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Sample records for simulated microgravity conditions

  1. Numerical simulation of controlled directional solidification under microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl, S.; Roos, D.; Wein, J.

    The computer-assisted simulation of solidification processes influenced by gravity has gained increased importance during the previous years regarding ground-based as well as microgravity research. Depending on the specific needs of the investigator, the simulation model ideally covers a broad spectrum of applications. These primarily include the optimization of furnace design in interaction with selected process parameters to meet the desired crystallization conditions. Different approaches concerning the complexity of the simulation models as well as their dedicated applications will be discussed in this paper. Special emphasis will be put on the potential of software tools to increase the scientific quality and cost-efficiency of microgravity experimentation. The results gained so far in the context of TEXUS, FSLP, D-1 and D-2 (preparatory program) experiments, highlighting their simulation-supported preparation and evaluation will be discussed. An outlook will then be given on the possibilities to enhance the efficiency of pre-industrial research in the Columbus era through the incorporation of suitable simulation methods and tools.

  2. The expression of heat shock proteins 70 and 90 in pea seedlings under simulated microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozeko, L.

    Microgravity is an abnormal and so stress factor for plants. Expression of known stress-related genes is appeared to implicate in the cell response to different kinds of stress. Heat shock proteins HSP70 and HSP90 are present in plant cells under the normal growth conditions and their quantity increases during stress. The effect of simulated microgravity on expression of HSP70 and HSP90 was studied in etiolated Pisum sativum seedlings grown on the horizontal clinostat (2 rpm) from seed germination for 3 days. Seedlings were also subjected to two other types of stressors: vertical clinorotatoin (2 rpm) and 2 h temperature elevation (40°C). HSPs' level was measured by ELISA. The quantity of both HSPs increased more than in three times in the seedlings on the horizontal clinostat in comparison with the stationary 1 g control. Vertical clinorotation also increased HSPs' level but less at about 20% than horizontal one. These effects were comparable with the influence of temperature elevation. The data presented suggest that simulated microgravity upregulate HSP70 and HSP90 expression. The increased HSPs' level might evidence the important functional role of these proteins in plant adaptation to microgravity. We are currently investigating the contribution of constitutive or inducible forms of the HSPs in this stress response.

  3. Simulated conditions of microgravity suppress progesterone production by luteal cells of the pregnant rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, G. K.; Yang, H.; Sridaran, R.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether simulated conditions of microgravity induce changes in the production of progesterone by luteal cells of the pregnant rat ovary using an in vitro model system. The microgravity environment was simulated using either a high aspect ratio vessel (HARV) bioreactor with free fall or a clinostat without free fall of cells. A mixed population of luteal cells isolated from the corpora lutea of day 8 pregnant rats was attached to cytodex microcarrier beads (cytodex 3). These anchorage dependent cells were placed in equal numbers in the HARV or a spinner flask control vessel in culture conditions. It was found that HARV significantly reduced the daily production of progesterone from day 1 through day 8 compared to controls. Scanning electron microscopy showed that cells attached to the microcarrier beads throughout the duration of the experiment in both types of culture vessels. Cells cultured in chamber slide flasks and placed in a clinostat yielded similar results when compared to those in the HARV. Also, when they were stained by Oil Red-O for lipid droplets, the clinostat flasks showed a larger number of stained cells compared to control flasks at 48 h. Further, the relative amount of Oil Red-O staining per milligram of protein was found to be higher in the clinostat than in the control cells at 48 h. It is speculated that the increase in the level of lipid content in cells subjected to simulated conditions of microgravity may be due to a disruption in cholesterol transport and/or lesions in the steroidogenic pathway leading to a fall in the synthesis of progesterone. Additionally, the fall in progesterone in simulated conditions of microgravity could be due to apoptosis of luteal cells.

  4. A Systems Biology Analysis Unfolds the Molecular Pathways and Networks of Two Proteobacteria in Spaceflight and Simulated Microgravity Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Raktim; Shilpa, P Phani; Bagh, Sangram

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria are important organisms for space missions due to their increased pathogenesis in microgravity that poses risks to the health of astronauts and for projected synthetic biology applications at the space station. We understand little about the effect, at the molecular systems level, of microgravity on bacteria, despite their significant incidence. In this study, we proposed a systems biology pipeline and performed an analysis on published gene expression data sets from multiple seminal studies on Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium under spaceflight and simulated microgravity conditions. By applying gene set enrichment analysis on the global gene expression data, we directly identified a large number of new, statistically significant cellular and metabolic pathways involved in response to microgravity. Alteration of metabolic pathways in microgravity has rarely been reported before, whereas in this analysis metabolic pathways are prevalent. Several of those pathways were found to be common across studies and species, indicating a common cellular response in microgravity. We clustered genes based on their expression patterns using consensus non-negative matrix factorization. The genes from different mathematically stable clusters showed protein-protein association networks with distinct biological functions, suggesting the plausible functional or regulatory network motifs in response to microgravity. The newly identified pathways and networks showed connection with increased survival of pathogens within macrophages, virulence, and antibiotic resistance in microgravity. Our work establishes a systems biology pipeline and provides an integrated insight into the effect of microgravity at the molecular systems level. Systems biology-Microgravity-Pathways and networks-Bacteria. Astrobiology 16, 677-689.

  5. Pathways Regulating Spheroid Formation of Human Follicular Thyroid Cancer Cells under Simulated Microgravity Conditions: A Genetic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Riwaldt

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity induces three-dimensional (3D growth in numerous cell types. Despite substantial efforts to clarify the underlying mechanisms for spheroid formation, the precise molecular pathways are still not known. The principal aim of this paper is to compare static 1g-control cells with spheroid forming (MCS and spheroid non-forming (AD thyroid cancer cells cultured in the same flask under simulated microgravity conditions. We investigated the morphology and gene expression patterns in human follicular thyroid cancer cells (UCLA RO82-W-1 cell line after a 24 h-exposure on the Random Positioning Machine (RPM and focused on 3D growth signaling processes. After 24 h, spheroid formation was observed in RPM-cultures together with alterations in the F-actin cytoskeleton. qPCR indicated more changes in gene expression in MCS than in AD cells. Of the 24 genes analyzed VEGFA, VEGFD, MSN, and MMP3 were upregulated in MCS compared to 1g-controls, whereas ACTB, ACTA2, KRT8, TUBB, EZR, RDX, PRKCA, CAV1, MMP9, PAI1, CTGF, MCP1 were downregulated. A pathway analysis revealed that the upregulated genes code for proteins, which promote 3D growth (angiogenesis and prevent excessive accumulation of extracellular proteins, while genes coding for structural proteins are downregulated. Pathways regulating the strength/rigidity of cytoskeletal proteins, the amount of extracellular proteins, and 3D growth may be involved in MCS formation.

  6. Media Compositions for Three-Dimensional Mammalian Tissue Growth under Microgravity Culture Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue.The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  7. Media Compositions for Three Dimensional Mammalian Tissue Growth Under Microgravity Culture Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue. The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  8. Effect of simulated microgravity on Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratap, Jeffrey J.

    2005-08-01

    A rotating bioreactor was developed to simulate microgravity and its influence was studied on fungal growth. The reactor was designed to simulate microgravity using 'free fall' principle, which creates an apparent weightlessness for a brief period of time. In this experiment, a sealed vertically rotating tube is the reactor in which the cells are grown. For the first time vertically rotating tubes were used to obtain 'free fall' thereby simulating microgravity. Simulated microgravity served significant in the alteration of growth and productivity of Aspergillus niger, a common soil fungi. Two other sets of similar cultures were maintained as still and shake control cultures to compare with the growth and productivity of cells in rotating culture. It was found increased growth and productivity occurred in simulated microgravity. Since this experiment involves growth of cells in a liquid medium, the fluidic effects must also be studied which is a limitation.

  9. Cadmium uptake capacity of an indigenous cyanobacterial strain, Nostoc entophytum ISC32: new insight into metal uptake in microgravity-simulating conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidoust, Leila; Soltani, Neda; Modiri, Sima; Haghighi, Omid; Azarivand, Aisan; Khajeh, Khosro; Shahbani Zahiri, Hossein; Vali, Hojatollah; Akbari Noghabi, Kambiz

    2016-02-01

    Among nine cyanobacterial strains isolated from oil-contaminated regions in southern Iran, an isolate with maximum cadmium uptake capacity was selected and identified on the basis of analysis of morphological criteria and 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity as Nostoc entophytum (with 99% similarity). The isolate was tentatively designated N. entophytum ISC32. The phylogenetic affiliation of the isolates was determined on the basis of their 16S rRNA gene sequence. The maximum amount of Cd(II) adsorbed by strain ISC32 was 302.91 mg g(-1) from an initial exposure to a solution with a Cd(II) concentration of 150 mg l(-1). The cadmium uptake by metabolically active cells of cyanobacterial strain N. entophytum ISC32, retained in a clinostat for 6 days to simulate microgravity conditions, was examined and compared with that of ground control samples. N. entophytum ISC32 under the influence of microgravity was able to take up cadmium at amounts up to 29% higher than those of controls. The activity of antioxidant enzymes including catalase and peroxidase was increased in strain ISC32 exposed to microgravity conditions in a clinostat for 6 days, as catalase activity of the cells was more than three times higher than that of controls. The activity of the peroxidase enzyme increased by 36% compared with that of the controls. Membrane lipid peroxidation was also increased in the cells retained under microgravity conditions, up to 2.89-fold higher than in non-treated cells. Images obtained using scanning electron microscopy showed that cyanobacterial cells form continuous filaments which are drawn at certain levels, while the cells placed in a clinostat appeared as round-shaped, accumulated together and distorted to some extent.

  10. The Importance of Caveolin-1 as Key-Regulator of Three-Dimensional Growth in Thyroid Cancer Cells Cultured under Real and Simulated Microgravity Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Riwaldt

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We recently demonstrated that the CAV1 gene was down-regulated, when poorly differentiated thyroid FTC-133 cancer cells formed spheroids under simulated microgravity conditions. Here, we present evidence that the caveolin-1 protein is involved in the inhibition of spheroid formation, when confluent monolayers are exposed to microgravity. The evidence is based on proteins detected in cells and their supernatants of the recent spaceflight experiment: “NanoRacks-CellBox-Thyroid Cancer”. The culture supernatant had been collected in a special container adjacent to the flight hardware incubation chamber and stored at low temperature until it was analyzed by Multi-Analyte Profiling (MAP technology, while the cells remaining in the incubation chamber were fixed by RNAlater and examined by mass spectrometry. The soluble proteins identified by MAP were investigated in regard to their mutual interactions and their influence on proteins, which were associated with the cells secreting the soluble proteins and had been identified in a preceding study. A Pathway Studio v.11 analysis of the soluble and cell-associated proteins together with protein kinase C alpha (PRKCA suggests that caveolin-1 is involved, when plasminogen enriched in the extracellular space is not activated and the vascular cellular adhesion molecule (VCAM-1 mediated cell–cell adhesion is simultaneously strengthened and activated PRKCA is recruited in caveolae, while the thyroid cancer cells do not form spheroids.

  11. Simulated Microgravity Modulates Differentiation Processes of Embryonic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav Shinde

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Embryonic developmental studies under microgravity conditions in space are very limited. To study the effects of altered gravity on the embryonic development processes we established an in vitro methodology allowing differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs under simulated microgravity within a fast-rotating clinostat (clinorotation and capture of microarray-based gene signatures. Methods: The differentiating mESCs were cultured in a 2D pipette clinostat. The microarray and bioinformatics tools were used to capture genes that are deregulated by simulated microgravity and their impact on developmental biological processes. Results: The data analysis demonstrated that differentiation of mESCs in pipettes for 3 days resultet to early germ layer differentiation and then to the different somatic cell types after further 7 days of differentiation in the Petri dishes. Clinorotation influences differentiation as well as non-differentiation related biological processes like cytoskeleton related 19 genes were modulated. Notably, simulated microgravity deregulated genes Cyr61, Thbs1, Parva, Dhrs3, Jun, Tpm1, Fzd2 and Dll1 are involved in heart morphogenesis as an acute response on day 3. If the stem cells were further cultivated under normal gravity conditions (1 g after clinorotation, the expression of cardiomyocytes specific genes such as Tnnt2, Rbp4, Tnni1, Csrp3, Nppb and Mybpc3 on day 10 was inhibited. This correlated well with a decreasing beating activity of the 10-days old embryoid bodies (EBs. Finally, we captured Gadd45g, Jun, Thbs1, Cyr61and Dll1 genes whose expressions were modulated by simulated microgravity and by real microgravity in various reported studies. Simulated microgravity also deregulated genes belonging to the MAP kinase and focal dhesion signal transduction pathways. Conclusion: One of the most prominent biological processes affected by simulated microgravity was the process of cardiomyogenesis. The

  12. Ultrastructural changes in osteocytes in microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionova, N. V.; Oganov, V. S.; Zolotova, N. V.

    We examined the histology and morphometry of biosamples (biopsies) of the iliac crest of monkeys, flown 14 days aboard the "Bion-11", using electron microscopy. We found, that some young osteocytes take part in the activization of collagen protein biosynthesis in the adaptive remodeling process of the bone tissue to microgravity conditions. Osteocyte lacunae filled with collagen fibrils; this correlates with fibrotic osteoblast reorganization in such zones. The osteolytic activity in mature osteocytes is intensified. As a result of osteocyte destruction, the quantity of empty osteocytic lacunae in the bone tissue increases.

  13. Validity of microgravity simulation models on earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regnard, J; Heer, M; Drummer, C

    2001-01-01

    Many studies have used water immersion and head-down bed rest as experimental models to simulate responses to microgravity. However, some data collected during space missions are at variance or in contrast with observations collected from experimental models. These discrepancies could reflect...... incomplete knowledge of the characteristics inherent to each model. During water immersion, the hydrostatic pressure lowers the peripheral vascular capacity and causes increased thoracic blood volume and high vascular perfusion. In turn, these changes lead to high urinary flow, low vasomotor tone, and a high...

  14. Planarians Sense Simulated Microgravity and Hypergravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Adell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Planarians are flatworms, which belong to the phylum Platyhelminthes. They have been a classical subject of study due to their amazing regenerative ability, which relies on the existence of adult totipotent stem cells. Nowadays they are an emerging model system in the field of developmental, regenerative, and stem cell biology. In this study we analyze the effect of a simulated microgravity and a hypergravity environment during the process of planarian regeneration and embryogenesis. We demonstrate that simulated microgravity by means of the random positioning machine (RPM set at a speed of 60 °/s but not at 10 °/s produces the dead of planarians. Under hypergravity of 3 g and 4 g in a large diameter centrifuge (LDC planarians can regenerate missing tissues, although a decrease in the proliferation rate is observed. Under 8 g hypergravity small planarian fragments are not able to regenerate. Moreover, we found an effect of gravity alterations in the rate of planarian scission, which is its asexual mode of reproduction. No apparent effects of altered gravity were found during the embryonic development.

  15. Measurement of Two-Phase Flow Characteristics Under Microgravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshock, E. G.; Lin, C. S.; Edwards, L. G.; Knapp, J.; Harrison, M. E.; Xhang, X.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the technical approach and initial results of a test program for studying two-phase annular flow under the simulated microgravity conditions of KC-135 aircraft flights. A helical coil flow channel orientation was utilized in order to circumvent the restrictions normally associated with drop tower or aircraft flight tests with respect to two-phase flow, namely spatial restrictions preventing channel lengths of sufficient size to accurately measure pressure drops. Additionally, the helical coil geometry is of interest in itself, considering that operating in a microgravity environment vastly simplifies the two-phase flows occurring in coiled flow channels under 1-g conditions for virtually any orientation. Pressure drop measurements were made across four stainless steel coil test sections, having a range of inside tube diameters (0.95 to 1.9 cm), coil diameters (25 - 50 cm), and length-to-diameter ratios (380 - 720). High-speed video photographic flow observations were made in the transparent straight sections immediately preceding and following the coil test sections. A transparent coil of tygon tubing of 1.9 cm inside diameter was also used to obtain flow visualization information within the coil itself. Initial test data has been obtained from one set of KC-135 flight tests, along with benchmark ground tests. Preliminary results appear to indicate that accurate pressure drop data is obtainable using a helical coil geometry that may be related to straight channel flow behavior. Also, video photographic results appear to indicate that the observed slug-annular flow regime transitions agree quite reasonably with the Dukler microgravity map.

  16. Mathematical Modeling of Wastewater Oxidation under Microgravity Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Boyun Guo; Donald W. Holder; David S. Schechter

    2005-01-01

    Volatile removal assembly (VRA) is a module installed in the International Space Station for removing contaminants (volatile organics) in the wastewater produced by the crew. The VRA contains a slim pack bed reactor to perform catalyst oxidation of the wastewater at elevated pressure and temperature under microgravity conditions. Optimal design of the reactor requires a thorough understanding about how the reactor performs under microgravity conditions. The objective of this study was to theo...

  17. Hemodynamic effects of microgravity and their ground-based simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobachik, V. I.; Abrosimov, S. V.; Zhidkov, V. V.; Endeka, D. K.

    Hemodynamic effects of simulated microgravity were investigated, in various experiments, using radioactive isotopes, in which 40 healthy men, aged 35 to 42 years, took part. Blood shifts were evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively. Simulation studies included bedrest, head-down tilt (-5° and -15°), and vertical water immersion, it was found that none of the methods could entirely simulate hemodynamic effects of microgravity. Subjective sensations varied in a wide range. They cannot be used to identify reliably the effects of real and simulated microgravity. Renal fluid excretion in real and simulated microgravity was different in terms of volume and time. The experiments yielded data about the general pattern of circulation with blood displaced to the upper body.

  18. Desert Rats 2011 Mission Simulation: Effects of Microgravity Operational Modes on Fields Geology Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, Jacob E.; Hurtado, J. M., Jr.; Meyer, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS) is a multi-year series of NASA tests that deploy planetary surface hardware and exercise mission and science operations in difficult conditions to advance human and robotic exploration capabilities. DRATS 2011 (Aug. 30-Sept. 9, 2011) tested strategies for human exploration of microgravity targets such as near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). Here we report the crew perspective on the impact of simulated microgravity operations on our capability to conduct field geology.

  19. Finite Element Analysis of Osteocytes Mechanosensitivity Under Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Sun, Lian-Wen; Du, Cheng-Fei; Wu, Xin-Tong; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2018-04-01

    It was found that the mechanosensitivity of osteocytes could be altered under simulated microgravity. However, how the mechanical stimuli as the biomechanical origins cause the bioresponse in osteocytes under microgravity is unclear yet. Computational studies may help us to explore the mechanical deformation changes of osteocytes under microgravity. Here in this paper, we intend to use the computational simulation to investigate the mechanical behavior of osteocytes under simulated microgravity. In order to obtain the shape information of osteocytes, the biological experiment was conducted under simulated microgravity prior to the numerical simulation The cells were rotated by a clinostat for 6 hours or 5 days and fixed, the cytoskeleton and the nucleus were immunofluorescence stained and scanned, and the cell shape and the fluorescent intensity were measured from fluorescent images to get the dimension information of osteocytes The 3D finite element (FE) cell models were then established based on the scanned image stacks. Several components such as the actin cortex, the cytoplasm, the nucleus, the cytoskeleton of F-actin and microtubules were considered in the model. The cell models in both 6 hours and 5 days groups were then imposed by three magnitudes (0.5, 10 and 15 Pa) of simulating fluid shear stress, with cell total displacement and the internal discrete components deformation calculated. The results showed that under the simulated microgravity: (1) the nuclear area and height statistically significantly increased, which made the ratio of membrane-cortex height to nucleus height statistically significantly decreased; (2) the fluid shear stress-induced maximum displacements and average displacements in the whole cell decreased, with the deformation decreasing amplitude was largest when exposed to 1.5Pa of fluid shear stress; (3) the fluid shear stress-induced deformation of cell membrane-cortex and cytoskeleton decreased, while the fluid shear stress

  20. Response of Human Prostate Cancer Cells to Mitoxantrone Treatment in Simulated Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Wu, Honglu

    2012-07-01

    RESPONSE OF HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER CELLS TO MITOXANTRONE TREATMENT IN SIMULATED MICROGRAVITY ENVIRONMENT Ye Zhang1,2, Christopher Edwards3, and Honglu Wu1 1 NASA-Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 2 Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering Group, Houston, TX 3 Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR This study explores the changes in growth of human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP) and their response to the treatment of an antineoplastic agent, mitoxantrone, under the simulated microgravity condition. In comparison to static 1g, microgravity and simulated microgravity have been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels in various cultured cell models or animals. However, very little is known about the effect of altered gravity on the responses of cells to the treatment of drugs, especially chemotherapy drugs. To test the hypothesis that zero gravity would result in altered regulations of cells in response to antineoplastic agents, we cultured LNCaP cells in either a High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) bioreactor at the rotating condition to model microgravity in space or in the static condition as control, and treated the cells with mitoxantrone. Cell growth, as well as expressions of oxidative stress related genes, were analyzed after the drug treatment. Compared to static 1g controls, the cells cultured in the simulated microgravity environment did not present significant differences in cell viability, growth rate, or cell cycle distribution. However, after mitoxantrone treatment, a significant proportion of bioreactor cultured cells became apoptotic or was arrested in G2. Several oxidative stress related genes also showed a higher expression level post mitoxantrone treatment. Our results indicate that simulated microgravity may alter the response of LNCaP cells to mitoxantrone treatment. Understanding the mechanisms by which cells respond to drugs differently in an altered gravity environment will be useful for the improvement of cancer treatment on

  1. Estimated Muscle Loads During Squat Exercise in Microgravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregly, Christopher D.; Kim, Brandon T.; Li, Zhao; DeWitt, John K.; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2012-01-01

    Loss of muscle mass in microgravity is one of the primary factors limiting long-term space flight. NASA researchers have developed a number of exercise devices to address this problem. The most recent is the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED), which is currently used by astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) to emulate typical free-weight exercises in microgravity. ARED exercise on the ISS is intended to reproduce Earth-level muscle loads, but the actual muscle loads produced remain unknown as they cannot currently be measured directly. In this study we estimated muscle loads experienced during squat exercise on ARED in microgravity conditions representative of Mars, the moon, and the ISS. The estimates were generated using a subject-specific musculoskeletal computer model and ARED exercise data collected on Earth. The results provide insight into the capabilities and limitations of the ARED machine.

  2. Tissue Engineering Under Microgravity Conditions-Use of Stem Cells and Specialized Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Daniela; Egli, Marcel; Krüger, Marcus; Riwaldt, Stefan; Corydon, Thomas J; Kopp, Sascha; Wehland, Markus; Wise, Petra; Infanger, Manfred; Mann, Vivek; Sundaresan, Alamelu

    2018-03-29

    Experimental cell research studying three-dimensional (3D) tissues in space and on Earth using new techniques to simulate microgravity is currently a hot topic in Gravitational Biology and Biomedicine. This review will focus on the current knowledge of the use of stem cells and specialized cells for tissue engineering under simulated microgravity conditions. We will report on recent advancements in the ability to construct 3D aggregates from various cell types using devices originally created to prepare for spaceflights such as the random positioning machine (RPM), the clinostat, or the NASA-developed rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor, to engineer various tissues such as preliminary vessels, eye tissue, bone, cartilage, multicellular cancer spheroids, and others from different cells. In addition, stem cells had been investigated under microgravity for the purpose to engineer adipose tissue, cartilage, or bone. Recent publications have discussed different changes of stem cells when exposed to microgravity and the relevant pathways involved in these biological processes. Tissue engineering in microgravity is a new technique to produce organoids, spheroids, or tissues with and without scaffolds. These 3D aggregates can be used for drug testing studies or for coculture models. Multicellular tumor spheroids may be interesting for radiation experiments in the future and to reduce the need for in vivo experiments. Current achievements using cells from patients engineered on the RWV or on the RPM represent an important step in the advancement of techniques that may be applied in translational Regenerative Medicine.

  3. Evaluation of upper body muscle activity during cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance in simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waye, A. B.; Krygiel, R. G.; Susin, T. B.; Baptista, R.; Rehnberg, L.; Heidner, G. S.; de Campos, F.; Falcão, F. P.; Russomano, T.

    2013-09-01

    Performance of efficient single-person cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is vital to maintain cardiac and cerebral perfusion during the 2-4 min it takes for deployment of advanced life support during a space mission. The aim of the present study was to investigate potential differences in upper body muscle activity during CPR performance at terrestrial gravity (+1Gz) and in simulated microgravity (μG). Muscle activity of the triceps brachii, erector spinae, rectus abdominis and pectoralis major was measured via superficial electromyography in 20 healthy male volunteers. Four sets of 30 external chest compressions (ECCs) were performed on a mannequin. Microgravity was simulated using a body suspension device and harness; the Evetts-Russomano (ER) method was adopted for CPR performance in simulated microgravity. Heart rate and perceived exertion via Borg scores were also measured. While a significantly lower depth of ECCs was observed in simulated microgravity, compared with +1Gz, it was still within the target range of 40-50 mm. There was a 7.7% decrease of the mean (±SEM) ECC depth from 48 ± 0.3 mm at +1Gz, to 44.3 ± 0.5 mm during microgravity simulation (p < 0.001). No significant difference in number or rate of compressions was found between the two conditions. Heart rate displayed a significantly larger increase during CPR in simulated microgravity than at +1Gz, the former presenting a mean (±SEM) of 23.6 ± 2.91 bpm and the latter, 76.6 ± 3.8 bpm (p < 0.001). Borg scores were 70% higher post-microgravity compressions (17 ± 1) than post +1Gz compressions (10 ± 1) (p < 0.001). Intermuscular comparisons showed the triceps brachii to have significantly lower muscle activity than each of the other three tested muscles, in both +1Gz and microgravity. As shown by greater Borg scores and heart rate increases, CPR performance in simulated microgravity is more fatiguing than at +1Gz. Nevertheless, no significant difference in muscle activity between conditions

  4. Development of life sciences equipment for microgravity and hypergravity simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulenburg, G. M.; Evans, J.; Vasques, M.; Gundo, D. P.; Griffith, J. B.; Harper, J.; Skundberg, T.

    1994-01-01

    The mission of the Life Science Division at the NASA Ames Research Center is to investigate the effects of gravity on living systems in the spectrum from cells to humans. The range of these investigations is from microgravity, as experienced in space, to Earth's gravity, and hypergravity. Exposure to microgravity causes many physiological changes in humans and other mammals including a headward shift of body fluids, atrophy of muscles - especially the large muscles of the legs - and changes in bone and mineral metabolism. The high cost and limited opportunity for research experiments in space create a need to perform ground based simulation experiments on Earth. Models that simulate microgravity are used to help identify and quantify these changes, to investigate the mechanisms causing these changes and, in some cases, to develop countermeasures.

  5. Gravisensitivity of various host plant -virus systems in simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Lidiya; Taran, Oksana; Gordejchyk, Olga

    In spite of considerable achievements in the study of gravity effects on plant development, some issues of gravitropism, like species-specificity and gravitation response remain unclear. The so-lution of such problems is connected with the aspects of life supply, in piloted space expeditions. The role of microgravity remains practically unstudied in the development of relations in the system host plant-virus, which are important for biotechnologies in crop production. It is ev-ident that the conditions of space flight can act as stressors, and the stress inducted by them favors the reactivation of latest herpes viruses in humans (satish et al., 2009) Viral infections of plants, which also can be in a latest state at certain stages of plant organism development, cause great damage to the growth and development of a host plant. Space flight conditions may cause both reactivation of latent viral infection in plants and its elimination, as it has been found by us for the system WSMW -wheat (Mishchenko et al., 2004). Our further research activities were concentrated on the identification of gravisensitivity in the system virus -potato plant to find out whether there was any species -related specificity of the reaction. In our research we used potato plants of Krymska Rosa, Zhuravushka, Agave, Belarosa, Kupalinka, and Zdubytok varieties. Simulated microgravity was ensured by clinostats KG-8 and Cycle -2. Gravisensitiv-ity has been studied the systems including PVX, PVM and PVY. Virus concentrations have been determined by ELISA using LOEWE reagents (placecountry-regionGermany). Virus iden-tification by morphological features were done by electron microscopy. For the system PVX -potato plant, we found the reduction in virus antigens content with prolonged clinostating. On the 18th day of cultivation, the plants showed a high level of X-virus antigen content on both stationary (control) and clinostated variants. On 36th and 47th day, depending plant variety, clinostated

  6. Proteomic analysis of zebrafish embryos exposed to simulated-microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Xiaoming; Ma, Wenwen; Wang, Wei; Liu, Cong; Sun, Yeqing

    Microgravity can induce a serial of physiological and pathological changes in human body, such as cardiovascular functional disorder, bone loss, muscular atrophy and impaired immune system function, etc. In this research, we focus on the influence of microgravity to vertebrate embryo development. As a powerful model for studying vertebrate development, zebrafish embryos at 8 hpf (hour past fertilization) and 24 hpf were placed into a NASA developed bioreac-tor (RCCS) to simulate microgravity for 64 and 48 hours, respectively. The same number of control embryos from the same parents were placed in a tissue culture dish at the same temper-ature of 28° C. Each experiment was repeated 3 times and analyzed by two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis. Image analysis of silver stained 2-D gels revealed that 64 from total 292 protein spots showed quantitative and qualitative variations that were significantly (P<0.05) and reproducibly different between simulate-microgravity treatment and the stationary control samples. 4 protein spots with significant expression alteration (P<0.01) were excised from 2-D gels and analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectra primarily. Of these proteins, 3 down-regulated proteins were identified as bectin 2, centrosomal protein of 135kDa and tropomyosin 4, while the up-regulated protein was identified as creatine kinase muscle B. Other protein spots showed significant expression alteration will be identified successively and the corresponding genes expression will also be measured by Q-PCR method at different development stages. The data presented in this study illustrate that zebrafish embryo can be significantly induced by microgravity on the expression of proteins involved in bone and muscle formation. Key Words: Danio rerio; Simulated-microgravity; Proteomics

  7. Centrifuges for Microgravity Simulation. The Reduced Gravity Paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loon, Jack J. W. A. van

    2016-01-01

    Due to the cumbersome nature of performing real microgravity—spaceflight research scientists have been searching for alternatives to perform simulated microgravity or partial gravity experiments on Earth. For more than a century one uses the slow rotating clinostat as developed by von Sachs at the end of the nineteenth century. Since then, the fast rotating clinostat, the 3D clinostat or the random positioning machine, the rotating wall vessels, tail suspension and bed rest head down tilt and lately the levitating magnets have been introduced. Several of these simulation systems provide some similarities of the responses and phenotypes as seen in real microgravity experiments. However, one should always realize that we cannot reduce gravity on Earth, other than the relative short duration free fall studies in e.g., drop towers or parabolic aircraft. In this paper we want to explore the possibility to apply centrifuges to simulate microgravity or maybe better to simulate hypo-gravity. This Reduced Gravity Paradigm, RGP is based on the premise that adaptations seen going from a hypergravity level to a lower gravity are similar as changes seen going from unit gravity to microgravity.

  8. Centrifuges for Microgravity Simulation. The Reduced Gravity Paradigm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loon, Jack J. W. A. van, E-mail: j.vanloon@vumc.nl [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery / Oral Pathology, Dutch Experiment Support Center, VU University Medical Center and Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); TEC-MMG LIS Lab, European Space Agency Technology Center, Noordwijk (Netherlands)

    2016-07-19

    Due to the cumbersome nature of performing real microgravity—spaceflight research scientists have been searching for alternatives to perform simulated microgravity or partial gravity experiments on Earth. For more than a century one uses the slow rotating clinostat as developed by von Sachs at the end of the nineteenth century. Since then, the fast rotating clinostat, the 3D clinostat or the random positioning machine, the rotating wall vessels, tail suspension and bed rest head down tilt and lately the levitating magnets have been introduced. Several of these simulation systems provide some similarities of the responses and phenotypes as seen in real microgravity experiments. However, one should always realize that we cannot reduce gravity on Earth, other than the relative short duration free fall studies in e.g., drop towers or parabolic aircraft. In this paper we want to explore the possibility to apply centrifuges to simulate microgravity or maybe better to simulate hypo-gravity. This Reduced Gravity Paradigm, RGP is based on the premise that adaptations seen going from a hypergravity level to a lower gravity are similar as changes seen going from unit gravity to microgravity.

  9. Effect of Oxygen Enrichment in Propane Laminar Diffusion Flames under Microgravity and Earth Gravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Pramod; Singh, Ravinder

    2017-06-01

    Diffusion flames are the most common type of flame which we see in our daily life such as candle flame and match-stick flame. Also, they are the most used flames in practical combustion system such as industrial burner (coal fired, gas fired or oil fired), diesel engines, gas turbines, and solid fuel rockets. In the present study, steady-state global chemistry calculations for 24 different flames were performed using an axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics code (UNICORN). Computation involved simulations of inverse and normal diffusion flames of propane in earth and microgravity condition with varying oxidizer compositions (21, 30, 50, 100 % O2, by mole, in N2). 2 cases were compared with the experimental result for validating the computational model. These flames were stabilized on a 5.5 mm diameter burner with 10 mm of burner length. The effect of oxygen enrichment and variation in gravity (earth gravity and microgravity) on shape and size of diffusion flames, flame temperature, flame velocity have been studied from the computational result obtained. Oxygen enrichment resulted in significant increase in flame temperature for both types of diffusion flames. Also, oxygen enrichment and gravity variation have significant effect on the flame configuration of normal diffusion flames in comparison with inverse diffusion flames. Microgravity normal diffusion flames are spherical in shape and much wider in comparison to earth gravity normal diffusion flames. In inverse diffusion flames, microgravity flames were wider than earth gravity flames. However, microgravity inverse flames were not spherical in shape.

  10. Effect of microgravity simulation using 3D clinostat on cavendish banana (Musa acuminata AAA Group) ripening process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivany, Fenny Martha; Esyanti, Rizkita R.; Prapaisie, Adeline; Puspa Kirana, Listya; Latief, Chunaeni; Ginaldi, Ari

    2016-11-01

    The objective of the research was to determine the effect of microgravity simulation by 3D clinostat on Cavendish banana (Musa acuminata AAA group) ripening process. In this study, physical, physiological changes as well as genes expression were analysed. The result showed that in microgravity simulation condition ripening process in banana was delayed and the MaACOl, MaACSl and MaACS5 gene expression were affected.

  11. Effect of Simulated Microgravity on Human Brain Gray Matter and White Matter--Evidence from MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Li

    Full Text Available There is limited and inconclusive evidence that space environment, especially microgravity condition, may affect microstructure of human brain. This experiment hypothesized that there would be modifications in gray matter (GM and white matter (WM of the brain due to microgravity.Eighteen male volunteers were recruited and fourteen volunteers underwent -6° head-down bed rest (HDBR for 30 days simulated microgravity. High-resolution brain anatomical imaging data and diffusion tensor imaging images were collected on a 3T MR system before and after HDBR. We applied voxel-based morphometry and tract-based spatial statistics analysis to investigate the structural changes in GM and WM of brain.We observed significant decreases of GM volume in the bilateral frontal lobes, temporal poles, parahippocampal gyrus, insula and right hippocampus, and increases of GM volume in the vermis, bilateral paracentral lobule, right precuneus gyrus, left precentral gyrus and left postcentral gyrus after HDBR. Fractional anisotropy (FA changes were also observed in multiple WM tracts.These regions showing GM changes are closely associated with the functional domains of performance, locomotion, learning, memory and coordination. Regional WM alterations may be related to brain function decline and adaption. Our findings provide the neuroanatomical evidence of brain dysfunction or plasticity in microgravity condition and a deeper insight into the cerebral mechanisms in microgravity condition.

  12. Response of Human Prostate Cancer Cells to Mitoxantrone Treatment in Simulated Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Edwards, Christopher; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the changes in growth of human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP) and their response to the treatment of antineoplastic agent, mitoxantrone, under the simulated microgravity condition. In comparison to static 1g, microgravity and simulated microgravity have been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels in various cultured cell models or animals. However, very little is known about the effect of altered gravity on the responses of cells to drugs, especially chemotherapy drugs. To test the hypothesis that zero gravity would result in altered regulation of cells in response to antineoplastic agents, we cultured LNCaP cells for 96 hr either in a High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) bioreactor at the rotating condition to model microgravity in space or in the static condition as a control. 24 hr after the culture started, mitoxantrone was introduced to the cells at a final concentration of 1 M. The mitoxantrone treatment lasted 72 hr and then the cells were collected for various measurements. Compared to static 1g controls, the cells cultured in the simulated microgravity environment did not show significant differences in cell viability, growth rate, or cell cycle distribution. However, in response to mitoxantrone (1uM), a significant proportion of bioreactor cultured cells (30%) was arrested at G2 phase and a significant number of these cells were apoptotic in comparison to their static controls. The expressions of 84 oxidative stress related genes were analyzed using Qiagen PCR array to identify the possible mechanism underlying the altered responses of bioreactor culture cells to mitoxantrone. Nine out of 84 genes showed higher expression at four hour post mitoxantrone treatment in cells cultured at rotating condition compared to those at static. Taken together, the results reported here indicate that simulated microgravity may alter the responses of LNCaP cells to mitoxantrone treatment. The alteration of oxidative stress pathways

  13. Terrestrial Microgravity Model and Threshold Gravity Simulation using Magnetic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, N.

    2005-01-01

    What is the threshold gravity (minimum gravity level) required for the nominal functioning of the human system? What dosage is required? Do human cell lines behave differently in microgravity in response to an external stimulus? The critical need for such a gravity simulator is emphasized by recent experiments on human epithelial cells and lymphocytes on the Space Shuttle clearly showing that cell growth and function are markedly different from those observed terrestrially. Those differences are also dramatic between cells grown in space and those in Rotating Wall Vessels (RWV), or NASA bioreactor often used to simulate microgravity, indicating that although morphological growth patterns (three dimensional growth) can be successfully simulated using RWVs, cell function performance is not reproduced - a critical difference. If cell function is dramatically affected by gravity off-loading, then cell response to stimuli such as radiation, stress, etc. can be very different from terrestrial cell lines. Yet, we have no good gravity simulator for use in study of these phenomena. This represents a profound shortcoming for countermeasures research. We postulate that we can use magnetic levitation of cells and tissue, through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients, as a terrestrial microgravity model to study human cells. Specific objectives of the research are: 1. To develop a tried, tested and benchmarked terrestrial microgravity model for cell culture studies; 2. Gravity threshold determination; 3. Dosage (magnitude and duration) of g-level required for nominal functioning of cells; 4. Comparisons of magnetic levitation model to other models such as RWV, hind limb suspension, etc. and 5. Cellular response to reduced gravity levels of Moon and Mars. The paper will discuss experiments md modeling work to date in support of this project.

  14. Terrestrial Microgravity Model and Threshold Gravity Simulation sing Magnetic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, N.

    2005-01-01

    What is the threshold gravity (minimum gravity level) required for the nominal functioning of the human system? What dosage is required? Do human cell lines behave differently in microgravity in response to an external stimulus? The critical need for such a gravity simulator is emphasized by recent experiments on human epithelial cells and lymphocytes on the Space Shuttle clearly showing that cell growth and function are markedly different from those observed terrestrially. Those differences are also dramatic between cells grown in space and those in Rotating Wall Vessels (RWV), or NASA bioreactor often used to simulate microgravity, indicating that although morphological growth patterns (three dimensional growth) can be successiblly simulated using RWVs, cell function performance is not reproduced - a critical difference. If cell function is dramatically affected by gravity off-loading, then cell response to stimuli such as radiation, stress, etc. can be very different from terrestrial cell lines. Yet, we have no good gravity simulator for use in study of these phenomena. This represents a profound shortcoming for countermeasures research. We postulate that we can use magnetic levitation of cells and tissue, through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients, as a terrestrial microgravity model to study human cells. Specific objectives of the research are: 1. To develop a tried, tested and benchmarked terrestrial microgravity model for cell culture studies; 2. Gravity threshold determination; 3. Dosage (magnitude and duration) of g-level required for nominal functioning of cells; 4. Comparisons of magnetic levitation model to other models such as RWV, hind limb suspension, etc. and 5. Cellular response to reduced gravity levels of Moon and Mars.

  15. Planar air-bearing microgravity simulators: Review of applications, existing solutions and design parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybus, Tomasz; Seweryn, Karol

    2016-03-01

    All devices designed to be used in space must be thoroughly tested in relevant conditions. For several classes of devices the reduced gravity conditions are the key factor. In early stages of development and later due to financial reasons, the tests need to be done on Earth. However, in Earth conditions it is impossible to obtain a different gravity field independent on all linear and rotational spatial coordinates. Therefore, various test-bed systems are used, with their design driven by the device's specific needs. One of such test-beds are planar air-bearing microgravity simulators. In such an approach, the tested objects (e.g., manipulators intended for on-orbit operations or vehicles simulating satellites in a close formation flight) are mounted on planar air-bearings that allow almost frictionless motion on a flat surface, thus simulating microgravity conditions in two dimensions. In this paper we present a comprehensive review of research activities related to planar air-bearing microgravity simulators, demonstrating achievements of the most active research groups and describing newest trends and ideas, such as tests of landing gears for low-g bodies. Major design parameters of air-bearing test-beds are also reviewed and a list of notable existing test-beds is presented.

  16. 2-D Clinostat for Simulated Microgravity Experiments with Arabidopsis Seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Li, Xugang; Krause, Lars; Görög, Mark; Schüler, Oliver; Hauslage, Jens; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Kircher, Stefan; Lasok, Hanna; Haser, Thomas; Rapp, Katja; Schmidt, Jürgen; Yu, Xin; Pasternak, Taras; Aubry-Hivet, Dorothée; Tietz, Olaf; Dovzhenko, Alexander; Palme, Klaus; Ditengou, Franck Anicet

    2016-04-01

    Ground-based simulators of microgravity such as fast rotating 2-D clinostats are valuable tools to study gravity related processes. We describe here a versatile g-value-adjustable 2-D clinostat that is suitable for plant analysis. To avoid seedling adaptation to 1 g after clinorotation, we designed chambers that allow rapid fixation. A detailed protocol for fixation, RNA isolation and the analysis of selected genes is described. Using this clinostat we show that mRNA levels of LONG HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5), MIZU-KUSSEI 1 (MIZ1) and microRNA MIR163 are down-regulated in 5-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana roots after 3 min and 6 min of clinorotation using a maximal reduced g-force of 0.02 g, hence demonstrating that this 2-D clinostat enables the characterization of early transcriptomic events during root response to microgravity. We further show that this 2-D clinostat is able to compensate the action of gravitational force as both gravitropic-dependent statolith sedimentation and subsequent auxin redistribution (monitoring D R5 r e v :: G F P reporter) are abolished when plants are clinorotated. Our results demonstrate that 2-D clinostats equipped with interchangeable growth chambers and tunable rotation velocity are suitable for studying how plants perceive and respond to simulated microgravity.

  17. Effect of simulated microgravity on growth and production of exopolymeric substances of Micrococcus luteus space and earth isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauclaire, Laurie; Egli, Marcel

    2010-08-01

    Microorganisms tend to form biofilms on surfaces, thereby causing deterioration of the underlaying material. In addition, biofilm is a potential health risk to humans. Therefore, microorganism growth is not only an issue on Earth but also in manned space habitats like the International Space Station (ISS). The aim of the study was to identify physiological processes relevant for Micrococcus luteus attachment under microgravity conditions. The results demonstrate that simulated microgravity influences physiological processes which trigger bacterial attachment and biofilm formation. The ISS strains produced larger amounts of exopolymeric substances (EPS) compared with a reference strain from Earth. In contrast, M. luteus strains were growing faster, and Earth as well as ISS isolates produced a higher yield of biomass under microgravity conditions than under normal gravity. Furthermore, microgravity caused a reduction of the colloidal EPS production of ISS isolates in comparison with normal gravity, which probably influences biofilm thickness and stability as well.

  18. Stress and Recovery during Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Michel

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a 60-day head-down tilt long-term bed rest (HDT) on stress and recovery in sixteen healthy female volunteers during the WISE-2005 study (Women International Space Simulation for Exploration). Participants were randomly assigned to either an exercise group (Exe) that followed a training program combining resistive and aerobic exercises, or to a no-exercise control group (Ctl). Psychological states were assessed using the Rest-Q, a validated questionnaire based on stress-recovery responses. A longitudinal analysis revealed significant changes in the general and specific stress scales for all participants throughout the experiment with a critical stage from supine to standing posture leading to a significant decrease in physical recovery. During HDT, Exe reported higher scores in stress subscales, as well as lower recovery scores compared to the Ctl. During the post HDT ambulatory recovery period, the exercisers still reported higher scores than the non-exercisers on the Lack of energy stress related scale, along with lower scores in general well-being and personal accomplishment. The present findings show that simulated weightlessness such as HDT may induce psychological stress and lead to subsequent alterations in perceived recovery. Exercise did not reduce HDT impaired effects on stress and recovery states. In the perspective of spaceflights of long-duration such as the future missions to Mars, there is a need for additional experiments to further investigate spaceflight-induced changes of stress and recovery parameters and the effects of exercise on these parameters. Further studies might determine and analyze the psychological factors involved, but also how to intervene concerning these factors with efficient psychological preparation which, although not yet fully investigated, may reduce stress, promote recovery and support adaptive responses to such extreme environments.

  19. Categorization of Brazil nut effect and its reverse under less-convective conditions for microgravity geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chujo, Toshihiro; Mori, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Junichiro; Yano, Hajime

    2018-03-01

    Due to its important role in the sorting of particles on microgravity bodies by size, Brazil nut effect (BNE) is a major subject of study for understanding the evolution of planetesimals. Recent studies have revealed that the mechanism for the BNE on microgravity bodies is the percolation of particles or void-filling, rather than granular convection. This study also considers the mechanism for the BNE under `less-convective' conditions and introduces three categories of behaviour for particles that mainly depend on the dimensionless acceleration of vibration Γ (ratio of maximum acceleration to gravitational acceleration), using a simplified analytical model. The conditions for Γ proposed by the model for each category are verified by both numerical simulations and laboratory experiments. `Less-convective' conditions are realized by reducing the friction force between particles and the wall. We found three distinct behaviours of the particles when Γ > 1: the (i) `slow BNE', (ii) `fast BNE', and (iii) `fluid motion' (the reverse BNE may be induced), and the thresholds for Γ correspond well with those proposed by the simple model. We also applied this categorization to low-gravity environments and found that the categorization scales with gravity level. These results imply that laboratory experiments can provide knowledge of granular mobility on the surface of microgravity bodies.

  20. A Novel Microgravity Simulator Applicable for Three-Dimensional Cell Culturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuest, Simon L.; Richard, Stéphane; Walther, Isabelle; Furrer, Reinhard; Anderegg, Roland; Sekler, Jörg; Egli, Marcel

    2014-10-01

    Random Positioning Machines (RPM) were introduced decades ago to simulate microgravity. Since then numerous experiments have been carried out to study its influence on biological samples. The machine is valued by the scientific community involved in space relevant topics as an excellent experimental tool to conduct pre-studies, for example, before sending samples into space. We have developed a novel version of the traditional RPM to broaden its operative range. This novel version has now become interesting to researchers who are working in the field of tissue engineering, particularly those interested in alternative methods for three-dimensional (3D) cell culturing. The main modifications concern the cell culture condition and the algorithm that controls the movement of the frames for the nullification of gravity. An incubator was integrated into the inner frame of the RPM allowing precise control over the cell culture environment. Furthermore, several feed-throughs now allow a permanent supply of gas like CO 2. All these modifications substantially improve conditions to culture cells; furthermore, the rewritten software responsible for controlling the movement of the frames enhances the quality of the generated microgravity. Cell culture experiments were carried out with human lymphocytes on the novel RPM model to compare the obtained response to the results gathered on an older well-established RPM as well as to data from space flights. The overall outcome of the tests validates this novel RPM for cell cultivation under simulated microgravity conditions.

  1. Premixed Flames Under Microgravity and Normal Gravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikunova, Anastasia I.; Son, Eduard E.

    2018-03-01

    Premixed conical CH4-air flames were studied experimentally and numerically under normal straight, reversed gravity conditions and microgravity. Low-gravity experiments were performed in Drop tower. Classical Bunsen-type burner was used to find out features of gravity influence on the combustion processes. Mixture equivalence ratio was varied from 0.8 to 1.3. Wide range of flow velocity allows to study both laminar and weakly turbulized flames. High-speed flame chemoluminescence video-recording was used as diagnostic. The investigations were performed at atmospheric pressure. As results normalized flame height, laminar flame speed were measured, also features of flame instabilities were shown. Low- and high-frequency flame-instabilities (oscillations) have a various nature as velocity fluctuations, preferential diffusion instability, hydrodynamic and Rayleigh-Taylor ones etc., that was explored and demonstrated.

  2. Microgravity-Driven Optic Nerve/Sheath Biomechanics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, A.; Myers, J. G.; Nelson, E.; Raykin, J.; Samuels, B.

    2016-01-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a concern for long-duration space flight. Current thinking suggests that the ocular changes observed in VIIP syndrome are related to cephalad fluid shifts resulting in altered fluid pressures [1]. In particular, we hypothesize that increased intracranial pressure (ICP) drives connective tissue remodeling of the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath (ONS). We describe here finite element (FE) modeling designed to understand how altered pressures, particularly altered ICP, affect the tissues of the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath (ONS) in VIIP. METHODS: Additional description of the modeling methodology is provided in the companion IWS abstract by Feola et al. In brief, a geometric model of the posterior eye and optic nerve, including the ONS, was created and the effects of fluid pressures on tissue deformations were simulated. We considered three ICP scenarios: an elevated ICP assumed to occur in chronic microgravity, and ICP in the upright and supine positions on earth. Within each scenario we used Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) to consider a range of ICPs, ONH tissue mechanical properties, intraocular pressures (IOPs) and mean arterial pressures (MAPs). The outcome measures were biomechanical strains in the lamina cribrosa, optic nerve and retina; here we focus on peak values of these strains, since elevated strain alters cell phenotype and induce tissue remodeling. In 3D, the strain field can be decomposed into three orthogonal components, denoted as first, second and third principal strains. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: For baseline material properties, increasing ICP from 0 to 20 mmHg significantly changed strains within the posterior eye and ONS (Fig. 1), indicating that elevated ICP affects ocular tissue biomechanics. Notably, strains in the lamina cribrosa and retina became less extreme as ICP increased; however, within the optic nerve, the occurrence of such extreme strains greatly increased as

  3. Analysis of Statoliths Displacement in Chara Rhizoids for Validating the Microgravity-Simulation Quality of Clinorotation Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Lars; Braun, Markus; Hauslage, Jens; Hemmersbach, Ruth

    2018-05-01

    In single-celled rhizoids of the green algae Chara, positively gravitropic growth is governed by statoliths kept in a dynamically stable position 10-25 μ m above the cell tip by a complex interaction of gravity and actomyosin forces. Any deviation of the tube-like cells from the tip-downward orientation causes statoliths to sediment onto the gravisensitive subapical cell flank which initiates a gravitropic curvature response. Microgravity experiments have shown that abolishing the net tip-directed gravity force results in an actomyosin-mediated axial displacement of statoliths away from the cell tip. The present study was performed to critically assess the quality of microgravity simulation provided by different operational modes of a Random Positioning Machine (RPM) running with one axis (2D mode) or two axes (3D mode) and different rotational speeds (2D), speed ranges and directions (3D). The effects of 2D and 3D rotation were compared with data from experiments in real microgravity conditions (MAXUS sounding rocket missions). Rotational speeds in the range of 60-85 rpm in 2D and 3D modes resulted in a similar kinetics of statolith displacement as compared to real microgravity data, while slower clinorotation (2-11 rpm) caused a reduced axial displacement and a more dispersed arrangement of statoliths closer to the cell tip. Increasing the complexity of rotation by adding a second rotation axis in case of 3D clinorotation did not increase the quality of microgravity simulation, however, increased side effects such as the level of vibrations resulting in a more dispersed arrangement of statoliths. In conclusion, fast 2D clinorotation provides the most appropriate microgravity simulation for investigating the graviperception mechanism in Chara rhizoids, whereas slower clinorotation speeds and rotating samples around two axes do not improve the quality of microgravity simulation.

  4. Plant cell transformation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens under simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarnatska, Veresa; Gladun, Hanna; Padalko, Svetlana

    To investigate simulated microgravity (clinorotation) effect on plant cell transformation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens and crown gall formation, the culture of primary explants of potato and Jerusalem artichoke tubers was used. It is found that the efficiency of tumor formation and development in clinorotated explants are considerably reduced. When using the explants isolated from potato tubers clinorotated for 3, 5 and 19 days, drastic reduction of formation and development of crown gall tumors was observed. Conversely, the tumor number and their development increased when potato tubers were clinorotated for one day. As was estimated by us previously, cells of Jerusalem artichoke explants are the most sensitive to agrobacteria on 4-5 h of in vitro culturing and this time corresponds to the certain period of G1-stage of the cell cycle. We have also estimated that this period is characterized by the increase of binding of acridine orange by nuclear chromatin and increase in activity of RNA-polymerase I and II. Inoculation of explants with agrobacteria in this period was the most optimal for transformation and crown gall induction. We estimated that at four - hour clinorotation of explants the intensity of acridine orange binding to nuclei was considerably lower than on 4h in the control. At one-day clinorotation of potato tubers, a considerable increase in template accessibility of chromatin and in activity of RNA-polymerase I and II occurred. These results may serve as an evidence for the ability of plant dormant tissues to respond to microgravity. Another demonstration of dormant tissue response to changed gravity we obtained when investigating pathogenesis-related proteins (PR-proteins). PR-proteins were subjected to nondenaturing PAGE.and we have not found any effect of microgravity on PR-proteins of potato explants with normal or tumorous growth. We may suggest that such response derives from the common effects of two stress factors - wounding and changed

  5. Cell proliferation of Paramecium tetraurelia under simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawai, S.; Mogami, Y.; Baba, S. A.

    Paramecium is known to proliferate faster under microgravity in space and slower under hypergravity Experiments using axenic culture medium have demonstrated that the hypergravity affected directly on the proliferation of Paramecium itself Kato et al 2003 In order to assess the mechanisms underlying the physiological effects of gravity on cell proliferation Paramecium tetraurelia was grown under simulated microgravity performed by clinorotation and the time course of the proliferation was investigated in detail on the basis of the logistic analysis P tetraurelia was cultivated in a closed chamber in which cells were confined without air babbles reducing the shear stresses and turbulence under the rotation The chamber is made of quartz and silicone rubber film the former is for the optically-flat walls for the measurement of cell density by means of a non-invasive laser optical-slice method and the latter for gas exchange Because the closed chamber has an inner dimension of 3 times 3 times 60 mm Paramecium does not accumulate at the top of the chamber despite its negative gravitactic behavior We measured the cell density at regular time intervals without breaking the configuration of the chamber and analyzed the proliferation parameters by fitting the data to a logistic equation Clinorotation had the effects of reducing the proliferation of P tetraurelia It reduced both the saturation cell density and the maximum proliferation rate although it had little effect on the

  6. Effect of electromagnetic fields on the chondrogenic differentiation under microgravity conditions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A combination therapy of electromagnetic fields (EMF) and simulated microgravity (SMG) has not been examined in regenerative medicine of cartilage. In the present...

  7. Agglomeration of Ni-nanoparticles in the gas phase under gravity and microgravity conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lösch, S; Günther, B H; Iles, G N; Schmitz, B

    2011-01-01

    The agglomeration of metallic nanoparticles can be performed using the well-known inert gas condensation process. Unfortunately, thermal effects such as convection are created by the heating source and as a result the turbulent aerosol avoids ideal conditions. In addition, the sedimentation of large particles and/or agglomerates influences the self-assembly of particles. These negative effects can be eliminated by using microgravity conditions. Here we present the results of the agglomeration of nanoscale Ni-particles under gravity and microgravity conditions, the latter provided by adapted microgravity platforms namely the European sounding rocket MAXUS 8 and the European Parabolic Flight aircraft, Airbus A300 Zero-G.

  8. Polymethylmethacrylate combustion in a narrow channel apparatus simulating a microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornand, Garrett Randall

    compared to results found by Michigan State University's NCA. Flame spread results from the SDSU NCA compare closely to that of the other experimental techniques. Additionally, an infrared camera and species concentration sensors were added to the SDSU NCA and initial results are provided. Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) was used to model the combustion of PMMA within the SDSU NCA. Both thin and thick fuel beds were simulated and the numerical results were compared to experimental data. The simulation was then used to determine various results that cannot easily be found with experimentation, including how effectively the NCA simulates microgravity under certain environmental conditions, gas and fuel bed temperatures, heat fluxes, species concentrations, pyrolysis rate, and other various data. The simulation was found to give reasonable results and overall flame spread trends, but could be improved upon with further detailed kinetic parameter studies.

  9. Myocardial CKIP-1 Overexpression Protects from Simulated Microgravity-Induced Cardiac Remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukuan Ling

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Human cardiovascular system has adapted to Earth's gravity of 1G. The microgravity during space flight can induce cardiac remodeling and decline of cardiac function. At present, the mechanism of cardiac remodeling induced by microgravity remains to be disclosed. Casein kinase-2 interacting protein-1 (CKIP-1 is an important inhibitor of pressure-overload induced cardiac remodeling by decreasing the phosphorylation level of HDAC4. However, the role of CKIP-1 in the cardiac remodeling induced by microgravity is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether CKIP-1 was also involved in the regulation of cardiac remodeling induced by microgravity. We first detected the expression of CKIP-1 in the heart from mice and monkey after simulated microgravity using Q-PCR and western blotting. Then, myocardial specific CKIP-1 transgenic (TG and wild type mice were hindlimb-suspended (HU to simulate microgravity effect. We estimated the cardiac remodeling in morphology and function by histological analysis and echocardiography. Finally, we detected the phosphorylation of AMPK, ERK1/2, and HDAC4 in the heart from wild type and CKIP-1 transgenic mice after HU. The results revealed the reduced expression of CKIP-1 in the heart both from mice and monkey after simulated microgravity. Myocardial CKIP-1 overexpression protected from simulated microgravity-induced decline of cardiac function and loss of left ventricular mass. Histological analysis demonstrated CKIP-1 TG inhibited the decreases in the size of individual cardiomyocytes of mice after hindlimb unloading. CKIP-1 TG can inhibit the activation of HDAC4 and ERK1/2 and the inactivation of AMPK in heart of mice induced by simulated microgravity. These results demonstrated CKIP-1 was a suppressor of cardiac remodeling induced by simulated microgravity.

  10. Measurements of phoretic velocities of aerosol particles in microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodi, F.; Santachiara, G.; Travaini, S.; Vedernikov, A.; Dubois, F.; Minetti, C.; Legros, J. C.

    2006-11-01

    Measurements of thermo- and diffusio-phoretic velocities of aerosol particles (carnauba wax, paraffin and sodium chloride) were performed in microgravity conditions (Drop Tower facility, in Bremen, and Parabolic Flights, in Bordeaux). In the case of thermophoresis, a temperature gradient was obtained by heating the upper plate of the cell, while the lower one was maintained at environmental temperature. For diffusiophoresis, the water vapour gradient was obtained with sintered plates imbued with a water solution of MgCl 2 and distilled water, at the top and at the bottom of the cell, respectively. Aerosol particles were observed through a digital holographic velocimeter, a device allowing the determination of 3-D coordinates of particles from the observed volume. Particle trajectories and consequently particle velocities were reconstructed through the analysis of the sequence of particle positions. The experimental values of reduced thermophoretic velocities are between the theoretical values of Yamamoto and Ishihara [Yamamoto, K., Ishihara, Y., 1988. Thermophoresis of a spherical particle in a rarefied gas of a transition regime. Phys. Fluids. 31, 3618-3624] and Talbot et al. [Talbot, L., Cheng, R.K., Schefer, R.W., Willis, D.R., 1980. Thermophoresis of particles in a heated boundary layer. J. Fluid Mech. 101, 737-758], and do not show a clear dependence on the thermal conductivity of the aerosol. The existence of negative thermophoresis is not confirmed in our experiments. Concerning diffusiophoretic experiments, the results obtained show a small increase of reduced diffusiophoretic velocity with the Knudsen number.

  11. The Effect of Simulated Microgravity Environment of RWV Bioreactors on Surface Reactions and Adsorption of Serum Proteins on Bone-bioactive Microcarriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radin, Shula; Ducheyne, P.; Ayyaswamy, P. S.

    2003-01-01

    Biomimetically modified bioactive materials with bone-like surface properties are attractive candidates for use as microcarriers for 3-D bone-like tissue engineering under simulated microgravity conditions of NASA designed rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors. The simulated microgravity environment is attainable under suitable parametric conditions of the RWV bioreactors. Ca-P containing bioactive glass (BG), whose stimulatory effect on bone cell function had been previously demonstrated, was used in the present study. BG surface modification via reactions in solution, resulting formation of bone-like minerals at the surface and adsorption of serum proteins is critical for obtaining the stimulatory effect. In this paper, we report on the major effects of simulated microgravity conditions of the RWV on the BG reactions surface reactions and protein adsorption in physiological solutions. Control tests at normal gravity were conducted at static and dynamic conditions. The study revealed that simulated microgravity remarkably enhanced reactions involved in the BG surface modification, including BG dissolution, formation of bone-like minerals at the surface and adsorption of serum proteins. Simultaneously, numerical models were developed to simulate the mass transport of chemical species to and from the BG surface under normal gravity and simulated microgravity conditions. The numerical results showed an excellent agreement with the experimental data at both testing conditions.

  12. Reactions and Surface Transformations of a Bone-Bioactive Material in a Simulated Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radin, S.; Ducheyne, P.; Ayyaswamy, P. S.

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive program to investigate the expeditious in vitro formation of three-dimensional bone-like tissue is currently underway at the University of Pennsylvania. The study reported here forms a part of that program. Three-dimensional bone-like tissue structures may be grown under the simulated microgravity conditions of NASA designed Rotating Wall Bioreactor Vessels (RWV's). Such tissue growth will have wide clinical applications. In addition, an understanding of the fundamental changes that occur to bone cells under simulated microgravity would yield important information that will help in preventing or minimizing astronaut bone loss, a major health issue with travel or stay in space over long periods of time. The growth of three-dimensional bone-like tissue structures in RWV's is facilitated by the use of microcarriers which provide structural support. If the microcarrier material additionally promotes bone cell growth, then it is particularly advantageous to employ such microcarriers. We have found that reactive, bone-bioactive glass (BBG) is an attractive candidate for use as microcarrier material. Specifically, it has been found that BBG containing Ca- and P- oxides upregulates osteoprogenitor cells to osteoblasts. This effect on cells is preceded by BBG reactions in solution which result in the formation of a Ca-P surface layer. This surface further transforms to a bone-like mineral (i.e., carbonated crystalline hydroxyapatite (c-HA)). At normal gravity, time-dependent, immersion-induced BBG reactions and transformations are greatly affected both by variations in the composition of the milieu in which the glass is immersed and on the immersion conditions. However, the nature of BBG reactions and phase transformations under the simulated microgravity conditions of RWV's are unknown, and must be understood in order to successfully use BBG as microcarrier material in RWV'S. In this paper, we report some of our recent findings in this regard using

  13. The effect of simulated microgravity on human mesenchymal stem cells cultured in an osteogenic differentiation system: a bioinformatics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheyn, Dima; Pelled, Gadi; Netanely, Dvir; Domany, Eytan; Gazit, Dan

    2010-11-01

    One proposed strategy for bone regeneration involves ex vivo tissue engineering, accomplished using bone-forming cells, biodegradable scaffolds, and dynamic culture systems, with the goal of three-dimensional tissue formation. Rotating wall vessel bioreactors generate simulated microgravity conditions ex vivo, which lead to cell aggregation. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have been extensively investigated and shown to possess the potential to differentiate into several cell lineages. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of simulated microgravity on all genes expressed in hMSCs, with the underlying hypothesis that many important pathways are affected during culture within a rotating wall vessel system. Gene expression was analyzed using a whole genome microarray and clustering with the aid of the National Institutes of Health's Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery database and gene ontology analysis. Our analysis showed 882 genes that were downregulated and 505 genes that were upregulated after exposure to simulated microgravity. Gene ontology clustering revealed a wide variety of affected genes with respect to cell compartment, biological process, and signaling pathway clusters. The data sets showed significant decreases in osteogenic and chondrogenic gene expression and an increase in adipogenic gene expression, indicating that ex vivo adipose tissue engineering may benefit from simulated microgravity. This finding was supported by an adipogenic differentiation assay. These data are essential for further understanding of ex vivo tissue engineering using hMSCs.

  14. Effect of simulated microgravity on E. coli K12 MG1655 growth and gene expression

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This study demonstrates simulated microgravity effects on E. coli K 12 MG1655 when grown on LB medium supplemented with glycerol. The results imply that E. coli...

  15. ATF4 is involved in the regulation of simulated microgravity induced integrated stress response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingxian; Li, Qi; Wang, Xiaogang; Sun, Qiao; Wan, Yumin; Li, Yinghui; Bai, Yanqiang

    Objective: Many important metabolic and signaling pathways have been identified as being affected by microgravity, thereby altering cellular functions such as proliferation, differentiation, maturation and cell survival. It has been demonstrated that microgravity could induce all kinds of stress response such as endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress et al. ATF4 belongs to the ATF/CREB family of basic region leucine zipper transcription factors. ATF4 is induced by stress signals including anoxia/hypoxia, ER stress, amino acid deprivation and oxidative stress. ATF4 regulates the expression of genes involved in oxidative stress, amino acid synthesis, differentiation, metastasis and angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to examine the changes of ATF4 under microgravity, and to investigate the role of ATF4 in microgravity induced stress. MethodsMEF cells were cultured in clinostat to simulate microgravity. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting were used to examine mRNA and protein levels of ATF4 expression under simulated microgravity in MEF cells. ROS levels were measured with the use of the fluorescent signal H2DCF-DA. GFP-XBP1 stably transfected cell lines was used to detect the extent of ER stress under microgravity by the intensity of GFP. Dual luciferase reporter assay was used to detect the activity of ATF4. Co-immunoprecipitation was performed to analyze protein interaction. Results: ATF4 protein levels in MEF cells increased under simulated microgravity. However, ATF4 mRNA levels were consistent. XBP1 splicing can be induced due to ER stress caused by simulated microgravity. At the same time, ROS levels were also increased. Increased ATF4 could promote the expression of CHOP, which is responsible for cell apoptosis. ATF4 also play an important role in cellular anti-oxidant stress. In ATF4 -/-MEF cells, the ROS levels after H2O2 treatment were obviously higher than that of wild type cells. HDAC4 was

  16. Impact of simulated microgravity on the secretory and adhesive activity of cultured human vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudimov, Evgeny; Buravkova, Ludmila; Pogodina, Margarita; Andrianova, Irina

    The layer of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) is a dynamic,disseminated organ that perform the function of an interface between the blood and vascular wall. The endothelial monolayer is able to quickly respond to changes in the microenvironment due to its synthesis of vasoactive substances, chemokines, adhesion molecules expression, etc. ECs are highly sensitive to gravitational changes and capable of short-term and long-term responses (Sangha et al., 2001; Buravkova et al., 2005; Infanger et al., 2006, 2007. However, the question remains how to reflect the impact of microgravity on endothelium under the inflammatory process. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate secretory and adhesive activity of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) during simulated microgravity and TNF-a activation. HUVECs were isolated according to Gimbrone et al. (1978) in modification A. Antonov (1981) and used for experiments at 2-4 passages. HUVECs were activated by low level of TNF-a (2 ng/ml). Microgravity was generated by Random Positioning Machine (RPM, Dutch Space, Leiden) placed into the thermostat at 37°C. After 24 hours of clinorotation we measured adhesion molecules expression on the cell surface (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, PECAM-1, E-selectin, CD144, endoglin (CD105)) and cell viability using a flow cytometry. To evaluate the level of target gene expression was used the real time RT-PCR. IL-6 and IL-8 concentration was measured in the conditioned medium of HUVECs by using the ELISA test. We found that simulated microgravity within 24 hours caused a decrease of ICAM-1, CD144, and E-selectin expression, at the same time not affect the cell viability, endoglin and PECAM-1 expression on the surface HUVEC. Furthermore, there were no changes of the level of IL-6 and IL-8 gene expression and their products in the culture medium. TNF-activated HUVECs showed an increase in gene expression of interleukins and molecules involved in the adhesion process, which also was confirmed

  17. The Transcriptional Response of Diverse Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains to Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Lily S.; Fleury, Samantha T.; Galazka, Jonathan M.

    2018-01-01

    Spaceflight imposes multiple stresses on biological systems resulting in genome-scale adaptations. Understanding these adaptations and their underlying molecular mechanisms is important to clarifying and reducing the risks associated with spaceflight. One such risk is infection by microbes present in spacecraft and their associated systems and inhabitants. This risk is compounded by results suggesting that some microbes may exhibit increased virulence after exposure to spaceflight conditions. The yeast, S. cerevisiae, is a powerful microbial model system, and its response to spaceflight has been studied for decades. However, to date, these studies have utilized common lab strains. Yet studies on trait variation in S. cerevisiae demonstrate that these lab strains are not representative of wild yeast and instead respond to environmental stimuli in an atypical manner. Thus, it is not clear how transferable these results are to the wild S. cerevisiae strains likely to be encountered during spaceflight. To determine if diverse S. cerevisiae strains exhibit a conserved response to simulated microgravity, we will utilize a collection of 100 S. cerevisiae strains isolated from clinical, environmental and industrial settings. We will place selected S. cerevisiae strains in simulated microgravity using a high-aspect rotating vessel (HARV) and document their transcriptional response by RNA-sequencing and quantify similarities and differences between strains. Our research will have a strong impact on the understanding of how genetic diversity of microorganisms effects their response to spaceflight, and will serve as a platform for further studies.

  18. In Vitro Disease Model of Microgravity Conditioning on Human Energy Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Jessica; Culbertson, C.; Zhang, Ye; Emami, K.; Wu, H.; Sun, Wei

    2010-01-01

    NASA and its partners are committed to introducing appropriate new technology to enable learning and living safely beyond the Earth for extended periods of time in a sustainable and possibly indefinite manner. In the responsible acquisition of that goal, life sciences is tasked to tune and advance current medical technology to prepare for human health and wellness in the space environment. The space environment affects the condition and function of biological systems from organ level function to shape of individual organelles. The objective of this paper is to study the effect of microgravity on kinetics of drug metabolism. This fundamental characterization is meaningful to (1) scientific understanding of the response of biology to microgravity and (2) clinical dosing requirements and pharmacological thresholds during long term manned space exploration. Metabolism kinetics of the anti-nausea drug promethazine (PMZ) were determined by an in vitro ground model of 3-dimensional aggregates of human hepatocytes conditioned to weightlessness using a rotating wall bioreactor. The authors observed up-regulated PMZ conversion in model microgravity conditions and attribute this to effect to model microgravity conditioning acting on metabolic mechanisms of the cells. Further work is necessary to determine which particular cellular mechanisms are governing the experimental observations, but the authors conclude kinetics of drug metabolism are responsive to gravitational fields and further study of this sensitivity would improve dosing of pharmaceuticals to persons exposed to a microgravity environment.

  19. Comparison of Simulated Microgravity and Hydrostatic Pressure for Chondrogenesis of hASC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, Liliana F; Steward, Andrew J; Nordberg, Rachel C; Taylor, Michael A; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2017-04-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering is a growing field due to the lack of regenerative capacity of native tissue. The use of bioreactors for cartilage tissue engineering is common, but the results are controversial. Some studies suggest that microgravity bioreactors are ideal for chondrogenesis, while others show that mimicking hydrostatic pressure is crucial for cartilage formation. A parallel study comparing the effects of loading and unloading on chondrogenesis has not been performed. The goal of this study was to evaluate chondrogenesis of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC) under two different mechanical stimuli relative to static culture: microgravity and cyclic hydrostatic pressure (CHP). Pellets of hASC were cultured for 14 d under simulated microgravity using a rotating wall vessel bioreactor or under CHP (7.5 MPa, 1 Hz, 4 h · d-1) using a hydrostatic pressure vessel. We found that CHP increased mRNA expression of Aggrecan, Sox9, and Collagen II, caused a threefold increase in sulfated glycosaminoglycan production, and resulted in stronger vimentin staining intensity and organization relative to microgravity. In addition, Wnt-signaling patterns were altered in a manner that suggests that simulated microgravity decreases chondrogenic differentiation when compared to CHP. Our goal was to compare chondrogenic differentiation of hASC using a microgravity bioreactor and a hydrostatic pressure vessel, two commonly used bioreactors in cartilage tissue engineering. Our results indicate that CHP promotes hASC chondrogenesis and that microgravity may inhibit hASC chondrogenesis. Our findings further suggest that cartilage formation and regeneration might be compromised in space due to the lack of mechanical loading.Mellor LF, Steward AJ, Nordberg RC, Taylor MA, Loboa EG. Comparison of simulated microgravity and hydrostatic pressure for chondrogenesis of hASC. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(4):377-384.

  20. Plant cell proliferation and growth are altered by microgravity conditions in spaceflight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matia, I.; Gonzalez-Camacho, F.; Herranz, R.; Kiss, J.Z.; Gasset, G.; van Loon, J.J.W.A.; Marco, R.; Medina, F.J.

    2010-01-01

    Seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana were sent to space and germinated in orbit. Seedlings grew for 4 d and were then fixed in-flight with paraformaldehyde. The experiment was replicated on the ground in a Random Positioning Machine, an effective simulator of microgravity. In addition, samples from a

  1. Response of SAOS-2 cells to simulated microgravity and effect of biocompatible sol-gel hybrid coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catauro, M.; Bollino, F.; Papale, F.

    2016-05-01

    The health of astronauts, during space flight, is threatened by bone loss induced by microgravity, mainly attributed to an imbalance in the bone remodeling process. In the present work, the response to the microgravity of bone cells has been studied using the SAOS-2 cell line grown under the condition of weightlessness, simulated by means of a Random Positioning Machine (RPM). Cell viability after 72 h of rotation has been evaluated by means of WST-8 assay and compared to that of control cells. Although no significant difference between the two cell groups has been observed in terms of viability, F-actin staining showed that microgravity environment induces cell apoptosis and altered F-actin organization. To investigate the possibility of hindering the trend of the cells towards the death, after 72 h of rotation the cells have been seeded onto biocompatible ZrO2/PCL hybrid coatings, previously obtained using a sol-gel dip coating procedure. WST-8 assay, carried out after 24 h, showed that the materials are able to inhibit the pro-apoptotic effect of microgravity on cells.

  2. Long-Term Evolution Studies of E. Coli under Combined Effects of Simulated Microgravity and Antibiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karouia, Fathi; Tirumalai, Madhan R.; Ott, Mark C.; Pierson, Duane L.; Fox, George E.; Tran, Quyen

    2016-07-01

    Multiple spaceflight and simulated microgravity experiments have shown changes in phenotypic microbial characteristics such as microbial growth, morphology, metabolism, genetic transfer, antibiotic and stress susceptibility, and an increase in virulence factors. However, while these studies have contributed to expand our understanding of the short-term effects of spaceflight or simulated microgravity on biological systems, it remains unclear the type of responses subsequent to long-term exposure to space environment and microgravity in particular. As such, organisms exposed to the space environment for extended periods of time may evolve in unanticipated ways thereby negatively impacting long duration space missions. We report here for the first time, an experimental study of microbial evolution in which the effect of long-term exposure to Low Shear Modeled MicroGravity (LSMMG) on microbial gene expression and physiology in Escherichia coli (E. coli) MG1655 was examined using functional genomics, and molecular techniques with and without simultaneous exposure to broad spectrum antibiotic chloramphenicol. E. coli cells were grown under simulated microgravity for 1000 generations in High Aspect Ratio Vessels (HARVs) that were either heat-sterilized (115 deg C, 15 min) or by using/rinsing the HARVs with a saturated solution of the broad-spectrum antibiotic chloramphenicol. In the case of the cells evolved using the antibiotic sterilized HARVs, the expression levels of 357 genes were significantly changed. In particular, fimbriae encoding genes were significantly up-regulated whereas genes encoding the flagellar motor complex were down-regulated. Re-sequencing of the genome revealed that a number of the flagellar genes were actually deleted. The antibiotic resistance levels of the evolved strains were analyzed using VITEK analyzer. The evolved strain was consistently resistant to the antibiotics used (viz., Ampicillin, Cefalotin, Cefurox-ime, Cefuroxime Axetil

  3. The time course of altered brain activity during 7-day simulated microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang eLiao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity causes multiple changes in physical and mental levels in humans, which can induce performance deficiency among astronauts. Studying the variations in brain activity that occur during microgravity would help astronauts to deal with these changes. In the current study, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI was used to observe the variations in brain activity during a 7-day head down tilt (HDT bed rest, which is a common and reliable model for simulated microgravity. The amplitudes of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF of twenty subjects were recorded pre-head down tilt (pre-HDT, during a bed rest period (HDT0, and then each day in the HDT period (HDT1–HDT7. One-way analysis of variance of the ALFF values over these 8 days was used to test the variation across time period (P<0.05, corrected. Compared to HDT0, subjects presented lower ALFF values in the posterior cingulate cortex and higher ALFF values in the anterior cingulate cortex during the HDT period, which may partially account for the lack of cognitive flexibility and alterations in autonomic nervous system seen among astronauts in microgravity. Additionally, the observed improvement in function in CPL during the HDT period may play a compensatory role to the functional decline in the paracentral lobule to sustain normal levels of fine motor control for astronauts in a microgravity environment. Above all, those floating brain activities during 7 days of simulated microgravity may indicate that the brain self-adapts to help astronauts adjust to the multiple negative stressors encountered in a microgravity environment.

  4. Lab-On-Chip Clinorotation System for Live-Cell Microscopy Under Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Alvin G.; Atencia, Javier; Chinn, Ben; Hsieh, Adam H.

    2013-01-01

    Cells in microgravity are subject to mechanical unloading and changes to the surrounding chemical environment. How these factors jointly influence cellular function is not well understood. We can investigate their role using ground-based analogues to spaceflight, where mechanical unloading is simulated through the time-averaged nullification of gravity. The prevailing method for cellular microgravity simulation is to use fluid-filled containers called clinostats. However, conventional clinostats are not designed for temporally tracking cell response, nor are they able to establish dynamic fluid environments. To address these needs, we developed a Clinorotation Time-lapse Microscopy (CTM) system that accommodates lab-on- chip cell culture devices for visualizing time-dependent alterations to cellular behavior. For the purpose of demonstrating CTM, we present preliminary results showing time-dependent differences in cell area between human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) under modeled microgravity and normal gravity.

  5. Evaluation of a novel basic life support method in simulated microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehnberg, Lucas; Russomano, Thaws; Falcão, Felipe; Campos, Fabio; Everts, Simon N

    2011-02-01

    If a cardiac arrest occurs in microgravity, current emergency protocols aim to treat patients via a medical restraint system within 2-4 min. It is vital that crewmembers have the ability to perform single-person cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during this period, allowing time for advanced life support to be deployed. The efficacy of the Evetts-Russomano (ER) method has been tested in 22 s of microgravity in a parabolic flight and has shown that external chest compressions (ECC) and mouth-to-mouth ventilation are possible. There were 21 male subjects who performed both the ER method in simulated microgravity via full body suspension and at +1 Gz. The CPR mannequin was modified to provide accurate readings for ECC depth and a metronome to set the rate at 100 bpm. Heart rate, rate of perceived exertion, and angle of arm flexion were measured with an ECG, elbow electrogoniometers, and Borg scale, respectively. The mean (+/- SD) depth of ECC in simulated microgravity was lower in each of the 3 min compared to +1 G2. The ECC depth (45.7 +/- 2.7 mm, 42.3 +/- 5.5 mm, and 41.4 +/- 5.9 mm) and rate (104.5 +/- 5.2, 105.2 +/- 4.5, and 102.4 +/- 6.6 compressions/min), however, remained within CPR guidelines during simulated microgravity over the 3-min period. Heart rate, perceived exertion, and elbow flexion of both arms increased using the ER method. The ER method can provide adequate depth and rate of ECC in simulated microgravity for 3 min to allow time to deploy a medical restraint system. There is, however, a physiological cost associated with it and a need to use the flexion of the arms to compensate for the lack of weight.

  6. Disrupted resting-state functional architecture of the brain after 45-day simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuan; Wang, Yun; Rao, Li-Lin; Liang, Zhu-Yuan; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Zheng, Dang; Tan, Cheng; Tian, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Chun-Hui; Bai, Yan-Qiang; Chen, Shan-Guang; Li, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Long-term spaceflight induces both physiological and psychological changes in astronauts. To understand the neural mechanisms underlying these physiological and psychological changes, it is critical to investigate the effects of microgravity on the functional architecture of the brain. In this study, we used resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) to study whether the functional architecture of the brain is altered after 45 days of −6° head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest, which is a reliable model for the simulation of microgravity. Sixteen healthy male volunteers underwent rs-fMRI scans before and after 45 days of −6° HDT bed rest. Specifically, we used a commonly employed graph-based measure of network organization, i.e., degree centrality (DC), to perform a full-brain exploration of the regions that were influenced by simulated microgravity. We subsequently examined the functional connectivities of these regions using a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) analysis. We found decreased DC in two regions, the left anterior insula (aINS) and the anterior part of the middle cingulate cortex (MCC; also called the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex in many studies), in the male volunteers after 45 days of −6° HDT bed rest. Furthermore, seed-based RSFC analyses revealed that a functional network anchored in the aINS and MCC was particularly influenced by simulated microgravity. These results provide evidence that simulated microgravity alters the resting-state functional architecture of the brains of males and suggest that the processing of salience information, which is primarily subserved by the aINS–MCC functional network, is particularly influenced by spaceflight. The current findings provide a new perspective for understanding the relationships between microgravity, cognitive function, autonomic neural function, and central neural activity. PMID:24926242

  7. Disrutpted resting-state functional architecture of the brain after 45-day simulated microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan eZhou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Long-term spaceflight induces both physiological and psychological changes in astronauts. To understand the neural mechanisms underlying these physiological and psychological changes, it is critical to investigate the effects of microgravity on the functional architecture of the brain. In this study, we used resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI to study whether the functional architecture of the brain is altered after 45 days of -6° head-down tilt (HDT bed rest, which is a reliable model for the simulation of microgravity. Sixteen healthy male volunteers underwent rs-fMRI scans before and after 45 days of -6° HDT bed rest. Specifically, we used a commonly employed graph-based measure of network organization, i.e., degree centrality (DC, to perform a full-brain exploration of the regions that were influenced by simulated microgravity. We subsequently examined the functional connectivities of these regions using a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC analysis. We found decreased DC in two regions, the left anterior insula (aINS and the anterior part of the middle cingulate cortex (MCC; also called the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex in many studies, in the male volunteers after 45 days of -6° HDT bed rest. Furthermore, seed-based RSFC analyses revealed that a functional network anchored in the aINS and MCC was particularly influenced by simulated microgravity. These results provide evidence that simulated microgravity alters the resting-state functional architecture of the brains of males and suggest that the processing of salience information, which is primarily subserved by the aINS–MCC functional network, is particularly influenced by spaceflight. The current findings provide a new perspective for understanding the relationships between microgravity, cognitive function, autonomic neural function and central neural activity.

  8. Common Effects on Follicular Thyroid Cancer Cells Exerted by Simulated Microgravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejgaard, Benjamin; Grimm, Daniela; Corydon, Thomas Juhl

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on gravity-sensitive proteins of two human follicular cancer cell lines (ML-1; RO82-W-1), which were exposed to simulated microgravity (s-μg) on two different machines. Changes in protein cytoskeletal structure, growth patterns and protein expression in response to s-μg were...

  9. Simulated microgravity activates MAPK pathways in fibroblasts cultured on microgrooved surface topography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loesberg, W.A.; Walboomers, X.F.; van Loon, J.J.W.A.; Jansen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated in vitro the differences in morphological behaviour between fibroblast cultured on smooth and microgrooved substrata (groove depth: 0.5 mu m, width: I pm), which were subjected to simulated microgravity. The aim of the study was to clarify which of these parameters was more

  10. Simulated microgravity activates MAPK pathways in fibroblasts cultured on microgrooved surface topography.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loesberg, W.A.; Walboomers, X.F.; Loon, J.J.W.A. van; Jansen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated in vitro the differences in morphological behaviour between fibroblast cultured on smooth and microgrooved substrata (groove depth: 0.5 mum, width: 1 mum), which were subjected to simulated microgravity. The aim of the study was to clarify which of these parameters was more

  11. Microgravity modulation effects on free convection problems LBM simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Khodayar; Kazemi, Koorosh

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, microgravity modulation effects on free convection in a cavity are investigated using the lattice Boltzmann method. In order to create microgravity modulation, a sinusoidal time-dependent function is considered. Parameters of the flow are chosen such that the maximum Rayleigh number approaches 106. The natural frequency of the system is obtained at first. Afterwards, effects of different frequencies on the flow and heat transfer fields are investigated in detail. Results are presented in four different frequency ratios categorized as (1) ω*=1/200 , 1/100 , 1/20 , and 1/10 ; (2) ω*=1/8 , 1/5 , 1/3 , and 1/2 ; (3) ω* = 0.75, 0.85, and 0.95; and (4) the last one is considered for natural frequency as a special case of ω* = 1. Furthermore, the fast Fourier transformation is used to describe the cavity flow behavior. The results indicated that at low frequency, the system has enough time to adapt itself with the gravity modulation while historical effects do not disappear. Increasing the frequency changes the behavior of the system and different flow patterns appear. Finally, at the natural frequency (ω* = 1), all system modes are stimulated and a strange flow pattern is formed.

  12. Numerical simulation of gender differences in a long-term microgravity exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Poch, Antoni

    The objective of this work is to analyse and simulate gender differences when individuals are exposed to long-term microgravity. Risk probability of a health impairment which may put in jeopardy a long-term mission is also evaluated. Computer simulations are becoming a promising research line of work, as physiological models become more and more sophisticated and reliable. Technological advances in state-of-the-art hardware technology and software allow nowadays for better and more accurate simulations of complex phenomena, such as the response of the human cardiovascular system to long-term exposure to microgravity. Experimental data for long-term missions are difficult to achieve and reproduce, therefore the predictions of computer simulations are of a major importance in this field. Our approach is based on a previous model developed and implemented in our laboratory (NELME: Numerical Evaluation of Long-term Microgravity Effects). The software simulates the behaviour of the cardiovascular system and different human organs, has a modular architecture, and allows to introduce perturbations such as physical exercise or countermeasures. The implementation is based on a complex electricallike model of this control system, using inexpensive software development frameworks, and has been tested and validated with the available experimental data. Gender differences have been implemented for this specific work, as an adjustment of a number of parameters that are included in the model. Women versus men physiological differences have been therefore taken into account, based upon estimations from the physiology bibliography. A number of simulations have been carried out for long-term exposure to microgravity. Gravity varying from Earth-based to zero, and time exposure are the two main variables involved in the construction of results, including responses to patterns of physical aerobical exercise, and also thermal stress simulating an extra-vehicular activity. Results show

  13. Liftoff characteristics of partially premixed flames under normal and microgravity conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lock, Andrew J.; Briones, Alejandro M.; Aggarwal, Suresh K. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Qin, Xiao [Department of Mechanical & amp; Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Puri, Ishwar K. [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Hegde, Uday [National Center for Microgravity Research, Cleveland, OH 44135 (United States)

    2005-11-01

    An experimental and computational investigation on the liftoff characteristics of laminar partially premixed flames (PPFs) under normal (1-g) and microgravity ({mu}-g) conditions is presented. Lifted methane-air PPFs were established in axisymmetric coflowing jets using nitrogen dilution and various levels of partial premixing. The {mu}-g experiments were conducted in the 2.2-s drop tower at the NASA Glenn Research Center. A time-accurate, implicit algorithm that uses a detailed description of the chemistry and includes radiation effects is used for the simulations. The predictions are validated through a comparison of the flame reaction zone topologies, liftoff heights, lengths, and oscillation frequencies. The effects of equivalence ratio, gravity, jet velocity, and radiation on flame topology, liftoff height, flame length, base structure, and oscillation frequency are characterized. Both the simulations and measurements indicate that under identical conditions, a lifted {mu}-g PPF is stabilized closer to the burner compared with the 1-g flame, and that the liftoff heights of both 1-g and {mu}-g flames decrease with increasing equivalence ratio and approach their respective nonpremixed flame limits. The liftoff height also increases as the jet velocity is increased. In addition, the flame base structure transitions from a triple- to a double-flame structure as the flame liftoff height decreases. A modified flame index is developed to distinguish between the rich premixed, lean premixed, and nonpremixed reaction zones near the flame base. The 1-g lifted flames exhibit well-organized oscillations due to buoyancy-induced instability, while the corresponding {mu}-g flames exhibit steady-state behavior. The effect of thermal radiation is to slightly decrease the liftoff heights of both 1-g and {mu}-g flames under coflow conditions.

  14. Simulated microgravity, Mars gravity, and 2g hypergravity affect cell cycle regulation, ribosome biogenesis, and epigenetics in Arabidopsis cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Khaled Y; Herranz, Raúl; van Loon, Jack J W A; Medina, F Javier

    2018-04-23

    Gravity is the only component of Earth environment that remained constant throughout the entire process of biological evolution. However, it is still unclear how gravity affects plant growth and development. In this study, an in vitro cell culture of Arabidopsis thaliana was exposed to different altered gravity conditions, namely simulated reduced gravity (simulated microgravity, simulated Mars gravity) and hypergravity (2g), to study changes in cell proliferation, cell growth, and epigenetics. The effects after 3, 14, and 24-hours of exposure were evaluated. The most relevant alterations were found in the 24-hour treatment, being more significant for simulated reduced gravity than hypergravity. Cell proliferation and growth were uncoupled under simulated reduced gravity, similarly, as found in meristematic cells from seedlings grown in real or simulated microgravity. The distribution of cell cycle phases was changed, as well as the levels and gene transcription of the tested cell cycle regulators. Ribosome biogenesis was decreased, according to levels and gene transcription of nucleolar proteins and the number of inactive nucleoli. Furthermore, we found alterations in the epigenetic modifications of chromatin. These results show that altered gravity effects include a serious disturbance of cell proliferation and growth, which are cellular functions essential for normal plant development.

  15. Spectral indices of cardiovascular adaptations to short-term simulated microgravity exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, A. R.; Evans, J. M.; Berk, M.; Grande, K. J.; Charles, J. B.; Knapp, C. F.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the effects of exposure to microgravity on the baseline autonomic balance in cardiovascular regulation using spectral analysis of cardiovascular variables measured during supine rest. Heart rate, arterial pressure, radial flow, thoracic fluid impedance and central venous pressure were recorded from nine volunteers before and after simulated microgravity, produced by 20 hours of 6 degrees head down bedrest plus furosemide. Spectral powers increased after simulated microgravity in the low frequency region (centered at about 0.03 Hz) in arterial pressure, heart rate and radial flow, and decreased in the respiratory frequency region (centered at about 0.25 Hz) in heart rate. Reduced heart rate power in the respiratory frequency region indicates reduced parasympathetic influence on the heart. A concurrent increase in the low frequency power in arterial pressure, heart rate, and radial flow indicates increased sympathetic influence. These results suggest that the baseline autonomic balance in cardiovascular regulation is shifted towards increased sympathetic and decreased parasympathetic influence after exposure to short-term simulated microgravity.

  16. Experimental study of two-phase flow in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell in short-term microgravity condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Hang; Liu, Xuan; Zhao, Jian Fu; Ye, Fang; Ma, Chong Fang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Two-phase flow in PEMFC cathode channels is observed in different gravity environments. • The PEMFC shows different operating behavior in normal and microgravity conditions. • Water tends can be removed in microgravity conditions at high water production regime. • Liquid aggregation occurs in microgravity conditions at low water production regime. • Effect of gravity on performance and two-phase flow at two operating regimes is studied. - Abstract: Water management is important for improving the performance and stability of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) for space applications. An in situ visual observation was conducted on the gas–liquid two-phase flow in the cathode channels of a PEMFC in short-term microgravity condition. The microgravity environment was supplied by a drop tower. A single serpentine flow channel with a depth of 2 mm and a width of 2 mm was applied as the cathode flow field. A membrane electrode assembly comprising of a Nafion 112 membrane sandwiched between gas diffusion layers was used. The anode and cathode were loaded with 1 mg cm −2 platinum. The PEMFC shows a distinct operating behavior in microgravity because of the effect of gravity on the two-phase flow. At a high water production regime, cell performance is enhanced by 4.6% and the accumulated liquid water in the flow channel tends can be removed in microgravity conditions to alleviate flooding. At a low water production regime, cell performance deteriorates by 6.6% and liquid aggregation occurs in the flow channel because of the coalescence of dispersed water droplets in microgravity conditions, thus squeezing the flow channel. The operating behavior of PEMFC in microgravity conditions is different from that in normal gravity conditions. Further studies are needed on PEMFC operating characteristics and liquid management for space applications

  17. Thermophysical Properties Measurement of High-Temperature Liquids Under Microgravity Conditions in Controlled Atmospheric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masahito; Ozawa, Shumpei; Mizuno, Akotoshi; Hibiya, Taketoshi; Kawauchi, Hiroya; Murai, Kentaro; Takahashi, Suguru

    2012-01-01

    Microgravity conditions have advantages of measurement of surface tension and viscosity of metallic liquids by the oscillating drop method with an electromagnetic levitation (EML) device. Thus, we are preparing the experiments of thermophysical properties measurements using the Materials-Science Laboratories ElectroMagnetic-Levitator (MSL-EML) facilities in the international Space station (ISS). Recently, it has been identified that dependence of surface tension on oxygen partial pressure (Po2) must be considered for industrial application of surface tension values. Effect of Po2 on surface tension would apparently change viscosity from the damping oscillation model. Therefore, surface tension and viscosity must be measured simultaneously in the same atmospheric conditions. Moreover, effect of the electromagnetic force (EMF) on the surface oscillations must be clarified to obtain the ideal surface oscillation because the EMF works as the external force on the oscillating liquid droplets, so extensive EMF makes apparently the viscosity values large. In our group, using the parabolic flight levitation experimental facilities (PFLEX) the effect of Po2 and external EMF on surface oscillation of levitated liquid droplets was systematically investigated for the precise measurements of surface tension and viscosity of high temperature liquids for future ISS experiments. We performed the observation of surface oscillations of levitated liquid alloys using PFLEX on board flight experiments by Gulfstream II (G-II) airplane operated by DAS. These observations were performed under the controlled Po2 and also under the suitable EMF conditions. In these experiments, we obtained the density, the viscosity and the surface tension values of liquid Cu. From these results, we discuss about as same as reported data, and also obtained the difference of surface oscillations with the change of the EMF conditions.

  18. Pressure-volume-temperature gauging method experiment using liquid nitrogen under microgravity condition of parabolic flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Man Su; Park, Hana; Yoo, Don Gyu; Jeong, Sang Kwon [Cryogenic Engineering Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young Suk [Launcher Systems Development Team, Korea Aerospace Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Measuring an exact amount of remaining cryogenic liquid propellant under microgravity condition is one of the important issues of rocket vehicle. A Pressure-Volume-Temperature (PVT) gauging method is attractive due to its minimal additional hardware and simple gauging process. In this paper, PVT gauging method using liquid nitrogen is investigated under microgravity condition with parabolic flight. A 9.2 litre metal cryogenic liquid storage tank containing approximately 30% of liquid nitrogen is pressurized by ambient temperature helium gas. During microgravity condition, the inside of the liquid tank becomes near-isothermal condition within 1 K difference indicated by 6 silicon diode sensors vertically distributed in the middle of the liquid tank. Helium injection with higher mass flow rate after 10 seconds of the waiting time results in successful measurements of helium partial pressure in the tank. Average liquid volume measurement error is within 11% of the whole liquid tank volume and standard deviation of errors is 11.9. As a result, the applicability of PVT gauging method to liquid.

  19. Pressure-volume-temperature gauging method experiment using liquid nitrogen under microgravity condition of parabolic flight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Man Su; Park, Hana; Yoo, Don Gyu; Jeong, Sang Kwon; Jung, Young Suk

    2014-01-01

    Measuring an exact amount of remaining cryogenic liquid propellant under microgravity condition is one of the important issues of rocket vehicle. A Pressure-Volume-Temperature (PVT) gauging method is attractive due to its minimal additional hardware and simple gauging process. In this paper, PVT gauging method using liquid nitrogen is investigated under microgravity condition with parabolic flight. A 9.2 litre metal cryogenic liquid storage tank containing approximately 30% of liquid nitrogen is pressurized by ambient temperature helium gas. During microgravity condition, the inside of the liquid tank becomes near-isothermal condition within 1 K difference indicated by 6 silicon diode sensors vertically distributed in the middle of the liquid tank. Helium injection with higher mass flow rate after 10 seconds of the waiting time results in successful measurements of helium partial pressure in the tank. Average liquid volume measurement error is within 11% of the whole liquid tank volume and standard deviation of errors is 11.9. As a result, the applicability of PVT gauging method to liquid

  20. Microstructural anomalies in a W-Ni alloy liquid phase sintered under microgravity conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.; Iacocca, R.G.; Johnson, J.L.; German, R.M.; Kohara, Shiro

    1995-01-01

    The gravitational role in liquid phase sintering (LPS) is a problem of great interest in both materials science and engineering practice. Gravity-induced microstructural gradients in grain size, grain shape, and solid volume fraction have been well documented in liquid phase sintered tungsten heavy alloys and have been analyzed by a number of theoretical models. However, gravity may have many unknown effects on LPS, which can only be revealed by experiments conducted under microgravity conditions

  1. Advantages of simulated microgravity in the production of compounds of industrial relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versari, Silvia; Villa, Alessandro; Barenghi, Livia; Bradamante, Silvia

    2005-08-01

    Glutathione (α-glutamyl-L-cysteinylglycine, GSH) is the most abundant non-protein thiol compound and it is widely distributed in living organisms, mainly, in eukaryotic cells. Inside the cells, GSH assumes pivotal roles in bioreduction processes and protection against oxidative stress. Due to its antioxidant properties, GSH is widely used not only in food and cosmetic area but also as a pharmaceutical compound.The best total GSH production obtained culturing yeast cells in standard conditions is about 3.5% DCW, as the sum of intracellular (mainly) and extracellular GSH. Its production is limited by a feedback inhibition process. Using our patented microgravity (μg) simulator, the NRG bioreactor, we obtained a three-fold increase in total GSH production. In particular we observed an increased GSH extracellular excretion (9%), thus avoiding the feedback inhibition and easing the downstream processing.To confirm the role of μg, we extended our findings on GSH extracellular production using another μg simulator, the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV).

  2. Activation of nuclear transcription factor-kappaB in mouse brain induced by a simulated microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Kimberly C.; Manna, Sunil K.; Yamauchi, Keiko; Ramesh, Vani; Wilson, Bobby L.; Thomas, Renard L.; Sarkar, Shubhashish; Kulkarni, Anil D.; Pellis, Neil R.; Ramesh, Govindarajan T.

    2005-01-01

    Microgravity induces inflammatory responses and modulates immune functions that may increase oxidative stress. Exposure to a microgravity environment induces adverse neurological effects; however, there is little research exploring the etiology of these effects resulting from exposure to such an environment. It is also known that spaceflight is associated with increase in oxidative stress; however, this phenomenon has not been reproduced in land-based simulated microgravity models. In this study, an attempt has been made to show the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mice brain, using ground-based microgravity simulator. Increased ROS was observed in brain stem and frontal cortex with concomitant decrease in glutathione, on exposing mice to simulated microgravity for 7 d. Oxidative stress-induced activation of nuclear factor-kappaB was observed in all the regions of the brain. Moreover, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase was phosphorylated equally in all regions of the brain exposed to simulated microgravity. These results suggest that exposure of brain to simulated microgravity can induce expression of certain transcription factors, and these have been earlier argued to be oxidative stress dependent.

  3. Cytomorphometric changes in hippocampal CA1 neurons exposed to simulated microgravity using rats as model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit eRanjan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity and sleep loss lead to cognitive and learning deficits. These behavioral alterations are likely to be associated with cytomorphological changes and loss of neurons. To understand the phenomenon, we exposed rats (225-275g to 14 days simulated microgravity (SMg and compared its effects on CA1 hippocampal neuronal plasticity, with that of normal cage control rats. We observed that the mean area, perimeter, synaptic cleft and length of active zone of CA1 hippocampal neurons significantly decreased while dendritic arborization and number of spines significantly increased in SMg group as compared with controls. The mean thickness of the post synaptic density and total dendritic length remained unaltered. The changes may be a compensatory effect induced by exposure to microgravity; however, the effects may be transient or permanent, which need further study. These findings may be useful for designing effective prevention for those, including the astronauts, exposed to microgravity. Further, subject to confirmation we propose that SMg exposure might be useful for recovery of stroke patients.

  4. Changes in Peak Oxygen Uptake and Plasma Volume in Fit and Unfit Subjects Following Exposure to a Simulation of Microgravity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Convertino, Victor

    1997-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that the magnitude of reduction in plasma volume and work capacity following exposure to simulated microgravity is dependent on the initial level of aerobic fitness, peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak...

  5. Effects of a simulated microgravity model on cell structure and function in rat testis and epididymis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Jill A.; Hall, Joseph C.; O'Brien, Ami; Ball, Richard

    1992-01-01

    The effect of simulated microgravity on the structure and function of the testis and epididymis cells was investigated in rats subjected to 7 days of tail suspension. Results of a histological examination revealed presence of disorganized seminiferous tubules and accumulation of large multinucleated cells and spermatids in the lumen of the epididymis. In addition, decreases in the content of testis protein and in testosterone levels in the testis, the interstitial fluid, and the epididymis were observed.

  6. Transcriptional profiling of protein expression related genes of Pichia pastoris under simulated microgravity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Qi

    Full Text Available The physiological responses and transcription profiling of Pichia pastoris GS115 to simulated microgravity (SMG were substantially changed compared with normal gravity (NG control. We previously reported that the recombinant P. pastoris grew faster under SMG than NG during methanol induction phase and the efficiencies of recombinant enzyme production and secretion were enhanced under SMG, which was considered as the consequence of changed transcriptional levels of some key genes. In this work, transcriptiome profiling of P. pastoris cultured under SMG and NG conditions at exponential and stationary phases were determined using next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies. Four categories of 141 genes function as methanol utilization, protein chaperone, RNA polymerase and protein transportation or secretion classified according to Gene Ontology (GO were chosen to be analyzed on the basis of NGS results. And 80 significantly changed genes were weighted and estimated by Cluster 3.0. It was found that most genes of methanol metabolism (85% of 20 genes and protein transportation or secretion (82.2% of 45 genes were significantly up-regulated under SMG. Furthermore the quantity and fold change of up-regulated genes in exponential phase of each category were higher than those of stationary phase. The results indicate that the up-regulated genes of methanol metabolism and protein transportation or secretion mainly contribute to enhanced production and secretion of the recombinant protein under SMG.

  7. Self-rotations in simulated microgravity: performance effects of strategy training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirling, Leia; Newman, Dava; Willcox, Karen

    2009-01-01

    This research studies reorientation methodologies in a simulated microgravity environment using an experimental framework to reduce astronaut adaptation time and provide for a safety countermeasure during extravehicular activity. There were 20 subjects (10 men, 10 women, mean age of 23.6 +/- 3.5) who were divided into 2 groups, fully trained and minimally trained, which determined the amount of motion strategy training received. Subjects performed a total of 48 rotations about their pitch, roll, and yaw axes in a suspension system that simulated microgravity. In each trial subjects either rotated 90 degrees in pitch, 90 degrees in roll, or 180 degrees in yaw. Experimental measures include subject coordination, performance time, cognitive workload assessments, and qualitative motion control strategies. Subjects in the fully trained group had better initial performance with respect to performance time and workload scores for the pitch and yaw rotations. Further, trained subjects reached a steady-state performance time in fewer trials than those with minimal training. The subjects with minimal training tended to use motions that were common in an Earth environment since no technique was provided. For roll rotations they developed motions that would have led to significant off-axis (pitch and yaw) rotations in a true microgravity environment. We have shown that certain body axes are easier to rotate about than others and that fully trained subjects had an easier time performing the body rotations than the minimally trained subjects. This study has provided the groundwork for the development of an astronaut motion-control training program.

  8. Space headache on Earth: head-down-tilted bed rest studies simulating outer-space microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oosterhout, W P J; Terwindt, G M; Vein, A A; Ferrari, M D

    2015-04-01

    Headache is a common symptom during space travel, both isolated and as part of space motion syndrome. Head-down-tilted bed rest (HDTBR) studies are used to simulate outer space microgravity on Earth, and allow countermeasure interventions such as artificial gravity and training protocols, aimed at restoring microgravity-induced physiological changes. The objectives of this article are to assess headache incidence and characteristics during HDTBR, and to evaluate the effects of countermeasures. In a randomized cross-over design by the European Space Agency (ESA), 22 healthy male subjects, without primary headache history, underwent three periods of -6-degree HDTBR. In two of these episodes countermeasure protocols were added, with either centrifugation or aerobic exercise training protocols. Headache occurrence and characteristics were daily assessed using a specially designed questionnaire. In total 14/22 (63.6%) subjects reported a headache during ≥1 of the three HDTBR periods, in 12/14 (85.7%) non-specific, and two of 14 (14.4%) migraine. The occurrence of headache did not differ between HDTBR with and without countermeasures: 12/22 (54.5%) subjects vs. eight of 22 (36.4%) subjects; p = 0.20; 13/109 (11.9%) headache days vs. 36/213 (16.9%) headache days; p = 0.24). During countermeasures headaches were, however, more often mild (p = 0.03) and had fewer associated symptoms (p = 0.008). Simulated microgravity during HDTBR induces headache episodes, mostly on the first day. Countermeasures are useful in reducing headache severity and associated symptoms. Reversible, microgravity-induced cephalic fluid shift may cause headache, also on Earth. HDTBR can be used to study space headache on Earth. © International Headache Society 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. T cell resistance to activation by dendritic cells requires long-term culture in simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Jillian H.; Stein, Rachel; Randolph, Brad; Molina, Emily; Arnold, Jennifer P.; Gregg, Randal K.

    2017-11-01

    Immune impairment mediated by microgravity threatens the success of space exploration requiring long-duration spaceflight. The cells of most concern, T lymphocytes, coordinate the host response against microbial and cancerous challenges leading to elimination and long-term protection. T cells are activated upon recognition of specific microbial peptides bound on the surface of antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DC). Subsequently, this engagement results in T cell proliferation and differentiation into effector T cells driven by autocrine interleukin-2 (IL-2) and other cytokines. Finally, the effector T cells acquire the weaponry needed to destroy microbial invaders and tumors. Studies conducted on T cells during spaceflight, or using Earth-based culture systems, have shown reduced production of cytokines, proliferation and effector functions as compared to controls. This may account for the cases of viral reactivation events and opportunistic infections associated with astronauts of numerous missions. This work has largely been based upon the outcome of T cell activation by stimulatory factors that target select T cell signaling pathways rather than the complex, signaling events related to the natural process of antigen presentation by DC. This study tested the response of an ovalbumin peptide-specific T cell line, OT-II TCH, to activation by DC when the T cells were cultured 24-120 h in a simulated microgravity (SMG) environment generated by a rotary cell culture system. Following 72 h culture of T cells in SMG (SMG-T) or control static (Static-T) conditions, IL-2 production by the T cells was reduced in SMG-T cells compared to Static-T cells upon stimulation by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin. However, when the SMG-T cells were stimulated with DC and peptide, IL-2 was significantly increased compared to Static-T cells. Such enhanced IL-2 production by SMG-T cells peaked at 72 h SMG culture time and decreased thereafter. When

  10. T cell resistance to activation by dendritic cells requires long-term culture in simulated microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Jillian H; Stein, Rachel; Randolph, Brad; Molina, Emily; Arnold, Jennifer P; Gregg, Randal K

    2017-11-01

    Immune impairment mediated by microgravity threatens the success of space exploration requiring long-duration spaceflight. The cells of most concern, T lymphocytes, coordinate the host response against microbial and cancerous challenges leading to elimination and long-term protection. T cells are activated upon recognition of specific microbial peptides bound on the surface of antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DC). Subsequently, this engagement results in T cell proliferation and differentiation into effector T cells driven by autocrine interleukin-2 (IL-2) and other cytokines. Finally, the effector T cells acquire the weaponry needed to destroy microbial invaders and tumors. Studies conducted on T cells during spaceflight, or using Earth-based culture systems, have shown reduced production of cytokines, proliferation and effector functions as compared to controls. This may account for the cases of viral reactivation events and opportunistic infections associated with astronauts of numerous missions. This work has largely been based upon the outcome of T cell activation by stimulatory factors that target select T cell signaling pathways rather than the complex, signaling events related to the natural process of antigen presentation by DC. This study tested the response of an ovalbumin peptide-specific T cell line, OT-II TCH, to activation by DC when the T cells were cultured 24-120 h in a simulated microgravity (SMG) environment generated by a rotary cell culture system. Following 72 h culture of T cells in SMG (SMG-T) or control static (Static-T) conditions, IL-2 production by the T cells was reduced in SMG-T cells compared to Static-T cells upon stimulation by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin. However, when the SMG-T cells were stimulated with DC and peptide, IL-2 was significantly increased compared to Static-T cells. Such enhanced IL-2 production by SMG-T cells peaked at 72 h SMG culture time and decreased thereafter

  11. Physical Forces Modulate Oxidative Status and Stress Defense Meditated Metabolic Adaptation of Yeast Colonies: Spaceflight and Microgravity Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Timothy G.; Allen, Patricia L.; Gunter, Margaret A.; Chiang, Jennifer; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Birdsall, Holly H.

    2018-05-01

    Baker's yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae) has broad genetic homology to human cells. Although typically grown as 1-2mm diameter colonies under certain conditions yeast can form very large (10 + mm in diameter) or `giant' colonies on agar. Giant yeast colonies have been used to study diverse biomedical processes such as cell survival, aging, and the response to cancer pharmacogenomics. Such colonies evolve dynamically into complex stratified structures that respond differentially to environmental cues. Ammonia production, gravity driven ammonia convection, and shear defense responses are key differentiation signals for cell death and reactive oxygen system pathways in these colonies. The response to these signals can be modulated by experimental interventions such as agar composition, gene deletion and application of pharmaceuticals. In this study we used physical factors including colony rotation and microgravity to modify ammonia convection and shear stress as environmental cues and observed differences in the responses of both ammonia dependent and stress response dependent pathways We found that the effects of random positioning are distinct from rotation. Furthermore, both true and simulated microgravity exacerbated both cellular redox responses and apoptosis. These changes were largely shear-response dependent but each model had a unique response signature as measured by shear stress genes and the promoter set which regulates them These physical techniques permitted a graded manipulation of both convection and ammonia signaling and are primed to substantially contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of drug action, cell aging, and colony differentiation.

  12. Physical Forces Modulate Oxidative Status and Stress Defense Meditated Metabolic Adaptation of Yeast Colonies: Spaceflight and Microgravity Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Timothy G.; Allen, Patricia L.; Gunter, Margaret A.; Chiang, Jennifer; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Birdsall, Holly H.

    2017-12-01

    Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) has broad genetic homology to human cells. Although typically grown as 1-2mm diameter colonies under certain conditions yeast can form very large (10 + mm in diameter) or `giant' colonies on agar. Giant yeast colonies have been used to study diverse biomedical processes such as cell survival, aging, and the response to cancer pharmacogenomics. Such colonies evolve dynamically into complex stratified structures that respond differentially to environmental cues. Ammonia production, gravity driven ammonia convection, and shear defense responses are key differentiation signals for cell death and reactive oxygen system pathways in these colonies. The response to these signals can be modulated by experimental interventions such as agar composition, gene deletion and application of pharmaceuticals. In this study we used physical factors including colony rotation and microgravity to modify ammonia convection and shear stress as environmental cues and observed differences in the responses of both ammonia dependent and stress response dependent pathways We found that the effects of random positioning are distinct from rotation. Furthermore, both true and simulated microgravity exacerbated both cellular redox responses and apoptosis. These changes were largely shear-response dependent but each model had a unique response signature as measured by shear stress genes and the promoter set which regulates them These physical techniques permitted a graded manipulation of both convection and ammonia signaling and are primed to substantially contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of drug action, cell aging, and colony differentiation.

  13. Simulated microgravity impacts the plant plasmalemma lipid bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedukha, Olena; Berkovich, Yuliy A.; Vorobyeva, Tamara; Grakhov, Volodimir; Klimenko, Elena; Zhupanov, Ivan; Jadko, Sergiy

    Biological membranes, especially the plasmalemma, and their properties and functions can be considered one of the most sensitive indicators of gravity interaction or alteration of gravity, respectively. Studies on the molecular basis of cellular signal perception and transduction are very important in order to understand signal responses at the cellular and organism level. The plasmalemma lipid bilayer is the boundary between the cell internal and external environment and mediates communication between them. Therefore, we studied the content and composition of lipids, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, sterols, and microviscosity in the plasmalemma isolated from pea seedling roots and epicotyls grown in the stationary conditions and under slow horizontal clinorotation. In addition, lipid peroxidation intensity of intact roots was also identified. The plasmalemma fraction was isolated by the two-phase aquatic-polymer system optimized for pea using a centrifuge Optima L-90K. Lipid bilayer components were determined by using highly effective liquid chromatography with a system Angilent 1100 (Germany). Spontaneous chemiluminescence intensity was measured with a chemiluminometer ChLMTS-01. The obtained data showed that plasmalemma investigated parameters are sensitive to clinorotation, namely: increasing or decreasing the different lipids content, among which, phospho- and glycolipids were dominated, as well as changes in the content of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids and sterols. A degree of plasmalemma sensitivity to clinorotation was higher for the root plasmalemma than epicocotyl ones. This distinguish may be naturally explained by the differences in the structure, cell types, growth, and specific functions of a root and an epicotyl, those are the most complicated in roots. An index of unsaturation under clinorotation was similar to that in the stationary conditions as a result of the certain balance between changes in the content of saturated and

  14. Altered regional homogeneity with short-term simulated microgravity and its relationship with changed performance in mental transformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liao

    Full Text Available In order to further the insight into the explanation of changed performance in mental transformation under microgravity, we discuss the change of performance in mental transformation and its relationship with altered regional homogeneity (ReHo in resting-state brain by using simulated weightlessness model. Twelve male subjects with age between 24 and 31 received resting-state fMRI scan and mental transformation test both in normal condition and immediately after 72 hours -6° head down tilt (HDT. A paired sample t-test was used to test the difference of behavior performance and brain activity between these two conditions. Compare with normal condition, subjects showed a changed performance in mental transformation with short term simulated microgravity and appeared to be falling. Meanwhile, decreased ReHo were found in right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG and left inferior parietal lobule (IPL after 72 hours -6° HDT, while increased ReHo were found in bilateral medial frontal gyrus (MFG and left superior frontal gyrus (SFG (P<0.05, corrected. Particularly, there was a significant correlation between ReHo values in left IPL and velocity index of mental transformation. Our findings indicate that gravity change may disrupt the function of right IFG and left IPL in the resting-state, among of which functional change in left IPL may contribute to changed abilities of mental transformation. In addition, the enhanced activity of the bilateral MFG and decreased activity of right IFG found in the current study maybe reflect a complementation effect on inhibitory control process.

  15. Force field inside the void in complex plasmas under microgravity conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kretschmer, M.; Khrapak, S.A.; Zhdanov, S.K.; Thomas, H.M.; Morfill, G.E.; Fortov, V.E.; Lipaev, A.M.; Molotkov, V.I.; Ivanov, A.I.; Turin, M.V.

    2005-01-01

    Observations of complex plasmas under microgravity conditions onboard the International Space Station performed with the Plasma-Kristall experiment-Nefedov facility are reported. A weak instability of the boundary between the central void (region free of microparticles) and the microparticle cloud is observed at low gas pressures. The instability leads to periodic injections of a relatively small number of particles into the void region (by analogy this effect is called the 'trampoline effect'). The trajectories of injected particles are analyzed providing information on the force field inside the void. The experimental results are compared with theory which assumes that the most important forces inside the void are the electric and the ion drag forces. Good agreement is found clearly indicating that under conditions investigated the void formation is caused by the ion drag force

  16. Growing tissues in real and simulated microgravity: new methods for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Daniela; Wehland, Markus; Pietsch, Jessica; Aleshcheva, Ganna; Wise, Petra; van Loon, Jack; Ulbrich, Claudia; Magnusson, Nils E; Infanger, Manfred; Bauer, Johann

    2014-12-01

    Tissue engineering in simulated (s-) and real microgravity (r-μg) is currently a topic in Space medicine contributing to biomedical sciences and their applications on Earth. The principal aim of this review is to highlight the advances and accomplishments in the field of tissue engineering that could be achieved by culturing cells in Space or by devices created to simulate microgravity on Earth. Understanding the biology of three-dimensional (3D) multicellular structures is very important for a more complete appreciation of in vivo tissue function and advancing in vitro tissue engineering efforts. Various cells exposed to r-μg in Space or to s-μg created by a random positioning machine, a 2D-clinostat, or a rotating wall vessel bioreactor grew in the form of 3D tissues. Hence, these methods represent a new strategy for tissue engineering of a variety of tissues, such as regenerated cartilage, artificial vessel constructs, and other organ tissues as well as multicellular cancer spheroids. These aggregates are used to study molecular mechanisms involved in angiogenesis, cancer development, and biology and for pharmacological testing of, for example, chemotherapeutic drugs or inhibitors of neoangiogenesis. Moreover, they are useful for studying multicellular responses in toxicology and radiation biology, or for performing coculture experiments. The future will show whether these tissue-engineered constructs can be used for medical transplantations. Unveiling the mechanisms of microgravity-dependent molecular and cellular changes is an up-to-date requirement for improving Space medicine and developing new treatment strategies that can be translated to in vivo models while reducing the use of laboratory animals.

  17. The current state of bone loss research: data from spaceflight and microgravity simulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraja, Mamta Patel; Risin, Diana

    2013-05-01

    Bone loss is a well documented phenomenon occurring in humans both in short- and in long-term spaceflights. This phenomenon can be also reproduced on the ground in human and animals and also modeled in cell-based analogs. Since space flights are infrequent and expensive to study the biomedical effects of microgravity on the human body, much of the known pathology of bone loss comes from experimental studies. The most commonly used in vitro simulators of microgravity are clinostats while in vivo simulators include the bed rest studies in humans and hindlimb unloading experiments in animals. Despite the numerous reports that have documented bone loss in wide ranges in multiple crew members, the pathology remains a key concern and development of effective countermeasures is still a major task. Thus far, the offered modalities have not shown much success in preventing or alleviating bone loss in astronauts and cosmonauts. The objective of this review is to capture the most recent research on bone loss from spaceflights, bed rest and hindlimb unloading, and in vitro studies utilizing cellular models in clinostats. Additionally, this review offers projections on where the research has to focus to ensure the most rapid development of effective countermeasures. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. CAFE simulation of columnar-to-equiaxed transition in Al-7wt%Si alloys directionally solidified under microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D. R.; Mangelinck-Noël, N.; Gandin, Ch-A.; Zimmermann, G.; Sturz, L.; Nguyen Thi, H.; Billia, B.

    2016-03-01

    A two-dimensional multi-scale cellular automaton - finite element (CAFE) model is used to simulate grain structure evolution and microsegregation formation during solidification of refined Al-7wt%Si alloys under microgravity. The CAFE simulations are first qualitatively compared with the benchmark experimental data under microgravity. Qualitative agreement is obtained for the position of columnar to equiaxed transition (CET) and the CET transition mode (sharp or progressive). Further comparisons of the distributions of grain elongation factor and equivalent diameter are conducted and reveal a fair quantitative agreement.

  19. CAFE simulation of columnar-to-equiaxed transition in Al-7wt%Si alloys directionally solidified under microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, D R; Mangelinck-Noël, N; Thi, H Nguyen; Billia, B; Gandin, Ch-A; Zimmermann, G; Sturz, L

    2016-01-01

    A two-dimensional multi-scale cellular automaton - finite element (CAFE) model is used to simulate grain structure evolution and microsegregation formation during solidification of refined Al-7wt%Si alloys under microgravity. The CAFE simulations are first qualitatively compared with the benchmark experimental data under microgravity. Qualitative agreement is obtained for the position of columnar to equiaxed transition (CET) and the CET transition mode (sharp or progressive). Further comparisons of the distributions of grain elongation factor and equivalent diameter are conducted and reveal a fair quantitative agreement. (paper)

  20. Storage of a lithium-ion secondary battery under micro-gravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sone, Yoshitsugu; Ooto, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Eguro, Takashi; Sakai, Shigeru; Yoshida, Teiji; Takahashi, Keiji; Uno, Masatoshi; Hirose, Kazuyuki; Tajima, Michio; Kawaguchi, Jun'ichiro

    'HAYABUSA' is a Japanese inter-planetary spacecraft built for the exploration of an asteroid named 'ITOKAWA.' The spacecraft is powered by a 13.2 Ah lithium-ion secondary battery. To realize maximum performance of the battery for long flight operation, the state-of-charge (SOC) of the battery was maintained at ca. 65% during storage, in case it is required for a loss of attitude control. The capacity of the battery was measured during flight operations. Along with the operation in orbit, a ground-test battery was discharged, and both results showed a good agreement. This result confirmed that the performance of the lithium-ion secondary battery stored under micro-gravity conditions is predictable using a ground-test battery.

  1. Spaceflight and Simulated Microgravity Increases Virulence of the Known Bacterial Pathogen S. Marcescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens-Grisham, Rachel Andrea; Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Wade, William

    2016-01-01

    After spaceflight, the number of immune cells is reduced in humans. In other research models, including Drosophila, not only is there a reduction in the number of plasmatocytes, but expression of immune-related genes is also changed after spaceflight. These observations suggest that the immune system is compromised after exposure to microgravity. It has also been reported that there is a change in virulence of some bacterial pathogens after spaceflight. We recently observed that samples of gram-negative S. marcescens retrieved from spaceflight is more virulent than ground controls, as determined by reduced survival and increased bacterial growth in the host. We were able to repeat this finding of increased virulence after exposure to simulated microgravity using the rotating wall vessel, a ground based analog to microgravity. With the ground and spaceflight samples, we looked at involvement of the Toll and Imd pathways in the Drosophila host in fighting infection by ground and spaceflight samples. We observed that Imd-pathway mutants were more susceptible to infection by the ground bacterial samples, which aligns with the known role of this pathway in fighting infections by gram-negative bacteria. When the Imd-pathway mutants were infected with the spaceflight sample, however, they exhibited the same susceptibility as seen with the ground control bacteria. Interestingly, all mutant flies show the same susceptibility to the spaceflight bacterial sample as do wild type flies. This suggests that neither humoral immunity pathway is effectively able to counter the increased pathogenicity of the space-flown S. marcescens bacteria.

  2. Trampoline effect and the force field inside the void in complex plasma under microgravity conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrapak, S. A.; Kretschmer, M.; Zhdanov, S. K.; Thomas, H. M.; MOrfill, G. e.; Fortov, V. E.; Lipaev, A. M.; Molotkov, V. I.; Ivanov, A. I.; Turin, M. V.

    2005-01-01

    The PKE-Nefedov facility onboard the International Space Station (ISS),operational since March, 2'001, has enabled the study of complex (dusty) plasmas under microgravity conditions. A complex plasma is generated by introducing micron sized grains in a capacitively coupled rf discharge. The grains form a cloud inside the bulk of the discharge and can be easily visualized with the help of standard tools-laser illumination and video cameras. In most of the experiments under microgravity conditions the central region of the discharge is free of grains a so called void is formed. Due to recent theoretical advances, showing that the ion drag force can be more than a factor of ten larger than had traditionally been believed, void formation is now through to be a consequence of this (enhanced) interaction. The way this process works is the following: the ions drifting from the central region of a discharge to its walls and electrodes transfer their momentum to the grains pushing them out of the center. However, no direct experimental results on the origin of the void formation were reported so far. In this paper we report new results on the observation of a weak instability of the void-complex plasma interface observed at a relatively low gas pressure (p=12Pa). The instability leads to periodic injections of a relatively small number of particles into the void region (by analogy this effect is called trampoline effect), The trajectories of injected particles are analyzed providing information on the force field and potential energy distribution inside the void. For the relatively low neutral gas pressure used in the experiment a direct comparison with theory involving a model of the ion drag force in the collisionless regime is possible. Such a comparison yields good agreement, implying that we have observed the first experimental confirmation of the ion drag mechanism as being responsible for the void formation. (Author)

  3. Trampoline effect and the force field inside the void in complex plasma under microgravity conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khrapak, S. A.; Kretschmer, M.; Zhdanov, S. K.; Thomas, H. M.; MOrfill, G. e.; Fortov, V. E.; Lipaev, A. M.; Molotkov, V. I.; Ivanov, A. I.; Turin, M. V.

    2005-07-01

    The PKE-Nefedov facility onboard the International Space Station (ISS),operational since March, 2'001, has enabled the study of complex (dusty) plasmas under microgravity conditions. A complex plasma is generated by introducing micron sized grains in a capacitively coupled rf discharge. The grains form a cloud inside the bulk of the discharge and can be easily visualized with the help of standard tools-laser illumination and video cameras. In most of the experiments under microgravity conditions the central region of the discharge is free of grains a so called void is formed. Due to recent theoretical advances, showing that the ion drag force can be more than a factor of ten larger than had traditionally been believed, void formation is now through to be a consequence of this (enhanced) interaction. The way this process works is the following: the ions drifting from the central region of a discharge to its walls and electrodes transfer their momentum to the grains pushing them out of the center. However, no direct experimental results on the origin of the void formation were reported so far. In this paper we report new results on the observation of a weak instability of the void-complex plasma interface observed at a relatively low gas pressure (p=12Pa). The instability leads to periodic injections of a relatively small number of particles into the void region (by analogy this effect is called trampoline effect), The trajectories of injected particles are analyzed providing information on the force field and potential energy distribution inside the void. For the relatively low neutral gas pressure used in the experiment a direct comparison with theory involving a model of the ion drag force in the collisionless regime is possible. Such a comparison yields good agreement, implying that we have observed the first experimental confirmation of the ion drag mechanism as being responsible for the void formation. (Author)

  4. Impact of simulated microgravity and caloric restriction on autonomic nervous system function in adipose tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschmann, Michael; Adams, Frauke; Tank, Jens; Schaller, Karin; Boese, Andrea; Heer, Martina; Klause, Susanne; Luft, Friedrich C.; Jordan, Jens

    2005-08-01

    Long term immobilization and reduced food intake is often associated with development of orthostatic intolerance. Blocking the norepinephrine transporter (NET) can also mimic symptoms of orthostatic intolerance. Therefore, we hypothesized that simulated microgravity (14 days bed rest at head down tilt, BR) can cause changes in postganglionic NET function and adrenoreceptor (AR) sensitivity and these changes can be aggravated by hypocaloric food intake. For testing, two microdialysis probes were inserted into subcutaneous adipose tissue of eight young healthy men at day 1 and 14 of BR and perfused with Ringer's solution and increasing doses of tyramine and isoproterenol in order to simulate NET blockade and stimulate AR, respectively. At day 14 of eucaloric diet and BR, isoproterenol induced lipolysis was greater, whereas at day 14 of hypocaloric diet and BR, tyramine induced lipolysis was greater when compared to day 1. Therefore, the nutritional state affects NET function and AR sensitivity differently during BR.

  5. Microgravity simulation activates Cdc42 via Rap1GDS1 to promote vascular branch morphogenesis during vasculogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouli Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Gravity plays an important role in normal tissue maintenance. The ability of stem cells to repair tissue loss in space through regeneration and differentiation remains largely unknown. To investigate the impact of microgravity on blood vessel formation from pluripotent stem cells, we employed the embryoid body (EB model for vasculogenesis and simulated microgravity by clinorotation. We first differentiated mouse embryonic stem cells into cystic EBs containing two germ layers and then analyzed vessel formation under clinorotation. We observed that endothelial cell differentiation was slightly reduced under clinorotation, whereas vascular branch morphogenesis was markedly enhanced. EB-derived endothelial cells migrated faster, displayed multiple cellular processes, and had higher Cdc42 and Rac1 activity when subjected to clinorotation. Genetic analysis and rescue experiments demonstrated that Cdc42 but not Rac1 is required for microgravity-induced vascular branch morphogenesis. Furthermore, affinity pull-down assay and mass spectrometry identified Rap1GDS1 to be a Cdc42 guanine nucleotide exchange factor, which was upregulated by clinorotation. shRNA-mediated knockdown of Rap1GDS1 selectively suppressed Cdc42 activation and inhibited both baseline and microgravity-induced vasculogenesis. This was rescued by ectopic expression of constitutively active Cdc42. Taken together, these results support the notion that simulated microgravity activates Cdc42 via Rap1GDS1 to promote vascular branch morphogenesis.

  6. Convection Effects During Bulk Transparent Alloy Solidification in DECLIC-DSI and Phase-Field Simulations in Diffusive Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, F. L.; Song, Y.; Pereda, J.; Billia, B.; Tourret, D.; Debierre, J.-M.; Trivedi, R.; Karma, A.; Bergeon, N.

    2017-08-01

    To study the dynamical formation and evolution of cellular and dendritic arrays under diffusive growth conditions, three-dimensional (3D) directional solidification experiments were conducted in microgravity on a model transparent alloy onboard the International Space Station using the Directional Solidification Insert in the DEvice for the study of Critical LIquids and Crystallization. Selected experiments were repeated on Earth under gravity-driven fluid flow to evidence convection effects. Both radial and axial macrosegregation resulting from convection are observed in ground experiments, and primary spacings measured on Earth and microgravity experiments are noticeably different. The microgravity experiments provide unique benchmark data for numerical simulations of spatially extended pattern formation under diffusive growth conditions. The results of 3D phase-field simulations highlight the importance of accurately modeling thermal conditions that strongly influence the front recoil of the interface and the selection of the primary spacing. The modeling predictions are in good quantitative agreements with the microgravity experiments.

  7. Transfection of the IHH gene into rabbit BMSCs in a simulated microgravity environment promotes chondrogenic differentiation and inhibits cartilage aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng-Cheng; Liu, Kuan; Liu, Jun-Feng; Xia, Kuo; Chen, Li-Yang; Wu, Xing

    2016-09-27

    The effect of overexpressing the Indian hedgehog (IHH) gene on the chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) was investigated in a simulated microgravity environment. An adenovirus plasmid encoding the rabbit IHH gene was constructed in vitro and transfected into rabbit BMSCs. Two large groups were used: conventional cell culture and induction model group and simulated microgravity environment group. Each large group was further divided into blank control group, GFP transfection group, and IHH transfection group. During differentiation induction, the expression levels of cartilage-related and cartilage hypertrophy-related genes and proteins in each group were determined. In the conventional model, the IHH transfection group expressed high levels of cartilage-related factors (Coll2 and ANCN) at the early stage of differentiation induction and expressed high levels of cartilage hypertrophy-related factors (Coll10, annexin 5, and ALP) at the late stage. Under the simulated microgravity environment, the IHH transfection group expressed high levels of cartilage-related factors and low levels of cartilage hypertrophy-related factors at all stages of differentiation induction. Under the simulated microgravity environment, transfection of the IHH gene into BMSCs effectively promoted the generation of cartilage and inhibited cartilage aging and osteogenesis. Therefore, this technique is suitable for cartilage tissue engineering.

  8. Influence of oxygen in the cultivation of human mesenchymal stem cells in simulated microgravity: an explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versari, S.; Klein-Nulend, J.; van Loon, J.; Bradamante, S.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that human Adipose Tissue-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (AT-MSCs) cultured in simulated microgravity (sim-μg) in standard laboratory incubators alter their proliferation and differentiation. Recent studies on the stem cell (SC) niches and the influence of oxygen on SC

  9. Influence of Oxygen in the Cultivation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Simulated Microgravity: An Explorative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versari, S.; Klein-Nulend, J.; van Loon, J.J.W.A.; Bradamante, S.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that human Adipose Tissue-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (AT-MSCs) cultured in simulated microgravity (sim-μg) in standard laboratory incubators alter their proliferation and differentiation. Recent studies on the stem cell (SC) niches and the influence of oxygen on SC

  10. XRMON-GF: A novel facility for solidification of metallic alloys with in situ and time-resolved X-ray radiographic characterization in microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Thi, H.; Reinhart, G.; Salloum Abou Jaoude, G.; Mathiesen, R. H.; Zimmermann, G.; Houltz, Y.; Voss, D.; Verga, A.; Browne, D. J.; Murphy, A. G.

    2013-07-01

    As most of the phenomena involved during the growth of metallic alloys from the melt are dynamic, in situ and time-resolved X-ray imaging should be retained as the method of choice for investigating the solidification front evolution. On Earth, the gravity force is the major source of various disturbing effects (natural convection, buoyancy/sedimentation, and hydrostatic pressure) which can significantly modify or mask certain physical mechanisms. Therefore solidification under microgravity is an efficient way to eliminate such perturbations to provide unique benchmark data for the validation of models and numerical simulations. Up to now, in situ observation during microgravity solidification experiments were limited to the investigations on transparent organic alloys, using optical methods. On the other hand, in situ observation on metallic alloys generally required synchrotron facilities. This paper reports on a novel facility we have designed and developed to investigate directional solidification on metallic alloys in microgravity conditions with in situ X-ray radiography observation. The facility consists of a Bridgman furnace and an X-ray radiography device specifically devoted to the study of Al-based alloys. An unprecedented experiment was recently performed on board a sounding rocket, with a 6 min period of microgravity. Radiographs were successfully recorded during the entire experiment including the melting and solidification phases of the sample, with a Field-of-View of about 5 mm×5 mm, a spatial resolution of about 4 µm and a frequency of 2 frames per second. Some preliminary results are presented on the solidification of the Al-20 wt% Cu sample, which validate the apparatus and confirm the potential of in situ X-ray characterization for the investigation of dynamical phenomena in materials processing, and particularly for the studying of metallic alloys solidification.

  11. Glucocorticoid: A potential role in microgravity-induced bone loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiancheng; Yang, Zhouqi; Li, Wenbin; Xue, Yanru; Xu, Huiyun; Li, Jingbao; Shang, Peng

    2017-11-01

    Exposure of animals and humans to conditions of microgravity, including actual spaceflight and simulated microgravity, results in numerous negative alterations to bone structure and mechanical properties. Although there are abundant researches on bone loss in microgravity, the explicit mechanism is not completely understood. At present, it is widely accepted that the absence of mechanical stimulus plays a predominant role in bone homeostasis disorders in conditions of weightlessness. However, aside from mechanical unloading, nonmechanical factors such as various hormones, cytokines, dietary nutrition, etc. are important as well in microgravity induced bone loss. The stress-induced increase in endogenous glucocorticoid (GC) levels is inevitable in microgravity environments. Moreover, it is well known that GCs have a detrimental effect to bone health at excess concentrations. Therefore, GC plays a potential role in microgravity-induced bone loss. This review summarizeds several studies and their prospective solutions to this hypothesis.

  12. Effect of Simulated Microgravity on the Activity of Regulatory Enzymes of Glycolysis and Gluconeogenesis in Mice Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Joaquin; Periyakaruppan, Adaikkappan; Sarkar, Shubhashish; Ramesh, Govindarajan T.; Sharma, S. Chidananda

    2014-02-01

    Gravity supports all the life activities present on earth. Microgravity environments have effect on the biological functions and physiological status of an individual. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of simulated microgravity on important regulatory enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in liver using HLS mice model. Following hind limb unloading of mice for 11 days the animal's average body weights were found to be not different, while the liver weights were decreased and found to be significantly different ( p gluconeogenesis in liver and reciprocally regulated.

  13. Simulated Microgravity Regulates Gene Transcript Profiles of 2T3 Preosteoblasts: Comparison of the Random Positioning Machine and the Rotating Wall Vessel Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mamta J.; Liu, Wenbin; Sykes, Michelle C.; Ward, Nancy E.; Risin, Semyon A.; Risin, Diana; Hanjoong, Jo

    2007-01-01

    Microgravity of spaceflight induces bone loss due in part to decreased bone formation by osteoblasts. We have previously examined the microgravity-induced changes in gene expression profiles in 2T3 preosteoblasts using the Random Positioning Machine (RPM) to simulate microgravity conditions. Here, we hypothesized that exposure of preosteoblasts to an independent microgravity simulator, the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV), induces similar changes in differentiation and gene transcript profiles, resulting in a more confined list of gravi-sensitive genes that may play a role in bone formation. In comparison to static 1g controls, exposure of 2T3 cells to RWV for 3 days inhibited alkaline phosphatase activity, a marker of differentiation, and downregulated 61 genes and upregulated 45 genes by more than two-fold as shown by microarray analysis. The microarray results were confirmed with real time PCR for downregulated genes osteomodulin, bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4), runx2, and parathyroid hormone receptor 1. Western blot analysis validated the expression of three downregulated genes, BMP4, peroxiredoxin IV, and osteoglycin, and one upregulated gene peroxiredoxin I. Comparison of the microarrays from the RPM and the RWV studies identified 14 gravi-sensitive genes that changed in the same direction in both systems. Further comparison of our results to a published database showing gene transcript profiles of mechanically loaded mouse tibiae revealed 16 genes upregulated by the loading that were shown to be downregulated by RWV and RPM. These mechanosensitive genes identified by the comparative studies may provide novel insights into understanding the mechanisms regulating bone formation and potential targets of countermeasure against decreased bone formation both in astronauts and in general patients with musculoskeletal disorders.

  14. Experiments on Nitrogen Oxide Production of Droplet Arrays Burning under Microgravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moesl, Klaus; Sattelmayer, Thomas; Kikuchi, Masao; Yamamoto, Shin; Yoda, Shinichi

    The optimization of the combustion process is top priority in current aero-engine and aircraft development, particularly from the perspectives of high efficiency, minimized fuel consumption, and a sustainable exhaust gas production. Aero-engines are exclusively liquid-fueled with a strong correlation between the combustion temperature and the emissions of nitric oxide (NOX ). Due to safety concerns, the progress in NOX reduction has been much slower than in stationary gas turbines. In the past, the mixing intensity in the primary zone of aero-engine combustors was improved and air staging implemented. An important question for future aero-engine combustors, consequently, is how partial vaporization influences the NOX emissions of spray flames? In order to address this question, the combustion of partially vaporized, linear droplet arrays was studied experimentally under microgravity conditions. The influence of fuel pre-vaporization on the NOX emissions was assessed in a wide range. The experiments were performed in a drop tower and a sounding rocket campaign. The microgravity environment provided ideal experiment conditions without the disturbing ef-fect of natural convection. This allowed the study of the interacting phenomena of multi-phase flow, thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. This way the understanding of the physical and chemical processes related to droplet and spray combustion could be improved. The Bremen drop tower (ZARM) was utilized for the precursor campaign in July 2008, which was com-prised of 30 drops. The sounding rocket experiments, which totaled a microgravity duration of 6 minutes, were finally performed on the flight of TEXUS-46 in November 2009. On both campaigns the "Japanese Combustion Module" (JCM) was used. It is a cooperative experi-ment on droplet array combustion between the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and ESA's (European Space Agency) research team, working on the combustion properties of partially premixed sprays

  15. Effects of 12 days exposure to simulated microgravity on central circulatory hemodynamics in the rhesus monkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, V. A.; Koenig, S. C.; Krotov, V. P.; Fanton, J. W.; Korolkov, V. I.; Trambovetsky, E. V.; Ewert, D. L.; Truzhennikov, A.; Latham, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    Central circulatory hemodynamic responses were measured before and during the initial 9 days of a 12-day 10 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) in 4 flight-sized juvenile rhesus monkeys who were surgically instrumented with a variety of intrathoracic catheters and blood flow sensors to assess the effects of simulated microgravity on central circulatory hemodynamics. Each subject underwent measurements of aortic and left ventricular pressures, and aortic flow before and during HDT as well as during a passive head-up postural test before and after HDT. Heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output, and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure were measured, and dP/dt and left ventricular elastance was calculated from hemodynamic measurements. The postural test consisted of 5 min of supine baseline control followed by 5 minutes of 90 degrees upright tilt (HUT). Heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output, and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure showed no consistent alterations during HDT. Left ventricular elastance was reduced in all animals throughout HDT, indicating that cardiac compliance was increased. HDT did not consistently alter left ventricular +dP/dt, indicating no change in cardiac contractility. Heart rate during the post-HDT HUT postural test was elevated compared to pre-HDT while post-HDT cardiac output was decreased by 52% as a result of a 54% reduction in stroke volume throughout HUT. Results from this study using an instrumented rhesus monkey suggest that exposure to microgravity may increase ventricular compliance without alternating cardiac contractility. Our project supported the notion that an invasively-instrumented animal model should be viable for use in spaceflight cardiovascular experiments to assess potential changes in myocardial function and cardiac compliance.

  16. Gender differences in organ density in a rat simulated microgravity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettis, Christopher Ryan; Witten, Mark Lee

    2004-01-01

    Research investigating the physiological effects of microgravity on the human body has demonstrated a shift of body fluids in actual spaceflight and in simulated Earth-based microgravity models in both males and females, possibly causing many deleterious physiological effects. Twenty-five anatomically normal female (NF) and 20 ovariectomized (OE) Fischer 344 rats were randomly selected to be in an experimental ( 1 h of 45° head-down tilt, 45HDT) or control ( 1 h of prone position) group. At the end of the hour experimental period, the density of the brain, lungs, heart, liver, and left and right kidneys were measured using spiral computed tomography (SCT) while the rats remained in their experimental positions. A sub-group of OE rats ( N=6) was administered estrogen replacement therapy on a daily basis ( 5 μg/kg body weight, s.c.) for 4 days and then underwent 1 h of 45HDT and SCT analysis at one day, 2 days, and 5 days to determine if estrogen replacement therapy would alter organ densities. Our data demonstrate that 1 h of 45HDT produced significant increases ( pbrain, liver, left kidney, and lung of the OE female group compared to their prone controls. However, only the brain density was significantly increased in the NF group. Estrogen replacement therapy caused a significant decrease in brain organ density at the 5 day time point compared to the 24 h time point. We conclude that estrogen plays a role in fluid distribution in a rat 45HDT model.

  17. Surface (glyco-)proteins: primary structure and crystallization under microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, H.; Akca, E.; Schultz, N.; Karbach, G.; Schlott, B.; Debaerdemaeker, T.; De Clercq, J.-P.; König, H.

    2001-08-01

    The Archaea comprise microorganisms that live under environmental extremes, like high temperature, low pH value or high salt concentration. Their cells are often covered by a single layer of (glyco)protein subunits (S-layer) in hexagonal arrangement. In order to get further hints about the molecular mechanisms of protein stabilization we compared the primary and secondary structures of archaeal S-layer (glyco)proteins. We found an increase of charged amino acids in the S-layer proteins of the extreme thermophilic species compared to their mesophilic counterparts. Our data and those of other authors suggest that ionic interactions, e.g., salt bridges seem to be played a major role in protein stabilization at high temperatures. Despite the differences in the growth optima and the predominance of some amino acids the primary structures of S-layers revealed also a significant degree of identity between phylogenetically related archaea. These obervations indicate that protein sequences of S-layers have been conserved during the evolution from extremely thermophilic to mesophilic life. To support these findings the three-dimensional structure of the S-layer proteins has to be elucidated. Recently, we described the first successful crystallization of an extreme thermophilic surface(glyco)protein under microgravity conditions.

  18. Macromolecular crystallization in microgravity generated by a superconducting magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakayama, N I; Yin, D C; Harata, K; Kiyoshi, T; Fujiwara, M; Tanimoto, Y

    2006-09-01

    About 30% of the protein crystals grown in space yield better X-ray diffraction data than the best crystals grown on the earth. The microgravity environments provided by the application of an upward magnetic force constitute excellent candidates for simulating the microgravity conditions in space. Here, we describe a method to control effective gravity and formation of protein crystals in various levels of effective gravity. Since 2002, the stable and long-time durable microgravity generated by a convenient type of superconducting magnet has been available for protein crystal growth. For the first time, protein crystals, orthorhombic lysozyme, were grown at microgravity on the earth, and it was proved that this microgravity improved the crystal quality effectively and reproducibly. The present method always accompanies a strong magnetic field, and the magnetic field itself seems to improve crystal quality. Microgravity is not always effective for improving crystal quality. When we applied this microgravity to the formation of cubic porcine insulin and tetragonal lysozyme crystals, we observed no dependence of effective gravity on crystal quality. Thus, this kind of test will be useful for selecting promising proteins prior to the space experiments. Finally, the microgravity generated by the magnet is compared with that in space, considering the cost, the quality of microgravity, experimental convenience, etc., and the future use of this microgravity for macromolecular crystal growth is discussed.

  19. The adaptation of Escherichia coli cells grown in simulated microgravity for an extended period is both phenotypic and genomic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirumalai, Madhan R; Karouia, Fathi; Tran, Quyen; Stepanov, Victor G; Bruce, Rebekah J; Ott, C Mark; Pierson, Duane L; Fox, George E

    2017-01-01

    Microorganisms impact spaceflight in a variety of ways. They play a positive role in biological systems, such as waste water treatment but can be problematic through buildups of biofilms that can affect advanced life support. Of special concern is the possibility that during extended missions, the microgravity environment will provide positive selection for undesirable genomic changes. Such changes could affect microbial antibiotic sensitivity and possibly pathogenicity. To evaluate this possibility, Escherichia coli (lac plus) cells were grown for over 1000 generations on Luria Broth medium under low-shear modeled microgravity conditions in a high aspect rotating vessel. This is the first study of its kind to grow bacteria for multiple generations over an extended period under low-shear modeled microgravity. Comparisons were made to a non-adaptive control strain using growth competitions. After 1000 generations, the final low-shear modeled microgravity-adapted strain readily outcompeted the unadapted lac minus strain. A portion of this advantage was maintained when the low-shear modeled microgravity strain was first grown in a shake flask environment for 10, 20, or 30 generations of growth. Genomic sequencing of the 1000 generation strain revealed 16 mutations. Of the five changes affecting codons, none were neutral. It is not clear how significant these mutations are as individual changes or as a group. It is concluded that part of the long-term adaptation to low-shear modeled microgravity is likely genomic. The strain was monitored for acquisition of antibiotic resistance by VITEK analysis throughout the adaptation period. Despite the evidence of genomic adaptation, resistance to a variety of antibiotics was never observed.

  20. Does vector-free gravity simulate microgravity? Functional and morphologic attributes of clinorotated nerve and muscle grown in cell culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruener, R.; Hoeger, G.

    1988-01-01

    Cocultured Xenopus neurons and myocytes were subjected to non-vectorial gravity by clinostat rotation to determine if microgravity, during space flights, may affect cell development and communications. Clinorotated cells showed changes consistent with the hypothesis that cell differentiation, in microgravity, is altered by interference with cytoskeleton-related mechanisms. We found: increases in the myocyte and its nuclear area, "fragmentation" of nucleoli, appearance of neuritic "aneurysms", decreased growth in the presence of "trophic" factors, and decreased yolk utilization. The effects were most notable at 1-10 rpm and depended on the onset and duration of rotation. Some parameters returned to near control values within 48 hrs after cessation of rotation. Cells from cultures rotated at higher speeds (>50 rpm) appeared comparable to controls. Compensation by centrifugal forces may account for this finding. Our data are consistent, in principle, with effects on other, flighted cells and suggest that "vector-free" gravity may simulate certain aspects of microgravity. The distribution of acetylcholine receptor aggregates, on myocytes, was also altered. This indicates that brain development, in microgravity, may also be affected.

  1. Microgravity simulation by diamagnetic levitation: effects of a strong gradient magnetic field on the transcriptional profile of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herranz Raul

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many biological systems respond to the presence or absence of gravity. Since experiments performed in space are expensive and can only be undertaken infrequently, Earth-based simulation techniques are used to investigate the biological response to weightlessness. A high gradient magnetic field can be used to levitate a biological organism so that its net weight is zero. Results We have used a superconducting magnet to assess the effect of diamagnetic levitation on the fruit fly D. melanogaster in levitation experiments that proceeded for up to 22 consecutive days. We have compared the results with those of similar experiments performed in another paradigm for microgravity simulation, the Random Positioning Machine (RPM. We observed a delay in the development of the fruit flies from embryo to adult. Microarray analysis indicated changes in overall gene expression of imagoes that developed from larvae under diamagnetic levitation, and also under simulated hypergravity conditions. Significant changes were observed in the expression of immune-, stress-, and temperature-response genes. For example, several heat shock proteins were affected. We also found that a strong magnetic field, of 16.5 Tesla, had a significant effect on the expression of these genes, independent of the effects associated with magnetically-induced levitation and hypergravity. Conclusions Diamagnetic levitation can be used to simulate an altered effective gravity environment in which gene expression is tuned differentially in diverse Drosophila melanogaster populations including those of different age and gender. Exposure to the magnetic field per se induced similar, but weaker, changes in gene expression.

  2. Increased efficiency of mammalian somatic cell hybrid production under microgravity conditions during ballistic rocket flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnettler, R.; Gessner, P.; Zimmermann, U.; Neil, G. A.; Urnovitz, H. B.

    1989-01-01

    The electrofusion of hybridoma cell lines under short-duration microgravity during a flight of the TEXUS 18 Black Brand ballistic sounding rocket at Kiruna, Sweden is reported. The fusion partners, growth medium, cell fusion medium, cell fusion, cell viability in the fusion medium, and postfusion cell culture are described, and the rocket, cell fusion chamber, apparatus, and module are examined. The experimental timeline, the effects of fusion medium and incubation time on cell viability and hybrid yields, and the effect of microgravity on hybrid yields are considered.

  3. Enterococci Isolated from Japanese Quails Exposed to Microgravity Conditions and Stability of their Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Lauková

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterococci isolated from the crop and caecum of Japanese quails exposed to 7 day conditions of microgravity were re-vitalized after their dry-freezing long storage. Originally, the strains were isolated from Japanese quails after their landing from flight onboard the orbital station Mir during the experiment in August 1990. Because taxonomy as well as the studies concerning the bacteriocins, especially those produced by enterococci, have been continually developed for years, the aim of this study was to confirm species identification, stability of the properties of enterococci as well as to test new properties after their long storage. Genotyping allotted the strains to the species E. faecium. Lactic acid production was detected in similar amounts in the strains before and after their long-storage in dry-frozen form. The strains were vancomycinsensitive and kanamycin-resistant before as well as after their long-time storage. Variability in sensitivity to different antibiotics was found among the strains tested even before and after longtime storage. Each of the strains possessed at least one structural enterocin gene. The structural genes for enterocin A, P, B, L50B were detected in E. faecium EP7. E. faecium EP2, EEP4 have the genes for ent A, B, L50B. The gene for ent P was detected only in the strain EP7. The most often detected was ent A gene followed by ent genes B, L50B. All strains inhibited growth of at least 4 out of 15 indicators. The stability of the enterococcal properties determined before as well as after their dry-freezing was not influenced during their long-term storage; moreover, new properties were determined.

  4. Involvement of activated leukocytes in the regulation of plasma levels of acute phase proteins in microgravity simulation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larina, Olga; Bekker, Anna; Turin-Kuzmin, Alexey

    2016-07-01

    experiment. The effects obtained in this survey suggest the enhancement of the synthesis of active oxygen species by blood phagocytes at the initial stages of adaptation to immersion conditions. The gain of chemiluminescence signal correlated with maximal augment in APP concentrations registered in the course of 4-day immersion. Moreover, in the only case with zero effects in chemiluminescent reply stable APP levels were obtained. The data from functional studies performed with phagocytic cells in the experiment with dry immersion corroborate their implication in acute phase mechanisms participating in the adaptation to simulated microgravity conditions.

  5. Effect of Prolonged Simulated Microgravity on Metabolic Proteins in Rat Hippocampus: Steps toward Safe Space Travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Javed, Iqbal; Liu, Yahui; Lu, Song; Peng, Guang; Zhang, Yongqian; Qing, Hong; Deng, Yulin

    2016-01-04

    Mitochondria are not only the main source of energy in cells but also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), which result in oxidative stress when in space. This oxidative stress is responsible for energy imbalances and cellular damage. In this study, a rat tail suspension model was used in individual experiments for 7 and 21 days to explore the effect of simulated microgravity (SM) on metabolic proteins in the hippocampus, a vital brain region involved in learning, memory, and navigation. A comparative (18)O-labeled quantitative proteomic strategy was used to observe the differential expression of metabolic proteins. Forty-two and sixty-seven mitochondrial metabolic proteins were differentially expressed after 21 and 7 days of SM, respectively. Mitochondrial Complex I, III, and IV, isocitrate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase were down-regulated. Moreover, DJ-1 and peroxiredoxin 6, which defend against oxidative damage, were up-regulated in the hippocampus. Western blot analysis of proteins DJ-1 and COX 5A confirmed the mass spectrometry results. Despite these changes in mitochondrial protein expression, no obvious cell apoptosis was observed after 21 days of SM. The results of this study indicate that the oxidative stress induced by SM has profound effects on metabolic proteins.

  6. Perspectives of experimental and theoretical studies of self-organized dust structures in complex plasmas under microgravity conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsytovich, V N

    2015-01-01

    We review research aimed at understanding the phenomena occurring in a complex plasma under microgravity conditions. Some aspects of the work already performed are considered that have not previously been given sufficient attention but which are potentially crucial for future work. These aspects, in particular, include the observation of compact dust structures that are estimated to be capable of confining all components of a dust plasma in a bounded spatial volume; experimental evidence of the nonlinear screening of dust particles; and experimental evidence of the excitation of collective electric fields. In theoretical terms, novel collective attraction processes between likely charged dust particles are discussed and all schemes of the shadowy attraction between dust particles used earlier, including in attempts to interpret observations, are reviewed and evaluated. Dust structures are considered from the standpoint of the current self-organization theory. It is emphasized that phase transitions between states of self-organized systems differ significantly from those in homogeneous states and that the phase diagrams should be constructed in terms of the parameters of a self-organized structure and cannot be constructed in terms of the temperature and density or similar parameters of homogeneous structures. Using the existing theoretical approaches to modeling self-organized structures in dust plasmas, the parameter distribution of a structure is recalculated for a simpler model that includes the quasineutrality condition and neglects diffusion. These calculations indicate that under microgravity conditions, any self-organized structure can contain a limited number of dust particles and is finite in size. The maximum possible number of particles in a structure determines the characteristic inter-grain distance in dust crystals that can be created under microgravity conditions. Crystallization criteria for the structures are examined and the quasispherical

  7. Simulated Microgravity Alters Actin Cytoskeleton and Integrin-Mediated Focal Adhesions of Cultured Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershovich, P. M.; Gershovic, J. G.; Buravkova, L. B.

    2008-06-01

    Cytoskeletal alterations occur in several cell types including lymphocytes, glial cells, and osteoblasts, during spaceflight and under simulated microgravity (SMG) (3, 4). One potential mechanism for cytoskeletal gravisensitivity is disruption of extracellular matrix (ECM) and integrin interactions. Focal adhesions are specialized sites of cell-matrix interaction composed of integrins and the diversity of focal adhesion-associated cytoplasmic proteins including vinculin, talin, α-actinin, and actin filaments (4, 5). Integrins produce signals essential for proper cellular function, survival and differentiation. Therefore, we investigated the effects of SMG on F-actin cytoskeleton structure, vinculin focal adhesions, expression of some integrin subtypes and cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) in mesenchymal stem cells derived from human bone marrow (hMSCs). Simulated microgravity was produced by 3D-clinostat (Dutch Space, Netherlands). Staining of actin fibers with TRITC-phalloidin showed reorganization even after 30 minutes of simulated microgravity. The increasing of cells number with abnormal F-actin was observed after subsequent terms of 3D-clinorotation (6, 24, 48, 120 hours). Randomization of gravity vector altered dimensional structure of stress fibers and resulted in remodeling of actin fibers inside the cells. In addition, we observed vinculin redistribution inside the cells after 6 hours and prolonged terms of clinorotation. Tubulin fibers in a contrast with F-actin and vinculin didn't show any reorganization even after long 3Dclinorotation (120 hours). The expression of integrin α2 increased 1,5-6-fold in clinorotated hMSCs. Also we observed decrease in number of VCAM-1-positive cells and changes in expression of ICAM-1. Taken together, our findings indicate that SMG leads to microfilament and adhesion alterations of hMSCs most probably associated with involvement of some integrin subtypes.

  8. Effects of simulated microgravity on circadian rhythm of caudal arterial pressure and heart rate in rats and their underlying mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li CHEN

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore the effects of simulated microgravity on the circadian rhythm of rats' caudal arterial pressure and heart rate, and their underlying mechanism. Methods  Eighteen male SD rats (aged 8 weeks were randomly assigned to control (CON and tail suspension (SUS group (9 each. Rats with tail suspension for 28 days were adopted as the animal model to simulate microgravity. Caudal arterial pressure and heart rate of rats were measured every 3 hours. The circadian difference of abdominal aorta contraction was measured by aortic ring test. Western blotting was performed to determine and compare the protein expression level of clock genes such as Per2 (Period2, Bmal1 (Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocatorlike and dbp (D element binding protein in suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN and abdominal aorta of rats in CON and SUS group at different time points. Results  Compared with CON group, the caudal arterial pressure, both systolic and diastolic pressure, decreased significantly and the diurnal variability disappeared, meanwhile the heart rate increased obviously and also the diurnal variability disappeared in rats of SUS group. Compared with CON group, the contraction reactivity of abdominal aorta decreased with disappearence of the diurnal variability, and also the clock genes expression in SCN and abdominal aorta showed no diurnal variability in rats of SUS group. Conclusion  Simulated microgravity may lead to circadian rhythm disorders in rats' cardiovascular system, which may be associated with the changes of the clock genes expression. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.04.06

  9. Decreasing ventromedial prefrontal cortex deactivation in risky decision making after simulated microgravity: Effects of -6 degree head-down tilt bed rest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Lin eRao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Space is characterized by risk and uncertainty. As humans play an important role in long-duration space missions, the ability to make risky decisions effectively is important for astronauts who spend extended time periods in space. The present study used the Balloon Analog Risk Task to conduct both behavioral and fMRI experiments to evaluate the effects of simulated microgravity on individuals’ risk-taking behavior and the neural basis of the effect. The results showed that participants’ risk-taking behavior was not affected by bed rest. However, we found that the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC showed less deactivation after bed rest and that the VMPFC activation in the active choice condition showed no significant difference between the win outcome and the loss outcome after bed rest, although its activation was significantly greater in the win outcome than in the loss outcome before bed rest. These results suggested that the participants showed a decreased level of value calculation after the bed rest. Our findings can contribute to a better understanding of the effect of microgravity on individual higher-level cognitive functioning.

  10. Decreasing ventromedial prefrontal cortex deactivation in risky decision making after simulated microgravity: effects of −6° head-down tilt bed rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Li-Lin; Zhou, Yuan; Liang, Zhu-Yuan; Rao, Henyi; Zheng, Rui; Sun, Yan; Tan, Cheng; Xiao, Yi; Tian, Zhi-Qiang; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Wang, Chun-Hui; Bai, Yan-Qiang; Chen, Shan-Guang; Li, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Space is characterized by risk and uncertainty. As humans play an important role in long-duration space missions, the ability to make risky decisions effectively is important for astronauts who spend extended time periods in space. The present study used the Balloon Analog Risk Task to conduct both behavioral and fMRI experiments to evaluate the effects of simulated microgravity on individuals' risk-taking behavior and the neural basis of the effect. The results showed that participants' risk-taking behavior was not affected by bed rest. However, we found that the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) showed less deactivation after bed rest and that the VMPFC activation in the active choice condition showed no significant difference between the win outcome and the loss outcome after bed rest, although its activation was significantly greater in the win outcome than in the loss outcome before bed rest. These results suggested that the participants showed a decreased level of value calculation after the bed rest. Our findings can contribute to a better understanding of the effect of microgravity on individual higher-level cognitive functioning. PMID:24904338

  11. Vaccination efficacy with marrow mesenchymal stem cell against cancer was enhanced under simulated microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jing; Chen, Jun; Li, Xiuyu; Qian, Yanfang

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell vaccination can induce consistent and strong anti-tumor immunity against cancer in mice model. The antigenic similarity between tumors and embryos has been appreciated for many years and reflects the expression of embryonic gene products by cancer cells and/or cancer-initiating stem cells. Taking advantage of this similarity, we have tested a prophylactic lung cancer vaccine composed of allogeneic murine MSCs. Based on this conception, we first compared their tumor vaccines intervention effects of adult MSCs and MSCs under simulated microgravity (MSC/SMG). In this study, BALB/c mice were vaccinated with MSCs or MSC/SMG, compared with mice vaccinated with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) as negative controls. We then subcutaneously implanted the A549 human lung cancer cell line into vaccinated mice and monitored tumor growth potential in vivo. The smaller tumor size and less tumor weight were observed in mice vaccinated with MSCs or MSC/SMG, compared with that of the Control group. Particularly, it was much more significant in the group of MSC/SMG than that group of the MSCs. Vaccination with SMG treated MSCs inhibited proliferation and promoted apoptosis of tumor tissue. SMG/MSC vaccination induced bothTh1-mediated cytokine response; CD8-dependent cytotoxic response which reduced the proportion of Treg cells. Furthermore, SMG/MSC vaccination significantly increased MHC1 and HSPs proteins expression. In conclusion, we demonstrated the SMG could improve tumor-suppressive activity of MSC. The enhanced anti-tumor immune response of MSCs/SMG was strongly associated with the higher expression of MHC class I molecule on DCs, and the abundance of HSPs in the SMG treated MSCs may make antigens in the MSC more cross-presentable to the host DCs for generating protective antitumor activity. This study gains an insight into the mechanism of MSCs anti-tumor efficacy and gives a new strategy for cancer therapies in the future. - Highlights: • Vaccination with SMG

  12. Effects of simulated microgravity on gene expression and biological phenotypes of a single generation Caenorhabditis elegans cultured on 2 different media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Ling Fei; Neoh, Hui-Min; Then, Sue Mian; Murad, Nor Azian; Asillam, Mohd Fairos; Hashim, Mohd Helmy; Nathan, Sheila; Jamal, Rahman

    2017-11-01

    Studies of multigenerational Caenorhabditis elegans exposed to long-term spaceflight have revealed expression changes of genes involved in longevity, DNA repair, and locomotion. However, results from spaceflight experiments are difficult to reproduce as space missions are costly and opportunities are rather limited for researchers. In addition, multigenerational cultures of C. elegans used in previous studies contribute to mixture of gene expression profiles from both larvae and adult worms, which were recently reported to be different. Usage of different culture media during microgravity simulation experiments might also give rise to differences in the gene expression and biological phenotypes of the worms. In this study, we investigated the effects of simulated microgravity on the gene expression and biological phenotype profiles of a single generation of C. elegans worms cultured on 2 different culture media. A desktop Random Positioning Machine (RPM) was used to simulate microgravity on the worms for approximately 52 to 54 h. Gene expression profile was analysed using the Affymetrix GeneChip® C. elegans 1.0 ST Array. Only one gene (R01H2.2) was found to be downregulated in nematode growth medium (NGM)-cultured worms exposed to simulated microgravity. On the other hand, eight genes were differentially expressed for C. elegans Maintenance Medium (CeMM)-cultured worms in microgravity; six were upregulated, while two were downregulated. Five of the upregulated genes (C07E3.15, C34H3.21, C32D5.16, F35H8.9 and C34F11.17) encode non-coding RNAs. In terms of biological phenotype, we observed that microgravity-simulated worms experienced minimal changes in terms of lifespan, locomotion and reproductive capabilities in comparison with the ground controls. Taking it all together, simulated microgravity on a single generation of C. elegans did not confer major changes to their gene expression and biological phenotype. Nevertheless, exposure of the worms to microgravity

  13. Adrenomedullin is a key Protein Mediating Rotary Cell Culture System that Induces the Effects of Simulated Microgravity on Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Yang, Xi; Cui, Xiang; Jiang, Minmin; Gui, Yu; Zhang, Yanni; Luo, Xiangdong

    2015-11-01

    Microgravity or simulated microgravity promotes stem cell proliferation and inhibits differentiation. But, researchers have not yet been able to understand the underlying mechanism through which microgravity or simulated microgravity brings about stem cell proliferation and inhibition of differentiation. In this study, we investigated the effect of simulated microgravity (SMG) on MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells using rotary cell culture system (RCCS). SMG induced a significant accumulation of these cancer cells in S phase of the cell cycle. But, compared with the static group, there was no effect on the overall growth rate of cells in the RCCS group. Furthermore, the expression of cyclin D1 was inhibited in the RCCS group, indicating that RCCS induced cell cycle arrest. In addition, RCCS also induced glycolytic metabolism by increasing the expression of adrenomedullin (ADM), but not HIF1 a. The addition of ADM further enhanced the effects of SMG, which was induced by RCCS. But, the addition of adrenomedullin antagonist (AMA) reversed these effects of SMG. Finally, our results proved that RCCS, which induced cells cycle arrest of breast cancer cells, enhanced glycolysis and upregulated the expression of ADM. But, this did not lead to an increase in hypoxia-inducible factor-1 a (HIF1 a) expression. Thus, we have uncovered a new mechanism for understanding the Warburg effect in breast cancer cells, this mechanism is not the same as hypoxia induced glycolysis.

  14. Enhancement of osteogenic differentiation and proliferation in human mesenchymal stem cells by a modified low intensity ultrasound stimulation under simulated microgravity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sardar M Z Uddin

    Full Text Available Adult stem cells can differentiate into multiple lineages depending on their exposure to differing biochemical and biomechanical inductive factors. Lack of mechanical signals due to disuse can inhibit osteogenesis and induce adipogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. Long-term bed rest due to both brain/spinal cord injury and space travel can lead to disuse osteoporosis that is in part caused by a reduced number of osteoblasts. Thus, it is essential to provide proper mechanical stimulation for cellular viability and osteogenesis, particularly under disuse conditions. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS on the osteogenic differentiation of adipose-derived human stem cells (Ad-hMSC in simulated microgravity conditions. Cells were cultured in a 1D clinostat to simulate microgravity (SMG and treated with LIPUS at 30mW/cm(2 for 20 min/day. It was hypothesized that the application of LIPUS to SMG cultures would restore osteogenesis in Ad-hMSCs. The results showed significant increases in ALP, OSX, RANKL, RUNX2, and decreases in OPG in LIPUS treated SMG cultures of Ad-MSC compared to non-treated cultures. LIPUS also restored OSX, RUNX2 and RANKL expression in osteoblast cells. SMG significantly reduced ALP positive cells by 70% (p<0.01 and ALP activity by 22% (p<0.01, while LIPUS treatment restored ALP positive cell number and activity to equivalence with normal gravity controls. Extracellular matrix collagen and mineralization was assessed by Sirius red and Alizarin red staining, respectively. SMG cultures showed little or no collagen or mineralization, but LIPUS treatment restored collagen content to 50% (p<0.001 and mineralization by 45% (p<0.001 in LIPUS treated-SMG cultures relative to SMG-only cultures. The data suggest that LIPUS treatment can restore normal osteogenic differentiation of MSCs from disuse by daily short duration stimulation.

  15. Improving Working Conditions for Astronauts: An Electronic Personal Restraint System for Use in Microgravity Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Tait

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While in microgravity, astronauts are preoccupied with physical restraint, which takes attention away from the maintenance task or scientific experiment at hand. This may directly lead to safety concerns and increased time for extravehicular activity, as well as potentially inhibit or corrupt data collection. A primary concern is the time it takes to manipulate the current restraint system. The portable foot restraint currently in use by NASA employs a series of pins in order to engage the system or release in an emergency. This requires considerable time for the user to detach, and there is an increased risk of entanglement. If restraint operating time could be reduced by 50%, the astronaut’s assigned experiment time could be increased an average of 100 minutes per mission. Another problem identified by NASA included the inability of the current system to release the user upon failure. Research and design was conducted following the Six-Sigma DMEDI project architecture, and a new form of restraint to replace the existing system was proposed. The research team first studied the customer requirements and relevant standards set by NASA, and with this information they began drafting designs for a solution. This project utilized electromagnetism to restrain a user in microgravity. The proposed system was capable of being manipulated quickly, failing in a manner that released the user, and being electronically controlled. This active electronic control was a new concept in restraint systems, as it enabled an astronaut to effectively “walk” along a surface while remaining restrained to it. With the design prototype and a limited budget, a rudimentary test assembly was built by the team, and most of NASA’s specifications were met. With recommendations from NASA, the research team concluded by developing potential material and design solutions that can be explored in the future by Purdue University or other parties.

  16. Research progress on microgravity boiling heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Zejun; Chen Bingde

    2003-01-01

    Microgravity boiling heat transfer is one of the most basic research topics in aerospace technology, which is important for both scientific research and engineering application. Research progress on microgravity boiling heat transfer is presented, including terrestrial simulation technique, terrestrial simulation experiment, microgravity experiment, and flow boiling heat transfer

  17. [Volume Homeostasis and Renal Function in Rats Exposed to Simulated and Actual Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Bryan J.

    1993-01-01

    This project has investigated mechanisms that influence alterations in compartmental fluid and electrolyte balance in microgravity and evaluates countermeasures to control renal fluid and electrolyte losses. Determining the alterations due to space flight in fluid compartments and renal function is an important component in understanding long term adaptation to spaceflight and the contribution to post-flight orthostatic intolerance. Four definition phase studies and two studies examining neuro-humoral and vascular mechanisms have been completed.

  18. microRNA expression profiles in human peripheral blood lymphocytes cultured in modeled microgravity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the present study we analyzed miRNA and mRNA expression profiles in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) incubated in microgravity condition simulated by a...

  19. Gene expression profiling of human peripheral blood lymphocytes cultured in modeled microgravity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the present study we analyzed miRNA and mRNA expression profiles in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) incubated in microgravity condition simulated by a...

  20. Measurement of the speed of sound by observation of the Mach cones in a complex plasma under microgravity conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukhovitskii, D. I., E-mail: dmr@ihed.ras.ru; Fortov, V. E.; Molotkov, V. I.; Lipaev, A. M.; Naumkin, V. N. [Joint Institute of High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13, Bd. 2, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Thomas, H. M. [Research Group Complex Plasma, DLR, Oberpfaffenhofen, 82234 Wessling (Germany); Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Schwabe, M. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Graves Lab, D75 Tan Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    We report the first observation of the Mach cones excited by a larger microparticle (projectile) moving through a cloud of smaller microparticles (dust) in a complex plasma with neon as a buffer gas under microgravity conditions. A collective motion of the dust particles occurs as propagation of the contact discontinuity. The corresponding speed of sound was measured by a special method of the Mach cone visualization. The measurement results are incompatible with the theory of ion acoustic waves. The estimate for the pressure in a strongly coupled Coulomb system and a scaling law for the complex plasma make it possible to derive an evaluation for the speed of sound, which is in a reasonable agreement with the experiments in complex plasmas.

  1. Measurement of the speed of sound by observation of the Mach cones in a complex plasma under microgravity conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukhovitskii, D. I.; Fortov, V. E.; Molotkov, V. I.; Lipaev, A. M.; Naumkin, V. N.; Thomas, H. M.; Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.; Schwabe, M.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first observation of the Mach cones excited by a larger microparticle (projectile) moving through a cloud of smaller microparticles (dust) in a complex plasma with neon as a buffer gas under microgravity conditions. A collective motion of the dust particles occurs as propagation of the contact discontinuity. The corresponding speed of sound was measured by a special method of the Mach cone visualization. The measurement results are incompatible with the theory of ion acoustic waves. The estimate for the pressure in a strongly coupled Coulomb system and a scaling law for the complex plasma make it possible to derive an evaluation for the speed of sound, which is in a reasonable agreement with the experiments in complex plasmas

  2. Transcriptional profiling of human breast cancer cells cultured under microgravity conditions revealed the key role of genetic gravity sensors previously detected in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio E.; Lavan, David; Diego Orihuela-Tacuri, M.; Sanabria, Gabriela

    2016-07-01

    Currently, studies in Drosophila melanogaster has shown emerging evidence that microgravity stimuli can be detected at the genetic level. Analysis of the transcriptome in the pupal stage of the fruit flies under microgravity conditions versus ground controls has suggested the presence of a few candidate genes as "gravity sensors" which are experimentally validated. Additionally, several studies have shown that microgravity causes inhibitory effects in different types of cancer cells, although the genes involved and responsible for these effects are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the genes suggested as the sensors of gravitational waves in Drosophila melanogaster and their human counterpart (orthologous genes) are highly involved in carcinogenesis, proliferation, anti-apoptotic signals, invasiveness, and metastatic potential of breast cancer cell tumors. The transcriptome analyses suggested that the observed inhibitory effect in cancer cells could be due to changes in the genetic expression of these candidates. These results encourage the possibility of new therapeutic targets managed together and not in isolation.

  3. Motor control of landing from a countermovement jump in simulated microgravity.

    OpenAIRE

    Gambelli, C N; Theisen, D; Willems, Patrick; Schepens, Bénédicte

    2016-01-01

    Landing from a jump implies proper positioning of the lower limb segments and the generation of an adequate muscular force to cope with the imminent collision with the ground. This study assesses how a hypogravitational environment affects the control of landing after a countermovement jump (CMJ). Eight participants performed submaximal CMJs on Earth (1-g condition) and in a weightlessness environment with simulated gravity conditions generated by a pull-down force (1-, 0.6-, 0.4-, and 0.2-g0...

  4. Motor control of landing from a countermovement jump in simulated microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambelli, C N; Theisen, D; Willems, P A; Schepens, B

    2016-05-15

    Landing from a jump implies proper positioning of the lower limb segments and the generation of an adequate muscular force to cope with the imminent collision with the ground. This study assesses how a hypogravitational environment affects the control of landing after a countermovement jump (CMJ). Eight participants performed submaximal CMJs on Earth (1-g condition) and in a weightlessness environment with simulated gravity conditions generated by a pull-down force (1-, 0.6-, 0.4-, and 0.2-g0 conditions). External forces applied to the body, movements of the lower limb segments, and muscular activity of six lower limb muscles were recorded. 1) All subjects were able to jump and stabilize their landing in all experimental conditions, except one subject in 0.2-g0 condition. 2) The mechanical behavior of lower limb muscles switches during landing from a stiff spring to a compliant spring associated with a damper. This is true whatever the environment, on Earth as well as in environments where sensory inputs are altered. 3) The motor control of landing in simulated 1 g0 reveals an increased "safety margin" strategy, illustrated by increased stiffness and damping coefficient compared with landing on Earth. 4) The motor command is adjusted to the task constraints: muscular activity of lower limb extensors and flexors, stiffness and damping coefficient decrease according to the decreased gravity level. Our results show that even if in daily living gravity can be perceived as a constant factor, subjects can cope with altered sensory signals, taking advantage of the remaining information (visual and/or decreased proprioceptive inputs). Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Effects of simulated microgravity on surfactant and water balance of lung in animals with different resistance to stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryndina, Irina; Vasilieva, Natalia

    Weightlessness is accompanied by redistribution of blood flow in lung, changes of lung volumes and gas exchange (Prisk et al., 2002; Grigoriev, Baranov, 2003). On the other hand, it is known that microgravity is considered as a kind of moderate stress (Grigoriev et al., 2004). Stress response may differ in animals resistant or vulnerable to stress (Sudakov, 2007). To study the effects of simulated microgravity upon lung, we used 20 male albino rats tested for behavior in the "open field" and than divided into active (stress resistant - SR ) and passive (stress vulnerable - CV) groups. Two mouse lines were used with similar goal - C57Bl/6 and BALB/c mice (n=16). According to data obtained earlier, BALB/c mice referred as more stress vulnerable, in contrast to C57BL/6 mice, which are considered to be relatively stress resistant (Flint et al., 2007). We have previously shown that changes in lung surfactant system after psychosocial stress or long-term immobilization are less pronounced in stress resistant rats (Vasilieva, Bryndina, 2012). The aim of this work is to study the properties and biochemical composition of pulmonary surfactant and lung water balance in rats and mice with different stress resistance in antiorthostatic suspension (AOS) of short and long duration. Simulated microgravity was reproduced according to procedure of Ilyin-Novikov in modification of Morey-Holton. The duration of exposure was 10 days for rats and 30 days for mice. The properties of pulmonary surfactant were assessed by the evaluation of surface activity (surface tension - ST), the content of total phospholipids (PL) and their fractions. Simultaneously we calculated the gravimetric water balance indices: lung coefficient, "dry residue" and wet-to-dry ratio. Total and extravascular lung fluid and pulmonary blood supply were estimated as well. The experiments demonstrated that there was a decrease of surface tension of surfactant films after 10-day AOS in both groups of rats (to a greater

  6. CFD studies of soot production in a coflow laminar diffusion flame under conditions of micro-gravity in fire safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Mbainguebem

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This work which is in the fire safety framework is focused on a numerical study of the production of soot in a laminar diffusion flame, under different conditions of micro-gravity in unsteady regime. It is intended to evaluate the temperature and rate at which the production of soot is predominant, to quantify their concentrations and volume fraction in dispersion. It has been accomplished by modification of the ReactingFOAM application source code of the OpenFOAM-2.3.0 by introducing for the first time, the equations of concentration transport and of volume fractions of soot. The results of the different values of gravity obtained are compared with the normal value of gravity and we ascertain that the results obtained were satisfactory and show the ability of the code to predict the speed and temperature of the formation of soot, their concentrations and their volume fractions. The maximum peak of the volume fraction varies from 7 × 10−8 to 4.5 × 10−6. The maximum temperature, which was 2423 K before changing the code, is about 2410 K after implementation of our modifications due to the taking into account of the numerical model.

  7. Mechanics and composition of middle cerebral arteries from simulated microgravity rats with and without 1-h/d -Gx gravitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiu-Hua Cheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To elucidate further from the biomechanical aspect whether microgravity-induced cerebral vascular mal-adaptation might be a contributing factor to postflight orthostatic intolerance and the underlying mechanism accounting for the potential effectiveness of intermittent artificial gravity (IAG in preventing this adverse effect. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Middle cerebral arteries (MCAs were isolated from 28-day SUS (tail-suspended, head-down tilt rats to simulate microgravity effect, S+D (SUS plus 1-h/d -Gx gravitation by normal standing to simulate IAG, and CON (control rats. Vascular myogenic reactivity and circumferential stress-strain and axial force-pressure relationships and overall stiffness were examined using pressure arteriography and calculated. Acellular matrix components were quantified by electron microscopy. The results demonstrate that myogenic reactivity is susceptible to previous pressure-induced, serial constrictions. During the first-run of pressure increments, active MCAs from SUS rats can strongly stiffen their wall and maintain the vessels at very low strains, which can be prevented by the simulated IAG countermeasure. The strains are 0.03 and 0.14 respectively for SUS and S+D, while circumferential stress being kept at 0.5 (106 dyn/cm2. During the second-run pressure steps, both the myogenic reactivity and active stiffness of the three groups declined. The distensibility of passive MCAs from S+D is significantly higher than CON and SUS, which may help to attenuate the vasodilatation impairment at low levels of pressure. Collagen and elastin percentages were increased and decreased, respectively, in MCAs from SUS and S+D as compared with CON; however, elastin was higher in S+D than SUS rats. CONCLUSIONS: Susceptibility to previous myogenic constrictions seems to be a self-limiting protective mechanism in cerebral small resistance arteries to prevent undue cerebral vasoconstriction during orthostasis at 1-G

  8. Coulomb scatter of diamagnetic dust particles in a cusp magnetic trap under microgravity conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myasnikov, M. I., E-mail: miasnikovmi@mail.ru; D’yachkov, L. G.; Petrov, O. F.; Vasiliev, M. M., E-mail: mixxy@mail.ru; Fortov, V. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Savin, S. F.; Serova, E. O. [Korolev Rocket and Space Corporation Energia, ul. Lenina 4A (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The effect of a dc electric field on strongly nonideal Coulomb systems consisting of a large number (~10{sup 4}) of charged diamagnetic dust particles in a cusp magnetic trap are carried out aboard the Russian segment of the International Space Station (ISS) within the Coulomb Crystal experiment. Graphite particles of 100–400 μm in size are used in the experiments. Coulomb scatter of a dust cluster and the formation of threadlike chains of dust particles are observed experimentally. The processes observed are simulated by the molecular dynamics (MD) method.

  9. From microgravity to osmotic conditions: mechanical integration of plant cells in response to stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtaszek, Przemyslaw; Kasprowicz, Anna; Michalak, Michal; Janczara, Renata; Volkmann, Dieter; Baluska, Frantisek

    Chemical reactions and interactions between molecules are commonly thought of as being at the basis of Life. Research of recent years, however, is more and more evidently indicating that physical forces are profoundly affecting the functioning of life at all levels of its organiza-tion. To detect and to respond to such forces, plant cells need to be integrated mechanically. Cell walls are the outermost functional zone of plant cells. They surround the individual cells, and also form a part of the apoplast. In cell suspensions, cell walls are embedded in the cul-ture medium which can be considered as a superapoplast. Through physical and chemical interactions they provide a basis for the structural and functional cell wall-plasma membrane-cytoskeleton (WMC) continuum spanning the whole cell. Here, the working of WMC contin-uum, and the participation of signalling molecules, like NO, would be presented in the context of plant responses to stress. In addition, the effects of the changing composition of WMC continuum will be considered, with particular attention paid to the modifications of the WMC components. Plant cells are normally adapted to changing osmotic conditions, resulting from variable wa-ter availability. The appearance of the osmotic stress activates adaptory mechanisms. If the strength of osmotic stress grows relatively slowly over longer period of time, the cells are able to adapt to conditions that are lethal to non-adapted cells. During stepwise adaptation of tobacco BY-2 suspension cells to the presence of various osmotically active agents, cells diverged into independent, osmoticum type-specific lines. In response to ionic agents (NaCl, KCl), the adhe-sive properties were increased and randomly dividing cells formed clumps, while cells adapted to nonionic osmotica (mannitol, sorbitol, PEG) revealed ordered pattern of precisely positioned cell divisions, resulting in the formation of long cell files. Changes in the growth patterns were accompanied by

  10. Efficacy of manual versus free-weight training to improve maximal strength and performance for microgravity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behringer, Michael; Schüren, Thomas; McCourt, Molly; Mester, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    We tested a simple and compact device designed for manual resistance training in conditions of microgravity (Self-Powered Rope Trainer Duo (SPoRT Duo)) to increase muscle performance. Twenty-four participants (20.8 ± 2.1 years) were randomly assigned to a manual resistance group (n = 12) and a free-weight group (n = 12). Participants performed eight exercises (three sets; 8-12 efforts) either with free weights or the SPoRT Duo twice a week for 6 weeks. Maximal isometric force of trunk flexion, back extension and chest press increased (P at least 0.01, d at least 0.52) both in the manual resistance group (18.4% ± 15.0%; 32.7% ± 22.7%; 15.3% ± 9.7%) and free-weight group (18.0% ± 13.9%; 26.6% ± 28.9%; 13.3% ± 7.6%). The change in maximal isometric force of wide grip row in both groups (d at best 0.38) did not reach statistical significance (P at best 0.08). The squat one-repetition-maximum increased in the manual resistance group (29.8% ± 22.1%) and the free-weight group (32.4% ± 26.6%). Jump height, determined by a jump-and-reach test, increased in the free-weight group (9.8% ± 13.2%) but not in the manual resistance group (2.0% ± 8.5%). Manual resistance training was equally effective in increasing strength as traditional resistance training with free weights. This apparatus is a useful addition to current in-flight exercise systems.

  11. Three-dimentional growth of liver / stem cells in vitro under simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mei Fu

    Liver is a important and largest parenchymatous organ in vivo, and have complex and diverse structures and functions. In the world, there are many peoples suffers from liver injury and dis-ease, especially in Asia, but serious shortage of donor organ, especially for organic pathological changes, is a big problem in the world. Stem cells have the capabilities to self-renew and differ-entiate into multiple lineages, and are very significant in both theoretical research and clinical applications. Compared with traditional cell culture, cells of 3D growth are more close to their situation in vivo. The specific physics environment in space provides a great opportunity for 3D growth of cells and tissues. Due to the chance for entering into the space is so scarce, to mimic microgravity effects using a rotating cell culture system (RCCS) designed by NASA, and some other methods were studied for cellular 3D growth in vitro. Neonatal mouse liver Cells, hepatic progenitor/stem cells from fetal liver and WB-F344 cells were cultured in a 1:1 mixture of DMEM and F-12 supplemented with 10 % FCS and several factors, and seeded into the RCCS, 6-well and 24-well plates. Their growth characteristic, metabolism, differentiation and gene expression were studied by SEM, Histochemistry, Flow Cytometry, RT-PCR and so on. The results showed: 1. Neonatal mouse liver Cells (1day after birth) seem easy to grow for a three-dimentional-like structure, when the cells were cultured in the RCCS, a cell aggregate formed after 1 day of culture and were kept during 10 days culture. The size of aggregate was about 1 2 mm in diameter. 2. Hepatic progenitor/stem cells from fetal liver seem a good cell resource for liver disease'cell therapy. They expressed AFP and CKs, and no mature hepato-cytes marker and bile duct epithelial cells marker were detected. When were transplanted into Nod-Scid mice, they had multi-potential differentiation. 3. WB-F344 cells, a liver epithelial cell line, could grew well on

  12. Effects of preheated combustion air on laminar coflow diffusion flames under normal and microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi Yeganeh, Mohammad

    Global energy consumption has been increasing around the world, owing to the rapid growth of industrialization and improvements in the standard of living. As a result, more carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide are being released into the environment. Therefore, techniques for achieving combustion at reduced carbon dioxide and nitric oxide emission levels have drawn increased attention. Combustion with a highly preheated air and low-oxygen concentration has been shown to provide significant energy savings, reduce pollution and equipment size, and uniform thermal characteristics within the combustion chamber. However, the fundamental understanding of this technique is limited. The motivation of the present study is to identify the effects of preheated combustion air on laminar coflow diffusion flames. Combustion characteristics of laminar coflow diffusion flames are evaluated for the effects of preheated combustion air temperature under normal and low-gravity conditions. Experimental measurements are conducted using direct flame photography, particle image velocimetry (PIV) and optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics. Laminar coflow diffusion flames are examined under four experimental conditions: normal-temperature/normal-gravity (case I), preheated-temperature/normal gravity (case II), normal-temperature/low-gravity (case III), and preheated-temperature/low-gravity (case IV). Comparisons between these four cases yield significant insights. In our studies, increasing the combustion air temperature by 400 K (from 300 K to 700 K), causes a 37.1% reduction in the flame length and about a 25% increase in peak flame temperature. The results also show that a 400 K increase in the preheated air temperature increases CH concentration of the flame by about 83.3% (CH is a marker for the rate of chemical reaction), and also increases the C2 concentration by about 60% (C2 is a marker for the soot precursor). It can therefore be concluded that preheating the combustion air

  13. Differential Regulation of cGMP Signaling in Human Melanoma Cells at Altered Gravity: Simulated Microgravity Down-Regulates Cancer-Related Gene Expression and Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Krassimira; Eiermann, Peter; Tsiockas, Wasiliki; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Gerzer, Rupert

    2018-03-01

    Altered gravity is known to affect cellular function by changes in gene expression and cellular signaling. The intracellular signaling molecule cyclic guanosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP), a product of guanylyl cyclases (GC), e.g., the nitric oxide (NO)-sensitive soluble GC (sGC) or natriuretic peptide-activated GC (GC-A/GC-B), is involved in melanocyte response to environmental stress. NO-sGC-cGMP signaling is operational in human melanocytes and non-metastatic melanoma cells, whereas up-regulated expression of GC-A/GC-B and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) are found in metastatic melanoma cells, the deadliest skin cancer. Here, we investigated the effects of altered gravity on the mRNA expression of NOS isoforms, sGC, GC-A/GC-B and multidrug resistance-associated proteins 4/5 (MRP4/MRP5) as selective cGMP exporters in human melanoma cells with different metastatic potential and pigmentation. A specific centrifuge (DLR, Cologne Germany) was used to generate hypergravity (5 g for 24 h) and a fast-rotating 2-D clinostat (60 rpm) to simulate microgravity values ≤ 0.012 g for 24 h. The results demonstrate that hypergravity up-regulates the endothelial NOS-sGC-MRP4/MRP5 pathway in non-metastatic melanoma cells, but down-regulates it in simulated microgravity when compared to 1 g. Additionally, the suppression of sGC expression and activity has been suggested to correlate inversely to tumor aggressiveness. Finally, hypergravity is ineffective in highly metastatic melanoma cells, whereas simulated microgravity down-regulates predominantly the expression of the cancer-related genes iNOS and GC-A/GC-B (shown additionally on protein levels) as well as motility in comparison to 1 g. The results suggest that future studies in real microgravity can benefit from considering GC-cGMP signaling as possible factor for melanocyte transformation.

  14. Extra Low-Gear: A Micro-Gravity Laboratory to Simulate Asteroid Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheeres, D. J.; Sánchez, P.; Dissly, R. W.; Asphaug, E. I.; Housen, K. R.; Swift, M. R.; Yano, H.; Roark, S. E.; Soto, J. C.

    2009-03-01

    The conceptual design and application of a low-speed centrifuge for carrying out milli to micro-G gravity experiments to simulate the granular nature of the surface and interiors of asteroids and comets is described.

  15. Effects of Simulated Microgravity on Otolith Growth of Larval Zebrafish using a Rotating-Wall Vessel: Appropriate Rotation Speed and Fish Developmental Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Anken, Ralf; Liu, Liyue; Wang, Gaohong; Liu, Yongding

    2017-02-01

    Stimulus dependence is a general feature of developing animal sensory systems. In this respect, it has extensively been shown earlier that fish inner ear otoliths can act as test masses as their growth is strongly affected by altered gravity such as hypergravity obtained using centrifuges, by (real) microgravity achieved during spaceflight or by simulated microgravity using a ground-based facility. Since flight opportunities are scarce, ground-based simulators of microgravity, using a wide variety of physical principles, have been developed to overcome this shortcoming. Not all of them, however, are equally well suited to provide functional weightlessness from the perspective of the biosystem under evaluation. Therefore, the range of applicability of a particular simulator has to be extensively tested. Earlier, we have shown that a Rotating-Wall Vessel (RWV) can be used to provide simulated microgravity for developing Zebrafish regarding the effect of rotation on otolith development. In the present study, we wanted to find the most effective speed of rotation and identify the appropriate developmental stage of Zebrafish, where effects are the largest, in order to provide a methodological basis for future in-depth analyses dedicated to the physiological processes underlying otolith growth at altered gravity. Last not least, we compared data on the effect of simulated microgravity on the size versus the weight of otoliths, since the size usually is measured in related studies due to convenience, but the weight more accurately approximates the physical capacity of an otolith. Maintaining embryos at 10 hours post fertilization for three days in the RWV, we found that 15 revolutions per minute (rpm) yielded the strongest effects on otolith growth. Maintenance of Zebrafish staged at 10 hpf, 1 day post fertilization (dpf), 4 dpf, 7 dpf and 14 dpf for three days at 15 rpm resulted in the most prominent effects in 7 dpf larvae. Weighing versus measuring the size of otoliths

  16. Experience with simulator training for emergency conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The training of operators by the use of simulators is common to most countries with nuclear power plants. Simulator training programmes are generally well developed, but their value can be limited by the age, type, size and capability of the simulator. Within these limits, most full scope simulators have a capability of training operators for a range of design basis accidents. It is recognized that human performance under accident conditions is difficult to predict or analyse, particularly in the area of severe accidents. These are rare events and by their very nature, unpredictable. Of importance, therefore, is to investigate the training of operators for severe accident conditions, and to examine ways in which simulators may be used in this task. The International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) has reviewed this field and the associated elements of human behaviour. It has recommended that activities are concentrated on this area. Initially it is encouraging the following objectives: i) To train operators for accident conditions including severe accidents and to strongly encourage the development and use of simulators for this purpose; ii) To improve the man-machine interface by the use of computer aids to the operator; iii) To develop human performance requirements for plant operating staff. As part of this work, the IAEA convened a technical committee on 15-19 September 1986 to review the experience with simulator training for emergency conditions, to review simulator modelling for severe accident training, to examine the role of human cognitive behaviour modelling, and to review guidance on accident scenarios. A substantial deviation may be a major fuel failure, a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), etc. Examples of engineered safety features are: an Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS), and Containment Systems. This report was prepared by the participants during the meeting and reviewed further in a Consultant's Meeting. It also includes papers which were

  17. Automated Boundary Conditions for Wind Tunnel Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jan-Renee

    2018-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of models tested in wind tunnels require a high level of fidelity and accuracy particularly for the purposes of CFD validation efforts. Considerable effort is required to ensure the proper characterization of both the physical geometry of the wind tunnel and recreating the correct flow conditions inside the wind tunnel. The typical trial-and-error effort used for determining the boundary condition values for a particular tunnel configuration are time and computer resource intensive. This paper describes a method for calculating and updating the back pressure boundary condition in wind tunnel simulations by using a proportional-integral-derivative controller. The controller methodology and equations are discussed, and simulations using the controller to set a tunnel Mach number in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel are demonstrated.

  18. Microgravity Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Basso, Steve

    2000-01-01

    The world's space agencies have been conducting microgravity research since the beginning of space flight. Initially driven by the need to understand the impact of less than- earth gravity physics on manned space flight, microgravity research has evolved into a broad class of scientific experimentation that utilizes extreme low acceleration environments. The U.S. NASA microgravity research program supports both basic and applied research in five key areas: biotechnology - focusing on macro-molecular crystal growth as well as the use of the unique space environment to assemble and grow mammalian tissue; combustion science - focusing on the process of ignition, flame propagation, and extinction of gaseous, liquid, and solid fuels; fluid physics - including aspects of fluid dynamics and transport phenomena; fundamental physics - including the study of critical phenomena, low-temperature, atomic, and gravitational physics; and materials science - including electronic and photonic materials, glasses and ceramics, polymers, and metals and alloys. Similar activities prevail within the Chinese, European, Japanese, and Russian agencies with participation from additional international organizations as well. While scientific research remains the principal objective behind these program, all hope to drive toward commercialization to sustain a long range infrastructure which .benefits the national technology and economy. In the 1997 International Space Station Commercialization Study, conducted by the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies, some viable microgravity commercial ventures were identified, however, none appeared sufficiently robust to privately fund space access at that time. Thus, government funded micro gravity research continues on an evolutionary path with revolutionary potential.

  19. Thermal Simulations, Open Boundary Conditions and Switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnier, Yannis; Florio, Adrien; Kaczmarek, Olaf; Mazur, Lukas

    2018-03-01

    SU(N) gauge theories on compact spaces have a non-trivial vacuum structure characterized by a countable set of topological sectors and their topological charge. In lattice simulations, every topological sector needs to be explored a number of times which reflects its weight in the path integral. Current lattice simulations are impeded by the so-called freezing of the topological charge problem. As the continuum is approached, energy barriers between topological sectors become well defined and the simulations get trapped in a given sector. A possible way out was introduced by Lüscher and Schaefer using open boundary condition in the time extent. However, this solution cannot be used for thermal simulations, where the time direction is required to be periodic. In this proceedings, we present results obtained using open boundary conditions in space, at non-zero temperature. With these conditions, the topological charge is not quantized and the topological barriers are lifted. A downside of this method are the strong finite-size effects introduced by the boundary conditions. We also present some exploratory results which show how these conditions could be used on an algorithmic level to reshuffle the system and generate periodic configurations with non-zero topological charge.

  20. Thermal Simulations, Open Boundary Conditions and Switches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burnier Yannis

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available SU(N gauge theories on compact spaces have a non-trivial vacuum structure characterized by a countable set of topological sectors and their topological charge. In lattice simulations, every topological sector needs to be explored a number of times which reflects its weight in the path integral. Current lattice simulations are impeded by the so-called freezing of the topological charge problem. As the continuum is approached, energy barriers between topological sectors become well defined and the simulations get trapped in a given sector. A possible way out was introduced by Lüscher and Schaefer using open boundary condition in the time extent. However, this solution cannot be used for thermal simulations, where the time direction is required to be periodic. In this proceedings, we present results obtained using open boundary conditions in space, at non-zero temperature. With these conditions, the topological charge is not quantized and the topological barriers are lifted. A downside of this method are the strong finite-size effects introduced by the boundary conditions. We also present some exploratory results which show how these conditions could be used on an algorithmic level to reshuffle the system and generate periodic configurations with non-zero topological charge.

  1. Plant Cell Adaptive Responses to Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, Elizabeth; Kozeko, Liudmyla; Talalaev, Alexandr

    Microgravity is an abnormal environmental condition that plays no role in the functioning of biosphere. Nevertheless, the chronic effect of microgravity in space flight as an unfamiliar factor does not prevent the development of adaptive reactions at the cellular level. In real microgravity in space flight under the more or less optimal conditions for plant growing, namely temperature, humidity, CO2, light intensity and directivity in the hardware angiosperm plants perform an “reproductive imperative”, i.e. they flower, fruit and yield viable seeds. It is known that cells of a multicellular organism not only take part on reactions of the organism but also carry out processes that maintain their integrity. In light of these principles, the problem of the identification of biochemical, physiological and structural patterns that can have adaptive significance at the cellular and subcellular level in real and simulated microgravity is considered. Cytological studies of plants developing in real and simulated microgravity made it possible to establish that the processes of mitosis, cytokinesis, and tissue differentiation of vegetative and generative organs are largely normal. At the same time, under microgravity, essential reconstruction in the structural and functional organization of cell organelles and cytoskeleton, as well as changes in cell metabolism and homeostasis have been described. In addition, new interesting data concerning the influence of altered gravity on lipid peroxidation intensity, the level of reactive oxygen species, and antioxidant system activity, just like on the level of gene expression and synthesis of low-molecular and high-molecular heat shock proteins were recently obtained. So, altered gravity caused time-dependent increasing of the HSP70 and HSP90 levels in cells, that may indicate temporary strengthening of their functional loads that is necessary for re-establish a new cellular homeostasis. Relative qPCR results showed that

  2. Identification of unique cis-element pattern on simulated microgravity treated Arabidopsis by in silico and gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Hyuncheol; Choi, Yongsang; Lee, Taek-Kyun; Yeo, Up-Dong; Han, Kyeongsik; Auh, Chungkyun; Lee, Sukchan

    2012-08-01

    Arabidopsis gene expression microarray (44 K) was used to detect genes highly induced under simulated microgravity stress (SMS). Ten SMS-inducible genes were selected from the microarray data and these 10 genes were found to be abundantly expressed in 3-week-old plants. Nine out of the 10 SMS-inducible genes were also expressed in response to the three abiotic stresses of drought, touch, and wounding in 3-week-old Arabidopsis plants respectively. However, WRKY46 was elevated only in response to SMS. Six other WRKY genes did not respond to SMS. To clarify the characteristics of the genes expressed at high levels in response to SMS, 20 cis-elements in the promoters of the 40 selected genes including the 10 SMS-inducible genes, the 6 WRKY genes, and abiotic stress-inducible genes were analyzed and their spatial positions on each promoter were determined. Four cis-elements (M/T-G-T-P from MYB1AT or TATABOX5, GT1CONSENSUS, TATABOX5, and POLASIG1) showed a unique spatial arrangement in most SMS-inducible genes including WRKY46. Therefore the M/T-G-T-P cis-element patterns identified in the promoter of WRKY46 may play important roles in regulating gene expression in response to SMS. The presences of the cis-element patterns suggest that the order or spatial positioning of certain groups of cis-elements is more important than the existence or numbers of specific cis-elements. Taken together, our data indicate that WRKY46 is a novel SMS inducible transcription factor and the unique spatial arrangement of cis-elements shown in WRKY46 promoter may play an important role for its response to SMS.

  3. Characterization of disuse skeletal muscle atrophy and the efficacy of a novel muscle atrophy countermeasure during spaceflight and simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Andrea Marie

    Humans are an integral part of the engineered systems that will enable return to the Moon and eventually travel to Mars. Major advancements in countermeasure development addressing deleterious effects of microgravity and reduced gravity on the musculoskeletal system need to be made to ensure mission safety and success. The primary objectives of this dissertation are to advance the knowledge and understanding of skeletal muscle atrophy, and support development of novel countermeasures for disuse atrophy to enable healthy long-duration human spaceflight. Models simulating microgravity and actual spaceflight were used to examine the musculoskeletal adaptations during periods of unloading. Myostatin inhibition, a novel anti-atrophy drug therapy, and exercise were examined as a means of preventing and recovering from disuse atrophy. A combination of assays was used to quantify adaptation responses to unloading and examine efficacy of the countermeasures. Body and muscle masses were collected to analyze systemic changes due to treatments. Hindlimb strength and individual muscle forces were measured to demonstrate functional adaptations to treatments. Muscle fiber morphology and myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression was examined to identify adaptations at the cellular level. Protein synthesis signals insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), Akt, and p70s6 kinase; and the degradation signals Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 were examined to identify adaptations at the molecular level that ultimately lead to muscle hypertrophy and atrophy. A time course study provided a thorough characterization of the adaptation of skeletal muscle during unloading in C57BL/6 mice, and baseline data for comparison to and evaluation of subsequent studies. Time points defining the on-set and endpoints of disuse muscle atrophy were identified to enable characterization of rapid vs. long-term responses of skeletal muscle to hindlimb suspension. Unloading-induced atrophy primarily resulted from increased protein

  4. A Whole-Genome Microarray Study of Arabidopsis thaliana Semisolid Callus Cultures Exposed to Microgravity and Nonmicrogravity Related Spaceflight Conditions for 5 Days on Board of Shenzhou 8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svenja Fengler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Simbox mission was the first joint space project between Germany and China in November 2011. Eleven-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana wild type semisolid callus cultures were integrated into fully automated plant cultivation containers and exposed to spaceflight conditions within the Simbox hardware on board of the spacecraft Shenzhou 8. The related ground experiment was conducted under similar conditions. The use of an in-flight centrifuge provided a 1 g gravitational field in space. The cells were metabolically quenched after 5 days via RNAlater injection. The impact on the Arabidopsis transcriptome was investigated by means of whole-genome gene expression analysis. The results show a major impact of nonmicrogravity related spaceflight conditions. Genes that were significantly altered in transcript abundance are mainly involved in protein phosphorylation and MAPK cascade-related signaling processes, as well as in the cellular defense and stress responses. In contrast to short-term effects of microgravity (seconds, minutes, this mission identified only minor changes after 5 days of microgravity. These concerned genes coding for proteins involved in the plastid-associated translation machinery, mitochondrial electron transport, and energy production.

  5. Developing Physiologic Models for Emergency Medical Procedures Under Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Nigel; O'Quinn, Veronica

    2012-01-01

    Several technological enhancements have been made to METI's commercial Emergency Care Simulator (ECS) with regard to how microgravity affects human physiology. The ECS uses both a software-only lung simulation, and an integrated mannequin lung that uses a physical lung bag for creating chest excursions, and a digital simulation of lung mechanics and gas exchange. METI s patient simulators incorporate models of human physiology that simulate lung and chest wall mechanics, as well as pulmonary gas exchange. Microgravity affects how O2 and CO2 are exchanged in the lungs. Procedures were also developed to take into affect the Glasgow Coma Scale for determining levels of consciousness by varying the ECS eye-blinking function to partially indicate the level of consciousness of the patient. In addition, the ECS was modified to provide various levels of pulses from weak and thready to hyper-dynamic to assist in assessing patient conditions from the femoral, carotid, brachial, and pedal pulse locations.

  6. Effect of modeled microgravity on radiation-induced adaptive response of root growth in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Chenguang; Wang, Ting; Wu, Jingjing; Xu, Wei; Li, Huasheng; Liu, Min

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The radio-adaptive response (RAR) of A. thaliana root growth is modulated in microgravity. • The DNA damage repairs in RAR are regulated by microgravity. • The phytohormone auxin plays a regulatory role in the modulation of microgravity on RAR of root growth. - Abstract: Space particles have an inevitable impact on organisms during space missions; radio-adaptive response (RAR) is a critical radiation effect due to both low-dose background and sudden high-dose radiation exposure during solar storms. Although it is relevant to consider RAR within the context of microgravity, another major space environmental factor, there is no existing evidence as to its effects on RAR. In the present study, we established an experimental method for detecting the effects of gamma-irradiation on the primary root growth of Arabidopsis thaliana, in which RAR of root growth was significantly induced by several dose combinations. Microgravity was simulated using a two-dimensional rotation clinostat. It was shown that RAR of root growth was significantly inhibited under the modeled microgravity condition, and was absent in pgm-1 plants that had impaired gravity sensing in root tips. These results suggest that RAR could be modulated in microgravity. Time course analysis showed that microgravity affected either the development of radio-resistance induced by priming irradiation, or the responses of plants to challenging irradiation. After treatment with the modeled microgravity, attenuation in priming irradiation-induced expressions of DNA repair genes (AtKu70 and AtRAD54), and reduced DNA repair efficiency in response to challenging irradiation were observed. In plant roots, the polar transportation of the phytohormone auxin is regulated by gravity, and treatment with an exogenous auxin (indole-3-acetic acid) prevented the induction of RAR of root growth, suggesting that auxin might play a regulatory role in the interaction between microgravity and RAR of root growth.

  7. Effect of modeled microgravity on radiation-induced adaptive response of root growth in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Chenguang [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology and Pollution Control Technology of Anhui Province (China); Institute of Technical Biology and Agriculture Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Wang, Ting [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology and Pollution Control Technology of Anhui Province (China); Institute of Technical Biology and Agriculture Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei 230031 (China); Wu, Jingjing [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology and Pollution Control Technology of Anhui Province (China); Institute of Technical Biology and Agriculture Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Xu, Wei [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology and Pollution Control Technology of Anhui Province (China); Institute of Technical Biology and Agriculture Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei 230031 (China); Li, Huasheng; Liu, Min [China Space Molecular Biological Lab, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100086 (China); and others

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • The radio-adaptive response (RAR) of A. thaliana root growth is modulated in microgravity. • The DNA damage repairs in RAR are regulated by microgravity. • The phytohormone auxin plays a regulatory role in the modulation of microgravity on RAR of root growth. - Abstract: Space particles have an inevitable impact on organisms during space missions; radio-adaptive response (RAR) is a critical radiation effect due to both low-dose background and sudden high-dose radiation exposure during solar storms. Although it is relevant to consider RAR within the context of microgravity, another major space environmental factor, there is no existing evidence as to its effects on RAR. In the present study, we established an experimental method for detecting the effects of gamma-irradiation on the primary root growth of Arabidopsis thaliana, in which RAR of root growth was significantly induced by several dose combinations. Microgravity was simulated using a two-dimensional rotation clinostat. It was shown that RAR of root growth was significantly inhibited under the modeled microgravity condition, and was absent in pgm-1 plants that had impaired gravity sensing in root tips. These results suggest that RAR could be modulated in microgravity. Time course analysis showed that microgravity affected either the development of radio-resistance induced by priming irradiation, or the responses of plants to challenging irradiation. After treatment with the modeled microgravity, attenuation in priming irradiation-induced expressions of DNA repair genes (AtKu70 and AtRAD54), and reduced DNA repair efficiency in response to challenging irradiation were observed. In plant roots, the polar transportation of the phytohormone auxin is regulated by gravity, and treatment with an exogenous auxin (indole-3-acetic acid) prevented the induction of RAR of root growth, suggesting that auxin might play a regulatory role in the interaction between microgravity and RAR of root growth.

  8. The Impact of Simulated and Real Microgravity on Bone Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Ulbrich

    2014-01-01

    machine (RPM, the 2D-clinostat, or the NASA-developed rotating wall vessel bioreactor (RWV to create tissue from bone, tumor, and mesenchymal stem cells. To understand the development of 3D structures, in vitro experiments using s-µg devices can provide valuable information about modulations in signal-transduction, cell adhesion, or extracellular matrix induced by altered gravity conditions. These systems also facilitate the analysis of the impact of growth factors, hormones, or drugs on these tissue-like constructs. Progress has been made in bone tissue engineering using the RWV, and multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS, formed in both r- and s-µg, have been reported and were analyzed in depth. Currently, these MCTS are available for drug testing and proteomic investigations. This review provides an overview of the influence of µg on the aforementioned cells and an outlook for future perspectives in tissue engineering.

  9. Development of microgravity, full body functional reach envelope using 3-D computer graphic models and virtual reality technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Patricia F.

    1994-01-01

    In microgravity conditions mobility is greatly enhanced and body stability is difficult to achieve. Because of these difficulties, optimum placement and accessibility of objects and controls can be critical to required tasks on board shuttle flights or on the proposed space station. Anthropometric measurement of the maximum reach of occupants of a microgravity environment provide knowledge about maximum functional placement for tasking situations. Calculations for a full body, functional reach envelope for microgravity environments are imperative. To this end, three dimensional computer modeled human figures, providing a method of anthropometric measurement, were used to locate the data points that define the full body, functional reach envelope. Virtual reality technology was utilized to enable an occupant of the microgravity environment to experience movement within the reach envelope while immersed in a simulated microgravity environment.

  10. Mechanical Stimulation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Functional Tissue Engineering of the Musculoskeletal System via Cyclic Hydrostatic Pressure, Simulated Microgravity, and Cyclic Tensile Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordberg, Rachel C; Bodle, Josie C; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2018-01-01

    It is critical that human adipose stem cell (hASC) tissue-engineering therapies possess appropriate mechanical properties in order to restore function of the load bearing tissues of the musculoskeletal system. In an effort to elucidate the hASC response to mechanical stimulation and develop mechanically robust tissue engineered constructs, recent research has utilized a variety of mechanical loading paradigms including cyclic tensile strain, cyclic hydrostatic pressure, and mechanical unloading in simulated microgravity. This chapter describes methods for applying these mechanical stimuli to hASC to direct differentiation for functional tissue engineering of the musculoskeletal system.

  11. Simulation of hydrocephalus condition in infant head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayanti, Erna; Arif, Idam

    2014-03-01

    Hydrocephalus is a condition of an excessive of cerebrospinal fluid in brain. In this paper, we try to simulate the behavior of hydrocephalus conditions in infant head by using a hydro-elastic model which is combined with orthotropic elastic skull and with the addition of suture that divide the skull into two lobes. The model then gives predictions for the case of stenosis aqueduct by varying the cerebral aqueduct diameter, time constant and brain elastic modulus. The hydrocephalus condition which is shown by the significant value of ventricle displacement, as the result shows, is occurred when the aqueduct is as resistant as brain parenchyma for the flow of cerebrospinal fluid. The decrement of brain elastic modulus causes brain parenchyma displacement value approach ventricle displacement value. The smaller of time constant value causes the smaller value of ventricle displacement.

  12. Slamming Simulations in a Conditional Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seng, Sopheak; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2012-01-01

    A study of slamming events in conditional waves is presented in this paper. The ship is sailing in head sea and the motion is solved for under the assumption of rigid body motion constrained to two degree-of-freedom i.e. heave and pitch. Based on a time domain non-linear strip theory most probable...... surface NS/VOF CFD simulations under the same wave conditions. In moderate seas and no occurrence of slamming the structural responses predicted by the methods agree well. When slamming occurs the strip theory overpredicts VBM but the peak values of VBM occurs at approximately the same time as predicted...... by the CFD method implying the possibility to use the more accurate CFD results to improve the estimation of slamming loads in the strip theory through a rational correction coefficient....

  13. Microgravity cultivation of cells and tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, L. E.; Pellis, N.; Searby, N.; de Luis, J.; Preda, C.; Bordonaro, J.; Vunjak-Novakovic, G.

    1999-01-01

    In vitro studies of cells and tissues in microgravity, either simulated by cultivation conditions on earth or actual, during spaceflight, are expected to help identify mechanisms underlying gravity sensing and transduction in biological organisms. In this paper, we review rotating bioreactor studies of engineered skeletal and cardiovascular tissues carried out in unit gravity, a four month long cartilage tissue engineering study carried out aboard the Mir Space Station, and the ongoing laboratory development and testing of a system for cell and tissue cultivation aboard the International Space Station.

  14. Biogeochemical Reactions Under Simulated Europa Ocean Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amashukeli, X.; Connon, S. A.; Gleeson, D. F.; Kowalczyk, R. S.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2007-12-01

    Galileo data have demonstrated the probable presence of a liquid water ocean on Europa, and existence of salts and carbon dioxide in the satellite's surface ice (e.g., Carr et al., 1998; McCord et al., 1999, Pappalardo et al., 1999; Kivelson et al., 2000). Subsequently, the discovery of chemical signatures of extinct or extant life in Europa's ocean and on its surface became a distinct possibility. Moreover, understanding of Europa's potential habitability is now one of the major goals of the Europa Orbiter Flagship mission. It is likely, that in the early stages of Europa's ocean formation, moderately alkaline oceanic sulfate-carbonate species and a magnetite-silicate mantel could have participated in low-temperature biogeochemical sulfur, iron and carbon cycles facilitated by primitive organisms (Zolotov and Shock, 2004). If periodic supplies of fresh rock and sulfate-carbonate ions are available in Europa's ocean, then an exciting prospect exists that life may be present in Europa's ocean today. In our laboratory, we began the study of the plausible biogeochemical reactions under conditions appropriate to Europa's ocean using barophilic psychrophilic organisms that thrive under anaerobic conditions. In the near absence of abiotic synthetic pathways due to low Europa's temperatures, the biotic synthesis may present a viable opportunity for the formation of the organic and inorganic compounds under these extreme conditions. This work is independent of assumptions regarding hydrothermal vents at Europa's ocean floor or surface-derived oxidant sources. For our studies, we have fabricated a high-pressure (5,000 psi) reaction vessel that simulates aqueous conditions on Europa. We were also successful at reviving barophilic psychrophilic strains of Shewanella bacterium, which serve as test organisms in this investigation. Currently, facultative barophilic psychrophilic stains of Shewanella are grown in the presence of ferric food source; the strains exhibiting iron

  15. Fluid behavior in microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Lee, C. C.; Tsao, Y. D.

    1990-01-01

    The instability of liquid and gas interface can be induced by the presence of longitudinal and lateral accelerations, vehicle vibration, and rotational fields of spacecraft in a microgravity environment. In a spacecraft design, the requirements of settled propellant are different for tank pressurization, engine restart, venting, or propellent transfer. In this paper, the dynamical behavior of liquid propellant, fluid reorientation, and propellent resettling have been carried out through the execution of a CRAY X-MP super computer to simulate fluid management in a microgravity environment. Characteristics of slosh waves excited by the restoring force field of gravity jitters have also been investigated.

  16. Action of microgravity on root development

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Arabidopsis were grown on horizontal or vertical clinostat for 4 8 or 12 days. Seedlings on horizontal clinostat were in simulated microgravity and seedlings on...

  17. Quantitative EEG and its Correlation with Cardiovascular, Cognition and mood State: an Integrated Study in Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianyuan; Hu, Bin; Chen, Wenjuan; Moore, Philip; Xu, Tingting; Dong, Qunxi; Liu, Zhenyu; Luo, Yuejia; Chen, Shanguang

    2014-12-01

    The focus of the study is the estimation of the effects of microgravity on the central nervous activity and its underlying influencing mechanisms. To validate the microgravity-induced physiological and psychological effects on EEG, quantitative EEG features, cardiovascular indicators, mood state, and cognitive performances data collection was achieved during a 45 day period using a -6°head-down bed rest (HDBR) integrated approach. The results demonstrated significant differences in EEG data, as an increased Theta wave, a decreased Beta wave and a reduced complexity of brain, accompanied with an increased heart rate and pulse rate, decreased positive emotion, and degraded emotion conflict monitoring performance. The canonical correlation analysis (CCA) based cardiovascular and cognitive related EEG model showed the cardiovascular effect on EEG mainly affected bilateral temporal region and the cognitive effect impacted parietal-occipital and frontal regions. The results obtained in the study support the use of an approach which combines a multi-factor influential mechanism hypothesis. The changes in the EEG data may be influenced by both cardiovascular and cognitive effects.

  18. Microgravity, Stem Cells, and Embryonic Development: Challenges and Opportunities for 3D Tissue Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreazzoli, Massimiliano; Angeloni, Debora; Broccoli, Vania; Demontis, Gian C.

    2017-01-01

    Space is a challenging environment for the human body, due to the combined effects of reduced gravity (microgravity) and cosmic radiation. Known effects of microgravity range from the blood redistribution that affects the cardiovascular system and the eye to muscle wasting, bone loss, anemia, and immune depression. About cosmic radiation, the shielding provided by the spaceship hull is far less efficient than that afforded at ground level by the combined effects of the Earth atmosphere and magnetic field. The eye and its nervous layer (the retina) are affected by both microgravity and heavy ions exposure. Considering the importance of sight for long-term manned flights, visual research aimed at devising measures to protect the eye from environmental conditions of the outer space represents a special challenge to meet. In this review we focus on the impact of microgravity on embryonic development, discussing the roles of mechanical forces in the context of the neutral buoyancy the embryo experiences in the womb. At variance with its adverse effects on the adult human body, simulated microgravity may provide a unique tool for understanding the biomechanical events involved in the development and assembly in vitro of three-dimensional (3D) ocular tissues. Prospective benefits are the development of novel safety measures to protect the human eye from cosmic radiation in microgravity during long-term manned spaceflights in the outer space, as well as the generation of human 3D-retinas with its supporting structures to develop innovative and effective therapeutic options for degenerative eye diseases.

  19. Microgravity, Stem Cells, and Embryonic Development: Challenges and Opportunities for 3D Tissue Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreazzoli, Massimiliano [Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Angeloni, Debora [Institute of Life Sciences, Scuola Superiore Sant' Anna, Pisa (Italy); Broccoli, Vania [National Research Council, Institute of Neuroscience, Milan (Italy); Stem Cells and Neurogenesis Unit, Division of Neuroscience, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Demontis, Gian C., E-mail: giancarlo.demontis@farm.unipi.it [Department of Pharmacy and Centro D' Ateneo “E. Piaggio”, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2017-04-25

    Space is a challenging environment for the human body, due to the combined effects of reduced gravity (microgravity) and cosmic radiation. Known effects of microgravity range from the blood redistribution that affects the cardiovascular system and the eye to muscle wasting, bone loss, anemia, and immune depression. About cosmic radiation, the shielding provided by the spaceship hull is far less efficient than that afforded at ground level by the combined effects of the Earth atmosphere and magnetic field. The eye and its nervous layer (the retina) are affected by both microgravity and heavy ions exposure. Considering the importance of sight for long-term manned flights, visual research aimed at devising measures to protect the eye from environmental conditions of the outer space represents a special challenge to meet. In this review we focus on the impact of microgravity on embryonic development, discussing the roles of mechanical forces in the context of the neutral buoyancy the embryo experiences in the womb. At variance with its adverse effects on the adult human body, simulated microgravity may provide a unique tool for understanding the biomechanical events involved in the development and assembly in vitro of three-dimensional (3D) ocular tissues. Prospective benefits are the development of novel safety measures to protect the human eye from cosmic radiation in microgravity during long-term manned spaceflights in the outer space, as well as the generation of human 3D-retinas with its supporting structures to develop innovative and effective therapeutic options for degenerative eye diseases.

  20. Simulated Microgravity Reduces TNF-Alpha Activity, Suppresses Glucose Uptake and Enhances Arginine Flux in Pancreatic Islets of Langerhans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Brian W.; Leeper-Woodford, Sandra K.; Hashemi, Brian B.; Smith, Scott M.; Sams, Clarence F.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The present studies were designed to determine effects of microgravity upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF - alpha) activity and indices of insulin and fuel homeostasis of pancreatic islets of Langerhans. Islets (1726+/-117,150 u IEU) from Wistar Furth rats were treated as: 1) HARV (High Aspect Ratio Vessel cell culture) , 2) HARV plus LPS 3) static culture, 4) static culture plus LPS TNF-alpha (L929 cytotoxicity assay) was significantly increased in LPS-induced HARV and static cultures, yet the increase was more pronounced in the static culture group (palpha production of pancreatic islets of Langerhans, favoring a lesser TNF activity in the HARV paradigm. These alterations in fuel homeostasis may be promulgated by gravity averaged cell culture methods or by three dimensional cell assembly.

  1. Three-dimensional growth patterns of various human tumor cell lines in simulated microgravity of a NASA bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M; Techy, G B; Saroufeem, R; Yazan, O; Narayan, K S; Goodwin, T J; Spaulding, G F

    1997-06-01

    Growth patterns of a number of human tumor cell lines that from three-dimensional structures of various architectures when cultured without carrier beads in a NASA rotary cell culture system are described and illustrated. The culture system, which was designed to mimic microgravity, maintained cells in suspension under very low-shear stress throughout culture. Spheroid (particulate) production occurred within a few hours after culture was started, and spheroids increased in size by cell division and fusion of small spheroids, usually stabilizing at a spheroid diameter of about 0.5 mm. Architecture of spheroids varied with cell type. Cellular interactions that occurred in spheroids resulted in conformation and shape changes of cells, and some cell lines produced complex, epithelial-like architectures. Expression of the cell adhesion molecules, CD44 and E cadherin, was upregulated in the three-dimensional constructs. Coculture of fibroblast spheroids with PC3 prostate cancer cells induced tenascin expression by the fibroblasts underlying the adherent prostate epithelial cells. Invasion of the fibroblast spheroids by the malignant epithelium was also demonstrated.

  2. FY 2000 report on research and development of combustion technology utilizing microgravity conditions for fuel diversification; 2000 nendo bisho juryoku kankyo wo riyoshita nenryo tayoka nensho gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    This project is aimed at development of optimum combustion technology with diversified fuels, e.g., naphtha and LCO, for gas turbines and others as power sources for topographical energy supply. The combustion under the microgravity is also investigated using the underground facilities at Japan Microgravity Center. Described herein are the FY 2000 results. For construction of combustion model and simulation, the combustion reactions for various liquid fuels are simplified to calculate ignition delay, adiabatic flame temperature and laminar burning velocity with an error less than about 3%. The microgravity combustion experiments are conducted for spray dispersed into a cylinder, to find flame propagation velocities changing with the vaporization characteristics of liquid fuels, and also to construct the combustion models. The premixed turbulent combustion simulation program is developed using a probability density function and analyzed. Development of new combustion technologies includes the study themes of flame propagation and combustion of the air mixture of the multi-component fuel in which the spray exists, combustion characteristics of the droplets of diversified fuels, and combustion of gas turbines with diversified fuels. A propane/air mixture shows different flame propagation characteristics whether it contains kerosene or LCO droplets. The effects of electrical field intensity in the combustion zone on combustion of fuel droplets are elucidated. (NEDO)

  3. Conditional simulation for efficient global optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, Jack P.C.; Mehdad, E.; Pasupathy, R.; Kim, S.-H.; Tolk, A.; Hill, R.; Kuhl, M.E.

    2013-01-01

    A classic Kriging or Gaussian process (GP) metamodel estimates the variance of its predictor by plugging-in the estimated GP (hyper)parameters; namely, the mean, variance, and covariances. The problem is that this predictor variance is biased. To solve this problem for deterministic simulations, we

  4. The economics of microgravity research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiFrancesco, Jeanne M; Olson, John M

    2015-01-01

    In this introduction to the economics of microgravity research, DiFrancesco and Olson explore the existing landscape and begin to define the requirements for a robust, well-funded microgravity research environment. This work chronicles the history, the opportunities, and how the decisions made today will shape the future. The past 60 years have seen tremendous growth in the capabilities and resources available to conduct microgravity science. However, we are now at an inflection point for the future of humanity in space. A confluence of factors including the rise of commercialization, a shifting funding landscape, and a growing international presence in space exploration, and terrestrial research platforms are shaping the conditions for full-scale microgravity research programs. In this first discussion, the authors focus on the concepts of markets, tangible and intangible value, research pathways and their implications for investments in research projects, and the collateral platforms needed. The opportunities and implications for adopting new approaches to funding and market-making illuminate how decisions made today will affect the speed of advances the community will be able to achieve in the future.

  5. Numerical simulation of meteorological conditions for peak pollution in Paris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carissimo, B. [Electricite de France (EDF), 78 - Chatou (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches

    1997-06-01

    Results obtained on the simulation of meteorological conditions during two episodes of peak pollution in Paris are presented, one in the winter, the other in the summer. The A3UR air quality modelling system is first described followed by the MERCURE mesoscale meteorological model. The conditions of simulation are described. The results obtained on these two causes show satisfactory agreement, for example on the magnitude of the urban heat island which is correctly reproduced. In this study, several areas of progress have been identified: improvement of the altitude measurement network around cities, the simulation of light wind conditions and the simulation of formation and dissipation of fog. (author) 24 refs.

  6. Initial conditions for turbulent mixing simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kaman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the classical Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamical instability, we examine the much debated question of models for initial conditions and the possible influence of unrecorded long wave length contributions to the instability growth rate α.

  7. Slamming Simulations in a Conditional Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seng, Sopheak; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2012-01-01

    A study of slamming events in conditional waves is presented in this paper. The ship is sailing in head sea and the motion is solved for under the assumption of rigid body motion constrained to two degree-of-freedom i.e. heave and pitch. Based on a time domain non-linear strip theory most probable...

  8. Chemical etching of a GaSb crystal incorporated with Mn grown by the Bridgman method under microgravity conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaofeng; Chen Nuofu; Wu Jinliang; Zhang Xiulan; Chai Chunlin; Yu Yude

    2009-01-01

    A GaSb crystal incorporated with Mn has been grown by the Bridgman method on the Polizon facility onboard the FOTON-M3 spacecraft. Structural defects and growth striations have been successfully revealed by the chemical etching method. By calculating various parameters of the convection, the striation patterns can be explained, and the critical value of the Taylor number, which characterizes the convective condition of the rotating magnetic field induced azimuthal flow, was shown. The stresses generated during crystal growth can be reflected by the observations of etch pit distribution and other structural defects. Suggestions for improving the space experiment to improve the quality of the crystal are given. (semiconductor materials)

  9. Chemical etching of a GaSb crystal incorporated with Mn grown by the Bridgman method under microgravity conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xiaofeng; Chen Nuofu; Wu Jinliang; Zhang Xiulan; Chai Chunlin; Yu Yude, E-mail: xfchen@semi.ac.c, E-mail: nfchen@semi.ac.c [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials and Devices, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2009-08-15

    A GaSb crystal incorporated with Mn has been grown by the Bridgman method on the Polizon facility onboard the FOTON-M3 spacecraft. Structural defects and growth striations have been successfully revealed by the chemical etching method. By calculating various parameters of the convection, the striation patterns can be explained, and the critical value of the Taylor number, which characterizes the convective condition of the rotating magnetic field induced azimuthal flow, was shown. The stresses generated during crystal growth can be reflected by the observations of etch pit distribution and other structural defects. Suggestions for improving the space experiment to improve the quality of the crystal are given. (semiconductor materials)

  10. Microgravity Emissions Laboratory (MEL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Microgravity Emissions Laboratory (MEL) utilizes a low-frequency acceleration measurement system for the characterization of rigid body inertial forces generated...

  11. Expression of transcription factors after short-term exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures to hypergravity and simulated microgravity (2-D/3-D clinorotation, magnetic levitation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbick, M.; Dijkstra, C.; Larkin, O. J.; Anthony, P.; Davey, M. R.; Power, J. B.; Lowe, K. C.; Cogoli-Greuter, M.; Hampp, R.

    Gravity is an important environmental factor that controls plant growth and development. Studies have shown that the perception of gravity is not only a property of specialized cells, but can also be performed by undifferentiated cultured cells. In this investigation, callus of Arabidopsis thaliana cv. Columbia was used to investigate the initial steps of gravity-related signalling cascades, through altered expression of transcription factors (TFs). TFs are families of small proteins that regulate gene expression by binding to specific promoter sequences. Based on microarray studies, members of the gene families WRKY, MADS-box, MYB, and AP2/EREBP were selected for investigation, as well as members of signalling chains, namely IAA 19 and phosphoinositol-4-kinase. Using qRT-PCR, transcripts were quantified within a period of 30 min in response to hypergravity (8 g), clinorotation [2-D clinostat and 3-D random positioning machine (RPM)] and magnetic levitation (ML). The data indicated that (1) changes in gravity induced stress-related signalling, and (2) exposure in the RPM induced changes in gene expression which resemble those of magnetic levitation. Two dimensional clinorotation resulted in responses similar to those caused by hypergravity. It is suggested that RPM and ML are preferable to simulate microgravity than clinorotation.

  12. Cellular and molecular aspects of plant adaptation to microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, Elizabeth; Kozeko, Liudmyla

    2016-07-01

    Elucidation of the range and mechanisms of the biological effects of microgravity is one of the urgent fundamental tasks of space and gravitational biology. The absence of forbidding on plant growth and development in orbital flight allows studying different aspects of plant adaptation to this factor that is directly connected with development of the technologies of bioregenerative life-support systems. Microgravity belongs to the environmental factors which cause adaptive reactions at the cellular and molecular levels in the range of physiological responses in the framework of genetically determined program of ontogenesis. It is known that cells of a multicellular organism not only take part in reactions of the organism but also carry out processes that maintain their integrity. In light of these principles, the problem of identification of biochemical, physiological and structural patterns that can have adaptive significance at the cellular and molecular levels in real and simulated microgravity is considered. It is pointed that plant cell responses in microgravity and under clinorotation vary according to growth phase, physiological state, and taxonomic position of the object. At the same time, the responses have, to some degree, a similar character reflecting the changes in the cell organelle functional load. The maintenance of the plasmalemma fluidity at the certain level, an activation of both the antioxidant system and expression of HSP genes, especially HSP70, under increasing reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation intensity and alteration in protein homeostasis, are a strategic paradigm of rapid (primary) cell adaptation to microgravity. In this sense, biological membranes, especially plasmalemma, and their properties and functions may be considered as the most sensitive indicators of the influence of gravity or altered gravity on a cell. The plasmalemma lipid bilayer is a border between the cell internal content and environment, so it is a mediator

  13. Graphite Oxidation Simulation in HTR Accident Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Genk, Mohamed

    2012-10-19

    Massive air and water ingress, following a pipe break or leak in steam-generator tubes, is a design-basis accident for high-temperature reactors (HTRs). Analysis of these accidents in both prismatic and pebble bed HTRs requires state-of-the-art capability for predictions of: 1) oxidation kinetics, 2) air helium gas mixture stratification and diffusion into the core following the depressurization, 3) transport of multi-species gas mixture, and 4) graphite corrosion. This project will develop a multi-dimensional, comprehensive oxidation kinetics model of graphite in HTRs, with diverse capabilities for handling different flow regimes. The chemical kinetics/multi-species transport model for graphite burning and oxidation will account for temperature-related changes in the properties of graphite, oxidants (O2, H2O, CO), reaction products (CO, CO2, H2, CH4) and other gases in the mixture (He and N2). The model will treat the oxidation and corrosion of graphite in geometries representative of HTR core component at temperatures of 900°C or higher. The developed chemical reaction kinetics model will be user-friendly for coupling to full core analysis codes such as MELCOR and RELAP, as well as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes such as CD-adapco. The research team will solve governing equations for the multi-dimensional flow and the chemical reactions and kinetics using Simulink, an extension of the MATLAB solver, and will validate and benchmark the model's predictions using reported experimental data. Researchers will develop an interface to couple the validated model to a commercially available CFD fluid flow and thermal-hydraulic model of the reactor , and will perform a simulation of a pipe break in a prismatic core HTR, with the potential for future application to a pebble-bed type HTR.

  14. Cavitation studies in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobel, Philippe; Obreschkow, Danail; Farhat, Mohamed; Dorsaz, Nicolas; de Bosset, Aurele

    The hydrodynamic cavitation phenomenon is a major source of erosion for many industrial systems such as cryogenic pumps for rocket propulsion, fast ship propellers, hydraulic pipelines and turbines. Erosive processes are associated with liquid jets and shockwaves emission fol-lowing the cavity collapse. Yet, fundamental understanding of these processes requires further cavitation studies inside various geometries of liquid volumes, as the bubble dynamics strongly depends the surrounding pressure field. To this end, microgravity represents a unique platform to produce spherical fluid geometries and remove the hydrostatic pressure gradient induced by gravity. The goal of our first experiment (flown on ESA's parabolic flight campaigns 2005 and 2006) was to study single bubble dynamics inside large spherical water drops (having a radius between 8 and 13 mm) produced in microgravity. The water drops were created by a micro-pump that smoothly expelled the liquid through a custom-designed injector tube. Then, the cavitation bubble was generated through a fast electrical discharge between two electrodes immersed in the liquid from above. High-speed imaging allowed to analyze the implications of isolated finite volumes and spherical free surfaces on bubble evolution, liquid jets formation and shock wave dynamics. Of particular interest are the following results: (A) Bubble lifetimes are shorter than in extended liquid volumes, which could be explain by deriving novel corrective terms to the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. (B) Transient crowds of micro-bubbles (smaller than 1mm) appeared at the instants of shockwaves emission. A comparison between high-speed visualizations and 3D N-particle simulations of a shock front inside a liquid sphere reveals that focus zones within the drop lead to a significantly increased density of induced cavitation. Considering shock wave crossing and focusing may hence prove crucially useful to understand the important process of cavitation erosion

  15. Simulations of QCD and QED with C* boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Martin; Lucini, Biagio; Patella, Agostino; Tantalo, Nazario

    2018-03-01

    We present exploratory results from dynamical simulations of QCD in isolation, as well as QCD coupled to QED, with C* boundary conditions. In finite volume, the use of C* boundary conditions allows for a gauge invariant and local formulation of QED without zero modes. In particular we show that the simulations reproduce known results and that masses of charged mesons can be extracted in a completely gauge invariant way. For the simulations we use a modified version of the HiRep code. The primary features of the simulation code are presented and we discuss some details regarding the implementation of C* boundary conditions and the simulated lattice action. Preprint: CP3-Origins-2017-046 DNRF90, CERN-TH-2017-214

  16. Straight Ahead in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S. J.; Vanya, R. D.; Clement, G.

    2014-01-01

    This joint ESA-NASA study will address adaptive changes in spatial orientation related to the subjective straight ahead, and the use of a vibrotactile sensory aid to reduce perceptual errors. The study will be conducted before and after long-duration expeditions to the International Space Station (ISS) to examine how spatial processing of target location is altered following exposure to microgravity. This project specifically addresses the sensorimotor research gap "What are the changes in sensorimotor function over the course of a mission?" Six ISS crewmembers will be requested to participate in three preflight sessions (between 120 and 60 days prior to launch) and then three postflight sessions on R+0/1 day, R+4 +/-2 days, and R+8 +/-2 days. The three specific aims include: (a) fixation of actual and imagined target locations at different distances; (b) directed eye and arm movements along different spatial reference frames; and (c) the vestibulo-ocular reflex during translation motion with fixation targets at different distances. These measures will be compared between upright and tilted conditions. Measures will then be compared with and without a vibrotactile sensory aid that indicates how far one has tilted relative to the straight-ahead direction. The flight study was been approved by the medical review boards and will be implemented in the upcoming Informed Crew Briefings to solicit flight subject participation. Preliminary data has been recorded on 6 subjects during parabolic flight to examine the spatial coding of eye movements during roll tilt relative to perceived orientations while free-floating during the microgravity phase of parabolic flight or during head tilt in normal gravity. Binocular videographic recordings obtained in darkness allowed us to quantify the mean deviations in gaze trajectories along both horizontal and vertical coordinates relative to the aircraft and head orientations. During some parabolas, a vibrotactile sensory aid provided

  17. Three-dimensional simulated microgravity culture improves the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cell in PLGA scaffolds implanted in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanping; He, Lina; Pan, Shuang; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Weiwei; Yi, Hong; Niu, Yumei

    2017-02-01

    Tooth regeneration through stem cell-based therapy is a promising treatment for tooth decay and loss. Human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) have been widely identified as the stem cells with the most potential for tooth tissue regeneration. However, the culture of hDPSCs in vitro for tissue engineering is challenging, as cells may proliferate slowly or/and differentiate poorly in vivo. Dynamic three‑dimensional (3D) simulated microgravity (SMG) created using the rotary cell culture system is considered to an effective tool, which contributes to several cell functions. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the effect of dynamic 3D SMG culture on the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation abilities of hDPSCs in poly (lactic‑co‑glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffolds in nude mice. The hDPSCs on PLGA scaffolds were maintained separately in the 3D SMG culture system and static 3D cultures with osteogenic medium for 7 days in vitro. Subsequently, the cell‑PLGA complexes were implanted subcutaneously on the backs of nude mice for 4 weeks. The results of histological and immunohistochemical examinations of Ki‑67, type I collagen, dentin sialoprotein and DMP‑1 indicated that the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation abilities of the hDPSCs prepared in the 3D SMG culture system were higher, compared with those prepared in the static culture system. These findings suggested that dynamic 3D SMG culture likely contributes to tissue engineering by improving the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation abilities of hDPSCs in vivo.

  18. The dynamical simulation of transient three-dimensional cryogenic liquid sloshing oscillations under low-gravity and microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yong Mann

    A numerical simulation model has been developed for the dynamical behavior of spacecraft propellant, both during the draining and the closing of the tank outlet at the onset of suction dip affected by the asymmetric combined gravity gradient and gravity jitter accelerations. In particular the effect of the surface tension of the fluids in the partially filled dewar (applicable to the Gravity Probe-B spacecraft dewar tank and fuel tanks for a liquid rocket) with rotation has been simulated and investigated. Two different cases of accelerations, one with gravity jitter dominated and the other equally weighted between gravity gradient and gravity jitter accelerations, are studied. In the development of this numerical simulation model, the NASA-VOF3D has been used as a supplement to the numerical program of this dissertation. The NASA-VOF3D code has been used for performing the three-dimensional incompressible flows with free surface. This is also used for controlling liquid sloshing inside the tank when the spacecraft is orbiting. To keep track of the location of the liquid, the fractional volume of fluid (VOF) technique was used. The VOF is based on the indicator function of the region occupied by the liquid with an Eulerian approach to solve the free surface phenomena between liquid and gas phases. For the calculation of surface tension force, the VOF model is also used. The newly developed simulation model is used to investigate the characteristics of liquid hydrogen draining in terms of the residual amount of trapped liquid at the onset of the suction dip and residual liquid volume at the time the dip of the liquid-vapor interface formed. This investigation simulates the characteristics of liquid oscillations due to liquid container outlet shut-off at the onset of suction dip. These phenomena checked how these mechanisms affected the excitation of slosh waves during the course of liquid draining and after shut-off tank outlet. In the present study, the dynamical

  19. Multiple point statistical simulation using uncertain (soft) conditional data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Thomas Mejer; Vu, Le Thanh; Mosegaard, Klaus; Cordua, Knud Skou

    2018-05-01

    Geostatistical simulation methods have been used to quantify spatial variability of reservoir models since the 80s. In the last two decades, state of the art simulation methods have changed from being based on covariance-based 2-point statistics to multiple-point statistics (MPS), that allow simulation of more realistic Earth-structures. In addition, increasing amounts of geo-information (geophysical, geological, etc.) from multiple sources are being collected. This pose the problem of integration of these different sources of information, such that decisions related to reservoir models can be taken on an as informed base as possible. In principle, though difficult in practice, this can be achieved using computationally expensive Monte Carlo methods. Here we investigate the use of sequential simulation based MPS simulation methods conditional to uncertain (soft) data, as a computational efficient alternative. First, it is demonstrated that current implementations of sequential simulation based on MPS (e.g. SNESIM, ENESIM and Direct Sampling) do not account properly for uncertain conditional information, due to a combination of using only co-located information, and a random simulation path. Then, we suggest two approaches that better account for the available uncertain information. The first make use of a preferential simulation path, where more informed model parameters are visited preferentially to less informed ones. The second approach involves using non co-located uncertain information. For different types of available data, these approaches are demonstrated to produce simulation results similar to those obtained by the general Monte Carlo based approach. These methods allow MPS simulation to condition properly to uncertain (soft) data, and hence provides a computationally attractive approach for integration of information about a reservoir model.

  20. Solidification under microgravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    microgravity are highlighted in terms of science returns. Keywords. ... indicate its relevance in any materials science research programme, especially ..... of low gravity on the macro segregation patterns although good qualitative results were.

  1. DISAIN SIMULATOR AUTOMOTIVE AIR CONDITIONING UNTUK MENINGKATKAN KOMPETENSI MAHASISWA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamin Sumardi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Perkembangan teknologi automotive air conditioning dan aplikasinya sangat cepat, salah satunya dengan menerapkan green technology. Penerapan green technology pada teknologi air conditioning, karena masih menggunakan refrigeran yang mengandung unsur kimia yang merusak lapisan ozon dan pemanasan global. Alih teknologi bidang air conditioning yang ramah lingkungan, belum dibarengi dengan ketersediaan tenaga kerja pada tingkat SMK dan perguruan tinggi yang memadai, baik kuantitas maupun kompetensinya. Pada level SMK dan perguruan tinggi, kompetensi akademik dan vokasional bidang automotive air conditioning harus terus ditingkatkan dan diperbaharui sesuai dengan perkembangan teknologinya. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menghasilkan simulator automotive air conditioner dan model pembelajaran tata udara pada otomotif berwawasan teknologi ramah lingkungan. Penelitian menggunakan metode research and development dengan langkah-langkah: studi pendahuluan, perencanaan, pengembangan melalui uji coba simulator, validasi, dan produk akhir. Simulator dibuat sesuai dengan kondisi di dunia kerja agar tidak terjadi miskonsepsi dan mala-praktek automotive air conditioning. Simulator ini dibuat secara kompak dan mobile atau dapat dipindah dan dibawa. Model pembelajaran disesuaikan dengan kebutuhan kompetensi yang dipersyaratkan. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa dengan bantuan simulator automotive air conditioner dan model pembelajaran yang tepat mahasiswa mampu menyerap konsep dan praktek lebih cepat 85%. Hasil belajar pada ranah afektif, kognitif, psikomotor dan kompetensi meningkat secara signifikan.

  2. Extremophiles survival to simulated space conditions: an astrobiology model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastascusa, V; Romano, I; Di Donato, P; Poli, A; Della Corte, V; Rotundi, A; Bussoletti, E; Quarto, M; Pugliese, M; Nicolaus, B

    2014-09-01

    In this work we investigated the ability of four extremophilic bacteria from Archaea and Bacteria domains to resist to space environment by exposing them to extreme conditions of temperature, UV radiation, desiccation coupled to low pressure generated in a Mars' conditions simulator. All the investigated extremophilic strains (namely Sulfolobus solfataricus, Haloterrigena hispanica, Thermotoga neapolitana and Geobacillus thermantarcticus) showed a good resistance to the simulation of the temperature variation in the space; on the other hand irradiation with UV at 254 nm affected only slightly the growth of H. hispanica, G. thermantarcticus and S. solfataricus; finally exposition to Mars simulated condition showed that H. hispanica and G. thermantarcticus were resistant to desiccation and low pressure.

  3. Response of HEPA filters to simulated-accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, W.S.; Martin, R.A.; Smith, P.R.; Fenton, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters have been subjected to simulated accident conditions to determine their response to abnormal operating events. Both domestic and European standard and high-capacity filters have been evaluated to determine their response to simulated fire, explosion, and tornado conditions. The HEPA filter structural limitations for tornado and explosive loadings are discussed. In addition, filtration efficiencies during these accident conditions are reported for the first time. Our data indicate efficiencies between 80% and 90% for shock loadings below the structural limit level. We describe two types of testing for ineffective filtration - clean filters exposed to pulse-entrained aerosol and dirty filters exposed to tornado and shock pulses. Efficiency and material loss data are described. Also, the resonse of standard HEPA filters to simulated fire conditions is presented. We describe a unique method of measuring accumulated combustion products on the filter. Additionally, data relating to pressure drop vs accumulated mass during plugging are reported for simulated combustion aerosols. The effects of concentration and moisture levels on filter plugging were evaluated. We are obtaining all of the above data so that mathematical models can be developed for fire, explosion, and tornado accident analysis computer codes. These computer codes can be used to assess the response of nuclear air cleaning systems to accident conditions

  4. Responses, applications, and analysis of microgravity effects on bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Michael Robert

    ) to evaluate changes in extracellular fluid density on convective mass transport. From the theoretical analysis results, I predicted convective and diffusive transport regimes for bacteria grown under microgravity, 1 g, and hyper-gravity conditions. Finally, using a numerical model, I successfully simulated an experimentally observed phenomenon of buoyancy-driven convection created by cellular metabolism.

  5. Microgravity Outreach and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Rosenberg, Carla B.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Research Program has been actively developing classroom activities and educator's guides since the flight of the First United States Microgravity Laboratory. In addition, various brochures, posters, and exhibit materials have been produced for outreach efforts to the general public and to researchers outside of the program. These efforts are led by the Microgravity Research Outreach/Education team at Marshall Space Flight Center, with classroom material support from the K-12 Educational Program of The National Center for Microgravity Research on Fluids and Combustion (NCMR), general outreach material development by the Microgravity Outreach office at Hampton University, and electronic/media access coordinated by Marshall. The broad concept of the NCMR program is to develop a unique set of microgravity-related educational products that enable effective outreach to the pre-college community by supplementing existing mathematics, science, and technology curricula. The current thrusts of the program include summer teacher and high school internships during which participants help develop educational materials and perform research with NCMR and NASA scientists; a teacher sabbatical program which allows a teacher to concentrate on a major educational product during a full school year; frequent educator workshops held at NASA and at regional and national teachers conferences; a nascent student drop tower experiment competition; presentations and demonstrations at events that also reach the general public; and the development of elementary science and middle school mathematics classroom products. An overview of existing classroom products will be provided, along with a list of pertinent World Wide Web URLs. Demonstrations of some hands on activities will show the audience how simple it can be to bring microgravity into the classroom.

  6. FY 1997 report on the study on creation of inorganic materials under micro-gravity environment; 1997 nendo chosa hokokusho (bisho juryoku kankyo riyo muki zairyo no sosei kenkyu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Study was made on creation of new functional inorganic materials under micro-gravity condition in an underground non-gravity experiment center to develop new production techniques of inorganic crystalline thin film, fine glass particle, anharmonic alloy, spherical semiconductor and surface modified semiconductor thin film. The micro-gravity observation result was analyzed numerically of interference fringes of Cu ion around an electrode during electrolysis. Experimental data relatively well agreed with computer simulation data. Prototype CdTe thin film was prepared by electrolysis. The size control condition of fine true spherical glass particles was clarified by micro-gravity evaporation/condensation of glass. Pb-Zn system alloys as an anharmonic alloy were prepared under micro-gravity condition, however, no compound of Pb and Zn was found. A production equipment of true spherical single-crystalline semiconductor by melting cubic Ge under micro-gravity condition, and basic data of heating condition were obtained. Surface modified semiconductor thin film was also obtained by micro-gravity laser annealing of SiGe prepared by plasma CVD. 23 refs., 65 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Hydrogen deflagration simulations under typical containment conditions for nuclear safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanez, J., E-mail: jorge.yanez@kit.edu [Institute for Energy and Nuclear Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Kaiserstrasse 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Kotchourko, A.; Lelyakin, A. [Institute for Energy and Nuclear Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Kaiserstrasse 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lean H{sub 2}-air combustion experiments highly relevant to typical NPP simulated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analyzed effect of temperature, concentration of H{sub 2}, and steam concentration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Similar conditions and H{sub 2} concentration yielded different combustion regimes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Flame instabilities (FIs) were the effect driving divergences. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Model developed for acoustic FI in simulations. Agreement experiments obtained. - Abstract: This paper presents the modeling of low-concentration hydrogen deflagrations performed with the recently developed KYLCOM model specially created to perform calculations in large scale domains. Three experiments carried out in THAI facility (performed in the frames of international OECD THAI experimental program) were selected to be analyzed. The tests allow studying lean mixture hydrogen combustion at normal ambient, elevated temperature and superheated and saturated conditions. The experimental conditions considered together with the facility size and shape grant a high relevance degree to the typical NPP containment conditions. The results of the simulations were thoroughly compared with the experimental data, and the comparison was supplemented by the analysis of the combustion regimes taking place in the considered tests. Results of the analysis demonstrated that despite the comparatively small difference in mixture properties, three different combustion regimes can be definitely identified. The simulations of one of the cases required of the modeling of the acoustic-parametric instability which was carefully undertaken.

  8. Plasma-material interaction under simulated disruption conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhipov, N.I.; Bakhtin, V.P.; Safronov, V.M.; Toporkov, D.A.; Vasenin, S.G.; Wurz, H.; Zhitlukhin, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    Sudden evaporation of divertor plate surface under high heat load during tokamak plasma disruption instantaneously produces a vapor shield. The cloud of vaporized material prevents the divertor plates from the bulk of incoming energy flux and thus reduces the further material erosion. Dynamics and effectiveness of the vapor shield are studied experimentally at the 2MK-200 facility under simulated disruption conditions. (orig.)

  9. ANALYSIS OF OPERATING INSTRUMENT LANDING SYSTEM ACCURACY UNDER SIMULATED CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy MERKISZ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The instrument landing system (ILS is the most popular landing aid in the world. It is a distance-angled support system for landing in reduced visibility, while its task is the safe conduct of the aircraft from the prescribed course landing on the approach path. The aim of this study is to analyse the correctness of the ILS in simulated conditions. The study was conducted using a CKAS MotionSim5 flight simulator in the Simulation Research Laboratory of the Institute of Combustion Engines and Transport at Poznan University of Technology. With the advancement of technical equipment, it was possible to check the operation of the system in various weather conditions. Studies have shown that the impact of fog, rain and snow on the correct operation of the system is marginal. Significant influence has been observed, however, during landing in strong winds.

  10. Transient analysis of multifailure conditions by using PWR plant simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morisaki, Hidetoshi; Yokobayashi, Masao.

    1984-11-01

    This report describes results of the analysis of abnormal transients caused by multifailures using a PWR plant simulator. The simulator is based on an existing 822MWe power plant with 3 loops, and designed to cover wide range of plant operation from cold shutdown to full power at the end of life. Various malfunctions to simulate abnormal conditions caused by equipment failures are provided. In this report, features of abnormal transients caused by concurrence of malfunctions are discussed. The abnormal conditions studied are leak of primary coolant, loss of charging and feedwater flows, and control systems failure. From the results, it was observed that transient responses caused by some of the malfunctions are almost same as the addition of behaviors caused by each single malfunction. Therefore, it can be said that kinds of malfunctions which are concurrent may be estimated from transient characteristics of each single malfunction. (author)

  11. The Biophysics Microgravity Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorti, S.

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical microgravity research on the International Space Station using biological materials has been ongoing for several decades. The well-documented substantive effects of long duration microgravity include the facilitation of the assembly of biological macromolecules into large structures, e.g., formation of large protein crystals under micro-gravity. NASA is invested not only in understanding the possible physical mechanisms of crystal growth, but also promoting two flight investigations to determine the influence of µ-gravity on protein crystal quality. In addition to crystal growth, flight investigations to determine the effects of shear on nucleation and subsequent formation of complex structures (e.g., crystals, fibrils, etc.) are also supported. It is now considered that long duration microgravity research aboard the ISS could also make possible the formation of large complex biological and biomimetic materials. Investigations of various materials undergoing complex structure formation in microgravity will not only strengthen NASA science programs, but may also provide invaluable insight towards the construction of large complex tissues, organs, or biomimetic materials on Earth.

  12. Discretely Integrated Condition Event (DICE) Simulation for Pharmacoeconomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, J Jaime

    2016-07-01

    Several decision-analytic modeling techniques are in use for pharmacoeconomic analyses. Discretely integrated condition event (DICE) simulation is proposed as a unifying approach that has been deliberately designed to meet the modeling requirements in a straightforward transparent way, without forcing assumptions (e.g., only one transition per cycle) or unnecessary complexity. At the core of DICE are conditions that represent aspects that persist over time. They have levels that can change and many may coexist. Events reflect instantaneous occurrences that may modify some conditions or the timing of other events. The conditions are discretely integrated with events by updating their levels at those times. Profiles of determinant values allow for differences among patients in the predictors of the disease course. Any number of valuations (e.g., utility, cost, willingness-to-pay) of conditions and events can be applied concurrently in a single run. A DICE model is conveniently specified in a series of tables that follow a consistent format and the simulation can be implemented fully in MS Excel, facilitating review and validation. DICE incorporates both state-transition (Markov) models and non-resource-constrained discrete event simulation in a single formulation; it can be executed as a cohort or a microsimulation; and deterministically or stochastically.

  13. Limestone attrition under simulated oxyfiring Fluidized-Bed combustion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scala, F. [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione - CNR, Napoli (Italy); Salatino, P. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica - Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy)

    2009-03-15

    Limestone attrition by surface wear was studied during the flue gas desulfurization under simulated fluidized-bed (FB) oxyfiring conditions and hindered calcination. Bench-scale experimental tests were carried out using well-established techniques previously developed for the characterization of sulfation and attrition of sorbents in air-blown atmospheric FB combustors. The experimental limestone conversion and attrition results were compared with those previously obtained with the same limestone under simulated air-blown combustion conditions. The differences in the conversion and attrition extents and patterns associated with oxyfiring as compared to air-blown atmospheric combustion were highlighted and related to the different particle morphologies and thicknesses of the sulfate layer. It was noted that attrition could play an important role in practical circulating FB combustor operation, by effectively enhancing particle sulfation under both oxyfiring and air-blown combustion conditions. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Relativistic initial conditions for N-body simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fidler, Christian [Catholic University of Louvain—Center for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3) 2, Chemin du Cyclotron, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Tram, Thomas; Crittenden, Robert; Koyama, Kazuya; Wands, David [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Rampf, Cornelius, E-mail: christian.fidler@uclouvain.be, E-mail: thomas.tram@port.ac.uk, E-mail: rampf@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de, E-mail: robert.crittenden@port.ac.uk, E-mail: kazuya.koyama@port.ac.uk, E-mail: david.wands@port.ac.uk [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, D–69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-06-01

    Initial conditions for (Newtonian) cosmological N-body simulations are usually set by re-scaling the present-day power spectrum obtained from linear (relativistic) Boltzmann codes to the desired initial redshift of the simulation. This back-scaling method can account for the effect of inhomogeneous residual thermal radiation at early times, which is absent in the Newtonian simulations. We analyse this procedure from a fully relativistic perspective, employing the recently-proposed Newtonian motion gauge framework. We find that N-body simulations for ΛCDM cosmology starting from back-scaled initial conditions can be self-consistently embedded in a relativistic space-time with first-order metric potentials calculated using a linear Boltzmann code. This space-time coincides with a simple ''N-body gauge'' for z < 50 for all observable modes. Care must be taken, however, when simulating non-standard cosmologies. As an example, we analyse the back-scaling method in a cosmology with decaying dark matter, and show that metric perturbations become large at early times in the back-scaling approach, indicating a breakdown of the perturbative description. We suggest a suitable ''forwards approach' for such cases.

  15. Conditional truncated plurigaussian simulation; Simulacao plurigaussiana truncada com condicionamento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Vitor Hugo

    1997-12-01

    The goal of this work was a development of an algorithm for the Truncated Plurigaussian Stochastic Simulation and its validation in a complex geologic model. The reservoir data comes from Aux Vases Zone at Rural Hill Field in Illinois, USA, and from the 2D geological interpretation, described by WEIMER et al. (1982), three sets of samples, with different grid densities ware taken. These sets were used to condition the simulation and to refine the estimates of the non-stationary matrix of facies proportions, used to truncate the gaussian random functions (RF). The Truncated Plurigaussian Model is an extension of the Truncated Gaussian Model (TG). In this new model its possible to use several facies with different spatial structures, associated with the simplicity of TG. The geological interpretation, used as a validation model, was chosen because it shows a set of NW/SE elongated tidal channels cutting the NE/SW shoreline deposits interleaved by impermeable facies. These characteristics of spatial structures of sedimentary facies served to evaluate the simulation model. Two independent gaussian RF were used, as well as an 'erosive model' as the truncation strategy. Also, non-conditional simulations were proceeded, using linearly combined gaussian RF with varying correlation coefficients. It was analyzed the influence of some parameters like: number of gaussian RF,correlation coefficient, truncations strategy, in the outcome of simulation, and also the physical meaning of these parameters under a geological point of view. It was showed, step by step, using an example, the theoretical model, and how to construct an algorithm to simulate with the Truncated Plurigaussian Model. The conclusion of this work was that even with a plain algorithm of the Conditional Truncated Plurigaussian and a complex geological model it's possible to obtain a usefulness product. (author)

  16. Microgravity Two-Phase Flow Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parang, M.; Chao, D.

    1999-01-01

    Two-phase flows under microgravity condition find a large number of important applications in fluid handling and storage, and spacecraft thermal management. Specifically, under microgravity condition heat transfer between heat exchanger surfaces and fluids depend critically on the distribution and interaction between different fluid phases which are often qualitatively different from the gravity-based systems. Heat transfer and flow analysis in two-phase flows under these conditions require a clear understanding of the flow pattern transition and development of appropriate dimensionless scales for its modeling and prediction. The physics of this flow is however very complex and remains poorly understood. This has led to various inadequacies in flow and heat transfer modeling and has made prediction of flow transition difficult in engineering design of efficient thermal and flow systems. In the present study the available published data for flow transition under microgravity condition are considered for mapping. The transition from slug to annular flow and from bubbly to slug flow are mapped using dimensionless variable combination developed in a previous study by the authors. The result indicate that the new maps describe the flow transitions reasonably well over the range of the data available. The transition maps are examined and the results are discussed in relation to the presumed balance of forces and flow dynamics. It is suggested that further evaluation of the proposed flow and transition mapping will require a wider range of microgravity data expected to be made available in future studies.

  17. Corrosion of pure OFHC-copper in simulated repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, P.

    1990-04-01

    The research program 'Corrosion of pure OFHC-copper in simulated repository conditions' was planned to provide an experimental evaluation with respect to the theoretical calculations and forecasts made for the corrosion behaviour of pure copper in bentonite groundwater environments at temperatures between 20-80 deg C. The aim of this study in the first place is to evaluate the effects of groundwater composition, bentonite and temperature on the equilibrium and possible corrosion reactions between pure copper and the simulated repository environment. The progress report includes the results obtained after 36 months exposure time

  18. Simulation of Artificial Intelligence for Automotive Air-conditioning System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Xiao-mei; CHEN You-hua; CHEN Zhi-jiu

    2002-01-01

    The artificial intelligence is applied to the simulation of the automotive air-conditioning system ( AACS )According to the system's characteristics a model of AACS, based on neural network, is developed. Different control methods of AACS are discussed through simulation based on this model. The result shows that the neural- fuzzy control is the best one compared with the on-off control and conventional fuzzy control method.It can make the compartment's temperature descend rapidly to the designed temperature and the fluctuation is small.

  19. Macromolecular crystallization in microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, Edward H; Helliwell, John R

    2005-01-01

    Density difference fluid flows and sedimentation of growing crystals are greatly reduced when crystallization takes place in a reduced gravity environment. In the case of macromolecular crystallography a crystal of a biological macromolecule is used for diffraction experiments (x-ray or neutron) so as to determine the three-dimensional structure of the macromolecule. The better the internal order of the crystal then the greater the molecular structure detail that can be extracted. It is this structural information that enables an understanding of how the molecule functions. This knowledge is changing the biological and chemical sciences, with major potential in understanding disease pathologies. In this review, we examine the use of microgravity as an environment to grow macromolecular crystals. We describe the crystallization procedures used on the ground, how the resulting crystals are studied and the knowledge obtained from those crystals. We address the features desired in an ordered crystal and the techniques used to evaluate those features in detail. We then introduce the microgravity environment, the techniques to access that environment and the theory and evidence behind the use of microgravity for crystallization experiments. We describe how ground-based laboratory techniques have been adapted to microgravity flights and look at some of the methods used to analyse the resulting data. Several case studies illustrate the physical crystal quality improvements and the macromolecular structural advances. Finally, limitations and alternatives to microgravity and future directions for this research are covered. Macromolecular structural crystallography in general is a remarkable field where physics, biology, chemistry and mathematics meet to enable insight to the fundamentals of life. As the reader will see, there is a great deal of physics involved when the microgravity environment is applied to crystallization, some of it known, and undoubtedly much yet to

  20. Simulating reservoir lithologies by an actively conditioned Markov chain model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Runhai; Luthi, Stefan M.; Gisolf, Dries

    2018-06-01

    The coupled Markov chain model can be used to simulate reservoir lithologies between wells, by conditioning them on the observed data in the cored wells. However, with this method, only the state at the same depth as the current cell is going to be used for conditioning, which may be a problem if the geological layers are dipping. This will cause the simulated lithological layers to be broken or to become discontinuous across the reservoir. In order to address this problem, an actively conditioned process is proposed here, in which a tolerance angle is predefined. The states contained in the region constrained by the tolerance angle will be employed for conditioning in the horizontal chain first, after which a coupling concept with the vertical chain is implemented. In order to use the same horizontal transition matrix for different future states, the tolerance angle has to be small. This allows the method to work in reservoirs without complex structures caused by depositional processes or tectonic deformations. Directional artefacts in the modeling process are avoided through a careful choice of the simulation path. The tolerance angle and dipping direction of the strata can be obtained from a correlation between wells, or from seismic data, which are available in most hydrocarbon reservoirs, either by interpretation or by inversion that can also assist the construction of a horizontal probability matrix.

  1. Dynamic simulation of variable capacity refrigeration systems under abnormal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Nan; Shao Shuangquan; Tian Changqing; Yan Yuying

    2010-01-01

    There are often abnormal working conditions at evaporator outlet of a refrigeration system, such as two-phase state in transient process, and it is essential to investigate such transient behaviours for system design and control strategy. In this paper, a dynamic lumped parameter model is developed to simulate the transient behaviours of refrigeration system with variable capacity in both normal and abnormal working conditions. The appropriate discriminant method is adopted to switch the normal and abnormal conditions smoothly and to eliminate the simulated data oscillation. In order to verify the dynamic model, we built a test system with variable frequency compressor, water-cooling condenser, evaporator and electronic expansion valve. Calculated values from the mathematical model show reasonable agreement with the experimental data. The simulation results show that the transient behaviours of the variable capacity refrigeration system in the abnormal working conditions can be calculated reliably with the dynamic model when the compressor rotary speed or the opening of electronic expansion valve changes abruptly.

  2. Conditional flood frequency and catchment state: a simulation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettschneider, Marco; Bourgin, François; Merz, Bruno; Andreassian, Vazken; Blaquiere, Simon

    2017-04-01

    Catchments have memory and the conditional flood frequency distribution for a time period ahead can be seen as non-stationary: it varies with the catchment state and climatic factors. From a risk management perspective, understanding the link of conditional flood frequency to catchment state is a key to anticipate potential periods of higher flood risk. Here, we adopt a simulation approach to explore the link between flood frequency obtained by continuous rainfall-runoff simulation and the initial state of the catchment. The simulation chain is based on i) a three state rainfall generator applied at the catchment scale, whose parameters are estimated for each month, and ii) the GR4J lumped rainfall-runoff model, whose parameters are calibrated with all available data. For each month, a large number of stochastic realizations of the continuous rainfall generator for the next 12 months are used as inputs for the GR4J model in order to obtain a large number of stochastic realizations for the next 12 months. This process is then repeated for 50 different initial states of the soil moisture reservoir of the GR4J model and for all the catchments. Thus, 50 different conditional flood frequency curves are obtained for the 50 different initial catchment states. We will present an analysis of the link between the catchment states, the period of the year and the strength of the conditioning of the flood frequency compared to the unconditional flood frequency. A large sample of diverse catchments in France will be used.

  3. Fish Inner Ear Otolith Growth Under Real Microgravity (Spaceflight) and Clinorotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anken, Ralf; Brungs, Sonja; Grimm, Dennis; Knie, Miriam; Hilbig, Reinhard

    2016-06-01

    Using late larval stages of cichlid fish ( Oreochromis mossambicus) we have shown earlier that the biomineralization of otoliths is adjusted towards gravity by means of a neurally guided feedback loop. Centrifuge experiments, e.g., revealed that increased gravity slows down otolith growth. Microgravity thus should yield an opposite effect, i.e., larger than normal otoliths. Consequently, late larval cichlids (stage 14, vestibular system operational) were subjected to real microgravity during the 12 days FOTON-M3 spaceflight mission (OMEGAHAB-hardware). Controls were kept at 1 g on ground within an identical hardware. Animals of another batch were subsequently clinorotated within a submersed fast-rotating clinostat with one axis of rotation (2d-clinostat), a device regarded to simulate microgravity. Temperature and light conditions were provided in analogy to the spaceflight experiment. Controls were maintained at 1 g within the same aquarium. After all experiments, animals had reached late stage 21 (fish can swim freely). Maintenance under real microgravity during spaceflight resulted in significantly larger than normal otoliths (both lapilli and sagittae, involved in sensing gravity and the hearing process, respectively). This result is fully in line with an earlier spaceflight study in the course of which otoliths from late-staged swordtails Xiphophorus helleri were analyzed. Clinorotation resulted in larger than 1 g sagittae. However, no effect on lapilli was obtained. Possibly, an effect was present but too light to be measurable. Overall, spaceflight obviously induces an adaptation of otolith growth, whereas clinorotation does not fully mimic conditions of microgravity regarding late larval cichlids.

  4. Do downscaled general circulation models reliably simulate historical climatic conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Andrew R.; Hay, Lauren E.; McCabe, Gregory J.; Markstrom, Steven L.; Atkinson, R. Dwight

    2018-01-01

    The accuracy of statistically downscaled (SD) general circulation model (GCM) simulations of monthly surface climate for historical conditions (1950–2005) was assessed for the conterminous United States (CONUS). The SD monthly precipitation (PPT) and temperature (TAVE) from 95 GCMs from phases 3 and 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3 and CMIP5) were used as inputs to a monthly water balance model (MWBM). Distributions of MWBM input (PPT and TAVE) and output [runoff (RUN)] variables derived from gridded station data (GSD) and historical SD climate were compared using the Kolmogorov–Smirnov (KS) test For all three variables considered, the KS test results showed that variables simulated using CMIP5 generally are more reliable than those derived from CMIP3, likely due to improvements in PPT simulations. At most locations across the CONUS, the largest differences between GSD and SD PPT and RUN occurred in the lowest part of the distributions (i.e., low-flow RUN and low-magnitude PPT). Results indicate that for the majority of the CONUS, there are downscaled GCMs that can reliably simulate historical climatic conditions. But, in some geographic locations, none of the SD GCMs replicated historical conditions for two of the three variables (PPT and RUN) based on the KS test, with a significance level of 0.05. In these locations, improved GCM simulations of PPT are needed to more reliably estimate components of the hydrologic cycle. Simple metrics and statistical tests, such as those described here, can provide an initial set of criteria to help simplify GCM selection.

  5. Exact simulation of conditioned Wright-Fisher models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Lascoux, Martin; Waxman, David

    2014-12-21

    Forward and backward simulations play an increasing role in population genetics, in particular when inferring the relative importance of evolutionary forces. It is therefore important to develop fast and accurate simulation methods for general population genetics models. Here we present an exact simulation method that generates trajectories of an allele׳s frequency in a finite population, as described by a general Wright-Fisher model. The method generates conditioned trajectories that start from a known frequency at a known time, and which achieve a specific final frequency at a known final time. The simulation method applies irrespective of the smallness of the probability of the transition between the initial and final states, because it is not based on rejection of trajectories. We illustrate the method on several different populations where a Wright-Fisher model (or related) applies, namely (i) a locus with 2 alleles, that is subject to selection and mutation; (ii) a locus with 3 alleles, that is subject to selection; (iii) a locus in a metapopulation consisting of two subpopulations of finite size, that are subject to selection and migration. The simulation method allows the generation of conditioned trajectories that can be used for the purposes of visualisation, the estimation of summary statistics, and the development/testing of new inferential methods. The simulated trajectories provide a very simple approach to estimating quantities that cannot easily be expressed in terms of the transition matrix, and can be applied to finite Markov chains other than the Wright-Fisher model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Investigating the Effects of Simulated Space conditions on Novel Extremely Halophilic Archaea: Halovarius Luteus gen. nov., sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feshangsaz, Niloofar; Van Loon, ing.. Jack J. W. A.; Nazmi, Kamran; Semsarha, Farid

    2016-07-01

    Studying halophiles from different environments of Earth provide new insights into our search for life in the universe. Haloarchaea show some unique characteristics and physiological adaptations like acidic proteins against harsh environments such as natural brine with salt concentration approaching saturation (5 M) and regions with low active water. These properties make haloarchaea interesting candidate for astrobiological studies. Halovarius luteus gen. nov., sp. nov. a novel extremely halophilic archaeon from Urmia salt lake, in Iran has been chosen to explore its resistance against a series of extreme conditions. The aim of this study is to assess the resistance of strain DA50T under the effects of simulated space conditions like simulated microgravity, hypergravity, and desiccation. In this paper we will discuss the results of these studies where we specifically focus on changes in carotenoid pigments production and whole cell proteome. This is the first report of very novel Iranian archaea in response to extreme space conditions. The pigments were extracted by acetone and methanol. Pigments were analyzed by scanning the absorbance spectrum in the UV-VIS spectrophotometer. And they were separated by TLC. Whole protein from cell lysate supernatant was extracted after lysis with Bacterial Protein Extraction Reagent and fractionated by RP-HPLC using C18 column. Proteome analyzed by electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and MALDI-TOF. Carotenoid pigments are formed under different extreme conditions such as dry environment and gravitational changes. Also the protein composition exhibits alterations after exposure to the same conditions. Our conclusion is that pigments and proteins formation depend on the growth circumstances. Halophiles use this as an adaptation to survive under different environmental conditions.

  7. Simulated Fission Gas Behavior in Silicide Fuel at LWR Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yinbin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mo, Kun [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yacout, Abdellatif [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Harp, Jason [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-09-15

    As a promising candidate for the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) used in light water reactors (LWRs), the fuel performance of uranium silicide (U3Si2) at LWR conditions needs to be well-understood. However, existing experimental post-irradiation examination (PIE) data are limited to the research reactor conditions, which involve lower fuel temperature compared to LWR conditions. This lack of appropriate experimental data significantly affects the development of fuel performance codes that can precisely predict the microstructure evolution and property degradation at LWR conditions, and therefore evaluate the qualification of U3Si2 as an AFT for LWRs. Considering the high cost, long timescale, and restrictive access of the in-pile irradiation experiments, this study aims to utilize ion irradiation to simulate the inpile behavior of the U3Si2 fuel. Both in situ TEM ion irradiation and ex situ high-energy ATLAS ion irradiation experiments were employed to simulate different types of microstructure modifications in U3Si2. Multiple PIE techniques were used or will be used to quantitatively analyze the microstructure evolution induced by ion irradiation so as to provide valuable reference for the development of fuel performance code prior to the availability of the in-pile irradiation data.

  8. Dynamic scaling for the growth of non-equilibrium fluctuations during thermophoretic diffusion in microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerbino, Roberto; Sun, Yifei; Donev, Aleksandar; Vailati, Alberto

    2015-09-30

    Diffusion processes are widespread in biological and chemical systems, where they play a fundamental role in the exchange of substances at the cellular level and in determining the rate of chemical reactions. Recently, the classical picture that portrays diffusion as random uncorrelated motion of molecules has been revised, when it was shown that giant non-equilibrium fluctuations develop during diffusion processes. Under microgravity conditions and at steady-state, non-equilibrium fluctuations exhibit scale invariance and their size is only limited by the boundaries of the system. In this work, we investigate the onset of non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations induced by thermophoretic diffusion in microgravity, a regime not accessible to analytical calculations but of great relevance for the understanding of several natural and technological processes. A combination of state of the art simulations and experiments allows us to attain a fully quantitative description of the development of fluctuations during transient diffusion in microgravity. Both experiments and simulations show that during the onset the fluctuations exhibit scale invariance at large wave vectors. In a broader range of wave vectors simulations predict a spinodal-like growth of fluctuations, where the amplitude and length-scale of the dominant mode are determined by the thickness of the diffuse layer.

  9. Simulation of gas turbines operating in off-design condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, Arnaldo [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Energia]. E-mail: walter@fem.unicamp.br

    2000-07-01

    In many countries thermal power plants based on gas turbines have been the main option for new investment into the electric system due to their relatively high efficiency and low capital cost. Cogeneration systems based on gas turbines have also been an important option for the electric industry. Feasibility studies of power plants based on gas turbine should consider the effect of atmospheric conditions and part-load operation on the machine performance. Doing this, an off-design procedure is required. A G T off-design simulation procedure is described in this paper. Ruston R M was used to validate the simulation procedure that, general sense, presents deviations lower than 2.5% in comparison to manufacturer's data. (author)

  10. Accurate initial conditions in mixed Dark Matter--Baryon simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Valkenburg, Wessel

    2017-06-01

    We quantify the error in the results of mixed baryon--dark-matter hydrodynamic simulations, stemming from outdated approximations for the generation of initial conditions. The error at redshift 0 in contemporary large simulations, is of the order of few to ten percent in the power spectra of baryons and dark matter, and their combined total-matter power spectrum. After describing how to properly assign initial displacements and peculiar velocities to multiple species, we review several approximations: (1) {using the total-matter power spectrum to compute displacements and peculiar velocities of both fluids}, (2) scaling the linear redshift-zero power spectrum back to the initial power spectrum using the Newtonian growth factor ignoring homogeneous radiation, (3) using longitudinal-gauge velocities with synchronous-gauge densities, and (4) ignoring the phase-difference in the Fourier modes for the offset baryon grid, relative to the dark-matter grid. Three of these approximations do not take into account that ...

  11. Generalized Sheet Transition Condition FDTD Simulation of Metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabzadeh, Yousef; Chamanara, Nima; Caloz, Christophe

    2018-01-01

    We propose an FDTD scheme based on Generalized Sheet Transition Conditions (GSTCs) for the simulation of polychromatic, nonlinear and space-time varying metasurfaces. This scheme consists in placing the metasurface at virtual nodal plane introduced between regular nodes of the staggered Yee grid and inserting fields determined by GSTCs in this plane in the standard FDTD algorithm. The resulting update equations are an elegant generalization of the standard FDTD equations. Indeed, in the limiting case of a null surface susceptibility ($\\chi_\\text{surf}=0$), they reduce to the latter, while in the next limiting case of a time-invariant metasurface $[\\chi_\\text{surf}\

  12. Numerical simulation of hydrodynamic performance of ship under oblique conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Zhiming

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available [Objectives] This paper is intended to study the viscous flow field around a ship under oblique conditions and provide a research basis for ship maneuverability. [Methods] Using commercial software STRA-CCM+, the SST k-ω turbulence model is selected to predict the hydrodynamic performance of the KVLCC2 model at different drift angles, and predict the hull flow field. The pressure distribution of the ship model at different drift angles is observed and the vortex shedding of the ship's hull and constraint streamlines on the hull's surface are also observed. [Results] The results show that numerical simulation can satisfy the demands of engineering application in the prediction of the lateral force, yaw moment and hull surface pressure distribution of a ship. [Conclusions] The research results of this paper can provide valuable references for the study of the flow separation phenomenon under oblique conditions.

  13. The influence of fluid shear stress on the expression of Cbfa1 in MG-63 cells cultured under different gravitational conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Wang, B.; Cao, X. S.; Yang, Z.; Sun, X. Q.

    2008-12-01

    AuthorPurposeThis study was aimed to explore the effect of flow shear stress on the expression of Cbfa1 in human osteosarcoma cells and to survey its functional alteration in simulated microgravity. After culture for 48 h in two different gravitational environments, i.e. 1 G terrestrial gravitational condition and simulated microgravity condition, human osteosarcoma cells (MG-63) were treated with 0.5 or 1.5 Pa fluid shear stress (FSS) in a flow chamber for 15, 30, and 60 min, respectively. The total RNA in cells was isolated. RT-PCR analysis was made to examine the gene expression of Cbfa1. The total protein of cells was extracted and the expression of Cbfa1 protein was detected by means of Western blotting. ResultsMG-63 cells cultured in 1 G condition reacted to FSS treatment with an enhanced expression of Cbfa1. Compared with no-FSS control group, Cbfa1 mRNA expression increased significantly at 30 and 60 min with the treatment of FSS ( P cells cultured in simulated microgravity by using clinostat, the expression of Cbfa1 was significantly different between 1 G and simulated microgravity conditions at each test time ( P cultured in simulated microgravity, Cbfa1 mRNA expression increased significantly at 30 and 60 min with the treatment of FSS ( P osteosarcoma cells. And this inducible function of FSS was adversely affected by simulated microgravity.

  14. Simulation of CHF Condition using an Electroplating System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohk, Seung-Min; Park, Hae-Kyun; Chung, Bum-Jin [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Heat transfer is enhanced when the bubbles are generated on the heated surface at the nucleate boiling regime since vigorous mixing of the liquid occurs near the heated surface due to the buoyancy force of the bubbles. As this phenomenon intensified, vapor film can be formed on the heated surface and it impairs heat transfer disturbing the heat exchange between the surface and the bulk liquid. And thus, the heat flux has the certain maximum value. This maximum value, Critical Heat Flux (CHF) is generally exhibits in the pool boiling condition in non-film boiling mode. Actually, the higher heat flux could be generated at the film boiling mode with extremely high surface temperature, which may unendurable for the system structure. CHF phenomena is simulated by hydrogen gas using electroplating system in mass transfer experiment. Vapor behavior on mass transfer experiment was visualized, and it was similar to that of on the heat transfer. CHF value was simulated by hydrogen gas with isovolumetric concept. Thus, virtual heat flux was estimated by mass flux, which is a non-heating process. Difference of gas density from heat transfer and mass transfer systems were considered and revised for the simulated heat flux. Despite of the simple parametric analysis, estimated CHF value of this study was 6.6 times smaller than Zuber's.

  15. Durability of cemented waste in repository and under simulated conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragolici, F.; Nicu, M.; Lungu, L.; Turcanu, C.; Rotarescu, Gh.

    2000-01-01

    The Romanian Radioactive Waste National Repository for low level and intermediate level radioactive waste was built in Baita - Bihor county, in an extinct uranium exploitation. The site is at 840 m above sea level and the host rock is crystalline with a low porosity, a good chemical homogeneity and impermeability, keeping these qualities over a considerable horizontal and vertical spans. To obtain the experimental data necessary for the waste form and package characterization together with the back-filling material behaviour in the repository environment, a medium term research programme (1996 - 2010) was implemented. The purpose of this experimental programme is to obtain a part of the data base necessary for the approach of medium and long term assessment of the safety and performance of Baita - Bihor Repository. The programme will provide: a deeper knowledge of the chemical species and reaction mechanisms, the structure, properties and performances of the final products. For safety reasons the behaviour of waste package, which is a main barrier, must be properly known in terms of long term durability in real repository conditions. Characterization of the behaviour includes many interactions between the waste package itself and the surrounding near field conditions such as mineralogy, hydrogeology and groundwater chemistry. To obtain a more deeper knowledge of the species and physical-chemical reactions participating in the matrix formation, as well as their future behaviour during the disposal period, a thorough XRD study started in 1998. For Romanian Radioactive Waste National Repository (DNDR) Baita - Bihor the following steps are planned for the conditioned waste matrix characterization in simulated and real conditions: - preparation and characterization of normal reference matrices based on different cement formulations; - preparation of reference simulated sludge cemented matrices containing iron hydroxide and iron phosphate; - selection of real and

  16. Pyrite oxidation under simulated acid rain weathering conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kai; Li, Heping; Wang, Luying; Wen, Xiaoying; Liu, Qingyou

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the electrochemical corrosion behavior of pyrite in simulated acid rain with different acidities and at different temperatures. The cyclic voltammetry, polarization curve, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results showed that pyrite has the same electrochemical interaction mechanism under different simulated acid rain conditions, regardless of acidity or environmental temperature. Either stronger acid rain acidity or higher environmental temperature can accelerate pyrite corrosion. Compared with acid rain having a pH of 5.6 at 25 °C, the prompt efficiency of pyrite weathering reached 104.29% as the acid rain pH decreased to 3.6, and it reached 125.31% as environmental temperature increased to 45 °C. Increasing acidity dramatically decreases the charge transfer resistance, and increasing temperature dramatically decreases the passivation film resistance, when other conditions are held constant. Acid rain always causes lower acidity mine drainage, and stronger acidity or high environmental temperatures cause serious acid drainage. The natural parameters of latitude, elevation, and season have considerable influence on pyrite weathering, because temperature is an important influencing factor. These experimental results are of direct significance for the assessment and management of sulfide mineral acid drainage in regions receiving acid rain.

  17. Modelling and simulation of concrete leaching under outdoor exposure conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiopu, Nicoleta; Tiruta-Barna, Ligia; Jayr, Emmanuel; Mehu, Jacques; Moszkowicz, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Recently, a demand regarding the assessment of release of dangerous substances from construction products was raised by European Commission which has issued the Mandate M/366 addressed to CEN. This action is in relation with the Essential Requirement No. 3 'Hygiene, Health and Environment' of the Construction Products Directive (89/106/EC). The potential hazard for environment and health may arise in different life cycle stages of a construction product. During the service life stage, the release of substances due to contact with the rain water is the main potential hazard source, as a consequence of the leaching phenomenon. The objective of this paper is to present the development of a coupled chemical-transport model for the case of a concrete based construction product, i.e. concrete paving slabs, exposed to rain water under outdoor exposure conditions. The development of the model is based on an iterative process of comparing the experimental results with the simulated results up to an acceptable fit. The experiments were conducted at laboratory scale (equilibrium and dynamic leaching tests) and field scale. The product was exposed for one year in two types of leaching scenarios under outdoor conditions, 'runoff' and 'stagnation', and the element release was monitored. The model was calibrated using the experimental data obtained at laboratory scale and validated against measured field data, by taking into account the specific rain water balance and the atmospheric CO 2 uptake as input parameters. The numerical tool used in order to model and simulate the leaching behaviour was PHREEQC, coupled with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) thermodynamic data base. The simulation results are satisfying and the paper demonstrates the feasibility of the modelling approach for the leaching behaviour assessment of concrete type construction materials

  18. Characteristics and preliminary observations of the influence of electromyostimulation on the size and function of human skeletal muscle during 30 days of simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvoisin, Marc R.; Convertino, Victor A.; Buchanan, Paul; Gollnick, Philip A.; Dudley, Gary A.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of transcutaneous electromyostimulation (EMS) on the development of atrophy and the loss of strength in lower limb musculature in humans exposed to microgravity was determined in three subjects who received EMS twice daily in a 3-d on/1-d off cycle on their dominant leg during 30 days of bedrest. The output waveform from the stimulator was sequenced to the knee extensors, knee flexors, ankle extensors, and ankle flexors, and caused three isometric contractions of each muscle group per minute. It was found that, in the dominant leg, EMS acted to attenuate the changes caused by bedrest, such as reductions in the leg volume, muscle compartment size, cross-sectional area of slow- and fast-twitch fibers, strength, and aerobic enzyme activities, and an increase in leg compliance.

  19. Influence of Spanwise Boundary Conditions on Slat Noise Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockard, David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Buning, Pieter G.

    2015-01-01

    The slat noise from the 30P/30N high-lift system is being investigated through computational fluid dynamics simulations with the OVERFLOW code in conjunction with a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings acoustics solver. In the present study, two different spanwise grids are being used to investigate the effect of the spanwise extent and periodicity on the near-field unsteady structures and radiated noise. The baseline grid with periodic boundary conditions has a short span equal to 1/9th of the stowed chord, whereas the other, longer span grid adds stretched grids on both sides of the core, baseline grid to allow inviscid surface boundary conditions at both ends. The results indicate that the near-field mean statistics obtained using the two grids are similar to each other, as are the directivity and spectral shapes of the radiated noise. However, periodicity forces all acoustic waves with less than one wavelength across the span to be two-dimensional, without any variation in the span. The spanwise coherence of the acoustic waves is what is needed to make estimates of the noise that would be radiated from realistic span lengths. Simulations with periodic conditions need spans of at least six slat chords to allow spanwise variation in the low-frequencies associated with the peak of broadband slat noise. Even then, the full influence of the periodicity is unclear, so employing grids with a fine, central region and highly stretched meshes that go to slip walls may be a more efficient means of capturing the spanwise decorrelation of low-frequency acoustic phenomena.

  20. Combustion in microgravity: The French contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme, Roger; Legros, Guillaume; Torero, José L.

    2017-01-01

    Microgravity (drop towers, parabolic flights, sounding rockets and space stations) are particularly relevant to combustion problems given that they show high-density gradients and in many cases weak forced convection. For some configurations where buoyancy forces result in complex flow fields, microgravity leads to ideal conditions that correspond closely to canonical problems, e.g., combustion of a spherical droplet in a far-field still atmosphere, Emmons' problem for flame spreading over a solid flat plate, deflagration waves, etc. A comprehensive chronological review on the many combustion studies in microgravity was written first by Law and Faeth (1994) and then by F.A. Williams (1995). Later on, new recommendations for research directions have been delivered. In France, research has been managed and supported by CNES and CNRS since the creation of the microgravity research group in 1992. At this time, microgravity research and future activities contemplated the following: Droplets: the "D2 law" has been well verified and high-pressure behavior of droplet combustion has been assessed. The studies must be extended in two main directions: vaporization in mixtures near the critical line and collective effects in dense sprays. Flame spread: experiments observed blue flames governed by diffusion that are in accordance with Emmons' theory. Convection-dominated flames showed significant departures from the theory. Some theoretical assumptions appeared controversial and it was noted that radiation effects must be considered, especially when regarding the role of soot production in quenching. Heterogeneous flames: two studies are in progress, one in Poitiers and the other in Marseilles, about flame/suspension interactions. Premixed and triple flames: the knowledge still needs to be complemented. Triple flames must continue to be studied and understanding of "flame balls" still needs to be addressed.

  1. Aqueous alteration of VHTR fuels particles under simulated geological conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Chaou, Abdelouahed, E-mail: aitchaou@subatech.in2p3.fr; Abdelouas, Abdesselam; Karakurt, Gökhan; Grambow, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) fuels consist of the bistructural-isotropic (BISO) or tristructural-isotropic (TRISO)-coated particles embedded in a graphite matrix. Management of the spent fuel generated during VHTR operation would most likely be through deep geological disposal. In this framework we investigated the alteration of BISO (with pyrolytic carbon) and TRISO (with SiC) particles under geological conditions simulated by temperatures of 50 and 90 °C and in the presence of synthetic groundwater. Solid state (scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-Raman spectroscopy, electron probe microanalyses (EPMA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)) and solution analyses (ICP-MS, ionique chromatography (IC)) showed oxidation of both pyrolytic carbon and SiC at 90 °C. Under air this led to the formation of SiO{sub 2} and a clay-like Mg–silicate, while under reducing conditions (H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} atmosphere) SiC and pyrolytic carbon were highly stable after a few months of alteration. At 50 °C, in the presence and absence of air, the alteration of the coatings was minor. In conclusion, due to their high stability in reducing conditions, HTR fuel disposal in reducing deep geological environments may constitute a viable solution for their long-term management.

  2. Scanning probe microscopy experiments in microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drobek, Tanja; Reiter, Michael; Heckl, Wolfgang M.

    2004-01-01

    The scanning probe microscopy setups are small, lightweight and do not require vacuum or high voltage supply. In addition, samples can be investigated directly without further preparation. Therefore, these techniques are well-suited for applications in space, in particular, for operation on the International Space Station (ISS) or for high resolution microscopy on planetary missions. A feasibility study for a scanning tunneling microscopy setup was carried out on a parabolic flight campaign in November 2001 in order to test the technical setup for microgravity applications. With a pocket-size design microscope, a graphite surface was imaged under ambient conditions. Atomic resolution was achieved although the quality of the images was inferior in comparison to laboratory conditions. Improvements for future scanning probe microscopy experiments in microgravity are suggested

  3. Microgravity Investigation of Capillary Driven Imbibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dushin, V. R.; Nikitin, V. F.; Smirnov, N. N.; Skryleva, E. I.; Tyurenkova, V. V.

    2018-05-01

    The goal of the present paper is to investigate the capillary driven filtration in porous media under microgravity conditions. New mathematical model that allows taking into account the blurring of the front due to the instability of the displacement that is developing at the front is proposed. The constants in the mathematical model were selected on the basis of the experimental data on imbibition into unsaturated porous media under microgravity conditions. The flow under the action of a combination of capillary forces and a constant pressure drop or a constant flux is considered. The effect of capillary forces and the type of wettability of the medium on the displacement process is studied. A criterion in which case the capillary effects are insignificant and can be neglected is established.

  4. Filter Media Tests Under Simulated Martian Atmospheric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agui, Juan H.

    2016-01-01

    Human exploration of Mars will require the optimal utilization of planetary resources. One of its abundant resources is the Martian atmosphere that can be harvested through filtration and chemical processes that purify and separate it into its gaseous and elemental constituents. Effective filtration needs to be part of the suite of resource utilization technologies. A unique testing platform is being used which provides the relevant operational and instrumental capabilities to test articles under the proper simulated Martian conditions. A series of tests were conducted to assess the performance of filter media. Light sheet imaging of the particle flow provided a means of detecting and quantifying particle concentrations to determine capturing efficiencies. The media's efficiency was also evaluated by gravimetric means through a by-layer filter media configuration. These tests will help to establish techniques and methods for measuring capturing efficiency and arrestance of conventional fibrous filter media. This paper will describe initial test results on different filter media.

  5. Multi-Scale Initial Conditions For Cosmological Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Oliver; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /ZAH, Heidelberg /HITS, Heidelberg

    2011-11-04

    We discuss a new algorithm to generate multi-scale initial conditions with multiple levels of refinements for cosmological 'zoom-in' simulations. The method uses an adaptive convolution of Gaussian white noise with a real-space transfer function kernel together with an adaptive multi-grid Poisson solver to generate displacements and velocities following first- (1LPT) or second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT). The new algorithm achieves rms relative errors of the order of 10{sup -4} for displacements and velocities in the refinement region and thus improves in terms of errors by about two orders of magnitude over previous approaches. In addition, errors are localized at coarse-fine boundaries and do not suffer from Fourier-space-induced interference ringing. An optional hybrid multi-grid and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) based scheme is introduced which has identical Fourier-space behaviour as traditional approaches. Using a suite of re-simulations of a galaxy cluster halo our real-space-based approach is found to reproduce correlation functions, density profiles, key halo properties and subhalo abundances with per cent level accuracy. Finally, we generalize our approach for two-component baryon and dark-matter simulations and demonstrate that the power spectrum evolution is in excellent agreement with linear perturbation theory. For initial baryon density fields, it is suggested to use the local Lagrangian approximation in order to generate a density field for mesh-based codes that is consistent with the Lagrangian perturbation theory instead of the current practice of using the Eulerian linearly scaled densities.

  6. Effects of Perchlorate on Organic Molecules under Simulated Mars Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, B. L.; Kounaves, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) was discovered in the northern polar region of Mars by the Mars Phoenix Lander in 2008 and has also been recently detected by the Curiosity Rover in Gale Crater [1,2]. Perchlorate has also been shown to be formed under current Mars conditions via the oxidation of mineral chlorides, further supporting the theory that perchlorate is present globally on Mars [3]. The discovery of perchlorate on Mars has raised important questions about the effects of perchlorate on the survival and detection of organic molecules. Although it has been shown that pyrolysis in the presence of perchlorate results in the alteration or destruction of organic molecules [4], few studies have been conducted on the potential effects of perchlorate on organic molecules under martian surface conditions. Although perchlorate is typically inert under Mars-typical temperatures [5], perchlorate does absorb high energy UV radiation, and has been shown to decompose to form reactive oxychlorine species such as chlorite (ClO2-) when exposed to martian conditions including UV or ionizing radiation [6,7]. Here we investigate the effects of perchlorate on the organic molecules tryptophan, benzoic acid and mellitic acid in order to determine how perchlorate may alter these compounds under Mars conditions. Experiments are performed in a Mars Simulation Chamber (MSC) capable of reproducing the temperature, pressure, atmospheric composition and UV flux found on Mars. Soil simulants are prepared consisting of SiO2 and each organic, as well as varying concentrations of perchlorate salts, and exposed in the MSC. Subsequent to exposure in the MSC samples are leached and the leachate analyzed by HPLC and LC-MS to determine the degree of degradation of the original organic and the identity of any potential decomposition products formed by oxidation or chlorination. References: [1] Kounaves et al., J. Geophys. Res. Planets, Vol. 115, p. E00E10, 2010 [2] Glavin et al., J. Geophys. Res. Planets, Vol

  7. Influence of simulated microgravity on clock genes expression rhythmicity and underlying blood circulating miRNAs-mRNA co-expression regulatory mechanism in C57BL/6J mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Ke; Qu, Lina

    Purpose: It is vital for astronauts to maintain the optimal alertness and neurobehavioral function. Among various factors that exist in the space flight and long-duration mission environment, gravity changes may probably an essential environmental factor to interfere with internal circadian rhythms homeostasis and sleep quality, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Mammals' biological clock is controlled by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), and peripheral organs adjust their own rhythmicity with the central signals. Nevertheless the mechanism underlying this synchronizition process is still unknown. microRNAs (miRNAs) are about 19˜22nt long regulatory RNAs that serve as critical modulators of post-transcriptional gene regulation. Recently, circulating miRNAs were found to have the regulatory role between cells and peripheral tissues, besides its function inside the cells. This study aims to investigate the regulatory signal transduction role of miRNAs between SCN and peripheral biological clock effecter tissues and to further decipher the mechanism of circadian disturbance under microgravity. Method: Firstly, based on the assumption that severe alterations in the expression of genes known to be involved in circadian rhythms may affect the expression of other genes, the labeled cDNA from liver and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of clock-knockout mice and control mice in different time points were cohybridized to microarrays. The fold change exceeding 2 (FC>2) was used to identify genes with altered expression levels in the knockout mice compared with control mice. Secondly, male C57BL/6J mice at 8 weeks of age were individually caged and acclimatized to the laboratory conditions (12h light/dark cycle) before being used for continuous core body temperature and activity monitoring. The mice were individually caged and tail suspended using a strip of adhesive surgical tape attached to a chain hanging from a pulley. Peripheral blood and liver tissues collection

  8. Thermo-electro-hydrodynamic convection under microgravity: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutabazi, Innocent; Yoshikawa, Harunori N; Fogaing, Mireille Tadie; Travnikov, Vadim; Crumeyrolle, Olivier [Laboratoire Ondes et Milieux Complexes, UMR 6294, CNRS-Université du Havre, CS 80450, F-76058 Le Havre Cedex (France); Futterer, Birgit; Egbers, Christoph, E-mail: Innocent.Mutabazi@univ-lehavre.fr [Department of Aerodynamics and Fluid Mechanics, Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus-Senftenberg, Cottbus (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Recent studies on thermo-electro-hydrodynamic (TEHD) convection are reviewed with focus on investigations motivated by the analogy with natural convection. TEHD convection originates in the action of the dielectrophoretic force generated by an alternating electric voltage applied to a dielectric fluid with a temperature gradient. This electrohydrodynamic force is analogous to Archimedean thermal buoyancy and can be regarded as a thermal buoyancy force in electric effective gravity. The review is concerned with TEHD convection in plane, cylindrical, and spherical capacitors under microgravity conditions, where the electric gravity can induce convection without any complexities arising from geometry or the buoyancy force due to the Earth’s gravity. We will highlight the convection in spherical geometry, comparing developed theories and numerical simulations with the GEOFLOW experiments performed on board the International Space Station (ISS). (paper)

  9. Improvement in the quality of hematopoietic prostaglandin D synthase crystals in a microgravity environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiroaki; Tsurumura, Toshiharu; Aritake, Kosuke; Furubayashi, Naoki; Takahashi, Sachiko; Yamanaka, Mari; Hirota, Erika; Sano, Satoshi; Sato, Masaru; Kobayashi, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Tetsuo; Inaka, Koji; Urade, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    Crystals of hematopoietic prostaglandin D synthase grown in microgravity show improved quality. Human hematopoietic prostaglandin synthase, one of the better therapeutic target enzymes for allergy and inflammation, was crystallized with 22 inhibitors and in three inhibitor-free conditions in microgravity. Most of the space-grown crystals showed better X-ray diffraction patterns than the terrestrially grown ones, indicating the advantage of a microgravity environment on protein crystallization, especially in the case of this protein

  10. Flow and air conditioning simulations of computer turbinectomized nose models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Mota, J; Solorio-Ordaz, F; Cervantes-de Gortari, J

    2018-04-16

    Air conditioning for the human respiratory system is the most important function of the nose. When obstruction occurs in the nasal airway, turbinectomy is used to correct such pathology. However, mucosal atrophy may occur sometime after this surgery when it is overdone. There is not enough information about long-term recovery of nasal air conditioning performance after partial or total surgery. The purpose of this research was to assess if, based on the flow and temperature/humidity characteristics of the air intake to the choana, partial resection of turbinates is better than total resection. A normal nasal cavity geometry was digitized from tomographic scans and a model was printed in 3D. Dynamic (sinusoidal) laboratory tests and computer simulations of airflow were conducted with full agreement between numerical and experimental results. Computational adaptations were subsequently performed to represent six turbinectomy variations and a swollen nasal cavity case. Streamlines along the nasal cavity and temperature and humidity distributions at the choana indicated that the middle turbinate partial resection is the best alternative. These findings may facilitate the diagnosis of nasal obstruction and can be useful both to plan a turbinectomy and to reduce postoperative discomfort. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  11. NASA Microgravity Materials Science Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, D. C. (Compiler); McCauley, D. E. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The Microgravity Materials Science Conference was held July 14-16, 1998 at the Von Braun Center in Huntsville, AL. It was organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters, and hosted by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Alliance for Microgravity Materials Science and Applications. It was the third NASA conference of this type in the microgravity materials science discipline. The microgravity science program sponsored approximately 125 investigations and 100 principal investigators in FY98, almost all of whom made oral or poster presentations at this conference. The conference's purpose was to inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity in preparation for a NASA Research Announcement scheduled for release in late 1998 by the Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters. The conference was aimed at materials science researchers from academia, industry, and government. A tour of the Marshall Space Flight Center microgravity research facilities was held on July 16, 1998. This volume is comprised of the research reports submitted by the principal investigators after the conference.

  12. Mechanobiologic Research in a Microgravity Environment Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, A.; Dubini, G.; Tominetti, F.; Raimondi, M.

    mechanical forces. For example, cartilage constructs have been cultured in spinner flasks under mixed or unmixed conditions, in simulated and in real microgravity. In these mixing studies, however, it is difficult to definitively quantify the effects of mixing-induced mechanical forces from those of convection-enhanced transport of nutrients to and of catabolites away from the cells. At the state of the art, the presence of a more controlled mechanical environment may be the condition required in order to study the biochemical and mechanical response of these biological systems. Such a controlled environment could lead to an advanced fluid dynamic design of the culture chamber that could both enhance the local mass transfer phenomena and match the needs of specific macroscopic mechanical effects in tissue development. The bioreactor is an excellent example of how the skills and resources of two distinctly different fields can complement each other. Microgravity can be used to enhance the formation of tissue like aggregates in specially designed bioreactors. Theoretical and experimental projects are under way to improve cell culture techniques using microgravity conditions experienced during space flights. Bioreactors usable under space flight conditions impose constructional principles which are different from those intended solely for ground applications. The Columbus Laboratory as part of the International Space Station (ISS) will be an evolving facility in low Earth orbit. Its mission is to support scientific, technological, and commercial activities in space. A goal of this research is to design a unique bioreactor for use sequentially from ground research to space research. One of the particularities of the simulated microgravity obtained through time averaging of the weight vector is that by varying the rotational velocity the same results can be obtained with a different value of g. One of the first applications of this technique in space biology was in fact the

  13. Pulmonary function in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, H. J.; Prisk, G. K.; West, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    We report the successful collection of a large quantity of human resting pulmonary function data on the SLS-1 mission. Preliminary analysis suggests that cardiac stroke volumes are high on orbit, and that an adaptive reduction takes at least several days, and in fact may still be in progress after 9 days on orbit. It also suggests that pulmonary capillary blood volumes are high, and remain high on orbit, but that the pulmonary interstitium is not significantly impacted. The data further suggest that the known large gravitational gradients of lung function have only a modest influence on single breath tests such as the SBN washout. They account for only approximately 25% of the phase III slope of nitrogen, on vital capacity SBN washouts. These gradients are only a moderate source of the cardiogenic oscillations seen in argon (bolus gas) and nitrogen (resident gas), on such tests. They may have a greater role in generating the normal CO2 oscillations, as here the phase relationship to argon and nitrogen reverses in microgravity, at least at mid exhalation in those subjects studied to date. Microgravity may become a useful tool in establishing the nature of the non-gravitational mechanisms that can now be seen to play such a large part in the generation of intra-breath gradients and oscillations of expired gas concentration. Analysis of microgravity multibreath nitrogen washouts, single breath washouts from more physiological pre-inspiratory volumes, both using our existing SLS-1 data, and data from the upcoming D-2 and SLS-2 missions, should be very fruitful in this regard.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  14. Dependence of Substorm Evolution on Solar Wind Condition: Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiyoshikawa, N.; Ebihara, Y.; Tanaka, T.

    2017-12-01

    A substorm is one of the remarkable disturbances occurring in the magnetosphere. It is known that the substorm occurs frequently when IMF is southward and solar wind speed is high. However, the physical process to determine substorm scale is not well understood. We reproduced substorms by using global MHD simulation, calculated auroral electrojet (ionospheric Hall current) flowing in the ionosphere to investigate the dependence of substorm evolution on solar wind condition. Solar wind speed of 372.4 km/s and IMF Bz of 5.0 nT were imposed to, obtain the quasi-stationary state of the magnetosphere. Then the solar wind parameters were changed as a step function. For the solar wind speed, we assumed 300 km/s, 500 km/s and 700 km/s. For IMF, we assumed -1.0 nT, -3.0 nT, -5.0 nT, -7.0 nT and -9.0 nT. In total, 15 simulation runs were performed. In order to objectively evaluate the substorm, the onset was identified with the method based on the one proposed by Newell et al. (2011). This method uses the SME index that is an extension of the AE index. In this study, the geomagnetic variation induced by the ionospheric Hall current was obtained every 1 degree from the magnetic latitude 40 degrees to 80 degrees and in every 0.5 hours in the magnetic region direction. The upper and the lower envelopes of the geomagnetic variation are regarded as SMU index and SML index, respectively. The larger the solar wind speed, the larger the southward IMF, the more the onset tends to be faster. This tendency is consistent with the onset occurrence probability indicated by Newell et al. (2016). Moreover, the minimum value of the SML index within 30 minutes from the beginning of the onset tends to decrease with the solar wind speed and the magnitude of the southward IMF. A rapid decrease of the SML index can be explained by a rapid increase in the field-aligned currents flowing in and out of the nightside ionosphere. This means that electromagnetic energies flowing into the ionosphere

  15. CO2/ brine substitution experiments at simulated reservoir conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummerow, Juliane; Spangenberg, Erik

    2015-04-01

    Capillary properties of rocks affect the mobility of fluids in a reservoir. Therefore, the understanding of the capillary pressure behaviour is essential to assess the long-term behaviour of CO2 reservoirs. Beyond this, a calibration of the petrophysical properties on water saturation of reservoir rocks at simulated in situ conditions is crucial for a proper interpretation of field monitoring data. We present a set-up, which allows for the combined measurements of capillary pressure, electric resistivity, and elastic wave velocities under controlled reservoir conditions (pconf = 400 bar, ppore = 180 bar, T = 65 ° C) at different brine-CO2 saturations. The capillary properties of the samples are measured using the micropore membrane technique. The sample is jacketed with a Viton tube (thickness = 4 mm) and placed between two current electrode endcaps, which as well contain pore fluid ports and ultrasonic P and S wave transducers. Between the sample and the lower endcap the hydrophilic semi-permeable micro-pore membrane (pore size = 100 nm) is integrated. It is embedded into filter papers to establish a good capillary contact and to protect the highly sensitive membrane against mechanical damage under load. Two high-precision syringe pumps are used to displace a quantified volume of brine by CO2 and determine the corresponding sample saturation. The fluid displacement induces a pressure gradient along the sample, which corresponds to the capillary pressure at a particular sample saturation. It is measured with a differential pressure sensor in the range between 0 - 0.2 MPa. Drainage and imbibition cycles are performed to provide information on the efficiency of capillary trapping and to get a calibration of the petrophysical parameters of the sample.

  16. Structural performance of HEPA filters under simulated tornado conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, H.L.; Gregory, W.S.; Ricketts, C.I.; Smith, P.R.

    1982-02-01

    This report contains the results of structural tests to determine the response of High Efficiency Particulate Air filters to simulated tornado conditions. The data include the structural limits of the filters, their resistance at high flow rates, and the effects of filter design features and tornado parameters. Considering all the filters tested, the mean break pressure or structural limit was found to be 2.35 pse (16.2 kPa). The maximum value was 2.87 psi (19.8 kPa), and the low value found was 1.31 psi (9.0 kPa). The type of failure was usually a medium break of the downstream filter fold. The type of filters that were evaluated were nuclear grade with design flow rates of 1000 cfm (0.472 m 3 /s), standard separators, and folded medium design. The parameters evaluated that are characteristic of the filter included manufacturer, separator type, faceguards, pack tightness, and aerosol loading. Manufacturer and medium properties were found to have a large effect on the structural limits

  17. Simulation of fatigue crack growth under large scale yielding conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Christoph; Seifert, Thomas; Riedel, Hermann

    2010-07-01

    A simple mechanism based model for fatigue crack growth assumes a linear correlation between the cyclic crack-tip opening displacement (ΔCTOD) and the crack growth increment (da/dN). The objective of this work is to compare analytical estimates of ΔCTOD with results of numerical calculations under large scale yielding conditions and to verify the physical basis of the model by comparing the predicted and the measured evolution of the crack length in a 10%-chromium-steel. The material is described by a rate independent cyclic plasticity model with power-law hardening and Masing behavior. During the tension-going part of the cycle, nodes at the crack-tip are released such that the crack growth increment corresponds approximately to the crack-tip opening. The finite element analysis performed in ABAQUS is continued for so many cycles until a stabilized value of ΔCTOD is reached. The analytical model contains an interpolation formula for the J-integral, which is generalized to account for cyclic loading and crack closure. Both simulated and estimated ΔCTOD are reasonably consistent. The predicted crack length evolution is found to be in good agreement with the behavior of microcracks observed in a 10%-chromium steel.

  18. Photodegradation of clothianidin under simulated California rice field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Rebecca A; Redman, Zachary C; Keener, Megan R; Ball, David B; Tjeerdema, Ronald S

    2016-07-01

    Photodegradation can be a major route of dissipation for pesticides applied to shallow rice field water, leading to diminished persistence and reducing the risk of offsite transport. The objective of this study was to characterize the aqueous-phase photodegradation of clothianidin under simulated California rice field conditions. Photodegradation of clothianidin was characterized in deionized, Sacramento River and rice field water samples. Pseudo-first-order rate constants and DT50 values in rice field water (mean k = 0.0158 min(-1) ; mean DT50 = 18.0 equivalent days) were significantly slower than in deionized water (k = 0.0167 min(-1) ; DT50 = 14.7 equivalent days) and river water (k = 0.0146 min(-1) ; DT50 = 16.6 equivalent days) samples. Quantum yield ϕc values demonstrate that approximately 1 and 0.5% of the light energy absorbed results in photochemical transformation in pure and field water respectively. Concentrations of the photodegradation product thiazolymethylurea in aqueous photolysis samples were determined using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and accounted for ≤17% in deionized water and ≤8% in natural water. Photodegradation rates of clothianidin in flooded rice fields will be controlled by turbidity and light attenuation. Aqueous-phase photodegradation may reduce the risk of offsite transport of clothianidin from flooded rice fields (via drainage) and mitigate exposure to non-target organisms. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Minimization for conditional simulation: Relationship to optimal transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Dean S.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of generating independent samples from a conditional distribution when independent samples from the prior distribution are available. Although there are exact methods for sampling from the posterior (e.g. Markov chain Monte Carlo or acceptance/rejection), these methods tend to be computationally demanding when evaluation of the likelihood function is expensive, as it is for most geoscience applications. As an alternative, in this paper we discuss deterministic mappings of variables distributed according to the prior to variables distributed according to the posterior. Although any deterministic mappings might be equally useful, we will focus our discussion on a class of algorithms that obtain implicit mappings by minimization of a cost function that includes measures of data mismatch and model variable mismatch. Algorithms of this type include quasi-linear estimation, randomized maximum likelihood, perturbed observation ensemble Kalman filter, and ensemble of perturbed analyses (4D-Var). When the prior pdf is Gaussian and the observation operators are linear, we show that these minimization-based simulation methods solve an optimal transport problem with a nonstandard cost function. When the observation operators are nonlinear, however, the mapping of variables from the prior to the posterior obtained from those methods is only approximate. Errors arise from neglect of the Jacobian determinant of the transformation and from the possibility of discontinuous mappings.

  20. Optimizing grade-control drillhole spacing with conditional simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Martínez-Vargas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes a method to determine the optimum spacing of grade-control drillholes drilled with reverse-circulation. The optimum drillhole spacing was defined as that one whose cost equals the cost of misclassifying ore and waste in selection mining units (SMU. The cost of misclassification of a given drillhole spacing is equal to the cost of processing waste misclassified as ore (Type I error plus the value of the ore misclassified as waste (Type II error. Type I and Type II errors were deduced by comparing true and estimated grades at SMUs, in relation to a cuttoff grade value and assuming free ore selection. True grades at SMUs and grades at drillhole samples were generated with conditional simulations. A set of estimated grades at SMU, one per each drillhole spacing, were generated with ordinary kriging. This method was used to determine the optimum drillhole spacing in a gold deposit. The results showed that the cost of misclassification is sensitive to extreme block values and tend to be overrepresented. Capping SMU’s lost values and implementing diggability constraints was recommended to improve calculations of total misclassification costs.

  1. Wetting of bituminized ion-exchangers under simulated repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aalto, H.; Valkiainen, M.

    2001-01-01

    According to the present plans the spent nuclear fuel from four Finnish nuclear power units will be transferred after interim storage to the final disposal site where it will be encapsulated and disposed of in a final repository constructed into the bedrock at a depth of 500 meters. Low and medium level waste generated at nuclear power plants will be finally disposed of in caverns constructed in the bedrock at the power plant site. The safety of the final disposal is based on a multibarrier concept and the degree of safety is estimated by using predictive models. The properties of the waste form are taken into account in the design of the repository construction. Bitumen has been chosen as an immobilisation agent for the wet wastes at Olkiluoto Power Plant, where two BWR units, TVO 1 and TVO 2, have separate bituminization facilities designed by Asea-Atom. Properties of bituminized spent ion-exchange resins from Olkiluoto power plant have been studied by VTT Chemical Technology since the late 70's. These studies have concentrated mainly on determining the long-term behaviour of the bituminization product under the repository conditions. Current interest lies on wetted product as a diffusion barrier. For this purpose a microscopic method for the visualisation of the structure of the wetted product has been developed. The equilibration of the samples in simulated concrete groundwater is currently going on at a temperature of 5-8 deg. C. Preliminary results are presented in this paper. Diffusion experiments have been planned for the further characterising of the wetted product as a release barrier for radionuclides including modelling. (author)

  2. Abiotic partitioning of clothianidin under simulated rice field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Rebecca A; Parikh, Sanjai J; Tjeerdema, Ronald S

    2015-10-01

    Clothianidin is registered for pre- and post-flood application in Californian rice fields for control of the rice seed midge, Cricotopus sylvestris, and the rice water weevil, Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus. The objective was to characterize air-water and soil-water partitioning of clothianidin under simulated Californian rice field conditions. Clothianidin was confirmed to be non-volatile (from water) via the gas purge method, as no loss from the aqueous phase was observed at 22 and 37 °C; an upper-limit KH value was calculated at 2.9 × 10(-11) Pa m(3) mol(-1) (20 °C). Soil-water partitioning was determined by the batch equilibrium method using four soils collected from rice fields in the Sacramento Valley, and sorption affinity (Kd ), sorbent capacity, desorption and organic-carbon-normalized distribution (Koc ) were determined. Values for pH, cation exchange capacity and organic matter content ranged from 4.5 to 6.6, from 5.9 to 37.9 and from 1.25 to 1.97% respectively. The log Koc values (22 and 37 °C) ranged from 2.6 to 2.7, while sorption capacity was low at 22 °C and decreased further at 37 °C. Hysteresis was observed in soils at both temperatures, suggesting that bound residues do not readily desorb. Soil-water and air-water partitioning will not significantly reduce offsite transport of clothianidin from flooded rice fields via drainage. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Partitioning of etofenprox under simulated California rice-growing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Martice E; Gunasekara, Amrith S; Cahill, Thomas M; Tjeerdema, Ronald S

    2010-01-01

    The pyrethroid insecticide etofenprox is of current interest to rice farmers in the Sacramento Valley owing to its effectiveness against the rice water weevil, Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel. This study aimed to describe the partitioning of etofenprox under simulated rice field conditions by determining its Henry's law constant (H) (an estimate of volatilization) and organic carbon-normalized soil-water distribution coefficient (K(oc)) at representative field temperatures. A comparison of etofenprox and lambda-cyhalothrin is presented using a level-1 fugacity model. Experimental determination of H revealed that etofenprox partitioned onto the apparatus walls and did not significantly volatilize; the maximum value of H was estimated to be 6.81 x 10(-1) Pa m(3) mol(-1) at 25 degrees C, based on its air and water method detection limits. Calculated values for H ranged from 5.6 x 10(-3) Pa m(3) mol(-1) at 5 degrees C to 2.9 x 10(-1) Pa m(3) mol(-1) at 40 degrees C, based on estimated solubility and vapor pressure values at various temperatures. Log K(oc) values (at 25 degrees C) were experimentally determined to be 6.0 and 6.4 for Princeton and Richvale rice field soils, respectively, and were very similar to the values for other pyrethroids. Finally, temperature appears to have little influence on etofenprox sorption, as the log K(oc) for the Princeton soil at 35 degrees C was 6.1. High sorption coefficients and relatively insignificant desorption and volatilization of etofenprox suggest that its insolubility drives it to partition from water by sorbing to soils with high affinity. Offsite movement is unlikely unless transported in a bound state on suspended sediments.

  4. NMR diffusion simulation based on conditional random walk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudbjartsson, H; Patz, S

    1995-01-01

    The authors introduce here a new, very fast, simulation method for free diffusion in a linear magnetic field gradient, which is an extension of the conventional Monte Carlo (MC) method or the convolution method described by Wong et al. (in 12th SMRM, New York, 1993, p.10). In earlier NMR-diffusion simulation methods, such as the finite difference method (FD), the Monte Carlo method, and the deterministic convolution method, the outcome of the calculations depends on the simulation time step. In the authors' method, however, the results are independent of the time step, although, in the convolution method the step size has to be adequate for spins to diffuse to adjacent grid points. By always selecting the largest possible time step the computation time can therefore be reduced. Finally the authors point out that in simple geometric configurations their simulation algorithm can be used to reduce computation time in the simulation of restricted diffusion.

  5. Modulation of modeled microgravity on radiation-induced bystander effects in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ting [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Sun, Qiao [Space Molecular Biological Lab, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100086 (China); Xu, Wei; Li, Fanghua [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Li, Huasheng; Lu, Jinying [Space Molecular Biological Lab, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100086 (China); Wu, Lijun; Wu, Yuejin [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Liu, Min [Space Molecular Biological Lab, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100086 (China); Bian, Po [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • The effects of microgravity on the radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) were definitely demonstrated. • The effects of microgravity on RIBE might be divergent for different biological events. • The microgravity mainly modified the generation or transport of bystander signals at early stage. - Abstract: Both space radiation and microgravity have been demonstrated to have inevitable impact on living organisms during space flights and should be considered as important factors for estimating the potential health risk for astronauts. Therefore, the question whether radiation effects could be modulated by microgravity is an important aspect in such risk evaluation. Space particles at low dose and fluence rate, directly affect only a fraction of cells in the whole organism, which implement radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) in cellular response to space radiation exposure. The fact that all of the RIBE experiments are carried out in a normal gravity condition bring forward the need for evidence regarding the effect of microgravity on RIBE. In the present study, a two-dimensional rotation clinostat was adopted to demonstrate RIBE in microgravity conditions, in which the RIBE was assayed using an experimental system of root-localized irradiation of Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) plants. The results showed that the modeled microgravity inhibited significantly the RIBE-mediated up-regulation of expression of the AtRAD54 and AtRAD51 genes, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and transcriptional activation of multicopy P35S:GUS, but made no difference to the induction of homologous recombination by RIBE, showing divergent responses of RIBE to the microgravity conditions. The time course of interaction between the modeled microgravity and RIBE was further investigated, and the results showed that the microgravity mainly modulated the processes of the generation or translocation of the bystander signal(s) in roots.

  6. Microgravity is the experimentl basis for understanding of the peculiarities of plant morphogenesis in the gravitational field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demkiv, O. T.; Kordyum, Ye. L.; Khorkavtsiv, Ya. D.; Tairbekov, M. G.

    Spiral growth of the gravisensitive protonema of Ceratodon purpureus moss is revealed in real microgravity during space flight. Caulonema differentiation with oblique cell partitions and deviation of an apical cell growth zone from the growth horizontal axis were shown to precede the stolon spiralization. The slope of subapical cell walls enables an apical cell to revolve on its long axis, overcome the substrate and gravity resistance, and become twisted. Investigations of C. purpureus, Burbula unguiculata and Physcomitrella patens protonema growth in the conditions of 1g, real and simulated microgravity (clinorotation) in darkness and under different light intensity and nutrient medium composition show that protonema morphogenesis is above all regulated by endogenous signals, action of which is concealed by gravity or light on the Earth.

  7. Diagnostics in Japan's microgravity experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Toshikazu

    1995-01-01

    The achievement of the combustion research under microgravity depends substantially on the availability of diagnostic systems. The non-intrusive diagnostic systems are potentially applicable for providing the accurate, realistic and detailed information on momentum, mass and energy transport, complex gas phase chemistry, and phase change in the combustion field under microgravity. The non-intrusive nature of optical instruments is essential to the measurement of combustion process under microgravity which is very nervous to any perturbation. However, the implementation of the non-intrusive combustion diagnostic systems under microgravity is accompanied by several constraints. Usually, a very limited space is only available for constructing a highly sophisticated system which is so sensitive that it is easily affected by the magnitude of the gravitational force, vibration and heterogeneous field of temperature and density of the environments. The system should be properly adjusted prior to the experiment. Generally, it is quite difficult to tune the instruments during measurements. The programmed sequence of operation should also be provided. Extensive effort has been toward the development of non-intrusive diagnostic systems available for the combustion experiments under microgravity. This paper aims to describe the current art and the future strategy on the non-intrusive diagnostic systems potentially applicable to the combustion experiments under microgravity in Japan.

  8. Formation of intermetallic phases in AlSi7Fe1 alloy processed under microgravity and forced fluid flow conditions and their influence on the permeability

    OpenAIRE

    Steinbach, Sonja; Ratke, Lorenz; Zimmermann, Gerhard; Budenkova, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Ternary Al-6.5wt.%Si-0.93wt.%Fe alloy samples were directionally solidified on-board of the International Space Station ISS in the ESA payload Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) equipped with Low Gradient Furnace (LGF) under both purely diffusive and stimulated convective conditions induced by a rotating magnetic field. Using different analysis techniques the shape and distribution of the intermetallic phase β-Al 5 SiFe in the dendritic microstructure was investigated, to study the influence ...

  9. Response of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 to low-shear modeled microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Wallace, Sarah; Stahl, Sarah; Voorhies, Alexander; Lorenzi, Hernan; Douglas, Grace L.

    2017-10-01

    The introduction of probiotic microbes into the spaceflight food system has the potential for use as a safe, non-invasive, daily countermeasure to crew microbiome and immune dysregulation. However, the microgravity effects on the stress tolerances and gene expression of probiotic bacteria must be investigated to confirm that benefits of selected strains will still be conveyed under microgravity conditions. The goal of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of the probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 in a microgravity analog environment. L. acidophilus was cultured anaerobically under modeled microgravity conditions and assessed for differences in growth, survival through stress challenge, and gene expression compared to control cultures. No significant differences were observed between the modeled microgravity and control grown L. acidophilus, suggesting that this strain will behave similarly in spaceflight.

  10. Effects of the initial conditions on cosmological $N$-body simulations

    OpenAIRE

    L'Huillier, Benjamin; Park, Changbom; Kim, Juhan

    2014-01-01

    Cosmology is entering an era of percent level precision due to current large observational surveys. This precision in observation is now demanding more accuracy from numerical methods and cosmological simulations. In this paper, we study the accuracy of $N$-body numerical simulations and their dependence on changes in the initial conditions and in the simulation algorithms. For this purpose, we use a series of cosmological $N$-body simulations with varying initial conditions. We test the infl...

  11. Desert Cyanobacteria under simulated space and Martian conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billi, D.; Ghelardini, P.; Onofri, S.; Cockell, C. S.; Rabbow, E.; Horneck, G.

    2008-09-01

    The environment in space and on planets such as Mars, can be lethal to living organisms and high levels of tolerance to desiccation, cold and radiation are needed for survival: rock-inhabiting cyanobacteria belonging to the genus Chroococcidiopsis can fulfil these requirements [1]. These cyanobacteria constantly appear in the most extreme and dry habitats on Earth, including the McMurdo Dry Valleys (Antarctica) and the Atacama Desert (Chile), which are considered the closest terrestrial analogs of two Mars environmental extremes: cold and aridity. In their natural environment, these cyanobacteria occupy the last refuges for life inside porous rocks or at the stone-soil interfaces, where they survive in a dry, dormant state for prolonged periods. How desert strains of Chroococcidiopsis can dry without dying is only partially understood, even though experimental evidences support the existence of an interplay between mechanisms to avoid (or limit) DNA damage and repair it: i) desert strains of Chroococcidiopsis mend genome fragmentation induced by ionizing radiation [2]; ii) desiccation-survivors protect their genome from complete fragmentation; iii) in the dry state they show a survival to an unattenuated Martian UV flux greater than that of Bacillus subtilis spores [3], and even though they die following atmospheric entry after having orbited the Earth for 16 days [4], they survive to simulated shock pressures up to 10 GPa [5]. Recently additional experiments were carried out at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) of Cologne (Germany) in order to identify suitable biomarkers to investigate the survival of Chroococcidiopsis cells present in lichen-dominated communities, in view of their direct and long term space exposition on the International Space Station (ISS) in the framework of the LIchens and Fungi Experiments (LIFE, EXPOSEEuTEF, ESA). Multilayers of dried cells of strains CCMEE 134 (Beacon Valley, Antarctica), and CCMEE 123 (costal desert, Chile ), shielded by

  12. Formation of intermetallic phases in AlSi7Fe1 alloy processed under microgravity and forced fluid flow conditions and their influence on the permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, S.; Ratke, L.; Zimmermann, G.; Budenkova, O.

    2016-03-01

    Ternary Al-6.5wt.%Si-0.93wt.%Fe alloy samples were directionally solidified on-board of the International Space Station ISS in the ESA payload Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) equipped with Low Gradient Furnace (LGF) under both purely diffusive and stimulated convective conditions induced by a rotating magnetic field. Using different analysis techniques the shape and distribution of the intermetallic phase β-Al5SiFe in the dendritic microstructure was investigated, to study the influence of solidification velocity and fluid flow on the size and spatial arrangement of intermetallics. Deep etching as well as 3-dimensional computer tomography measurements characterized the size and the shape of β-Al5SiFe platelets: Diffusive growth results in a rather homogeneous distribution of intermetallic phases, whereas forced flow promotes an increase in the amount and the size of β-Al5SiFe platelets in the centre region of the samples. The β-Al5SiFe intermetallics can form not only simple platelets, but also be curved, branched, crossed, interacting with dendrites and porosity located. This leads to formation of large and complex groups of Fe-rich intermetallics, which reduce the melt flow between dendrites leading to lower permeability of the mushy zone and might significantly decrease feeding ability in castings.

  13. Leaching of Al2O3 in simulated repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, B.-M.; Dahl, L.

    1978-06-01

    Al 2 O 3 material has been leached at 90 deg C in: simulated ground water at pH 8.5, embedded in bentonite + silica sand saturated with the same water, and in simulated ground water at pH 6 and pH 10. Leaching periods varied from 30 days to 300 days. We observed slight weight increments in all cases from deposits on samples from the environment. These mask weight losses from Al 2 O 3 that may have occurred. (author)

  14. Microgravity Disturbance Predictions in the Combustion Integrated Rack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, M.; Grodsinsky, Carlos M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper will focus on the approach used to characterize microgravity disturbances in the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR), currently scheduled for launch to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2005. Microgravity experiments contained within the CIR are extremely sensitive to vibratory and transient disturbances originating on-board and off-board the rack. Therefore, several techniques are implemented to isolate the critical science locations from external vibration. A combined testing and analysis approach is utilized to predict the resulting microgravity levels at the critical science location. The major topics to be addressed are: 1) CIR Vibration Isolation Approaches, 2) Disturbance Sources and Characterization, 3) Microgravity Predictive Modeling, 4) Science Microgravity Requirements, 6) Microgravity Control, and 7) On-Orbit Disturbance Measurement. The CIR is using the Passive Rack Isolation System (PaRIS) to isolate the rack from offboard rack disturbances. By utilizing this system, CIR is connected to the U.S. Lab module structure by either 13 or 14 umbilical lines and 8 spring / damper isolators. Some on-board CIR disturbers are locally isolated by grommets or wire ropes. CIR's environmental and science on board support equipment such as air circulation fans, pumps, water flow, air flow, solenoid valves, and computer hard drives cause disturbances within the rack. These disturbers along with the rack structure must be characterized to predict whether the on-orbit vibration levels during experimentation exceed the specified science microgravity vibration level requirements. Both vibratory and transient disturbance conditions are addressed. Disturbance levels/analytical inputs are obtained for each individual disturber in a "free floating" condition in the Glenn Research Center (GRC) Microgravity Emissions Lab (MEL). Flight spare hardware is tested on an Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) basis. Based on test and analysis, maximum disturbance level

  15. The Effect of Microgravity on the Smallest Space Travelers: Bacterial Physiology and Virulence on Earth and in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, Barry; Vasques, Marilyn; Aquilina, Rudy (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since the first human flights outside of Earth's gravity, crew health and well-being have been major concerns. Exposure to microgravity during spaceflight is known to affect the human immune response, possibly making the crew members more vulnerable to infectious disease. In addition, biological experiments previously flown in space have shown that bacteria grow faster in microgravity than they do on Earth. The ability of certain antibiotics to control bacterial infections may also differ greatly in microgravity. It is therefore critical to understand how spaceflight and microgravity affect bacterial virulence, which is their ability to cause disease. By utilizing spaceflight hardware provided by the European Space Agency (ESA), Dr. Barry Pyle and his team at Montana State University, Bozeman, will be performing an experiment to study the effects of microgravity on the virulence of a common soil and water bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Importantly, these bacteria have been detected in the water supplies of previous Space Shuttle flights. The experiment will examine the effects of microgravity exposure on bacterial growth and on the bacterium's ability to form a toxin called Exotoxin A. Another goal is to evaluate the effects of microgravity on the physiology of the bacteria by analyzing their ability to respire (produce energy), by studying the condition of the plasma membrane surrounding the cell, and by determining if specific enzymes remain active. Proteins produced by the bacteria will also be assayed to see if the normal functions of the bacteria are affected. In the context of human life support in spaceflight, the results of this experiment will offer guidance in providing the highest possible water quality for the Shuttle in order to limit the risk of infection to human occupants and to minimize water system and spacecraft deterioration.

  16. International cooperative research project between NEDO and NASA on advanced combustion science utilizing microgravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    This paper describes an international cooperative research project between NEDO and NASA on advanced combustion science utilizing microgravity. In June, 1994, NEDO and NASA reached a basic agreement with each other about this cooperative R and D on combustion under microgravity conditions. In fiscal 2000, Japan proposed an experiment using the drop tower facilities and parabolic aircraft at NASA Glen Research Center and at JAMIC (Japan Microgravity Center). In other words, the proposals from Japan included experiments on combustion of droplets composed of diversified fuels under different burning conditions (vaporization), flame propagation in smoldering porous materials and dispersed particles under microgravity conditions, and control of interactive combustion of two droplets by acoustical and electrical perturbations. Additionally proposed were experiments on effect of low external air flow on solid material combustion under microgravity, and sooting and radiation effects on the burning of large droplets under microgravity conditions. This report gives an outline of the results of these five cooperative R and D projects. The experiments were conducted under ordinary normal gravity and microgravity conditions, with the results compared and examined mutually. (NEDO)

  17. The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, T.; Holmes, W.; Lai, A.; Croonquist, A.; Eraker, J.; Abbott, R.; Mills, G.; Mohl, J.; Craig, J.; Balachandra, B.; hide

    2000-01-01

    We describe the design and development of the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility, which is intended to provide a unique environment of low temperature and microgravity for the scientists to perform breakthrough investigations on board the International Space Station.

  18. Continuous Strip Reduction Test Simulating Tribological Conditions in Ironing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Üstünyagiz, Esmeray; Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Christiansen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    materials, surface roughnesses, normal pressure, sliding length, sliding speed, interface temperature and lubrication. This paper proposes a new Strip Reduction Test (SRT) for industrial ironing processes that is capable of replicating the highly severe tribological conditions that are experienced during...

  19. Persistence of Initial Conditions in Continental Scale Air Quality Simulations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset contains the data used in Figures 1 – 6 and Table 2 of the technical note "Persistence of Initial Conditions in Continental Scale Air Quality...

  20. Sensitivity of a Simulated Derecho Event to Model Initial Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei

    2014-05-01

    Since 2003, the MMM division at NCAR has been experimenting cloud-permitting scale weather forecasting using Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Over the years, we've tested different model physics, and tried different initial and boundary conditions. Not surprisingly, we found that the model's forecasts are more sensitive to the initial conditions than model physics. In 2012 real-time experiment, WRF-DART (Data Assimilation Research Testbed) at 15 km was employed to produce initial conditions for twice-a-day forecast at 3 km. On June 29, this forecast system captured one of the most destructive derecho event on record. In this presentation, we will examine forecast sensitivity to different model initial conditions, and try to understand the important features that may contribute to the success of the forecast.

  1. Finite element simulation of ironing process under warm conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swadesh Kumar Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal forming is one of the most important steps in manufacturing of a large variety of products. Ironing in deep drawing is done by adjusting the clearance between the punch and the die and allow the material flow over the punch. In the present investigation effect of extent of ironing behavior on the characteristics of the product like thickness distribution with respect to temperature was studied. With the help of finite element simulation using explicit finite element code LS-DYNA the stress in the drawn cup were predicted in the drawn cup. To increase the accuracy in the simulation process, numbers of integration points were increased in the thickness direction and it was found that there is very close prediction of finite element results to that of experimental ones.

  2. Development of simulation technology on full auto air conditioning system; Auto eakon no simulation gijutsu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, N; Otsubo, Y; Matsumura, K; Sako, H [Mazda Motor Corp., Hiroshima (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Mazda has developed simulation technology on control of full auto air conditioning system. We have developed the development tool based on the technology, aiming at higher controllability of full auto air conditioning system and shorter development period. The tool performs simulation on control, on-vehicle evaluation of actual load operation, collecting data and analyzing them by personal computer. This paper reports our verification results on effectiveness of the technology/ and the tool. 4 refs., 9 figs.

  3. Simulation of global warming effect on outdoor thermal comfort conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roshan, G.R.; Ranjbar, F. [Univ. of Tehran (IR). Dept. of Physical Geography; Orosa, J.A. [Univ. of A Coruna (Spain). Dept. of Energy

    2010-07-01

    In the coming decades, global warming and increase in temperature, in different regions of the world, may change indoor and outdoor thermal comfort conditions and human health. The aim of this research was to study the effects of global warming on thermal comfort conditions in indoor ambiences in Iran. To study the increase in temperature, model for assessment of greenhouse-gas induced climate change scenario generator compound model has been used together with four scenarios and to estimate thermal comfort conditions, adaptive model of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers has been used. In this study, Iran was divided into 30 zones, outdoor conditions were obtained using meteorological data of 80 climatological stations and changes in neutral comfort conditions in 2025, 2050, 2075 and 2100 were predicted. In accordance with each scenario, findings from this study showed that temperature in the 30 zones will increase by 2100 to between 3.4 C and 5.6 C. In the coming decades and in the 30 studied zones, neutral comfort temperature will increase and be higher and more intense in the central and desert zones of Iran. The low increase in this temperature will be connected to the coastal areas of the Caspian and Oman Sea in southeast Iran. This increase in temperature will be followed by a change in thermal comfort and indoor energy consumption from 8.6 % to 13.1 % in air conditioning systems. As a result, passive methods as thermal inertia are proposed as a possible solution.

  4. Simulation of conditional diffusions via forward-reverse stochastic representations

    KAUST Repository

    Bayer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    We derive stochastic representations for the finite dimensional distributions of a multidimensional diffusion on a fixed time interval,conditioned on the terminal state. The conditioning can be with respect to a fixed measurement point or more generally with respect to some subset. The representations rely on a reverse process connected with the given (forward) diffusion as introduced by Milstein, Schoenmakers and Spokoiny in the context of density estimation. The corresponding Monte Carlo estimators have essentially root-N accuracy, and hence they do not suffer from the curse of dimensionality. We also present an application in statistics, in the context of the EM algorithm.

  5. Simulation of conditional diffusions via forward-reverse stochastic representations

    KAUST Repository

    Bayer, Christian

    2015-01-07

    We derive stochastic representations for the finite dimensional distributions of a multidimensional diffusion on a fixed time interval,conditioned on the terminal state. The conditioning can be with respect to a fixed measurement point or more generally with respect to some subset. The representations rely on a reverse process connected with the given (forward) diffusion as introduced by Milstein, Schoenmakers and Spokoiny in the context of density estimation. The corresponding Monte Carlo estimators have essentially root-N accuracy, and hence they do not suffer from the curse of dimensionality. We also present an application in statistics, in the context of the EM algorithm.

  6. Simulation of Daylighting Conditions in a Virtual Underground City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Merli Alcini

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available From the Piranesi fantastic architectures to the animation movies and video games of the last thirty years, a new design approach has been introduced and developed: the design of the virtual space. Designing the "virtual" means experiencing a multidisciplinary approach where architecture, engineering, and urban planning meet the new horizons of information and communication technology. This study is focused on virtual space, which is an underground city. Mankind have always made and used underground environments: the possibilities of unlimited spaces to potential development, the reduced needs for raw materials for the construction and the protection from outdoor weather are some of the reasons that prompted humans to the realization of underground spaces in the past. These reasons and the availability of innovative technologies could encourage a breakthrough in the realization of new underground environments. A recent example is represented by the Underground City of Montreal (RÉSO. We present the architectural design of a virtual underground city, which is called Arch[ane], and its evaluation. The underground city is modular and the studied module is composed of eight floors with a total depth of 400 m and dimensions of 800 m × 800 m. The study comprises the evaluation of the effect of sunlight on each eight floors of the city. Daylighting simulations were performed considering different cities at different latitudes, days, and hours. The results have shown that the particular design of the underground city with skylights gives significant values of illuminance at a certain depth. Furthermore, the simulation results show how huge can be the potentialities of software to simulate extremely big environments.

  7. Radiotracer technique for leakage detection under simulated conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yelgaonkar, V.N.; Sharma, V.K.; Tapase, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    Radiotracer techniques are often used to locate leaks in underground pipelines. An attempt was made to standardize radiotracer pulse migration in terms of minimum detectable limit. For this purpose a 6 inch diameter 1200 long steel pipe was used. Two leak rates viz. 10 litres per minute and 1 litre per minute with an accuracy of ± 10% were simulated. The experiments on this pipeline showed that this method could be used to locate a leak of the order of 1 litre per minute in a 6 inch diameter isolated underground pipeline. (author)

  8. 2002 Microgravity Materials Science Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Donald (Editor); Ramachandran, Narayanan (Editor); Murphy, Karen (Editor); McCauley, Dannah (Editor); Bennett, Nancy (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The 2002 Microgravity Materials Science Conference was held June 25-26, 2002, at the Von Braun Center, Huntsville, Alabama. Organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Physical Sciences Research Division, NASA Headquarters, and hosted by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and member institutions under the Cooperative Research in Biology and Materials Science (CORBAMS) agreement, the conference provided a forum to review the current research and activities in materials science, discuss the envisioned long-term goals, highlight new crosscutting research areas of particular interest to the Physical Sciences Research Division, and inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity. An abstracts book was published and distributed at the conference to the approximately 240 people attending, who represented industry, academia, and other NASA Centers. This CD-ROM proceedings is comprised of the research reports submitted by the Principal Investigators in the Microgravity Materials Science program.

  9. Numerical Investigation of Microgravity Tank Pressure Rise Due to Boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylton, Sonya; Ibrahim, Mounir; Kartuzova, Olga; Kassemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The ability to control self-pressurization in cryogenic storage tanks is essential for NASAs long-term space exploration missions. Predictions of the tank pressure rise in Space are needed in order to inform the microgravity design and optimization process. Due to the fact that natural convection is very weak in microgravity, heat leaks into the tank can create superheated regions in the liquid. The superheated regions can instigate microgravity boiling, giving rise to pressure spikes during self-pressurization. In this work, a CFD model is developed to predict the magnitude and duration of the microgravity pressure spikes. The model uses the Schrage equation to calculate the mass transfer, with a different accommodation coefficient for evaporation at the interface, condensation at the interface, and boiling in the bulk liquid. The implicit VOF model was used to account for the moving interface, with bounded second order time discretization. Validation of the models predictions was carried out using microgravity data from the Tank Pressure Control Experiment, which flew aboard the Space Shuttle Mission STS-52. Although this experiment was meant to study pressurization and pressure control, it underwent boiling during several tests. The pressure rise predicted by the CFD model compared well with the experimental data. The ZBOT microgravity experiment is scheduled to fly on February 2016 aboard the ISS. The CFD model was also used to perform simulations for setting parametric limits for the Zero-Boil-Off Tank (ZBOT) Experiments Test Matrix in an attempt to avoid boiling in the majority of the test runs that are aimed to study pressure increase rates during self-pressurization. *Supported in part by NASA ISS Physical Sciences Research Program, NASA HQ, USA

  10. Simulation of temperature conditions on APT of HMA mixes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steyn, WJVDM

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available between these APT data and practical application of the outcomes of the tests. The paper starts with general background on the effect of temperature on the loading conditions and response of HMA materials, methods to manage it during APT testing...

  11. Validation of Boundary Conditions for CFD Simulations on Ventilated Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topp, Claus; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Pedersen, D.N.

    2001-01-01

    The application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for ventilation research and design of ventilation systems has increased during the recent years. This paper provides an investigation of direct description of boundary conditions for a complex inlet diffuser and a heated surface. A series...

  12. Performance of Chlorella sorokiniana under simulated extreme winter conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuaresma, M.; Buffing, M.F.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Lobato, C.V.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2012-01-01

    High annual microalgae productivities can only be achieved if solar light is efficiently used through the different seasons. During winter the productivity is low because of the light and temperature conditions. The productivity and photosynthetic efficiency of Chlorella sorokiniana were assessed

  13. Powder agglomeration in a microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, James D.

    1994-01-01

    This is the final report for NASA Grant NAG3-755 entitled 'Powder Agglomeration in a Microgravity Environment.' The research program included both two types of numerical models and two types of experiments. The numerical modeling included the use of Monte Carlo type simulations of agglomerate growth including hydrodynamic screening and molecular dynamics type simulations of the rearrangement of particles within an agglomerate under a gravitational field. Experiments included direct observation of the agglomeration of submicron alumina and indirect observation, using small angle light scattering, of the agglomeration of colloidal silica and aluminum monohydroxide. In the former class of experiments, the powders were constrained to move on a two-dimensional surface oriented to minimize the effect of gravity. In the latter, some experiments involved mixture of suspensions containing particles of opposite charge which resulted in agglomeration on a very short time scale relative to settling under gravity.

  14. Comments on ''Use of conditional simulation in nuclear waste site performance assessment'' by Carol Gotway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downing, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses Carol Gotway's paper, ''The Use of Conditional Simulation in Nuclear Waste Site Performance Assessment.'' The paper centers on the use of conditional simulation and the use of geostatistical methods to simulate an entire field of values for subsequent use in a complex computer model. The issues of sampling designs for geostatistics, semivariogram estimation and anisotropy, turning bands method for random field generation, and estimation of the comulative distribution function are brought out

  15. A suitable boundary condition for bounded plasma simulation without sheath resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, S.E.; Procassini, R.J.; Birdsall, C.K.; Cohen, B.I.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a technique that allows for a sheath boundary layer without having to resolve the inherently small space and time scales of the sheath region. We refer to this technique as the logical sheath boundary condition. This boundary condition, when incorporated into a direct-implicit particle code, permits large space- and time-scale simulations of bounded systems, which would otherwise be impractical on current supercomputers. The lack of resolution of the collector sheath potential drop obtained from conventional implicit simulations at moderate values of ω pe Δt and Δz/λ De provides the motivation for the development of the logical sheath boundary condition. The algorithm for use of the logical sheath boundary condition in a particle simulation is presented. Results from simulations which use the logical sheath boundary condition are shown to compare reasonably well with those from an analytic theory and simulations in which the sheath is resolved

  16. Technology base for microgravity horticulture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, R. L.; Magnuson, J. W.; Scruby, R. R.; Scheld, H. W.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced microgravity plant biology research and life support system development for the spacecraft environment are critically hampered by the lack of a technology base. This inadequacy stems primarily from the fact that microgravity results in a lack of convective currents and phase separation as compared to the one gravity environment. A program plan is being initiated to develop this technology base. This program will provide an iterative flight development effort that will be closely integrated with both basic science investigations and advanced life support system development efforts incorporating biological processes. The critical considerations include optimum illumination methods, root aeration, root and shoot support, and heat rejection and gas exchange in the plant canopy.

  17. Simulation of drive of mechanisms, working in specific conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovskaya, A. V.; Rybak, A. T.

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a method for determining the dynamic loads on the lifting actuator device other than the conventional methods, for example, ship windlass. For such devices, the operation of their drives is typical under special conditions: different environments, the influence of hydrometeorological factors, a high level of vibration, variability of loading, etc. Hoisting devices working in such conditions are not considered in the standard; however, relevant studies concern permissible parameters of the drive devices of this kind. As an example, the article studied the work deck lifting devices - windlass. To construct a model, the windlass is represented by a rod of the variable cross-section. As a result, a mathematical model of the longitudinal oscillations of such rod is obtained. Analytic dependencies have also been obtained to determine the natural frequencies of the lowest forms of oscillations, which are necessary and are the basis for evaluating the parameters of operation of this type of the device.

  18. Simulations of the Scandinavian ice sheet and its subsurface conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulton, G.S.; Caban, P.; Hulton, N.

    1999-12-01

    An ice sheet model has been applied to an approximate flow line through the area of the Fennoscandian ice sheet. The modelled ice sheet fluctuations have been matched with stratigraphic evidence of Weichselian ice sheet fluctuation in order to simulate ice sheet attributes through time along the flowline. The model predicts extensive melting at the base of the ice sheet. This output has been used as an input to a simplified model of hydrogeology along the southern flank of the ice sheet so as to reconstruct patterns of subglacial groundwater flow. The output from the model is also used to estimate patterns of subglacial stress and strain. Results suggest that large scale subglacial groundwater catchment are formed which were quite different in extent from modern catchment; that fossil subglacial groundwaters should be found at sampling depths; and much fracturing in shallow bedrock in Sweden could be glacially generated

  19. Simulations of the Scandinavian ice sheet and its subsurface conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulton, G.S.; Caban, P.; Hulton, N. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept of Geology and Geophysics

    1999-12-01

    An ice sheet model has been applied to an approximate flow line through the area of the Fennoscandian ice sheet. The modelled ice sheet fluctuations have been matched with stratigraphic evidence of Weichselian ice sheet fluctuation in order to simulate ice sheet attributes through time along the flowline. The model predicts extensive melting at the base of the ice sheet. This output has been used as an input to a simplified model of hydrogeology along the southern flank of the ice sheet so as to reconstruct patterns of subglacial groundwater flow. The output from the model is also used to estimate patterns of subglacial stress and strain. Results suggest that large scale subglacial groundwater catchment are formed which were quite differentin extent from modern catchment; that fossil subglacial groundwaters should be found at sampling depths; and much fracturing in shallow bedrock in Sweden could be glacially generated.

  20. Generating wind fluctuations for Large Eddy Simulation inflow boundary condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekele, S.A.; Hangan, H.

    2004-01-01

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) studies of flows over bluff bodies immersed in a boundary layer wind environment require instantaneous wind characteristics. The influences of the wind environment on the building pressure distribution are a well-established fact in the experimental study of wind engineering. Measured wind data of full or model scale are available only at a limited number of points. A method of obtaining instantaneous wind data at all mesh points of the inlet boundary for LES computation is necessary. Herein previous and new wind inflow generation techniques are presented. The generated wind data is then applied to a LES computation of a channel flow. The characteristics of the generated wind fluctuations in comparison to the measured data and the properties of the flow field computed from these two wind data are discussed. (author)

  1. Degradation of Poly (lactic acid under Simulated Landfill Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chomnutcha Boonmee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the physical and chemical properties change of poly(lactic acid after burying in the mixture of soil and sludge under thermophilic (61 °C oxygen limited conditions were investigated using various analytical techniques. The environmental factors under these setting conditions and microbial activities accelerated the degradation process of PLA. Under tested conditions, PLA loss their weight about 90% at the burying time of 90 days. During the degradation process, PLA samples were continuously broken to small fragile fragments and showed the size less than 1 mm at the end of degradation test. Change of the surface morphology change was revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Many pores, cracks and irregular roughness were presented on the PLA surface. Thermal decomposition was decreased from 387.8 to 289.2 °C. The percentage of carbon content in molecular structure decreased from 49.46% to 45.42%. In addition, the Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR revealed the change of ester bonds. This study can be used for developing PLA waste management process.

  2. Germination and elongation of flax in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Howard G.; Anderson, Ken; Boody, April; Cox, Dave; Kuznetsov, Oleg A.; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    2003-05-01

    This experiment was conducted as part of a risk mitigation payload aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis on STS-101. The objectives were to test a newly developed water delivery system, and to determine the optimal combination of water volume and substrate for the imbibition and germination of flax ( Linum usitatissimum) seeds in space. Two different combinations of germination paper were tested for their ability to absorb, distribute, and retain water in microgravity. A single layer of thick germination paper was compared with one layer of thin germination paper under a layer of thick paper. Paper strips were cut to fit snugly into seed cassettes, and seeds were glued to them with the micropyle ends pointing outward. Water was delivered in small increments that traveled through the paper via capillary action. Three water delivery volumes were tested, with the largest (480 μL) outperforming the 400 μL, and 320 μL volumes for percent germination (90.6%) and root growth (mean = 4.1 mm) during the 34-hour spaceflight experiment. The ground control experiment yielded similar results, but with lower rates of germination (84.4%) and shorter root lengths (mean = 2.8 mm). It is not clear if the roots emerged more quickly in microgravity and/or grew faster than the ground controls. The single layer of thick germination paper generally exhibited better overall growth than the two layered option. Significant seed position effects were observed in both the flight and ground control experiments. Overall, the design of the water delivery system, seed cassettes and the germination paper strip concept was validated as an effective method for promoting seed germination and root growth under microgravity conditions.

  3. Germination and elongation of flax in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Howard G.; Anderson, Ken; Boody, April; Cox, Dave; Kuznetsov, Oleg A.; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    2003-01-01

    This experiment was conducted as part of a risk mitigation payload aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis on STS-101. The objectives were to test a newly developed water delivery system, and to determine the optimal combination of water volume and substrate for the imbibition and germination of flax (Linum usitatissimum) seeds in space. Two different combinations of germination paper were tested for their ability to absorb, distribute, and retain water in microgravity. A single layer of thick germination paper was compared with one layer of thin germination paper under a layer of thick paper. Paper strips were cut to fit snugly into seed cassettes, and seeds were glued to them with the micropyle ends pointing outward. Water was delivered in small increments that traveled through the paper via capillary action. Three water delivery volumes were tested, with the largest (480 microliters) outperforming the 400 microliters and 320 microliters volumes for percent germination (90.6%) and root growth (mean=4.1 mm) during the 34-hour spaceflight experiment. The ground control experiment yielded similar results, but with lower rates of germination (84.4%) and shorter root lengths (mean=2.8 mm). It is not clear if the roots emerged more quickly in microgravity and/or grew faster than the ground controls. The single layer of thick germination paper generally exhibited better overall growth than the two layered option. Significant seed position effects were observed in both the flight and ground control experiments. Overall, the design of the water delivery system, seed cassettes and the germination paper strip concept was validated as an effective method for promoting seed germination and root growth under microgravity conditions. c2003 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Microgravity Flight - Accommodating Non-Human Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Bonnie P.; Searby, Nancy; Ostrach, Louis

    1994-01-01

    Spacelab Life Sciences-3 (SLS-3) was scheduled to be the first United States man-tended microgravity flight containing Rhesus monkeys. The goal of this flight as in the five untended Russian COSMOS Bion flights and an earlier American Biosatellite flight, was to understand the biomedical and biological effects of a microgravity environment using the non-human primate as human surrogate. The SLS-3/Rhesus Project and COSMOS Primate-BIOS flights all utilized the rhesus monkey, Macaca mulatta. The ultimate objective of all flights with an animal surrogate has been to evaluate and understand biological mechanisms at both the system and cellular level, thus enabling rational effective countermeasures for future long duration human activity under microgravity conditions and enabling technical application to correction of common human physiological problems within earth's gravity, e.g., muscle strength and reloading, osteoporosis, immune deficiency diseases. Hardware developed for the SLS-3/Rhesus Project was the result of a joint effort with the French Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) and the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) extending over the last decade. The flight hardware design and development required implementation of sufficient automation to insure flight crew and animal bio-isolation and maintenance with minimal impact to crew activities. A variety of hardware of varying functional capabilities was developed to support the scientific objectives of the original 22 combined French and American experiments, along with 5 Russian co-investigations, including musculoskeletal, metabolic, and behavioral studies. Unique elements of the Rhesus Research Facility (RRF) included separation of waste for daily delivery of urine and fecal samples for metabolic studies and a psychomotor test system for behavioral studies along with monitored food measurement. As in untended flights, telemetry measurements would allow monitoring of

  5. Human posture experiments under water: ways of applying the findings to microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirlich, Thomas

    For the design and layout human spacecraft interiors the Neutral Body Posture (NBP) in micro-gravity is of great importance. The NBP has been defined as the stable, replicable and nearly constant posture the body "automatically" assumes when a human relaxes in microgravity. Furthermore the NBP, as published, suggests that there is one standard neutral posture for all individuals. Published experiments from space, parabolic flights and under water on the other hand show strong inter-individual variations of neutral (relaxed) postures. This might originate from the quite small sample sizes of subjects analyzed or the different experiment conditions, e. g. space and under water. Since 2008 a collaborative research project focussing on human postures and motions in microgravity has been ongoing at the Technische Univer-sitüt München (TUM). This collaborative effort is undertaken by the Institute of Astronautics a (LRT) and the Institute of Ergonomics (LfE). Several test campaigns have been conducted in simulated microgravity under water using a specially designed standardized experiment setup. Stereo-metric HD video footage and anthropometric data from over 50 subjects (female and male) has been gathered in over 80 experiments. The video data is analyzed using PCMAN software, developed by the LfE, resulting in a 3D volumetric CAD-based model of each subject and posture. Preliminary and ongoing analysis of the data offer evidence for the existence of intra-individually constant neutral postures, as well as continuously recurring relaxation strate-gies. But as with the data published prior the TUM experiments show quite a large variation of inter-individual postures. These variation might be induced or influenced by the special environmental conditions in the underwater experiment. Thus in present paper ways of stan-dardizing data and applying the findings gathered under water to real microgravity are being discussed. The following influences stemming from the

  6. Behavior of ionic conducting IPN actuators in simulated space conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fannir, Adelyne; Plesse, Cédric; Nguyen, Giao T. M.; Laurent, Elisabeth; Cadiergues, Laurent; Vidal, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    The presentation focuses on the performances of flexible all-polymer electroactive actuators under space-hazardous environmental factors in laboratory conditions. These bending actuators are based on high molecular weight nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR), poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) derivative and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxithiophene) (PEDOT). The electroactive PEDOT is embedded within the PEO/NBR membrane which is subsequently swollen with an ionic liquid as electrolyte. Actuators have been submitted to thermal cycling test between -25 to 60°C under vacuum (2.4 10-8 mbar) and to ionizing Gamma radiations at a level of 210 rad/h during 100 h. Actuators have been characterized before and after space environmental condition ageing. In particular, the viscoelasticity properties and mechanical resistance of the materials have been determined by dynamic mechanical analysis and tensile tests. The evolution of the actuation properties as the strain and the output force have been characterized as well. The long-term vacuuming, the freezing temperature and the Gamma radiations do not affect significantly the thermomechanical properties of conducting IPNs actuators. Only a slight decrease on actuation performances has been observed.

  7. Heterogeneous oxidation of mercury in simulated post combustion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn A. Norton; Hongqun Yang; Robert C. Brown; Dennis L. Laudal; Grant E. Dunham; John Erjavec [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States). Center for Sustainable Environmental Technologies

    2003-01-01

    Heterogeneous mercury oxidation was studied by exposing whole fly ash samples and magnetic, nonmagnetic, and size-classified fly ash fractions to elemental mercury vapor in simulated flue gas streams. Fly ash from sub-bituminous Wyodak-Anderson PRB coal and bituminous Blacksville coal were used. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analyses, and BET N{sub 2} isothermal sorption analyses were performed to characterize the fly ash samples. Mercury speciation downstream from the ash was determined using the Ontario Hydro method. Results showed that the presence of fly ash was critical for mercury oxidation, and the surface area of the ash appears to be an important parameter. However, for a given fly ash, there were generally no major differences in catalytic oxidation potential between different fly ash fractions. This includes fractions enriched in unburned carbon and iron oxides. The presence of NO{sub 2}, HCl, and SO{sub 2} resulted in greater levels of mercury oxidation, while NO inhibited mercury oxidation. The gas matrix affected mercury oxidation more than the fly ash composition. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Some potentialities of living organisms under simulated Martian conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozina-Lozinsky, L K; Bychenkova, V N; Zaar, E I; Levin, V L; Rumyantseva, V M

    1971-01-01

    Temperature, humidity, pressure, composition of the atmosphere and radiation are the main factors conditioning life on the surface of Mars. When studying the Martian ecology, one must know the total effect of these factors. One may expect that, as a result of adaptation to low temperatures, there is a corresponding shift in the temperature optimum of enzymatic activity. Dryness is the main obstacle to active life. We suggest the presence of some soil moisture and water vapour. Moreover, there can be areas of permafrost. This minimum supply of water and periodic fluctuations of humidity may create conditions for the existence of drought-resistant organisms. Decreased atmospheric pressure alone does not affect micro-organisms, plants, protozoa and even insects. Ciliates reproduce in a flowing atmosphere of pure nitrogen containing 0.0002-0.0005% oxygen as an impurity. Protozoa may also develop in an atmosphere of 98-99% carbon dioxide mixed with 1% O2. Therefore, even traces of oxygen in the Martian atmosphere would be sufficient for aerobic unicellular organisms. Cells and organisms on earth have acquired various ways of protection from uv light, and therefore may increase their resistance further by adaptation or selection. The resistance of some organisms to ionizing radiation is high enough to enable them to endure hard ionizing radiation of the sun. Experiments with unicellular [correction of unicellar] organisms show that the effect of short wave uv radiation depends on the intensity of visible light, long-wave solar uv radiation, temperatures, cell repair processes, and the state of cell components, i.e. whether the cell was frozen, dried or hydrated.

  9. Kombucha Multimicrobial Community under Simulated Spaceflight and Martian Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolich, O.; Zaets, I.; Kukharenko, O.; Orlovska, I.; Reva, O.; Khirunenko, L.; Sosnin, M.; Haidak, A.; Shpylova, S.; Rabbow, E.; Skoryk, M.; Kremenskoy, M.; Demets, R.; Kozyrovska, N.; de Vera, J.-P.

    2017-05-01

    Kombucha microbial community (KMC) produces a cellulose-based biopolymer of industrial importance and a probiotic beverage. KMC-derived cellulose-based pellicle film is known as a highly adaptive microbial macrocolony—a stratified community of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In the framework of the multipurpose international astrobiological project "BIOlogy and Mars Experiment (BIOMEX)," which aims to study the vitality of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms and the stability of selected biomarkers in low Earth orbit and in a Mars-like environment, a cellulose polymer structural integrity will be assessed as a biomarker and biotechnological nanomaterial. In a preflight assessment program for BIOMEX, the mineralized bacterial cellulose did not exhibit significant changes in the structure under all types of tests. KMC members that inhabit the cellulose-based pellicle exhibited a high survival rate; however, the survival capacity depended on a variety of stressors such as the vacuum of space, a Mars-like atmosphere, UVC radiation, and temperature fluctuations. The critical limiting factor for microbial survival was high-dose UV irradiation. In the tests that simulated a 1-year mission of exposure outside the International Space Station, the core populations of bacteria and yeasts survived and provided protection against UV; however, the microbial density of the populations overall was reduced, which was revealed by implementation of culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. Reduction of microbial richness was also associated with a lower accumulation of chemical elements in the cellulose-based pellicle film, produced by microbiota that survived in the post-test experiments, as compared to untreated cultures that populated the film.

  10. Role of Boundary Conditions in Monte Carlo Simulation of MEMS Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, Robert P.; Hash, David B.; Hassan, H. A.

    1997-01-01

    A study is made of the issues surrounding prediction of microchannel flows using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. This investigation includes the introduction and use of new inflow and outflow boundary conditions suitable for subsonic flows. A series of test simulations for a moderate-size microchannel indicates that a high degree of grid under-resolution in the streamwise direction may be tolerated without loss of accuracy. In addition, the results demonstrate the importance of physically correct boundary conditions, as well as possibilities for reducing the time associated with the transient phase of a simulation. These results imply that simulations of longer ducts may be more feasible than previously envisioned.

  11. Simulation of worst-case operating conditions for integrated circuits operating in a total dose environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhuva, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Degradations in the circuit performance created by the radiation exposure of integrated circuits are so unique and abnormal that thorough simulation and testing of VLSI circuits is almost impossible, and new ways to estimate the operating performance in a radiation environment must be developed. The principal goal of this work was the development of simulation techniques for radiation effects on semiconductor devices. The mixed-mode simulation approach proved to be the most promising. The switch-level approach is used to identify the failure mechanisms and critical subcircuits responsible for operational failure along with worst-case operating conditions during and after irradiation. For precise simulations of critical subcircuits, SPICE is used. The identification of failure mechanisms enables the circuit designer to improve the circuit's performance and failure-exposure level. Identification of worst-case operating conditions during and after irradiation reduces the complexity of testing VLSI circuits for radiation environments. The results of test circuits for failure simulations using a conventional simulator and the new simulator showed significant time savings using the new simulator. The savings in simulation time proved to be circuit topology-dependent. However, for large circuits, the simulation time proved to be orders of magnitude smaller than simulation time for conventional simulators

  12. Simulation study on the maximum continuous working condition of a power plant boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Han, Jiting; Sun, Haitian; Cheng, Jiwei; Jing, Ying'ai; Li, Wenbo

    2018-05-01

    First of all, the boiler is briefly introduced to determine the mathematical model and the boundary conditions, then the boiler under the BMCR condition numerical simulation study, and then the BMCR operating temperature field analysis. According to the boiler actual test results and the hot BMCR condition boiler output test results, the simulation results are verified. The main conclusions are as follows: the position and size of the inscribed circle in the furnace and the furnace temperature distribution and test results under different elevation are compared and verified; Accuracy of numerical simulation results.

  13. Tolerance of centrifuge-simulated suborbital spaceflight by medical condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Rebecca S; Pattarini, James M; Reyes, David P; Mulcahy, Robert A; Garbino, Alejandro; Mathers, Charles H; Vardiman, Johnené L; Castleberry, Tarah L; Vanderploeg, James M

    2014-07-01

    We examined responses of volunteers with known medical disease to G forces in a centrifuge to evaluate how potential commercial spaceflight participants (SFPs) might tolerate the forces of spaceflight despite significant medical history. Volunteers were recruited based upon suitability for each of five disease categories (hypertension, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, lung disease, back or neck problems) or a control group. Subjects underwent seven centrifuge runs over 2 d. Day 1 consisted of two +G(z) runs (peak = +3.5 G(z), Run 2) and two +G(x), runs (peak = +6.0 G(x), Run 4). Day 2 consisted of three runs approximating suborbital spaceflight profiles (combined +G(x) and +G(z), peak = +6.0 G(x)/+4.0 G(z)). Data collected included blood pressure, electrocardiogram, pulse oximetry, neurovestibular exams, and post-run questionnaires regarding motion sickness, disorientation, grayout, and other symptoms. A total of 335 subjects registered for participation, of which 86 (63 men, 23 women, age 20-78 yr) participated in centrifuge trials. The most common causes for disqualification were weight and severe and uncontrolled medical or psychiatric disease. Five subjects voluntarily withdrew from the second day of testing: three for anxiety reasons, one for back strain, and one for time constraints. Maximum hemodynamic values recorded included HR of 192 bpm, systolic BP of 217 mmHg, and diastolic BP of 144 mmHg. Common subjective complaints included grayout (69%), nausea (20%), and chest discomfort (6%). Despite their medical history, no subject experienced significant adverse physiological responses to centrifuge profiles. These results suggest that most individuals with well-controlled medical conditions can withstand acceleration forces of launch and re-entry profiles of current commercial spaceflight vehicles.

  14. METAL STRUCTURES SURVIVABILITY ASSESSMENT WHEN SIMULATING SERVICE CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Gibalenko

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The research is aimed at improving the quality and reliability of measures of primary and secondary protection of metal structures at manufacturing companies, to prolong the service life of cyclically loaded structures of production facilities taking into account the corrosion level of danger. Methodology. Authors proposed to use the principles of process approach for statement and realization of management problems of operational service life in corrosion environments. The principles of ensuring reliability on the level of corrosion danger include justification of stages sequence for survivability assessment of a structural metalwork based on the strategy of DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, control: definitions, measurements, analysis, improvement and monitoring of measures of primary and secondary corrosion protection. Findings. Providing control measures from corrosion according to the criterion of corrosion danger allows providing requirements of reliability of structural metalwork based on calculated provisions of the limiting conditions method and solving the problems of management in technological safety during the expected service life of structural objects. Originality. The developed strategy of maintenance of the industrial facilities on an actual state includes the process approach to resource management by creation of system for the account and the functional controlling, risk analysis and regulation of technological safety in production facilities of the enterprises. Realization of the principles of process approach to management of technological safety at the object level is directed to perfecting of tools and methods of anticorrosive protection, extension of a resource taking into account indexes of survivability (, and justification of program measures to ensure the reliability of enterprises(PER. Practical value. On the basis of process approach to quality and reliability management, generalizations of the

  15. RANS simulation of cavitation and hull pressure fluctuation for marine propeller operating behind-hull condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Kwang-Jun; Park, Hyung-Gil; Seo, Jongsoo

    2013-12-01

    Simulations of cavitation flow and hull pressure fluctuation for a marine propeller operating behind a hull using the unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) are presented. A full hull body submerged under the free surface is modeled in the computational domain to simulate directly the wake field of the ship at the propeller plane. Simulations are performed in design and ballast draught conditions to study the effect of cavitation number. And two propellers with slightly different geometry are simulated to validate the detectability of the numerical simulation. All simulations are performed using a commercial CFD software FLUENT. Cavitation patterns of the simulations show good agreement with the experimental results carried out in Samsung CAvitation Tunnel (SCAT). The simulation results for the hull pressure fluctuation induced by a propeller are also compared with the experimental results showing good agreement in the tendency and amplitude, especially, for the first blade frequency.

  16. RANS simulation of cavitation and hull pressure fluctuation for marine propeller operating behind-hull condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Jun Paik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of cavitation flow and hull pressure fluctuation for a marine propeller operating behind a hull using the unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS are presented. A full hull body submerged under the free surface is modeled in the computational domain to simulate directly the wake field of the ship at the propeller plane. Simulations are performed in design and ballast draught conditions to study the effect of cavitation number. And two propellers with slightly different geometry are simulated to validate the detectability of the numerical simulation. All simulations are performed using a commercial CFD software FLUENT. Cavitation patterns of the simulations show good agreement with the experimental results carried out in Samsung CAvitation Tunnel (SCAT. The simulation results for the hull pressure fluctuation induced by a propeller are also compared with the experimental results showing good agreement in the tendency and amplitude, especially, for the first blade frequency.

  17. Computational and Experimental Study of Energetic Materials in a Counterflow Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki (Technical Monitor); Urban, David (Technical Monitor); Smooke, M. D.; Parr, T. P.; Hanson-Parr, D. M.; Yetter, R. A.; Risha, G.

    2004-01-01

    Counterflow diffusion flames are studied for various fuels flowing against decomposition products from solid ammonium perchlorate (AP) pellets in order to obtain fundamental understanding of composite propellant flame structure and chemistry. We illustrate this approach through a combined experimental and numerical study of a fuel mixture consisting of C2H4 CO + H2, and C2H2 + C2H4 flowing against solid AP. For these particular AP-fuel systems, the resulting flame zone simulates the various flame structures that are ex+ to exist between reaction products from Ap crystals and a hydrocarbon binder. As in all our experimental studies, quantitative species and temperature profiles have been measured between the fuel exit and AP surface. Species measured included CN, NH, NO, OH, N2, CO2, CO, H2, CO, HCl, and H2O. Temperature was measured using a thermocouple at the exit, spontaneous Raman scattering measurements throughout the flame, OH rotational population distributions, and NO vibrational population distributions. The burning rate of AP was also measured as a function of strain rate, given by the separation distance between the AP surface and the gaseous hydrocarbon fuel tube exit plane. This distance was nominally set at 5 mm, although studies have been performed for variations in separation distance. The measured 12 scalars are compared with predictions from a detailed gas-phase kinetics model consisting of 86 species and 531 reactions. Model predictions are found to be in good agreement with experiment and illustrate the type of kinetic features that may be expected to occur in propellants when AP particle size distributions are varied. Furthermore, the results constitute the continued development of a necessary database and validation of a comprehensive model for studying more complex AP-solid fuel systems in microgravity. Exploratory studies have also been performed with liquid and solid fuels at normal gravity. Because of melting (and hence dripping) and deep

  18. Microgravity Stress: Bone and Connective Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Susan A; Martinez, Daniel A; Boudreaux, Ramon D; Mantri, Anita V

    2016-03-15

    The major alterations in bone and the dense connective tissues in humans and animals exposed to microgravity illustrate the dependency of these tissues' function on normal gravitational loading. Whether these alterations depend solely on the reduced mechanical loading of zero g or are compounded by fluid shifts, altered tissue blood flow, radiation exposure, and altered nutritional status is not yet well defined. Changes in the dense connective tissues and intervertebral disks are generally smaller in magnitude but occur more rapidly than those in mineralized bone with transitions to 0 g and during recovery once back to the loading provided by 1 g conditions. However, joint injuries are projected to occur much more often than the more catastrophic bone fracture during exploration class missions, so protecting the integrity of both tissues is important. This review focuses on the research performed over the last 20 years in humans and animals exposed to actual spaceflight, as well as on knowledge gained from pertinent ground-based models such as bed rest in humans and hindlimb unloading in rodents. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the mechanisms for alterations in bone and connective tissues with exposure to microgravity, but intriguing questions remain to be solved, particularly with reference to biomedical risks associated with prolonged exploration missions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. Resource Management in the Microgravity Science Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casselle, Justine

    2004-01-01

    In the Microgravity Science Division, the primary responsibilities of the Business Management Office are resource management and data collection. Resource management involves working with a budget to do a number of specific projects, while data collection involves collecting information such as the status of projects and workforce hours. This summer in the Business Management Office I assisted Margie Allen with resource planning and the implementation of specific microgravity projects. One of the main duties of a Project Control Specialists, such as my mentor, is to monitor and analyze project manager s financial plans. Project managers work from the bottom up to determine how much money their project will cost. They then set up a twelve month operating plan which shows when money will be spent. I assisted my mentor in checking for variances in her data against those of the project managers. In order to successfully check for those variances, we had to understand: where the project is including plans vs. actual performance, why it is in its present condition, and what the future impact will be based on known budgetary parameters. Our objective was to make sure that the plan, or estimated resources input, are a valid reflection of the actual cost. To help with my understanding of the process, over the course of my tenure I had to obtain skills in Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Access.

  20. Electrical Aspects of Flames in Microgravity Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn-Rankin, D.; Strayer, B.; Weinberg, F.; Carleton, F.

    1999-01-01

    A principal characteristic of combustion in microgravity is the absence of buoyancy driven flows. In some cases, such as for spherically symmetrical droplet burning, the absence of buoyancy is desirable for matching analytical treatments with experiments. In other cases, however, it can be more valuable to arbitrarily control the flame's convective environment independent of the environmental gravitational condition. To accomplish this, we propose the use of ion generated winds driven by electric fields to control local convection of flames. Such control can produce reduced buoyancy (effectively zero buoyancy) conditions in the laboratory in 1-g facilitating a wide range of laser diagnostics that can probe the system without special packaging required for drop tower or flight tests. In addition, the electric field generated ionic winds allow varying gravitational convection equivalents even if the test occurs in reduced gravity environments.

  1. Artificial Boundary Conditions for the Numerical Simulation of Unsteady Acoustic Waves

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsynkov, S. V

    2003-01-01

    We construct non-local artificial boundary conditions (ABCs) for the numerical simulation of genuinely time-dependent acoustic waves that propagate from a compact source in an unbounded unobstructed space...

  2. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

    1992-06-01

    The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 x 3.0 x 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models

  3. The effect of box shape on the dynamic properties of proteins simulated under periodic boundary conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassenaar, T.A.; Mark, A.E.

    The effect of the box shape on the dynamic behavior of proteins simulated under periodic boundary conditions is evaluated. In particular, the influence of simulation boxes defined by the near-densest lattice packing (NDLP) in conjunction with rotational constraints is compared to that of standard

  4. A Simulation of Strategic Decision Making in Situational Stereotype Conditions for Entrepreneurial Companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, G. Page, III; Wilson, E. Vance

    1995-01-01

    Examines simulation in entrepreneurial research, reviews cognitive structures and theories, and presents a computerized simulation of strategic decision-making in situational stereotype conditions for entrepreneurial companies. The study suggests repeated exposure to a pattern recognition issue in entrepreneurship may lead to a broader…

  5. Physical robustness of canopy temperature models for crop heat stress simulation across environments and production conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webber, Heidi; White, Jeffrey W; Kimball, Bruce

    2018-01-01

    to simulate Tc. Model performance in predicting Tc was evaluated for two experiments in continental North America with various water, nitrogen and CO2 treatments. An empirical model fit to one dataset had the best performance, followed by the EBSC models. Stability conditions explained much of the differences...... between modeling approaches. More accurate simulation of heat stress will likely require use of energy balance approaches that consider atmospheric stability conditions....

  6. Generating a picokelvin ultracold atomic ensemble in microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lu; Ma, Zhao-Yuan; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Xu-Zong

    2013-01-01

    Applying the direct Monte Carlo simulation (DSMC) method developed for a cold atom system, we study the evaporative cooling process in tilted optical dipole traps with a magnetic field gradient-induced over-levitation or merely a gravitational force. We propose a two-stage decomposed evaporative cooling process in a microgravity environment, and suggest that quantum degeneracy can be obtained at a few picokelvins with several thousand atoms. (paper)

  7. Comparison of different techniques for in microgravity-a simple mathematic estimation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality for space environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunecker, S; Douglas, B; Hinkelbein, J

    2015-07-01

    Since astronauts are selected carefully, are usually young, and are intensively observed before and during training, relevant medical problems are rare. Nevertheless, there is a certain risk for a cardiac arrest in space requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Up to now, there are 5 known techniques to perform CPR in microgravity. The aim of the present study was to analyze different techniques for CPR during microgravity about quality of CPR. To identify relevant publications on CPR quality in microgravity, a systematic analysis with defined searching criteria was performed in the PubMed database (http://www.pubmed.com). For analysis, the keywords ("reanimation" or "CPR" or "resuscitation") and ("space" or "microgravity" or "weightlessness") and the specific names of the techniques ("Standard-technique" or "Straddling-manoeuvre" or "Reverse-bear-hug-technique" or "Evetts-Russomano-technique" or "Hand-stand-technique") were used. To compare quality and effectiveness of different techniques, we used the compression product (CP), a mathematical estimation for cardiac output. Using the predefined keywords for literature search, 4 different publications were identified (parabolic flight or under simulated conditions on earth) dealing with CPR efforts in microgravity and giving specific numbers. No study was performed under real-space conditions. Regarding compression depth, the handstand (HS) technique as well as the reverse bear hug (RBH) technique met parameters of the guidelines for CPR in 1G environments best (HS ratio, 0.91 ± 0.07; RBH ratio, 0.82 ± 0.13). Concerning compression rate, 4 of 5 techniques reached the required compression rate (ratio: HS, 1.08 ± 0.11; Evetts-Russomano [ER], 1.01 ± 0.06; standard side straddle, 1.00 ± 0.03; and straddling maneuver, 1.03 ± 0.12). The RBH method did not meet the required criteria (0.89 ± 0.09). The HS method showed the highest cardiac output (69.3% above the required CP), followed by the ER technique (33

  8. Detailed simulations of lighting conditions in office rooms lit by daylight and artificial light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Anne

    In this thesis the effect on the annual artificial lighting demand is investigated by employing detailed simulations of lighting conditions in office rooms lit by daylight and artificial. The simulations of the artificial lighting demand is accomplished through daylight simulations in Radiance....... The detailed simulations includes studies of the resolution of different weather data sets in climate-based daylight modeling. Furthermore, influence of the electrical lighting demand by simulating with dynamic occupancy patterns is studied. Finally the thesis explores the influence of obstructions in an urban...... canyon on the daylight availability within the buildings, and hence on the energy consumption for artificial lights. The results from the thesis demonstrates that the effect on the outcome of the daylight simulations when simulating with typical weather data files for the location of Copenhagen...

  9. Regulation of ICAM-1 in Cells of the Monocyte/Macrophage System in Microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Paulsen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cells of the immune system are highly sensitive to altered gravity, and the monocyte as well as the macrophage function is proven to be impaired under microgravity conditions. In our study, we investigated the surface expression of ICAM-1 protein and expression of ICAM-1 mRNA in cells of the monocyte/macrophage system in microgravity during clinostat, parabolic flight, sounding rocket, and orbital experiments. In murine BV-2 microglial cells, we detected a downregulation of ICAM-1 expression in clinorotation experiments and a rapid and reversible downregulation in the microgravity phase of parabolic flight experiments. In contrast, ICAM-1 expression increased in macrophage-like differentiated human U937 cells during the microgravity phase of parabolic flights and in long-term microgravity provided by a 2D clinostat or during the orbital SIMBOX/Shenzhou-8 mission. In nondifferentiated U937 cells, no effect of microgravity on ICAM-1 expression could be observed during parabolic flight experiments. We conclude that disturbed immune function in microgravity could be a consequence of ICAM-1 modulation in the monocyte/macrophage system, which in turn could have a strong impact on the interaction with T lymphocytes and cell migration. Thus, ICAM-1 can be considered as a rapid-reacting and sustained gravity-regulated molecule in mammalian cells.

  10. Analysis and simulation of mobile air conditioning system coupled with engine cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Zhao-gang; Chen, Jiang-ping; Chen, Zhi-jiu

    2007-01-01

    Many components of the mobile air conditioning system and engine cooling system are closely interrelated and make up the vehicle climate control system. In the present paper, a vehicle climate control system model including air conditioning system and engine cooling system has been proposed under different operational conditions. All the components have been modeled on the basis of experimental data. Based on the commercial software, a computer simulation procedure of the vehicle climate control system has been developed. The performance of the vehicle climate control system is simulated, and the calculational data have good agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, the vehicle climate control simulation results have been compared with an individual air conditioning system and engine cooling system. The influences between the mobile air conditioning system and the engine cooling system are discussed

  11. mRNA expression profile in DLD-1 and MOLT-4 cancer cell lines cultured under Microgravity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DLD-1 and MOLT-4 cell lines were cultured in a Rotating cell culture system to simulate microgravity and mRNA expression profile was observed in comparison to Static...

  12. Stress, and pathogen response gene expression in modeled microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaresan, Alamelu; Pellis, Neal R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Immune suppression in microgravity has been well documented. With the advent of human exploration and long-term space travel, the immune system of the astronaut must be optimally maintained. It is important to investigate the expression patterns of cytokine genes, because they are directly related to immune response. Heat shock proteins (HSPs), also called stress proteins, are a group of proteins that are present in the cells of every life form. These proteins are induced when a cell responds to stressors such as heat, cold and oxygen deprivation. Microgravity is another stressor that may regulate HSPs. Heat shock proteins trigger immune response through activities that occur both inside the cell (intracellular) and outside the cell (extracellular). Knowledge about these two gene groups could lead to establishment of a blueprint of the immune response and adaptation-related genes in the microgravity environment. Methods: Human peripheral blood cells were cultured in 1g (T flask) and modeled microgravity (MMG, rotating-wall vessel) for 24 and 72 hours. Cell samples were collected and subjected to gene array analysis using the Affymetrix HG_U95 array. Data was collected and subjected to a two-way analysis of variance. The genes related to immune and stress responses were analyzed. Results and Conclusions: HSP70 was up-regulated by more than two fold in microgravity culture, while HSP90 was significantly down-regulated. HSP70 is not typically expressed in all kinds of cells, but it is expressed at high levels in stress conditions. HSP70 participates in translation, protein translocation, proteolysis and protein folding, suppressing aggregation and reactivating denatured proteins. Increased serum HSP70 levels correlate with a better outcome for heat-stroke or severe trauma patients. At the same time, elevated serum levels of HSP70 have been detected in patients with peripheral or renal vascular disease. HSP90 has been identified in the cytosol, nucleus and

  13. A Six-DOF Buoyancy Tank Microgravity Test Bed with Active Drag Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chong; Chen, Shiyu; Yuan, Jianping; Zhu, Zhanxia

    2017-10-01

    Ground experiment under microgravity is very essential because it can verify the space enabling technologies before applied in space missions. In this paper, a novel ground experiment system that can provide long duration, large scale and high microgravity level for the six degree of freedom (DOF) spacecraft trajectory tracking is presented. In which, the most gravity of the test body is balanced by the buoyancy, and the small residual gravity is offset by the electromagnetic force. Because the electromagnetic force on the test body can be adjusted in the electromagnetic system, it can significantly simplify the balancing process using the proposed microgravity test bed compared to the neutral buoyance system. Besides, a novel compensation control system based on the active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) method is developed to estimate and compensate the water resistance online, in order to improve the fidelity of the ground experiment. A six-DOF trajectory tracking in the microgravity system is applied to testify the efficiency of the proposed compensation controller, and the experimental simulation results are compared to that obtained using the classic proportional-integral-derivative (PID) method. The simulation results demonstrated that, for the six-DOF motion ground experiment, the microgravity level can reach to 5 × 10-4 g. And, because the water resistance has been estimated and compensated, the performance of the presented controller is much better than the PID controller. The presented ground microgravity system can be applied in on-orbit service and other related technologies in future.

  14. Microgravity Fluids for Biology, Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, DeVon; Kohl, Fred; Massa, Gioia D.; Motil, Brian; Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; Quincy, Charles; Sato, Kevin; Singh, Bhim; Smith, Jeffrey D.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2013-01-01

    Microgravity Fluids for Biology represents an intersection of biology and fluid physics that present exciting research challenges to the Space Life and Physical Sciences Division. Solving and managing the transport processes and fluid mechanics in physiological and biological systems and processes are essential for future space exploration and colonization of space by humans. Adequate understanding of the underlying fluid physics and transport mechanisms will provide new, necessary insights and technologies for analyzing and designing biological systems critical to NASAs mission. To enable this mission, the fluid physics discipline needs to work to enhance the understanding of the influence of gravity on the scales and types of fluids (i.e., non-Newtonian) important to biology and life sciences. In turn, biomimetic, bio-inspired and synthetic biology applications based on physiology and biology can enrich the fluid mechanics and transport phenomena capabilities of the microgravity fluid physics community.

  15. Detrimental effects of microgravity on mouse preimplantation development in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayaka Wakayama

    Full Text Available Sustaining life beyond Earth either on space stations or on other planets will require a clear understanding of how the space environment affects key phases of mammalian reproduction. However, because of the difficulty of doing such experiments in mammals, most studies of reproduction in space have been carried out with other taxa, such as sea urchins, fish, amphibians or birds. Here, we studied the possibility of mammalian fertilization and preimplantation development under microgravity (microG conditions using a three-dimensional (3D clinostat, which faithfully simulates 10(-3 G using 3D rotation. Fertilization occurred normally in vitro under microG. However, although we obtained 75 healthy offspring from microG-fertilized and -cultured embryos after transfer to recipient females, the birth rate was lower than among the 1G controls. Immunostaining demonstrated that in vitro culture under microG caused slower development and fewer trophectoderm cells than in 1G controls but did not affect polarization of the blastocyst. These results suggest for the first time that fertilization can occur normally under microG environment in a mammal, but normal preimplantation embryo development might require 1G.

  16. Polymer solution phase separation: Microgravity simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Lawrence C.; Sutter, James K.

    1989-01-01

    In many multicomponent systems, a transition from a single phase of uniform composition to a multiphase state with separated regions of different composition can be induced by changes in temperature and shear. The density difference between the phase and thermal and/or shear gradients within the system results in buoyancy driven convection. These differences affect kinetics of the phase separation if the system has a sufficiently low viscosity. This investigation presents more preliminary developments of a theoretical model in order to describe effects of the buoyancy driven convection in phase separation kinetics. Polymer solutions were employed as model systems because of the ease with which density differences can be systematically varied and because of the importance of phase separation in the processing and properties of polymeric materials. The results indicate that the kinetics of the phase separation can be performed viscometrically using laser light scattering as a principle means of following the process quantitatively. Isopycnic polymer solutions were used to determine the viscosity and density difference limits for polymer phase separation.

  17. Dynamics Modeling and Simulation of Large Transport Airplanes in Upset Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, John V.; Cunningham, Kevin; Fremaux, Charles M.; Shah, Gautam H.; Stewart, Eric C.; Rivers, Robert A.; Wilborn, James E.; Gato, William

    2005-01-01

    As part of NASA's Aviation Safety and Security Program, research has been in progress to develop aerodynamic modeling methods for simulations that accurately predict the flight dynamics characteristics of large transport airplanes in upset conditions. The motivation for this research stems from the recognition that simulation is a vital tool for addressing loss-of-control accidents, including applications to pilot training, accident reconstruction, and advanced control system analysis. The ultimate goal of this effort is to contribute to the reduction of the fatal accident rate due to loss-of-control. Research activities have involved accident analyses, wind tunnel testing, and piloted simulation. Results have shown that significant improvements in simulation fidelity for upset conditions, compared to current training simulations, can be achieved using state-of-the-art wind tunnel testing and aerodynamic modeling methods. This paper provides a summary of research completed to date and includes discussion on key technical results, lessons learned, and future research needs.

  18. Microgravity-Enhanced Stem Cell Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudio, Pier Paolo; Valluri, Jagan

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells, both embryonic and adult, promise to revolutionize the practice of medicine in the future. In order to realize this potential, a number of hurdles must be overcome. Most importantly, the signaling mechanisms necessary to control the differentiation of stem cells into tissues of interest remain to be elucidated, and much of the present research on stem cells is focused on this goal. Nevertheless, it will also be essential to achieve large-scale expansion and, in many cases, assemble cells in 3D as transplantable tissues. To this end, microgravity analog bioreactors can play a significant role. Microgravity bioreactors were originally conceived as a tool to study the cellular responses to microgravity. However, the technology can address some of the shortcomings of conventional cell culture systems; namely, the deficiency of mass transport in static culture and high mechanical shear forces in stirred systems. Unexpectedly, the conditions created in the vessel were ideal for 3D cell culture. Recently, investigators have demonstrated the capability of the microgravity bioreactors to expand hematopoietic stem cells compared to static culture, and facilitate the differentiation of umbilical cord stem cells into 3D liver aggregates. Stem cells are capable of differentiating into functional cells. However, there are no reliable methods to induce the stem cells to form specific cells or to gain enough cells for transplantation, which limits their application in clinical therapy. The aim of this study is to select the best experimental setup to reach high proliferation levels by culturing these cells in a microgravity-based bioreactor. In typical cell culture, the cells sediment to the bottom surface of their container and propagate as a one-cell-layer sheet. Prevention of such sedimentation affords the freedom for self-assembly and the propagation of 3D tissue arrays. Suspension of cells is easily achievable using stirred technologies. Unfortunately, in

  19. Studies on the survival of Ascaris suum eggs under laboratory and simulated field conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaasenbeek, C.P.H.; Borgsteede, F.H.M.

    1998-01-01

    A series of four experiments was carried out to study the survival of Ascaris suum eggs: in a pig slurry unit on a farm, in the laboratory under anaerobic conditions and different relative humidities (rH), and under simulated field conditions. Survival of eggs in the pig slurry unit was 20% after

  20. Development of a comprehensive database of scattering environmental conditions and simulation constraints for offshore wind turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hübler

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available For the design and optimisation of offshore wind turbines, the knowledge of realistic environmental conditions and utilisation of well-founded simulation constraints is very important, as both influence the structural behaviour and power output in numerical simulations. However, real high-quality data, especially for research purposes, are scarcely available. This is why, in this work, a comprehensive database of 13 environmental conditions at wind turbine locations in the North and Baltic Sea is derived using data of the FINO research platforms. For simulation constraints, like the simulation length and the time of initial simulation transients, well-founded recommendations in the literature are also rare. Nevertheless, it is known that the choice of simulation lengths and times of initial transients fundamentally affects the quality and computing time of simulations. For this reason, studies of convergence for both parameters are conducted to determine adequate values depending on the type of substructure, the wind speed, and the considered loading (fatigue or ultimate. As the main purpose of both the database and the simulation constraints is to compromise realistic data for probabilistic design approaches and to serve as a guidance for further studies in order to enable more realistic and accurate simulations, all results are freely available and easy to apply.

  1. Effects of Uncertainties in Electric Field Boundary Conditions for Ring Current Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Margaret W.; O'Brien, T. Paul; Lemon, Colby L.; Guild, Timothy B.

    2018-01-01

    Physics-based simulation results can vary widely depending on the applied boundary conditions. As a first step toward assessing the effect of boundary conditions on ring current simulations, we analyze the uncertainty of cross-polar cap potentials (CPCP) on electric field boundary conditions applied to the Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium (RCM-E). The empirical Weimer model of CPCP is chosen as the reference model and Defense Meteorological Satellite Program CPCP measurements as the reference data. Using temporal correlations from a statistical analysis of the "errors" between the reference model and data, we construct a Monte Carlo CPCP discrete time series model that can be generalized to other model boundary conditions. RCM-E simulations using electric field boundary conditions from the reference model and from 20 randomly generated Monte Carlo discrete time series of CPCP are performed for two large storms. During the 10 August 2000 storm main phase, the proton density at 10 RE at midnight was observed to be low (Dst index is bounded by the simulated Dst values. In contrast, the simulated Dst values during the recovery phases of the 10 August 2000 and 31 August 2005 storms tend to underestimate systematically the observed late Dst recovery. This suggests a need to improve the accuracy of particle loss calculations in the RCM-E model. Application of this technique can aid modelers to make efficient choices on either investing more effort on improving specification of boundary conditions or on improving descriptions of physical processes.

  2. specsim: A Fortran-77 program for conditional spectral simulation in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Tingting

    1998-12-01

    A Fortran 77 program, specsim, is presented for conditional spectral simulation in 3D domains. The traditional Fourier integral method allows generating random fields with a given covariance spectrum. Conditioning to local data is achieved by an iterative identification of the conditional phase information. A flowchart of the program is given to illustrate the implementation procedures of the program. A 3D case study is presented to demonstrate application of the program. A comparison with the traditional sequential Gaussian simulation algorithm emphasizes the advantages and drawbacks of the proposed algorithm.

  3. Simulation Study of Flap Effects on a Commercial Transport Airplane in Upset Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kevin; Foster, John V.; Shah, Gautam H.; Stewart, Eric C.; Ventura, Robin N.; Rivers, Robert A.; Wilborn, James E.; Gato, William

    2005-01-01

    As part of NASA's Aviation Safety and Security Program, a simulation study of a twinjet transport airplane crew training simulation was conducted to address fidelity for upset or loss of control conditions and to study the effect of flap configuration in those regimes. Piloted and desktop simulations were used to compare the baseline crew training simulation model with an enhanced aerodynamic model that was developed for high-angle-of-attack conditions. These studies were conducted with various flap configurations and addressed the approach-to-stall, stall, and post-stall flight regimes. The enhanced simulation model showed that flap configuration had a significant effect on the character of departures that occurred during post-stall flight. Preliminary comparisons with flight test data indicate that the enhanced model is a significant improvement over the baseline. Some of the unrepresentative characteristics that are predicted by the baseline crew training simulation for flight in the post-stall regime have been identified. This paper presents preliminary results of this simulation study and discusses key issues regarding predicted flight dynamics characteristics during extreme upset and loss-of-control flight conditions with different flap configurations.

  4. Amphibian fertilization and development in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Kenneth A.

    1993-01-01

    During the year before launch, female frogs will be tested every 3 months for the quantity and quality of eggs produced. Two weeks or more prior to launch, male and female frogs will be transported to the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). During the few weeks before launch, groups will be periodically tested for egg quality to assure that the frogs have adapted to the KSC laboratory environment. About 27 hours before launch, four females will be placed in a damp foam-lined box, called the Adult Frog Box (AFB), through which 100 cc/min of air wil be circulated. The AFB will be lowered into the Spacelab and loaded into the Frog Environmental Unit (FEU) during the final pre-launch preparations. A sperm suspension, for use in flight to fertilize the eggs, will also be prepared and loaded during the pre-launch period. The sperm suspension, together with a kit of syringes containing Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (HCG), will be stored in a refrigerator aboard the shuttle until needed in flight. On the first day of flight, the AFB will be transferred from the FEU to the General Purpose Work Station (GPWS), which is a type of glove box specially designed to allow the crew to use chemicals and biological materials during the flight without contaminating the shuttle/Spacelab environment. Inside the GPWS the four adult frogs will be injected with the HCG hormone and returned to the FEU. Approximately 16 hours after injection, ovulation should have taken place and 15 to 20 eggs from each frog will be placed on each of two egg baskets and covered with sperm for 10 minutes. The egg baskets are inserted into acrylic egg chambers and 50 ml of 'pond water' (20 percent strength Modified Ringers solution (is added. One of the chambers from each frog will be placed on a centrifuge within the FEU and rotated to simulate normal terrestrial gravity (1 g). The remaining chambers are incubated under microgravity conditions within the FEU. Forty minutes after fertilization, the four

  5. Microgravity as a biological tool to examine host-pathogen interactions and to guide development of therapeutics and preventatives that target pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, Ellen E; Galen, James E; Levine, Myron M; Tennant, Sharon M

    2016-11-01

    Space exploration programs have long been interested in the effects of spaceflight on biology. This research is important not only in its relevance to future deep space exploration, but also because it has allowed investigators to ask questions about how gravity impacts cell behavior here on Earth. In the 1980s, scientists designed and built the first rotating wall vessel, capable of mimicking the low shear environment found in space. This vessel has since been used to investigate growth of both microorganisms and human tissue cells in low shear modeled microgravity conditions. Bacterial behavior has been shown to be altered both in space and under simulated microgravity conditions. In some cases, bacteria appear attenuated, whereas in others virulence is enhanced. This has consequences not only for manned spaceflight, but poses larger questions about the ability of bacteria to sense the world around them. By using the microgravity environment as a tool, we can exploit this phenomenon in the search for new therapeutics and preventatives against pathogenic bacteria for use both in space and on Earth. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Influence of Contact Angle Boundary Condition on CFD Simulation of T-Junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, S.; Montlaur, A.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we study the influence of the contact angle boundary condition on 3D CFD simulations of the bubble generation process occurring in a capillary T-junction. Numerical simulations have been performed with the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics solver ANSYS Fluent v15.0.7. Experimental results serve as a reference to validate numerical results for four independent parameters: the bubble generation frequency, volume, velocity and length. CFD simulations accurately reproduce experimental results both from qualitative and quantitative points of view. Numerical results are very sensitive to the gas-liquid-wall contact angle boundary conditions, confirming that this is a fundamental parameter to obtain accurate CFD results for simulations of this kind of problems.

  7. Microgravity Science Glovebox Aboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    In the Destiny laboratory aboard the International Space Station (ISS), European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Pedro Duque of Spain is seen working at the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG). He is working with the PROMISS experiment, which will investigate the growth processes of proteins during weightless conditions. The PROMISS is one of the Cervantes program of tests (consisting of 20 commercial experiments). The MSG is managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  8. Simulation of snow distribution and melt under cloudy conditions in an Alpine watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-Y. Li

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An energy balance method and remote-sensing data were used to simulate snow distribution and melt in an alpine watershed in northwestern China within a complete snow accumulation-melt period. The spatial energy budgets were simulated using meteorological observations and a digital elevation model of the watershed. A linear interpolation method was used to estimate the daily snow cover area under cloudy conditions, using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS data. Hourly snow distribution and melt, snow cover extent and daily discharge were included in the simulated results. The root mean square error between the measured snow-water equivalent samplings and the simulated results is 3.2 cm. The Nash and Sutcliffe efficiency statistic (NSE between the measured and simulated discharges is 0.673, and the volume difference (Dv is 3.9 %. Using the method introduced in this article, modelling spatial snow distribution and melt runoff will become relatively convenient.

  9. Nineteenth International Microgravity Measurements Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLombard, Richard (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    The Microgravity Measurements Group meetings provide a forum for an exchange of information and ideas about various aspects of microgravity acceleration research in international microgravity research programs. These meetings are sponsored by the PI Microgravity Services (PIMS) project at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The 19th MGMG meeting was held 11-13 July 2000 at the Sheraton Airport Hotel in Cleveland, Ohio. The 44 attendees represented NASA, other space agencies, universities, and commercial companies; 8 of the attendees were international representatives from Japan, Italy, Canada, Russia, and Germany. Twenty-seven presentations were made on a variety of microgravity environment topics including the International Space Station (ISS), acceleration measurement and analysis results, science effects from microgravity accelerations, vibration isolation, free flyer satellites, ground testing, vehicle characterization, and microgravity outreach and education. The meeting participants also toured three microgravity-related facilities at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Contained within the minutes is the conference agenda, which indicates each speaker, the title of their presentation, and the actual time of their presentation. The minutes also include the charts for each presentation, which indicate the authors' name(s) and affiliation. In some cases, a separate written report was submitted and has been Included here

  10. Numerical ductile tearing simulation of circumferential cracked pipe tests under dynamic loading conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Hyun Suk; Kim, Ji Soo; Ryu, Ho Wan; Kim, Yun Jae [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Weon [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This paper presents a numerical method to simulate ductile tearing in cracked components under high strain rates using finite element damage analysis. The strain rate dependence on tensile properties and multiaxial fracture strain is characterized by the model developed by Johnson and Cook. The damage model is then defined based on the ductility exhaustion concept using the strain rate dependent multiaxial fracture strain concept. The proposed model is applied to simulate previously published three cracked pipe bending test results under two different test speed conditions. Simulated results show overall good agreement with experimental results.

  11. Effects of earthquake rupture shallowness and local soil conditions on simulated ground motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apsel, Randy J.; Hadley, David M.; Hart, Robert S.

    1983-03-01

    The paucity of strong ground motion data in the Eastern U.S. (EUS), combined with well recognized differences in earthquake source depths and wave propagation characteristics between Eastern and Western U.S. (WUS) suggests that simulation studies will play a key role in assessing earthquake hazard in the East. This report summarizes an extensive simulation study of 5460 components of ground motion representing a model parameter study for magnitude, distance, source orientation, source depth and near-surface site conditions for a generic EUS crustal model. The simulation methodology represents a hybrid approach to modeling strong ground motion. Wave propagation is modeled with an efficient frequency-wavenumber integration algorithm. The source time function used for each grid element of a modeled fault is empirical, scaled from near-field accelerograms. This study finds that each model parameter has a significant influence on both the shape and amplitude of the simulated response spectra. The combined effect of all parameters predicts a dispersion of response spectral values that is consistent with strong ground motion observations. This study provides guidelines for scaling WUS data from shallow earthquakes to the source depth conditions more typical in the EUS. The modeled site conditions range from very soft soil to hard rock. To the extent that these general site conditions model a specific site, the simulated response spectral information can be used to either correct spectra to a site-specific environment or used to compare expected ground motions at different sites. (author)

  12. Evaluation of Rankine cycle air conditioning system hardware by computer simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, H. M.; Clark, D.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program for simulating the performance of a variety of solar powered Rankine cycle air conditioning system components (RCACS) has been developed. The computer program models actual equipment by developing performance maps from manufacturers data and is capable of simulating off-design operation of the RCACS components. The program designed to be a subroutine of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Solar Energy System Analysis Computer Program 'SOLRAD', is a complete package suitable for use by an occasional computer user in developing performance maps of heating, ventilation and air conditioning components.

  13. A Geology Sampling System for Microgravity Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Anthony; Naids, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Human exploration of microgravity bodies is being investigated as a precursor to a Mars surface mission. Asteroids, comets, dwarf planets, and the moons of Mars all fall into this microgravity category and some are been discussed as potential mission targets. Obtaining geological samples for return to Earth will be a major objective for any mission to a microgravity body. Currently the knowledge base for geology sampling in microgravity is in its infancy. Humans interacting with non-engineered surfaces in microgravity environment pose unique challenges. In preparation for such missions a team at the NASA Johnson Space Center has been working to gain experience on how to safely obtain numerous sample types in such an environment. This paper describes the type of samples the science community is interested in, highlights notable prototype work, and discusses an integrated geology sampling solution.

  14. Activity and stability of a complex bacterial soil community under simulated Martian conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Aviaja Anna; Merrison, Jonathan; Nørnberg, Per; Aagaard Lomstein, Bente; Finster, Kai

    2005-04-01

    A simulation experiment with a complex bacterial soil community in a Mars simulation chamber was performed to determine the effect of Martian conditions on community activity, stability and survival. At three different depths in the soil core short-term effects of Martian conditions with and without ultraviolet (UV) exposure corresponding to 8 Martian Sol were compared. Community metabolic activities and functional diversity, measured as glucose respiration and versatility in substrate utilization, respectively, decreased after UV exposure, whereas they remained unaffected by Martian conditions without UV exposure. In contrast, the numbers of culturable bacteria and the genetic diversity were unaffected by the simulated Martian conditions both with and without UV exposure. The genetic diversity of the soil community and of the colonies grown on agar plates were evaluated by denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) on DNA extracts. Desiccation of the soil prior to experimentation affected the functional diversity by decreasing the versatility in substrate utilization. The natural dominance of endospores and Gram-positive bacteria in the investigated Mars-analogue soil may explain the limited effect of the Mars incubations on the survival and community structure. Our results suggest that UV radiation and desiccation are major selecting factors on bacterial functional diversity in terrestrial bacterial communities incubated under simulated Martian conditions. Furthermore, these results suggest that forward contamination of Mars is a matter of great concern in future space missions.

  15. A simulation Model of the Reactor Hall Ventilation and air Conditioning Systems of ETRR-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Rahman, M.F.

    2004-01-01

    Although the conceptual design for any system differs from one designer to another. each of them aims to achieve the function of the system required. the ventilation and air conditioning system of reactors hall is one of those systems that really differs but always dose its function for which it is designed. thus, ventilation and air conditioning in some reactor hall constitute only one system whereas in some other ones, they are separate systems. the Egypt Research Reactor-2 (ETRR-2)represents the second type. most studies conducted on ventilation and air conditioning simulation models either in traditional building or for research rectors show that those models were not designed similarly to the model of the hall of ETRR-2 in which ventilation and air conditioning constitute two separate systems.besides, those studies experimented on ventilation and air conditioning simulation models of reactor building predict the temperature and humidity inside these buildings at certain outside condition and it is difficult to predict when the outside conditions are changed . also those studies do not discuss the influences of reactor power changes. therefore, the present work deals with a computational study backed by infield experimental measurements of the performance of the ventilation and air conditioning systems of reactor hall during normal operation at different outside conditions as well as at different levels of reactor power

  16. Protein patterns of black fungi under simulated Mars-like conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, Kristina; Marzban, Gorji; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Lorek, Andreas; Sterflinger, Katja

    2014-05-29

    Two species of microcolonial fungi - Cryomyces antarcticus and Knufia perforans - and a species of black yeasts-Exophiala jeanselmei - were exposed to thermo-physical Mars-like conditions in the simulation chamber of the German Aerospace Center. In this study the alterations at the protein expression level from various fungi species under Mars-like conditions were analyzed for the first time using 2D gel electrophoresis. Despite of the expectations, the fungi did not express any additional proteins under Mars simulation that could be interpreted as stress induced HSPs. However, up-regulation of some proteins and significant decreasing of protein number were detected within the first 24 hours of the treatment. After 4 and 7 days of the experiment protein spot number was increased again and the protein patterns resemble the protein patterns of biomass from normal conditions. It indicates the recovery of the metabolic activity under Martian environmental conditions after one week of exposure.

  17. CFD simulation of a four-loop PWR at asymmetric operation conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Jian-Ping; Yan, Li-Ming; Li, Feng-Chen, E-mail: lifch@hit.edu.cn

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • A CFD numerical simulation procedure was established for simulating RPV of VVER-1000. • The established CFD approach was validated by comparing with available data. • Thermal hydraulic characteristics under asymmetric operation condition were investigated. • Apparent influences of the shutdown loop on its neighboring loops were obtained. - Abstract: The pressurized water reactor (PWR) with multiple loops may have abnormal working conditions with coolant pumps out of running in some loops. In this paper, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical study of the four-loop VVER-1000 PWR pressure vessel model was presented. Numerical simulations of the thermohydrodynamic characteristics in the pressure vessel were carried out at different inlet conditions with four and three loops running, respectively. At normal stead-state condition (four-loop running), different parameters were obtained for the full fluid domain, including pressure losses across different parts, pressure, velocity and temperature distributions in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and mass flow distribution of the coolant at the inlet of reactor core. The obtained results for pressure losses matched with the experimental reference values of the VVER-1000 PWR at Tianwan nuclear power plant (NPP). For most fuel assemblies (FAs), the inlet flow rates presented a symmetrical distribution about the center under full-loop operation conditions, which accorded with the practical distribution. These results indicate that it is now possible to study the dynamic transition process between different asymmetric operation conditions in a multi-loop PWR using the established CFD method.

  18. Isobaric-isothermal Monte Carlo simulations from first principles: Application to liquid water at ambient conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, M; Siepmann, J I; Kuo, I W; Mundy, C J; VandeVondele, J; Hutter, J; Mohamed, F; Krack, M

    2004-12-02

    A series of first principles Monte Carlo simulations in the isobaric-isothermal ensemble were carried out for liquid water at ambient conditions (T = 298 K and p = 1 atm). The Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr (BLYP) exchange and correlation energy functionals and norm-conserving Goedecker-Teter-Hutter (GTH) pseudopotentials were employed with the CP2K simulation package to examine systems consisting of 64 water molecules. The fluctuations in the system volume encountered in simulations in the isobaric-isothermal ensemble requires a reconsideration of the suitability of the typical charge density cutoff and the regular grid generation method previously used for the computation of the electrostatic energy in first principles simulations in the microcanonical or canonical ensembles. In particular, it is noted that a much higher cutoff is needed and that the most computationally efficient method of creating grids can result in poor simulations. Analysis of the simulation trajectories using a very large charge density cutoff at 1200 Ry and four different grid generation methods point to a substantially underestimated liquid density of about 0.85 g/cm{sup 3} resulting in a somewhat understructured liquid (with a value of about 2.7 for the height of the first peak in the oxygen/oxygen radial distribution function) for BLYP-GTH water at ambient conditions.

  19. Realizability conditions for the turbulent stress tensor in large-eddy simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreman, A.W.; Geurts, Bernardus J.; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.

    1994-01-01

    The turbulent stress tensor in large-eddy simulation is examined from a theoretical point of view. Realizability conditions for the components of this tensor are derived, which hold if and only if the filter function is positive. The spectral cut-off, one of the filters frequently used in large-eddy

  20. Improving Chemical EOR Simulations and Reducing the Subsurface Uncertainty Using Downscaling Conditioned to Tracer Data

    KAUST Repository

    Torrealba, Victor A.; Hoteit, Hussein; Chawathe, Adwait

    2017-01-01

    and thermodynamic phase split, the impact of grid downscaling on CEOR simulations is not well understood. In this work, we introduce a geostatistical downscaling method conditioned to tracer data to refine a coarse history-matched WF model. This downscaling process

  1. Simulation-Based Planning of Optimal Conditions for Industrial Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisinger, S.; Kasperl, S.; Franz, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present a method to optimise conditions for industrial computed tomography (CT). This optimisation is based on a deterministic simulation. Our algorithm finds task-specific CT equipment settings to achieve optimal exposure parameters by means of an STL-model of the specimen and a raytracing...

  2. Cavitation Simulation on Conventional and Highly-Skewed Propellers in the Behind Condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Keun Woo; Andersen, Poul; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2011-01-01

    The cavitating flows around conventional and highly-skewed propellers in the behind-hull condition are simulated by an in-house RANS solver, EllipSys (Sørensen 2003), with the cavitation model, based on the homogeneous equilibrium modeling (HEM) approach and a vapor transport equation. The valida...

  3. The Impact of Preparation: Conditions for Developing Professional Knowledge through Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöberg, David; Karp, Staffan; Söderström, Tor

    2015-01-01

    This article examines simulations of critical incidents in police education by investigating how activities in the preparation phase influence participants' actions and thus the conditions for learning professional knowledge. The study is based on interviews in two stages (traditional and stimulated recall interviews) with six selected students…

  4. Penetration of n-hexadecane and water into wood under conditions simulating catastrophic floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganna Baglayeva; Wayne S. Seames; Charles R. Frihart; Jane O' Dell; Evguenii I. Kozliak

    2017-01-01

    To simulate fuel oil spills occurring during catastrophic floods, short-term absorption of two chemicals, n-hexadecane (representative of semivolatile organic compounds in fuel oil) and water, into southern yellow pine was gravimetrically monitored as a function of time at ambient conditions. Different scenarios were run on the basis of (1) the...

  5. Numerical simulations of unsteady flows past two-bladed rotors in forward-flight conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, H.; Mamou, M.; Khalid, M.

    2004-01-01

    The current paper presents time-accurate numerical simulations of compressible flows past two-bladed rotor configurations using a Chimera moving grid approach. The simulations are performed for a variety of flow conditions and various blade aspect ratios. The rotor blades are rectangular, untapered and untwisted planforms. Their cross-sections are built using the NACA 0012 airfoil profile. The aerodynamic performance of the rotor is investigated using the Euler equations. The CFD-FASTRAN code was used for the computations. The pressure distributions are benchmarked against the experimental data from Caradonna and Tung and a number of previous Euler calculations by Agarwal and Deese and Chen et al. The comparisons indicate that the current simulations for the forward flight conditions can reproduce the pressure distributions on the blade surfaces and the prediction of shockwave locations with reasonably good accuracy. (author)

  6. Numerical simulations of unsteady flows past two-bladed rotors in forward-flight conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, H.; Mamou, M.; Khalid, M. [National Research Council, Inst. for Aerospace Research, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: Hongyi.Xu@nrc.ca

    2004-07-01

    The current paper presents time-accurate numerical simulations of compressible flows past two-bladed rotor configurations using a Chimera moving grid approach. The simulations are performed for a variety of flow conditions and various blade aspect ratios. The rotor blades are rectangular, untapered and untwisted planforms. Their cross-sections are built using the NACA 0012 airfoil profile. The aerodynamic performance of the rotor is investigated using the Euler equations. The CFD-FASTRAN code was used for the computations. The pressure distributions are benchmarked against the experimental data from Caradonna and Tung and a number of previous Euler calculations by Agarwal and Deese and Chen et al. The comparisons indicate that the current simulations for the forward flight conditions can reproduce the pressure distributions on the blade surfaces and the prediction of shockwave locations with reasonably good accuracy. (author)

  7. Numerical Simulation of Interactions between Corrosion Pits on Stainless Steel under Loading Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Haitao; Han, En-Hou

    2017-01-01

    The interactions between corrosion pits on stainless steel under loading conditions are studied by using a cellular automata model coupled with finite element method at a mesoscopic scale. The cellular automata model focuses on a metal/film/electrolyte system, including anodic dissolution, passivation, diffusion of hydrogen ions and salt film hydrolysis. The Chopard block algorithm is used to improve the diffusion simulation efficiency. The finite element method is used to calculate the stress concentration on the pit surface during pit growth, and the effect of local stress and strain on anodic current is obtained by using the Gutman model, which is used as the boundary conditions of the cellular automata model. The transient current characteristics of the interactions between corrosion pits under different simulation factors including the breakdown of the passive film at the pit mouth and the diffusion of hydrogen ions are analyzed. The analysis of the pit stability product shows that the simulation results are close to the experimental conclusions.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Interactions between Corrosion Pits on Stainless Steel under Loading Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haitao; Han, En-Hou [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang (China)

    2017-04-15

    The interactions between corrosion pits on stainless steel under loading conditions are studied by using a cellular automata model coupled with finite element method at a mesoscopic scale. The cellular automata model focuses on a metal/film/electrolyte system, including anodic dissolution, passivation, diffusion of hydrogen ions and salt film hydrolysis. The Chopard block algorithm is used to improve the diffusion simulation efficiency. The finite element method is used to calculate the stress concentration on the pit surface during pit growth, and the effect of local stress and strain on anodic current is obtained by using the Gutman model, which is used as the boundary conditions of the cellular automata model. The transient current characteristics of the interactions between corrosion pits under different simulation factors including the breakdown of the passive film at the pit mouth and the diffusion of hydrogen ions are analyzed. The analysis of the pit stability product shows that the simulation results are close to the experimental conclusions.

  9. Finite Element Modeling of the Posterior Eye in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feola, Andrew; Raykin, Julia; Mulugeta, Lealem; Gleason, Rudolph; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian; Ethier, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity experienced during spaceflight affects astronauts in various ways, including weakened muscles and loss of bone density. Recently, visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome has become a major concern for space missions lasting longer than 30 days. Astronauts suffering from VIIP syndrome have changes in ocular anatomical and visual impairment that persist after returning to earth. It is hypothesized that a cephalad fluid shift in microgravity may increase the intracranial pressure (ICP), which leads to an altered biomechanical environment of the posterior globe and optic nerve sheath (ONS).Currently, there is a lack of knowledge of how elevated ICP may lead to vision impairment and connective tissue changes in VIIP. Our goal was to develop a finite element model to simulate the acute effects of elevated ICP on the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath. We used a finite element (FE) analysis approach to understand the response of the lamina cribrosa and optic nerve to the elevations in ICP thought to occur in microgravity and to identify which tissue components have the greatest impact on strain experienced by optic nerve head tissues.

  10. [Nursing students assessment in simulated conditions : in search of meaning and ethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homerin, Marie-Pierre; Roumanet, Marie-Cécile

    2014-10-01

    A thought about the assessment in simulated conditions is at the origin of this research-action conducted at the Institute of Nursing Education of Chambery, France. Indeed, the differences in the assessment procedures between units that require this kind of validation and the disappointing rate of success at the examinations in simulated situations have led the trainers to raise the following question : « How can these assessments be meaningful and consistent with the goal of training (help to become autonomous and reflexive practitioners) » ?This issue was addressed with concepts such as socioconstructivism, simulation in health, assessment and ethical principles. The change of practices has been the application of the principles of ?educative? assessment according to G. Nunziatti which strongly involves the students in the assessment?s process.In order to estimate the impact of these changes of practices, an unidentified online survey was offered to all students who benefited from this kind of assessment. The results between two classes of students having had different evaluation procedures have also been compared.The objectives were, after the implementation of this new kind of evaluation, to assess the students? satisfaction, to compare the failure rate at the tests in simulated conditions and to verify the compliance with the ethical principles.This study has shown the students? satisfaction about these new forms of assessment in simulated conditions, an increased success rate in the tests and the applicability of the ethical principles with this way of proceeding. However, the principles of justice and non-maleficence are difficult to implement. Nevertheless, this critical thinking on the procedures of assessment in simulated conditions has helped to change the practices and the assessment design by the teachers.

  11. Perturbations in the initial soil moisture conditions: Impacts on hydrologic simulation in a large river basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niroula, Sundar; Halder, Subhadeep; Ghosh, Subimal

    2018-06-01

    Real time hydrologic forecasting requires near accurate initial condition of soil moisture; however, continuous monitoring of soil moisture is not operational in many regions, such as, in Ganga basin, extended in Nepal, India and Bangladesh. Here, we examine the impacts of perturbation/error in the initial soil moisture conditions on simulated soil moisture and streamflow in Ganga basin and its propagation, during the summer monsoon season (June to September). This provides information regarding the required minimum duration of model simulation for attaining the model stability. We use the Variable Infiltration Capacity model for hydrological simulations after validation. Multiple hydrologic simulations are performed, each of 21 days, initialized on every 5th day of the monsoon season for deficit, surplus and normal monsoon years. Each of these simulations is performed with the initial soil moisture condition obtained from long term runs along with positive and negative perturbations. The time required for the convergence of initial errors is obtained for all the cases. We find a quick convergence for the year with high rainfall as well as for the wet spells within a season. We further find high spatial variations in the time required for convergence; the region with high precipitation such as Lower Ganga basin attains convergence at a faster rate. Furthermore, deeper soil layers need more time for convergence. Our analysis is the first attempt on understanding the sensitivity of hydrological simulations of Ganga basin on initial soil moisture conditions. The results obtained here may be useful in understanding the spin-up requirements for operational hydrologic forecasts.

  12. Changes in Mouse Bone Turnover in Response to Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng-Campbell, M.; Blaber, E.; Almeida, E.

    2016-01-01

    after 37-days of spaceflight. To do this, we will analyze differences in bone morphometric parameters using MicroCT. The pelvis, femur, and tibia are key in supporting and distributing weight under normal conditions. Therefore, we expect to see altered remodeling in flight animals in response to microgravity with respect to ground controls. In combination with histomorphometry, these results will help elucidate the complex mechanisms underlying bone tissue maintenance and stem cell regeneration.

  13. Psychophysiology in microgravity and the role of exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, J. M.; Hackney, A. C.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Transportation-Shuttle (STS) Program has greatly expanded our capabilities in space by allowing for missions to be flown more frequently, less expensively, and to encompass a greater range of goals than ever before. However, the scope of the United State's role and involvement in space is currently at the edge of a new and exciting era. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has plans for placing an orbiting space station (Space Station Freedom) into operation before the year 2000. Space Station Freedom promises to redefine the extent of our involvement in space even further than the STS program. Space Station crewmembers will be expected to spend extended periods of time (approximately 30 to 180 days) in space exposed to an extremely diverse and adverse environment (e.g., the major adversity being the chronic microgravity condition). Consequently, the detrimental effects of exposure to the microgravity environment is of primary importance to the biomedical community responsible for the health and well-being of the crewmembers. Space flight and microgravity exposure present a unique set of stressors for the crewmember; weightlessness, danger, isolation/confinement, irregular work-rest cycles, separation from family/friends, and mission/ground crew interrelationships. A great deal is beginning to be known about the physiological changes associated with microgravity exposure, however, limited objective psychological findings exist. Examination of this latter area will become of critical concern as NASA prepares to place crewmembers on the longer space missions that will be required on Space Station Freedom. Psychological factors, such as interpersonal relations will become increasingly important issues, especially as crews become more heterogeneous in the way of experience, professional background, and assigned duties. In an attempt to minimize the detrimental physiological effects of prolonged space flight and microgravity exposure, the

  14. Influence of changes in initial conditions for the simulation of dynamic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotyrba, Martin [Department of Informatics and Computers, University of Ostrava, 30 dubna 22, Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2015-03-10

    Chaos theory is a field of study in mathematics, with applications in several disciplines including meteorology, sociology, physics, engineering, economics, biology, and philosophy. Chaos theory studies the behavior of dynamical systems that are highly sensitive to initial conditions—a paradigm popularly referred to as the butterfly effect. Small differences in initial conditions field widely diverging outcomes for such dynamical systems, rendering long-term prediction impossible in general. This happens even though these systems are deterministic, meaning that their future behavior is fully determined by their initial conditions, with no random elements involved. In this paperinfluence of changes in initial conditions will be presented for the simulation of Lorenz system.

  15. Interaction of oxides of nitrogen and aromatic hydrocarbons under simulated atmospheric conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obrien, R.J.; Green, P.J.; Doty, R.A.; Vanderzanden, J.W.; Easton, R.R.; Irwin, R.P.

    1979-01-01

    The reactions of nitrogen oxides with aromatic hydrocarbons under simulated atmospheric conditions are investigated. Gaseous reaction products formed when toluene is irradiated under simulated atmospheric conditions in the presence of nitrogen oxides were analyzed by gas chromatography. Reaction products detected include acetylene, water, acetaldehyde, acetone, toluene, benzaldehyde, ortho-, meta- and para-cresol, benzyl nitrate and meta- and para-nitrotoluene. Reaction mechanisms yielding the various products are illustrated. The assumption that all the nitrogen oxides observed to be lost from the reaction products can be accounted for by nitric acid formation in the absence of ozone formation is verified by a model in which the hydroxyl radical is assumed to be the only means of removing toluene. Under conditions in which ozone is formed, nitrogen oxide loss is accounted for by ozone formation in addition to nitric acid formation

  16. Simulation of concrete deterioration in Finnish rock cavern conditions for final disposal of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kari, O.P.; Puttonen, J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Concrete deterioration in Finnish rock cavern disposal conditions was simulated. • Simulation requires advanced models instead of traditional linear diffusion models. • Concrete analysed performed moderately during the period of 500 years. • Corrosion of steel reinforcement cannot be excluded during the period analysed. - Abstract: A simulation of concrete ageing in Finnish rock cavern disposal conditions showed that the concrete undergoes complex deterioration processes during the period required for lowering the level of radiation. In respect of the concrete ageing, the life time of the disposal facilities shall be divided into the periods before and after the closing of the caverns. Generally, the sulphate-resistant type of concrete analysed performed moderately during the analysed period of 500 years contrary to the corrosion of steel reinforcement, which cannot be excluded. Simulation of ageing clearly requires thermodynamical methods instead of linear diffusion models based on Fick’s law, which are traditionally used in construction industry. The study proves that the thermodynamical simulation method developed with adequate experimental data also makes it possible to observe latent factors of concrete deterioration

  17. Flow behavior of Daqing waxy crude oil under simulated pipelining conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Jianlin [China University of Petroleum, Beijing (China); PetroChina Company Ltd. (China); Zhang, Jinjun; Li, Hongying; Zhang, Fan; Yang, Xiaojing [China University of Petroleum, Beijing (China)

    2005-07-01

    Daqing oil field is the largest oil field in China. This crude oil is a typical waxy crude oil, with a wax content of 26% and a gel point of 32 deg C. Flow behaviors of waxy crude oils at temperatures near the gel point/pour point are vital for both pipeline hydraulic calculation and evaluation on restartability of a shutdown pipeline. In this study, experimental simulation was conducted by using a stirred vessel with the energy dissipation of viscous flow as the shear simulation parameter. The viscosity, gel point, yield stress and thixotropy were measured by sampling from the simulation vessel. The viscosity under simulated pipelining condition was found less than that measured under quiescent cooling condition. The gel point decreased with decreasing temperature of sampling, i.e. the end temperature of the dynamic cooling process. At sampling temperatures above 35 deg C, that is 3 deg C above the gel point measured under quiescent cooling condition, both the yield stresses and the thixotropic parameters showed little dependence on the shear history. However, at lower sampling temperatures, remarkable shear history dependence was found. Empirical correlations were developed between the yield stress and the sampling temperature as well as the measurement temperature, and between the thixotropic parameters and the sampling temperature. (author)

  18. Study on operational condition of electro-decontamination by computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amamoto, Ippei; Sato, Koji; Kawabe, Akihiro; Fujita, Reiko; Terai, Takayuki

    2005-01-01

    The molten-salt electro-decontamination method can be taken up as adecontamination method for contaminated metal systems generated in the reprocessing using the fluoride volatility method, etc. This method makes a small amount of secondary waste and is able to construct a small-size process in which a critical state is easily controlled. It can be further expected that an electrolytic current penetrates inside contaminated substances of complex shape. In this report, an appropriate operational condition was theoretically obtained by the simulation on the applicability of this method to decontamination of metal materials, and it was confirmed by a fundamental testing that the simulation result is reasonable. (M.H.)

  19. Stochastic simulation of PWR vessel integrity for pressurized thermal shock conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, P.S.; Moelling, D.S.

    1984-01-01

    A stochastic simulation methodology is presented for performing probabilistic analyses of Pressurized Water Reactor vessel integrity. Application of the methodology to vessel-specific integrity analyses is described in the context of Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) conditions. A Bayesian method is described for developing vessel-specific models of the density of undetected volumetric flaws from ultrasonic inservice inspection results. Uncertainty limits on the probabilistic results due to sampling errors are determined from the results of the stochastic simulation. An example is provided to illustrate the methodology

  20. Stress induced conditioning and thermal relaxation in the simulation of quasi-static compression experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scalerandi, M; Delsanto, P P; Johnson, P A

    2003-01-01

    Local interaction simulation approach simulations of the ultrasonic wave propagation in multi-grained materials have succeeded in reproducing most of the recently observed nonclassical nonlinear effects, such as stress-strain hysteresis and discrete memory in quasi-static experiments and a downwards shift of the resonance frequency and the generation of odd harmonics at specific amplitude rates in dynamics experiments. By including a simple mechanism of thermally activated random transitions, we can predict the occurrence of experimentally observed effects, such as the conditioning and relaxation of the specimen. Experiments are also suggested for a quantitative assessment of the validity of the model

  1. Simulation Evaluation of Controller-Managed Spacing Tools under Realistic Operational Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callantine, Todd J.; Hunt, Sarah M.; Prevot, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Controller-Managed Spacing (CMS) tools have been developed to aid air traffic controllers in managing high volumes of arriving aircraft according to a schedule while enabling them to fly efficient descent profiles. The CMS tools are undergoing refinement in preparation for field demonstration as part of NASA's Air Traffic Management (ATM) Technology Demonstration-1 (ATD-1). System-level ATD-1 simulations have been conducted to quantify expected efficiency and capacity gains under realistic operational conditions. This paper presents simulation results with a focus on CMS-tool human factors. The results suggest experienced controllers new to the tools find them acceptable and can use them effectively in ATD-1 operations.

  2. Stress induced conditioning and thermal relaxation in the simulation of quasi-static compression experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Scalerandi, M; Johnson, P A

    2003-01-01

    Local interaction simulation approach simulations of the ultrasonic wave propagation in multi-grained materials have succeeded in reproducing most of the recently observed nonclassical nonlinear effects, such as stress-strain hysteresis and discrete memory in quasi-static experiments and a downwards shift of the resonance frequency and the generation of odd harmonics at specific amplitude rates in dynamics experiments. By including a simple mechanism of thermally activated random transitions, we can predict the occurrence of experimentally observed effects, such as the conditioning and relaxation of the specimen. Experiments are also suggested for a quantitative assessment of the validity of the model.

  3. An effective absorbing layer for the boundary condition in acoustic seismic wave simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Gang; da Silva, Nuno V.; Wu, Di

    2018-04-01

    Efficient numerical simulation of seismic wavefields generally involves truncating the Earth model in order to keep computing time and memory requirements down. Absorbing boundary conditions, therefore, are applied to remove the boundary reflections caused by this truncation, thereby allowing for accurate modeling of wavefields. In this paper, we derive an effective absorbing boundary condition for both acoustic and elastic wave simulation, through the simplification of the damping term of the split perfectly matched layer (SPML) boundary condition. This new boundary condition is accurate, cost-effective, and easily implemented, especially for high-performance computing. Stability analysis shows that this boundary condition is effectively as stable as normal (non-absorbing) wave equations for explicit time-stepping finite differences. We found that for full-waveform inversion (FWI), the strengths of the effective absorbing layer—a reduction of the computational and memory cost coupled with a simplistic implementation—significantly outweighs the limitation of incomplete absorption of outgoing waves relative to the SPML. More importantly, we demonstrate that this limitation can easily be overcome through the use of two strategies in FWI, namely variable cell size and model extension thereby fully compensating for the imperfectness of the proposed absorbing boundary condition.

  4. Second order bounce back boundary condition for the lattice Boltzmann fluid simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Chan

    2000-01-01

    A new bounce back boundary method of the second order in error is proposed for the lattice Boltzmann fluid simulation. This new method can be used for the arbitrarily irregular lattice geometry of a non-slip boundary. The traditional bounce back boundary condition for the lattice Boltzmann simulation is of the first order in error. Since the lattice Boltzmann method is the second order scheme by itself, a boundary technique of the second order has been desired to replace the first order bounce back method. This study shows that, contrary to the common belief that the bounce back boundary condition is unilaterally of the first order, the second order bounce back boundary condition can be realized. This study also shows that there exists a generalized bounce back technique that can be characterized by a single interpolation parameter. The second order bounce back method can be obtained by proper selection of this parameter in accordance with the detailed lattice geometry of the boundary. For an illustrative purpose, the transient Couette and the plane Poiseuille flows are solved by the lattice Boltzmann simulation with various boundary conditions. The results show that the generalized bounce back method yields the second order behavior in the error of the solution, provided that the interpolation parameter is properly selected. Coupled with its intuitive nature and the ease of implementation, the bounce back method can be as good as any second order boundary method

  5. Pilot points method for conditioning multiple-point statistical facies simulation on flow data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei; Jafarpour, Behnam

    2018-05-01

    We propose a new pilot points method for conditioning discrete multiple-point statistical (MPS) facies simulation on dynamic flow data. While conditioning MPS simulation on static hard data is straightforward, their calibration against nonlinear flow data is nontrivial. The proposed method generates conditional models from a conceptual model of geologic connectivity, known as a training image (TI), by strategically placing and estimating pilot points. To place pilot points, a score map is generated based on three sources of information: (i) the uncertainty in facies distribution, (ii) the model response sensitivity information, and (iii) the observed flow data. Once the pilot points are placed, the facies values at these points are inferred from production data and then are used, along with available hard data at well locations, to simulate a new set of conditional facies realizations. While facies estimation at the pilot points can be performed using different inversion algorithms, in this study the ensemble smoother (ES) is adopted to update permeability maps from production data, which are then used to statistically infer facies types at the pilot point locations. The developed method combines the information in the flow data and the TI by using the former to infer facies values at selected locations away from the wells and the latter to ensure consistent facies structure and connectivity where away from measurement locations. Several numerical experiments are used to evaluate the performance of the developed method and to discuss its important properties.

  6. Large eddy simulation of cooling flows in underground subway station according to different PSD operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Yong Jun; Kim, Jin Ho; Park, Sung Huk; Koo, Dong Hoe [Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Large eddy simulation (LES) method is applied to systematically investigate the cooling fluid flow and the temperature distribution under the operating of air conditioning in the deeply underground subway station. The Shin-Gum-Ho subway station in Seoul which is the 8{sup th} floor and 43.6 m deep is selected for this analysis. The entire station is covered for simulation. The ventilation mode for air conditioning is kept as ordinary state. Different operating conditions for Platform screen door (PSD) are applied. First one is PSD is completely close and second one is PSD is regularly open and close which imitate the actual circumstances in the platform. The ventilation diffusers are modeled as 95 square shapes in the lobby and 222 squares in the platform. The temperature variations and flow behaviors are numerically simulated after operating of air conditioning for the whole station and the calculated results are compared with experimental data. LES method solves the momentum and thermal equations. Werner-Wengle wall law is applied to viscous sub layers for near wall resolution. The total grid numbers are 7.5 million and the whole domain is divided to 22 blocks. Multi blocks are computed in parallel using MPI. The results show the temperature difference in the platform between PSD-close and PSD-regularly open and close cases is 3-4 .deg. C.

  7. Large eddy simulation of cooling flows in underground subway station according to different PSD operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Yong Jun; Kim, Jin Ho; Park, Sung Huk; Koo, Dong Hoe

    2015-01-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) method is applied to systematically investigate the cooling fluid flow and the temperature distribution under the operating of air conditioning in the deeply underground subway station. The Shin-Gum-Ho subway station in Seoul which is the 8"t"h floor and 43.6 m deep is selected for this analysis. The entire station is covered for simulation. The ventilation mode for air conditioning is kept as ordinary state. Different operating conditions for Platform screen door (PSD) are applied. First one is PSD is completely close and second one is PSD is regularly open and close which imitate the actual circumstances in the platform. The ventilation diffusers are modeled as 95 square shapes in the lobby and 222 squares in the platform. The temperature variations and flow behaviors are numerically simulated after operating of air conditioning for the whole station and the calculated results are compared with experimental data. LES method solves the momentum and thermal equations. Werner-Wengle wall law is applied to viscous sub layers for near wall resolution. The total grid numbers are 7.5 million and the whole domain is divided to 22 blocks. Multi blocks are computed in parallel using MPI. The results show the temperature difference in the platform between PSD-close and PSD-regularly open and close cases is 3-4 .deg. C

  8. Terrestrial applications of bone and muscle research in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, F. W.

    1994-08-01

    Major applications to people on Earth are possible from NASA-sponsored research on bone and muscle which is conducted either in microgravity or on Earth using models mimicking microgravity. In microgravity bone and muscle mass are lost. Humans experience a similar loss under certain conditions on Earth. Bone and muscle loss exist on Earth as humans age from adulthood to senescence, during limb immobilization for healing of orthopedic injuries, during wheelchair confinement because of certain diseases, and during chronic bed rest prescribed for curing of diseases. NASA-sponsored research is dedicated to learning both what cause bone and muscle loss as well as finding out how to prevent this loss. The health ramifications of these discoveries will have major impact. Objective 1.6 of Healthy People 2000, a report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, states that the performance of physical activities that improve muscular strength, muscular endurance, and flexibility is particularly important to maintaining functional independence and social integration in older adults /1/. This objective further states that these types of physical activities are important because they may protect against disability, an event which costs the U.S. economy hugh sums of money. Thus NASA research related to bone and muscle loss has potential major impact on the quality of life in the U.S. Relative to its potential health benefits, NASA and Congressional support of bone and muscle research is funded is a very low level.

  9. Host-Microbe Interactions in Microgravity: Assessment and Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie S. Foster

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Spaceflight imposes several unique stresses on biological life that together can have a profound impact on the homeostasis between eukaryotes and their associated microbes. One such stressor, microgravity, has been shown to alter host-microbe interactions at the genetic and physiological levels. Recent sequencing of the microbiomes associated with plants and animals have shown that these interactions are essential for maintaining host health through the regulation of several metabolic and immune responses. Disruptions to various environmental parameters or community characteristics may impact the resiliency of the microbiome, thus potentially driving host-microbe associations towards disease. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of host-microbe interactions in microgravity and assess the impact of this unique environmental stress on the normal physiological and genetic responses of both pathogenic and mutualistic associations. As humans move beyond our biosphere and undergo longer duration space flights, it will be essential to more fully understand microbial fitness in microgravity conditions in order to maintain a healthy homeostasis between humans, plants and their respective microbiomes.

  10. Host-microbe interactions in microgravity: assessment and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jamie S; Wheeler, Raymond M; Pamphile, Regine

    2014-05-26

    Spaceflight imposes several unique stresses on biological life that together can have a profound impact on the homeostasis between eukaryotes and their associated microbes. One such stressor, microgravity, has been shown to alter host-microbe interactions at the genetic and physiological levels. Recent sequencing of the microbiomes associated with plants and animals have shown that these interactions are essential for maintaining host health through the regulation of several metabolic and immune responses. Disruptions to various environmental parameters or community characteristics may impact the resiliency of the microbiome, thus potentially driving host-microbe associations towards disease. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of host-microbe interactions in microgravity and assess the impact of this unique environmental stress on the normal physiological and genetic responses of both pathogenic and mutualistic associations. As humans move beyond our biosphere and undergo longer duration space flights, it will be essential to more fully understand microbial fitness in microgravity conditions in order to maintain a healthy homeostasis between humans, plants and their respective microbiomes.

  11. Microgravity Outreach with Math Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Don Gillies, a materials scientist at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), demonstrates the greater bounce to the ounce of metal made from a supercooled bulk metallic glass alloy that NASA is studying in space experiments. The metal plates at the bottom of the plexiglass tubes are made of three different types of metal. Bulk metallic glass is more resilient and, as a result, the dropped ball bearing bounces higher. Fundamental properties of this bulk metallic glass were measured in a space flight in 1997 Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission. These properties could not have been measured on Earth and have been incorporated into recent design. This demonstration was at the April 2000 conference of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) in Chicago. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  12. Microgravity computing codes. User's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Codes used in microgravity experiments to compute fluid parameters and to obtain data graphically are introduced. The computer programs are stored on two diskettes, compatible with the floppy disk drives of the Apple 2. Two versions of both disks are available (DOS-2 and DOS-3). The codes are written in BASIC and are structured as interactive programs. Interaction takes place through the keyboard of any Apple 2-48K standard system with single floppy disk drive. The programs are protected against wrong commands given by the operator. The programs are described step by step in the same order as the instructions displayed on the monitor. Most of these instructions are shown, with samples of computation and of graphics.

  13. A microgravity boiling and convective condensation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachnik, Leo; Lee, Doojeong; Best, Frederick; Faget, Nanette

    1987-12-01

    A boiling and condensing test article consisting of two straight tube boilers, one quartz and one stainless steel, and two 1.5 m long glass-in-glass heat exchangers, on 6 mm ID and one 10 mm ID, was flown on the NASA KC-135 0-G aircraft. Using water as the working fluid, the 5 kw boiler produces two phase mixtures of varying quality for mass flow rates between 0.005 and 0.1 kg/sec. The test section is instrumented at eight locations with absolute and differential pressure transducers and thermocouples. A gamma densitometer is used to measure void fraction, and high speed photography records the flow regimes. A three axis accelerometer provides aircraft acceleration data (+ or - 0.01G). Data are collected via an analog-to-digital conversion and data acquisition system. Bubbly, annular, and slug flow regimes were observed in the test section under microgravity conditions. Flow oscillations were observed for some operating conditions and the effect of the 2-G pullout prior to the 0-G period was observed by continuously recording data throughout the parabolas. A total fo 300 parabolas was flown.

  14. Uncertainty analysis for the assembly and core simulation of BEAVRS at the HZP conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Chenghui; Cao, Liangzhi; Wu, Hongchun; Shen, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Uncertainty analysis has been completed based on the “two-step” scheme. • Uncertainty analysis has been performed to BEAVRS at HZP. • For lattice calculations, the few-group constant’s uncertainty was quantified. • For core simulation, uncertainties of k_e_f_f and power distributions were quantified. - Abstract: Based on the “two-step” scheme for the reactor-physics calculations, the capability of uncertainty analysis for the core simulations has been implemented in the UNICORN code, an in-house code for the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of the reactor-physics calculations. Applying the statistical sampling method, the nuclear-data uncertainties can be propagated to the important predictions of the core simulations. The uncertainties of the few-group constants introduced by the uncertainties of the multigroup microscopic cross sections are quantified first for the lattice calculations; the uncertainties of the few-group constants are then propagated to the core multiplication factor and core power distributions for the core simulations. Up to now, our in-house lattice code NECP-CACTI and the neutron-diffusion solver NECP-VIOLET have been implemented in UNICORN for the steady-state core simulations based on the “two-step” scheme. With NECP-CACTI and NECP-VIOLET, the modeling and simulation of the steady-state BEAVRS benchmark problem at the HZP conditions was performed, and the results were compared with those obtained by CASMO-4E. Based on the modeling and simulation, the UNICORN code has been applied to perform the uncertainty analysis for BAEVRS at HZP. The uncertainty results of the eigenvalues and two-group constants for the lattice calculations and the multiplication factor and the power distributions for the steady-state core simulations are obtained and analyzed in detail.

  15. Uncertainty analysis for the assembly and core simulation of BEAVRS at the HZP conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Chenghui [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Cao, Liangzhi, E-mail: caolz@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Wu, Hongchun [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Shen, Wei [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Uncertainty analysis has been completed based on the “two-step” scheme. • Uncertainty analysis has been performed to BEAVRS at HZP. • For lattice calculations, the few-group constant’s uncertainty was quantified. • For core simulation, uncertainties of k{sub eff} and power distributions were quantified. - Abstract: Based on the “two-step” scheme for the reactor-physics calculations, the capability of uncertainty analysis for the core simulations has been implemented in the UNICORN code, an in-house code for the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of the reactor-physics calculations. Applying the statistical sampling method, the nuclear-data uncertainties can be propagated to the important predictions of the core simulations. The uncertainties of the few-group constants introduced by the uncertainties of the multigroup microscopic cross sections are quantified first for the lattice calculations; the uncertainties of the few-group constants are then propagated to the core multiplication factor and core power distributions for the core simulations. Up to now, our in-house lattice code NECP-CACTI and the neutron-diffusion solver NECP-VIOLET have been implemented in UNICORN for the steady-state core simulations based on the “two-step” scheme. With NECP-CACTI and NECP-VIOLET, the modeling and simulation of the steady-state BEAVRS benchmark problem at the HZP conditions was performed, and the results were compared with those obtained by CASMO-4E. Based on the modeling and simulation, the UNICORN code has been applied to perform the uncertainty analysis for BAEVRS at HZP. The uncertainty results of the eigenvalues and two-group constants for the lattice calculations and the multiplication factor and the power distributions for the steady-state core simulations are obtained and analyzed in detail.

  16. Turbulent Premixed Flame Propagation in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, S.; Disseau, M.; Chakravarthy, V. K.; Jagoda, J.

    1997-01-01

    A facility in which turbulent Couette flow could be generated in a microgravity environment was designed and built. To fit into the NASA Lewis drop tower the device had to be very compact. This means that edge effects and flow re-circulation were expected to affect the flow. The flow was thoroughly investigated using LDV and was found to be largely two dimensional away from the edges with constant turbulence intensities in the core. Slight flow asymmetries are introduced by the non symmetric re-circulation of the fluid outside the test region. Belt flutter problems were remedied by adding a pair of guide plates to the belt. In general, the flow field was found to be quite similar to previously investigated Couette flows. However, turbulence levels and associated shear stresses were higher. This is probably due to the confined re-circulation zone reintroducing turbulence into the test section. An estimate of the length scales in the flow showed that the measurements were able to resolve nearly all the length scales of interest. Using a new LES method for subgrid combustion it has been demonstrated that the new procedure is computational feasible even on workstation type environment. It is found that this model is capable of capturing the propagation of the premixed names by resolving the flame in the LES grid within 2-3 grid points. In contrast, conventional LES results in numerical smearing of the flame and completely inaccurate estimate of the turbulent propagation speed. Preliminary study suggests that there is observable effect of buoyancy in the 1g environment suggesting the need for microgravity experiments of the upcoming experimental combustion studies. With the cold flow properties characterized, an identical hot flow facility is under construction. It is assumed that the turbulence properties ahead of the flame in this new device will closely match the results obtained here. This is required since the hot facility will not enable LDV measurements. The

  17. Effect of modeled microgravity on UV-C-induced interplant communication of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Xu, Wei; Li, Huasheng; Deng, Chenguang; Zhao, Hui; Wu, Yuejin; Liu, Min; Wu, Lijun; Lu, Jinying; Bian, Po

    2017-12-01

    Controlled ecological life support systems (CELSS) will be an important feature of long-duration space missions of which higher plants are one of the indispensable components. Because of its pivotal role in enabling plants to cope with environmental stress, interplant communication might have important implications for the ecological stability of such CELSS. However, the manifestations of interplant communication in microgravity conditions have yet to be fully elucidated. To address this, a well-established Arabidopsis thaliana co-culture experimental system, in which UV-C-induced airborne interplant communication is evaluated by the alleviation of transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) in bystander plants, was placed in microgravity modeled by a two-dimensional rotating clinostat. Compared with plants under normal gravity, TGS alleviation in bystander plants was inhibited in microgravity. Moreover, TGS alleviation was also prevented when plants of the pgm-1 line, which are impaired in gravity sensing, were used in either the UV-C-irradiated or bystander group. In addition to the specific TGS-loci, interplant communication-shaped genome-wide DNA methylation in bystander plants was altered under microgravity conditions. These results indicate that interplant communications might be modified in microgravity. Time course analysis showed that microgravity interfered with both the production of communicative signals in UV-C-irradiated plants and the induction of epigenetic responses in bystander plants. This was further confirmed by the experimental finding that microgravity also prevented the response of bystander plants to exogenous methyl jasmonate (JA) and methyl salicylate (SA), two well-known airborne signaling molecules, and down-regulated JA and SA biosynthesis in UV-C-irradiated plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Simulating the dynamic behavior of a vertical axis wind turbine operating in unsteady conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisti, L.; Benini, E.; Brighenti, A.; Soraperra, G.; Raciti Castelli, M.

    2016-09-01

    The present work aims at assessing the reliability of a simulation tool capable of computing the unsteady rotational motion and the associated tower oscillations of a variable speed VAWT immersed in a coherent turbulent wind. As a matter of fact, since the dynamic behaviour of a variable speed turbine strongly depends on unsteady wind conditions (wind gusts), a steady state approach can't accurately catch transient correlated issues. The simulation platform proposed here is implemented using a lumped mass approach: the drive train is described by resorting to both the polar inertia and the angular position of rotating parts, also considering their speed and acceleration, while rotor aerodynamic is based on steady experimental curves. The ultimate objective of the presented numerical platform is the simulation of transient phenomena, driven by turbulence, occurring during rotor operation, with the aim of supporting the implementation of efficient and robust control algorithms.

  19. The Simulation and Animation of Virtual Humans to Better Understand Ergonomic Conditions at Manual Workplaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Rossmann

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This article extends an approach to simulate and control anthro- pomorphic kinematics as multiagent-systems. These "anthro- pomorphic multiagent-systems" have originally been developed to control coordinated multirobot systems in industrial applica- tions, as well as to simulate humanoid robots. Here, we apply the approach of the anthropomorphic multiagent-systems to propose a "Virtual Human" - a model of human kinematics - to analyze ergonomic conditions at manual workplaces. Ergonom- ics provide a wide range of methods to evaluate human postures and movements. By the simulation and animation of the Virtual Human we develop examples of how results from the field of ergonomics can help to consider the human factor during the design and optimization phases of production lines.

  20. Artemisia vulgaris pollen allergoids digestibility in the simulated conditions of the gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RATKO M. JANKOV

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemically modified allergens (allergoids have found use in both traditional and novel forms of immunotherapy of allergic disorders. Novel forms of immunotherapy include local allergen delivery, via the gastrointestinal tract. This study conveys the gastrointestinal stability of three types ofmugwort pollen allergoids under simulated conditions of the gut. Allergoids of the pollen extract of Artemisia vulgaris were obtained by means of potassium cyanate, succinic and maleic anhydride. Gastrointestinal tract conditions (saliva, and gastric fluid were simulated in accordance with the EU Pharmacopoeia. The biochemical and immunochemical properties of the derivatives following exposure to different conditions were monitored by determining the number of residual amino groups with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid, SDS PAGE, immunoblotting and inhibition of mugwort-specific IgE. Exposure to saliva fluid for 2 min did not influence the biochemical and immunochemical properties of the derivatives. In the very acidic conditions of the simulated gastric fluid, the degree of demaleylation and desuccinylation, even after 4 h exposure, was low, ranging from 10 to 30 %. The digestion patterns with pepsin proceeded rapidly in both the unmodified and modified samples. In all four cases, a highly resistant IgE-binding protein theMwof which was about 28 – 35 kD, was present. Within the physiological conditions, no new IgE binding epitopes were revealed, as demonstrated by immunoblot and CAP inhibition of the mugwort specific IgE binding. An important conclusion of this study is the stability of the modified derivatives in the gastrointestinal tract of patients, within physiological conditions. The means that they are suitable for use inmuch higher concentrations in local forms of immunotherapy than unmodified ones.

  1. Microgravity Effects on Yersinia Pestis Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawal, A.; Abogunde, O.; Jejelowo, O.; Rosenzweig, J.-A.

    2010-04-01

    Microgravity effects on Yersinia pestis proliferation, cold growth, and type three secretion system function were evaluated in macrophage cell infections, HeLa cell infections, and cold growth plate assays.

  2. A short term -12° head down tilt does not mimic microgravity in terms of human gonadal function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strollo, Felice; Pecorelli, Lia; Strollo, Giovanna; Morè, Massimo; Riondino, Giuseppe; Masini, Maria Angela; Uva, Bianca Maria

    2006-09-01

    A significant reversible decrease in testosterone (T) has been associated with microgravity in male rodents and humans. Urinary T excretion increases in primates under hypergravity. Hypogonadism is somehow related to abnormally high levels of leptin (L), a hormone produced by the adipose tissue which has been found to increase under microgravity simulation conditions like head down bed rest (HDBR). The aim of this study was to assess hemodynamic and pituitary-adrenal and -gonadal adaptation to an acute HDBR test to be eventually used on a routine basis to get better prepared to next space flights. The Authors performed a 1 hour -12° HDBR in 6 male and 6 female volunteers who underwent heart rate and blood pressure measurement together with a blood draw three times at 30 min intervals from the start to the end of the test for L, T, estradiol (E2), LH, androstenedione (A), cortisol (F), ACTH. 12 age- and sexmatched control subjects followed the same protocol except for keeping the sitting position all the time. According to the ANOVA for repeated measures, no changes occurred in L, T, E2 or LH whereas A, F and ACTH significantly decreased independently of gender. During HDBR systolic blood pressure decreased in both genders, diastolic blood pressure decreased significantly only in men and HR showed a more clear-cut decrease in women than in men. As a conclusion, such an acute steep-slope HDBR protocol may be efficiently used to testing immediate individual haemodynamic or adrenal response to microgravity but is not suitable for studies concerning gonadal adaptation.

  3. Mapping and simulating systematics due to spatially varying observing conditions in DES science verification data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leistedt, B.; Peiris, H. V.; Elsner, F.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Amara, A.

    2016-01-01

    Spatially varying depth and the characteristics of observing conditions, such as seeing, airmass, or sky background, are major sources of systematic uncertainties in modern galaxy survey analyses, particularly in deep multi-epoch surveys. We present a framework to extract and project these sources of systematics onto the sky, and apply it to the Dark Energy Survey (DES) to map the observing conditions of the Science Verification (SV) data. The resulting distributions and maps of sources of systematics are used in several analyses of DES–SV to perform detailed null tests with the data, and also to incorporate systematics in survey simulations. We illustrate the complementary nature of these two approaches by comparing the SV data with BCC-UFig, a synthetic sky catalog generated by forward-modeling of the DES–SV images. We analyze the BCC-UFig simulation to construct galaxy samples mimicking those used in SV galaxy clustering studies. We show that the spatially varying survey depth imprinted in the observed galaxy densities and the redshift distributions of the SV data are successfully reproduced by the simulation and are well-captured by the maps of observing conditions. The combined use of the maps, the SV data, and the BCC-UFig simulation allows us to quantify the impact of spatial systematics on N(z), the redshift distributions inferred using photometric redshifts. We conclude that spatial systematics in the SV data are mainly due to seeing fluctuations and are under control in current clustering and weak-lensing analyses. However, they will need to be carefully characterized in upcoming phases of DES in order to avoid biasing the inferred cosmological results. Finally, the framework presented here is relevant to all multi-epoch surveys and will be essential for exploiting future surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, which will require detailed null tests and realistic end-to-end image simulations to correctly interpret the deep, high

  4. Quantification of discreteness effects in cosmological N-body simulations: Initial conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joyce, M.; Marcos, B.

    2007-01-01

    The relation between the results of cosmological N-body simulations, and the continuum theoretical models they simulate, is currently not understood in a way which allows a quantification of N dependent effects. In this first of a series of papers on this issue, we consider the quantification of such effects in the initial conditions of such simulations. A general formalism developed in [A. Gabrielli, Phys. Rev. E 70, 066131 (2004).] allows us to write down an exact expression for the power spectrum of the point distributions generated by the standard algorithm for generating such initial conditions. Expanded perturbatively in the amplitude of the input (i.e. theoretical, continuum) power spectrum, we obtain at linear order the input power spectrum, plus two terms which arise from discreteness and contribute at large wave numbers. For cosmological type power spectra, one obtains as expected, the input spectrum for wave numbers k smaller than that characteristic of the discreteness. The comparison of real space correlation properties is more subtle because the discreteness corrections are not as strongly localized in real space. For cosmological type spectra the theoretical mass variance in spheres and two-point correlation function are well approximated above a finite distance. For typical initial amplitudes this distance is a few times the interparticle distance, but it diverges as this amplitude (or, equivalently, the initial redshift of the cosmological simulation) goes to zero, at fixed particle density. We discuss briefly the physical significance of these discreteness terms in the initial conditions, in particular, with respect to the definition of the continuum limit of N-body simulations

  5. Microgravity Flight: Accommodating Non-Human Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Bonnie P.; Searby, Nancy; Ostrach, Louis

    1995-01-01

    Spacelab Life Sciences-3 (SLS-3) was scheduled to be the first United States man-tended microgravity flight containing Rhesus monkeys. The goal of this flight as in the five untended Russian COSMOS Bion flights and an earlier American Biosatellite flight, was to understand the biomedical and biological effects of a microgravity environment using the non-human primate as human surrogate. The SLS-3/Rhesus Project and COSMOS Primate-BIOS flights all utilized the rhesus monkey, Macaca mulatta. The ultimate objective of all flights with an animal surrogate has been to evaluate and understand biological mechanisms at both the system and cellular level, thus enabling rational effective countermeasures for future long duration human activity under microgravity conditions and enabling technical application to correction of common human physiological problems within earth's gravity, e.g., muscle strength and reloading, osteoporosis, immune deficiency diseases. Hardware developed for the SLS-3/Rhesus Project was the result of a joint effort with the French Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) and the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) extending over the last decade. The flight hardware design and development required implementation of sufficient automation to insure flight crew and animal bio-isolation and maintenance with minimal impact to crew activities. A variety of hardware of varying functional capabilities was developed to support the scientific objectives of the original 22 combined French and American experiments, along with 5 Russian co-investigations, including musculoskeletal, metabolic, and behavioral studies. Unique elements of the Rhesus Research Facility (RRF) included separation of waste for daily delivery of urine and fecal samples for metabolic studies and a psychomotor test system for behavioral studies along with monitored food measurement. As in untended flights, telemetry measurements would allow monitoring of

  6. Effect of Microgravity on Bone Tissue and Calcium Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Session TA4 includes short reports concerning: (1) Human Bone Tissue Changes after Long-Term Space Flight: Phenomenology and Possible Mechanics; (2) Prediction of Femoral Neck Bone Mineral Density Change in Space; (3) Dietary Calcium in Space; (4) Calcium Metabolism During Extended-Duration Space Flight; (5) External Impact Loads on the Lower Extremity During Jumping in Simulated Microgravity and the Relationship to Internal Bone Strain; and (6) Bone Loss During Long Term Space Flight is Prevented by the Application of a Short Term Impulsive Mechanical Stimulus.

  7. A computer code simulating multistage chemical exchange column under wide range of operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Okuno, Kenji

    1996-09-01

    A computer code has been developed to simulate a multistage CECE(Combined Electrolysis Chemical Exchange) column. The solution of basic equations can be found out by the Newton-Raphson method. The independent variables are the atom fractions of D and T in each stage for the case where H is dominant within the column. These variables are replaced by those of H and T under the condition that D is dominant. Some effective techniques have also been developed to get a set of solutions of the basic equations: a setting procedure of initial values of the independent variables; and a procedure for the convergence of the Newton-Raphson method. The computer code allows us to simulate the column behavior under a wide range of the operating conditions. Even for a severe case, where the dominant species changes along the column height, the code can give a set of solutions of the basic equations. (author)

  8. Long-term durability experiments with concrete-based waste packages in simulated repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ipatti, A.

    1993-03-01

    Two extensive experiments on long-term durability of waste packages in simulated repository conditions are described. The first one is a 'half-scale experiment' comprising radioactive waste product and half-scale concrete containers in site specific groundwater conditions. The second one is 'full-scale experiment' including simulated inactive waste product and full-scale concrete container stored in slowly flowing fresh water. The scope of the experiments is to demonstrate long-term behaviour of the designed waste packages in contact with moderately concrete aggressive groundwater, and to evaluate the possible interactions between the waste product, concrete container and ground water. As the waste packages are made of high-quality concrete, provisions have been made to continue the experiments for several years

  9. Forty years experience in developing and using rainfall simulators under tropical and Mediterranean conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla-Sentís, Ildefonso; Nacci, Silvana

    2010-05-01

    Rainfall simulation has been used as a practical tool for evaluating the interaction of falling water drops on the soil surface, to measure both stability of soil aggregates to drop impact and water infiltration rates. In both cases it is tried to simulate the effects of natural rainfall, which usually occurs at very different, variable and erratic rates and intensities. One of the main arguments against the use of rainfall simulators is the difficulty to reproduce the size, final velocity and kinetic energy of the drops in natural rainfall. Since the early 70´s we have been developing and using different kinds of rainfall simulators, both at laboratory and field levels, and under tropical and Mediterranean soil and climate conditions, in flat and sloping lands. They have been mainly used to evaluate the relative effects of different land use and management, including different cropping systems, tillage practices, surface soil conditioning, surface covers, etc. on soil water infiltration, on runoff and on erosion. Our experience is that in any case it is impossible to reproduce the variable size distribution and terminal velocity of raindrops, and the variable changes in intensity of natural storms, under a particular climate condition. In spite of this, with the use of rainfall simulators it is possible to obtain very good information, which if it is properly interpreted in relation to each particular condition (land and crop management, rainfall characteristics, measurement conditions, etc.) may be used as one of the parameters for deducing and modelling soil water balance and soil moisture regime under different land use and management and variable climate conditions. Due to the possibility for a better control of the intensity of simulated rainfall and of the size of water drops, and the possibility to make more repeated measurements under very variable soil and land conditions, both in the laboratory and specially in the field, the better results have been

  10. A digital computer simulation and study of a direct-energy-transfer power-conditioning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, W. W., III; Owen, H. A., Jr.; Wilson, T. G.; Rodriguez, G. E.; Paulkovich, J.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation of the behavior of the power-conditioning system as a whole is a necessity to ensure the integrity of the aggregate system in the case of space applications. An approach for conducting such an investigation is considered. A description is given of the application of a general digital analog simulator program to the study of an aggregate power-conditioning system which is being developed for use on the International Ultraviolet Explorer spacecraft. The function of the direct energy transfer system studied involves a coupling of a solar array through a main distribution bus to the spacecraft electrical loads.

  11. Effects of baseline conditions on the simulated hydrologic response to projected climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczot, Kathryn M.; Markstrom, Steven L.; Hay, Lauren E.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in temperature and precipitation projected from five general circulation models, using one late-twentieth-century and three twenty-first-century emission scenarios, were downscaled to three different baseline conditions. Baseline conditions are periods of measured temperature and precipitation data selected to represent twentieth-century climate. The hydrologic effects of the climate projections are evaluated using the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS), which is a watershed hydrology simulation model. The Almanor Catchment in the North Fork of the Feather River basin, California, is used as a case study. Differences and similarities between PRMS simulations of hydrologic components (i.e., snowpack formation and melt, evapotranspiration, and streamflow) are examined, and results indicate that the selection of a specific time period used for baseline conditions has a substantial effect on some, but not all, hydrologic variables. This effect seems to be amplified in hydrologic variables, which accumulate over time, such as soil-moisture content. Results also indicate that uncertainty related to the selection of baseline conditions should be evaluated using a range of different baseline conditions. This is particularly important for studies in basins with highly variable climate, such as the Almanor Catchment.

  12. Enhanced desorption of persistent organic pollutants from microplastics under simulated physiological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakir, Adil; Rowland, Steven J.; Thompson, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Microplastics have the potential to uptake and release persistent organic pollutants (POPs); however, subsequent transfer to marine organisms is poorly understood. Some models estimating transfer of sorbed contaminants to organisms neglect the role of gut surfactants under differing physiological conditions in the gut (varying pH and temperature), examined here. We investigated the potential for polyvinylchloride (PVC) and polyethylene (PE) to sorb and desorb 14 C-DDT, 14 C-phenanthrene (Phe), 14 C-perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and 14 C-di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP). Desorption rates of POPs were quantified in seawater and under simulated gut conditions. Influence of pH and temperature was examined in order to represent cold and warm blooded organisms. Desorption rates were faster with gut surfactant, with a further substantial increase under conditions simulating warm blooded organisms. Desorption under gut conditions could be up to 30 times greater than in seawater alone. Of the POP/plastic combinations examined Phe with PE gave the highest potential for transport to organisms. Highlights: • PVC and PE (200–250 μm) were able to sorb phenanthrene, DDT, PFOA and DEHP. • Desorption rates were faster using a gut surfactant compared to seawater alone. • Desorption rates were further enhanced at lower pH and higher temperature. • Plastic-POPs were ranked according to their potential to cause “harm”. -- Desorption rates of sorbed POPs from plastics were substantially enhanced under gut conditions specific of warm blooded organisms, suggesting potential transfer following ingestion

  13. CFD simulation of pressure and discharge surge in Francis turbine at off-design conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirkov, D; Avdyushenko, A; Panov, L; Bannikov, D; Cherny, S; Skorospelov, V; Pylev, I

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid 1D-3D CFD model is developed for the numerical simulation of pressure and discharge surge in hydraulic power plants. The most essential part – the turbine itself – is simulated directly using 3D unsteady equations of turbulent motion of fluid-vapor mixture, while the rest of the hydraulic system is simulated in frames of 1D hydro-acoustic model. Thus the model accounts for the main factors responsible for excitation and propagation of pressure and discharge waves in hydraulic power plant. Boundary conditions at penstock inlet and draft tube outlet are discussed in detail. Then simulations of dynamic behavior at part load and full load operating points are performed. It is shown that the numerical model is able to capture self-excited oscillations in full load conditions. The influence of penstock length and flow structure behind the runner are investigated. The presented approach seems to be a promising tool for prediction and investigation the dynamic behavior in hydraulic power plants.

  14. An Automatic Approach to the Stabilization Condition in a HIx Distillation Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ji Woon; Shin, Young Joon; Lee, Ki Young; Kim, Yong Wan; Chang, Jong Hwa; Youn, Cheung

    2010-01-01

    In the Sulfur-Iodine(SI) thermochemical process to produce nuclear hydrogen, an H 2 O-HI-I 2 ternary mixture solution discharged from the Bunsen reaction is primarily concentrated by electro-electrodialysis. The concentrated solution is distillated in the HIx distillation column to generate a high purity HI vapor. The pure HI vapor is obtained at the top of the HIx distillation column and the diluted HIx solution is discharged at the bottom of the column. In order to simulate the steady-state HIx distillation column, a vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) model of the H 2 O-HI-I 2 ternary system is required and the subprogram to calculate VLE concentrations has been already introduced by KAERI research group in 2006. The steady state simulation code for the HIx distillation process was also developed in 2007. However, the intrinsic phenomena of the VLE data such as the steep slope of a T-x-y diagram caused the instability of the simulation calculation. In this paper, a computer program to automatically find a stabilization condition in the steady state simulation of the HIx distillation column is introduced. A graphic user interface (GUI) function to monitor an approach to the stabilization condition was added in this program

  15. Artemisia vulgaris pollen allergoids digestibility in the simulated conditions of the gastrointestinal tract

    OpenAIRE

    RATKO M. JANKOV; NATALIJA DJ. POLOVIC; MARIJA DJ. GAVROVIC-JANKULOVIC; LIDIJA BURAZER; DANICA DJERGOVIC-PETROVIC; OLGA VUCKOVIC; OLIKA DROBNJAK; ZORICA SPORCIC; MARINA ATANASKOVIC-MARKOVIC; RATKO M. JANKOV

    2006-01-01

    Chemically modified allergens (allergoids) have found use in both traditional and novel forms of immunotherapy of allergic disorders. Novel forms of immunotherapy include local allergen delivery, via the gastrointestinal tract. This study conveys the gastrointestinal stability of three types ofmugwort pollen allergoids under simulated conditions of the gut. Allergoids of the pollen extract of Artemisia vulgaris were obtained by means of potassium cyanate, succinic and maleic anhydride. Gastro...

  16. The Matter Bispectrum in N-body Simulations with non-Gaussian Initial Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Sefusatti, Emiliano; Crocce, Martin; Desjacques, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    We present measurements of the dark matter bispectrum in N-body simulations with non-Gaussian initial conditions of the local kind for a large variety of triangular configurations and compare them with predictions from Eulerian perturbation theory up to one-loop corrections. We find that the effects of primordial non-Gaussianity at large scales, when compared to perturbation theory, are well described by the initial component of the matter bispectrum, linearly extrapolated at the redshift of ...

  17. Natural Circulation Characteristics at Low-Pressure Conditions through PANDA Experiments and ATHLET Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Paladino, Domenico; Huggenberger, Max; Schäfer, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Natural circulation characteristics at low pressure/low power have been studied by performing experimental investigations and numerical simulations. The PANDA large-scale facility was used to provide valuable, high quality data on natural circulation characteristics as a function of several parameters and for a wide range of operating conditions. The new experimental data allow for testing and improving the capabilities of the thermal-hydraulic computer codes to be used for treating natural c...

  18. Mechanical Properties of a Unidirectional Basalt-Fiber-Reinforced Plastic Under a Loading Simulating Operation Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, D. S.; Slovikov, S. V.

    2017-01-01

    The results of experimental investigations of unidirectional composites based on basalt fibers and different marks of epoxy resins are presented. Uniaxial tensile tests were carried out using a specimen fixation technique simulating the operation conditions of structures. The mechanical properties of the basalt-fiber-reinforced plastics (BFRPs) were determined. The diagrams of loading and deformation of BFRP specimens were obtain. The formulations of the composites with the highest mechanical properties were revealed.

  19. Operational factors affecting microgravity levels in orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, R. E.; Mockovciak, J., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Microgravity levels desired for proposed materials processing payloads are fundamental considerations in the design of future space platforms. Disturbance sources, such as aerodynamic drag, attitude control torques, crew motion and orbital dynamics, influence the microgravity levels attainable in orbit. The nature of these effects are assessed relative to platform design parameters such as orbital altitude and configuration geometry, and examples are presented for a representative spacecraft configuration. The possible applications of control techniques to provide extremely low acceleration levels are also discussed.

  20. Effects of Microgravity on the Formation of Aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, A. J.; Ayers, M. R.; Sibille, L.; Cronise, R. J.; Noever, D. A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes research to investigate fundamental aspects of the effects of microgravity on the formation of the microstructure of metal oxide alcogels and aerogels. We are studying the role of gravity on pore structure and gel uniformity in collaboration with Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) on gelling systems under microgravity conditions. While this project was just initiated in May 1998, related research performed earlier is described along with the plans and rationale for the current microgravity investigation to provide background and describe newly developing techniques that should be useful for the current gellation studies. The role of gravity in materials processing must be investigated through the study of well-mastered systems. Sol-gel processed materials are near-perfect candidates to determine the effect of gravity on the formation and growth of random clusters from hierarchies of aggregated units. The processes of hydrolysis, condensation, aggregation and gellation in the formation of alcogels are affected by gravity and therefore provide a rich system to study under microgravity conditions. Supercritical drying of the otherwise unstable wet alcogel preserves the alcogel structure produced during sol-gel processing as aerogel. Supercritically dried aerogel provides for the study of material microstructures without interference from the effects of surface tension, evaporation, and solvent flow. Aerogels are microstructured, low density open-pore solids. They have many unusual properties including: transparency, excellent thermal resistance, high surface area, very low refractive index, a dielectric constant approaching that of air, and extremely low sound velocity. Aerogels are synthesized using sol-gel processing followed by supercritical solvent extraction that leaves the original gel structure virtually intact. These studies will elucidate the effects of microgravity on the homogeneity of the microstructure and porosity of aerogel. The

  1. Lifting simulation of an offshore supply vessel considering various operating conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hoon Jeong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, an offshore support vessel is being widely used to install an offshore structure such as a subsea equipment which is laid on its deck. The lifting operation which is one of the installation operations includes lifting off, lifting in the air, splash zone crossing, deep submerging, and finally landing of the structure with an offshore support vessel crane. There are some major considerations during this operation. Especially, when lifting off the structure, if operating conditions such as ocean environmental loads and hoisting (or lowering speed are bad, the excess of tension of wire ropes of the crane and the collision between the offshore support vessel and the structure can be occurred due to the relative motion between them. To solve this problem, this study performs the lifting simulation while the offshore support vessel installs the structure. The simulation includes the calculation of dynamic responses of the offshore support vessel and the equipment, including the wire tension and the collision detection. To check the applicability of the simulation, it is applied to some lifting steps by varying operating conditions. As a result, it is confirmed that the conditions affect the operability of those steps.

  2. Properties of Lactobacillus reuteri chitosan-calcium-alginate encapsulation under simulated gastrointestinal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui-Ying; Tang, Yi-Ju; King, V An-Erl; Chou, Jen-Wei; Tsen, Jen-Horng

    2015-03-01

    The protective effects of encapsulation on the survival of Lactobacillus reuteri and the retention of the bacterium's probiotic properties under simulated gastrointestinal conditions were investigated. Viable counts and the remaining probiotic properties of calcium (Ca)-alginate encapsulated (A group), chitosan-Ca-alginate encapsulated (CA group), and unencapsulated, free L. reuteri (F group) were determined. Encapsulation improved the survival of L. reuteri subjected to simulated gastrointestinal conditions, with the greatest protective effect achieved in the CA group. The degree of cell membrane injury increased with increasing bile salt concentrations at constant pH, but the extent of injury was less in the encapsulated than in the free cells. Adherence rates were, in descending order: CA (0.524%)>A (0.360%)>F (0.275%). Lactobacillus reuteri cells retained their antagonistic activity toward Listeria monocytogenes even after incubation of the lactobacilli under simulated gastrointestinal conditions. Displacement of the pathogen by cells released from either of the encapsulation matrices was higher than that by free cells. The safety of L. reuteri was demonstrated in an in vitro invasion assay. Copyright© by the Spanish Society for Microbiology and Institute for Catalan Studies.

  3. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces with gas pockets using linearized boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jongmin; Bose, Sanjeeb; Garcia-Mayoral, Ricardo; Mani, Ali

    2012-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces are shown to be effective for surface drag reduction under laminar regime by both experiments and simulations (see for example, Ou and Rothstein, Phys. Fluids 17:103606, 2005). However, such drag reduction for fully developed turbulent flow maintaining the Cassie-Baxter state remains an open problem due to high shear rates and flow unsteadiness of turbulent boundary layer. Our work aims to develop an understanding of mechanisms leading to interface breaking and loss of gas pockets due to interactions with turbulent boundary layers. We take advantage of direct numerical simulation of turbulence with slip and no-slip patterned boundary conditions mimicking the superhydrophobic surface. In addition, we capture the dynamics of gas-water interface, by deriving a proper linearized boundary condition taking into account the surface tension of the interface and kinematic matching of interface deformation and normal velocity conditions on the wall. We will show results from our simulations predicting the dynamical behavior of gas pocket interfaces over a wide range of dimensionless surface tensions. Supported by the Office of Naval Research and the Kwanjeong Educational Scholarship Foundation.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of a fully hydrated dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayer with different macroscopic boundary conditions and parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieleman, D.P; Berendsen, H.J.C.

    1996-01-01

    We compared molecular dynamics simulations of a bilayer of 128 fully hydrated phospholipid (DPPC) molecules, using different parameters and macroscopic boundary conditions. The same system was studied under constant pressure, constant volume, and constant surface tension boundary conditions, with

  5. Initial condition effects on large scale structure in numerical simulations of plane mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, W. A.; Garrett, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, Large Eddy Simulations are performed on the spatially developing plane turbulent mixing layer. The simulated mixing layers originate from initially laminar conditions. The focus of this research is on the effect of the nature of the imposed fluctuations on the large-scale spanwise and streamwise structures in the flow. Two simulations are performed; one with low-level three-dimensional inflow fluctuations obtained from pseudo-random numbers, the other with physically correlated fluctuations of the same magnitude obtained from an inflow generation technique. Where white-noise fluctuations provide the inflow disturbances, no spatially stationary streamwise vortex structure is observed, and the large-scale spanwise turbulent vortical structures grow continuously and linearly. These structures are observed to have a three-dimensional internal geometry with branches and dislocations. Where physically correlated provide the inflow disturbances a "streaky" streamwise structure that is spatially stationary is observed, with the large-scale turbulent vortical structures growing with the square-root of time. These large-scale structures are quasi-two-dimensional, on top of which the secondary structure rides. The simulation results are discussed in the context of the varying interpretations of mixing layer growth that have been postulated. Recommendations are made concerning the data required from experiments in order to produce accurate numerical simulation recreations of real flows.

  6. Time Accurate Unsteady Pressure Loads Simulated for the Space Launch System at a Wind Tunnel Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, Stephen J.; Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Kleb, Bil; Streett, Craig L; Glass, Christopher E.; Schuster, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Using the Fully Unstructured Three-Dimensional (FUN3D) computational fluid dynamics code, an unsteady, time-accurate flow field about a Space Launch System configuration was simulated at a transonic wind tunnel condition (Mach = 0.9). Delayed detached eddy simulation combined with Reynolds Averaged Naiver-Stokes and a Spallart-Almaras turbulence model were employed for the simulation. Second order accurate time evolution scheme was used to simulate the flow field, with a minimum of 0.2 seconds of simulated time to as much as 1.4 seconds. Data was collected at 480 pressure taps at locations, 139 of which matched a 3% wind tunnel model, tested in the Transonic Dynamic Tunnel (TDT) facility at NASA Langley Research Center. Comparisons between computation and experiment showed agreement within 5% in terms of location for peak RMS levels, and 20% for frequency and magnitude of power spectral densities. Grid resolution and time step sensitivity studies were performed to identify methods for improved accuracy comparisons to wind tunnel data. With limited computational resources, accurate trends for reduced vibratory loads on the vehicle were observed. Exploratory methods such as determining minimized computed errors based on CFL number and sub-iterations, as well as evaluating frequency content of the unsteady pressures and evaluation of oscillatory shock structures were used in this study to enhance computational efficiency and solution accuracy. These techniques enabled development of a set of best practices, for the evaluation of future flight vehicle designs in terms of vibratory loads.

  7. Conditional Stochastic Models in Reduced Space: Towards Efficient Simulation of Tropical Cyclone Precipitation Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodov, B.

    2017-12-01

    Stochastic simulation of realistic and statistically robust patterns of Tropical Cyclone (TC) induced precipitation is a challenging task. It is even more challenging in a catastrophe modeling context, where tens of thousands of typhoon seasons need to be simulated in order to provide a complete view of flood risk. Ultimately, one could run a coupled global climate model and regional Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) model, but this approach is not feasible in the catastrophe modeling context and, most importantly, may not provide TC track patterns consistent with observations. Rather, we propose to leverage NWP output for the observed TC precipitation patterns (in terms of downscaled reanalysis 1979-2015) collected on a Lagrangian frame along the historical TC tracks and reduced to the leading spatial principal components of the data. The reduced data from all TCs is then grouped according to timing, storm evolution stage (developing, mature, dissipating, ETC transitioning) and central pressure and used to build a dictionary of stationary (within a group) and non-stationary (for transitions between groups) covariance models. Provided that the stochastic storm tracks with all the parameters describing the TC evolution are already simulated, a sequence of conditional samples from the covariance models chosen according to the TC characteristics at a given moment in time are concatenated, producing a continuous non-stationary precipitation pattern in a Lagrangian framework. The simulated precipitation for each event is finally distributed along the stochastic TC track and blended with a non-TC background precipitation using a data assimilation technique. The proposed framework provides means of efficient simulation (10000 seasons simulated in a couple of days) and robust typhoon precipitation patterns consistent with observed regional climate and visually undistinguishable from high resolution NWP output. The framework is used to simulate a catalog of 10000 typhoon

  8. Design and Simulation of an Air Conditioning Project in a Hospital Based on Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding X. R.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to design a novel air cleaning facility which conforms to the current situation in China, and moreover can satisfy our demand on air purification under the condition of poor air quality, as well as discuss the development means of a prototype product. Air conditions in the operating room of a hospital were measured as the research subject of this study. First, a suitable turbulence model and boundary conditions were selected and computational fluid dynamics (CFD software was used to simulate indoor air distribution. The analysis and comparison of the simulation results suggested that increasing the area of air supply outlets and the number of return air inlets would not only increase the area of unidirectional flow region in main flow region, but also avoid an indoor vortex and turbulivity of the operating area. Based on the summary of heat and humidity management methods, the system operation mode and relevant parameter technologies as well as the characteristics of the thermal-humidity load of the operating room were analyzed and compiled. According to the load value and parameters of indoor design obtained after our calculations, the airflow distribution of purifying the air-conditioning system in a clean operating room was designed and checked. The research results suggested that the application of a secondary return air system in the summer could reduce energy consumption and be consistent with the concept of primaiy humidity control. This study analyzed the feasibility and energy conservation properties of cleaning air-conditioning technology in operating rooms, proposed some solutions to the problem, and performed a feasible simulation, which provides a reference for practical engineering.

  9. The Strata-l Experiment on Microgravity Regolith Segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, M.; Abell, P.; Brisset, J.; Britt, D.; Colwell, J.; Durda, D.; Dove, A.; Graham, L.; Hartzell, C.; John, K.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Strata-1 experiment studies the segregation of small-body regolith through long-duration exposure of simulant materials to the microgravity environment on the International Space Station (ISS). Many asteroids feature low bulk densities, which implies high values of porosity and a mechanical structure composed of loosely bound particles, (i.e. the "rubble pile" model), a prime example of a granular medium. Even the higher-density, mechanically coherent asteroids feature a significant surface layer of loose regolith. These bodies will evolve in response to very small perturbations such as micrometeoroid impacts, planetary flybys, and the YORP effect. A detailed understanding of asteroid mechanical evolution is needed in order to predict the surface characteristics of as-of-yet unvisited bodies, to understand the larger context of samples from sample return missions, and to mitigate risks for both manned and unmanned missions to asteroidal bodies. Due to observation of rocky regions on asteorids such as Eros and Itokawa, it has been hypothesized that grain size distribution with depth on an asteroid may be inhomogeneous: specifically, that large boulders have been mobilized to the surface. In terrestrial environments, this size-dependent sorting to the surface of the sample is called the Brazil Nut Effect. The microgravity and acceleration environment on the ISS is similar that of a small asteroid. Thus, Strata-1 investigates size segregation of regolith in an environment analogous to that of small bodies. Strata-1 consists of four regolith simulants in evacuated tubes, as shown in Figure 1 (Top and Middle). The simulants are (1) a crushed and sieved ordinary chondrite meteorite to simulate an asteroidal surface, (2) a carbonaceous chondrite simulant with a mixture of fine and course particles, and two simplified silicate glass simulants; (3) one with angular and (4) another with spherical particles. These materials were chosen to span a range of granular

  10. 3-D simulations to investigate initial condition effects on the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, Malcolm J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The effect of initial conditions on the growth rate of turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing has been studied using carefully formulated numerical simulations. An integrated large-eddy simulation (ILES) that uses a finite-volume technique was employed to solve the three-dimensional incompressible Euler equations with numerical dissipation. The initial conditions were chosen to test the dependence of the RT growth parameters ({alpha}{sub b}, {alpha}{sub s}) on variations in (a) the spectral bandwidth, (b) the spectral shape, and (c) discrete banded spectra. Our findings support the notion that the overall growth of the RT mixing is strongly dependent on initial conditions. Variation in spectral shapes and bandwidths are found to have a complex effect of the late time development of the RT mixing layer, and raise the question of whether we can design RT transition and turbulence based on our choice of initial conditions. In addition, our results provide a useful database for the initialization and development of closures describing RT transition and turbulence.

  11. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

    1992-01-01

    The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 x 3.0 x 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells

  12. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.P.; Reeves, T.L.; Skinner, Q.D.; Hasfurther, V.

    1992-11-01

    The scope of the original research program and of its continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large-scale testing sufficient to describe commercial-scale embankment behavior. The large-scale testing was accomplished by constructing five lysimeters, each 7.3x3.0x3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process (Schmalfield 1975). Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin near Rifle, Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was placed in the lysimeter cells. This report discusses and summarizes results from scientific efforts conducted between October 1991 and September 1992 for Fiscal Year 1992

  13. Simulating low-flow conditions in an arctic watershed using WaSiM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daanen, R. P.; Gaedeke, A.; Liljedahl, A. K.; Arp, C. D.; Whitman, M. S.; Jones, B. M.; Cai, L.; Alexeev, V. A.

    2017-12-01

    The goal of this study is to identify the magnitude, timing, and duration of low-flow conditions under scenarios of summer drought throughout the 4500-km2 Fish Creek watershed, which is set entirely on the Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska. The hydrologic response of streams in this region to drought conditions is not well understood, but likely varies by stream size, upstream lake extent, and geologic setting. We used a physically based model, Water Balance Simulation Model (WaSiM) to simulate river discharge, surface runoff, active layer depth, soil temperatures, water levels, groundwater levels, groundwater flow, and snow distribution. We found that 7-day low flows were strongly affected by scenarios of drought or wet conditions. The 10-year-period scenarios were generated by selecting dry or wet years from a reanalysis dataset. Starting conditions for the simulations were based on a control run with average atmospheric conditions. Connectivity of lakes with better feeding conditions for fish significantly decreased in the scenarios of both summer and winter drought. The overall memory of the hydrologic network seems to be on the order of two to three years, based on the time to reach equilibrium hydrological conditions. This suggests that lake level fluctuation and water harvest could have a long-term effect on the connectivity of lakes. Climate change could strongly affect this system, and increased future water use could add more pressure on fish populations. Snowmelt is a major component of the water balance in a typical Arctic watershed and fish tend to migrate to their summer feeding lakes during the spring. Mid-summer periods without significant rainfall prove most limiting on fish movement, and during this time headwater lakes supply the majority of streamflow and are often the habitat destination for foraging fish. Models that predict connectivity of these lakes to downstream networks during low-flow conditions will help identify where lake water

  14. Use of a driving simulator to assess performance under adverse weather conditions in adults with albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Gwen M; Summers, C Gail; Ward, Nicholas; Bhargava, Esha; Rakauskas, Michael E; Holleschau, Ann M

    2012-04-01

    Participants with albinism have reduced vision and nystagmus with reduced foveation times. This prospective study evaluated driving in 12 participants with albinism and 12 matched controls. Participants drove a vehicle simulator through a virtual rural course in sunny and foggy conditions. Under sunny conditions, participants with albinism showed a narrower preferred minimum safety boundary during car-following tasks than did controls, but there was no difference under foggy conditions. Their driving did not differ significantly from that of controls when approaching a stop sign or when choosing gap size between oncoming vehicles when crossing an intersection. However, when compared to control drivers, participants with albinism had a decreased minimum safety boundary for car-following that should be included in counseling regarding driving safety.

  15. Interphase Chromosome Conformation and Chromatin-Chromatin Interactions in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured Under Different Gravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Hada, Megumi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels both in cultured cells and animal models. It has been suggested that the packaging of chromatin fibers in the interphase nucleus is closely related to genome function, and the changes in transcriptional activity are tightly correlated with changes in chromatin folding. This study explores the changes of chromatin conformation and chromatin-chromatin interactions in the simulated microgravity environment, and investigates their correlation to the expression of genes located at different regions of the chromosome. To investigate the folding of chromatin in interphase under various culture conditions, human epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and lymphocytes were fixed in the G1 phase. Interphase chromosomes were hybridized with a multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probe for chromosome 3 which distinguishes six regions of the chromosome as separate colors. After images were captured with a laser scanning confocal microscope, the 3-dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 was reconstructed at multi-mega base pair scale. In order to determine the effects of microgravity on chromosome conformation and orientation, measures such as distance between homologous pairs, relative orientation of chromosome arms about a shared midpoint, and orientation of arms within individual chromosomes were all considered as potentially impacted by simulated microgravity conditions. The studies revealed non-random folding of chromatin in interphase, and suggested an association of interphase chromatin folding with radiation-induced chromosome aberration hotspots. Interestingly, the distributions of genes with expression changes over chromosome 3 in cells cultured under microgravity environment are apparently clustered on specific loci and chromosomes. This data provides important insights into how mammalian cells respond to microgravity at molecular level.

  16. Simulation of KAEVER experiments on aerosol behavior in a nuclear power plant containment at accident conditions with the ASTEC code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kljenak, I.; Mavko, B.

    2006-01-01

    Experiments on aerosol behaviour in saturated and non-saturated atmosphere, which were performed in the KAEVER experimental facility, were simulated with the severe accident computer code ASTEC CPA V1.2. The specific purpose of the work was to assess the capability of the code to model aerosol condensation and deposition in the containment of a light-water-reactor nuclear power plant at severe accident conditions, if the atmosphere saturation conditions are simulated adequately. Five different tests were first simulated with boundary conditions, obtained from the experiments. In all five tests, a non-saturated atmosphere was simulated, although, in four tests, the atmosphere was allegedly saturated. The simulations were repeated with modified boundary conditions, to obtain a saturated atmosphere in all tests. Results of dry and wet aerosol concentrations in the test vessel atmosphere for both sets of simulations are compared to experimental results. (author)

  17. SQUEEZE-E: The Optimal Solution for Molecular Simulations with Periodic Boundary Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassenaar, Tsjerk A; de Vries, Sjoerd; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Bekker, Henk

    2012-10-09

    In molecular simulations of macromolecules, it is desirable to limit the amount of solvent in the system to avoid spending computational resources on uninteresting solvent-solvent interactions. As a consequence, periodic boundary conditions are commonly used, with a simulation box chosen as small as possible, for a given minimal distance between images. Here, we describe how such a simulation cell can be set up for ensembles, taking into account a priori available or estimable information regarding conformational flexibility. Doing so ensures that any conformation present in the input ensemble will satisfy the distance criterion during the simulation. This helps avoid periodicity artifacts due to conformational changes. The method introduces three new approaches in computational geometry: (1) The first is the derivation of an optimal packing of ensembles, for which the mathematical framework is described. (2) A new method for approximating the α-hull and the contact body for single bodies and ensembles is presented, which is orders of magnitude faster than existing routines, allowing the calculation of packings of large ensembles and/or large bodies. 3. A routine is described for searching a combination of three vectors on a discretized contact body forming a reduced base for a lattice with minimal cell volume. The new algorithms reduce the time required to calculate packings of single bodies from minutes or hours to seconds. The use and efficacy of the method is demonstrated for ensembles obtained from NMR, MD simulations, and elastic network modeling. An implementation of the method has been made available online at http://haddock.chem.uu.nl/services/SQUEEZE/ and has been made available as an option for running simulations through the weNMR GRID MD server at http://haddock.science.uu.nl/enmr/services/GROMACS/main.php .

  18. Cell Culture in Microgravity: Opening the Door to Space Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellis, Neal R.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Adaptational response of human cell populations to microgravity is investigated using simulation, short-term Shuttle experiments, and long-term microgravity. Simulation consists of a clinostatically-rotated cell culture system. The system is a horizontally-rotated cylinder completely filled with culture medium. Low speed rotation results in continuous-fall of the cells through the fluid medium. In this setting, cells: 1) aggregate, 2) propagate in three dimensions, 3) synthesize matrix, 4) differentiate, and 5) form sinusoids that facilitate mass transfer. Space cell culture is conducted in flight bioreactors and in static incubators. Cells grown in microgravity are: bovine cartilage, promyelocytic leukemia, kidney proximal tubule cells, adrenal medulla, breast and colon cancer, and endothelium. Cells were cultured in space to test specific hypotheses. Cartilage cells were used to determine structural differences in cartilage grown in space compared to ground-based bioreactors. Results from a 130-day experiment on Mir revealed that cartilage grown in space was substantially more compressible due to insufficient glycosaminoglycan in the matrix. Interestingly, earth-grown cartilage conformed better to the dimensions of the scaffolding material, while the Mir specimens were spherical. The other cell populations are currently being analyzed for cell surface properties, gene expression, and differentiation. Results suggest that some cells spontaneously differentiate in microgravity. Additionally, vast changes in gene expression may occur in response to microgravity. In conclusion, the transition to microgravity may constitute a physical perturbation in cells resulting in unique gene expressions, the consequences of which may be useful in tissue engineering, disease modeling, and space cell biology.

  19. Simulation of Deep Water Renewal in Crater Lake, Oregon, USA under Current and Future Climate Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolroaz, S.; Wood, T. M.; Wherry, S.; Girdner, S.

    2015-12-01

    We applied a 1-dimensional lake model developed to simulate deep mixing related to thermobaric instabilities in temperate lakes to Crater Lake, a 590-m deep caldera lake in Oregon's Cascade Range known for its stunning deep blue color and extremely clear water, in order to determine the frequency of deep water renewal in future climate conditions. The lake model was calibrated with 6 years of water temperature profiles, and then simulated 10 years of validation data with an RMSE ranging from 0.81°C at 50 m depth to 0.04°C at 350-460 m depth. The simulated time series of heat content in the deep lake accurately captured extreme years characterized by weak and strong deep water renewal. The lake model uses wind speed and lake surface temperature (LST) as boundary conditions. LST projections under six climate scenarios from the CMIP5 intermodel comparison project (2 representative concentration pathways X 3 general circulation models) were evaluated with air2water, a simple lumped model that only requires daily values of downscaled air temperature. air2water was calibrated with data from 1993-2011, resulting in a RMSE between simulated and observed daily LST values of 0.68°C. All future climate scenarios project increased water temperature throughout the water column and a substantive reduction in the frequency of deepwater renewal events. The least extreme scenario (CNRM-CM5, RCP4.5) projects the frequency of deepwater renewal events to decrease from about 1 in 2 years in the present to about 1 in 3 years by 2100. The most extreme scenario (HadGEM2-ES, RCP8.5) projects the frequency of deepwater renewal events to be less than 1 in 7 years by 2100 and lake surface temperatures never cooling to less than 4°C after 2050. In all RCP4.5 simulations the temperature of the entire water column is greater than 4°C for increasing periods of time. In the RCP8.5 simulations, the temperature of the entire water column is greater than 4°C year round by the year 2060 (HadGEM2

  20. Numerical simulation of diurnally varying thermal environment in a street canyon under haze-fog conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zijing; Dong, Jingliang; Xiao, Yimin; Tu, Jiyuan

    2015-10-01

    The impact of haze-fog on surface temperature, flow pattern, pollutant dispersion and pedestrian thermal comfort are investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach based on a three-dimensional street canyon model under different haze-fog conditions. In this study, light extinction coefficient (Kex) is adopted to represent haze-fog pollution level. Numerical simulations are performed for different Kex values at four representative time events (1000 LST, 1300 LST, 1600 LST and 2000 LST). The numerical results suggest that the surface temperature is strongly affected by the haze-fog condition. Surface heating induced by the solar radiation is enhanced by haze-fog, as higher surface temperature is observed under thicker haze-fog condition. Moreover, the temperature difference between sunlit and shadow surfaces is reduced, while that for the two shadow surfaces is slightly increased. Therefore, the surface temperature among street canyon facets becomes more evenly distributed under heavy haze-fog conditions. In addition, flow patterns are considerably altered by different haze-fog conditions, especially for the afternoon (1600 LST) case, in which thermal-driven flow has opposite direction as that of the wind-driven flow direction. Consequently, pollutants such as vehicular emissions will accumulate at pedestrian level, and pedestrian thermal comfort may lower under thicker haze-fog condition.

  1. Ice Storage Air-Conditioning System Simulation with Dynamic Electricity Pricing: A Demand Response Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Chun Lo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an optimal dispatch model of an ice storage air-conditioning system for participants to quickly and accurately perform energy saving and demand response, and to avoid the over contact with electricity price peak. The schedule planning for an ice storage air-conditioning system of demand response is mainly to transfer energy consumption from the peak load to the partial-peak or off-peak load. Least Squares Regression (LSR is used to obtain the polynomial function for the cooling capacity and the cost of power consumption with a real ice storage air-conditioning system. Based on the dynamic electricity pricing, the requirements of cooling loads, and all technical constraints, the dispatch model of the ice-storage air-conditioning system is formulated to minimize the operation cost. The Improved Ripple Bee Swarm Optimization (IRBSO algorithm is proposed to solve the dispatch model of the ice storage air-conditioning system in a daily schedule on summer. Simulation results indicate that reasonable solutions provide a practical and flexible framework allowing the demand response of ice storage air-conditioning systems to demonstrate the optimization of its energy savings and operational efficiency and offering greater energy efficiency.

  2. Experimental verification of boundary conditions for numerical simulation of airflow in a benchmark ventilation channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizal Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Correct definition of boundary conditions is crucial for the appropriate simulation of a flow. It is a common practice that simulation of sufficiently long upstream entrance section is performed instead of experimental investigation of the actual conditions at the boundary of the examined area, in the case that the measurement is either impossible or extremely demanding. We focused on the case of a benchmark channel with ventilation outlet, which models a regular automotive ventilation system. At first, measurements of air velocity and turbulence intensity were performed at the boundary of the examined area, i.e. in the rectangular channel 272.5 mm upstream the ventilation outlet. Then, the experimentally acquired results were compared with results obtained by numerical simulation of further upstream entrance section defined according to generally approved theoretical suggestions. The comparison showed that despite the simple geometry and general agreement of average axial velocity, certain difference was found in the shape of the velocity profile. The difference was attributed to the simplifications of the numerical model and the isotropic turbulence assumption of the used turbulence model. The appropriate recommendations were stated for the future work.

  3. Leaching behavior of a simulated bituminized radioactive waste form under deep geological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Shinichi; Iida, Yoshihisa; Nagano, Tetsushi; Akimoto, Toshiyuki

    2003-01-01

    The leaching behavior of a simulated bituminized waste form was studied to acquire data for the performance assessment of the geologic disposal of bituminized radioactive waste. Laboratory-scale leaching tests were performed for radioactive and non-radioactive waste specimens simulating bituminized waste of a French reprocessing company, COGEMA. The simulated waste was contacted with deionized water, an alkaline solution (0.03-mol/l KOH), and a saline solution (0.5-mol/l KCl) under atmospheric and anoxic conditions. The concentrations of Na, Ba, Cs, Sr, Np, Pu, NO 3 , SO 4 and I in the leachates were determined. Swelling of the bituminized waste progressed in deionized water and KOH. The release of the soluble components, Na and Cs, was enhanced by the swelling, and considered to be diffusion-controlled in the swelled layers of the specimens. The release of sparingly soluble components such as Ba and Np was solubility-limited in addition to the progression of leaching. Neptunium, a redox-sensitive element, showed a distinct difference in release between anoxic and atmospheric conditions. The elemental release from the bituminized waste specimens leached in the KCl was very low, which is likely due to the suppression of swelling of the specimens at high ionic strength. (author)

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of UO2 nanocrystals melting under isolated and periodic boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyarchenkov, A.S.; Potashnikov, S.I.; Nekrasov, K.A.; Kupryazhkin, A.Ya.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We perform MD simulation of UO 2 nanocrystals melting (in range of 768–49 152 ions). ► T(P) melting curves intersect zero near −20 GPa and saturate near 25 GPa. ► Reciprocal size dependences of nanocrystal melting point decrease nonlinearly. ► Linear and parabolic extrapolations to macroscopic values are considered. ► Melting point and density jump are reproduced, but heat of fusion is underestimated. - Abstract: Melting of uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) nanocrystals has been studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Ten recent and widely used sets of pair potentials were assessed in the rigid ion approximation. Both isolated (in vacuum) and periodic boundary conditions (PBC) were explored. Using barostat under PBC the pressure dependences of melting point were obtained. These curves intersected zero near −20 GPa, saturated near 25 GPa and increased nonlinearly in between. Using simulation of surface under isolated boundary conditions (IBC) recommended melting temperature and density jump were successfully reproduced. However, the heat of fusion is still underestimated. These melting characteristics were calculated for nanocrystals of cubic shape in the range of 768–49 152 particles (volume range of 10–1000 nm 3 ). The obtained reciprocal size dependences decreased nonlinearly. Linear and parabolic extrapolations to macroscopic values are considered. The parabolic one is found to be better suited for analysis of the data on temperature and heat of melting.

  5. An alternative phase-space distribution to sample initial conditions for classical dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Vela, A.

    2002-01-01

    A new quantum-type phase-space distribution is proposed in order to sample initial conditions for classical trajectory simulations. The phase-space distribution is obtained as the modulus of a quantum phase-space state of the system, defined as the direct product of the coordinate and momentum representations of the quantum initial state. The distribution is tested by sampling initial conditions which reproduce the initial state of the Ar-HCl cluster prepared by ultraviolet excitation, and by simulating the photodissociation dynamics by classical trajectories. The results are compared with those of a wave packet calculation, and with a classical simulation using an initial phase-space distribution recently suggested. A better agreement is found between the classical and the quantum predictions with the present phase-space distribution, as compared with the previous one. This improvement is attributed to the fact that the phase-space distribution propagated classically in this work resembles more closely the shape of the wave packet propagated quantum mechanically

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation of the local concentration and structure in multicomponent aerosol nanoparticles under atmospheric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadima, Katerina S; Mavrantzas, Vlasis G; Pandis, Spyros N

    2017-06-28

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to investigate the local structure and local concentration in atmospheric nanoparticles consisting of an organic compound (cis-pinonic acid or n-C 30 H 62 ), sulfate and ammonium ions, and water. Simulations in the isothermal-isobaric (NPT) statistical ensemble under atmospheric conditions with a prespecified number of molecules of the abovementioned compounds led to the formation of a nanoparticle. Calculations of the density profiles of all the chemical species in the nanoparticle, the corresponding radial pair distribution functions, and their mobility inside the nanoparticle revealed strong interactions developing between sulfate and ammonium ions. However, sulfate and ammonium ions prefer to populate the central part of the nanoparticle under the simulated conditions, whereas organic molecules like to reside at its outer surface. Sulfate and ammonium ions were practically immobile; in contrast, the organic molecules exhibited appreciable mobility at the outer surface of the nanoparticle. When the organic compound was a normal alkane (e.g. n-C 30 H 62 ), a well-organized (crystalline-like) phase was rapidly formed at the free surface of the nanoparticle and remained separate from the rest of the species.

  7. Modelling Geomechanical Heterogeneity of Rock Masses Using Direct and Indirect Geostatistical Conditional Simulation Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eivazy, Hesameddin; Esmaieli, Kamran; Jean, Raynald

    2017-12-01

    An accurate characterization and modelling of rock mass geomechanical heterogeneity can lead to more efficient mine planning and design. Using deterministic approaches and random field methods for modelling rock mass heterogeneity is known to be limited in simulating the spatial variation and spatial pattern of the geomechanical properties. Although the applications of geostatistical techniques have demonstrated improvements in modelling the heterogeneity of geomechanical properties, geostatistical estimation methods such as Kriging result in estimates of geomechanical variables that are not fully representative of field observations. This paper reports on the development of 3D models for spatial variability of rock mass geomechanical properties using geostatistical conditional simulation method based on sequential Gaussian simulation. A methodology to simulate the heterogeneity of rock mass quality based on the rock mass rating is proposed and applied to a large open-pit mine in Canada. Using geomechanical core logging data collected from the mine site, a direct and an indirect approach were used to model the spatial variability of rock mass quality. The results of the two modelling approaches were validated against collected field data. The study aims to quantify the risks of pit slope failure and provides a measure of uncertainties in spatial variability of rock mass properties in different areas of the pit.

  8. Time-Accurate Unsteady Pressure Loads Simulated for the Space Launch System at Wind Tunnel Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, Stephen J.; Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Kleb, William L.; Glass, Christopher E.; Streett, Craig L.; Schuster, David M.

    2015-01-01

    A transonic flow field about a Space Launch System (SLS) configuration was simulated with the Fully Unstructured Three-Dimensional (FUN3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code at wind tunnel conditions. Unsteady, time-accurate computations were performed using second-order Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (DDES) for up to 1.5 physical seconds. The surface pressure time history was collected at 619 locations, 169 of which matched locations on a 2.5 percent wind tunnel model that was tested in the 11 ft. x 11 ft. test section of the NASA Ames Research Center's Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. Comparisons between computation and experiment showed that the peak surface pressure RMS level occurs behind the forward attach hardware, and good agreement for frequency and power was obtained in this region. Computational domain, grid resolution, and time step sensitivity studies were performed. These included an investigation of pseudo-time sub-iteration convergence. Using these sensitivity studies and experimental data comparisons, a set of best practices to date have been established for FUN3D simulations for SLS launch vehicle analysis. To the author's knowledge, this is the first time DDES has been used in a systematic approach and establish simulation time needed, to analyze unsteady pressure loads on a space launch vehicle such as the NASA SLS.

  9. FULL GPU Implementation of Lattice-Boltzmann Methods with Immersed Boundary Conditions for Fast Fluid Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Boroni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM has shown great potential in fluid simulations, but performance issues and difficulties to manage complex boundary conditions have hindered a wider application. The upcoming of Graphic Processing Units (GPU Computing offered a possible solution for the performance issue, and methods like the Immersed Boundary (IB algorithm proved to be a flexible solution to boundaries. Unfortunately, the implicit IB algorithm makes the LBM implementation in GPU a non-trivial task. This work presents a fully parallel GPU implementation of LBM in combination with IB. The fluid-boundary interaction is implemented via GPU kernels, using execution configurations and data structures specifically designed to accelerate each code execution. Simulations were validated against experimental and analytical data showing good agreement and improving the computational time. Substantial reductions of calculation rates were achieved, lowering down the required time to execute the same model in a CPU to about two magnitude orders.

  10. Numerical Simulation of single-stage axial fan operation under dusty flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkov, L. L.; Pikushchak, E. V.

    2017-11-01

    Assessment of the aerodynamic efficiency of the single-stage axial flow fan under dusty flow conditions based on a numerical simulation using the computational package Ansys-Fluent is proposed. The influence of dust volume fraction on the dependences of the air volume flow rate and the pressure drop on the rotational speed of rotor is demonstrated. Matching functions for formulas describing a pressure drop and volume flow rate in dependence on the rotor speed and dust content are obtained by numerical simulation for the single-stage axial fan. It is shown that the aerodynamic efficiency of the single-stage axial flow fan decreases exponentially with increasing volume content of dust in the air.

  11. Natural Circulation Characteristics at Low-Pressure Conditions through PANDA Experiments and ATHLET Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Paladino

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural circulation characteristics at low pressure/low power have been studied by performing experimental investigations and numerical simulations. The PANDA large-scale facility was used to provide valuable, high quality data on natural circulation characteristics as a function of several parameters and for a wide range of operating conditions. The new experimental data allow for testing and improving the capabilities of the thermal-hydraulic computer codes to be used for treating natural circulation loops in a range with increased attention. This paper presents a synthesis of a part of the results obtained within the EU-Project NACUSP “natural circulation and stability performance of boiling water reactors.” It does so by using the experimental results produced in PANDA and by showing some examples of numerical simulations performed with the thermal-hydraulic code ATHLET.

  12. Simulation of effects of incident beam condition in p-p elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Lei; Zhang Gaolong; Le Xiaoyun; Tanihata, I.

    2014-01-01

    The simulation is performed for the monitors of beam direction and beam position for p-p elastic scattering. We set several variables to simulate the monitors of incident beam condition changes: beam positions at the quadrupole magnet and target in beam line polarimeter (BLP2), distance between quadrupole magnet and target, size of plastic scintillators, distance between the target in BLP2 and the centers of plastic scintillators, and beam polarization. Through the rotation of the coordinate system, the distributions of scattered and recoiled protons in the laboratory system were obtained. By analyzing the count yields in plastic scintillators at different beam positions, we found that the beam incident angular change (0.35°) could be detected when the asymmetry of geometries of left and right scintillators in BLP2 was changed by 6%. Therefore, the scattering angle measured in the experiment can be tracked by these monitors. (authors)

  13. Automorphosis of higher plants in space is simulated by using a 3-dimensional clinostat or by application of chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K.; Hoshino, T.; Hitotsubashi, R.; Yamashita, M.; Ueda, J.

    In STS-95 space experiments, etiolated pea seedlings grown under microgravity conditions in space have shown to be automorphosis. Epicotyls were almost straight but the most oriented toward the direction far from their cotyledons with ca. 45 degrees from the vertical line as compared with that on earth. In order to know the mechanism of microgravity conditions in space to induce automorphosis, we introduced simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-dimensional clinostat, resulting in the successful induction of automorphosis-like growth and development. Kinetic studies revealed that epicotyls bent at their basal region or near cotyledonary node toward the direction far from the cotyledons with about 45 degrees in both seedlings grown on 1 g and under simulated microgravity conditions on the clinostat within 48 hrs after watering. Thereafter epicotyls grew keeping this orientation under simulated microgravity conditions on the clinostat, whereas those grown on 1 g changed the growth direction to vertical direction by negative gravitropic response. Automorphosis-like growth and development was induced by the application of auxin polar transport inhibitors (2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid, N-(1-naphtyl)phthalamic acid, 9-hydroxyfluorene-9-carboxylic acid), but not an anti-auxin, p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid. Automorphosis-like epicotyl bending was also phenocopied by the application of inhibitors of stretch-activated channel, LaCl3 and GdCl3, and by the application of an inhibitor of protein kinase, cantharidin. These results suggest that automorphosis-like growth in epicotyls of etiolated pea seedlings is due to suppression of negative gravitropic responses on 1 g, and the growth and development of etiolated pea seedlings under 1 g conditions requires for normal activities of auxin polar transport and the gravisensing system relating to calcium channels. Possible mechanisms of perception and transduction of gravity signals to induce automorphosis are discussed.

  14. Simulation of irrigation and nitrogen fertilization management of maize under edaphic conditions of south of Havana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Seijas, Teresa; Cid, G.; Gonzalez, F.; Jorge, Y.; Chaterlan, Y.; Giralt, E.; Rodriguez, R.; Duennas, G.

    1999-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to validate the crop simulation model STICS for the soil and climate conditions of south of Havana, especially for the water and nitrogen balances on Maize crop on Ferralitic soil, For this purpose was used all the available information from field experiments carried out in the Experimental Stations of the Irrigation and Drainage and Soil Research Institutes, both on south of Havana, The comparison between the simulation and observed values showed a good fitness for the variables related to the crop water uptake, while for the soil water content when the root water uptake flux is minimum and the soil water redistribution flux is maximum wasn't good, The soil nitrogen balance was adjusted from the optimization of the parameters related to the mineralization velocity of soil organic nitrogen, Nevertheless is necessary to complete this study involving other climate conditions and water and nitrogen managements to define the optimum strategy for irrigation and fertilization of Maize crop on the studied conditions,

  15. Effect of encapsulation of selected probiotic cell on survival in simulated gastrointestinal tract condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasiah Ayama

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The health benefits of probiotic bacteria have been led to their increasing use in foods. Encapsulation has been investigated to improve their survival. In this study, the selection, encapsulation and viability of lactic acid bacteria (LAB with probiotic properties in simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT condition were investigated. One hundred and fifty isolates of LAB were obtained from 30 samples of raw cow and goat milk and some fermented foods. Nine isolates could survive under GIT condition and only 3 isolates exhibited an antimicrobial activity against all food-borne pathogenic bacteria. Among them, 2 isolates (CM21 and CM53 exhibited bile salt hydrolase activity on glycocholate and glycodeoxycholate agar plates and were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum. CM53 was selected for encapsulation using 1-3% alginate and 2% Hi-maize resistant starch by emulsion system. Viability and releasing ability of encapsulated CM53 in simulated GIT condition was increased in accordance to the alginate concentration and incubation time, respectively.

  16. SiC/SiC Leading Edge Turbine Airfoil Tested Under Simulated Gas Turbine Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R. Craig; Hatton, Kenneth S.

    1999-01-01

    Silicon-based ceramics have been proposed as component materials for use in gas turbine engine hot-sections. A high pressure burner rig was used to expose both a baseline metal airfoil and ceramic matrix composite leading edge airfoil to typical gas turbine conditions to comparatively evaluate the material response at high temperatures. To eliminate many of the concerns related to an entirely ceramic, rotating airfoil, this study has focused on equipping a stationary metal airfoil with a ceramic leading edge insert to demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of such a configuration. Here, the idea was to allow the SiC/SiC composite to be integrated as the airfoil's leading edge, operating in a "free-floating" or unrestrained manner. and provide temperature relief to the metal blade underneath. The test included cycling the airfoils between simulated idle, lift, and cruise flight conditions. In addition, the airfoils were air-cooled, uniquely instrumented, and exposed to the same internal and external conditions, which included gas temperatures in excess of 1370 C (2500 F). Results show the leading edge insert remained structurally intact after 200 simulated flight cycles with only a slightly oxidized surface. The instrumentation clearly suggested a significant reduction (approximately 600 F) in internal metal temperatures as a result of the ceramic leading edge. The object of this testing was to validate the design and analysis done by Materials Research and Design of Rosemont, PA and to determine the feasibility of this design for the intended application.

  17. SIMULATION OF COOLING TOWER AND INFLUENCE OF AERODYNAMIC ELEMENTS ON ITS WORK UNDER CONDITIONS OF WIND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Dobrego

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern Cooling Towers (CT may utilize different aerodynamic elements (deflectors, windbreak walls etc. aimed to improvement of its heat performance especially at the windy conditions. In this paper the effect of flow rotation in overshower zone of CT and windbreak walls on a capacity of tower evaporating unit in the windy condition is studied numerically. Geometry of the model corresponds to real Woo-Jin Power station, China. Analogy of heat and mass transfer was used that allowed to consider aerodynamic of one-dimension flow and carried out detailed 3D calculations applying modern PC. Heat transfer coefficient of irrigator and its hydrodynamic resistance were established according to experimental data on total air rate in cooling tower. Numerical model is tested and verified with experimental data.Nonlinear dependence of CT thermal performance on wind velocity is demonstrated with the minimum (critical wind velocity at ucr ~ 8 m/s for simulated system. Application of windbreak walls does not change the value of the critical wind velocity, but may improves performance of cooling unit at moderate and strong wind conditions. Simultaneous usage of windbreak walls and overshower deflectors may increase efficiency up to 20–30 % for the deflectors angle a = 60o. Simulation let one analyze aerodynamic patterns, induced inside cooling tower and homogeneity of velocities’ field in irrigator’s area.Presented results may be helpful for the CT aerodynamic design optimization, particularly, for perspective hybrid type CTs.

  18. The Viability of the Lactobacillus Rhamnosus IL4.2 Strain in Simulated Gastrointestinal Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Vamanu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The viability maintenance of Lactobacillus rhamnosus IL4.2 strain in gastrointestinal conditions represents one of the most important characteristics regarding its use for obtaining probiotic products. The tests were performed with a cell suspension kept in 0.5% NaCl. The influence of pepsin (3 g/l at pH of 1.5, 2, 2.5 and 3, as well as of pancreatin (1 g/l in the presence of bile salts (1.5, 2, 3 and 5 mg/ml were determined. The influence of casein and mucin, in a concentration of 1 g/l, was also established in the aforementioned conditions. It was observed that mucin presented a longer viability maintenance, fact also confirmed by the calculation of the mathematical parameters of viability and mortality, when mucin was either used or not, especially in the case of gastric transit. The results proved that the tested strain maintained its viability even at pH between 1.8 - 2 and at an even higher concentration, of 2 mg/ml of bile salts, but up to two hours as of the exposure to the conditions of the simulated small intestinal juice. Such results were also confirmed by the cumulated effect of the simulated gastric and small intestinal juice, the strain thus increasing its viability with an average of 10% in the presence of mucin.

  19. Inclusion of models to describe severe accident conditions in the fuel simulation code DIONISIO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemes, Martín; Soba, Alejandro [Sección Códigos y Modelos, Gerencia Ciclo del Combustible Nuclear, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Avenida General Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Daverio, Hernando [Gerencia Reactores y Centrales Nucleares, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Avenida General Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Denis, Alicia [Sección Códigos y Modelos, Gerencia Ciclo del Combustible Nuclear, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Avenida General Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2017-04-15

    The simulation of fuel rod behavior is a complex task that demands not only accurate models to describe the numerous phenomena occurring in the pellet, cladding and internal rod atmosphere but also an adequate interconnection between them. In the last years several models have been incorporated to the DIONISIO code with the purpose of increasing its precision and reliability. After the regrettable events at Fukushima, the need for codes capable of simulating nuclear fuels under accident conditions has come forth. Heat removal occurs in a quite different way than during normal operation and this fact determines a completely new set of conditions for the fuel materials. A detailed description of the different regimes the coolant may exhibit in such a wide variety of scenarios requires a thermal-hydraulic formulation not suitable to be included in a fuel performance code. Moreover, there exist a number of reliable and famous codes that perform this task. Nevertheless, and keeping in mind the purpose of building a code focused on the fuel behavior, a subroutine was developed for the DIONISIO code that performs a simplified analysis of the coolant in a PWR, restricted to the more representative situations and provides to the fuel simulation the boundary conditions necessary to reproduce accidental situations. In the present work this subroutine is described and the results of different comparisons with experimental data and with thermal-hydraulic codes are offered. It is verified that, in spite of its comparative simplicity, the predictions of this module of DIONISIO do not differ significantly from those of the specific, complex codes.

  20. Microencapsulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its evaluation to protect in simulated gastric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani-Choboghlo, Hassan; Zahraei-Salehi, Taghi; Ashrafi-Helan, Javad; Yahyaraeyat, Ramak; Pourjafar, Hadi; Nikaein, Donya; Balal, Asad; Khosravi, Ali-Reza

    2015-12-01

    Probiotic yeasts are used in production of functional foods and pharmaceutical products. They play an important role in promoting and maintaining human health. Until now, little work has been published on improving the survival of Saccharomyces in stimulated gastrointestinal condition. In this study the exposure of the yeast in the capsulate and free forms to artificial gastrointestinal conditions was assessed and the number of viable Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells during 0 to 120 mines in these conditions was evaluated by a pour plate method using sabouraud dextrose agar. Results showed the shape of the beads was generally spherical, sometimes elliptical with a mean diameter of about 50-90 μm. Also count of viable probiotic cells obtained for all the microcapsules were above the recommended levels for a probiotic food. Also decrease of approximately 4 logs was noted in the number of free cells after 2 h of incubation at pH 2 and 8, when compared to decreases of about 2 logs in the all microencapsulated S. cerevisiae under similar conditions. It is concluded that microencapsulation process was significantly able to increase the survival rate of Saccharomyces in a simulated gastrointestinal condition (p<0.05)..

  1. Characterization of ash melting behaviour at high temperatures under conditions simulating combustible solid waste gasification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Miaomiao; Dong, Qing; Huang, Yaji; Jin, Baosheng; Wang, Hongyan; Gu, Haiming

    2018-05-01

    To achieve high-temperature gasification-melting of combustible solid waste, ash melting behaviour under conditions simulating high-temperature gasification were studied. Raw ash (RA) and gasified ash (GA) were prepared respectively by waste ashing and fluidized bed gasification. Results of microstructure and composition of the two-ash indicated that GA showed a more porous structure and higher content of alkali and alkali earth metals among metallic elements. Higher temperature promoted GA melting and could reach a complete flowing state at about 1250°C. The order of melting rate of GA under different atmospheres was reducing condition > inert condition > oxidizing condition, which might be related to different existing forms of iron during melting and different flux content with atmosphere. Compared to RA, GA showed lower melting activity at the same condition due to the existence of an unconverted carbon and hollow structure. The melting temperature for sufficient melting and separation of GA should be at least 1250°C in this work.

  2. Simulation of Entropy Generation under Stall Conditions in a Centrifugal Fan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rotating stalls are generally the first instability met in turbomachinery, before surges. This 3D phenomenon is characterized by one or more stalled flow cells which rotate at a fraction of the impeller speed. The goal of the present work is to shed some light on the entropy generation in a centrifugal fan under rotating stall conditions. A numerical simulation of entropy generation is carried out with the ANSYS Fluent software which solves the Navier-Stokes equations and user defined function (UDF. The entropy generation characteristics in the centrifugal fan for five typical conditions are presented and discussed, involving the design condition, conditions on occurrence and development of stall inception, the rotating stall conditions with two throttle coefficients. The results show that the entropy generation increases after the occurrence of stall inception. The high entropy generation areas move along the circumferential and axial directions, and finally merge into one stall cell. The entropy generation rate during circumferential propagation of the stall cell is also discussed, showing that the entropy generation history is similar to sine curves in impeller and volute, and the volute tongue has a great influence on entropy generation in the centrifugal fan.

  3. Yield gap analysis of Chickpea under semi-arid conditions: A simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    seyed Reza Amiri Deh ahmadi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yield gap analysis provides an essential framework to prioritize research and policy efforts aimed at reducing yield constraints. To identify options for increasing chickpea yield, the SSM-chickpea model was parameterized and evaluated to analyze yield potentials, water limited yields and yield gaps for nine regions representing major chickpea-growing areas of Razavi Khorasan province. The average potential yield of chickpea for the locations was 2251 kg ha-1, while the water limited yield was 1026 kg ha-1 indicating a 54% reduction in yield due to adverse soil moisture conditions. Also, the average irrigated and rainfed actual yields were respectively 64% and 79% less than simulated potential and water limited yields. Maximum and minimum yield gap between potential yield and actual yield were observed in Quchan and Torbat-jam respectively. Generally, yield gap showed an increasing trend from the north (including Nishabur, Mashhad, Quchan and Daregaz regions to the south of the province (Torbat- Jam and Gonabad. In addition, yield gap between simulated water limited potential yield and rainfed actual yield were very low because both simulated water limiting potential and average rainfed actual yields were low in these regions. Yield gap analysis provides an essential framework to prioritize research and policy efforts aimed at reducing yield constraints. To identify options for increasing chickpea yield, the SSM-chickpea model was parameterized and evaluated to analyze yield potentials, water limited yields and yield gaps for nine regions representing major chickpea-growing areas of Razavi Khorasan province. The average potential yield of chickpea for the locations was 2251 kg ha-1, while the water limited yield was 1026 kg ha-1 indicating a 54% reduction in yield due to adverse soil moisture conditions. Also, the average irrigated and rainfed actual yields were respectively 64% and 79% less than simulated potential and water limited yields

  4. Fiscal 1999 international cooperation project report. R and D on convection control technology of glass melts by microgravity experiment; 1999 nendo bisho juryoku kankyo wo riyoshita glass yuekinai tairyu seigyo gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    This R and D aims at development of convection simulation technology of glass melts based on measurement of accurate glass melt properties, and development of convection control technology of glass melts through the model experiment and small tank furnace experiment. Experiment was made on measurement of surface tension while levitating glass melts under the microgravity condition obtained by the drop tower of Japan Microgravity Center in Hokkaido. The shape of glass melt changes into a real sphere under the microgravity condition, and surface tension can be obtained by measuring its frequency, however, such frequency of glass could not be measured in this experiment. Levitation, fusion and oscillation experiment of glass was carried out by using an aero-acoustic levitator of CRT at Chicago. The experiment result is now in analysis. This study also aims the analysis in consideration of a surface tension flow effect. The calculation result showed generation of surface tension flow due to temperature gradient on a liquid surface. Various information were obtained through the model experiment using silicon oil, and glass convention observation by using a small tank furnace. (NEDO)

  5. Influence of LOCA simulating conditions on the variation of electrical characteristics of insulating materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Sohei; Yoshikawa, Masato; Ito, Masayuki; Kusama, Yasuo; Yagi, Toshiaki

    1982-01-01

    The authors have examined the variation of insulation resistance when the sheets of insulating materials and cables were exposed to various LOCA simulating environment. This report describes the summarized results obtained so far for ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) which is important as an insulating material of cables. The samples used were an EPR sheet of standard compound ratio, 2 kinds of EPR sheets of practical compound ratio, 6 types of PH cables (fire-retardant, EPR insulated, chlorosulphonated polyethylene sheathed cable) produced for trial as reactor use, and 6 kinds of EPR sheets of the same composition as the cable core. To discuss the difference of insulation resistance change, the logarithmic mean of the ratio of 1 min values to initial insulation resistance rho/rhosub(o) was used. PWR LOCA-simulating environment was used, while the thermal aging in the air at 121 deg C for 7 days and 50 Mrad irradiation in the air at room temperature were given as the predeterioration. The effect of LOCA-simulation period in the simultaneous method without air, in which steam and radiation were given in parallel, the difference in the experimental results of cables and sheets, the effect of air, the comparison of the simultaneous method with the sequential method in which LOCA-simulating steam was applied after the irradiation in the air and the reverse sequential method (dielectric property measurements) are described. Under the existence of air, the sequential method seems to be a good simulation condition for the simultaneous method, though many experiments are required further. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  6. Influence of LOCA simulating conditions on the variation of electrical characteristics of insulating materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Sohei; Yoshikawa, Masato; Ito, Masayuki; Kusama, Yasuo; Yagi, Toshiaki

    1982-12-01

    The authors have examined the variation of insulation resistance when the sheets of insulating materials and cables were exposed to various LOCA simulating environment. This report describes the summarized results obtained so far for ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) which is important as an insulating material of cables. The samples used were an EPR sheet of standard compound ratio, 2 kinds of EPR sheets of practical compound ratio, 6 types of PH cables (fire-retardant, EPR insulated, chlorosulphonated polyethylene sheathed cable) produced for trial as reactor use, and 6 kinds of EPR sheets of the same composition as the cable core. To discuss the difference of insulation resistance change, the logarithmic mean of the ratio of 1 min values to initial insulation resistance rho/rhosub(o) was used. PWR LOCA-simulating environment was used, while the thermal aging in the air at 121 deg C for 7 days and 50 Mrad irradiation in the air at room temperature were given as the predeterioration. The effect of LOCA-simulation period in the simultaneous method without air, in which steam and radiation were given in parallel, the difference in the experimental results of cables and sheets, the effect of air, the comparison of the simultaneous method with the sequential method in which LOCA-simulating steam was applied after the irradiation in the air and the reverse sequential method (dielectric property measurements) are described. Under the existence of air, the sequential method seems to be a good simulation condition for the simultaneous method, though many experiments are required further.

  7. Space microgravity drives transdifferentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells from osteogenesis to adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cui; Li, Liang; Jiang, Yuanda; Wang, Cuicui; Geng, Baoming; Wang, Yanqiu; Chen, Jianling; Liu, Fei; Qiu, Peng; Zhai, Guangjie; Chen, Ping; Quan, Renfu; Wang, Jinfu

    2018-03-13

    Bone formation is linked with osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the bone marrow. Microgravity in spaceflight is known to reduce bone formation. In this study, we used a real microgravity environment of the SJ-10 Recoverable Scientific Satellite to examine the effects of space microgravity on the osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). hMSCs were induced toward osteogenic differentiation for 2 and 7 d in a cell culture device mounted on the SJ-10 Satellite. The satellite returned to Earth after going through space experiments in orbit for 12 d, and cell samples were harvested and analyzed for differentiation potentials. The results showed that space microgravity inhibited osteogenic differentiation and resulted in adipogenic differentiation, even under osteogenic induction conditions. Under space microgravity, the expression of 10 genes specific for osteogenesis decreased, including collagen family members, alkaline phosphatase ( ALP), and runt-related transcription factor 2 ( RUNX2), whereas the expression of 4 genes specific for adipogenesis increased, including adipsin ( CFD), leptin ( LEP), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β ( CEBPB), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ ( PPARG). In the analysis of signaling pathways specific for osteogenesis, we found that the expression and activity of RUNX2 was inhibited, expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 ( BMP2) and activity of SMAD1/5/9 were decreased, and activity of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and ERK-1/2 declined significantly under space microgravity. These data indicate that space microgravity plays a dual role by decreasing RUNX2 expression and activity through the BMP2/SMAD and integrin/FAK/ERK pathways. In addition, we found that space microgravity increased p38 MAPK and protein kinase B (AKT) activities, which are important for the promotion of adipogenic differentiation of hMSCs. Space microgravity significantly

  8. Effects of simulated Mars conditions on the survival and growth of Escherichia coli and Serratia liquefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Bonnie J; Jenkins, David G; Schuerger, Andrew C

    2010-04-01

    Escherichia coli and Serratia liquefaciens, two bacterial spacecraft contaminants known to replicate under low atmospheric pressures of 2.5 kPa, were tested for growth and survival under simulated Mars conditions. Environmental stresses of high salinity, low temperature, and low pressure were screened alone and in combination for effects on bacterial survival and replication, and then cells were tested in Mars analog soils under simulated Mars conditions. Survival and replication of E. coli and S. liquefaciens cells in liquid medium were evaluated for 7 days under low temperatures (5, 10, 20, or 30 degrees C) with increasing concentrations (0, 5, 10, or 20%) of three salts (MgCl(2), MgSO(4), NaCl) reported to be present on the surface of Mars. Moderate to high growth rates were observed for E. coli and S. liquefaciens at 30 or 20 degrees C and in solutions with 0 or 5% salts. In contrast, cell densities of both species generally did not increase above initial inoculum levels under the highest salt concentrations (10 and 20%) and the four temperatures tested, with the exception that moderately higher cell densities were observed for both species at 10% MgSO(4) maintained at 20 or 30 degrees C. Growth rates of E. coli and S. liquefaciens in low salt concentrations were robust under all pressures (2.5, 10, or 101.3 kPa), exhibiting a general increase of up to 2.5 orders of magnitude above the initial inoculum levels of the assays. Vegetative E. coli cells were maintained in a Mars analog soil for 7 days under simulated Mars conditions that included temperatures between 20 and -50 degrees C for a day/night diurnal period, UVC irradiation (200 to 280 nm) at 3.6 W m(-2) for daytime operations (8 h), pressures held at a constant 0.71 kPa, and a gas composition that included the top five gases found in the martian atmosphere. Cell densities of E. coli failed to increase under simulated Mars conditions, and survival was reduced 1 to 2 orders of magnitude by the interactive

  9. Wind-driven rain as a boundary condition for HAM simulations: analysis of simplified modelling approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssen, Hans; Blocken, Bert; Roels, Staf

    2007-01-01

    While the numerical simulation of moisture transfer inside building components is currently undergoing standardisation, the modelling of the atmospheric boundary conditions has received far less attention. This article analyses the modelling of the wind-driven-rain load on building facades...... though: the full variability with the perpendicular wind speed and horizontal rain intensity should be preserved, where feasible, for improved estimations of the moisture transfer in building components. In the concluding section, it is moreover shown that the dependence of the surface moisture transfer...

  10. Vehicle operation characteristic under different ramp entrance conditions in underground road: Analysis, simulation and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qiming; Liu, Shuo; Liu, Yang

    2018-05-01

    An experimental design was used to study the vehicle operation characteristics of different ramp entrance conditions in underground road. With driving simulator, the experimental scenarios include left or right ramp with first, second and third service level, respectively, to collect vehicle speed, acceleration, lateral displacement and location information at the ramp entrance section. By using paired t-test and ANOVA, the influence factors of vehicle operating characteristics are studied. The result shows that effects of ramp layout and mainline traffic environment on vehicle operation characteristics are significant. The regression model of vehicle traveling distance on acceleration lane is established. Suggestions are made for ramp entrance design of underground road.

  11. High temperature corrosion under conditions