WorldWideScience

Sample records for simulative htgr fuel

  1. HTGR fuel reprocessing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, L.H.; Heath, C.A.; Shefcik, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    The following aspects of HTGR reprocessing technology are discussed: characteristics of HTGR fuels, criteria for a fuel reprocessing flowsheet; selection of a reference reprocessing flowsheet, and waste treatment

  2. HTGR fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    In the spring of 1987, the HTGR fuel cycle project has been existing for ten years, and for this reason a status seminar has been held on May 12, 1987 in the Juelich Nuclear Research Center, that gathered the participants in this project for a discussion on the state of the art in HTGR fuel element development, graphite development, and waste management. The papers present an overview of work performed so far and an outlook on future tasks and goals, and on taking stock one can say that the project has been very successful so far: The HTGR fuel element now available meets highest requirements and forms the basis of today's HTGR safety philosophy; research work on graphite behaviour in a high-temperature reactor has led to complete knowledge of the temperature or neutron-induced effects, and with the concept of direct ultimate waste disposal, the waste management problem has found a feasible solution. (orig./GL) [de

  3. HTGR Fuel performance basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamasundar, B.I.; Stansfield, O.M.; Jensen, D.D.

    1982-05-01

    The safety characteristics of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) during normal and accident conditions are determined in part by HTGR fuel performance. During normal operation, less than 0.1% fuel failure occurs, primarily from defective particles. This low fuel failure fraction limits circulating activity to acceptable levels. During severe accidents, the radiological consequence is influenced by high-temperature fuel particle behavior. An empirical fuel failure model, supported by recent experimental data, is presented. The onset of significant fuel particle failure occurs at temperatures in excess of 1600 0 C, and complete fuel failure occurs at 2660 0 C. This indicates that the fuel is more retentive at higher temperatures than previously assumed. The more retentive nature of the fuel coupled with the high thermal capacitance of the core results in slow release of fission products from the core during severe accidents

  4. HTGR fuel performance basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamasundar, B.I.; Stansfield, O.M.; Jensen, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    The safety characteristics of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) during normal and accident conditions are determined in part by HTGR fuel performance. During normal operation, less than 0.1% fuel failure occurs, primarily from defective particles. This low fuel failure fraction limits circulating activity to acceptable levels. During severe accidents, the radiological consequence is influenced by high-temperature fuel particle behavior. An empirical fuel failure model, supported by recent experimental data, is presented. The onset of significant fuel particle failure occurs at temperatures in excess of 1600 0 C, and complete fuel failure occurs at 2660 0 C. This indicates that the fuel is more retentive at higher temperatures than previously assumed. The more retentive nature of the fuel coupled with the high thermal capacitance of the core results in slow release of fission products from the core during severe accidents. The slow release of fission products over hundreds of hours allows for decay of short-lived isotopes. The slow and limited release of fission products under HTGR accident conditions results in very low off-site doses. The slow nature of the accident provides more time for operator action to mitigate the accident and for local and state authorities to respond. These features can be used to take advantage of close-in siting for process applications, flexibility in site selection, and emergency planning

  5. Measurement of Weight of Kernels in a Simulated Cylindrical Fuel Compact for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woong Ki; Lee, Young Woo; Kim, Young Min; Kim, Yeon Ku; Eom, Sung Ho; Jeong, Kyung Chai; Cho, Moon Sung; Cho, Hyo Jin; Kim, Joo Hee

    2011-01-01

    The TRISO-coated fuel particle for the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is composed of a nuclear fuel kernel and outer coating layers. The coated particles are mixed with graphite matrix to make HTGR fuel element. The weight of fuel kernels in an element is generally measured by the chemical analysis or a gamma-ray spectrometer. Although it is accurate to measure the weight of kernels by the chemical analysis, the samples used in the analysis cannot be put again in the fabrication process. Furthermore, radioactive wastes are generated during the inspection procedure. The gamma-ray spectrometer requires an elaborate reference sample to reduce measurement errors induced from the different geometric shape of test sample from that of reference sample. X-ray computed tomography (CT) is an alternative to measure the weight of kernels in a compact nondestructively. In this study, X-ray CT is applied to measure the weight of kernels in a cylindrical compact containing simulated TRISO-coated particles with ZrO 2 kernels. The volume of kernels as well as the number of kernels in the simulated compact is measured from the 3-D density information. The weight of kernels was calculated from the volume of kernels or the number of kernels. Also, the weight of kernels was measured by extracting the kernels from a compact to review the result of the X-ray CT application

  6. Overview of HTGR fuel recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notz, K.J.

    1976-01-01

    An overview of HTGR fuel recycle is presented, with emphasis placed on reprocessing and fuel kernel refabrication. Overall recycle operations include (1) shipment and storage, (2) reprocessing, (3) refabrication, (4) waste handling, and (5) accountability and safeguards

  7. Scoping study of flowpath of simulated fission products during secondary burning of crushed HTGR fuel in a quartz fluidized-bed burner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rindfleisch, J.A.; Barnes, V.H.

    1976-04-01

    The results of four experimental runs in which isotopic tracers were used to simulate fission products during fluidized bed secondary burning of HTGR fuel were studied. The experimental tests provided insight relative to the flow path of fission products during fluidized-bed burning of HTGR fuel

  8. Computer simulation of HTGR fuel microspheres using a Monte-Carlo statistical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedrick, C.E.

    1976-01-01

    The concept and computational aspects of a Monte-Carlo statistical approach in relating structure of HTGR fuel microspheres to the uranium content of fuel samples have been verified. Results of the preliminary validation tests and the benefits to be derived from the program are summarized

  9. HTGR spent fuel storage study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgoyne, R.M.; Holder, N.D.

    1979-04-01

    This report documents a study of alternate methods of storing high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) spent fuel. General requirements and design considerations are defined for a storage facility integral to a fuel recycle plant. Requirements for stand-alone storage are briefly considered. Three alternate water-cooled storage conceptual designs (plug well, portable well, and monolith) are considered and compared to a previous air-cooled design. A concept using portable storage wells in racks appears to be the most favorable, subject to seismic analysis and economic evaluation verification

  10. HTGR fuel and fuel cycle technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotts, A.L.; Homan, F.J.; Balthesen, E.; Turner, R.F.

    1977-01-01

    Significant advances have occurred in the development of HTGR fuel and fuel cycle. These accomplishments permit a wide choice of fuel designs, reactor concepts, and fuel cycles. Fuels capable of providing helium outlet temperatures of 750 0 C are available, and fuels capable of 1000 0 C outlet temperatures may be expected from extension of present technology. Fuels have been developed for two basic HTGR designs, one using a spherical (pebble bed) element and the other a prismatic element. Within each concept a number of variations of geometry, fuel composition, and structural materials are permitted. Potential fuel cycles include both low-enriched and high-enriched Th- 235 U, recycle Th- 233 U, and Th-Pu or U-Pu cycles. This flexibility offered by the HTGR is of great practical benefit considering the rapidly changing economics of power production. The inflation of ore prices has increased optimum conversion ratios, and increased the necessity of fuel recycle at an early date. Fuel element makeup is very similar for prismatic and spherical designs. Both use spherical fissile and fertile particles coated with combinations of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. Both use carbonaceous binder materials, and graphite as the structural material. Weak-acid resin (WAR) UO 2 -UC 2 fissile fuels and sol-gel-derived ThO 2 fertile fuels have been selected for the Th- 233 U cycle in the prismatic design. Sol-gel-derived UO 2 UC 2 is the reference fissile fuel for the low-enriched pebble bed design. Both the United States and Federal Republic of Germany are developing technology for fuel cycle operations including fabrication, reprocessing, refabrication, and waste handling. Feasibility of basic processes has been established and designs developed for full-scale equipment. Fuel and fuel cycle technology provide the basis for a broad range of applications of the HTGR. Extension of the fuels to higher operating temperatures and development and commercial demonstration of fuel

  11. Advances in HTGR fuel performance models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stansfield, O.M.; Goodin, D.T.; Hanson, D.L.; Turner, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Advances in HTGR fuel performance models have improved the agreement between observed and predicted performance and contributed to an enhanced position of the HTGR with regard to investment risk and passive safety. Heavy metal contamination is the source of about 55% of the circulating activity in the HTGR during normal operation, and the remainder comes primarily from particles which failed because of defective or missing buffer coatings. These failed particles make up about 5 x 10 -4 fraction of the total core inventory. In addition to prediction of fuel performance during normal operation, the models are used to determine fuel failure and fission product release during core heat-up accident conditions. The mechanistic nature of the models, which incorporate all important failure modes, permits the prediction of performance from the relatively modest accident temperatures of a passively safe HTGR to the much more severe accident conditions of the larger 2240-MW/t HTGR. (author)

  12. HTGR fuel and fuel cycle technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotts, A.L.; Coobs, J.H.

    1976-08-01

    The status of fuel and fuel cycle technology for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) is reviewed. The all-ceramic core of the HTGRs permits high temperatures compared with other reactors. Core outlet temperatures of 740 0 C are now available for the steam cycle. For advanced HTGRs such as are required for direct-cycle power generation and for high-temperature process heat, coolant temperatures as high as 1000 0 C may be expected. The paper discusses the variations of HTGR fuel designs that meet the performance requirements and the requirements of the isotopes to be used in the fuel cycle. Also discussed are the fuel cycle possibilities, which include the low-enrichment cycle, the Th- 233 U cycle, and plutonium utilization in either cycle. The status of fuel and fuel cycle development is summarized

  13. Gas-Cooled Reactor Programs annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1973. [HTGR fuel reprocessing, fuel fabrication, fuel irradiation, core materials, and fission product distribution; GCFR fuel irradiation and steam generator modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, P.R.; Coobs, J.H.; Lotts, A.L.

    1976-04-01

    Progress is summarized in studies relating to HTGR fuel reprocessing, refabrication, and recycle; HTGR fuel materials development and performance testing; HTGR PCRV development; HTGR materials investigations; HTGR fuel chemistry; HTGR safety studies; and GCFR irradiation experiments and steam generator modeling.

  14. The investigation of HTGR fuel regeneration process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarev, L N; Bertina, L E; Popik, V P; Isakov, V P; Alkhimov, N B; Pokhitonov, Yu A

    1985-07-01

    The aim of this report is the investigation of HTGR fuel regeneration. The operation in the technologic scheme of uranium extraction from fuel depleted elements is separation of fuel from graphite. Available methods of graphite matrix destruction are: mechanical destruction, chemical destruction, and burning. Mechanical destruction is done in combination with leaching or chlorination. Methods of chemical destruction of graphite matrix are not sufficiently studied. Most of the investigations nowadays sre devoted to removal of graphite by burning.

  15. The investigation of HTGR fuel regeneration process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarev, L.N.; Bertina, L.E.; Popik, V.P.; Isakov, V.P.; Alkhimov, N.B.; Pokhitonov, Yu.A.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this report is the investigation of HTGR fuel regeneration. The operation in the technologic scheme of uranium extraction from fuel depleted elements is separation of fuel from graphite. Available methods of graphite matrix destruction are: mechanical destruction, chemical destruction, and burning. Mechanical destruction is done in combination with leaching or chlorination. Methods of chemical destruction of graphite matrix are not sufficiently studied. Most of the investigations nowadays sre devoted to removal of graphite by burning

  16. HTGR fuel particle crusher design evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johanson, N.W.

    1978-10-01

    This report describes an evaluation of the design of the existing engineering-scale fuel particle crushing system for the HTGR reprocessing cold pilot plant at General Atomic Company (GA). The purpose of this evaluation is to assess the suitability of the existing design as a prototype of the HTGR Recycle Reference Facility (HRRF) particle crushing system and to recommend alternatives where the existing design is thought to be unsuitable as a prototype. This evaluation has led to recommendations for an upgraded design incorporating improvements in bearing and seal arrangement, housing construction, and control of roll gap thermal expansion. 23 figures, 6 tables

  17. HTGR fuel element structural design consideration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alloway, R.; Gorholt, W.; Ho, F.; Vollman, R.; Yu, H.

    1987-01-01

    The structural design of the large HTGR prismatic core fuel elements involve the interaction of four engineering disciplines: nuclear physics, thermo-hydraulics, structural and material science. Fuel element stress analysis techniques and the development of structural criteria are discussed in the context of an overview of the entire design process. The core of the proposed 2240 MW(t) HTGR is described as an example where the design process was used. Probabilistic stress analysis techniques coupled with probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) to develop structural criteria to account for uncertainty are described. The PRA provides a means for ensuring that the proposed structural criteria are consistant with plant investment and safety risk goals. The evaluation of cracked fuel elements removed from the Fort St. Vrain reactor in the U.S.A. is discussed in the context of stress analysis uncertainty and structural criteria development. (author)

  18. HTGR fuel element structural design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alloway, R.; Gorholt, W.; Ho, F.; Vollman, R.; Yu, H.

    1986-09-01

    The structural design of the large HTGR prismatic core fuel elements involve the interaction of four engineering disciplines: nuclear physics, thermo-hydraulics, structural and material science. Fuel element stress analysis techniques and the development of structural criteria are discussed in the context of an overview of the entire design process. The core of the proposed 2240 MW(t) HTGR is described as an example where the design process was used. Probabalistic stress analysis techniques coupled with probabalistic risk analysis (PRA) to develop structural criteria to account for uncertainty are described. The PRA provides a means for ensuring that the proposed structural criteria are consistent with plant investment and safety risk goals. The evaluation of cracked fuel elements removed from the Fort St. Vrain reactor in the USA is discussed in the context of stress analysis uncertainty and structural criteria development

  19. Fission-product retention in HTGR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homan, F.J.; Kania, M.J.; Tiegs, T.N.

    1982-01-01

    Retention data for gaseous and metallic fission products are presented for both Triso-coated and Biso-coated HTGR fuel particles. Performance trends are established that relate fission product retention to operating parameters, such as temperature, burnup, and neutron exposure. It is concluded that Biso-coated particles are not adequately retentive of fission gas or metallic cesium, and Triso-coated particles which retain cesium still lose silver. Design implications related to these performance trends are identified and discussed

  20. Irradiation performance of HTGR recycle fissile fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homan, F.J.; Long, E.L. Jr.

    1976-08-01

    The irradiation performance of candidate HTGR recycle fissile fuel under accelerated testing conditions is reviewed. Failure modes for coated-particle fuels are described, and the performance of candidate recycle fissile fuels is discussed in terms of these failure modes. The bases on which UO 2 and (Th,U)O 2 were rejected as candidate recycle fissile fuels are outlined, along with the bases on which the weak-acid resin (WAR)-derived fissile fuel was selected as the reference recycle kernel. Comparisons are made relative to the irradiation behavior of WAR-derived fuels of varying stoichiometry and conclusions are drawn about the optimum stoichiometry and the range of acceptable values. Plans for future testing in support of specification development, confirmation of the results of accelerated testing by real-time experiments, and improvement in fuel performance and reliability are described

  1. Flowsheet development for HTGR fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, B.; Benedict, G.E.; Zimmerman, R.D.

    1976-01-01

    Development studies to date indicate that the HTGR fuel blocks can be effectively crushed with two stages of eccentric jaw crushing, followed by a double-roll crusher, a screener and an eccentrically mounted single-roll crusher for oversize particles. Burner development results indicate successful long-term operation of both the primary and secondary fluidized-bed combustion systems can be performed with the equipment developed in this program. Aqueous separation development activities have centered on adapting known Acid-Thorex processing technology to the HTGR reprocessing task. Significant progress has been made on dissolution of burner ash, solvent extraction feed preparation, slurry transfer, solids drying and solvent extraction equipment and flowsheet requirements

  2. HTGR fuel particle crusher: Mark 2 design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, J.W.

    1979-06-01

    The double-roll crusher for fracturing the silicon carbide coatings of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel particles has been redesigned to improve the equipment. The housing was simplified and reduced to a two-piece assembly; the bearings were changed to accommodate thermal effects; the bearing protection seals were improved with triple redundancy; the bearing preload arrangement was simplified and improved; and localized wear areas were reinforced with better materials or special treatment. In addition, the crusher drive was changed for impoved characteristics and an increase in power

  3. HTGR fuel particle crusher: Mark 2 design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, J.W.

    1979-06-01

    The double-roll crusher for fracturing the silicon carbide coatings of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel particles has been redesigned to improve the equipment. The housing was simplified and reduced to a two-piece assembly; the bearings were changed to accommodate thermal effects; the bearing protection seals were improved with triple redundancy; the bearing preload arrangement was simplified and improved; and localized wear areas were reinforced with better materials or special treatment. In addition, the crusher drive was changed for impoved characteristics and an increase in power.

  4. Nondestructive assay of HTGR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menlove, H.O.

    1974-01-01

    Performance characteristics of three different radioactive source NDA systems are compared for the assay of HTGR fuel rods and stacks of rods. These systems include the fast neutron Sb-Be assay system, the 252 Cf ''Shuffler,'' and the thermal neutron PAPAS assay system. Studies have been made to determinethe perturbation on the measurements from particle size, kernel Th/U ratio, thorium content, and hydrogen content. In addition to the total 235 U determination, the pellet-to-pellet or rod-to-rod uniformity of HTGR fuel rod stacks has been measured by counting the delayed gamma rays with a NaI through-hole in the PAPAS system. These measurements showed that rod substitutions can be detected easily in a fuel stack, and that detailed information is available on the loading variations in a uniform stack. Using a 1.0 mg 252 Cf source, assay rates of 2 to 4 rods/s are possible, thus facilitating measurement of 100 percent of a plant's throughput. (U.S.)

  5. Calorimetric assay of HTGR fuel samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, E.J.; McNeany, S.R.; Jenkins, J.D.

    1979-04-01

    A calorimeter using a neutron source was designed and fabricated by Mound Laboratory, according to ORNL specifications. A calibration curve of the device for HTGR standard fuel rods was experimentally determined. The precision of a single measurement at the 95% confidence level was estimated to be +-0.8 μW. For a fuel sample containing 0.3 g 235 U and a neutron source containing 691 μg 252 Cf, this represents a relative standard deviation of 0.5%. Measurement time was approximately 5.5 h per sample. Use of the calorimeter is limited by its relatively poor precision, long measurement time, manual sample changing, sensitivity to room environment, and possibility of accumulated dust blocking water flow through the calorimeter. The calorimeter could be redesigned to resolve most of these difficulties, but not without significant development work

  6. Characteristics of radioactive waste streams generated in HTGR fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, K.H.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented of a study concerned with identification and characterization of radioactive waste streams from an HTGR fuel reprocessing plant. Approximate quantities of individual waste streams as well as pertinent characteristics of selected streams have been estimated. Most of the waste streams are unique to HTGR fuel reprocessing. However, waste streams from the solvent extraction system and from the plant facilities do not differ greatly from the corresponding LWR fuel reprocessing wastes

  7. Safety aspects of solvent nitration in HTGR fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbourn, R.G.

    1977-06-01

    Reprocessing of HTGR fuels requires evaporative concentration of uranium and thorium nitrate solutions. The results of a bench-scale test program conducted to assess the safety aspects of planned concentrator operations are reported

  8. Fuel behavior and fission product release under HTGR accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, K.; Hayashi, K.; Shiba, K.

    1990-01-01

    In early 1989 a final decision was made over construction of a 30 MWth HTGR called the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor, HTTR, in Japan in order to utilize it for high temperature gas engineering tests and various nuclear material tests. The HTTR fuel is a pin-in-block type fuel element which is composed of a hexagonal graphite block with dimension of 580 mm in length and 360 mm in face-to-face distance and about 30 of the fuel rods inserted into the coolant channels drilled in the block. The TRISO coated fuel particles for HTTR are incorporated with graphite powder and phenol resin into the fuel compacts, 19 of which are encased into a graphite sleeve as a fuel rod. It is necessary for the HTTR licensing to prove the fuel stability under predicted accidents related to the high temperature events. Therefore, the release of the fission products and the fuel failure have been investigated in the irradiation---and the heating experiments simulating these conditions at JAERI. This report describes the HTTR fuel behavior at extreme temperature, made clear in these experiments

  9. Feasibility study of the Dragon reactor for HTGR fuel testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallroth, C.F.

    1975-01-01

    The Organization of European Community Development (OECD) Dragon high-temperature reactor project has performed HTGR fuel and fuel element testing for about 10 years. To date, a total of about 250 fuel elements have been irradiated and the test program continues. The feasibility of using this test facility for HTGR fuel testing, giving special consideration to U. S. needs, is evaluated. A detailed description for design, preparation, and data acquisition of a test experiment is given together with all possible options on supporting work, which could be carried out by the experienced Dragon project staff. 11 references. (U.S.)

  10. Features of spherical uranium-graphite HTGR fuel elements control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreindlin, I.I.; Oleynikov, P.P.; Shtan, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    Control features of spherical HTGR uranium-graphite fuel elements with spherical coated fuel particles are mainly determined by their specific construction and fabrication technology. The technology is chiefly based on methods of ceramic fuel (fuel microspheres fabrication) and graphite production practice it is necessary to deal with a lot of problems from determination of raw materials properties to final fuel elements testing. These procedures are described

  11. Features of spherical uranium-graphite HTGR fuel elements control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreindlin, I I; Oleynikov, P P; Shtan, A S

    1985-07-01

    Control features of spherical HTGR uranium-graphite fuel elements with spherical coated fuel particles are mainly determined by their specific construction and fabrication technology. The technology is chiefly based on methods of ceramic fuel (fuel microspheres fabrication) and graphite production practice it is necessary to deal with a lot of problems from determination of raw materials properties to final fuel elements testing. These procedures are described.

  12. Interim development report: engineering-scale HTGR fuel particle crusher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, J.W.; Strand, J.B.

    1978-09-01

    During the reprocessing of HTGR fuel, a double-roll crusher is used to fracture the silicon carbide coatings on the fuel particles. This report describes the development of the roll crusher used for crushing Fort-St.Vrain type fissile and fertile fuel particles, and large high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (LHTGR) fissile fuel particles. Recommendations are made for design improvements and further testing

  13. Design evaluation of the HTGR fuel element size reduction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, J.B.

    1978-06-01

    A fuel element size reduction system for the ''cold'' pilot plant of the General Atomic HTGR Reference Recycle Facility has been designed and tested. This report is both an evaluation of the design based on results of initial tests and a description of those designs which require completion or modification for hot cell use. 11 figures

  14. Estimation and control in HTGR fuel rod fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downing, D.J.; Bailey, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    A control algorithm has been derived for an HTGR Fuel Rod Fabrication Process utilizing the method of G.E.P. Box and G.M. Jenkins. The estimator is a Kalman filter and is compared with a Least Square estimator and a standard control chart. The effects of system delays are presented. 1 ref

  15. Estimation and control in HTGR fuel rod fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downing, D.J.; Bailey, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    A control algorithm has been derived for a HTGR Fuel Rod Fabrication Process utilizing the method of Box and Jenkins. The estimator is a Kalman filter and is compared with a Least Square estimator and a standard control chart. The effects of system delays are presented

  16. The calculation - experimental investigations of the HTGR fuel element construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremeev, V.S.; Kolesov, V.S.; Chernikov, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    One of the most important problems in the HTGR development is the creation of the fuel element gas-tight for the fission products. This problem is being solved by using fuel elements of dispersion type representing an ensemble of coated fuel particles dispersed in the graphite matrix. Gas-tightness of such fuel elements is reached at the expense of deposing a protective coating on the fuel particles. It is composed of some layers serving as diffusion barriers for fission products. It is apparent that the rate of fission products diffusion from coated fuel particles is determined by the strength and temperature of the protective coating

  17. Thermal design and analysis of the HTGR fuel element vertical carbonizing and annealing furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llewellyn, G.H.

    1977-06-01

    Computer analyses of the thermal design for the proposed HTGR fuel element vertical carbonizing and annealing furnace were performed to verify its capability and to determine the required power input and distribution. Although the furnace is designed for continuous operation, steady-state temperature distributions were obtained by assuming internal heat generation in the fuel elements to simulate their mass movement. The furnace thermal design, the analysis methods, and the results are discussed herein

  18. Use of non-proliferation fuel cycles in the HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, A.M.; Merrill, M.H.; Dahlberg, R.C.

    1978-10-01

    All high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) built or designed to date utilize a uranium-thorium fuel cycle (HEU/Th) in which fully-enriched uranium (93% U-235) is the initial fuel and thorium is the fertile material. The U-233 produced from the thorium is recycled in subsequent loadings to reduce U-235 makeup requirements. However, the recent interest in proliferation-proof fuel cycles for fission reactors has prompted a review and evaluation of possible alternate cycles in the HTGR. This report discusses these alternate fuel cycles, defines those considered usable in an HTGR core, summarizes their advantages and disadvantages, and briefly describes the effect on core design of the most important cycles. Examples from design studies are also given. These studies show that the flexibility afforded by the HTGR coated-particle fuel design allows a variety of alternative cycles, each having special advantages and attractions under different circumstances. Moreover, these alternate cycles can all use the same fuel block, core layout, control scheme, and basic fuel zoning concept

  19. HTGR fuel behavior at very high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashimura, Satoru; Ogawa, Touru; Fukuda, Kousaku; Iwamoto, Kazumi

    1986-03-01

    Fuel behavior at very high temperature simulating abnormal transient of the reactor operation and accidents have been investigated on TRISO coating LEU oxide particle fuels at JAERI. The test simulating the abnormal transient was carried out by irradiation of loose coated particles above 1600 deg C. The irradiation test indicated that particle failure was principally caused by kernel migration. For simulation of the core heat-up accident, two experiments of out-of-pile heating were made. Survival temperature limits were measured and fuel performance at very high temperature were investigated by the heatings. Study on the fuel behavior under reactivity initiated accident was made by NSRR(Nuclear Safety Research Reactor) pulse irradiation, where maximum temperature was higher than 2800 deg C. It was found in the pulse irradiation experiments that the coated particles incorporated in the compacts did not so severely fail unlike the loose coated particles at ultra high temperature above 2800 deg C. In the former particles UO 2 material at the center of the kernel vaporized, leaving a spherical void. (author)

  20. ORR irradiation experiment OF-1: accelerated testing of HTGR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiegs, T.N.; Long, E.L. Jr.; Kania, M.J.; Thoms, K.R.; Allen, E.J.

    1977-08-01

    The OF-1 capsule, the first in a series of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor fuel irradiations in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor, was irradiated for more than 9300 hr at full reactor power (30 MW). Peak fluences of 1.08 x 10 22 neutrons/cm 2 (> 0.18 MeV) were achieved. General Atomic Company's magazine P13Q occupied the upper two-thirds of the test space and the ORNL magazine OF-1 the lower one-third. The ORNL portion tested various HTGR recycle particles and fuel bonding matrices at accelerated flux levels under reference HTGR irradiation conditions of temperature, temperature gradient, and fast fluence exposure

  1. Process control of an HTGR fuel reprocessing cold pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rode, J.S.

    1976-10-01

    Development of engineering-scale systems for a large-scale HTGR fuel reprocessing demonstration facility is currently underway in a cold pilot plant. These systems include two fluidized-bed burners, which remove the graphite (carbon) matrix from the crushed HTGR fuel by high temperature (900 0 C) oxidation. The burners are controlled by a digital process controller with an all analog input/output interface which has been in use since March, 1976. The advantages of such a control system to a pilot plant operation can be summarized as follows: (1) Control loop functions and configurations can be changed easily; (2) control constants, alarm limits, output limits, and scaling constants can be changed easily; (3) calculation of data and/or interface with a computerized information retrieval system during operation are available; (4) diagnosis of process control problems is facilitated; and (5) control panel/room space is saved

  2. Optimization of MOX fuel cycles in pebble bed HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Jinfeng; Li Fu; Sun Yuliang

    2013-01-01

    Compared with light water reactor (LWR), the pebble bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is able to operate in a full mixed oxide (MOX) fuelled core without significant change to core structure design. Based on a reference design of 250 MW pebble bed HTGR, four MOX fuel cycles were designed and evaluated by VSOP program package, including the mixed Pu-U fuel pebbles and mixed loading of separate Pu-pebbles and U-pebbles. Some important physics features were investigated and compared for these four cycles, such as the effective multiplication factor of initial core, the pebble residence time, discharge burnup, and temperature coefficients. Preliminary results show that the overall performance of one case is superior to other equivalent MOX fuel cycles on condition that uranium fuel elements and plutonium fuel elements are separated as the different fuel pebbles and that the uranium fuel elements are irradiated longer in the core than the plutonium fuel elements, and the average discharge burnup of this case is also higher than others. (authors)

  3. Study on the inspection item and inspection method of HTGR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Sang Ho; Kim, Y. K.; Jeong, K. C.; Oh, S. C.; Cho, M. S.; Kim, Y. M.; Lee, Y. W.

    2006-01-01

    The type of HTGR(High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) fuel is different according to the reactor type. Generally the HTGR fuel has two types. One is a block type, which is manufactured in Japan or America. And the other is a pebble type, which is manufactured in China. Regardless of the fuel type, the fuel manufacturing process started from the coated particle, which is consisted of fuel kernel and the 4 coating layers. Korea has a plan to fabricate a HTGR fuel in near future. The appropriate quality inspection standards are requested to produce a sound and reliable coated particle for HTGR fuel. Therefore, the inspection items and the inspection methods of HTGR fuel between Japan and China, which countries have the manufacturing process, are investigated to establish a proper inspection standards of our product characteristics

  4. Status of reprocessing technology in the HTGR fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, G.; Merz, E.; Zimmer, E.

    1977-01-01

    For more than ten years extensive R and D work has been carried out in the Federal Republic of Germany in order to develop the technology necessary for closing the fuel cycle of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The efforts are concentrated primarily on fuel elements having either highly enriched 235 U or recycled 233 U as the fissile and thorium as the fertile material embedded in a graphite matrix. They include the development of processes and equipment for reprocessing and remote preparation of coated microspheres from the recovered uranium. The paper reviews the issues and problems associated with the requirements to deal with high burn-up fuel from HTGR's of different design and composition. It is anticipated that a grind-burn-leach head-end treatment and a modified THOREX-type chemical processing are the optimum choice for the flowsheet. An overview of the present status achieved in construction of a small reprocessing facility, called JUPITER, is presented. It includes a discussion of problems which have already been solved and which have still to be solved like the treatment of feed/breed particle systems and for minimizing environmental impacts envisaged with a HTGR fuel cycle technology. Also discussed is the present status of remote fuel kernel fabrication and coating technology. Additional activities include the design of a mock-up prototype burning head-end facility, called VENUS, with a throughput equivalent to about 6000 MW installed electrical power, as well as a preliminary study for the utilisation of the Karlsruhe LWR prototype reprocessing plant (WAK) to handle HTGR fuel after remodelling of the installations. The paper concludes with an outlook of projects for the future

  5. Irradiation experience with HTGR fuels in the Peach Bottom Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheffel, W.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1974-01-01

    Fuel performance in the Peach Bottom High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is reviewed, including (1) the driver elements in the second core and (2) the test elements designed to test fuel for larger HTGR plants. Core 2 of this reactor, which is operated by the Philadelphia Electric Company, performed reliably with an average nuclear steam supply availability of 85 percent since its startup in July 1970. Core 2 had accumulated a total of 897.5 equivalent full power days (EFPD), almost exactly its design life-time of 900 EFPD, when the plant was shut down permanently on October 31, 1974. Gaseous fission product release and the activity of the main circulating loop remained significantly below the limits allowed by the technical specifications and the levels observed during operation of Core 1. The low circulating activity and postirradiation examination of driver fuel elements have demonstrated the improved irradiation stability of the coated fuel particles in Core 2. Irradiation data obtained from these tests substantiate the performance predictions based on accelerated tests and complement the fuel design effort by providing irradiation data in the low neutron fluence region

  6. HTGR fuel element size reduction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, J.B.; Cramer, G.T.

    1978-06-01

    Reprocessing of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel requires development of a fuel element size reduction system. This report describes pilot plant testing of crushing equipment designed for this purpose. The test program, the test results, the compatibility of the components, and the requirements for hot reprocessing are discussed

  7. CHAP: a composite nuclear plant simulation program applied to the 3000 MW(t) HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secker, P.A.; Bailey, P.G.; Gilbert, J.S.; Willcutt, G.J.E. Jr.; Vigil, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    The Composite HTGR Analysis Program (CHAP) is a general systems analysis program which has been developed at LASL. The program is being used for simulating large HTGR nuclear power plant operation and accident transients. The general features and analytical methods of the CHAP program are discussed. Features of the large HTGR model and results of model transients are also presented

  8. Advances in HTGR spent fuel treatment technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holder, N.D.; Lessig, W.S.

    1984-08-01

    GA Technologies, Inc. has been investigating the burning of spent reactor graphite under Department of Energy sponsorship since 1969. Several deep fluidized bed burners have been used at the GA pilot plant to develop graphite burning techniques for both spent fuel recovery and volume reduction for waste disposal. Since 1982 this technology has been extended to include more efficient circulating bed burners. This paper includes updates on high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel cycle options and current results of spent fuel treatment testing for fluidized and advanced circulating bed burners

  9. Evaluation of a blender for HTGR fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1977-03-01

    An experimental blender for mixing HTGR fuel particles prior to molding the particles into fuel rods was evaluated. The blender consists of a conical chamber with an air inlet in the bottom. A pneumatically operated valve provides for discharge of the particles out of the bottom of the cone. The particles are mixed by periodically levitating with pulses of air. The blender has provision for regulating the air flow rate and the number and duration of the air flow pulses. The performance of the blender was governed by the particle blend being mixed, the air flow rate, and the pulse time. Adequately blended fuel rods can be made, if the air flow rate and pulse time are carefully controlled for each fuel rod composition

  10. Quantification of TRISO fuel heterogeneity effects in HTGR lattice physics calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perfetti, C. M.; Anghaie, S.; Dugan, E.; Marcille, T.

    2010-01-01

    A large number of LEU-MHR fuel compact models were generated with randomly distributed TRISO particle fuel and were simulated using MCNP5, and it was determined how several neutronic parameters, including k-infinite, the thermal and fast diffusion coefficients, and the four factors, varied across the randomly-generated cases. A sensitivity study was also performed to determine how the four factors depend on the definition of the thermal energy group. Values of k-infinite for the cases had a sample standard deviation of 248 pcm and were found to follow an approximately normal distribution about the mean value of k-infinite. Although all of the four factors were found to have similar sample standard deviations, the resonance escape probability was found to be the most variable parameter with a sample relative standard deviation between 0.07% and 0.08%. HTGR fuel compact homogenization methods typically examine only one reference fuel compact that contains a uniform distribution of TRISO particles, but in reality the TRISO particles are randomly distributed throughout the fuel compact. Thus, the neutronic parameters for actual fuel compacts differ randomly from those in the reference model. To license next-generation High-Temperature Gas Reactors engineers must quantify all uncertainties of the design and this random variation in neutron parameters is a previously unmeasured quantity; this study measures this uncertainty by examining the variation in k-infinite for HTGR fuel compact models with randomly distributed TRISO fuel. (authors)

  11. Study on the HTGR axial fuel loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Ryokichi

    1981-01-01

    In the nuclear and thermal design of reactor cores, it is one of the important targets for reactor safety to flatten fuel temperature distribution as far as possible to prevent local peaking. As a macroscopic method to prevent temperature peaking, it is considered to give exponential type power output distribution in coolant flow direction, while flattening radial power output distribution. Assuming rod-shaped fuel, the distribution of fuel heat generation is given by an exponential function under constant maximum fuel temperature condition in the direction of channel. By applying this function to neutron source distribution, and in a premise that U-235 loading can be changed continuously, the preliminary investigation on no-reflector core by one-dimensional one-group consideration, and then the analytical solution of the diffusion equation for a core with reflectors by two group one-dimensional approximation were carried out. The results of these investigations revealed that the U-235 concentration required for achieving exponential type power output distribution is necessary to have large concentration gradient up to the distance equivalent to the length of a few fuel elements from the core inlet, but it is sufficient to have constant concentration in downstream fuel elements, which is 0.8 to 0.9 times as much as the average value along the channel, except for large flow rate channel. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  12. Automatic particle-size analysis of HTGR recycle fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, J.E.; Pechin, W.H.

    1977-09-01

    An automatic particle-size analyzer was designed, fabricated, tested, and put into operation measuring and counting HTGR recycle fuel particles. The particle-size analyzer can be used for particles in all stages of fabrication, from the loaded, uncarbonized weak acid resin up to fully-coated Biso or Triso particles. The device handles microspheres in the range of 300 to 1000 μm at rates up to 2000 per minute, measuring the diameter of each particle to determine the size distribution of the sample, and simultaneously determining the total number of particles. 10 figures

  13. On transient irradiation behavior of HTGR fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortenson, S.C.; Okrent, D.

    1977-01-01

    An examination of HTGR TRISO coated fuel particles was made in which the particles' stress-strain histories were determined during both steady-state and transient operating conditions. The basis for the examination was a modified version of a computer code written by Kaae which assumed spherical symmetry, isotropic thermal expansion, isotropic elastic constants, time-temperature-irradiation invariant materials properties, and steady state operation during particle exposure. Additionally, the Kaae code modelled potential separation of layers at the SiC-inner PyC interface and considered that several entrapped fission products could exist in either the gaseous or solid state, dependent upon particle operating conditions. Using the modified code which modelled transient behavior in a quasi-static fashion, a series of both steady-state and transient operating condition computer simulations was made. For the former set of runs, a candidate set of particle dimensions and a nominal set of materials' properties was assumed. Layer thicknesses were assumed to be normally distributed about the nominal thickenesses and a probability distribution of SiC tensile stresses was generated; sensitivity of the stress distribution to assumed standard deviation of the layer thicknesses was acute. Further, this series of steady-state runs demonstrated that for certain combinations of the assumed PyC-SiC bond interface strength and irradiation-induced creep constant, anomalous predicted stresses may be obtained in the PyC layers. The steady-state runs also suggest that transient behavior would most likely not be significant at fast neutron exposures below about 10 21 NVT due to both low fission gas pressure and likely beneficial interface separation

  14. Experimental design for HTGR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayne, C.K.

    1975-01-01

    Fuel rods for the high temperature gas cooled reactor are composed of pyrolytic carbon coated fuel particles bounded by a carbonaceous matrix. Because of differential shrinkage between coated particles and the carbonaceous matrix, breakage of the pyrolytic coating has been observed with certain combinations of coated particles and matrix compositions. The pyrolytic coating is intended to be the primary containment for fission products. Therefore, an experiment is desired to determine the breakage characteristics of different strength coated particles combined with different matrix compositions during irradiation

  15. Device for sampling HTGR recycle fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchomel, R.R.; Lackey, W.J.

    1977-03-01

    Devices for sampling High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor fuel microspheres were evaluated. Analysis of samples obtained with each of two specially designed passive samplers were compared with data generated by more common techniques. A ten-stage two-way sampler was found to produce a representative sample with a constant batch-to-sample ratio

  16. Chemical thermodynamics of iodine species in the HTGR fuel particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindemer, T.B.

    1982-09-01

    The iodine-containing species in an intact fuel particle in the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) have been calculated. Assumptions include: (1) attainment of chemical thermodynamic equilibrium among all species in the open porosity of the particle, primarily in the buffer layer; and (2) fission-product concentrations in proportion to their yields. The primary gaseous species is calculated to be cesium iodide; in carbide-containing fuels, gaseous barium iodide may exhibit equivalent pressures. The condensed iodine-containing phase is usually cesium iodide, but in carbide-containing fuels, barium iodide may be stable instead. Absorption of elemental iodine on the carbon in the particle appears to be less than or equal to 10 -4 μg I/g C. The fission-product-spectra excess of cesium over iodine would generally be adsorbed on the carbon, but may form Cs 2 MoO 4 under some circumstances

  17. Fission product release from HTGR fuel under core heatup accident conditions - HTR2008-58160

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, K.; Nabielek, H.

    2008-01-01

    Various countries engaged in the development and fabrication of modern fuel for the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) have initiated activities of modeling the fuel and fission product release behavior with the aim of predicting the fuel performance under operating and accidental conditions of future HTGRs. Within the IAEA directed Coordinated Research Project CRP6 on 'Advances in HTGR Fuel Technology Development' active since 2002, the 13 participating Member States have agreed upon benchmark studies on fuel performance during normal operation and under accident conditions. While the former has been completed in the meantime, the focus is now on the extension of the national code developments to become applicable to core heatup accident conditions. These activities are supported by the fact that core heatup simulation experiments have been resumed recently providing new, highly valuable data. Work on accident performance will be - similar to the normal operation benchmark - consisting of three essential parts comprising both code verification that establishes the correspondence of code work with the underlying physical, chemical and mathematical laws, and code validation that establishes reasonable agreement with the existing experimental data base, but including also predictive calculations for future heating tests and/or reactor concepts. The paper will describe the cases to be studied and the calculational results obtained with the German computer model FRESCO. Among the benchmark cases in consideration are tests which were most recently conducted in the new heating facility KUEFA. Therefore this study will also re-open the discussion and analysis of both the validity of diffusion models and the transport data of the principal fission product species in the HTGR fuel materials as essential input data for the codes. (authors)

  18. Developments of HTGR thermofluid dynamic analysis codes and HTGR plant dynamic simulation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Mitsuhiro; Izaki, Makoto; Koike, Hiroyuki; Tokumitsu, Masashi

    1983-01-01

    In nuclear power plants as well as high temperature gas-cooled reactor plants, the design is mostly performed on the basis of the results after their characteristics have been grasped by carrying out the numerical simulation using the analysis code. Also in Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd., on the basis of the system engineering accumulated with gas-cooled reactors since several years ago, the preparation and systematization of analysis codes have been advanced, aiming at lining up the analysis codes for heat transferring flow and control characteristics, taking up HTGR plants as the main object. In this report, a part of the results is described. The example of the analysis applying the two-dimensional compressible flow analysis codes SOLA-VOF and SALE-2D, which were developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory in USA and modified for use in Kawasaki, to HTGR system is reported. Besides, Kawasaki has developed the control characteristics analyzing code DYSCO by which the change of system composition is easy and high versatility is available. The outline, fundamental equations, fundamental algorithms and examples of application of the SOLA-VOF and SALE-2D, the present status of system characteristic simulation codes and the outline of the DYSCO are described. (Kako, I.)

  19. Crushing strength of HTGR fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lackey, W.J.; Stinton, D.P.; Davis, L.E.; Beatty, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    The whole-particle crushing strengths of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor fertile and fissile coated particles were measured and correlated with fabrication procedures. The crushing strength of Biso-coated fertile particles was increased by the following factors: (1) increasing the outer coating thickness by 10 μm increased strengths by 0.3 lb (1.3 N) for annealed particles and by 0.5 lb (2.2 N) for unannealed particles. (2) An 1800 0 C postcoating anneal increased strengths by 1 lb (4.4 N) for particles with thick outer coatings and by 2 lb (8.9 N) for particles having thin coatings. (3) Increasing the inner coating density by 0.1 g/cm 3 increased strength by 0.6 lb (2.7 N). The crushing strength of Triso-coated fissile particles was proportional to the thickness of the SiC coatings, and strength decreased on annealing by about 0.2 lb (0.9 N) when a porous plate was used to distribute the coating gas and by about 1.5 lb (6.7 N) when a conical gas distributor was used. The strengths of fertile and fissile coated particles as well as uncoated kernels appear adequate to allow fuel fabrication without excessive particle damage

  20. Research on solvent extraction process for reprocessing of Th-U fuel from HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Borong; Wang Gaodong; Qian Jun

    1992-05-01

    The unique properties of spent fuel from HTGR (high temperature gas cooled reactor) have been analysed. The single solvent extraction process using 30% TBP for separation and purification of Th-U fuel has been studied. In addition, the solvent extraction process for second uranium purification is also investigated to meet different needs of reprocessing and reproduction of Th-U spent fuel from HTGR

  1. Quality control procedures for HTGR fuel element components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delle, W.W.; Koizlik, K.; Luhleich, H.; Nickel, H.

    1976-08-01

    The growing use of nuclear reactors for the production of electric power throughout the world, and the consequent increase in the number of nuclear fuel manufacturers, is giving enhanced importance to the consideration of quality assurance in the production of nuclear fuels. The fuel is the place, where the radioactive fission products are produced in the reactor and, therefore, the integrity of the fuel is of utmost importance. The first and most fundamental means of insuring that integrity is through the exercise of properly designed quality assurance programmes during the manufacture of the fuel and other fuel element components. The International Atomic Energy Agency therefore conducted an International Seminar on Nuclear Fuel Quality Assurance in Oslo, Norway from 24 till 28 May, 1976. This KFA report contains a paper which was distributed preliminary during the seminar and - in the second part - the text of the oral presentation. The paper gives a summary of the procedures available in the present state for the production control of HTGR core materials and of the meaning of the particular properties for reactor operation. (orig./UA) [de

  2. Production control in HTGR fuel rod fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downing, D.J.; Bailey, M.

    1979-06-01

    Purpose of this report was (1) to determine which techniques (Kalman Filter, weighted least squares, Shewhart control chart) are capable of detecting drift or step changes earliest in a manufacturing process, and (2) what method would work well in maintaining the manufacturing process at an acceptable level of quality. To solve part (1) simulation studies were performed for various test cases of interest. No single technique was superior in all of these cases, but the Kalman Filter appeared to be more robust to various process changes. The weighted least squares did a good job when the weight was near unity (0.9977) and failed when the weight was small (0.63). The Shewhart control chart is better for detecting step changes than for trends. Several methods wre compared to try to answer part (2). In this report the model building and forecasting was done using the methods of Box and Jenkins

  3. GTOROTO: a simulation system for HTGR core seismic behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takeshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Onuma, Yoshio

    1980-07-01

    One of the most important design of HTGR core is its aseismic structure. Therefore, it is necessary to predict the forces and motion of the core blocks. To meet the requirement, many efforts to develop analytical methods and computer programs are made. A graphic simulation system GTOROTO with a CRT graphic display and lightpen was developed to analyze the HTGR core behavior in seismic excitation. Feature of the GTOROTO are as follows: (1) Behavior of the block-type HTGR core during earthquake can be shown on the CRT-display. (2) Parameters of the computing scheme can be changed with the lightpen. (3) Routines of the computing scheme can be changed with the lightpen and an alteration switch. (4) Simulation pictures are shown automatically. Hardcopies are available by plotter in stopping the progress of simulation pictures. Graphic representation can be re-start with the predetermined program. (5) Graphic representation informations can be stored in assembly language on a disk for rapid representation. (6) A computer-generated cinema can be made by COM (Computer Output Microfilming) or filming directly the CRT pictures. These features in the GTOROTO are provided in on-line conversational mode. (author)

  4. Fission-product SiC reaction in HTGR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, F.

    1981-01-01

    The primary barrier to release of fission product from any of the fuel types into the primary circuit of the HTGR are the coatings on the fuel particles. Both pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coatings are very effective in retaining fission gases under normal operating conditions. One of the possible performance limitations which has been observed in irradiation tests of TRISO fuel is chemical interaction of the SiC layer with fission products. This reaction reduces the thickness of the SiC layer in TRISO particles and can lead to release of fission products from the particles if the SiC layer is completely penetrated. The experimental section of this report describes the results of work at General Atomic concerning the reaction of fission products with silicon carbide. The discussion section describes data obtained by various laboratories and includes (1) a description of the fission products which have been found to react with SiC; (2) a description of the kinetics of silicon carbide thinning caused by fission product reaction during out-of-pile thermal gradient heating and the application of these kinetics to in-pile irradiation; and (3) a comparison of silicon carbide thinning in LEU and HEU fuels

  5. HTGR Technology Family Assessment for a Range of Fuel Cycle Missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Nick Soelberg

    2010-08-01

    This report examines how the HTGR technology family can provide options for the once through, modified open cycle (MOC), or full recycle fuel cycle strategies. The HTGR can serve all the fuel cycle missions that an LWR can; both are thermal reactors. Additional analyses are warranted to determine if HTGR “full recycle” service could provide improved consumption of transuranic (TRU) material than LWRs (as expected), to analyze the unique proliferation resistance issues associated with the “pebble bed” approach, and to further test and analyze methods to separate TRISO-coated fuel particles from graphite and/or to separate used HTGR fuel meat from its TRISO coating. The feasibility of these two separation issues is not in doubt, but further R&D could clarify and reduce the cost and enable options not adequately explored at present. The analyses here and the now-demonstrated higher fuel burnup tests (after the illustrative designs studied here) should enable future MOC and full recycle HTGR concepts to more rapidly consume TRU, thereby offering waste management advantages. Interest in “limited separation” or “minimum fuel treatment” separation approaches motivates study of impurity-tolerant fuel fabrication. Several issues are outside the scope of this report, including the following: thorium fuel cycles, gas-cooled fast reactors, the reliability of TRISO-coated particles (billions in a reactor), and how soon any new reactor or fuel type could be licensed and then deployed and therefore impact fuel cycle performance measures.

  6. HTGR Technology Family Assessment for a Range of Fuel Cycle Missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, Steven J.; Bays, Samuel E.; Soelberg, Nick

    2010-01-01

    This report examines how the HTGR technology family can provide options for the once through, modified open cycle (MOC), or full recycle fuel cycle strategies. The HTGR can serve all the fuel cycle missions that an LWR can; both are thermal reactors. Additional analyses are warranted to determine if HTGR 'full recycle' service could provide improved consumption of transuranic (TRU) material than LWRs (as expected), to analyze the unique proliferation resistance issues associated with the 'pebble bed' approach, and to further test and analyze methods to separate TRISO-coated fuel particles from graphite and/or to separate used HTGR fuel meat from its TRISO coating. The feasibility of these two separation issues is not in doubt, but further R and D could clarify and reduce the cost and enable options not adequately explored at present. The analyses here and the now-demonstrated higher fuel burnup tests (after the illustrative designs studied here) should enable future MOC and full recycle HTGR concepts to more rapidly consume TRU, thereby offering waste management advantages. Interest in 'limited separation' or 'minimum fuel treatment' separation approaches motivates study of impurity-tolerant fuel fabrication. Several issues are outside the scope of this report, including the following: thorium fuel cycles, gas-cooled fast reactors, the reliability of TRISO-coated particles (billions in a reactor), and how soon any new reactor or fuel type could be licensed and then deployed and therefore impact fuel cycle performance measures.

  7. Development of processes and equipment for the refabrication of HTGR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sease, J.D.; Lotts, A.L.

    1976-06-01

    Refabrication is in the step in the HTGR thorium fuel cycle that begins with a nitrate solution containing 238 U and culminates in the assembly of this material into fuel elements for use in an HTGR. Refabrication of HTGR fuel is essentially a manufacturing operation and consists of preparation of fuel kernels, application of multiple layers of pyrolytic carbon and SiC, preparation of fuel rods, and assembly of fuel rods in fuel elements. All the equipment for refabrication of 238 U-containing fuel must be designed for completely remote operation and maintenance in hot cell facilities. This paper describes the status of processes and equipment development for the remote refabrication of HTGR fuels. The feasibility of HTGR refabrication processes has been proven by laboratory development. Engineering-scale development is now being performed on a unit basis on the majority of the major equipment items. Engineering-scale equipment described includes full-scale resin loading equipment, a 5-in.-dia (0.13-m) microsphere coating furnace, a fuel rod forming machine, and a cure-in-place furnace

  8. FREVAP-6, Metal Fission Products Release from HTGR Fuel Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, V.H.

    2005-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: The FREVAP type of code for estimating the release of longer-lived metallic fission products from HTGR fuel elements has been developed to take into account the combined effects of the retention of metallic fission products by fuel particles and the rather strong absorption of these fission products by the graphite of the fuel elements. Release calculations are made on the basis that the loss of fission product nuclides such as strontium, cesium, and barium is determined by their evaporation from the graphite surfaces and their transpiration induced by the flowing helium coolant. The code is devised so that changes of fission rate (fuel element power), fuel temperature, and graphite temperature may be incorporated into the calculation. Temperature is quite important in determining release because, in general, both release from fuel particles and loss by evaporation (transpiration) vary exponentially with the reciprocal of the absolute temperature. NESC0301/02: This version differs from the previous one in the following points: The source and output files were converted from BCD to ASCII coding. 2 - Method of solution: A problem is defined as having a one-dimensional segment made up of three parts - (1) the fission product source (fuel particles) in series with, (2) a non-source and absorption part (element graphite) and (3) a surface for evaporation to the coolant (graphite-helium interface). More than one segment may be connected (possibly segments stacked axially) by way of the coolant. At any given segment, a continuity equation is solved assuming equilibrium between the source term, absorption term, evaporation at coolant interface and the partial pressure of the fission product isotope in the coolant. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem - Maxima of: 5 isotopes; 10 time intervals for time-dependent variable; 49 segments (times number of isotopes); 5 different output print time-steps

  9. Irradiation performance of HTGR fuel in HFIR experiment HRB-13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiegs, T.N.

    1982-03-01

    Irradiation capsule HRB-13 tested High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) fuel under accelerated conditions in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL. The ORNL part of the capsule was designed to provide definitive results on how variously misshapen kernels affect the irradiation performance of weak-acid-resin (WAR)-derived fissile fuel particles. Two batches of WAR fissile fuel particles were Triso-coated and shape-separated into four different fractions according to their deviation from spericity, which ranged from 9.6 to 29.7%. The fissile particles were irradiated for 7721 h. Heavy-metal burnups ranged from 80 to 82.5% FIMA (fraction of initial heavy-metal atoms). Fast neutron fluences (>0.18 MeV) ranged from 4.9 x 10 25 neutrons/m 2 to 8.5 x 10 25 neutrons/m 2 . Postirradiation examination showed that the two batches of fissile particles contained chlorine, presumably introduced during deposition of the SiC coating

  10. A reactivity accidents simulation of the Fort Saint Vrain HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fainer, Gerson

    1980-01-01

    A reactivity accidents analysis of the Fort Saint Vrain HTGR was made. The following accidents were analysed 1) A rod pair withdrawal accident during normal operation, 2) A rod pair ejection accident, 3) A rod pair withdrawal accident during startup operations at source levels and 4) Multiple rod pair withdrawal accident. All the simulations were performed by using the BLOOST-6 nuclear code The steady state reactor operation results obtained with the code were consistent with the design reactor data. The numerical analysis showed that all accidents - except the first one - cause particle failure. (author)

  11. In-pile tests of HTGR fuel particles and fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernikov, A.S.; Kolesov, V.S.; Deryugin, A.I.

    1985-01-01

    Main types of in-pile tests for specimen tightness control at the initial step, research of fuel particle radiation stability and also study of fission product release from fuel elements during irradiation are described in this paper. Schemes and main characteristics of devices used for these tests are also given. Principal results of fission gas product release measurements satisfying HTGR demands are illustrated on the example of fuel elements, manufactured by powder metallurgy methods and having TRISO fuel particles on high temperature pyrocarbon and silicon carbide base. (author)

  12. Computational analysis of modern HTGR fuel performance and fission product release during the HFR-EU1 irradiation experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfondern, Karl, E-mail: k.verfondern@fz-juelich.de [Research Center Jülich, Institute of Energy and Climate Research, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Xhonneux, André, E-mail: xhonneux@lrst.rwth-aachen.de [Research Center Jülich, Institute of Energy and Climate Research, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Nabielek, Heinz, E-mail: heinznabielek@me.com [Research Center Jülich, Monschauerstrasse 61, 52355 Düren (Germany); Allelein, Hans-Josef, E-mail: h.j.allelein@fz-juelich.de [Research Center Jülich, Institute of Energy and Climate Research, 52425 Jülich (Germany); RWTH Aachen, Chair for Reactor Safety and Reactor Technology, 52072 Aachen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • HFR-EU1 irradiation test demonstrates high quality of HTGR spherical fuel elements. • Irradiation performance is in good agreement with German fuel performance modeling. • International benchmark exercise expected first particle to fail at ∼13–17% FIMA. • EOL silver release is predicted to be in the percentage range. • EOL cesium and strontium are expected to remain at a low level. - Abstract: Various countries engaged in the development and fabrication of modern HTGR fuel have initiated activities of modeling the fuel and fission product release behavior with the aim of predicting the fuel performance under HTGR operating and accident conditions. Verification and validation studies are conducted by code-to-code benchmarking and code-to-experiment comparisons as part of international exercises. The methodology developed in Germany since the 1980s represents valuable and efficient tools to describe fission product release from spherical fuel elements and TRISO fuel performance, respectively, under given conditions. Continued application to new results of irradiation and accident simulation testing demonstrates the appropriateness of the models in terms of a conservative estimation of the source term as part of interactions with HTGR licensing authorities. Within the European irradiation testing program for HTGR fuel and as part of the former EU RAPHAEL project, the HFR-EU1 irradiation experiment explores the potential for high performance of the presently existing German and newly produced Chinese fuel spheres under defined conditions up to high burnups. The fuel irradiation was completed in 2010. Test samples are prepared for further postirradiation examinations (PIE) including heatup simulation testing in the KÜFA-II furnace at the JRC-ITU, Karlsruhe, to be conducted within the on-going ARCHER Project of the European Commission. The paper will describe the application of the German computer models to the HFR-EU1 irradiation test and

  13. Computer simulation of radiation damage in HTGR elements and structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gann, V.V.; Gurin, V.A.; Konotop, Yu.F.; Shilyaev, B.A.; Yamnitskij, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of mathematical simulation of radiation damages in material and items of HTGR is considered. A system-program complex IMITATOR, intended for imitation of neutron damages by means of charged particle beams, is used. Account of material composite structure and certain geometry of items permits to calculate fields of primary radiation damages and introductions of reaction products in composite fuel elements, microfuel elements, their shells, composite absorbing elements on the base of boron carbide, structural steels and alloys. A good correspondence of calculation and experimental burn-out of absorbing elements is obtained, application of absorbing element as medium for imitation experiments is grounded [ru

  14. HTGR Fuel Technology Program. Semiannual report for the period ending March 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    This document reports the technical accomplishments on the HTGR Fuel Technology Program at General Atomic during the first half of FY-81. The activities include the fuel process, fuel materials, fuel cycle, fission product transport, and core component verification testing tasks necessary to support the design and development of a steam cycle/cogeneration (SC/C) version of the HTGR with a follow-on reformer (R) version. An important effort which was initiated during this period was the preparation of input data for a long-range technology program plan

  15. HTGR Fuel-Technology Program. Semiannual report for the period ending September 30, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    This document reports the technical accomplishments on the HTGR Fuel Technology Program at GA Technologies Inc. during the second half of FY-1982. The activities include the fuel process, fuel materials, fuel cycle, fission product transport, and core component verification testing tasks necessary to support the design and development of a steam cycle/cogeneration (SC/C) version of the HTGR with a follow-on reformer (R) version. An important effort which was completed during this period was the preparation of input data for a long-range technology program plan

  16. Development of HTGR plant dynamics simulation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Kazutaka; Tazawa, Yujiro; Mitake, Susumu; Suzuki, Katsuo.

    1987-01-01

    Plant dynamics simulation analysis plays an important role in the design work of nuclear power plant especially in the plant safety analysis, control system analysis, and transient condition analysis. The authors have developed the plant dynamics simulation code named VESPER, which is applicable to the design work of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor, and have been improving the code corresponding to the design changes made in the subsequent design works. This paper describes the outline of VESPER code and shows its sample calculation results selected from the recent design work. (author)

  17. Thermal stress analysis of HTGR fuel and control rod fuel blocks in the HTGR in-block carbonization and annealing furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwaltney, R.C.; McAfee, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    A new approach that utilizes the equivalent solid plate method has been applied to the thermal stress analysis of HTGR fuel and control rod fuel blocks. Cases were considered where these blocks, loaded with reprocessed HTGR fuel pellets, were being cured at temperatures up to 1800 0 C. A two-dimensional segment of a fuel block cross section including fuel, coolant holes, and graphite matrix was analyzed using the ORNL HEATING3 heat transfer code to determine the temperature-dependent effective thermal conductivity for the perforated region of the block. Using this equivalent conductivity to calculate the temperature distributions through different cross sections of the blocks, two-dimensional thermal-stress analyses were performed through application of the equivalent solid plate method. In this approach, the perforated material is replaced by solid homogeneous material of the same external dimensions but whose material properties have been modified to account for the perforations

  18. Selection of LEU/Th reference fuel for the HTGR-SC/C lead plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, R.F.; Neylan, A.J.; Baxter, A.M.; McEachern, D.W.; Stansfield, O.M.

    1983-05-01

    This paper describes the reference fuel materials for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plant for steam cycle/cogeneration (SC/C). A development and testing program carried out in 1978 through 1982 led to the selection of coated fuel particles of uranium-oxycarbide (UCO) for fissile materials and thorium oxide (ThO 2 ) for fertiel materials. Low-enriched uranium (LEU) is the enrichment basis for the HTGR-SC/C application. While UC 2 and UO 2 would also meet the essential criteria for fissile fuel, the UCO, alternative was selected on the basis of improved performance, economics, and process conditions

  19. Simulation of thermal response of the 250 MWT modular HTGR during hypothetical uncontrolled heatup accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, R.M.; Ball, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    One of the central design features of the 250 MWT modular HTGR is the ability to withstand uncontrolled heatup accidents without severe consequences. This paper describes calculational studies, conducted to test this design feature. A multi-node thermal-hydraulic model of the 250 MWT modular HTGR reactor core was developed and implemented in the IBM CSMP (Continuous System Modeling Program) simulation language. Survey calculations show that the loss of forced circulation accident with loss of steam generator cooling water and with accidental depressurization is the most severe heatup accident. The peak hot-spot fuel temperature is in the neighborhood of 1600 0 C. Fuel failure and fission product releases for such accidents would be minor. Sensitivity studies show that code input assumptions for thermal properties such as the side reflector conductivity have a significant effect on the peak temperature. A computer model of the reactor vessel cavity concrete wall and its surrounding earth was developed to simulate the extremely unlikely and very slowly-developing heatup accident that would take place if the worst-case loss of forced primary coolant circulation accident were further compounded by the loss of cooling water to the reactor vessel cavity liner cooling system. Results show that the ability of the earth surrounding the cavity to act as a satisfactory long-term heat sink is very sensitive to the assumed rate of decay heat generation and on the effective thermal conductivity of the earth

  20. Concept of safe tank-type water cooled and moderated reactor with HTGR microparticle fuel compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gol'tsev, A.O.; Kukharkin, N.E.; Mosevitskij, I.S.; Ponomarev-Stepnoj, N.N.; Popov, S.V.; Udyanskij, Yu.N.; Tsibul'skij, V.F.

    1993-01-01

    Concept of safe tank-type water-cooled and moderated reactor on the basis of HTGR fuel microparticles which enable to avoid environment contamination with radioactive products under severe accidents, is proposed. Results of neutron-physical and thermal-physical studies of water cooled and moderated reactor with HTGR microparticle compacts are presented. Characteristics of two reactors with thermal power of 500 and 1500 MW are indicated within the concept frames. The reactor behaviour under severe accident connected with complete loss of water coolant is considered. It is shown that under such an accident the fission products release from fuel microparticles does not occur

  1. Calcination, Reduction and Sintering of ADU Spheres for HTGR Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kyung Chai; Eom, Sung Ho; Kim, Yeon Ku; Kim, Woong Ki; Kim, Young Min; Lee, Young Woo; Kim, Ju Hee; Cho, Hyo Jin; Cho, Moon Seoung

    2011-01-01

    The international oil market is again in turmoil in accordance with the increasing of human needs and energy consumption. Soaring oil prices, fears of supply security, and climate change are concerned becoming more concrete make for an uncertain energy future. In this view point, nuclear energy is an important, yet controversial option for energy supply. High Temperature Gas Reactor will play a dominant role in the worldwide fleet of nuclear reactors of the next decade for electricity production and high temperature heat. HTGR have two reactor types which use the basic fuel concept based on the dispersion of TRISO coated particles in graphite in shown Fig.1. The TRISO coated particle for these purposes is prepared with pyro-carbon and silicone carbide coatings on a spherical UO 2 kernel surface as fissile material. The TRISO fuel particle consists of a microsphere (i.e., UO 2 kernel) of nuclear material: encapsulated by multiple layers of pyro-carbon and a SiC layer. This multiple coating layers system has been engineered to retain the fission products generated by fission of the nuclear material in the kernel during normal operation and all licensing basis events over the design lifetime of the fuel. UO 2 kernels are produced by using the modified sol-gel process, a wet process, generally known as the GSP method. Wet chemical processes are flexible in producing kernels of different size and chemical composition with high throughout and yield, good spherical shape, and narrow size distribution. This chemical processing route is well-known to the potential kernel fabrication processes. The principle, as set out in Fig.2, involves first of all preparing a pseudo-sol(also known as a 'broth') from an initial uranyl nitrate solution . This broth solution is obtained through addition of a number of additives, as determined by process know-how, including a soluble organic polymer, that are subsequently gels into droplets and are dispersed for ADU precipitation. The

  2. Irradiation performance of HTGR fuel rods in HFIR experiments HRB-11 and -12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homan, F.J.; Tiegs, T.N.; Kania, M.J.; Long, E.L. Jr.; Thoms, K.R.; Robbins, J.M.; Wagner, P.

    1980-06-01

    Capsules HRB-11 and -12 were irradiated in support of development of weak-acid-resin-derived recycle fuel for the high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel cycle for the HTGR. Fissil fuel particles with initial oxygen-to-metal ratios between 1.0 and 1.7 performed acceptably to full burnup for HEU fuel. Particles with ratios below 1.0 showed excessive chemical interaction between rare earth fission products and the SiC layer

  3. Radiation resistance of pyrocarbon-boned fuel and absorbing elements for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurin, V.A.; Konotop, Yu.F.; Odejchuk, N.P.; Shirochenkov, S.D.; Yakovlev, V.K.; Aksenov, N.A.; Kuprienko, V.A.; Lebedev, I.G.; Samsonov, B.V.

    1990-01-01

    In choosing the reactor type, problems of nuclear and radiation safety are outstanding. The analysis of the design and experiments show that HTGR type reactors helium cooled satisfy all the safety requirements. It has been planned in the Soviet Union to construct two HTGR plants, VGR-50 and VG-400. Later it was decided to construct an experimental plant with a low power high temperature reactor (VGM). Spherical uranium-graphite fuel elements with coated fuel particles are supposed to be used in HTGR core. A unique technology for producing spherical pyrocarbon-bound fuel and absorbing elements of monolithic type has been developed. Extended tests were done to to investigate fuel elements behaviour: radiation resistance of coated fuel particles with different types of fuel; influence of the coated fuel particles design on gaseous fission products release; influence of non-sphericity on coated fuel particle performance; dependence of gaseous fission products release from fuel elements on the thickness of fuel-free cans; confining role of pyrocarbon as a factor capable of diminishing the rate of fission products release; radiation resistance of spherical fuel elements during burnup; radiation resistance of spherical absorbing elements to fast neutron fluence and boron burnup

  4. Factors affecting defective fraction of biso-coated HTGR fuel particles during in-block carbonization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caputo, A.J.; Johnson, D.R.; Bayne, C.K.

    1977-01-01

    The performance of Biso-coated thoria fuel particles during the in-block processing step of HTGR fuel element refabrication was evaluated. The effect of various process variables (heating rate, particle crushing strength, horizontal and/or vertical position in the fuel element blocks, and fuel hole permeability) on pitch coke yield, defective fraction of fuel particles, matrix structure, and matrix porosity was evaluated. Of the variables tested, only heating rate had a significant effect on pitch coke yield while both heating rate and particle crushing strength had a significant effect on defective fraction of fuel particles

  5. Strategy to support HTGR fuel for the 10 MW Indonesia’s experimental power reactor (RDE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taswanda Taryo; Geni Rina Sunaryo; Ridwan; Meniek Rachmawati

    2018-01-01

    The Indonesia’s 10 MW experimental power reactor (RDE) is developed based on high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) and the program of the RDE was firstly introduced to the Agency for National Development Planning (BAPPENAS) at the beginning of 2014. The RDE program is expected to have positive impacts on community prosperity, self-reliance and sovereignty of Indonesia. The availability of RDE will be able to accelerate advanced nuclear power technology development and hence elevate Indonesia to be the nuclear champion in the ASEAN region. The RDE is expected to be operable in 2022/2023. In terms of fuel supply for the reactor, the first batch of RDE fuel will be inclusive in the RDE engineering, procurement and construction (RDE-EPC) contract for the assurance of the RDE reactor operation from 2023 to 2027. Consideration of RDE fuel plant construction is important as RDE can be the basis for the development of reactors of similar type with small-medium power(25 MWe–200/300 MWe), which are preferable for eastern part of Indonesia. To study the feasibility of the construction of RDE fuel plant, current state of the art of the R&D on HTGR fuel in some advanced countries such as European countries, the United States, South Africa and Japan will be discussed and overviewed to draw a conclusion about the prospective countries for supporting the fuel for long-term RDE operation. The strategy and road map for the preparation of the RDE fuel plant construction with the involvement of national stake holders have been developed. The best possible vendor country to support HTGR fuel for long-term operation is finally accomplished. In the end, this paper can be assigned as a reference for the planning and construction of HTGR RDE fuel fabrication plant in Indonesia. (author)

  6. The radiological risks associated with the thorium fuelled HTGR fuel cycle. A comparative risk evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, D.H.; Hienen, J.F.A. van.

    1995-10-01

    This report presents the results of task B.3 of the 'Technology Assessment of the High Temperature Reactor' project. The objective of task B.3 was to evaluate the radiological risks to the general public associated with the sustainable HTGR cycle. Since the technologies to be used at several stages of this fuel cycle are still in the design phase and since a detailed specification of this fuel cycle has not yet been developed, the emphasis was on obtaining a global impression of the risk associated with a generic thorium-based HTGR fuel cycle. This impression was obtained by performing a comparative risk analysis on the basis of data given in the literature. As reference for the comparison a generic uranium fuelled LWR cycle was used. The major benefit with respect to the radiological rsiks of basing the fuel cycle around modular HTGR technology instead of the LWR technology is the increase in reactor safety. The design of the modular HTGR is expected to prevent the release of a significant amount of radioactive material to the environment, and hence early deaths in the surrounding population, during accident conditions. This implies that there is no group risk as defined in the Dutch risk management policy. The major benefit of thorium based fuel cycles over uranium based fuel cycles is the reduction in the radiological risks from unraium mining and milling. The other stages of the nuclear fuel cycle which make a significant contribution to the radiological risks are electricity generation, reprocessing and final disposal. The risks associated with the electricity generation stage are dominated by the risks from fission products, activated corrosion products and the activation products tritium and carbon-14. The risks associated with the reprocessing stage are determined by fission and activation products (including actinides). (orig./WL)

  7. The radiological risks associated with the thorium fuelled HTGR fuel cycle. A comparative risk evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodd, D.H.; Hienen, J.F.A. van

    1995-10-01

    This report presents the results of task B.3 of the `Technology Assessment of the High Temperature Reactor` project. The objective of task B.3 was to evaluate the radiological risks to the general public associated with the sustainable HTGR cycle. Since the technologies to be used at several stages of this fuel cycle are still in the design phase and since a detailed specification of this fuel cycle has not yet been developed, the emphasis was on obtaining a global impression of the risk associated with a generic thorium-based HTGR fuel cycle. This impression was obtained by performing a comparative risk analysis on the basis of data given in the literature. As reference for the comparison a generic uranium fuelled LWR cycle was used. The major benefit with respect to the radiological rsiks of basing the fuel cycle around modular HTGR technology instead of the LWR technology is the increase in reactor safety. The design of the modular HTGR is expected to prevent the release of a significant amount of radioactive material to the environment, and hence early deaths in the surrounding population, during accident conditions. This implies that there is no group risk as defined in the Dutch risk management policy. The major benefit of thorium based fuel cycles over uranium based fuel cycles is the reduction in the radiological risks from unraium mining and milling. The other stages of the nuclear fuel cycle which make a significant contribution to the radiological risks are electricity generation, reprocessing and final disposal. The risks associated with the electricity generation stage are dominated by the risks from fission products, activated corrosion products and the activation products tritium and carbon-14. The risks associated with the reprocessing stage are determined by fission and activation products (including actinides). (orig./WL).

  8. Study on erbium loading method to improve reactivity coefficients for low radiotoxic spent fuel HTGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukaya, Y., E-mail: fukaya.yuji@jaea.go.jp; Goto, M.; Nishihara, T.

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • We attempted and optimized erbium loading methods to improve reactivity coefficients for LRSF-HTGR. • We elucidated the mechanism of the improvements for each erbium loading method by using the Bondarenko approach. • We concluded the erbium loading method by embedding into graphite shaft is preferable. - Abstract: Erbium loading methods are investigated to improve reactivity coefficients of Low Radiotoxic Spent Fuel High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (LRSF-HTGR). Highly enriched uranium is used for fuel to reduce the generation of toxicity from uranium-238. The power coefficients are positive without the use of any additive. Then, the erbium is loaded into the core to obtain negative reactivity coefficients owing to the large resonance the peak of neutron capture reaction of erbium-167. The loading methods are attempted to find the suitable method for LRSF-HTGR. The erbium is mixed in a CPF fuel kernel, loaded by binary packing with fuel particles and erbium particles, and embedded into the graphite shaft deployed in the center of the fuel compact. It is found that erbium loading causes negative reactivity as moderator temperature reactivity, and from the viewpoint of heat transfer, it should be loaded into fuel pin elements for pin-in-block type fuel. Moreover, the erbium should be incinerated slowly to obtain negative reactivity coefficients even at the End Of Cycle (EOC). A loading method that effectively causes self-shielding should be selected to avoid incineration with burn-up. The incineration mechanism is elucidated using the Bondarenko approach. As a result, it is concluded that erbium embedded into graphite shaft is preferable for LRSF-HTGR to ensure that the reactivity coefficients remain negative at EOC.

  9. Fuel temperature prediction during high burnup HTGR fuel irradiation test. US-JAERI irradiation test for HTGR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawa, Kazuhiro; Fukuda, Kousaku; Acharya, R.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the preirradiation thermal analysis of the HRB-22 capsule designed for an irradiation test in a removable beryllium position of the High Flux Isotope Reactor(HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This test is being carried out under Annex 2 of the Arrangement between the U.S. Department of Energy and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute on Cooperation in Research and Development regarding High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors. The fuel used in the test is an advanced type. The advanced fuel was designed aiming at burnup of about 10%FIMA(% fissions per initial metallic atom) which was higher than that of the first charge fuel for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor(HTTR) and was produced in Japan. CACA-2, a heavy isotope and fission product concentration calculational code for experimental irradiation capsules, was used to determine time-dependent fission power for the fuel compacts. The Heat Engineering and Transfer in Nine Geometries(HEATING) code was used to solve the steady-state heat conduction problem. The diameters of the graphite fuel body, which contains the fuel compacts, and of the primary pressure vessel were determined such that the requirements of running the fuel compacts at an average temperature less than 1250degC and of not exceeding a maximum fuel temperature of 1350degC were met throughout the four cycles of irradiation. The detail design of the capsule was carried out based on this analysis. (author)

  10. HTGR fuel reprocessing pilot plant: results of the sequential equipment operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, J.B.; Fields, D.E.; Kergis, C.A.

    1979-05-01

    The second sequential operation of the HTGR fuel reprocessing cold-dry head-end pilot plant equipment has been successfully completed. Twenty standard LHGTR fuel elements were crushed to a size suitable for combustion in a fluid bed burner. The graphite was combusted leaving a product of fissile and fertile fuel particles. These particles were separated in a pneumatic classifier. The fissile particles were fractured and reburned in a fluid bed to remove the inner carbon coatings. The remaining products are ready for dissolution and solvent extraction fuel recovery

  11. Determining the minimum required uranium carbide content for HTGR UCO fuel kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMurray, Jacob W.; Lindemer, Terrence B.; Brown, Nicholas R.; Reif, Tyler J.; Morris, Robert N.; Hunn, John D.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The minimum required uranium carbide content for HTGR UCO fuel kernels is calculated. • More nuclear and chemical factors have been included for more useful predictions. • The effect of transmutation products, like Pu and Np, on the oxygen distribution is included for the first time. - Abstract: Three important failure mechanisms that must be controlled in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel for certain higher burnup applications are SiC layer rupture, SiC corrosion by CO, and coating compromise from kernel migration. All are related to high CO pressures stemming from O release when uranium present as UO 2 fissions and the O is not subsequently bound by other elements. In the HTGR kernel design, CO buildup from excess O is controlled by the inclusion of additional uranium apart from UO 2 in the form of a carbide, UC x and this fuel form is designated UCO. Here general oxygen balance formulas were developed for calculating the minimum UC x content to ensure negligible CO formation for 15.5% enriched UCO taken to 16.1% actinide burnup. Required input data were obtained from CALPHAD (CALculation of PHAse Diagrams) chemical thermodynamic models and the Serpent 2 reactor physics and depletion analysis tool. The results are intended to be more accurate than previous estimates by including more nuclear and chemical factors, in particular the effect of transmuted Pu and Np oxides on the oxygen distribution as the fuel kernel composition evolves with burnup.

  12. Sustainable and safe energy supply with seawater uranium fueled HTGR and its economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukaya, Y.; Goto, M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We discussed uranium resources with an energy security perspective. • We concluded seawater uranium is preferable for sustainability and energy security. • We evaluated electricity generation cost of seawater uranium fueled HTGR. • We concluded electricity generation with seawater uranium is reasonable. - Abstract: Sustainable and safe energy supply with High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) fueled by uranium from seawater have been investigated and discussed. From the view point of safety feature of self-regulation with thermal reactor of HTGR, the uranium resources should be inexhaustible. The seawater uranium is expected to be alternative resources to conventional resources because it exists so much in seawater as a solute. It is said that 4.5 billion tons of uranium is dissolved in the seawater, which corresponds to a consumption of approximately 72 thousand years. Moreover, a thousand times of the amount of 4.5 trillion tU of uranium, which corresponds to the consumption of 72 million years, also is included in the rock on the surface of the sea floor, and that is also recoverable as seawater uranium because uranium in seawater is in an equilibrium state with that. In other words, the uranium from seawater is almost inexhaustible natural resource. However, the recovery cost with current technology is still expensive compared with that of conventional uranium. Then, we assessed the effect of increase in uranium purchase cost on the entire electricity generation cost. In this study, the economy of electricity generation of cost of a commercial HTGR was evaluated with conventional uranium and seawater uranium. Compared with ordinary LWR using conventional uranium, HTGR can generate electricity cheaply because of small volume of simple direct gas turbine system compared with water and steam systems of LWR, rationalization by modularizing, and high thermal efficiency, even if fueled by seawater uranium. It is concluded that the HTGR

  13. Irradiation Performance of HTGR Fuel in WWR-K Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueta, Shohei; Sakaba, Nariaki; Shaimerdenov, Asset; Gizatulin, Shamil; Chekushina, Lyudmila; Chakrov, Petr; Honda, Masaki; Takahashi, Masashi; Kitagawa, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    A capsule irradiation test with the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel is being carried out using WWR-K research reactor in the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Republic of Kazakhstan (INP) to attain 100 GWd/t-U of burnup under normal operating condition of a practical small-sized HTGR. This is the first HTGR fuel irradiation test for INP in Kazakhstan collaborated with Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in frame of International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) project. In the test, TRISO coated fuel particle with low-enriched UO_2 (less than 10 % of "2"3"5U) is used, which was newly designed by JAEA to extend burnup up to 100 GWd/t-U comparing with that of the HTTR (33 GWd/t-U). Both TRISO and fuel compact as the irradiation test specimen were fabricated in basis of the HTTR fuel technology by Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd. in Japan. A helium-gas-swept capsule and a swept-gas sampling device installed in WWR-K were designed and constructed by INP. The irradiation test has been started in October 2012 and will be completed up to the end of February 2015. The irradiation test is in the progress up to 69 GWd/t of burnup, and integrity of new TRISO fuel has been confirmed. In addition, as predicted by the fuel design, fission gas release was observed due to additional failure of as-fabricated SiC-defective fuel. (author)

  14. The chemical stability of TRISO-coated HTGR fuel. Pt. 1. Status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groot, P.; Cordfunke, E.H.P.; Konings, R.J.M.

    1994-12-01

    The US fuel seemed to be more difficult to produce than the German fuel. Also the chemical stability of this fuel must be investigated. The conditions are more severe in the US concept than in the German concept. Oxidation of the graphite seems to be no problem, according to US HTGR concept. A ZrC coating seems to have a number of advantages with regard to the SiC coating: (1) Better retention, (2) no reaction with Pd, (3) no thermal dissociation. Only the oxidation resistance is worse than SiC. Also the maximum stress must be determined that the ZrC coating can have. (orig./HP)

  15. Design method of control system for HTGR fuel handling process with control Petri net

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Zandong; Luo Sheng; Liu Jiguo

    2008-01-01

    As a complex mechanical system,the fuel handling system (FHS) of pebble-bed high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) is with the features of complicated structure, numerous control devices and strict working scheduling. It is very important to precisely describe the function of FHS and effectively design its control system. A design method of control system based on control Petri net (CPN) is introduced in this paper. By associating outputs and operations with places, associating inputs and conditions with transitions, and introducing macro-places and macro-actions, the CPN realizes hierarchy design of complex control system. Based on the analysis of basic functions and working flow of FHS, its control system is described and designed by CPN. According to the firing regulation of transition,the designed CPN can be easily converted into LAD program of PLC, which can be implemented on the FHS simulating control test-bed. Application illuminates that proposed method has the advantages of clear design structure, exact description power and effective design ability of control program, which can meet the requirements of FHS control sys-tem design. (authors)

  16. Spent fuel reprocessing system availability definition by process simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holder, N.; Haldy, B.B.; Jonzen, M.

    1978-05-01

    To examine nuclear fuel reprocessing plant operating parameters such as maintainability, reliability, availability, equipment redundancy, and surge storage requirements and their effect on plant throughput, a computer simulation model of integrated HTGR fuel reprocessing plant operations is being developed at General Atomic Company (GA). The simulation methodology and the status of the computer programming completed on reprocessing head end systems is reported

  17. Study on the Efficient Disintegration of HTGR Fuel Elements by Electrochemical Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piao Nan; Chen Ji; Xiao Cuiping; We Mingfen; Che Jing

    2014-01-01

    The spent fuel elements in High- temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) have a special structure, so the head-end process of the spent fuel reprocessing is different from the process of water reactor spent fuel. The first step of head-end process of the HTGR spent fuel reprocessing process is disintegration of the graphite matrix and separation of the coated fuel particles. Electrochemical method with nitrate solution as an electrolyte for fuel element disintegration has been conducted by the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology in Tsinghua University. This method allows a total disintegration of graphite matrix, while still preserving the integrity of TRISO particles. The influences of the pretreatment methods such as heating oxidation of graphite, hydrothermal and oxidants oxidation were investigated in the present work. The experimental results showed that there were no significant effects on increasing the disintegration rate when pretreatment methods were used ahead of electrochemical disintegration. This phenomenon indicated that the fuel elements which were calcined at 1073 K and pressed under 300 MPa are too compact to be broken by these pretreatment methods. And the electrochemical disintegration is an effective but slow method in breaking the graphite matrix. (author)

  18. Design and operation of equipment used to develop remote coating capability for HTGR fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchomel, R.R.; Stinton, D.P.; Preston, M.K.; Heck, J.L.; Bolfing, B.J.; Lackey, W.J.

    1978-12-01

    Refabrication of HTGR fuels is a manufacturing process that consists of preparation of fuel kernels, application of multiple layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide, preparation of fuel rods, and assembly of fuel rods into fuel elements. All the equipment for refabrication of 233 U-containing fuel must be designed for completely remote operation and maintenance in hot-cell facilities. Equipment to remotely coated HTGR fuel particles has been designed and operated. Although not all of the equipment development needed for a fully remote coating system has been completed, significant progress has been made. The most important component of the coating furnace is the gas distributor, which must be simple, reliable, and easily maintainable. Techniques for loading and unloading the coater and handling microspheres have been developed. An engineering-scale system, currently in operation, is being used to verify the workability of these concepts. Coating crucible handling components are used to remove the crucible from the furnace, remove coated particles, and exchange the crucible, if necessary. After the batch of particles has been unloaded, it is transferred, weighed, and sampled. The components used in these processes have been tested to ensure that no particle breakage or holdup occurs. Tests of the particle handling system have been very encouraging because no major problems have been encountered. Instrumentation that controls the equipment performed very smoothly and reliably and can be operated remotely

  19. Uranium loss from BISO-coated weak-acid-resin HTGR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, R.L.; Lindemer, T.B.

    1977-02-01

    Recycle fuel for the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) contains a weak-acid-resin (WAR) kernel, which consists of a mixture of UC 2 , UO 2 , and free carbon. At 1900 0 C, BISO-coated WAR UC 2 or UC 2 -UO 2 kernels lose a significant portion of their uranium in several hundred hours. The UC 2 decomposes and uranium diffuses through the pyrolytic coating. The rate of escape of the uranium is dependent on the temperature and the surface area of the UC 2 , but not on a temperature gradient. The apparent activation energy for uranium loss, ΔH, is approximately 90 kcal/mole. Calculations indicate that uranium loss from the kernel would be insignificant under conditions to be expected in an HTGR

  20. Study on reprocessing of uranium-thorium fuel with solvent extraction for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao Rongzhou; He Peijun; Liu Bingren; Zhu Yongjun

    1992-08-01

    A single cycle process by solvent extraction with acid feed solution is suggested. The purpose is to reprocess uranium-thorium fuel elements which are of high burn-up and rich of 232 U from HTGR (high temperature gas cooled reactor). The extraction cascade tests have been completed. The recovery of uranium and thorium is greater than 99.6%. By this method, the requirement, under remote control to re-fabricate fuel elements, of decontamination factors for Cs, Sr, Zr-Nb and Ru has been reached

  1. Development of a pneumatic transfer system for HTGR recycle fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, J.E.; Johnson, D.R.

    1978-02-01

    In support of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Fuel Refabrication Development Program, an experimental pneumatic transfer system was constructed to determine the feasibility of pneumatically conveying pyrocarbon-coated fuel particles of Triso and Biso designs. Tests were conducted with these particles in each of their nonpyrophoric forms to determine pressure drops, particle velocities, and gas flow requirements during pneumatic transfer as well as to evaluate particle wear and breakage. Results indicated that the material can be pneumatically conveyed at low pressures without excessive damage to the particles or their coatings

  2. Process behavior and environmental assessment of 14C releases from an HTGR fuel reprocessing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snider, J.W.; Kaye, S.V.

    1976-01-01

    Large quantities of 14 CO 2 will be evolved when graphite fuel blocks are burned during reprocessing of spent fuel from HTGR reactors. The possible release of some or all of this 14 C to the environment is a matter of concern which is investigated in this paper. Various alternatives are considered in this study for decontaminating and releasing the process off-gas to the environment. Concomitant radiological analyses have been done for the waste process scenarios to supply the necessary feedbacks for process design

  3. An Experiment on the Carbonization of Fuel Compact Matrix Graphite for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Woo; Kim, Joo Hyoung; Cho, Moon Sung

    2012-01-01

    The fuel element for HTGR is manufactured by mixing coated fuel particles with matrix graphite powder and forming into either pebble type or cylindrical type compacts depending on their use in different HTGR cores. The coated fuel particle, the so-called TRISO particle, consists of 500-μm spherical UO 2 particles coated with the low density buffer Pyrolytic Carbon (PyC) layer, the inner and outer high density PyC layer and SiC layer sandwiched between the two inner and outer PyC layers. The coated TRISO particles are mixed with a properly prepared matrix graphite powder, pressed into a spherical shape or a cylindrical compact, and finally heat-treated at about 1800 .deg. C. These fuel elements can have different sizes and forms of compact. The basic steps for manufacturing a fuel element include preparation of graphite matrix powder, over coating the fuel particles, mixing the fuel particles with a matrix powder, carbonizing green compact, and the final high-temperature heat treatment of the carbonized fuel compact. The carbonization is a process step where the binder that is incorporated during the matrix graphite powder preparation step is evaporated and the residue of the binder is carbonized during the heat treatment at about 1073 K, In order to develop a fuel compact fabrication technology, and for fuel matrix graphite to meet the required material properties, it is of extreme importance to investigate the relationship among the process parameters of the matrix graphite powder preparation, fabrication parameters of fuel element green compact and the carbonization condition, which has a strong influence on further steps and the material properties of fuel element. In this work, the carbonization behavior of green compact samples prepared from the matrix graphite powder mixtures with different binder materials was investigated in order to elucidate the behavior of binders during the carbonization heat treatment by analyzing the change in weight, density and its

  4. TAPIR, Thermal Analysis of HTGR with Graphite Sleeve Fuel Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weicht, U.; Mueller, W.

    1983-01-01

    1 - Nature of the physical problem solved: Thermal analysis of a reactor core containing internally and/or externally gas cooled prismatic fuel elements of various geometries, rating, power distribution, and material properties. 2 - Method of solution: A fuel element in this programme is regarded as a sector of a fuelled annulus with graphite sleeves of any shape on either side and optional annular gaps between fuel and graphite and/or within the graphite. It may have any centre angle and the fuelled annulus may become a solid cylindrical rod. Heat generation in the fuel is assumed to be uniform over the cross section and peripheral heat flux into adjacent sectors is ignored. Fuel elements and coolant channels are treated separately, then linked together to fit a specified pattern. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Maxima of: 50 fuel elements; 50 cooled channels; 25 fuel geometries; 25 coolant channel geometries; 10 axial power distributions; 10 graphite conductivities

  5. Experimental determination of thermal conductivity and gap conductance of fuel rod for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Teruo; Iwamoto, Kazumi; Ikawa, Katsuichi; Ishimoto, Kiyoshi

    1985-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of fuel compacts and the gap conductance between the fuel compact and the graphite sleeve in fuel rods for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) were measured by the center heating method. These measurements were made as functions of volume percent particle loading and temperature for thermal conductivity and as functions of gap distance and gas composition for gap conductance. The thermal conductivity of fuel compacts decreases with increasing temperature and with increasing particle loading. The gap conductance increases with increasing temperature and decrease with increasing gap distance. A good gap conductance was observed with helium fill gas. It was seen that the gap conductance was dependent on the thermal conductivity of fill gas and conductance by radiation and could be neglected the conductance through solid-solid contact points of fuel compact and graphite sleeve. (author)

  6. Irradiation performance of HTGR fuel rods in HFIR experiments HRB-7 and -8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentine, K.H.; Homan, F.J.; Long, E.L. Jr.; Tiegs, T.N.; Montgomery, B.H.; Hamner, R.L.; Beatty, R.L.

    1977-05-01

    The HRB-7 and -8 experiments were designed as a comprehensive test of mixed thorium-uranium oxide fissile particles with Th:U ratios from 0 to 8 for HTGR recycle application. In addition, fissile particles derived from Weak-Acid Resin (WAR) were tested as a potential backup type of fissile particle for HTGR recycle. These experiments were conducted at two temperatures (1250 and 1500 0 C) to determine the influence of operating temperature on the performance parameters studied. The minor objectives were comparison of advanced coating designs where ZrC replaced SiC in the Triso design, testing of fuel coated in laboratory-scale equipment with fuel coated in production-scale coaters, comparison of the performance of 233 U-bearing particles with that of 235 U-bearing particles, comparison of the performance of Biso coatings with Triso coatings for particles containing the same type of kernel, and testing of multijunction tungsten-rhenium thermocouples. All objectives were accomplished. As a result of these experiments the mixed thorium-uranium oxide fissile kernel was replaced by a WAR-derived particle in the reference recycle design. A tentative decision to make this change had been reached before the HRB-7 and -8 capsules were examined, and the results of the examination confirmed the accuracy of the previous decision. Even maximum dilution (Th/U approximately equal to 8) of the mixed thorium-uranium oxide kernel was insufficient to prevent amoeba of the kernels at rates that are unacceptable in a large HTGR. Other results showed the performance of 233 U-bearing particles to be identical to that of 235 U-bearing particles, the performance of fuel coated in production-scale equipment to be at least as good as that of fuel coated in laboratory-scale coaters, the performance of ZrC coatings to be very promising, and Biso coatings to be inferior to Triso coatings relative to fission product retention

  7. Design and main characteristics of HTGR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernikov, A.S.; Kolesov, V.S.; Permyakov, L.N.; Koshelev, Yu.V.; Mikhajlichenko, L.I.

    1983-01-01

    Two types of spherical fuel elements and coated particles were investigated under the operating conditions of the high temperature reactors in the Soviet Union (VGR-50 and VG-400). This paper gives the main characteristics of spherical fuel elements (thermal conductivity, static and dynamic strength, wear resistance, release of gaseous fission products, etc.) as determined in test facilities. (author)

  8. Development of a fissile particle for HTGR fuel recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homan, F.J.; Long, E.L. Jr.; Lindemer, T.B.; Beatty, R.L.; Tiegs, T.N.

    1976-12-01

    Recycle fissile fuel particles for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) have been under development since the mid-1960s. Irradiation performance on early UO 2 and Th 0 . 8 U 0 . 2 O 2 kernels is described in this report, and the performance limitations associated with the dense oxide kernels are presented. The development of the new reference fuel kernel, the weak-acid-resin-derived (WAR) UO 2 --UC 2 , is discussed in detail, including an extensive section on the irradiation performance of this fuel in HFIR removable beryllium capsules HRB-7 through -10. The conclusion is reached that the irradiation performance of the WAR fissile fuel kernel is better than that of any coated particle fuel yet tested. Further, the present fissile kernel is adequate for steam cycle HTGRs as well as for many advanced applications such as gas turbine and process heat HTGRs

  9. Fluidized combustion of beds of large, dense particles in reprocessing HTGR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, D.T.

    1977-03-01

    Fluidized bed combustion of graphite fuel elements and carbon external to fuel particles is required in reprocessing high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) cores for recovery of uranium. This burning process requires combustion of beds containing both large particles and very dense particles as well as combustion of fine graphite particles which elutriate from the bed. Equipment must be designed for optimum simplicity and reliability as ultimate operation will occur in a limited access ''hot cell'' environment. Results reported in this paper indicate that successful long-term operation of fuel element burning with complete combustion of all graphite fines leading to a fuel particle product containing <1% external carbon can be performed on equipment developed in this program

  10. Fission product release from HTGR coated microparticles and fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, A.A.; Deryugin, A.I.; Lyutikov, R.A.; Chernikov, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    The article presents the results of the investigation of fission products release from microparticles with UO 2 core and five-layer HII PyC- and SiC base protection layers of TRICO type as well as from spherical fuel elements based thereon. It is shown that relative release of short-lived xenon and crypton from microparticles does not exceed (2-3) 10 -7 . The release of gaseous fission products from fuel elements containing no damaged coated microparticles, is primarily determined by the contamination of matrix graphite with fuel. An analytical dependence is derived, the dependence described the relation between structural parameters of coated microparticles, irradiation conditions and fuel burnup at which depressurization of coated microparticles starts

  11. HTGR fuel development: investigations of breakages of uranium-loaded weak acid resin microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, J.A. Jr.

    1977-11-01

    During the HTGR fuel development program, a high percentage of uranium-loaded weak acid resin microspheres broke during pneumatic transfer, carbonization, and conversion. One batch had been loaded by the UO 3 method; the other by the ammonia neutralization method. To determine the causes of failure, samples of the two failed batches were investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron beam microprobe, and other techniques. Causes of failure are postulated and methods are suggested to prevent recurrence of this kind of failure

  12. Fission product behavior in HTGR fuel particles made from weak-acid resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiegs, T.N.; Henson, T.J.

    1979-04-01

    Fission product retention and behavior are of utmost importance in HTGR fuel particles. The present study concentrates on particles made from weak-acid resins, which can vary in composition from 100% UO 2 plus excess carbon to 100% UC 2 plus excess carbon. Five compositions were tested: UC 4 58 O 2 04 , UC 3 68 O 0 01 , UC 4 39 O 1 72 , UC 4 63 O 0 97 , and UC 4 14 O 1 53 . Metallographically sectioned particles were examined with a shielded electron microprobe. The distributions of the fission products were determined by monitoring characteristic x-ray lines while scanning the electron beam over the particle surface

  13. Criticality considerations for 233U fuels in an HTGR fuel refabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeany, S.R.; Jenkins, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    Eleven 233 U solution critical assemblies spanning an H/ 233 U ratio range of 40 to 2000 and a bare metal 233 U assembly have been calculated with the ENDF/B-IV and Hansen-Roach cross sections. The results from these calculations are compared with the experimental results and with each other. An increasing disagreement between calculations with ENDF/B and Hansen-Roach data with decreasing H/ 233 U ratio was observed, indicative of large differences in their intermediate energy cross sections. The Hansen-Roach cross sections appeared to give reasonably good agreement with experiments over the whole range; whereas the ENDF/B calculations yielded high values for k/sub eff/ on assemblies of low moderation. It is concluded that serious problems exist in the ENDF/B-IV representation of the 233 U cross sections in the intermediate energy range and that further evaluation of this nuclide is warranted. In addition, it is recommended that an experimental program be undertaken to obtain 233 U criticality data at low H/ 233 U ratios for verification of generalized criticality safety guidelines. Part II of this report presents the results of criticality calculations on specific pieces of equipment required for HTGR fuel refabrication. In particular, fuel particle storage hoppers and resin carbonization furnaces are criticality safe up to 22.9 cm (9.0 in.) in diameter providing water or other hydrogenous moderators are excluded. In addition, no criticality problems arise due to accumulation of particles in the off-gas scrubber reservoirs provided reasonable administrative controls are exercised

  14. Loading ion exchange resins with uranium for HTGR fuel kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notz, K.J.; Greene, C.W.

    1976-12-01

    Uranium-loaded ion exchange beads provide an excellent starting material in the production of uranium carbide microspheres for nuclear fuel applications. Both strong-acid (sulfonate) and weak-acid (carboxylate) resins can be fully loaded with uranium from a uranyl nitrate solution utilizing either a batch method or a continuous column technique

  15. Performance of HTGR fuel in HFIR capsule HT-33

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiegs, T.N.; Robbins, J.M.

    1979-06-01

    Irradiation capsule HT-33 was a cooperative effort between General Atomic Company (GA) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In this capsule ThO 2 particles (fabricated by GA), low-enriched uranium particles, inert carbon particles, and various fuel rod matrices were tested under accelerated irradiation in the High-Flux Isotope Reactor. Visual examination showed good irradiation behavior for fuel rods with slug-injected matrices (using a pitch binder) and warm-molded matrices (using a thermosetting resin binder). Rod debonding improved somewhat with fuel rods that used GLCC H-451 ground graphite shim particles rather than Speer fluid coke shim particles. Measurements of permeability (by inert gas intrusion) of the pyrocarbon on the inert particles showed that the disorder created by the neutron flux did not increase the inert gas permeability. Metallographic examination of Triso-coated particles irradiated both with and without an outer pyrocarbon coating revealed that the outer coating is necessary to suppress SiC degradation at temperatures above approximately 1375 0 C. The fission product behavior (determined by the electron microprobe) was similar in both low-enriched and high-enriched uranium particles made from weak-acid resins. Furthermore, fission product palladium caused severe SiC corrosion at time-averaged temperatures above 1400 0 C

  16. Thermal-stress analysis of HTGR fuel and control rod fuel blocks in in-block carbonization and annealing furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwaltney, R.C.; McAfee, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    The equivalent solid plate method, in conjunction with two-dimensional plane stress and plane strain analyses, was used in assessing the thermal stress behavior of HTGR fuel and control rod fuel blocks. For the control rod fuel blocks, particular attention was given to ascertaining the effects of the reserve shutdown hole and the control rod channel holes. The assumed safety factor of 2 on the failure criteria was considered adequate to account for neglecting the axial temperature gradient in the plane analyses of the ends of the blocks. The analyses indicated that the maximum calculated tensile stress values were smaller than the criteria values except for the plane strain analysis of the control rod fuel block end surfaces and the axisymmetric analysis of the fuel block as a circular cylinder. However, most of the maximum calculated strain values were greater than the criteria values

  17. Irradiation performance of HTGR fuel in HFIR capsule HT-31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiegs, T.N.; Robbins, J.M.; Hamner, R.L.; Montgomery, B.H.; Kania, M.J.; Lindemer, T.B.; Morgan, C.S.

    1979-05-01

    The capsule was irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL to peak particle temperatures up to 1600 0 C, fast neutron fluences (0.18 MeV) up to 9 x 10 25 n/m 2 , and burnups up to 8.9% FIMA for ThO 2 particles. The oxygen release from plutonium fissions was less than calculated, possibly because of the solid solution of SrO and rare earth oxides in UO 2 . Tentative results show that pyrocarbon permeability decreases with increasing fast neutron fluence. Fission products in sol-gel UO 2 particles containing natural uranium mostly behaved similarly to those in particles containing highly enriched uranium (HEU). Thus, much of the data base collected on HEU fuel can be applied to low-enriched fuel. Fission product palladium penetrated into the SiC on Triso-coated particles. Also the SiC coating provided some retention of /sup 110m/Ag. Irradiation above about 1200 0 C without an outer pyrocarbon coating degraded the SiC coating on Triso-coated particles

  18. Formation of actinides in irradiated HTGR fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    dos Santos, A. M.

    1976-03-15

    Actinide nuclide concentrations of 11 spent AVR fuel elements were determined experimentally. The burnup of the spheres varied in the range between 10% and 100% fifa, the Th : U ratio was 5 : 1. The separation procedures for an actinide isolation were tested with highly irradiated ThO/sub 2/. Separation and decontamination factors are presented. Build-up of /sup 232/U was discussed. The AVR breeding rate was ascertained to be 0.5. The hazard potential of high activity waste was calculated. Actinide recovery factors were proposed in order to reduce the hazard potential of the waste by an actinide removal under consideration of the reprocessing technology which is available presently.

  19. Methods and data for HTGR fuel performance and radionuclide release modeling during normal operation and accidents for safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, K.; Martin, R.C.; Moormann, R.

    1993-01-01

    The previous status report released in 1987 on reference data and calculation models for fission product transport in High-Temperature, Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) safety analyses has been updated to reflect the current state of knowledge in the German HTGR program. The content of the status report has been expanded to include information from other national programs in HTGRs to provide comparative information on methods of analysis and the underlying database for fuel performance and fission product transport. The release and transport of fission products during normal operating conditions and during the accident scenarios of core heatup, water and air ingress, and depressurization are discussed. (orig.) [de

  20. Evaluation of temperature coefficients of reactivity for 233U--thorium fueled HTGR lattices. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, D.F.; Leonard, B.R. Jr.; Trapp, T.J.; Gore, B.F.; Kottwitz, D.A.; Thompson, J.K.; Purcell, W.L.; Stewart, K.B.

    1977-05-01

    A comparison of calculated and measured neutron multiplication factors as a function of temperature was made for three graphite-moderated lattices in the High Temperature Lattice Test Reactor (HTLTR) using 233 UO 2 --ThO 2 fuels in varying amounts and configurations. Correlation of neutronic analysis methods and cross section data with the experimental measurements forms the basis for assessing the accuracy of the methods and data and developing confidence in the ability to predict the temperature coefficient of reactivity for various High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) conditions in which 233 U and thorium are present in the fuel. The calculated values of k/sub infinity/(T) were correlated with measured values using two least-squares-fitted correlation coefficients: (1) a normalization factor, and (2) a temperature coefficient bias factor. These correlations indicate the existence of a negative (nonconservative) bias in temperature coefficients of reactivity calculated using ENDF/B-IV cross section data

  1. Automatic particle-size analysis of HTGR nuclear fuel microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    An automatic particle-size analyzer (PSA) has been developed at ORNL for measuring and counting samples of nuclear fuel microspheres in the diameter range of 300 to 1000 μm at rates in excess of 2000 particles per minute, requiring no sample preparation. A light blockage technique is used in conjunction with a particle singularizer. Each particle in the sample is sized, and the information is accumulated by a multi-channel pulse height analyzer. The data are then transferred automatically to a computer for calculation of mean diameter, standard deviation, kurtosis, and skewness of the distribution. Entering the sample weight and pre-coating data permits calculation of particle density and the mean coating thickness and density. Following this nondestructive analysis, the sample is collected and returned to the process line or used for further analysis. The device has potential as an on-line quality control device in processes dealing with spherical or near-spherical particles where rapid analysis is required for process control

  2. Formation of actinides in irradiated HTGR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, A.M. dos.

    1976-03-01

    Actinide nuclide concentrations of 11 spent AVR fuel elements were determined experimentally. The burnup of the spheres varied in the range between 10% and 100% fifa, the Th : U ratio was 5 : 1. The separation procedures for actinide isolation were tested with highly irradiated ThO 2 . Separation and decontamination factors are presented. Actinide nuclide formation can be described by exponential functions of the type ln msub(nuclide) = A + B x % fifa. The empirical factors A and B were calculated performing a least squares analysis. Build-up of 232 U was discussed. According to the experimental results, 232 U is mainly produced from 230 Th, a certain amount (e.g. about 20% at a 10 5 MWd/t burnup) originated from a (n,2n) reaction of 233 U; a formation from 233 Th by a (n,2n) followed by a (n,γ) reaction was not observed. The AVR breeding rate was ascertained to be 0.5. The hazard potential of high activity waste was calculated. After a 1,000 years' storage time, the elements Pa, Am and Cm will no longer influence the total hazard index. Actinide recovery factors were proposed in order to reduce the hazard potential of the waste by an actinide removal in consideration of the reprocessing technology which is available presently. (orig.) [de

  3. Acid in perchloroethylene scrubber solutions used in HTGR fuel preparation processes. Analytical chemistry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.A.

    1979-02-01

    Acids and corrosion products in used perchloroethylene scrubber solutions collected from HTGR fuel preparation processes have been analyzed by several analytical methods to determine the source and possible remedy of the corrosion caused by these solutions. Hydrochloric acid was found to be concentrated on the carbon particles suspended in perchloroethylene. Filtration of carbon from the scrubber solutions removed the acid corrosion source in the process equipment. Corrosion products chemisorbed on the carbon particles were identified. Filtered perchloroethylene from used scrubber solutions contained practically no acid. It is recommended that carbon particles be separated from the scrubber solutions immediately after the scrubbing process to remove the source of acid and that an inhibitor be used to prevent the hydrolysis of perchloroethylene and the formation of acids

  4. Thermodynamic assessment of the HTGR fuel system Th-U-C-O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugajin, M.; Shiba, K.

    1978-01-01

    Carbon monoxide pressures and uranium segregation at 2000 K have been calculated for the three-phase equilibria [(ThU)O 2 + (ThU)C 2 + C] in the Th-U-C-O system. This study is concerned with the thermochemical behavior of (Th, U)O 2 particle fuel for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). The following two points are considered: (1) Reduction of the in-particle CO pressure of (Th, U)O 2 kernels by doping (Th, U)C 2 to make it an oxygen getter. (2) Prediction of U segregation between (Th, U)O 2 and (Th, U)C 2 , doped in the kernel. (Auth.)

  5. Design and evaluation of an on-line fuel rod assay device for an HTGR fuel refabrication plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rushton, J.E.; Allen, E.J.; Chiles, M.M.; Jenkins, J.D.

    1979-11-01

    Refabricated HTGR fuel rods will contain from approx. 0.15 to 0.5 g 233 U and/or 235 U. The fuel rods are approx. 16 mm in diameter and 62 mm long. A typical commercial fuel refabrication facility will have six fuel rod production lines, each producing approximately one fuel rod every 4 seconds at design capacity. One on-line assay device will be present for each two production lines. The relative standard deviation in an individual fuel rod fissile material measurement must be less than 3% to satisfy process and quality control requirements. Systematic errors must be kept less than approx. 0.3% for fissile material measured in fuel rods produced over two months to satisfy material accountability requirements. Several nondestructive assay (NDA) methods were investigated. Because the gamma-ray activity of the refabricated fuel is relatively high due to the presence of 232 U in the fuel and because the gamma-ray activity is not directly related to total or fissile uranium content, NDA methods employing gamma-ray detection did not appear practicable. A method using thermal neutron irradiation and fast-fission neutron detection was selected. An experimental assay device was fabricated based on this NDA method. Experiments were performed to determine the precision and accuracy of the measurements and to investigate potential interferences and systematic errors. Operating procedures were evaluated, and analysis procedures were identified

  6. Uranium dispersion in the coating of weak-acid-resin-deprived HTGR fuel microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, G.W.; Beatty, R.L.; Tennery, V.J.; Lackey, W.J. Jr.

    1976-02-01

    The current reference HTGR recycle fuel particle is a UO 2 /UC 2 kernel with a Triso coating comprising a low-density pyrocarbon (PyC) buffer, a high-density PyC inner LTI coating, SiC, and a high-density PyC outer LTI. The kernel is fabricated from a weak-acid ion exchange resin (WAR). Microradiographic examination of coated WAR particles has demonstrated that considerable U can be transferred from the kernel to the buffer coating during fabrication. Investigation of causes of fuel dispersion has indicated several different factors that contribute to fuel redistribution if not properly controlled. The presence of a nonequilibrium UC/sub 1-x/O/sub x/ (0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 0.3) phase had no significant effect on initiating fuel dispersion. Gross exposure of the completed fuel kernel to ambient atmosphere or to water vapor at room temperature produced very minimal levels of dispersion. Exposure of the fuel to perchloroethylene during buffer and inner LTI deposition produced massive redistribution. Fuel redistribution observed in Triso-coated particles results from permeation of the inner LTI by HCl during SiC deposition. As the decomposition of CH 3 Cl 3 Si is used to deposit SiC, chlorine is readily available during this process. The permeability of the inner LTI coating has a marked effect on the extent of this mode of fuel dispersion. LTI permeability was determined by chlorine leaching studies to be a strong function of density, coating gas dilution, and coating temperature but relatively unaffected by application of a seal coat, variations in coating thickness, and annealing at 1800 0 C. Mechanical attrition of the kernels during processing was identified as a potential source of U-bearing fines that may be incorporated into the coating in some circumstances

  7. HTGR fuel rods: carbon-carbon composites designed for high weight and low strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullock, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    The evolution of the process for fabricating fuel rods for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) by injection and carbonization of a thermoplastic matrix that bonds close-packed beds of pyrocarbon-coated fuel particles together is reviewed for the fresh-fuel cycle, and a variant process involving a thermosetting matrix that would allow free-standing carbonization of refabricated fuel is discussed. Previous attempts to fabricate such injection-bonded fuel rods from undiluted thermosetting binders filled with powdered graphite were unsuccessful, because of damage to coatings on fuel particles that resulted from strong particle-to-matrix bonding in conjunction with large matrix shrinkage on carbonization and subsequent irradiation. These problems have now been overcome through the use of a diluted thermosetting matrix with a low-char-yield additive (fugitive), which produces a more porous char similar to that from the pitch-based thermoplastic used in fabrication of fresh fuel. A 1-to-1 dilution of resin with fugitive produced the optimum binder for injection and carbonization, where the fired matrix in such rods contained about 20 wt% binder char and 80 wt% powdered graphite. Thermosetting fuel rods diluted with various amounts of fugitive to give binder chars that range from 12 to 48 wt% of the fired matrix have been subjected to irradiation screening tests, and rods with no more than 32 wt% binder char appear to perform about as well under irradiation as do pitch-based rods. However, particle damage does begin to occur in those lightly diluted rods in which the less-stable binder char constitutes more than 32 wt% of the fired matrix. (author)

  8. High-temperature gas reactor (HTGR) market assessment, synthetic fuels analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    This study is an update of assessments made in TRW's October 1979 assessment of overall high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) markets in the future synfuels industry (1985 to 2020). Three additional synfuels processes were assessed. Revised synfuel production forecasts were used. General environmental impacts were assessed. Additional market barriers, such as labor and materials, were researched. Market share estimates were used to consider the percent of markets applicable to the reference HTGR size plant. Eleven HTGR plants under nominal conditions and two under pessimistic assumptions are estimated for selection by 2020. No new HTGR markets were identified in the three additional synfuels processes studied. This reduction in TRW's earlier estimate is a result of later availability of HTGR's (commercial operation in 2008) and delayed build up in the total synfuels estimated markets. Also, a latest date for HTGR capture of a synfuels market could not be established because total markets continue to grow through 2020. If the nominal HTGR synfuels market is realized, just under one million tons of sulfur dioxide effluents and just over one million tons of nitrous oxide effluents will be avoided by 2020. Major barriers to a large synfuels industry discussed in this study include labor, materials, financing, siting, and licensing. Use of the HTGR intensifies these barriers

  9. Irradiated-Microsphere Gamma Analyzer (IMGA): an integrated system for HTGR coated particle fuel performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kania, M.J.; Valentine, K.H.

    1980-02-01

    The Irradiated-Microsphere Gamma Analyzer (IMGA) System, designed and built at ORNL, provides the capability of making statistically accurate failure fraction measurements on irradiated HTGR coated particle fuel. The IMGA records the gamma-ray energy spectra from fuel particles and performs quantitative analyses on these spectra; then, using chemical and physical properties of the gamma emitters it makes a failed-nonfailed decision concerning the ability of the coatings to retain fission products. Actual retention characteristics for the coatings are determined by measuring activity ratios for certain gamma emitters such as 137 Cs/ 95 Zr and 144 Ce/ 95 Zr for metallic fission product retention and 134 Cs/ 137 Cs for an indirect measure of gaseous fission product retention. Data from IMGA (which can be put in the form of n failures observed in N examinations) can be accurately described by the binomial probability distribution model. Using this model, a mathematical relationship between IMGA data (n,N), failure fraction, and confidence level was developed. To determine failure fractions of less than or equal to 1% at confidence levels near 95%, this model dictates that from several hundred to several thousand particles must be examined. The automated particle handler of the IMGA system provides this capability. As a demonstration of failure fraction determination, fuel rod C-3-1 from the OF-2 irradiation capsule was analyzed and failure fraction statistics were applied. Results showed that at the 1% failure fraction level, with a 95% confidence level, the fissile particle batch could not meet requirements; however, the fertile particle exceeded these requirements for the given irradiation temperature and burnup

  10. Distribution of 60Co and 54Mn in graphite material of irradiated HTGR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kimio; Kikuchi, Teruo; Kobayashi, Fumiaki; Minato, Kazuo; Fukuda, Kousaku; Ikawa, Katsuichi; Iwamoto, Kazumi

    1984-05-01

    Distribution of 60 Co and 54 Mn was measured in the graphite sleeves and blocks of the third and fourth HTGR fuel assemblies irradiated in the Oarai Gas Loop-1 (OGL-1), which is a high temperature inpile gas loop installed in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Axial and circumferential profiles were obtained by gamma spectrometry, and radial profiles by lathe sectioning with gamma spectrometry. Distribution of 60 Co is in good agreement with that of thermal neutron flux, and the Co content in the graphite is estimated to be -- 1 x 10 -9 in weight fraction. Concentration of 54 Mn decreases toward the axial center in its axial profile, and radially is almost uniform inside and appreciably higher at free surfaces. An estimated Fe content of --10 -8 in wight fraction is smaller by two orders of magnitude than that from chemical analysis. Higher concentraion of 60 Co and 54 Mn at the free surfaces suggests the importance of transportation process of these nuclides in the coolant loop. (author)

  11. ORCOST-2, PWR, BWR, HTGR, Fossil Fuel Power Plant Cost and Economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, L.C.; Myers, M.L.

    1975-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: ORCOST2 estimates the cost of electrical energy production from single-unit steam-electric power plants. Capital costs and operating and maintenance costs are calculated using base cost models which are included in the program for each of the following types of plants: PWR, BWR, HTGR, coal, oil, and gas. The user may select one of several input/output options for calculation of capital cost, operating and maintenance cost, levelized energy costs, fixed charge rate, annual cash flows, cumulative cash flows, and cumulative discounted cash flows. Options include the input of capital cost and/or fixed charge rate to override the normal calculations. Transmission and distribution costs are not included. Fuel costs must be input by the user. 2 - Method of solution: The code follows the guidelines of AEC Report NUS-531. A base capital-cost model and a base operating- and maintenance-cost model are selected and adjusted for desired size, location, date, etc. Costs are discounted to the year of first commercial operation and levelized to provide annual cost of electric power generation. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The capital cost models are of doubtful validity outside the 500 to 1500 MW(e) range

  12. Influence of process variables on permeability and anisotropy of Biso-coated HTGR fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinton, D.P.; Lackey, W.J.; Thiele, B.A.

    1977-11-01

    The effect of several important process variables on the fraction of defective particles and anisotropy of the low-temperature isotropic (LTI) coating layer was determined for Biso-coated HTGR fuel particles. Process variables considered are deposition temperature, hydrocarbon type, diluent type, and percent diluent. The effect of several other variables such as coating rate and density that depend on the process variables were also considered in this analysis. The fraction of defective particles was controlled by the dependent variables coating rate and LTI density. Coating rate was also the variable controlling the anisotropy of the LTI layer. Diluent type and diluent concentration had only a small influence on the deposition rate of the LTI layer. High-quality particles in terms of anisotropy and permeability can be produced by use of a porous plate gas distributor if the coating rate is between 3 and 5 μm/min and the coating density is between about 1.75 and 1.95 g/cm 3

  13. Advanced Fuel UCO Preparation Technology for HTGR (Characteristics of Carbon Black)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kyung Chai; Oh, S. C.; Kim, Y. K.; Cho, M. S.; Kim, W. K.; Kim, Y. M.; Lee, Y. W.; Cho, H. J.; Shin, E. J.

    2010-06-01

    NGNP program for high specification of HTGR nuclear fuel through the GEN IV study is be progressed. Furthermore, because the NGNP program have a highly focused goal like UCO kernel, kernel fabrication and coating types varied which made selection of a US reference fabrication process. In this study, it was evaluated from the reviews on the UO2 and UCO kernel fabrication technologies and its particle characteristics. For improving the UCO qualities, first it was improved the kernel fabrication processes and carbon dispersion method also. New method for carbon dispersion in broth solution was developed, and its characteristics was evaluated from the AGR irradiation tests used the UCO kernel. In fabrication process, also process parameter variation tests in both forming and sintering steps led to an increased understanding of the acceptable ranges for process parameters and additional reduction in required operating times. Another result of this test program was to double the kernel production rate. Following the development tests, approximately 40 kg of natural uranium UCO kernels have been produced for use in coater scale up tests, and approximately 10 kg of low enriched uranium UCO kernels for use in the AGR-2 experiment

  14. Numerical simulation of flow field in cooling tower of passive residual heat removal system of HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaowei; Zhang Li; Wu Xinxin; He Shuyan

    2011-01-01

    Environmental wind will influence the working conditions of natural convection cooling tower. The velocity and temperature fields in the natural convection cooling tower of the HTGR residual heat removal system at different environmental wind velocities were numerically simulated. The results show that, if there is no wind baffle, the flow in the cooling tower is blocked when environmental wind velocity is higher than 6 m/s, residual heat can hardly be removed, and when wind velocity is higher than 9 m/s, the air even flow downwards in the tower, so wind baffle is very necessary. With the wind baffle installed, the cooling tower works well at the wind speed even higher than 9 m/s. The optimum baffle size and positions are also analyzed. (authors)

  15. Digital simulation of a commercial scale high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) steam power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, A.; Bowman, H.F.

    1978-01-01

    A nonlinear dynamic model of a commercial scale high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) steam power plant was derived in state-space form from fundamental principles. The plant model is 40th order, time-invariant, deterministic and continuous-time. Numerical results were obtained by digital simulation. Steady-state performance of the nonlinear model was verified with plant heat balance data at 100, 75 and 50 percent load levels. Local stability, controllability and observability were examined in this range using standard linear algorithms. Transfer function matrices for the linearized models were also obtained. Transient response characteristics of 6 system variables for independent step distrubances in 2 different input variables are presented as typical results

  16. A study of fuel failure behavior in high burnup HTGR fuel. Analysis by STRESS3 and STAPLE codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, David G.; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Ueta, Shouhei; Sumita, Junya

    2001-05-01

    In current high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs), Tri-isotropic coated fuel particles are employed as fuel. In safety design of the HTGR fuels, it is important to retain fission products within particles so that their release to primary coolant does not exceed an acceptable level. From this point of view, the basic design criteria for the fuel are to minimize the failure fraction of as-fabricated fuel coating layers and to prevent significant additional fuel failures during operation. This report attempts to model fuel behavior in irradiation tests using the U.K. codes STRESS3 and STAPLE. Test results in 91F-1A and HRB-22 capsules irradiation tests, which were carried out at the Japan Materials Testing Reactor of JAERI and at the High Flux Isotope Reactor of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, respectively, were employed in the calculation. The maximum burnup and fast neutron fluence were about 10%FIMA and 3 x 10 25 m -2 , respectively. The fuel for the irradiation tests was called high burnup fuel, whose target burnup and fast neutron fluence were higher than those of the first-loading fuel of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor. The calculation results demonstrated that if only mean fracture stress values of PyC and SiC are used in the calculation it is not possible to predict any particle failures, by which is meant when all three load bearing layers have failed. By contrast, when statistical variations in the fracture stresses and particle specifications are taken into account, as is done in the STAPLE code, failures can be predicted. In the HRB-22 irradiation test, it was concluded that the first two particles which had failed were defective in some way, but that the third and fourth failures can be accounted for by the pressure vessel model. In the 91F-1A irradiation test, the result showed that 1 or 2 particles had failed towards the end of irradiation in the upper capsule and no particles failed in the lower capsule. (author)

  17. Overall simulation of a HTGR plant with the gas adapted MANTA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmanuel Jouet; Dominique Petit; Robert Martin

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: AREVA's subsidiary Framatome ANP is developing a Very High Temperature Reactor nuclear heat source that can be used for electricity generation as well as cogeneration including hydrogen production. The selected product has an indirect cycle architecture which is easily adapted to all possible uses of the nuclear heat source. The coupling to the applications is implemented through an Intermediate Heat exchanger. The system code chosen to calculate the steady-state and transient behaviour of the plant is based on the MANTA code. The flexible and modular MANTA code that is originally a system code for all non LOCA PWR plant transients, has been the subject of new developments to simulate all the forced convection transients of a nuclear plant with a gas cooled High Temperature Reactor including specific core thermal hydraulics and neutronics modelizations, gas and water steam turbomachinery and control structure. The gas adapted MANTA code version is now able to model a total HTGR plant with a direct Brayton cycle as well as indirect cycles. To validate these new developments, a modelization with the MANTA code of a real plant with direct Brayton cycle has been performed and steady-states and transients compared with recorded thermal hydraulic measures. Finally a comparison with the RELAP5 code has been done regarding transient calculations of the AREVA indirect cycle HTR project plant. Moreover to improve the user-friendliness in order to use MANTA as a systems conception, optimization design tool as well as a plant simulation tool, a Man- Machine-Interface is available. Acronyms: MANTA Modular Advanced Neutronic and Thermal hydraulic Analysis; HTGR High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor. (authors)

  18. Status of CHAP: composite HTGR analysis program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secker, P.A.; Gilbert, J.S.

    1975-12-01

    Development of an HTGR accident simulation program is in progress for the prediction of the overall HTGR plant transient response to various initiating events. The status of the digital computer program named CHAP (Composite HTGR Analysis Program) as of June 30, 1975, is given. The philosophy, structure, and capabilities of the CHAP code are discussed. Mathematical descriptions are given for those HTGR components that have been modeled. Component model validation and evaluation using auxiliary analysis codes are also discussed

  19. FRESCO-II: A computer program for analysis of fission product release from spherical HTGR-fuel elements in irradiation and annealing experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krohn, H.; Finken, R.

    1983-06-01

    The modular computer code FRESCO has been developed to describe the mechanism of fission product release from a HTGR-Core under accident conditions. By changing some program modules it has been extended to take into account the transport phenomena (i.e. recoil) too, which only occur under reactor operating conditions and during the irradiation experiments. For this report, the release of cesium and strontium from three HTGR-fuel elements has been evaluated and compared with the experimental data. The results show that the measured release can be described by the considered models. (orig.) [de

  20. In-line monitoring of effluents from HTGR fuel particle preparation processes using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.A.; Costanzo, D.A.; Stinton, D.P.; Carpenter, J.A.; Rainey, W.T. Jr.; Canada, D.C.; Carter, J.A.

    1976-08-01

    The carbonization, conversion, and coating processes in the manufacture of HTGR fuel particles have been studied with the use of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Non-condensable effluents from these fluidized-bed processes have been monitored continuously from the beginning to the end of the process. The processes which have been monitored are these: uranium-loaded ion exchange resin carbonization, the carbothermic reduction of UO 2 to UC 2 , buffer and low temperature isotropic pyrocarbon coatings of fuel kernels, SiC coating of the kernels, and high-temperature particle annealing. Changes in concentrations of significant molecules with time and temperature have been useful in the interpretation of reaction mechanisms and optimization of process procedures

  1. Experimental determination of the Koo fuel temperature coefficient for an HTGR lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, P.; Benedetti, F.; Brighenti, G.; Chiodi, P. L.; Dell' Oro, P.; Giuliani, C.; Tassan, S.

    1974-10-15

    This paper describes temperature-dependent k-infinity measurements conducted using an assembly of loose HTGR coated particles in the BR-2 reactor by means of null reactivity oscillating method comparing the effect of poisoned and unpoisoned lattices like tests performed in the Physical Constants Test Reactor (PCTR) at Hanford. The RB-2 reactor was the property of the Italian firm AGIP NUCLEARE and operated at the Montecuccolino Center in Bologna.

  2. Preliminary Study on the Development of MIDAS/GCR to Simulate the Plate-out Phenomena from a HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong-Hwa; Kim, Dong-Ha; Lee, Won-Jae

    2006-01-01

    In HTGR, the dominant removal mechanism of the condensable fission product gas is a 'plate-out' on various kinds of surfaces over the primary coolant loop. The plate-outs are complex phenomena that are dependent on the mass transfer rate from the coolant to the fixed surface, the adsorption and desorption of the gas fission product, the material of the surfaces, the operation temperature, the fission product species, etc. In a normal operation, the important information on a plate-out is the amount and the distribution and the type of isotope. This information is applied to construct a safety engineering system, to calculate the necessary shielding and to estimate the impact on the environment. The status of a model development and available data are performed extensively but the data still has a large uncertainty. The objective of this study is to compare the condensation model of a gas fission product in the MIDAS for a PWR with the PADLOC model for a HTGR developed by GA and to perform a feasibility calculation on OGL-1 with MIDAS. The results of the model review on MIDAS and PADLOC, the feasibility calculation results on OGL-1 with MIDAS and the phenomena to be implemented into MIDAS to simulate the plate-out phenomena from HTGR are identified and listed

  3. Waste management considerations in HTGR recycle operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pence, D.T.; Shefcik, J.J.; Heath, C.A.

    1975-01-01

    Waste management considerations in the recycle of HTGR fuel are different from those encountered in the recycle of LWR fuel. The types of waste associated with HTGR recycle operations are discussed, and treatment methods for some of the wastes are described

  4. STAT, GAPS, STRAIN, DRWDIM: a system of computer codes for analyzing HTGR fuel test element metrology data. User's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saurwein, J.J.

    1977-08-01

    A system of computer codes has been developed to statistically reduce Peach Bottom fuel test element metrology data and to compare the material strains and fuel rod-fuel hole gaps computed from these data with HTGR design code predictions. The codes included in this system are STAT, STRAIN, GAPS, and DRWDIM. STAT statistically evaluates test element metrology data yielding fuel rod, fuel body, and sleeve irradiation-induced strains; fuel rod anisotropy; and additional data characterizing each analyzed fuel element. STRAIN compares test element fuel rod and fuel body irradiation-induced strains computed from metrology data with the corresponding design code predictions. GAPS compares test element fuel rod, fuel hole heat transfer gaps computed from metrology data with the corresponding design code predictions. DRWDIM plots the measured and predicted gaps and strains. Although specifically developed to expedite the analysis of Peach Bottom fuel test elements, this system can be applied, without extensive modification, to the analysis of Fort St. Vrain or other HTGR-type fuel test elements.

  5. Separation of the fission product noble gases krypton and xenon from dissolver off-gas in reprocessing HTGR-fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnenstingl, J.; Djoa, S. H.; Laser, M.; Mastera, S.; Merz, E.; Morschl, P.

    1976-04-15

    This paper describes a process developed for the retainment and separation of volatile (3H, 129 +131I) and gaseous (85Kr, Xe) fission products from the off-gas produced during dissolution of HTGR-fuel. To prevent unnecessary dilution of liberated noble gases by surrounding atmosphere, a helium purge-gas cycle is applied to enable a coarse fractionating of krypton and xenon by cold-trapping at about 80 deg K after precleaning the gas stream. The process consists of the following steps: deposition of droplets and solid aerosols; chemisorption of iodine on silver impregnated silica gel; catalytic removal of nitrogen oxides and oxygen; drying of the process gas stream; final filtering of abraded solids; deposition of xenon in solid form at 80 deg K and low subpressure; deposition of krypton in solid form at 80 deg K after compression to about 6 bar; decontamination of 85krypton-containing xenon by batch distillation for eventual industrial utilization; and removal of nitrogen and argon enrichment during continuous operation in the purge-gas stream by inleaking air with charcoal. A continuously operating dissolver vessel, closed to the surrounding atmosphere, yields a very high content of noble gases, e.g., 0.35 vol % krypton and 2.0 vol % xenon. The presented off-gas treatment unit is operated in cold runs with 1/3 of the full capacity and can treat about 1 m3 STP/h helium, corresponding to a quantity of about 10,000 MW(e) HTGR-fuel reprocessing plant.

  6. Separation of the fission product noble gases krypton and xenon from dissolver off-gas in reprocessing HTGR-fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohnenstingl, J.; Djoa, S.H.; Laser, M.; Mastera, S.; Merz, E.; Morschl, P.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes a process developed for the retainment and separation of volatile ( 3 H, 129+131 I) and gaseous ( 85 Kr, Xe) fission products from the off-gas produced during dissolution of HTGR-fuel. To prevent unnecessary dilution of liberated noble gases by surrounding atmosphere, a helium purge-gas cycle is applied to enable a coarse fractionating of krypton and xenon by cold-trapping at about 80 0 K after precleaning the gas stream. The process consists of the following steps: deposition of droplets and solid aerosols; chemisorption of iodine on silver impregnated silica gel; catalytic removal of nitrogen oxides and oxygen; drying of the process gas stream; final filtering of abraded solids; deposition of xenon in solid form at 80 0 K and low subpressure; deposition of krypton in solid form at 80 0 K after compression to about 6 bar; decontamination of 85 Kr-containing xenon by batch distillation for eventual industrial utilization; and removal of nitrogen and argon enrichment during continuous operation in the purge-gas stream by inleaking air with charcoal. A continuously operating dissolver vessel, closed to the surrounding atmosphere, yields a very high content of noble gases, i.e., 0.35 vol % krypton and 2.0 vol % xenon. The presented off-gas treatment unit is operated in cold runs with 1 / 3 of the full capacity and can treat about 1 m 3 STP/h helium, corresponding to a quantity of about 10,000 MW/sub e/ HTGR-fuel reprocessing plant

  7. Burning of spent fuel of an accelerator-driven modular HTGR in sub-critical condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Xingqing; Yang Yongwei; Chang Hong; Wu Zongxin; Gu Yuxiang

    2002-01-01

    The modular high temperature gas cooled reactor (MHTGR) has good safety characteristics because of the use of coated particles in the fuel element. After the particles cool outside of the reactor for some time, the spent fuel can be re-utilized. The author describes a physics feasibility study for the burning of spent fuel from a 350 MW ring-shaped modular high temperature gas cooled reactor in an accelerator-driven sub-critical reactor. A conceptual design is given for the 30 MW accelerator-driven sub-critical reactor. The neutron transport in the sub-critical reactor was simulated using the MCNP code, and the burnup was calculated using the ORIGEN2 code. The results show that the accelerator-driven sub-critical gas-cooled reactor has reliable sub-criticality and low power density and that the spent fuel from a 350 MW ring-shaped modular high temperature gas cooled reactor can be burned to provide 20% more energy

  8. Gelled fuel simulant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christy, J.; Hiser, E.J.; Sippel, N.J.

    1980-01-01

    A relatively stable inert simulant formulation for a hazardous metallized fuel has the density, shear rate and yield stress of the duplicated fuel. This formulation provides inexpensive and safe testing of exploratory hydraulic studies, or testing of the mechanical strength of containers, plumbing, etc., in which the metallized fuels are to be used

  9. HTGR fuel development: loading of uranium on carboxylic acid cation-exchange resins using solvent extraction of nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.A.

    1975-09-01

    The reference fuel kernel for recycle of 233 U to HTGR's (High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors) is prepared by loading carboxylic acid cation-exchange resins with uranium and carbonizing at controlled conditions. The purified 233 UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 solution from a fuel reprocessing plant contains excess HNO 3 (NO 3 - /U ratio of approximately 2.2). The reference flowsheet for a 233 U recycle fuel facility at Oak Ridge uses solvent extraction of nitrate by a 0.3 M secondary amine in a hydrocarbon diluent to prepare acid-deficient uranyl nitrate. This nitrate extraction, along with resin loading and amine regeneration steps, was demonstrated in 14 runs. No significant operating difficulties were encountered. The process is controlled via in-line pH measurements for the acid-deficient uranyl nitrate solutions. Information was developed on pH values for uranyl nitrate solution vs NO 3 - /U mole ratios, resin loading kinetics, resin drying requirements, and other resin loading process parameters. Calculations made to estimate the capacities of equipment that is geometrically safe with respect to control of nuclear criticality indicate 100 kg/day or more of uranium for single nitrate extraction lines with one continuous resin loading contactor or four batch loading contactors. (auth)

  10. Milling Behavior of Matrix Graphite Powders with Different Binder Materials in HTGR Fuel Element Fabrication: I. Variation in Particle Size Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Woo; Cho, Moon Sung

    2011-01-01

    The fuel element for HTGR is manufactured by mixing coated fuel particles with matrix graphite powder and forming into either pebble type or cylindrical type compacts depending on their use in different HTGR cores. The coated fuel particle, the so-called TRISO particle, consists of 500-μm spherical UO 2 particles coated with the low density buffer Pyrolytic Carbon (PyC) layer, the inner and outer high density PyC layer and SiC layer sandwiched between the two inner and outer PyC layers. The coated TRISO particles are mixed with a matrix graphite powder properly prepared and pressed into a spherical shape or a cylindrical compact finally heat-treated at about 1900 .deg. C. These fuel elements can have different sizes and forms of compact. The basic steps for manufacturing a fuel element include preparation of graphite matrix powder, overcoating the fuel particles, mixing the fuel particles with a matrix powder, carbonizing green compact, and the final high-temperature heat treatment of the carbonized fuel compact. In order to develop a fuel compact fabrication technology, it is important to develop a technology to prepare the matrix graphite powder (MGP) with proper characteristics, which has a strong influence on further steps and the material properties of fuel element. In this work, the milling behavior of matrix graphite powder mixture with different binder materials and their contents was investigated by analyzing the change in particle size distribution with different milling time

  11. Development of a surveillance robot for dimensional and visual inspection of fuel and reflector elements from the Fort St. Vrain HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallroth, C.F.; Marsh, N.I.; Miller, C.M.; Saurwein, J.J.; Smith, T.L.

    1979-11-01

    A robotic device has been developed for dimensional and visual inspection of irradiated HTGR core components. The robot consists of a rotary table and a two-finger probe, driven by stepping motors, and four remotely controlled television cameras. Automated operation is accomplished via minicomputer control. A total of 51 irradiated fuel and reflector elements were inspected at a fraction of the time and cost required for conventional methods

  12. Fractional release of short-lived noble gases and iodine from HTGR fuel compact containing a fraction of coated fuel particles with through-coating defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Toru; Fukuda, Kosaku; Kobayashi, Fumiaki; Kikuchi, Teruo; Tobita, Tsutomu; Kashimura, Satoru; Kikuchi, Hironobu; Yamamoto, Katsumune.

    1986-10-01

    Fractional release (R/B) data of short-lived noble gases and iodine from sweep-gas irradiated HTGR fuel compacts were analyzed. Empirical formulas to predict R/B of 88 Kr as a function of temperature and fraction through-coating defects, and to calculate ratios of R/B's of other shortlived gases to that of 88 Kr were proposed. A method to predict R/B of iodine was also proposed. As for 131 I, a fission product of major safety concern, (R/B) I 131 ≅ (R/B) Xe 133 was predicted. Applying those methods, R/B from OGL-1 fuel element (5th and 6th) was predicted to show a good agreement with observation. (author)

  13. Determination of end-of-life-failure fractions of HTGR-fuel particles by postirradiation annealing and beta autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiele, B.A.; Herren, M.

    1978-11-01

    Fission-product contamination of the helium coolant of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGR) is strongly influenced by the end-of-life (EOL) failed-particle fraction. Knowledge of the EOL-failure fraction is the basis for model calculations to predict the total fission product release from the reactor core. After disintegration of irradiation fuel rods, fuel particles are placed in individual holes of a graphite tray. During a 5-h heat treatment at 1000 0 C in a helium atmosphere failed particles leak fission products, especially the volatile cesium, into the graphite. After unloading a β-autoradiograph of the tray is made. Holes that housed defective particles are identified from black spots on the β-sensitive film. The EOL-failure fraction is the ratio of defective particles to the total number of particles tested. The technique is called PIAA, PostIrradiation Annealing and Autoradiography. The PIAA technique was applied to particles of a Trisocoated highly-enriched UO 2 fissile batch irradiated to a burnup of 35% FIMA at an irradiation temperature of 1250 0 C. Visual examination showed all particles to be intact. From 11 to 47% of the particles had failed, as determined by PIAA. Further, postirradiation examination showed that localized corrosion of the silicon carbide coating by fission-product rare-earth chlorides had occurred

  14. Conceptual design of the special nuclear material nondestructive assay and accountability system for the HTGR fuel refabrication pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, J.D.; McNeany, S.R.; Rushton, J.E.

    1975-07-01

    The conceptual design of the fissile material assay and accountability system for the HTGR refabrication pilot plant has been established. The primary feature affecting the design is the high, time varying, gamma activity of the process material due to the unavoidable presence of uranium-232. This imposes stringent requirements for remote operation and remote maintainability of system components. At the same time, the remote operation lends itself to implementation of an automated data collection and processing system for real-time accountability. The high time-varying gamma activity of the material also precludes application of a number of techniques presently employed for light-water reactor fuel assay. The techniques selected for application in the refabrication facility are (1) active thermal neutron interrogation with fast-fission or delayed-neutron counting for fuel-rod and small-sample assay, (2) calorimetry for high-level waste assay, and (3) passive gamma scanning for low-level waste assay, and rapid on-line relative rod-loading measurements. The principal nondestructive assay subsystems are identified as (1) on-line devices for 100 percent product fuel rod assay and quality control, (2) a multipurpose device in the sample inspection laboratory for small- sample assay and secondary standards calibration, and (3) equipment for assay of high- and low-uranium content scrap and waste materials. A data processing system, which coordinates data from these subsystems with information from other process control sensors, is included to provide real-time material balance information. (U.S.)

  15. HRB-22 capsule irradiation test for HTGR fuel. JAERI/USDOE collaborative irradiation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minato, Kazuo; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Fukuda, Kousaku [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; and others

    1998-03-01

    As a JAERI/USDOE collaborative irradiation test for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel, JAERI fuel compacts were irradiated in the HRB-22 irradiation capsule in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Postirradiation examinations also were performed at ORNL. This report describes 1) the preirradiation characterization of the irradiation samples of annular-shaped fuel compacts containing the Triso-coated fuel particles, 2) the irradiation conditions and fission gas releases during the irradiation to measure the performance of the coated particle fuel, 3) the postirradiation examinations of the disassembled capsule involving visual inspection, metrology, ceramography and gamma-ray spectrometry of the samples, and 4) the accident condition tests on the irradiated fuels at 1600 to 1800degC to obtain information about fuel performance and fission product release behavior under accident conditions. (author)

  16. Comparison of HTGR fuel design, manufacture and quality control methods between Japan and China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Xioming; Takahashi, Masashi; Ueta, Shouhei; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2002-05-01

    The first-loading fuel for the HTTR was started to fabricate at Nuclear Fuel Industries (NFI) in 1995 and the HTTR reached criticality in 1998. Meanwhile, 10 MW high temperature reactor (HTR-10) was constructed in Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University, and the first-loading fuel was fabricated concurrently. The HTR-10 reached criticality in December 2000. Though fuel type is different, i.e., pin-in-block type for the HTTR and pebble bed type for the HTR-10, the fabrication method of TRISO coated fuel particles is similar to each other. This report describes comparison of fuel design, fabrication process and quality inspection between them. (author)

  17. Postirradiation examination of Peach Bottom HTGR Driver Fuel Element E06-01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, F.F.; Wichner, R.P.; Martin, W.J.; Fairchild, L.L.; Kedl, R.J.; de Nordwall, H.J.

    1976-04-01

    The report presented describes the postirradiation examinations of driver fuel element E06-01, which had been irradiated an equivalent of 384 full-power days in Peach Bottom, Unit 1. The fuel element is described in detail and its temperature and irradiation service history briefly outlined. Results presented include: (1) visual observations; (2) critical dimensions of fuel compacts, sleeve, and spine; (3) axial distributions of gamma-emitting nuclides plus 3 H and 90 Sr; (4) radial distributions of these nuclides in the sleeve and spine at three axial locations in the fueled regions and three locations in the upper reflector; (5) metallographic examination of samples of fuel compact material; and (6) burnup determinations via radiochemical analyses at two compact locations

  18. High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) graphite pebble fuel: Review of technologies for reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcwilliams, A. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-08

    This report reviews literature on reprocessing high temperature gas-cooled reactor graphite fuel components. A basic review of the various fuel components used in the pebble bed type reactors is provided along with a survey of synthesis methods for the fabrication of the fuel components. Several disposal options are considered for the graphite pebble fuel elements including the storage of intact pebbles, volume reduction by separating the graphite from fuel kernels, and complete processing of the pebbles for waste storage. Existing methods for graphite removal are presented and generally consist of mechanical separation techniques such as crushing and grinding chemical techniques through the use of acid digestion and oxidation. Potential methods for reprocessing the graphite pebbles include improvements to existing methods and novel technologies that have not previously been investigated for nuclear graphite waste applications. The best overall method will be dependent on the desired final waste form and needs to factor in the technical efficiency, political concerns, cost, and implementation.

  19. HTGR R and D programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neylan, A.J.; Brisbois, J.

    1979-01-01

    A significant R and D program (including in certain cases full-scale prototype tests) formed the basis for the design and key elements in the foregoing projects and is continuing to provide a basis for generic design development. HTGR R and D programs are both privately and government sponsored. This paper provides an overview of the background, current status and outstanding design issues/problems remaining in the area of NSS Plant, Materials and Fuel. The specific objectives and scope of all recently completed, ongoing and planned major HTGR R and D programs are presented

  20. Use of spikants in HTGR fuel and their effect on costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, L.H.

    1979-05-01

    The costs of fresh fuel fabrication have been estimated for flowsheets that have spikant added (Co-60) at various points. The costs are compared with refabricated and fresh fuel fabrication costs. It is shown that the costs increase as the spikant is added nearer to the plant feed point. The least cost is achieved by adding a detachable spikant to the finished fuel element. The highest cost is incurred when the spikant is fed in with the plant feed. This cost is greater than that for refabricated fuel because extra process cells are necessary to prepare the spikant and, in addition, the gamma flux from the Co-60 is much greater than from U-232 and greater precautions have to be taken

  1. Comparison of Material Behavior of Matrix Graphite for HTGR Fuel Elements upon Irradiation: A literature Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Woo; Yeo, Seunghwan; Cho, Moon Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The fuel elements for the HTGRs (i.e., spherical fuel element in pebble-bed type core design and fuel compact in prismatic core design) consists of coated fuel particles dispersed and bonded in a closely packed array within a carbonaceous matrix. This matrix is generally made by mixing fully graphitized natural and needle- or pitchcoke originated powders admixed with a binder material (pitch or phenolic resin), The resulting resinated graphite powder mixture, when compacted, may influence a number of material properties as well as its behavior under neutron irradiation during reactor operation. In the fabrication routes of these two different fuel element forms, different consolidation methods are employed; a quasi-isostatic pressing method is generally adopted to make pebbles while fuel compacts are fabricated by uni-axial pressing mode. The result showed that the hardness values obtained from the two directions showed an anisotropic behavior: The values obtained from the perpendicular section showed much higher micro hardness (176.6±10.5MPa in average) than from the parallel section ((125.6±MPa in average). This anisotropic behavior was concluded to be related to the microstructure of the matrix graphite. This may imply that the uni-axial pressing method to make compacts influence the microstructure of the matrix and hence the material properties of the matrix graphite.

  2. Distribution of fission products in Peach Bottom HTGR fuel element E01-01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wichner, R.P.; Dyer, F.F.; Martin, W.J.; Fairchild, L.L.

    1978-10-01

    The fifth in a projected series of six postirradiation examinations of Peach Bottom High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor driver fuel elements is described. The element analyzed received an equivalent of 897 full-power days of irradiation prior to the scheduled termination of Core 2 operation. The examination procedures emphasized the determination of fission product distributions in the graphite portions of the fuel element. Continuous axial scans indicated a 137 Cs inventory of 20.3 Ci in the graphite sleeve and 8.1 Ci in the spine at the time of element withdrawal from the core. In addition, the nuclides 134 Cs, /sup 110 m/Ag, 60 Co, and 154 Eu were found in the graphite portions of the fuel element in significant amounts. Radial distributions of these nuclides plus the beta-emitters 3 H, 14 C, and 90 Sr were obtained at four axial locations of the fueled region of the element sleeve and two axial locations of the element spine. The radial dissection was accomplished by use of a manipulator-operated lathe in a hot cell. In addition to fission product distributions, the appearance of the component parts of the element was recorded photographically, fuel compact and graphite dimensions were recorded at numerous locations, and metallographic examinations of the fuel were performed

  3. Weight simulation fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumikawa, Kiyokazu; Tokomatsu, Mutsuo.

    1993-01-01

    A tungsten pellet is not applied with hollow fabrication but a tungsten rod is inserted and filled into a zircaloy fuel cladding tube, as well as different kind of material having a density lower than that of tungsten, for example, stainless steel rods, are disposed successively intermittently and alternately for simulating the weight of one fuel rod. The filling method and the length of the individual pellets are optional depending on the method of usage, providing that the outer diameter of the simulation pellet is made identical with that of the actual fuel pellet. With such a constitution, there is no need to dispose a hollow portion as in the case of using only tungsten pellets, and the costs for both the materials and the fabrication can be saved. (T.M.)

  4. Behaviour of HTGR coated fuel particles at high-temperature tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernikov, A.S.; Lyutikov, R.A.; Kurbakov, S.D.; Repnikov, V.M.; Khromonozhkin, V.V.; Soloviyov, G.I.

    1990-01-01

    At the temperature range 1200-2600 deg. C prereactor tests of TRISO fuel particles on the base of UO 2 , UC x O y and UO 2 +2Al 2 O 3 . SiO 2 kernels, and also fuel particle models with ZrC kernels were performed. Isothermal annealings carried out at temperatures of 1400-2600 deg. C, thermogradient ones at 1200-2200 deg. C (Δ T = 200-1200 deg. C/cm). It is shown that at heating to 2200 deg. C integrity of fuel particles is limited by different thermal expansion of PyC and SiC coatings, and also by thermal dissociation of SiC. At higher temperatures the failure is caused by development of high pressures within weakened fuel particles. It is found that uranium migration from alloyed fuel (UC x O y , UO 2 +2Al 2 O 3 .SiO 2 ) in the process of annealing is higher than that from UO 2 . (author)

  5. Improvement in retention of solid fission products in HTGR fuel particles by ceramic kernel additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerthmann, R.; Groos, E.; Gruebmeier, H.

    1975-08-01

    Increased requirements concerning the retention of long-lived solid fission products in fuel elements for use in advanced High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors led to the development of coated particles with improved fission product retention of the kernel, which represent an alternative to silicon carbide-coated fuel particles. Two irradiation experiments have shown that the release of strontium, barium, and caesium from pyrocarbon-coated particles can be reduced by orders of magnitude if the oxide kernel contains alumina-silica additives. It was detected by electron microprobe analysis that the improved retention of the mentioned fission products in the fuel kernel is caused by formation of the stable aluminosilicates SrAl 2 Si 2 O 8 , BaAl 2 Si 2 O 8 and CsAlSi 2 O 6 in the additional aluminasilica phase of the kernel. (orig.) [de

  6. Demonstration tests for HTGR fuel elements and core components with test sections in HENDEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Hino, Ryutaro; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    1995-03-01

    In the fuel stack test section (T{sub 1}) of the Helium Engineering Demonstration Loop (HENDEL), thermal and hydraulic performances of helium gas flows through a fuel rod channel and a fuel stack have been investigated for the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) core thermal design. The test data showed that the turbulent characteristics appearing in the Reynolds number above 2000: no typical behavior in the transition zone, and friction factors and heat transfer coefficients in the fuel channel were found to be higher than those in a smooth annular channel. Heat transfer behavior of gas flow in a fuel element channel with blockage and cross-flow through a gap between upper and lower fuel elements stacked was revealed using the mock-up models. On the other hand, demonstration tests have been performed to verify thermal and hydraulic characteristics and structural integrity related to the core bottom structure using a full-scale test facility named as the in-core structure test section (T{sub 2}). The sealing performance test revealed that the leakage of low-temperature helium gas through gaps between the permanent reflector blocks to the core was very low level compared with the HTTR design value and no change of the leakage flow rate were observed after a long term operation. The heat transfer tests including thermal transient at shutdown of gas circulators verified good insulating performance of core insulation structures in the core bottom structure and the hot gas duct; the temperature of the metal portion of these structure was below the design value. Examination of the thermal mixing characteristics indicated that the mixing of the hot helium gas started at a hot plenum and finished completely at downstream of the outlet hot gas duct. The present results obtained from these demonstration tests have been practically applied to the detailed design works and licensing procedures of the HTTR. (J.P.N.) 92 refs.

  7. 1976 scientific progress report. [Fuel and coating materials for HTGR]; Wissenschaftlicher Ergebnisberict 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickel, H.

    1976-07-01

    Activities at the Institute for Reactor Materials in the production and properties of high temperature gas cooled reactor fuel and coating materials are summarized. Major emphasis was placed on investigations of pyrocarbon, BISO and TRISO coatings, uranium and thorium oxides and carbides, and graphite and matrix materials. A list of publications is included. (HDR)

  8. General Atomic HTGR fuel reprocessing pilot plant: results of initial sequential equipment operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    In September 1977, the processing of 20 large high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (LHTGR) fuel elements was completed sequentially through the head-end cold pilot plant equipment. This report gives a brief description of the equipment and summarizes the results of the sequential operation of the pilot plant. 32 figures, 15 tables

  9. Dimensional Behavior of Matrix Graphite Compacts during Heat Treatments for HTGR Fuel Element Fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young-Woo; Yeo, Seunghwan; Cho, Moon Sung

    2015-01-01

    The carbonization is a process step where the binder that is incorporated during the matrix graphite powder preparation step is evaporated and the residue of the binder is carbonized during the heat treatment at about 1073 K. This carbonization step is followed by the final high temperature heat treatment where the carbonized compacts are heat treated at 2073-2173 K in vacuum for a relatively short time (about 2 hrs). In order to develop a fuel compact fabrication technology, and for fuel matrix graphite to meet the required material properties, it is essential to investigate the relationship among the process parameters of the matrix graphite powder preparation, the fabrication parameters of fuel element green compact and the heat treatments conditions, which has a strong influence on the further steps and the material properties of fuel element. In this work, the dimensional changes of green compacts during the carbonization and final heat treatment are evaluated when compacts have different densities from different pressing conditions and different final heat treatment temperatures are employed, keeping other process parameters constant, such as the binder content, carbonization time, temperature and atmosphere (two hours ant 1073K and N2 atmosphere). In this work, the dimensional variations of green compacts during the carbonization and final heat treatment are evaluated when compacts have different densities from different pressing conditions and different final heat treatment temperatures are employed

  10. Development of a FE Model for the Stress Analysis of HTGR TRISO-coated particle fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Moon Sung; Lee, Y. W.; Jeong, K. C.; Kim, Y. K.; Oh, S. C.; Chang, J. H.

    2005-12-01

    Finite element modelling of the stresses in TRISO-coated fuel particle under normal operating conditions was carried out with use of the structural analysis computer code ABAQUS. The FE model took into account the irradiation induced swelling and the creep of the PyC layers, the internal fission gas pressure that builds up during irradiation and the constant external ambient pressure. All of the inputs such as particle dimensions, swelling rates and creep rates of PyC layers and other mechanical properties used in these calculations were adopted from Miller's publication published in 1993. The FE model was verified against Miller's solution. Results of this model were found to be in good agreement with Miller's results. With use of the FE model, the static behavior of the TRISO-coated fuel particle, such as load shares, stress contours, stress variations as a function of fluence and shape changes of the TRISO -coated layers were investigated

  11. Anisotropic Material Behavior of Uni-axially Compacted Graphite Matrix for HTGR Fuel Compact Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Woo; Yeo, Seunghwan; Yoon, Ji-Hae; Cho, Moon Sung [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In developing the fuel compact fabrication technology, and fuel graphite material to meet the required material properties, it is essential to investigate the relationship among the process parameters of the matrix graphite powder preparation, the fabrication parameters of fuel element green compact and the heat treatments conditions and the material properties of fuel element. It was observed, during this development, that the pressing technique employed for the compaction fabrication prior to the two successive heat treatments (carbonization and final high temperature heat treatment) was of extreme importance in determining the material properties of the final compact product. In this work, the material behavior of the uni-axially pressed graphite matrix during the carbonization and final heat treatment are evaluated and summarized along the different directions, viz., perpendicular and parallel directions to pressing direction. In this work, the dimensional variations and variations in thermal expansion, thermal conductivity and Vickers hardness of the graphite matrix compact samples in the axial and radial directions prepared by uni-axial pressing are evaluated, and compared with those of samples prepared by cold isostatic pressing with the available data. From this work, the followings are observed. 1) Dimensional changes of matrix graphite green compacts during carbonization show that the difference in radial and axial variations shows a large anisotropic behavior in shrinkage. The radial variation is very small while the axial variation is large. During carbonization, the stresses caused by the force would be released in to the axial direction together with the phenolic resin vapor. 2) Dimensional variation of compact samples in perpendicular and parallel directions during carbonization shows a large difference in behavior when compact sample is prepared by uni-axial pressing. However, when compact sample is prepared by cold isostatic pressing, there is

  12. Anisotropic Material Behavior of Uni-axially Compacted Graphite Matrix for HTGR Fuel Compact Fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young-Woo; Yeo, Seunghwan; Yoon, Ji-Hae; Cho, Moon Sung

    2016-01-01

    In developing the fuel compact fabrication technology, and fuel graphite material to meet the required material properties, it is essential to investigate the relationship among the process parameters of the matrix graphite powder preparation, the fabrication parameters of fuel element green compact and the heat treatments conditions and the material properties of fuel element. It was observed, during this development, that the pressing technique employed for the compaction fabrication prior to the two successive heat treatments (carbonization and final high temperature heat treatment) was of extreme importance in determining the material properties of the final compact product. In this work, the material behavior of the uni-axially pressed graphite matrix during the carbonization and final heat treatment are evaluated and summarized along the different directions, viz., perpendicular and parallel directions to pressing direction. In this work, the dimensional variations and variations in thermal expansion, thermal conductivity and Vickers hardness of the graphite matrix compact samples in the axial and radial directions prepared by uni-axial pressing are evaluated, and compared with those of samples prepared by cold isostatic pressing with the available data. From this work, the followings are observed. 1) Dimensional changes of matrix graphite green compacts during carbonization show that the difference in radial and axial variations shows a large anisotropic behavior in shrinkage. The radial variation is very small while the axial variation is large. During carbonization, the stresses caused by the force would be released in to the axial direction together with the phenolic resin vapor. 2) Dimensional variation of compact samples in perpendicular and parallel directions during carbonization shows a large difference in behavior when compact sample is prepared by uni-axial pressing. However, when compact sample is prepared by cold isostatic pressing, there is

  13. Improvement in retention of solid fission products in HTGR fuel particles by ceramic kernel additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerthmann, R.; Groos, E.; Gruebmeier, H.

    1975-08-15

    Increased requirements concerning the retention of long-lived solid fission products in fuel elements for use in advanced High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors led to the development of coated particles with improved fission product retention which represent an alternative to silicon carbide-coated fuel particles. Two irradiation experiments have shown that the release of strontium, barium, and caesium from pyrocarbon-coated particles can be reduced by orders of magnitude if the oxide kernel contains alumina-silica additives. It was detected by electron microprobe analysis that the improved retention of the mentioned fission products in the fuel kernel is caused by formation of the stable aluminosilicates SrAl2Si2O8, BaAl2Si2O8and CsAlSi2O6 in the additional alumina-silica phase of the kernel.

  14. Interactive simulations of gas-turbine modular HTGR transients and heatup accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, S.J.; Nypaver, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    An interactive workstation-based simulator has been developed for performing analyses of modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) core transients and accidents. It was originally developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to assess the licensability of the US Department of Energy (DOE) steam cycle design 350-MW(t) MHTGR. Subsequently, the code was modified under DOE sponsorship to simulate the 450-MW(t) Gas Turbine (GT) design and to aid in development and design studies. Features of the code (MORECA-GT) include detailed modeling of 3-D core thermal-hydraulics, interactive workstation capabilities that allow user/analyst or ''operator'' involvement in accident scenarios, and options for studying anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) events. In addition to the detailed models for the core, MORECA includes models for the vessel, Shutdown Cooling System (SCS), and Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS), and core point kinetics to accommodate ATWS events. The balance of plant (BOP) is currently not modeled. The interactive workstation features include options for on-line parameter plots and 3-D graphic temperature profiling. The studies to date show that the proposed MHTGR designs are very robust and can generally withstand the consequences of even the extremely low probability postulated accidents with little or no damage to the reactor's fuel or metallic components

  15. Interactive simulations of gas-turbine modular HTGR transients and heatup accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, S.J.; Nypaver, D.J.

    1994-06-01

    An interactive workstation-based simulator has been developed for performing analyses of modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) core transients and accidents. It was originally developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to assess the licensability of the US Department of Energy (DOE) steam cycle design 350-MW(t) MHTGR. Subsequently, the code was modified under DOE sponsorship to simulate the 450-MW(t) Gas Turbine (GT) design and to aid in development and design studies. Features of the code (MORECA-GT) include detailed modeling of 3-D core thermal-hydraulics, interactive workstation capabilities that allow user/analyst or ``operator`` involvement in accident scenarios, and options for studying anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) events. In addition to the detailed models for the core, MORECA includes models for the vessel, Shutdown Cooling System (SCS), and Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS), and core point kinetics to accommodate ATWS events. The balance of plant (BOP) is currently not modeled. The interactive workstation features include options for on-line parameter plots and 3-D graphic temperature profiling. The studies to date show that the proposed MHTGR designs are very robust and can generally withstand the consequences of even the extremely low probability postulated accidents with little or no damage to the reactor`s fuel or metallic components.

  16. Comparison of US/FRG accident condition models for HTGR fuel failure and radionuclide release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, K.

    1991-03-01

    The objective was to compare calculation models used in safety analyses in the US and FRG which describe fission product release behavior from TRISO coated fuel particles under core heatup accident conditions. The frist step performed is the qualitative comparison of both sides' fuel failure and release models in order to identify differences and similarities in modeling assumptions and inputs. Assumptions of possible particle failure mechanisms under accident conditions (SiC degradation, pressure vessel) are principally the same on both sides though they are used in different modeling approaches. The characterization of a standard (= intact) coated particle to be of non-releasing (GA) or possibly releasing (KFA/ISF) type is one of the major qualitative differences. Similar models are used regarding radionuclide release from exposed particle kernels. In a second step, a quantitative comparison of the calculation models was made by assessing a benchmark problem predicting particle failure and radionuclide release under MHTGR conduction cooldown accident conditions. Calculations with each side's reference method have come to almost the same failure fractions after 250 hours for the core region with maximum core heatup temperature despite the different modeling approaches of SORS and PANAMA-I. The comparison of the results of particle failure obtained with the Integrated Failure and Release Model for Standard Particles and its revision provides a 'verification' of these models in this sense that the codes (SORS and PANAMA-II, and -III, respectively) which were independently developed lead to very good agreement in the predictions. (orig./HP) [de

  17. Reprocessing yields and material throughput: HTGR recycle demonstration facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holder, N.; Abraham, L.

    1977-08-01

    Recovery and reuse of residual U-235 and bred U-233 from the HTGR thorium-uranium fuel cycle will contribute significantly to HTGR fuel cycle economics and to uranium resource conservation. The Thorium Utilization National Program Plan for HTGR Fuel Recycle Development includes the demonstration, on a production scale, of reprocessing and refabrication processes in an HTGR Recycle Demonstration Facility (HRDF). This report addresses process yields and material throughput that may be typically expected in the reprocessing of highly enriched uranium fuels in the HRDF. Material flows will serve as guidance in conceptual design of the reprocessing portion of the HRDF. In addition, uranium loss projections, particle breakage limits, and decontamination factor requirements are identified to serve as guidance to the HTGR fuel reprocessing development program

  18. CFD investigating the air ingress accident for a HTGR simulation of graphite corrosion oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferng, Y.M.; Chi, C.W.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A CFD model is proposed to investigate graphite oxidation corrosion in the HTR-10. ► A postulated air ingress accident is assumed in this paper. ► Air ingress flowrate is the predicted result, instead of the preset one. ► O 2 would react with graphite on pebble surface, causing the graphite corrosion. ► No fuel exposure is predicted to be occurred under the air ingress accident. - Abstract: Through a compressible multi-component CFD model, this paper investigates the characteristics of graphite oxidation corrosion in the HTR-10 core under the postulated accident of gas duct rupture. In this accident, air in the steam generator cavity would enter into the core after pressure equilibrium is achieved between the core and the cavity, which is also called as the air ingress accident. Oxygen in the air would react with graphite on pebble surface, subsequently resulting in oxidation corrosion and challenging fuel integrity. In this paper, characteristics of graphite oxidation corrosion during the air ingress accident can be reasonably captured, including distributions of graphite corrosion amount on the different cross-sections, time histories of local corrosion amount at the monitoring points and overall corrosion amount in the core, respectively. Based on the transient simulation results, the corrosion pattern and its corrosion rate would approach to the steady-state conditions as the accident continuously progresses. The total amount of graphite corrosion during a 3-day accident time is predicted to be about 31 kg with the predicted asymptotic corrosion rate. This predicted value is less than that from the previous work of Gao and Shi.

  19. Effect of the Heat Treatment on the Graphite Matrix of Fuel Element for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chungyong; Lee, Seungjae; Suh, Jungmin; Jo, Youngho; Lee, Youngwoo; Cho, Moonsung

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the cylinder-formed fuel element for the block type reactor is focused on, which consists of the large part of graphite matrix. One of the most important properties of the graphite matrix is the mechanical strength for the high reliability because the graphite matrix should be enabled to protect the TRISO particles from the irradiation environment and the impact from the outside. In this study, the three kinds of candidate graphites and Phenol as a binder were chosen and mixed with each other, formed and heated for the compressive strength test. The objective of this research is to optimize the kinds and composition of the mixed graphite and the forming process by evaluating the compressive strength before/after heat treatment (carbonization of binder). In this study, the effect of heat treatment on graphite matrix was studied in terms of the density and the compressive strength. The size (diameter and length) of pellet is increased by heat treatment. Due to additional weight reduction and swelling (length and diameter) of samples the density of graphite pellet is decreased from about 2.0 to about 1.7g/cm 3 . From the mechanical test results, the compressive strength of graphite pellets was related to the various conditions such as the contents of binder, the kinds of graphite and the heat treatment. Both the green pellet and the heat treated pellet, the compressive strength of G+S+P pellets is relatively higher than that of R+S+P pellets. To optimize fuel element matrix, the effect of Phenol and other binders, graphite composition and the heat treatment on the mechanical properties will be deeply investigated for further study

  20. Cesium transport data for HTGR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, B.F.; Bell, W.E.

    1979-09-01

    Cesium transport data on the release of cesium from HTGR fuel elements are reviewed and discussed. The data available through 1976 are treated. Equations, parameters, and associated variances describing the data are presented. The equations and parameters are in forms suitable for use in computer codes used to calculate the release of metallic fission products from HTGR fuel elements into the primary circuit. The data cover the following processes: (1) diffusion of cesium in fuel kernels and pyrocarbon, (2) sorption of cesium on fuel rod matrix material and on graphite, and (3) migration of cesium in graphite. The data are being confirmed and extended through work in progress

  1. Utilization of Plutonium and Higher Actinides in the HTGR as Possibility to Maintain Long-Term Operation on One Fuel Loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsvetkova, Galina V.; Peddicord, Kenneth L.

    2002-01-01

    Promising existing nuclear reactor concepts together with new ideas are being discussed worldwide. Many new studies are underway in order to identify prototypes that will be analyzed and developed further as systems for Generation IV. The focus is on designs demonstrating full inherent safety, competitive economics and proliferation resistance. The work discussed here is centered on a modularized small-size High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) concept. This paper discusses the possibility of maintaining long-term operation on one fuel loading through utilization of plutonium and higher actinides in the small-size pebble-bed reactor (PBR). Acknowledging the well-known flexibility of the PBR design with respect to fuel composition, the principal limitations of the long-term burning of plutonium and higher actinides are considered. The technological challenges and further research are outlined. The results allow the identification of physical features of the PBR that significantly influence flexibility of the design and its applications. (authors)

  2. Operation and postirradiation examination of ORR capsule OF-2: accelerated testing of HTGR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiegs, T.N.; Thoms, K.R.

    1979-03-01

    Irradiation capsule OF-2 was a test of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor fuel types under accelerated irradiation conditions in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The results showed good irradiation performance of Triso-coated weak-acid-resin fissile particles and Biso-coated fertile particles. These particles had been coated by a fritted gas distributor in the 0.13-m-diam furnace. Fast-neutron damage (E > 0.18 MeV) and matrix-particle interaction caused the outer pyrocarbon coating on the Triso-coated particles to fail. Such failure depended on the optical anisotropy, density, and open porosity of the outer pyrocarbon coating, as well as on the coke yield of the matrix. Irradiation of specimens with values outside prescribed limits for these properties increased the failure rate of their outer pyrocarbon coating. Good irradiation performance was observed for weak-acid-resin particles with conversions in the range from 15 to 75% UC 2

  3. HTGR Generic Technology Program. Semiannual report for the period ending September 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-11-01

    The technical accomplishments on the HTGR Generic Technology Program at General Atomic during the second half of FY-79 are reported. The report covers a period when the major design direction of the National HTGR Program is in the process of changing from the HTGR-SC emphasis to an HTGR-GT emphasis in the near term. The HTGR Generic Technology Program activities have been redirected to ensure that the tasks covered are supportive of this changing emphasis in HTGR applications. The activities include the need to develop an MEU fuel, and the need to qualify materials and components for the higher temperatures of the gas turbine plant

  4. HTGR Generic Technology Program. Semiannual report for the period ending March 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    This document reports the technical accomplishments on the HTGR Generic Technology Program at General Atomic during the first half of FY-79. It covers a period when the major design direction of the National HTGR Program is in the process of changing from the HTGR-SC emphasis to an HTGR-GT emphasis in the near term. The HTGR Generic Technology Program activities have been redirected to ensure that the tasks covered are supportive of this changing emphasis in HTGR applications. The activities include the need to develop a medium enriched uranium (MEU) fuel, and the need to qualify materials and components for the higher temperatures of the gas turbine plant.

  5. HTGR Generic Technology Program. Semiannual report for the period ending March 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-06-01

    This document reports the technical accomplishments on the HTGR Generic Technology Program at General Atomic during the first half of FY-79. It covers a period when the major design direction of the National HTGR Program is in the process of changing from the HTGR-SC emphasis to an HTGR-GT emphasis in the near term. The HTGR Generic Technology Program activities have been redirected to ensure that the tasks covered are supportive of this changing emphasis in HTGR applications. The activities include the need to develop a medium enriched uranium (MEU) fuel, and the need to qualify materials and components for the higher temperatures of the gas turbine plant

  6. Resin-based preparation of HTGR fuels: operation of an engineering-scale uranium loading system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.A.

    1977-10-01

    The fuel particles for recycle of 233 U to High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors are prepared from uranium-loaded carboxylic acid ion exchange resins which are subsequently carbonized, converted, and refabricated. The development and operation of individual items of equipment and of an integrated system are described for the resin-loading part of the process. This engineering-scale system was full scale with respect to a hot demonstration facility, but was operated with natural uranium. The feed uranium, which consisted of uranyl nitrate solution containing excess nitric acid, was loaded by exchange with resin in the hydrogen form. In order to obtain high loadings, the uranyl nitrate must be acid deficient; therefore, nitric acid was extracted by a liquid organic amine which was regenerated to discharge a NaNO 3 or NH 4 NO 3 solution waste. Water was removed from the uranyl nitrate solution by an evaporator that yielded condensate containing less than 0.5 ppM of uranium. The uranium-loaded resin was washed with condensate and dried to a controlled water content via microwave heating. The loading process was controlled via in-line measurements of the pH and density of the uranyl nitrate. The demonstrated capacity was 1 kg of uranium per hour for either batch loading contractors or a continuous column as the resin loading contractor. Fifty-four batch loading runs were made without a single failure of the process outlined in the chemical flowsheet or any evidence of inability to control the conditions dictated by the flowsheet

  7. Determination of reactivity of multiplying systems filled with spherical HTGR-fuel elements using kinetic methods with regard to the pulsed-neutron method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drueke, V.

    1978-06-01

    At three critical or subcritical facilities - two of them filled with spherical HTGR-fuel elements - the reactivity is determined using kinetic methods. Besides the inverskinetic method the applicability of the pulsed-neutron method is investigated. The experimental results using the pulsed-neutron method are compared partly with the inverskinetic method and partly with diffusion-calculations. It is shown, that in the HTGR the space dependence of the reactivity in radial direction is not remarkable in spite of the 'kinetic distortion'; on the contrary in axial direction - the direction of the external neutron source - space dependent reactivity worths are measured. The results of the pulsed-neutron methods of Sjoestrand and Simmons-King are rather good applicable in all configurations. For the method of Sjoestrand it is necessary to select the detector positions, whereas for Simmons-King the calculated life-time determines the results. Therefore it is proposed to compare calculated and measured decay constants of the prompt neutron field in future. (orig.) [de

  8. Thermal-stress analysis of HTGR fuel and control rod fuel blocks in in-block carbonization and annealing furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwaltney, R.C.; McAfee, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    A new method for performing thermal stress analyses in structures with multiple penetrations was applied to these analyses. This method couples the development of an equivalent thermal conductivity for the blocks, a technique that has been used extensively for modeling the thermal characteristics of reactor cores, with the use of the equivalent solid plate method for stress analysis. Using this equivalent thermal conductivity, which models as one material the heat transfer characteristics of the fuel, coolant, and graphite two-dimensional, steady-state thermal analyses of the fuel and control rod fuel blocks were performed to establish all temperature boundaries required for the stress analyses. In applying the equivalent solid plate method, the region of penetrations being modeled was replaced by a pseudo material having the same dimensions but whose materials properties were adjusted to account for the penetration. The peak stresses and strains were determined by applying stress and strain intensification factors to the calculated distributions. The condition studied was where the blocks were located near the center of the furnace. In this position, the axial surface of the block is heated near one end and cooled near the other. The approximate axial surface temperatures ranged from 1521 0 C at both the heated and the cooled ends to a peak of 1800 0 C near the center. Five specific cases were analyzed: plane (two-dimensional thermal, plane stress strain) analyses of each end of a standard fuel block (2 cases), plane analyses of each end of a control rod fuel block (2 cases), and a two-dimensional analysis of a fuel block treated as an axisymmetric cylind

  9. HTGR generic technology program. Semiannual report ending March 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-05-01

    This document reports the technical accomplishments on the HTGR Generic Technology Program at General Atomic during the first half of FY-80. It covers a period when the design direction of the National HTGR Program is in the process of an overall review. The HTGR Generic Technology Program activities have continued so as to provide the basic technology required for all HTGR applications. The activities include the need to develop an MEU fuel and the need to qualify materials and components for the higher temperatures of the gas turbine and process heat plants

  10. R and D status and requirements for PIE in the fields of the HTGR fuel and the innovative basic research on High-Temperature Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawa, Kazuhiro; Tobita, Tsutomu; Sumita, Junya [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Ishihara, Masahiro; Hayashi, Kimio; Hoshiya, Taiji; Sekino, Hajime; Ooeda, Etsurou

    1999-09-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), which is the first high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in Japan, achieved its first criticality in November 1998 at the Oarai Research Establishment of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). In the field of HTGR fuel development, JAERI will proceed research and development (R and D) works by the following steps: (STEP-1) confirmation of irradiation performance of the first-loading fuel of the HTTR, (STEP-2) study on irradiation performance of high burnup SiC-coated fuel particle and (STEP-3) development of ZrC-coated fuel particle. Requirements for post-irradiation examination (PIE) are different for each R and D step. In STEP-1, firstly, hot cells will be prepared in the HTTR reactor building to handle spent fuels. In parallel, general equipments such as those for deconsolidation of fuel compacts and for handling coated fuel particles will be installed in the Hot Laboratory at Oarai. In STEP-2, precise PIE techniques, for example, Raman spectroscopy for measurement of stress on irradiated SiC layer, will be investigated. In STEP-3, new PIE techniques should be developed to investigate irradiation behavior of ZrC-coated particle. In the field of the innovative basic research on high-temperature engineering, some preliminary tests have been made on the research areas of (1) new materials development, (2) fusion technology, (3) radiation chemistry and (4) high-temperature in-core instrumentation. Requirements for PIE are under investigation, in particular in the field of the new materials development. Besides more general apparatuses including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), some special apparatuses such as an electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometer, a specific resistance/Hall coefficient measuring system and a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) are planned to install in the Hot Laboratory at Oarai. Acquisition of advanced knowledge on the irradiation behavior is expected in

  11. Station Blackout Analysis of HTGR-Type Experimental Power Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syarip; Zuhdi, Aliq; Falah, Sabilul

    2018-01-01

    The National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia has decided to build an experimental power reactor of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) type located at Puspiptek Complex. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate a small modular nuclear power plant that can be operated safely. One of the reactor safety characteristics is the reliability of the reactor to the station blackout (SBO) event. The event was observed due to relatively high disturbance frequency of electricity network in Indonesia. The PCTRAN-HTR functional simulator code was used to observe fuel and coolant temperature, and coolant pressure during the SBO event. The reactor simulated at 10 MW for 7200 s then the SBO occurred for 1-3 minutes. The analysis result shows that the reactor power decreases automatically as the temperature increase during SBO accident without operator’s active action. The fuel temperature increased by 36.57 °C every minute during SBO and the power decreased by 0.069 MW every °C fuel temperature rise at the condition of anticipated transient without reactor scram. Whilst, the maximum coolant (helium) temperature and pressure are 1004 °C and 9.2 MPa respectively. The maximum fuel temperature is 1282 °C, this value still far below the fuel temperature limiting condition i.e. 1600 °C, its mean that the HTGR has a very good inherent safety system.

  12. 3D Nondestructive Visualization and Evaluation of TRISO Particles Distribution in HTGR Fuel Pebbles Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongyi Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonuniform distribution of tristructural isotropic (TRISO particles within a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR pebble may lead to excessive thermal gradients and nonuniform thermal expansion during operation. If the particles are closely clustered, local hotspots may form, leading to excessive stresses on particle layers and an increased probability of particle failure. Although X-ray digital radiography (DR is currently used to evaluate the TRISO distributions in pebbles, X-ray DR projection images are two-dimensional in nature, which would potentially miss some details for 3D evaluation. This paper proposes a method of 3D visualization and evaluation of the TRISO distribution in HTGR pebbles using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT: first, a pebble is scanned on our high-resolution CBCT, and 2D cross-sectional images are reconstructed; secondly, all cross-sectional images are restructured to form the 3D model of the pebble; then, volume rendering is applied to segment and display the TRISO particles in 3D for visualization and distribution evaluation. For method validation, several pebbles were scanned and the 3D distributions of the TRISO particles within the pebbles were produced. Experiment results show that the proposed method provides more 3D than DR, which will facilitate pebble fabrication research and production quality control.

  13. HTGR Measurements and Instrumentation Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, Sydney J.; Holcomb, David Eugene; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit

    2012-01-01

    This report provides an integrated overview of measurements and instrumentation for near-term future high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). Instrumentation technology has undergone revolutionary improvements since the last HTGR was constructed in the United States. This report briefly describes the measurement and communications needs of HTGRs for normal operations, maintenance and inspection, fuel fabrication, and accident response. The report includes a description of modern communications technologies and also provides a potential instrumentation communications architecture designed for deployment at an HTGR. A principal focus for the report is describing new and emerging measurement technologies with high potential to improve operations, maintenance, and accident response for the next generation of HTGRs, known as modular HTGRs, which are designed with passive safety features. Special focus is devoted toward describing the failure modes of the measurement technologies and assessing the technology maturity.

  14. Fabrication of simulated DUPIC fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kweon Ho; Song, Ki Chan; Park, Hee Sung; Moon, Je Sun; Yang, Myung Seung

    2000-12-01

    Simulated DUPIC fuel provides a convenient way to investigate the DUPIC fuel properties and behavior such as thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, fission gas release, leaching, and so on without the complications of handling radioactive materials. Several pellets simulating the composition and microstructure of DUPIC fuel are fabricated by resintering the powder, which was treated through OREOX process of simulated spent PWR fuel pellets, which had been prepared from a mixture of UO2 and stable forms of constituent nuclides. The key issues for producing simulated pellets that replicate the phases and microstructure of irradiated fuel are to achieve a submicrometre dispersion during mixing and diffusional homogeneity during sintering. This study describes the powder treatment, OREOX, compaction and sintering to fabricate simulated DUPIC fuel using the simulated spent PWR fuel. The homogeneity of additives in the powder was observed after attrition milling. The microstructure of the simulated spent PWR fuel agrees well with the other studies. The leading structural features observed are as follows: rare earth and other oxides dissolved in the UO2 matrix, small metallic precipitates distributed throughout the matrix, and a perovskite phase finely dispersed on grain boundaries.

  15. DSNP models used in the pebble-bed HTGR dynamic simulation. V.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saphier, D.

    1984-04-01

    A detailed description is given of the components that were used in the DSNP simulation of the PNP-500 high temperature gas-cooled pebble-bed reactor. Each component presented in this report describes in detail the mathematical model that was used, and the assumptions that were made in developing the model. Most of the models were developed using basic physical principles with the simplication that could be justified on the basis of the requested accuracy. Most of the models were developed as either one dimensional or lumped parameter models. The heat transfer and flow correlations, which are mostly based on semiempirical correlations were either provided by KFA or were adapted from the available literature. A short description of DSNP is also given, with a comprehensive list of all the statements available in Rev. 4.1 of DSNP. (H.K.)

  16. GCRA perspective on the HTGR-GT plant configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-06-01

    Design specifications for the HTGR type reactor and gas turbine combination are presented concerning the turbomachinery; generator and isophase bus duct; PCRV and internals; heat exchangers; operability; maintenance; safety and licensing; core design; and fuel design

  17. Peach Bottom HTGR decommissioning and component removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohler, E.J.; Steward, K.P.; Iacono, J.V.

    1977-07-01

    The prime objective of the Peach Bottom End-of-Life Program was to validate specific HTGR design codes and predictions by comparison of actual and predicted physics, thermal, fission product, and materials behavior in Peach Bottom. Three consecutive phases of the program provide input to the HTGR design methods verifications: (1) Nondestructive fuel and circuit gamma scanning; (2) removal of steam generator and primary circuit components; and (3) Laboratory examinations of removed components. Component removal site work commenced with establishment of restricted access areas and installation of controlled atmosphere tents to retain relative humidity at <30%. A mock-up room was established to test and develop the tooling and to train operators under simulated working conditions. Primary circuit ducting samples were removed by trepanning, and steam generator access was achieved by a combination of arc gouging and grinding. Tubing samples were removed using internal cutters and external grinding. Throughout the component removal phase, strict health physics, safety, and quality assurance programs were implemented. A total of 148 samples of primary circuit ducting and steam generator tubing were removed with no significant health physics or safety incidents. Additionally, component removal served to provide access fordetermination of cesium plateout distribution by gamma scanning inside the ducts and for macroexamination of the steam generator from both the water and helium sides. Evaluations are continuing and indicate excellent performance of the steam generator and other materials, together with close correlation of observed and predicted fission product plateout distributions. It is concluded that such a program of end-of-life research, when appropriately coordinated with decommissioning activities, can significantly advance nuclear plant and fuel technology development

  18. HTGR generic technology program plan (FY 80)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Purpose of the program is to develop base technology and to perform design and development common to the HTGR Steam Cycle, Gas Turbine, and Process Heat Plants. The generic technology program breaks into the base technology, generic component, pebble-bed study, technology transfer, and fresh fuel programs

  19. Simulation of leaking fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hozer, Z.

    2006-01-01

    The behaviour of failed fuel rods includes several complex phenomena. The cladding failure initiates the release of fission product from the fuel and in case of large defect even urania grains can be released into the coolant. In steady state conditions an equilibrium - diffusion type - release is expected. During transients the release is driven by a convective type leaching mechanism. There are very few experimental data on leaking WWER fuel rods. For this reason the activity measurements at the nuclear power plants provide very important information. The evaluation of measured data can help in the estimation of failed fuel rod characteristics and the prediction of transient release dynamics in power plant transients. The paper deals with the simulation of leaking fuel rods under steady state and transient conditions and describes the following new results: 1) A new algorithm has been developed for the simulation of leaking fuel rods under steady state conditions and the specific parameters of the model for the Paks NPP has been determined; 2) The steady state model has been applied to calculation of leaking fuel characteristics using iodine and noble gas activity measurement data; 3) A new computational method has been developed for the simulation of leaking fuel rods under transient conditions and the specific parameters for the Paks NPP has been determined; 4) The transient model has been applied to the simulation of shutdown process at the Paks NPP and for the prediction of the time and magnitude of 123 I activity peak; 5) Using Paks NPP data a conservative value has been determined for the upper limit of the 123 I release from failed fuel rods during transients

  20. HTGR safety research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsell, A.W.; Olsen, B.E.; Silady, F.A.

    1981-01-01

    An HTGR safety research program is being performed supporting and guided in priorities by the AIPA Probabilistic Risk Study. Analytical and experimental studies have been conducted in four general areas where modeling or data assumptions contribute to large uncertainties in the consequence assessments and thus, in the risk assessment for key core heat-up accident scenarios. Experimental data have been obtained on time-dependent release of fission products from the fuel particles, and plateout characteristics of condensible fission products in the primary circuit. Potential failure modes of primarily top head PCRV components as well as concrete degradation processes have been analyzed using a series of newly developed models and interlinked computer programs. Containment phenomena, including fission product deposition and potential flammability of liberated combustible gases have been studied analytically. Lastly, the behaviour of boron control material in the core and reactor subcriticality during core heatup have been examined analytically. Research in these areas has formed the basis for consequence updates in GA-A15000. Systematic derivation of future safety research priorities is also discussed. (author)

  1. HTGR market assessment: interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    The purpose of this Assessment is to establish the utility perspective on the market potential of the HTGR. The majority of issues and conclusions in this report are applicable to both the HTGR-Gas Turbine (GT) and the HTGR-Steam Cycle (SC). This phase of the HTGR Market Assessment used the HTGR-GT as the reference design as it is the present focus of the US HTGR Program. A brief system description of the HTGR-GT is included in Appendix A. This initial report provides the proposed structure for conducting the HTGR Market Assessment plus preliminary analyses to establish the magnitude and nature of key factors that affect the HTGR market. The HTGR market factors and their relationship to the present HTGR Program are discussed. This report discusses two of these factors in depth: economics and water availability. The water availability situation in the US and its impact on the potential HTGR market are described. The approach for applying the HTGR within a framework of utility systems analyses is presented

  2. Creep-Rupture Properties and Corrosion Behaviour of 21/4 Cr-1 Mo Steel and Hastelloy X-Alloys in Simulated HTGR Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystrup, Aage; Rittenhouse, P. L.; DiStefano, J. R.

    Hastelloy X and 2/sup 1///sub 4/ Cr-1 Mo steel are being considered as structural alloys for components of a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) system. Among other mechanical properties, the creep behavior of these materials in HTGR primary coolant helium must be established to form part...

  3. Evaluation of Codisposal Viability for TH/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain HTGR) DOE-Owned Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radulescu, H.

    2001-01-01

    There are more than 250 forms of US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Due to the variety of the spent nuclear fuel, the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program has designated nine representative fuel groups for disposal criticality analyses based on fuel matrix, primary fissile isotope, and enrichment. The Fort Saint Vrain reactor (FSVR) SNF has been designated as the representative fuel for the Th/U carbide fuel group. The FSVR SNF consists of small particles (spheres of the order of 0.5-mm diameter) of thorium carbide or thorium and high-enriched uranium carbide mixture, coated with multiple, thin layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide, which serve as miniature pressure vessels to contain fission products and the U/Th carbide matrix. The coated particles are bound in a carbonized matrix, which forms fuel rods or ''compacts'' that are loaded into large hexagonal graphite prisms. The graphite prisms (or blocks) are the physical forms that are handled in reactor loading and unloading operations, and which will be loaded into the DOE standardized SNF canisters. The results of the analyses performed will be used to develop waste acceptance criteria. The items that are important to criticality control are identified based on the analysis needs and result sensitivities. Prior to acceptance to fuel from the Th/U carbide fuel group for disposal, the important items for the fuel types that are being considered for disposal under the Th/U carbide fuel group must be demonstrated to satisfy the conditions determined in this report

  4. Evaluation of Codisposal Viability for TH/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain HTGR) DOE-Owned Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. radulescu

    2001-09-28

    There are more than 250 forms of US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Due to the variety of the spent nuclear fuel, the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program has designated nine representative fuel groups for disposal criticality analyses based on fuel matrix, primary fissile isotope, and enrichment. The Fort Saint Vrain reactor (FSVR) SNF has been designated as the representative fuel for the Th/U carbide fuel group. The FSVR SNF consists of small particles (spheres of the order of 0.5-mm diameter) of thorium carbide or thorium and high-enriched uranium carbide mixture, coated with multiple, thin layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide, which serve as miniature pressure vessels to contain fission products and the U/Th carbide matrix. The coated particles are bound in a carbonized matrix, which forms fuel rods or ''compacts'' that are loaded into large hexagonal graphite prisms. The graphite prisms (or blocks) are the physical forms that are handled in reactor loading and unloading operations, and which will be loaded into the DOE standardized SNF canisters. The results of the analyses performed will be used to develop waste acceptance criteria. The items that are important to criticality control are identified based on the analysis needs and result sensitivities. Prior to acceptance to fuel from the Th/U carbide fuel group for disposal, the important items for the fuel types that are being considered for disposal under the Th/U carbide fuel group must be demonstrated to satisfy the conditions determined in this report.

  5. User's manual for the Composite HTGR Analysis Program (CHAP-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, J.S.; Secker, P.A. Jr.; Vigil, J.C.; Wecksung, M.J.; Willcutt, G.J.E. Jr.

    1977-03-01

    CHAP-1 is the first release version of an HTGR overall plant simulation program with both steady-state and transient solution capabilities. It consists of a model-independent systems analysis program and a collection of linked modules, each representing one or more components of the HTGR plant. Detailed instructions on the operation of the code and detailed descriptions of the HTGR model are provided. Information is also provided to allow the user to easily incorporate additional component modules, to modify or replace existing modules, or to incorporate a completely new simulation model into the CHAP systems analysis framework

  6. National HTGR safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, D.E.; Kelley, A.P. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the National HTGR Program in the US with emphasis on the safety and licensing strategy being pursued. This strategy centers upon the development of an integrated approach to organizing and classifying the functions needed to produce safe and economical nuclear power production. At the highest level, four plant goals are defined - Normal Operation, Core and Plant Protection, Containment Integrity and Emergency Preparedness. The HTGR features which support the attainment of each goal are described and finally a brief summary is provided of the current status of the principal safety development program supporting the validation of the four plant goals

  7. HTGR Generic Technology Program. Semiannual report for the period ending September 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-11-01

    This document reports the technical accomplishments on the HTGR Generic Technology Program at General Atomic during the second half of FY-80. It covers a period when the design direction of the National HTGR Program is in the process of an overall review. The HTGR Generic Technology Program activities have continued so as to provide the basic technology required for all HTGR applications. The activities include the need to develop an LEU fuel and the need to qualify materials and components for the higher temperatures of the gas turbines and process heat plants

  8. FIPS: a process for the solidification of fission product solutions using a drum drier. [HTGR fuel reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halaszovich, St.; Laser, M.; Merz, E.; Thiele, D.

    1976-08-01

    A new process consisting of the steps concentration of the fission product solution, denitration of the solution by addition of formaldehyde, addition of glass-forming additives, drying of the slurry using a drum drier, melting of the dry product in the crucible by rising level in-pot-melting, and off-gas treatment and recovery of nitric acid is under development. A small plant with a capacity of 1 kg glass per hour has been tested in hot cells with fission product solutions from LWR fuel element reprocessing since December 1974. The equipment is very simple to operate and to control. No serious problems arose during operation.

  9. Development, design, and preliminary operation of a resin-feed processing facility for resin-based HTGR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.A.; Drago, J.P.; Million, D.L.; Spence, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    Fuel kernels for recycle of 233 U to High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors are prepared by loading carboxylic acid cation exchange resins with uranium and carbonizing at controlled conditions. Resin-feed processing was developed and a facility was designed, installed, and operated to control the kernel size, shape, and composition by processing the resin before adding uranium. The starting materials are commercial cation exchange resins in the sodium form. The size separations are made by vibratory screening of resin slurries in water. After drying in a fluidized bed, the nonspherical particles are separated from spherical particles on vibratory plates of special design. The sized, shape-separated spheres are then rewetted and converted to the hydrogen form. The processing capacity of the equipment tested is equivalent to about 1 kg of uranium per hour and could meet commercial recycle plant requirements without scale-up of the principal process components

  10. HTGR Fuels and Core Development Program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending August 31, 1977. [Graphite and fuel irradiation; fission product release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-09-01

    The work reported includes studies of reactions between core materials and coolant impurities, basic fission product transport mechanisms, core graphite development and testing, the development and testing of recyclable fuel systems, and physics and fuel management studies. Materials studies include irradiation capsule tests of both fuel and graphite. Experimental procedures and results are discussed and data are presented.

  11. High Fidelity BWR Fuel Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Su Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This report describes the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) work conducted for completion of the Thermal Hydraulics Methods (THM) Level 3 milestone THM.CFD.P13.03: High Fidelity BWR Fuel Simulation. High fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) was conducted to investigate the applicability and robustness performance of BWR closures. As a preliminary study, a CFD model with simplified Ferrule spacer grid geometry of NUPEC BWR Full-size Fine-mesh Bundle Test (BFBT) benchmark has been implemented. Performance of multiphase segregated solver with baseline boiling closures has been evaluated. Although the mean values of void fraction and exit quality of CFD result for BFBT case 4101-61 agreed with experimental data, the local void distribution was not predicted accurately. The mesh quality was one of the critical factors to obtain converged result. The stability and robustness of the simulation was mainly affected by the mesh quality, combination of BWR closure models. In addition, the CFD modeling of fully-detailed spacer grid geometry with mixing vane is necessary for improving the accuracy of CFD simulation.

  12. Study on commercial HTGR hydrogen production system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishihara, Tetsuo

    2000-07-01

    The Japanese energy demand in 2030 will increase up to 117% in comparison with one in 2000. We have to avoid a large consumption of fossil fuel that induces a large CO 2 emission from viewpoint of global warming. Furthermore new energy resources expected to resolve global warming have difficulty to be introduced more because of their low energy density. As a result, nuclear power still has a possibility of large introduction to meet the increasing energy demand. On the other hand, in Japan, 40% of fossil fuels in the primary energy are utilized for power generation, and the remaining are utilized as a heat source. New clean energy is required to reduce the consumption of fossil fuels and hydrogen is expected as a alternative energy resource. Prediction of potential hydrogen demand in Japan is carried out and it is clarified that the demand will potentially increase up to 4% of total primary energy in 2050. In present, steam reforming method is the most economical among hydrogen generation processes and the cost of hydrogen production is about 7 to 8 yen/m 3 in Europe and the United States and about 13 yen/m 3 in Japan. JAERI has proposed for using the HTGR whose maximum core outlet temperature is at 950degC as a heat source in the steam reforming to reduced the consumption of fossil fuels and resulting CO 2 emission. Based on the survey of the production rate and the required thermal energy in conventional industry, it is clarified that a hydrogen production system by the steam reforming is the best process for the commercial HTGR nuclear heat utilization. The HTGR steam reforming system and other candidate nuclear heat utilization systems are considered from viewpoint of system layout and economy. From the results, the hydrogen production cost in the HTGR stream reforming system is expected to be about 13.5 yen/m 3 if the cost of nuclear heat of the HTGR is the same as one of the LWR. (author)

  13. HTGR safety philosophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joksimovic, V.; Fisher, C. R. [General Atomic Co., San Diego, CA (USA)

    1981-01-15

    The accident at the Three Mile Island has focused public attention on reactor safety. Many public figures advocate a safer method of generating nuclear electricity for the second nuclear era in the U.S. The paper discusses the safety philosophy of a concept deemed suitable for this second nuclear era. The HTGR, in the course of its evolution, included safety as a significant determinant in design philosophy. This is particularly evident in the design features which provide inherent safety. Inherent features cause releases from a wide spectrum of accident conditions to be low. Engineered features supplement inherent features. The significance of HTGR safety features is quantified and order-of-magnitude type of comparisons are made with alternative ways of generating electricity.

  14. HTGR safety philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joksimovic, V.; Fisher, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    The accident at the Three Mile Island has focused public attention on reactor safety. Many public figures advocate a safer method of generating nuclear electricity for the second nuclear era in the U.S. The paper discusses the safety philosophy of a concept deemed suitable for this second nuclear era. The HTGR, in the course of its evolution, included safety as a significant determinant in design philosophy. This is particularly evident in the design features which provide inherent safety. Inherent features cause releases from a wide spectrum of accident conditions to be low. Engineered features supplement inherent features. The significance of HTGR safety features is quantified and order-of-magnitude type of comparisons are made with alternative ways of generating electricity. (author)

  15. HTGR safety philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joskimovic, V.; Fisher, C.R.

    1980-08-01

    The accident at the Three Mile Island has focused public attention on reactor safety. Many public figures advocate a safer method of generating nuclear electricity for the second nuclear era in the US. The paper discusses the safety philosophy of a concept deemed suitable for this second nuclear era. The HTGR, in the course of its evolution, included safety as a significant determinant in design philosophy. This is particularly evident in the design features which provide inherent safety. Inherent features cause releases from a wide spectrum of accident conditions to be low. Engineered features supplement inherent features. The significance of HTGR safety features is quantified and order-of-magnitude type of comparisons are made with alternative ways of generating electricity

  16. Specialists' meeting on gas-cooled reactor fuel development and spent fuel treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1985-07-01

    Topics covered during the 'Specialists' meeting on gas-cooled reactor fuel development and spent fuel treatment' were as follows: Selection of constructions and materials, fuel element development concepts; Fabrication of spherical coated fuel particles and fuel element on their base; investigation of fuel properties; Spent fuel treatment and storage; Head-end processing of HTGR fuel elements; investigation of HTGR fuel regeneration process; applicability of gas-fluorine technology of regeneration of spent HTGR fuel elements.

  17. Specialists' meeting on gas-cooled reactor fuel development and spent fuel treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Topics covered during the 'Specialists' meeting on gas-cooled reactor fuel development and spent fuel treatment' were as follows: Selection of constructions and materials, fuel element development concepts; Fabrication of spherical coated fuel particles and fuel element on their base; investigation of fuel properties; Spent fuel treatment and storage; Head-end processing of HTGR fuel elements; investigation of HTGR fuel regeneration process; applicability of gas-fluorine technology of regeneration of spent HTGR fuel elements

  18. Small demonstration HTGR concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiryushin, A.I.

    1989-01-01

    Currently the USSR is investigating two high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The first plant is the VGM, a modular type HTGR with power rating of 180-250 MWth. The second plant is the VG-400 with 1000 MWth and a prestressed concrete reactor vessel. The paper contains the description of the VGM design and its main components. (author). 1 fig., 1 tab

  19. Simulated nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berta, V.T.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for electrically simulating a nuclear reactor fuel assembly. It includes a heater assembly having a top end and a bottom end and a plurality of concentric heater tubes having electrical circuitry connected to a power source, and radially spaced from each other. An outer target tube and an inner target tube is concentric with the heater tubes and with each other, and the outer target tube surrounds and is radially spaced from the heater tubes. The inner target tube is surrounded by and radially spaced from the heater tubes and outer target tube. The top of the assembly is generally open to allow for the electrical power connection to the heater tubes, and the bottom of the assembly includes means for completing the electrical circuitry in the heater tubes to provide electrical resistance heating to simulate the power profile in a nuclear reactor. The embedded conductor elements in each heater tube is split into two halves for a substantial portion of its length and provided with electrical isolation such that each half of the conductor is joined at one end and is not joined at the other end

  20. Effects of product form and boron addition on the creep damage in the modified Hastelloy X alloys in a simulated HTGR helium gas environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakasone, Yuji; Tanabe, Tatsuhiko; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Nakajima, Hajime.

    1992-01-01

    The present paper investigates early-stage-creep damage of Hastelloy XR and XR-II alloys, modified versions of Hastelloy X alloy, which have been developed in Japan as most promising candidate structural alloys for Japanese high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). Creep tests were made on Hastelloy XR forging, tube and XR-II tube at 1,123 to 1,273 K in a simulated HTGR helium gas environment. The tests were interrupted at different strain levels of up to 5 % in order to evaluate creep damage via intergranular voids. The void sizes along grain boundaries and the A-parameter, the ratio of the number of damaged grain boundaries, on which one or more voids are found, to that of the total grain boundaries observed are used in order to evaluate creep damage. Statistical analysis of the A-parameter as well as the void sizes reveals that the values of the parameter show wide variations and follow the Weibull distribution, reflecting spatial randomness of the voids. The void sizes along grain boundaries, on the other hand, follow the log-normal distribution. The maximum void size d max and the mean value of the A-parameter A m are calculated and plotted against interruption creep strain ε int . The resultant d max vs. ε int and A m vs. ε int diagrams show that Hastelloy XR forging had suffered more damage than Hastelloy XR tube; nevertheless, the forging has longer interruption life, or the time to reach a given interruption creep strain. The result indicates that grains may have been deformed more easily in Hastelloy XR in the form of tube than in the form of forging. The diagrams also imply that the addition of boron has suppressed the nucleation as well as the growth of voids and thus has brought about longer interruption life of Hastelloy XR-II. (author)

  1. A study on the thermal expansion characteristics of simulated spent fuel and simulated DUPIC fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kweon Ho; Ryu, H. J.; Kim, H. S.; Song, K. C.; Yang, M. S.

    2001-10-01

    Thermal expansions of simulated spent PWR fuel and simulated DUPIC fuel were studied using a dilatometer in the temperature range from 298 to 1900 K. The densities of simulated spent PWR fuel and simulated DUPIC fuel used in the measurement were 10.28 g/cm3 (95.35 % of TD) and 10.26 g/cm3 (95.14 % of TD), respectively. Their linear thermal expansions of simulated fuels are higher than that of UO2, and the difference between these fuels and UO2 increases progressively as temperature increases. However, the difference between simulated spent PWR fuel and simulated DUPIC fuel can hardly be observed. For the temperature range from 298 to 1900 K, the values of the average linear thermal expansion coefficients for simulated spent PWR fuel and simulated DUPIC fuel are 1.391 10-5 and 1.393 10-5 K-1, respectively. As temperature increases to 1900 K, the relative densities of simulated spent PWR fuel and simulated DUPIC fuel decrease to 93.81 and 93.76 % of initial densities at 298 K, respectively

  2. HTGR depressurization analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boccio, J.L.; Colman, J.; Skalyo, J.; Beerman, J.

    1979-01-01

    Relaxation of the prima facie assumption of complete mixing of primary and secondary containment gases during HTGR depressurization has led to a study program designed to identify and selectively quantify the relevant gas dynamic processes which prevail during the depressurization event. Uncertainty in the degree of gas mixedness naturally leads to uncertainty in containment vessel design pressure and heat loads and possible combustion hazards therein. This paper succinctly details an analytical approach and modeling methodology of the exhaust jet structure/containment vessel interaction during penetration failures. (author)

  3. International symposium on fuel rod simulators: development and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCulloch, R.W. (comp.)

    1981-05-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning fuel rod simulator operation and performance; simulator design and evaluation; clad heated fuel rod simulators and fuel rod simulators for cladding investigations; fuel rod simulator components and inspection; and simulator analytical modeling. Ten papers have previously been input to the Energy Data Base.

  4. Steam generator design considerations for modular HTGR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; DeFur, D.D.

    1986-01-01

    Studies are in progress to develop a standard High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant design that is amenable to serial production and is licensable. Based on the results of trade studies performed in the DOE-funded HTGR program, activities are being focused to emphasize a modular concept based on a 350 MW(t) annular reactor core with prismatic fuel elements. Utilization of a multiplicity of the standard module affords flexibility in power rating for utility electricity generation. The selected modular HTGR concept has the reactor core and heat transport systems housed in separate steel vessels. This paper highlights the steam generator design considerations for the reference plant, and includes a discussion of the major features of the heat exchanger concept and the technology base existing in the U.S

  5. Management feature of transuranic for HTGR and LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Jinfeng; Li Fu; Sun Yuliang

    2013-01-01

    Long-lived actinides from spent fuels can cause potential long-term environ- mental hazards. The generation and incineration of transuranic in different closed fuel cycles were studied. U and Pu were recycled from spent fuel in the 250 MW high-temperature gas-cooled reactor-pebble-bed-module (HTR-PM) U-Pu fuelled core, and then PuO 2 and MOX fuel elements were designed based on this recycled U and Pu. These fuel elements were used to build up a new PuO 2 or MOX fuelled core with the same geometry of the original reactor. Characteristics of transuranic incineration with HTGR open and closed fuel cycles were studied with VSOP code, and the corresponding results from the light water reactor were compared and analyzed. The transuranic generation with HTGR open fuel cycle is almost half of the corresponding result of the light water reactor. Thus, HTGR closed fuel cycles can effectively burn transuranic. (authors)

  6. HTGR Economic / Business Analysis and Trade Studies Market Analysis for HTGR Technologies and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, Matt [Ultra Safe Nuclear Corporation, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hamilton, Chris [Ultra Safe Nuclear Corporation, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2013-11-01

    This report provides supplemental information to the assessment of target markets provided in Appendix A of the 2012 Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Industry Alliance (NIA) business plan [NIA 2012] for deployment of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) in the 2025 – 2050 time frame. This report largely reiterates the [NIA 2012] assessment for potential deployment of 400 to 800 HTGR modules (100 to 200 HTGR plants with 4 reactor modules) in the 600-MWt class in North America by 2050 for electricity generation, co-generation of steam and electricity, oil sands operations, hydrogen production, and synthetic fuels production (e.g., coal to liquids). As the result of increased natural gas supply from hydraulic fracturing, the current and historically low prices of natural gas remain a significant barrier to deployment of HTGRs and other nuclear reactor concepts in the U.S. However, based on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Agency (EIA) data, U.S. natural gas prices are expected to increase by the 2030 – 2040 timeframe when a significant number of HTGR modules could be deployed. An evaluation of more recent EIA 2013 data confirms the assumptions in [NIA 2012] of future natural gas prices in the range of approximately $7/MMBtu to $10/MMBtu during the 2030 – 2040 timeframe. Natural gas prices in this range will make HTGR energy prices competitive with natural gas, even in the absence of carbon-emissions penalties. Exhibit ES-1 presents the North American projections in each market segment including a characterization of the market penetration logic. Adjustments made to the 2012 data (and reflected in Exhibit ES-1) include normalization to the slightly larger 625MWt reactor module, segregation between steam cycle and more advanced (higher outlet temperature) modules, and characterization of U.S. synthetic fuel process applications as a separate market segment.

  7. Status of international HTGR development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homan, F.J.; Simon, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    Programs for the development of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology over the past 30 years in eight countries are briefly described. These programs have included both government sector and industrial sector participation. The programs have produced four electricity-producing prototype/demonstration reactors, two in the United States, and two in the Federal Republic of Germany. Key design parameters for these ractors are compared with the design parameters planned for follow-on commercial-scale HTGRs. The development of HTGR technology has been enhanced by numerous cooperative agreements over the years, involving both government-sponsored national laboratories and industrial participants. Current bilateral cooperative agreements are described. A relatively new component in the HTGR international cooperation is that of multinational industrial alliances focused on supplying commercial-scale HTGR power plants. Current industrial cooperative agreements are briefly discussed

  8. HTGR Cost Model Users' Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandrik, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The High Temperature Gas-Cooler Reactor (HTGR) Cost Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Cost Model calculates an estimate of the capital costs, annual operating and maintenance costs, and decommissioning costs for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The user can generate these costs for multiple reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for a single or four-pack configuration; and for a reactor size of 350 or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Cost Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Cost Model. This model was design for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel. Modification of the HTGR Cost Model should only be performed by users familiar with Excel and Visual Basic.

  9. Effects of the HTGR-gas turbine on national reactor strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligon, D.M.; Brogli, R.H.

    1979-11-01

    A specific role for the HTGR in a national energy strategy is examined. The issue is addressed in two ways. First, the role of the HTGR-GT Binary cycle plant is examined in a national energy strategy based on symbiosis between fast breeder and advanced converter reactors utilizing the thorium U233 fuel cycle. Second, the advantages of the HTGR-GT dry-cooled plant operating in arid regions is examined and compared with a dry-cooled LWR. An event tree analysis of potential benefits is applied

  10. PUREX irradiated fuel recovery simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaquish, W.R.

    1994-09-01

    This paper discusses the application of IGRIP (Interactive Graphical Robot Instruction Program) to assist environmental remediation efforts at the Department of Energy PUREX Plant at the Hanford Site. An IGRIP simulation was developed to plan, review, and verify proposed remediation activities. This simulation was designed to satisfy a number of unique purposes that each placed specific constraints and requirements on the design and implementation of the simulation. These purposes and their influence on the design of the simulation are presented. A discussion of several control code architectures for mechanical system simulations, including their advantages and limitations, is also presented

  11. HTGR safety research concerns at NRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minogue, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    A general discussion of HTGR technical and safety-related problems is given. The broad areas of current research programs specific to the Fort St. Vrain reactor and applicable to HTGR technology are summarized

  12. Safety and licensing analyses for the Fort St. Vrain HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, S.J.; Conklin, J.C.; Harrington, R.M.; Cleveland, J.C.; Clapp, N.E. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) safety analysis program for the HTGR includes development and verification of system response simulation codes, and applications of these codes to specific Fort St. Vrain reactor licensing problems. Licensing studies addressed the oscillation problems and the concerns about large thermal stresses in the core support blocks during a postulated accident

  13. Dynamic Simulations of Advanced Fuel Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, Steven J.; Dixon, Brent W.; Jacobson, Jacob J.; Matthern, Gretchen E.; Shropshire, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Years of performing dynamic simulations of advanced nuclear fuel cycle options provide insights into how they could work and how one might transition from the current once-through fuel cycle. This paper summarizes those insights from the context of the 2005 objectives and goals of the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Our intent is not to compare options, assess options versus those objectives and goals, nor recommend changes to those objectives and goals. Rather, we organize what we have learned from dynamic simulations in the context of the AFCI objectives for waste management, proliferation resistance, uranium utilization, and economics. Thus, we do not merely describe 'lessons learned' from dynamic simulations but attempt to answer the 'so what' question by using this context. The analyses have been performed using the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Dynamics (VISION). We observe that the 2005 objectives and goals do not address many of the inherently dynamic discriminators among advanced fuel cycle options and transitions thereof.

  14. USNRC HTGR safety research program overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulds, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    An overview is given of current activities and planned research efforts of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) HTGR Safety Program. On-going research at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest Laboratory are outlined. Tables include: HTGR Safety Issues, Program Tasks, HTGR Computer Code Library, and Milestones for Long Range Research Plan

  15. HTGR analytical methods and design verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neylan, A.J.; Northup, T.E.

    1982-05-01

    Analytical methods for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) include development, update, verification, documentation, and maintenance of all computer codes for HTGR design and analysis. This paper presents selected nuclear, structural mechanics, seismic, and systems analytical methods related to the HTGR core. This paper also reviews design verification tests in the reactor core, reactor internals, steam generator, and thermal barrier

  16. Prospects of HTGR process heat application and role of HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiozawa, S.; Miyamoto, Y.

    2000-01-01

    At Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, an effort on development of process heat application with high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) has been continued for providing a future clean alternative to the burning of fossil energy for the production of industrial process heat. The project is named 'HTTR Heat Utilization Project', which includes a demonstration of hydrogen production using the first Japanese HTGR of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). In the meantime, some countries, such as China, Indonesia, Russia and South Africa are trying to explore the HTGR process heat application for industrial use. One of the key issues for this application is economy. It has been recognized for a long time and still now that the HTGR heat application system is not economically competitive to the current fossil ones, because of the high cost of the HTGR itself. However, the recent movement on the HTGR development, as represented by South Africa Pebble Beds Modular Reactor (SA-PBMR) Project, has revealed that the HTGRs are well economically competitive in electricity production to fossil fuel energy supply under a certain condition. This suggests that the HTGR process heat application will also possibly get economical in the near future. In the present paper, following a brief introduction describing the necessity of the HTGRs for the future process heat application, Japanese activities and prospect of the development on the process heat application with the HTGRs are described in relation with the HTTR Project. In conclusion, the process heat application system with HTGRs is thought technically and economically to be one of the most promising applications to solve the global environmental issues and energy shortage which may happen in the future. However, the commercialization for the hydrogen production system from water, which is the final goal of the HTGR process heat application, must await the technology development to be completed in 2030's at the

  17. Nuclear fuel cycle simulation system (VISTA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-02-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Cycle Simulation System (VISTA) is a simulation system which estimates long term nuclear fuel cycle material and service requirements as well as the material arising from the operation of nuclear fuel cycle facilities and nuclear power reactors. The VISTA model needs isotopic composition of spent nuclear fuel in order to make estimations of the material arisings from the nuclear reactor operation. For this purpose, in accordance with the requirements of the VISTA code, a new module called Calculating Actinide Inventory (CAIN) was developed. CAIN is a simple fuel depletion model which requires a small number of input parameters and gives results in a very short time. VISTA has been used internally by the IAEA for the estimation of: spent fuel discharge from the reactors worldwide, Pu accumulation in the discharged spent fuel, minor actinides (MA) accumulation in the spent fuel, and in the high level waste (HLW) since its development. The IAEA decided to disseminate the VISTA tool to Member States using internet capabilities in 2003. The improvement and expansion of the simulation code and the development of the internet version was started in 2004. A website was developed to introduce the simulation system to the visitors providing a simple nuclear material flow calculation tool. This website has been made available to Member States in 2005. The development work for the full internet version is expected to be fully available to the interested parties from IAEA Member States in 2007 on its website. This publication is the accompanying text which gives details of the modelling and an example scenario

  18. High-temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Sajad

    2011-05-01

    General Atomics (GA) has over 35 years experience in prismatic block High-temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) technology design. During this period, the design has recently involved into a modular have been performed to demonstrate its versatility. This versatility is directly related to refractory TRISO coated - particle fuel that can contain any type of fuel. This paper summarized GA's fuel cycle studies individually and compares each based upon its cycle sustainability, proliferation-resistance capabilities, and other performance data against pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel cycle data. Fuel cycle studies LEU-NV;commercial HEU-Th;commercial LEU-Th;weapons-grade plutonium consumption; and burning of LWR waste including plutonium and minor actinides in the MHR. results show that all commercial MHR options, with the exception of HEU-TH, are more sustainable than a PWR fuel cycle. With LEU-NV being the most sustainable commercial options. In addition, all commercial MHR options out perform the PWR with regards to its proliferation-resistance, with thorium fuel cycle having the best proliferation-resistance characteristics.

  19. Personnel radiation exposure in HTGR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, S.; Engholm, B.A.

    1981-01-01

    Occupational radiation exposures in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plants were assessed. The expected rate of dose accumulations for a large HTGR steam cycle unit is 0.07 man-rem/MW(e)y, while the design basis is 0.17 man-rem/MW(e)y. The comparable figure for actual light water reactor experience is 1.3 man-rem/MW(e)y. The favorable HTGR occupational exposure is supported by results from the Peach Bottom Unit No. 1 HTGR and Fort St. Vrain HTGR plants and by operating experience at British gas-cooled reactor stations

  20. Effects of graphite surface roughness on bypass flow computations for an HTGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tung, Yu-Hsin, E-mail: touushin@gmail.com [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, M.S. 3855, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Johnson, Richard W., E-mail: Rich.Johnson@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, M.S. 3855, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sato, Hiroyuki, E-mail: sato.hiroyuki09@jaea.go.jp [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, M.S. 3855, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFD calculations are made of bypass flow between graphite blocks in HTGR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Several turbulence models are employed to compare to friction and heat transfer correlations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Parameters varied include bypass gap width and surface roughness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface roughness causes increases in max fuel and coolant temperatures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface roughness does not cause increase in outlet coolant temperature variation. - Abstract: Bypass flow in a prismatic high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) occurs between graphite blocks as they sit side by side in the core. Bypass flow is not intentionally designed to occur in the reactor, but is present because of tolerances in manufacture, imperfect installation and expansion and shrinkage of the blocks from heating and irradiation. It is desired to increase the knowledge of the effects of such flow; it has been suggested that it may be as much as 20% of the total helium coolant flow [INL Report 2007, INL/EXT-07-13289]. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations can provide estimates of the scale and impacts of bypass flow. Previous CFD calculations have examined the effects of bypass gap width, level and distribution of heat generation and effects of shrinkage. The present contribution examines the effects of graphite surface roughness on the bypass flow for different relative roughness factors for three gap widths. Such calculations should be validated using specific bypass flow measurements. While such experiments are currently underway for the specific reference prismatic HTGR design for the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) program of the U.S. Dept. of Energy, the data are not yet available. To enhance confidence in the present calculations, wall shear stress and heat transfer results for several turbulence models and their associated wall treatments are first compared for steady flow in a

  1. CONTEMPT-G computer program and its application to HTGR containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macnab, D.I.

    1976-03-01

    The CONTEMPT-G computer program has been developed by General Atomic Company to simulate the temperature-pressure response of a containment atmosphere to postulated depressurization of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) primary or secondary coolant circuits. The mathematical models currently used in the code are described, and applications of the code in examples of the atmospheric response of a representative containment to a variety of postulated HTGR accident conditions are presented. In particular, maximum containment temperature and pressure, equilibrated long-term prestressed concrete reactor vessel and containment pressures, and peak containment conditions following steam pipe ruptures are examined for a representative 770-MW(e) HTGR

  2. Dynamics and control modeling of the closed-cycle gas turbine (GT-HTGR) power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardia, A.

    1980-02-01

    The simulation if presented for the 800-MW(e) two-loop GT-HTGR plant design with the REALY2 transient analysis computer code, and the modeling of control strategies called for by the inherently unique operational requirements of a multiple loop GT-HTGR is described. Plant control of the GT-HTGR is constrained by the nature of its power conversion loops (PCLs) in which the core cooling flow and the turbine flow are directly related and thus changes in flow affect core cooling as well as turbine power. Additionally, the high thermal inertia of the reactor core precludes rapid changes in the temperature of the turbine inlet flow

  3. Summary of foreign HTGR programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    This report contains pertinent information on the status, objectives, budgets, major projects and facilities, as well as user, industrial and governmental organizations involved in major foreign gas-cooled thermal reactor programs. This is the second issue of this document (the first was issued in March 1979). The format has been revised to consolidate material according to country. These sections are followed by the foreign HTGR program index which serves as a quick reference to some of the many acronyms associated with the foreign HTGR programs

  4. Information exchange on HTGR and nuclear hydrogen technology between JAEA and INET in 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Nozomu; Tachibana, Yukio; Sun Yuliang

    2009-07-01

    The worldwide interests in the HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) have been growing because the high temperature heat produced by the reactor can be utilized not only for efficient power generation but also for broad process heat applications, especially for thermo-chemical hydrogen production to fuel a prospective hydrogen economy in future. Presently only two HTGR reactors are operational in the world, including the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and the HTR-10 in the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University in China. JAEA and INET have cooperated since 1986 in the field of HTGR development, particularly on the HTTR and HTR-10 projects. This report describes the cooperation activities on HTGR and nuclear hydrogen technology between JAEA and INET in 2008. (author)

  5. Information exchange on HTGR and nuclear hydrogen technology between JAEA and INET in 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Nozomu; Wang Hong

    2010-07-01

    The worldwide interests in the HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) have been growing because the high temperature heat produced by the reactor can be utilized not only for efficient power generation but also for broad process heat applications, especially for thermo-chemical hydrogen production to fuel a prospective hydrogen economy in future. Presently only two HTGR reactors are operational in the world, including the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and the HTR-10 in the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University in China. JAEA and INET have cooperated since 1986 in the field of HTGR development, particularly on the HTTR and HTR-10 projects. This report describes the cooperation activities on HTGR and nuclear hydrogen technology between JAEA and INET in 2009. (author)

  6. Information exchange mainly on HTGR operation and maintenance technique between JAEA and INET in 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Yukio; Hino, Ryutaro; Yu Suyuan

    2006-06-01

    The worldwide interests in the HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) have been growing because the high temperature heat produced by the reactor can be utilized not only for efficient power generation but also for broad process heat applications, especially for thermo-chemical hydrogen production to fuel a prospective hydrogen economy in future. Presently only two HTGR reactors are operational in the world, including the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and the HTR-10 in the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University in China. JAEA and INET have cooperated since 1986 in the field of HTGR development, particularly on the HTTR and HTR-10 projects. This report describes the cooperation with emphasis on HTGR operation and maintenance techniques between JAEA and INET and outlines cooperation activities during the fiscal year 2005. (author)

  7. Is there a chance for commercializing the HTGR in Indonesia?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbie, B.; Akhmad, Y.R.

    1997-01-01

    Indonesia is one of the developing countries in Asia-Pacific regions that actively improving or at least continuously maintain its economic growth. For this purpose, to fulfill a domestic energy demand is a vital role to achieve the goals of Indonesian development. Pertamina, the state-owned oil company, has recently called for a significant increase in domestic gas consumption in a bid to delay Indonesia becoming a net oil importer. Therefore, there is good chance for gas industry to increase their roles in generating electricity and producing automotive fuels. The latter is an interesting field of study to be correlated with the utilization of HTGR technology where the heat source could be used in the reforming process to convert natural gas into syngas as feed material in producing automotive fuels. Since the end of 1995 National Atomic Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN) has made an effort to increase its role in the national energy program and Batan is also able to revolve in the Giant Natuna Project or the other natural gas field projects to promote syngas production applying HTGR technology. A series of meeting with Pertamina and BPPT (the Agency for the Assessment and Application of Technology) had been performed to promote utilization of HTGR technology in the Natuna Project. In this paper governmental policy for natural gas production that may closely relate to syngas production and preliminary study for production of syngas at the Natuna Project will be discussed. It is concluded that to gain the possibility of the HTGR acceptance in the project a scenario for production and distribution should be arranged in other to achieve the break even point for automotive fuel price at about 10 US$/GJ (fuel price in 1996) in Indonesia. (author)

  8. Analysis and simulation of straw fuel logistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Daniel [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Agricultural Engineering

    1998-12-31

    Straw is a renewable biomass that has a considerable potential to be used as fuel in rural districts. This bulky fuel is, however, produced over large areas and must be collected during a limited amount of days and taken to the storages before being ultimately transported to heating plants. Thus, a well thought-out and cost-effective harvesting and handling system is necessary to provide a satisfactory fuel at competitive costs. Moreover, high-quality non-renewable fuels are used in these operations. To be sustainable, the energy content of these fuels should not exceed the energy extracted from the straw. The objective of this study is to analyze straw as fuel in district heating plants with respect to environmental and energy aspects, and to improve the performance and reduce the costs of straw handling. Energy, exergy and emergy analyses were used to assess straw as fuel from an energy point of view. The energy analysis showed that the energy balance is 12:1 when direct and indirect energy requirements are considered. The exergy analysis demonstrated that the conversion step is ineffective, whereas the emergy analysis indicated that large amounts of energy have been used in the past to form the straw fuel (the net emergy yield ratio is 1.1). A dynamic simulation model, called SHAM (Straw HAndling Model), has also been developed to investigate handling of straw from the fields to the plant. The primary aim is to analyze the performance of various machinery chains and management strategies in order to reduce the handling costs and energy needs. The model, which is based on discrete event simulation, takes both weather and geographical conditions into account. The model has been applied to three regions in Sweden (Svaloev, Vara and Enkoeping) in order to investigate the prerequisites for straw harvest at these locations. The simulations showed that straw has the best chances to become a competitive fuel in south Sweden. It was also demonstrated that costs can be

  9. HTGR [High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor] ingress analysis using MINET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Tuyle, G.J.; Yang, J.W.; Kroeger, P.G.; Mallen, A.N.; Aronson, A.L.

    1989-04-01

    Modeling of water/steam ingress into the primary (helium) cooling circuit of a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is described. This modeling was implemented in the MINET Code, which is a program for analyzing transients in intricate fluid flow and heat transfer networks. Results from the simulation of a water ingress event postulated for the Modular HTGR are discussed. 27 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs

  10. Development of the fabrication technology of the simulated DUPIC fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kweon Ho; Yang, M. S.; Bae, K. K. and others

    2000-06-01

    It is important to get basic data to analysis physical properties, behavior in reactor and performance of the DUPIC fuel because physical properties of the DUPIC fuel is different from the commercial UO 2 fuel. But what directly measures physical properties et al. of DUPIC fuel being resinterred simulated spent fuel through OREOX process is very difficult in laboratory owing to its high level radiation. Then fabrication of simulated DUPIC fuel is needed to measure its properties. In this study, processes on powder treatment, OREOX, compaction and sintering to fabricate simulated DUPIC fuel using simulated spent fuel are discribed. To fabricate simulated DUPIC fuel, the powder from 3 times OREOX and 5 times attrition milling simulated spent fuel is compacted with 1.3 ton/cm 2 . Pellets are sintered in 100% H 2 atmosphere over 10 h at 1800 deg C. Sintered densities of pellets are 10.2-10.5 g/cm 3

  11. HTGR accident and risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silady, F.A.; Everline, C.J.; Houghton, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper is a synopsis of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) performed by General Atomic Company. Principal topics presented include: HTGR safety assessments, peer interfaces, safety research, process gas explosions, quantitative safety goals, licensing applications of PRA, enhanced safety, investment risk assessments, and PRA design integration

  12. Developmental assessment of the Fort St. Vrain version of the composite HTGR analysis program (CHAP-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroh, K.R.

    1981-01-01

    The Composite HTGR Analysis Program (CHAP) consists of a model-independent systems analysis mainframe named LASAN and model-dependent linked code modules, each representing a component, subsystem, or phenomenon of an HTGR plant. The Fort St. Vrain version (CHAP-2) includes 21 coded modules that model the neutron kinetics and thermal response of the core; the thermal-hydraulics of the reactor primary coolant system, secondary steam supply system, and balance-of-plant; the actions of the control system and plant protection system; the response of the reactor building; and the relative hazard resulting from fuel particle failure. FSV steady-state and transient plant data are being used to partially verify the component modeling and dynamic simulation techniques used to predict plant response to postulated accident sequences. Results of these preliminary validation efforts are presented showing good agreement between code output and plant data for the portions of the code that have been tested. Plans for further development and assessment as well as application of the validated code are discussed. (author)

  13. Analysis of fission product release from HTGR core during transient temperature excursion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Takao; Yamatoya, Naotoshi; Onuma, Mamoru

    1978-01-01

    The computer program ''FRANC'' was developed to calculate the release activity of fission products from a high-temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) core during transient temperature excursions such as a hypothetical loss of forced circulation combined with design basis depressurization. The program utilizes a segmented cylindrical core spatial model with the associated values of the prior fuel irradiation history and temperature conditions. The fission product transport and decay chain behavior is expressed by a set of differential equations. This set of equations describes the entire core inventory of fission products by means of calculated parameters based on the detailed spatial core conditions. The program determines the time-dependent amounts of fission product nuclides escaping from the core into the coolant. Coded in Continuous System Simulation Language (CSSL) with double precision, FRANC showed appropriate results for both short- and long-lived fission product nuclides. The sample calculation conducted by applying the program to a large HTGR indicated that it would take about one hour for noble gases and volatile nuclides to be released to the coolant, and several hours for metalic nuclides. (auth.)

  14. Present status of research on hydrogen energy and perspective of HTGR hydrogen production system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Ogawa, Masuro; Akino, Norio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment] [and others

    2001-03-01

    A study was performed to make a clear positioning of research and development on hydrogen production systems with a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) under currently promoting at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute through a grasp of the present status of hydrogen energy, focussing on its production and utilization as an energy in future. The study made clear that introduction of safe distance concept for hydrogen fire and explosion was practicable for a HTGR hydrogen production system, including hydrogen properties and need to provide regulations applying to handle hydrogen. And also generalization of hydrogen production processes showed technical issues of the HTGR system. Hydrogen with HTGR was competitive to one with fossil fired system due to evaluation of production cost. Hydrogen is expected to be used as promising fuel of fuel cell cars in future. In addition, the study indicated that there were a large amount of energy demand alternative to high efficiency power generation and fossil fuel with nuclear energy through the structure of energy demand and supply in Japan. Assuming that hydrogen with HTGR meets all demand of fuel cell cars, an estimation would show introduction of the maximum number of about 30 HTGRs with capacity of 100 MWt from 2020 to 2030. (author)

  15. HTGR strategy for reduced proliferation potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, H.B.; Dahlberg, R.C.

    1978-01-01

    The HTGR stratregy for reduced proliferation potential is one aspect of a potential broader nuclear strategy aimed primarily toward a transition nuclear period between today's uranium-consumption reactors and the long-range balanced system of breeder and advanced near-breeder reactors. In particular, the normal commerce of U-233 could be made acceptable by: (a) dependence on the gamma radiation from U-232 daughter products, (b) enhancement of that radioactivity by incomplete fission-product decontamination of the bred-fuel, or (c) denaturing of the U-233 with U-238. These approaches would, of course, supplement institutional initiatives to improve proliferation resistance such as the collocation of facilities and the establishment of secure energy centers. 6 refs

  16. HTGR-GT systems optimization studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kammerzell, L.L.; Read, J.W.

    1980-06-01

    The compatibility of the inherent features of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) and the closed-cycle gas turbine combined into a power conversion system results in a plant with characteristics consistent with projected utility needs and national energy goals. These characteristics are: (1) plant siting flexibility; (2) high resource utilization; (3) low safety risks; (4) proliferation resistance; and (5) low occupational exposure for operating and maintenance personnel. System design and evaluation studies on dry-cooled intercooled and nonintercooled commercial plants in the 800-MW(e) to 1200-MW(e) size range are described, with emphasis on the sensitivity of plant design objectives to variation of component and plant design parameters. The impact of these parameters on fuel cycle, fission product release, total plant economics, sensitivity to escalation rates, and plant capacity factors is examined

  17. The commercial application prospect of HTGR plant in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yingsu

    2008-01-01

    With an introduction of the features and current situation of the HTGR power generation as well as the development of HTGR demonstration project in China, the article analyzes the necessity of developing HTGR power plants. The article proposes to exercise the advantages of HTGR to full extent so as to further develop HTGR power plants. It is believed that HTGR is of great commercial promotion value under appropriate circumstances. (authors)

  18. Nuclear heat source design for an advanced HTGR process heat plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; O'Hanlon, T.W.

    1983-01-01

    A high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) coupled with a chemical process facility could produce synthetic fuels (i.e., oil, gasoline, aviation fuel, methanol, hydrogen, etc.) in the long term using low-grade carbon sources (e.g., coal, oil shale, etc.). The ultimate high-temperature capability of an advanced HTGR variant is being studied for nuclear process heat. This paper discusses a process heat plant with a 2240-MW(t) nuclear heat source, a reactor outlet temperature of 950 0 C, and a direct reforming process. The nuclear heat source outputs principally hydrogen-rich synthesis gas that can be used as a feedstock for synthetic fuel production. This paper emphasizes the design of the nuclear heat source and discusses the major components and a deployment strategy to realize an advanced HTGR process heat plant concept

  19. Uranium and thorium loadings determined by chemical and nondestructive methods in HTGR fuel rods for the Fort St. Vrain Early Validation Irradiation Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, P.; Rushton, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    The Fort St. Vrain Early Validation Irradiation Experiment is an irradiation test of reference and of improved High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor fuels in the Fort St. Vrain Reactor. The irradiation test includes fuel rods fabricated at ORNL on an engineering scale fuel rod molding machine. Fuel rods were nondestructively assayed for 235 U content by a technique based on the detection of prompt-fission neutrons induced by thermal-neutron interrogation and were later chemically assayed by using the modified Davies Gray potentiometric titration method. The chemical analysis of the thorium content was determined by a volumetric titration method. The chemical assay method for uranium was evaluated and the results from the as-molded fuel rods agree with those from: (1) large samples of Triso-coated fissile particles, (2) physical mixtures of the three particle types, and (3) standard solutions to within 0.05%. Standard fuel rods were fabricated in order to evaluate and calibrate the nondestructive assay device. The agreement of the results from calibration methods was within 0.6%. The precision of the nondestructive assay device was established as approximately 0.6% by repeated measurements of standard rods. The precision was comparable to that estimated by Poisson statistics. A relative difference of 0.77 to 1.5% was found between the nondestructive and chemical determinations on the reactor grade fuel rods

  20. Industrial thermoforming simulation of automotive fuel tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesche, Stefan aus der

    2004-01-01

    An industrial thermoforming simulation with regard to automotive plastic fuel tanks is presented including all relevant process stages. The radiative and conductive heat transfer during the reheat stage, the deformation and stress behaviour during the forming stage, and the final cooling stage are simulated. The modelling of the thermal and rheological behaviour of the involved material is investigated in greater detail. By means of experimental data it is found that modelling of the phase transition during the process is highly important for predicting correct wall thickness distributions

  1. HTGR type reactors for the heat market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oesterwind, D.

    1981-01-01

    Information about the standard of development of the HTGR type reactor are followed by an assessment of its utilization on the heat market. The utilization of HTGR type reactors is considered suitable for the production of synthesis gas, district heat, and industrial process heat. A comparison with a pit coal power station shows the economy of the HTGR. Finally, some aspects of introducing new technologies into the market, i.e. small plants in particular are investigated. (UA) [de

  2. Graphite oxidation in HTGR atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growcock, F.B.; Barry, J.J.; Finfrock, C.C.; Rivera, E.; Heiser, J.H. III

    1982-01-01

    On-going and recently completed studies of the effect of thermal oxidation on the structural integrity of HTGR candidate graphites are described, and some results are presented and discussed. This work includes the study of graphite properties which may play decisive roles in the graphites' resistance to oxidation and fracture: pore size distribution, specific surface area and impurity distribution. Studies of strength loss mechanisms in addition to normal oxidation are described. Emphasis is placed on investigations of the gas permeability of HTGR graphites and the surface burnoff phenomenon observed during recent density profile measurements. The recently completed studies of catalytic pitting and the effects of prestress and stress on reactivity and ultimate strength are also discussed

  3. Creep-rupture behavior of 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel, Alloy 800H and Hastelloy Alloy X in a simulated HTGR helium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, G.Y.; Wolwowicz, R.J.

    1979-12-01

    Creep-rupture testing was conducted on 1 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel, Alloy 800H and Hastelloy Alloy X in flowing helium containing nominal concentration of following gases: 1500 μatm H 2 , 450 μatm CO, 50 μatm CH 4 , 50 μatm H 2 O and 5 μatm CO 2 . This environment is believed to represent maximum permissible levels of impurities in the primary coolant for the steam-cycle system of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) when it is operating continuously with a water and/or steam leak at technical specification limits. Two or three heats of material for each alloy were investigated. Tests were conducted at 482 0 C and 760 0 C (1200 0 F and 1400 0 F) for Alloy 800H, and at 760 0 C and 871 0 C (1400 0 F and 1600 0 F) for Hastelloy Alloy X for times up to 10,000 h. Selected tests were performed on same heat of material in both air and helium environments to make a direct comparison of creep-rupture behaviors between two environments. Metallurgical evaluation was performed on selected post test specimens with respect to gas-metal interactions which included oxidation, carburization and/or decarburization. Correlation between gaseous corrosion and creep-rupture behavior was attempted. Limited tests were also performed to investigate the specimen size effects on creep-rupture behavior in the helium environment

  4. LWR and HTGR coolant dynamics: the containment of severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Gherson, P.; Nourbakhsh, H.P.; Hu, K.; Iyer, K.; Viskanta, R.; Lommers, L.

    1983-07-01

    This is the final report of a project containing three major tasks. Task I deals with the fundamental aspects of energetic fuel/coolant interactions (steam explosions) as they pertain to LWR core melt accidents. Task II deals with the applied aspects of LWR core melt accident sequences and mechanisms important to containment response, and includes consideration of energetic fuel/coolant interaction events, as well as non-explosive ones, corium material disposition and eventual coolability, and containment pressurization phenomena. Finally, Task III is concerned with HTGR loss of forced circulation accidents. This report is organized into three major parts corresponding to these three tasks respectively

  5. Scaling laws for HTGR core block seismic response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dove, R.C.

    1977-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of scaling laws, physical modeling, and seismic testing of a model designed to represent a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) core consisting of graphite blocks. The establishment of the proper scale relationships for length, time, force, and other parameters is emphasized. Tests to select model materials and the appropriate scales are described. Preliminary results obtained from both model and prototype systems tested under simulated seismic vibration are presented

  6. US HTGR Deployment Challenges and Strategies HTR 2014 Conference Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahrokhi, Farshid; Lommers, Lewis; Mayer, John III; Southworth, Finis

    2014-01-01

    The NGNP Industry Alliance (NIA), LLC (www.NGNPAliance.org), is a consortium of high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) designers, utility plant owner/operators, critical plant hardware suppliers, and end-user groups. The NIA is promoting the design and commercialization of a HTGR for industrial process heat applications and electricity generation. In 2012, NIA selected the AREVA Steam Cycle HTGR (SC-HTGR) as its primary reactor design choice for its first implementation in mid -2020s. The SC-HTGR can produce 625 MWth of process steam at 550°C or 275 MWe of electricity in a co-generation configuration. The standard plant is a four-pack of 625MWth modules providing steam and electricity co-generation. The safety characteristics of the HTGR technology allows close colocation of the nuclear plant and the industrial end-user. The plant design also allows the process steam used for the industrial applications to be completely segregated and separate from primary Helium coolant and the secondary nuclear steam supply systems. The process steam at temperatures up to 550°C is provided for a variety of direct or indirect applications. End-user requirements are met for a wide range of steam flow, pressure and temperature conditions. Very high reliability (>99.99%) is maintained by the use of multi-reactor modules and conventional gas-fired back-up. Intermittent steam loads can also be efficiently met through co-generation of electricity for internal use or external distribution and sale. The NIA technology development and deployment challenges are met with strategies that provide investment and partnerships opportunities for plant design and equipment supply, and by cooperative government research, sovereign or private investment, and philanthropic opportunities. Our goal is to create intellectual property (IP) and investor value as the design matures and a license is obtained. The strategy also includes involvement of the initial customer in sharing the value created in

  7. Uncertainties in HTGR neutron-physical characteristics due to computational errors and technological tolerances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glushkov, E.S.; Grebennik, V.N.; Davidenko, V.G.; Kosovskij, V.G.; Smirnov, O.N.; Tsibul'skij, V.F.

    1991-01-01

    The paper is dedicated to the consideration of uncertainties is neutron-physical characteristics (NPC) of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) with a core as spherical fuel element bed, which are caused by calculations from HTGR parameters mean values affecting NPC. Among NPC are: effective multiplication factor, burnup depth, reactivity effect, control element worth, distribution of neutrons and heat release over a reactor core, etc. The short description of calculated methods and codes used for HTGR calculations in the USSR is given and evaluations of NPC uncertainties of the methodical character are presented. Besides, the analysis of the effect technological deviations in parameters of reactor main elements such as uranium amount in the spherical fuel element, number of neutron-absorbing impurities in the reactor core and reflector, etc, upon the NPC is carried out. Results of some experimental studies of NPC of critical assemblies with graphite moderator are given as applied to HTGR. The comparison of calculations results and experiments on critical assemblies has made it possible to evaluate uncertainties of calculated description of HTGR NPC. (author). 8 refs, 8 figs, 6 tabs

  8. Classical molecular dynamics simulation of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devanathan, R.; Krack, M.; Bertolus, M.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation using forces calculated from empirical potentials, commonly called classical molecular dynamics, is well suited to study primary damage production by irradiation, defect interactions with fission gas atoms, gas bubble nucleation, grain boundary effects on defect and gas bubble evolution in nuclear fuel, and the resulting changes in thermomechanical properties. This enables one to obtain insights into fundamental mechanisms governing the behaviour of nuclear fuel, as well as parameters that can be used as inputs for mesoscale models. The interaction potentials used for the force calculations are generated by fitting properties of interest to experimental data and electronic structure calculations (see Chapter 12). We present here the different types of potentials currently available for UO 2 and illustrations of applications to the description of the behaviour of this material under irradiation. The results obtained from the present generation of potentials for UO 2 are qualitatively similar, but quantitatively different. There is a need to refine these existing potentials to provide a better representation of the performance of polycrystalline fuel under a variety of operating conditions, develop models that are equipped to handle deviations from stoichiometry, and validate the models and assumptions used. (authors)

  9. Experimental Study of Turbine Fuel Thermal Stability in an Aircraft Fuel System Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranos, A.; Marteney, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    The thermal stability of aircraft gas turbines fuels was investigated. The objectives were: (1) to design and build an aircraft fuel system simulator; (2) to establish criteria for quantitative assessment of fuel thermal degradation; and (3) to measure the thermal degradation of Jet A and an alternative fuel. Accordingly, an aircraft fuel system simulator was built and the coking tendencies of Jet A and a model alternative fuel (No. 2 heating oil) were measured over a range of temperatures, pressures, flows, and fuel inlet conditions.

  10. MMSNF 2005. Materials models and simulations for nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freyss, M.; Durinck, J.; Carlot, G.; Sabathier, C.; Martin, P.; Garcia, P.; Ripert, M.; Blanpain, P.; Lippens, M.; Schut, H.; Federov, A.V.; Bakker, K.; Osaka, M.; Miwa, S.; Sato, I.; Tanaka, K.; Kurosaki, K.; Uno, M.; Yamanaka, S.; Govers, K.; Verwerft, M.; Hou, M.; Lemehov, S.E.; Terentyev, D.; Govers, K.; Kotomin, E.A.; Ashley, N.J.; Grimes, R.W.; Van Uffelen, P.; Mastrikov, Y.; Zhukovskii, Y.; Rondinella, V.V.; Kurosaki, K.; Uno, M.; Yamanaka, S.; Minato, K.; Phillpot, S.; Watanabe, T.; Shukla, P.; Sinnott, S.; Nino, J.; Grimes, R.; Staicu, D.; Hiernaut, J.P.; Wiss, T.; Rondinella, V.V.; Ronchi, C.; Yakub, E.; Kaye, M.H.; Morrison, C.; Higgs, J.D.; Akbari, F.; Lewis, B.J.; Thompson, W.T.; Gueneau, C.; Gosse, S.; Chatain, S.; Dumas, J.C.; Sundman, B.; Dupin, N.; Konings, R.; Noel, H.; Veshchunov, M.; Dubourg, R.; Ozrin, C.V.; Veshchunov, M.S.; Welland, M.T.; Blanc, V.; Michel, B.; Ricaud, J.M.; Calabrese, R.; Vettraino, F.; Tverberg, T.; Kissane, M.; Tulenko, J.; Stan, M.; Ramirez, J.C.; Cristea, P.; Rachid, J.; Kotomin, E.; Ciriello, A.; Rondinella, V.V.; Staicu, D.; Wiss, T.; Konings, R.; Somers, J.; Killeen, J

    2006-07-01

    The MMSNF Workshop series aims at stimulating research and discussions on models and simulations of nuclear fuels and coupling the results into fuel performance codes.This edition was focused on materials science and engineering for fuel performance codes. The presentations were grouped in three technical sessions: fundamental modelling of fuel properties; integral fuel performance codes and their validation; collaborations and integration of activities. (A.L.B.)

  11. Use of advanced simulations in fuel performance codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Uffelen, P.

    2015-01-01

    The simulation of the cylindrical fuel rod behaviour in a reactor or a storage pool for spent fuel requires a fuel performance code. Such tool solves the equations for the heat transfer, the stresses and strains in fuel and cladding, the evolution of several isotopes and the behaviour of various fission products in the fuel rod. The main equations along with their limitations are briefly described. The current approaches adopted for overcoming these limitations and the perspectives are also outlined. (author)

  12. MMSNF 2005. Materials models and simulations for nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freyss, M.; Durinck, J.; Carlot, G.; Sabathier, C.; Martin, P.; Garcia, P.; Ripert, M.; Blanpain, P.; Lippens, M.; Schut, H.; Federov, A.V.; Bakker, K.; Osaka, M.; Miwa, S.; Sato, I.; Tanaka, K.; Kurosaki, K.; Uno, M.; Yamanaka, S.; Govers, K.; Verwerft, M.; Hou, M.; Lemehov, S.E.; Terentyev, D.; Govers, K.; Kotomin, E.A.; Ashley, N.J.; Grimes, R.W.; Van Uffelen, P.; Mastrikov, Y.; Zhukovskii, Y.; Rondinella, V.V.; Kurosaki, K.; Uno, M.; Yamanaka, S.; Minato, K.; Phillpot, S.; Watanabe, T.; Shukla, P.; Sinnott, S.; Nino, J.; Grimes, R.; Staicu, D.; Hiernaut, J.P.; Wiss, T.; Rondinella, V.V.; Ronchi, C.; Yakub, E.; Kaye, M.H.; Morrison, C.; Higgs, J.D.; Akbari, F.; Lewis, B.J.; Thompson, W.T.; Gueneau, C.; Gosse, S.; Chatain, S.; Dumas, J.C.; Sundman, B.; Dupin, N.; Konings, R.; Noel, H.; Veshchunov, M.; Dubourg, R.; Ozrin, C.V.; Veshchunov, M.S.; Welland, M.T.; Blanc, V.; Michel, B.; Ricaud, J.M.; Calabrese, R.; Vettraino, F.; Tverberg, T.; Kissane, M.; Tulenko, J.; Stan, M.; Ramirez, J.C.; Cristea, P.; Rachid, J.; Kotomin, E.; Ciriello, A.; Rondinella, V.V.; Staicu, D.; Wiss, T.; Konings, R.; Somers, J.; Killeen, J.

    2006-01-01

    The MMSNF Workshop series aims at stimulating research and discussions on models and simulations of nuclear fuels and coupling the results into fuel performance codes.This edition was focused on materials science and engineering for fuel performance codes. The presentations were grouped in three technical sessions: fundamental modelling of fuel properties; integral fuel performance codes and their validation; collaborations and integration of activities. (A.L.B.)

  13. 1170-MW(t) HTGR-PS/C plant application study report: Geismar, Louisiana refinery/chemical complex application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMain, A.T. Jr.; Stanley, J.D.

    1981-05-01

    This report summarizes a study to apply an 1170-MW(t) high-temperature gas-cooled reactor - process steam/cogeneration (HTGR-PS/C) to an industrial complex at Geismar, Louisiana. This study compares the HTGR with coal and oil as process plant fuels. This study uses a previous broad energy alternative study by the Stone and Webster Corporation on refinery and chemical plant needs in the Gulf States Utilities service area. The HTGR-PS/C was developed by General Atomic (GA) specifically for industries which require both steam and electric energy. The GA 1170-MW(t) HTGR-PC/C design is particularly well suited to industrial applications and is expected to have excellent cost benefits over other energy sources

  14. Simulation of integral local tests with high-burnup fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyori, G.

    2011-01-01

    The behaviour of nuclear fuel under LOCA conditions may strongly depend on the burnup-dependent fuel characteristics, as it has been indicated by recent integral experiments. Fuel fragmentation and the associated fission gas release can influence the integral fuel behaviour, the rod rupture and the radiological release. The TRANSURANUS fuel performance code is a proper tool for the consistent simulation of burnup-dependent phenomena during normal operation and the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the fuel rod in a subsequent accident. The code has been extended with an empirical model for micro-cracking induced FGR and fuel fragmentation and verified against integral LOCA tests of international projects. (author)

  15. Thermal expansion of UO2 and simulated DUPIC fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho Kang, Kweon; Jin Ryu, Ho; Chan Song, Kee; Seung Yang, Myung

    2002-01-01

    The lattice parameters of simulated DUPIC fuel and UO 2 were measured from room temperature to 1273 K using neutron diffraction to investigate the thermal expansion and density variation with temperature. The lattice parameter of simulated DUPIC fuel is lower than that of UO 2 , and the linear thermal expansion of simulated DUPIC fuel is higher than that of UO 2 . For the temperature range from 298 to 1273 K, the average linear thermal expansion coefficients for UO 2 and simulated DUPIC fuel are 10.471x10 -6 and 10.751x10 -6 K -1 , respectively

  16. Thermal expansion study of simulated DUPIC fuel using neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kweon Ho; Ryu, H. J.; Bae, J. H.; Kim, H. S.; Song, K. C.; Yang, M. S.; Choi, Y. N.; Han, Y. S.; Oh, H. S.

    2001-07-01

    The lattice parameters of simulated DUPIC fuel and UO2 were measured from room temperature to 1273 K using neutron diffraction to investigate the thermal expansion and density variation with temperature. The lattice parameter of simulated DUPIC fuel is lower than that of UO2 and the linear thermal expansion of simulated DUPIC fuel is higher than that of UO2. For the temperature range from 298 to 1273 K, the average linear thermal expansion coefficients for UO2 and simulated DUPIC fuel are 10.471 ''10-6 and 10.751 ''10-6 K-1, respectively

  17. Computer simulation of variform fuel assemblies using Dragon code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Haitao; Wu Hongchun; Yao Dong

    2005-01-01

    The DRAGON is a cell code that developed for the CANDU reactor by the Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal of CANADA. Although, the DRAGON is mainly used to simulate the CANDU super-cell fuel assembly, it has an ability to simulate other geometries of the fuel assembly. However, only NEACRP benchmark problem of the BWR lattice cell was analyzed until now except for the CANDU reactor. We also need to develop the code to simulate the variform fuel assemblies, especially, for design of the advanced reactor. We validated that the cell code DRAGON is useful for simulating various kinds of the fuel assembly by analyzing the rod-shape fuel assembly of the PWR and the MTR plate-shape fuel assembly. Some other kinds of geometry of geometry were computed. Computational results show that the DRAGON is able to analyze variform fuel assembly problems and the precision is high. (authors)

  18. HTGR Application Economic Model Users' Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandrik, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Application Economic Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Application Economic Model calculates either the required selling price of power and/or heat for a given internal rate of return (IRR) or the IRR for power and/or heat being sold at the market price. The user can generate these economic results for a range of reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for up to 16 reactor modules; and for module ratings of 200, 350, or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Application Economic Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Application Economic Model. This model was designed for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel and engineering economics. Modification of the HTGR Application Economic Model should only be performed by users familiar with the HTGR and its applications, Excel, and Visual Basic.

  19. Irradiation performance of HTGR fertile fuel in HFIR target capsules HT-12 through HT-15. Part I. Experiment description and fission product behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kania, M.J.; Lindemer, T.B.; Morgan, M.T.; Robbins, J.M.

    1977-02-01

    Sixteen types of Biso-coated designs, on ThO 2 kernels, were irradiated in High Flux Isotope Reactor target capsules HT-12 through HT-15. The report addresses the description of the experiment and extensive postirradiation analyses and experiments to determine fertile-particle burnup, fuel coating failures, and fission product behavior. Several low-temperature isotropic (LTI) pyrocarbon coatings, which ''survived'' according to visual inspection, were shown to have developed permeability during irradiation. These particles were irradiated at temperatures approximately equal to 1250 0 C and to burnups equal to or greater than 8 percent fission per initial heavy-metal atom (FIMA). No evidence of permeability was found in similar particles irradiated at temperatures approximately equal to 1550 0 C and burnups approximately equal to 16 percent FIMA. Failures due to permeability were not detectable by visual inspection but required a more extensive investigation by the 1000 0 C gaseous chlorine leaching technique. Maximum particle surface operating temperatures were found to be approximately 300 0 C in excess of design limits of 900 0 C (low-temperature magazines) and 1250 0 C (high-temperature magazines). The extremes of high temperatures and fast neutron fluences up to 1.6 x 10 22 neutrons/cm 2 produced severe degradation and swelling of the Poco graphite magazines and sample holders

  20. HTGR programme in the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    The HTGR is being developed by the US Department of Energy within the Division of HTGRs is reported. Fuel design, development and demonstration activities are being conducted by General Atomics and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. During FY-1990 the US continued work in cooperative projects with the KFA-Forschungszentrum Juelich and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute on post irradiation examination of fuel capsules and continued the Fission Product Transport Test Program with the French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique in the COMEDIE in-pile loop at the SILOE reactor at Grenoble. Other activities included installation of the high temperature core-conduction-cooldown test furnace at ORNL which will be used for testing of irradiated fuel compacts under accident conditions. Finally, the US fuel performance experts participated in the MHTGR Cost Reduction Study which is a major effort within the US commercial MHTGR program. 1 tab

  1. HTGR core seismic analysis using an array processor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shatoff, H.; Charman, C.M.

    1983-01-01

    A Floating Point Systems array processor performs nonlinear dynamic analysis of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) core with significant time and cost savings. The graphite HTGR core consists of approximately 8000 blocks of various shapes which are subject to motion and impact during a seismic event. Two-dimensional computer programs (CRUNCH2D, MCOCO) can perform explicit step-by-step dynamic analyses of up to 600 blocks for time-history motions. However, use of two-dimensional codes was limited by the large cost and run times required. Three-dimensional analysis of the entire core, or even a large part of it, had been considered totally impractical. Because of the needs of the HTGR core seismic program, a Floating Point Systems array processor was used to enhance computer performance of the two-dimensional core seismic computer programs, MCOCO and CRUNCH2D. This effort began by converting the computational algorithms used in the codes to a form which takes maximum advantage of the parallel and pipeline processors offered by the architecture of the Floating Point Systems array processor. The subsequent conversion of the vectorized FORTRAN coding to the array processor required a significant programming effort to make the system work on the General Atomic (GA) UNIVAC 1100/82 host. These efforts were quite rewarding, however, since the cost of running the codes has been reduced approximately 50-fold and the time threefold. The core seismic analysis with large two-dimensional models has now become routine and extension to three-dimensional analysis is feasible. These codes simulate the one-fifth-scale full-array HTGR core model. This paper compares the analysis with the test results for sine-sweep motion

  2. Natural circulation in simulated LMFBR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, A.E.; Carbajo, J.J.; Lloyd, D.B.; Montgomery, B.H.; Rose, S.D.; Wantland, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    Natural circulation experiments have been performed using simulated liquid metal fast breeder reactor fuel assemblies in the Thermal-Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety (THORS) facility, an engineering-scale sodium loop. Objective of these tests has been to provide experimental data under conditions that might be encountered during a partial or total loss of the shutdown heat removal system (SHRS) in a reactor. The experiments have included single- and two-phase tests under quasi-steady and transient conditions, at both nominal and non-nominal system conditions. Results from these test indicate that the potential for reactor damage during degraded SHRS operation is extremely slight, and that natural circulation can be a major contributor to safe operation of the system in both single- and two-phase flow during such operation

  3. Recent developments in graphite. [Use in HTGR and aerospace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Overall, the HTGR graphite situation is in excellent shape. In both of the critical requirements, fuel blocks and support structures, adequate graphites are at hand and improved grades are sufficiently far along in truncation. In the aerospace field, GraphNOL N3M permits vehicle performance with confidence in trajectories unobtainable with any other existing material. For fusion energy applications, no other graphite can simultaneously withstand both extreme thermal shock and neutron damage. Hence, the material promises to create new markets as well as to offer a better candidate material for existing applications.

  4. HTGR Industrial Application Functional and Operational Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demick, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    This document specifies the functional and performance requirements to be used in the development of the conceptual design of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) based plant supplying energy to a typical industrial facility. These requirements were developed from collaboration with industry and HTGR suppliers over the preceding three years to identify the energy needs of industrial processes for which the HTGR technology is technically and economically viable. The functional and performance requirements specified herein are an effective representation of the industrial sector energy needs and an effective basis for developing a conceptual design of the plant that will serve the broadest range of industrial applications.

  5. Fuel-management simulations for once-through thorium fuel cycle in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, P.S.W.; Boczar, P.G.; Ellis, R.J.; Ardeshiri, F.

    1999-01-01

    High neutron economy, on-power refuelling and a simple fuel bundle design result in unsurpassed fuel cycle flexibility for CANDU reactors. These features facilitate the introduction and exploitation of thorium fuel cycles in existing CANDU reactors in an evolutionary fashion. Detailed full-core fuel-management simulations concluded that a once-through thorium fuel cycle can be successfully implemented in an existing CANDU reactor without requiring major modifications. (author)

  6. Simulation and Test of a Fuel Cell Hybrid Golf Cart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingming Liang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper establishes the simulation model of fuel cell hybrid golf cart (FCHGC, which applies the non-GUI mode of the Advanced Vehicle Simulator (ADVISOR and the genetic algorithm (GA to optimize it. Simulation of the objective function is composed of fuel consumption and vehicle dynamic performance; the variables are the fuel cell stack power sizes and the battery numbers. By means of simulation, the optimal parameters of vehicle power unit, fuel cell stack, and battery pack are worked out. On this basis, GUI mode of ADVISOR is used to select the rated power of vehicle motor. In line with simulation parameters, an electrical golf cart is refitted by adding a 2 kW hydrogen air proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC stack system and test the FCHGC. The result shows that the simulation data is effective but it needs improving compared with that of the real cart test.

  7. An investigation on technical feasibilities of fuel cycle for high temperature gas-cooled reactor (Case study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Junya; Ueta, Shohei; Aihara, Jun; Shibata, Taiju; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2008-03-01

    In accordance with the basic policy of effectively using nuclear fuel resources, the FBR cycle, one of the most possible fuel cycle in the future, will be adapted after plu-thermal program by LWR in Japanese nuclear cycle plan. In this paper, a case study of technical investigation of HTGR fuel cycle based on HTGR fuel cycle proposed to adapt to Japanese nuclear fuel cycle plan were carried out from the viewpoint of effective utilization of uranium, fabrication technologies of MOX fuel, reprocessing technologies, amount of interim storage of HTGR fuel and graphite waste. As a result, the fuel cycle for HTGR is expected to be possible technically. (author)

  8. Property measurements and inner state estimation of simulated fuel debris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirooka, S.; Kato, M.; Morimoto, K.; Washiya, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Fuel debris properties and inner state such as temperature profile were evaluated by using analysis of simulated fuel debris manufactured from UO{sub 2} and oxidized zircaloy. The center of the fuel debris was expected to be molten state soon after the melt down accident of LWRs because power density was very high. On the other hand, the surface of the fuel debris was cooled in the water. This large temperature gradient may cause inner stress and consequent cracks were expected. (author)

  9. IAEA CRP on HTGR Uncertainties in Modeling: Assessment of Phase I Lattice to Core Model Uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouxelin, Pascal Nicolas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Best-estimate plus uncertainty analysis of reactors is replacing the traditional conservative (stacked uncertainty) method for safety and licensing analysis. To facilitate uncertainty analysis applications, a comprehensive approach and methodology must be developed and applied. High temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs) have several features that require techniques not used in light-water reactor analysis (e.g., coated-particle design and large graphite quantities at high temperatures). The International Atomic Energy Agency has therefore launched the Coordinated Research Project on HTGR Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling to study uncertainty propagation in the HTGR analysis chain. The benchmark problem defined for the prismatic design is represented by the General Atomics Modular HTGR 350. The main focus of this report is the compilation and discussion of the results obtained for various permutations of Exercise I 2c and the use of the cross section data in Exercise II 1a of the prismatic benchmark, which is defined as the last and first steps of the lattice and core simulation phases, respectively. The report summarizes the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) best estimate results obtained for Exercise I 2a (fresh single-fuel block), Exercise I 2b (depleted single-fuel block), and Exercise I 2c (super cell) in addition to the first results of an investigation into the cross section generation effects for the super-cell problem. The two dimensional deterministic code known as the New ESC based Weighting Transport (NEWT) included in the Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) 6.1.2 package was used for the cross section evaluation, and the results obtained were compared to the three dimensional stochastic SCALE module KENO VI. The NEWT cross section libraries were generated for several permutations of the current benchmark super-cell geometry and were then provided as input to the Phase II core calculation of the stand alone neutronics Exercise

  10. Proceedings of the 2nd JAERI symposium on HTGR technologies October 21 ∼ 23, 1992, Oarai, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) held the 2nd JAERI Symposium on HTGR Technologies on October 21 to 23, 1992, at Oarai Park Hotel at Oarai-machi, Ibaraki-ken, Japan, with support of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Science and Technology Agency of Japan and the Atomic Energy Society of Japan on the occasion that the construction of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), which is the first high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in Japan, is now being proceeded smoothly. In this symposium, the worldwide present status of research and development (R and D) of the HTGRs and the future perspectives of the HTGR development were discussed with 47 papers including 3 invited lectures, focusing on the present status of HTGR projects and perspectives of HTGR Development, Safety, Operation Experience, Fuel and Heat Utilization. A panel discussion was also organized on how the HTGRs can contribute to the preservation of global environment. About 280 participants attended the symposium from Japan, Bangladesh, Germany, France, Indonesia, People's Republic of China, Poland, Russia, Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States of America, Venezuela and the IAEA. This paper was edited as the proceedings of the 2nd JAERI Symposium on HTGR Technologies, collecting the 47 papers presented in the oral and poster sessions along with 11 panel exhibitions on the results of research and development associated to the HTTR. (author)

  11. Generator technology for HTGR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomba, D.; Thiot, D.

    1997-01-01

    Approximately 15% of the worlds installed capacity in electric energy production is from generators developed and manufactured by GEC Alsthom. GEC Alsthom is now working on the application of generators for HTGR power conversion systems. The main generator characteristics induced by the different HTGR power conversion technology include helium immersion, high helium pressure, brushless excitation system, magnetic bearings, vertical lineshaft, high reliability and long periods between maintenance. (author)

  12. Development of dynamic simulation code for fuel cycle fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Isao; Seki, Yasushi [Department of Fusion Engineering Research, Naka Fusion Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Sasaki, Makoto; Shintani, Kiyonori; Kim, Yeong-Chan

    1999-02-01

    A dynamic simulation code for fuel cycle of a fusion experimental reactor has been developed. The code follows the fuel inventory change with time in the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system during 2 days pulse operation cycles. The time dependence of the fuel inventory distribution is evaluated considering the fuel burn and exhaust in the plasma chamber, purification and supply functions. For each subsystem of the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system, the fuel inventory equation is written based on the equation of state considering the fuel burn and the function of exhaust, purification, and supply. The processing constants of subsystem for steady states were taken from the values in the ITER Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) report. Using this code, the time dependence of the fuel supply and inventory depending on the burn state and subsystem processing functions are shown. (author)

  13. Simulating forest fuel and fire risk dynamics across landscapes--LANDIS fuel module design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong S. He; Bo Z. Shang; Thomas R. Crow; Eric J. Gustafson; Stephen R. Shifley

    2004-01-01

    Understanding fuel dynamics over large spatial (103-106 ha) and temporal scales (101-103 years) is important in comprehensive wildfire management. We present a modeling approach to simulate fuel and fire risk dynamics as well as impacts of alternative fuel treatments. The...

  14. Cladding properties under simulated fuel pin transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, C.W.; Johnson, G.D.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of the HEDL fuel pin testing program utilizing a recently developed Fuel Cladding Transient Tester (FCTT) to generate the requisite mechanical property information on irradiated and unirradiated fast reactor fuel cladding under temperature ramp conditions. The test procedure is described, and data are presented

  15. Heat extraction from HTGR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balajka, J.; Princova, H.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of an HTGR reactor energy balance showed that steam reforming of natural gas or methane is the most suitable process of utilizing the high-temperature heat. Basic mathematical relations are derived allowing to perform a general energy balance of the link between steam reforming and reactor heat output. The results of the calculation show that the efficiency of the entire reactor system increases with increasing proportion of heat output for steam reforming as against heat output for the steam generator. This proportion, however, is limited with the output helium temperature from steam reforming. It is thus always necessary to use part of the reactor heat output for the steam cycle involving electric power generation or low-potential heat generation. (Z.M.)

  16. Simulation an Accelerator driven Subcritical Reactor core with thorium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirmohammadi, L.; Pazirandeh, A.

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is simulation An Accelerator driven Subcritical core with Thorium as a new generation nuclear fuel. In this design core , A subcritical core coupled to an accelerator with proton beam (E p =1 GeV) is simulated by MCNPX code .Although the main purpose of ADS systems are transmutation and use MA (Minor Actinides) as a nuclear fuel but another use of these systems are use thorium fuel. This simulated core has two fuel assembly type : (Th-U) and (U-Pu) . Consequence , Neutronic parameters related to ADS core are calculated. It has shown that Thorium fuel is use able in this core and less nuclear waste ,Although Iran has not Thorium reserves but study on Thorium fuel cycle can open a new horizontal in use nuclear energy as a clean energy and without nuclear waste

  17. Post irradiation test report of irradiated DUPIC simulated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Jung, I. H.; Moon, J. S. and others

    2001-12-01

    The post-irradiation examination of irradiated DUPIC (Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel in CANDU Reactors) simulated fuel in HANARO was performed at IMEF (Irradiated Material Examination Facility) in KAERI during 6 months from October 1999 to March 2000. The objectives of this post-irradiation test are i) the integrity of the capsule to be used for DUPIC fuel, ii) ensuring the irradiation requirements of DUPIC fuel at HANARO, iii) performance verification in-core behavior at HANARO of DUPIC simulated fuel, iv) establishing and improvement the data base for DUPIC fuel performance verification codes, and v) establishing the irradiation procedure in HANARO for DUPIC fuel. The post-irradiation examination performed are γ-scanning, profilometry, density, hardness, observation the microstructure and fission product distribution by optical microscope and electron probe microanalyser (EPMA)

  18. Neutron dose rate analysis on HTGR-10 reactor using Monte Carlo code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwoto; Adrial, H.; Hamzah, A.; Zuhair; Bakhri, S.; Sunaryo, G. R.

    2018-02-01

    The HTGR-10 reactor is cylinder-shaped core fuelled with kernel TRISO coated fuel particles in the spherical pebble with helium cooling system. The outlet helium gas coolant temperature outputted from the reactor core is designed to 700 °C. One advantage HTGR type reactor is capable of co-generation, as an addition to generating electricity, the reactor was designed to produce heat at high temperature can be used for other processes. The spherical fuel pebble contains 8335 TRISO UO2 kernel coated particles with enrichment of 10% and 17% are dispersed in a graphite matrix. The main purpose of this study was to analysis the distribution of neutron dose rates generated from HTGR-10 reactors. The calculation and analysis result of neutron dose rate in the HTGR-10 reactor core was performed using Monte Carlo MCNP5v1.6 code. The problems of double heterogeneity in kernel fuel coated particles TRISO and spherical fuel pebble in the HTGR-10 core are modelled well with MCNP5v1.6 code. The neutron flux to dose conversion factors taken from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP-74) was used to determine the dose rate that passes through the active core, reflectors, core barrel, reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and a biological shield. The calculated results of neutron dose rate with MCNP5v1.6 code using a conversion factor of ICRP-74 (2009) for radiation workers in the radial direction on the outside of the RPV (radial position = 220 cm from the center of the patio HTGR-10) provides the respective value of 9.22E-4 μSv/h and 9.58E-4 μSv/h for enrichment 10% and 17%, respectively. The calculated values of neutron dose rates are compliant with BAPETEN Chairman’s Regulation Number 4 Year 2013 on Radiation Protection and Safety in Nuclear Energy Utilization which sets the limit value for the average effective dose for radiation workers 20 mSv/year or 10μSv/h. Thus the protection and safety for radiation workers to be safe from the radiation source has

  19. Calculation simulation of equivalent irradiation swelling for dispersion nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Wei; Zhao Yunmei; Gong Xin; Ding Shurong; Huo Yongzhong

    2015-01-01

    The dispersion nuclear fuel was regarded as a kind of special particle composites. Assuming that the fuel particles are periodically distributed in the dispersion nuclear fuel meat, the finite element model to calculate its equivalent irradiation swelling was developed with the method of computational micro-mechanics. Considering irradiation swelling in the fuel particles and the irradiation hardening effect in the metal matrix, the stress update algorithms were established respectively for the fuel particles and metal matrix. The corresponding user subroutines were programmed, and the finite element simulation of equivalent irradiation swelling for the fuel meat was performed in Abaqus. The effects of the particle size and volume fraction on the equivalent irradiation swelling were investigated, and the fitting formula of equivalent irradiation swelling was obtained. The results indicate that the main factors to influence equivalent irradiation swelling of the fuel meat are the irradiation swelling and volume fraction of fuel particles. (authors)

  20. HTGR development in the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    The status of high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) development in the United States of America is described, including the organizational structure for the development support, HTGR development programme, and plans for future activities in the field

  1. Fuel management simulation for CANFLEX-RU in CANDU 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    Fuel management simulations have been performed for CANFLEX-09% RU fuel in the CANDU 6 reactor. In this study, the bi-directional 4-bundle shift fuelling scheme was assumed. The lattice cell and time-average calculation were carried out. The refuelling simulation calculations were performed for 600 full power days. Time-averaged results show good axial power profile with the CANFLEX-RU fuel. During the simulation period, the maximum channel and bundle power were maintained below the licensing limit of CANDU 6 reactor. 7 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  2. Fuel management simulation for CANFLEX-RU in CANDU 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    Fuel management simulations have been performed for CANFLEX-09% RU fuel in the CANDU 6 reactor. In this study, the bi-directional 4-bundle shift fuelling scheme was assumed. The lattice cell and time-average calculation were carried out. The refuelling simulation calculations were performed for 600 full power days. Time-averaged results show good axial power profile with the CANFLEX-RU fuel. During the simulation period, the maximum channel and bundle power were maintained below the licensing limit of CANDU 6 reactor. 7 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  3. Potential of the HTGR hydrogen cogeneration system in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishihara, Tetsuo; Mouri, Tomoaki; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2007-01-01

    A high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) is one of the next generation nuclear systems. The HTGR hydrogen cogeneration system can produce not only electricity but also hydrogen. Then it has a potential to supply massive low-cost hydrogen without greenhouse gas emission for the future hydrogen society. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been carried out the design study of the HTGR hydrogen cogeneration system (GTHTR300C). The thermal power of the reactor is 600 MW. The hydrogen production plant utilizes 370 MW and can supply 52,000 m 3 /h (0.4 Bm 3 /y) of hydrogen. Present industrial hydrogen production capacity in Japan is about 18 Bm 3 /y and it will decrease by 15 Bm 3 /y in 2030 due to the aging facilities. On the other hand, the hydrogen demand for fuel cell vehicle (FCV) in 2030 is estimated at 15 Bm 3 /y at a maximum. Since the hydrogen supply may be short after 2030, the additional hydrogen should be produced by clean hydrogen process to reduce greenhouse gas emission. This hydrogen shortage is a potential market for the GTHTR300C. The hydrogen production cost of GTHTR300C is estimated at 20.5 JPY/Nm 3 which has an economic competitiveness against other industrial hydrogen production processes. 38 units of the GTHTR300C can supply a half of this shortage which accounts for the 33% of hydrogen demand for FCV in 2100. According to the increase of hydrogen demand, the GTHTR300C should be constructed after 2030. (author)

  4. Simulation and modelling of advanced Argentinian nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, A.; Losada, E.; Demarco, G.; Garces, J.; Marino, A.; Jaroszewicz, S.; Mosca, H.; Demarco, G.

    2011-01-01

    The BaCo code (Barra Combustible, Spanish expression for 'fuel rod') was developed to simulate the nuclear fuel rods behaviour under irradiation. The generation of nucleo electricity in Argentina is based on PHWR NPP and, as a consequence, BaCo is focused on PHWR fuels keeping full compatibility with PWR, WWER, among others type of fuels (commercial, experimental or prototypes). BaCo includes additional extensions for 3D calculations, statistical improvements, fuel design and batch analysis. Research on new fuels and cladding materials properties based on ab initio and multiscale modelling are currently under development to be included in BaCo simulations in order to be applied to Generation IV reactors. The ab initio and multiscale modelling can enhance the field of application of the code by including a strong physical basement covering the unavailable data needed for those improvements. (authors)

  5. Computer simulation of fuel element performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukhanov, G I

    1979-01-01

    The review presents reports made at the Conference on the Bahaviour and Production of Fuel for Water Reactors on March 13-17, 1979. Discussed at the Conference are the most developed and tested calculation models specially evolved to predict the behaviour of fuel elements of water reactors. The following five main aspects of the problem are discussed: general conceptions and programs; mechanical mock-ups and their applications; gas release, gap conductivity and fuel thermal conductivity; analysis of nonstationary processes; models of specific phenomena. The review briefly describes the physical principles of the following models and programs: the RESTR, providing calculation of the radii of zones of columnar and equiaxial grains as well as the radius of the internal cavity of the fuel core; programs for calculation of fuel-can interaction, based on the finite elements method; a model predicting the behaviour of the CANDU-PHW fuel elements in transient conditions. General results are presented of investigations of heat transfer through a can-fuel gap and thermal conductivity of UO/sub 2/ with regard for cracking and gas release of the fuel. Many programs already suit the accepted standards and are intensively tested at present.

  6. Conceptual design of small-sized HTGR system (3). Core thermal and hydraulic design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaba, Yoshitomo; Sato, Hiroyuki; Goto, Minoru; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Tachibana, Yukio

    2012-06-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency has started the conceptual designs of small-sized High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) systems, aiming for the 2030s deployment into developing countries. The small-sized HTGR systems can provide power generation by steam turbine, high temperature steam for industry process and/or low temperature steam for district heating. As one of the conceptual designs in the first stage, the core thermal and hydraulic design of the power generation and steam supply small-sized HTGR system with a thermal power of 50 MW (HTR50S), which was a reference reactor system positioned as a first commercial or demonstration reactor system, was carried out. HTR50S in the first stage has the same coated particle fuel as HTTR. The purpose of the design is to make sure that the maximum fuel temperature in normal operation doesn't exceed the design target. Following the design, safety analysis assuming a depressurization accident was carried out. The fuel temperature in the normal operation and the fuel and reactor pressure vessel temperatures in the depressurization accident were evaluated. As a result, it was cleared that the thermal integrity of the fuel and the reactor coolant pressure boundary is not damaged. (author)

  7. Simulations of Failure via Three-Dimensional Cracking in Fuel Cladding for Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Hongbing; Bukkapatnam, Satish; Harimkar, Sandip; Singh, Raman; Bardenhagen, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Enhancing performance of fuel cladding and duct alloys is a key means of increasing fuel burnup. This project will address the failure of fuel cladding via three-dimensional cracking models. Researchers will develop a simulation code for the failure of the fuel cladding and validate the code through experiments. The objective is to develop an algorithm to determine the failure of fuel cladding in the form of three-dimensional cracking due to prolonged exposure under varying conditions of pressure, temperature, chemical environment, and irradiation. This project encompasses the following tasks: 1. Simulate 3D crack initiation and growth under instantaneous and/or fatigue loads using a new variant of the material point method (MPM); 2. Simulate debonding of the materials in the crack path using cohesive elements, considering normal and shear traction separation laws; 3. Determine the crack propagation path, considering damage of the materials incorporated in the cohesive elements to allow the energy release rate to be minimized; 4. Simulate the three-dimensional fatigue crack growth as a function of loading histories; 5. Verify the simulation code by comparing results to theoretical and numerical studies available in the literature; 6. Conduct experiments to observe the crack path and surface profile in unused fuel cladding and validate against simulation results; and 7. Expand the adaptive mesh refinement infrastructure parallel processing environment to allow adaptive mesh refinement at the 3D crack fronts and adaptive mesh merging in the wake of cracks. Fuel cladding is made of materials such as stainless steels and ferritic steels with added alloying elements, which increase stability and durability under irradiation. As fuel cladding is subjected to water, chemicals, fission gas, pressure, high temperatures, and irradiation while in service, understanding performance is essential. In the fast fuel used in advanced burner reactors, simulations of the nuclear

  8. Simulations of Failure via Three-Dimensional Cracking in Fuel Cladding for Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Hongbing [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Bukkapatnam, Satish; Harimkar, Sandip; Singh, Raman; Bardenhagen, Scott

    2014-01-09

    Enhancing performance of fuel cladding and duct alloys is a key means of increasing fuel burnup. This project will address the failure of fuel cladding via three-dimensional cracking models. Researchers will develop a simulation code for the failure of the fuel cladding and validate the code through experiments. The objective is to develop an algorithm to determine the failure of fuel cladding in the form of three-dimensional cracking due to prolonged exposure under varying conditions of pressure, temperature, chemical environment, and irradiation. This project encompasses the following tasks: 1. Simulate 3D crack initiation and growth under instantaneous and/or fatigue loads using a new variant of the material point method (MPM); 2. Simulate debonding of the materials in the crack path using cohesive elements, considering normal and shear traction separation laws; 3. Determine the crack propagation path, considering damage of the materials incorporated in the cohesive elements to allow the energy release rate to be minimized; 4. Simulate the three-dimensional fatigue crack growth as a function of loading histories; 5. Verify the simulation code by comparing results to theoretical and numerical studies available in the literature; 6. Conduct experiments to observe the crack path and surface profile in unused fuel cladding and validate against simulation results; and 7. Expand the adaptive mesh refinement infrastructure parallel processing environment to allow adaptive mesh refinement at the 3D crack fronts and adaptive mesh merging in the wake of cracks. Fuel cladding is made of materials such as stainless steels and ferritic steels with added alloying elements, which increase stability and durability under irradiation. As fuel cladding is subjected to water, chemicals, fission gas, pressure, high temperatures, and irradiation while in service, understanding performance is essential. In the fast fuel used in advanced burner reactors, simulations of the nuclear

  9. Simulation of a 250 kW diesel fuel processor/PEM fuel cell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amphlett, J. C.; Mann, R. F.; Peppley, B. A.; Roberge, P. R.; Rodrigues, A.; Salvador, J. P.

    Polymer-electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems offer a potential power source for utility and mobile applications. Practical fuel cell systems use fuel processors for the production of hydrogen-rich gas. Liquid fuels, such as diesel or other related fuels, are attractive options as feeds to a fuel processor. The generation of hydrogen gas for fuel cells, in most cases, becomes the crucial design issue with respect to weight and volume in these applications. Furthermore, these systems will require a gas clean-up system to insure that the fuel quality meets the demands of the cell anode. The endothermic nature of the reformer will have a significant affect on the overall system efficiency. The gas clean-up system may also significantly effect the overall heat balance. To optimize the performance of this integrated system, therefore, waste heat must be used effectively. Previously, we have concentrated on catalytic methanol-steam reforming. A model of a methanol steam reformer has been previously developed and has been used as the basis for a new, higher temperature model for liquid hydrocarbon fuels. Similarly, our fuel cell evaluation program previously led to the development of a steady-state electrochemical fuel cell model (SSEM). The hydrocarbon fuel processor model and the SSEM have now been incorporated in the development of a process simulation of a 250 kW diesel-fueled reformer/fuel cell system using a process simulator. The performance of this system has been investigated for a variety of operating conditions and a preliminary assessment of thermal integration issues has been carried out. This study demonstrates the application of a process simulation model as a design analysis tool for the development of a 250 kW fuel cell system.

  10. Atomic scale simulations for improved CRUD and fuel performance modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cooper, Michael William Donald [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-06

    A more mechanistic description of fuel performance codes can be achieved by deriving models and parameters from atomistic scale simulations rather than fitting models empirically to experimental data. The same argument applies to modeling deposition of corrosion products on fuel rods (CRUD). Here are some results from publications in 2016 carried out using the CASL allocation at LANL.

  11. HTGR-INTEGRATED COAL TO LIQUIDS PRODUCTION ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastasia M Gandrik; Rick A Wood

    2010-10-01

    As part of the DOE’s Idaho National Laboratory (INL) nuclear energy development mission, the INL is leading a program to develop and design a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which has been selected as the base design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. Because an HTGR operates at a higher temperature, it can provide higher temperature process heat, more closely matched to chemical process temperatures, than a conventional light water reactor. Integrating HTGRs into conventional industrial processes would increase U.S. energy security and potentially reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), particularly CO2. This paper focuses on the integration of HTGRs into a coal to liquids (CTL) process, for the production of synthetic diesel fuel, naphtha, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The plant models for the CTL processes were developed using Aspen Plus. The models were constructed with plant production capacity set at 50,000 barrels per day of liquid products. Analysis of the conventional CTL case indicated a potential need for hydrogen supplementation from high temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), with heat and power supplied by the HTGR. By supplementing the process with an external hydrogen source, the need to “shift” the syngas using conventional water-gas shift reactors was eliminated. HTGR electrical power generation efficiency was set at 40%, a reactor size of 600 MWth was specified, and it was assumed that heat in the form of hot helium could be delivered at a maximum temperature of 700°C to the processes. Results from the Aspen Plus model were used to perform a preliminary economic analysis and a life cycle emissions assessment. The following conclusions were drawn when evaluating the nuclear assisted CTL process against the conventional process: • 11 HTGRs (600 MWth each) are required to support production of a 50,000 barrel per day CTL facility. When compared to conventional CTL production, nuclear integration decreases coal

  12. HTGR-Integrated Coal To Liquids Production Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandrik, Anastasia M.; Wood, Rick A.

    2010-01-01

    As part of the DOE's Idaho National Laboratory (INL) nuclear energy development mission, the INL is leading a program to develop and design a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which has been selected as the base design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. Because an HTGR operates at a higher temperature, it can provide higher temperature process heat, more closely matched to chemical process temperatures, than a conventional light water reactor. Integrating HTGRs into conventional industrial processes would increase U.S. energy security and potentially reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), particularly CO2. This paper focuses on the integration of HTGRs into a coal to liquids (CTL) process, for the production of synthetic diesel fuel, naphtha, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The plant models for the CTL processes were developed using Aspen Plus. The models were constructed with plant production capacity set at 50,000 barrels per day of liquid products. Analysis of the conventional CTL case indicated a potential need for hydrogen supplementation from high temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), with heat and power supplied by the HTGR. By supplementing the process with an external hydrogen source, the need to 'shift' the syngas using conventional water-gas shift reactors was eliminated. HTGR electrical power generation efficiency was set at 40%, a reactor size of 600 MWth was specified, and it was assumed that heat in the form of hot helium could be delivered at a maximum temperature of 700 C to the processes. Results from the Aspen Plus model were used to perform a preliminary economic analysis and a life cycle emissions assessment. The following conclusions were drawn when evaluating the nuclear assisted CTL process against the conventional process: (1) 11 HTGRs (600 MWth each) are required to support production of a 50,000 barrel per day CTL facility. When compared to conventional CTL production, nuclear integration decreases coal consumption by 66

  13. Autonomous dynamic decision making in a nuclear fuel cycle simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelakauskas, Martynas; Auzans, Aris; Schneider, Erich A.; Tkaczyk, Alan H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Objective criteria based decision making in a nuclear fuel cycle simulator. • Simulation driven by an evolving performance metric. • Implementation of the model in a nuclear fuel cycle simulator. • Verification of dynamic decision making based on uranium price evolution. -- Abstract: Growing energy demand and the push to move toward carbon-free ways of electricity generation have renewed the world's interest in nuclear energy. Due to the high technical and economic uncertainties related to nuclear energy, simulation tools have become a necessity in order to plan and evaluate possible nuclear fuel cycles (NFCs). Most of the NFC simulators today work by running the simulation with a user-defined set of facility build orders and preferences. While this allows for a simple way to change the simulation conditions, it may not always lead to optimal results and strongly relies on the user defining the correct parameters. This study looks into the possibility of using the expected cost of electricity (CoE) as the driving build decision variable instead of relying on user-defined build orders. This is a first step toward a more general decision making strategy in dynamic fuel cycle simulation. For this purpose, additional modules were implemented in an NFC simulator, VEGAS, with the consumption dependent price of uranium as a time-varying NFC cost component that drives the cost competitiveness of available NFC options. The model was demonstrated to verify the correct operation of a CoE-driven NFC simulator

  14. Physical model of the nuclear fuel cycle simulation code SITON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brolly, Á.; Halász, M.; Szieberth, M.; Nagy, L.; Fehér, S.

    2017-01-01

    Finding answers to main challenges of nuclear energy, like resource utilisation or waste minimisation, calls for transient fuel cycle modelling. This motivation led to the development of SITON v2.0 a dynamic, discrete facilities/discrete materials and also discrete events fuel cycle simulation code. The physical model of the code includes the most important fuel cycle facilities. Facilities can be connected flexibly; their number is not limited. Material transfer between facilities is tracked by taking into account 52 nuclides. Composition of discharged fuel is determined using burnup tables except for the 2400 MW thermal power design of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR2400). For the GFR2400 the FITXS method is used, which fits one-group microscopic cross-sections as polynomial functions of the fuel composition. This method is accurate and fast enough to be used in fuel cycle simulations. Operation of the fuel cycle, i.e. material requests and transfers, is described by discrete events. In advance of the simulation reactors and plants formulate their requests as events; triggered requests are tracked. After that, the events are simulated, i.e. the requests are fulfilled and composition of the material flow between facilities is calculated. To demonstrate capabilities of SITON v2.0, a hypothetical transient fuel cycle is presented in which a 4-unit VVER-440 reactor park was replaced by one GFR2400 that recycled its own spent fuel. It is found that the GFR2400 can be started if the cooling time of its spent fuel is 2 years. However, if the cooling time is 5 years it needs an additional plutonium feed, which can be covered from the spent fuel of a Generation III light water reactor.

  15. Numerical simulator of the CANDU fueling machine driving desk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doca, Cezar

    2008-01-01

    As a national and European premiere, in the 2003 - 2005 period, at the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti two CANDU fueling machine heads, no.4 and no.5, for the Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda - Unit 2 were successfully tested. To perform the tests of these machines, a special CANDU fueling machine testing rig was built and was (and is) available for this goal. The design of the CANDU fueling machine test rig from the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti is a replica of the similar equipment operating in CANDU 6 type nuclear power plants. High technical level of the CANDU fueling machine tests required the using of an efficient data acquisition and processing Computer Control System. The challenging goal was to build a computer system (hardware and software) designed and engineered to control the test and calibration process of these fuel handling machines. The design takes care both of the functionality required to correctly control the CANDU fueling machine and of the additional functionality required to assist the testing process. Both the fueling machine testing rig and staff had successfully assessed by the AECL representatives during two missions. At same the time, at the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti was/is developed a numerical simulator for the CANDU fueling machine operators training. The paper presents the numerical simulator - a special PC program (software) which simulates the graphics and the functions and the operations at the main desk of the computer control system. The simulator permits 'to drive' a CANDU fueling machine in two manners: manual or automatic. The numerical simulator is dedicated to the training of operators who operate the CANDU fueling machine in a nuclear power plant with CANDU reactor. (author)

  16. European research and development on HTGR process heat applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, Karl; Lensa, Werner von

    2003-01-01

    The High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor represents a suitable and safe concept of a future nuclear power plant with the potential to produce process heat to be utilized in many industrial processes such as reforming of natural gas, coal gasification and liquefaction, heavy oil recovery to serve for the production of the storable commodities hydrogen or energy alcohols as future transportation fuels. The paper will include a description of the broad range of applications for HTGR process heat and describe the results of the German long-term projects ''Prototype Nuclear Process Heat Reactor Project'' (PNP), in which the technical feasibility of an HTGR in combination with a chemical facility for coal gasification processes has been proven, and ''Nuclear Long-Distance Energy Transportation'' (NFE), which was the demonstration and verification of the closed-cycle, long-distance energy transmission system EVA/ADAM. Furthermore, new European research initiatives are shortly described. A particular concern is the safety of a combined nuclear/chemical facility requiring a concept against potential fire and explosion hazards. (author)

  17. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Analysis and Simulation Tool (FAST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Won Il; Kwon, Eun Ha; Kim, Ho Dong

    2005-06-15

    This paper describes the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Analysis and Simulation Tool (FAST) which has been developed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Categorizing various mix of nuclear reactors and fuel cycles into 11 scenario groups, the FAST calculates all the required quantities for each nuclear fuel cycle component, such as mining, conversion, enrichment and fuel fabrication for each scenario. A major advantage of the FAST is that the code employs a MS Excel spread sheet with the Visual Basic Application, allowing users to manipulate it with ease. The speed of the calculation is also quick enough to make comparisons among different options in a considerably short time. This user-friendly simulation code is expected to be beneficial to further studies on the nuclear fuel cycle to find best options for the future all proliferation risk, environmental impact and economic costs considered.

  18. The prospects of HTGR in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Y.; Tong, Y.; Wu, Z.

    1994-01-01

    Present situations of the energy market in China are briefly introduced, while the forecast of the possible development of the Chinese energy market is shortly discussed. The discussion focuses on the expected roles of high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) in the Chinese energy market in the next century. The history and present status of the development of HTGR technologies in China are presented. In the National High-Tech Programme, a 10 MW helium-cooled test reactor (HTR-10) is projected to be built within this century. The main technical and safety features of the HTR-10 reactor are discussed. (author)

  19. Dynamic simulation of a direct carbonate fuel cell power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest, J.B. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States); Ghezel-Ayagh, H.; Kush, A.K. [Fuel Cell Engineering, Danbury, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) is commercializing a 2.85 MW Direct carbonate Fuel Cell (DFC) power plant. The commercialization sequence has already progressed through construction and operation of the first commercial-scale DFC power plant on a U.S. electric utility, the 2 MW Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP), and the completion of the early phases of a Commercial Plant design. A 400 kW fuel cell stack Test Facility is being built at Energy Research Corporation (ERC), FCE`s parent company, which will be capable of testing commercial-sized fuel cell stacks in an integrated plant configuration. Fluor Daniel, Inc. provided engineering, procurement, and construction services for SCDP and has jointly developed the Commercial Plant design with FCE, focusing on the balance-of-plant (BOP) equipment outside of the fuel cell modules. This paper provides a brief orientation to the dynamic simulation of a fuel cell power plant and the benefits offered.

  20. Simulating the Use of Alternative Fuels in a Turbofan Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Chin, Jeffrey Chevoor; Liu, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    The interest in alternative fuels for aviation has created a need to evaluate their effect on engine performance. The use of dynamic turbofan engine simulations enables the comparative modeling of the performance of these fuels on a realistic test bed in terms of dynamic response and control compared to traditional fuels. The analysis of overall engine performance and response characteristics can lead to a determination of the practicality of using specific alternative fuels in commercial aircraft. This paper describes a procedure to model the use of alternative fuels in a large commercial turbofan engine, and quantifies their effects on engine and vehicle performance. In addition, the modeling effort notionally demonstrates that engine performance may be maintained by modifying engine control system software parameters to account for the alternative fuel.

  1. Conjugate heat transfer simulations of advanced research reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piro, M.H.A., E-mail: pirom@aecl.ca; Leitch, B.W.

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Temperature predictions are enhanced by coupling heat transfer in solid and fluid zones. • Seven different cases are considered to observe trends in predicted temperature and pressure. • The seven cases consider high/medium/low power, flow, burnup, fuel material and geometry. • Simulations provide temperature predictions for performance/safety. Boiling is unlikely. • Simulations demonstrate that a candidate geometry can enhance performance/safety. - Abstract: The current work presents numerical simulations of coupled fluid flow and heat transfer of advanced U–Mo/Al and U–Mo/Mg research reactor fuels in support of performance and safety analyses. The objective of this study is to enhance predictions of the flow regime and fuel temperatures through high fidelity simulations that better capture various heat transfer pathways and with a more realistic geometric representation of the fuel assembly in comparison to previous efforts. Specifically, thermal conduction, convection and radiation mechanisms are conjugated between the solid and fluid regions. Also, a complete fuel element assembly is represented in three dimensional space, permitting fluid flow and heat transfer to be simulated across the entire domain. Seven case studies are examined that vary the coolant inlet conditions, specific power, and burnup to investigate the predicted changes in the pressure drop in the coolant and the fuel, clad and coolant temperatures. In addition, an alternate fuel geometry is considered with helical fins (replacing straight fins in the existing design) to investigate the relative changes in predicted fluid and solid temperatures. Numerical simulations predict that the clad temperature is sensitive to changes in the thermal boundary layer in the coolant, particularly in simultaneously developing flow regions, while the temperature in the fuel is anticipated to be unaffected. Finally, heat transfer between fluid and solid regions is enhanced with

  2. Development of dynamic simulation code for fuel cycle of fusion reactor. 1. Single pulse operation simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Isao; Seki, Yasushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Sasaki, Makoto; Shintani, Kiyonori; Kim, Yeong-Chan

    1997-11-01

    A dynamic simulation code for the fuel cycle of a fusion experimental reactor has been developed. The code follows the fuel inventory change with time in the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system during a single pulse operation. The time dependence of the fuel inventory distribution is evaluated considering the fuel burn and exhaust in the plasma chamber, purification and supply functions. For each subsystem of the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system, the fuel inventory equation is written based on the equation of state considering the function of fuel burn, exhaust, purification, and supply. The processing constants of subsystem for the steady states were taken from the values in the ITER Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) report. Using the code, the time dependence of the fuel supply and inventory depending on the burn state and subsystem processing functions are shown. (author)

  3. Nuclear heat source component design considerations for HTGR process heat reactor plant concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Kapich, D.; King, J.H.; Venkatesh, M.C.

    1982-05-01

    The coupling of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) and a chemical process facility has the potential for long-term synthetic fuel production (i.e., oil, gasoline, aviation fuel, hydrogen, etc) using coal as the carbon source. Studies are in progress to exploit the high-temperature capability of an advanced HTGR variant for nuclear process heat. The process heat plant discussed in this paper has a 1170-MW(t) reactor as the heat source and the concept is based on indirect reforming, i.e., the high-temperature nuclear thermal energy is transported [via an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX)] to the externally located process plant by a secondary helium transport loop. Emphasis is placed on design considerations for the major nuclear heat source (NHS) components, and discussions are presented for the reactor core, prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV), rotating machinery, and heat exchangers

  4. Drying studies of simulated DOE aluminum plate fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lords, R.E.; Windes, W.E.; Crepeau, J.C.; Sidwell, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to validate the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) drying procedures for preparation of corroded aluminum plate fuel for dry storage in an existing vented (and filtered) fuel storage facility. A mixture of hydrated aluminum oxide bound with a clay was used to model the aluminum corrosion product and sediment expected in these Department of Energy (DOE) owned fuel types. Previous studies demonstrated that the current drying procedures are adequate for removal of free water inside the storage canister and for transfer of this fuel to a vented dry storage facility. However, using these same drying procedures, the simulated corrosion product was found to be difficult to dry completely from between the aluminum clad plates of the fuel. Another related set of experiments was designed to ensure that the fuel would not be damaged during the drying process. Aluminum plate fuels are susceptible to pitting damage on the cladding that can result in a portion of UAl x fuel meat being disgorged. This would leave a water-filled void beneath the pit in the cladding. The question was whether bursting would occur when water in the void flashes to steam, causing separation of the cladding from the fuel, and/or possible rupture. Aluminum coupons were fabricated to model damaged fuel plates. These coupons do not rupture or sustain any visible damage during credible drying scenarios

  5. A 1500-MW(e) HTGR nuclear generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinson, R.C.; Hornbuckle, J.D.; Wilson, W.H.

    1976-01-01

    A conceptual design of a 1500-MW(e) HTGR nuclear generating station is described. The design concept was developed under a three-party arrangement among General Atomic Company as nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) supplier, Bechtel Power Corporation as engineer-constructors of the balance of plant (BOP), and Southern California Edison Company as a potential utility user. A typical site in the lower Mojave Desert in southeastern California was assumed for the purpose of establishing the basic site criteria. Various alternative steam cycles, prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) and component arrangements, fuel-handling concepts, and BOP layouts were developed and investigated in a programme designed to lead to an economic plant design. The paper describes the NSSS and BOP designs, the general plant arrangement and a description of the site and its unique characteristics. The elements of the design are: the use of four steam generators that are twice the capacity of GA's steam generators for its 770-MW(e) and 1100-MW(e) units; the rearrangement of steam and feedwater piping and support within the PCRV; the elimination of the PCRV star foundation to reduce the overall height of the containment building as well as of the PCRV; a revised fuel-handling concept which permits the use of a simplified, grade-level fuel storage pool; a plant arrangement that permits a substantial reduction in the penetration structure around the containment while still minimizing the lengths of cable and piping runs; and the use of two tandem-compound turbine generators. Plant design bases are discussed, and events leading to the changes in concept from the reference 8-loop PCRV 1500-MW(e) HTGR unit are described. (author)

  6. Consolidated fuel reprocessing program. Progress report, January 1-March 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-06-01

    Progress and activities are reported on process development, laboratory R and D, engineering research, engineering systems, Integrated Equipment Test (IET) facility operations, and HTGR fuel reprocessing

  7. Monte-Carlo simulation of dispersion fuel meat structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Zhonghu; Ying Shihao

    2003-01-01

    Under the irradiation conditions in research reactors, the inter-diffusion occurs at the fuel particle and matrix interfaces of U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion fuel. Because of the inter-diffusion reaction, the U 3 Al 7 Si 2 layer is formed around each U 3 Si 2 particle. The layer thickness grows up with irradiation duration and fission density. The formation of resultant layer causes the consumption of U 3 Si 2 fuel and aluminum matrix. This process leads to the evolution of geometrical structure of fuel meat. According to the stochastic locations of particles in dispersion, the authors developed a simulation method for the evolution of the fuel meat structure by utilizing Monte-Carlo method. Every particle is characterized by its diameter and location. The parameters of meat structure include particle size distribution, as-fabricated fuel volume fraction, resultant layer thickness, layer volume fraction, U 3 Si 2 fuel volume fraction, aluminum volume fraction, contiguity probability and inter-linkage fraction of particles. Particularly for the dispersion with as-fabricated fuel volume fraction of 43% and particle sizes in a well-defined normal distribution, more than 13000 sampling particles are simulated in the meat volume of 6 mm x 6 mm x 0.5 mm. The meat structure parameters are calculated as functions of layer thickness in the range from 0-16 μm. (authors)

  8. Lessons Learned From Dynamic Simulations of Advanced Fuel Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, Steven J.; Dixon, Brent W.; Jacobson, Jacob J.; Matthern, Gretchen E.; Shropshire, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Years of performing dynamic simulations of advanced nuclear fuel cycle options provide insights into how they could work and how one might transition from the current once-through fuel cycle. This paper summarizes those insights from the context of the 2005 objectives and goals of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Our intent is not to compare options, assess options versus those objectives and goals, nor recommend changes to those objectives and goals. Rather, we organize what we have learned from dynamic simulations in the context of the AFCI objectives for waste management, proliferation resistance, uranium utilization, and economics. Thus, we do not merely describe 'lessons learned' from dynamic simulations but attempt to answer the 'so what' question by using this context. The analyses have been performed using the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Dynamics (VISION). We observe that the 2005 objectives and goals do not address many of the inherently dynamic discriminators among advanced fuel cycle options and transitions thereof

  9. Coating Thickness Measurement of the Simulated TRISO-Coated Fuel Particles using an Image Plate and a High Resolution Scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woong Ki; Kim, Yeon Ku; Jeong, Kyung Chai; Lee, Young Woo; Kim, Bong Goo; Eom, Sung Ho; Kim, Young Min; Yeo, Sung Hwan; Cho, Moon Sung

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the thickness of the coating layers of 196 coated particles was measured using an Image Plate detector, high resolution scanner and digital image processing techniques. The experimental results are as follows. - An X-ray image was acquired for 196 simulated TRISO-coated fuel particles with ZrO 2 kernel using an Image Plate with high resolution in a reduced amount of time. - We could observe clear boundaries between coating layers for 196 particles. - The geometric distortion error was compensated for the calculation. - The coating thickness of the TRISO-coated fuel particles can be nondestructively measured using X-ray radiography and digital image processing technology. - We can increase the number of TRISO-coated particles to be inspected by increasing the number of Image Plate detectors. A TRISO-coated fuel particle for an HTGR (high temperature gas-cooled reactor) is composed of a nuclear fuel kernel and outer coating layers. The coating layers consist of buffer PyC (pyrolytic carbon), inner PyC (I-PyC), SiC, and outer PyC (O-PyC) layer. The coating thickness is measured to evaluate the soundness of the coating layers. X-ray radiography is one of the nondestructive alternatives for measuring the coating thickness without generating a radioactive waste. Several billion particles are subject to be loaded in a reactor. A lot of sample particles should be tested as much as possible. The acquired X-ray images for the measurement of coating thickness have included a small number of particles because of the restricted resolution and size of the X-ray detector. We tried to test many particles for an X-ray exposure to reduce the measurement time. In this experiment, an X-ray image was acquired for 196 simulated TRISO-coated fuel particles using an image plate and high resolution scanner with a pixel size of 25Χ25 μm 2 . The coating thickness for the particles could be measured on the image

  10. Regulatory Framework of Safety for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Chang Wook; Suh, Nam Duk

    2011-01-01

    Recent accident in Fukushima Daiichi plant in Japan makes big impacts on the future of nuclear business. Many countries are changing their nuclear projects and increased safety of nuclear plants is asked for from the public. Without providing safety the society accepts, it might be almost impossible to build new plants further. In this sense high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) which is under development needs to be licensed reflecting this new expectation regarding safety. It means we should have higher level of safety goal and a systematic regulatory framework to assure the safety. In our previous paper, we evaluated the current safety goal and design practice in view of this new safety expectation after Fukushima accident. It was argued that a top-down approach starting from safety goal is necessary to develop safety requirements or to assure safety. Thus we need to propose an ultimate safety goal public accepts and then establish a systematic regulatory framework. In this paper we are going to provide a conceptual regulatory framework to guarantee the safety of HTGR. Section 2 discusses the recent trend of IAEA safety requirements and then summarize the HTGR design approach. Incorporating these discussions, we propose a conceptual framework of regulation for safety of HTGR

  11. FY1983 HTGR summary level program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The major focus and priority of the FY1983 HTGR Program is the development of the HTGR-SC/C Lead Project through one of the candidate lead utilities. Accordingly, high priority will be given to work described in WBS 04 for site and user specific studies toward the development of the Lead Project. Asessment of advanced HTGR systems will continue during FY1983 in accordance with the High Temperature Process Heat (HTPH) Concept Evaluation Plan. Within the context of that plan, the assessment of the monolithic HTPH concepts has been essentially completed in FY1982 and FY1983 activities and will be limited to documentation only. the major advanced HTGR systems efforts in FY1983 will be focused on the further definition of the Modular Reactor Systems concepts in both the reforming (MRS-R) and Steam Cycle/Cogeneration 9MRS-SC/C) configurations in WBS 41. The effort will concentrate upon key technical issues and trade studies oriented to reduction in expected cost and schedule duration. With regard to the latter, the most significant will be trade study addressing the degree of modularization of reactor plant structures. particular attention will be given to the confinement building which currently defines the critical path for construction

  12. HTGR gas turbine power plant preliminary design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutz, S.L.; Krase, J.M.; Meyer, L.

    1973-01-01

    The preliminary reference design of the HTGR gas turbine power plant is presented. Economic and practical problems and incentives related to the development and introduction of this type of power plant are evaluated. The plant features and major components are described, and a discussion of its performance, economics, development, safety, control, and maintenance is presented. 4 references

  13. Simulating Impacts of Disruptions to Liquid Fuels Infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Resilience and Regulatory Effects; Corbet, Thomas F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Policy and Decision Analytics; Baker, Arnold B. [ABB Consulting, Albuquerque, NM (United States); O' Rourke, Julia M. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2015-04-01

    This report presents a methodology for estimating the impacts of events that damage or disrupt liquid fuels infrastructure. The impact of a disruption depends on which components of the infrastructure are damaged, the time required for repairs, and the position of the disrupted components in the fuels supply network. Impacts are estimated for seven stressing events in regions of the United States, which were selected to represent a range of disruption types. For most of these events the analysis is carried out using the National Transportation Fuels Model (NTFM) to simulate the system-level liquid fuels sector response. Results are presented for each event, and a brief cross comparison of event simulation results is provided.

  14. Tribological study on machine elements of HTGR components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, M.; Asanabe, S.; Kawaguchi, K.; Ono, S.; Oyamada, T.

    1980-01-01

    There are some tribological features peculiar to machines used in a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plant. In this kind of plant, water-lubricated bearing combined with the buffer gas sealing system and/or gas-lubricated bearings are often applied in order to prevent degrading of the purity of coolant helium gas. And, it is essential for the reliability and safety design of the sliding members in the HTGR to obtain fundamental data on their friction and wear in high-temperature helium atmosphere. In this paper, the results of tests on these bearings and sliding members are introduced, which are summarized as follows: (1) Water-lubricated shrouded step thrust bearing and buffer gas sealing system were tested separately under the conditions simulated to those of circulators used in commercial plants. The results showed that each elements satisfies the requirements. (2) A hydrostatically gas-lubricated, pivoted pad journal bearing with a moat-shaped rectangular groove is found to be promising for use as a high-load bearing, which is indispensable for the development of a large-type circulator. (3) Use of ceramic coating and carbon graphite materials is effective for the prevention of adhesive wear which is apt to occur in metal-to-metal combinations. (author)

  15. Tribological study on machine elements of HTGR components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, Masaaki; Ono, Shigeharu; Asanabe, Sadao; Kawaguchi, Katsuyuki; Oyamada, Tetsuya.

    1981-11-01

    There are some tribological features peculiar to machines used in a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plant. In this kind of plant, water-lubricated bearing combined with the buffer gas sealing system and/or gas-lubricated bearings are often applied in order to prevent degrading of the purity of coolant helium gas. And, it is essential for the reliability and safety design of the sliding members in the HTGR to obtain fundamental data on their friction and wear in high-temperature helium atmosphere. In this paper, the results of tests on these bearings and sliding members are introduced, which are summarized as follows: (1) Water-lubricated shrouded step thrust bearing and buffer gas sealing system were tested separately under the condition simulated to those of circulators used in commercial plants. The results showed that each elements satisfies the requirements. (2) A hydrostatically gas-lubricated, pivoted pad journal bearing with a moat-shaped rectangular groove is found to be promising for use as a high-load bearing, which is indispensable for the development of a large-type circulator. (3) Use of ceramic coating and carbon graphite materials is effective for the prevention of adhesive wear which is apt to occur in metal-to-metal combinations. (author)

  16. From fuel cells to batteries: Synergies, scales and simulation methods

    OpenAIRE

    Bessler, Wolfgang G.

    2011-01-01

    The recent years have shown a dynamic growth of battery research and development activities both in academia and industry, supported by large governmental funding initiatives throughout the world. A particular focus is being put on lithium-based battery technologies. This situation provides a stimulating environment for the fuel cell modeling community, as there are considerable synergies in the modeling and simulation methods for fuel cells and batteries. At the same time, batter...

  17. Creep and fatigue properties of Incoloy 800H in a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) helium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, J.G.Y.; Soo, P.; Epel, L.

    1978-01-01

    A mechanical test program to assess the effects of a simulated HTGR helium environment on the fatigue and creep properties of Incoloy 800H and other primary-circuit metals is described. The emphasis and the objectives of this work are directed toward obtaining information to assess the integrity and safety of an HTGR throughout its service life. The helium test environment selected for study contained 40 μ atm H 2 O, 200 μ atm H 2 , 40 μ atm CO, 10 μ atm CO 2 , and 20 μ atm CH 4 . It is believed that this ''wet'' environment simulates that which could exist in a steam-cycle HTGR containing some leaking steam-generator tubes. A recirculating helium loop operating at about 4 psi in which impurities can be maintained at a constant level, has been constructed to supply the desired environment for fatigue and creep testing

  18. HTGR-steam cycle/cogeneration plant economic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    The cogeneration of heat and electricity provides the potential for improved fuel utilization and corresponding reductions in energy costs. In the evaluation of the cogeneration plant product costs, it is advantageous to develop joint-product cost curves for alternative cogeneration plant models. The advantages and incentives for cogeneration are then presented in a form most useful to evaluate the various energy options. The HTGR-Steam Cycle/Cogeneration (SC/C) system is envisioned to have strong cogeneration potential due to its high-quality steam capability, its perceived nuclear siting advantages, and its projected cost advantages relative to coal. The economic information presented is based upon capital costs developed during 1980 and the economic assumptions identified herein

  19. 131I release from a HTGR during the LOFC accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, J.E.

    1975-03-01

    The time-dependent release of 131 I from both the core and the containment building of a high temperature gas-cooled (HTGR) reactor during the loss of forced coolant (LOFC) accident is studied. A simplified core release model is combined with a containment building release model so that the total amount of the isotope released to the environment can be calculated. The time-dependent release of 131 I from the core during the LOFC accident is primarily a function of the time-dependent core temperatures and the failed fuel release constants. The most important factor in calculating the amount of the isotope released to the environment is the total amount released into the containment building. (U.S.)

  20. Simulation of nuclear fuel reprocessing for safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canty, M.J.; Dayem, H.A.; Kern, E.A.; Spannagel, G.

    1983-11-01

    For safeguarding the chemical process area of future reprocessing plants the near-real-time material accountancy (NRTMA) method might be applied. Experimental data are not yet available for testing the capability of the NRTMA method but can be simulated using a digital computer. This report describes the mathematical modeling of the Pu-bearing components of reprocessing plants and presents first results obtained by simulation models. (orig.) [de

  1. PEM fuel cell modeling and simulation using Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Spiegel, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    Although, the basic concept of a fuel cell is quite simple, creating new designs and optimizing their performance takes serious work and a mastery of several technical areas. PEM Fuel Cell Modeling and Simulation Using Matlab, provides design engineers and researchers with a valuable tool for understanding and overcoming barriers to designing and building the next generation of PEM Fuel Cells. With this book, engineers can test components and verify designs in the development phase, saving both time and money.Easy to read and understand, this book provides design and modelling tips for

  2. Limits on the experimental simulation of nuclear fuel rod response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagar, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    The steady-state and transient effects of intrinxic geometric and material property differences between typical nuclear fuel pins and electric fuel pin simulators (FPSs) are identified. The effectiveness of varying the transient power supplied to the FPS in reducing the differences between the transient responses of nuclear fuel pins and FPSs is investigated. This effectiveness is shown to be limited by the heat capacity of the FPS, the allowed range of the power program, and different FPS power requirements at different positions on a full-length FPS

  3. Software Platform Evaluation - Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. J. Jacobson; D. E. Shropshire; W. B. West

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this Software Platform Evaluation (SPE) is to document the top-level evaluation of potential software platforms on which to construct a simulation model that satisfies the requirements for a Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION) of the Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC). See the Software Requirements Specification for Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) Model (INEEL/EXT-05-02643, Rev. 0) for a discussion of the objective and scope of the VISION model. VISION is intended to serve as a broad systems analysis and study tool applicable to work conducted as part of the AFCI (including costs estimates) and Generation IV reactor development studies. This document will serve as a guide for selecting the most appropriate software platform for VISION. This is a ''living document'' that will be modified over the course of the execution of this work

  4. A MULTIDIMENSIONAL AND MULTIPHYSICS APPROACH TO NUCLEAR FUEL BEHAVIOR SIMULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. L. Williamson; J. D. Hales; S. R. Novascone; M. R. Tonks; D. R. Gaston; C. J. Permann; D. Andrs; R. C. Martineau

    2012-04-01

    Important aspects of fuel rod behavior, for example pellet-clad mechanical interaction (PCMI), fuel fracture, oxide formation, non-axisymmetric cooling, and response to fuel manufacturing defects, are inherently multidimensional in addition to being complicated multiphysics problems. Many current modeling tools are strictly 2D axisymmetric or even 1.5D. This paper outlines the capabilities of a new fuel modeling tool able to analyze either 2D axisymmetric or fully 3D models. These capabilities include temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of fuel; swelling and densification; fuel creep; pellet fracture; fission gas release; cladding creep; irradiation growth; and gap mechanics (contact and gap heat transfer). The need for multiphysics, multidimensional modeling is then demonstrated through a discussion of results for a set of example problems. The first, a 10-pellet rodlet, demonstrates the viability of the solution method employed. This example highlights the effect of our smeared cracking model and also shows the multidimensional nature of discrete fuel pellet modeling. The second example relies on our the multidimensional, multiphysics approach to analyze a missing pellet surface problem. As a final example, we show a lower-length-scale simulation coupled to a continuum-scale simulation.

  5. Multidimensional simulations of hydrides during fuel rod lifecycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stafford, D.S.

    2015-01-01

    In light water reactor fuel rods, waterside corrosion of zirconium-alloy cladding introduces hydrogen into the cladding, where it is slightly soluble. When the solubility limit is reached, the hydrogen precipitates into crystals of zirconium hydride which decrease the ductility of the cladding and may lead to cladding failure during dry storage or transportation events. The distribution of the hydride phase and the orientation of the crystals depend on the history of the spatial temperature and stress profiles in the cladding. In this work, we have expanded the existing hydride modeling capability in the BISON fuel performance code with the goal of predicting both global and local effects on the radial, azimuthal and axial distribution of the hydride phase. We compare results from 1D simulations to published experimental data. We demonstrate the new capability by simulating in 2D a fuel rod throughout a lifecycle that includes irradiation, short-term storage in the spent fuel pool, drying, and interim storage in a dry cask. Using the 2D simulations, we present qualitative predictions of the effects of the inter-pellet gap and the drying conditions on the growth of a hydride rim. - Highlights: • We extend BISON fuel performance code to simulate lifecycle of fuel rods. • We model hydrogen evolution in cladding from reactor through dry storage. • We validate 1D simulations of hydrogen evolution against experiments. • We show results of 2D axisymmetric simulations predicting hydride formation. • We show how our model predicts formation of a hydride rim in the cladding.

  6. Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) Furnace for Post-Irradiation Heating Tests of VHTR Fuel Compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul A Demkowicz; Paul Demkowicz; David V Laug

    2010-10-01

    Abstract –Fuel irradiation testing and post-irradiation examination are currently in progress as part of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Fuels Development and Qualification Program. The PIE campaign will include extensive accident testing of irradiated very high temperature reactor fuel compacts to verify fission product retention characteristics at high temperatures. This work will be carried out at both the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, beginning with accident tests on irradiated fuel from the AGR-1 experiment in 2010. A new furnace system has been designed, built, and tested at INL to perform high temperature accident tests. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system is designed to heat fuel specimens at temperatures up to 2000°C in helium while monitoring the release of volatile fission metals (e.g. Cs, Ag, Sr, Eu, and I) and fission gases (Kr, Xe). Fission gases released from the fuel to the sweep gas are monitored in real time using dual cryogenic traps fitted with high purity germanium detectors. Condensable fission products are collected on a plate attached to a water-cooled cold finger that can be exchanged periodically without interrupting the test. Analysis of fission products on the condensation plates involves dry gamma counting followed by chemical analysis of selected isotopes. This paper will describe design and operational details of the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace system, as well as preliminary system calibration results.

  7. Two-dimensional vertical model seismic test and analysis for HTGR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takeshi; Honma, Toshiaki.

    1983-02-01

    The resistance against earthquakes of high-temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) core with block-type fuels is not fully ascertained yet. Seismic studies must be made if such a reactor plant is to be installed in areas with frequent earthquakes. In the paper the test results of seismic behavior of a half-scale two-dimensional vertical slice core model and analysis are presented. The following results were obtained: (1) With soft spring support of the fixed side reflector structure, the relative column displacement is larger than that for hand support but the impact reaction force is smaller. (2) In the case of hard spring support the dowel force is smaller than for soft support. (3) The relative column displacement is larger in the core center than at the periphery. The impact acceleration (force) in the center is smaller than at the periphery. (4) The relative column displacement and impact reaction force are smaller with the gas pressure simulation spring than without. (5) With decreasing gap width between the top blocks of columns, the relative column displacement and impact reaction force decrease. (6) The column damping ratio was estimated as 4 -- 10% of critical. (7) The maximum impact reaction force for random waves such as seismic was below 60% that for a sinusoidal wave. (8) Vibration behavior and impact response are in good agreement between test and analysis. (author)

  8. Reduction on high level radioactive waste volume and geological repository footprint with high burn-up and high thermal efficiency of HTGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukaya, Yuji, E-mail: fukaya.yuji@jaea.go.jp; Nishihara, Tetsuo

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • We evaluate the number of canisters and its footprint for HTGR. • We proposed new waste loading method for direct disposal of HTGR. • HTGR can significantly reduce HLW volume compared with LWR. - Abstract: Reduction on volume of High Level radioactive Waste (HLW) and footprint in a geological repository due to high burn-up and high thermal efficiency of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) has been investigated. A helium-cooled and graphite-moderated commercial HTGR was designed as a Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor (GTHTR300), and that has particular features such as significantly high burn-up of approximately 120 GWd/t, high thermal efficiency around 50%, and pin-in-block type fuel. The pin-in-block type fuel was employed to reduce processed graphite volume in reprocessing. By applying the feature, effective waste loading method for direct disposal is proposed in this study. By taking into account these feature, the number of HLW canister generations and its repository footprint are evaluated by burn-up fuel composition, thermal calculation and criticality calculation in repository. As a result, it is found that the number of canisters and its repository footprint per electricity generation can be reduced by 60% compared with Light Water Reactor (LWR) representative case for direct disposal because of the higher burn-up, higher thermal efficiency, less TRU generation, and effective waste loading proposed in this study for HTGR. But, the reduced ratios change to 20% and 50% if the long term durability of LWR canister is guaranteed. For disposal with reprocessing, the number of canisters and its repository footprint per electricity generation can be reduced by 30% compared with LWR because of the 30% higher thermal efficiency of HTGR.

  9. Identification of key amino acid residues in the hTGR5-nomilin interaction and construction of its binding model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Takashi; Mita, Moeko; Ikari, Naho; Kuboyama, Ayane; Hashimoto, Shuzo; Kaneko, Tatsuya; Ishiguro, Masaji; Shimizu, Makoto; Inoue, Jun; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2017-01-01

    TGR5, a member of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family, is activated by bile acids. Because TGR5 promotes energy expenditure and improves glucose homeostasis, it is recognized as a key target in treating metabolic diseases. We previously showed that nomilin, a citrus limonoid, activates TGR5 and confers anti-obesity and anti-hyperglycemic effects in mice. Information on the TGR5-nomilin interaction regarding molecular structure, however, has not been reported. In the present study, we found that human TGR5 (hTGR5) shows higher nomilin responsiveness than does mouse TGR5 (mTGR5). Using mouse-human chimeric TGR5, we also found that three amino acid residues (Q77ECL1, R80ECL1, and Y893.29) are important in the hTGR5-nomilin interaction. Based on these results, an hTGR5-nomilin binding model was constructed using in silico docking simulation, demonstrating that four hydrophilic hydrogen-bonding interactions occur between nomilin and hTGR5. The binding mode of hTGR5-nomilin is vastly different from those of other TGR5 agonists previously reported, suggesting that TGR5 forms various binding patterns depending on the type of agonist. Our study promotes a better understanding of the structure of TGR5, and it may be useful in developing and screening new TGR5 agonists.

  10. An introduction to our activities supporting HTGR developments in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, S.; Hayashi, T.; Tsuchie, Y.

    1997-01-01

    On the view point the most important for the HTGR development promotion now in Japan is to have people know about HTGR, the Research Association of HTGR Plants(RAHP) has paid the best efforts for making an appealing report for the past two years. The outline of the report is described with an introduction of some basic experiments done on the passive decay heat removal as one of the activities carried out in a member of the association. (author)

  11. Simulated Fission Gas Behavior in Silicide Fuel at LWR Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yinbin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mo, Kun [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yacout, Abdellatif [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Harp, Jason [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-09-15

    As a promising candidate for the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) used in light water reactors (LWRs), the fuel performance of uranium silicide (U3Si2) at LWR conditions needs to be well-understood. However, existing experimental post-irradiation examination (PIE) data are limited to the research reactor conditions, which involve lower fuel temperature compared to LWR conditions. This lack of appropriate experimental data significantly affects the development of fuel performance codes that can precisely predict the microstructure evolution and property degradation at LWR conditions, and therefore evaluate the qualification of U3Si2 as an AFT for LWRs. Considering the high cost, long timescale, and restrictive access of the in-pile irradiation experiments, this study aims to utilize ion irradiation to simulate the inpile behavior of the U3Si2 fuel. Both in situ TEM ion irradiation and ex situ high-energy ATLAS ion irradiation experiments were employed to simulate different types of microstructure modifications in U3Si2. Multiple PIE techniques were used or will be used to quantitatively analyze the microstructure evolution induced by ion irradiation so as to provide valuable reference for the development of fuel performance code prior to the availability of the in-pile irradiation data.

  12. Reprocessing flowsheet and material balance for MEU spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, L.

    1978-10-01

    In response to nonproliferation concerns, the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) Fuel Recycle Development Program is investigating the processing requirements for a denatured medium-enriched uranium--thorium (MEU/Th) fuel cycle. Prior work emphasized the processing requirements for a high-enriched uranium--thorium (HEU/Th) fuel cycle. This report presents reprocessing flowsheets for an HTGR/MEU fuel recycle base case. Material balance data have been calculated for reprocessing of spent MEU and recycle fuels in the HTGR Recycle Reference Facility (HRRF). Flowsheet and mass flow effects in MEU-cycle reprocessing are discussed in comparison with prior HEU-cycle flowsheets

  13. Very small HTGR nuclear power plant concepts for special terrestrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Goodjohn, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    The role of the very small nuclear power plant, of a few megawatts capacity, is perceived to be for special applications where an energy source as required but the following prevail: 1) no indigenous fossil fuel source, in long transport distances that add substantially to the cost of oil, coal in gas, and 3) secure long-term power production for defense applications with freedom from fuel supply lines. A small High Temperature Gas-Cooled reactor (HTGR) plant could provide the total energy needs for 1) a military installation, 2) an island base of strategic significance, 3) an industrial community or 4) an urban area. The small HTGR is regarded as a fixed-base installation (as opposed to a mobile system). All of the major components would be factory fabricated and transported to the site where emphasis would be placed on minimizing the construction time. The very small HTGR plant, currently in an early stage of design definition, has the potential for meeting the unique needs of the small energy user in both the military and private sectors. The plant may find acceptance for specialized applications in the industrialized nations and to meet the energy needs of developing nations. Emphasis in the design has been placed on safety, simplicity and compactness

  14. Heavy truck modeling for fuel consumption. Simulations and measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandberg, T.

    2001-12-01

    Fuel consumption for heavy trucks depends on many factors like roads, weather, and driver behavior that are hard for a manufacturer to influence. However, one design possibility is the power train configuration. Here a new simulation program for heavy trucks is created to find the configuration of the power train that gives the lowest fuel consumption for each transport task. For efficient simulations the model uses production code for speed and gear control, and it uses exchangeable data sets to allow simulation of the whole production range of engine types, on recorded road profiles from all over the world. Combined with a graphical user interface this application is called STARS (Scania Truck And Road Simulation). The forces of rolling resistance and air resistance in the model are validated through an experiment where the propeller shaft torque of a heavy truck is measured. It is found that the coefficient of rolling resistance is strongly dependent on tire temperature, not only on vehicle speed as expected. This led to the development of a new model for rolling resistance. The model includes the dynamic behavior of the tires and relates rolling resistance to tire temperature and vehicle speed. In another experiment the fuel consumption of a test truck in highway driving is measured. The altitude of the road is recorded with a barometer and used in the corresponding simulations. Despite of the limited accuracy of this equipment the simulation program manage to predict a level of fuel consumption only 2% lower than the real measurements. It is concluded that STARS is a good tool for predicting fuel consumption for trucks in highway driving and for comparing different power train configurations.

  15. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace system for high temperature performance testing of VHTR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demkowicz, Paul A., E-mail: paul.demkowicz@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 Fremont Avenue, MS 3860, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3860 (United States); Laug, David V.; Scates, Dawn M.; Reber, Edward L.; Roybal, Lyle G.; Walter, John B.; Harp, Jason M. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 Fremont Avenue, MS 3860, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3860 (United States); Morris, Robert N. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A system has been developed for safety testing of irradiated coated particle fuel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FACS system is designed to facilitate remote operation in a shielded hot cell. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer System will measure release of fission gases and condensable fission products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fuel performance can be evaluated at temperatures as high as 2000 Degree-Sign C in flowing helium. - Abstract: The AGR-1 irradiation of TRISO-coated particle fuel specimens was recently completed and represents the most successful such irradiation in US history, reaching peak burnups of greater than 19% FIMA with zero failures out of 300,000 particles. An extensive post-irradiation examination (PIE) campaign will be conducted on the AGR-1 fuel in order to characterize the irradiated fuel properties, assess the in-pile fuel performance in terms of coating integrity and fission metals release, and determine the fission product retention behavior during high temperature safety testing. A new furnace system has been designed, built, and tested to perform high temperature accident tests. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system is designed to heat fuel specimens at temperatures up to 2000 Degree-Sign C in helium while monitoring the release of volatile fission metals (e.g. Cs, Ag, Sr, and Eu), iodine, and fission gases (Kr, Xe). Fission gases released from the fuel to the sweep gas are monitored in real time using dual cryogenic traps fitted with high purity germanium detectors. Condensable fission products are collected on a plate attached to a water-cooled cold finger that can be exchanged periodically without interrupting the test. Analysis of fission products on the condensation plates involves dry gamma counting followed by chemical analysis of selected isotopes. This paper will describe design and operational details of the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system and the associated

  16. Beginning-of-life neutronic analysis of a 3000-MW(t) HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigil, J.C.

    1975-12-01

    The results of a study of safety-related neutronic characteristics for the beginning-of-life core of a 3000-MW(t) High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor are presented. Emphasis was placed on the temperature-dependent reactivity effects of fuel, moderator, control poisons, and fission products. Other neutronic characteristics studied were gross and local power distributions, neutron kinetics parameters, control rod and other material worths and worth distributions, and the reactivity worth of a selected hypothetical perturbation in the core configuration. The study was performed for the most part using discrete-ordinates transport theory codes and neutron cross sections that were interpolated from a four-parameter nine-group library supplied by the HTGR vendor. A few comparison calculations were also performed using nine-group data generated with an independent cross-section processing code system. Results from the study generally agree well with results reported by the HTGR vendor

  17. New small HTGR power plant concept with inherently safe features - an engineering and economic challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Sonn, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Studies are in a very early design stage to establish a modular concept High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant of about 100-MW(e) size to meet the special needs of small energy users in the industrialized and developing nations. The basic approach is to design a small system in which, even under the extreme conditions of loss of reactor pressure and loss of forced core cooling, the temperature would remain low enough so that the fuel would retain essentially all the fission products and the owner's investment would not be jeopardized. To realize economic goals, the designer faces the challenge of providing a standardized nuclear heat source, relying on a high percentage of factory fabrication to reduce site construction time, and keeping the system simple. While the proposed nuclear plant concept embodies new features, there is a large technology base to draw upon for the design of a small HTGR

  18. Developmental assessment of the Fort St. Vrain version of the Composite HTGR Analysis Program (CHAP-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroh, K.R.

    1980-01-01

    The Composite HTGR Analysis Program (CHAP) consists of a model-independent systems analysis mainframe named LASAN and model-dependent linked code modules, each representing a component, subsystem, or phenomenon of an HTGR plant. The Fort St. Vrain (FSV) version (CHAP-2) includes 21 coded modules that model the neutron kinetics and thermal response of the core; the thermal-hydraulics of the reactor primary coolant system, secondary steam supply system, and balance-of-plant; the actions of the control system and plant protection system; the response of the reactor building; and the relative hazard resulting from fuel particle failure. FSV steady-state and transient plant data are being used to partially verify the component modeling and dynamic smulation techniques used to predict plant response to postulated accident sequences

  19. Modeling and Simulation of a Nuclear Fuel Element Test Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Robert P.; Emrich, William

    2011-01-01

    "The Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator" test section closely simulates the internal operating conditions of a thermal nuclear rocket. The purpose of testing is to determine the ideal fuel rod characteristics for optimum thermal heat transfer to their hydrogen cooling/working fluid while still maintaining fuel rod structural integrity. Working fluid exhaust temperatures of up to 5,000 degrees Fahrenheit can be encountered. The exhaust gas is rendered inert and massively reduced in temperature for analysis using a combination of water cooling channels and cool N2 gas injectors in the H2-N2 mixer portion of the test section. An extensive thermal fluid analysis was performed in support of the engineering design of the H2-N2 mixer in order to determine the maximum "mass flow rate"-"operating temperature" curve of the fuel elements hydrogen exhaust gas based on the test facilities available cooling N2 mass flow rate as the limiting factor.

  20. Fuel rod simulator effects in flooding experiments single rod tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, M.

    1984-09-01

    The influence of a gas filled gap between cladding and pellet on the quenching behavior of a PWR fuel rod during the reflood phase of a LOCA has been investigated. Flooding experiments were conducted with a short length electrically heated single fuel rod simulator surrounded by glass housing. The gap of 0.05 mm width between the Zircaloy cladding and the internal Al 2 O 3 pellets of the rod was filled either wit helium or with argon to vary the radial heat resistance across the gap. This report presents some typical data and an evaluation of the reflood behavior of the fuel rod simulator used. The results show that the quench front propagates faster for increasing heat resistance in the gap between cladding and heat source of the rod. (orig.) [de

  1. Simulation with GOTHIC of experiments Oxidation of fuel in Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Murillo Mendez, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    In the present work has been addressed for the first time la simulation with the GOTHIC code, experiments oxidation and ignition of SFP in phase 1. This work represents a solid starting point for analysis of specific degradation of fuel in the pools of our facilities.

  2. Simulator for candu600 fuel handling system. the experimental model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinescu, N.; Predescu, D.; Valeca, S.

    2013-01-01

    A main way to increase the nuclear plant safety is related to selection and continuous training of the operation staff. In this order, the computer programs for training, testing and evaluation of the knowledge get, or training simulators including the advanced analytical models of the technological systems are using. The Institute for Nuclear Research from Pitesti, Romania intend to design and build an Fuel Handling Simulator at his F/M Head Test Rig facility, that will be used for training of operating personnel. This paper presents simulated system, advantages to use the simulator, and the experimental model of simulator, that has been built to allows setting of the requirements and fabrication details, especially for the software kit that will be designed and implement on main simulator. (authors)

  3. Nuclear fuel cycle cost analysis using a probabilistic simulation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Il Ko; Jong, Won Choi; Chul, Hyung Kang; Jae, Sol Lee; Kun, Jai Lee

    1998-01-01

    A simple approach was described to incorporate the Monte Carlo simulation technique into a fuel cycle cost estimate. As a case study, the once-through and recycle fuel cycle options were tested with some alternatives (ie. the change of distribution type for input parameters), and the simulation results were compared with the values calculated by a deterministic method. A three-estimate approach was used for converting cost inputs into the statistical parameters of assumed probabilistic distributions. It was indicated that the Monte Carlo simulation by a Latin Hypercube Sampling technique and subsequent sensitivity analyses were useful for examining uncertainty propagation of fuel cycle costs, and could more efficiently provide information to decisions makers than a deterministic method. It was shown from the change of distribution types of input parameters that the values calculated by the deterministic method were set around a 40 th ∼ 50 th percentile of the output distribution function calculated by probabilistic simulation. Assuming lognormal distribution of inputs, however, the values calculated by the deterministic method were set around an 85 th percentile of the output distribution function calculated by probabilistic simulation. It was also indicated from the results of the sensitivity analysis that the front-end components were generally more sensitive than the back-end components, of which the uranium purchase cost was the most important factor of all. It showed, also, that the discount rate made many contributions to the fuel cycle cost, showing the rank of third or fifth of all components. The results of this study could be useful in applications to another options, such as the Dcp (Direct Use of PWR spent fuel In Candu reactors) cycle with high cost uncertainty

  4. HTGR reactor physics, thermal-hydraulics and depletion uncertainty analysis: a proposed IAEA coordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyobeka, Bismark; Reitsma, Frederik; Ivanov, Kostadin

    2011-01-01

    The continued development of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) requires verification of HTGR design and safety features with reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes. The predictive capability of coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics and depletion simulations for reactor design and safety analysis can be assessed with sensitivity analysis and uncertainty analysis methods. In order to benefit from recent advances in modeling and simulation and the availability of new covariance data (nuclear data uncertainties) extensive sensitivity and uncertainty studies are needed for quantification of the impact of different sources of uncertainties on the design and safety parameters of HTGRs. Uncertainty and sensitivity studies are an essential component of any significant effort in data and simulation improvement. In February 2009, the Technical Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors recommended that the proposed IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the HTGR Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling be implemented. In the paper the current status and plan are presented. The CRP will also benefit from interactions with the currently ongoing OECD/NEA Light Water Reactor (LWR) UAM benchmark activity by taking into consideration the peculiarities of HTGR designs and simulation requirements. (author)

  5. Review of tritium behavior in HTGR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gainey, B.W.

    1976-01-01

    The available experimental evidence from laboratory and reactor studies pertaining to tritium production, capture, release, and transport within an HTGR leading to release to the environment is reviewed. Possible mechanisms for release, capture, and transport are considered and a simple model was used to calculate the expected tritium release from HTGRs. Comparison with Federal regulations governing tritium release confirm that expected HTGR releases will be well within the allowable release limits. Releases from HTGRs are expected to be somewhat less than from LWRs based on the published LWR operating data. Areas of research deserving further study are defined but it is concluded that a tritium surveillance at Fort St. Vrain is the most immediate need

  6. Safety criteria for advanced HTGR concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, W.

    1989-01-01

    It is commonly agreed that advanced HTGR concepts must be licensable, which means that they must fulfil existing regulatory requirements. Furthermore, it is necessary to improve their public acceptance and they must even be suitable for urban sites. Therefore, they should be 'safer' than existing plants, which mainly means with respect to low-frequency or beyond-design severe accidents. Last but not least, the realization of advanced HTGR would be easier if commonly shared safety principles could be stated ensuring this further increased level of safety internationally. These qualitative statements need to be cast into quantitative guidelines which can be used as a rationale for safety evaluation. This paper tries to describe the status reached and to stimulate international activities. (author). 12 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  7. Used nuclear fuel separations process simulation and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, C.; Krebs, J.F.; Copple, J.M.; Frey, K.E.; Maggos, L.E.; Figueroa, J.; Willit, J.L.; Papadias, D.D.

    2013-01-01

    Recent efforts in separations process simulation at Argonne have expanded from the traditional focus on solvent extraction flowsheet design in order to capture process dynamics and to simulate other components, processing and systems of a used nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. For example, the Argonne Model for Universal Solvent Extraction (AMUSE) code has been enhanced to make it both more portable and more readily extensible. Moving away from a spreadsheet environment makes the addition of new species and processes simpler for the expert user, which should enable more rapid implementation of chemical models that simulate evolving processes. The dyAMUSE (dynamic AMUSE) version allows the simulation of transient behavior across an extractor. Electrochemical separations have now been modeled using spreadsheet codes that simulate the electrochemical recycle of fast reactor fuel. The user can follow the evolution of the salt, products, and waste compositions in the electro-refiner, cathode processors, and drawdown as a function of fuel batches treated. To further expand capabilities in integrating multiple unit operations, a platform for linking mathematical models representing the different operations that comprise a reprocessing facility was adapted to enable systems-level analysis and optimization of facility functions. (authors)

  8. Used nuclear fuel separations process simulation and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, C.; Krebs, J.F.; Copple, J.M.; Frey, K.E.; Maggos, L.E.; Figueroa, J.; Willit, J.L.; Papadias, D.D. [Argonne National Laboratory: 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Recent efforts in separations process simulation at Argonne have expanded from the traditional focus on solvent extraction flowsheet design in order to capture process dynamics and to simulate other components, processing and systems of a used nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. For example, the Argonne Model for Universal Solvent Extraction (AMUSE) code has been enhanced to make it both more portable and more readily extensible. Moving away from a spreadsheet environment makes the addition of new species and processes simpler for the expert user, which should enable more rapid implementation of chemical models that simulate evolving processes. The dyAMUSE (dynamic AMUSE) version allows the simulation of transient behavior across an extractor. Electrochemical separations have now been modeled using spreadsheet codes that simulate the electrochemical recycle of fast reactor fuel. The user can follow the evolution of the salt, products, and waste compositions in the electro-refiner, cathode processors, and drawdown as a function of fuel batches treated. To further expand capabilities in integrating multiple unit operations, a platform for linking mathematical models representing the different operations that comprise a reprocessing facility was adapted to enable systems-level analysis and optimization of facility functions. (authors)

  9. HTGR experience, programs, and future applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.A.; Kantor, M.E.; Brey, H.L.; Olson, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews the current status of the programs for the development of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) in the major industrial countries of the world. Existing demonstration plants and facilities are briefly described, and national programs for exploiting the unique high-temperature capabilities of the HTGR for commercial production of electricity and in process steam/heat application are discussed. (orig.)

  10. Exergy analysis of HTGR-GT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Jianhua; Wang Jie; Yang Xiaoyong; Yu Suyuan

    2005-01-01

    The High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) coupled with gas turbine for high efficiency in electricity production is supposed to be one of the candidates for the future nuclear power plants. The HTGR gas turbine cycle is theoretically based on the Brayton cycle with recuperated, intercooled and precooled sub-processes. In this paper, an exergy analysis of the Brayton Cycle on HTGR is presented. The analyses were done for four typical reactor outlet temperatures and the exergy loss distribution and exergy loss ratio of each sub-process was quantified. The results show that more than a half of the exergy loss takes place in the reactor, while the low pressure compressor (LPC), the high pressure compressor (HPC) and the intercooler denoted by compress system together, play a much small role in the contribution of exergy losses. With the rise of the reactor outlet temperature, both the exergy loss and exergy loss ratio of the reactor can be greatly cut down, so is the total exergy loss of the cycle; while the exergy loss ratios of the recuperator and precooler have a small rise. The total exergy efficiency of the cycle is quite high (50% more or less). (authors)

  11. Irradiation test plan of the simulated DUPIC fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Ki Kwang; Yang, M. S.; Kim, B. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-11-01

    Simulated DUPIC fuel had been irradiated from Aug. 4, 1999 to Oct. 4 1999, in order to produce the data of its in-core behavior, to verify the design of DUPIC non-instrumented capsule developed, and to ensure the irradiation requirements of DUPIC fuel at HANARO. The welding process was certified for manufacturing the mini-element, and simulated DUPIC fuel rods were manufactured with simulated DUPIC pellets through examination and test. The non-instrumented capsule for a irradiation test of DUPIC fuel has been designed and manufactured referring to the design specification of the HANARO fuel. This is to be the design basis of the instrumented capsule under consideration. The verification experiment, whether the capsule loaded in the OR4 hole meet the HANARO requirements under the normal operation condition, as well as the structural analysis was carried out. The items for this experiment were the pressure drop test, vibration test, integrity test, et. al. It was noted that each experimental result meet the HANARO operational requirements. For the safety analysis of the DUPIC non-instrumented capsule loaded in the HANARO core, the nuclear/mechanical compatibility, thermodynamic compatibility, integrity analysis of the irradiation samples according to the reactor condition as well as the safety analysis of the HANARO were performed. Besides, the core reactivity effects were discussed during the irradiation test of the DUPIC capsule. The average power of each fuel rod in the DUPIC capsule was calculated, and maximal linear power reflecting the axial peaking power factor from the MCNP results was evaluated. From these calculation results, the HANARO core safety was evaluated. At the end of this report, similar overseas cases were introduced. 9 refs., 16 figs., 10 tabs. (Author)

  12. VISION User Guide - VISION (Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation) Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, Jacob J.; Jeffers, Robert F.; Matthern, Gretchen E.; Piet, Steven J.; Baker, Benjamin A.; Grimm, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a guide for using the current version of the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) model. This is a complex model with many parameters; the user is strongly encouraged to read this user guide before attempting to run the model. This model is an R and D work in progress and may contain errors and omissions. It is based upon numerous assumptions. This model is intended to assist in evaluating 'what if' scenarios and in comparing fuel, reactor, and fuel processing alternatives at a systems level for U.S. nuclear power. The model is not intended as a tool for process flow and design modeling of specific facilities nor for tracking individual units of fuel or other material through the system. The model is intended to examine the interactions among the components of a fuel system as a function of time varying system parameters; this model represents a dynamic rather than steady-state approximation of the nuclear fuel system. VISION models the nuclear cycle at the system level, not individual facilities, e.g., 'reactor types' not individual reactors and 'separation types' not individual separation plants. Natural uranium can be enriched, which produces enriched uranium, which goes into fuel fabrication, and depleted uranium (DU), which goes into storage. Fuel is transformed (transmuted) in reactors and then goes into a storage buffer. Used fuel can be pulled from storage into either separation of disposal. If sent to separations, fuel is transformed (partitioned) into fuel products, recovered uranium, and various categories of waste. Recycled material is stored until used by its assigned reactor type. Note that recovered uranium is itself often partitioned: some RU flows with recycled transuranic elements, some flows with wastes, and the rest is designated RU. RU comes out of storage if needed to correct the U/TRU ratio in new recycled fuel. Neither RU nor DU are designated as wastes. VISION is comprised of several Microsoft

  13. Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION): A Tool for Analyzing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Futures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, Jacob J.; Piet, Steven J.; Matthern, Gretchen E.; Shropshire, David E.; Jeffers, Robert F.; Yacout, A.M.; Schweitzer, Tyler

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle consists of a set of complex components that are intended to work together. To support the nuclear renaissance, it is necessary to understand the impacts of changes and timing of events in any part of the fuel cycle system such as how the system would respond to each technological change, a series of which moves the fuel cycle from where it is to a postulated future state. The system analysis working group of the United States research program on advanced fuel cycles (formerly called the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative) is developing a dynamic simulation model, VISION, to capture the relationships, timing, and changes in and among the fuel cycle components to help develop an understanding of how the overall fuel cycle works. This paper is an overview of the philosophy and development strategy behind VISION. The paper includes some descriptions of the model components and some examples of how to use VISION. For example, VISION users can now change yearly the selection of separation or reactor technologies, the performance characteristics of those technologies, and/or the routing of material among separation and reactor types - with the model still operating on a PC in <5 min.

  14. Decoupled numerical simulation of a solid fuel fired retort boiler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryfa, Arkadiusz; Buczynski, Rafal; Chabinski, Michal; Szlek, Andrzej; Bialecki, Ryszard A.

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with numerical simulation of the retort boiler fired with solid fuel. Such constructions are very popular for heating systems and their development is mostly based on the designer experience. The simulations have been done in ANSYS/Fluent package and involved two numerical models. The former deals with a fixed-bed combustion of the solid fuel and free-board gas combustion. Solid fuel combustion is based on the coal kinetic parameters. This model encompasses chemical reactions, radiative heat transfer and turbulence. Coal properties have been defined with user defined functions. The latter model describes flow of water inside a water jacked that surrounds the combustion chamber and flue gas ducts. The novelty of the proposed approach is separating of the combustion simulation from the water flow. Such approach allows for reducing the number of degrees of freedom and thus lowering the necessary numerical effort. Decoupling combustion from water flow requires defining interface boundary condition. As this boundary condition is unknown it is adjusted iteratively. The results of the numerical simulation have been successfully validated against measurement data. - Highlights: • New decoupled modelling of small scale boiler is proposed. • Fixed-bed combustion model based on kinetic parameters is introduced. • Decoupling reduced the complexity of the model and computational time. • Simple and computationally inexpensive coupling algorithm is proposed. • Model is successfully validated against measurements

  15. Large eddy simulation of a fuel rod subchannel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, Gusztav

    2007-01-01

    In a VVER-440 reactor the measured outlet temperature is related to fuel limit parameters and the power upgrading plans of VVER-440 reactors motivated us to obtain more information on the mixing process of the fuel assemblies. In a VVER-440 rod bundle the fuel rods are arranged in triangular array. Measurement shows (Krauss and Meyer, 1998) that the classical engineering approach, which tries to trace the characterization of such systems back to equivalent (hydraulic diameter) pipe flows, does not give reasonable results. Due to the different turbulence characteristics, the mixing is more intensive in rod bundles than it would be expected based on equivalent pipe flow correlations. As a possible explanation of the high mixing, secondary flow was deduced from measurements by several experimentalists (Trupp and Azad, 1975). Another candidate to explain the high mixing is the so-called flow pulsation phenomenon (Krauss and Meyer, 1998). In this paper we present subchannel simulations (Mayer et al. 2007) using large eddy simulation (LES) methodology and the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) without the spacers at Reynolds number 21000. The simulation results are compared with the measurements of Trupp and Azad (1975). The mean axial velocity profile shows good agreement with the measurement data. Secondary flow has been observed directly in the simulation results. Reasonable agreement has been achieved for most Reynolds stresses. Nevertheless, the calculated normal stresses show small, but systematic deviation from the measurement data. (author)

  16. Fuel management of HTR-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zongxin; Jing Xingqing

    2001-01-01

    The 10 MW high temperature cooled reactor (HTR-10) built in Tsinghua University is a pebble bed type of HTGR. The continuous recharge and multiple-pass of spherical fuel elements are used for fuel management. The initiative stage of core is composed of the mix of spherical fuel elements and graphite elements. The equilibrium stage of core is composed of identical spherical fuel elements. The fuel management during the transition from the initiative stage to the equilibrium stage is a key issue for HTR-10 physical design. A fuel management strategy is proposed based on self-adjustment of core reactivity. The neutron physical code is used to simulate the process of fuel management. The results show that the graphite elements, the recharging fuel elements below the burn-up allowance, and the discharging fuel elements over the burn-up allowance could be identified by burn-up measurement. The maximum of burn-up fuel elements could be controlled below the burn-up limit

  17. Simulation modelling for new gas turbine fuel controller creation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendland, L. E.; Pribylov, V. G.; Borisov, Yu A.; Arzamastsev, M. A.; Kosoy, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    State of the art gas turbine fuel flow control systems are based on throttle principle. Major disadvantage of such systems is that they require high pressure fuel intake. Different approach to fuel flow control is to use regulating compressor. And for this approach because of controller and gas turbine interaction a specific regulating compressor is required. Difficulties emerge as early as the requirement definition stage. To define requirements for new object, his properties must be known. Simulation modelling helps to overcome these difficulties. At the requirement definition stage the most simplified mathematical model is used. Mathematical models will get more complex and detailed as we advance in planned work. If future adjusting of regulating compressor physical model to work with virtual gas turbine and physical control system is planned.

  18. Process options and projected mass flows for the HTGR refabrication scrap recovery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiegs, S.M.

    1979-03-01

    The two major uranium recovery processing options reviewed are (1) internal recovery of the scrap by the refabrication system and (2) transfer to and external recovery of the scrap by the head end of the reprocessing system. Each option was reviewed with respect to equipment requirements, preparatory processing, and material accountability. Because there may be a high cost factor on transfer of scrap fuel material to the reprocessing system for recovery, all of the scrap streams will be recycled internally within the refabrication system, with the exception of reject fuel elements, which will be transferred to the head end of the reprocessing system for uranium recovery. The refabrication facility will be fully remote; thus, simple recovery techniques were selected as the reference processes for scrap recovery. Crushing, burning, and leaching methods will be used to recover uranium from the HTGR refabrication scrap fuel forms, which include particles without silicon carbide coatings, particles with silicon carbide coatings, uncarbonized fuel rods, carbon furnace parts, perchloroethylene distillation bottoms, and analytical sample remnants. Mass flows through the reference scrap recovery system were calculated for the HTGR reference recycle facility operating with the highly enriched uranium fuel cycle. Output per day from the refabrication scrap recovery system is estimated to be 4.02 kg of 2355 U and 10.85 kg of 233 U. Maximum equipment capacities were determined, and future work will be directed toward the development and costing of the scrap recovery system chosen as reference

  19. Conceptual design of small-sized HTGR system (1). Major specifications and system designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Hirofumi; Sato, Hiroyuki; Tazawa, Yujiro; Yan, Xing L.; Tachibana, Yukio

    2011-06-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has started a conceptual design of a 50MWt small-sized high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) for steam supply and electricity generation (HTR50S), which is a first-of-kind of the commercial plant or a demonstration plant of a small-sized HTGR system for steam supply to the industries and district heating and electricity generation by a steam turbine, to deploy in developing countries in the 2030s. The design philosophy is that the HTR50S is a high advanced reactor, which is reducing the R and D risk based on the HTTR design, upgrading the performance and reducing the cost for commercialization by utilizing the knowledge obtained by the HTTR operation and the GTHTR300 design. The major specifications of the HTR50S were determined and targets of the technology demonstration using the HTR50S (e.g., the increasing the power density, reduction of the number of uranium enrichment in the fuel, increasing the burn up, side-by-side arrangement between the reactor pressure vessel and the steam generator) were identified. In addition, the system design of HTR50S, which offers the capability of electricity generation, cogeneration of electricity and steam for a district heating and industries, was performed. Furthermore, a market size of small-sized HTGR systems was investigated. (author)

  20. Analysis by simulation of the disposition of nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turek, J.L.

    1980-09-01

    A descriptive simulation model is developed which includes all aspects of nuclear waste disposition. The model is comprised of two systems, the second system orchestrated by GASP IV. A spent fuel generation prediction module is interfaced with the AFR Program Management Information System and a repository scheduling information module. The user is permitted a wide range of options with which to tailor the simulation to any desired storage scenario. The model projects storage requirements through the year 2020. The outputs are evaluations of the impact that alternative decision policies and milestone date changes have on the demand for, the availability of, and the utilization of spent fuel storage capacities. Both graphs and detailed listings are available. These outputs give a comprehensive view of the particular scenario under observation, including the tracking, by year, of each discharge from every reactor. Included within the work is a review of the status of spent fuel disposition based on input data accurate as of August 1980. The results indicate that some temporary storage techniques (e.g., transshipment of fuel and/or additional at-reactor storage pools) must be utilized to prevent reactor shutdowns. These techniques will be required until the 1990's when several AFR facilities, and possibly one repository, can become operational

  1. A study on the creep characteristics of simulated DUPIC fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kweon Ho; Ryu, H. J.; Kim, H. S.; Song, K. C.; Yang, M. S.; Na, S.

    2001-09-01

    Compression creep test was performed using simulated DUPIC fuel in the temperature range from 1773 to 1973 K under the stress range of 21 - 60 MPa. Creep rate and the activation energy were obtained. The activation energy for creep was 649.35 - 675.94 kJ/mol at the low stress region, where creep mechanism was controlled by diffusion. On the other hand, the activation energy at high stress region was 750.68 - 792.18 kJ/mol, where creep mechanism was controlled by dislocation motion. The activation energy for dislocation creep was higher than that for diffusion creep. The activation energy of reference simulated DUPIC fuel was higher than that of UO2

  2. Acoustic emission from fuel pellets in a simulated reactor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.S.; Kennedy, C.R.; Reimann, K.J.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal-shock damage of nuclear reactor fuel pellets in a simulated reactor environment has been correlated with acoustic-emission data obtained from sensors placed on extensions of the electrical feedthroughs. Ringdown counts, rms output data, and event-location data has been acquired for experiments carried out with single pellets as well as multiple pellet stacks. These tests have shown that acoustic-emission monitoring can provide information indicating the onset and the extent of cracking

  3. Friction, adhesion and corrosion performance of metallurgical coatings in HTGR-helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, R.; Kleemann, W.

    1981-01-01

    The friction-, adhesion-, thermal cycling- and corrosion performance of several metallurgical coating systems have been tested in a simulated HTGR-test atmosphere at elevated temperatures. The coatings were applied to a solid solution strengthened Ni-based superalloy. Component design requires coatings for the protection of mating surfaces, since under reactor operating conditions, contacting surfaces of metallic components under high pressures are prone to friction and wear damage. The coatings will have to protect the metal surface for 30 years up to 950 0 C in HTGR-helium. The materials tested were various refractory carbides with or without metallic binders and intermetallic compounds. The coatings evaluated were applied by plasma spraying-, detonation gun- and chemical vapor deposition techniques. These yielded two types of coatings which employ different mechanisms to improve the tribiological properties and maintain coating integrity. (Auth.)

  4. Mesoscale Simulations of Pore Migration in a Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Gorti, Sarma B.

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of pore and grain structure in a nuclear fuel environment is strongly influenced by the local temperature, and the temperature gradient. The evolution of pore and grain structure in an externally imposed temperature gradient is simulated for a hypothetical material using a Potts model approach that allows for porosity migration by mechanisms similar to surface, grain boundary and volume diffusion, as well as the interaction of migrating pores with stationary grain boundaries. First, the migration of a single pore in a single crystal in the presence of the temperature gradient is simulated. Next, the interaction of a pore moving in a temperature gradient with a grain boundary that is perpendicular to the pore migration direction is simulated in order to capture the force exerted by the pore on the grain boundary. The simulations reproduce the expected variation of pore velocity with pore size as well as the variation of the grain boundary force with pore size.

  5. Simulation of the injection casting of metallic fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Tomokazu; Ogata, Takanari; Tokiwai, Moriyasu.

    1989-01-01

    For the fabrication of metallic fuel pins, injection casting is a preferable process because the simplicity of the process is suitable for remote operation. In this process, the molten metal in the crucible is injected into evacuated molds (suspended above the crucible) by pressurizing the casting furnace. Argonne National Laboratory has already adopted this process in the Integral Fast Reactor program. To obtain fuel pins with good quality, the casting parameters, such as the molten metal temperature, the magnitude of the pressure applied, the pressurizing rate, the cooling time, etc., must be optimized. Otherwise, bad-quality castings (short castings, rough surfaces, shrinkage cavities, mold fracture) may result. Therefore, it is very important in designing the casting equipment and optimizing the operation conditions to be able to predict the fluid and thermal behavior of the castings. This paper describes methods to simulate the heat and mass transfer in the molds and molten metallic fuel during injection casting. The results obtained by simulation are compared with experimental ones. Also, appropriate casting conditions for the uranium-plutonium-zirconium alloy are discussed based on the simulated results

  6. Simulating the impacts of a strategic fuels reserve in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a simulation analysis of the impacts of a strategic fuels reserve (SFR) designed to limit the increase in gasoline prices in the days following a refinery disruption. The analysis is based on a computer simulation model developed for the California Energy Commission. The model simulates the supply of gasoline as the sum of refinery production, cargoes arriving from outside California, withdrawals from private storage and the release of gasoline from the SFR. The demand for gasoline is the sum of the retail demand and the wholesale demand to rebuild inventory. The paper presents simulations to illustrate the impact on California consumers of refinery disruptions of different size and duration. The simulations are repeated with a strategic reserve operated with the time-swap mechanism proposed for California. The simulations demonstrate large intended benefits of a SFR in the event of a major refinery disruption. The simulations are then repeated with an unintended impact. The new simulations show that the SFR could lead to negative impacts on California consumers in the event of small disruptions. The paper concludes that the overall impact of the SFR is likely to be dominated by the frequency of large disruptions. (author)

  7. Simulating the impacts of a strategic fuels reserve in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a simulation analysis of the impacts of a strategic fuels reserve (SFR) designed to limit the increase in gasoline prices in the days following a refinery disruption. The analysis is based on a computer simulation model developed for the California Energy Commission. The model simulates the supply of gasoline as the sum of refinery production, cargoes arriving from outside California, withdrawals from private storage and the release of gasoline from the SFR. The demand for gasoline is the sum of the retail demand and the wholesale demand to rebuild inventory. The paper presents simulations to illustrate the impact on California consumers of refinery disruptions of different size and duration. The simulations are repeated with a strategic reserve operated with the time-swap mechanism proposed for California. The simulations demonstrate large intended benefits of a SFR in the event of a major refinery disruption. The simulations are then repeated with an unintended impact. The new simulations show that the SFR could lead to negative impacts on California consumers in the event of small disruptions. The paper concludes that the overall impact of the SFR is likely to be dominated by the frequency of large disruptions

  8. Present status of HTGR research and development, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    Based on the Long-term Program for Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy which was revised in 1987, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has carried out the Research and Development (R and D) on the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) in Japan. The JAERI obtained the installation permit of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) from the Government in November 1990 and started the construction of the HTTR facility in the Oarai Research Establishment in March 1991. The HTTR is a test reactor with thermal output of 30MW and outlet coolant temperature of 850degC at the rated operation and 950degC at the high temperature test operation, using the pin-in-block type fuel, and has capability to demonstrate nuclear process heat utilization. The reactor pressure vessel and intermediate heat exchanger were installed in the reactor containment vessel in 1994, and reactor internals were also installed in the reactor pressure vessel in 1995. The first criticality will be attained in December 1997. This report describes the design outline and construction progress of the HTTR, R and D of fuel, materials and components for the HTGR and high temperature nuclear heat application, and innovative and basic researches for high temperature technologies at the HTTR. (J.P.N.)

  9. Dynamic response of a multielement HTGR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, M.; Bezler, P.; Koplik, B.; Curreri, J.; Goradia, H.; Lasker, L.

    1977-01-01

    One of the primary factors in determining the structural integrity and consequently the safety of a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is the dynamic response of the core when subjected to a seismic excitation. The HTGR core under consideration consists of several thousands of hexagonal elements arranged in vertical stacks containing about eight elements per stack. There are clearance gaps between adjacent elements, which can change substantially due to radiation effects produced during their active lifetime. Surrounding the outer periphery of the core are reflector blocks and restraining spring-pack arrangements which bear against the reactor vessel structure (PCRV). Earthquake input motions to this type of core arrangement will result in multiple impacts between adjacent elements as well as between the reflector blocks and the restraining spring packs. The highly complex nonlinear response associated with the multiple collisions across the clearance gaps and with the spring packs is the subject matter of this paper. Of particular importance is the ability to analyze a complex nonlinear system with gaps by employing a model with a reduced number of masses. This is necessary in order to obtain solutions in a time-frame and at a cost which is not too expensive. In addition the effect of variations in total clearance as well as the initial distribution of clearances between adjacent elements is of primary concern. Both of these aspects of the problem are treated in the present analysis. Finally, by constraining the motion of the reflector blocks, a more realistic description of the dynamic response of the multi-element HTGR core is obtained

  10. The choice of equipment mix and parameters for HTGR-based nuclear cogeneration plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malevski, A L; Stoliarevski, A Ya; Vladimirov, V T; Larin, E A; Lesnykh, V V; Naumov, Yu V; Fedotov, I L

    1990-07-01

    Improvement of heat and electricity supply systems based on cogeneration is one of the high-priority problems in energy development of the USSR. Fossil fuel consumption for heat supply exceeds now its use for electricity production and amounts to about 30% of the total demands. District heating provides about 80 million t.c.e. of energy resources conserved annually and meets about 50% of heat consumption of the country, including about 30% due to cogeneration. The share of natural gas and liquid fuel in the fuel consumption for district heating is about 70%. The analysis of heat consumption dynamics in individual regions and industrial-urban agglomerations shows the necessity of constructing cogeneration plants with the total capacity of about 60 million kW till the year 2000. However, their construction causes some serious problems. The most important of them are provision of environmentally clean fuels for cogeneration plants and provision of clear air. The limited reserves of oil and natural gas and the growing expenditures on their production require more intensive introduction of nuclear energy in the national energy balance. Possible use of nuclear energy based on light-water reactors for substitution of deficient hydrocarbon fuels is limited by the physical, technical and economic factors and requirements of safety. Further development of nuclear energy in the USSR can be realized on a new technological base with construction of domestic reactors of increased and ultimate safety. The most promising reactors under design are high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) of low and medium capacity with the intrinsic property of safety. HTGR of low (about 200-250 MW(th) in a steel vessel), medium (about 500 MW(th) in a steel-concrete vessel) and high (about 1000-2500 MW(th) in a prestressed concrete vessel) are now designed and studied in the country. At outlet helium temperature of 920-1020 K it is possible to create steam turbine installations producing both

  11. The choice of equipment mix and parameters for HTGR-based nuclear cogeneration plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malevski, A.L.; Stoliarevski, A.Ya.; Vladimirov, V.T.; Larin, E.A.; Lesnykh, V.V.; Naumov, Yu.V.; Fedotov, I.L.

    1990-01-01

    Improvement of heat and electricity supply systems based on cogeneration is one of the high-priority problems in energy development of the USSR. Fossil fuel consumption for heat supply exceeds now its use for electricity production and amounts to about 30% of the total demands. District heating provides about 80 million t.c.e. of energy resources conserved annually and meets about 50% of heat consumption of the country, including about 30% due to cogeneration. The share of natural gas and liquid fuel in the fuel consumption for district heating is about 70%. The analysis of heat consumption dynamics in individual regions and industrial-urban agglomerations shows the necessity of constructing cogeneration plants with the total capacity of about 60 million kW till the year 2000. However, their construction causes some serious problems. The most important of them are provision of environmentally clean fuels for cogeneration plants and provision of clear air. The limited reserves of oil and natural gas and the growing expenditures on their production require more intensive introduction of nuclear energy in the national energy balance. Possible use of nuclear energy based on light-water reactors for substitution of deficient hydrocarbon fuels is limited by the physical, technical and economic factors and requirements of safety. Further development of nuclear energy in the USSR can be realized on a new technological base with construction of domestic reactors of increased and ultimate safety. The most promising reactors under design are high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) of low and medium capacity with the intrinsic property of safety. HTGR of low (about 200-250 MW(th) in a steel vessel), medium (about 500 MW(th) in a steel-concrete vessel) and high (about 1000-2500 MW(th) in a prestressed concrete vessel) are now designed and studied in the country. At outlet helium temperature of 920-1020 K it is possible to create steam turbine installations producing both

  12. Multi-Dimensional Simulation of LWR Fuel Behavior in the BISON Fuel Performance Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, R. L.; Capps, N. A.; Liu, W.; Rashid, Y. R.; Wirth, B. D.

    2016-11-01

    Nuclear fuel operates in an extreme environment that induces complex multiphysics phenomena occurring over distances ranging from inter-atomic spacing to meters, and times scales ranging from microseconds to years. To simulate this behavior requires a wide variety of material models that are often complex and nonlinear. The recently developed BISON code represents a powerful fuel performance simulation tool based on its material and physical behavior capabilities, finite-element versatility of spatial representation, and use of parallel computing. The code can operate in full three dimensional (3D) mode, as well as in reduced two dimensional (2D) modes, e.g., axisymmetric radial-axial ( R- Z) or plane radial-circumferential ( R- θ), to suit the application and to allow treatment of global and local effects. A BISON case study was used to illustrate analysis of Pellet Clad Mechanical Interaction failures from manufacturing defects using combined 2D and 3D analyses. The analysis involved commercial fuel rods and demonstrated successful computation of metrics of interest to fuel failures, including cladding peak hoop stress and strain energy density. In comparison with a failure threshold derived from power ramp tests, results corroborate industry analyses of the root cause of the pellet-clad interaction failures and illustrate the importance of modeling 3D local effects around fuel pellet defects, which can produce complex effects including cold spots in the cladding, stress concentrations, and hot spots in the fuel that can lead to enhanced cladding degradation such as hydriding, oxidation, CRUD formation, and stress corrosion cracking.

  13. Quantitative HTGR safety and forced outage goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houghton, W.J.; Parme, L.L.; Silady, F.A.

    1985-05-01

    A key step in the successful implementation of the integrated approach is the definition of the overall plant-level goals. To be effective, the goals should provide clear statements of what is to be achieved by the plant. This can be contrasted to the current practice of providing design-prescriptive criteria which implicitly address some higher-level objective but restrict the designer's flexibility. Furthermore, the goals should be quantifiable in such a way that satisfaction of the goal can be measured. In the discussion presented, two such plant-level goals adopted for the HTGR and addressing the impact of unscheduled occurrences are described. 1 fig

  14. Selection of JAERI'S HTGR-GT concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, Y.; Ishiyama, S.; Shiozawa, S.

    2001-01-01

    In JAERI, a feasibility study of HTGR-GT has been conducted as an assigned work from STA in Japan since January 1996. So far, the conceptual or preliminary designs of 600, 400 and 300 MW(t) power plants have been completed. The block type core and pebble-bed core have been selected in 600 MW(t) and 400/300 MW(t), respectively. The gas-turbine system adopts a horizontal single shaft rotor and then the power conversion vessel is separated into a turbine vessel and a heat exchanger vessel. In this paper, the issues related to the selection of these concepts are technically discussed. (author)

  15. An Open-Source Toolbox for PEM Fuel Cell Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Paul Kone

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an open-source toolbox that can be used to accurately predict the distribution of the major physical quantities that are transported within a proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell is presented. The toolbox has been developed using the Open Source Field Operation and Manipulation (OpenFOAM platform, which is an open-source computational fluid dynamics (CFD code. The base case results for the distribution of velocity, pressure, chemical species, Nernst potential, current density, and temperature are as expected. The plotted polarization curve was compared to the results from a numerical model and experimental data taken from the literature. The conducted simulations have generated a significant amount of data and information about the transport processes that are involved in the operation of a PEM fuel cell. The key role played by the concentration constant in shaping the cell polarization curve has been explored. The development of the present toolbox is in line with the objectives outlined in the International Energy Agency (IEA, Paris, France Advanced Fuel Cell Annex 37 that is devoted to developing open-source computational tools to facilitate fuel cell technologies. The work therefore serves as a basis for devising additional features that are not always feasible with a commercial code.

  16. Metallic Fuel Casting Development and Parameter Optimization Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fielding, Randall S.; Kennedy, J.R.; Crapps, J.; Unal, C.

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: • Gravity casting is a feasible process for casting of metallic fuels: – May not be as robust as CGIC, more parameter dependent to find right “sweet spot” for high quality castings; – Fluid flow is very important and is affected by mold design, vent size, super heat, etc.; – Pressure differential assist was found to be detrimental. • Simulation found that vent location was important to allow adequate filling of mold; • Surface tension plays an important role in determining casting quality; • Casting and simulations high light the need for better characterized fluid physical and thermal properties; • Results from simulations will be incorporated in GACS design such as vent location and physical property characterization

  17. SEFLEX - fuel rod simulator effects in flooding experiments. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihle, P.; Rust, K.

    1986-03-01

    This report presents typical data and a limited heat transfer analysis from unblocked bundle reflood tests of an experimental thermal-hydraulic program. Full-length bundles of 5 x 5 fuel rod simulators having a gas-filled gap between the Zy cladding and the alumina pellets were tested in the test rig designed for the earlier Flooding Experiments with Blocked Arrays (FEBA-program). The 5 x 5 FEBA rod bundle tests were performed with gapless heater rods. These rods have a close thermal contact between the stainless steel cladding and the electric insulation material. A comparison of the SEFLEX data with the reference data of FEBA obtained under identical initial and reflood conditions shows the influence of different fuel rod simulators on the thermal-hydraulic behavior during forced feed bottom reflooding of unblocked and blocked arrays. Compared to bundles of gapless rods, bundles of rods with Zy claddings and a gas filled gap between claddings and pellets, which more closely represent the features that exist in an actual fuel rod geometry, produced higher quench front velocities, enhanced removal of stored heat in the rods, reduced peak cladding temperatures, increased grid spacer effects and absolutely unproblematic coolability of 90 percent blockages with bypass. The data offer the opportunity for further validation of computer codes to make realistic predictions of safety margins during a LOCA in a PWR. (orig./HP) [de

  18. SEFLEX fuel rod simulator effects in flooding experiments. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihle, P.; Rust, K.

    1986-03-01

    This report presents typical data and a limited heat transfer analysis from blocked bundle reflood tests of an experimental thermal-hydraulic program. Full-length bundles of 5x5 fuel rod simulators having a gas-filled gap between the Zy cladding and the alumina pellets were tested in the test rig designed for the earlier Flooding Experiments with Blocked Arrays (FEBA-program). The 5x5 FEBA rod bundle tests were performed with gapless heater rods. These rods have a close thermal contact between the stainless steel cladding and the electric insulation material. A comparison of the SEFLEX data with the reference data of FEBA obtained under identical initial and reflood conditions shows the influence of different fuel rod simulators on the thermal-hydraulic behavior during forced feed bottom reflooding of unblocked and blocked arrays. Compared to bundles of gapless rods, bundles of rods with Zy claddings and a gas filled gap between claddings and pellets, which more closely represent the features that exist in an actual fuel rod geometry, produced higher quench front velocities, enhanced removal of stored heat in the rods, reduced peak cladding temperatures, increased grid spacer effects and absolutely unproblematic coolability of 90 percent blockages with bypass. The data offer the opportunity for further validation of computer codes to make realistic predictions of safety margins during a LOCA in a PWR. (orig./HP) [de

  19. HTGR Application Economic Model Users' Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.M. Gandrik

    2012-01-01

    The High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Application Economic Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Application Economic Model calculates either the required selling price of power and/or heat for a given internal rate of return (IRR) or the IRR for power and/or heat being sold at the market price. The user can generate these economic results for a range of reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for up to 16 reactor modules; and for module ratings of 200, 350, or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Application Economic Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Application Economic Model. This model was designed for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel and engineering economics. Modification of the HTGR Application Economic Model should only be performed by users familiar with the HTGR and its applications, Excel, and Visual Basic.

  20. Fuel Behaviour Simulations in Fumex III CRP at NRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valach, M.; Klouzal, J.; Dostal, M.; Zymak, J.

    2013-01-01

    NRI Rez plc took part in the previous coordinated research projects focused on fuel behaviour modelling held by the IAEA - FUMEX-I and FUMEX-II. These were very helpful for the development and validation of various codes used in the Nuclear Research Institute Rez (NRI) for the evaluation of the fuel rod thermomechanical behaviour. Based on the considerations of our needs related to the modeling for Czech NPPs we have performed basic parametric calculations of two LOCA cases (IFA-650.1 and IFA-650.2) and detailed evaluation WWER related cases Kola MIR ramp rods. The AREVA ''Idealized case'' and 16x16 LTA cases were also calculated because of the high burnup reached. Report summarises simulated cases in the frame of FUMEX III Project at the NRI Rez plc. (author)

  1. High-quality thorium TRISO fuel performance in HTGRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfondern, Karl [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Allelein, Hans-Josef [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany); Nabielek, Heinz; Kania, Michael J.

    2013-11-01

    Thorium as a nuclear fuel has received renewed interest, because of its widespread availability and the good irradiation performance of Th and mixed (Th,U) oxide compounds as fuels in nuclear power systems. Early HTGR development employed thorium together with high-enriched uranium (HEU). After 1980, HTGR fuel systems switched to low-enriched uranium (LEU). After completing fuel development for the AVR and the THTR with BISO coated particles, the German program expanded its efforts utilizing thorium and HEU TRISO coated particles in advanced HTGR concepts for process heat applications (PNP) and direct-cycle electricity production (HHT). The combination of a low-temperature isotropic (LTI) inner and outer pyrocarbon layers surrounding a strong, stable SiC layer greatly improved manufacturing conditions and the subsequent contamination and defective particle fractions in production fuel elements. In addition, this combination provided improved mechanical strength and a higher degree of solid fission product retention, not known previously with high-temperature isotropic (HTI) BISO coatings. The improved performance of the HEU (Th, U)O{sub 2} TRISO fuel system was successfully demonstrated in three primary areas of development: manufacturing, irradiation testing under normal operating conditions, and accident simulation testing. In terms of demonstrating performance for advanced HTGR applications, the experimental failure statistic from manufacture and irradiation testing are significantly below the coated particle requirements specified for PNP and HHT designs at the time. Covering a range to 1300 C in normal operations and 1600 C in accidents, with burnups to 13% FIMA and fast fluences to 8 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} (E> 16 fJ), the performance results exceed the design limits on manufacturing and operational requirements for the German HTR-Modul concept, which are 6.5 x 10{sup -5} for manufacturing, 2 x 10{sup -4} for normal operating conditions, and 5 x 10{sup -4

  2. High-quality thorium TRISO fuel performance in HTGRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, Karl; Allelein, Hans-Josef; Nabielek, Heinz; Kania, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Thorium as a nuclear fuel has received renewed interest, because of its widespread availability and the good irradiation performance of Th and mixed (Th,U) oxide compounds as fuels in nuclear power systems. Early HTGR development employed thorium together with high-enriched uranium (HEU). After 1980, HTGR fuel systems switched to low-enriched uranium (LEU). After completing fuel development for the AVR and the THTR with BISO coated particles, the German program expanded its efforts utilizing thorium and HEU TRISO coated particles in advanced HTGR concepts for process heat applications (PNP) and direct-cycle electricity production (HHT). The combination of a low-temperature isotropic (LTI) inner and outer pyrocarbon layers surrounding a strong, stable SiC layer greatly improved manufacturing conditions and the subsequent contamination and defective particle fractions in production fuel elements. In addition, this combination provided improved mechanical strength and a higher degree of solid fission product retention, not known previously with high-temperature isotropic (HTI) BISO coatings. The improved performance of the HEU (Th, U)O 2 TRISO fuel system was successfully demonstrated in three primary areas of development: manufacturing, irradiation testing under normal operating conditions, and accident simulation testing. In terms of demonstrating performance for advanced HTGR applications, the experimental failure statistic from manufacture and irradiation testing are significantly below the coated particle requirements specified for PNP and HHT designs at the time. Covering a range to 1300 C in normal operations and 1600 C in accidents, with burnups to 13% FIMA and fast fluences to 8 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E> 16 fJ), the performance results exceed the design limits on manufacturing and operational requirements for the German HTR-Modul concept, which are 6.5 x 10 -5 for manufacturing, 2 x 10 -4 for normal operating conditions, and 5 x 10 -4 for accident conditions. These

  3. Seismic response of high temperature gas-cooled reactor core with block-type fuel, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takeshi; Honma, Toshiaki.

    1980-01-01

    For the aseismic design of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) with block-type fuel, it is necessary to predict the motion and force of core columns and blocks. To reveal column vibration characteristics in three-dimensional space and impact response, column vibration tests were carried out with a scale model of a one-region section (seven columns) of the HTGR core. The results are as follows: (1) the column has a soft spring characteristic based on stacked blocks connected with loose pins, (2) the column has whirling phenomena, (3) the compression spring force simulating the gas pressure has the effect of raising the column resonance frequency, and (4) the vibration behavior of the stacked block column and impact response of the surrounding columns show agreement between experiment and analysis. (author)

  4. 1170-MW(t) HTGR-PS/C plant application study report: SRC-II process application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, R.; McMain, A.T. Jr.

    1981-05-01

    The solvent refined coal (SRC-II) process is an advanced process being developed by Gulf Mineral Resources Ltd. (a Gulf Oil Corporation subsidiary) to produce a clean, non-polluting liquid fuel from high-sulfur bituminous coals. The SRC-II commercial plant will process about 24,300 tonnes (26,800 tons) of feed coal per stream day, producing primarily fuel oil plus secondary fuel gases. This summary report describes the integration of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor operating in a process steam/cogeneration mode (HTGR-PS/C) to provide the energy requirements for the SRC-II process. The HTGR-PS/C plant was developed by General Atomic Company (GA) specifically for industries which require energy in the form of both steam and electricity. General Atomic has developed an 1170-MW(t) HTGR-PS/C design which is particularly well suited to industrial applications and is expected to have excellent cost benefits over other sources of energy

  5. Simulating the temperature noise in fast reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kebadze, B.V.; Pykhtina, T.V.; Tarasko, M.Z.

    1987-01-01

    Characteristics of temperature noise at various modes of coolant flow in fast reactor fuel assemblies (FA) and for different points of sensor installation are investigated. Stationary mode of coolant flow and mode with a partial overlapping of FA through cross section, resulting in local temperature increase and sodium boiling, are considered. Numerical simulation permits to evaluate time characteristicsof temperature noise and to formulate requirements for dynamic characteristics of the sensors, and also to clarify the dependence of coolant distribution parameters on the sensor location and peculiarities of stationary temperature profile

  6. Numerical Simulation of Methane Slip in Dual Fuel Marine Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Jaehyun; Jensen, Michael Vincent; Pang, Kar Mun; Walther, Jens Honore; Schramm, Jesper; Bae, Choongsik

    2017-01-01

    The methane slip is the problematic issue for the engines using natural gas(NG). Because methane is more powerful greenhouse gas (GHG) than CO2, understanding of the methane slip during gas exchange process of the engines is essential. In this study, the influence of the gas pipe geometry and the valve timings on the methane slip was investigated. MAN L28/32DF engine was modeled to simulate the gas exchange process of the four stroke NG-diesel dual fuel engines. The mesh size of the model was...

  7. Apparatus to simulate nuclear heating in advanced fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrona, B.J.; Galvin, T.M.; Johanson, E.

    1976-10-01

    A direct-electrical-heating apparatus has been built to simulate in-reactor temperature gradients and heating conditions in both the mixed nitrides and carbides of uranium and plutonium. The apparatus has the capability for the investigation and direct observation of fuel-behavior phenomena that should significantly enlarge the data base on mixed carbides and nitrides at temperatures near and above their melting points. In addition to heating UC, results of prooftests showed that the apparatus has the capability to heat graphite, 30 vol % ZrC in graphite, B 4 C control-rod pellets, and stainless steel

  8. Results for Phase I of the IAEA Coordinated Research Program on HTGR Uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bostelmann, Friederike [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Yoon, Su Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of uncertainties in design and safety analysis of reactors is today not only broadly accepted, but in many cases became the preferred way to replace traditional conservative analysis for safety and licensing analysis. The use of a more fundamental methodology is also consistent with the reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes available today. To facilitate uncertainty analysis applications a comprehensive approach and methodology must be developed and applied. High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGR) has its own peculiarities, coated particle design, large graphite quantities, different materials and high temperatures that also require other simulation requirements. The IAEA has therefore launched a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the HTGR Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling (UAM) in 2013 to study uncertainty propagation specifically in the HTGR analysis chain. Two benchmark problems are defined, with the prismatic design represented by the General Atomics (GA) MHTGR-350 and a 250 MW modular pebble bed design similar to the HTR-PM (INET, China). This report summarizes the contributions of the HTGR Methods Simulation group at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) up to this point of the CRP. The activities at INL have been focused so far on creating the problem specifications for the prismatic design, as well as providing reference solutions for the exercises defined for Phase I. An overview is provided of the HTGR UAM objectives and scope, and the detailed specifications for Exercises I-1, I-2, I-3 and I-4 are also included here for completeness. The main focus of the report is the compilation and discussion of reference results for Phase I (i.e. for input parameters at their nominal or best-estimate values), which is defined as the first step of the uncertainty quantification process. These reference results can be used by other CRP participants for comparison with other codes or their own reference

  9. Aqueous alteration of VHTR fuels particles under simulated geological conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Chaou, Abdelouahed, E-mail: aitchaou@subatech.in2p3.fr; Abdelouas, Abdesselam; Karakurt, Gökhan; Grambow, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) fuels consist of the bistructural-isotropic (BISO) or tristructural-isotropic (TRISO)-coated particles embedded in a graphite matrix. Management of the spent fuel generated during VHTR operation would most likely be through deep geological disposal. In this framework we investigated the alteration of BISO (with pyrolytic carbon) and TRISO (with SiC) particles under geological conditions simulated by temperatures of 50 and 90 °C and in the presence of synthetic groundwater. Solid state (scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-Raman spectroscopy, electron probe microanalyses (EPMA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)) and solution analyses (ICP-MS, ionique chromatography (IC)) showed oxidation of both pyrolytic carbon and SiC at 90 °C. Under air this led to the formation of SiO{sub 2} and a clay-like Mg–silicate, while under reducing conditions (H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} atmosphere) SiC and pyrolytic carbon were highly stable after a few months of alteration. At 50 °C, in the presence and absence of air, the alteration of the coatings was minor. In conclusion, due to their high stability in reducing conditions, HTR fuel disposal in reducing deep geological environments may constitute a viable solution for their long-term management.

  10. Conversion of microalgae to jet fuel: process design and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Yuan; Bluck, David; Van Wie, Bernard J

    2014-09-01

    Microalgae's aquatic, non-edible, highly genetically modifiable nature and fast growth rate are considered ideal for biomass conversion to liquid fuels providing promise for future shortages in fossil fuels and for reducing greenhouse gas and pollutant emissions from combustion. We demonstrate adaptability of PRO/II software by simulating a microalgae photo-bio-reactor and thermolysis with fixed conversion isothermal reactors adding a heat exchanger for thermolysis. We model a cooling tower and gas floatation with zero-duty flash drums adding solids removal for floatation. Properties data are from PRO/II's thermodynamic data manager. Hydrotreating is analyzed within PRO/II's case study option, made subject to Jet B fuel constraints, and we determine an optimal 6.8% bioleum bypass ratio, 230°C hydrotreater temperature, and 20:1 bottoms to overhead distillation ratio. Process economic feasibility occurs if cheap CO2, H2O and nutrient resources are available, along with solar energy and energy from byproduct combustion, and hydrotreater H2 from product reforming. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. FALCON Code Simulation for Verification of Fuel Preconditioning Guideline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee-Hun; Kwon, Oh-Hyun; Kim, Hong-Jin; Kim, Yong-Hwan [KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The magnitude and rate of power increases are key factors in the PCI failure process. KEPCO NF (KNF) provides operational restrictions called fuel preconditioning guideline (FPG) to mitigate PCI failures. The FPG contains recommended power maneuvering restrictions that should be followed when the KNF supplied fuel is being operated in-reactor. This guideline typically includes controlled power ramp rates, threshold power levels to initiate controlled ramp rates, and restrictions on the operating conditions that impact the potential for PCI failure. The purpose of the FPG is to allow time for stress relaxation to reduce cladding stress buildup during power maneuvers. Two general approaches have been adopted in the development of FPG to mitigate PCI failure in operating commercial reactors. The first approach relies primarily on past operational experience and power ramp test. The second one uses an analytical methodology where a figure-of-merit representative of PCI vulnerability, generally cladding hoop stress, is calculated using a fuel performance code. FALCON simulation can be the identification of a PCI limit parameter, typically cladding hoop stress, which can be used to evaluate a power maneuvering restriction on FPG. The PCI analysis is to assess the cladding hoop stress under various power ramp conditions. Startup ramp rate doesn't affect PCI failure until 50% of rated thermal power.

  12. Collision simulations of an exclusive ship of spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Ou; Endo, Hisayoshi

    2000-01-01

    Exclusive ships for sea transport of irradiated nuclear fuels operating in Japanese territorial waters are required to be built with the special hull structure against collision. To comply with the official notice 'KAISA No. 520' issued by the Ministry of Transport, the side structure of any such exclusive ship must be designed to secure the specified energy absorption capability based on Minorsky's ship collision model. The Shipbuilding Research Association of Japan (JSRA) has studied the safety in sea transport of nuclear fuels intermittently for these several decades. Recently, the adoption of finite element method has made detailed collision analyses practicable. Since 1998, the regulation research panel No. 46 of JSRA has carried out a series of finite element collision simulations in order to estimate the realistic damage to a typical exclusive ship of spent nuclear fuels. The expected structural responses, global motions and energy absorption capabilities of both colliding and struck ships during collision were investigated. The results of the investigations have shown that the ship is very likely to withstand the collision even with one of the world's largest ship. This is due mainly to her hull structure specially strengthened beyond the crushing strength of the colliding bow structures. (author)

  13. High-temperature process heat applications with an HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quade, R.N.; Vrable, D.L.

    1980-04-01

    An 842-MW(t) HTGR-process heat (HTGR-PH) design and several synfuels and energy transport processes to which it could be coupled are described. As in other HTGR designs, the HTGR-PH has its entire primary coolant system contained in a prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) which provides the necessary biological shielding and pressure containment. The high-temperature nuclear thermal energy is transported to the externally located process plant by a secondary helium transport loop. With a capability to produce hot helium in the secondary loop at 800 0 C (1472 0 F) with current designs and 900 0 C (1652 0 F) with advanced designs, a large number of process heat applications are potentially available. Studies have been performed for coal liquefaction and gasification using nuclear heat

  14. HTGR safety research program. Progress report, April--June 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, W.L.

    1975-09-01

    Progress in HTGR safety research is reported under the following headings: fission product technology; primary coolant impurities; structural investigation; safety instrumentation and control systems; phenomena modeling and systems analysis. (JWR)

  15. Status of the United States National HTGR program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The HTGR continues to appear as an increasingly attractive option for application to US energy markets. To examine that potential, a program is being pursued to examine the various HTGR applications and to provide information to decision-makers in both the public and private sectors. To date, this effort has identified a substantial technical and economic potential for Steam Cycle/Cogeneration applications. Advanced HTGR systems are currently being evaluated to determine their appropriate role and timing. The encouraging results which have been obtained lead to heightened anticipation that a role for the HTGR will be found in the US energy market and that an initiative culminating in a lead project will be evolved in the forseeable future. The US Program can continue to benefit from international cooperative activities to develop the needed technologies. Expansion of these cooperative activities will be actively pursued

  16. Volume 2. Probabilistic analysis of HTGR application studies. Supporting data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    Volume II, Probabilistic Analysis of HTGR Application Studies - Supporting Data, gives the detail data, both deterministic and probabilistic, employed in the calculation presented in Volume I. The HTGR plants and the fossil plants considered in the study are listed. GCRA provided the technical experts from which the data were obtained by MAC personnel. The names of the technical experts (interviewee) and the analysts (interviewer) are given for the probabilistic data

  17. Technical review of process heat applications using the HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brierley, G.

    1976-06-01

    The demand for process heat applications is surveyed. Those applications which can be served only by the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) are identified and the status of process heat applications in Europe, USA, and Japan in December 1975 is discussed. Technical problems associated with the HTGR for process heat applications are outlined together with an appraisal of the safety considerations involved. (author)

  18. HTGR high temperature process heat design and cost status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    This report describes the status of the studies conducted on the 850 0 C ROT indirect cycle and the 950 0 C ROT direct cycle through the end of Fiscal Year 1981. Volume I provides summaries of the design and optimization studies and the resulting capital and product costs, for the HTGR/thermochemical pipeline concept. Additionally, preliminary evaluations are presented for coupling of candidate process applications to the HTGR system

  19. Assessment of the licensing aspects of HTGR in Yugoslavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varazdinec, Z.

    1990-01-01

    This paper deals not only with the licensing procedure in Yugoslavia, but also reflects the Utility/Owner approach to the assessment of the licensability of the HTGR during the site selection process and especially during bid evaluation process. Besides the description of the existing procedure which was implemented on licensing of LWR program, the assessment of some licensing aspects of HTGR has been presented to describe possible implementation on licensing procedure. (author)

  20. Assessment of the licensing aspects of HTGR in Yugoslavia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varazdinec, Z [Institut za Elektroprivredu-Zagreb, Zagreb (Yugoslavia)

    1990-07-01

    This paper deals not only with the licensing procedure in Yugoslavia, but also reflects the Utility/Owner approach to the assessment of the licensability of the HTGR during the site selection process and especially during bid evaluation process. Besides the description of the existing procedure which was implemented on licensing of LWR program, the assessment of some licensing aspects of HTGR has been presented to describe possible implementation on licensing procedure. (author)

  1. A study on density, porosity and grain size of unirradiated ROX fuels and simulated ROX fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Shirasu, Noriko; Ohmichi, Toshihiko

    1999-05-01

    The unirradiated ROX fuels made of (1) 23wt%PuO 2 -17wt%SZR-56wt%Al 2 O 3 -4wt%MgO (ROX-SZR) and (2) 20wt%PuO 2 -29wt%ThO 2 -48wt%Al 2 O 3 -3wt%MgO (ROX-ThO 2 ) were fabricated by JAERI. Additionally, 9 simulated ROX fuels (used UO 2 instead of PuO 2 ) were fabricated by NFI. Densities, porosity and grain sizes of those were studied. Obtained results are: (1) ROX fuels: The estimated theoretical density (TD) was 5.6g/cc for the ROX-SZR and 6.2g/cc for the ROX-ThO 2 . Those were about half of that in UO 2 (10.96g/cc). As-fabricated density determined was 4.6g/cc (82%TD) for the former and 5.2g/cc (83%TD) for the latter. The %TD of those was low than that of UO 2 (95%TD). One of main reason is that the ROX fuels were sintered at temperature of 1,400degC while UO 2 was sintered at temperature of 1,700degC. The average pore diameter was about 3 μm and the porosity was 17-18%, implying that the ROX fuels were resulted in containing a lot of small pores 2 . As-fabricated density determined in the present study was about 4.5-5.5g/cc. The %TD of the simulated ROX fuels ranged about 94-98%TD. They were in the same as that of UO 2 because as high sintering temperature of 1,750degC as UO 2 . The average pore diameter was about 4-8 μm and the porosity was <6%. Grain size was revealed to be about 1-4 μm. (author)

  2. ORTURB, HTGR Steam Turbine Dynamic for FSV Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: ORTURB was written specifically to calculate the dynamic behavior of the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) High- Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) steam turbines. The program is divided into three main parts: the driver subroutine; turbine subroutines to calculate the pressure-flow balance of the high-, intermediate-, and low-pressure turbines; and feedwater heater subroutines. 2 - Method of solution: The program uses a relationship derived for ideal gas flow in an iterative fashion that minimizes computational time to determine the pressure and flow in the FSV steam turbines as a function of plant transient operating conditions. An important computer modeling characteristic, unique to FSV, is that the high-pressure turbine exhaust steam is used to drive the reactor core coolant circulators prior to entering the reheater. A feedwater heater dynamic simulation model utilizing seven state variables for each of the five heaters is included in the ORTURB computer simulation of the regenerative Rankine cycle steam turbines. The seven temperature differential equations are solved at each time- step using a matrix exponential method. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The turbine shaft is assumed to rotate at a constant (rated) speed of 3600 rpm. Energy and mass storage of steam in the high-, intermediate-, and low-pressure turbines is assumed to be negligible. These limitations exclude the use of ORTURB during a turbine transient such as startup from zero power or very low turbine flows

  3. Overview of HTGR utilization system developments at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Y.; Shiozawa, S.; Inagaki, Y.

    1997-01-01

    JAERI has been constructing a 30-MWt HTGR, named HTTR, to develop technology and to demonstrate effectiveness of high-temperature nuclear heat utilization. A hydrogen production system by natural gas steam reforming is to be the first heat utilization system of the HTTR since its technology matured in fossil-fired plant enables to couple with HTTR in the early 2000's and technical solutions demonstrated by the coupling will contribute to all other hydrogen production systems. The HTTR steam reforming system is designed to utilize the nuclear heat effectively and to achieve hydrogen productivity competitive to that of a fossil-fired plant with operability, controllability and safety acceptable enough to commercialization, and an arrangement of key components was already decided. Prior to coupling of the steam reforming system with the HTTR, an out-of-pile test is planned to confirm safety, controllability and performance of the steam reforming system under simulated operational conditions. The out-of-pile system is an approximately 1/20-1/30 scale system of the HTTR steam reforming system and simulates key components downstream from an IHX

  4. Volume 1. Probabilistic analysis of HTGR application studies. Technical discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, J.; Perry, L.

    1980-01-01

    The HTGR Program encompasses a number of decisions facing both industry and government which are being evaluated under the HTGR application studies being conducted by the GCRA. This report is in support of these application studies, specifically by developing comparative probabilistic energy costs of the alternative HTGR plant types under study at this time and of competitive PWR and coal-fired plants. Management decision analytic methodology was used as the basis for the development of the comparative probabilistic data. This study covers the probabilistic comparison of various HTGR plant types at a commercial development stage with comparative PWR and coal-fired plants. Subsequent studies are needed to address the sequencing of HTGR plants from the lead plant to the commercial plants and to integrate the R and D program into the plant construction sequence. The probabilistic results cover the comparison of the 15-year levelized energy costs for commercial plants, all with 1995 startup dates. For comparison with the HTGR plants, PWR and fossil-fired plants have been included in the probabilistic analysis, both as steam electric plants and as combined steam electric and process heat plants

  5. Research reactors for power reactor fuel and materials testing - Studsvik's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grounes, M.

    1998-01-01

    Presently Studsvik's R2 test reactor is used for BWR and PWR fuel irradiations at constant power and under transient power conditions. Furthermore tests are performed with defective LWR fuel rods. Tests are also performed on different types of LWR cladding materials and structural materials including post-irradiation testing of materials irradiated at different temperatures and, in some cases, in different water chemistries and on fusion reactor materials. In the past, tests have also been performed on HTGR fuel and FBR fuel and materials under appropriate coolant, temperature and pressure conditions. Fuel tests under development include extremely fast power ramps simulating some reactivity initiated accidents and stored energy (enthalpy) measurements. Materials tests under development include different types of in-pile tests including tests in the INCA (In-Core Autoclave) facility .The present and future demands on the test reactor fuel in all these cases are discussed. (author)

  6. Improvement of Modeling HTGR Neutron Physics by Uncertainty Analysis with the Use of Cross-Section Covariance Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyarinov, V. F.; Grol, A. V.; Fomichenko, P. A.; Ternovykh, M. Yu

    2017-01-01

    This work is aimed at improvement of HTGR neutron physics design calculations by application of uncertainty analysis with the use of cross-section covariance information. Methodology and codes for preparation of multigroup libraries of covariance information for individual isotopes from the basic 44-group library of SCALE-6 code system were developed. A 69-group library of covariance information in a special format for main isotopes and elements typical for high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR) was generated. This library can be used for estimation of uncertainties, associated with nuclear data, in analysis of HTGR neutron physics with design codes. As an example, calculations of one-group cross-section uncertainties for fission and capture reactions for main isotopes of the MHTGR-350 benchmark, as well as uncertainties of the multiplication factor (k∞) for the MHTGR-350 fuel compact cell model and fuel block model were performed. These uncertainties were estimated by the developed technology with the use of WIMS-D code and modules of SCALE-6 code system, namely, by TSUNAMI, KENO-VI and SAMS. Eight most important reactions on isotopes for MHTGR-350 benchmark were identified, namely: 10B(capt), 238U(n,γ), ν5, 235U(n,γ), 238U(el), natC(el), 235U(fiss)-235U(n,γ), 235U(fiss).

  7. Control rod for HTGR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mogi, Haruyoshi; Saito, Yuji; Fukamichi, Kenjiro.

    1990-01-01

    Upon dropping control rod elements into the reactor core, impact shocks are applied to wire ropes or spines to possibly deteriorate the integrity of the control rods. In view of the above in the present invention, shock absorbers such as springs or bellows are disposed between a wire rope and a spine in a HTGR type reactor control rod comprising a plurality of control rod elements connected axially by means of a spine that penetrates the central portion thereof, and is suspended at the upper end thereof by a wire rope. Impact shocks of about 5 kg are applied to the wire rope and the spine and, since they can be reduced by the shock absorbers, the control rod integrity can be maintained and the reactor safety can be improved. (T.M.)

  8. Screening of synfuel processes for HTGR application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    The aim of this study is to select for further study, the several synfuel processes which are the most attractive for application of HTGR heat and energy. In pursuing this objective, the Working Group identified 34 candidate synfuel processes, cut the number of processes to 16 in an initial screening, established 11 prime criteria with weighting factors for use in screening the remaining processes, developed a screening methodology and assumptions, collected process energy requirement information, and performed a comparative rating of the processes. As a result of this, three oil shale retorting processes, two coal liquefaction processes and one coal gasification process were selected as those of most interest for further study at this time

  9. The acoustic environment in large HTGR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, T.E.

    1979-01-01

    Well-known techniques for estimating acoustic vibration of structures have been applied to a General Atomic high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) design. It is shown that one must evaluate internal loss factors for both fluid and structure modes, as well as radiation loss factors, to avoid large errors in estimated structural response. At any frequency above 1350 rad/s there are generally at least 20 acoustic modes contributing to acoustic pressure, so statistical energy analysis may be employed. But because the gas circuit consists mainly of high-aspect-ratio cavities, reverberant fields are nowhere isotropic below 7500 rad/s, and in some regions are not isotropic below 60 000 rad/s. In comparison with isotropic reverberant fields, these anistropic fields enhance the radiation efficiencies of some structural modes at low frequencies, but have surprisingly little effect at most frequencies. The efficiency of a dipole sound source depends upon its orientation. (Auth.)

  10. Alternative Liquid Fuels Simulation Model (AltSim).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Ryan; Baker, Arnold Barry; Drennen, Thomas E.

    2009-12-01

    The Alternative Liquid Fuels Simulation Model (AltSim) is a high-level dynamic simulation model which calculates and compares the production and end use costs, greenhouse gas emissions, and energy balances of several alternative liquid transportation fuels. These fuels include: corn ethanol, cellulosic ethanol from various feedstocks (switchgrass, corn stover, forest residue, and farmed trees), biodiesel, and diesels derived from natural gas (gas to liquid, or GTL), coal (coal to liquid, or CTL), and coal with biomass (CBTL). AltSim allows for comprehensive sensitivity analyses on capital costs, operation and maintenance costs, renewable and fossil fuel feedstock costs, feedstock conversion ratio, financial assumptions, tax credits, CO{sub 2} taxes, and plant capacity factor. This paper summarizes the structure and methodology of AltSim, presents results, and provides a detailed sensitivity analysis. The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 sets a goal for the increased use of biofuels in the U.S., ultimately reaching 36 billion gallons by 2022. AltSim's base case assumes EPA projected feedstock costs in 2022 (EPA, 2009). For the base case assumptions, AltSim estimates per gallon production costs for the five ethanol feedstocks (corn, switchgrass, corn stover, forest residue, and farmed trees) of $1.86, $2.32, $2.45, $1.52, and $1.91, respectively. The projected production cost of biodiesel is $1.81/gallon. The estimates for CTL without biomass range from $1.36 to $2.22. With biomass, the estimated costs increase, ranging from $2.19 per gallon for the CTL option with 8% biomass to $2.79 per gallon for the CTL option with 30% biomass and carbon capture and sequestration. AltSim compares the greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) associated with both the production and consumption of the various fuels. EISA allows fuels emitting 20% less greenhouse gases (GHG) than conventional gasoline and diesels to qualify as renewable fuels. This allows several of the

  11. 1170-MW(t) HTGR-PS/C plant application study report: tar sands oil recovery application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, R.; McMain, A.T. Jr.

    1981-05-01

    This report summarizes a study to apply an 1170-MW(t) high-temperature gas-cooled reactor - process steam/cogeneration (HTGR-PS/C) to tar sands oil recovery and upgrading. The raw product recovered from the sands is a heavy, sour bitumen; upgrading, which involves coking and hydrodesulfurization, produces a synthetic crude (refinable by current technology) and petroleum coke. Steam and electric power are required for the recovery and upgrading process. Proposed and commercial plants would purchase electric power from local utilities and obtain from boilers fired with coal and with by-product fuels produced by the upgrading. This study shows that an HTGR-PS/C represents a more economical source of steam and electric power

  12. Development of advanced spent fuel management process. The fabrication and oxidation behavior of simulated metallized spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ro, Seung Gy; Shin, Y.J.; You, G.S.; Joo, J.S.; Min, D.K.; Chun, Y.B.; Lee, E.P.; Seo, H.S.; Ahn, S.B

    1999-03-01

    The simulated metallized spent fuel ingots were fabricated and evaluated the oxidation rates and the activation energies under several temperature conditions to develop an advanced spent fuel management process. It was also checked the alloying characteristics of the some elements with metal uranium. (Author). 3 refs., 1 tab., 36 figs.

  13. Multidisciplinary Simulation of Graphite-Composite and Cermet Fuel Elements for NTP Point of Departure Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Mark E.; Schnitzler, Bruce G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares the expected performance of two Nuclear Thermal Propulsion fuel types. High fidelity, fluid/thermal/structural + neutronic simulations help predict the performance of graphite-composite and cermet fuel types from point of departure engine designs from the Nuclear Thermal Propulsion project. Materials and nuclear reactivity issues are reviewed for each fuel type. Thermal/structural simulations predict thermal stresses in the fuel and thermal expansion mis-match stresses in the coatings. Fluid/thermal/structural/neutronic simulations provide predictions for full fuel elements. Although NTP engines will utilize many existing chemical engine components and technologies, nuclear fuel elements are a less developed engine component and introduce design uncertainty. Consequently, these fuel element simulations provide important insights into NTP engine performance.

  14. A methodology for determining the dynamic exchange of resources in nuclear fuel cycle simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidden, Matthew J., E-mail: gidden@iiasa.ac.at [International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Schlossplatz 1, A-2361 Laxenburg (Austria); University of Wisconsin – Madison, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Wilson, Paul P.H. [University of Wisconsin – Madison, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A novel fuel cycle simulation entity interaction mechanism is proposed. • A framework and implementation of the mechanism is described. • New facility outage and regional interaction scenario studies are described and analyzed. - Abstract: Simulation of the nuclear fuel cycle can be performed using a wide range of techniques and methodologies. Past efforts have focused on specific fuel cycles or reactor technologies. The CYCLUS fuel cycle simulator seeks to separate the design of the simulation from the fuel cycle or technologies of interest. In order to support this separation, a robust supply–demand communication and solution framework is required. Accordingly an agent-based supply-chain framework, the Dynamic Resource Exchange (DRE), has been designed implemented in CYCLUS. It supports the communication of complex resources, namely isotopic compositions of nuclear fuel, between fuel cycle facilities and their managers (e.g., institutions and regions). Instances of supply and demand are defined as an optimization problem and solved for each timestep. Importantly, the DRE allows each agent in the simulation to independently indicate preference for specific trading options in order to meet both physics requirements and satisfy constraints imposed by potential socio-political models. To display the variety of possible simulations that the DRE enables, example scenarios are formulated and described. Important features include key fuel-cycle facility outages, introduction of external recycled fuel sources (similar to the current mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility in the United States), and nontrivial interactions between fuel cycles existing in different regions.

  15. A methodology for determining the dynamic exchange of resources in nuclear fuel cycle simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gidden, Matthew J.; Wilson, Paul P.H.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel fuel cycle simulation entity interaction mechanism is proposed. • A framework and implementation of the mechanism is described. • New facility outage and regional interaction scenario studies are described and analyzed. - Abstract: Simulation of the nuclear fuel cycle can be performed using a wide range of techniques and methodologies. Past efforts have focused on specific fuel cycles or reactor technologies. The CYCLUS fuel cycle simulator seeks to separate the design of the simulation from the fuel cycle or technologies of interest. In order to support this separation, a robust supply–demand communication and solution framework is required. Accordingly an agent-based supply-chain framework, the Dynamic Resource Exchange (DRE), has been designed implemented in CYCLUS. It supports the communication of complex resources, namely isotopic compositions of nuclear fuel, between fuel cycle facilities and their managers (e.g., institutions and regions). Instances of supply and demand are defined as an optimization problem and solved for each timestep. Importantly, the DRE allows each agent in the simulation to independently indicate preference for specific trading options in order to meet both physics requirements and satisfy constraints imposed by potential socio-political models. To display the variety of possible simulations that the DRE enables, example scenarios are formulated and described. Important features include key fuel-cycle facility outages, introduction of external recycled fuel sources (similar to the current mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility in the United States), and nontrivial interactions between fuel cycles existing in different regions.

  16. Nuclear heat source component design considerations for HTGR process heat reactor plant concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Kapich, D.; King, J.H.; Venkatesh, M.C.

    1982-01-01

    Using alternate energy sources abundant in the U.S.A. to help curb foreign oil imports is vitally important from both national security and economic standpoints. Perhaps the most forwardlooking opportunity to realize national energy goals involves the integrated use of two energy sources that have an established technology base in the U.S.A., namely nuclear energy and coal. The coupling of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) and a chemical process facility has the potential for long-term synthetic fuel production (i.e., oil, gasoline, aviation fuel, hydrogen, etc.) using coal as the carbon source. Studies are in progress to exploit the high-temperature capability of an advanced HTGR variant for nuclear process heat. The process heat plant discussed in this paper has a 1170-MW(t) reactor as the heat source and the concept is based on indirect reforming, i.e., the high-temperature nuclear thermal energy is transported (via an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX)) to the externally located process plant by a secondary helium transport loop. Emphasis is placed on design considerations for the major nuclear heat source (NHS) components, and discussions are presented for the reactor core, prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV), rotating machinery, and heat exchangers

  17. Safety Design Approach for the Development of Safety Requirements for Design of Commercial HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Hirofumi; Sato, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Tachibana, Yukio; Nishihara, Tetsuo; Yan, Xing; Sakaba, Nariaki; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The research committee on “Safety requirements for HTGR design” was established in 2013 under the Atomic Energy Society of Japan to develop the draft safety requirements for the design of commercial High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs), which incorporate the HTGR safety features demonstrated using the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), lessons learned from the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station and requirements for the integration of the hydrogen production plants. The safety design approach for the commercial HTGRs which is a basement of the safety requirements is determined prior to the development of the safety requirements. The safety design approaches for the commercial HTGRs are to confine the radioactive materials within the coated fuel particles not only during normal operation but also during accident conditions, and the integrity of the coated fuel particles and other requiring physical barriers are protected by the inherent and passive safety features. This paper describes the main topics of the research committee, the safety design approaches and the safety functions of the commercial HTGRs determined in the research committee. (author)

  18. Development of joining techniques for fabrication of fuel rod simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moorhead, A.J.; McCulloch, R.W.; Reed, R.W.; Woodhouse, J.J.

    1980-10-01

    Much of the safety-related thermal-hydraulic tests on nuclear reactors are conducted not in the reactor itself, but in mockup segments of a core that uses resistance-heated fuel rod simulators (FRS) in place of the radioactive fuel rods. Laser welding and furnace brazing techniques are described for joining subassemblies for FRS that have survived up to 1000 h steady-state operation at 700 to 1100 0 C cladding temperatures and over 5000 thermal transients, ranging from 10 to 100 0 C/s. A pulsed-laser welding procedure that includes use of small-diameter filler wire is used to join one end of a resistance heating element of Pt-8 W, Fe-22 Cr-5.5 Al-0.5 Co, or 80 Ni-20 Cr (wt %) to a tubular conductor of an appropriate intermediate material. The other end of the heating element is laser welded to an end plug, which in turn is welded to a central conductor rod

  19. Simulation of primary fuel atomization processes at subcritical pressures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arienti, Marco

    2013-06-01

    This report documents results from an LDRD project for the first-principles simulation of the early stages of spray formation (primary atomization). The first part describes a Cartesian embedded-wall method for the calculation of flow internal to a real injector in a fully coupled primary calculation. The second part describes the extension to an all-velocity formulation by introducing a momentum-conservative semi-Lagrangian advection and by adding a compressible term in the Poissons equation. Accompanying the description of the new algorithms are verification tests for simple two-phase problems in the presence of a solid interface; a validation study for a scaled-up multi-hole Diesel injector; and demonstration calculations for the closing and opening transients of a single-hole injector and for the high-pressure injection of liquid fuel at supersonic velocity.

  20. Discrimination of irradiated MOX fuel from UOX fuel by multivariate statistical analysis of simulated activities of gamma-emitting isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åberg Lindell, M.; Andersson, P.; Grape, S.; Hellesen, C.; Håkansson, A.; Thulin, M.

    2018-03-01

    This paper investigates how concentrations of certain fission products and their related gamma-ray emissions can be used to discriminate between uranium oxide (UOX) and mixed oxide (MOX) type fuel. Discrimination of irradiated MOX fuel from irradiated UOX fuel is important in nuclear facilities and for transport of nuclear fuel, for purposes of both criticality safety and nuclear safeguards. Although facility operators keep records on the identity and properties of each fuel, tools for nuclear safeguards inspectors that enable independent verification of the fuel are critical in the recovery of continuity of knowledge, should it be lost. A discrimination methodology for classification of UOX and MOX fuel, based on passive gamma-ray spectroscopy data and multivariate analysis methods, is presented. Nuclear fuels and their gamma-ray emissions were simulated in the Monte Carlo code Serpent, and the resulting data was used as input to train seven different multivariate classification techniques. The trained classifiers were subsequently implemented and evaluated with respect to their capabilities to correctly predict the classes of unknown fuel items. The best results concerning successful discrimination of UOX and MOX-fuel were acquired when using non-linear classification techniques, such as the k nearest neighbors method and the Gaussian kernel support vector machine. For fuel with cooling times up to 20 years, when it is considered that gamma-rays from the isotope 134Cs can still be efficiently measured, success rates of 100% were obtained. A sensitivity analysis indicated that these methods were also robust.

  1. ROSA-IV Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) system description for second simulated fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    The ROSA-IV Program's Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) is a test facility for integral simulation of thermal-hydraulic response of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) during small break loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) and transients. In this facility, the PWR core nuclear fuel rods are simulated using electric heater rods. The simulated fuel assembly which was installed during the facility construction was replaced with a new one in 1988. The first test with this second simulated fuel assembly was conducted in December 1988. This report describes the facility configuration and characteristics as of this date (December 1988) including the new simulated fuel assembly design and the facility changes which were made during the testing with the first assembly as well as during the renewal of the simulated fuel assembly. (author)

  2. Present status of HTGR projects and their heat applications in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebennik, V.N.; Glushkov, E.S.; Kukharkin, N.E.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the main technical decision and parameters of the HTGR of different power and considers a few schemes of HTGR plants with a gas turbine cycle. Also, the future prospects on heat utilization of HTGR in Russia is presented. (J.P.N.)

  3. Fabrication of Non-instrumented capsule for DUPIC simulated fuel irradiation test in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, B.G.; Kang, Y.H.; Park, S.J.; Shin, Y.T. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-10-01

    In order to develope DUPIC nuclear fuel, the irradiation test for simulated DUPIC fuel was planed using a non-instrumented capsule in HANARO. Because DUPIC fuel is highly radioactive material the non-instrumented capsule for an irradiation test of simulated DUPIC fuel in HANARO was designed to remotely assemble and disassemble in hot cell. And then, according to the design requirements the non-instrumented DUPIC capsule was successfully manufactured. Also, the manufacturing technologies of the non-instrumented capsule for irradiating the nuclear fuel in HANARO were established, and the basic technology for the development of the instrumented capsule technology was accumulated. This report describes the manufacturing of the non-instrumented capsule for simulated DUPIC fuel. And, this report will be based to develope the instrumented capsule, which will be utilized to irradiate the nuclear fuel in HANARO. 26 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  4. A dynamic simulation tool for the battery-hybrid hydrogen fuel cell vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, R.M. [Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, University of Hawaii, Manoa (United States); Ramaswamy, S.; Cunningham, J.M. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Hauer, K.H. [xcellvision, Major-Hirst-Strasse 11, 38422 Wolfsburg (Germany)

    2006-10-15

    This paper describes a dynamic fuel cell vehicle simulation tool for the battery-hybrid direct-hydrogen fuel cell vehicle. The emphasis is on simulation of the hybridized hydrogen fuel cell system within an existing fuel cell vehicle simulation tool. The discussion is focused on the simulation of the sub-systems that are unique to the hybridized direct-hydrogen vehicle, and builds on a previous paper that described a simulation tool for the load-following direct-hydrogen vehicle. The configuration of the general fuel cell vehicle simulation tool has been previously presented in detail, and is only briefly reviewed in the introduction to this paper. Strictly speaking, the results provided in this paper only serve as an example that is valid for the specific fuel cell vehicle design configuration analyzed. Different design choices may lead to different results, depending strongly on the parameters used and choices taken during the detailed design process required for this highly non-linear and n-dimensional system. The primary purpose of this paper is not to provide a dynamic simulation tool that is the ''final word'' for the ''optimal'' hybrid fuel cell vehicle design. The primary purpose is to provide an explanation of a simulation method for analyzing the energetic aspects of a hybrid fuel cell vehicle. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. Approach on a global HTGR R and D network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lensa, W. von

    1997-01-01

    The present situation of nuclear power in general and of the innovative nuclear reactor systems in particular requires more comprehensive, coordinated R and D efforts on a broad international level to respond to today's requirements with respect to public and economic acceptance as well as to globalization trends and global environmental problems. HTGR technology development has already reached a high degree of maturity that will be complemented by the operation of the two new test reactors in Japan and China, representing technological milestones for the demonstration of HTGR safety characteristics and Nuclear Process Heat generation capabilities. It is proposed by the IAEA 'International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors' to establish a 'Global HTGR R and D Network' on basic HTGR technology for the stable, long-term advancement of the specific HTGR features and as a basis for the future market introduction of this innovative reactor system. The background and the motivation for this approach are illustrated, as well as first proposals on the main objectives, the structure and the further procedures for the implementation of such a multinational working sharing R and D network. Modern telecooperation methods are foreseen as an interactive tool for effective communication and collaboration on a global scale. (author)

  6. Transient performance simulation of aircraft engine integrated with fuel and control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.; Li, Y.G.; Yang, B.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A new performance simulation method for engine hydraulic fuel systems is introduced. • Time delay of engine performance due to fuel system model is noticeable but small. • The method provides details of fuel system behavior in engine transient processes. • The method could be used to support engine and fuel system designs. - Abstract: A new method for the simulation of gas turbine fuel systems based on an inter-component volume method has been developed. It is able to simulate the performance of each of the hydraulic components of a fuel system using physics-based models, which potentially offers more accurate results compared with those using transfer functions. A transient performance simulation system has been set up for gas turbine engines based on an inter-component volume (ICV) method. A proportional-integral (PI) control strategy is used for the simulation of engine controller. An integrated engine and its control and hydraulic fuel systems has been set up to investigate their coupling effect during engine transient processes. The developed simulation system has been applied to a model aero engine. The results show that the delay of the engine transient response due to the inclusion of the fuel system model is noticeable although relatively small. The developed method is generic and can be applied to any other gas turbines and their control and fuel systems.

  7. Development of dynamic simulation code for fuel cycle of fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Isao; Seki, Yasushi; Sasaki, Makoto; Shintani, Kiyonori; Kim, Yeong-Chan

    1999-02-01

    A dynamic simulation code for fuel cycle of a fusion experimental reactor has been developed. The code follows the fuel inventory change with time in the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system during 2 days pulse operation cycles. The time dependence of the fuel inventory distribution is evaluated considering the fuel burn and exhaust in the plasma chamber, purification and supply functions. For each subsystem of the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system, the fuel inventory equation is written based on the equation of state considering the fuel burn and the function of exhaust, purification, and supply. The processing constants of subsystem for steady states were taken from the values in the ITER Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) report. Using this code, the time dependence of the fuel supply and inventory depending on the burn state and subsystem processing functions are shown. (author)

  8. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR): long term program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The FY 1980 effort was to investigate four technology options identified by program participants as potentially viable candidates for near-term demonstration: the Gas Turbine system (HTGR-GT), reflecting its perceived compatibility with the dry-cooling market, two systems addressing the process heat market, the Reforming (HTGR-R) and Steam Cycle (HTGR-SC) systems, and a more developmental reactor system, The Nuclear Heat Source Demonstration Reactor (NHSDR), which was to serve as a basis for both the HTGR-GT and HTGR-R systems as well as the further potential for developing advanced applications such as steam-coal gasification and water splitting

  9. Subharmonic excitation in an HTGR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezler, P.; Curreri, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    The occurrence of subharmonic resonance in a series of blocks with clearance between blocks and with springs on the outer most ends is the subject of this paper. This represents an HTGR core response to an earthquake input. An analytical model of the cross section of this type of core is a series of blocks arranged horizontally between outer walls. Each block represents many graphite hexagonal core elements acting in unison as a single mass. The blocks are of unequal size to model the true mass distribution through the core. Core element elasticity and damping characteristics are modeled with linear spring and viscous damping units affixed to each block. The walls and base represent the core barell or core element containment structure. For forced response calculations, these boundaries are given prescribed motions. The clearance between each block could be the same or different with the total clearance duplicating that of the entire core. Spring packs installed between the first and last block and the boundaries model the boundary elasticity. The system non-linearity is due to the severe discontinuity in the interblock elastic forces when adjacent blocks collide. A computer program using a numerical integration scheme was developed to solve for the response of the system to arbitrary inputs

  10. Preliminary risk assessments of the small HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everline, C.J.; Bellis, E.A.

    1985-05-01

    Preliminary investment and safety risk assessments were performed for a preconceptual design of a four-module 250-MW(t) side-by-side steel-vessel pebble bed HTGR plant. Broad event spectra were analyzed involving component damage resulting in unscheduled plant outages and fission product releases resulting in offsite doses. The preliminary assessment indicates at this stage of the design that two categories of events govern the investment risk envelope: primary coolant leaks which release some circulating and plate-out activity that contaminates the confinement and turbogenerator damage which involves extensive turbine blade failure. Primary coolant leaks are important contributors because associated cleanup and decontamination requirements result in longer outages that arise from other events with comparable frequencies. Turbogenerator damage is the salient low-frequency investment risk accident due to the relatively long outages being experienced in the industry. Thermal transients are unimportant investment risk contributors because pressurized core heatups cause little damage, and depressurized core heatups occur at negligible frequencies relative to the forced outage goal. These preliminary results demonstrate investment and safety risk goal compliance at this stage in the design process. Studies are continuing in order to provide valuable insights into risk-significant events to assure a balanced approach to meeting user and regulatory requirements

  11. Studies of iodine adsorption and desorption on HTGR coolant circuit materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, M.F.; Compere, E.L.; de Nordwall, H.J.

    1976-04-01

    Safety studies of the HTGR system indicate that radioactive iodine, released from the fuel to the helium coolant, may pose a problem of concern if no attenuation of the amount of iodine released occurs in the coolant circuit. Since information on iodine behavior in this system was incomplete, iodine adsorption on HTGR materials was studied in vacuum as a function of iodine pressure and of adsorber temperature. Iodine coverages on Fe 3 O 4 and Cr 2 O 3 approached maxima of about 2 x 10 14 and 1 x 10 14 atoms/cm 2 , respectively, whereas the iodine coverage on graphite under similar conditions was found to be less by a factor of about 100. Iodine desorption from the same materials into vacuum or flowing helium was investigated, on a limited basis, as a function of iodine coverage, of adsorber temperature, and of dry vs wet helium. The rate of vacuum desorption from Fe 3 O 4 was related to the spectrum of energies of the adsorption sites. A small amount of water vapor in the helium enhanced desorption from iron powder but appeared to have less effect on desorption from the metal oxides

  12. A three-dimensional computer code for the nonlinear dynamic response of an HTGR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subudhi, M.; Lasker, L.; Koplik, B.; Curreri, J.; Goradia, H.

    1979-01-01

    A three-dimensional dynamic code has been developed to determine the nonlinear response of an HTGR core. The HTGR core consists of several thousands of hexagonal core blocks. These are arranged in layers stacked together. Each layer contains many core blocks surrounded on their outer periphery by reflector blocks. The entire assembly is contained within a prestressed concrete reactor vessel. Gaps exist between adjacent blocks in any horizontal plane. Each core block in a given layer is connected to the blocks directly above and below it via three dowell pins. The present analytical study is directed towards an investigation of the nonlinear response of the reactor core blocks in the event of a seismic occurrence. The computer code is developed for a specific mathematical model which represents a vertical arrangement of layers of blocks. This comprises a 'block module' of core elements which would be obtained by cutting a cylindrical portion consisting of seven fuel blocks per layer. It is anticipated that a number of such modules properly arranged could represent the entire core. Hence, the predicted response of this module would exhibit the response characteristics of the core. (orig.)

  13. Present status of research on and development of HTGR techniques in the People's Republic of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yongjun

    1989-01-01

    China is a developing country rich in coal, petroleum and hydropower resources. In the past ten years, energy production in China has had a large increase, but along with the development of economy, energy demands increase even more rapidly. Many problems exist in China's energy system. Considering the large energy demand in the near future and long-term energy strategy, China has already decided to develop nuclear power gradually. The first several nuclear power stations are being and will be built in the South-east sea shore region. Two 900 MW PWRs (from France) and one 300 MW PWR (home made) are now under construction at Daya Bay (Kwangton Province) and Qin Shan (Zhejiang Province). The succeeding PWR power plants are being planned. PWR nuclear power station has been selected for the beginning of China's nuclear power plan. For large scale utilization of nuclear power in the next century, the development of advanced reactor type with good safety and economy performances and high uranium utilization rate (uranium resources in China is not rich enough) is strategically important. HTGR, due to its inherent safety characteristics, high heat efficiency, flexible fuel system and wide application fields, is a prospective advanced reactor type. Research and development on HTGR have already been included in China's national technical development program and are going on smoothly

  14. Three-dimensional computer code for the nonlinear dynamic response of an HTGR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subudhi, M.; Lasker, L.; Koplik, B.; Curreri, J.; Goradia, H.

    1979-01-01

    A three-dimensional dynamic code has been developed to determine the nonlinear response of an HTGR core. The HTGR core consists of several thousands of hexagonal core blocks. These are arranged inlayers stacked together. Each layer contains many core blocks surrounded on their outer periphery by reflector blocks. The entire assembly is contained within a prestressed concrete reactor vessel. Gaps exist between adjacent blocks in any horizontal plane. Each core block in a given layer is connected to the blocks directly above and below it via three dowell pins. The present analystical study is directed towards an invesstigation of the nonlinear response of the reactor core blocks in the event of a seismic occurrence. The computer code is developed for a specific mathemtical model which represents a vertical arrangement of layers of blocks. This comprises a block module of core elements which would be obtained by cutting a cylindrical portion consisting of seven fuel blocks per layer. It is anticipated that a number of such modules properly arranged could represent the entire core. Hence, the predicted response of this module would exhibit the response characteristics of the core

  15. Uranium oxide fuel cycle analysis in VVER-1000 with VISTA simulation code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirekhtiary, Seyedeh Fatemeh; Abbasi, Akbar

    2018-02-01

    The VVER-1000 Nuclear power plant generates about 20-25 tons of spent fuel per year. In this research, the fuel transmutation of Uranium Oxide (UOX) fuel was calculated by using of nuclear fuel cycle simulation system (VISTA) code. In this simulation, we evaluated the back end components fuel cycle. The back end component calculations are Spent Fuel (SF), Actinide Inventory (AI) and Fission Product (FP) radioisotopes. The SF, AI and FP values were obtained 23.792178 ton/y, 22.811139 ton/y, 0.981039 ton/y, respectively. The obtained value of spent fuel, major actinide, and minor actinide and fission products were 23.8 ton/year, 22.795 ton/year, 0.024 ton/year and 0.981 ton/year, respectively.

  16. Utilization of HTGR on active carbon recycling energy system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Yukitaka, E-mail: yukitaka@nr.titech.ac.jp

    2014-05-01

    A new energy transformation concept based on carbon recycling, called as active carbon recycling energy system, ACRES, was proposed for a zero carbon dioxide emission process. The ACRES is driven availably by carbon dioxide free primary energy. High temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) is a candidate of the energy sources for ACRES. A smart ironmaking system with ACRES (iACRES) is one of application examples. The contribution of HTGR on iACRES was discussed thermodynamically in this study. A carbon material is re-used cyclically as energy carrier media in ACRES. Carbon monoxide (CO) had higher energy densities than hydrogen and was compatible with conventional process. Thus, CO was suitable recycling media for ACRES. Efficient regeneration of CO was a key technology for ACRES. A combined system of hydrogen production by water electrolysis and CO{sub 2} hydrogen reduction was candidate. CO{sub 2} direct electrolysis was also one of the candidates. HTGR was appropriate heat source for both water and CO{sub 2} electrolysises, and CO{sub 2} hydrogen reduction. Thermodynamic energy balances were calculated for both systems with HTGR for an ironmaking system. The direct system showed relatively advantage to the combined system in the stand point of enthalpy efficiency and simplicity of the process. One or two plants of HTGR are corresponding with ACRES system for one unit of conventional blast furnace. The proposed ACRES system with HTGR was expected to form the basis of a new energy industrial process that had low CO{sub 2} emission.

  17. Modeling and Simulation for Fuel Cell Polymer Electrolyte Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Hayashi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have established methods to evaluate key properties that are needed to commercialize polyelectrolyte membranes for fuel cell electric vehicles such as water diffusion, gas permeability, and mechanical strength. These methods are based on coarse-graining models. For calculating water diffusion and gas permeability through the membranes, the dissipative particle dynamics–Monte Carlo approach was applied, while mechanical strength of the hydrated membrane was simulated by coarse-grained molecular dynamics. As a result of our systematic search and analysis, we can now grasp the direction necessary to improve water diffusion, gas permeability, and mechanical strength. For water diffusion, a map that reveals the relationship between many kinds of molecular structures and diffusion constants was obtained, in which the direction to enhance the diffusivity by improving membrane structure can be clearly seen. In order to achieve high mechanical strength, the molecular structure should be such that the hydrated membrane contains narrow water channels, but these might decrease the proton conductivity. Therefore, an optimal design of the polymer structure is needed, and the developed models reviewed here make it possible to optimize these molecular structures.

  18. Simulating control rod and fuel assembly motion using moving meshes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada)], E-mail: gilbertdw1@gmail.com; Roman, J.E. [Departamento de Sistemas Informaticos y Computacion, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Garland, Wm. J. [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada); Poehlman, W.F.S. [Department of Computing and Software, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada)

    2008-02-15

    A prerequisite for designing a transient simulation experiment which includes the motion of control and fuel assemblies is the careful verification of a steady state model which computes k{sub eff} versus assembly insertion distance. Previous studies in nuclear engineering have usually approached the problem of the motion of control rods with the use of nonlinear nodal models. Nodal methods employ special approximations for the leading and trailing cells of the moving assemblies to avoid the rod cusping problem which results from the naive volume weighted cell cross-section approximation. A prototype framework called the MOOSE has been developed for modeling moving components in the presence of diffusion phenomena. A linear finite difference model is constructed, solutions for which are computed by SLEPc, a high performance parallel eigenvalue solver. Design techniques for the implementation of a patched non-conformal mesh which links groups of sub-meshes that can move relative to one another are presented. The generation of matrices which represent moving meshes which conserve neutron current at their boundaries, and the performance of the framework when applied to model reactivity insertion experiments is also discussed.

  19. HTGR-GT and electrical load integrated control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, T.; Openshaw, F.; Pfremmer, D.

    1980-05-01

    A discussion of the control and operation of the HTGR-GT power plant is presented in terms of its closely coupled electrical load and core cooling functions. The system and its controls are briefly described and comparisons are made with more conventional plants. The results of analyses of selected transients are presented to illustrate the operation and control of the HTGR-GT. The events presented were specifically chosen to show the controllability of the plant and to highlight some of the unique characteristics inherent in this multiloop closed-cycle plant

  20. HTGR containment design options: an application of probabilistic risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    Through the use of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), it is possible to quantitatively evaluate the radiological risk associated with a given reactor design and to place such risk into perspective with alternative designs. The merits are discussed for several containment alternatives for the HTGR from the viewpoints of economics and licensability, as well as public risk. The quantification of cost savings and public risk indicates that presently acceptable public risk can be maintained and cost savings of $40 million can result from use of a vented confinement for the HTGR

  1. HTGR structural-materials efforts in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rittenhouse, P.L.; Roberts, D.I.

    1982-07-01

    The status of ongoing structural materials programs being conducted in the US to support development and deployment of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is described. While the total US program includes work in support of all variants of this reactor system, the emphasis of this paper is on the work aimed at support of the steam cycle/cogeneration (SC/C) version of the HTGR. Work described includes activities to develop design and performance prediction data on metals, ceramics, and graphite

  2. Fission gas induced deformation model for FRAP-T6 and NSRR irradiated fuel test simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Takehiko; Sasajima, Hideo; Fuketa, Toyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Hosoyamada, Ryuji; Mori, Yukihide

    1996-11-01

    Pulse irradiation tests of irradiated fuels under simulated reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs) have been carried out at the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR). Larger cladding diameter increase was observed in the irradiated fuel tests than in the previous fresh fuel tests. A fission gas induced cladding deformation model was developed and installed in a fuel behavior analysis code, FRAP-T6. The irradiated fuel tests were analyzed with the model in combination with modified material properties and fuel cracking models. In Test JM-4, where the cladding temperature rose to higher temperatures and grain boundary separation by the pulse irradiation was significant, the fission gas model described the cladding deformation reasonably well. The fuel had relatively flat radial power distribution and the grain boundary gas from the whole radius was calculated to contribute to the deformation. On the other hand, the power density in the irradiated LWR fuel rods in the pulse irradiation tests was remarkably higher at the fuel periphery than the center. A fuel thermal expansion model, GAPCON, which took account of the effect of fuel cracking by the temperature profile, was found to reproduce well the LWR fuel behavior with the fission gas deformation model. This report present details of the models and their NSRR test simulations. (author)

  3. Numerical simulation of progressive BWR fuel inlet orifices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sara Lundgren; Hernan Tinoco; Aleksander Pohl; Wiktor Frid

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: A 'progressive' orifice is characterized by an edge-shaped hole that gives a Reynolds number dependent resistance coefficient. For Reynolds numbers smaller than a critical one, the resistance coefficient has a high constant value that drops to a much lower value for Reynolds numbers greater than this critical value. A similar effect is widely known for external flows around bodies of different shapes, i. e. spheres, cylinders, etc., and the sudden drop in drag coefficient is due to the shift from laminar to turbulent boundary-layer flow. Experimentally, progressive orifices have been investigated under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions by Akiba et al. (2001) for a reduced set of geometrical parameters. Using the sparse experimental data, a core stability study was carried out by Forsmaks Kraftgrupp AB that showed an improvement in core stability but without the expected reduction in pump power at normal operation. The reason for this partial success was the impossibility of optimizing the fuel inlet pressure drop owing to the limited amount of available data. Due to the high costs associated with the experimental generation of high-pressure, high-temperature data, it was considered that, if possible, the lacking data could be generated numerically at much lower cost. Therefore, the present work deals with the possibility of numerically simulate the flow through progressive orifices, and with the conditions under which to reproduce and generate resistance coefficient data by means of a commercial CFD-code. The results obtained with a two-dimensional, axisymmetric approximation show that Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models are able to qualitatively capture the physics of the phenomenon but with an earlier transition to turbulent boundary-layer flow and with an underestimation of the resistance coefficient by approximately 20 %. This underestimation of the resistance coefficient is related to the two

  4. Numerical simulation of progressive BWR fuel inlet orifices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sara Lundgren; Hernan Tinoco [Forsmarks Kraftgrupp AB, 742 03 Oesthammar (Sweden); Aleksander Pohl; Wiktor Frid [The Royal Institute of Technology, Dept. Energy Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: A 'progressive' orifice is characterized by an edge-shaped hole that gives a Reynolds number dependent resistance coefficient. For Reynolds numbers smaller than a critical one, the resistance coefficient has a high constant value that drops to a much lower value for Reynolds numbers greater than this critical value. A similar effect is widely known for external flows around bodies of different shapes, i. e. spheres, cylinders, etc., and the sudden drop in drag coefficient is due to the shift from laminar to turbulent boundary-layer flow. Experimentally, progressive orifices have been investigated under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions by Akiba et al. (2001) for a reduced set of geometrical parameters. Using the sparse experimental data, a core stability study was carried out by Forsmaks Kraftgrupp AB that showed an improvement in core stability but without the expected reduction in pump power at normal operation. The reason for this partial success was the impossibility of optimizing the fuel inlet pressure drop owing to the limited amount of available data. Due to the high costs associated with the experimental generation of high-pressure, high-temperature data, it was considered that, if possible, the lacking data could be generated numerically at much lower cost. Therefore, the present work deals with the possibility of numerically simulate the flow through progressive orifices, and with the conditions under which to reproduce and generate resistance coefficient data by means of a commercial CFD-code. The results obtained with a two-dimensional, axisymmetric approximation show that Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models are able to qualitatively capture the physics of the phenomenon but with an earlier transition to turbulent boundary-layer flow and with an underestimation of the resistance coefficient by approximately 20 %. This underestimation of the resistance coefficient is related to

  5. Significance and prospects of the energo-technological usage of HTGR for nuclear power development in the beginning of the XXI century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breger, A.Kh.; Putilov, A.V.; Bogoyavlensky, R.G.; Glebov, V.P.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the economic efficiency of atomic stations (HTGR plants). The realization of the complex (energy radiation-technological) using of nuclear fuel leads to the economically effective mastering of nuclear energy sources instead of organic ones for supplying inductry and municipal economy. It is necessary to include in the power engineering development programme, under the circumstances of fulfillment of requirements of safety and reliability, research and development by the end of the century of the pattern of complex unit on the base of the HTGR with spherical fuel elements and (by 2010-15), mastering the energy-technological plants in high-energy branches of industry and municipal economy. Solving the mentioned problems will make a perceptible contribution into scientific progress, will allow to fulfill the conversion of war industry, attract highly qualified specialists to solving the tasks of national economy

  6. Computer simulation of the behaviour and performance of a CANDU fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, A.C.

    1997-01-01

    At the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission (Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, CNEA) the BACO code (for 'BArra COmbustible', fuel rod) was developed. It allows the simulation of the thermo-mechanical performance of a cylindrical fuel rod in a Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR). The standard present version of the code (2.30), is a powerful tool for a relatively easy and complete evaluation of fuel behaviour predictions. Input parameters and, therefore, output ones may include statistical dispersion. As a demonstration of BACO capabilities we include a review of CANDU fuel applications, and the calculation and a parametric analysis of a characteristic CANDU fuel. (author)

  7. Simulation study of a PEM fuel cell system fed by hydrogen produced by partial oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozdogan, S [Marmara University, Faculty of Engineering, Istanbul (Turkey); Ersoz, A; Olgun, H [TUBITAK Marmara Research Center, Energy Systems and Environmental Research Institute, Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2003-09-01

    Within the frame of sustainable development, efficient and clean, if possible zero emission energy production technologies are of utmost importance in various sectors such as utilities, industry, households and transportation. Low-temperature fuel cell systems are suitable for powering transportation systems such as automobiles and trucks in an efficient and low-emitting manner. Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems constitute the most promising low temperature fuel cell option being developed globally. PEM fuel cells generate electric power from air and hydrogen or from a hydrogen rich gas via electrochemical reactions. Water and waste heat are the only by-products of PEM fuel cells. There is great interest in converting current hydrocarbon based common transportation fuels such as gasoline and diesel into hydrogen rich gases acceptable by PEM fuel cells. Hydrogen rich gases can be produced from conventional transportation fuels via various reforming technologies. Steam reforming, partial oxidation and auto-thermal reforming are the three major reforming technologies. In this paper, we discuss the results of a simulation study for a PEM fuel cell with partial oxidation. The Aspen HYSYS 3.1 code has been used for simulation purposes. Two liquid hydrocarbon fuels have been selected to investigate the effect of average molecular weights of hydrocarbons, on the fuel processing efficiency. The overall system efficiency depends on the fuel preparation and fuel cell efficiencies as well as on the heat integration within the system. It is desired to investigate the overall system efficiencies for net electrical power production at 100 kW considering bigger scale transport applications. Results indicate that fuel properties, fuel preparation system operating parameters and PEM fuel cell polarization curve characteristics all affect the overall system efficiency. (authors)

  8. Development of the fabrication technology of the simulated fuel-I, 15,000MWd/tU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kweon Ho; Kim, D. J.; Kim, H. S.; Lee, J. W.; Yang, M. S

    2001-04-01

    It is important to get basic data to analysis physical properties, behavior in reactor and performance of the DUPIC fuel because physical properties, fission gas release, grain growth and et al. of the DUPIC fuel is different from the commercial UO2 fuel. But what directly measures physical properties et al. of DUPIC fuel being resinterred simulated spent fuel through OREOX process is very difficult in laboratory owing to its high level radiation. Then fabrication of simulated DUPIC fuel is needed to measure its properties. In this study, the sintering characterization of wet milled powder for 24 hours to fabricate 15,000MWd/tU equivalent burnup simulated fuel.

  9. Formation and characterization of fission-product aerosols under postulated HTGR accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, I.N.; Munkelwitz, H.R.

    1982-07-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental investigation on the formation mechanism and physical characterization of simulated nuclear aerosols that could likely be released during an HTGR core heat-up accident. Experiments were carried out in a high-temperature flow system consisting essentially of an inductively heated release source, a vapor deposition tube, and a filter assembly for collecting particulate matter. Simulated fission products Sr and Ba as oxides are separately impregnated in H451 graphite wafers and released at elevated temperatures into a dry helium flow. In the presence of graphite, the oxides are quantitatively reduced to metals, which subsequently vaporize at temperatures much lower than required for the oxides alone to vaporize in the absence of graphite. A substantial fraction of the released material is associated with particulate matter, which is collected on filters located downstream at ambient temperature. The release and transport of simulated fission product Ag as metal are also investigated

  10. Development of THYDE-HTGR: computer code for transient thermal-hydraulics of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Masashi; Hada, Kazuhiko

    1990-04-01

    The THYDE-HTGR code has been developed for transient thermal-hydraulic analyses of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors, based on the THYDE-W code. THYDE-W is a code developed at JAERI for the simulation of Light Water Reactor plant dynamics during various types of transients including loss-of-coolant accidents. THYDE-HTGR solves the conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy for compressible gas, or single-phase or two-phase flow. The major code modification from THYDE-W is to treat helium loops as well as water loops. In parallel to this, modification has been made for the neutron kinetics to be applicable to helium-cooled graphite-moderated reactors, for the heat transfer models to be applicable to various types of heat exchangers, and so forth. In order to assess the validity of the modifications, analyses of some of the experiments conducted at the High Temperature Test Loop of ERANS have been performed. In this report, the models applied in THYDE-HTGR are described focusing on the present modifications and the results from the assessment calculations are presented. (author)

  11. Multi-agent simulation of adoption of alternative fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, Oscar; de Vries, Bert; Faaij, Andre; Turkenburg, Wim; Jager, Wander

    We have formalized and parameterized a model for the production of six transport fuels and six fuels blends from six feedstocks through 13 different production chains, and their adoption of by 11 distinct subpopulations of motorists. The motorists are represented by agents that use heuristics to

  12. Infinite fuel element simulation of pin power distributions and control blade history in a BWR fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J.; Nuenighoff, K.; Allelein, H.J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (DE). Inst. fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung (IEK), Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktortechnik (IEK-6)

    2011-07-01

    Pellet-Cladding Interaction (PCI) is a well known effect in fuel pins. One possible reason for PCI-effects could be local power excursions in the fuel pins, which can led to a rupture of the fuel cladding tube. From a reactor safety point of view this has to be considered as a violence of the barrier principal in order to retain fission products in the fuel pins. This paper focuses on the pin power distributions in a 2D infinite lattice of a BWR fuel element. Lots of studies related PCI effect can be found in the literature. In this compact, coupled neutronic depletion calculations taking the control history effect into account are described. Depletion calculations of an infinite fuel element of a BWR were carried out with controlled, uncontrolled and temporarily controlled scenarios. Later ones are needed to describe the control blade history (CBH) effect. A Monte-Carlo approach is mandatory to simulate the neutron physics. The VESTA code was applied to couple the Monte-Carlo-Code MCNP(X) with the burnup code ORIGEN. Additionally, CASMO-4 is also employed to verify the method of simulation results from VESTA. The cross sections for Monte Carlo and burn-up calculations are derived from ENDF/B-VII.0. (orig.)

  13. Simulations of Lithium-Based Neutron Coincidence Counter for Gd-Loaded Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowles, Christian C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kouzes, Richard T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Siciliano, Edward R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Lithium-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology Coincidence Counting for Gd-loaded Fuels at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the development of a lithium-based neutron coincidence counter for nondestructively assaying Gd loaded nuclear fuel. This report provides results from MCNP simulations of a lithium-based coincidence counter for the possible measurement of Gd-loaded nuclear fuel. A comparison of lithium-based simulations and UNCL-II simulations with and without Gd loaded fuel is provided. A lithium-based model, referred to as PLNS3A-R1, showed strong promise for assaying Gd loaded fuel.

  14. High Resolution Numerical Simulations of Primary Atomization in Diesel Sprays with Single Component Reference Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    NC. 14. ABSTRACT A high-resolution numerical simulation of jet breakup and spray formation from a complex diesel fuel injector at diesel engine... diesel fuel injector at diesel engine type conditions has been performed. A full understanding of the primary atomization process in diesel fuel... diesel liquid sprays the complexity is further compounded by the physical attributes present including nozzle turbulence, large density ratios

  15. INVESTIGATION ON THERMAL-FLOW CHARACTERISTICS OF HTGR CORE USING THERMIX-KONVEK MODULE AND VSOP'94 CODE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarmono Sudarmono

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The failure of heat removal system of water-cooled reactor such as PWR in Three Mile Islands and Fukushima Daiichi BWR makes nuclear society starting to consider the use of high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR. Reactor Physics and Technology Division – Center for Nuclear Reactor Safety and Technology  (PTRKN has tasks to perform research and development on the conceptual design of cogeneration gas cooled reactor with medium power level of 200 MWt. HTGR is one of nuclear energy generation system, which has high energy efficiency, and has high and clean inherent safety level. The geometry and structure of the HTGR200 core are designed to produce the output of helium gas coolant temperature as high as 950 °C to be used for hydrogen production and other industrial processes in co-generative way. The output of very high temperature helium gas will cause thermal stress on the fuel pebble that threats the integrity of fission product confinement. Therefore, it is necessary to perform thermal-flow evaluation to determine the temperature distribution in the graphite and fuel pebble in the HTGR core. The evaluation was carried out by Thermix-Konvek module code that has been already integrated into VSOP'94 code. The HTGR core geometry was done using BIRGIT module code for 2-D model (RZ model with 5 channels of pebble flow in active core in the radial direction. The evaluation results showed that the highest and lowest temperatures in the reactor core are 999.3 °C and 886.5 °C, while the highest temperature of TRISO UO2 is 1510.20 °C in the position (z= 335.51 cm; r=0 cm. The analysis done based on reactor condition of 120 kg/s of coolant mass flow rate, 7 MPa of pressure and 200 MWth of power. Compared to the temperature distribution resulted between VSOP’94 code and fuel temperature limitation as high as 1600 oC, there is enough safety margin from melting or disintegrating. Keywords: Thermal-Flow, VSOP’94, Thermix-Konvek, HTGR, temperature

  16. Proceedings of the 1st JAERI symposium on HTGR technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-07-01

    This report was edited as the Proceedings of the 1st JAERI Symposium on HTGR Technologies, - Design, Licensing Requirements and Supporting Technologies -, collecting the 21 papers presented in the Symposium. The 19 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  17. Consolidated fuel reprocessing program. Progress report, July 1-September 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    Technical progress is reported in overview fashion in the following areas: process development, laboratory R and D, engineering research, engineering systems, integrated equipment test facility (IET) operations, and HTGR fuel reprocessing

  18. A system automatic study for the spent fuel rod cutting and simulated fuel pellet extraction device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, J. H.; Yun, J. S.; Hong, D. H.; Kim, Y. H.; Park, K. Y.

    2001-01-01

    A fuel pellet extraction device of the spent fuel rods is described. The device consists of a cutting device of the spent fuel rods and the decladding device of the fuel pellets. The cutting device is to cut a spent fuel rod to n optimal size for fast decladding operation. To design the device, the fuel rod properties are investigated including the dimension and material of fuel rod tubes and pellets. Also, various methods of existing cutting method are investigated. The design concepts accommodate remote operability for the Hot-Cell(radioactive ) area operation. Also, the modularization of the device structure is considered for the easy maintenance. The decladding device is to extract the fuel pellet from the rod cut. To design this device, the existing method is investigated including the chemical and mechanical decladding methods. From the view point of fuel recovery and feasibility of implementation. it is concluded that the chemical decladding method is not appropriate due to the mass production of radioactive liquid wastes, in spite of its high fuel recovery characteristics. Hence, in this paper, the mechanical decladding method is adopted and the device is designed so as to be applicable to various lengths of rod-cuts. As like the cutting device,the concepts of remote operability and maintainability is considered. Both devices are fabricated and the performance is investigated through a series of experiments. From the experimental result, the optimal operational condition of the devices is established

  19. Laser pulse heating of nuclear fuels for simulation of reactor power ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    As a prelude to work on irradiated nuclear fuel specimens, pilot studies on ... But facilities for making such fuel pins, and carrying out test irradiations for the .... To graduate to a complete simulation set-up, the following are needed: (a) A means.

  20. Nuclear fuel cycle system simulation tool based on high-fidelity component modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, David E.,

    2014-02-01

    The DOE is currently directing extensive research into developing fuel cycle technologies that will enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy. The task is formidable considering the numerous fuel cycle options, the large dynamic systems that each represent, and the necessity to accurately predict their behavior. The path to successfully develop and implement an advanced fuel cycle is highly dependent on the modeling capabilities and simulation tools available for performing useful relevant analysis to assist stakeholders in decision making. Therefore a high-fidelity fuel cycle simulation tool that performs system analysis, including uncertainty quantification and optimization was developed. The resulting simulator also includes the capability to calculate environmental impact measures for individual components and the system. An integrated system method and analysis approach that provides consistent and comprehensive evaluations of advanced fuel cycles was developed. A general approach was utilized allowing for the system to be modified in order to provide analysis for other systems with similar attributes. By utilizing this approach, the framework for simulating many different fuel cycle options is provided. Two example fuel cycle configurations were developed to take advantage of used fuel recycling and transmutation capabilities in waste management scenarios leading to minimized waste inventories.

  1. Simulation of the mechanical behavior of a spent fuel shipping cask in a rail accident environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fields, S.R.

    1977-02-01

    A preliminary mathematical model has been developed to simulate the dynamic mechanical response of a large spent fuel shipping cask to the impact experienced in a hypothetical rail accident. The report was written to record the status of the development of the mechanical response model and to supplement an earlier report on spent fuel shipping cask accident evaluation

  2. Lateral Flow Field Behavior Downstream of Mixing Vanes In a Simulated Nuclear Fuel Rod Bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, Michael E.; Smith, L. David III; Holloway, Mary V.; Beasley, Donald E.

    2004-01-01

    To assess the fuel assembly performance of PWR nuclear fuel assemblies, average subchannel flow values are used in design analyses. However, for this highly complex flow, it is known that local conditions around fuel rods vary dependent upon the location of the fuel rod in the fuel assembly and upon the support grid design that maintains the fuel rod pitch. To investigate the local flow in a simulated nuclear fuel rod bundle, a testing technique has been employed to measure the lateral flow field in a 5 x 5 rod bundle. Particle Image Velocimetry was used to measure the lateral flow field downstream of a support grid with mixing vanes for four unique subchannels in the 5 x 5 bundle. The dominant lateral flow structures for each subchannel are compared in this paper including the decay of these flow structures. (authors)

  3. IAEA Coordinated Research Project on HTGR Reactor Physics, Thermal-hydraulics and Depletion Uncertainty Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bostelmann, F. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The continued development of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) requires verification of HTGR design and safety features with reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes. The predictive capability of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics and depletion simulations for reactor design and safety analysis can be assessed with sensitivity analysis (SA) and uncertainty analysis (UA) methods. Uncertainty originates from errors in physical data, manufacturing uncertainties, modelling and computational algorithms. (The interested reader is referred to the large body of published SA and UA literature for a more complete overview of the various types of uncertainties, methodologies and results obtained). SA is helpful for ranking the various sources of uncertainty and error in the results of core analyses. SA and UA are required to address cost, safety, and licensing needs and should be applied to all aspects of reactor multi-physics simulation. SA and UA can guide experimental, modelling, and algorithm research and development. Current SA and UA rely either on derivative-based methods such as stochastic sampling methods or on generalized perturbation theory to obtain sensitivity coefficients. Neither approach addresses all needs. In order to benefit from recent advances in modelling and simulation and the availability of new covariance data (nuclear data uncertainties) extensive sensitivity and uncertainty studies are needed for quantification of the impact of different sources of uncertainties on the design and safety parameters of HTGRs. Only a parallel effort in advanced simulation and in nuclear data improvement will be able to provide designers with more robust and well validated calculation tools to meet design target accuracies. In February 2009, the Technical Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors (TWG-GCR) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) recommended that the proposed Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on

  4. On the improvement of HTGR fuel elements corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernikov, A.S.; Kurbakov, S.D.

    1996-01-01

    The results of corrosion tests of matrix graphite based on calcinated (30PG graphite) and non-calcinated (MPG graphite) petroleum cokes in helium containing 0.01-1 vol.% water vapour in the temperature range 600-1200degC are presented. The results of investigation of matrix graphite components reactivity are considered. It is shown that the filler graphite 30PG has the minimum activity towards the water vapour. The influence of impurities content on the oxidation rate are considered. The results of corrosion tests of matrix graphite coated with protective layers (silicon carbide and aluminium phosphates) in the air environment at 1600degC, 1 h, are given. (author)

  5. Improved gas distributor for coating HTGR fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lackey, W.J.; Stinton, D.P.; Sease, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    The important criteria to be considered in design of the gas distributor are: (1) The distributor should ideally spread or disperse the gas over the full area of the coating chamber to maximize the particle gas contact area and thereby increase both particle circulation and the percentage of the input gas that ends up as coating. (2) The gas should not heat up during its passage through the distributor. Otherwise the gas would partially decompose prematurely, causing excessive coating deposition within or on the distributor. (3) The distributor should be designed to minimize accidental drainage of particles from the furnace and blowover of particles into the effluent system. (4) The distributor should be capable of depositing both carbon and SiC coatings of high quality as regards to density, preferred orientation, permeability, defective fraction, and other product attributes. (5) The distributor should be amenable to use with large particle charges and short turnaround times and be simple, inexpensive, and reliable. We have devised a simple distributor that incorporates the five criteria listed above. The new design is termed a blind-hole frit. All the gas passes through the thinned blind-hole regions, and thus the gas velocity is considerably higher than for a flat frit of uniform thickness. Because of its high velocity, the gas does not have time to reach a high enough temperature to cause deposition within the frit. Also most of the resistance to gas flow is provided by the porous distributor and not by the particle bed; therefore, localized variations of the quantity of particles above any particular gas inlet do not significantly alter the flow rate through that inlet

  6. Passive afterheat removal in the HTGR with the liner cooling system as a heat sink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehm, W.; Jahn, W.; Verfondern, K.

    1984-09-01

    The report deals with the transients of temperature and system pressure and the fission product behaviour in the primary circuit of an HTGR during passive afterheat removal, where the liner cooling system of the PCRV serves as a heat sink. The analysis has been made for the PNP-500-reactor representing nuclear plants with medium thermal power. The investigations show that the liner cooling system is able to control a core heatup. High temperature loads are encountered in the upper core region. In the case of a reactor under pressure the fuel elements and the primary circuit remain intact as the first and second barriers for fission products. In the case of a depressurized primary circuit the liner cooling system also keeps the PCRV at normal operating temperatures. The effects of a core heatup on component damage and release of fission products are thus limited. (orig.) [de

  7. Benefits of reactor physics experiments for the HTGR industrial development - an attempt to a quantitative approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuniberti, R; Graziani, G; Massino, L; Rinaldini, C; Zanantoni, C

    1972-10-15

    The available results of reactor physics experiments on HTGRs and their accuracies are briefiy reviewed. The physical quantities of interest are grouped into three categories: basic nuclear data, lattice parameters and integral design data. The last two are considered and their possible improvements in accuracy by means of experimental measurements are assessed. The cost penalty on fuel cycle and capital cost due to each physical quantity is then considered, and consequently the benefits of reactor physics experiments are evaluated for a number of hypotheses concerning the foreseeable HTGR development and the delay in taking practical advantage of experimental results. It is concluded that, at the present state of knowledge of basic nuclear data and with the available calculation methods, the economic incentive to new reactor physics experiments is small, and a previous careful analysis is recommended to those intending to perform such experiments.

  8. Modeling and Simulation of the Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohr, M.; Narayanan, S. R.; Halpert, G.

    1996-01-01

    From intro.: The direct methanol liquid feed fuel cell uses aqueous solutions of methanol as fuel and oxygen or air as the oxidant and uses an ionically conducting polymer membrane such as Nafion(sup r)117 and the electrolyte. This type of direct oxidation cell is fuel versatile and offers significant advantages in terms of simplicity of design and operation...The present study focuses on the results of a phenomenological model based on current understanding of the various processed operating in these cells.

  9. Simulation on reactor TRIGA Puspati core kinetics fueled with thorium (Th) based fuel element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed, Abdul Aziz, E-mail: azizM@uniten.edu.my; Rahman, Shaik Mohmmed Haikhal Abdul [Universiti Tenaga Nasional. Jalan Ikram-UNITEN, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Pauzi, Anas Muhamad, E-mail: anas@uniten.edu.my; Zin, Muhamad Rawi Muhammad; Jamro, Rafhayudi; Idris, Faridah Mohamad [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    In confronting global energy requirement and the search for better technologies, there is a real case for widening the range of potential variations in the design of nuclear power plants. Smaller and simpler reactors are attractive, provided they can meet safety and security standards and non-proliferation issues. On fuel cycle aspect, thorium fuel cycles produce much less plutonium and other radioactive transuranic elements than uranium fuel cycles. Although not fissile itself, Th-232 will absorb slow neutrons to produce uranium-233 ({sup 233}U), which is fissile. By introducing Thorium, the numbers of highly enriched uranium fuel element can be reduced while maintaining the core neutronic performance. This paper describes the core kinetic of a small research reactor core like TRIGA fueled with a Th filled fuel element matrix using a general purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code.

  10. Public acceptance of HTGR technology - HTR2008-58218

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannink, R.; Kuhr, R.; Morris, T.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear energy projects continue to evoke strong emotional responses from the general public throughout the world. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology offers improved safety and performance characteristics that should enhance public acceptance but is burdened with demonstrating a different set of safety principles. This paper summarizes key issues impacting public acceptance and discusses the importance of openly engaging the public in the early stages of new HTGR projects. The public gets information about new technologies through schools and universities, news and entertainment media, the internet, and other forms of information exchange. Development of open public forums, access to information in understandable formats, participation of universities in preparing and distributing educational materials, and other measures will be needed to support widespread public confidence in the improved safety and performance characteristics of HTGR technology. This confidence will become more important as real projects evolve and participants from outside the nuclear industry begin to evaluate the real and perceived risks, including potential impacts on public relations, branding, and shareholder value when projects are announced. Public acceptance and support will rely on an informed understanding of the issues and benefits associated with HTGR technology. Major issues of public concern include nuclear safety, avoidance of greenhouse gas emissions, depletion of natural gas resources, energy security, nuclear waste management, local employment and economic development, energy prices, and nuclear proliferation. Universities, the media, private industry, government entities, and other organizations will all have roles that impact public acceptance, which will likely play a critical role in the future markets, siting, and permitting of HTGR projects. (authors)

  11. Processing of FRG high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel elements at General Atomic under the US/FRG cooperative agreement for spent fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holder, N.D.; Strand, J.B.; Schwarz, F.A.; Drake, R.N.

    1981-11-01

    The Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) and the United States (US) are cooperating on certain aspects of gas-cooled reactor technology under an umbrella agreement. Under the spent fuel treatment development section of the agreement, both FRG mixed uranium/ thorium and low-enriched uranium fuel spheres have been processed in the Department of Energy-sponsored cold pilot plant for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel processing at General Atomic Company in San Diego, California. The FRG fuel spheres were crushed and burned to recover coated fuel particles suitable for further treatment for uranium recovery. Successful completion of the tests described in this paper demonstrated certain modifications to the US HTGR fuel burining process necessary for FRG fuel treatment. Results of the tests will be used in the design of a US/FRG joint prototype headend facility for HTGR fuel

  12. Aircraft Wing Fuel Tank Environmental Simulator Tests for Evaluation of Antimisting Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-01

    C.*: % _ _ _.__ _ o During boost pump operation, strands of a gel-like, semi-transparent material were observed on the free surface of the fuel and...Boeing Materials Technology (BMT) laboratory to measure the water content of the fuel samples is described in appendix C. 2.5.3 Water Ingestion Results...Jet A pump at 8 gpm 32 .. . . ... . . . . . . . -%tr. go*7 .*.**.*.*..* -*.... * . . recuroed for each fueling increment. From these data a height

  13. Hardware in the loop simulation test platform of fuel cell backup system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Tiancai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on an analysis of voltage mechanistic model, a real-time simulation model of the proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell backup system is developed, and verified by the measurable experiment data. The method of online parameters identification for the model is also improved. Based on the software LabVIEW/VeriStand real-time environment and the PXI Express hardware system, the PEM fuel cell system controller hardware in the loop (HIL simulation plat-form is established. Controller simulation test results showed the accuracy of HIL simulation platform.

  14. Simulation model of dynamical behaviour of reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planchard, J.

    1994-01-01

    This report briefly describes the homogenized dynamical equations of a tube bundle placed in a perfect irrotational fluid, on case of small displacements. This approach can be used to study the mechanical behaviour of fuel assemblies of PWR reactor submitted to earthquake or depressurization blow-down. The numerical calculations require to define the added mass matrix of the fuel assemblies, for which the principle of computation is presented. (author). 14 refs., 4 figs

  15. CFD simulation of fuel cell proton exchange membrane multichannel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argota, Raúl; García, Lázaro; Torre, Raciel de la; González, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen has several applications that make the strongest candidate for implementation as an energy carrier in the future sustainable scenario. Current hydrogen production is based on fossil fuels that have a high contribution to air pollution. The imminent depletion of fossil fuels and high emissions of greenhouse gases that cause consumption has brought the world to consider energy scenarios that are more environmentally friendly and yet profitable. The use of hydrogen as an energy carrier generally occurs with good application prospects. Fuel cells have attracted great interest for its application mainly in the transport sector. The fuel cell PEM proton exchange membrane which convert chemical energy stored in hydrogen into electrical energy directly and efficiently, with water as a byproduct, have the ability to reduce emissions and dependence on fossil fuels. A model for multiple cell PEM five channels using the ANSYS software CFD occurs. Performance analysis and optimization of the thermodynamic and geometric parameters of the fuel cell is performed. It was analyzed the overall electrical performance and assessed performance by local current density, flow and temperatures. (full text)

  16. TRISO fuel thermal simulations in the LS-VHTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Mario C.; Scari, Maria E.; Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria A.F., E-mail: marc5663@gmail.com, E-mail: melizabethscari@yahoo.com, E-mail: antonella@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: dora@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores/CNPq (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The liquid-salt-cooled very high-temperature reactor (LS-VHTR) is a reactor that presents very good characteristics in terms of energy production and safety aspects. It uses as fuel the TRISO particles immersed in a graphite matrix with a cylindrical shape called fuel compact, as moderator graphite and as coolant liquid salt Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} called Flibe. This work evaluates the thermal hydraulic performance of the heat removal system and the reactor core by performing different simplifications to represent the reactor core and the fuel compact under steady-state conditions, starting the modeling from a single fuel element, until complete the studies with the entire core model developed in the RELAP5-3D code. Two models were considered for representation of the fuel compact, homogeneous and non-homogeneous models, as well as different geometries of the heat structures was considered. The aim to develop several models was to compare the thermal hydraulic characteristics resulting from the construction of a more economical and less discretized model with much more refined models that can lead to more complexes analyzes to representing TRISO effect particles in the fuel compact. The different results found, mainly, for the core temperature distributions are presented and discussed. (author)

  17. Approaches to simulate channel and fuel behaviour using CATHENA and ELOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabourin, G.; Huynh, H.M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper documents a new approach where the detailed fuel and channel thermalhydraulic calculations are performed by an integrated code. The thermalhydraulic code CATHENA is coupled with the fuel code ELOCA. The scenario used in the simulations is a 100% pump suction break, because its power pulse is large and leads to high sheath temperatures. The results shows that coupling the two codes at each time step can have an important effect on parameters such as the sheath, fuel and pressure tube temperature. In summary, this demonstrates that this original approach can model more adequately the channel and fuel behaviour under postulated large LOCAs. (author)

  18. Equilibrium fuel-management simulations for 1.2% SEU in a CANDU 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younis, M.H.; Boczar, P.G.

    1989-06-01

    Fuel-management simulations have been performed for 1.2% SEU in a CANDU 6 reactor at equilibrium, for three fuel-management options: axial shuffling; a regular 2-bundling shift with the adjuster rods removed from the core; and a regular 2-bundle shift with the adjuster rods present. Both time-average and time-dependent simulations were performed, from which the physics characteristics of the cores at equilibrium were estimated. Power and power-boost envelopes were derived for both 37-element fuel, and the advanced CANFLEX bundle

  19. Simulating thermal behavior of AECL's spent fuel dry storage system with CATHENA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabourin, G.

    1998-01-01

    This paper documents the comparisons between CATHENA predictions and temperature measurements taken at the Gentilly-2 NPP spent fuel dry storage facility and in a mock--up of a storage basket placed inside a storage cylinder. It also presents CATHENA temperature predictions related to the storage of spent fuel in MACSTOR modules as planned for Ignalina NPP, Lithuania. CATHENA has been chosen because it can simulate many noncondensable gases including air and helium, and because of its great flexibility in the representation of the MACSTOR module geometry. The results of the simulations show good agreement with the experimental measurements. The two comparisons indicate that CATHENA can be used to simulate heat transfer from the fuel to the external air circuit of the spent fuel dry storage system. For the Ignalina MACSTOR module, containing RBMK fuel having higher heat release than typical CANDU fuel, CATHENA predicts that the maximum fuel temperature is expected to be around 240 deg C, giving an acceptable margin below the maximum allowed temperature of 300 deg C. In conclusion, this paper shows that the thermalhydraulic code CATHENA can accurately predict the thermal behavior AECL's air cooled spent fuel dry storage system. (author)

  20. Simulating thermal behavior of AECL's spent fuel dry storage system with CATHENA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabourin, G. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    1998-07-01

    This paper documents the comparisons between CATHENA predictions and temperature measurements taken at the Gentilly-2 NPP spent fuel dry storage facility and in a mock--up of a storage basket placed inside a storage cylinder. It also presents CATHENA temperature predictions related to the storage of spent fuel in MACSTOR modules as planned for Ignalina NPP, Lithuania. CATHENA has been chosen because it can simulate many noncondensable gases including air and helium, and because of its great flexibility in the representation of the MACSTOR module geometry. The results of the simulations show good agreement with the experimental measurements. The two comparisons indicate that CATHENA can be used to simulate heat transfer from the fuel to the external air circuit of the spent fuel dry storage system. For the Ignalina MACSTOR module, containing RBMK fuel having higher heat release than typical CANDU fuel, CATHENA predicts that the maximum fuel temperature is expected to be around 240 deg C, giving an acceptable margin below the maximum allowed temperature of 300 deg C. In conclusion, this paper shows that the thermalhydraulic code CATHENA can accurately predict the thermal behavior AECL's air cooled spent fuel dry storage system. (author)