functions are routinely used to resolve crust and mantle structure in various geologic settings. Receiver functions are approximations to the Earth's Green's functions and are composed of various scattered phase arrivals, depending on the complexity of the underlying Earth structure. For simple structure, the dominant arrivals (converted and back-scattered P-to-S phases) are well separated in time and can be reliably used in estimating crustal velocity structure. In the presence of sedimentary layers, strong reverberations typically produce high-amplitude oscillations that contaminate the early part of the wave train and receiver functions can be difficult to interpret in terms of underlying structure. The effect of a water column also limits the interpretability of under-water receiver functions due to the additional acoustic wave propagating within the water column that can contaminate structural arrivals. We perform numerical modeling of teleseismic Green's functions and receiver functions using a reflectivity technique for a range of Earth models that include thin sedimentary layers and overlying water column. These modeling results indicate that, as expected, receiver functions are difficult to interpret in the presence of sediments, but the contaminating effect of the water column is dependent on the thickness of the water layer. To circumvent these effects and recover source-side structure, we propose using an approach based on transfer function modeling that bypasses receiver functions altogether and estimates crustal properties directly from the waveforms (Frederiksen and Delayney, 2015). Using this approach, reasonable assumptions about the properties of the sedimentary layer can be included in forward calculations of the Green's functions that are convolved with radial waveforms to predict vertical waveforms. Exploration of model space using Monte Carlo-style search and least-square waveform misfits can be performed to

  9. Laser characterisation of a 3D single-type column p-type prototype module read out with ATLAS SCT electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrich, T.; Kuehn, S.; Boscardin, M.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Eckert, S.; Jakobs, K.; Maassen, M.; Parzefall, U.; Piemonte, C.; Pozza, A.; Ronchin, S.; Zorzi, N.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper measurements of a 3D single-type column (3D-stc) microstrip silicon device are shown. The 3D-stc sensor has n-type columns in p-type substrate. It has been connected to an ATLAS SCT ABCD3T chip and is readout with ATLAS SCT electronics at 40 MHz. Spatial measurements were done with a laser setup to investigate the expected low field region in 3D devices. An influence of the p-stops on the collected charge has been observed

  10. Laser characterisation of a 3D single-type column p-type prototype module read out with ATLAS SCT electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrich, T. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder Str. 3, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Kuehn, S. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder Str. 3, 79104 Freiburg (Germany)], E-mail: susanne.kuehn@physik.uni-freiburg.de; Boscardin, M.; Dalla Betta, G.-F. [ITC-irst Trento, Microsystems Division, via Sommarive, 18 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Eckert, S.; Jakobs, K.; Maassen, M.; Parzefall, U. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder Str. 3, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Piemonte, C.; Pozza, A.; Ronchin, S.; Zorzi, N. [ITC-irst Trento, Microsystems Division, via Sommarive, 18 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy)

    2007-12-11

    In this paper measurements of a 3D single-type column (3D-stc) microstrip silicon device are shown. The 3D-stc sensor has n-type columns in p-type substrate. It has been connected to an ATLAS SCT ABCD3T chip and is readout with ATLAS SCT electronics at 40 MHz. Spatial measurements were done with a laser setup to investigate the expected low field region in 3D devices. An influence of the p-stops on the collected charge has been observed.

  11. Non-Fickian dispersive transport of strontium in laboratory-scale columns: Modelling and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongxu; Jivkov, Andrey P.; Wang, Lichun; Si, Gaohua; Yu, Jing

    2017-06-01

    In the context of environmental remediation of contaminated sites and safety assessment of nuclear waste disposal in the near-surface zone, we investigate the leaching and non-Fickian dispersive migration with sorption of strontium (mocking strontium-90) through columns packed with sand and clay. Analysis is based on breakthrough curves (BTCs) from column experiments, which simulated rainfall infiltration and source term release scenario, rather than applying constant tracer solution at the inlet as commonly used. BTCs are re-evaluated and transport parameters are estimated by inverse modelling using two approaches: (1) equilibrium advection-dispersion equation (ADE); and (2) continuous time random walk (CTRW). Firstly, based on a method for calculating leach concentration, the inlet condition with an exponential decay input is identified. Secondly, the results show that approximately 39%-58% of Br- and 16%-49% of Sr2+ are eluted from the columns at the end of the breakthrough experiments. This suggests that trapping mechanisms, including diffusion into immobile zones and attachment of tracer on mineral surfaces, are more pronounced for Sr2+ than for Br-. Thirdly, we demonstrate robustness of CTRW-based truncated power-law (TPL) model in capturing non-Fickian reactive transport with 0 2. The non-Fickian dispersion observed experimentally is explained by variations of local flow field from preferential flow paths due to physical heterogeneities. Particularly, the additional sorption process of strontium on clay minerals contributes to the delay of the peak concentration and the tailing features, which leads to an enhanced non-Fickian transport for strontium. Finally, the ADE and CTRW approaches to environmental modelling are evaluated. It is shown that CTRW with a sorption term can describe non-Fickian dispersive transport of strontium at laboratory scale by identifying appropriate parameters, while the traditional ADE with a retardation factor fails to reproduce

  12. Flow-through Column Experiments and Modeling of Microbially Mediated Cr(VI) Reduction at Hanford 100H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L.; Molins, S.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.; Steefel, C.; Nico, P. S.; Han, R.

    2010-12-01

    Microbially mediated Cr(VI) reduction at the Hanford 100H area was investigated by flow-through column experiments. Three separate experiments were conducted to promote microbial activities associated with denitrification, iron and sulfate reduction, respectively. Replicate columns packed with natural sediments from the site under anaerobic environment were injected with 5mM Lactate as the electron donor and 5 μM Cr(VI) in all experiments. Sulfate and nitrate solutions were added to act as the main electron acceptors in the respective experiments, while iron columns relied on the indigenous sediment iron (and manganese) oxides as electron acceptors. Column effluent solutions were analyzed by IC and ICP-MS to monitor the microbial consumption/conversion of lactate and the associated Cr(VI) reduction. Biogeochemical reactive transport modeling was performed to gain further insights into the reaction mechanisms and Cr(VI) bioreduction rates. All experimental columns showed a reduction of the injected Cr(VI). Columns under denitrifying conditions showed the least Cr(VI) reduction at early stages (simulations indicated that biomass growth completely depleted influent ammonium, and called for an additional source of N to account for the measured reduction rates. Iron columns were the least active with undetectable consumption of the injected lactate, slowest cell growth, and the smallest change in Cr(VI) concentrations during the course of the experiment. In contrast, columns under sulfate-reducing/fermentative conditions exhibited the greatest Cr(VI) reduction capacity. Two sulfate columns evolved to complete lactate fermentation with acetate and propionate produced in the column effluent after 40 days of experiments. These fermenting columns showed a complete removal of injected Cr(VI), visible precipitation of sulfide minerals, and a significant increase in effluent Fe and Mn concentrations. Reactive transport simulations suggested that direct reduction of Cr(VI) by

  13. Gyrokinetic-water-bag modeling of low-frequency instabilities in a laboratory magnetized plasma column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravier, E.; Klein, R.; Morel, P.; Besse, N.; Bertrand, P.

    2008-12-01

    A new model is presented, named collisional-gyro-water-bag (CGWB), which describes the collisional drift waves and ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) instabilities in a plasma column. This model is based on the kinetic gyro-water-bag approach recently developed [P. Morel et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 112109 (2007)] to investigate ion-temperature-gradient modes. In CGWB electron-neutral collisions have been introduced and are now taken into account. The model has been validated by comparing CGWB linear analysis with other models previously proposed and experimental results as well. Kinetic effects on collisional drift waves are investigated, resulting in a less effective growth rate, and the transition from collisional drift waves to ITG instability depending on the ion temperature gradient is studied.

  14. Analytical modeling of post-tensioned precast beam-to-column connections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaya, Mustafa; Arslan, A. Samet

    2009-01-01

    In this study, post-tensioned precast beam-to-column connections are tested experimentally at different stress levels, and are modelled analytically using 3D nonlinear finite element modelling method. ANSYS finite element software is used for this purposes. Nonlinear static analysis is used to determine the connection strength, behavior and stiffness when subjected to cyclic inelastic loads simulating ground excitation during an earthquake. The results obtained from the analytical studies are compared with the test results. In terms of stiffness, it was seen that the initial stiffness of the analytical models was lower than that of the tested specimens. As a result, modelling of these types of connection using 3D FEM can give crucial beforehand information, and overcome the disadvantages of time consuming workmanship and cost of experimental studies.

  15. Effect of concentration gradients on biodegradation in bench-scale sand columns with HYDRUS modeling of hydrocarbon transport and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horel, Agota; Schiewer, Silke; Misra, Debasmita

    2015-09-01

    The present research investigated to what extent results obtained in small microcosm experiments can be extrapolated to larger settings with non-uniform concentrations. Microbial hydrocarbon degradation in sandy sediments was compared for column experiments versus homogenized microcosms with varying concentrations of diesel, Syntroleum, and fish biodiesel as contaminants. Syntroleum and fish biodiesel had higher degradation rates than diesel fuel. Microcosms showed significantly higher overall hydrocarbon mineralization percentages (p transport and degradation of the investigated fuels in vadose zone conditions similar to those in laboratory column experiments. The numerical model was used to evaluate the impact of different degradation rate constants from microcosm versus column experiments.

  16. Prediction of the Effect of Using Stone Column in Clayey Soil on the Behavior of Circular Footing by ANN Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Khaleel Ismael Al-Kubaisi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Shallow foundations are usually used for structures with light to moderate loads where the soil underneath can carry them. In some cases, soil strength and/or other properties are not adequate and require improvement using one of the ground improvement techniques. Stone column is one of the common improvement techniques in which a column of stone is installed vertically in clayey soils. Stone columns are usually used to increase soil strength and to accelerate soil consolidation by acting as vertical drains. Many researches have been done to estimate the behavior of the improved soil. However, none of them considered the effect of stone column geometry on the behavior of the circular footing. In this research, finite element models have been conducted to evaluate the behavior of a circular footing with different stone column configurations. Moreover, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN model has been generated for predicting these effects. The results showed a reduction in the bending moment, the settlement, and the vertical stresses with the increment of the stone column length, while both the horizontal stress and the shear force were increased. ANN model showed a good relationship between the predicted and the calculated results.

  17. Modeling on-column reduction of trisulfide bonds in monoclonal antibodies during protein A chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Sanchayita; Rajshekaran, Rupshika; Labanca, Marisa; Conley, Lynn

    2017-01-06

    Trisulfides can be a common post-translational modification in many recombinant monoclonal antibodies. These are a source of product heterogeneity that add to the complexity of product characterization and hence, need to be reduced for consistent product quality. Trisulfide bonds can be converted to the regular disulfide bonds by incorporating a novel cysteine wash step during Protein A affinity chromatography. An empirical model is developed for this on-column reduction reaction to compare the reaction rates as a function of typical operating parameters such as temperature, cysteine concentration, reaction time and starting level of trisulfides. The model presented here is anticipated to assist in the development of optimal wash conditions for the Protein A step to effectively reduce trisulfides to desired levels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Modeling a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope Focusing Column - Lessons Learned in Electron Optics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, Jody; Gregory, Don; Gaskin, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    This presentation discusses work done to assess the design of a focusing column in a miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for use in-situ on the Moon-in particular for mineralogical analysis. The MSFC beam column design uses purely electrostatic fields for focusing, because of the severe constraints on mass and electrical power consumption imposed by the goals of lunar exploration and of spaceflight in general. The resolution of an SEM ultimately depends on the size of the focused spot of the scanning beam probe, for which the stated goal here is a diameter of 10 nanometers. Optical aberrations are the main challenge to this performance goal, because they blur the ideal geometrical optical image of the electron source, effectively widening the ideal spot size of the beam probe. In the present work the optical aberrations of the mini SEM focusing column were assessed using direct tracing of non-paraxial rays, as opposed to mathematical estimates of aberrations based on paraxial ray-traces. The geometrical ray-tracing employed here is completely analogous to ray-tracing as conventionally understood in the realm of photon optics, with the major difference being that in electron optics the lens is simply a smoothly varying electric field in vacuum, formed by precisely machined electrodes. Ray-tracing in this context, therefore, relies upon a model of the electrostatic field inside the focusing column to provide the mathematical description of the "lens" being traced. This work relied fundamentally on the boundary element method (BEM) for this electric field model. In carrying out this research the authors discovered that higher accuracy in the field model was essential if aberrations were to be reliably assessed using direct ray-tracing. This led to some work in testing alternative techniques for modeling the electrostatic field. Ultimately, the necessary accuracy was attained using a BEM

  19. Quantitation of triacylglycerols in edible oils by off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry using a single column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fang; Hu, Na; Lv, Xin; Dong, Xu-Yan; Chen, Hong

    2015-07-24

    In this investigation, off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry using a single column has been applied for the identification and quantification of triacylglycerols in edible oils. A novel mixed-mode phenyl-hexyl chromatographic column was employed in this off-line two-dimensional separation system. The phenyl-hexyl column combined the features of traditional C18 and silver-ion columns, which could provide hydrophobic interactions with triacylglycerols under acetonitrile conditions and can offer π-π interactions with triacylglycerols under methanol conditions. When compared with traditional off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography employing two different chromatographic columns (C18 and silver-ion column) and using elution solvents comprised of two phases (reversed-phase/normal-phase) for triacylglycerols separation, the novel off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography using a single column can be achieved by simply altering the mobile phase between acetonitrile and methanol, which exhibited a much higher selectivity for the separation of triacylglycerols with great efficiency and rapid speed. In addition, an approach based on the use of response factor with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry has been developed for triacylglycerols quantification. Due to the differences between saturated and unsaturated acyl chains, the use of response factors significantly improves the quantitation of triacylglycerols. This two-dimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry system was successfully applied for the profiling of triacylglycerols in soybean oils, peanut oils and lord oils. A total of 68 triacylglycerols including 40 triacylglycerols in soybean oils, 50 triacylglycerols in peanut oils and 44 triacylglycerols in lord oils have been identified and quantified. The liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry data were analyzed

  20. Single-tier city logistics model for single product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saragih, N. I.; Nur Bahagia, S.; Suprayogi; Syabri, I.

    2017-11-01

    This research develops single-tier city logistics model which consists of suppliers, UCCs, and retailers. The problem that will be answered in this research is how to determine the location of UCCs, to allocate retailers to opened UCCs, to assign suppliers to opened UCCs, to control inventory in the three entities involved, and to determine the route of the vehicles from opened UCCs to retailers. This model has never been developed before. All the decisions will be simultaneously optimized. Characteristic of the demand is probabilistic following a normal distribution, and the number of product is single.

  1. Advanced postbuckling and imperfection sensitivity of the elastic-plastic Shanley-Hutchinson model column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus Dencker; Byskov, Esben

    2008-01-01

    The postbuckling behavior and imperfection sensitivity of the Shanley-Hutchinson plastic model column introduced by Hutchinson in 1973 are examined. The study covers the initial, buckled state and the advanced postbuckling regime of the geometrically perfect realization as well as its sensitivity...... to geometric imperfections. In Section 1, which is concerned with the perfect structure, a new, simple explicit upper bound for all solutions to the problem is found when the tangent modulus at bifurcation vanishes compared to the linear elastic (unloading) modulus. The difference between the upper bound...... and the solution to an actual problem is determined by an asymptotic expansion involving hyperbolic trial functions (instead of polynomials) which fulfill general boundary conditions at bifurcation and infinity. The method provides an accurate estimate of the maximum load even if it occurs in an advanced...

  2. Further evaluation of wetland emission estimates from the JULES land surface model using SCIAMACHY and GOSAT atmospheric column methane measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, Garry; Comyn-Platt, Edward; McNorton, Joey; Chipperfield, Martyn; Gedney, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    The atmospheric concentration of methane began rising again in 2007 after a period of near-zero growth [1,2], with the largest increases observed over polar northern latitudes and the Southern Hemisphere in 2007 and in the tropics since then. The observed inter-annual variability in atmospheric methane concentrations and the associated changes in growth rates have variously been attributed to changes in different methane sources and sinks [2,3]. Wetlands are generally accepted as being the largest, but least well quantified, single natural source of CH4, with global emission estimates ranging from 142-284 Tg yr-1 [3]. The modelling of wetlands and their associated emissions of CH4 has become the subject of much current interest [4]. We have previously used the HadGEM2 chemistry-climate model to evaluate the wetland emission estimates derived using the UK community land surface model (JULES, the Joint UK Land Earth Simulator) against atmospheric observations of methane, including SCIAMACHY total methane columns [5] up to 2007. We have undertaken a series of new HadGEM2 runs using new JULES emission estimates extended in time to the end of 2012, thereby allowing comparison with both SCIAMACHY and GOSAT atmospheric column methane measurements. We will describe the results of these runs and the implications for methane wetland emissions. References [1] Rigby, M., et al.: Renewed growth of atmospheric methane. Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L22805, 2008; [2] Nisbet, E.G., et al.: Methane on the Rise-Again, Science 343, 493, 2014; [3] Kirschke, S., et al.,: Three decades of global methane sources and sinks, Nature Geosciences, 6, 813-823, 2013; [4] Melton, J. R., et al.: Present state of global wetland extent and wetland methane modelling: conclusions from a model inter-comparison project (WETCHIMP), Biogeosciences, 10, 753-788, 2013; [5] Hayman, G.D., et al.: Comparison of the HadGEM2 climate-chemistry model against in situ and SCIAMACHY atmospheric methane data, Atmos. Chem

  3. Importance of modeling beam-column joints for seismic safety of reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Akanshu; Reddy, G.R.; Vaze, K.K.; Eligehausen, R.; Hofmann, J.

    2011-01-01

    Almost all structures, except the containment building, in a NPP can be classified as reinforced concrete (RC) framed structures. In case of such structures subjected to seismic loads, beam-column joints are recognized as the critical and vulnerable zone. During an earthquake, the global behavior of the structure is highly governed by the behavior of the joints. If the joints behave in a ductile manner, the global behavior generally will be ductile, whereas if the joints behave in a brittle fashion then the structure will display a brittle behavior. The joints of old and non-seismically detailed structures are more vulnerable and behave poorly under the earthquakes compared to the joints of new and seismically detailed structures. Modeling of these joint regions is very important for correct assessment of the seismic performance of the structures. In this paper, it is shown with the help of a recently developed joint model that not modeling the inelastic behavior of the joints can lead to significantly misleading and unsafe results in terms of the performance assessment of the structures under seismic loads. Comparison of analytical and experimental results is shown for two structures, tested under lateral monotonic seismic pushover loads. It is displayed that the model can predict the inelastic seismic response of structures considering joint distortion with high accuracy by little extra effort in modeling. (author)

  4. Development of gas chromatography-flame ionization detection system with a single column and liquid nitrogen-free for measuring atmospheric C2-C12 hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengtang; Mu, Yujing; Zhang, Chenglong; Zhang, Zhibo; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Junfeng; Sheng, Jiujiang; Quan, Jiannong

    2016-01-04

    A liquid nitrogen-free GC-FID system equipped with a single column has been developed for measuring atmospheric C2-C12 hydrocarbons. The system is consisted of a cooling unit, a sampling unit and a separation unit. The cooling unit is used to meet the temperature needs of the sampling unit and the separation unit. The sampling unit includes a dehydration tube and an enrichment tube. No breakthrough of the hydrocarbons was detected when the temperature of the enrichment tube was kept at -90 °C and sampling volume was 400 mL. The separation unit is a small round oven attached on the cooling column. A single capillary column (OV-1, 30 m × 0.32 mm I.D.) was used to separate the hydrocarbons. An optimal program temperature (-60 ∼ 170 °C) of the oven was achieved to efficiently separate C2-C12 hydrocarbons. There were good linear correlations (R(2)=0.993-0.999) between the signals of the hydrocarbons and the enrichment amount of hydrocarbons, and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was less than 5%, and the method detection limits (MDLs) for the hydrocarbons were in the range of 0.02-0.10 ppbv for sampling volume of 400 mL. Field measurements were also conducted and more than 50 hydrocarbons from C2 to C12 were detected in Beijing city. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis of Multi-Loop Control Structures of Dividing-Wall Distillation Columns Using a Fundamental Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Tututi-Avila

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Dividing-wall columns (DWCs have significant potential as energy-efficient processes for the separation of multicomponent mixtures. However, in addition to an efficient steady state design, dynamics and control also play a major part for the success of a technology. This is especially so for complex distillation systems. This paper investigates the dynamics of a dividing wall column used for the separation of ternary mixtures. A detailed dynamic first principles-based model of the column I s developed in gPROMS. The model is used to generate data used for control loop pairing via the Relative Gain Array (RGA, and controller parameters are found by using Internal Model Control (IMC tuning. The best control structures for DWC systems, involving four different ternary mixtures, and two different feed compositions for each mixture, are investigated.

  6. Measuring and modeling three-dimensional water uptake of a growing faba bean (Vicia faba) within a soil column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Katrin; Koebernick, Nicolai; Kerkhofs, Elien; Vanderborght, Jan; Javaux, Mathieu; Vetterlein, Doris; Vereecken, Harry

    2014-05-01

    A faba bean was grown in a column filled with a sandy soil, which was initially close to saturation and then subjected to a single drying cycle of 30 days. The column was divided in four hydraulically separated compartments using horizontal paraffin layers. Paraffin is impermeable to water but penetrable by roots. Thus by growing deeper, the roots can reach compartments that still contain water. The root architecture was measured every second day by X-ray CT. Transpiration rate, soil matric potential in four different depths, and leaf area were measured continously during the experiment. To investigate the influence of the partitioning of available soil water in the soil column on water uptake, we used R-SWMS, a fully coupled root and soil water model [1]. We compared a scenario with and without the split layers and investigated the influence on root xylem pressure. The detailed three-dimensional root architecture was obtained by reconstructing binarized root images manually with a virtual reality system, located at the Juelich Supercomputing Centre [2]. To verify the properties of the root system, we compared total root lengths, root length density distributions and root surface with estimations derived from Minkowski functionals [3]. In a next step, knowing the change of root architecture in time, we could allocate an age to each root segment and use this information to define age dependent root hydraulic properties that are required to simulate water uptake for the growing root system. The scenario with the split layers showed locally much lower pressures than the scenario without splits. Redistribution of water within the unrestricted soil column led to a more uniform distribution of water uptake and lowers the water stress in the plant. However, comparison of simulated and measured pressure heads with tensiometers suggested that the paraffin layers were not perfectly hydraulically isolating the different soil layers. We could show compensation efficiency of

  7. MAX-DOAS tropospheric nitrogen dioxide column measurements compared with the Lotos-Euros air quality model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlemmix, T.; Eskes, H.J.; Piters, A.J.M.; Schaap, M.; Sauter, F.J.; Kelder, H.; Levelt, P.F.

    2015-01-01

    A 14-month data set of MAX-DOAS (Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) tropospheric NO2 column observations in De Bilt, the Netherlands, has been compared with the regional air quality model Lotos-Euros. The model was run on a 7×7 km2 grid, the same resolution as the emission

  8. Mathematical Modeling of Oscillating Water Columns Wave-Structure Interaction in Ocean Energy Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aitor J. Garrido

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oscillating Water Column (OWC-based power take-off systems are one of the potential solutions to the current energy problems arising from the use of nuclear fission and the consumption of fossil fuels. This kind of energy converter turns wave energy into electric power by means of three different stages: firstly wave energy is transformed into pneumatic energy in the OWC chamber, and then a turbine turns it into mechanical energy and finally the turbogenerator module attached to the turbine creates electric power from the rotational mechanical energy. To date, capture chambers have been the least studied part. In this context, this paper presents an analytical model describing the dynamic behavior of the capture chamber, encompassing the wave motion and its interaction with the OWC structure and turbogenerator module. The model is tested for the case of the Mutriku wave power plant by means of experimental results. For this purpose, representative case studies are selected from wave and pressure drop input-output data. The results show an excellent matching rate between the values predicted by the model and the experimental measured data with a small bounded error in all cases, so that the validity of the proposed model is proven.

  9. Study and modeling of the dispersed phase behavior in a pulsed column: application to an oxalic precipitation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amokrane, Abdenour

    2014-01-01

    The thesis focuses on the study and modeling of a pulsed column used in liquid-liquid extraction operations in the nuclear industry and which is otherwise considered for continuous precipitation operations in emulsion. Modeling the behavior of the dispersed phase in the column is undertaken in this manuscript. First, we began by modeling the continuous phase mean velocity and turbulence fields, which are responsible for transport, breakage and coalescence of the drops. The model developed, validated by PIV measurements, predicts turbulence in a satisfying way. Modeling the residence time distribution (RTD) of the drops by a Lagrangian approach is then achieved. This model is validated on measurements taken by a shadow-graph technique. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental ones. To model the droplet size distributions (DSD) in the column, we used the population balance equations (PBE) that we have coupled with the computational fluid dynamics equations (CFD). A continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with an optical sensor is used, at first, to acquire the DSD representative of our liquid-liquid system. Through a 0D modeling of the flow in the CSTR, and solving the inverse problem, we have determined the breakage and coalescence kernels relevant for our system, to be used in the PBE. These kernels were then used to predict the DSD in the pulsed column by a coupled CFD-PBE model based on the QMOM method. Finally, a validation of the coupled CFD-PBE model is made from DSD in good agreement with the experimental data both qualitatively and quantitatively. The validated model is then used to study the emulsion sensitivity to the column operating conditions. (author) [fr

  10. Using the hydrophobic subtraction model to choose orthogonal columns for online comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsbøll, Rune; Nielsen, Nikoline Juul; Christensen, Jan H.

    2014-01-01

    A method for choosing orthogonal columns for a specific sample set in on-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC×LC) was developed on the basis of the hydrophobic subtraction model. The method takes into account the properties of the sample analytes by estimating new F...... neutral and 4 acidic oxygenated polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) and 3 nitrogen-containing PAC bases was measured isocratically on 12 columns. The isocratic runs were used to determine the hydrophobic subtraction model analyte parameters, and these were used to estimate new F-weights and predict...

  11. Implications of soil mixing for NAPL source zone remediation: Column studies and modeling of field-scale systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Mitchell R; Sale, Tom C

    2015-01-01

    Soil remediation is often inhibited by subsurface heterogeneity, which constrains contaminant/reagent contact. Use of soil mixing techniques for reagent delivery provides a means to overcome contaminant/reagent contact limitations. Furthermore, soil mixing reduces the permeability of treated soils, thus extending the time for reactions to proceed. This paper describes research conducted to evaluate implications of soil mixing on remediation of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) source zones. The research consisted of column studies and subsequent modeling of field-scale systems. For column studies, clean influent water was flushed through columns containing homogenized soils, granular zero valent iron (ZVI), and trichloroethene (TCE) NAPL. Within the columns, NAPL depletion occurred due to dissolution, followed by either column-effluent discharge or ZVI-mediated degradation. Complete removal of TCE NAPL from the columns occurred in 6-8 pore volumes of flow. However, most of the TCE (>96%) was discharged in the column effluent; less than 4% of TCE was degraded. The low fraction of TCE degraded is attributed to the short hydraulic residence time (10 m) and reducing permeability by one-or-more orders of magnitude, the residence time could be greatly extended, potentially for periods of years to decades. Model output indicates that the fraction of TCE degraded can be increased to >99.9%, given typical post-mixing soil permeability values. These results suggest that remediation performance can be greatly enhanced by combining contaminant degradation with an extended residence time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Design Oriented Model for the Assessment of T-Shaped Beam-Column Joints in Reinforced Concrete Frames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Bossio

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Beam-column joints represent very important elements of reinforced concrete (RC structures. In fact, beams and columns, at the boundary, generate internal forces acting on concrete core and on reinforcement bars with a very high gradient. To fully understand the seismic performances and the failure modes of T-shaped beam-column joints (external corner-positioned in RC structures, a simplified analytical model of joint behaviour is proposed and theoretical simulations have been performed. The model is based on the solution of a system of equilibrium equations of cracked joint portions designed to evaluate internal stresses at different values of column shear forces. The main aim of the proposed model is to identify the strength hierarchy. Limit values of different internal stresses allow us to detect the occurrence of different failure modes (namely the failure of the cracked joint, the bond failure of passing through bars, and the flexural/shear failures of columns or beams associated with column shear forces; the smaller one represents the capacity of the joint. The present work, focusing on T-shaped joints, could represent a useful tool for designers to quantify the performance of new structures or of existing ones. In fact, such a tool allows us to push an initial undesired failure mode to a more appropriate one to be evaluated. Finally, some experimental results of tests available in literature are reported, analysed, and compared to the predictions of the proposed model (by means of a worked example and of some international codes. The outcomes confirm that failure modes and corresponding joint capacities require an analytical model, like the proposed one, to be accurately predicted.

  13. Modelling the behaviour of steel fibre reinforced precast beam-to-column connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, C. E.; Sarbini, NN; Ibrahim, I. S.; Ma, C. K.; Tajol Anuar, M. Z.

    2017-11-01

    The numerical behaviour of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) corbels reinforced with different fibre volume ratio subjected to vertical incremental load is presented in this paper. Precast concrete structures had become popular in the construction field, which offer a faster, neater, safer, easier and cheaper construction work. The construction components are prefabricated in controlled environment under strict supervision before being erected on site. However, precast beam-column connections are prone to failure due to the brittle properties of concrete. Finite element analysis (FEA) is adopted due to the nonlinear behaviour of concrete and SFRC. The key objective of this research is to develop a reliable nonlinear FEA model to represent the behaviour of reinforced concrete corbel. The developed model is validated with experimental data from previous researches. Then, the validated FEA model is used to predict the behaviour of SFRC corbel reinforced with different fibre volume ratio by changing the material parameters. The results show that the addition of steel fibre (SF) increases the load carrying capacity, ductility, stiffness, and changed the failure mode of corbel from brittle bending-shear to flexural ductile. On the other hand, the increasing of SF volume ratio also leads to increased load carrying capacity, ductility, and stiffness of corbel.

  14. Extracting Models in Single Molecule Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presse, Steve

    2013-03-01

    Single molecule experiments can now monitor the journey of a protein from its assembly near a ribosome to its proteolytic demise. Ideally all single molecule data should be self-explanatory. However data originating from single molecule experiments is particularly challenging to interpret on account of fluctuations and noise at such small scales. Realistically, basic understanding comes from models carefully extracted from the noisy data. Statistical mechanics, and maximum entropy in particular, provide a powerful framework for accomplishing this task in a principled fashion. Here I will discuss our work in extracting conformational memory from single molecule force spectroscopy experiments on large biomolecules. One clear advantage of this method is that we let the data tend towards the correct model, we do not fit the data. I will show that the dynamical model of the single molecule dynamics which emerges from this analysis is often more textured and complex than could otherwise come from fitting the data to a pre-conceived model.

  15. The nuclear single particle model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mang, H.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty years ago in December 1963 one half of the Nobel prize in Physics was awarded to Maria Goeppert-Mayer and Johannes Daniel Jensen for their work on the nuclear shell model. They suggested independently that a strong spin-orbit force with the opposite sign of the one known from atomic physics should be added to the shell-model potential. This proved to be the crucial new idea, because then all the bits of and pieces of evidence that had accumulated over the years fell into place. The author begins with the basic assumption: In a nucleus nucleons move almost independently of each other in an average or shell-model potential. He then provides experimental evidence plausibility arguments and mathematical deductions

  16. First Directly Retrieved Global Distribution of Tropospheric Column Ozone from GOME: Comparison with the GEOS-CHEM Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiong; Chance, Kelly; Sioris, Christopher E.; Kurosu, Thomas P.; Spurr, Robert J. D.; Martin, Randall V.; Fu, Tzung-May; Logan, Jennifer A.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Palmer, Paul I.; hide

    2006-01-01

    We present the first directly retrieved global distribution of tropospheric column ozone from Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) ultraviolet measurements during December 1996 to November 1997. The retrievals clearly show signals due to convection, biomass burning, stratospheric influence, pollution, and transport. They are capable of capturing the spatiotemporal evolution of tropospheric column ozone in response to regional or short time-scale events such as the 1997-1998 El Nino event and a 10-20 DU change within a few days. The global distribution of tropospheric column ozone displays the well-known wave-1 pattern in the tropics, nearly zonal bands of enhanced tropospheric column ozone of 36-48 DU at 20degS-30degS during the austral spring and at 25degN-45degN during the boreal spring and summer, low tropospheric column ozone of 33 DU at some northern high-latitudes during the spring. Simulation from a chemical transport model corroborates most of the above structures, with small biases of <+/-5 DU and consistent seasonal cycles in most regions, especially in the southern hemisphere. However, significant positive biases of 5-20 DU occur in some northern tropical and subtropical regions such as the Middle East during summer. Comparison of GOME with monthly-averaged Measurement of Ozone and Water Vapor by Airbus in-service Aircraft (MOZAIC) tropospheric column ozone for these regions usually shows good consistency within 1 a standard deviations and retrieval uncertainties. Some biases can be accounted for by inadequate sensitivity to lower tropospheric ozone, the different spatiotemporal sampling and the spatiotemporal variations in tropospheric column ozone.

  17. Cs-selective mineral adsorbents in columns: physico-chemical properties and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Following the nuclear disaster in Fukushima Dai-Ichi, thousands of tons of fresh water and seawater were used for cooling the reactors or contaminated as a result of groundwater seepage. Decontamination of these waters is complicated by the presence of other cations (Na + , K + , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ ) naturally present in these waters. Decontamination process in columns packed was studied in this context with two types of mineral adsorbents: the TERMOXID 35 and the SORBMATECH 202. The first one is a commercial adsorbent and consists of mixed ferrocyanide K/Ni impregnated over a solid matrix Zr(OH) 4 . The second one was synthesized in CEA and is composed of ferrocyanide K/Cu impregnated over a solid matrix SiO 2 . Both materials have shown a high efficiency for Cs decontamination in seawater with K(d,Cs) of about 10 5 mL/g. Batch studies conducted in different solutions (pure water, fresh water and seawater) allowed determining sorption kinetics and ion exchange mechanisms responsible for the sorption of Cs + , taking into account competitive effects of the natural water cations (Na + , K + , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ ). Modelling of batches was performed with the geochemical code CHESS considering competitive effects according to the Vanselow formalism and selectivity coefficients, developing a specific thermodynamic database. The performances of these materials were then tested in column. The operating parameters such as Darcy's velocity and the H/D ratio were studied for a proper functioning of this process. The T35 has proven to be less efficient mainly because of the slow diffusion of Cs in the pores of the material. The S 2 O 2 has proven to be a good candidate for the application of high flow rates. The breakthrough curves obtained in fresh water have been modelled with the reactive transport codes HYTEC and OPTIPUR using the CHESS thermodynamic database. This approach will eventually help to support the design of a decontamination unit by the operator. (author) [fr

  18. A Model Predictive Control-Based Power Converter System for Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gimara Rajapakse

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the predictability and availability at large scale, wave energy conversion (WEC has still not become a mainstream renewable energy technology. One of the main reasons is the large variations in the extracted power which could lead to instabilities in the power grid. In addition, maintaining the speed of the turbine within optimal range under changing wave conditions is another control challenge, especially in oscillating water column (OWC type WEC systems. As a solution to the first issue, this paper proposes the direct connection of a battery bank into the dc-link of the back-to-back power converter system, thereby smoothening the power delivered to the grid. For the second issue, model predictive controllers (MPCs are developed for the rectifier and the inverter of the back-to-back converter system aiming to maintain the turbine speed within its optimum range. In addition, MPC controllers are designed to control the battery current as well, in both charging and discharging conditions. Operations of the proposed battery direct integration scheme and control solutions are verified through computer simulations. Simulation results show that the proposed integrated energy storage and control solutions are capable of delivering smooth power to the grid while maintaining the turbine speed within its optimum range under varying wave conditions.

  19. Transport of sulfadiazine in soil columns — Experiments and modelling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrhan, Anne; Kasteel, Roy; Simunek, Jirka; Groeneweg, Joost; Vereecken, Harry

    2007-01-01

    Antibiotics, such as sulfadiazine, reach agricultural soils directly through manure of grazing livestock or indirectly through the spreading of manure or sewage sludge on the field. Knowledge about the fate of antibiotics in soils is crucial for assessing the environmental risk of these compounds, including possible transport to the groundwater. Transport of 14C-labelled sulfadiazine was investigated in disturbed soil columns at a constant flow rate of 0.26 cm h - 1 near saturation. Sulfadiazine was applied in different concentrations for either a short or a long pulse duration. Breakthrough curves of sulfadiazine and the non-reactive tracer chloride were measured. At the end of the leaching period the soil concentration profiles were determined. The peak maxima of the breakthrough curves were delayed by a factor of 2 to 5 compared to chloride and the decreasing limbs are characterized by an extended tailing. However, the maximum relative concentrations differed as well as the eluted mass fractions, ranging from 18 to 83% after 500 h of leaching. To identify relevant sorption processes, breakthrough curves of sulfadiazine were fitted with a convective-dispersive transport model, considering different sorption concepts with one, two and three sorption sites. Breakthrough curves can be fitted best with a three-site sorption model, which includes two reversible kinetic and one irreversible sorption site. However, the simulated soil concentration profiles did not match the observations for all of the used models. Despite this incomplete process description, the obtained results have implications for the transport behavior of sulfadiazine in the field. Its leaching may be enhanced if it is frequently applied at higher concentrations.

  20. Bisimulation for Single-Agent Plausibility Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikkel Birkegaard; Bolander, Thomas; van Ditmarsch, H.

    2013-01-01

    define a proper notion of bisimulation, and prove that bisimulation corresponds to logical equivalence on image-finite models. We relate our results to other epistemic notions, such as safe belief and degrees of belief. Our results imply that there are only finitely many non-bisimilar single......-agent epistemic plausibility models on a finite set of propositions. This gives decidability for single-agent epistemic plausibility planning....

  1. Governing equations of multi-component rigid body-spring discrete element models of reinforced concrete columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, P B; Tingatinga, E A; Longalong, R E; Saguid, J

    2016-01-01

    During the past decades, the complexity of conventional methods to perform seismic performance assessment of buildings led to the development of more effective approaches. The rigid body spring-discrete element method (RBS-DEM) is one of these approaches and has recently been applied to the study of the behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) buildings subjected to strong earthquakes. In this paper, the governing equations of RBS-DEM planar elements subjected to lateral loads and horizontal ground motion are presented and used to replicate the hysteretic behavior of experimental RC columns. The RBS-DEM models of columns are made up of rigid components connected by systems of springs that simulate axial, shear, and bending behavior of an RC section. The parameters of springs were obtained using Response-2000 software and the hysteretic response of the models of select columns from the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research (PEER) Structural Performance Database were computed numerically. Numerical examples show that one-component models were able to simulate the initial stiffness reasonably, while the displacement capacity of actual columns undergoing large displacements were underestimated. (paper)

  2. Preoperative embolization of hypervascular thoracic, lumbar, and sacral spinal column tumors: technique and outcomes from a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Sreejit; Gobin, Y Pierre; Leng, Lewis Z; Marcus, Joshua D; Bilsky, Mark; Laufer, Ilya; Patsalides, Athos

    2013-09-01

    The existing literature on preoperative spine tumor embolization is limited in size of patient cohorts and diversity of tumor histologies. This report presents our experience with preoperative embolization of hypervascular thoracic, lumbar, and sacral spinal column tumors in the largest series to date. We conducted a retrospective review of 228 angiograms and 188 pre-operative embolizations for tumors involving thoracic, lumbar and sacral spinal column. Tumor vascularity was evaluated with conventional spinal angiography and was graded from 0 (same as normal adjacent vertebral body) to 3 (severe tumor blush with arteriovenous shunting). Embolic materials included poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) particles and detachable platinum coils and rarely, liquid embolics. The degree of embolization was graded as complete, near-complete, or partial. Anesthesia records were reviewed to document blood loss during surgery. Renal cell carcinoma (44.2%), thyroid carcinoma (9.2%), and leiomyosarcoma (6.6%) were the most common tumors out of a total of 40 tumor histologies. Hemangiopericytoma had the highest mean vascularity (2.6) of all tumor types with at least five representative cases followed by renal cell carcinoma (2.0) and thyroid carcinoma (2.0). PVA particles were used in 100% of cases. Detachable platinum coils were used in 51.6% of cases. Complete, near-complete, and partial embolizations were achieved in 86.1%, 12.7%, and 1.2% of all cases, respectively. There were no new post-procedure neurologic deficits or other complications with long-term morbidity. The mean intra-operative blood loss for the hypervascular tumors treated with pre-operative embolization was 1745 cc. Preoperative embolization of hypervascular thoracic, lumbar, and sacral spine tumors can be performed with high success rates and a high degree of safety at high volume centers.

  3. 3-Dimensional Flow Modeling of a Proposed Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Ion-Exchange Column Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ALEMAN, SEBASTIAN

    2002-01-01

    Historically, it has been assumed that the inlet and outlet low activity waste plenums would be designed such that a nearly uniform velocity profile would be maintained at every axial cross-section (i.e., providing nearly 100 percent use of the resin bed). With this proposed design, we see a LAW outlet distributor that results in significant non-axial velocity gradients in the bottom regions of the bed with the potential to reduce the effectiveness'' of the overall resin bed. The magnitude of this efficiency reduction depends upon how far up-gradient of the LAW outlet these non-axial velocities persist and to what extent a ''dead-zone'' is established beneath the LAW outlet. This can impact loading and elution performance of the ion-exchange facility. Currently, no experimental studies are planned. The primary objective of this work was, through modeling, to assess the fluid dynamic impact on ''effective'' resin volume of the full-scale column based on its normal operation using a recently proposed LAW outlet distributor. The analysis effort was limited to 3-D flow only analyses (i.e., no follow on transport analyses) with 3-D particle tracking to approximate the impact that a nonaxial velocity profile would have on bed ''effectiveness''. Additional analyses were performed to estimate under nominal operating conditions the thermal temperature rise across a loaded resin bed and within its particles. Hydrogen bubble formation is not considered in the heat transfer analysis or in the determination of minimum flowrate. All modeling objectives were met

  4. PROGRESS TOWARDS MODELING OF FISCHER TROPSCH SYNTHESIS IN A SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen; Tami Grimmett; Anastasia M. Gandrik; Steven P. Antal

    2010-11-01

    The Hybrid Energy Systems Testing (HYTEST) Laboratory is being established at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop and test hybrid energy systems with the principal objective to safeguard U.S. Energy Security by reducing dependence on foreign petroleum. A central component of the HYTEST is the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) in which the gas-to-liquid reactions will be performed to synthesize transportation fuels using the Fischer Tropsch (FT) process. SBCRs are cylindrical vessels in which gaseous reactants (for example, synthesis gas or syngas) is sparged into a slurry of liquid reaction products and finely dispersed catalyst particles. The catalyst particles are suspended in the slurry by the rising gas bubbles and serve to promote the chemical reaction that converts syngas to a spectrum of longer chain hydrocarbon products, which can be upgraded to gasoline, diesel or jet fuel. These SBCRs operate in the churn-turbulent flow regime which is characterized by complex hydrodynamics, coupled with reacting flow chemistry and heat transfer, that effect reactor performance. The purpose of this work is to develop a computational multiphase fluid dynamic (CMFD) model to aid in understanding the physico-chemical processes occurring in the SBCR. Our team is developing a robust methodology to couple reaction kinetics and mass transfer into a four-field model (consisting of the bulk liquid, small bubbles, large bubbles and solid catalyst particles) that includes twelve species: (1) CO reactant, (2) H2 reactant, (3) hydrocarbon product, and (4) H2O product in small bubbles, large bubbles, and the bulk fluid. Properties of the hydrocarbon product were specified by vapor liquid equilibrium calculations. The absorption and kinetic models, specifically changes in species concentrations, have been incorporated into the mass continuity equation. The reaction rate is determined based on the macrokinetic model for a cobalt catalyst developed by Yates and Satterfield [1]. The

  5. Combined Study of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Transport and Toxicity on Microbial Nitrifying Communities under Single and Repeated Exposures in Soil Columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonin, Marie; Martins, Jean M F; Uzu, Gaëlle; Vince, Erwann; Richaume, Agnès

    2016-10-04

    Soils are exposed to nanoparticles (NPs) as a result of their increasing use in many commercial products. Adverse effects of NPs on soil microorganisms have been reported in several ecotoxicological studies using microcosms. Although repeated exposures are more likely to occur in soils, most of these previous studies were performed as a single exposure to NPs. Contrary to single contamination, the study of multiple NP contaminations in soils requires the use of specialized setups. Using a soil column experiment, we compared the influence of single and repeated exposures (one, two, or three exposures that resulted in the same final concentration applied) on the transport of titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) NPs through soil and the effect of these different exposure scenarios on the abundance and activity of soil nitrifying microbial communities after a 2 month incubation. The transport of TiO 2 NPs was very limited under both single and repeated exposures and was highest for the lowest concentration injected during the first application. Significant decreases in nitrification activity and ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria populations were observed only for the repeated exposure scenario (three TiO 2 NP contaminations). These results suggest that, under repeated exposures, the transport of TiO 2 NPs to deep soil layers and groundwater is limited and that a chronic contamination is more harmful for the soil microbiological functioning than a single exposure.

  6. WINKLER'S SINGLE-PARAMETER SUBGRADE MODEL FROM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Page 1 ... corresponding single-parameter Winkler model presented in this work. Keywords: Heterogeneous subgrade, Reissner's simplified continuum, Shear interaction, Simplified continuum, Winkler ... model in practical applications and its long time familiarity among practical engineers, its usage has endured to this date ...

  7. JCE Feature Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-05-01

    The Features area of JCE Online is now readily accessible through a single click from our home page. In the Features area each column is linked to its own home page. These column home pages also have links to them from the online Journal Table of Contents pages or from any article published as part of that feature column. Using these links you can easily find abstracts of additional articles that are related by topic. Of course, JCE Online+ subscribers are then just one click away from the entire article. Finding related articles is easy because each feature column "site" contains links to the online abstracts of all the articles that have appeared in the column. In addition, you can find the mission statement for the column and the email link to the column editor that I mentioned above. At the discretion of its editor, a feature column site may contain additional resources. As an example, the Chemical Information Instructor column edited by Arleen Somerville will have a periodically updated bibliography of resources for teaching and using chemical information. Due to the increase in the number of these resources available on the WWW, it only makes sense to publish this information online so that you can get to these resources with a simple click of the mouse. We expect that there will soon be additional information and resources at several other feature column sites. Following in the footsteps of the Chemical Information Instructor, up-to-date bibliographies and links to related online resources can be made available. We hope to extend the online component of our feature columns with moderated online discussion forums. If you have a suggestion for an online resource you would like to see included, let the feature editor or JCE Online (jceonline@chem.wisc.edu) know about it. JCE Internet Features JCE Internet also has several feature columns: Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Equipment Buyers Guide, Hal's Picks, Mathcad

  8. Leaching models for multiple immersed materials and for granular materials flushed in a column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, H.J.H.

    1997-01-01

    The present paper addresses the leaching of hazardous contaminants from immersed and replenished materials and from granular materials flushed in a column. First, the leaching of an immersed material in contact with a limited volume of leachant is studied. The mass transfer from material to leachant

  9. Effect of gravity on colloid transport through water-saturated columns packed with glass beads: modeling and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V; Syngouna, Vasiliki I

    2014-06-17

    The role of gravitational force on colloid transport in water-saturated columns packed with glass beads was investigated. Transport experiments were performed with colloids (clays: kaolinite KGa-1b, montmorillonite STx-1b). The packed columns were placed in various orientations (horizontal, vertical, and diagonal) and a steady flow rate of Q = 1.5 mL/min was applied in both up-flow and down-flow modes. All experiments were conducted under electrostatically unfavorable conditions. The experimental data were fitted with a newly developed, analytical, one-dimensional, colloid transport model. The effect of gravity is incorporated in the mathematical model by combining the interstitial velocity (advection) with the settling velocity (gravity effect). The results revealed that flow direction influences colloid transport in porous media. The rate of particle deposition was shown to be greater for up-flow than for down-flow direction, suggesting that gravity was a significant driving force for colloid deposition.

  10. COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING OF THREE-PHASE SLURRY-BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaac K. Gamwo; Dimitri Gidaspow

    1999-09-01

    Considerable progress has been achieved in understanding three-phase reactors from the point of view of kinetic theory. In a paper in press for publication in Chemical Engineering Science (Wu and Gidaspow, 1999) we have obtained a complete numerical solution of bubble column reactors. In view of the complexity of the simulation a better understanding of the processes using simplified analytical solutions is required. Such analytical solutions are presented in the attached paper, Large Scale Oscillations or Gravity Waves in Risers and Bubbling Beds. This paper presents analytical solutions for bubbling frequencies and standing wave flow patterns. The flow patterns in operating slurry bubble column reactors are not optimum. They involve upflow in the center and downflow at the walls. It may be possible to control flow patterns by proper redistribution of heat exchangers in slurry bubble column reactors. We also believe that the catalyst size in operating slurry bubble column reactors is not optimum. To obtain an optimum size we are following up on the observation of George Cody of Exxon who reported a maximum granular temperature (random particle kinetic energy) for a particle size of 90 microns. The attached paper, Turbulence of Particles in a CFB and Slurry Bubble Columns Using Kinetic Theory, supports George Cody's observations. However, our explanation for the existence of the maximum in granular temperature differs from that proposed by George Cody. Further computer simulations and experiments involving measurements of granular temperature are needed to obtain a sound theoretical explanation for the possible existence of an optimum catalyst size.

  11. Numerical evaluation of Cs adsorption in PB column by extended Langmuir formula and one-dimensional adsorption model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroshi Ogawa; Akiko Kitajima; Hisashi Tanaka; Tohru Kawamoto

    2015-01-01

    Adsorption property of granulated Prussian blue adsorbent on radioactive cesium was evaluated for efficient decontamination in Fukushima area. The adsorbent was found to show an inflective adsorption isotherm, which was expressed by extended Langmuir formula with three adsorption sites. Adsorption speeds of each site were evaluated by time-dependent batch experiment. The simulation using derived parameters and one-dimensional adsorption model successfully reproduced the experimental data of cesium decontamination by small and large columns. (author)

  12. Modelling Pseudocalanus elongatus stage-structured population dynamics embedded in a water column ecosystem model for the northern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Andreas; Stegert, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines an approach to couple a structured zooplankton population model with state variables for eggs, nauplii, two copepodites stages and adults adapted to Pseudocalanus elongatus into the complex marine ecosystem model ECOHAM2 with 13 state variables resolving the carbon and nitrogen cycle. Different temperature and food scenarios derived from laboratory culture studies were examined to improve the process parameterisation for copepod stage dependent development processes. To study annual cycles under realistic weather and hydrographic conditions, the coupled ecosystem-zooplankton model is applied to a water column in the northern North Sea. The main ecosystem state variables were validated against observed monthly mean values. Then vertical profiles of selected state variables were compared to the physical forcing to study differences between zooplankton as one biomass state variable or partitioned into five population state variables. Simulated generation times are more affected by temperature than food conditions except during the spring phytoplankton bloom. Up to six generations within the annual cycle can be discerned in the simulation.

  13. Finite Element Modeling of GFRP-Reinforced Concrete Interior Slab-Column Connections Subjected to Moment Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Gouda

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A finite element model (FEM was constructed using specialized three-dimensional (3D software to investigate the punching shear behavior of interior slab-column connections subjected to a moment-to-shear ratio of 0.15 m. The FEM was then verified against the experimental results of full-scale interior slab-column connections reinforced with glass fiber reinforcement polymer (GFRP bars previously tested by the authors. The FEM results showed that the constructed model was able to predict the behavior of the slabs with reasonable accuracy. Afterward, the verified model was used to conduct a parametric study to investigate the effects of reinforcement ratio, perimeter-to-depth ratio, and column aspect ratio on the punching shear behavior of such connections. The test results showed that increasing the tested parameters enhanced the overall behavior of the connections in terms of decreasing deflections and reinforcement strain and increasing the ultimate capacity. In addition, the obtained punching shear stresses of the connections were compared to the predictions of the Canadian standard and the American guideline for FRP-reinforced concrete structures.

  14. Modelling by partial least squares the relationship between the HPLC mobile phases and analytes on phenyl column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markopoulou, Catherine K; Kouskoura, Maria G; Koundourellis, John E

    2011-06-01

    Twenty-five descriptors and 61 structurally different analytes have been used on a partial least squares (PLS) to latent structure technique in order to study chromatographically their interaction mechanism on a phenyl column. According to the model, 240 different retention times of the analytes, expressed as Y variable (log k), at different % MeOH mobile-phase concentrations have been correlated with their theoretical most important structural or molecular descriptors. The goodness-of-fit was estimated by the coefficient of multiple determinations r(2) (0.919), and the root mean square error of estimation (RMSEE=0.1283) values with a predictive ability (Q(2)) of 0.901. The model was further validated using cross-validation (CV), validated by 20 response permutations r(2) (0.0, 0.0146), Q(2) (0.0, -0.136) and validated by external prediction. The contribution of certain mechanism interactions between the analytes, the mobile phase and the column, proportional or counterbalancing is also studied. Trying to evaluate the influence on Y of every variable in a PLS model, VIP (variables importance in the projection) plot provides evidence that lipophilicity (expressed as Log D, Log P), polarizability, refractivity and the eluting power of the mobile phase are dominant in the retention mechanism on a phenyl column. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Assessing Model Characterization of Single Source ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aircraft measurements made downwind from specific coal fired power plants during the 2013 Southeast Nexus field campaign provide a unique opportunity to evaluate single source photochemical model predictions of both O3 and secondary PM2.5 species. The model did well at predicting downwind plume placement. The model shows similar patterns of an increasing fraction of PM2.5 sulfate ion to the sum of SO2 and PM2.5 sulfate ion by distance from the source compared with ambient based estimates. The model was less consistent in capturing downwind ambient based trends in conversion of NOX to NOY from these sources. Source sensitivity approaches capture near-source O3 titration by fresh NO emissions, in particular subgrid plume treatment. However, capturing this near-source chemical feature did not translate into better downwind peak estimates of single source O3 impacts. The model estimated O3 production from these sources but often was lower than ambient based source production. The downwind transect ambient measurements, in particular secondary PM2.5 and O3, have some level of contribution from other sources which makes direct comparison with model source contribution challenging. Model source attribution results suggest contribution to secondary pollutants from multiple sources even where primary pollutants indicate the presence of a single source. The National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) Computational Exposure Division (CED) develops and evaluates data, deci

  16. PULSE COLUMN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmett, E.S.

    1964-01-01

    This patent covers a continuous countercurrent liquidsolids contactor column having a number of contactor states each comprising a perforated plate, a layer of balls, and a downcomer tube; a liquid-pulsing piston; and a solids discharger formed of a conical section at the bottom of the column, and a tubular extension on the lowest downcomer terminating in the conical section. Between the conical section and the downcomer extension is formed a small annular opening, through which solids fall coming through the perforated plate of the lowest contactor stage. This annular opening is small enough that the pressure drop thereacross is greater than the pressure drop upward through the lowest contactor stage. (AEC)

  17. Graphical models for inferring single molecule dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez Ruben L

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent explosion of experimental techniques in single molecule biophysics has generated a variety of novel time series data requiring equally novel computational tools for analysis and inference. This article describes in general terms how graphical modeling may be used to learn from biophysical time series data using the variational Bayesian expectation maximization algorithm (VBEM. The discussion is illustrated by the example of single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET versus time data, where the smFRET time series is modeled as a hidden Markov model (HMM with Gaussian observables. A detailed description of smFRET is provided as well. Results The VBEM algorithm returns the model’s evidence and an approximating posterior parameter distribution given the data. The former provides a metric for model selection via maximum evidence (ME, and the latter a description of the model’s parameters learned from the data. ME/VBEM provide several advantages over the more commonly used approach of maximum likelihood (ML optimized by the expectation maximization (EM algorithm, the most important being a natural form of model selection and a well-posed (non-divergent optimization problem. Conclusions The results demonstrate the utility of graphical modeling for inference of dynamic processes in single molecule biophysics.

  18. Can the human lumbar posterior columns be stimulated by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation? A modeling study

    OpenAIRE

    Danner, Simon M.; Hofstoetter, Ursula S.; Ladenbauer, Josef; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Stimulation of different spinal cord segments in humans is a widely developed clinical practice for modification of pain, altered sensation and movement. The human lumbar cord has become a target for modification of motor control by epidural and more recently by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation. Posterior columns of the lumbar spinal cord represent a vertical system of axons and when activated can add other inputs to the motor control of the spinal cord than stimulated posterior roots. ...

  19. Seasonal & Daily Amazon Column CO2 & CO Observations from Ground & Space Used to Evaluate Tropical Ecosystem Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, M. K.; Parker, H. A.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wunch, D.; Jacobson, A. R.; Kawa, S. R.; Keppel-Aleks, G.; Basu, S.; O'Dell, C.; Frankenberg, C.; Michalak, A. M.; Baker, D. F.; Christofferson, B.; Restrepo-Coupe, N.; Saleska, S. R.; De Araujo, A. C.; Miller, J. B.

    2016-12-01

    The Amazon basin stores 150-200 PgC, exchanges 18 PgC with the atmosphere every year and has taken up 0.42-0.65 PgC/y over the past two decades. Despite its global significance, the response of the tropical carbon cycle to climate variability and change is ill constrained as evidenced by the large negative and positive feedbacks in future climate simulations. The complex interplay of radiation, water and ecosystem phenology remains unresolved in current tropical ecosystem models. We use high frequency regional scale TCCON observations of column CO2, CO and CH4 near Manaus, Brazil that began in October 2014 to understand the aforementioned interplay of processes in regulating biosphere-atmosphere exchange. We observe a robust daily column CO2 uptake of about 2 ppm (4 ppm to 0.5 ppm) over 8 hours and evaluate how it changes as we transition to the dry season. Back-trajectory calculations show that the daily CO2 uptake footprint is terrestrial and influenced by the heterogeneity of the Amazon rain forests. The column CO falls from above 120 ppb to below 80 ppb as we transition from the biomass burning to wet seasons. The daily mean column CO2 rises by 3 ppm from October through June. Removal of biomass burning, secular CO2 increase and variations from transport (by Carbon tracker simulations) implies an increase of 2.3 ppm results from tropical biospheric processes (respiration and photosynthesis). This is consistent with ground-based remote sensing and eddy flux observations that indicate that leaf development and demography drives the tropical carbon cycle in regions that are not water limited and is not considered in current models. We compare our observations with output from 7 CO2 inversion transport models with assimilated meteorology and find that while 5 models reproduce the CO2 seasonal cycle all of them under predict the daily drawdown of CO2 by a factor of 3. This indicates that the CO2 flux partitioning between photosynthesis and respiration is incorrect

  20. A simulation-optimization model for Stone column-supported embankment stability considering rainfall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deb, Kousik; Dhar, Anirban; Purohit, Sandip

    2016-01-01

    Landslide due to rainfall has been and continues to be one of the most important concerns of geotechnical engineering. The paper presents the variation of factor of safety of stone column-supported embankment constructed over soft soil due to change in water level for an incessant period of rainfall. A combined simulation-optimization based methodology has been proposed to predict the critical surface of failure of the embankment and to optimize the corresponding factor of safety under rainfall conditions using an evolutionary genetic algorithm NSGA-II (Non-Dominated Sorted Genetic Algorithm-II). It has been observed that the position of water table can be reliably estimated with varying periods of infiltration using developed numerical method. The parametric study is presented to study the optimum factor of safety of the embankment and its corresponding critical failure surface under the steady-state infiltration condition. Results show that in case of floating stone columns, period of infiltration has no effect on factor of safety. Even critical failure surfaces for a particular floating column length remain same irrespective of rainfall duration

  1. A simulation-optimization model for Stone column-supported embankment stability considering rainfall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deb, Kousik, E-mail: kousik@civil.iitkgp.ernet.in [Associate Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, IIT Kharagpur, Kharagpur-721302 (India); Dhar, Anirban, E-mail: anirban@civil.iitkgp.ernet.in [Assistant Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, IIT Kharagpur, Kharagpur-721302 (India); Purohit, Sandip, E-mail: sandip.purohit91@gmail.com [Former B.Tech Student, Department of Civil Engineering, NIT Rourkela, Rourkela (India)

    2016-02-01

    Landslide due to rainfall has been and continues to be one of the most important concerns of geotechnical engineering. The paper presents the variation of factor of safety of stone column-supported embankment constructed over soft soil due to change in water level for an incessant period of rainfall. A combined simulation-optimization based methodology has been proposed to predict the critical surface of failure of the embankment and to optimize the corresponding factor of safety under rainfall conditions using an evolutionary genetic algorithm NSGA-II (Non-Dominated Sorted Genetic Algorithm-II). It has been observed that the position of water table can be reliably estimated with varying periods of infiltration using developed numerical method. The parametric study is presented to study the optimum factor of safety of the embankment and its corresponding critical failure surface under the steady-state infiltration condition. Results show that in case of floating stone columns, period of infiltration has no effect on factor of safety. Even critical failure surfaces for a particular floating column length remain same irrespective of rainfall duration.

  2. Proposed Model of Predicting the Reduced Yield Axial Load of Reinforced Concrete Columns Due to Casting Deficiency Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achillopoulou Dimitra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study deals with the investigation of the effect of casting deficiencies- both experimentally and analytically on axial yield load or reinforced concrete columns. It includes 6 specimens of square section (150x150x500 mm of 24.37 MPa nominal concrete strength with 4 longitudinal steel bars of 8 mm (500 MPa nominal strength with confinement ratio ωc=0.15. Through casting procedure the necessary provisions defined by International Standards were not applied strictly in order to create construction deficiencies. These deficiencies are quantified geometrically without the use of expensive and expertise non-destructive methods and their effect on the axial load capacity of the concrete columns is calibrated trough a novel and simplified prediction model extracted by an experimental and analytical investigation that included 6 specimens. It is concluded that: a even with suitable repair, load reduction up to 22% is the outcome of the initial construction damage presence, b the lower dispersion is noted for the section damage index proposed, c extended damage alters the failure mode to brittle accompanied with longitudinal bars buckling, d the proposed model presents more than satisfying results to the load capacity prediction of repaired columns.

  3. Predictive geochemical modeling of uranium and other contaminants in laboratory columns in relatively oxidizing, carbonate-rich solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longmire, P.; Turney, W.R.; Mason, C.F.V.

    1994-01-01

    Carbonate heap leaching of uranium-contaminated soils and sediments represents a viable, cost-effective remediation technology. Column experiments have been conducted using 0.1, 0.25, and 0.5 M Na 2 CO 3 /NaHCO 3 solutions for leaching uranium from soils located adjacent to an incinerator at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site. Results from column experiments and geochemical modeling are used to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of heap leaching. Leach efficiencies of up to 72 wt.% of total uranium in CaO-agglomerated soil result from dissolution of uranium (U(VI)-dominated) minerals, formation of the soluble complex UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- , and uranium desorption from clay minerals, ferric hydroxides, and humic acids. Parameters that control the extent of uranium extraction include pH, Eh, temperature, carbonate concentration, lixiviant-flow rate, pore-solution chemistry, solid phases, and soil texture

  4. Top-down NOX Emissions of European Cities Derived from Modelled and Spaceborne Tropospheric NO2 Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, W. W.; Boersma, K. F.; Douros, J.; Williams, J. E.; Eskes, H.; Delcloo, A. W.

    2017-12-01

    High nitrogen oxides (NOX = NO + NO2) concentrations near the surface impact humans and ecosystems badly and play a key role in tropospheric chemistry. NO2 is an important precursor of tropospheric ozone (O3) which in turn affects the production of the hydroxyl radical controlling the chemical lifetime of key atmospheric pollutants and reactive greenhouse gases. Combustion from industrial, traffic and household activities in large and densely populated urban areas result in high NOX emissions. Accurate mapping of these emissions is essential but hard to do since reported emissions factors may differ from real-time emissions in order of magnitude. Modelled NO2 levels and lifetimes also have large associated uncertainties and overestimation in the chemical lifetime which may mask missing NOX chemistry in current chemistry transport models (CTM's). The simultaneously estimation of both the NO2 lifetime and as well as the concentrations by applying the Exponentially Modified Gaussian (EMG) method on tropospheric NO2 columns lines densities should improve the surface NOX emission estimates. Here we evaluate if the EMG methodology applied on the tropospheric NO2 columns simulated by the LOTOS-EUROS (Long Term Ozone Simulation-European Ozone Simulation) CTM can reproduce the NOX emissions used as model input. First we process both the modelled tropospheric NO2 columns for the period April-September 2013 for 21 selected European urban areas under windy conditions (averaged vertical wind speeds between surface and 500 m from ECMWF > 2 m s-1) as well as the accompanying OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) data providing us with real-time observation-based estimates of midday NO2 columns. Then we compare the top-down derived surface NOX emissions with the 2011 MACC-III emission inventory, used in the CTM as input to simulate the NO2 columns. For cities where NOX emissions can be assumed as originating from one large source good agreement is found between the top-down derived

  5. Modeliranje kretanja automobilskih jedinica realnim vojnim saobraćajnim tokom u koloni / Movement modeling of real military column traffic automobile units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radomir S. Gordić

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available U radu je prikazan model za ocenu efikasnosti i optimizaciju kretanja organizovanog vojnog saobraćajnog toka u koloni. Razrađeni i usavršeni model obezbeđuje brzu i jednostavnu realizaciju istraživanja motorizovanih kolona različitih karakteristika. Prikazani su model, metodologija i rezultati imitacionog modeliranja realnog organizovanog vojnog saobraćajnog toka automobilskih jedinica u koloni. Rad predstavlja originalan doprinos istraživanju realnog vojnog saobraćajnog toka u koloni. / Target of this research was appraisal efficiency and optimization developments of organized column traffic. Elaborated and perfected model provides quick and simple target research realization for the motorized columns with different characteristics. In this work, model, methodology and results of imitation modeling, for real organized column traffic, have been shown. Work represents an original contribution to effective military column traffic.

  6. THE BERTRAND MODEL OF THE SINGLE MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadasan Ioana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Starting with the signification of the rationality hypothesis when the agent’s contentment is directly affected by the other agents’ decisions, the theory of games defines solutions for solving different situations of conflict. The economic actors have different behaviours of the Single Market. Oligopoly strategic behaviours were analysed by the Bertrand model. The two types revealed in the work show that strategic interactions are sensitive to the companies’ features, products and markets. Regarding the situation when we have an oligopoly competition, the companies make interdependent decisions in the environment affected by risk and uncertainty of the Single Market. For this reason it is an opportunity to study the structure of oligopoly type of of the Single Market with the aid of non – cooperative games.

  7. QSPR models for predicting generator-column-derived octanol/water and octanol/air partition coefficients of polychlorinated biphenyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jintao; Yu, Shuling; Zhang, Ting; Yuan, Xuejie; Cao, Yunyuan; Yu, Xingchen; Yang, Xuan; Yao, Wu

    2016-06-01

    Octanol/water (K(OW)) and octanol/air (K(OA)) partition coefficients are two important physicochemical properties of organic substances. In current practice, K(OW) and K(OA) values of some polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are measured using generator column method. Quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models can serve as a valuable alternative method of replacing or reducing experimental steps in the determination of K(OW) and K(OA). In this paper, two different methods, i.e., multiple linear regression based on dragon descriptors and hologram quantitative structure-activity relationship, were used to predict generator-column-derived log K(OW) and log K(OA) values of PCBs. The predictive ability of the developed models was validated using a test set, and the performances of all generated models were compared with those of three previously reported models. All results indicated that the proposed models were robust and satisfactory and can thus be used as alternative models for the rapid assessment of the K(OW) and K(OA) of PCBs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Laboratory tools to quantify biogenic dissolution of rocks and minerals: a model rock biofilm growing in percolation columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz eSeiffert

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sub-aerial biofilms (SAB are ubiquitous, self-sufficient microbial ecosystems found on mineral surfaces at all altitudes and latitudes. SABs, which are the principal causes of weathering on exposed terrestrial surfaces, are characterised by patchy growth dominated by associations of algae, cyanobacteria, fungi and heterotrophic bacteria. A recently developed in vitro system to study colonisation of rocks exposed to air included two key SAB participants - the rock-inhabiting ascomycete Knufia petricola (CBS 123872 and the phototrophic cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC29133. Both partners are genetically tractable and we used them here to study weathering of granite, K-feldspar and plagioclase. Small fragments of the various rocks or minerals (1 to 6 mm were packed into flow-through columns and incubated with 0.1% glucose and 10 µM thiamine-hydrochloride (90 µL.min-1 to compare weathering with and without biofilms. Dissolution of the minerals was followed by: analysing (i the degradation products in the effluent from the columns via Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectroscopy and (ii by studying polished sections of the incubated mineral fragment/grains using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analyses. K. petricola/N. punctiforme stimulated release of Ca, Na, Mg and Mn. Analyses of the polished sections confirmed depletion of Ca, Na and K near the surface of the fragments. The abrupt decrease in Ca concentration observed in peripheral areas of plagioclase fragments favoured a dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism. Percolation columns in combination with a model biofilm can thus be used to study weathering in closed systems. Columns can easily be filled with different minerals and biofilms, the effluent as well as grains can be collected after long-term exposure under axenic conditions and easily analysed.

  9. Laboratory tools to quantify biogenic dissolution of rocks and minerals: a model rock biofilm growing in percolation columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffert, Franz; Bandow, Nicole; Kalbe, Ute; Milke, Ralf; Gorbushina, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Sub-aerial biofilms (SAB) are ubiquitous, self-sufficient microbial ecosystems found on mineral surfaces at all altitudes and latitudes. SABs, which are the principal causes of weathering on exposed terrestrial surfaces, are characterised by patchy growth dominated by associations of algae, cyanobacteria, fungi and heterotrophic bacteria. A recently developed in vitro system to study colonisation of rocks exposed to air included two key SAB participants - the rock-inhabiting ascomycete Knufia petricola (CBS 123872) and the phototrophic cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC29133. Both partners are genetically tractable and we used them here to study weathering of granite, K-feldspar and plagioclase. Small fragments of the various rocks or minerals (1 to 6 mm) were packed into flow-through columns and incubated with 0.1% glucose and 10 µM thiamine-hydrochloride (90 µL.min-1) to compare weathering with and without biofilms. Dissolution of the minerals was followed by: analysing (i) the degradation products in the effluent from the columns via Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectroscopy and (ii) by studying polished sections of the incubated mineral fragment/grains using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analyses. K. petricola/N. punctiforme stimulated release of Ca, Na, Mg and Mn. Analyses of the polished sections confirmed depletion of Ca, Na and K near the surface of the fragments. The abrupt decrease in Ca concentration observed in peripheral areas of plagioclase fragments favoured a dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism. Percolation columns in combination with a model biofilm can thus be used to study weathering in closed systems. Columns can easily be filled with different minerals and biofilms, the effluent as well as grains can be collected after long-term exposure under axenic conditions and easily analysed.

  10. Attenuation of pyrite oxidation with a fly ash pre-barrier: Reactive transport modelling of column experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Lopez, R.; Cama, J.; Nieto, J.M.; Ayora, C.; Saaltink, M.W. [University of Huelva, Huelva (Spain). Dept. of Geology

    2009-09-15

    Conventional permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for passive treatment of groundwater contaminated by acid mine drainage (AMD) use limestone as reactive material that neutralizes water acidity. However, the limestone-alkalinity potential ceases as inevitable precipitation of secondary metal-phases on grain surfaces occurs, limiting its efficiency. In the present study, fly ash derived from coal combustion is investigated as an alternative alkalinity generating material for the passive treatment of AMD using solution-saturated column experiments. Unlike conventional systems, the utilization of fly ash in a pre-barrier to intercept the non-polluted recharge water before this water reacts with pyrite-rich wastes is proposed. Chemical variation in the columns was interpreted with the reactive transport code RETRASO. In parallel, kinetics of fly ash dissolution at alkaline pH were studied using flow-through experiments and incorporated into the model. In a saturated column filled solely with pyritic sludge-quartz sand (1: 10), oxidation took place at acidic conditions (pH 3.7). According to SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} release and pH, pyrite dissolution occurred favourably in the solution-saturated porous medium until dissolved O{sub 2} was totally consumed. In a second saturated column, pyrite oxidation took place at alkaline conditions (pH 10.45) as acidity was neutralized by fly ash dissolution in a previous level. At this pH Fe release from pyrite dissolution was immediately depleted as Fe-oxy(hydroxide) phases that precipitated on the pyrite grains, forming Fe-coatings (microencapsulation). With time, pyrite microencapsulation inhibited oxidation in practically 97% of the pyritic sludge. Rapid pyrite-surface passivation decreased its reactivity, preventing AMD production in the relatively short term.

  11. Experimental and modelling buckling of wood-based columns under repeated loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafa Z.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Collapse of timber constructions can appear under the effect of load that exceeds the resistance of a carrying element or under the effect of a geometrical instability like buckling. In addition, loading can be constant or varying for example loads due to wind or earthquakes. The aim of this paper is to study the behaviour and the lifetime of columns in wood or based-wood material such as glulam (GL or laminated veneer lumber (LVL under repeated loading leading to buckling.

  12. A single quark effective potential model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmann, B.E.J.; Vasconcellos, C.A.Z.

    1994-01-01

    In the present work we construct a radial spherical symmetric single quark potential model for the nucleon, consistent with asymptotic freedom and confinement. The quark mass enters as potential parameter and that way induces indirectly an isospin dependence in the interaction. As a consequence, a contribution to the negative charge square radius of the neutron arises an an effect of the quark core, which simulates an isospin symmetry breaking effect in the nucleon due to strong interaction. (author)

  13. Development of a hysteresis model for R/C columns subjected to bi-axial lateral loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, Sekhar Chandra; Chowdhury, Rajib; Roy, Raghupati; Reddy, G. Rami

    2003-01-01

    Recent investigations on dynamic response of reinforced concrete (R/C) structures have confirmed that the R/C structural members undergo much more inelastic deformation in each of the two mutually perpendicular directions under bi-directional seismic loading, than that observed only under unidirectional ground motion. To predict the seismic response of R/C structure with fair accuracy demands, a faithful model that can incorporate the effect of biaxial bending interaction in column. This model should not have high computational demand but should adequately reflect the stiffness degrading and strength deterioration characteristics of R/C structural members. Present study is an effort to develop such a bi-directional hysteresis model accounting the effect of interaction between lateral loadings in two orthogonal directions. The development of the present model is based on the yield surface approach and it can incorporate both strength and stiffness degradation characteristics, which is unavoidable in R/C structures during cyclic loading. The performance of the proposed model/ is demonstrated through the prediction of available experimental results of a reinforced concrete column, subjected to biaxial loading. (author)

  14. Numerical simulation of the dynamic flow behaviour in a bubble column: comparison of the bubble-induced turbulence models in K-epsilon model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, D.; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the gas-liquid bubbly flow in a bubble column were conducted with the commercial CFD package CFX-4.4 to investigate the performance of three models (Pfleger and Becker, 2001; Sato and Sekoguchi, 1975; Troshko and Hassan, 2001) to account for the bubble-induced turbulence in

  15. Theoretical modelling and optimization of bubble column dehumidifier for a solar driven humidification-dehumidification system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjitha, P. Raj; Ratheesh, R.; Jayakumar, J. S.; Balakrishnan, Shankar

    2018-02-01

    Availability and utilization of energy and water are the top most global challenges being faced by the new millennium. At the present state water scarcity has become a global as well as a regional challenge. 40 % of world population faces water shortage. Challenge of water scarcity can be tackled only with increase in water supply beyond what is obtained from hydrological cycle. This can be achieved either by desalinating the sea water or by reusing the waste water. High energy requirement need to be overcome for either of the two processes. Of many desalination technologies, humidification dehumidification (HDH) technology powered by solar energy is widely accepted for small scale production. Detailed optimization studies on system have the potential to effectively utilize the solar energy for brackish water desalination. Dehumidification technology, specifically, require further study because the dehumidifier effectiveness control the energetic performance of the entire HDH system. The reason attributes to the high resistance involved to diffuse dilute vapor through air in a dehumidifier. The present work intends to optimize the design of a bubble column dehumidifier for a solar energy driven desalination process. Optimization is carried out using Matlab simulation. Design process will identify the unique needs of a bubble column dehumidifier in HDH system.

  16. Modeling of tropospheric NO2 column over different climatic zones and land use/land cover types in South Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ul-Haq, Zia; Rana, Asim Daud; Tariq, Salman; Mahmood, Khalid; Ali, Muhammad; Bashir, Iqra

    2018-03-01

    We have applied regression analyses for the modeling of tropospheric NO2 (tropo-NO2) as the function of anthropogenic nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and some important meteorological parameters such as temperature (Temp), precipitation (Preci), relative humidity (RH), wind speed (WS), cloud fraction (CLF) and outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) over different climatic zones and land use/land cover types in South Asia during October 2004-December 2015. Simple linear regression shows that, over South Asia, tropo-NO2 variability is significantly linked to AOD, WS, NOx, Preci and CLF. Also zone-5, consisting of tropical monsoon areas of eastern India and Myanmar, is the only study zone over which all the selected parameters show their influence on tropo-NO2 at statistical significance levels. In stepwise multiple linear modeling, tropo-NO2 column over landmass of South Asia, is significantly predicted by the combination of RH (standardized regression coefficient, β = - 49), AOD (β = 0.42) and NOx (β = 0.25). The leading predictors of tropo-NO2 columns over zones 1-5 are OLR, AOD, Temp, OLR, and RH respectively. Overall, as revealed by the higher correlation coefficients (r), the multiple regressions provide reasonable models for tropo-NO2 over South Asia (r = 0.82), zone-4 (r = 0.90) and zone-5 (r = 0.93). The lowest r (of 0.66) has been found for hot semi-arid region in northwestern Indus-Ganges Basin (zone-2). The highest value of β for urban area AOD (of 0.42) is observed for megacity Lahore, located in warm semi-arid zone-2 with large scale crop-residue burning, indicating strong influence of aerosols on the modeled tropo-NO2 column. A statistical significant correlation (r = 0.22) at the 0.05 level is found between tropo-NO2 and AOD over Lahore. Also NOx emissions appear as the highest contributor (β = 0.59) for modeled tropo-NO2 column over megacity Dhaka.

  17. Modeling Bimolecular Reactive Transport With Mixing-Limitation: Theory and Application to Column Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginn, T. R.

    2018-01-01

    The challenge of determining mixing extent of solutions undergoing advective-dispersive-diffusive transport is well known. In particular, reaction extent between displacing and displaced solutes depends on mixing at the pore scale, that is, generally smaller than continuum scale quantification that relies on dispersive fluxes. Here a novel mobile-mobile mass transfer approach is developed to distinguish diffusive mixing from dispersive spreading in one-dimensional transport involving small-scale velocity variations with some correlation, such as occurs in hydrodynamic dispersion, in which short-range ballistic transports give rise to dispersed but not mixed segregation zones, termed here ballisticules. When considering transport of a single solution, this approach distinguishes self-diffusive mixing from spreading, and in the case of displacement of one solution by another, each containing a participant reactant of an irreversible bimolecular reaction, this results in time-delayed diffusive mixing of reactants. The approach generates models for both kinetically controlled and equilibrium irreversible reaction cases, while honoring independently measured reaction rates and dispersivities. The mathematical solution for the equilibrium case is a simple analytical expression. The approach is applied to published experimental data on bimolecular reactions for homogeneous porous media under postasymptotic dispersive conditions with good results.

  18. Quantitative occupational risk model: Single hazard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papazoglou, I.A.; Aneziris, O.N.; Bellamy, L.J.; Ale, B.J.M.; Oh, J.

    2017-01-01

    A model for the quantification of occupational risk of a worker exposed to a single hazard is presented. The model connects the working conditions and worker behaviour to the probability of an accident resulting into one of three types of consequence: recoverable injury, permanent injury and death. Working conditions and safety barriers in place to reduce the likelihood of an accident are included. Logical connections are modelled through an influence diagram. Quantification of the model is based on two sources of information: a) number of accidents observed over a period of time and b) assessment of exposure data of activities and working conditions over the same period of time and the same working population. Effectiveness of risk reducing measures affecting the working conditions, worker behaviour and/or safety barriers can be quantified through the effect of these measures on occupational risk. - Highlights: • Quantification of occupational risk from a single hazard. • Influence diagram connects working conditions, worker behaviour and safety barriers. • Necessary data include the number of accidents and the total exposure of worker • Effectiveness of risk reducing measures is quantified through the impact on the risk • An example illustrates the methodology.

  19. Modeling of intensity-modulated continuous-wave laser absorption spectrometer systems for atmospheric CO(2) column measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing; Ismail, Syed; Wallace Harrison, F; Browell, Edward V; Nehrir, Amin R; Dobler, Jeremy; Moore, Berrien; Refaat, Tamer; Kooi, Susan A

    2013-10-10

    The focus of this study is to model and validate the performance of intensity-modulated continuous-wave (IM-CW) CO(2) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) systems and their CO(2) column measurements from airborne and satellite platforms. The model accounts for all fundamental physics of the instruments and their related CO(2) measurement environments, and the modeling results are presented statistically from simulation ensembles that include noise sources and uncertainties related to the LAS instruments and the measurement environments. The characteristics of simulated LAS systems are based on existing technologies and their implementation in existing systems. The modeled instruments are specifically assumed to be IM-CW LAS systems such as the Exelis' airborne multifunctional fiber laser lidar (MFLL) operating in the 1.57 μm CO(2) absorption band. Atmospheric effects due to variations in CO(2), solar radiation, and thin clouds, are also included in the model. Model results are shown to agree well with LAS atmospheric CO(2) measurement performance. For example, the relative bias errors of both MFLL simulated and measured CO(2) differential optical depths were found to agree to within a few tenths of a percent when compared to the in situ observations from the flight of 3 August 2011 over Railroad Valley (RRV), Nevada, during the summer 2011 flight campaign. In addition, the horizontal variations in the model CO(2) differential optical depths were also found to be consistent with those from MFLL measurements. In general, the modeled and measured signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the CO(2) column differential optical depths (τd) agreed to within about 30%. Model simulations of a spaceborne IM-CW LAS system in a 390 km dawn/dusk orbit for CO(2) column measurements showed that with a total of 42 W of transmitted power for one offline and two different sideline channels (placed at different locations on the side of the CO(2) absorption line), the accuracy of the

  20. Development of a numerical model for calculating exposure to toxic and nontoxic stressors in the water column and sediment from drilling discharges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rye, Henrik; Reed, Mark; Frost, Tone Karin; Smit, Mathijs G D; Durgut, Ismail; Johansen, Øistein; Ditlevsen, May Kristin

    2008-04-01

    Drilling discharges are complex mixtures of chemical components and particles which might lead to toxic and nontoxic stress in the environment. In order to be able to evaluate the potential environmental consequences of such discharges in the water column and in sediments, a numerical model was developed. The model includes water column stratification, ocean currents and turbulence, natural burial, bioturbation, and biodegradation of organic matter in the sediment. Accounting for these processes, the fate of the discharge is modeled for the water column, including near-field mixing and plume motion, far-field mixing, and transport. The fate of the discharge is also modeled for the sediment, including sea floor deposition, and mixing due to bioturbation. Formulas are provided for the calculation of suspended matter and chemical concentrations in the water column, and burial, change in grain size, oxygen depletion, and chemical concentrations in the sediment. The model is fully 3-dimensional and time dependent. It uses a Lagrangian approach for the water column based on moving particles that represent the properties of the release and an Eulerian approach for the sediment based on calculation of the properties of matter in a grid. The model will be used to calculate the environmental risk, both in the water column and in sediments, from drilling discharges. It can serve as a tool to define risk mitigating measures, and as such it provides guidance towards the "zero harm" goal.

  1. Geochemical modelling. Column 2: a computer program for simulation of migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, O.J.; Carlsen, L.; Bo, P.

    1985-01-01

    COLUMN2 is a 1D FORTRAN77 computer program designed for studies of the effects of various physicochemical processes on migration. It solves the solute transport equation and can take into account dispersion, sorption, ion exchange, first and second order homogeneous chemical reactions. Spatial variations of input pulses and retention factors are possible. The method of solution is based on a finite difference discretion followed by the application of the method of characteristics and two separate grid systems. This report explains the mathematical and numerical methods used, describes the necessary input, contains a number of test examples, provides a listing of the program and explains how to acquire the program, adapt it to other computers and run it. This report serves as a manual for the program

  2. Approximations to the electron energy distribution and positive column models for low-pressure discharge light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lister, G G; Sheverev, V A; Uhrlandt, D

    2002-01-01

    The applicability of 'fluid' models based on analytic approximations of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and of kinetic models for low-pressure discharge light sources is discussed. Traditionally, 'fluid' models of fluorescent lamps assume that the EEDF is Maxwellian up to the energy of the first excited state. It is shown that such an approach is sufficiently accurate in most cases of conventional as well as of 'highly loaded' fluorescent lamps. However, this assumption is strongly violated for many rare gas glow discharges for mercury free light sources. As an example, a neon dc discharge is studied. The densities of the four lowest excited states and the electric field have been measured. The experimental results can be fairly well reproduced by a kinetic positive column model. This article was scheduled to appear in issue 14 of J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. To access this special issue please follow this link: http://stacks.iop.org/0022-3727/35/i=14/

  3. Steady-state modeling of reactive distillation columns - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v34i1.9535

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilmar Steffen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm for the solution of the mathematical model featuring reactive distillation process in steady-state columns is analyzed. It has been presumed that each stage’s outlet streams in the model were in phase equilibrium conditions and that chemical kinetics was described by a reaction rate model. Within the context of the developed algorithm a procedure to solve a set of equations in a sequential form and a methodology to produce the initial estimates was defined. Broyden’s method was employed to solve the equations that model the chemical reactions. Algorithm was evaluated by study cases of 2-pentene metathesis and MTBE synthesis. The simulation results were close to results available in the literature and the proposed algorithm proved to be efficient since in both cases the convergence towards a solution was found.

  4. Online hyphenation of extraction, Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography, and high-speed countercurrent chromatography: A highly efficient strategy for the preparative separation of andrographolide from Andrographis paniculata in a single step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying-Qi; Wang, Shan-Shan; Han, Chao; Xu, Jin-Fang; Luo, Jian-Guang; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2017-12-01

    A novel isolation strategy, online hyphenation of ultrasonic extraction, Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography combined with high-speed countercurrent chromatography, was developed for pure compounds extraction and purification. Andrographolide from Andrographis paniculata was achieved only in a single step purification protocol via the present strategy. The crude powder was ultrasonic extracted and extraction was pumped into Sephadex LH-20 column directly to cut the nontarget fractions followed by the second-dimensional high-speed countercurrent chromatography, hyphenated by a six-port valve equipped at the post-end of Sephadex LH-20 column, for the final purification. The results yielded andrographolide with the amount of 1.02 mg and a purity of 98.5% in a single step, indicating that the present method is effective to harvest target compound from medicinal plant. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. A two-column formalism for time-dependent modelling of stellar convection. I. Description of the method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stökl, A.

    2008-11-01

    Context: In spite of all the advances in multi-dimensional hydrodynamics, investigations of stellar evolution and stellar pulsations still depend on one-dimensional computations. This paper devises an alternative to the mixing-length theory or turbulence models usually adopted in modelling convective transport in such studies. Aims: The present work attempts to develop a time-dependent description of convection, which reflects the essential physics of convection and that is only moderately dependent on numerical parameters and far less time consuming than existing multi-dimensional hydrodynamics computations. Methods: Assuming that the most extensive convective patterns generate the majority of convective transport, the convective velocity field is described using two parallel, radial columns to represent up- and downstream flows. Horizontal exchange, in the form of fluid flow and radiation, over their connecting interface couples the two columns and allows a simple circulating motion. The main parameters of this convective description have straightforward geometrical meanings, namely the diameter of the columns (corresponding to the size of the convective cells) and the ratio of the cross-section between up- and downdrafts. For this geometrical setup, the time-dependent solution of the equations of radiation hydrodynamics is computed from an implicit scheme that has the advantage of being unaffected by the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy time-step limit. This implementation is part of the TAPIR-Code (short for The adaptive, implicit RHD-Code). Results: To demonstrate the approach, results for convection zones in Cepheids are presented. The convective energy transport and convective velocities agree with expectations for Cepheids and the scheme reproduces both the kinetic energy flux and convective overshoot. A study of the parameter influence shows that the type of solution derived for these stars is in fact fairly robust with respect to the constitutive numerical

  6. Modelling transport in single electron transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinh Sy Hien; Huynh Lam Thu Thao; Le Hoang Minh

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a model of single electron transistor (SET). Simulation programme of SET is used as the exploratory tool in order to gain better understanding of process and device physics. This simulator includes a graphic user interface (GUI) in Matlab. The SET was simulated using GUI in Matlab to get current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. In addition, effects of device capacitance, bias, temperature on the I-V characteristics were obtained. In this work, we review the capabilities of the simulator of the SET. Typical simulations of the obtained I-V characteristics of the SET are presented.

  7. Velocity of a single gas plug rising through a particle-gas-liquid three-phase flow (In the case that particles updrift in a stagnant liquid column)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Yasuo; Shimada, Jun; Ohtake, Hiroyasu

    1999-01-01

    The velocity of a single air plug rising through a stagnant water column in a pipe with updrifting particles has been examined at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The particles used were polymer balls with a diameter of 3.18 mm and a density of 0.835 x 10 -3 kg/m 3 . The water velocity in a film around the plug and a wake region behind the plug was measured by a laser Doppler velocimeter. The thickness of the film was also measured with a dye-fluoresce-method by a laser ray. When the updrifting particles were introduced, the rising velocity of the plug became fast a little. However, the velocity was considerably slower than that in the falling particle case and independent on the particle introduction rate. The film around the plug was thicker a little than that in the no particle case, however considerably thinner than that in the falling particle case. The water velocity in the film around the plug was slower a little than that in the no particle case, and not dependent on the particle introduction rate contrary to that in the falling particle case. The vortex size behind the plug was almost the same as that in the no particle case although the vortex region was spread downward in the falling particle case. (author)

  8. Study of efficacy in a mercury-free flat discharge fluorescent lamp using a zero-dimensional positive column model

    CERN Document Server

    Shiga, T; Boeuf, J P; Mikoshiba, S

    2003-01-01

    A zero-dimensional model of the positive column in Ar/Ne/Xe gas mixtures has been developed to help understand the measured dependence of the efficacy on operating conditions in a mercury-free flat fluorescent lamp in a dielectric barrier geometry. The experimental conditions are such that the radiation from the discharge is homogeneous over most of the discharge voltage. The model uses as input the discharge current waveform from the experiments, and it yields the time variations of the mean electron energy and the species densities. From these quantities we calculate the number of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons emitted by the xenon resonance atoms and excimers during one current pulse and the efficiency for generation of VUV radiation in the positive column, which are compared with the measured luminance and efficacy for various voltages, pulse intervals, and lamp sizes. Over the range of conditions studied, we find that most electrical energy dissipated in xenon excitation is converted to VUV radiation; ...

  9. Two-Dimensional Model for Reactive-Sorption Columns of Cylindrical Geometry: Analytical Solutions and Moment Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Farman U; Qamar, Shamsul

    2017-05-01

    A set of analytical solutions are presented for a model describing the transport of a solute in a fixed-bed reactor of cylindrical geometry subjected to the first (Dirichlet) and third (Danckwerts) type inlet boundary conditions. Linear sorption kinetic process and first-order decay are considered. Cylindrical geometry allows the use of large columns to investigate dispersion, adsorption/desorption and reaction kinetic mechanisms. The finite Hankel and Laplace transform techniques are adopted to solve the model equations. For further analysis, statistical temporal moments are derived from the Laplace-transformed solutions. The developed analytical solutions are compared with the numerical solutions of high-resolution finite volume scheme. Different case studies are presented and discussed for a series of numerical values corresponding to a wide range of mass transfer and reaction kinetics. A good agreement was observed in the analytical and numerical concentration profiles and moments. The developed solutions are efficient tools for analyzing numerical algorithms, sensitivity analysis and simultaneous determination of the longitudinal and transverse dispersion coefficients from a laboratory-scale radial column experiment. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Power to Fuels: Dynamic Modeling of a Slurry Bubble Column Reactor in Lab-Scale for Fischer Tropsch Synthesis under Variable Load of Synthesis Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siavash Seyednejadian

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This research developed a comprehensive computer model for a lab-scale Slurry Bubble Column Reactor (SBCR (0.1 m Dt and 2.5 m height for Fischer–Tropsch (FT synthesis under flexible operation of synthesis gas load flow rates. The variable loads of synthesis gas are set at 3.5, 5, 7.5 m3/h based on laboratory adjustments at three different operating temperatures (483, 493 and 503 K. A set of Partial Differential Equations (PDEs in the form of mass transfer and chemical reaction are successfully coupled to predict the behavior of all the FT components in two phases (gas and liquid over the reactor bed. In the gas phase, a single-bubble-class-diameter (SBCD is adopted and the reduction of superficial gas velocity through the reactor length is incorporated into the model by the overall mass balance. Anderson Schulz Flory distribution is employed for reaction kinetics. The modeling results are in good agreement with experimental data. The results of dynamic modeling show that the steady state condition is attained within 10 min from start-up. Furthermore, they show that step-wise syngas flow rate does not have a detrimental influence on FT product selectivity and the dynamic modeling of the slurry reactor responds quite well to the load change conditions.

  11. Single toxin dose-response models revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demidenko, Eugene, E-mail: eugened@dartmouth.edu [Department of Biomedical Data Science, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH03756 (United States); Glaholt, SP, E-mail: sglaholt@indiana.edu [Indiana University, School of Public & Environmental Affairs, Bloomington, IN47405 (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH03755 (United States); Kyker-Snowman, E, E-mail: ek2002@wildcats.unh.edu [Department of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH03824 (United States); Shaw, JR, E-mail: joeshaw@indiana.edu [Indiana University, School of Public & Environmental Affairs, Bloomington, IN47405 (United States); Chen, CY, E-mail: Celia.Y.Chen@dartmouth.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH03755 (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to offer a rigorous analysis of the sigmoid shape single toxin dose-response relationship. The toxin efficacy function is introduced and four special points, including maximum toxin efficacy and inflection points, on the dose-response curve are defined. The special points define three phases of the toxin effect on mortality: (1) toxin concentrations smaller than the first inflection point or (2) larger then the second inflection point imply low mortality rate, and (3) concentrations between the first and the second inflection points imply high mortality rate. Probabilistic interpretation and mathematical analysis for each of the four models, Hill, logit, probit, and Weibull is provided. Two general model extensions are introduced: (1) the multi-target hit model that accounts for the existence of several vital receptors affected by the toxin, and (2) model with a nonzero mortality at zero concentration to account for natural mortality. Special attention is given to statistical estimation in the framework of the generalized linear model with the binomial dependent variable as the mortality count in each experiment, contrary to the widespread nonlinear regression treating the mortality rate as continuous variable. The models are illustrated using standard EPA Daphnia acute (48 h) toxicity tests with mortality as a function of NiCl or CuSO{sub 4} toxin. - Highlights: • The paper offers a rigorous study of a sigmoid dose-response relationship. • The concentration with highest mortality rate is rigorously defined. • A table with four special points for five morality curves is presented. • Two new sigmoid dose-response models have been introduced. • The generalized linear model is advocated for estimation of sigmoid dose-response relationship.

  12. Dissolved nutrients and atrazine removal by column-scale monophasic and biphasic rain garden model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hanbae; McCoy, Edward L; Grewal, Parwinder S; Dick, Warren A

    2010-08-01

    Rain gardens are bioretention systems that have the potential to reduce peak runoff flow and improve water quality in a natural and aesthetically pleasing manner. We compared hydraulic performance and removal efficiencies of nutrients and atrazine in a monophasic rain garden design versus a biphasic design at a column-scale using simulated runoff. The biphasic rain garden was designed to increase retention time and removal efficiency of runoff pollutants by creating a sequence of water saturated to unsaturated conditions. We also evaluated the effect of C substrate availability on pollutant removal efficiency in the biphasic rain garden. Five simulated runoff events with various concentrations of runoff pollutants (i.e. nitrate, phosphate, and atrazine) were applied to the monophasic and biphasic rain gardens once every 5d. Hydraulic performance was consistent over the five simulated runoff events. Peak flow was reduced by approximately 56% for the monophasic design and 80% for the biphasic design. Both rain garden systems showed excellent removal efficiency of phosphate (89-100%) and atrazine (84-100%). However, significantly (prain garden (29-39%). Addition of C substrate in the form of glucose increased removal efficiency of nitrate significantly (prain gardens. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Artificial neural network modelling of retention of pesticides in various octadecylsiloxane-bonded reversed-phase columns and water-acetonitrile mobile phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Archivio, Angelo Antonio; Maggi, Maria Anna; Mazzeo, Pietro; Ruggieri, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    Previously, retention of 26 pesticides in the reversed-phase column Gemini (Phenomenex) and water-acetonitrile mobile phase was modelled using a feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN) learned by error back-propagation, accounting for both the effect of solute structure and mobile phase composition. To this end, log K ow of solutes and four quantum chemical molecular descriptors (the dipole moment, the mean polarizability, the anisotropy of the polarizability and an hydrogen-bonding descriptor based on the atomic charges located on the acid and basic functional groups) and acetonitrile % (v/v) in the eluent (%ACN) were used as ANN inputs. The above ANN-based approach is here tested on further five similar octadecylsiloxane-bonded columns in water-acetonitrile mobile phase within the %ACN range 30-70%. A quite good predictive performance evaluated on three external solutes in the whole %ACN range is observed, prediction errors being lower than ±0.1 log k units or slightly higher although still within ±0.15 log k units. On the other hand, multilinear regression used in place of ANN provides a more diffuse and non-uniform residual distribution for all the investigated columns. ANN multiple-column retention prediction is attempted by adding to the above variables a column descriptor defined as the average retention of calibration solutes extrapolated to 100% water. This more general model is built using 16 solutes and five 5-μm columns in calibration, while its predictive performance is tested on the remaining 10 compounds. Under these conditions, prediction errors are generally within ±0.2 log k units regardless of the kind of column. The possibility of cross-column prediction is evaluated by column leave-one-out cross-validation within the five 5-μm stationary phases and on a 4-μm external column. This analysis reveals that accuracy of retention prediction for unknown solutes in unknown columns is acceptable provided that the external column is not very

  14. Artificial neural network modelling of retention of pesticides in various octadecylsiloxane-bonded reversed-phase columns and water-acetonitrile mobile phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Archivio, Angelo Antonio, E-mail: angeloantonio.darchivio@univaq.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Ingegneria Chimica e Materiali, Universita degli Studi di L' Aquila, Via Vetoio, 67010 Coppito, L' Aquila (Italy); Maggi, Maria Anna; Mazzeo, Pietro; Ruggieri, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Chimica, Ingegneria Chimica e Materiali, Universita degli Studi di L' Aquila, Via Vetoio, 67010 Coppito, L' Aquila (Italy)

    2009-07-30

    Previously, retention of 26 pesticides in the reversed-phase column Gemini (Phenomenex) and water-acetonitrile mobile phase was modelled using a feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN) learned by error back-propagation, accounting for both the effect of solute structure and mobile phase composition. To this end, log K{sub ow} of solutes and four quantum chemical molecular descriptors (the dipole moment, the mean polarizability, the anisotropy of the polarizability and an hydrogen-bonding descriptor based on the atomic charges located on the acid and basic functional groups) and acetonitrile % (v/v) in the eluent (%ACN) were used as ANN inputs. The above ANN-based approach is here tested on further five similar octadecylsiloxane-bonded columns in water-acetonitrile mobile phase within the %ACN range 30-70%. A quite good predictive performance evaluated on three external solutes in the whole %ACN range is observed, prediction errors being lower than {+-}0.1 log k units or slightly higher although still within {+-}0.15 log k units. On the other hand, multilinear regression used in place of ANN provides a more diffuse and non-uniform residual distribution for all the investigated columns. ANN multiple-column retention prediction is attempted by adding to the above variables a column descriptor defined as the average retention of calibration solutes extrapolated to 100% water. This more general model is built using 16 solutes and five 5-{mu}m columns in calibration, while its predictive performance is tested on the remaining 10 compounds. Under these conditions, prediction errors are generally within {+-}0.2 log k units regardless of the kind of column. The possibility of cross-column prediction is evaluated by column leave-one-out cross-validation within the five 5-{mu}m stationary phases and on a 4-{mu}m external column. This analysis reveals that accuracy of retention prediction for unknown solutes in unknown columns is acceptable provided that the external

  15. Biosorption of cobalt(II) with sunflower biomass from aqueous solutions in a fixed bed column and neural networks modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguz, Ensar; Ersoy, Muhammed

    2014-01-01

    The effects of inlet cobalt(II) concentration (20-60 ppm), feed flow rate (8-19 ml/min) and bed height (5-15 cm), initial solution pH (3-5) and particle size (0.25shells of sunflower biomass was found to be 1.82 m(2)/g. A relationship between the predicted results of the ANN model and experimental data was conducted. The ANN model yielded determination coefficient of (R(2) 0.972), standard deviation ratio (0.166), mean absolute error (0.0158) and root mean square error (0.0141). The results indicated that the shells of the sunflower biomass is a suitable biosorbent for the uptake of cobalt(II) in fixed bed columns. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Model representations of aerosol layers transported from North America over the Atlantic Ocean during the Two-Column Aerosol Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, Jerome D.; Berg, Larry K.; Zhang, Kai; Easter, Richard C.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Liu, Ying; Ortega, Ivan; Sedlacek, Art; Shilling, John E.; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Springston, Stephen R.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Volkamer, Rainer M.; Wilson, Jacqueline M.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Zelenyuk-Imre, Alla

    2016-08-22

    The ability of the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) version 3.7 and the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.3 (CAM5) in simulating profiles of aerosol properties is quantified using extensive in situ and remote sensing measurements from the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) conducted during July of 2012. TCAP was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program and was designed to obtain observations within two atmospheric columns; one fixed over Cape Cod, Massachusetts and the other several hundred kilometers over the ocean. The performance is quantified using most of the available aircraft and surface measurements during July, and two days are examined in more detail to identify the processes responsible for the observed aerosol layers. The higher resolution WRF-Chem model produced more aerosol mass in the free troposphere than the coarser resolution CAM5 model so that the fraction of aerosol optical thickness above the residual layer from WRF-Chem was more consistent with lidar measurements. We found that the free troposphere layers are likely due to mean vertical motions associated with synoptic-scale convergence that lifts aerosols from the boundary layer. The vertical displacement and the time period associated with upward transport in the troposphere depend on the strength of the synoptic system and whether relatively high boundary layer aerosol concentrations are present where convergence occurs. While a parameterization of subgrid scale convective clouds applied in WRF-Chem modulated the concentrations of aerosols aloft, it did not significantly change the overall altitude and depth of the layers.

  17. Monod kinetics rather than a first-order degradation model explains atrazine fate in soil mini-columns: Implications for pesticide fate modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheyns, K.; Mertens, J.; Diels, J.; Smolders, E.; Springael, D.

    2010-01-01

    Pesticide transport models commonly assume first-order pesticide degradation kinetics for describing reactive transport in soil. This assumption was assessed in mini-column studies with associated batch degradation tests. Soil mini-columns were irrigated with atrazine in two intermittent steps of about 30 days separated by 161 days application of artificial rain water. Atrazine concentration in the effluent peaked to that of the influent concentration after initial break-through but sharply decreased while influx was sustained, suggesting a degradation lag phase. The same pattern was displayed in the second step but peak height and percentage of atrazine recovered in the effluent were lower. A Monod model with biomass decay was successfully calibrated to this data. The model was successfully evaluated against batch degradation data and mini-column experiments at lower flow rate. The study suggested that first-order degradation models may underestimate risk of pesticide leaching if the pesticide degradation potential needs amplification during degradation. - Population dynamics of pesticide degrading population should be taken into account when predictions of pesticide fate are made to avoid underestimation of pesticide break-through towards groundwater.

  18. Structural Decoupling and Disturbance Rejection in a Distillation Column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahar, Mehrdad; Jantzen, Jan; Commault, C.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction, distillation column model, input-output decoupling, disturbance rejection, concluding remarks, references.......Introduction, distillation column model, input-output decoupling, disturbance rejection, concluding remarks, references....

  19. A stochastic view on column efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritti, Fabrice

    2018-03-09

    A stochastic model of transcolumn eddy dispersion along packed beds was derived. It was based on the calculation of the mean travel time of a single analyte molecule from one radial position to another. The exchange mechanism between two radial positions was governed by the transverse dispersion of the analyte across the column. The radial velocity distribution was obtained by flow simulations in a focused-ion-beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) based 3D reconstruction from a 2.1 mm × 50 mm column packed with 2 μm BEH-C 18 particles. Accordingly, the packed bed was divided into three coaxial and uniform zones: (1) a 1.4 particle diameter wide, ordered, and loose packing at the column wall (velocity u w ), (2) an intermediate 130 μm wide, random, and dense packing (velocity u i ), and (3) the bulk packing in the center of the column (velocity u c ). First, the validity of this proposed stochastic model was tested by adjusting the predicted to the observed reduced van Deemter plots of a 2.1 mm × 50 mm column packed with 2 μm BEH-C 18 fully porous particles (FPPs). An excellent agreement was found for u i  = 0.93u c , a result fully consistent with the FIB-SEM observation (u i  = 0.95u c ). Next, the model was used to measure u i  = 0.94u c for 2.1 mm × 100 mm column packed with 1.6 μm Cortecs-C 18 superficially porous particles (SPPs). The relative velocity bias across columns packed with SPPs is then barely smaller than that observed in columns packed with FPPs (+6% versus + 7%). u w =1.8u i is measured for a 75 μm × 1 m capillary column packed with 2 μm BEH-C 18 particles. Despite this large wall-to-center velocity bias (+80%), the presence of the thin and ordered wall packing layer has no negative impact on the kinetic performance of capillary columns. Finally, the stochastic model of long-range eddy dispersion explains why analytical (2.1-4.6 mm i.d.) and capillary (columns can all be

  20. Modeling and Control Perspectives of Two-Phase Fluid Systems - with Applications to Bubble Columns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djordjevic, S.

    2011-01-01

    The recent progress in the chemical industry is now forcing engineers and physicists to get to deal with control-oriented modeling of material properties on microscopic scale inside reactors in order to build more efficient chemical plants. The control-oriented modeling provides a new way of

  1. Predictive geochemical modeling of contaminant concentrations in laboratory columns and in plumes migrating from uranium mill tailings waste impoundments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S.R.; Martin, W.J.; Serne, R.J.

    1986-04-01

    A computer-based conceptual chemical model was applied to predict contaminant concentrations in plumes migrating from a uranium mill tailings waste impoundment. The solids chosen for inclusion in the conceptual model were selected based on reviews of the literature, on ion speciation/solubility calculations performed on the column effluent solutions and on mineralogical characterization of the contacted and uncontacted sediments. The mechanism of adsorption included in the conceptual chemical model was chosen based on results from semiselective extraction experiments and from mineralogical characterization procedures performed on the sediments. This conceptual chemical model was further developed and partially validated in laboratory experiments where assorted acidic uranium mill tailings solutions percolated through various sediments. This document contains the results of a partial field and laboratory validation (i.e., test of coherence) of this chemical model. Macro constituents (e.g., Ca, SO 4 , Al, Fe, and Mn) of the tailings solution were predicted closely by considering their concentrations to be controlled by the precipitation/dissolution of solid phases. Trace elements, however, were generally predicted to be undersaturated with respect to plausible solid phase controls. The concentration of several of the trace elements were closely predicted by considering their concentrations to be controlled by adsorption onto the amorphous iron oxyhydroxides that precipitated

  2. Design of pulsed perforated-plate columns for industrial scale mass transfer applications - present experience and the need for a model based approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Amitava

    2010-01-01

    Mass transfer is a vital unit operation in the processing of spent nuclear fuel in the backend of closed fuel cycle and Pulsed perforated plate extraction columns are used as mass transfer device for more than five decades. The pulsed perforated plate column is an agitated differential contactor, which has wide applicability due to its simplicity, high mass transfer efficiency, high through put, suitability for maintenance free remote operation, ease of cleaning/decontamination and cost effectiveness. Design of pulsed columns are based on a model proposed to describe the hydrodynamics and mass transfer. In equilibrium stage model, the HETS values are obtained from pilot plant experiments and then scaled empirically to design columns for industrial application. The dispersion model accounts for mass transfer kinetics and back-mixing. The drop population balance model can describe complex hydrodynamics of dispersed phase, that is, drop formation, break-up and drop-to-drop interactions. In recent years, significant progress has been made to model pulsed columns using CFD, which provides complete mathematical description of hydrodynamics in terms of spatial distribution of flow fields and 3D visualization. Under the condition of pulsation, the poly-dispersed nature of turbulent droplet swarm renders modeling difficult. In the absence of industry acceptance of proposed models, the conventional chemical engineering practice is to use HETS-NTS concept or HTU-NTU approach to design extraction columns. The practicability of HTU-NTU approach has some limitations due to the lack of experimental data on individual film mass transfer coefficients. Presently, the HETS-NTS concept has been used for designing the columns, which has given satisfactory performance. The design objective is mainly to arrive at the diameter and height of the mass transfer section for a specific plate geometry, fluid properties and pulsing condition to meet the intended throughput (capacity) and mass

  3. Mathematical modeling of the adsorption/desorption characteristics of anthocyanins from muscadine (Vitis rotundifolia cv. Noble) juice pomace on Amberlite FPX66 resin in a fixed bed column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzdevenes, Chad G; Gao, Chi; Sandhu, Amandeep K; Yagiz, Yavuz; Gu, Liwei

    2018-03-24

    Muscadine grape pomace, a by-product of juicing and wine-making, contains significant amounts of anthocyanin 3,5-diglucosides, known to be beneficial to human health. The objective of this research was to use mathematical modeling to investigate the adsorption/desorption characteristics of these anthocyanins from muscadine grape pomace on Amberlite FPX66 resin in a fixed bed column. Anthocyanins were extracted using hot water and ultrasound, and the extracts were loaded onto a resin column at five bed depths (5, 6, 8, 10 and 12 cm) using three flow rates (4, 6 and 8 mL min -1 ). It was found that adsorption on the column fitted the bed depth service time (BDST) model and the empty bed residence time (EBRT) model. Desorption was achieved by eluting the column using ethanol at four concentrations (25, 40, 55 and 70% v/v) and could be described with an empirical sigmoid model. The breakthrough curves of anthocyanins fitted the BDST model for all three flow rates with R 2 values of 0.983, 0.992 and 0.984 respectively. The EBRT model was successfully employed to find the operating lines, which allow for column scale-up while still achieving similar results to those found in a laboratory operation. Desorption with 40% (v/v) ethanol achieved the highest recovery rate of anthocyanins at 79.6%. The mathematical models established in this study can be used in designing a pilot/industrial- scale column for the separation and concentration of anthocyanins from muscadine juice pomace. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Development of Artificial Neural Network Model of Crude Oil Distillation Column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hussein Khalaf

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Artificial neural network in MATLAB simulator is used to model Baiji crude oil distillation unit based on data generated from aspen-HYSYS simulator. Thirteen inputs, six outputs and over 1487 data set are used to model the actual unit. Nonlinear autoregressive network with exogenous inputs (NARXand back propagation algorithm are used for training. Seventy percent of data are used for training the network while the remaining  thirty percent are used for testing  and validating the network to determine its prediction accuracy. One hidden layer and 34 hidden neurons are used for the proposed network with MSE of 0.25 is obtained. The number of neuron are selected based on less MSE for the network. The model founded to predict the optimal operating conditions for different objective functions within the training limit since ANN models are poor extrapolators. They are usually only reliable within the range of data that they had been trained for.

  5. Development of Artificial Neural Network Model of Crude Oil Distillation Column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duraid F. Ahmed

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Artificial neural network in MATLAB simulator is used to model Baiji crude oil distillation unit based on data generated from aspen-HYSYS simulator. Thirteen inputs, six outputs and over 1487 data set are used to model the actual unit. Nonlinear autoregressive network with exogenous inputs (NARX and back propagation algorithm are used for training. Seventy percent of data are used for training the network while the remaining thirty percent are used for testing and validating the network to determine its prediction accuracy. One hidden layer and 34 hidden neurons are used for the proposed network with MSE of 0.25 is obtained. The number of neuron are selected based on less MSE for the network. The model founded to predict the optimal operating conditions for different objective functions within the training limit since ANN models are poor extrapolators. They are usually only reliable within the range of data that they had been trained for.

  6. A Theory of How Columns in the Neocortex Enable Learning the Structure of the World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Hawkins

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Neocortical regions are organized into columns and layers. Connections between layers run mostly perpendicular to the surface suggesting a columnar functional organization. Some layers have long-range excitatory lateral connections suggesting interactions between columns. Similar patterns of connectivity exist in all regions but their exact role remain a mystery. In this paper, we propose a network model composed of columns and layers that performs robust object learning and recognition. Each column integrates its changing input over time to learn complete predictive models of observed objects. Excitatory lateral connections across columns allow the network to more rapidly infer objects based on the partial knowledge of adjacent columns. Because columns integrate input over time and space, the network learns models of complex objects that extend well beyond the receptive field of individual cells. Our network model introduces a new feature to cortical columns. We propose that a representation of location relative to the object being sensed is calculated within the sub-granular layers of each column. The location signal is provided as an input to the network, where it is combined with sensory data. Our model contains two layers and one or more columns. Simulations show that using Hebbian-like learning rules small single-column networks can learn to recognize hundreds of objects, with each object containing tens of features. Multi-column networks recognize objects with significantly fewer movements of the sensory receptors. Given the ubiquity of columnar and laminar connectivity patterns throughout the neocortex, we propose that columns and regions have more powerful recognition and modeling capabilities than previously assumed.

  7. Modelling and control of heat-integrated distillation columns: An industrial case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Johansen, Kristoffer; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    reboiler). Based on a numerical model of the system, two solutions are presented for improving its control: i) a fine tuning of the existing control strategy, therefore suitable for immediate implementation; and ii) a new control structure, including sensors and actuators for long term modification...

  8. Modelling biological Cr(VI) reduction in aquifer microcosm column systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molokwane, Pulane E; Chirwa, Evans M N

    2013-01-01

    Several chrome processing facilities in South Africa release hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) into groundwater resources. Pump-and-treat remediation processes have been implemented at some of the sites but have not been successful in reducing contamination levels. The current study is aimed at developing an environmentally friendly, cost-effective and self-sustained biological method to curb the spread of chromium at the contaminated sites. An indigenous Cr(VI)-reducing mixed culture of bacteria was demonstrated to reduce high levels of Cr(VI) in laboratory samples. The effect of Cr(VI) on the removal rate was evaluated at concentrations up to 400 mg/L. Following the detailed evaluation of fundamental processes for biological Cr(VI) reduction, a predictive model for Cr(VI) breakthrough through aquifer microcosm reactors was developed. The reaction rate in batch followed non-competitive rate kinetics with a Cr(VI) inhibition threshold concentration of approximately 99 mg/L. This study evaluates the application of the kinetic parameters determined in the batch reactors to the continuous flow process. The model developed from advection-reaction rate kinetics in a porous media fitted best the effluent Cr(VI) concentration. The model was also used to elucidate the logistic nature of biomass growth in the reactor systems.

  9. Joint model to simulate inelastic shear behavior of poorly detailed exterior and interior beam-column connections reinforced with deformed bars under seismic excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Akanshu; Reddy, G.R.; Vaze, K.K.; Ghosh, A.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Eligehausen, Rolf

    2009-12-01

    A model for predicting the nonlinear shear behaviour of reinforced concrete beam column joints based on principal stresses reaching limits is proposed. The joint model proposes shear springs for the column region and rotational spring for the beam region of the joint. This is based on the actual displacement behaviour of the shear buildings. The spring characteristics are calculated based on well-known principal of mechanics using the principal stresses as the failure criteria. The model reasonably accurately predicts the shear behaviour of the joint and also can consider the effect of axial loads on the column. The model does not need any special element or special program for implementation and can be used for nonlinear static pushover analysis of RC framed structures giving due consideration to joint deformations. The model is therefore extremely useful for practical displacement based analysis of old RC buildings where the joints were not designed and detailed as per current codal requirements, invariably making them the weakest link in the structure. The background theory, assumptions followed and the complete formulations for generating the joint characteristics are given in this report. The model is validated with experimental results of tests on exterior and interior beam-column connections given in the published literature having substandard detailing using deformed bars. (author)

  10. Measuring and modeling of a three-dimensional tracer transport in a planted soil column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, N.; Javaux, M.; Haber-Pohlmeier, S.; Pohlmeier, A. J.; Huber, K.; Vereecken, H.; Vanderborght, J.

    2013-12-01

    Water flow from soil to root is driven by the plant transpiration and an important component of the hydrological cycle. The model R-SWMS combines three-dimensional (3D) water flow and solute transport in soil with a detailed description of root structure in three dimensions [1,2]. This model offers the possibility to calculate root water and solute uptake and flow within the roots, which enables explicit studies with respect to the distribution of water and solutes around the roots as well as local processes at the root-soil interface. In this study, we compared measured data from a tracer experiment using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with simulations in order to assess the distribution and magnitude of the water uptake of a young lupine plant. An aqueous solution of the Gadolinium-complex (Gd-DTPA2-) was chosen as a tracer, as it behaves conservatively and is ideally suited for MRI. Water flow in the soil towards the roots can thus be visualized by following the change in tracer concentrations over time. The data were obtained by MRI, providing high resolution 3D images of the tracer distribution and root architecture structures by using a spin echo pulse sequence, which is strongly T1- weighted to be tracer sensitive [3], and T2 -weighted for root imaging [4]. This experimental setup was simulated using the 3D high-resolution numerical model R-SWMS. The comparison between MRI data and the simulations showed extensive effects of root architecture parameters on solute spreading. Although the results of our study showed the strength of combining non-invasive measurements and 3D modeling of solute and water flow in soil-root systems, where the derivation of plant hydraulic parameters such as axial and radial root conductivities is possible, current limitations were found with respect to MRI measurements and process description. [1] Javaux, M., T. Schröder, J. Vanderborght, and H. Vereecken (2008), Use of a Three-Dimensional Detailed Modeling Approach for

  11. Reduction of Mn-oxides by ferrous iron in a flow system: column experiment and reactive transport modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Appelo, C. A. J.

    2000-01-01

    Cl2 solution into the column, an ion distribution pattern was observed in the effluent that suggests the formation of separate reaction fronts for Mn(III)-oxide and Mn(IV)-oxide travelling at different velocities through the column. At the proximal reaction front, Fe21 reacts with MnO2 producing Fe......The reduction of Mn-oxide by Fe21 was studied in column experiments, using a column filled with natural Mn-oxide coated sand. Analysis of the Mn-oxide indicated the presence of both Mn(III) and Mn(IV) in the Mn-oxide. The initial exchange capacity of the column was determined by displacement...... of adsorbed Ca21 with Mg21. Subsequently a FeCl2 solution was injected into the column causing the reduction of the Mn-oxide and the precipitation of Fe(OH)3. Finally the exchange capacity of the column containing newly formed Fe(OH)3 was determined by injection of a KBr solution. During injection of the Fe...

  12. Evaluation of non destructive testing to characterize the resistance of the prefabricated system of columns and floor tiles for single family homes of a level: permeability meter, determination of wave velocity by ultrasound, Schmidt sclerometer and metal detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada Chacon, Dannell

    2014-01-01

    Non destructive testing are determined to be correlated with resistance to compression and flexion of elements belonging to prefabricated system of columns and floor tiles for single family homes of a level. The characteristics of the non destructive testing are described, such as: measurer of permeability, Schmidt sclerometer, determination of wave velocity by ultrasound and metal detector. The columns and floor tiles are elaborated with 2 mixtures of different resistances at 28 days. The first more than 30 MPa and the second less than 25 MPa are sampled together with the control cylinders necessary to obtain the actual resistance according to ASTM C39. Last resistance testings to compression and Schmidt sclerometer are realized to control cylinders to 1, 2, and 4 weeks after being cast. Non destructive testings (permeability meter Torrent, Schmidt sclerometer and determination of wave velocity by ultrasound) are performed in columns and floor tiles to 1, 2, and 4 weeks after being cast. Last resistance testings to flexion is obtained by means of destructive tests of the columns and floor tiles sampled. The correlation of the data obtained is determined to derive values of compression resistance from non destructive testing [es

  13. Inverse modeling of GOSAT-retrieved ratios of total column CH4 and CO2 for 2009 and 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pandey

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the constraint provided by greenhouse gas measurements from space on surface fluxes. Imperfect knowledge of the light path through the atmosphere, arising from scattering by clouds and aerosols, can create biases in column measurements retrieved from space. To minimize the impact of such biases, ratios of total column retrieved CH4 and CO2 (Xratio have been used. We apply the ratio inversion method described in Pandey et al. (2015 to retrievals from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT. The ratio inversion method uses the measured Xratio as a weak constraint on CO2 fluxes. In contrast, the more common approach of inverting proxy CH4 retrievals (Frankenberg et al., 2005 prescribes atmospheric CO2 fields and optimizes only CH4 fluxes. The TM5–4DVAR (Tracer Transport Model version 5–variational data assimilation system inverse modeling system is used to simultaneously optimize the fluxes of CH4 and CO2 for 2009 and 2010. The results are compared to proxy inversions using model-derived CO2 mixing ratios (XCO2model from CarbonTracker and the Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC Reanalysis CO2 product. The performance of the inverse models is evaluated using measurements from three aircraft measurement projects. Xratio and XCO2model are compared with TCCON retrievals to quantify the relative importance of errors in these components of the proxy XCH4 retrieval (XCH4proxy. We find that the retrieval errors in Xratio (mean  =  0.61 % are generally larger than the errors in XCO2model (mean  =  0.24 and 0.01 % for CarbonTracker and MACC, respectively. On the annual timescale, the CH4 fluxes from the different satellite inversions are generally in agreement with each other, suggesting that errors in XCO2model do not limit the overall accuracy of the CH4 flux estimates. On the seasonal timescale, however, larger differences are found due to uncertainties in XCO2model, particularly

  14. Modeling the Activity of Single Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjolsness, Eric; Gibson, Michael

    1999-01-01

    the key questions in gene regulation are: What genes are expressed in a certain cell at a certain time? How does gene expression differ from cell to cell in a multicellular organism? Which proteins act as transcription factors, i.e., are important in regulating gene expression? From questions like these, we hope to understand which genes are important for various macroscopic processes. Nearly all of the cells of a multicellular organism contain the same DNA. Yet this same genetic information yields a large number of different cell types. The fundamental difference between a neuron and a liver cell, for example, is which genes are expressed. Thus understanding gene regulation is an important step in understanding development. Furthermore, understanding the usual genes that are expressed in cells may give important clues about various diseases. Some diseases, such as sickle cell anemia and cystic fibrosis, are caused by defects in single, non-regulatory genes; others, such as certain cancers, are caused when the cellular control circuitry malfunctions - an understanding of these diseases will involve pathways of multiple interacting gene products. There are numerous challenges in the area of understanding and modeling gene regulation. First and foremost, biologists would like to develop a deeper understanding of the processes involved, including which genes and families of genes are important, how they interact, etc. From a computation point of view, there has been embarrassingly little work done. In this chapter there are many areas in which we can phrase meaningful, non-trivial computational questions, but questions that have not been addressed. Some of these are purely computational (what is a good algorithm for dealing with a model of type X) and others are more mathematical (given a system with certain characteristics, what sort of model can one use? How does one find biochemical parameters from system-level behavior using as few experiments as possible?). In

  15. A statistical model to predict total column ozone in Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, K. C.; Lim, H. S.; Mat Jafri, M. Z.

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to predict monthly columnar ozone in Peninsular Malaysia based on concentrations of several atmospheric gases. Data pertaining to five atmospheric gases (CO2, O3, CH4, NO2, and H2O vapor) were retrieved by satellite scanning imaging absorption spectrometry for atmospheric chartography from 2003 to 2008 and used to develop a model to predict columnar ozone in Peninsular Malaysia. Analyses of the northeast monsoon (NEM) and the southwest monsoon (SWM) seasons were conducted separately. Based on the Pearson correlation matrices, columnar ozone was negatively correlated with H2O vapor but positively correlated with CO2 and NO2 during both the NEM and SWM seasons from 2003 to 2008. This result was expected because NO2 is a precursor of ozone. Therefore, an increase in columnar ozone concentration is associated with an increase in NO2 but a decrease in H2O vapor. In the NEM season, columnar ozone was negatively correlated with H2O (-0.847), NO2 (0.754), and CO2 (0.477); columnar ozone was also negatively but weakly correlated with CH4 (-0.035). In the SWM season, columnar ozone was highly positively correlated with NO2 (0.855), CO2 (0.572), and CH4 (0.321) and also highly negatively correlated with H2O (-0.832). Both multiple regression and principal component analyses were used to predict the columnar ozone value in Peninsular Malaysia. We obtained the best-fitting regression equations for the columnar ozone data using four independent variables. Our results show approximately the same R value (≈ 0.83) for both the NEM and SWM seasons.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPUTATIONAL MULTIPHASE FLOW MODEL FOR FISCHER TROPSCH SYNTHESIS IN A SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen; Tami Grimmett; Anastasia M. Gribik; Steven P. Antal

    2011-12-01

    The Hybrid Energy Systems Testing (HYTEST) Laboratory at the Idaho National Laboratory was established to develop and test hybrid energy systems with the principal objective of reducing dependence on imported fossil fuels. A central component of the HYTEST is the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) in which the gas-to-liquid reactions are performed to synthesize transportation fuels using the Fischer Tropsch (FT) process. These SBCRs operate in the churn-turbulent flow regime, which is characterized by complex hydrodynamics, coupled with reacting flow chemistry and heat transfer. Our team is developing a research tool to aid in understanding the physicochemical processes occurring in the SBCR. A robust methodology to couple reaction kinetics and mass transfer into a four-field model (consisting of the bulk liquid, small bubbles, large bubbles and solid catalyst particles) consisting of thirteen species, which are CO reactant, H2 reactant, hydrocarbon product, and H2O product in small bubbles, large bubbles, and the bulk fluid plus catalyst is outlined. Mechanistic submodels for interfacial momentum transfer in the churn-turbulent flow regime are incorporated, along with bubble breakup/coalescence and two-phase turbulence submodels. The absorption and kinetic models, specifically changes in species concentrations, have been incorporated into the mass continuity equation. The reaction rate is based on the macrokinetic model for a cobalt catalyst developed by Yates and Satterfield. The model includes heat generation produced by the exothermic chemical reaction, as well as heat removal from a constant temperature heat exchanger. A property method approach is employed to incorporate vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) in a robust manner. Physical and thermodynamic properties as functions of changes in both pressure and temperature are obtained from VLE calculations performed external to the CMFD solver. The novelty of this approach is in its simplicity, as well as its

  17. MODELLING OF PROCESS OF COMPRESSION OF STEAMS OF A RECTIFIED ALCOHOL IN THE SCHEMA OF AN ALCOHOLIC COLUMN WITH A HEAT PUMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. G. Korotkova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of thermodynamic relations and equation of state of Redlich-Kwong, obtaining the approximation of the molar volume dependence on temperature and pressure, ideal gas heat capacity on temperature for the modeling of vapor compression rectified alcohol. Energy analysis scheme alcohol column with a heat pump and its comparison with the standard rectification plant.

  18. Development of a numerical model for calculating exposure to toxic and nontoxic stressors in the water column and sediment from drilling discharges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rye, H.; Reed, M.; Frost, T.K.; Smit, M.G.D.; Durgut, S.

    2008-01-01

    Drilling discharges are complex mixtures of chemical components and particles which might lead to toxic and nontoxic stress in the environment. In order to be able to evaluate the potential environmental consequences of such discharges in the water column and in sediments, a numerical model was

  19. Lead Biosorption by Self-Immobilized Rhizopus nigricans Pellets in a Laboratory Scale Packed Bed Column: Mathematical Model and Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Kogej

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The biosorption of lead ions from aqueous solution on a self-immobilized Rhizopus nigricans biomass has been studied. Experiments were performed in a laboratory scale packed bed column at different liquid flow rates and biosorbent bed heights. Recorded experimental breakthrough curves were compared to those predicted by a mathematical model, which was developed to simulate a packed bed biosorption process by a soft, self-immobilized fungal biosorbent. In the range of examined experimental conditions, the biomass characteristics such as pellet porosity and biosorption capacity substantially affected the predicted response curve. General correlations for the estimation of the intra-pellet effective diffusivity, the external mass transfer coefficient, as well as axial dispersion were successfully applied in this biological system with specific mechanical properties. Under the experimental conditions, mass transfer is controlled by the external film resistance, while the intra-pellet mass transfer resistance, as well as the effect of axial dispersion, can be neglected. A new parameter α, the fraction of active biomass, with an average value of α=0.7, was introduced to take into account the specific biomass characteristics, and consequently the observed non-ideal liquid flow through the bed of fungal pellets.

  20. Numerical modelling of thin-walled Z-columns made of general laminates subjected to uniform shortening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teter, Andrzej; Kolakowski, Zbigniew

    2018-01-01

    The numerical modelling of a plate structure was performed with the finite element method and a one-mode approach based on Koiter's method. The first order approximation of Koiter's method enables one to solve the eigenvalue problem. The second order approximation describes post-buckling equilibrium paths. In the finite element analysis, the Lanczos method was used to solve the linear problem of buckling. Simulations of the non-linear problem were performed with the Newton-Raphson method. Detailed calculations were carried out for a short Z-column made of general laminates. Configurations of laminated layers were non-symmetric. Due to possibilities of its application, the general laminate is very interesting. The length of the samples was chosen to obtain the lowest value of local buckling load. The amplitude of initial imperfections was 10% of the wall thickness. Thin-walled structures were simply supported on both ends. The numerical results were verified in experimental tests. A strain-gauge technique was applied. A static compression test was performed on a universal testing machine and a special grip, which consisted of two rigid steel plates and clamping sleeves, was used. Specimens were obtained with an autoclave technique. Tests were performed at a constant velocity of the cross-bar equal to 2 mm/min. The compressive load was less than 150% of the bifurcation load. Additionally, soft and thin pads were used to reduce inaccuracy of the sample ends.

  1. A nonlocal and periodic reaction-diffusion-advection model of a single phytoplankton species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Rui; Zhao, Xiao-Qiang

    2016-02-01

    In this article, we are concerned with a nonlocal reaction-diffusion-advection model which describes the evolution of a single phytoplankton species in a eutrophic vertical water column where the species relies solely on light for its metabolism. The new feature of our modeling equation lies in that the incident light intensity and the death rate are assumed to be time periodic with a common period. We first establish a threshold type result on the global dynamics of this model in terms of the basic reproduction number R0. Then we derive various characterizations of R0 with respect to the vertical turbulent diffusion rate, the sinking or buoyant rate and the water column depth, respectively, which in turn give rather precise conditions to determine whether the phytoplankton persist or become extinct. Our theoretical results not only extend the existing ones for the time-independent case, but also reveal new interesting effects of the modeling parameters and the time-periodic heterogeneous environment on persistence and extinction of the phytoplankton species, and thereby suggest important implications for phytoplankton growth control.

  2. Using In Situ Observations and Satellite Retrievals to Constrain Large-Eddy Simulations and Single-Column Simulations: Implications for Boundary-Layer Cloud Parameterization in the NASA GISS GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remillard, J.

    2015-12-01

    Two low-cloud periods from the CAP-MBL deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility at the Azores are selected through a cluster analysis of ISCCP cloud property matrices, so as to represent two low-cloud weather states that the GISS GCM severely underpredicts not only in that region but also globally. The two cases represent (1) shallow cumulus clouds occurring in a cold-air outbreak behind a cold front, and (2) stratocumulus clouds occurring when the region was dominated by a high-pressure system. Observations and MERRA reanalysis are used to derive specifications used for large-eddy simulations (LES) and single-column model (SCM) simulations. The LES captures the major differences in horizontal structure between the two low-cloud fields, but there are unconstrained uncertainties in cloud microphysics and challenges in reproducing W-band Doppler radar moments. The SCM run on the vertical grid used for CMIP-5 runs of the GCM does a poor job of representing the shallow cumulus case and is unable to maintain an overcast deck in the stratocumulus case, providing some clues regarding problems with low-cloud representation in the GCM. SCM sensitivity tests with a finer vertical grid in the boundary layer show substantial improvement in the representation of cloud amount for both cases. GCM simulations with CMIP-5 versus finer vertical gridding in the boundary layer are compared with observations. The adoption of a two-moment cloud microphysics scheme in the GCM is also tested in this framework. The methodology followed in this study, with the process-based examination of different time and space scales in both models and observations, represents a prototype for GCM cloud parameterization improvements.

  3. Numerical Evaluation on the Different Shapes of Gravelly Sand Columns to Increase the Loading Capacity of Soft Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghzili Sif Allah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Improvement on soft clay by the installation of stone column is one of the most popular methods followed worldwide. Different analytical and numerical solutions have already been developed for understanding the load transfer mechanism of soft soil reinforced with stone column. This study investigated a bearing capacity of the gravelly sand column, installed in soft clay bed at 15kpa of undrained shear strength. The column variable of length and diameter ratio at 7, 8 and 9 were evaluated. On top of that, the combination of two diameters in single column was tested and the uniform diameter was used as a control. In the numerical analysis, Mohrcoulomb model was adopted in the idealization of the behaviour of the gravelly sand column and soft clay materials. The results revealed that the optimum design that gave the highest loading capacity of the combination 11=12 of column diameter was the length and diameter ratio of 8.

  4. Cotransport of Herbaspirillum chlorophenolicum FA1 and heavy metals in saturated porous media: column studies and modeling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Xu, H.; Wu, J.

    2017-12-01

    For in situ biodegradation of organic contaminants in soil and groundwater, precise prediction and monitoring of the movement of the bio-agent is vital for the effectiveness of the subsurface bioremediation technologies. Therefore, the fate and transport of functional microorganisms in porous media has been extensively investigated in the literature, and the effects of a number of physical and chemical factors have been explored. During the bioremediation of contaminated sites, it is highly likely that functional bacteria and heavy metals would be simultaneously present for heavy metals often co-exist with organic contaminants like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in polluted environment. To date, relevant studies on the interactions between heavy metals and functional agents such as PAHs-degrading bacteria are lacking and thus require investigation. In this study, the cotransport of bioremediation agents and heavy metals were evaluated through batch and column experiments. Herbaspirillum chlorophenolicum FA1, a pure bacterial strain capable of absorbing heavy metals and degrading polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), was used as the model remediation agent, and metal ions of Pb(Ⅱ) and Cd(Ⅱ) were used as the representative heavy metals. Effects of metal species, the concentration of heavy metals, the sequence of entering the media, and the activity of biomass were investigated in detail. In addition, numerical simulations of breakthrough curves (BTC) data were also performed for information gathering. Results of this study could advance our understanding of interactions between functional bacteria and heavy metals during bioremediation process and help to develop successful bioremediation strategies.This work was financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China -Xinjiang Project (U1503282), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (41030746, 41102148), and the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province (BK20151385

  5. A single product perishing inventory model with demand interaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper describes a single perishing product inventory model in which ... continuous review inventory models have been studied recently by Yadavalli et al ...... stochastic inventory system with lost sales, Stochastic Analysis and Applications ...

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPUTATIONAL MULTIPHASE FLOW MODEL FOR FISCHER TROPSCH SYNTHESIS IN A SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen; Tami Grimmett; Anastasia M. Gribik; Steven P. Antal

    2010-09-01

    The Hybrid Energy Systems Testing (HYTEST) Laboratory is being established at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop and test hybrid energy systems with the principal objective to safeguard U.S. Energy Security by reducing dependence on foreign petroleum. A central component of the HYTEST is the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) in which the gas-to-liquid reactions will be performed to synthesize transportation fuels using the Fischer Tropsch (FT) process. SBCRs are cylindrical vessels in which gaseous reactants (for example, synthesis gas or syngas) is sparged into a slurry of liquid reaction products and finely dispersed catalyst particles. The catalyst particles are suspended in the slurry by the rising gas bubbles and serve to promote the chemical reaction that converts syngas to a spectrum of longer chain hydrocarbon products, which can be upgraded to gasoline, diesel or jet fuel. These SBCRs operate in the churn-turbulent flow regime which is characterized by complex hydrodynamics, coupled with reacting flow chemistry and heat transfer, that effect reactor performance. The purpose of this work is to develop a computational multiphase fluid dynamic (CMFD) model to aid in understanding the physico-chemical processes occurring in the SBCR. Our team is developing a robust methodology to couple reaction kinetics and mass transfer into a four-field model (consisting of the bulk liquid, small bubbles, large bubbles and solid catalyst particles) that includes twelve species: (1) CO reactant, (2) H2 reactant, (3) hydrocarbon product, and (4) H2O product in small bubbles, large bubbles, and the bulk fluid. Properties of the hydrocarbon product were specified by vapor liquid equilibrium calculations. The absorption and kinetic models, specifically changes in species concentrations, have been incorporated into the mass continuity equation. The reaction rate is determined based on the macrokinetic model for a cobalt catalyst developed by Yates and Satterfield [1]. The

  7. Single-cluster dynamics for the random-cluster model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, Y.; Qian, X.; Blöte, H.W.J.

    2009-01-01

    We formulate a single-cluster Monte Carlo algorithm for the simulation of the random-cluster model. This algorithm is a generalization of the Wolff single-cluster method for the q-state Potts model to noninteger values q>1. Its results for static quantities are in a satisfactory agreement with those

  8. Glyoxal Vertical Column Retrievals from the GOME-2/METOP-A European Spaceborne Sensor and Comparisons with the IMAGESv2 CT Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerot, C.; Stavrakou, T.; de Smedt, I.; Muller, J. J.; van Roozendael, M.

    2010-12-01

    Glyoxal is mostly formed in our atmosphere as an intermediate product in the oxidation of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOC). To a lesser extent, it is also directly emitted from biomass burning events and from fossil- and bio-fuel combustion processes. Several studies have estimated its atmospheric lifetime to 2-3 hours, which makes of glyoxal a good indicator for short-lived NMVOC emissions. Glyoxal is also known to be a precursor for secondary organic aerosols and could help to reduce the gap between observations and models for organic aerosol abundances. The three absorption bands of glyoxal in the visible region allow applying the DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) technique to retrieve its vertical column densities from the nadir backscattered light measurements performed by the GOME-2 satellite sensor. This instrument has been launched in October 2006 on board of the METOP-A platform and is characterized by a spatial resolution of 80 km x 40 km and by a large scan-width (1920 km) leading to a global coverage reached in 1.5 day. The GOME-2 glyoxal retrieval algorithm developed at BIRA-IASB accounts for the liquid water absorption and provides geophysically sound column measurements not only over lands but also over oceanic regions where spectral interferences between glyoxal and liquid water have been shown to be significant. The a-priori glyoxal vertical distribution required for the slant to vertical column conversion is provided by the global chemical transport model IMAGESv2. The highest glyoxal vertical column densities are mainly observed in continental tropical regions, while the mid-latitude columns strongly depend on the season with maximum values during warm months. An anthropogenic signature is also observed in highly populated regions of Asia. Comparisons with glyoxal columns simulated with IMAGESv2 in different regions of the world generally point to a missing glyoxal source in current models. As already reported from

  9. Bi-axial M-. Phi. analyses of RC columns using fiber model and comparison with experimental results. 2 jikumage wo ukeru hashirabuzai no M-. Phi. kankei eno fiber model no tekigosei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murayama, Y.; Tokuyama, S.; Furuichi, K. (Kajima Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-10-31

    In order to examine the accuracy of a fiber model for analyzing the stability of towers of a cable-stayed bridge subjected to biaxial bending force due to earthquake, experimental results of column test specimens were compared with analytical results. The relation between biaxial bending moment and curvature (M-{Phi}) was measured in biaxial bending model experiment using a reinforcement ratio, axial compressive force and loading pattern as parameters. Since the relation was greatly affected by axial modeling of a reinforcing material, the parameter analysis was conducted by paying particular attention to reinforcement models (bilinear model, cubic one and Ramberg-Osgood one). As a result, the Ramberg-Osgood model was suitable for columns with a large longitudinal reinforcement ratio and large axial tension such as seen in highrise buildings, while the cubic model was more suitable for columns with a small ratio such as seen in cable-stayed bridges. 4 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Single-layer model for surface roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniglia, C K; Jensen, D G

    2002-06-01

    Random roughness of an optical surface reduces its specular reflectance and transmittance by the scattering of light. The reduction in reflectance can be modeled by a homogeneous layer on the surface if the refractive index of the layer is intermediate to the indices of the media on either side of the surface. Such a layer predicts an increase in the transmittance of the surface and therefore does not provide a valid model for the effects of scatter on the transmittance. Adding a small amount of absorption to the layer provides a model that predicts a reduction in both reflectance and transmittance. The absorbing layer model agrees with the predictions of a scalar scattering theory for a layer with a thickness that is twice the rms roughness of the surface. The extinction coefficient k for the layer is proportional to the thickness of the layer.

  11. Application of response surface methodology and semi-mechanistic model to optimize fluoride removal using crushed concrete in a fixed-bed column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Bon-Wun; Lee, Chang-Gu; Park, Seong-Jik

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the removal of fluoride from aqueous solutions by using crushed concrete fines as a filter medium under varying conditions of pH 3-7, flow rate of 0.3-0.7 mL/min, and filter depth of 10-20 cm. The performance of fixed-bed columns was evaluated on the basis of the removal ratio (Re), uptake capacity (qe), degree of sorbent used (DoSU), and sorbent usage rate (SUR) obtained from breakthrough curves (BTCs). Three widely used semi-mechanistic models, that is, Bohart-Adams, Thomas, and Yoon-Nelson models, were applied to simulate the BTCs and to derive the design parameters. The Box-Behnken design of response surface methodology (RSM) was used to elucidate the individual and interactive effects of the three operational parameters on the column performance and to optimize these parameters. The results demonstrated that pH is the most important factor in the performance of fluoride removal by a fixed-bed column. The flow rate had a significant negative influence on Re and DoSU, and the effect of filter depth was observed only in the regression model for DoSU. Statistical analysis indicated that the model attained from the RSM study is suitable for describing the semi-mechanistic model parameters.

  12. Continuous Fixed-Bed Column Study and Adsorption Modeling: Removal of Lead Ion from Aqueous Solution by Charcoal Originated from Chemical Carbonization of Rubber Wood Sawdust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarup Biswas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of chemically carbonized rubber wood sawdust for the removal of lead ion from the aqueous stream was investigated by column process. Chemically carbonized rubber wood sawdust was prepared by treating the sawdust with H2SO4 and HNO3. Maximum removal of lead ion in column process was found as 38.56 mg/g. The effects of operating parameters such as flow rate, bed depth, concentration, and pH were studied in column mode. Experimental data confirmed that the adsorption capacity increased with the increasing inlet concentration and bed depth and decreased with increasing flow rate. Thomas, Yoon-Nelson, and Adams-Bohart models were used to analyze the column experimental data and the relationship between operating parameters. Chemically carbonized rubber wood sawdust was characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscope was also utilized for morphological analysis of the adsorbent. Furthermore X-ray fluorescence spectrum analysis and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were also used for the confirmation of lead adsorption process.

  13. Modelling of a plasma column sustained by a travelling circularly polarized electromagnetic wave (m=1 mode) in the presence of a constant axial magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benova, E.; Staikov, P.; Zhelyazkov, I.

    1992-01-01

    A set of equations modelling a low-pressure plasma column sustained by a travelling electromagnetic wave in the dipolar mode in the presence of a constant external magnetic field is presented. It is shown that, from a practical point of view, only the m = 1 mode (the right-hand-polarized wave) can sustain plasma columns in a wide region of gas-discharge conditions: plasma radius R, wave frequency ω, magnetic field B 0 and low pressures, irrespective of the nature of the gas. The main result of this study is that the magnetic field makes it possible to sustain a plasma column for values of σ smaller than σ cr = 0.3726, below which, in the absence of a magnetic field, the dipolar wave cannot produce a plasma. Moreover, at a fixed wave power, the magnetic field - in contrast with the case of plasma columns sustained by azimuthally symmetric waves - increases the plasma density and its axial gradient. The limit of an infinite external magnetic field (Ω → ∞) is also considered. A three-dimensional wave structure is obtained, and it indicates that the wave can be a generalized surface mode, a pure surface or a pseudosurface one. (author)

  14. Prediction of E. coli release from streambed to water column during base flow periods using SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial water quality in streams is of importance for recreation, irrigation, and other uses. The streambed sediment has been shown to harbor large fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) population that can be released to water column during high-flow events when sediments are resuspended. There have been...

  15. Numerical modeling of carbon dioxide chemisorption in sodium hydroxide solution in a micro-structured bubble column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jain, D.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Deen, N.G.

    2015-01-01

    Gas-liquid flows with solid catalyst particles are encountered in many applications in the chemical, petrochemical, and pharmaceutical industries. Most commonly, two reactor types, slurry bubble column (SBC) and trickle bed (TB) reactors are applied for large scale in the industry. Both of these

  16. MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF DYNAMICS IN BEARING SYSTEM OF DRILLING, MILLING AND BORING MACHINE WITH MONO-COLUMN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Vasilevich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available  FEM-analysis of dynamics in the bearing system of a heavy-duty machine tool has been carried out in the paper. This is a prospective variant for a large-size multi-purpose machine tool with a horizontal sliding ram. A saddle and a ram are moving vertically along a subtle mono-column. A rigid double-column is used in the existing analog machine tool. A static, modal and harmonic analysis of the bearing system with the mono-column has been made in the paper. It has been done with the help of FEM-simulation prior to fabrication of a prototype sample. Previously conducted calculations for the analog machine tool have shown good compatibility of FEM-calculation with experiments.Six common machine tool resonances have been revealed for the bearing system. Their oscillating cutting forces are actively exciting three-four resonance modes. Ranges of a flexure-torsion resonance (20–40 Hz and nose-diving resonances (70–90 Hz have been determined in the paper. The paper shows that the range of multi-wave resonances starts significantly higher from 140 Hz. These resonances are interconnected with bending oscillations of the ram and bucklings of the column walls which are matched with the oscillations. The paper demonstrates stability in resonance pattern. The torsional resonance of the column on the frequency of nearly 40 Hz is considered as the more dangerous one. Spindle rigidity goes down up to 3.8 Н/μm. It is possible to observe self-stabilization of the torsional resonance. Frequency of the torsional oscillations is practically unchangeable when there is a lifting or lowering down of the saddle and the ram. It is related to the migration of dynamical axis of torsion.Frequency-response characteristics of the bearing system have been constructed for various saddle positions on the column. Three frequency intervals that make it possible to carry out machining operation have been determined in the paper. The first interval is a static one. The

  17. Comparison of the Experimental and Numerical Results of Modelling a 32-Oscillating Water Column (OWC, V-Shaped Floating Wave Energy Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John V. Ringwood

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Combining offshore wind and wave energy converting apparatuses presents a number of potentially advantageous synergies. To facilitate the development of a proposed floating platform combining these two technologies, proof of concept scale model testing on the wave energy converting component of this platform has been conducted. The wave energy component is based on the well-established concept of the oscillating water column. A numerical model of this component has been developed in the frequency domain, and the work presented here concerns the results of this modelling and testing. The results of both are compared to assess the validity and usefulness of the numerical model.

  18. Elastic oscillations of water column in the 2003 Tokachi-oki tsunami source: in-situ measurements and 3-D numerical modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Nosov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available During the 2003 Tokachi-Oki tsunamigenic earthquake the real-time JAMSTEC observatory obtained records which provided a unique opportunity to have a look deep inside the tsunami source. Considering water column as a compressible medium we processed the bottom pressure records in order to estimate amplitude, duration and velocity of bottom displacement. Spectral analysis of the records revealed a clear manifestation of the low-frequency elastic oscillations of water column. We also presented 3-D finite-difference numerical model developed in the framework of linear potential theory of ideal compressible fluid to better understand dynamical processes in the tsunami source. The model reproduces position of the main spectral maximum rather correctly. However, due to neglecting of crust elasticity and to lack of exact knowledge of spatiotemporal laws of bottom motion, there is an essential difference between in-situ observed and computed spectra.

  19. Detailed modelling of hydrodynamics, mass transfer and chemical reactions in a bubble column using a discrete bubble model: Chemisorption of CO2 into NaOH solution, numerical and experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darmana, D.; Henket, R.L.B.; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes simulations that were performed with an Euler–Lagrange model that takes into account mass transfer and chemical reaction reported by Darmana et al. (2005. Detailed modelling of hydrodynamics, mass transfer and chemical reactions in a bubble column using a discrete bubble model.

  20. Factors affecting GEBV accuracy with single-step Bayesian models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Mrode, Raphael; Zhang, Shengli; Zhang, Qin; Li, Bugao; Liu, Jian-Feng

    2018-01-01

    A single-step approach to obtain genomic prediction was first proposed in 2009. Many studies have investigated the components of GEBV accuracy in genomic selection. However, it is still unclear how the population structure and the relationships between training and validation populations influence GEBV accuracy in terms of single-step analysis. Here, we explored the components of GEBV accuracy in single-step Bayesian analysis with a simulation study. Three scenarios with various numbers of QTL (5, 50, and 500) were simulated. Three models were implemented to analyze the simulated data: single-step genomic best linear unbiased prediction (GBLUP; SSGBLUP), single-step BayesA (SS-BayesA), and single-step BayesB (SS-BayesB). According to our results, GEBV accuracy was influenced by the relationships between the training and validation populations more significantly for ungenotyped animals than for genotyped animals. SS-BayesA/BayesB showed an obvious advantage over SSGBLUP with the scenarios of 5 and 50 QTL. SS-BayesB model obtained the lowest accuracy with the 500 QTL in the simulation. SS-BayesA model was the most efficient and robust considering all QTL scenarios. Generally, both the relationships between training and validation populations and LD between markers and QTL contributed to GEBV accuracy in the single-step analysis, and the advantages of single-step Bayesian models were more apparent when the trait is controlled by fewer QTL.

  1. A single grain approach applied to modelling recrystallization kinetics in a single-phase metal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, S.P.; Zwaag, van der S.

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive model for the recrystallization kinetics is proposed which incorporates both microstructure and the textural components in the deformed state. The model is based on the single-grain approach proposed previously. The influence of the as-deformed grain orientation, which affects the

  2. Tests of the single-pion exchange model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treiman, S.B.; Yang, C.N.

    1983-01-01

    The single-pion exchange model (SPEM) of high-energy particle reactions provides an attractively simple picture of seemingly complex processes and has accordingly been much discussed in recent times. The purpose of this note is to call attention to the possibility of subjecting the model to certain tests precisely in the domain where the model stands the best chance of making sense

  3. Modeling of calcination of single kaolinitic clay particle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebremariam, Abraham Teklay; Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse

    The present work aims at modeling of the calcination (dehydroxylation) process of clay particles, specifically kaolinite, and its thermal transformation. For such purpose, 1D single particle calcination model was developed based on the concept of shrinking core model to assess the dehydroxylation...

  4. Mixture of Regression Models with Single-Index

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Sijia; Yao, Weixin

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we propose a class of semiparametric mixture regression models with single-index. We argue that many recently proposed semiparametric/nonparametric mixture regression models can be considered special cases of the proposed model. However, unlike existing semiparametric mixture regression models, the new pro- posed model can easily incorporate multivariate predictors into the nonparametric components. Backfitting estimates and the corresponding algorithms have been proposed for...

  5. ( Anogeissus leiocarpus ) timber columns

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A procedure for designing axially loaded Ayin (Anogeissus leiocarpus) wood column or strut has been investigated. Instead of the usual categorization of columns into short, intermediate and slender according to the value of slenderness ratio, a continuous column formula representing the three categories was derived.

  6. Column Liquid Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majors, Ronald E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature covering developments of column liquid chromatography during 1982-83. Areas considered include: books and reviews; general theory; columns; instrumentation; detectors; automation and data handling; multidimensional chromatographic and column switching techniques; liquid-solid chromatography; normal bonded-phase, reversed-phase,…

  7. Comparison of performance of partial prestressed beam-column subassemblages made of reactive powder concrete and normal concrete materials using finite element models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurjannah, S. A.; Budiono, B.; Imran, I.; Sugiri, S.

    2016-04-01

    Research on concrete material continues in several countries and had produced a concrete type of Ultra High Performance Concrete (UHPC) which has a better compressive strength, tensile strength, flexural strength, modulus of elasticity, and durability than normal concrete (NC) namely Reactive Powder Concrete (RPC). Researches on structures using RPC material showed that the RPC structures had a better performance than the NC structures in resisting gravity and lateral cyclic loads. In this study, an experiment was conducted to apply combination of constant axial and lateral cyclic loads to a prototype of RPC interior partial prestressed beam-column subassemblage (prototype of BCS-RPC) with a value of Partial Prestressed Ratio (PPR) of 31.72% on the beam. The test results were compared with finite element model of beam-column subassemblage made of RPC by PPR of 31.72% (BCS-RPC-31.72). Furthermore, there was BCS-RPC modeling with PPR of 21.39% (BCS-RPC-21.39) and beam-column subassemblages made of NC materials modeling with a value of PPR at 21.09% (BCS-NC-21.09) and 32.02% (BCS-NC-32.02). The purpose of this study was to determine the performance of the BCS-RPC models compared to the performance of the BCS-NC models with PPR values below and above 25%, which is the maximum limit of permitted PPR. The results showed that all models of BCS-RPC had a better performance than all models of BCS-NC and the BCS-RPC model with PPR above 25% still behaved ductile and was able to dissipate energy well.

  8. Experiments and modeling of single plastic particle conversion in suspension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakhaei, Mohammadhadi; Wu, Hao; Grévain, Damien

    2018-01-01

    Conversion of single high density polyethylene (PE) particles has been studied by experiments and modeling. The experiments were carried out in a single particle combustor for five different shapes and masses of particles at temperature conditions of 900 and 1100°C. Each experiment was recorded...... against the experiments as well as literature data. Furthermore, a simplified isothermal model appropriate for CFD applications was developed, in order to model the combustion of plastic particles in cement calciners. By comparing predictions with the isothermal and the non–isothermal models under typical...

  9. Variance Function Partially Linear Single-Index Models1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Heng; Liang, Hua; Carroll, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    We consider heteroscedastic regression models where the mean function is a partially linear single index model and the variance function depends upon a generalized partially linear single index model. We do not insist that the variance function depend only upon the mean function, as happens in the classical generalized partially linear single index model. We develop efficient and practical estimation methods for the variance function and for the mean function. Asymptotic theory for the parametric and nonparametric parts of the model is developed. Simulations illustrate the results. An empirical example involving ozone levels is used to further illustrate the results, and is shown to be a case where the variance function does not depend upon the mean function.

  10. SPICE Modeling of Single-Grain Si TFTs using BSIMSOI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baiano, A.; Ishihara, R.; Saputra, N.; Long, J.; Karaki, N.; Inoue, S.; Metselaar, W.; Beenakker, C.I.M.

    2007-01-01

    Single Grain Thin-film transistors (SG-TFTs) fabricated inside a location-controlled grain by µ-Czochralski process have as high as SOI performance. To model them, BSIMSOI with a proper modification of the mobility is proposed. The model has been verified for n- and p-channel DC and low frequency AC

  11. Optimization and simulation of tandem column supercritical fluid chromatography separations using column back pressure as a unique parameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunlei; Tymiak, Adrienne A; Zhang, Yingru

    2014-04-15

    Tandem column supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) has demonstrated to be a useful technique to resolve complex mixtures by serially coupling two columns of different selectivity. The overall selectivity of a tandem column separation is the retention time weighted average of selectivity from each coupled column. Currently, the method development merely relies on extensive screenings and is often a hit-or-miss process. No attention is paid to independently adjust retention and selectivity contributions from individual columns. In this study, we show how tandem column SFC selectivity can be optimized by changing relative dimensions (length or inner diameter) of the coupled columns. Moreover, we apply column back pressure as a unique parameter for SFC optimization. Continuous tuning of tandem column SFC selectivity is illustrated through column back pressure adjustments of the upstream column, for the first time. In addition, we show how and why changing coupling order of the columns can produce dramatically different separations. Using the empirical mathematical equation derived in our previous study, we also demonstrate a simulation of tandem column separations based on a single retention time measurement on each column. The simulation compares well with experimental results and correctly predicts column order and back pressure effects on the separations. Finally, considerations on instrument and column hardware requirements are discussed.

  12. Comparing Mass Balance and Adjoint-Based 4D-VAR Methods for Inverse Modeling of Nitrogen Dioxide Columns for Nitrogen Oxide Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, M.; Martin, R.; Henze, D. K.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen oxide (NOx ≡ NO + NO2) emission inventories can be improved through top-down constraints provided by inverse modeling of observed nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns. Here we compare two methods of inverse modeling for emissions of NOx from synthetic NO2 columns generated from known emissions using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint. We treat the adjoint-based 4D-VAR approach for estimating top-down emissions as a benchmark against which to evaluate variations on the mass balance method. We find that the standard mass balance algorithm can be improved by using an iterative process and using finite difference to calculate the local sensitivity of a change in NO2 columns to a change in emissions, resulting in a factor of two reduction in inversion error. In a simplified case study to recover local emission perturbations, horizontal smearing effects due to NOx transport were better resolved by the adjoint-based approach than by mass balance. For more complex emission changes that reflect real world scenarios, the iterative finite difference mass balance and adjoint methods produce similar top-down inventories when inverting hourly synthetic observations, both reducing the a priori error by factors of 3-4. Inversions of data sets that simulate satellite observations from low Earth and geostationary orbits also indicate that both the mass balance and adjoint inversions produce similar results, reducing a priori error by a factor of 3. As the iterative finite difference mass balance method provides similar accuracy as the adjoint-based 4D-VAR method, it offers the ability to efficiently estimate top-down emissions using models that do not have an adjoint.

  13. Family of columns isospectral to gravity-loaded columns with tip force: A discrete approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Nirmal; Ganguli, Ranjan

    2018-06-01

    A discrete model is introduced to analyze transverse vibration of straight, clamped-free (CF) columns of variable cross-sectional geometry under the influence of gravity and a constant axial force at the tip. The discrete model is used to determine critical combinations of loading parameters - a gravity parameter and a tip force parameter - that cause onset of dynamic instability in the CF column. A methodology, based on matrix-factorization, is described to transform the discrete model into a family of models corresponding to weightless and unloaded clamped-free (WUCF) columns, each with a transverse vibration spectrum isospectral to the original model. Characteristics of models in this isospectral family are dependent on three transformation parameters. A procedure is discussed to convert the isospectral discrete model description into geometric description of realistic columns i.e. from the discrete model, we construct isospectral WUCF columns with rectangular cross-sections varying in width and depth. As part of numerical studies to demonstrate efficacy of techniques presented, frequency parameters of a uniform column and three types of tapered CF columns under different combinations of loading parameters are obtained from the discrete model. Critical combinations of these parameters for a typical tapered column are derived. These results match with published results. Example CF columns, under arbitrarily-chosen combinations of loading parameters are considered and for each combination, isospectral WUCF columns are constructed. Role of transformation parameters in determining characteristics of isospectral columns is discussed and optimum values are deduced. Natural frequencies of these WUCF columns computed using Finite Element Method (FEM) match well with those of the given gravity-loaded CF column with tip force, hence confirming isospectrality.

  14. Modeling retention and selectivity as a function of pH and column temperature in liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Leonardo G; Castells, Cecilia B; Ràfols, Clara; Rosés, Martí; Bosch, Elisabeth

    2006-08-15

    In reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), the retention of weak acids and bases is a sigmoidal function of the mobile-phase pH. Therefore, pH is a key chromatographic variable to optimize retention and selectivity. Furthermore, at an eluent pH close to the pKa of the solute, the dependence of ionization of the buffer and solute on temperature can be used to improve chromatographic separations involving ionizable solutes by an adequate handling of column temperature. In this paper, we derive a general equation for the prediction of the retentive behavior of ionizable compounds upon simultaneous changes in mobile-phase pH and column temperature. Four experiments, two limiting pH values and two temperatures, provide the input data that allow predictions in the whole range of these two variables, based on the thermodynamic fundamentals of the involved equilibria. Also, the study demonstrates the significant role that the choice of the buffer compound would have on selectivity factors in RPLC at temperatures higher than 25 degrees C.

  15. Neural fuzzy modelization of copper removal from water by biosorption in fixed-bed columns using olive stone and pinion shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero, M; Iáñez-Rodríguez, I; Pérez, A; Martín-Lara, M A; Blázquez, G

    2018-03-01

    Continuous copper biosorption in fixed-bed column by olive stone and pinion shell was studied. The effect of three operational parameters was analyzed: feed flow rate (2-6 ml/min), inlet copper concentration (40-100 mg/L) and bed-height (4.4-13.4 cm). Artificial Neural-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) was used in order to optimize the percentage of copper removal and the retention capacity in the column. The highest percentage of copper retained was achieved at 2 ml/min, 40 mg/L and 4.4 cm. However, the optimum biosorption capacity was obtained at 6 ml/min, 100 mg/L and 13.4 cm. Finally, breakthrough curves were simulated with mathematical traditional models and ANFIS model. The calculated results obtained with each model were compared with experimental data. The best results were given by ANFIS modelling that predicted copper biosorption with high accuracy. Breakthrough curves surfaces, which enable the visualization of the behavior of the system in different process conditions, were represented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Small Column Ion Exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huff, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) leverages a suite of technologies developed by DOE across the complex to achieve lifecycle savings. Technologies are applicable to multiple sites. Early testing supported multiple sites. Balance of SRS SCIX testing supports SRS deployment. A forma Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) was performed and selected Small Column Ion Exchange columns containing Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) in a 2-column lead/lag configuration. SEE considered use of Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF). Advantages of approach at SRS include: (1) no new buildings, (2) low volume of Cs waste in solid form compared to aqueous strip effluent; and availability of downstream processing facilities for immediate processing of spent resin.

  17. Numerical Simulations of Settlement of Jet Grouting Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juzwa Anna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the comparison of results of numerical analyses of interaction between group of jet grouting columns and subsoil. The analyses were conducted for single column and groups of three, seven and nine columns. The simulations are based on experimental research in real scale which were carried out by authors. The final goal for the research is an estimation of an influence of interaction between columns working in a group.

  18. The Neighboring Column Approximation (NCA) – A fast approach for the calculation of 3D thermal heating rates in cloud resolving models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinger, Carolin; Mayer, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Due to computational costs, radiation is usually neglected or solved in plane parallel 1D approximation in today's numerical weather forecast and cloud resolving models. We present a fast and accurate method to calculate 3D heating and cooling rates in the thermal spectral range that can be used in cloud resolving models. The parameterization considers net fluxes across horizontal box boundaries in addition to the top and bottom boundaries. Since the largest heating and cooling rates occur inside the cloud, close to the cloud edge, the method needs in first approximation only the information if a grid box is at the edge of a cloud or not. Therefore, in order to calculate the heating or cooling rates of a specific grid box, only the directly neighboring columns are used. Our so-called Neighboring Column Approximation (NCA) is an analytical consideration of cloud side effects which can be considered a convolution of a 1D radiative transfer result with a kernel or radius of 1 grid-box (5 pt stencil) and which does usually not break the parallelization of a cloud resolving model. The NCA can be easily applied to any cloud resolving model that includes a 1D radiation scheme. Due to the neglect of horizontal transport of radiation further away than one model column, the NCA works best for model resolutions of about 100 m or lager. In this paper we describe the method and show a set of applications of LES cloud field snap shots. Correction terms, gains and restrictions of the NCA are described. Comprehensive comparisons to the 3D Monte Carlo Model MYSTIC and a 1D solution are shown. In realistic cloud fields, the full 3D simulation with MYSTIC shows cooling rates up to −150 K/d (100 m resolution) while the 1D solution shows maximum coolings of only −100 K/d. The NCA is capable of reproducing the larger 3D cooling rates. The spatial distribution of the heating and cooling is improved considerably. Computational costs are only a factor of 1.5–2 higher compared to a 1D

  19. Nitrogen oxide absorption into water and dilute nitric acid in an engineering-scale sieve-plate column: description of a mathematical model and comparison with experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Counce, R M

    1978-09-01

    The study reported here is concerned with the absorption of gaseous NO/sub x/ compounds into water and dilute HNO/sub 3/ in a three-stage sieve-plate column with plates designed for high gas-liquid interfacial area. The performance of the column was measured while several operating parameters were varied. A mechanistic model was developed and presented to explain the observed phenomena. The results of the study indicate the importance of three mechanisms in the absorption of gaseous NO/sub x/ compounds: (a) the absorption of NO/sub 2/*, which results in the production of liquid HNO/sub 3/ and HNO/sub 2/; (b) the dissociation of the liquid HNO/sub 2/ into HNO/sub 3/ and gaseous NO; and (c) the gas-phase oxidation of NO to NO/sub 2/. A useful model was developed to explain the absorption of NO/sub x/ compounds based on the above mechanisms. This model is presented and discussed.

  20. Development of laboratory experiments serving as a basis for modeling the transport behaviour of arsenate, lead, cadmium and copper in water-saturated columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamer, K.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the study was to work out laboratory experiments which might serve as a link between the bench and the application of CoTAM (Column Transport and Absorption Model) in real practice, thus thanking the development of this computer model which is to permit the simulation of the transport behaviour of heavy metals in porous aquilers. Efforts were made to find a process-oriented concept so as to provide a wide field of application. In developing the model and the laboratory experiments, this meant studying all the processes in groundwater separately as far as possible and avoiding case-specific sum parameters. The work centered on an examination of sorption processes during transport in groundwater, as this combination of processes is always found in natural porous aquifers. In water-saturated-column experiments on combinations of arenaceous quartz, feldspar, montmorillonite, goethite, peat and manganese oxide as the aquifer material, the transport of cadmium, copper, lead and arsenate was simulated on the bench scale. These case examples served to study sorption processes and their diverse kinetics as well as hydrodynamic processes. (orig./BBR) [de

  1. On the Predictiveness of Single-Field Inflationary Models

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, C.P.; Trott, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We re-examine the predictiveness of single-field inflationary models and discuss how an unknown UV completion can complicate determining inflationary model parameters from observations, even from precision measurements. Besides the usual naturalness issues associated with having a shallow inflationary potential, we describe another issue for inflation, namely, unknown UV physics modifies the running of Standard Model (SM) parameters and thereby introduces uncertainty into the potential inflationary predictions. We illustrate this point using the minimal Higgs Inflationary scenario, which is arguably the most predictive single-field model on the market, because its predictions for $A_s$, $r$ and $n_s$ are made using only one new free parameter beyond those measured in particle physics experiments, and run up to the inflationary regime. We find that this issue can already have observable effects. At the same time, this UV-parameter dependence in the Renormalization Group allows Higgs Inflation to occur (in prin...

  2. Single-particle spectral density of the Hubbard model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehlig, B.; Eskes, H.; Hayn, R.; Meinders, M.B.J.

    1995-01-01

    We calculate the single-particle spectral function for the Hubbard model within the framework of a projection technique equivalent to the two-pole approximation. We show that the two-pole approximation can be well understood as an average characterization of the upper and the lower Hubbard bands,

  3. SINGLE-PARTICLE SPECTRAL DENSITY OF THE HUBBARD-MODEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEHLIG, B; ESKES, H; HAYN, R; MEINDERS, MBJ

    1995-01-01

    We calculate the single-particle spectral function for the Hubbard model within the framework of a projection technique equivalent to the two-pole approximation. We show that the two-pole approximation can be well understood as an average characterization of the upper and the lower Hubbard bands,

  4. Modeling single cell antibody excretion on a biosensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stojanovic, Ivan; Baumgartner, W.; van der Velden, T.J.G.; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; Schasfoort, Richardus B.M.

    2016-01-01

    We simulated, using Comsol Multiphysics, the excretion of antibodies by single hybridoma cells and their subsequent binding on a surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) sensor. The purpose was to confirm that SPRi is suitable to accurately quantify antibody (anti-EpCAM) excretion. The model showed

  5. Single-Index Additive Vector Autoregressive Time Series Models

    KAUST Repository

    LI, YEHUA; GENTON, MARC G.

    2009-01-01

    We study a new class of nonlinear autoregressive models for vector time series, where the current vector depends on single-indexes defined on the past lags and the effects of different lags have an additive form. A sufficient condition is provided

  6. Modeling single versus multiple systems in implicit and explicit memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starns, Jeffrey J; Ratcliff, Roger; McKoon, Gail

    2012-04-01

    It is currently controversial whether priming on implicit tasks and discrimination on explicit recognition tests are supported by a single memory system or by multiple, independent systems. In a Psychological Review article, Berry and colleagues used mathematical modeling to address this question and provide compelling evidence against the independent-systems approach. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Interpolation solution of the single-impurity Anderson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzemsky, A.L.

    1990-10-01

    The dynamical properties of the single-impurity Anderson model (SIAM) is studied using a novel Irreducible Green's Function method (IGF). The new solution for one-particle GF interpolating between the strong and weak correlation limits is obtained. The unified concept of relevant mean-field renormalizations is indispensable for strong correlation limit. (author). 21 refs

  8. Discrete dislocation plasticity modeling of short cracks in single crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deshpande, VS; Needleman, A; Van der Giessen, E

    2003-01-01

    The mode-I crack growth behavior of geometrically similar edge-cracked single crystal specimens of varying size subject to both monotonic and cyclic axial loading is analyzed using discrete dislocation dynamics. Plastic deformation is modeled through the motion of edge dislocations in an elastic

  9. Effective single scattering albedo estimation using regional climate model

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tesfaye, M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, by modifying the optical parameterization of Regional Climate model (RegCM), the authors have computed and compared the Effective Single-Scattering Albedo (ESSA) which is a representative of VIS spectral region. The arid, semi...

  10. Comparing single- and dual-process models of memory development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Brett K; Dunn, John C; Joubert, Amy; Taylor, Robert

    2017-11-01

    This experiment examined single-process and dual-process accounts of the development of visual recognition memory. The participants, 6-7-year-olds, 9-10-year-olds and adults, were presented with a list of pictures which they encoded under shallow or deep conditions. They then made recognition and confidence judgments about a list containing old and new items. We replicated the main trends reported by Ghetti and Angelini () in that recognition hit rates increased from 6 to 9 years of age, with larger age changes following deep than shallow encoding. Formal versions of the dual-process high threshold signal detection model and several single-process models (equal variance signal detection, unequal variance signal detection, mixture signal detection) were fit to the developmental data. The unequal variance and mixture signal detection models gave a better account of the data than either of the other models. A state-trace analysis found evidence for only one underlying memory process across the age range tested. These results suggest that single-process memory models based on memory strength are a viable alternative to dual-process models for explaining memory development. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Modeling and simulation of a pseudo-two-phase gas-liquid column reactor for thermal hydrocracking of petroleum heavy fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.M. Matos

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a model to predict the behavior of velocity, gas holdup and local concentration fields in a pseudo-two-phase gas-liquid column reactor applied for thermal hydrocracking of petroleum heavy fractions. The model is based on the momentum and mass balances for the system, using an Eulerian-Eulerian approach. Using the k-epsilon model,fluid dynamics accounts for both laminar and turbulent flows, with discrete small bubbles (hydrogen flowing in a continuous pseudohomogeneous liquid phase (oil and catalyst particles. The petroleum is assumed to be a mixture of pseudocomponents, grouped by similar chemical structural properties, and the thermal hydrocracking is taken into account using a kinetic network based on these pseudocomponents.

  12. Modeling Rabbit Responses to Single and Multiple Aerosol ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal Article Survival models are developed here to predict response and time-to-response for mortality in rabbits following exposures to single or multiple aerosol doses of Bacillus anthracis spores. Hazard function models were developed for a multiple dose dataset to predict the probability of death through specifying dose-response functions and the time between exposure and the time-to-death (TTD). Among the models developed, the best-fitting survival model (baseline model) has an exponential dose-response model with a Weibull TTD distribution. Alternative models assessed employ different underlying dose-response functions and use the assumption that, in a multiple dose scenario, earlier doses affect the hazard functions of each subsequent dose. In addition, published mechanistic models are analyzed and compared with models developed in this paper. None of the alternative models that were assessed provided a statistically significant improvement in fit over the baseline model. The general approach utilizes simple empirical data analysis to develop parsimonious models with limited reliance on mechanistic assumptions. The baseline model predicts TTDs consistent with reported results from three independent high-dose rabbit datasets. More accurate survival models depend upon future development of dose-response datasets specifically designed to assess potential multiple dose effects on response and time-to-response. The process used in this paper to dev

  13. Identification of TCE and PCE sorption and biodegradation parameters in a sandy aquifer for fate and transport modelling: batch and column studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kret, E; Kiecak, A; Malina, G; Nijenhuis, I; Postawa, A

    2015-07-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine the sorption and biodegradation parameters of trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE) as input data required for their fate and transport modelling in a Quaternary sandy aquifer. Sorption was determined based on batch and column experiments, while biodegradation was investigated using the compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA). The aquifer materials medium (soil 1) to fine (soil 2) sands and groundwater samples came from the representative profile of the contaminated site (south-east Poland). The sorption isotherms were approximately linear (TCE, soil 1, K d = 0.0016; PCE, soil 1, K d = 0.0051; PCE, soil 2, K d = 0.0069) except for one case in which the best fitting was for the Langmuir isotherm (TCE, soil 2, K f = 0.6493 and S max = 0.0145). The results indicate low retardation coefficients (R) of TCE and PCE; however, somewhat lower values were obtained in batch compared to column experiments. In the column experiments with the presence of both contaminants, TCE influenced sorption of PCE, so that the R values for both compounds were almost two times higher. Non-significant differences in isotope compositions of TCE and PCE measured in the observation points (δ(13)C values within the range of -23.6 ÷ -24.3‰ and -26.3 ÷-27.7‰, respectively) indicate that biodegradation apparently is not an important process contributing to the natural attenuation of these contaminants in the studied sandy aquifer.

  14. Mechanistic modelling of the drying behaviour of single pharmaceutical granules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thérèse F.C. Mortier, Séverine; Beer, Thomas De; Gernaey, Krist

    2012-01-01

    The trend to move towards continuous production processes in pharmaceutical applications enhances the necessity to develop mechanistic models to understand and control these processes. This work focuses on the drying behaviour of a single wet granule before tabletting, using a six...... phase (submodel 2), the water inside the granule evaporates. The second submodel contains an empirical power coefficient, b. A sensitivity analysis was performed to study the influence of parameters on the moisture content of single pharmaceutical granules, which clearly points towards the importance...

  15. An optical channel modeling of a single mode fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavi, Neda; Liu, Peng; Hall, Trevor James

    2018-05-01

    The evaluation of the optical channel model that accurately describes the single mode fibre as a coherent transmission medium is reviewed through analytical, numerical and experimental analysis. We used the numerical modelling of the optical transmission medium and experimental measurements to determine the polarization drift as a function of time for a fixed length of fibre. The probability distribution of the birefringence vector was derived, which is associated to the 'Poole' equation. The theory and experimental evidence that has been disclosed in the literature in the context of polarization mode dispersion - Stokes & Jones formulations and solutions for key statistics by integration of stochastic differential equations has been investigated. Besides in-depth definition of the single-mode fibre-optic channel, the modelling which concerns an ensemble of fibres each with a different instance of environmental perturbation has been analysed.

  16. On-line control of a liquid-liquid extraction column by the modal control method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnefoi, P.; Poujol, A.; Zwingelstein, G.; Dargier, C.; Rouyer, H.

    1977-02-01

    The application of modal analysis to the on-line control of a liquid-liquid extraction column is presented. This process is used in reprocessing for U purification. U in the aqueous acid phase is extracted by a solvent flowing at counter-current. The process is described by 4 nonlinear equations and gives the U and acid concentrations in the two phases. An approximative model is established adapted to the control of the column. Some results of a numerical simulation are given when a single mode is controled. They show that a single sensor allows a good control [fr

  17. Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George E. Dzyacky

    2010-11-23

    The Flooding Predictor™ is a patented advanced control technology proven in research at the Separations Research Program, University of Texas at Austin, to increase distillation column throughput by over 6%, while also increasing energy efficiency by 10%. The research was conducted under a U. S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement awarded to George Dzyacky of 2ndpoint, LLC. The Flooding Predictor™ works by detecting the incipient flood point and controlling the column closer to its actual hydraulic limit than historical practices have allowed. Further, the technology uses existing column instrumentation, meaning no additional refining infrastructure is required. Refiners often push distillation columns to maximize throughput, improve separation, or simply to achieve day-to-day optimization. Attempting to achieve such operating objectives is a tricky undertaking that can result in flooding. Operators and advanced control strategies alike rely on the conventional use of delta-pressure instrumentation to approximate the column’s approach to flood. But column delta-pressure is more an inference of the column’s approach to flood than it is an actual measurement of it. As a consequence, delta pressure limits are established conservatively in order to operate in a regime where the column is never expected to flood. As a result, there is much “left on the table” when operating in such a regime, i.e. the capacity difference between controlling the column to an upper delta-pressure limit and controlling it to the actual hydraulic limit. The Flooding Predictor™, an innovative pattern recognition technology, controls columns at their actual hydraulic limit, which research shows leads to a throughput increase of over 6%. Controlling closer to the hydraulic limit also permits operation in a sweet spot of increased energy-efficiency. In this region of increased column loading, the Flooding Predictor is able to exploit the benefits of higher liquid

  18. Nuclear reactor control column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachovchin, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest crosssectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor

  19. Electron-helium S-wave model benchmark calculations. I. Single ionization and single excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Philip L.; Stelbovics, Andris T.

    2010-02-01

    A full four-body implementation of the propagating exterior complex scaling (PECS) method [J. Phys. B 37, L69 (2004)] is developed and applied to the electron-impact of helium in an S-wave model. Time-independent solutions to the Schrödinger equation are found numerically in coordinate space over a wide range of energies and used to evaluate total and differential cross sections for a complete set of three- and four-body processes with benchmark precision. With this model we demonstrate the suitability of the PECS method for the complete solution of the full electron-helium system. Here we detail the theoretical and computational development of the four-body PECS method and present results for three-body channels: single excitation and single ionization. Four-body cross sections are presented in the sequel to this article [Phys. Rev. A 81, 022716 (2010)]. The calculations reveal structure in the total and energy-differential single-ionization cross sections for excited-state targets that is due to interference from autoionization channels and is evident over a wide range of incident electron energies.

  20. Improvements in solvent extraction columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aughwane, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    Solvent extraction columns are used in the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel. For an effective reprocessing operation a solvent extraction column is required which is capable of distributing the feed over most of the column. The patent describes improvements in solvent extractions columns which allows the feed to be distributed over an increased length of column than was previously possible. (U.K.)

  1. Computational Modeling of Photonic Crystal Microcavity Single-Photon Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulnier, Nicole A.

    Conventional cryptography is based on algorithms that are mathematically complex and difficult to solve, such as factoring large numbers. The advent of a quantum computer would render these schemes useless. As scientists work to develop a quantum computer, cryptographers are developing new schemes for unconditionally secure cryptography. Quantum key distribution has emerged as one of the potential replacements of classical cryptography. It relics on the fact that measurement of a quantum bit changes the state of the bit and undetected eavesdropping is impossible. Single polarized photons can be used as the quantum bits, such that a quantum system would in some ways mirror the classical communication scheme. The quantum key distribution system would include components that create, transmit and detect single polarized photons. The focus of this work is on the development of an efficient single-photon source. This source is comprised of a single quantum dot inside of a photonic crystal microcavity. To better understand the physics behind the device, a computational model is developed. The model uses Finite-Difference Time-Domain methods to analyze the electromagnetic field distribution in photonic crystal microcavities. It uses an 8-band k · p perturbation theory to compute the energy band structure of the epitaxially grown quantum dots. We discuss a method that combines the results of these two calculations for determining the spontaneous emission lifetime of a quantum dot in bulk material or in a microcavity. The computational models developed in this thesis are used to identify and characterize microcavities for potential use in a single-photon source. The computational tools developed are also used to investigate novel photonic crystal microcavities that incorporate 1D distributed Bragg reflectors for vertical confinement. It is found that the spontaneous emission enhancement in the quasi-3D cavities can be significantly greater than in traditional suspended slab

  2. Single-Index Additive Vector Autoregressive Time Series Models

    KAUST Repository

    LI, YEHUA

    2009-09-01

    We study a new class of nonlinear autoregressive models for vector time series, where the current vector depends on single-indexes defined on the past lags and the effects of different lags have an additive form. A sufficient condition is provided for stationarity of such models. We also study estimation of the proposed model using P-splines, hypothesis testing, asymptotics, selection of the order of the autoregression and of the smoothing parameters and nonlinear forecasting. We perform simulation experiments to evaluate our model in various settings. We illustrate our methodology on a climate data set and show that our model provides more accurate yearly forecasts of the El Niño phenomenon, the unusual warming of water in the Pacific Ocean. © 2009 Board of the Foundation of the Scandinavian Journal of Statistics.

  3. Modelling a single phase voltage controlled rectifier using Laplace transforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, L. Alan; Kankam, M. David

    1992-01-01

    The development of a 20 kHz, AC power system by NASA for large space projects has spurred a need to develop models for the equipment which will be used on these single phase systems. To date, models for the AC source (i.e., inverters) have been developed. It is the intent of this paper to develop a method to model the single phase voltage controlled rectifiers which will be attached to the AC power grid as an interface for connected loads. A modified version of EPRI's HARMFLO program is used as the shell for these models. The results obtained from the model developed in this paper are quite adequate for the analysis of problems such as voltage resonance. The unique technique presented in this paper uses the Laplace transforms to determine the harmonic content of the load current of the rectifier rather than a curve fitting technique. Laplace transforms yield the coefficient of the differential equations which model the line current to the rectifier directly.

  4. Buckling of liquid columns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habibi, M.; Rahmani, Y.; Bonn, D.; Ribe, N.M.

    2010-01-01

    Under appropriate conditions, a column of viscous liquid falling onto a rigid surface undergoes a buckling instability. Here we show experimentally and theoretically that liquid buckling exhibits a hitherto unsuspected complexity involving three different modes—viscous, gravitational, and

  5. Unified Model of Dynamic Forced Barrier Crossing in Single Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friddle, R W

    2007-06-21

    Thermally activated barrier crossing in the presence of an increasing load can reveal kinetic rate constants and energy barrier parameters when repeated over a range of loading rates. Here we derive a model of the mean escape force for all relevant loading rates--the complete force spectrum. Two well-known approximations emerge as limiting cases; one of which confirms predictions that single-barrier spectra should converge to a phenomenological description in the slow loading limit.

  6. A macroscopic model for magnetic shape-memory single crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bessoud, A. L.; Kružík, Martin; Stefanelli, U.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 2 (2013), s. 343-359 ISSN 0044-2275 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100750802; GA ČR GAP201/10/0357 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : magnetostriction * evolution Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.214, year: 2013 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/MTR/kruzik-a macroscopic model for magnetic shape- memory single crystals.pdf

  7. Stochastic models for spike trains of single neurons

    CERN Document Server

    Sampath, G

    1977-01-01

    1 Some basic neurophysiology 4 The neuron 1. 1 4 1. 1. 1 The axon 7 1. 1. 2 The synapse 9 12 1. 1. 3 The soma 1. 1. 4 The dendrites 13 13 1. 2 Types of neurons 2 Signals in the nervous system 14 2. 1 Action potentials as point events - point processes in the nervous system 15 18 2. 2 Spontaneous activi~ in neurons 3 Stochastic modelling of single neuron spike trains 19 3. 1 Characteristics of a neuron spike train 19 3. 2 The mathematical neuron 23 4 Superposition models 26 4. 1 superposition of renewal processes 26 4. 2 Superposition of stationary point processe- limiting behaviour 34 4. 2. 1 Palm functions 35 4. 2. 2 Asymptotic behaviour of n stationary point processes superposed 36 4. 3 Superposition models of neuron spike trains 37 4. 3. 1 Model 4. 1 39 4. 3. 2 Model 4. 2 - A superposition model with 40 two input channels 40 4. 3. 3 Model 4. 3 4. 4 Discussion 41 43 5 Deletion models 5. 1 Deletion models with 1nd~endent interaction of excitatory and inhibitory sequences 44 VI 5. 1. 1 Model 5. 1 The basic de...

  8. Solvent extraction columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, P.; Smith, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    In pulsed columns for use in solvent extraction processes, e.g. the reprocessing of nuclear fuel, the horizontal perforated plates inside the column are separated by interplate spacers manufactured from metallic neutron absorbing material. The spacer may be in the form of a spiral or concentric circles separated by radial limbs, or may be of egg-box construction. Suitable neutron absorbing materials include stainless steel containing boron or gadolinium, hafnium metal or alloys of hafnium. (UK)

  9. The footprint of CO2 leakage in the water-column: Insights from numerical modeling based on a North Sea gas release experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielstädte, L.; Linke, P.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, S.; Wallmann, K.; McGinnis, D. F.; Haeckel, M.

    2013-12-01

    Assessing the environmental impact of potential CO2 leakage from offshore carbon dioxide storage sites necessitates the investigation of the corresponding pH change in the water-column. Numerical models have been developed to simulate the buoyant rise and dissolution of CO2 bubbles in the water-column and the subsequent near-field dispersion of dissolved CO2 in seawater under ocean current and tidal forcing. In order to test and improve numerical models a gas release experiment has been conducted at 80 m water-depth within the Sleipner area (North Sea). CO2 and Kr (used as inert tracer gas) were released on top of a benthic lander at varying gas flows (impact of such leakage rates is limited to the near-field bottom waters, due to the rapid dissolution of CO2 bubbles in seawater (CO2 is being stripped within the first two to five meters of bubble rise). In particular, small bubbles, which will dissolve close to the seafloor, may cause a dangerous low-pH environment for the marine benthos. However, on the larger scale, the advective transport by e.g. tidal currents, dominates the CO2 dispersal in the North Sea and dilutes the CO2 peak quickly. The model results show that at the small scales (impact on the marine environment, thereby reducing pH substantially (by 0.4 units) within a diameter of less than 50 m around the release spot (depending on the duration of leakage and the current velocities). Strong currents and tidal cycles significantly reduce the spreading of low-pH water masses into the far-field by efficiently diluting the amount of CO2 in ambient seawater.

  10. A toy model for single field open inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaudrevange, Pascal M.; Westphal, Alexander

    2012-05-01

    Inflation in an open universe produced by Coleman-De Luccia (CDL) tunneling induces a friction term that is strong enough to allow for successful small-field inflation in models that would otherwise suffer from a severe overshoot problem. In this paper, we present a polynomial scalar potential which allows for a full analysis. This provides a simple model of single-field open inflation on a small-field inflection point after tunneling. We present numerical results and compare them with analytic approximations.

  11. Development of a external exposure computational model for studying of input dose in skin for radiographs of thorax and vertebral column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muniz, Bianca C.; Menezes, Claudio J.M.; Vieira, Jose W.

    2014-01-01

    The dosimetric measurements do not always happen directly in the human body. Therefore, these assessments can be performed using anthropomorphic models (phantoms) evidencing models computational exposure (MCE) using techniques of Monte Carlo Method for virtual simulations. These processing techniques coupled with more powerful and affordable computers make the Monte Carlo method one of the tools most used worldwide in radiation transport area. In this work, the Monte Carlo EGS4 program was used to develop a computer model of external exposure to study the entrance skin dose for chest and column X-radiography and, aiming to optimize these practices by reducing doses to patients, professionals involved and the general public. The results obtained experimentally with the electrometer Radcal, model 9015, associated with the ionization chamber for radiology model 10X5-6, showed that the proposed computational model can be used in quality assurance programs in radiodiagnostic, evaluating the entrance skin dose when varying parameters of the radiation beam such as kilo voltage peak (kVp), current-time product (mAs), total filtration and distance surface source (DFS), optimizing the practices in radiodiagnostic and meeting the current regulation

  12. Theoretical performance model for single image depth from defocus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouvé-Peloux, Pauline; Champagnat, Frédéric; Le Besnerais, Guy; Idier, Jérôme

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we present a performance model for depth estimation using single image depth from defocus (SIDFD). Our model is based on an original expression of the Cramér-Rao bound (CRB) in this context. We show that this model is consistent with the expected behavior of SIDFD. We then study the influence on the performance of the optical parameters of a conventional camera such as the focal length, the aperture, and the position of the in-focus plane (IFP). We derive an approximate analytical expression of the CRB away from the IFP, and we propose an interpretation of the SIDFD performance in this domain. Finally, we illustrate the predictive capacity of our performance model on experimental data comparing several settings of a consumer camera.

  13. Dynamic Human Body Modeling Using a Single RGB Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haiyu; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Yu; Du, Sidan

    2016-03-18

    In this paper, we present a novel automatic pipeline to build personalized parametric models of dynamic people using a single RGB camera. Compared to previous approaches that use monocular RGB images, our system can model a 3D human body automatically and incrementally, taking advantage of human motion. Based on coarse 2D and 3D poses estimated from image sequences, we first perform a kinematic classification of human body parts to refine the poses and obtain reconstructed body parts. Next, a personalized parametric human model is generated by driving a general template to fit the body parts and calculating the non-rigid deformation. Experimental results show that our shape estimation method achieves comparable accuracy with reconstructed models using depth cameras, yet requires neither user interaction nor any dedicated devices, leading to the feasibility of using this method on widely available smart phones.

  14. A transient single particle model under FCI conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-Yan; SHANG Zhi; XU Ji-Jun

    2005-01-01

    The paper is focused on the coupling effect between film boiling heat transfer and evaporation drag around a hot-particle in cold liquid. Based on the continuity, momentum and energy equations of the vapor film, a transient two-dimensional single particle model has been established. This paper contains a detailed description of HPMC (High-temperature Particle Moving in Coolant) model for studying some aspects of the premixing stage of fuel-coolant interactions (FCIs). The transient process of high-temperature particles moving in coolant can be simulated. Comparisons between the experiment results and the calculations using HPMC model demonstrate that HPMC model achieves a good agreement in predicting the time-varying characteristic of high-temperature spheres moving in coolant.

  15. A single model procedure for tank calibration function estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    York, J.C.; Liebetrau, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    Reliable tank calibrations are a vital component of any measurement control and accountability program for bulk materials in a nuclear reprocessing facility. Tank volume calibration functions used in nuclear materials safeguards and accountability programs are typically constructed from several segments, each of which is estimated independently. Ideally, the segments correspond to structural features in the tank. In this paper the authors use an extension of the Thomas-Liebetrau model to estimate the entire calibration function in a single step. This procedure automatically takes significant run-to-run differences into account and yields an estimate of the entire calibration function in one operation. As with other procedures, the first step is to define suitable calibration segments. Next, a polynomial of low degree is specified for each segment. In contrast with the conventional practice of constructing a separate model for each segment, this information is used to set up the design matrix for a single model that encompasses all of the calibration data. Estimation of the model parameters is then done using conventional statistical methods. The method described here has several advantages over traditional methods. First, modeled run-to-run differences can be taken into account automatically at the estimation step. Second, no interpolation is required between successive segments. Third, variance estimates are based on all the data, rather than that from a single segment, with the result that discontinuities in confidence intervals at segment boundaries are eliminated. Fourth, the restrictive assumption of the Thomas-Liebetrau method, that the measured volumes be the same for all runs, is not required. Finally, the proposed methods are readily implemented using standard statistical procedures and widely-used software packages

  16. Thermal asymmetry model of single slope single basin solar still with sponge liner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanmugan Sengottain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An attempt has been made to propose a thermal asymmetry model for single slope basin type solar still with sponge liner of different thickness (3cm, 5cm, and 10cm in the basin. Two different color sponge liners have been used i.e., yellow and black. In the proposed design, a suitable dripping arrangement has been designed and used to pour water drop by drop over the sponge liner instead of sponge liner in stagnant saline water in the basin. The special arrangement overcomes the dryness of the sponge during peak sunny hours. The performance of the system with black color sponge of 3cm thickness shows better result with an output of 5.3 kg/m2 day and the proposed model have used to find the thermal asymmetries during the working hours of the still.

  17. Demonstration of two-phase Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) methods potentiality to give information to averaged models: application to bubbles column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magdeleine, S.

    2009-11-01

    This work is a part of a long term project that aims at using two-phase Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) in order to give information to averaged models. For now, it is limited to isothermal bubbly flows with no phase change. It could be subdivided in two parts: Firstly, theoretical developments are made in order to build an equivalent of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) for two phase flows called Interfaces and Sub-grid Scales (ISS). After the implementation of the ISS model in our code called Trio U , a set of various cases is used to validate this model. Then, special test are made in order to optimize the model for our particular bubbly flows. Thus we showed the capacity of the ISS model to produce a cheap pertinent solution. Secondly, we use the ISS model to perform simulations of bubbly flows in column. Results of these simulations are averaged to obtain quantities that appear in mass, momentum and interfacial area density balances. Thus, we processed to an a priori test of a complete one dimensional averaged model.We showed that this model predicts well the simplest flows (laminar and monodisperse). Moreover, the hypothesis of one pressure, which is often made in averaged model like CATHARE, NEPTUNE and RELAP5, is satisfied in such flows. At the opposite, without a polydisperse model, the drag is over-predicted and the uncorrelated A i flux needs a closure law. Finally, we showed that in turbulent flows, fluctuations of velocity and pressure in the liquid phase are not represented by the tested averaged model. (author)

  18. Study on application of single-crystal ice `Kurobe ice column` to high-speed skating rinks. Demonstration test result at Olympic memorial arena `M wave` in Nagano city; Tankesshohyo `Kurobe no hyojun` no kosoku skate link eno tekiyosei kenkyu. Naganoshi olympic kinen arina `Emu Wave` deno jissho shiken kekka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasaki, M. [Kansai Electric Power Co. Inc., Osaka (Japan)

    1999-06-10

    For high-speed low-friction skating rinks, research was made on sticking artificial ice columns (ice bamboo shoot). The ice columns were fabricated with the ice column production equipment equipped with 4-line water droplet dropping devices which were installed at intervals of 0.3m on both sides of a pathway of 200m long, 2.6m wide and 1.8m high in the lateral adit of Kurobegawa No.4 hydroelectric power station. The grown ice columns were processed for high-speed skating rinks through cutting, confirmation of single crystal and crystal orientation, slicing for every 7mm thickness and packaging. The ice columns were spread all over the rink while sliding them to prevent mixing of bubbles after spraying distilled water of nearly 25 degreesC onto base ices. In addition, hot water of nearly 40 degreesC was sprayed to produce the final ice rink of 30mm thick by nearly 5mm a day. The dynamic friction coefficient of the ice column rink reduced to 0.0038 by nearly 16% as compared with 0.0045 of conventional rinks. (NEDO)

  19. Spin models for the single molecular magnet Mn12-AC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saqer, Mohamad A.

    2005-11-01

    The single molecular magnet (SMM) Mn12-AC attracted the attention of scientists since the discovery of its magnetic hystereses which are accompanied by sudden jumps in magnetic moments at low temperature. Unlike conventional bulk magnets, hysteresis in SMMs is of molecular origin. This qualifies them as candidates for next generation of high density storage media where a molecule which is at most few nanometers in size can be used to store a bit of information. However, the jumps in these hystereses, due to spin tunneling, can lead to undesired loss of information. Mn12-AC molecule contains twelve magnetic ions antiferromagnetically coupled by exchanges leading to S = 10 ground state manifold. The magnetic ions are surrounded by ligands which isolate them magnetically from neighboring molecules. The lowest state of S = 9 manifold is believed to lie at about 40 K above the ground state. Therefore, at low temperatures, the molecule is considered as a single uncoupled moment of spin S = 10. Such model has been used widely to understand phenomena exhibited by the molecule at low temperatures including the tunneling of its spin, while a little attention has been paid for the multi-spin nature of the molecule. Using the 8-spin model, we demonstrate that in order to understand the phenomena of tunneling, a full spin description of the molecule is required. We utilized a calculation scheme where a fraction of energy levels are used in the calculations and the influence of levels having higher energy is neglected. From the dependence of tunnel splittings on the number of states include, we conclude that models based on restricting the number of energy levels (single-spin and 8-spin models) lead to unreliable results of tunnel splitting calculations. To attack the full 12-spin model, we employed the Davidson algorithm to calculated lowest energy levels produced by exchange interactions and single ion anisotropies. The model reproduces the anisotropy properties at low

  20. A simple shear limited, single size, time dependent flocculation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuprenas, R.; Tran, D. A.; Strom, K.

    2017-12-01

    This research focuses on the modeling of flocculation of cohesive sediment due to turbulent shear, specifically, investigating the dependency of flocculation on the concentration of cohesive sediment. Flocculation is important in larger sediment transport models as cohesive particles can create aggregates which are orders of magnitude larger than their unflocculated state. As the settling velocity of each particle is determined by the sediment size, density, and shape, accounting for this aggregation is important in determining where the sediment is deposited. This study provides a new formulation for flocculation of cohesive sediment by modifying the Winterwerp (1998) flocculation model (W98) so that it limits floc size to that of the Kolmogorov micro length scale. The W98 model is a simple approach that calculates the average floc size as a function of time. Because of its simplicity, the W98 model is ideal for implementing into larger sediment transport models; however, the model tends to over predict the dependency of the floc size on concentration. It was found that the modification of the coefficients within the original model did not allow for the model to capture the dependency on concentration. Therefore, a new term within the breakup kernel of the W98 formulation was added. The new formulation results is a single size, shear limited, and time dependent flocculation model that is able to effectively capture the dependency of the equilibrium size of flocs on both suspended sediment concentration and the time to equilibrium. The overall behavior of the new model is explored and showed align well with other studies on flocculation. Winterwerp, J. C. (1998). A simple model for turbulence induced flocculation of cohesive sediment. .Journal of Hydraulic Research, 36(3):309-326.

  1. MODEL TESTS AND 3D ELASTIC FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS FOR STEEL PIPE PILES WITH WINGS IN STALLED IN SOIL CEMENT COLUMN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, Toshiyuki; Teramoto, Shuntarou; Kimura, Makoto

    Steel pipe piles with wings installed in soil cement column is a composite foundation of pile consisting of soil improvement with cement and steel pipe with wings. This type of pile shows higher vertical bearing capacity when compared to steel pipe piles that are installed without soil cement. It is thought the wings contribute to higher bearing capacity of this type of piles. The wings are also thought to play the role of structural unification of pile foundations and load transfer. In this study, model test and 3D elastic finite element analysis was carried out in order to elucidate the effect of wings on the structural unification of pile foundation and the load transfer mechanism. Firstly, the model test was carried out in order to grasp the influence of pile with and without wings, the shape of wings of the pile and the unconfined compression strength of the soil cement on the structural unification of the pile foundation. The numerical analysis of the model test was then carried out on the intermediate part of the pile foundation with wings and mathematical model developed. Finally load tran sfer mechanism was checked for the entire length of the pile through this mathematical model and the load sharing ratio of the wings and stress distribution occurring in the soil cement clarified. In addition, the effect of the wing interval on the structural unification of the pile foundation and load transfer was also checked and clarified.

  2. Estimating fate and transport of multiple contaminants in the vadose zone using a multi-layered soil column and three-phase equilibrium partitioning model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucker, Gregory G.

    2007-01-01

    Soils at waste sites must be evaluated for the potential of residual soil contamination to leach and migrate to the groundwater beneath the disposal area. If migration to the aquifer occurs, contaminants can travel vast distances and pollute drinking water wells, thus exposing human receptors to harmful levels of toxins and carcinogens. To prevent groundwater contamination, a contaminant fate and transport analysis is necessary to assess the migration potential of residual soil contaminants. This type of migration analysis is usually performed using a vadose zone model to account for complex geotechnical and chemical variables including: decay processes, infiltration rate, soil properties, vadose zone thickness, and chemical behavior. The distinct advantage of using a complex model is that less restrictive, but still protective, soil threshold levels may be determined avoiding the unnecessary and costly remediation of marginally contaminated soils. However, the disadvantage of such modeling is the additional cost for data collection and labor required to apply these models. In order to allay these higher costs and to achieve a less restrictive but still protective clean-up level, a multiple contaminant and multi layered soil column equilibrium partitioning model was developed which is faster, simpler and less expensive to use. (authors)

  3. A discrete dislocation–transformation model for austenitic single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, J; Turteltaub, S; Remmers, J J C; Van der Giessen, E

    2008-01-01

    A discrete model for analyzing the interaction between plastic flow and martensitic phase transformations is developed. The model is intended for simulating the microstructure evolution in a single crystal of austenite that transforms non-homogeneously into martensite. The plastic flow in the untransformed austenite is simulated using a plane-strain discrete dislocation model. The phase transformation is modeled via the nucleation and growth of discrete martensitic regions embedded in the austenitic single crystal. At each instant during loading, the coupled elasto-plasto-transformation problem is solved using the superposition of analytical solutions for the discrete dislocations and discrete transformation regions embedded in an infinite homogeneous medium and the numerical solution of a complementary problem used to enforce the actual boundary conditions and the heterogeneities in the medium. In order to describe the nucleation and growth of martensitic regions, a nucleation criterion and a kinetic law suitable for discrete regions are specified. The constitutive rules used in discrete dislocation simulations are supplemented with additional evolution rules to account for the phase transformation. To illustrate the basic features of the model, simulations of specimens under plane-strain uniaxial extension and contraction are analyzed. The simulations indicate that plastic flow reduces the average stress at which transformation begins, but it also reduces the transformation rate when compared with benchmark simulations without plasticity. Furthermore, due to local stress fluctuations caused by dislocations, martensitic systems can be activated even though transformation would not appear to be favorable based on the average stress. Conversely, the simulations indicate that the plastic hardening behavior is influenced by the reduction in the effective austenitic grain size due to the evolution of transformation. During cyclic simulations, the coupled plasticity

  4. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    of the system, coupled with these processes, define the fundamental compositional and dynamic diversity of the Mush Column. In some ways it functions like a complex musical instrument. Entrainment, transport, and sorting of cumulate crystals as a function of repose time and the local flux intensity also contribute to the basic compositional diversity of the system. In the Ferrar dolerite system, about 104 km3 of dolerite is distributed throughout a fir-tree like stack of 4 or 5 extensive 300-750 m thick sills. The lowest sill contains a vast tongue of entrained orthopyroxene (opx) cumulates emplaced with the sill itself. The bulk sill composition varies from 20 pc MgO in the tongue center to 7 pc in the leading tip and margins of the sill, which itself defines the compositional spectrum of the whole complex and is remarkably similar to that exhibited by Hawaii. Relative sorting of large (1-50 mm) opx and small (1-3 mm) plagioclase due to kinetic sieving in the tongue produces pervasive anorthosite stringers. Through local ponding this has culminated in the formation of a small, well-formed layered intrusion consisting of alternating layers of orthopyroxenite and anorthosite. Upwards in the system the sills become progressively depleted in MgO and temporally and spatially contiguous flood basalts are low MgO tholeiites with no sign of opx cumulates. The size, extent, number of sills, and the internal structure of individual sills suggest a rhythm of injection similar to that of volcanic episodes. The continued horizontal stretching of a system of this type would lead to processes as recorded by ophiolites, and the repeated injection into a single reservoir would undoubtedly lead to a massive layered intrusion or to a series of high-level nested plutons.

  5. Dehalogenation of chlorinated ethenes and immobilization of nickel in anaerobic sediment columns under sulfidogenic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drzyzga, O; EL Mamouni, R; Agathos, SN; Gottschal, JC

    2002-01-01

    A sediment column study was carried out to demonstrate the bioremediation of chloroethene- and nickel-contaminated sediment in a single anaerobic step under sulfate-reducing conditions. Four columns (one untreated control column and three experimental columns) with sediment from a chloroethene- and

  6. Single image interpolation via adaptive nonlocal sparsity-based modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Yaniv; Protter, Matan; Elad, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Single image interpolation is a central and extensively studied problem in image processing. A common approach toward the treatment of this problem in recent years is to divide the given image into overlapping patches and process each of them based on a model for natural image patches. Adaptive sparse representation modeling is one such promising image prior, which has been shown to be powerful in filling-in missing pixels in an image. Another force that such algorithms may use is the self-similarity that exists within natural images. Processing groups of related patches together exploits their correspondence, leading often times to improved results. In this paper, we propose a novel image interpolation method, which combines these two forces-nonlocal self-similarities and sparse representation modeling. The proposed method is contrasted with competitive and related algorithms, and demonstrated to achieve state-of-the-art results.

  7. Connecting single-stock assessment models through correlated survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Christoffer Moesgaard; Nielsen, Anders; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro

    2017-01-01

    times. We propose a simple alternative. In three case studies each with two stocks, we improve the single-stock models, as measured by Akaike information criterion, by adding correlation in the cohort survival. To limit the number of parameters, the correlations are parameterized through...... the corresponding partial correlations. We consider six models where the partial correlation matrix between stocks follows a band structure ranging from independent assessments to complex correlation structures. Further, a simulation study illustrates the importance of handling correlated data sufficiently...... by investigating the coverage of confidence intervals for estimated fishing mortality. The results presented will allow managers to evaluate stock statuses based on a more accurate evaluation of model output uncertainty. The methods are directly implementable for stocks with an analytical assessment and do...

  8. On the single-mass model of the vocal folds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, M S; McGowan, R S

    2010-01-01

    An analysis is made of the fluid-structure interactions necessary to support self-sustained oscillations of a single-mass mechanical model of the vocal folds subject to a nominally steady subglottal overpressure. The single-mass model of Fant and Flanagan is re-examined and an analytical representation of vortex shedding during 'voiced speech' is proposed that promotes cooperative, periodic excitation of the folds by the glottal flow. Positive feedback that sustains glottal oscillations is shown to occur during glottal contraction, when the flow separates from the 'trailing edge' of the glottis producing a low-pressure 'suction' force that tends to pull the folds together. Details are worked out for flow that can be regarded as locally two-dimensional in the glottal region. Predictions of free-streamline theory are used to model the effects of quasi-static variations in the separation point on the glottal wall. Numerical predictions are presented to illustrate the waveform of the sound radiated towards the mouth from the glottis. The theory is easily modified to include feedback on the glottal flow of standing acoustic waves, both in the vocal tract beyond the glottis and in the subglottal region. (invited paper)

  9. Assembly for connecting the column ends of two capillary columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, B.; Auer, M.; Pospisil, P.

    1984-01-01

    In gas chromatography, the column ends of two capillary columns are inserted into a straight capillary from both sides forming annular gaps. The capillary is located in a tee out of which the capillary columns are sealingly guided, and to which carrier gas is supplied by means of a flushing flow conduit. A ''straight-forward operation'' having capillary columns connected in series and a ''flush-back operation'' are possible. The dead volume between the capillary columns can be kept small

  10. Spinal cord stimulation of dorsal columns in a rat model of neuropathic pain: evidence for a segmental spinal mechanism of pain relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, H; van Kleef, M; Joosten, E A

    2012-01-01

    Although spinal cord stimulation (SCS) of the dorsal columns is an established method for treating chronic neuropathic pain, patients still suffer from a substantial level of pain. From a clinical perspective it is known that the location of the SCS is of pivotal importance, thereby suggesting a segmental spinal mode of action. However, experimental studies suggest that SCS acts also through the modulation of supraspinal mechanisms, which might suggest that the location is unimportant. Here we investigated the effect of the rostrocaudal location of SCS stimulation and the effectiveness of pain relief in a rat model of chronic neuropathic pain. Adult male rats (n=45) were submitted to a partial ligation of the sciatic nerve. The majority of animals developed tactile hypersensitivity in the nerve lesioned paw. All allodynic rats were submitted to SCS (n=33) for 30 minutes (f=50 Hz; pulse width 0.2 ms). In one group (n=16) the electrodes were located at the level where the injured sciatic nerve afferents enter the spinal cord (T13), and in a second group (n=17) the electrodes were positioned at more rostral levels (T11) as verified by X-ray. A repositioning experiment of electrodes from T12 to T13 was performed in 2 animals. Our data demonstrate that SCS of the dorsal columns at the level where the injured fibers enter the spinal cord dorsal horn result in a much better pain-relieving effect than SCS at more rostral levels. From this we conclude that SCS in treatment of neuropathic pain acts through a segmental spinal site of action. Copyright © 2011 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Replica Analysis for Portfolio Optimization with Single-Factor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinzato, Takashi

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we use replica analysis to investigate the influence of correlation among the return rates of assets on the solution of the portfolio optimization problem. We consider the behavior of an optimal solution for the case where the return rate is described with a single-factor model and compare the findings obtained from our proposed methods with correlated return rates with those obtained with independent return rates. We then analytically assess the increase in the investment risk when correlation is included. Furthermore, we also compare our approach with analytical procedures for minimizing the investment risk from operations research.

  12. Single-server blind quantum computation with quantum circuit model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoqian; Weng, Jian; Li, Xiaochun; Luo, Weiqi; Tan, Xiaoqing; Song, Tingting

    2018-06-01

    Blind quantum computation (BQC) enables the client, who has few quantum technologies, to delegate her quantum computation to a server, who has strong quantum computabilities and learns nothing about the client's quantum inputs, outputs and algorithms. In this article, we propose a single-server BQC protocol with quantum circuit model by replacing any quantum gate with the combination of rotation operators. The trap quantum circuits are introduced, together with the combination of rotation operators, such that the server is unknown about quantum algorithms. The client only needs to perform operations X and Z, while the server honestly performs rotation operators.

  13. Dynamic effects of diabatization in distillation columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thomas; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Abildskov, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic effects of diabatization in distillation columns are investigated in simulation emphasizing the heat-integrated distillation column (HIDiC). A generic, dynamic, first-principle model has been formulated, which is flexible enough to describe various diabatic distillation configurations....... Dynamic Relative Gain Array and Singular Value Analysis have been applied in a comparative study of a conventional distillation column and a HIDiC. The study showed increased input-output coupling due to diabatization. Feasible SISO control structures for the HIDiC were also found and control...

  14. Dynamic Effects of Diabatization in Distillation Columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thomas; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Abildskov, Jens

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic eects of diabatization in distillation columns are investigated in simulation with primary focus on the heat-integrated distillation column (HIDiC). A generic, dynamic, rst-principle model has been formulated, which is exible to describe various diabatic distillation congurations....... Dynamic Relative Gain Array and Singular Value Analysis have been applied in a comparative study of a conventional distillation column and a HIDiC. The study showed increased input-output coupling due to diabatization. Feasible SISO control structures for the HIDiC were also found. Control...

  15. Fire emissions constrained by the synergistic use of formaldehyde and glyoxal SCIAMACHY columns in a two-compound inverse modelling framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrakou, T.; Muller, J.; de Smedt, I.; van Roozendael, M.; Vrekoussis, M.; Wittrock, F.; Richter, A.; Burrows, J.

    2008-12-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) and glyoxal (CHOCHO) are carbonyls formed in the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by plants, anthropogenic activities, and biomass burning. They are also directly emitted by fires. Although this primary production represents only a small part of the global source for both species, yet it can be locally important during intense fire events. Simultaneous observations of formaldehyde and glyoxal retrieved from the SCIAMACHY satellite instrument in 2005 and provided by the BIRA/IASB and the Bremen group, respectively, are compared with the corresponding columns simulated with the IMAGESv2 global CTM. The chemical mechanism has been optimized with respect to HCHO and CHOCHO production from pyrogenically emitted NMVOCs, based on the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) and on an explicit profile for biomass burning emissions. Gas-to-particle conversion of glyoxal in clouds and in aqueous aerosols is considered in the model. In this study we provide top-down estimates for fire emissions of HCHO and CHOCHO precursors by performing a two- compound inversion of emissions using the adjoint of the IMAGES model. The pyrogenic fluxes are optimized at the model resolution. The two-compound inversion offers the advantage that the information gained from measurements of one species constrains the sources of both compounds, due to the existence of common precursors. In a first inversion, only the burnt biomass amounts are optimized. In subsequent simulations, the emission factors for key individual NMVOC compounds are also varied.

  16. Water surface modeling from a single viewpoint video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuan; Pickup, David; Saunders, Thomas; Cosker, Darren; Marshall, David; Hall, Peter; Willis, Philip

    2013-07-01

    We introduce a video-based approach for producing water surface models. Recent advances in this field output high-quality results but require dedicated capturing devices and only work in limited conditions. In contrast, our method achieves a good tradeoff between the visual quality and the production cost: It automatically produces a visually plausible animation using a single viewpoint video as the input. Our approach is based on two discoveries: first, shape from shading (SFS) is adequate to capture the appearance and dynamic behavior of the example water; second, shallow water model can be used to estimate a velocity field that produces complex surface dynamics. We will provide qualitative evaluation of our method and demonstrate its good performance across a wide range of scenes.

  17. Simulation and modeling CO2 absorption in biogas with DEA promoted K2CO3 solution in packed column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurkhamidah, Siti; Altway, Ali; Airlangga, Bramantyo; Emilia, Dwi Putri

    2017-05-01

    Absorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) using potassium carbonate (K2CO3) is one of biogas purification method. However, K2CO3 have slow mass transfer in liquid phase. So it is necessary to eliminate the disadvantage of CO2 absorption using K2CO3 by adding promotor (activator). Diethanol amine (DEA) is one of promotor which can increase its reaction rate. Simulation and modeling research of the CO2 absorption from biogas with DEA promoted K2CO3 solution has not been conducted. Thus, the main goal of this research is create model and simulation for the CO2 absorption from biogas with DEA promoted K2CO3 solution, then observe the influence of promoter concentration. DEA concentration varies between 1-5 %wt. From the simulation, we concluded that the CO2 removal rise with the increasing of promoter concentration. The highest CO2 removal is 54.5318 % at 5 % wt DEA concentration.

  18. Deexcitation of single excited nuclei in the QMD model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, W.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Aichelin, J.

    1992-10-01

    We investigate the emission pattern of a single excited nucleus in the QMD model and compare the results with several statistical and phenomenological models. We find that the number of intermediate mass fragments as a function of the excitation energy is in very good agreement with the results of statistical models in which the emission pattern is governed by phase space only. This allows two conclusions: (a) The microscopic dynamical description of the disintegration of static excited nuclei in the QMD yields directly the emission pattern expected from phase space decay. This is the case despite of the fact that nuclear level densities are not given directly but are modeled semiclassically by the nucleon-nucleon interaction. Thus there is no need to supplement the QMD calculations by an additional evaporation model. (b) Differences between the QMD results and the data are not due to insufficiencies in the description of the disintegration of excited systems. Thus other possible reasons, like a substantial change of the free cross section in the nuclear environment have to be investigated. (orig.)

  19. Dissipation of coumaphos acaricide in model cattle dipping vats and soil columns under sub-tropical climate of Delhi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jindal, T.; Singh, D.K.; Agarwal, H.C.

    1997-01-01

    The stability of coumaphos was studied in model dipping vats under field conditions using 14 C-labelled and unlabelled coumaphos, with or without additives. Four vats were used each containing 50 litre of water treated with 3.7 MBq 14 C and 10 g (AI) unlabelled coumaphos in 25 mL acetone. Vat 1 was control. Vat 2 and 3 were maintained at pH 5 by addition of superphosphate initially and at regular intervals as required. Vat 3 and 4 were treated with bacteriostat copper sulphate at 0.01 g per litre. The pH of vat 1 and 4 gradually increased with time from initial value of 7 to 8.47 and 7.57 respectively. In vat 1 and 4 the concentration of coumaphos declined from about initial concentration of 200 μg/mL to about 9 μg/mL in 255 days after initial treatment, whereas the persistence of coumaphos was more in vats 2 and 3. The stability of coumaphos in model vats increased significantly by maintaining a pH of 5 by addition of superphosphate. The pesticide residues consisted of 80 % or more of unchanged coumaphos. In addition potasan, chlorferon and 4 - methylumbelliferone were detected in small proportions. In another experiment the effect of pH was studied. Coumaphos was most stable at pH 5 as also observed in model vats under field conditions. Coumaphos did not leach below 10 cm in all the four cases. Dissipation, degradation and bound residue formation was more in case of alkali treated coumaphos than normal coumaphos. Aged residues of vat 3 were reasonably stable as copper sulphate inhibited the degradation of coumaphos in soil by microorganisms. Coumaphos along with the the above three metabolises were detected in the extractable insecticide residues from the soil, though the proportion of metabolises was much more than found in model vats. Again treatment of coumaphos with alkali further increased its metabolism and the soil bound residues were double as compared to untreated coumaphos

  20. Integrating the augmented SCOR model and the ISO 15288 life cycle model into a single logistic model

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schmitz, Peter MU

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available using the Supply Chain Operations Reference (SCOR) model. The SANDF indicated that the augmented SCOR model (Bean, Schmitz and Engelbrecht, 2009) should be extended into a single logistics process which should include a life-cycle perspective...

  1. Columns in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  2. Slender CRC Columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarup, Bendt; Jensen, Lars Rom; Ellegaard, Peter

    2005-01-01

    CRC is a high-performance steel fibre reinforced concrete with a typical compressive strength of 150 MPa. Design methods for a number of structural elements have been developed since CRC was invented in 1986, but the current project set out to further investigate the range of columns for which...

  3. Practical column design guide

    CERN Document Server

    Nitsche, M

    2017-01-01

    This book highlights the aspects that need to be considered when designing distillation columns in practice. It discusses the influencing parameters as well as the equations governing them, and presents several numerical examples. The book is intended both for experienced designers and for those who are new to the subject.

  4. Ideal versus real automated twin column recycling chromatography process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritti, Fabrice; Leal, Mike; McDonald, Thomas; Gilar, Martin

    2017-07-28

    The full baseline separation of two compounds (selectivity factors αchromatography is used to confirm that the speed-resolution performance of the TCRSP is intrinsically superior to that of the single-column process. This advantage is illustrated in this work by developing an automated TCRSP for the challenging separation of two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) isomers (benzo[a]anthracene and chrysene) in the reversed-phase retention mode at pressure smaller than 5000psi. The columns used are the 3.0mm×150mm column packed with 3.5μm XBridge BEH-C 18 material (α=1.010) and the 3.0mm or 4.6mm×150mm columns packed with the same 3.5μm XSelect HSST 3 material (α=1.025). The isocratic mobile phase is an acetonitrile-water mixture (80/20, v/v). Remarkably, significant differences are observed between the predicted retention times and efficiencies of the ideal TCRSP (given by the number of cycles multiplied by the retention time and efficiency of one column) and those of the real TCRSP. The fundamental explanation lies in the pressure-dependent retention of these PAHs or in the change of their partial molar volume as they are transferred from the mobile to the stationary phase. A revisited retention and efficiency model is then built to predict the actual performance of real TCRSPs. The experimental and calculated resolution data are found in very good agreement for a change, Δv m =-10cm 3 /mol, of the partial molar volume of the two PAH isomers upon transfer from the acetonitrile-water eluent mixture to the silica-C 18 stationary phase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Circular Raft Footings Strengthened by Stone Columns under Static Loads

    OpenAIRE

    R. Ziaie Moayed; B. Mohammadi-Haji

    2016-01-01

    Stone columns have been widely employed to improve the load-settlement characteristics of soft soils. The results of two small scale displacement control loading tests on stone columns were used in order to validate numerical finite element simulations. Additionally, a series of numerical calculations of static loading have been performed on strengthened raft footing to investigate the effects of using stone columns on bearing capacity of footings. The bearing capacity of single and group of ...

  6. Single progenitor model for GW150914 and GW170104

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Orazio, Daniel J.; Loeb, Abraham

    2018-04-01

    The merger of stellar-mass black holes (BHs) is not expected to generate detectable electromagnetic (EM) emission. However, the gravitational wave (GW) events GW150914 and GW170104, detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory to be the result of merging, ˜60 M⊙ binary black holes (BBHs), each have claimed coincident gamma-ray emission. Motivated by the intriguing possibility of an EM counterpart to BBH mergers, we construct a model that can reproduce the observed EM and GW signals for GW150914- and GW170104-like events, from a single-star progenitor. Following Loeb [Astrophys. J. Lett. 819, L21 (2016), 10.3847/2041-8205/819/2/L21], we envision a massive, rapidly rotating star within which a rotating-bar instability fractures the core into two overdensities that fragment into clumps which merge to form BHs in a tight binary with arbitrary spin-orbit alignment. Once formed, the BBH inspirals due to gas and gravitational-wave drag until tidal forces trigger strong feeding of the BHs with the surrounding stellar-density gas about 10 sec before merger. The resulting giga-Eddington accretion peak launches a jet that breaks out of the progenitor star and drives a powerful outflow that clears the gas from the orbit of the binary within 1 sec, preserving the vacuum GW waveform in the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory band. The single-progenitor scenario predicts the existence of variability of the gamma-ray burst, modulated at the ˜0.2 sec chirping period of the BBH due to relativistic Doppler boost. The jet breakout should be accompanied by a low-luminosity supernova. Finally, because the BBHs of the single-progenitor model do not exist at large separations, they will not be detectable in the low-frequency gravitational-wave band of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna. Hence, the single-progenitor BBHs will be unambiguously discernible from BBHs formed through alternate, double-progenitor evolution scenarios.

  7. Monte Carlo simulations of lattice models for single polymer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Ping

    2014-10-01

    Single linear polymer chains in dilute solutions under good solvent conditions are studied by Monte Carlo simulations with the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method up to the chain length N ˜ O(10^4). Based on the standard simple cubic lattice model (SCLM) with fixed bond length and the bond fluctuation model (BFM) with bond lengths in a range between 2 and sqrt{10}, we investigate the conformations of polymer chains described by self-avoiding walks on the simple cubic lattice, and by random walks and non-reversible random walks in the absence of excluded volume interactions. In addition to flexible chains, we also extend our study to semiflexible chains for different stiffness controlled by a bending potential. The persistence lengths of chains extracted from the orientational correlations are estimated for all cases. We show that chains based on the BFM are more flexible than those based on the SCLM for a fixed bending energy. The microscopic differences between these two lattice models are discussed and the theoretical predictions of scaling laws given in the literature are checked and verified. Our simulations clarify that a different mapping ratio between the coarse-grained models and the atomistically realistic description of polymers is required in a coarse-graining approach due to the different crossovers to the asymptotic behavior.

  8. Monte Carlo simulations of lattice models for single polymer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Single linear polymer chains in dilute solutions under good solvent conditions are studied by Monte Carlo simulations with the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method up to the chain length N∼O(10 4 ). Based on the standard simple cubic lattice model (SCLM) with fixed bond length and the bond fluctuation model (BFM) with bond lengths in a range between 2 and √(10), we investigate the conformations of polymer chains described by self-avoiding walks on the simple cubic lattice, and by random walks and non-reversible random walks in the absence of excluded volume interactions. In addition to flexible chains, we also extend our study to semiflexible chains for different stiffness controlled by a bending potential. The persistence lengths of chains extracted from the orientational correlations are estimated for all cases. We show that chains based on the BFM are more flexible than those based on the SCLM for a fixed bending energy. The microscopic differences between these two lattice models are discussed and the theoretical predictions of scaling laws given in the literature are checked and verified. Our simulations clarify that a different mapping ratio between the coarse-grained models and the atomistically realistic description of polymers is required in a coarse-graining approach due to the different crossovers to the asymptotic behavior

  9. Modelling of creep curves of Ni3Ge single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starenchenko, V. A.; Starenchenko, S. V.; Pantyukhova, O. D.; Solov'eva, Yu V.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the creep model of alloys with L12 superstructure is presented. The creep model is based on the idea of the mechanisms superposition connected with the different elementary deformation processes. Some of them are incident to the ordered structure L12 (anomalous mechanisms), others are typical to pure metals with the fcc structure (normal mechanisms): the accumulation of thermal APBs by means of the intersection of moving dislocations; the formation of APB tubes; the multiplication of superdislocations; the movement of single dislocations; the accumulation of point defects, such as vacancies and interstitial atoms; the accumulation APBs at the climb of edge dislocations. This model takes into account the experimental facts of the wetting antiphase boundaries and emergence of the disordered phase within the ordered phase. The calculations of the creep curves are performed under different conditions. This model describes different kinds of the creep curves and demonstrates the important meaning of the deformation superlocalisation leading to the inverse creep. The experimental and theoretical results coincide rather well.

  10. Gyrokinetic water-bag modeling of a plasma column: Magnetic moment distribution and finite Larmor radius effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, R.; Gravier, E.; Morel, P.; Besse, N.; Bertrand, P.

    2009-08-01

    Describing turbulent transport in fusion plasmas is a major concern in magnetic confinement fusion. It is now widely known that kinetic and fluid descriptions can lead to significantly different properties. Although more accurate, the kinetic calculation of turbulent transport is much more demanding of computer resources than fluid simulations. An alternative approach is based on a water-bag representation of the distribution function that is not an approximation but rather a special class of initial conditions, allowing one to reduce the full kinetic Vlasov equation into a set of hydrodynamics equations while keeping its kinetic character [P. Morel, E. Gravier, N. Besse et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 112109 (2007)]. In this paper, the water-bag concept is used in a gyrokinetic context to study finite Larmor radius effects with the possibility of using the full Larmor radius distribution instead of an averaged Larmor radius. The resulting model is used to study the ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability.

  11. Effect of graft shape in lateral column lengthening on tarsal bone position and subtalar and talonavicular contact pressure in a cadaveric flatfoot model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Sean T; Reese, Keri A; Ross, Steven D; McGarry, Michelle H; Leba, Thu-Ba; Lee, Thay Q

    2014-11-01

    Lateral column lengthening (LCL) has been used for correction of flatfoot deformity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of LCL graft shape on tarsal bone position and talonavicular and subtalar joint pressure. A flatfoot model was created in 6 cadaveric specimens. Corrective LCL was performed using a rectangular graft or a trapezoidal graft with the broad surface oriented dorsally, laterally, or plantarly. Bony surface markers were digitized to calculate angular parameters used in the evaluation of flatfoot deformity. Contact pressure and area in the subtalar and talonavicular joints were also recorded. All measurements were carried out under multiple axial loads in the intact and flatfoot conditions, and following LCL with each graft shape. Flatfoot creation resulted in significant changes in arch collapse and forefoot abduction. LCL with a rectangular graft best corrected these parameters, while a laterally oriented trapezoidal graft provided some correction. Talonavicular contact pressure was unchanged after flatfoot creation, and was significantly less than intact after LCL. Subtalar contact pressure decreased in some conditions after flatfoot creation, and decreased further after LCL. LCL with a rectangular graft best restored tarsal bone orientation in a cadaveric flatfoot model. The decreases in talonavicular pressure likely represent redistribution of force from the medial to lateral foot. When performing LCL for flatfoot deformity, increased bone graft volume medially better restores tarsal bone position. One way of achieving this is through the use of a rectangular graft as opposed to a trapezoidal graft. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Rapid determination of {sup 135}Cs and precise {sup 135}Cs/{sup 137}Cs atomic ratio in environmental samples by single-column chromatography coupled to triple-quadrupole inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Guosheng [Department of Radiation Chemistry, Institute of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Hirosaki University, 66-1 Hon-cho, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8564 (Japan); Division of Nuclear Technology and Applications, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Beijing Engineering Research Center of Radiographic Techniques and Equipment, Beijing 100049 (China); Tazoe, Hirofumi [Department of Radiation Chemistry, Institute of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Hirosaki University, 66-1 Hon-cho, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8564 (Japan); Yamada, Masatoshi, E-mail: myamada@hirosaki-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Chemistry, Institute of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Hirosaki University, 66-1 Hon-cho, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8564 (Japan)

    2016-02-18

    For source identification, measurement of {sup 135}Cs/{sup 137}Cs atomic ratio not only provides information apart from the detection of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs, but it can also overcome the application limit that measurement of the {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio has due to the short half-life of {sup 134}Cs (2.06 y). With the recent advancement of ICP-MS, it is necessary to improve the corresponding separation method for rapid and precise {sup 135}Cs/{sup 137}Cs atomic ratio analysis. A novel separation and purification technique was developed for the new generation of triple-quadrupole inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS/MS). The simple chemical separation, incorporating ammonium molybdophosphate selective adsorption of Cs and subsequent single cation-exchange chromatography, removes the majority of isobaric and polyatomic interference elements. Subsequently, the ICP-MS/MS removes residual interference elements and eliminates the peak tailing effect of stable {sup 133}Cs, at m/z 134, 135, and 137. The developed analytical method was successfully applied to measure {sup 135}Cs/{sup 137}Cs atomic ratios and {sup 135}Cs activities in environmental samples (soil and sediment) for radiocesium source identification. - Highlights: • A simple {sup 135}Cs/{sup 137}Cs analytical method was developed. • The separation procedure was based on AMP adsorption and one column chromatography. • {sup 135}Cs/{sup 137}Cs was measured by ICP-MS/MS. • Decontamination factors for Ba, Mo, Sb, and Sn were improved. • {sup 135}Cs/{sup 137}Cs atomic ratios of 0.341–0.351 were found in Japanese soil samples.

  13. Determination of C10-chloroalkane residues in fish matrices by short column gas chromatography/electron capture negative ion low resolution mass spectrometry applying single pure and representative synthesised chlorodecanes as standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaume, Florence; Coelhan, Mehmet; Parlar, Harun

    2006-01-01

    A new chlorodecane (CD) standard was developed consisting of five single compounds with 5-9 Cl-atoms, with which it was possible to determine chlorodecane residues in fish matrices from different countries using short column gas chromatography/electron capture negative ion low resolution mass spectrometry (SCGC/ECNI-LRMS). The concentrations found were between 4.8 and 30.2 ng/g fat. Pentachlorodecanes could not be detected in all samples. For an evaluation of the new CD-standard, the fish matrices were also quantified by several other polychlorinated decane (CP10) standards with different chlorine grade: 50, 55, 63.5, 65, and 70%. The concentrations found differed unsurprisingly considerable among the applied standards. Considering only these CP10:50-70% standards that showed the highest similarity in peak patterns with the fish samples, the differences in observed chlorodecane concentrations between these standards and the new CD-standard were low, varying only 1-16%. The CP10:50-70% standards were further quantified with the new CD-standard (chlorine content, 58.2%) with neglectable observed differences to the CP10:60, 63.5, and 65% standards. Highest differences were observed to the CP10:50, 55, and 70% standards. By this work, the quantification of eco-toxicologically relevant C10-chloroparaffins using the new CD-standard has led to reproducible and reliable results, which indicates further that these compounds are still a concerning class of substances in environmental fish samples

  14. Modelling the reworking effects of bioturbation on the incorporation of radionuclides into the sediment column: implications for the fate of particle-reactive radionuclides in Irish Sea sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cournane, S.; Leon Vintro, L.; Mitchell, P.I.

    2010-01-01

    A microcosm laboratory experiment was conducted to determine the impact of biological reworking by the ragworm Nereis diversicolor on the redistribution of particle-bound radionuclides deposited at the sediment-water interface. Over the course of the 40-day experiment, as much as 35% of a 137 Cs-labelled particulate tracer deposited on the sediment surface was redistributed to depths of up to 11 cm by the polychaete. Three different reworking models were employed to model the profiles and quantify the biodiffusion and biotransport coefficients: a gallery-diffuser model, a continuous sub-surface egestion model and a biodiffusion model. Although the biodiffusion coefficients obtained for each model were quite similar, the continuous sub-surface egestion model provided the best fit to the data. The average biodiffusion coefficient, at 1.8 ± 0.9 cm 2 y -1 , is in good agreement with the values quoted by other workers on the bioturbation effects of this polychaete species. The corresponding value for the biotransport coefficient was found to be 0.9 ± 0.4 cm y -1 . The effects of non-local mixing were incorporated in a model to describe the temporal evolution of measured 99 Tc and 60 Co radionuclide sediment profiles in the eastern Irish Sea, influenced by radioactive waste discharged from the Sellafield reprocessing plant. Reworking conditions in the sediment column were simulated by considering an upper mixed layer, an exponentially decreasing diffusion coefficient, and appropriate biotransport coefficients to account for non-local mixing. The diffusion coefficients calculated from the 99 Tc and 60 Co cores were in the range 2-14 cm 2 y -1 , which are consistent with the values found by other workers in the same marine area, while the biotransport coefficients were similar to those obtained for a variety of macrobenthic organisms in controlled laboratories and field studies. -- Research highlights: →N. diversicolor redistributes up to 35% particle

  15. Topographic shear and the relation of ocular dominance columns to orientation columns in primate and cat visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Richard J.; Schwartz, Eric L.

    1999-03-01

    Shear has been known to exist for many years in the topographic structure of the primary visual cortex, but has received little attention in the modeling literature. Although the topographic map of V1 is largely conformal (i.e. zero shear), several groups have observed topographic shear in the region of the V1/V2 border. Furthermore, shear has also been revealed by anisotropy of cortical magnification factor within a single ocular dominance column. In the present paper, we make a functional hypothesis: the major axis of the topographic shear tensor provides cortical neurons with a preferred direction of orientation tuning. We demonstrate that isotropic neuronal summation of a sheared topographic map, in the presence of additional random shear, can provide the major features of cortical functional architecture with the ocular dominance column system acting as the principal source of the shear tensor. The major principal axis of the shear tensor determines the direction and its eigenvalues the relative strength of cortical orientation preference. This hypothesis is then shown to be qualitatively consistent with a variety of experimental results on cat and monkey orientation column properties obtained from optical recording and from other anatomical and physiological techniques. In addition, we show that a recent result of Das and Gilbert (Das, A., & Gilbert, C. D., 1997. Distortions of visuotopic map match orientation singularities in primary visual cortex. Nature, 387, 594-598) is consistent with an infinite set of parameterized solutions for the cortical map. We exploit this freedom to choose a particular instance of the Das-Gilbert solution set which is consistent with the full range of local spatial structure in V1. These results suggest that further relationships between ocular dominance columns, orientation columns, and local topography may be revealed by experimental testing.

  16. Modeling the dynamics of single-bubble sonoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignoli, Lucas L; De Barros, Ana L F; Thomé, Roberto C A; Nogueira, A L M A; Paschoal, Ricardo C; Rodrigues, Hilário

    2013-01-01

    Sonoluminescence (SL) is the phenomenon in which acoustic energy is (partially) transformed into light. It may occur by means of one bubble or many bubbles of gas inside a liquid medium, giving rise to the terms single-bubble and multi-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL and MBSL). In recent years some models have been proposed to explain this phenomenon, but there is still no complete theory for the light-emission mechanism (especially in the case of SBSL). In this paper, we do not address this more complicated specific issue, but only present a simple model describing the dynamical behavior of the sonoluminescent bubble in the SBSL case. Using simple numerical techniques within the Matlab software package, we discuss solutions that consider various possibilities for some of the parameters involved: liquid compressibility, surface tension, viscosity and type of gas. The model may be used for an introductory study of SL on undergraduate or graduate physics courses, and as a clarifying example of a physical system exhibiting large nonlinearity. (paper)

  17. Modeling bidirectionally coupled single-mode semiconductor lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulet, Josep; Masoller, Cristina; Mirasso, Claudio R.

    2002-01-01

    We develop a dynamical model suitable for the description of two mutually coupled semiconductor lasers in a face-to-face configuration. Our study considers the propagation of the electric field along the compound system as well as the evolution of the carrier densities within each semiconductor laser. Mutual injection, passive optical feedback, and multiple reflections are accounted for in this framework, although under weak to moderate coupling conditions. We systematically describe the effect of the coupling strength on the spectrum of monochromatic solutions and on the respective dynamical behavior. By assuming single-longitudinal-mode operation, weak mutual coupling and slowly varying approximation, the dynamical model can be reduced to rate equations describing the mutual injection from one laser to its counterpart and vice versa. A good agreement between the complete and simplified models is found for small coupling. For larger coupling, higher-order terms lead to a smaller threshold reduction, reflected itself in the spectrum of the monochromatic solutions and in the dynamics of the optical power

  18. Mathematical modeling of a single stage ultrasonically assisted distillation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Taha; Ahmad, Arshad; Ripin, Adnan; Abdullah, Tuan Amran Tuan; Nasef, Mohamed M; Ali, Mohamad W

    2015-05-01

    The ability of sonication phenomena in facilitating separation of azeotropic mixtures presents a promising approach for the development of more intensified and efficient distillation systems than conventional ones. To expedite the much-needed development, a mathematical model of the system based on conservation principles, vapor-liquid equilibrium and sonochemistry was developed in this study. The model that was founded on a single stage vapor-liquid equilibrium system and enhanced with ultrasonic waves was coded using MATLAB simulator and validated with experimental data for ethanol-ethyl acetate mixture. The effects of both ultrasonic frequency and intensity on the relative volatility and azeotropic point were examined, and the optimal conditions were obtained using genetic algorithm. The experimental data validated the model with a reasonable accuracy. The results of this study revealed that the azeotropic point of the mixture can be totally eliminated with the right combination of sonication parameters and this can be utilized in facilitating design efforts towards establishing a workable ultrasonically intensified distillation system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Application for Single Price Auction Model (SPA) in AC Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachi, Tsunehisa; Fukutome, Suguru; Chen, Luonan; Makino, Yoshinori; Koshimizu, Gentarou

    This paper aims to develop a single price auction model with AC transmission network, based on the principle of maximizing social surplus of electricity market. Specifically, we first formulate the auction market as a nonlinear optimization problem, which has almost the same form as the conventional optimal power flow problem, and then propose an algorithm to derive both market clearing price and trade volume of each player even for the case of market-splitting. As indicated in the paper, the proposed approach can be used not only for the price evaluation of auction or bidding market but also for analysis of bidding strategy, congestion effect and other constraints or factors. Several numerical examples are used to demonstrate effectiveness of our method.

  20. Contributions to reversed-phase column selectivity: III. Column hydrogen-bond basicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, P W; Dolan, J W; Dorsey, J G; Snyder, L R; Kirkland, J J

    2015-05-22

    Column selectivity in reversed-phase chromatography (RPC) can be described in terms of the hydrophobic-subtraction model, which recognizes five solute-column interactions that together determine solute retention and column selectivity: hydrophobic, steric, hydrogen bonding of an acceptor solute (i.e., a hydrogen-bond base) by a stationary-phase donor group (i.e., a silanol), hydrogen bonding of a donor solute (e.g., a carboxylic acid) by a stationary-phase acceptor group, and ionic. Of these five interactions, hydrogen bonding between donor solutes (acids) and stationary-phase acceptor groups is the least well understood; the present study aims at resolving this uncertainty, so far as possible. Previous work suggests that there are three distinct stationary-phase sites for hydrogen-bond interaction with carboxylic acids, which we will refer to as column basicity I, II, and III. All RPC columns exhibit a selective retention of carboxylic acids (column basicity I) in varying degree. This now appears to involve an interaction of the solute with a pair of vicinal silanols in the stationary phase. For some type-A columns, an additional basic site (column basicity II) is similar to that for column basicity I in primarily affecting the retention of carboxylic acids. The latter site appears to be associated with metal contamination of the silica. Finally, for embedded-polar-group (EPG) columns, the polar group can serve as a proton acceptor (column basicity III) for acids, phenols, and other donor solutes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Spatial Variability in Column CO2 Inferred from High Resolution GEOS-5 Global Model Simulations: Implications for Remote Sensing and Inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, L.; Putman, B.; Collatz, J.; Gregg, W.

    2012-01-01

    Column CO2 observations from current and future remote sensing missions represent a major advancement in our understanding of the carbon cycle and are expected to help constrain source and sink distributions. However, data assimilation and inversion methods are challenged by the difference in scale of models and observations. OCO-2 footprints represent an area of several square kilometers while NASA s future ASCENDS lidar mission is likely to have an even smaller footprint. In contrast, the resolution of models used in global inversions are typically hundreds of kilometers wide and often cover areas that include combinations of land, ocean and coastal areas and areas of significant topographic, land cover, and population density variations. To improve understanding of scales of atmospheric CO2 variability and representativeness of satellite observations, we will present results from a global, 10-km simulation of meteorology and atmospheric CO2 distributions performed using NASA s GEOS-5 general circulation model. This resolution, typical of mesoscale atmospheric models, represents an order of magnitude increase in resolution over typical global simulations of atmospheric composition allowing new insight into small scale CO2 variations across a wide range of surface flux and meteorological conditions. The simulation includes high resolution flux datasets provided by NASA s Carbon Monitoring System Flux Pilot Project at half degree resolution that have been down-scaled to 10-km using remote sensing datasets. Probability distribution functions are calculated over larger areas more typical of global models (100-400 km) to characterize subgrid-scale variability in these models. Particular emphasis is placed on coastal regions and regions containing megacities and fires to evaluate the ability of coarse resolution models to represent these small scale features. Additionally, model output are sampled using averaging kernels characteristic of OCO-2 and ASCENDS measurement

  2. Cow-in-a-Column – A Synthetic Food Replicator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The project tested the concept for combining waste degradation and food production in a single reactor or column, i.e., a "Cow-in-a-Column".  The inputs could...

  3. Enrichment of heavy water in thermal-diffusion columns connected in series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Ho-Ming; Chen, Liu Yi

    2009-01-01

    The separation equations for enrichment of heavy water from water isotope mixture by thermal diffusion in multiple columns connected in series, have been derived based on one column design developed in previous work. The improvement in separation is achievable by operating in a double-column device, instead of in a single-column device, with the same total column length. It is also found that further improvement in separation is obtainable if a triple-column device is employed, except for operating under small total column length and low flow rate.

  4. Desulfotignum toluenicum sp. nov., a novel toluene-degrading, sulphate-reducing bacterium isolated from an oil-reservoir model column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ommedal, Hege; Torsvik, Terje

    2007-12-01

    A Gram-negative, sulphate-reducing bacterium (strain H3(T)) was isolated from an oil-reservoir model column. The new isolate was able to oxidize toluene coupled to hydrogen sulphide production. For growth, the optimum salt concentration was 1.5 % (w/v), the optimum pH was 7.2 and the optimum temperature was 34 degrees C. The cells were straight to slightly curved rods, 0.6-1.0 microm in diameter and 1.4-2.5 microm in length. The predominant fatty acids were C(16 : 0), C(16 : 1)omega7c and C(17 : 0) cyclo, and the cells also contained dimethylacetals. Cloning and sequencing of a 1505 bp long fragment of the 16S rRNA gene showed that strain H3(T) is a member of the Deltaproteobacteria and is related closely to Desulfotignum balticum DSM 7044(T). The G+C content of the DNA was 52.0 mol% and the DNA-DNA similarity to D. balticum DSM 7044(T) was 56.1 %. Based on differences in DNA sequence and the unique property of toluene degradation, it is proposed that strain H3(T) should be designated a member of a novel species within the genus Desulfotignum, for which the name Desulfotignum toluenicum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is H3(T) (=DSM 18732(T)=ATCC BAA-1460(T)).

  5. Transformation impacts of dissolved and solid phase Fe(II) on trichloroethylene (TCE) reduction in an iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) mixed column system: a mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yeunook; Kim, Dooil; Cho, Hyun-Hee; Singhal, Naresh; Park, Jae-Woo

    2012-12-01

    In this research, we conducted trichloroethylene (TCE) reduction in a column filled with iron and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) and developed a mathematical model to investigate the critical reactions between active species in iron/IRB/contaminant systems. The formation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) in this system with IRB and zero-valent iron (ZVI, Fe(0)) coated with a ferric iron (Fe(III)) crust significantly affected TCE reduction and IRB respiration in various ways. This study presents a new framework for transformation property and reducing ability of both dissolved (Fe(II)(dissolved)) and solid form ferrous iron (Fe(II)(solid)). Results showed that TCE reduction was strongly depressed by Fe(II)(solid) rather than by other inhibitors (e.g., Fe(III) and lactate), suggesting that Fe(II)(solid) might reduce IRB activation due to attachment to IRB cells. Newly exposed Fe(0) from the released Fe(II)(dissolved) was a strong contributor to TCE reduction compared to Fe(II)(solid). In addition, our research confirmed that less Fe(II)(solid) production strongly supported long-term TCE reduction because it may create an easier TCE approach to Fe(0) or increase IRB growth. Our findings will aid the understanding of the contributions of iron media (e.g., Fe(II)(solid), Fe(II)(dissolved), Fe(III), and Fe(0)) to IRB for decontamination in natural groundwater systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Calculations of dose distributions in the lungs of a rat model irradiated in the thermal column of the TRIGA reactor in Pavia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Protti, N. [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia, Via Bassi, 6, Pavia (Italy); National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) Section of Pavia, Via Bassi, 6, Pavia (Italy)], E-mail: nicoletta.protti@pv.infn.it; Bortolussi, S.; Stella, S. [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia, Via Bassi, 6, Pavia (Italy); National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) Section of Pavia, Via Bassi, 6, Pavia (Italy); Gadan, M.A. [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia, Via Bassi, 6, Pavia (Italy); De Bari, A.; Ballarini, F. [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia, Via Bassi, 6, Pavia (Italy); National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) Section of Pavia, Via Bassi, 6, Pavia (Italy); Bruschi, P. [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia, Via Bassi, 6, Pavia (Italy); Ferrari, C.; Clerici, A.M.; Zonta, C. [Department of Surgery, Experimental Surgery Laboratory, University of Pavia (Italy); Bakeine, J.G. [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia, Via Bassi, 6, Pavia (Italy); Dionigi, P.; Zonta, A. [Department of Surgery, Experimental Surgery Laboratory, University of Pavia (Italy); Altieri, S. [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia, Via Bassi, 6, Pavia (Italy); National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) Section of Pavia, Via Bassi, 6, Pavia (Italy)

    2009-07-15

    To test the possibility to apply boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) to lung tumors, some rats are planned to be irradiated in the thermal column of the TRIGA reactor of University of Pavia. Before the irradiation, lung metastases will be induced in BDIX rats, which will be subsequently infused with boronophenylalanine (BPA). During the irradiation, the rats will be positioned in a box designed to shield the whole animal except the thorax area. In order to optimize the irradiation set-up and to design a suitable shielding box, a set of calculations were performed with the MCNP Monte Carlo transport code. A rat model was constructed using the MCNP geometry capabilities and was positioned in a box with walls filled with lithium carbonate. A window was opened in front of the lung region. Different shapes of the holder and of the window were tested and analyzed in terms of the dose distribution obtained in the lungs and of the dose absorbed by the radiosensitive organs in the rat. The best configuration of the holder ensures an almost uniform thermal neutron flux inside the lungs ({phi}{sub max}/{phi}{sub min}=1.5), an irradiation time about 10 min long, to deliver at least 40 Gy{sub w} to the tumor, a mean lung dose of 5.9{+-}0.4 Gy{sub w}, and doses absorbed by all the other healthy tissues below the tolerance limits.

  7. Nine Words - Nine Columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trempe Jr., Robert B.; Buthke, Jan

    2016-01-01

    This book records the efforts of a one-week joint workshop between Master students from Studio 2B of Arkitektskolen Aarhus and Master students from the Harbin Institute of Technology in Harbin, China. The workshop employed nine action words to instigate team-based investigation into the effects o...... as formwork for the shaping of wood veneer. The resulting columns ‘wear’ every aspect of this design pipeline process and display the power of process towards an architectural resolution....

  8. Computational analysis of ozonation in bubble columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinones-Bolanos, E.; Zhou, H.; Otten, L.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a new computational ozonation model based on the principle of computational fluid dynamics along with the kinetics of ozone decay and microbial inactivation to predict the performance of ozone disinfection in fine bubble columns. The model can be represented using a mixture two-phase flow model to simulate the hydrodynamics of the water flow and using two transport equations to track the concentration profiles of ozone and microorganisms along the height of the column, respectively. The applicability of this model was then demonstrated by comparing the simulated ozone concentrations with experimental measurements obtained from a pilot scale fine bubble column. One distinct advantage of this approach is that it does not require the prerequisite assumptions such as plug flow condition, perfect mixing, tanks-in-series, uniform radial or longitudinal dispersion in predicting the performance of disinfection contactors without carrying out expensive and tedious tracer studies. (author)

  9. Primordial black holes from single field models of inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Bellido, Juan

    Primordial black holes (PBH) have been shown to arise from high peaks in the matter power spectra of multi-field models of inflation. Here we show, with a simple toy model, that it is also possible to generate a peak in the curvature power spectrum of single-field inflation. We assume that the effective dynamics of the inflaton field presents a near-inflection point which slows down the field right before the end of inflation and gives rise to a prominent spike in the fluctuation power spectrum at scales much smaller than those probed by Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and Large Scale Structure (LSS) observations. This peak will give rise, upon reentry during the radiation era, to PBH via gravitational collapse. The mass and abundance of these PBH is such that they could constitute the totality of the Dark Matter today. We satisfy all CMB and LSS constraints and predict a very broad range of PBH masses. Some of these PBH are light enough that they will evaporate before structure formation, leaving behind a ...

  10. Generalized Functional Linear Models With Semiparametric Single-Index Interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yehua

    2010-06-01

    We introduce a new class of functional generalized linear models, where the response is a scalar and some of the covariates are functional. We assume that the response depends on multiple covariates, a finite number of latent features in the functional predictor, and interaction between the two. To achieve parsimony, the interaction between the multiple covariates and the functional predictor is modeled semiparametrically with a single-index structure. We propose a two step estimation procedure based on local estimating equations, and investigate two situations: (a) when the basis functions are pre-determined, e.g., Fourier or wavelet basis functions and the functional features of interest are known; and (b) when the basis functions are data driven, such as with functional principal components. Asymptotic properties are developed. Notably, we show that when the functional features are data driven, the parameter estimates have an increased asymptotic variance, due to the estimation error of the basis functions. Our methods are illustrated with a simulation study and applied to an empirical data set, where a previously unknown interaction is detected. Technical proofs of our theoretical results are provided in the online supplemental materials.

  11. Generalized Functional Linear Models With Semiparametric Single-Index Interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yehua; Wang, Naisyin; Carroll, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a new class of functional generalized linear models, where the response is a scalar and some of the covariates are functional. We assume that the response depends on multiple covariates, a finite number of latent features in the functional predictor, and interaction between the two. To achieve parsimony, the interaction between the multiple covariates and the functional predictor is modeled semiparametrically with a single-index structure. We propose a two step estimation procedure based on local estimating equations, and investigate two situations: (a) when the basis functions are pre-determined, e.g., Fourier or wavelet basis functions and the functional features of interest are known; and (b) when the basis functions are data driven, such as with functional principal components. Asymptotic properties are developed. Notably, we show that when the functional features are data driven, the parameter estimates have an increased asymptotic variance, due to the estimation error of the basis functions. Our methods are illustrated with a simulation study and applied to an empirical data set, where a previously unknown interaction is detected. Technical proofs of our theoretical results are provided in the online supplemental materials.

  12. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, S A; McCoy, R B; Morrison, H; Ackerman, A; Avramov, A; deBoer, G; Chen, M; Cole, J; DelGenio, A; Golaz, J; Hashino, T; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; Luo, Y; McFarquhar, G; Menon, S; Neggers, R; Park, S; Poellot, M; von Salzen, K; Schmidt, J; Sednev, I; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Spangenberg, D; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Falk, M; Foster, M; Fridlind, A; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xie, S; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

    2008-02-27

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics indicate that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is some evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics. This case study, which has been well observed from both aircraft and ground-based remote sensors, could be a benchmark for model simulations of mixed-phase clouds.

  13. NMFS Water Column Sonar Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water column sonar data are an important component of fishery independent surveys, habitat studies and other research. NMFS water column sonar data are archived here.

  14. The Mass and Absorption Columns of Galactic Gaseous Halos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhijie; Bregman, Joel N.

    2018-01-01

    The gaseous halo surrounding the galaxy is a reservoir for the gas on the galaxy disk, supplying materials for the star formation. We developed a gaseous halo model connecting the galactic disk and the gaseous halo by assuming the star formation rate is equal to the radiative cooling rate. Besides the single-phase collisional gaseous halo, we also consider the photoionization effect and a time-independent cooling model that assumes the mass cooling rate is constant over all temperatures. The photoionization dominates the low mass galaxy and the outskirts of the massive galaxy due to the low-temperature or low-density nature. The multi-phase cooling model dominates the denser region within the cooling radius, where the efficient radiative cooling must be included. Applying these two improvements, our model can reproduce the most of observed high ionization state ions (i.e., O VI, O VII, Ne VIII and Mg X). Our models show that the O VI column density is almost a constant of around 10^14 cm^-2 over a wide stellar mass from M_\\star ~10^8 M_Sun to 10^11 M_Sun, which is constant with current observations. This model also implies the O VI is photoionized for the galaxy with a halo mass fraction function of the EAGLE simulation. Finally, our model predicts plateaus of the Ne VIII and the Mg X column densities above the sub-L^* galaxy, and the possibly detectable O VII and O VIII column densities for low-mass galaxies, which help to determine the required detection limit for the future observations and missions.

  15. The handedness of historiated spiral columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couzin, Robert

    2017-09-01

    Trajan's Column in Rome (AD 113) was the model for a modest number of other spiral columns decorated with figural, narrative imagery from antiquity to the present day. Most of these wind upwards to the right, often with a congruent spiral staircase within. A brief introductory consideration of antique screw direction in mechanical devices and fluted columns suggests that the former may have been affected by the handedness of designers and the latter by a preference for symmetry. However, for the historiated columns that are the main focus of this article, the determining factor was likely script direction. The manner in which this operated is considered, as well as competing mechanisms that might explain exceptions. A related phenomenon is the reversal of the spiral in a non-trivial number of reproductions of the antique columns, from Roman coinage to Renaissance and baroque drawings and engravings. Finally, the consistent inattention in academic literature to the spiral direction of historiated columns and the repeated publication of erroneous earlier reproductions warrants further consideration.

  16. Vertebral Column Resection for Rigid Spinal Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifi, Comron; Laratta, Joseph L; Petridis, Petros; Shillingford, Jamal N; Lehman, Ronald A; Lenke, Lawrence G

    2017-05-01

    Broad narrative review. To review the evolution, operative technique, outcomes, and complications associated with posterior vertebral column resection. A literature review of posterior vertebral column resection was performed. The authors' surgical technique is outlined in detail. The authors' experience and the literature regarding vertebral column resection are discussed at length. Treatment of severe, rigid coronal and/or sagittal malalignment with posterior vertebral column resection results in approximately 50-70% correction depending on the type of deformity. Surgical site infection rates range from 2.9% to 9.7%. Transient and permanent neurologic injury rates range from 0% to 13.8% and 0% to 6.3%, respectively. Although there are significant variations in EBL throughout the literature, it can be minimized by utilizing tranexamic acid intraoperatively. The ability to correct a rigid deformity in the spine relies on osteotomies. Each osteotomy is associated with a particular magnitude of correction at a single level. Posterior vertebral column resection is the most powerful posterior osteotomy method providing a successful correction of fixed complex deformities. Despite meticulous surgical technique and precision, this robust osteotomy technique can be associated with significant morbidity even in the most experienced hands.

  17. Descriptive models for single-jet sluicing of sludge waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erian, F.F.; Mahoney, L.A.; Terrones, G.

    1997-12-01

    Mobilization of sludge waste stored in underground storage tanks can be achieved safely and reliably by sluicing. In the project discussed in this report, the waste in Hanford single-shell Tank 241-C-106 will be mobilized by sluicing, retrieved by a slurry retrieval pump, and transferred via an 1800-ft slurry pipeline to Tank 241-AY-102. A sluicing strategy must be developed that ensures efficient use of the deployed configuration of the sluicing system: the nozzle(s) and the retrieval pump(s). Given a sluicing system configuration in a particular tank, it is desirable to prescribe the sequential locations at which the sludge will be mobilized and retrieved and the rate at which these mobilization and retrieval processes take place. In addition, it is necessary to know whether the retrieved waste slurry meets the requirements for cross-site slurry transport. Some of the physical phenomena that take place during mobilization and retrieval and certain aspects of the sluicing process are described in this report. First, a mathematical model gives (1) an idealized geometrical representation of where, within the confines of a storage tank containing a certain amount of settled waste, sludge can be removed and mobilized; and (2) a quantitative measure of the amount of sludge that can be removed during a sluicing campaign. A model describing an idealized water jet issuing from a circular nozzle located at a given height above a flat surface is also presented in this report. This dynamic water-jet model provides the basis for improving the geometrical sluicing model presented next. In this model the authors assume that the water jet follows a straight trajectory toward a target point on a flat surface. However, the water jet does not follow a straight line in the actual tank, and using the true trajectory will allow a more accurate estimate of the amount of disturbed material. Also, the authors hope that developing accurate force and pressure fields will lead to a better

  18. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Stephen A.; McCoy, Renata B.; Morrison, Hugh; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Avramov, Alexander; de Boer, Gijs; Chen, Mingxuan; Cole, Jason N.S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Falk, Michael; Foster, Michael J.; Fridlind, Ann; Golaz, Jean-Christophe; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Hoose, Corinna; Khairoutdinov, Marat F.; Larson, Vincent E.; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Yali; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Menon, Surabi; Neggers, Roel A. J.; Park, Sungsu; Poellot, Michael R.; Schmidt, Jerome M.; Sednev, Igor; Shipway, Ben J.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Sud, Yogesh C.; Turner, David D.; Veron, Dana E.; von Salzen, Knut; Walker, Gregory K.; Wang, Zhien; Wolf, Audrey B.; Xie, Shaocheng; Xu, Kuan-Man; Yang, Fanglin; Zhang, Gong

    2009-02-02

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed average liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the average mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics suggest that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics.

  19. Equivalence of two models in single-phase multicomponent flow simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Yuanqing

    2016-02-28

    In this work, two models to simulate the single-phase multicomponent flow in reservoirs are introduced: single-phase multicomponent flow model and two-phase compositional flow model. Because the single-phase multicomponent flow is a special case of the two-phase compositional flow, the two-phase compositional flow model can also simulate the case. We compare and analyze the two models when simulating the single-phase multicomponent flow, and then demonstrate the equivalence of the two models mathematically. An experiment is also carried out to verify the equivalence of the two models.

  20. Equivalence of two models in single-phase multicomponent flow simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Yuanqing; Sun, Shuyu

    2016-01-01

    In this work, two models to simulate the single-phase multicomponent flow in reservoirs are introduced: single-phase multicomponent flow model and two-phase compositional flow model. Because the single-phase multicomponent flow is a special case of the two-phase compositional flow, the two-phase compositional flow model can also simulate the case. We compare and analyze the two models when simulating the single-phase multicomponent flow, and then demonstrate the equivalence of the two models mathematically. An experiment is also carried out to verify the equivalence of the two models.

  1. A single-vendor and a single-buyer integrated inventory model with ordering cost reduction dependent on lead time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayashree, M.; Uthayakumar, R.

    2017-09-01

    Lead time is one of the major limits that affect planning at every stage of the supply chain system. In this paper, we study a continuous review inventory model. This paper investigates the ordering cost reductions are dependent on lead time. This study addressed two-echelon supply chain problem consisting of a single vendor and a single buyer. The main contribution of this study is that the integrated total cost of the single vendor and the single buyer integrated system is analyzed by adopting two different (linear and logarithmic) types ordering cost reductions act dependent on lead time. In both cases, we develop effective solution procedures for finding the optimal solution and then illustrative numerical examples are given to illustrate the results. The solution procedure is to determine the optimal solutions of order quantity, ordering cost, lead time and the number of deliveries from the single vendor and the single buyer in one production run, so that the integrated total cost incurred has the minimum value. Ordering cost reduction is the main aspect of the proposed model. A numerical example is given to validate the model. Numerical example solved by using Matlab software. The mathematical model is solved analytically by minimizing the integrated total cost. Furthermore, the sensitivity analysis is included and the numerical examples are given to illustrate the results. The results obtained in this paper are illustrated with the help of numerical examples. The sensitivity of the proposed model has been checked with respect to the various major parameters of the system. Results reveal that the proposed integrated inventory model is more applicable for the supply chain manufacturing system. For each case, an algorithm procedure of finding the optimal solution is developed. Finally, the graphical representation is presented to illustrate the proposed model and also include the computer flowchart in each model.

  2. Heat Transfer Analysis for a Fixed CST Column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.

    2004-01-01

    In support of a small column ion exchange (SCIX) process for the Savannah River Site waste processing program, a transient two-dimensional heat transfer model that includes the conduction process neglecting the convection cooling mechanism inside the crystalline silicotitanate (CST) column has been constructed and heat transfer calculations made for the present design configurations. For this situation, a no process flow condition through the column was assumed as one of the reference conditions for the simulation of a loss-of-flow accident. A series of the modeling calculations has been performed using a computational heat transfer approach. Results for the baseline model indicate that transit times to reach 130 degrees Celsius maximum temperature of the CST-salt solution column are about 96 hours when the 20-in CST column with 300 Ci/liter heat generation source and 25 degrees Celsius initial column temperature is cooled by natural convection of external air as a primary heat transfer mechanism. The modeling results for the 28-in column equipped with water jacket systems on the external wall surface of the column and water coolant pipe at the center of the CST column demonstrate that the column loaded with 300 Ci/liter heat source can be maintained non-boiling indefinitely. Sensitivity calculations for several alternate column sizes, heat loads of the packed column, engineered cooling systems, and various ambient conditions at the exterior wall of the column have been performed under the reference conditions of the CST-salt solution to assess the impact of those parameters on the peak temperatures of the packed column for a given transient time. The results indicate that a water-coolant pipe at the center of the CST column filled with salt solution is the most effective one among the potential design parameters related to the thermal energy dissipation of decay heat load. It is noted that the cooling mechanism at the wall boundary of the column has significant

  3. Effect of backmixing on pulse column performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao, Y.W.

    1979-05-01

    A critical survey of the published literature concerning dispersed phase holdup and longitudinal mixing in pulsed sieve-plate extraction columns has been made to assess the present state-of-the-art in predicting these two parameters, both of which are of critical importance in the development of an accurate mathematical model of the pulse column. Although there are many conflicting correlations of these variables as a function of column geometry, operating conditions, and physical properties of the liquid systems involved it has been possible to develop new correlations which appear to be useful and which are consistent with much of the available data over the limited range of variables most likely to be encountered in plant sized equipment. The correlations developed were used in a stagewise model of the pulse column to predict product concentrations, solute inventory, and concentration profiles in a column for which limited experimental data were available. Reasonable agreement was obtained between the mathematical model and the experimental data. Complete agreement, however, can only be obtained after a correlation for the extraction efficiency has been developed. The correlation of extraction efficiency was beyond the scope of this work

  4. A discrete dislocation dynamics model of creeping single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaguru, M.; Keralavarma, S. M.

    2018-04-01

    Failure by creep is a design limiting issue for metallic materials used in several high temperature applications. Current theoretical models of creep are phenomenological with little connection to the underlying microscopic mechanisms. In this paper, a bottom-up simulation framework based on the discrete dislocation dynamics method is presented for dislocation creep aided by the diffusion of vacancies, known to be the rate controlling mechanism at high temperature and stress levels. The time evolution of the creep strain and the dislocation microstructure in a periodic unit cell of a nominally infinite single crystal is simulated using the kinetic Monte Carlo method, together with approximate constitutive laws formulated for the rates of thermal activation of dislocations over local pinning obstacles. The deformation of the crystal due to dislocation glide between individual thermal activation events is simulated using a standard dislocation dynamics algorithm, extended to account for constant stress periodic boundary conditions. Steady state creep conditions are obtained in the simulations with the predicted creep rates as a function of stress and temperature in good agreement with experimentally reported values. Arrhenius scaling of the creep rates as a function of temperature and power-law scaling with the applied stress are also reproduced, with the values of the power-law exponents in the high stress regime in good agreement with experiments.

  5. Single bumps in a 2-population homogenized neuronal network model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodina, Karina; Oleynik, Anna; Wyller, John

    2018-05-01

    We investigate existence and stability of single bumps in a homogenized 2-population neural field model, when the firing rate functions are given by the Heaviside function. The model is derived by means of the two-scale convergence technique of Nguetseng in the case of periodic microvariation in the connectivity functions. The connectivity functions are periodically modulated in both the synaptic footprint and in the spatial scale. The bump solutions are constructed by using a pinning function technique for the case where the solutions are independent of the local variable. In the weakly modulated case the generic picture consists of two bumps (one narrow and one broad bump) for each admissible set of threshold values for firing. In addition, a new threshold value regime for existence of bumps is detected. Beyond the weakly modulated regime the number of bumps depends sensitively on the degree of heterogeneity. For the latter case we present a configuration consisting of three coexisting bumps. The linear stability of the bumps is studied by means of the spectral properties of a Fredholm integral operator, block diagonalization of this operator and the Fourier decomposition method. In the weakly modulated regime, one of the bumps is unstable for all relative inhibition times, while the other one is stable for small and moderate values of this parameter. The latter bump becomes unstable as the relative inhibition time exceeds a certain threshold. In the case of the three coexisting bumps detected in the regime of finite degree of heterogeneity, we have at least one stable bump (and maximum two stable bumps) for small and moderate values of the relative inhibition time.

  6. Elevator frames two columns

    OpenAIRE

    Marín Jiménez, Juan Francisco

    2015-01-01

    This project aims to solve the problem of vertical transport of charges raised by a company with the standard UNE 58-132-91/6. The purpose of this project is the industrial design of a system of load handling by a bi-columned lifting device, tractioned by flat belts and steel cables from a transport level to a different level in order to connect two different assembly lines situated at different heights. The goal of this project is lifting a 780 Kg load at a 2.400 mm height....

  7. Column: Every Last Byte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simson Garfinkel

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Inheritance powder is the name that was given to poisons, especially arsenic, that were commonly used in the 17th and early 18th centuries to hasten the death of the elderly. For most of the 17th century, arsenic was deadly but undetectable, making it nearly impossible to prove that someone had been poisoned. The first arsenic test produced a gas—hardly something that a scientist could show to a judge. Faced with a growing epidemic of poisonings, doctors and chemists spent decades searching for something better.(see PDF for full column

  8. Recovery of deuterium from H-D gas mixture by thermal diffusion in a multi-concentric-tube column device of fixed total sum of column heights with transverse sampling streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, H.-M.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of the increment in the number of concentric-tube thermal diffusion columns on the recovery of deuterium from H 2 -HD-D 2 system with fixed total sum of column heights, has been investigated. The equations for predicting the degrees of separation in single-column, double-column and triple-column devices have been derived. Considerable improvement in recovery can be achieved if a multi-column device with larger number of column is employed, instead of a single-column device with column height equal to the same total sum of column heights, especially for the case of higher flow-rate operation and larger total sum of column heights.

  9. Dynamical and Radiative Properties of X-Ray Pulsar Accretion Columns: Phase-averaged Spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, Brent F. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States); Wolfram, Kenneth D. [Naval Research Laboratory (retired), Washington, DC (United States); Becker, Peter A., E-mail: bwest@usna.edu, E-mail: kswolfram@gmail.com, E-mail: pbecker@gmu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The availability of the unprecedented spectral resolution provided by modern X-ray observatories is opening up new areas for study involving the coupled formation of the continuum emission and the cyclotron absorption features in accretion-powered X-ray pulsar spectra. Previous research focusing on the dynamics and the associated formation of the observed spectra has largely been confined to the single-fluid model, in which the super-Eddington luminosity inside the column decelerates the flow to rest at the stellar surface, while the dynamical effect of gas pressure is ignored. In a companion paper, we have presented a detailed analysis of the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic structure of the accretion column obtained using a new self-consistent model that includes the effects of both gas and radiation pressures. In this paper, we explore the formation of the associated X-ray spectra using a rigorous photon transport equation that is consistent with the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic structure of the column. We use the new model to obtain phase-averaged spectra and partially occulted spectra for Her X-1, Cen X-3, and LMC X-4. We also use the new model to constrain the emission geometry, and compare the resulting parameters with those obtained using previously published models. Our model sheds new light on the structure of the column, the relationship between the ionized gas and the photons, the competition between diffusive and advective transport, and the magnitude of the energy-averaged cyclotron scattering cross-section.

  10. Flow dynamics in distillation columns packed with Dixon rings as used in isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilath, C.; Cohen, H.; Wolf, D.

    1977-01-01

    Packed distillation columns are common in isotope separation. The pressure drop serves as an indication for the hydrodynamic state of the column. Models were formulated for flow and pressure drop dynamics in packed distillation columns. These models were confirmed on columns packed with Dixon rings and operated with water for separation of oxygen isotopes. Liquid holdup displacement is very important in isotope separation practice. Experiments proved that distillation columns packed with Dixon rings exhibit a behaviour close to plug flow. (author)

  11. Annular pulse column development studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    The capacity of critically safe cylindrical pulse columns limits the size of nuclear fuel solvent extraction plants because of the limited cross-sectional area of plutonium, U-235, or U-233 processing columns. Thus, there is a need to increase the cross-sectional area of these columns. This can be accomplished through the use of a column having an annular cross section. The preliminary testing of a pilot-plant-scale annular column has been completed and is reported herein. The column is made from 152.4-mm (6-in.) glass pipe sections with an 89-mm (3.5-in.) o.d. internal tube, giving an annular width of 32-mm (1.25-in.). Louver plates are used to swirl the column contents to prevent channeling of the phases. The data from this testing indicate that this approach can successfully provide larger-cross-section critically safe pulse columns. While the capacity is only 70% of that of a cylindrical column of similar cross section, the efficiency is almost identical to that of a cylindrical column. No evidence was seen of any non-uniform pulsing action from one side of the column to the other

  12. The role of c-AMP-dependent protein kinase in spinal cord and post synaptic dorsal column neurons in a rat model of visceral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Su, Guangxiao; Ma, Long; Zhang, Xuan; Lei, Yongzhong; Lin, Qing; Nauta, Haring J W; Li, Junfa; Fang, Li

    2007-04-01

    Visceral noxious stimulation induces central neuronal plasticity changes and suggests that the c-AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) signal transduction cascade contributes to long-term changes in nociceptive processing at the spinal cord level. Our previous studies reported the clinical neurosurgical interruption of post synaptic dorsal column neuron (PSDC) pathway by performing midline myelotomy effectively alleviating the intractable visceral pain in patients with severe pain. However, the intracellular cascade in PSDC neurons mediated by PKA nociceptive neurotransmission was not known. In this study, by using multiple experimental approaches, we investigated the role of PKA in nociceptive signaling in the spinal cord and PSDC neurons in a visceral pain model in rats with the intracolonic injection of mustard oil. We found that mustard oil injection elicited visceral pain that significantly changed exploratory behavior activity in rats in terms of decreased numbers of entries, traveled distance, active and rearing time, rearing activity and increased resting time when compared to that of rats receiving mineral oil injection. However, the intrathecal infusion of PKA inhibitor, H89 partially reversed the visceral pain-induced effects. Results from Western blot studies showed that mustard oil injection significantly induced the expression of PKA protein in the lumbosacral spinal cord. Immunofluorescent staining in pre-labeled PSDC neurons showed that mustard oil injection greatly induces the neuronal profile numbers. We also found that the intrathecal infusion of a PKA inhibitor, H89 significantly blocked the visceral pain-induced phosphorylation of c-AMP-responsive element binding (CREB) protein in spinal cord in rats. The results of our study suggest that the PKA signal transduction cascade may contribute to visceral nociceptive changes in spinal PSDC pathways.

  13. A Mathematical Model of the Single Aluminium Diboride Particle Ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Yagodnikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a developed mathematical model of ignition of the single aluminum diboride particle as an aluminum-boron alloy in the oxidizing environment of a complicated chemical composition containing oxygen, water vapor, and carbon dioxide. The mathematical model is based on the theory of parallel chemical reactions proceeding on the appropriate parts of the particle surface occupied by each element in proportion to their molar share in the alloy. The paper considers a possibility to establish a thermodynamic balance between components over a particle surface in the gas phase. The composition of components is chosen as a result of thermodynamic calculation, namely В g , B2O3 g , BO, B2O2, BO2, Alg , AlO, Al2O, N2. The mathematical model is formed by a system of the differential equations of enthalpy balance, mass of aluminum diboride particle, and of formed oxides, which become isolated by initial and boundary conditions for temperature and size of particles, concentration of an oxidizer, and temperature of gas. The software package “AlB2“ is developed. It is a complete independent module written in Fortran algorithmic language, which together with a package of the subroutines “SPARKS” is used to calculate parameters of burning aluminum diboride particle by the Runge-Kutt method.For stoichiometry of chemical reactions of interaction between aluminum diboride and oxygen, a dynamics of changing temperature of a particle and thickness of an oxide film on its surface is calculated. It was admitted as initial conditions that the aluminum diboride particle radius was 100μ and the reference temperature of environment was 500 K, 1000 K, 2300 K, and 3000 K. Depending on this temperature the aluminum diboride particle temperature was calculated. Changing thickness of the oxide film on the particle surface at various initial gas temperatures characterizes its increase at the initial heating period of ~ 0,01 s and a gradual slowdown of the

  14. Improvement in deuterium recovery from water–isotope mixture by thermal diffusion in the device of branch columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Ching-Chun; Yeh, Ho-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Recovery of deuterium by thermal diffusion from water–isotope mixture has been investigated. • The undesirable remixing effect can be reduced by employing the device of branch columns. • Deuterium recoveries were compared with that in a single column of the same total column length. • Considerable recovery improvement is obtainable in the device of branch columns, instead of in a single-column device. - Abstract: Deuterium recovery from water–isotopes mixture using thermal diffusion can be improved by employing the branch column device, instead of single column devices, with the same total column length. The remixing effect due to convection currents in a thermal diffusion column for heavy water enrichment is thus reduced and separation improvement increases when the flow rate or the total column length increases. The improvement in separation can reach about 50% for the numerical example given

  15. Modeling and Development of Superconducting Nanowire Single Photon Detectors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal outlines a research project as the central component of a Ph.D. program focused on the device physics of superconducting nanowire single photon...

  16. Column-to-column packing variation of disposable pre-packed columns for protein chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Susanne; Hinterberger, Stephan; Jungbauer, Alois

    2017-12-08

    In the biopharmaceutical industry, pre-packed columns are the standard for process development, but they must be qualified before use in experimental studies to confirm the required performance of the packed bed. Column qualification is commonly done by pulse response experiments and depends highly on the experimental testing conditions. Additionally, the peak analysis method, the variation in the 3D packing structure of the bed, and the measurement precision of the workstation influence the outcome of qualification runs. While a full body of literature on these factors is available for HPLC columns, no comparable studies exist for preparative columns for protein chromatography. We quantified the influence of these parameters for commercially available pre-packed and self-packed columns of disposable and non-disposable design. Pulse response experiments were performed on 105 preparative chromatography columns with volumes of 0.2-20ml. The analyte acetone was studied at six different superficial velocities (30, 60, 100, 150, 250 and 500cm/h). The column-to-column packing variation between disposable pre-packed columns of different diameter-length combinations varied by 10-15%, which was acceptable for the intended use. The column-to-column variation cannot be explained by the packing density, but is interpreted as a difference in particle arrangement in the column. Since it was possible to determine differences in the column-to-column performance, we concluded that the columns were well-packed. The measurement precision of the chromatography workstation was independent of the column volume and was in a range of±0.01ml for the first peak moment and±0.007 ml 2 for the second moment. The measurement precision must be considered for small columns in the range of 2ml or less. The efficiency of disposable pre-packed columns was equal or better than that of self-packed columns. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of Model Reliabilities from Single-Step and Bivariate Blending Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taskinen, Matti; Mäntysaari, Esa; Lidauer, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Model based reliabilities in genetic evaluation are compared between three methods: animal model BLUP, single-step BLUP, and bivariate blending after genomic BLUP. The original bivariate blending is revised in this work to better account animal models. The study data is extracted from...... be calculated. Model reliabilities by the single-step and the bivariate blending methods were higher than by animal model due to genomic information. Compared to the single-step method, the bivariate blending method reliability estimates were, in general, lower. Computationally bivariate blending method was......, on the other hand, lighter than the single-step method....

  18. Uncertain Buckling Load and Reliability of Columns with Uncertain Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köylüoglu, H. U.; Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Cakmak, A. S.

    Continuous and finite element methods are utilized to determine the buckling load of columns with material and geometrical uncertainties considering deterministic, stochastic and interval models for the bending rigidity of columns. When the bending rigidity field is assumed to be deterministic, t....... for structural design, the lower bound is of crucial interest. The buckling load of fixed-free, simple-supported, pinned-fixed, fixed-fixed columns and a sample frame are calculated....

  19. Column: File Cabinet Forensics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simson Garfinkel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Researchers can spend their time reverse engineering, performing reverse analysis, or making substantive contributions to digital forensics science. Although work in all of these areas is important, it is the scientific breakthroughs that are the most critical for addressing the challenges that we face.Reverse Engineering is the traditional bread-and-butter of digital forensics research. Companies like Microsoft and Apple deliver computational artifacts (operating systems, applications and phones to the commercial market. These artifacts are bought and used by billions. Some have evil intent, and (if society is lucky, the computers end up in the hands of law enforcement. Unfortunately the original vendors rarely provide digital forensics tools that make their systems amenable to analysis by law enforcement. Hence the need for reverse engineering.(see PDF for full column

  20. DeepQA: Improving the estimation of single protein model quality with deep belief networks

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Renzhi; Bhattacharya, Debswapna; Hou, Jie; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    Background Protein quality assessment (QA) useful for ranking and selecting protein models has long been viewed as one of the major challenges for protein tertiary structure prediction. Especially, estimating the quality of a single protein model, which is important for selecting a few good models out of a large model pool consisting of mostly low-quality models, is still a largely unsolved problem. Results We introduce a novel single-model quality assessment method DeepQA based on deep belie...

  1. One stacked-column vibration test and analysis for VHTR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takeshi; Ishizuka, Hiroshi; Ide, Akira; Hayakawa, Hitoshi; Shingai, Kazuteru.

    1978-07-01

    This paper describes experimental results of the vibration test on a single stacked-column and compares them with the analytical results. A 1/2 scale model of the core element of a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) was set on a shaking table. Sinusoidal waves, response time history waves, beat wave and step wave of input acceleration 100 - 900 gal in the frequency of 0.5 to 15 Hz were used to vibrate the table horizontally. Results are as follows: (1) The column has a non-linear resonance and exhibits a hysteresis response with jump points. (2) The column vibration characteristics is similar to that of the finite beams connected with non-linear soft spring. (3) The column resonance frequency decreases with increasing input acceleration. (4) The impact force increases with increasing input acceleration and boundary gap width. (5) Good correlation in vibration behavior of the stacked-column and impact force on the boundary between test and analysis was obtained. (auth.)

  2. Response of steel box columns in fire conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Yahyai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Effect of elevated temperatures on the mechanical properties of steel, brings the importance of investigating the effect of fire on the steel structures anxiously. Columns, as the main load-carrying part of a structure, can be highly vulnerable to the fire. In this study, the behavior of steel gravity columns with box cross section exposed to fire has been investigated. These kinds of columns are widely used in common steel structures design in Iran. In current study, the behavior of such columns in fire conditions is investigated through the finite element method. To perform this, the finite element model of a steel column which has been previously tested under fire condition, was prepared. Experimental loading and boundary conditions were considered in the model and was analyzed. Results were validated by experimental data and various specimens of gravity box columns were designed according to the Iran’s steel buildings code, and modeled and analyzed using Abaqus software. The effect of width to thickness ratio of column plates, the load ratio and slenderness on the ultimate strength of the column was investigated, and the endurance time was estimated under ISO 834 standard fire curve. The results revealed that an increase in width to thickness ratio and load ratio leads to reduction of endurance time and the effect of width to thickness ratio on the ultimate strength of the column decreases with temperature increase.

  3. Strengthening of Steel Columns under Load: Torsional-Flexural Buckling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Vild

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents experimental and numerical research into the strengthening of steel columns under load using welded plates. So far, the experimental research in this field has been limited mostly to flexural buckling of columns and the preload had low effect on the column load resistance. This paper focuses on the local buckling and torsional-flexural buckling of columns. Three sets of three columns each were tested. Two sets corresponding to the base section (D and strengthened section (E were tested without preloading and were used for comparison. Columns from set (F were first preloaded to the load corresponding to the half of the load resistance of the base section (D. Then the columns were strengthened and after they cooled, they were loaded to failure. The columns strengthened under load (F had similar average resistance as the columns welded without preloading (E, meaning the preload affects even members susceptible to local buckling and torsional-flexural buckling only slightly. This is the same behaviour as of the tested columns from previous research into flexural buckling. The study includes results gained from finite element models of the problem created in ANSYS software. The results obtained from the experiments and numerical simulations were compared.

  4. Column Stores as an IR Prototyping Tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.F. Mühleisen (Hannes); T. Samar (Thaer); J.J.P. Lin (Jimmy); A.P. de Vries (Arjen)

    2014-01-01

    textabstract. We make the suggestion that instead of implementing custom index structures and query evaluation algorithms, IR researchers should simply store document representations in a column-oriented relational database and write ranking models using SQL. For rapid prototyping, this is

  5. A comparison of the ECMWF forecast model with observations over the annual cycle at SHEBA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bretherton, C.S.; Roode, S.R. de; Jakob, C.; Andreas, E.L.; Intrieri, J.; Moritz, R.E.; Persson, P.O.G.

    2000-01-01

    A central objective of the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) experiment was to provide a comprehensive observational test for single-column models of the atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system over the Arctic Ocean. For single-column modeling, one must specify the time-varying tendencies

  6. Compact electron beam focusing column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, Arun; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani

    2001-12-01

    A novel design for an electron beam focusing column has been developed at LBNL. The design is based on a low-energy spread multicusp plasma source which is used as a cathode for electron beam production. The focusing column is 10 mm in length. The electron beam is focused by means of electrostatic fields. The column is designed for a maximum voltage of 50 kV. Simulations of the electron trajectories have been performed by using the 2D simulation code IGUN and EGUN. The electron temperature has also been incorporated into the simulations. The electron beam simulations, column design and fabrication will be discussed in this presentation.

  7. Mini-columns for Conducting Breakthrough Experiments. Design and Construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittrich, Timothy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ware, Stuart Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-11

    Experiments with moderately and strongly sorbing radionuclides (i.e., U, Cs, Am) have shown that sorption between experimental solutions and traditional column materials must be accounted for to accurately determine stationary phase or porous media sorption properties (i.e., sorption site density, sorption site reaction rate coefficients, and partition coefficients or Kd values). This report details the materials and construction of mini-columns for use in breakthrough columns to allow for accurate measurement and modeling of sorption parameters. Material selection, construction techniques, wet packing of columns, tubing connections, and lessons learned are addressed.

  8. Modelling of glass refining kinetics-Part 1. Single bubbles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, Lubomír; Kloužek, Jaroslav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 3 (2003), s. 81-87 ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS4032103 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : glass melt * refining * single bubble Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.449, year: 2003

  9. Multiscale modelling of single crystal superalloys for gas turbine blades

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tinga, T.

    2009-01-01

    Gas turbines are extensively used for power generation and for the propulsion of aircraft and vessels. Their most severely loaded parts, the turbine rotor blades, are manufactured from single crystal nickel-base superalloys. The superior high temperature behaviour of these materials is attributed to

  10. The role of c-AMP-dependent protein kinase in spinal cord and post synaptic dorsal column neurons in a rat model of visceral pain

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jing; Su, Guangxiao; Ma, Long; Zhang, Xuan; Lei, Yongzhong; Lin, Qing; Nauta, Haring J.W.; Li, Junfa; Fang, Li

    2007-01-01

    Visceral noxious stimulation induces central neuronal plasticity changes and suggests that the c-AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) signal transduction cascade contributes to long-term changes in nociceptive processing at the spinal cord level. Our previous studies reported the clinical neurosurgical interruption of post synaptic dorsal column neuron (PSDC) pathway by performing midline myelotomy effectively alleviating the intractable visceral pain in patients with severe pain. However, the ...

  11. THE PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF A PACKED COLUMN : CALIBRATION OF AN ORIFICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur ŞENOL

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations to develop data for this study were made using a pilot scale glass column of 9 cm inside diameter randomly filled to a depth of 1.90 cm with a Raschig type ring at a slightly modified geometry. The geometrical characteristics of packing are: the total area of a single particle ad = 2.3 cm2; specific area ap = 10.37 cm2/cm3; voidage ? = 0.545 m3/m3. The efficiency tests were run using trichloroethylene/n-heptane system under total reflux conditions. Using the modified versions of the Eckert flooding model and the Bravo effective area (ae approach, as well as the Onda wetted area (aw and individual mass transfer coefficient models, it has been attempted to estimate the packing efficiency theoretically. This article also deals with the design strategies attributed to a randomly packed column. Emphasis is mainly placed on the way to formulate an algorithm of designing a pilot scale column through the models being attributed to the film theory. Using the column dry pressure drop properties based on the air flowing it has been achieved a generalized flow rate approach for calibrating of an orifice through which the air passes.

  12. Calculation of single chain cellulose elasticity using fully atomistic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiawa Wu; Robert J. Moon; Ashlie Martini

    2011-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals, a potential base material for green nanocomposites, are ordered bundles of cellulose chains. The properties of these chains have been studied for many years using atomic-scale modeling. However, model predictions are difficult to interpret because of the significant dependence of predicted properties on model details. The goal of this study is...

  13. [Single embryo transfer: is Scandinavian model valuable in France?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaisch-Allart, J; Mayenga, J-M; Grefenstette, I; Chouraqui, A; Serkine, A-M; Abirached, F; Kulski, O

    2008-11-01

    The aim of infertility treatment is clearly to obtain one healthy baby. If the transfer of a top quality single embryo could provide a baby to all the patients, there would be no more discussion. The problem is that, nowadays, French pregnancy rates after fresh embryo or frozen embryo transfer are not the same as in Nordic countries. All studies show that in unselected patients, single embryo transfer decreases twin pregnancy rate but decreases pregnancy rate too. Pregnancy rate is dependent on embryo quality, women's age, rank of IVF attempt (clear data) but also on body mass index, ovarian reserve, smoking habits. All these data cannot be taken into account in a law. That is the reason why a flexible policy of transfer adapted to each couple is preferable. Each couple and each IVF team are unique and must keep the freedom to choose how many embryos must be transferred to obtain healthy babies, and to avoid twin pregnancies but without demonizing them.

  14. Safety barriers and lighting columns.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D.A.

    1972-01-01

    Problems arising from the sitting of lighting columns on the central reserve are reviewed, and remedial measures such as break-away lighting supports and installation of safety fences on the central reserve on both sides of the lighting columns are examined.

  15. Characterization of Bubble Size Distributions within a Bubble Column

    OpenAIRE

    Shahrouz Mohagheghian; Brian R. Elbing

    2018-01-01

    The current study experimentally examines bubble size distribution (BSD) within a bubble column and the associated characteristic length scales. Air was injected into a column of water via a single injection tube. The column diameter (63–102 mm), injection tube diameter (0.8–1.6 mm) and superficial gas velocity (1.4–55 mm/s) were varied. Large samples (up to 54,000 bubbles) of bubble sizes measured via 2D imaging were used to produce probability density functions (PDFs). The PDFs were used to...

  16. HETP evaluation of structured packing distillation column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Orlando Jr.

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Several tests with a hydrocarbon mixture of known composition (C8-C14, obtained from DETEN Chemistry S.A., have been performed in a laboratory distillation column, having 40mm of nominal diameter and 2.2m high, with internals of Sulzer DX gauze stainless steel structured packing. The main purpose of this work was to evaluate HETP of a structured packing laboratory scale distillation column, operating continuously. Six HETP correlations available in the literature were compared in order to find out which is the most appropriate for structured packing columns working with medium distillates. Prior to the experimental tests, simulation studies using commercial software PRO/II® were performed in order to establish the optimum operational conditions for the distillation, especially concerning operating pressure, top and bottom temperatures, feed location and reflux ratio. The results of PRO/II® were very similar to the analysis of the products obtained during continuous operation, therefore permitting the use of the properties calculated by that software on the theoretical models investigated. The theoretical models chosen for HETP evaluation were: Bravo, Rocha and Fair (1985; Rocha, Bravo and Fair (1993, 1996; Brunazzi and Pagliant (1997; Carlo, Olujić and Pagliant (2006; Olujić et al., (2004. Modifications concerning calculation of specific areas were performed on the correlations in order to fit them for gauze packing HETP evaluation. As the laboratory distillation column was operated continuously, different HETP values were found by the models investigated for each section of the column. The low liquid flow rates in the top section of the column are a source of error for HETP evaluation by the models; therefore, more reliable HETP values were found in the bottom section, in which liquid flow rates were much greater. Among the theoretical models, Olujić et al. (2004 has shown good results relative to the experimental tests. In addition, the

  17. Study on application of single-crystal ice 'Kurobe ice column' to high-speed skating rinks. Demonstration test result at Olympic memorial arena 'M wave' in Nagano city. Tankesshohyo 'Kurobe no hyojun' no kosoku skate link eno tekiyosei kenkyu. Naganoshi olympic kinen arina 'Emu Wave' deno jissho shiken kekka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasaki, M. (Kansai Electric Power Co. Inc., Osaka (Japan))

    1999-06-10

    For high-speed low-friction skating rinks, research was made on sticking artificial ice columns (ice bamboo shoot). The ice columns were fabricated with the ice column production equipment equipped with 4-line water droplet dropping devices which were installed at intervals of 0.3m on both sides of a pathway of 200m long, 2.6m wide and 1.8m high in the lateral adit of Kurobegawa No.4 hydroelectric power station. The grown ice columns were processed for high-speed skating rinks through cutting, confirmation of single crystal and crystal orientation, slicing for every 7mm thickness and packaging. The ice columns were spread all over the rink while sliding them to prevent mixing of bubbles after spraying distilled water of nearly 25 degreesC onto base ices. In addition, hot water of nearly 40 degreesC was sprayed to produce the final ice rink of 30mm thick by nearly 5mm a day. The dynamic friction coefficient of the ice column rink reduced to 0.0038 by nearly 16% as compared with 0.0045 of conventional rinks. (NEDO)

  18. Single-Phase Bundle Flows Including Macroscopic Turbulence Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Yoon, Han Young [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Seok Jong; Cho, Hyoung Kyu [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    To deal with various thermal hydraulic phenomena due to rapid change of fluid properties when an accident happens, securing mechanistic approaches as much as possible may reduce the uncertainty arising from improper applications of the experimental models. In this study, the turbulence mixing model, which is well defined in the subchannel analysis code such as VIPRE, COBRA, and MATRA by experiments, is replaced by a macroscopic k-e turbulence model, which represents the aspect of mathematical derivation. The performance of CUPID with macroscopic turbulence model is validated against several bundle experiments: CNEN 4x4 and PNL 7x7 rod bundle tests. In this study, the macroscopic k-e model has been validated for the application to subchannel analysis. It has been implemented in the CUPID code and validated against CNEN 4x4 and PNL 7x7 rod bundle tests. The results showed that the macroscopic k-e turbulence model can estimate the experiments properly.

  19. A structurally based analytic model of growth and biomass dynamics in single species stands of conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin J. Tausch

    2015-01-01

    A theoretically based analytic model of plant growth in single species conifer communities based on the species fully occupying a site and fully using the site resources is introduced. Model derivations result in a single equation simultaneously describes changes over both, different site conditions (or resources available), and over time for each variable for each...

  20. Nine Words - Nine Columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trempe Jr., Robert B.; Buthke, Jan

    2016-01-01

    of computational and mechanical processes towards an anesthetic. Each team received a single word, translating and evolving that word first into a double-curved computational surface, next a ruled computational surface, and then a physically shaped foam mold via a 6-axis robot. The foam molds then operated...

  1. Ciliary heterogeneity within a single cell: the Paramecium model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubusson-Fleury, Anne; Cohen, Jean; Lemullois, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium is a single cell able to divide in its morphologically differentiated stage that has many cilia anchored at its cell surface. Many thousands of cilia are thus assembled in a short period of time during division to duplicate the cell pattern while the cell continues swimming. Most, but not all, of these sensory cilia are motile and involved in two main functions: prey capture and cell locomotion. These cilia display heterogeneity, both in their length and their biochemical properties. Thanks to these properties, as well as to the availability of many postgenomic tools and the possibility to follow the regrowth of cilia after deciliation, Paramecium offers a nice opportunity to study the assembly of the cilia, as well as the genesis of their diversity within a single cell. In this paper, after a brief survey of Paramecium morphology and cilia properties, we describe the tools and the protocols currently used for immunofluorescence, transmission electron microscopy, and ultrastructural immunocytochemistry to analyze cilia, with special recommendations to overcome the problem raised by cilium diversity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. SINGLE PHASE ANALYTICAL MODELS FOR TERRY TURBINE NOZZLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Haihua; Zhang, Hongbin; Zou, Ling; O' Brien, James

    2016-11-01

    All BWR RCIC (Reactor Core Isolation Cooling) systems and PWR AFW (Auxiliary Feed Water) systems use Terry turbine, which is composed of the wheel with turbine buckets and several groups of fixed nozzles and reversing chambers inside the turbine casing. The inlet steam is accelerated through the turbine nozzle and impacts on the wheel buckets, generating work to drive the RCIC pump. As part of the efforts to understand the unexpected “self-regulating” mode of the RCIC systems in Fukushima accidents and extend BWR RCIC and PWR AFW operational range and flexibility, mechanistic models for the Terry turbine, based on Sandia National Laboratories’ original work, has been developed and implemented in the RELAP-7 code to simulate the RCIC system. RELAP-7 is a new reactor system code currently under development with the funding support from U.S. Department of Energy. The RELAP-7 code is a fully implicit code and the preconditioned Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) method is used to solve the discretized nonlinear system. This paper presents a set of analytical models for simulating the flow through the Terry turbine nozzles when inlet fluid is pure steam. The implementation of the models into RELAP-7 will be briefly discussed. In the Sandia model, the turbine bucket inlet velocity is provided according to a reduced-order model, which was obtained from a large number of CFD simulations. In this work, we propose an alternative method, using an under-expanded jet model to obtain the velocity and thermodynamic conditions for the turbine bucket inlet. The models include both adiabatic expansion process inside the nozzle and free expansion process out of the nozzle to reach the ambient pressure. The combined models are able to predict the steam mass flow rate and supersonic velocity to the Terry turbine bucket entrance, which are the necessary input conditions for the Terry Turbine rotor model. The nozzle analytical models were validated with experimental data and

  3. Defense of single-factor models of population regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamarin, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    I reject a multifactorial approach to the study of the regulation of animal populations for two reasons. First, a mechanism suggested by Chitty, that has natural selection at its base, has not been adequately tested. Second, the multifactorial model suggested by Lidicker is untestable because of its vagueness. As a middle ground, I suggest a model that has natural selection as its mechanism, but is multifacturial because it allows many parameters to be the selective agents. I particularly emphasize prediction and selective dispersal. Methods to test this model are suggested

  4. Mathematical modelling of the combustion of a single wood particle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porteiro, J.; Miguez, J.L.; Granada, E.; Moran, J.C. [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Maquinas y Motores Termicos y Fluidos. Universidad de Vigo, Lagoas Marcosende 9 36200 Vigo (Spain)

    2006-01-15

    A mathematical model describing the thermal degradation of densified biomass particles is presented here. The model uses a novel discretisation scheme and combines intra-particle combustion processes with extra-particle transport processes, thereby including thermal and diffusional control mechanisms. The influence of structural changes on the physical-thermal properties of wood in its different stages is studied together with shrinkage of the particle during its degradation. The model is used to compare the predicted data with data on the mass loss dynamics and internal temperature of several particles from previous works and relevant literature, with good agreement. (author)

  5. HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR FIXED CST AND RF COLUMNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S

    2007-01-01

    In support of a small column ion exchange (SCIX) process for the Savannah River Site waste processing program, transient and steady state two-dimensional heat transfer models have been constructed for columns loaded with cesium-saturated crystalline silicotitanate (CST) or spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) beads and 6 molar sodium tank waste supernate. Radiolytic decay of sorbed cesium results in heat generation within the columns. The models consider conductive heat transfer only with no convective cooling and no process flow within the columns (assumed column geometry: 27.375 in ID with a 6.625 in OD center-line cooling pipe). Heat transfer at the column walls was assumed to occur by natural convection cooling with 35 C air. A number of modeling calculations were performed using this computational heat transfer approach. Minimal additional calculations were also conducted to predict temperature increases expected for salt solution processed through columns of various heights at the slowest expected operational flow rate of 5 gpm. Results for the bounding model with no process flow and no active cooling indicate that the time required to reach the boiling point of ∼130 C for a CST-salt solution mixture containing 257 Ci/liter of Cs-137 heat source (maximum expected loading for SCIX applications) at 35 C initial temperature is about 6 days. Modeling results for a column actively cooled with external wall jackets and the internal coolant pipe (inlet coolant water temperature: 25 C) indicate that the CST column can be maintained non-boiling under these conditions indefinitely. The results also show that the maximum temperature of an RF-salt solution column containing 133 Ci/liter of Cs-137 (maximum expected loading) will never reach boiling under any conditions (maximum predicted temperature without cooling: 88 C). The results indicate that a 6-in cooling pipe at the center of the column provides the most effective cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum

  6. on the apllication of single specie dynamic population model 306

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pc

    Bayero Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences, 10(1): 306 - 311. Received: ... The Method of mathematical models of Malthus and Verhults were applied on ten years data collected from ..... and Time, Cambridge University Press,. (1991), 6 – 9.

  7. Mathematical Modeling in Population Dynamics: The Case of Single ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kofimereku

    Department of Mathematics, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology,. Kumasi, Ghana ... The trust of this paper is the application of mathematical models in helping to ..... Statistics and Computing, New York: Wiley. Cox, C.B and ...

  8. Column-Oriented Database Systems (Tutorial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Abadi; P.A. Boncz (Peter); S. Harizopoulos

    2009-01-01

    textabstractColumn-oriented database systems (column-stores) have attracted a lot of attention in the past few years. Column-stores, in a nutshell, store each database table column separately, with attribute values belonging to the same column stored contiguously, compressed, and densely packed, as

  9. Modelling of flow and contaminant migration in single rock fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlblom, P.; Joensson, L.

    1990-03-01

    The report deals with flow and hydrodynamic dispersion of a nonreactive contaminant in a single, irregularly shaped fracture. The main purpose of the report is to describe the basis and development of a computational 'tool' for simulating the aperture geometry of a single fracture and the detailed flow in it. On the basis of this flow information further properties of the fracture can be studied. Some initial application to dispersion of a nonreactive contaminant are thus discussed. The spatial pattern of variation of the fracture aperture is considered as a two-dimensional stochastic process. A method for simulation of such a process is described. The stochastic properties can be chosen arbitrarily. It is assumed that the fracture aperture belongs to a log-normal distribution. For calculation of the flow pattern, the Navier-Stokes equations are simplified to describe low velocity and steady-state flow. These equations, and the continuity equation are integrated in the direction across the fracture plane. A stream function, which describes the integrated flow in the fracture, is defined. A second order partial differential equation, with respect to the stream function, is established and solved by the finite difference method. Isolines for the stream function define boundaries between channels with equal flow rates. The travel time for each channel can be calculated to achieve a measure of the dispersion. The impact of the aperture distribution on the ratio between the mass balance fracture aperture and the cubic law fracture aperture is shown by simple examples. (28 figs., 1 tab., 22 refs.)

  10. LRFD software for design and actual ultimate capacity of confined rectangular columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    The analysis of concrete columns using unconfined concrete models is a well established practice. On the : other hand, prediction of the actual ultimate capacity of confined concrete columns requires specialized nonlinear : analysis. Modern codes and...

  11. Aspects of a collective single-particle model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutz, U.

    1985-01-01

    The successful application of time-reversal breaking wave functions in the framework of collective models based on a mean-field approach is for fermionic accesses known for a long while. In this thesis this concept is confirmed also for bosons. Especially in the study of some simple models the physical content of which is determined by the IBA model analytical model-solutions are found which are in a surprisingly well agreement with the exact IBA solutions and the experimental spectra. These solutions which describe the ground-state band are thereby dependent on geometrical shape parameters and of a simpler structure than those of the IBA model. Thereby the cranking model serves as an essential support. In order to obtain a better understanding of the cranking model it is tried to go beyond the mean-field approach. Thereby also the neighbourhood of the stationary point is studied. The approach consecuted here is based on the necessity of a variation after the projection. This is forced by the application of as simple wave functions as possible in the solution of the nuclear many-body problem by means of a symmetry breaking mean-field. Exactly performable is the projection however only in the case of the particle-number symmetry. The particle-number projection was applied to the study of the high spin excitations of 168 Hf. The two-quasiparticle band of this nucleus exhibits a rotational band with the moment of inertia of a rigid body. The speculation of a phase transition of the nuclear system from superfluid to normally fluid resulting from this is not confirmed in the theoretical study. The energy gap remains also in the two-quasiparticle band up to high angular momenta nearly undiminishedly. Especially it is shown that the energy-level scheme of a nucleus contains no information about phase transitions. (orig./HSI) [de

  12. Reliability of multi-model and structurally different single-model ensembles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokohata, Tokuta [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Center for Global Environmental Research, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Annan, James D.; Hargreaves, Julia C. [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Research Institute for Global Change, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Collins, Matthew [University of Exeter, College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, Exeter (United Kingdom); Jackson, Charles S.; Tobis, Michael [The University of Texas at Austin, Institute of Geophysics, 10100 Burnet Rd., ROC-196, Mail Code R2200, Austin, TX (United States); Webb, Mark J. [Met Office Hadley Centre, Exeter (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    The performance of several state-of-the-art climate model ensembles, including two multi-model ensembles (MMEs) and four structurally different (perturbed parameter) single model ensembles (SMEs), are investigated for the first time using the rank histogram approach. In this method, the reliability of a model ensemble is evaluated from the point of view of whether the observations can be regarded as being sampled from the ensemble. Our analysis reveals that, in the MMEs, the climate variables we investigated are broadly reliable on the global scale, with a tendency towards overdispersion. On the other hand, in the SMEs, the reliability differs depending on the ensemble and variable field considered. In general, the mean state and historical trend of surface air temperature, and mean state of precipitation are reliable in the SMEs. However, variables such as sea level pressure or top-of-atmosphere clear-sky shortwave radiation do not cover a sufficiently wide range in some. It is not possible to assess whether this is a fundamental feature of SMEs generated with particular model, or a consequence of the algorithm used to select and perturb the values of the parameters. As under-dispersion is a potentially more serious issue when using ensembles to make projections, we recommend the application of rank histograms to assess reliability when designing and running perturbed physics SMEs. (orig.)

  13. Effect of the structured packing height on efficiency of freons mixture separation in a large-scale model of distillation column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlenko Aleksandr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of experimental studies of heat-and-mass transfer and hydrodynamic processes at distillation on a regular packing are presented. The mixture of freons R114–R21 at the pressure of 0.3 MPa was used as a working mixture. The mixture was separated on the Mellapak 350Y structured packing with the diameter of 0.9 m under the conditions of complete reflux (L/V = 1 at different packing heights. A specially designed liquid distributor with a possibility to change the density and pattern of drip points was used to irrigate the packing. The experimental data on the efficiency of mixture separation (height of transfer unit HTU and distribution of the local flow rate density over the column cross-section were compared. It is shown that an increase in the height of the structured packing from 2.1 m to 4.0 m leads to a significant decrease in the efficiency of mixture separation in the distillation column.

  14. Equipment for automatic measurement of gamma activity distribution in a column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalincak, M.; Machan, V.; Vilcek, S.; Balkovsky, K.

    1978-01-01

    The design of a device for stepwise scanning of gamma activity distributions along chromatographic columns is described. In connection with a single-channel gamma spectrometer and a counting ratemeter with a recorder this device permits the resolution of a number of gamma emitters on the column, the determination of the gamma nuclide content in different chemical forms in the sample by means of column separation methods - Gel Chromatography Columns Scanning Method - and the determination of gamma nuclide distribution along the columns. The device permits the scanning of columns of up to 20 mm in diameter and 700 mm in length and continual scanning over a 450 mm column length with one clamping. With minor adaptations it is possible to scan columns up to 30 mm in diameter. The length of the scanned sections is 5 or 10 mm, the scanning time setting is arbitrary and variable activity levels and radiation energies may be measured. (author)

  15. Single Canonical Model of Reflexive Memory and Spatial Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Saumil S.; Red, Stuart; Lin, Eric; Sereno, Anne B.

    2015-01-01

    Many neurons in the dorsal and ventral visual stream have the property that after a brief visual stimulus presentation in their receptive field, the spiking activity in these neurons persists above their baseline levels for several seconds. This maintained activity is not always correlated with the monkey’s task and its origin is unknown. We have previously proposed a simple neural network model, based on shape selective neurons in monkey lateral intraparietal cortex, which predicts the valence and time course of reflexive (bottom-up) spatial attention. In the same simple model, we demonstrate here that passive maintained activity or short-term memory of specific visual events can result without need for an external or top-down modulatory signal. Mutual inhibition and neuronal adaptation play distinct roles in reflexive attention and memory. This modest 4-cell model provides the first simple and unified physiologically plausible mechanism of reflexive spatial attention and passive short-term memory processes. PMID:26493949

  16. Single Canonical Model of Reflexive Memory and Spatial Attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Saumil S; Red, Stuart; Lin, Eric; Sereno, Anne B

    2015-10-23

    Many neurons in the dorsal and ventral visual stream have the property that after a brief visual stimulus presentation in their receptive field, the spiking activity in these neurons persists above their baseline levels for several seconds. This maintained activity is not always correlated with the monkey's task and its origin is unknown. We have previously proposed a simple neural network model, based on shape selective neurons in monkey lateral intraparietal cortex, which predicts the valence and time course of reflexive (bottom-up) spatial attention. In the same simple model, we demonstrate here that passive maintained activity or short-term memory of specific visual events can result without need for an external or top-down modulatory signal. Mutual inhibition and neuronal adaptation play distinct roles in reflexive attention and memory. This modest 4-cell model provides the first simple and unified physiologically plausible mechanism of reflexive spatial attention and passive short-term memory processes.

  17. Multiobjective Optimization Modeling Approach for Multipurpose Single Reservoir Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iosvany Recio Villa

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The water resources planning and management discipline recognizes the importance of a reservoir’s carryover storage. However, mathematical models for reservoir operation that include carryover storage are scarce. This paper presents a novel multiobjective optimization modeling framework that uses the constraint-ε method and genetic algorithms as optimization techniques for the operation of multipurpose simple reservoirs, including carryover storage. The carryover storage was conceived by modifying Kritsky and Menkel’s method for reservoir design at the operational stage. The main objective function minimizes the cost of the total annual water shortage for irrigation areas connected to a reservoir, while the secondary one maximizes its energy production. The model includes operational constraints for the reservoir, Kritsky and Menkel’s method, irrigation areas, and the hydropower plant. The study is applied to Carlos Manuel de Céspedes reservoir, establishing a 12-month planning horizon and an annual reliability of 75%. The results highly demonstrate the applicability of the model, obtaining monthly releases from the reservoir that include the carryover storage, degree of reservoir inflow regulation, water shortages in irrigation areas, and the energy generated by the hydroelectric plant. The main product is an operational graph that includes zones as well as rule and guide curves, which are used as triggers for long-term reservoir operation.

  18. Winkler's single-parameter subgrade model from the perspective of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... tensor are taken into consideration, whereas the shear stresses are intentionally dropped with the purpose of providing a useful perspective, with which Winkler's model and its associated coefficient of subgrade reaction can be viewed. The formulation takes into account the variation of the elasticity modulus with depth.

  19. On the apllication of single specie dynamic population model | Iguda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Method of mathematical models of Malthus and Verhults were applied on ten years data collected from Magaram Poultry Farm to determine the nature of population growth, population decay or constant ... Keywords: Birth rate, sustainable population, overcrowding, harvesting, independent t-test and one way Anova.

  20. Multi products single machine economic production quantity model with multiple batch size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ata Allah Taleizadeh

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a multi products single machine economic order quantity model with discrete delivery is developed. A unique cycle length is considered for all produced items with an assumption that all products are manufactured on a single machine with a limited capacity. The proposed model considers different items such as production, setup, holding, and transportation costs. The resulted model is formulated as a mixed integer nonlinear programming model. Harmony search algorithm, extended cutting plane and particle swarm optimization methods are used to solve the proposed model. Two numerical examples are used to analyze and to evaluate the performance of the proposed model.

  1. Brain Emotional Learning Based Intelligent Decoupler for Nonlinear Multi-Input Multi-Output Distillation Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. El-Saify

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The distillation process is vital in many fields of chemical industries, such as the two-coupled distillation columns that are usually highly nonlinear Multi-Input Multi-Output (MIMO coupled processes. The control of MIMO process is usually implemented via a decentralized approach using a set of Single-Input Single-Output (SISO loop controllers. Decoupling the MIMO process into group of single loops requires proper input-output pairing and development of decoupling compensator unit. This paper proposes a novel intelligent decoupling approach for MIMO processes based on new MIMO brain emotional learning architecture. A MIMO architecture of Brain Emotional Learning Based Intelligent Controller (BELBIC is developed and applied as a decoupler for 4 input/4 output highly nonlinear coupled distillation columns process. Moreover, the performance of the proposed Brain Emotional Learning Based Intelligent Decoupler (BELBID is enhanced using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO technique. The performance is compared with the PSO optimized steady state decoupling compensation matrix. Mathematical models of the distillation columns and the decouplers are built and tested in simulation environment by applying the same inputs. The results prove remarkable success of the BELBID in minimizing the loops interactions without degrading the output that every input has been paired with.

  2. A single model procedure for estimating tank calibration equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebetrau, A.M.

    1997-10-01

    A fundamental component of any accountability system for nuclear materials is a tank calibration equation that relates the height of liquid in a tank to its volume. Tank volume calibration equations are typically determined from pairs of height and volume measurements taken in a series of calibration runs. After raw calibration data are standardized to a fixed set of reference conditions, the calibration equation is typically fit by dividing the data into several segments--corresponding to regions in the tank--and independently fitting the data for each segment. The estimates obtained for individual segments must then be combined to obtain an estimate of the entire calibration function. This process is tedious and time-consuming. Moreover, uncertainty estimates may be misleading because it is difficult to properly model run-to-run variability and between-segment correlation. In this paper, the authors describe a model whose parameters can be estimated simultaneously for all segments of the calibration data, thereby eliminating the need for segment-by-segment estimation. The essence of the proposed model is to define a suitable polynomial to fit to each segment and then extend its definition to the domain of the entire calibration function, so that it (the entire calibration function) can be expressed as the sum of these extended polynomials. The model provides defensible estimates of between-run variability and yields a proper treatment of between-segment correlations. A portable software package, called TANCS, has been developed to facilitate the acquisition, standardization, and analysis of tank calibration data. The TANCS package was used for the calculations in an example presented to illustrate the unified modeling approach described in this paper. With TANCS, a trial calibration function can be estimated and evaluated in a matter of minutes

  3. Water Column Sonar Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The collection and analysis of water column sonar data is a relatively new avenue of research into the marine environment. Primary uses include assessing biological...

  4. Semiparametric Mixtures of Regressions with Single-index for Model Based Clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Sijia; Yao, Weixin

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we propose two classes of semiparametric mixture regression models with single-index for model based clustering. Unlike many semiparametric/nonparametric mixture regression models that can only be applied to low dimensional predictors, the new semiparametric models can easily incorporate high dimensional predictors into the nonparametric components. The proposed models are very general, and many of the recently proposed semiparametric/nonparametric mixture regression models a...

  5. Competitive adsorption and selectivity sequence of heavy metals by chicken bone-derived biochar: Batch and column experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Hwan; Cho, Ju-Sik; Ok, Yong Sik; Kim, Seong-Heon; Kang, Se-Won; Choi, Ik-Won; Heo, Jong-Soo; DeLaune, Ronald D; Seo, Dong-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate adsorption of heavy metals in single- and ternary-metal forms onto chicken bone biochar (CBB). Competitive sorption of heavy metals by CBB has never been reported previously. The maximum adsorption capacities of metals by CBB were in the order of Cu (130 mg g(-1)) > Cd (109 mg g(-1)) > Zn (93 mg g(-1)) in the single-metal adsorption isotherm and Cu (108 mg g(-1)) > Cd (54 mg g(-1)) ≥ Zn (44 mg g(-1)) in the ternary-metal adsorption isotherm. Cu was the most retained cation, whereas Zn could be easily exchanged and substituted by Cu. Batch experimental data best fit the Langmuir model rather than the Freundlich isotherms. In the column experiments, the total adsorbed amounts of the metals were in the following order of Cu (210 mg g(-1)) > Cd (192 mg g(-1)) > Zn (178) in single-metal conditions, and Cu (156) > Cd (123) > Zn (92) in ternary-metal conditions. Results from both the batch and column experiments indicate that competitive adsorption among metals increases the mobility of these metals. Especially, Zn in single-metal conditions lost it adsorption capacity most significantly. Based on the 3D simulation graphs of heavy metals, adsorption patterns under single adsorption condition were different than under competitive adsorption condition. Results from both the batch and column experiments show that competitive adsorption among metals increases the mobility of these metals. The maximum metal adsorption capacity of the metals in the column experiments was higher than that in the batch experiment indicating other metal retention mechanisms rather than adsorption may be involved. Therefore, both column and batch experiments are needed for estimating retention capacities and removal efficiencies of metals in CBB.

  6. LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION COLUMNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, J.D.

    1957-12-31

    This patent relates to liquid-liquid extraction columns having a means for pulsing the liquid in the column to give it an oscillatory up and down movement, and consists of a packed column, an inlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase located in the direct communication with the liquid in the lower part of said column, an inlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase located in direct communication with the liquid in the upper part of said column, a tube having one end communicating with liquid in the lower part of said column and having its upper end located above the level of said outlet pipe for the dispersed phase, and a piston and cylinder connected to the upper end of said tube for applying a pulsating pneumatic pressure to the surface of the liquid in said tube so that said surface rises and falls in said tube.

  7. The central column structure in SPHEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duck, R.C.; French, P.A.; Browning, P.K.; Cunningham, G.; Gee, S.J.; al-Karkhy, A.; Martin, R.; Rusbridge, M.G.

    1994-01-01

    SPHEX is a gun injected spheromak in which a magnetised Marshall gun generates and maintains an approximately axisymmetric toroidal plasma within a topologically spherical flux conserving vessel. The central column has been defined as a region of high mean floating potential, f > up to ∼ 150 V, aligned with the geometric axis of the device. It has been suggested that this region corresponds to the open magnetic flux which is connected directly to the central electrode of the gun and links the toroidal annulus (in which f > ∼ 0 V). Poynting vector measurements have shown that the power required to drive toroidal current in the annulus is transmitted out of the column by the coherent 20 kHz mode which pervades the plasma. Measurements of the MHD dynamo in the column indicate an 'antidynamo' electric field due to correlated fluctuations in v and B at the 20 kHz mode frequency which is consistent with the time-averaged Ohm's Law. On shorting the gun electrodes, the density in the column region decays rapidly leaving a 'hole' of radius R c ∼ 7 cm. This agrees with the estimated dimension of the open flux from mean internal B measurements and axisymmetric force-free equilibrium modelling, but is considerably smaller than the radius of ∼ 13 cm inferred from the time-averaged potential. In standard operating conditions the gun delivers a current of I G ∼ 60 kA at V G ∼ 500 V for ∼ 1 ms, driving a toroidal current of I t ∼ 60 kA. Ultimately we wish to understand the mechanism which drives toroidal current in the annulus; the central column is of interest because of the crucial role it plays in this process. (author) 8 refs., 6 figs

  8. Column-Oriented Database Systems (Tutorial)

    OpenAIRE

    Abadi, D.; Boncz, Peter; Harizopoulos, S.

    2009-01-01

    textabstractColumn-oriented database systems (column-stores) have attracted a lot of attention in the past few years. Column-stores, in a nutshell, store each database table column separately, with attribute values belonging to the same column stored contiguously, compressed, and densely packed, as opposed to traditional database systems that store entire records (rows) one after the other. Reading a subset of a table’s columns becomes faster, at the potential expense of excessive disk-head s...

  9. Studying Validity of Single-Fluid Model in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Jian-Fa; Fan Zheng-Feng; Dai Zhen-Sheng; Ye Wen-Hua; Pei Wen-Bing; Zhu Shao-Ping

    2014-01-01

    The validity of single-fluid model in inertial confinement fusion simulations is studied by comparing the results of the multi- and single-fluid models. The multi-fluid model includes the effects of collision and interpenetration between fluid species. By simulating the collision of fluid species, steady-state shock propagation into the thin DT gas and expansion of hohlraum Au wall heated by lasers, the results show that the validity of single-fluid model is strongly dependent on the ratio of the characteristic length of the simulated system to the particle mean free path. When the characteristic length L is one order larger than the mean free path λ, the single-fluid model's results are found to be in good agreement with the multi-fluid model's simulations, and the modeling of single-fluid remains valid. If the value of L/λ is lower than 10, the interpenetration between fluid species is significant, and the single-fluid simulations show some unphysical results; while the multi-fluid model can describe well the interpenetration and mix phenomena, and give more reasonable results. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  10. Arrays of 3D micro-columns generated by laser ablation of Ta and steel: modelling of a black body emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensaoula, A.; Boney, C.; Pillai, R.; Starikov, D. [Texas Center for Superconductivity and Advanced Materials, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Shafeev, G.A.; Simakin, A.V. [Wave Research Center, General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-09-01

    Three-dimensional extended arrays of micro-columns are generated on the surface of Ta and several stainless steels by their ablation by radiation of a Cu vapor laser either in vacuum or in air. The reflectivity of the arrays is tested in both visible and near-IR regions using the facilities at NASA Johnson Space Center. The reflectivity of the laser-treated areas was found to be very low (0.03-0.08) in the range 250-2800 nm. The emissivity of 3D arrays measured at elevated temperatures is close to the emissivity of a calibrated black body emitter. The effects of the experimental conditions of ablation (laser fluence, environment, etc.) on the integral optical characteristics of the generated arrays are discussed. (orig.)

  11. Modeling water movement in horizontal columns using fractal theory Modelagem de movimento horizontal de água no solo utilizando a teoria dos fractais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tairone Paiva Leão

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Fractal mathematics has been used to characterize water and solute transport in porous media and also to characterize and simulate porous media properties. The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the soil infiltration parameters sorptivity (S and time exponent (n and the parameters dimension (D and the Hurst exponent (H. For this purpose, ten horizontal columns with pure (either clay or loam and heterogeneous porous media (clay and loam distributed in layers in the column were simulated following the distribution of a deterministic Cantor Bar with fractal dimension H" 0.63. Horizontal water infiltration experiments were then simulated using Hydrus 2D software. The sorptivity (S and time exponent (n parameters of the Philip equation were estimated for each simulation, using the nonlinear regression procedure of the statistical software package SAS®. Sorptivity increased in the columns with the loam content, which was attributed to the relation of S with the capillary radius. The time exponent estimated by nonlinear regression was found to be less than the traditional value of 0.5. The fractal dimension estimated from the Hurst exponent was 17.5 % lower than the fractal dimension of the Cantor Bar used to generate the columns.A matemática fractal tem sido utilizada para caracterizar o transporte de água e solutos em meios porosos e também para simular características físicas e geométricas de meios porosos. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a correlação entre os parâmetros de infiltração de água sortividade e expoente de tempo (n e os parâmetros dimensão fractal (D e expoente de Hurst (H. Para isso, dez colunas horizontais foram simuladas em computador, sendo preenchidas com material de textura franca ou argilosa, puros ou em combinações de camadas alternadas dos dois materiais, seguindo a distribuição de um Conjunto de Cantor determinístico com dimensão fractal 0,63. As simulações de movimento

  12. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS FOR SALTSTONE DISPOSAL UNIT COLUMN DEGRADATION ANALYSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, G.

    2014-10-28

    PORFLOW related analyses supporting a Sensitivity Analysis for Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) column degradation were performed. Previous analyses, Flach and Taylor 2014, used a model in which the SDU columns degraded in a piecewise manner from the top and bottom simultaneously. The current analyses employs a model in which all pieces of the column degrade at the same time. Information was extracted from the analyses which may be useful in determining the distribution of Tc-99 in the various SDUs throughout time and in determining flow balances for the SDUs.

  13. IMPLEMENTATION OF COLUMN-ORIENTED DATABASE IN POSTGRESQL FOR OPTIMIZATION OF READ-ONLY QUERIES

    OpenAIRE

    Aditi D. Andurkar

    2012-01-01

    The era of column-oriented database systems has truly begun with open source database systems like C-Store, MonetDb, LucidDb and commercial ones like Vertica. Column-oriented database stores data column-by-column which means it stores information of single attribute collectively. The need for Column-oriented database arose from the need of business intelligence for efficient decision making where traditional row-oriented database gives poor performance. PostgreSql is an open so...

  14. Corpuscular Model of Two-Beam Interference and Double-Slit Experiments with Single Photons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, Fengping; Yuan, Shengjun; De Raedt, Hans; Michielsen, Kristel; Miyashita, Seiji

    We introduce an event-based corpuscular simulation model that reproduces the wave mechanical results of single-photon double-slit and two-beam interference experiments and (of a one-to-one copy of an experimental realization) of a single-photon interference experiment with a Fresnel biprism. The

  15. Dynamics and Control of Distillation Columns - A Critical Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigurd Skogestad

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Distillation column dynamics and control have been viewed by many as a very mature or even dead field. However, as is discussed in this paper significant new results have appeared over the last 5-10 years. These results include multiple steady states and instability in simple columns with ideal thermodynamics (which was believed to be impossible, the understanding of the difference between various control configurations and the systematic transformation between these, the feasibility of using the distillate-bottom structure, for control (which was believed to be impossible, the importance of flow dynamics for control studies, the fundamental problems in identifying models from open-loops responses, the use of simple regression estimators to estimate composition from temperatures, and an improved general understanding of the dynamic behavior of distillation columns which includes a better understanding of the fundamental difference between internal and external flow, simple formulas for estimating the dominant time constant, and a derivation of the linearizing effect of logarithmic transformations. These issues apply to all columns, even for ideal mixtures and simple columns with only two products. In addition, there have been significant advances for cases with complex thermodynamics and complex column configurations. These include the behavior and control of azeotropic distillation columns, and the possible complex dynamics of nonideal mixtures and of interlinked columns. However, both for the simple and more complex cases there are still a number of areas where further research is needed.

  16. Single-layer skull approximations perform well in transcranial direct current stimulation modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rampersad, S.M.; Stegeman, D.F.; Oostendorp, T.F.

    2013-01-01

    In modeling the effect of transcranial direct current stimulation, the representation of the skull is an important factor. In a spherical model, we compared a realistic skull modeling approach, in which the skull consisted of three isotropic layers, to anisotropic and isotropic single-layer

  17. Modeling and Control of a Single-Phase Marine Cooling System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael; Stoustrup, Jakob; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents two model-based control design approaches for a single-phase marine cooling system. Models are derived from first principles and aim at describing significant system dynamics including nonlinearities and transport delays, while keeping the model complexity low. The two...

  18. Modeling and optimization of the single-leg multi-fare class ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents a static overbooking model for a single-leg multi-fare class flight. A realistic distribution of no-show data in modeling the cost function was considered using data collected from the Ethiopian airlines. The overbooking model developed considers the interaction (i.e. the transfer of an extra passenger in a ...

  19. POD-Galerkin Model for Incompressible Single-Phase Flow in Porous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yi; Yu, Bo; Sun, Shuyu

    2017-01-01

    Fast prediction modeling via proper orthogonal decomposition method combined with Galerkin projection is applied to incompressible single-phase fluid flow in porous media. Cases for different configurations of porous media, boundary conditions

  20. Radiotracer Imaging of Sediment Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, W. W.; O'Neil, J. P.; Boutchko, R.; Nico, P. S.; Druhan, J. L.; Vandehey, N. T.

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear medical PET and SPECT cameras routinely image radioactivity concentration of gamma ray emitting isotopes (PET - 511 keV; SPECT - 75-300 keV). We have used nuclear medical imaging technology to study contaminant transport in sediment columns. Specifically, we use Tc-99m (T1/2 = 6 h, Eγ = 140 keV) and a SPECT camera to image the bacteria mediated reduction of pertechnetate, [Tc(VII)O4]- + Fe(II) → Tc(IV)O2 + Fe(III). A 45 mL bolus of Tc-99m (32 mCi) labeled sodium pertechnetate was infused into a column (35cm x 10cm Ø) containing uranium-contaminated subsurface sediment from the Rifle, CO site. A flow rate of 1.25 ml/min of artificial groundwater was maintained in the column. Using a GE Millennium VG camera, we imaged the column for 12 hours, acquiring 44 frames. As the microbes in the sediment were inactive, we expected most of the iron to be Fe(III). The images were consistent with this hypothesis, and the Tc-99m pertechnetate acted like a conservative tracer. Virtually no binding of the Tc-99m was observed, and while the bolus of activity propagated fairly uniformly through the column, some inhomogeneity attributed to sediment packing was observed. We expect that after augmentation by acetate, the bacteria will metabolically reduce Fe(III) to Fe(II), leading to significant Tc-99m binding. Imaging sediment columns using nuclear medicine techniques has many attractive features. Trace quantities of the radiolabeled compounds are used (micro- to nano- molar) and the half-lives of many of these tracers are short (Image of Tc-99m distribution in a column containing Rifle sediment at four times.

  1. Performance evaluation of a rectifier column using gamma column scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aquino Denis D.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rectifier columns are considered to be a critical component in petroleum refineries and petrochemical processing installations as they are able to affect the overall performance of these facilities. It is deemed necessary to monitor the operational conditions of such vessels to optimize processes and prevent anomalies which could pose undesired consequences on product quality that might lead to huge financial losses. A rectifier column was subjected to gamma scanning using a 10-mCi Co-60 source and a 2-inch-long detector in tandem. Several scans were performed to gather information on the operating conditions of the column under different sets of operating parameters. The scan profiles revealed unexpected decreases in the radiation intensity at vapour levels between trays 2 and 3, and between trays 4 and 5. Flooding also occurred during several scans which could be attributed to parametric settings.

  2. Transient groundwater chemistry near a river: Effects on U(VI) transport in laboratory column experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun; Haggerty, Roy; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Istok, Jonathan D.; Greskowiak, Janek; Zachara, John M.

    2011-01-01

    In the 300 Area of a U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at Hanford, Washington, USA, inorganic carbon and major cations, which have large impacts on U(VI) transport, change on an hourly and seasonal basis near the Columbia River. Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the factors controlling U(VI) adsorption/desorption by changing chemical conditions over time. Low alkalinity and low Ca concentrations (Columbia River water) enhanced adsorption and reduced aqueous concentrations. Conversely, high alkalinity and high Ca concentrations (Hanford groundwater) reduced adsorption and increased aqueous concentrations of U(VI). An equilibrium surface complexation model calibrated using laboratory batch experiments accounted for the decrease in U(VI) adsorption observed with increasing (bi)carbonate concentrations and other aqueous chemical conditions. In the column experiment, alternating pulses of river and groundwater caused swings in aqueous U(VI) concentration. A multispecies multirate surface complexation reactive transport model simulated most of the major U(VI) changes in two column experiments. The modeling results also indicated that U(VI) transport in the studied sediment could be simulated by using a single kinetic rate without loss of accuracy in the simulations. Moreover, the capability of the model to predict U(VI) transport in Hanford groundwater under transient chemical conditions depends significantly on the knowledge of real-time change of local groundwater chemistry.

  3. Post column derivatisation analyses review. Is post-column derivatisation incompatible with modern HPLC columns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew; Pravadali-Cekic, Sercan; Dennis, Gary R; Shalliker, R Andrew

    2015-08-19

    Post Column derivatisation (PCD) coupled with high performance liquid chromatography or ultra-high performance liquid chromatography is a powerful tool in the modern analytical laboratory, or at least it should be. One drawback with PCD techniques is the extra post-column dead volume due to reaction coils used to enable adequate reaction time and the mixing of reagents which causes peak broadening, hence a loss of separation power. This loss of efficiency is counter-productive to modern HPLC technologies, -such as UHPLC. We reviewed 87 PCD methods published from 2009 to 2014. We restricted our review to methods published between 2009 and 2014, because we were interested in the uptake of PCD methods in UHPLC environments. Our review focused on a range of system parameters including: column dimensions, stationary phase and particle size, as well as the geometry of the reaction loop. The most commonly used column in the methods investigated was not in fact a modern UHPLC version with sub-2-micron, (or even sub-3-micron) particles, but rather, work-house columns, such as, 250 × 4.6 mm i.d. columns packed with 5 μm C18 particles. Reaction loops were varied, even within the same type of analysis, but the majority of methods employed loop systems with volumes greater than 500 μL. A second part of this review illustrated briefly the effect of dead volume on column performance. The experiment evaluated the change in resolution and separation efficiency of some weak to moderately retained solutes on a 250 × 4.6 mm i.d. column packed with 5 μm particles. The data showed that reaction loops beyond 100 μL resulted in a very serious loss of performance. Our study concluded that practitioners of PCD methods largely avoid the use of UHPLC-type column formats, so yes, very much, PCD is incompatible with the modern HPLC column. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Transformation of 3-chloroallyl alcohol in water-saturated subsoil studied with a column method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beltman, W.H.J.; Leistra, M.; Matser, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The performance of a newly developed column method for pesticide transformation rate measurements in the subsoil was tested using (Z)- and (E)-3-chloroallyl alcohol as model compounds. The subsoil columns were filled in situ. In the column experiment the half-life ranged from 0.5-5.2 d for

  5. An introduction to modeling longitudinal data with generalized additive models: applications to single-case designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Kristynn J; Shadish, William R; Steiner, Peter M

    2015-03-01

    Single-case designs (SCDs) are short time series that assess intervention effects by measuring units repeatedly over time in both the presence and absence of treatment. This article introduces a statistical technique for analyzing SCD data that has not been much used in psychological and educational research: generalized additive models (GAMs). In parametric regression, the researcher must choose a functional form to impose on the data, for example, that trend over time is linear. GAMs reverse this process by letting the data inform the choice of functional form. In this article we review the problem that trend poses in SCDs, discuss how current SCD analytic methods approach trend, describe GAMs as a possible solution, suggest a GAM model testing procedure for examining the presence of trend in SCDs, present a small simulation to show the statistical properties of GAMs, and illustrate the procedure on 3 examples of different lengths. Results suggest that GAMs may be very useful both as a form of sensitivity analysis for checking the plausibility of assumptions about trend and as a primary data analysis strategy for testing treatment effects. We conclude with a discussion of some problems with GAMs and some future directions for research on the application of GAMs to SCDs. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Fractional single-phase-lagging heat conduction model for describing anomalous diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.N. Mishra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The fractional single-phase-lagging (FSPL heat conduction model is obtained by combining scalar time fractional conservation equation to the single-phase-lagging (SPL heat conduction model. Based on the FSPL heat conduction model, anomalous diffusion within a finite thin film is investigated. The effect of different parameters on solution has been observed and studied the asymptotic behavior of the FSPL model. The analytical solution is obtained using Laplace transform method. The whole analysis is presented in dimensionless form. Numerical examples of particular interest have been studied and discussed in details.

  7. Modeling and Stability Assessment of Single-Phase Grid Synchronization Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golestan, Saeed; Guerrero, Josep M.; Vasquez, Juan

    2018-01-01

    (GSTs) is of vital importance. This task is most often based on obtaining a linear time-invariant (LTI) model for the GST and applying standard stability tests to it. Another option is modeling and dynamics/stability assessment of GSTs in the linear time-periodic (LTP) framework, which has received...... a very little attention. In this letter, the procedure of deriving the LTP model for single-phase GSTs is first demonstrated. The accuracy of the LTP model in predicting the GST dynamic behavior and stability is then evaluated and compared with that of the LTI one. Two well-known single-phase GSTs, i...

  8. A revised 3-column classification approach for the surgical planning of extended lateral tibial plateau fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, H; Kempenaers, K; Nijs, S

    2017-10-01

    Variable angle locking compression plates allow for lateral buttress and support of the posterolateral joint surface of tibial plateau fractures. This gives room for improvement of the surgical 3-column classification approach. Our aim was to revise and validate the 3-column classification approach to better guide the surgical planning of tibial plateau fractures extending into the posterolateral corner. In contrast to the 3-column classification approach, in the revised approach the posterior border of the lateral column in the revised approach lies posterior instead of anterior of the fibula. According to the revised 3-column classification approach, extended lateral column fractures are defined as single lateral column fractures extending posteriorly into the posterolateral corner. CT-images of 36 patients were reviewed and classified twice online according to Schatzker and revised 3-column classification approach by five observers. The intraobserver reliability was calculated using the Cohen's kappa and the interobserver reliability was calculated using the Fleiss' kappa. The intraobserver reliability showed substantial agreement according to Landis and Koch for both Schatzker and the revised 3-column classification approach (0.746 vs. 0.782 p = 0.37, Schatzker vs. revised 3-column, respectively). However, the interobserver reliability of the revised 3-column classification approach was significantly higher as compared to the Schatzker classification (0.531 vs. 0.669 p column, respectively). With the introduction of variable angle locking compression plates, the revised 3-column classification approach is a very helpful tool in the preoperative surgical planning of tibial plateau fractures, in particular, lateral column fractures that extend into the posterolateral corner. The revised 3-column classification approach is rather a practical supplement to the Schatzker classification. It has a significantly higher interobserver reliability as compared to the

  9. NOx retention in scrubbing column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazone, A.K.; Costa, R.E.; Lobao, A.S.T.; Matsuda, H.T.; Araujo, B.F.

    1988-07-01

    During the UO 2 dissolution in nitric acid, some different species of NO x are released. The off gas can either be refluxed to the dissolver or be released and retained on special columns. The final composition of the solution is the main parameter to take in account. A process for nitrous gases retention using scubber columns containing H 2 O or diluted HNO 3 is presented. Chemiluminescence measurement was employed to NO x evalution before and after scrubbing. Gas flow, temperature, residence time are the main parameters considered in this paper. For the dissolution of 100g UO 2 in 8M nitric acid, a 6NL/h O 2 flow was the best condition for the NO/NO 2 oxidation with maximum adsorption in the scrubber columns. (author) [pt

  10. Thermal-Hydraulics analysis of pressurized water reactor core by using single heated channel model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Akbari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermal hydraulics of nuclear reactor as a basis of reactor safety has a very important role in reactor design and control. The thermal-hydraulic analysis provides input data to the reactor-physics analysis, whereas the latter gives information about the distribution of heat sources, which is needed to perform the thermal-hydraulic analysis. In this study single heated channel model as a very fast model for predicting thermal hydraulics behavior of pressurized water reactor core has been developed. For verifying the results of this model, we used RELAP5 code as US nuclear regulatory approved thermal hydraulics code. The results of developed single heated channel model have been checked with RELAP5 results for WWER-1000. This comparison shows the capability of single heated channel model for predicting thermal hydraulics behavior of reactor core.

  11. Time domain system identification of longitudinal dynamics of single rotor model helicopter using sidpac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaizer, A.N.; Hussain, I.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a time-domain approach for identification of longitudinal dynamics of single rotor model helicopter. A frequency sweep excitation input signal is applied for hover flying mode widely used for space state linearized model. A fully automated programmed flight test method provides high quality flight data for system identification using the computer controlled flight simulator X-plane. The flight test data were recorded, analyzed and reduced using the SIDPAC (System Identification Programs for Air Craft) toolbox for MATLAB, resulting in an aerodynamic model of single rotor helicopter. Finally, the identified model of single rotor helicopter is validated on Raptor 30-class model helicopter at hover showing the reliability of proposed approach. (author)

  12. Partial Path Column Generation for the Vehicle Routing Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Mads Kehlet; Petersen, Bjørn

    This paper presents a column generation algorithm for the Capacitated Vehicle Routing Problem (CVRP) and the Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows (VRPTW). Traditionally, column generation models of the CVRP and VRPTW have consisted of a Set Partitioning master problem with each column...... of the giant tour’; a so-called partial path, i.e., not necessarily starting and ending in the depot. This way, the length of the partial path can be bounded and a better control of the size of the solution space for the pricing problem can be obtained....

  13. Single, Integrated, Service-Centric Model of Military Health System Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    of the research is to establish what the model of governance of the Military Health System should be. That, with other recommendations, should be the...foundation for the impending transformation. The research found that the model of governance should be a single service model with regional health...commands that support the geographic combatant commander (GCC). With an organization based on the presented model of governance , the Military Health

  14. Developing a Model for Optimizing Inventory of Repairable Items at Single Operating Base

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Tin

    2016-01-01

    The use of EOQ model in inventory management is popular. However, EOQ models has many disadvantages, especially, when the model is applied to manage repairable items. In order to deal with high-cost and repairable items, Craig C. Sherbrooke introduced a model in his book “Optimal Inventory Modeling of Systems: Multi-Echelon Techniques”. The research focus is to implement and develop a program to execute the single-site in-ventory model for repairable items. The model helps to significantl...

  15. NON-LINEAR ANALYSIS OF AN EXPERIMENTAL JOINT OF COLUMN AND BEAMS OF ARMED CONCRETE-STEEL COLUMN FOR FRAME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson López

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the nonlinear behavior of a real-scale experimental joint (node is studied, consisting of three reinforced concrete elements, one column and two beams joined to a structural steel column at the upper level. In the numerical analysis the model of the union was analyzed in the inelastic range, this model was elaborated with the finite element program based on fibers, SeismoStruct to analyze as a function of time, the traction and compression efforts in the confined area and not confined area of the concrete column and in the longitudinal reinforcement steel, as well as verification of the design of the base plate that joins the two columns. The results showed that tensile stresses in the unconfined zone surpassed the concrete breaking point, with cracking occurring just below the lower edge of the beams; in the confined area the traction efforts were much lower, with cracks occurring later than in the non-confined area. The concrete column-steel column joint behaved as a rigid node, so the elastic design was consistent with the calculation methodology of base plates for steel columns.

  16. Comparison and Analysis of Steel Frame Based on High Strength Column and Normal Strength Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Taiyu; An, Yuwei

    2018-01-01

    The anti-seismic performance of high strength steel has restricted its industrialization in civil buildings. In order to study the influence of high strength steel column on frame structure, three models are designed through MIDAS/GEN finite element software. By comparing the seismic performance and economic performance of the three models, the three different structures are comprehensively evaluated to provide some references for the development of high strength steel in steel structure.

  17. Buckling driven debonding in sandwich columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Rasmus Christian

    2008-01-01

    results from two mechanisms: (a) interaction of local debond buckling and global buckling and (b) the development of a damaged zone at the debond crack tip. Based on the pronounced imperfection sensitivity, the author predicts that an experimental measurement of the strength of sandwich structures may......A compression loaded sandwich column that contains a debond is analyzed using a geometrically non-linear finite element model. The model includes a cohesive zone along one face sheet/core interface whereby the debond can extend by interface crack growth. Two geometrical imperfections are introduced...

  18. A single-system model predicts recognition memory and repetition priming in amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Christopher J; Kessels, Roy P C; Wester, Arie J; Shanks, David R

    2014-08-13

    We challenge the claim that there are distinct neural systems for explicit and implicit memory by demonstrating that a formal single-system model predicts the pattern of recognition memory (explicit) and repetition priming (implicit) in amnesia. In the current investigation, human participants with amnesia categorized pictures of objects at study and then, at test, identified fragmented versions of studied (old) and nonstudied (new) objects (providing a measure of priming), and made a recognition memory judgment (old vs new) for each object. Numerous results in the amnesic patients were predicted in advance by the single-system model, as follows: (1) deficits in recognition memory and priming were evident relative to a control group; (2) items judged as old were identified at greater levels of fragmentation than items judged new, regardless of whether the items were actually old or new; and (3) the magnitude of the priming effect (the identification advantage for old vs new items) overall was greater than that of items judged new. Model evidence measures also favored the single-system model over two formal multiple-systems models. The findings support the single-system model, which explains the pattern of recognition and priming in amnesia primarily as a reduction in the strength of a single dimension of memory strength, rather than a selective explicit memory system deficit. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3410963-12$15.00/0.

  19. Short steel and concrete columns under high temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. P. G. A. Jacintho

    Full Text Available The growing demand for knowledge about the effect of high temperatures on structures has stimulated increasing research worldwide. This article presents experimental results for short composite steel and concrete columns subjected to high temperatures in ovens with or without an axial compression load, numerically analyzes the temperature distribution in these columns after 30 and 60 minutes and compares them with experimental results. The models consist of concrete-filled tubes of three different thicknesses and two different diameters, and the concrete fill has conventional properties that remained constant for all of the models. The stress-strain behavior of the composite columns was altered after exposure to high temperatures relative to the same columns at room temperature, which was most evident in the 60-minute tests due to the higher temperatures reached. The computational analysis adopted temperature rise curves that were obtained experimentally.

  20. Modelling of Vortex-Induced Loading on a Single-Blade Installation Setup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrzypinski, Witold Robert; Gaunaa, Mac; Heinz, Joachim Christian

    2016-01-01

    the same procedure. The reference time series were significantly different, depending on the inflow angle. This made the modelling of all the time series with a single and relatively simple engineering model challenging. In order to find model parameters, optimizations were carried out, based on the root-mean-square......Vortex-induced integral loading fluctuations on a single suspended blade at various inflow angles were modeled in the presents work by means of stochastic modelling methods. The reference time series were obtained by 3D DES CFD computations carried out on the DTU 10MW reference wind turbine blade...... varied depending on the inflow angle. None the less, the modelled and reference time series showed a satisfactory general agreement in terms of their visual and frequency characteristics. This indicated that the proposed method is suitable to model loading fluctuations on suspended blades....