WorldWideScience

Sample records for simulated electronic structures

  1. Lattice Boltzmann Model for Electronic Structure Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Mendoza, M; Succi, S

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a new connection between density functional theory and kinetic theory has been proposed. In particular, it was shown that the Kohn-Sham (KS) equations can be reformulated as a macroscopic limit of the steady-state solution of a suitable single-particle kinetic equation. By using a discrete version of this new formalism, the exchange and correlation energies of simple atoms and the geometrical configuration of the methane molecule were calculated accurately. Here, we discuss the main ideas behind the lattice kinetic approach to electronic structure computations, offer some considerations for prospective extensions, and also show additional numerical results, namely the geometrical configuration of the water molecule.

  2. First-principle simulations of electronic structure in semicrystalline polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyassari, A.; Unge, M.; Hedenqvist, M. S.; Gedde, U. W.; Nilsson, F.

    2017-05-01

    In order to increase our fundamental knowledge about high-voltage cable insulation materials, realistic polyethylene (PE) structures, generated with a novel molecular modeling strategy, have been analyzed using first principle electronic structure simulations. The PE structures were constructed by first generating atomistic PE configurations with an off-lattice Monte Carlo method and then equilibrating the structures at the desired temperature and pressure using molecular dynamics simulations. Semicrystalline, fully crystalline and fully amorphous PE, in some cases including crosslinks and short-chain branches, were analyzed. The modeled PE had a structure in agreement with established experimental data. Linear-scaling density functional theory (LS-DFT) was used to examine the electronic structure (e.g., spatial distribution of molecular orbitals, bandgaps and mobility edges) on all the materials, whereas conventional DFT was used to validate the LS-DFT results on small systems. When hybrid functionals were used, the simulated bandgaps were close to the experimental values. The localization of valence and conduction band states was demonstrated. The localized states in the conduction band were primarily found in the free volume (result of gauche conformations) present in the amorphous regions. For branched and crosslinked structures, the localized electronic states closest to the valence band edge were positioned at branches and crosslinks, respectively. At 0 K, the activation energy for transport was lower for holes than for electrons. However, at room temperature, the effective activation energy was very low (˜0.1 eV) for both holes and electrons, which indicates that the mobility will be relatively high even below the mobility edges and suggests that charge carriers can be hot carriers above the mobility edges in the presence of a high electrical field.

  3. Modeling and simulation of electronic structure, material interface and random doping in nano electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Duan; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-01-01

    The miniaturization of nano-scale electronic devices, such as metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), has given rise to a pressing demand in the new theoretical understanding and practical tactic for dealing with quantum mechanical effects in integrated circuits. Modeling and simulation of this class of problems have emerged as an important topic in applied and computational mathematics. This work presents mathematical models and computational algorithms for the simulation of nano-scale MOSFETs. We introduce a unified two-scale energy functional to describe the electrons and the continuum electrostatic potential of the nano-electronic device. This framework enables us to put microscopic and macroscopic descriptions in an equal footing at nano scale. By optimization of the energy functional, we derive consistently-coupled Poisson-Kohn-Sham equations. Additionally, layered structures are crucial to the electrostatic and transport properties of nano transistors. A material interface model is proposed for more accurate description of the electrostatics governed by the Poisson equation. Finally, a new individual dopant model that utilizes the Dirac delta function is proposed to understand the random doping effect in nano electronic devices. Two mathematical algorithms, the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method and the Dirichlet-to-Neumann mapping (DNM) technique, are introduced to improve the computational efficiency of nano-device simulations. Electronic structures are computed via subband decomposition and the transport properties, such as the I-V curves and electron density, are evaluated via the non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF) formalism. Two distinct device configurations, a double-gate MOSFET and a four-gate MOSFET, are considered in our three-dimensional numerical simulations. For these devices, the current fluctuation and voltage threshold lowering effect induced by the discrete dopant model are explored. Numerical convergence

  4. High-speed evaluation of track-structure Monte Carlo electron transport simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasciak, A. S.; Ford, J. R.

    2008-10-01

    There are many instances where Monte Carlo simulation using the track-structure method for electron transport is necessary for the accurate analytical computation and estimation of dose and other tally data. Because of the large electron interaction cross-sections and highly anisotropic scattering behavior, the track-structure method requires an enormous amount of computation time. For microdosimetry, radiation biology and other applications involving small site and tally sizes, low electron energies or high-Z/low-Z material interfaces where the track-structure method is preferred, a computational device called a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) is capable of executing track-structure Monte Carlo electron-transport simulations as fast as or faster than a standard computer can complete an identical simulation using the condensed history (CH) technique. In this paper, data from FPGA-based track-structure electron-transport computations are presented for five test cases, from simple slab-style geometries to radiation biology applications involving electrons incident on endosteal bone surface cells. For the most complex test case presented, an FPGA is capable of evaluating track-structure electron-transport problems more than 500 times faster than a standard computer can perform the same track-structure simulation and with comparable accuracy.

  5. High-speed evaluation of track-structure Monte Carlo electron transport simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasciak, A S; Ford, J R

    2008-10-07

    There are many instances where Monte Carlo simulation using the track-structure method for electron transport is necessary for the accurate analytical computation and estimation of dose and other tally data. Because of the large electron interaction cross-sections and highly anisotropic scattering behavior, the track-structure method requires an enormous amount of computation time. For microdosimetry, radiation biology and other applications involving small site and tally sizes, low electron energies or high-Z/low-Z material interfaces where the track-structure method is preferred, a computational device called a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) is capable of executing track-structure Monte Carlo electron-transport simulations as fast as or faster than a standard computer can complete an identical simulation using the condensed history (CH) technique. In this paper, data from FPGA-based track-structure electron-transport computations are presented for five test cases, from simple slab-style geometries to radiation biology applications involving electrons incident on endosteal bone surface cells. For the most complex test case presented, an FPGA is capable of evaluating track-structure electron-transport problems more than 500 times faster than a standard computer can perform the same track-structure simulation and with comparable accuracy.

  6. Atomistic Simulation and Electronic Structure of Lithium Doped Ionic Liquids: Structure, Transport, and Electrochemical Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Justin B.; Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Lawson, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Zero-temperature density functional theory (DFT), density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD), and classical molecular dynamics using polarizable force fields (PFF-MD) are employed to evaluate the influence of Lithium ion on the structure, transport, and electrochemical stability of three potential ionic liquid electrolytes: N--methyl-N-butylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([pyr14][TFSI]), N--methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide ([pyr13][FSI]), and 1-ethyl-3--methylimidazolium boron tetrafluoride ([EMIM][BF4]). We characterize the Lithium ion solvation shell through zero-temperature DFT simulations of [Li(Anion)sub n](exp n-1) -clusters, DFT-MD simulations of isolated lithium ions in small ionic liquid systems, and PFF-MD simulations with high Li-doping levels in large ionic liquid systems. At low levels of Li-salt doping, highly stable solvation shells having 2-3 anions are seen in both [pyr14][TFSI] and [pyr13][FSI], while solvation shells with 4 anions dominate in [EMIM][BF sub 4]. At higher levels of doping, we find the formation of complex Li-network structures that increase the frequency of 4 anion-coordinated solvation shells. A comparison of computational and experimental Raman spectra for a wide range of [Li(Anion) sub n](exp n -1) - clusters shows that our proposed structures are consistent with experiment. We estimate the ion diffusion coefficients and quantify both size and simulation time effects. We find estimates of lithium ion diffusion are a reasonable order of magnitude and can be corrected for simulation time effects. Simulation size, on the other hand, is also important, with diffusion coefficients from long PFF-MD simulations of small cells having 20-40% error compared to large-cell values. Finally, we compute the electrochemical window using differences in electronic energy levels of both isolated cation/anion pairs and small ionic liquid systems with Li-salt doping. The single pair and liquid

  7. Ion gyroharmonic structures in stimulated radiation during second electron gyroharmonic heating: 2. Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samimi, A.; Scales, W. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Briczinski, S. J.; McCarrick, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Characteristics of the Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission (SEE) spectrum recorded during ionospheric heating near the second electron gyroharmonic frequency, 2fce, have attracted attention due to their possible connection to artificially generated airglow and artificial ionospheric layers. Two newly discovered SEE spectral features within 1 kHz frequency shift relative to the pump frequency are (1) discrete narrowband structures ordered by the local ion gyrofrequency involving parametric decay of the pump field into upper hybrid/electron Bernstein (UH/EB) and ion Bernstein (IB) waves and (2) broadband structures that maximize around 500 Hz downshifted relative to the pump frequency involving parametric decay of the pump field into upper hybrid/electron Bernstein and oblique ion acoustic (IA) waves [Samimi et al., 2013]. In this paper, a two-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo Collision computational model is employed in order to consider nonlinear aspects such as (1) electron acceleration through wave-particle interaction, (2) more complex nonlinear wave-wave processes, and (3) temporal evolution of irregularities through nonlinear saturation. The simulation results show that the IB-associated parametric decay is primarily associated with electron acceleration perpendicular to the geomagnetic field. More gyroharmonic lines are typically associated with more electron acceleration. Electron acceleration is reduced when the pump frequency is sufficiently close to 2fce. The IA-associated parametric decay instability is primarily associated with electron tail heating along the magnetic field and electron acceleration is reduced when the pump frequency is sufficiently close to 2fce. Characteristics of caviton collapse behavior become prevalent in this case. Results are discussed within the context of some recent experimental observations.

  8. Electromagnetic Simulations of Dielectric Wall Accelerator Structures for Electron Beam Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Scott D

    2005-01-01

    Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA) technology incorporates the energy storage mechanism, the switching mechanism, and the acceleration mechanism for electron beams. Electromagnetic simulations of DWA structures includes these effects and also details of the switch configuration and how that switch time affects the electric field pulse which accelerates the particle beam. DWA structures include both bi-linear and bi-spiral configurations with field gradients on the order of 20MV/m and the simulations include the effects of the beampipe, the beampipe walls, the DWA High Gradient Insulator (HGI) insulating stack, wakefield impedance calculations, and test particle trajectories with low emittance gain. Design trade-offs include the transmission line impedance (typically a few ohms), equilibration ring optimization, driving switch inductances, and a layer-to-layer coupling analysis and its affect on the pulse rise time.

  9. Ab Initio Simulations and Electronic Structure of Lithium-Doped Ionic Liquids: Structure, Transport, and Electrochemical Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Justin B; Bauschlicher, Charles W; Lawson, John W

    2015-11-19

    Density functional theory (DFT), density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD), and classical molecular dynamics using polarizable force fields (PFF-MD) are employed to evaluate the influence of Li(+) on the structure, transport, and electrochemical stability of three potential ionic liquid electrolytes: N-methyl-N-butylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([pyr14][TFSI]), N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide ([pyr13][FSI]), and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium boron tetrafluoride ([EMIM][BF4]). We characterize the Li(+) solvation shell through DFT computations of [Li(Anion)n]((n-1)-) clusters, DFT-MD simulations of isolated Li(+) in small ionic liquid systems, and PFF-MD simulations with high Li-doping levels in large ionic liquid systems. At low levels of Li-salt doping, highly stable solvation shells having two to three anions are seen in both [pyr14][TFSI] and [pyr13][FSI], whereas solvation shells with four anions dominate in [EMIM][BF4]. At higher levels of doping, we find the formation of complex Li-network structures that increase the frequency of four anion-coordinated solvation shells. A comparison of computational and experimental Raman spectra for a wide range of [Li(Anion)n]((n-1)-) clusters shows that our proposed structures are consistent with experiment. We then compute the ion diffusion coefficients and find measures from small-cell DFT-MD simulations to be the correct order of magnitude, but influenced by small system size and short simulation length. Correcting for these errors with complementary PFF-MD simulations, we find DFT-MD measures to be in close agreement with experiment. Finally, we compute electrochemical windows from DFT computations on isolated ions, interacting cation/anion pairs, and liquid-phase systems with Li-doping. For the molecular-level computations, we generally find the difference between ionization energy and electron affinity from isolated ions and interacting cation/anion pairs to

  10. Propagation of localized structures in relativistic magnetized electron-positron plasmas using particle-in-cell simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López, Rodrigo A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción 4070386 (Chile); Muñoz, Víctor [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Viñas, Adolfo F. [Geospace Physics Laboratory, Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Valdivia, Juan A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y la Nanotecnología (CEDENNA), Santiago 9170124 (Chile)

    2015-09-15

    We use a particle-in-cell simulation to study the propagation of localized structures in a magnetized electron-positron plasma with relativistic finite temperature. We use as initial condition for the simulation an envelope soliton solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, derived from the relativistic two fluid equations in the strongly magnetized limit. This envelope soliton turns out not to be a stable solution for the simulation and splits in two localized structures propagating in opposite directions. However, these two localized structures exhibit a soliton-like behavior, as they keep their profile after they collide with each other due to the periodic boundary conditions. We also observe the formation of localized structures in the evolution of a spatially uniform circularly polarized Alfvén wave. In both cases, the localized structures propagate with an amplitude independent velocity.

  11. Unravelling the structure and dynamics of concentrated aqueous proton defects using simulations incorporating both nuclear and electronic quantum effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markland, Thomas

    Aqueous proton defects give rise to a range of structural and dynamical environments that vary with concentration. These manifest as a continuum of infra-red and Raman spectral features. However, assigning spectral features to the underlying structures formed in solution and their dynamical interconversion remains an area of significant debate. In this talk I will show how path integral ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, where the electronic structure is computed on the fly using density functional theory and nuclear quantum effects are included explicitly via path integral molecular dynamics, can be used to accurately describe the spectroscopic properties of liquid water and systems with aqueous proton defects. These simulations, which have previously been computationally intractable for such large condensed phase systems, are now possible due to our recent path integral developments. I will discuss how these simulations can be used to elucidate the linear and multidimensional spectroscopy of concentrated acid systems and the dynamics and structures that give rise to them.

  12. Xyce parallel electronic simulator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Schiek, Richard Louis; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd S; Pawlowski, Roger P; Santarelli, Keith R.

    2010-05-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users Guide. The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users Guide.

  13. Monte Carlo simulations of disorder in ZnSn N2 and the effects on the electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lany, Stephan; Fioretti, Angela N.; Zawadzki, Paweł P.; Schelhas, Laura T.; Toberer, Eric S.; Zakutayev, Andriy; Tamboli, Adele C.

    2017-08-01

    In multinary compound semiconductors, cation disorder can decisively alter the electronic properties and impact potential applications. ZnSn N2 is a ternary nitride of interest for photovoltaics, which forms in a wurtzite-derived crystal structure. In the ground state, every N anion is coordinated by two Zn and two Sn cations, thereby observing the octet rule locally. Using a motif-based model Hamiltonian, we performed Monte Carlo simulations that provide atomistic representations of ZnSn N2 with varying degrees of cation disorder. Subsequent electronic structure calculations describe the evolution of band gaps, optical properties, and carrier localization effects as a function of the disorder. We find that octet-rule conserving disorder is practically impossible to avoid but perfectly benign, with hardly any effects on the electronic structure. In contrast, a fully random cation distribution would be very detrimental, but fortunately it is energetically highly unfavorable. A degree of disorder that can realistically be expected for nonequilibrium thin-film deposition leads to a moderate band-gap reduction and to moderate carrier localization effects. Comparing the simulated structures with experimental samples grown by sputtering, we find evidence that these samples indeed incorporate a certain degree of octet-rule violating disorder, which is reflected in the x-ray diffraction and in the optical absorption spectra. This study demonstrates that the electronic properties of ZnSn N2 are dominated by changes of the local coordination environments rather than long-range ordering effects.

  14. The VENUS/NWChem Software Package. Tight Coupling Between Chemical Dynamics Simulations and Electronic Structure Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lourderaj, Upakarasamy; Sun, Rui; De Jong, Wibe A.; Windus, Theresa L.; Hase, William L.

    2014-03-01

    The interface for VENUS and NWChem, and the resulting software package for direct dynamics simulations are described. The coupling of the two codes is considered to be a tight coupling. The two codes are compiled and linked together and act as one executable with data being passed between the two codes through routine calls. The advantages of this type of coupling are discussed. The interface has been designed to have as little interference as possible with the core codes of both VENUS and NWChem. VENUS is the code that propagates the direct dynamics trajectories and, therefore, is the program that drives the overall execution of VENUS/NWChem. VENUS has remained an essentially sequential code, which uses the highly parallel structure of NWChem. Subroutines of the interface which accomplish the data transmission and communication between the two computer programs are described. Recent examples of the use of VENUS/NWChem for direct dynamics simulations are summarized.

  15. Electronic structure and optical properties of doped gallium phosphide: A first-principles simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xuefeng; Gao, Xu; Li, Cuixia; Ren, Junqiang; Guo, Xin; La, Peiqing

    2017-09-01

    Using DFT-GGA-PW91 calculations we investigate the electronic structures and optical properties of doped GaP. It is found that the lattice constants and volume increase slightly for Al, In, As and Sb doped systems and EG distinctly decrease after doping. The formation energies are 0.587 and 0.273 eV for As and Sb doped systems, respectively, and lower remarkably than those in other systems, indicating that the stability of the two systems is higher. The direct band gap transition occurs when doped with In, As and Sb elements. The charge density difference images reveal that electron loss near Al atom is observed accompanying the enhancement of covalent bond feature, and then electron enrichment is present around N atom demonstrating that the ionic bond characteristic is obvious. The Sb-doped system has the higher static dielectric constant illustrating the applications in semiconductor devices. The absorption peak value is located at 194.7 nm for Al-doped system and this shows that the system can absorb a large amount of light and displays ;Barrier-type; characteristics in UV region. In the visible region, the doped systems have lower reflectivity coefficient, indicating that the systems all have ;clear-type; properties. This is conducive to fundamentally insights to a tunable band gap semiconductor with enormous potential in device fields.

  16. Characterization of the Structural, Mechanical, and Electronic Properties of Fullerene Mixtures: A Molecular Simulations Description

    KAUST Repository

    Tummala, Naga Rajesh

    2017-10-06

    We investigate mixtures of fullerenes and fullerene derivatives, the most commonly used electron accepting materials in organic solar cells, by using a combination of molecular dynamics and density functional theory methods. Our goal is to describe how mixing affects the molecular packing, mechanical properties, and electronic parameters (site energy disorder, electronic couplings) of interest for solar-cell applications. Specifically, we consider mixtures of: (i) C60 and C70; (ii) C60, C70, and C84, and (iii) PC61BM and PC71BM.

  17. Socorro Electronic Structure Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-08-03

    Socorro can be used to compute the ground-state electron density for a periodically repeated simulation cell in which the external potential is obtained from norm-conserving pseudopotentials or projector-augmented-wave functions. The ground-state electron density is computed by summation over one-electron orbitals which are obtained using the Kohn-Sham formulation of density-functional theory and which are expanded in a plane-wave basis. Various quantities can be computed from the ground-state solution, including atomic forces which can be used to optimize atom positions in the simulation cell and to perform molecular dynamics simulations.

  18. Synergic Investigation Of The Self-Assembly Structure And Mechanism Of Retroviral Capsid Proteins By Solid State NMR, Transmission Electron Microscopy And Multiscale simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-29

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2017-0074 Synergic investigation of the self-assembly structure and mechanism of retroviral capsid proteins by solid state NMR...assembly structure and mechanism of retroviral capsid proteins by solid state NMR, transmission electron microscopy and multiscale simulation 5a.  CONTRACT...capsid protein (CA). In vitro, tubular assembly can be obtained with the CA with similar underlying structural properties as the authentic RSV capsid

  19. Electron Structure of Francium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koufos, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    This talk presents the first calculations of the electronic structure of francium for the bcc, fcc and hcp structures, using the Augmented Plane Wave (APW) method in its muffin-tin and linearized general potential forms. Both the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA), were used to calculate the electronic structure and total energy of francium (Fr). The GGA and LDA both found the total energy of the hcp structure slightly below that of the fcc and bcc structure, respectively. This is in agreement with similar results for the other alkali metals using the same methodology. The equilibrium lattice constant, bulk modulus and superconductivity parameters were calculated. We found that under pressures, in the range of 1-5 GPa, Fr could be a superconductor at a critical temperature of about 4K.

  20. Exploring the Physics Limitations of Compact High Gradient Accelerating Structures Simulations of the Electron Current Spectrometer Setup in Geant4

    CERN Document Server

    Van Vliet, Philine Julia

    2017-01-01

    The high field gradient of 100 MV/m that will be applied to the accelerator cavities of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), gives rise to the problem of RF breakdowns. The field collapses and a plasma of electrons and ions is being formed in the cavity, preventing the RF field from penetrating the cavity. Electrons in the plasma are being accelerated and ejected out, resulting in a breakdown current up to a few Amp`eres, measured outside the cavities. These breakdowns lead to luminosity loss, so reducing their amount is of great importance. For this, a better understanding of the physics behind RF breakdowns is needed. To study these breakdowns, the XBox 2 test facility has a spectrometer setup installed after the RF cavity that is being conditioned. For this report, a simulation of this spectrometer setup has been made using Geant4. Once a detailed simulation of the RF field and cavity has been made, it can be connected to this simulation of the spectrometer setup and used to recreate the data that has b...

  1. Computer simulation of electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabchevski, S.P.; Mladenov, G.M. (Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. po Elektronika)

    1994-04-14

    Self-fields and forces as well as the local degree of space-charge neutralization in overcompensated electron beams are considered. The radial variation of the local degree of space-charge neutralization is analysed. A novel model which describes the equilibrium potential distribution in overcompensated beams is proposed and a method for computer simulation of the beam propagation is described. Results from numerical experiments which illustrate the propagation of finite emittance overneutralized beams are presented. (Author).

  2. Electronic structure simulation of chromium aluminum oxynitride by discrete variational-X alpha method and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Y; Lee, J D; Kim, E; No, K

    2002-01-01

    We use a first-principles discrete variational (DV)-X alpha method to investigate the electronic structure of chromium aluminum oxynitride. When nitrogen is substituted for oxygen in the Cr-Al-O system, the N2p level appears in the energy range between O2p and Cr3d levels. Consequently, the valence band of chromium aluminum oxynitride becomes broader and the band gap becomes smaller than that of chromium aluminum oxide, which is consistent with the photoelectron spectra for the valence band using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). We expect that this valence band structure of chromium aluminum oxynitride will modify the transmittance slope which is a requirement for photomask application.

  3. The electronic structures of solids

    CERN Document Server

    Coles, B R

    2013-01-01

    The Electronic Structures of Solids aims to provide students of solid state physics with the essential concepts they will need in considering properties of solids that depend on their electronic structures and idea of the electronic character of particular materials and groups of materials. The book first discusses the electronic structure of atoms, including hydrogen atom and many-electron atom. The text also underscores bonding between atoms and electrons in metals. Discussions focus on bonding energies and structures in the solid elements, eigenstates of free-electron gas, and electrical co

  4. Electronic Structure of Lanthanide Scandates

    OpenAIRE

    Mizzi, Christopher A.; Koirala, Pratik; Marks, Laurence D.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, and density functional theory were used to study the electronic structure of three lanthanide scandates: GdScO3, TbScO3, and DyScO3. X-ray photoelectron spectra simulated from first principles calculations using a combination of on-site hybrid and GGA+U methods were found to be in good agreement with experimental x-ray photoelectron spectra. From these results, the lanthanide scandate valence bands were determined to be...

  5. Analysis and simulation of BGK electron holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Muschietti

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent observations from satellites crossing regions of magnetic-field-aligned electron streams reveal solitary potential structures that move at speeds much greater than the ion acoustic/thermal velocity. The structures appear as positive potential pulses rapidly drifting along the magnetic field, and are electrostatic in their rest frame. We interpret them as BGK electron holes supported by a drifting population of trapped electrons. Using Laplace transforms, we analyse the behavior of one phase-space electron hole. The resulting potential shapes and electron distribution functions are self-consistent and compatible with the field and particle data associated with the observed pulses. In particular, the spatial width increases with increasing amplitude. The stability of the analytic solution is tested by means of a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation code with open boundaries. We consider a strongly magnetized parameter regime in which the bounce frequency of the trapped electrons is much less than their gyrofrequency. Our investigation includes the influence of the ions, which in the frame of the hole appear as an incident beam, and impinge on the BGK potential with considerable energy. The nonlinear structure is remarkably resilient

  6. Xyce parallel electronic simulator design.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornquist, Heidi K.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Mei, Ting; Schiek, Richard Louis; Keiter, Eric Richard; Russo, Thomas V.

    2010-09-01

    This document is the Xyce Circuit Simulator developer guide. Xyce has been designed from the 'ground up' to be a SPICE-compatible, distributed memory parallel circuit simulator. While it is in many respects a research code, Xyce is intended to be a production simulator. As such, having software quality engineering (SQE) procedures in place to insure a high level of code quality and robustness are essential. Version control, issue tracking customer support, C++ style guildlines and the Xyce release process are all described. The Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator has been under development at Sandia since 1999. Historically, Xyce has mostly been funded by ASC, the original focus of Xyce development has primarily been related to circuits for nuclear weapons. However, this has not been the only focus and it is expected that the project will diversify. Like many ASC projects, Xyce is a group development effort, which involves a number of researchers, engineers, scientists, mathmaticians and computer scientists. In addition to diversity of background, it is to be expected on long term projects for there to be a certain amount of staff turnover, as people move on to different projects. As a result, it is very important that the project maintain high software quality standards. The point of this document is to formally document a number of the software quality practices followed by the Xyce team in one place. Also, it is hoped that this document will be a good source of information for new developers.

  7. Simulations of Gaussian electron guns for RHIC electron lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pikin, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-02-28

    Simulations of two versions of the electron gun for RHIC electron lens are presented. The electron guns have to generate an electron beam with Gaussian radial profile of the electron beam density. To achieve the Gaussian electron emission profile on the cathode we used a combination of the gun electrodes and shaping of the cathode surface. Dependence of electron gun performance parameters on the geometry of electrodes and the margins for electrodes positioning are presented.

  8. Use of Simulation Based on an Electronic Health Records Environment to Evaluate the Structure and Accuracy of Notes Generated by Medical Scribes: Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranaat, Robert; Mohan, Vishnu; O'Reilly, Megan; Hirsh, Maxwell; McGrath, Karess; Scholl, Gretchen; Woodcock, Deborah; Gold, Jeffrey A

    2017-09-20

    The increasing adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) has been associated with a number of unintended negative consequences with provider efficiency and job satisfaction. To address this, there has been a dramatic increase in the use of medical scribes to perform many of the required EHR functions. Despite this rapid growth, little has been published on the training or assessment tools to appraise the safety and efficacy of scribe-related EHR activities. Given the number of reports documenting that other professional groups suffer from a number of performance errors in EHR interface and data gathering, scribes likely face similar challenges. This highlights the need for new assessment tools for medical scribes. The objective of this study was to develop a virtual video-based simulation to demonstrate and quantify the variability and accuracy of scribes' transcribed notes in the EHR. From a pool of 8 scribes in one department, a total of 5 female scribes, intent on pursuing careers in health care, with at least 6 months of experience were recruited for our simulation study. We created three simulated patient-provider scenarios. Each scenario contained a corresponding medical record in our simulation instance of our EHR. For each scenario, we video-recorded a standardized patient-provider encounter. Five scribes with at least 6 months of experience both with our EHR and in the specialty of the simulated cases were recruited. Each scribe watched the simulated encounter and transcribed notes into a simulated EHR environment. Transcribed notes were evaluated for interscribe variability and compared with a gold standard for accuracy. All scribes completed all simulated cases. There was significant interscribe variability in note structure and content. Overall, only 26% of all data elements were unique to the scribe writing them. The term data element was used to define the individual pieces of data that scribes perceived from the simulation. Note length was

  9. X-Pol Potential: An Electronic Structure-Based Force Field for Molecular Dynamics Simulation of a Solvated Protein in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wangshen; Orozco, Modesto; Truhlar, Donald G; Gao, Jiali

    2009-02-17

    A recently proposed electronic structure-based force field called the explicit polarization (X-Pol) potential is used to study many-body electronic polarization effects in a protein, in particular by carrying out a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) in water with periodic boundary conditions. The primary unit cell is cubic with dimensions ~54 × 54 × 54 Å(3), and the total number of atoms in this cell is 14281. An approximate electronic wave function, consisting of 29026 basis functions for the entire system, is variationally optimized to give the minimum Born-Oppenheimer energy at every MD step; this allows the efficient evaluation of the required analytic forces for the dynamics. Intramolecular and intermolecular polarization and intramolecular charge transfer effects are examined and are found to be significant; for example, 17 out of 58 backbone carbonyls differ from neutrality on average by more than 0.1 electron, and the average charge on the six alanines varies from -0.05 to +0.09. The instantaneous excess charges vary even more widely; the backbone carbonyls have standard deviations in their fluctuating net charges from 0.03 to 0.05, and more than half of the residues have excess charges whose standard deviation exceeds 0.05. We conclude that the new-generation X-Pol force field permits the inclusion of time-dependent quantum mechanical polarization and charge transfer effects in much larger systems than was previously possible.

  10. Atomic and electronic structure of free niobium nanoclusters: Simulation of the M{sub 4,5}-XANES spectrum of Nb{sub 13}{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravtsova, Antonina N., E-mail: akravtsova@sfedu.ru [Research Center for Nanoscale Structure of Matter, Southern Federal University, Sorge str. 5, 344090 Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Lomachenko, Kirill A. [Research Center for Nanoscale Structure of Matter, Southern Federal University, Sorge str. 5, 344090 Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Department of Chemistry and NIS Centre of Excellence, University of Turin, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Turin (Italy); Soldatov, Alexander V., E-mail: soldatov@sfedu.ru [Research Center for Nanoscale Structure of Matter, Southern Federal University, Sorge str. 5, 344090 Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Meyer, Jennifer; Niedner-Schatteburg, Gereon [Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Fachbereich Chemie und Forschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Erwin-Schrödinger-Straße 52, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Peredkov, Sergey [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Wilhelm-Conrad-Röntgen-Campus Adlershof, Elektronenspeicherring BESSY II, Albert-Einstein-Straße 15, Berlin (Germany); Eberhardt, Wolfgang [Technische Universität Berlin, IOAP, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Neeb, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.neeb@helmholtz-berlin.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Wilhelm-Conrad-Röntgen-Campus Adlershof, Elektronenspeicherring BESSY II, Albert-Einstein-Straße 15, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • M{sub 4,5}-XANES spectra have been calculated for several structural models of free Nb{sub 13}{sup +} cluster. • Theoretical M{sub 4,5}-XANES have been compared with the experimental spectrum of free Nb{sub 13}{sup +}. • Icosahedral structure of Nb{sub 13}{sup +} shows better agreement with experiment than the “amorphous” one. • Distance between Nb atoms in the icosahedral cluster is distinctly reduced as compared to the bulk phase. - Abstract: The atomic and electronic structure of free niobium nanoclusters has been studied on the basis of X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and density functional theory. M{sub 4,5}-XANES spectra have been calculated for several structural models of the 13-atomic niobium cluster. The calculations have been done on the basis of both full multiple scattering theory within the muffin-tin approximation for a potential and full-potential finite difference method. The comparison of the experimental M{sub 4,5}-edge XANES spectrum (Peredkov et al., J. Electron Spectros. Relat. Phenomena 184 (2011) 113–118) with the simulated X-ray absorption spectra of Nb{sub 13}{sup +} hints to a highly-symmetric icosahedral structure of the cluster. An internuclear distance of 2.2 ± 0.1 Å between neighboring “surface” atoms of the icosahedron and 2.09 Å between the central “bulk” atom and “surface” atoms, respectively, has been found upon comparison of the experimental and theoretical XANES spectra.

  11. Electronic Concepts Simulation Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The laboratory utilizes state-of-the-art digital models and simulations of both friendly and enemy airborne and ground-based weapon and command and control systems....

  12. The Electronic Structure of Calcium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jan, J.-P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    .149 Ryd, respectively, relative to the s band, give the best possible agreement. Under increasing pressure the s and p electrons are found to transfer into the d band, and Ca undergoes metal-semimetal-metal electronic transitions. Calculations of the bandstructure and the electronic pressure, including......The electronic structure of calcium under pressure is re-examined by means of self-consistent energy band calculations based on the local density approximation and using the linear muffin-tin orbitals (LMTO) method with corrections to the atomic sphere approximation included. At zero pressure...

  13. STRUCTURAL STABILITY AND ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-12-31

    Dec 31, 2012 ... STRUCTURAL STABILITY AND ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF YCu DUCTILE. INTERMETALLIC COMPOUND BY FIRST-PRINCIPAL CALCULATION. A. Sekkal1* and A. Benzair2. 1Laboratoire d'Etude et Prédiction de Matériaux, Unité de Recherche Matériaux et Energies. Renouvelables, Département ...

  14. Simulation study of secondary electron images in scanning ion microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ohya, K

    2003-01-01

    The target atomic number, Z sub 2 , dependence of secondary electron yield is simulated by applying a Monte Carlo code for 17 species of metals bombarded by Ga ions and electrons in order to study the contrast difference between scanning ion microscopes (SIM) and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In addition to the remarkable reversal of the Z sub 2 dependence between the Ga ion and electron bombardment, a fine structure, which is correlated to the density of the conduction band electrons in the metal, is calculated for both. The brightness changes of the secondary electron images in SIM and SEM are simulated using Au and Al surfaces adjacent to each other. The results indicate that the image contrast in SIM is much more sensitive to the material species and is clearer than that for SEM. The origin of the difference between SIM and SEM comes from the difference in the lateral distribution of secondary electrons excited within the escape depth.

  15. QUEST: QUantum Electron Simulation Toolbox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Roger Che-Rung [National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan; Chiesa, Simone [ORNL; Varney, Christopher N [ORNL; Khatami, Ehsan [Georgetown University; Bai, Zhaojun [University of California, Davis; D' Azevedo, Ed F [ORNL; Jarrell, Mark [Louisiana State University; Maier, Thomas A [ORNL; Savrasov, Sergey [ORNL; Scalettar, Richard [University of California, Davis; Tomko, Karen [Ohio Supercomputer Center

    2010-01-01

    QUEST is a part of the SciDAC project on next generation multi-scale quantum simulation software for strongly correlated materials. It is a Fortran 90/95 package that implements the determinant quantum Monte Carlo (DQMC) method for simulation of magnetic, superconducting, and metal-insulator transitions in model Hamiltonians. In this paper, we show how QUEST is capable of treating lattices of unprecedentedly large sizes and how this can be fruitful in the study of the physics of trapped fermionic system, in the development of more efficient solvers for Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMFT) and as a tool to test and, in the future, improve diagrammatic approaches such as the Parquet approximation. We will also present a range of synergistic activities on the development of stable and robust numerical algorithms and hybrid granularity parallelization scheme that combines algorithmic and implementation techniques to high-performance DQMC simulation. The work reported here is a key step forward in achieving the goals of our SciDAC project.

  16. ELECTRON COOLING SIMULATION FOR ARBITRARY DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SIDORIN,A.; SMIRNOV, A.; FEDOTOV, A.; BEN-ZVI, I.; KAYRAN, D.

    2007-09-10

    Typically, several approximations are being used in simulation of electron cooling process, for example, density distribution of electrons is calculated using an analytical expression and distribution in the velocity space is assumed to be Maxwellian in all degrees of freedom. However, in many applications, accurate description of the cooling process based on realistic distribution of electrons is very useful. This is especially true for a high-energy electron cooling system which requires bunched electron beam produced by an Energy Recovery Linac (Em). Such systems are proposed, for instance, for RHIC and electron - ion collider. To address unique features of the RHIC-I1 cooler, new algorithms were introduced in BETACOOL code which allow us to take into account local properties of electron distribution as well as calculate friction force for an arbitrary velocity distribution. Here, we describe these new numerical models. Results based on these numerical models are compared with typical approximations using electron distribution produced by simulations of electron bunch through ERL of RHIC-II cooler.

  17. Combining MOSCED with molecular simulation free energy calculations or electronic structure calculations to develop an efficient tool for solvent formulation and selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Courtney E; Phifer, Jeremy R; Ferreira da Silva, Larissa; Gonçalves Nogueira, Gabriel; Ley, Ryan T; O'Loughlin, Elizabeth J; Pereira Barbosa, Ana Karolyne; Rygelski, Brett T; Paluch, Andrew S

    2017-02-01

    Solubility parameter based methods have long been a valuable tool for solvent formulation and selection. Of these methods, the MOdified Separation of Cohesive Energy Density (MOSCED) has recently been shown to correlate well the equilibrium solubility of multifunctional non-electrolyte solids. However, before it can be applied to a novel solute, a limited amount of reference solubility data is required to regress the necessary MOSCED parameters. Here we demonstrate for the solutes methylparaben, ethylparaben, propylparaben, butylparaben, lidocaine and ephedrine how conventional molecular simulation free energy calculations or electronic structure calculations in a continuum solvent, here the SMD or SM8 solvation model, can instead be used to generate the necessary reference data, resulting in a predictive flavor of MOSCED. Adopting the melting point temperature and enthalpy of fusion of these compounds from experiment, we are able to predict equilibrium solubilities. We find the method is able to well correlate the (mole fraction) equilibrium solubility in non-aqueous solvents over four orders of magnitude with good quantitative agreement.

  18. Combining MOSCED with molecular simulation free energy calculations or electronic structure calculations to develop an efficient tool for solvent formulation and selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Courtney E.; Phifer, Jeremy R.; Ferreira da Silva, Larissa; Gonçalves Nogueira, Gabriel; Ley, Ryan T.; O'Loughlin, Elizabeth J.; Pereira Barbosa, Ana Karolyne; Rygelski, Brett T.; Paluch, Andrew S.

    2017-02-01

    Solubility parameter based methods have long been a valuable tool for solvent formulation and selection. Of these methods, the MOdified Separation of Cohesive Energy Density (MOSCED) has recently been shown to correlate well the equilibrium solubility of multifunctional non-electrolyte solids. However, before it can be applied to a novel solute, a limited amount of reference solubility data is required to regress the necessary MOSCED parameters. Here we demonstrate for the solutes methylparaben, ethylparaben, propylparaben, butylparaben, lidocaine and ephedrine how conventional molecular simulation free energy calculations or electronic structure calculations in a continuum solvent, here the SMD or SM8 solvation model, can instead be used to generate the necessary reference data, resulting in a predictive flavor of MOSCED. Adopting the melting point temperature and enthalpy of fusion of these compounds from experiment, we are able to predict equilibrium solubilities. We find the method is able to well correlate the (mole fraction) equilibrium solubility in non-aqueous solvents over four orders of magnitude with good quantitative agreement.

  19. Optimising electron microscopy experiment through electron optics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Y. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse France (France); Hitachi High-Technologies Corporation, 882, Ichige, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-8504 (Japan); Gatel, C.; Snoeck, E. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse France (France); Houdellier, F., E-mail: florent.houdellier@cemes.fr [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse France (France)

    2017-04-15

    We developed a new type of electron trajectories simulation inside a complete model of a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM). Our model incorporates the precise and real design of each element constituting a TEM, i.e. the field emission (FE) cathode, the extraction optic and acceleration stages of a 300 kV cold field emission gun, the illumination lenses, the objective lens, the intermediate and projection lenses. Full trajectories can be computed using magnetically saturated or non-saturated round lenses, magnetic deflectors and even non-cylindrical symmetry elements like electrostatic biprism. This multi-scale model gathers nanometer size components (FE tip) with parts of meter length (illumination and projection systems). We demonstrate that non-trivial TEM experiments requiring specific and complex optical configurations can be simulated and optimized prior to any experiment using such model. We show that all the currents set in all optical elements of the simulated column can be implemented in the real column (I2TEM in CEMES) and used as starting alignment for the requested experiment. We argue that the combination of such complete electron trajectory simulations in the whole TEM column with automatic optimization of the microscope parameters for optimal experimental data (images, diffraction, spectra) allows drastically simplifying the implementation of complex experiments in TEM and will facilitate the development of advanced use of the electron microscope in the near future. - Highlights: • Using dedicated electron optics software, we calculate full electrons trajectories inside a modern transmission electron microscope. • We have determined how to deal with multi-scale electron optics elements like high voltage cold field emission source. • W • e have succeed to model both weak and strong magnetic lenses whether in saturated or unsaturated conditions as well as electrostatic biprism and magnetic deflectors. • We have applied this model

  20. Electron vortex magnetic holes: A nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.T. Haynes; D. Burgess; E. Camporeale (Enrico); T. Sundberg

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractWe report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron

  1. Molecular electronic-structure theory

    CERN Document Server

    Helgaker, Trygve; Jorgensen, Poul

    2013-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemistry is increasingly paired with computational methods to solve intractable problems in chemistry and molecular physics. Now in a paperback edition, this comprehensive and technical work covers all the important aspects of modern molecular electronic-structure theory, clearly explaining quantum-mechanical methods and applications to molecular equilibrium structure, atomization energies, and reaction enthalpies. Extensive numerical examples illustrate each method described. An excellent resource for researchers in quantum chemistry and anyone interested in the theory and its applications.

  2. Electron energization and structure of the diffusion region during asymmetric reconnection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Li‐Jen; Hesse, Michael; Wang, Shan; Bessho, Naoki; Daughton, William

    2016-01-01

    Results from particle‐in‐cell simulations of reconnection with asymmetric upstream conditions are reported to elucidate electron energization and structure of the electron diffusion region (EDR...

  3. Graph-based linear scaling electronic structure theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Mniszewski, Susan M; Negre, Christian F A; Cawkwell, Marc J; Swart, Pieter J; Mohd-Yusof, Jamal; Germann, Timothy C; Wall, Michael E; Bock, Nicolas; Rubensson, Emanuel H; Djidjev, Hristo

    2016-06-21

    We show how graph theory can be combined with quantum theory to calculate the electronic structure of large complex systems. The graph formalism is general and applicable to a broad range of electronic structure methods and materials, including challenging systems such as biomolecules. The methodology combines well-controlled accuracy, low computational cost, and natural low-communication parallelism. This combination addresses substantial shortcomings of linear scaling electronic structure theory, in particular with respect to quantum-based molecular dynamics simulations.

  4. Hybrid Simulation of Composite Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgh, Jacob Herold

    Hybrid simulation is a substructural method combining a numerical simulation with a physical experiment. A structure is thereby simulated under the assumption that a substructure’s response is well known and easily modelled while a given substructure is studied more accurately in a physical...... of freedom. In this dissertation the main focus is to develop hybrid simulation for composite structures e.g. wind turbine blades where the boundary between the numerical model and the physical experiment is continues i.e. in principal infinite amount of degrees of freedom. This highly complicates...... the transfer system and the control and monitoring techniques in the shared boundary is therefore a key issue in this type of hybrid simulation. During the research, hybrid simulation platforms have been programmed capable of running on different time scales with advanced control and monitoring techniques...

  5. Electronic structure of antibiotic erythromycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Igor; Kovač, Branka

    2015-03-01

    The electronic structure of erythromycin A (ERYMA) molecule has been studied by UV photoelectron spectroscopy and assigned (in the low ionization energy region only) by empirical arguments. The two orbitals with highest energy (lowest ionization energy) are localized on the nitrogen of the desosamine sugar functional group and on the ester group of macrolide (lactone) ring. We discuss how these orbital energies can help to rationalize the known mode of binding of ERYMA to their biological receptors.

  6. Electron vortex magnetic holes: a nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    CERN Document Server

    Haynes, Christopher T; Camporeale, Enrico; Sundberg, Torbjorn

    2014-01-01

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional PIC simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic holes (EVMHs), have circular cross-section. The magnetic field depression is associated with a diamagnetic azimuthal current provided by a population of trapped electrons in petal-like orbits. The trapped electron population provides a mean azimuthal velocity and since trapping preferentially selects high pitch angles, a perpendicular temperature anisotropy. The structures arise out of initial perturbations in the course of the turbulent evolution of the plasma, and are stable over at least 100 electron gyroperiods. We have verified the model for the EVMH by carrying out test particle and PIC simulations of isolated structures in a uniform plasma. It is found that (quasi-)stable structures can be formed provided that there is ...

  7. Electron Cloud Simulations with PyECLOUD

    CERN Document Server

    Iadarola, G

    2012-01-01

    PyECLOUD is a newly developed code for the simulation of the electron cloud (EC) build-up in particle accelerators. Almost entirely written in Python, it is mostly based on the physical models already used in the ECLOUD code but, thanks to the implementation of new optimized algorithms, it exhibits a significantly improved performance in accuracy, speed, reliability and flexibility. PyECLOUD simulations have been already broadly employed for benchmarking the EC observations in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Thanks to the new feature of running EC simulations with bunch-by-bunch length and intensity data from machine measurements, the scrubbing process of the LHC beam pipes could be reconstructed from heat load measurements in the cryogenic dipoles. In addition, PyECLOUD simulations also provide the estimation of the bunch-by-bunch energy loss, which can be compared with the measurements of the stable phase shift.

  8. Hollow Electron Lens Simulation for the SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Previtali, V; Stancari, G; Valishev, A

    2013-01-01

    The hardware of the Tevatron hollow electron lens, which has been used in the past for collimation purposes, is presently available. Possible applications of similar devices in the LHC are under evaluation, but a realistic date for installation of electron lenses in the LHC would be not earlier than the machine shutdown scheduled for 2018. We investigated the possibility of beam tests with the available hardware in the meantime in the SPS. This article aims to answer this question by presenting the results of dedicated numerical simulations

  9. Xyce parallel electronic simulator release notes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R; Hoekstra, Robert John; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Coffey, Todd S; Pawlowski, Roger P; Santarelli, Keith R.

    2010-05-01

    The Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator has been written to support, in a rigorous manner, the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. Specific requirements include, among others, the ability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel computing platforms, improved numerical performance and object-oriented code design and implementation. The Xyce release notes describe: Hardware and software requirements New features and enhancements Any defects fixed since the last release Current known defects and defect workarounds For up-to-date information not available at the time these notes were produced, please visit the Xyce web page at http://www.cs.sandia.gov/xyce.

  10. Molecular electronic-structure theory

    CERN Document Server

    Helgaker, Trygve; Olsen, Jeppe

    2014-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemistry has emerged as an important tool in chemical research and is appliced to a wide variety of problems in chemistry and molecular physics. Recent developments of computational methods have enabled previously intractable chemical problems to be solved using rigorous quantum-mechanical methods. This is the first comprehensive, up-to-date and technical work to cover all the important aspects of modern molecular electronic-structure theory. Topics covered in the book include: * Second quantization with spin adaptation * Gaussian basis sets and molecular-integral evaluati

  11. Electronic shell structure and chemisorption on gold nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ask Hjorth; Kleis, Jesper; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2011-01-01

    We use density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the electronic structure and chemical properties of gold nanoparticles. Different structural families of clusters are compared. For up to 60 atoms we optimize structures using DFT-based simulated annealing. Cluster geometries are found...

  12. Xyce parallel electronic simulator : reference guide.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Ting; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Santarelli, Keith R.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd Stirling; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Warrender, Christina E.; Keiter, Eric Richard; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick

    2011-05-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users Guide. The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users Guide. The Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator has been written to support, in a rigorous manner, the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. It is targeted specifically to run on large-scale parallel computing platforms but also runs well on a variety of architectures including single processor workstations. It also aims to support a variety of devices and models specific to Sandia needs. This document is intended to complement the Xyce Users Guide. It contains comprehensive, detailed information about a number of topics pertinent to the usage of Xyce. Included in this document is a netlist reference for the input-file commands and elements supported within Xyce; a command line reference, which describes the available command line arguments for Xyce; and quick-references for users of other circuit codes, such as Orcad's PSpice and Sandia's ChileSPICE.

  13. Electronic structure of rare earth bismuthides

    CERN Document Server

    Drzyzga, M; Deniszczyk, J; Michalczewski, T

    2003-01-01

    The electronic structure of rare earth bismuthides - Gd sub 4 Bi sub 3 , Tb sub 4 Bi sub 3 and R sub 5 Bi sub 3 (R = Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er) - has been investigated with use of x-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopies and calculated with the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital method. The spectra simulated on the basis of ab initio results reproduce correctly the experimental ones. This enabled analysis of the character of the electronic states, their hybridization and influence on magnetic properties. The temperature dependence of the valence band photoemission of ferromagnetic Gd sub 4 Bi sub 3 and Tb sub 4 Bi sub 3 has been studied and compared to the results obtained with the spin-polarized, non-polarized and open core methods of calculation.

  14. Electronic Structure Calculations and the Ising Hamiltonian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Rongxin; Bian, Teng; Kais, Sabre

    2017-11-20

    Obtaining exact solutions to the Schrödinger equation for atoms, molecules, and extended systems continues to be a "Holy Grail" problem which the fields of theoretical chemistry and physics have been striving to solve since inception. Recent breakthroughs have been made in the development of hardware-efficient quantum optimizers and coherent Ising machines capable of simulating hundreds of interacting spins with an Ising-type Hamiltonian. One of the most vital questions pertaining to these new devices is, "Can these machines be used to perform electronic structure calculations?" Within this work, we review the general procedure used by these devices and prove that there is an exact mapping between the electronic structure Hamiltonian and the Ising Hamiltonian. Additionally, we provide simulation results of the transformed Ising Hamiltonian for H2 , He2 , HeH+, and LiH molecules, which match the exact numerical calculations. This demonstrates that one can map the molecular Hamiltonian to an Ising-type Hamiltonian which could easily be implemented on currently available quantum hardware. This is an early step in developing generalized methods on such devices for chemical physics.

  15. Fast Electron Beam Simulation and Dose Calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Trindade, A; Peralta, L; Lopes, M C; Alves, C; Chaves, A

    2003-01-01

    A flexible multiple source model capable of fast reconstruction of clinical electron beams is presented in this paper. A source model considers multiple virtual sources emulating the effect of accelerator head components. A reference configuration (10 MeV and 10x10 cm2 field size) for a Siemens KD2 linear accelerator was simulated in full detail using GEANT3 Monte Carlo code. Our model allows the reconstruction of other beam energies and field sizes as well as other beam configurations for similar accelerators using only the reference beam data. Electron dose calculations were performed with the reconstructed beams in a water phantom and compared with experimental data. An agreement of 1-2% / 1-2 mm was obtained, equivalent to the accuracy of full Monte Carlo accelerator simulation. The source model reduces accelerator simulation CPU time by a factor of 7500 relative to full Monte Carlo approaches. The developed model was then interfaced with DPM, a fast radiation transport Monte Carlo code for dose calculati...

  16. Simulation of scanning transmission electron microscope images on desktop computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, C., E-mail: christian.dwyer@mcem.monash.edu.au [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2010-02-15

    Two independent strategies are presented for reducing the computation time of multislice simulations of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images: (1) optimal probe sampling, and (2) the use of desktop graphics processing units. The first strategy is applicable to STEM images generated by elastic and/or inelastic scattering, and requires minimal effort for its implementation. Used together, these two strategies can reduce typical computation times from days to hours, allowing practical simulation of STEM images of general atomic structures on a desktop computer.

  17. Nonlinearity in structural and electronic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, A.R.; Beardmore, K.M.; Ben-Naim, E. [and others

    1997-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project strengthens a nonlinear technology base relevant to a variety of problems arising in condensed matter and materials science, and applies this technology to those problems. In this way the controlled synthesis of, and experiments on, novel electronic and structural materials provide an important focus for nonlinear science, while nonlinear techniques help advance the understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of microstructure and dynamics in complex materials. This research is primarily focused on four topics: (1) materials microstructure: growth and evolution, and porous media; (2) textures in elastic/martensitic materials; (3) electro- and photo-active polymers; and (4) ultrafast photophysics in complex electronic materials. Accomplishments included the following: organization of a ``Nonlinear Materials`` seminar series and international conferences including ``Fracture, Friction and Deformation,`` ``Nonequilibrium Phase Transitions,`` and ``Landscape Paradigms in Physics and Biology``; invited talks at international conference on ``Synthetic Metals,`` ``Quantum Phase Transitions,`` ``1996 CECAM Euroconference,`` and the 1995 Fall Meeting of the Materials Research Society; large-scale simulations and microscopic modeling of nonlinear coherent energy storage at crack tips and sliding interfaces; large-scale simulation and microscopic elasticity theory for precursor microstructure and dynamics at solid-solid diffusionless phase transformations; large-scale simulation of self-assembling organic thin films on inorganic substrates; analysis and simulation of smoothing of rough atomic surfaces; and modeling and analysis of flux pattern formation in equilibrium and nonequilibrium Josephson junction arrays and layered superconductors.

  18. Electron transmission through molecules and molecular layers: Theory and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzan, Abraham

    2000-03-01

    Several aspects of electron transmission through molecular layers will be discussed. (a) The mechanism of electron tunneling through a narrow water barrier between two Pt(100) metal surfaces was studied by numerical simulations.[1] Assuming that the water configuration is static on the time scale of the electron motion, the tunneling probability show distinct resonance structures below the vacuum barrier. These resonances are shown to be associated with molecular cavities in which the electron is trapped between repulsive oxygen cores. The lifetimes of these resonances are found to be of the order 10 fs or less. (b) The concept of 'tunneling time' is revisited and this time is analyzed for a simple superexchange model of electron transfer.[2] This time is computed also for electron tunneling through water and its relation to the resonance features observed in that process and to their lifetime is discussed.[3] (c) Theoretical models that analyze thermal effects in resonance tunneling are presented.[4] References 1. U. Peskin, A. Edlund, I. Bar-On , M. Galperin and A. Nitzan, Transient resonance structures in electron tunneling through water, J. Chem. Phys. 111, 7558 (1999). 2. A. Nitzan, J. Jortner, J. Wilkie and M. Ratner, Tunneling time for electron transfer reactions, to be published. 3. M. Galperin and A. Nitzan, Tunneling time for electron transfer through water, to be published. 4. D. Segal, A. Nitzan, W. B. Davis, M. R. Wasielewski, and M. A. Ratner, Electron Transfer Rates in Bridged Molecular Systems II: A steady state analysis of coherent tunneling and thermal transitions, J. Phys. Chem., in press.

  19. On the vertical structure of longitudinal differences in electron densities in the mid-latitudes: COSMIC radio occultation observations and GITM simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Dingwei; Zhang, Kedeng

    2016-04-01

    By using COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate) satellite observations, and GITM (Global Ionosphere and Thermosphere Model) simulations, the altitudinal dependences of the longitudinal differences in electron densities Ne were studied at mid-latitudes for the first time. Distinct altitudinal dependences were revealed: (1) in the northern (southern) hemisphere, there were wave-1 variations mainly in the daytime in the altitudes below 180 km, but wave-2 (wave-1) variations over a whole day above 220 km; (2) a transition (or separation) layer occurred mainly in the daytime within 180 km and 220 km, showing reversed longitudinal variation from that at lower altitudes. Solar illumination was one of the plausible mechanisms for the zonal difference of Ne at lower altitudes. At higher altitudes both neutral winds and solar illumination played important roles. The neutral winds effects accounted for the longitudinal differences in Ne in the European-Asian sector. Neutral composition changes and neutral wind effects both contributed to the formation of the transition layer.

  20. The Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator - An Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HUTCHINSON,SCOTT A.; KEITER,ERIC R.; HOEKSTRA,ROBERT J.; WATTS,HERMAN A.; WATERS,ARLON J.; SCHELLS,REGINA L.; WIX,STEVEN D.

    2000-12-08

    The Xyce{trademark} Parallel Electronic Simulator has been written to support the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. As such, the development has focused on providing the capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel computing platforms (up to thousands of processors). In addition, they are providing improved performance for numerical kernels using state-of-the-art algorithms, support for modeling circuit phenomena at a variety of abstraction levels and using object-oriented and modern coding-practices that ensure the code will be maintainable and extensible far into the future. The code is a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase--a message passing parallel implementation--which allows it to run efficiently on the widest possible number of computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel as well as heterogeneous platforms. Furthermore, careful attention has been paid to the specific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiency is achieved even as the number of processors grows.

  1. Electronic structure of pesticides: 1. Organochlorine insecticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, Igor, E-mail: inovak@csu.edu.au [Charles Sturt University, POB 883, Orange, NSW 2800 (Australia); Kovac, Branka [Physical Chemistry Division, ' R. Boskovic' Institute, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} Electronic structure of several organochlorine insecticides has been determined by UV photoelectron spectroscopy and high-level ab initio calculations. {yields} The electronic structure obtained from spectra has been related to their biological activity. {yields} The molecular modes of binding to appropriate receptors are rationalized in view of the molecule's electronic structure and conformational flexibility. - Abstract: The electronic structures of six organochlorine insecticides: {gamma}-lindane (I), aldrin (II), dieldrin (III), DDD (IV), DDE (V) and DDT (VI) have been investigated by UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), quantum chemical calculations and comparison with molecular modelling studies. Their electronic and molecular structures are discussed in order to rationalize their biological activity. In this work we relate the biological activity of these insecticides to their experimentally observed electronic and molecular structures.

  2. Simulations of electron transport in GaN devices

    CERN Document Server

    Arabshahi, H

    2002-01-01

    model of a device with traps to investigate this suggestion. The model includes the simulation of the capture and release of electrons by traps whose charge has a direct effect on the current flowing through the transistor terminals. The influence of temperature and light on the occupancy of the traps and the I-V characteristics are considered. It is concluded that traps are likely to play a substantial role in the behaviour of GaN field effect transistors. Further simulations were performed to model electron transport in AIGaN/GaN heterojunction FETs. So called HFET structures with a 78 nm Al sub 0 sub . sub 2 Ga sub 0 sub . sub 8 N pseudomorphically strained layer have been simulated, with the inclusion of spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization effects in the strained layer. The polarization effects are shown to not only increase the current density, but also improve the electron transport by inducing a higher electron density close to the positive charge sheet that occurs in the channel. This thesis de...

  3. Stochastic simulation of electron avalanches on supercomputers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogasinsky, S. V.; Marchenko, M. A. [Institute of Computational Mathematics and Mathematical Geophysics of the SB RAS, Novosibirsk State University, Prospekt Akademika Lavrentieva 6, 6300090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-09

    In the paper, we present a three-dimensional parallel Monte Carlo algorithm named ELSHOW which is developed for simulation of electron avalanches in gases. Parallel implementation of the ELSHOW was made on supercomputers with different architectures (massive parallel and hybrid ones). Using the ELSHOW, calculations of such integral characteristics as the number of particles in an avalanche, the coefficient of impact ionization, the drift velocity, and the others were made. Also, special precise computations were made to select an appropriate size of the time step using the technique of dependent statistical tests. Particularly, the algorithm consists of special methods of distribution modeling, a lexicographic implementation scheme for “branching” of trajectories, justified estimation of functionals. A comparison of the obtained results for nitrogen with previously published theoretical and experimental data was made.

  4. Simulation of electron-matter interaction during wet-STEM electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Septiyanto, Rahmat Firman, E-mail: karine.masenelli-varlot@insa-lyon.fr [MATEIS, INSA-Lyon, CNRS UMR5510, F-69621, France and Physics of Electronic Material, Departement of Physics, Faculty of Mathematic and Natural Sciences, ITB Jalan Ganesha No. 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Masenelli-Varlot, Karine [MATEIS, INSA-Lyon, CNRS UMR5510, F-69621 (France); Iskandar, Ferry [Physics of Electronic Material, Departement of Physics, Faculty of Mathematic and Natural Sciences, ITB Jalan Ganesha No. 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2014-02-24

    Tomography is an efficient tool to probe the 3 dimensional (3D) structure of materials. In the laboratory, a device has been developed to perform electron tomography in an environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The configuration of Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) in Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) provides a novel approach for the characterization of the 3D structure of materials and optimizes a compromise between the resolution level of a few nm and the large tomogram due to the high thickness of transparency. Moreover, STEM allows the observation in 2D of wet samples in an ESEM by finely controlling the sample temperature and the water pressure of the sample environment. It has been recently demonstrated that it was possible to acquire image series of hydrated objects and thus to attain 3D characterization of wet samples. In order to get reliable and quantitative data, the present study deals with the simulation of electron-matter interactions. From such simulation on the MCM-41 material, we determine the minimum quantity of water layer which can be detected on wet materials.

  5. Electron vortex magnetic holes: A nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, Christopher T., E-mail: c.t.haynes@qmul.ac.uk; Burgess, David; Sundberg, Torbjorn [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Camporeale, Enrico [Multiscale Dynamics, Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica (CWI), Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic holes (EVMHs), have circular cross-section. The magnetic field depression is associated with a diamagnetic azimuthal current provided by a population of trapped electrons in petal-like orbits. The trapped electron population provides a mean azimuthal velocity and since trapping preferentially selects high pitch angles, a perpendicular temperature anisotropy. The structures arise out of initial perturbations in the course of the turbulent evolution of the plasma, and are stable over at least 100 electron gyroperiods. We have verified the model for the EVMH by carrying out test particle and PIC simulations of isolated structures in a uniform plasma. It is found that (quasi-)stable structures can be formed provided that there is some initial perpendicular temperature anisotropy at the structure location. The properties of these structures (scale size, trapped population, etc.) are able to explain the observed properties of magnetic holes in the terrestrial plasma sheet. EVMHs may also contribute to turbulence properties, such as intermittency, at short scale lengths in other astrophysical plasmas.

  6. Computer Simulation of Electron Positron Annihilation Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, y

    2003-10-02

    With the launching of the Next Linear Collider coming closer and closer, there is a pressing need for physicists to develop a fully-integrated computer simulation of e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation process at center-of-mass energy of 1TeV. A simulation program acts as the template for future experiments. Either new physics will be discovered, or current theoretical uncertainties will shrink due to more accurate higher-order radiative correction calculations. The existence of an efficient and accurate simulation will help us understand the new data and validate (or veto) some of the theoretical models developed to explain new physics. It should handle well interfaces between different sectors of physics, e.g., interactions happening at parton levels well above the QCD scale which are described by perturbative QCD, and interactions happening at much lower energy scale, which combine partons into hadrons. Also it should achieve competitive speed in real time when the complexity of the simulation increases. This thesis contributes some tools that will be useful for the development of such simulation programs. We begin our study by the development of a new Monte Carlo algorithm intended to perform efficiently in selecting weight-1 events when multiple parameter dimensions are strongly correlated. The algorithm first seeks to model the peaks of the distribution by features, adapting these features to the function using the EM algorithm. The representation of the distribution provided by these features is then improved using the VEGAS algorithm for the Monte Carlo integration. The two strategies mesh neatly into an effective multi-channel adaptive representation. We then present a new algorithm for the simulation of parton shower processes in high energy QCD. We want to find an algorithm which is free of negative weights, produces its output as a set of exclusive events, and whose total rate exactly matches the full Feynman amplitude calculation. Our strategy is to create

  7. Electronic structure and tautomerism of thioamides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, Igor, E-mail: inovak@csu.edu.au [Charles Sturt University, POB 883, Orange, NSW 2800 (Australia); Klasinc, Leo, E-mail: klasinc@irb.hr [Physical Chemistry Department, Ruđer Bošković Institute, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia); McGlynn, Sean P., E-mail: sean.mcglynn@chemgate.chem.lsu.edu [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Electronic structure of thioamide group and its relation to Lewis basicity. • Tautomerism of the (thio)amide groups. • Substituent effects on the electronic structure of (thio)amide group. - Abstract: The electronic structures of several thioamides have been studied by UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The relative stabilities of keto–enol tautomers have been determined using high-level ab initio calculations and the results were used in the analysis of UPS spectra. The main features of electronic structure and tautomerism of thioamide derivatives are discussed. The predominant tautomers in the gas phase are of keto–(thio)keto form. The addition of cyclohexanone moiety to the thioamide group enhances the Lewis base character of the sulfur atom. The addition of phenyl group to the (thio)amide group significantly affects its electronic structure.

  8. Electron gun controlled smart structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jeffrey W.; Main, John Alan; Redmond, James M.; Henson, Tammy D.; Watson, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and system for actively controlling the shape of a sheet of electroactive material; the system comprising: one or more electrodes attached to the frontside of the electroactive sheet; a charged particle generator, disposed so as to direct a beam of charged particles (e.g. electrons) onto the electrode; a conductive substrate attached to the backside of the sheet; and a power supply electrically connected to the conductive substrate; whereby the sheet changes its shape in response to an electric field created across the sheet by an accumulation of electric charge within the electrode(s), relative to a potential applied to the conductive substrate. Use of multiple electrodes distributed across on the frontside ensures a uniform distribution of the charge with a single point of e-beam incidence, thereby greatly simplifying the beam scanning algorithm and raster control electronics, and reducing the problems associated with "blooming". By placing a distribution of electrodes over the front surface of a piezoelectric film (or other electroactive material), this arrangement enables improved control over the distribution of surface electric charges (e.g. electrons) by creating uniform (and possibly different) charge distributions within each individual electrode. Removal or deposition of net electric charge can be affected by controlling the secondary electron yield through manipulation of the backside electric potential with the power supply. The system can be used for actively controlling the shape of space-based deployable optics, such as adaptive mirrors and inflatable antennae.

  9. An electronic structure perspective of graphene interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Brian J; Dennis, Robert V; Lee, Vincent; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2014-04-07

    The unusual electronic structure of graphene characterized by linear energy dispersion of bands adjacent to the Fermi level underpins its remarkable transport properties. However, for practical device integration, graphene will need to be interfaced with other materials: 2D layered structures, metals (as ad-atoms, nanoparticles, extended surfaces, and patterned metamaterial geometries), dielectrics, organics, or hybrid structures that in turn are constituted from various inorganic or organic components. The structural complexity at these nanoscale interfaces holds much promise for manifestation of novel emergent phenomena and provides a means to modulate the electronic structure of graphene. In this feature article, we review the modifications to the electronic structure of graphene induced upon interfacing with disparate types of materials with an emphasis on iterative learnings from theoretical calculations and electronic spectroscopy (X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD)). We discuss approaches for engineering and modulating a bandgap in graphene through interfacial hybridization, outline experimental methods for examining electronic structure at interfaces, and overview device implications of engineered interfaces. A unified view of how geometric and electronic structure are correlated at interfaces will provide a rational means for designing heterostructures exhibiting emergent physical phenomena with implications for plasmonics, photonics, spintronics, and engineered polymer and metal matrix composites.

  10. Electronic structure and tautomerism of aryl ketones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, Igor, E-mail: inovak@csu.edu.au [Charles Sturt University, POB 883, Orange, NSW 2800 (Australia); Klasinc, Leo, E-mail: klasinc@irb.hr [Physical Chemistry Department, Ruđer Bošković Institute, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Šket, Boris, E-mail: Boris.Sket@fkkt.uni-lj.si [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, SI-1000 (Slovenia); McGlynn, S.P., E-mail: sean.mcglynn@chemgate.chem.lsu.edu [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Photoelectron spectroscopy, tautomerism. - Highlights: • UV photoelectron spectroscopy of aryl ketones. • The relative stability of tautomers and their electronic structures. • The factors influencing tautomerism. - Abstract: The electronic structures of several aryl ketones (AK) and their α-halo derivatives have been studied by UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The relative stabilities of keto–enol tautomers have been determined using high-level ab initio calculations and the results were used in the analysis of UPS spectra. The main features of electronic structure and tautomerism of the AK derivatives are discussed.

  11. Electromagnetic Structure and Electron Acceleration in Shock-Shock Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanotani, Masaru; Matsukiyo, Shuichi; Hada, Tohru; Mazelle, Christian X.

    2017-09-01

    A shock-shock interaction is investigated by using a one-dimensional full particle-in-cell simulation. The simulation reproduces the collision of two symmetrical high Mach number quasi-perpendicular shocks. The basic structure of the shocks and ion dynamics is similar to that obtained by previous hybrid simulations. The new aspects obtained here are as follows. Electrons are already strongly accelerated before the two shocks collide through multiple reflection. The reflected electrons self-generate waves upstream between the two shocks before they collide. The waves far upstream are generated through the right-hand resonant instability with the anomalous Doppler effect. The waves generated near the shock are due to firehose instability and have much larger amplitudes than those due to the resonant instability. The high-energy electrons are efficiently scattered by the waves so that some of them gain large pitch angles. Those electrons can be easily reflected at the shock of the other side. The accelerated electrons form a power-law energy spectrum. Due to the accelerated electrons, the pressure of upstream electrons increases with time. This appears to cause the deceleration of the approaching shock speed. The accelerated electrons having sufficiently large Larmor radii are further accelerated through the similar mechanism working for ions when the two shocks are colliding.

  12. Structure of the Hermean magnetosphere: hybrid simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travnicek, P.; Hellinger, P.

    We examine the interaction of the Hermean magnetosphere with the solar wind using global three dimensional hybrid plasma simulations. Hybrid simulations treat ions as particles and electrons as a fluid. Having ions as particles allows ion kinetic behavior and waves to be included in the physical treatment of the plasma as compared to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modeling that treats the plasma as a single magnetized fluid and does not include such kinetic effects. Kinetic effects are essential for understanding magnetospheric physics. Hybrid simulations scale to the ion inertial length and thus on a global scale are somewhat limited in spatial extent compared to an MHD simulation. We note effects caused by the scalling of the numerical model of the magnetized obstacle interacting with the solar wind flow with the full scale simulation. In this paper we shall focus on the study of the overal structure of the bow shock and magnetosheath formed in front of Mercury under different solar wind conditions, namely, in the perihelion and aphelion points of the excentric Hermean orbit. We examine the formation of the magnetospheric tail. We study particle distribution functions in different locations of the numerical model of the Hermean magnetosphere. We make qualitative comparison of the numerical results with the observations of Mariner 10. Hermean magnetosphere is estimated to be only a few times the planetary radius, it can fit within a hybrid simulation system. The overal structure of the interaction between a magnetized obstacle in the solar wind flow is determined by few basic parameters (namely the solar wind density, background magnetic field, and the speed of solar wind, and also the strength of the magnetic dipole of the obstacle and its radius). The structure of the interaction of the solar wind flow with Mercury is to a large extend unique when compared to other planets. For example, the magnetic moment of the Mercury is over 1000 times smaller than that of the

  13. Block Tridiagonal Matrices in Electronic Structure Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Dan Erik

    This thesis focuses on some of the numerical aspects of the treatment of the electronic structure problem, in particular that of determining the ground state electronic density for the non–equilibrium Green’s function formulation of two–probe systems and the calculation of transmission...

  14. Structural stability and electronic structure of YCu ductile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Structural stability and electronic structure of YCu ductile intermetallic compound by first-principal calculation. ... the ground states properties such as lattice parameter, bulk modulus and its pressure derivative, elastic constants and the structural phase stability with respect to the B1, B3, and L10structures of this compound.

  15. Page 1 Simulation of power electronics converter systems 703 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IEEE Power Electron. Syst. Conf 90 pp 606–610. Hsiao CJ, Ridley RB, Lee FC 1989 The simulation of switching converters using the new version. COSMIR program. Proc. VPEC Seminar pp 121-130. Jin H 1995a PSIM: Power electronic system simulator. Software 1995, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering ...

  16. Teaching Behavioral Modeling and Simulation Techniques for Power Electronics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramovitz, A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper suggests a pedagogical approach to teaching the subject of behavioral modeling of switch-mode power electronics systems through simulation by general-purpose electronic circuit simulators. The methodology is oriented toward electrical engineering (EE) students at the undergraduate level, enrolled in courses such as "Power…

  17. Electron conductance in curved quantum structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willatzen, Morten; Gravesen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    A differential-geometry analysis is employed to investigate the transmission of electrons through a curved quantum-wire structure. Although the problem is a three-dimensional spatial problem, the Schrodinger equation can be separated into three general coordinates. Hence, the proposed method...... is computationally fast and provides direct (geometrical) parameter insight as regards the determination of the electron transmission coefficient. We present, as a case study, calculations of the electron conductivity of a helically shaped quantum-wire structure and discuss the influence of the quantum...

  18. Effective in silico prediction of new oxazolidinone antibiotics: force field simulations of the antibiotic?ribosome complex supervised by experiment and electronic structure methods

    OpenAIRE

    Jörg Grunenberg; Giuseppe Licari,

    2016-01-01

    Summary We propose several new and promising antibacterial agents for the treatment of serious Gram-positive infections. Our predictions rely on force field simulations, supervised by first principle calculations and available experimental data. Different force fields were tested in order to reproduce linezolid's conformational space in terms of a) the isolated and b) the ribosomal bound state. In a first step, an all-atom model of the bacterial ribosome consisting of nearly 1600 atoms was co...

  19. Electronic Structure of Semiconductor Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    crystal- line form of SiO 2 , diamond-like beta cristobalite . Nearly perfect registry between Si and Si0 2 is obtained by placing the (100) face of the...use beta cristobalite , 3 1 except that we will straighten out the Si-O-Si bonds in the actual structure, making them all linear rather than crooked jall...unit cube edge of idealized diamond-like SiO 2 becomes 7.543 A, which is 5 percent larger than the unit cube edge of actual beta cristobalite , 7.16 A

  20. Electron wave collimation by conical horns : computer simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, K.; de Raedt, H.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of extensive numerical simulations of electron wave packets transmitted by horns. A detailed quantitative analysis is given of the collimation of the electron wave by horn-like devices. It is demonstrated that the electron wave collimation effect cannot be described in terms of

  1. Comparison of direct dynamics simulations with different electronic structure methods. F(-) + CH3I with MP2 and DFT/B97-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rui; Davda, Collin J; Zhang, Jiaxu; Hase, William L

    2015-01-28

    In previous work, ion imaging experiments and direct chemical dynamics simulations with DFT/B97-1 were performed to study the atomic-level dynamics of the F(-) + CH3I → FCH3 + I(-) SN2 nucleophilic substitution reaction at different collision energies. Overall, the simulations are in quite good agreement with experiment at the low collision energy of 0.32 eV, however there are differences between experiment and simulation at the high collision energy of 1.53 eV. A recent CCSD(T) study of the potential energy surface for the F(-) + CH3I → FCH3 + I(-) SN2 reaction shows that it has both a traditional C3v and a hydrogen-bond entrance channel. They are represented by MP2 but not by B97-1, which has only the latter channel. On the other hand, B97-1 gives a reaction exothermicity in excellent agreement with experiment, while MP2 is in error by 24.3 kJ mol(-1). In the work presented here, direct dynamics simulations using MP2/aug-cc-pvdz/ECP/d were performed for the F(-) + CH3I → FCH3 + I(-) reaction at a 1.53 eV collision energy. The same direct rebound and stripping and indirect atomistic reaction mechanisms are found in the B97-1 and MP2 simulations. Both the B97-1 and MP2 simulations agree with the experimental fraction of the available product energy partitioned to CH3F internal energy, i.e. fint = 0.59 ± 0.08. However, the MP2 fint distribution is broader and in better agreement with experiment than B97-1. The two simulations methods give the same product energy partitioning for the stripping mechanism, but different partitionings for the rebound and indirect mechanisms. Compared to experiment, the principal difference between the B97-1 and MP2 results is the differential cross section which is nearly isotropic for B97-1. For MP2 backward scattering is more important than forward, as found in the experiments. Though there is no overall barrier for the reaction, B97-1 gives a reaction cross section appreciably larger than that for MP2, i.e. 8.6 ± 2.2 Å(2

  2. The Electron Transport Chain: An Interactive Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Chris; Choun, James

    2014-01-01

    This activity provides students an interactive demonstration of the electron transport chain and chemiosmosis during aerobic respiration. Students use simple, everyday objects as hydrogen ions and electrons and play the roles of the various proteins embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane to show how this specific process in cellular…

  3. Geant4-DNA simulation of electron slowing-down spectra in liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Incerti, S., E-mail: sebastien.incerti@tdt.edu.vn [Division of Nuclear Physics, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170, Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Kyriakou, I. [Medical Physics Laboratory, University of Ioannina Medical School, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Tran, H.N. [Division of Nuclear Physics, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam)

    2017-04-15

    This work presents the simulation of monoenergetic electron slowing-down spectra in liquid water by the Geant4-DNA extension of the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit (release 10.2p01). These spectra are simulated for several incident energies using the most recent Geant4-DNA physics models, and they are compared to literature data. The influence of Auger electron production is discussed. For the first time, a dedicated Geant4-DNA example allowing such simulations is described and is provided to Geant4 users, allowing further verification of Geant4-DNA track structure simulation capabilities.

  4. Hydrated Electron Transfer to Nucleobases in Aqueous Solutions Revealed by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Mei; Fu, Aiyun; Yang, Hongfang; Bu, Yuxiang

    2015-08-03

    We present an ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation study into the transfer dynamics of an excess electron from its cavity-shaped hydrated electron state to a hydrated nucleobase (NB)-bound state. In contrast to the traditional view that electron localization at NBs (G/A/C/T), which is the first step for electron-induced DNA damage, is related only to dry or prehydrated electrons, and a fully hydrated electron no longer transfers to NBs, our AIMD simulations indicate that a fully hydrated electron can still transfer to NBs. We monitored the transfer dynamics of fully hydrated electrons towards hydrated NBs in aqueous solutions by using AIMD simulations and found that due to solution-structure fluctuation and attraction of NBs, a fully hydrated electron can transfer to a NB gradually over time. Concurrently, the hydrated electron cavity gradually reorganizes, distorts, and even breaks. The transfer could be completed in about 120-200 fs in four aqueous NB solutions, depending on the electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs and the structural fluctuation of the solution. The transferring electron resides in the π*-type lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the NB, which leads to a hydrated NB anion. Clearly, the observed transfer of hydrated electrons can be attributed to the strong electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs over the hydrated electron cavity, which is the driving force, and the transfer dynamics is structure-fluctuation controlled. This work provides new insights into the evolution dynamics of hydrated electrons and provides some helpful information for understanding the DNA-damage mechanism in solution. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Effective in silico prediction of new oxazolidinone antibiotics: force field simulations of the antibiotic–ribosome complex supervised by experiment and electronic structure methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Grunenberg

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose several new and promising antibacterial agents for the treatment of serious Gram-positive infections. Our predictions rely on force field simulations, supervised by first principle calculations and available experimental data. Different force fields were tested in order to reproduce linezolid's conformational space in terms of a the isolated and b the ribosomal bound state. In a first step, an all-atom model of the bacterial ribosome consisting of nearly 1600 atoms was constructed and evaluated. The conformational space of 30 different ribosomal/oxazolidinone complexes was scanned by stochastic methods, followed by an evaluation of their enthalpic penalties or rewards and the mechanical strengths of the relevant hydrogen bonds (relaxed force constants; compliance constants. The protocol was able to reproduce the experimentally known enantioselectivity favoring the S-enantiomer. In a second step, the experimentally known MIC values of eight linezolid analogues were used in order to crosscheck the robustness of our model. In a final step, this benchmarking led to the prediction of several new and promising lead compounds. Synthesis and biological evaluation of the new compounds are on the way.

  6. Electronic device simulates respiration rate and depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J. A.

    1964-01-01

    An oscillator circuit and a thermistor, in close proximity to a light bulb, periodically alter the heat output of the bulb by varying the voltage across its filament. Use of this simulator permits checkout tests on pneumographs.

  7. A combined molecular dynamics simulation and quantum mechanics study on mercaptopurine interaction with the cucurbit [6,7] urils: Analysis of electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaboli, Maryam; Raissi, Heidar

    2018-01-01

    In the current study, the probability of complex formation between mercaptopurine drug with cucurbit[6]urils and cucurbit[7]urils has been investigated. The calculations for geometry optimization of complexes have been carried out by means of DFT (B3LYP), DFT-D (B3LYP-D) and M06-2X methods. The Atoms In Molecules (AIM), Natural Bond Orbital (NBO), NMR, the density of states (DOSs) and frontier molecular orbital (MO) analyses have been done on the inclusion complexes. In addition, the UV-Vis spectra of the first eight states have been obtained by CAM-B3LYP/TD-DFT calculation. The obtained results of the complexation process reveal that CB[7]-DRG complexes are more favorable than that of CB[6]-DRG interactions. Furthermore, our theoretical results show that configurations III and I are the most stable configurations related to the CB[6]/DRG and CB[7]/DRG interactions, respectively. The positive ∇2ρ(r) and HC values at the bond critical points indicate that exist the weak H-bonds between CB[6] and CB[7] with H atoms of the drug molecule. The obtained negative binding energy values of CB[7]-DRG interaction in solution phase show the stability of these complexes in the aqueous medium. Also, all of the observed parameters of molecular dynamics simulation such as the number of contacts, hydrogen bonding, center-of-mass distance and van der Waals energy values confirm the encapsulation of mercaptopurine molecule inside the cucurbit[7]urils cavity at about 3.2 ns.

  8. A combined molecular dynamics simulation and quantum mechanics study on mercaptopurine interaction with the cucurbit [6,7] urils: Analysis of electronic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaboli, Maryam; Raissi, Heidar

    2018-01-05

    In the current study, the probability of complex formation between mercaptopurine drug with cucurbit[6]urils and cucurbit[7]urils has been investigated. The calculations for geometry optimization of complexes have been carried out by means of DFT (B3LYP), DFT-D (B3LYP-D) and M06-2X methods. The Atoms In Molecules (AIM), Natural Bond Orbital (NBO), NMR, the density of states (DOSs) and frontier molecular orbital (MO) analyses have been done on the inclusion complexes. In addition, the UV-Vis spectra of the first eight states have been obtained by CAM-B3LYP/TD-DFT calculation. The obtained results of the complexation process reveal that CB[7]-DRG complexes are more favorable than that of CB[6]-DRG interactions. Furthermore, our theoretical results show that configurations III and I are the most stable configurations related to the CB[6]/DRG and CB[7]/DRG interactions, respectively. The positive ∇ 2 ρ (r) and HC values at the bond critical points indicate that exist the weak H-bonds between CB[6] and CB[7] with H atoms of the drug molecule. The obtained negative binding energy values of CB[7]-DRG interaction in solution phase show the stability of these complexes in the aqueous medium. Also, all of the observed parameters of molecular dynamics simulation such as the number of contacts, hydrogen bonding, center-of-mass distance and van der Waals energy values confirm the encapsulation of mercaptopurine molecule inside the cucurbit[7]urils cavity at about 3.2ns. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. BITLLES: Electron Transport Simulation with Quantum Trajectories

    CERN Document Server

    Albareda, Guillermo; Benali, Abdelilah; Alarcón, Alfonso; Moises, Simeon; Oriols, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    After the seminal work of R. Landauer in 1957 relating the electrical resistance of a conductor to its scattering properties, much progress has been made in our ability to predict the performance of electron devices in the DC (stationary) regime. Computational tools to describe their dynamical behavior (including the AC, transient and noise performance), however, are far from being as trustworthy as would be desired by the electronic industry. While there is no fundamental limitation to correctly modeling the high-frequency quantum transport and its fluctuations, certainly more careful attention must be paid to delicate issues such as overall charge neutrality, total current conservation, or the back action of the measuring apparatus. In this review, we will show how the core ideas behind the Bohmian formulation of quantum mechanics can be exploited to design an efficient Monte Carlo algorithm that provides a quantitative description of electron transport in open quantum systems. By making the most of traject...

  10. Atomic and electronic structures of novel silicon surface structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, J.H. Jr.

    1997-03-01

    The modification of silicon surfaces is presently of great interest to the semiconductor device community. Three distinct areas are the subject of inquiry: first, modification of the silicon electronic structure; second, passivation of the silicon surface; and third, functionalization of the silicon surface. It is believed that surface modification of these types will lead to useful electronic devices by pairing these modified surfaces with traditional silicon device technology. Therefore, silicon wafers with modified electronic structure (light-emitting porous silicon), passivated surfaces (H-Si(111), Cl-Si(111), Alkyl-Si(111)), and functionalized surfaces (Alkyl-Si(111)) have been studied in order to determine the fundamental properties of surface geometry and electronic structure using synchrotron radiation-based techniques.

  11. Structures of quantum 2D electron-hole plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filinov, V S; Levashov, P R; Fortov, V E [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13 bldg 2, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Bonitz, M [Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Leibnizstrasse 15, 24098 Kiel (Germany); Fehske, H [Institut fuer Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str 6, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2009-05-29

    We investigate structures of 2D quantum electron-hole (e-h) plasmas by the direct path integral Monte Carlo method (PIMC) in a wide range of temperature, density and hole-to-electron mass ratio. Our simulation includes a region of appearance and decay of the bound states (excitons and biexcitons), the Mott transition from the neutral e-h plasma to metallic-like clusters, formation from clusters of the hexatic-like liquid and formation of the crystal-like lattice.

  12. Structures of quantum 2D electron-hole plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Filinov, V. S.; Bonitz, M.; Fehske, H.; Levashov, P. R.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate structures of 2D quantum electron-hole (e-h) plasmas by the direct path integral Monte Carlo method (PIMC) in a wide range of temperature, density and hole-to-electron mass ratio. Our simulation includes a region of appearance and decay of the bound states (excitons and biexcitons), the Mott transition from the neutral e-h plasma to metallic-like clusters, formation from clusters the hexatic-like liquid and formation of the crystal-like lattice.

  13. Atomic and electronic structure of exfoliated black phosphorus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ryan J.; Topsakal, Mehmet; Jeong, Jong Seok; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.; Mkhoyan, K. Andre, E-mail: mkhoyan@umn.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Low, Tony; Robbins, Matthew C.; Haratipour, Nazila; Koester, Steven J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Black phosphorus, a layered two-dimensional crystal with tunable electronic properties and high hole mobility, is quickly emerging as a promising candidate for future electronic and photonic devices. Although theoretical studies using ab initio calculations have tried to predict its atomic and electronic structure, uncertainty in its fundamental properties due to a lack of clear experimental evidence continues to stymie our full understanding and application of this novel material. In this work, aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and ab initio calculations are used to study the crystal structure of few-layer black phosphorus. Directly interpretable annular dark-field images provide a three-dimensional atomic-resolution view of this layered material in which its stacking order and all three lattice parameters can be unambiguously identified. In addition, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is used to measure the conduction band density of states of black phosphorus, which agrees well with the results of density functional theory calculations performed for the experimentally determined crystal. Furthermore, experimental EELS measurements of interband transitions and surface plasmon excitations are also consistent with simulated results. Finally, the effects of oxidation on both the atomic and electronic structure of black phosphorus are analyzed to explain observed device degradation. The transformation of black phosphorus into amorphous PO{sub 3} or H{sub 3}PO{sub 3} during oxidation may ultimately be responsible for the degradation of devices exposed to atmosphere over time.

  14. Structure of conduction electrons on polysilanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, Tsuneki [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan); Kumagai, Jun

    1998-10-01

    The orbital structures of conduction electrons on permethylated oligosilane, Si{sub 2n}(CH{sub 3}){sub 2n+2}(n = 2 - 8), and poly(cyclohexylmethylsilane) have been determined by the electron spin-echo envelope modulation signals of the radical anions of these silanes in a deuterated rigid matrix at 77 K. The conduction electron on permethylated oligosilane is delocalized over the entire main chain, whereas that on poly(cyclohexylmethylsilane) is localized on a part of the main chain composed of about six Si atoms. Quantum-chemical calculations suggest that Anderson localization due to fluctuation of {sigma} conjugation by conformational disorder of the main chain is responsible for the localization of both the conduction electron and the hole. (author)

  15. The portability of the "Electronics Workbench" simulation software to China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collis, Betty; Zhi-Cheng, Dong

    1993-01-01

    This article discusses the portability of the Canadian-made simulation software package, "Electronic Workbench" package (EWB) to China. As part of a larger project investigating the portability of various educational software packages, the EWB package was used in electronics instruction in China and

  16. NASCAP simulation of laboratory charging tests using multiple electron guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, M. J.; Katz, I.; Parks, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    NASCAP calculations have been performed simulating exposure of a spacecraft-like model to multiple electron guns. The results agree well with experiment. It is found that magnetic field effects are fairly small, but substantial differential charging can result from electron gun placement. Conditions for surface flashover are readily achieved.

  17. Electronic structure of Fe-based superconductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Fe-based superconductors have drawn much attention during the last decade due to the presence of superconductivity in materials containing the magnetic element, Fe, and the coexistence of superconductivity and magnetism. Extensive study of the electronic structure of these systems suggested the dominant ...

  18. Electronic structure of Fe-based superconductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-29

    May 29, 2015 ... Fe-based superconductors have drawn much attention during the last decade due to the presence of superconductivity in materials containing the magnetic element, Fe, and the coexistence of superconductivity and magnetism. Extensive study of the electronic structure of these systems suggested the ...

  19. The electronic structure of antiferromagnetic chromium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The author has used the local spin density formalism to perform self-consistent calculations of the electronic structure of chromium in the non-magnetic and commensurate antiferromagnetic phases, as a function of the lattice parameter. A change of a few per cent in the atomic radius brings...

  20. Electronic structure of MgB 2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Results of ab initio electronic structure calculations on the compound MgB2 using the FPLAPW method employing GGA for the exchange-correlation energy are presented. Total energy minimization enables us to estimate the equilibrium volume, / ratio and the bulk modulus, all of which are in excellent agreement with ...

  1. Electronic and crystallographic structure of apatites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderín, L.; Stott, M. J.; Rubio, A.

    2003-04-01

    An ab initio study of four different stoichiometric apatites (oxyapatite, hydroxyapatite, fluorapatite, and chlorapatite) is presented. The calculations were performed using density-functional theory with the local-density approximation for exchange and correlation, and a full relaxation of the electronic structure, the atomic arrangement, and the unit cell. Hexagonal unit cells were obtained for all four apatites, and the calculated atomic arrangements are in close agreement with observation in those cases for which the structure is firmly established. A zero-temperature structure is predicted for oxyapatite, and two possible configurations were found for the Cl- ions in chlorapatite. The possibility of the monoclinic structure in hydroxyapatite and chlorapatite was also studied but no indication of greater stability with respect to the hexagonal structure was found. A relationship between the structure of the apatites and that of pure calcium is discussed.

  2. Evolving Nonthermal Electrons in Simulations of Black Hole Accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chael, Andrew; Narayan, Ramesh; Sadowski, Aleksander

    2017-06-01

    Current simulations of hot accretion flows around black holes assume either a single-temperature gas or, at best, a two-temperature gas with thermal ions and electrons. However, processes like magnetic reconnection and shocks can accelerate electrons into a nonthermal distribution, which will not quickly thermalise at the very low densities found in many systems. Such nonthermal electrons have been invoked to explain the infrared and X-ray spectra and strong variability of Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the black hole at the Galactic Center. We present a method for self-consistent evolution of a nonthermal electron population in the GRMHD code KORAL. The electron distribution is tracked across Lorentz factor space and is evolved in space and time, in parallel with thermal electrons, thermal ions, and radiation. At present, for simplicity, energy injection into the nonthermal distribution is taken as a fixed fraction of the local electron viscous heating rate. Numerical results are presented for a model with a low mass accretion rate similar to Sgr A*. We find that the presence of a nonthermal population of electrons has negligible effect on the overall dynamics of the system. Relative to a purely thermal simulation, the radiative power in the nonthermal simulation is enhanced at large radii and at high frequencies. The energy distribution of the nonthermal electrons shows a synchrotron cooling break, with the break Lorentz factor varying with location and time, reflecting the complex interplay between the local viscous heating rate, magnetic field strength, and fluid velocity.

  3. Multi-million atom electronic structure calculations for quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Muhammad

    Quantum dots grown by self-assembly process are typically constructed by 50,000 to 5,000,000 structural atoms which confine a small, countable number of extra electrons or holes in a space that is comparable in size to the electron wavelength. Under such conditions quantum dots can be interpreted as artificial atoms with the potential to be custom tailored to new functionality. In the past decade or so, these nanostructures have attracted significant experimental and theoretical attention in the field of nanoscience. The new and tunable optical and electrical properties of these artificial atoms have been proposed in a variety of different fields, for example in communication and computing systems, medical and quantum computing applications. Predictive and quantitative modeling and simulation of these structures can help to narrow down the vast design space to a range that is experimentally affordable and move this part of nanoscience to nano-Technology. Modeling of such quantum dots pose a formidable challenge to theoretical physicists because: (1) Strain originating from the lattice mismatch of the materials penetrates deep inside the buffer surrounding the quantum dots and require large scale (multi-million atom) simulations to correctly capture its effect on the electronic structure, (2) The interface roughness, the alloy randomness, and the atomistic granularity require the calculation of electronic structure at the atomistic scale. Most of the current or past theoretical calculations are based on continuum approach such as effective mass approximation or k.p modeling capturing either no or one of the above mentioned effects, thus missing some of the essential physics. The Objectives of this thesis are: (1) to model and simulate the experimental quantum dot topologies at the atomistic scale; (2) to theoretically explore the essential physics i.e. long range strain, linear and quadratic piezoelectricity, interband optical transition strengths, quantum confined

  4. Monte Carlo simulations of electron photoemission from cesium antimonide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pranav; Cultrera, Luca; Bazarov, Ivan

    2017-06-01

    We report on the results from semi-classical Monte Carlo simulations of electron photoemission (photoelectric emission) from cesium antimonide (Cs3Sb) and compare them with experimental results at 90 K and room temperature, with an emphasis on near-threshold photoemission properties. Interfacial effects, impurities, and electron-phonon coupling are central features of our Monte Carlo model. We use these simulations to predict photoemission properties at the ultracold cryogenic temperature of 20 K and to identify critical material parameters that need to be properly measured experimentally for reproducing the electron photoemission properties of Cs3Sb and other materials more accurately.

  5. Electronic structure of bacterial surface protein layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslyuk, Volodymyr V.; Mertig, Ingrid; Bredow, Thomas; Mertig, Michael; Vyalikh, Denis V.; Molodtsov, Serguei L.

    2008-01-01

    We report an approach for the calculation of the electronic density of states of the dried two-dimensional crystalline surface protein layer ( S layer) of the bacterium Bacillus sphaericus NCTC 9602. The proposed model is based on the consideration of individual amino acids in the corresponding conformation of the peptide chain which additively contribute to the electronic structure of the entire protein complex. The derived results agree well with the experimental data obtained by means of photoemission (PE), resonant PE, and near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  6. Development of the electron cooling simulation program for JLEIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, He [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Chen, Jie [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Li, Rui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Yuhong [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Huang, He [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Luo, Li-Shi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    In the JLab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC) project the traditional electron cooling technique is used to reduce the ion beam emittance at the booster ring, and to compensate the intrabeam scattering effect and maintain the ion beam emittance during collision at the collider ring. A new electron cooling process simulation program has been developed to fulfill the requirements of the JLEIC electron cooler design. The new program allows the users to calculate the electron cooling rate and simulate the cooling process with either DC or bunched electron beam to cool either coasting or bunched ion beam. It has been benchmarked with BETACOOL in aspect of accuracy and efficiency. In typical electron cooling process of JLEIC, the two programs agree very well and we have seen a significant improvement of computational speed using the new one. Being adaptive to the modern multicore hardware makes it possible to further enhance the efficiency for computationally intensive problems. The new program is being actively used in the electron cooling study and cooler design for JLEIC. We will present our models and some simulation results in this paper.

  7. Electronic structure theory: Applications and geometrical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coh, Sinisa

    This thesis contains several applications of the first-principles electronic-structure theory with special emphasis in parts of the thesis on the geometrical aspects of the theory. We start by reviewing the basics of the first-principles electronic-structure methods which are then used throughout the thesis. The first application of these methods is on the analysis of the stability and lattice dynamics of alpha- and beta-cristobalite phases of SiO2. We also map the complete low-energy landscape connecting these two structures and give implications on the phase transition in this compound. Next we study a family of Pbnm perovskites that are promising candidates for silicon-compatible high-K dielectrics. We calculate their structure and dielectric response, and compare with experimental results where available. The third application of these methods is to the large isosymmetric reorientation of oxygen octahedra rotation axes in epitaxially strained perovskites. We explain the origin of the peculiar energy landscape topology as a function of epitaxial strain. In the part of the thesis devoted to the geometrical aspects of electronic structure theory, we begin by extending the concept of electronic polarization to a Chern insulators. These insulators are characterized by a non-zero off-diagonal sigma_xy conductivity tensor component, quantized in units of e 2/h. Finally we discuss another geometrical quantity, the Chern-Simons orbital magnetoelectric coupling. We present a first-principles based calculation of this quantity in several compounds, and motivated by recent developments in the theory of topological insulators, we speculate about the existence of "large-theta materials," in which this kind of coupling could be unusually large.

  8. Elements of Regolith Simulant's Cost Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, Douglas L.

    2009-01-01

    The cost of lunar regolith simulants is much higher than many users anticipate. After all, it is nothing more than broken rock. This class will discuss the elements which make up the cost structure for simulants. It will also consider which elements can be avoided under certain circumstances and which elements might be altered by the application of additional research and development.

  9. Electronic Structure of Strongly Correlated Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Anisimov, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Electronic structure and physical properties of strongly correlated materials containing elements with partially filled 3d, 4d, 4f and 5f electronic shells is analyzed by Dynamical Mean-Field Theory (DMFT). DMFT is the most universal and effective tool used for the theoretical investigation of electronic states with strong correlation effects. In the present book the basics of the method are given and its application to various material classes is shown. The book is aimed at a broad readership: theoretical physicists and experimentalists studying strongly correlated systems. It also serves as a handbook for students and all those who want to be acquainted with fast developing filed of condensed matter physics.

  10. Gravitational Reference Sensor Front-End Electronics Simulator for LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshksar, Neda; Ferraioli, Luigi; Mance, Davor; ten Pierick, Jan; Zweifel, Peter; Giardini, Domenico; ">LISA Pathfinder colaboration, simulator that provides a realistic simulation of the Front End Electronics (FEE) for LISA Gravitational Reference Sensor (GRS). It is based on the GRS FEE-simulator already implemented for LISA Pathfinder. It considers, in particular, the non-linearity and the critical details of hardware, such as the non-linear multiplicative noise caused by voltage reference instability, test mass charging and detailed actuation and sensing algorithms. We present the simulation modules, considering the above-mentioned features. Based on the ETH GRS FEE-simulator for LISA Pathfinder we aim to develop a modular simulator that provides a realistic simulation of GRS FEE for LISA.

  11. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of selected lanthanide and actinide intermetallic Laves-phase alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Olle; Johansson, Börje; Brooks, M. S. S.

    1989-01-01

    The electronic structure and magnetic properties of some yttrium and uranium Laves-phase pseudobinary alloys with 3d elements have been calculated. The calculations were done by simulating the electronic structure of the alloy by that of an ordered compound with the same stoichiometry. In general...

  12. Electronic structure of platinum-containing polyynes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lhost, O. (Service de Chimie des Materiaux Nouveaux et Dept. des Materiaux et Procedes, Univ. de Mons-Hainaut, Mons (Belgium)); Toussaint, J.M. (Service de Chimie des Materiaux Nouveaux et Dept. des Materiaux et Procedes, Univ. de Mons-Hainaut, Mons (Belgium)); Bredas, J.L. (Service de Chimie des Materiaux Nouveaux et Dept. des Materiaux et Procedes, Univ. de Mons-Hainaut, Mons (Belgium)); Wittmann, H.F. (Cavendish Lab., Univ. of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Fuhrmann, K. (Cavendish Lab., Univ. of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Friend, R.H. (Cavendish Lab., Univ. of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Khan, M.S. (University Chemical Lab., Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Lewis, J. (University Chemical Lab., Cambridge (United Kingdom))

    1993-04-19

    Using an Extended Hueckel approach, we investigate the electronic structure of a class of metal-containing polyynes (oligomers and polymers). These systems contain square-planar coordinated platinum sites linked by conjugated sequences of acetylenic units. We mainly focus on the evolution of the first optical transition as a function of the molecule size when going from short oligomers to the polymer. Our primary interest is in establishing the contribution of the metal atoms in the conjugation path. (orig.)

  13. Electronic Structure of Metallacyclophosphazene and Metallacyclothiazene Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundermann, Andreas; Schoeller, Wolfgang W.

    1999-12-27

    The electronic structure of metallacyclotriphosphazene complexes with several substituents at the phosphorus atoms and metallacyclothiazene complexes is explored for a variety of transition metal elements using density functional theory methods. Accordingly the metallacyclophosphazenes possess a large HOMO-LUMO energy separation while the metallacyclothiazenes bear stronger open-shell character. In addition our calculations predict the existence of experimentally so far unknown dimetallacyclophosphazenes. All structures show to be highly dynamical. The double bond character of the transition metal nitrogen bond is much less pronounced than in nitrido or imido complexes. For the ring compounds vibrational spectra are reported and compared with experimental data.

  14. Structural dynamics of electronic and photonic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Suhir, Ephraim; Steinberg, David S

    2011-01-01

    The proposed book will offer comprehensive and versatile methodologies and recommendations on how to determine dynamic characteristics of typical micro- and opto-electronic structural elements (printed circuit boards, solder joints, heavy devices, etc.) and how to design a viable and reliable structure that would be able to withstand high-level dynamic loading. Particular attention will be given to portable devices and systems designed for operation in harsh environments (such as automotive, aerospace, military, etc.)  In-depth discussion from a mechanical engineer's viewpoint will be conducte

  15. Electronic Structure of Regular Bacterial Surface Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyalikh, Denis V.; Danzenbächer, Steffen; Mertig, Michael; Kirchner, Alexander; Pompe, Wolfgang; Dedkov, Yuriy S.; Molodtsov, Serguei L.

    2004-12-01

    We report photoemission and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure measurements of the occupied and unoccupied valence electronic states of the regular surface layer of Bacillus sphaericus, which is widely used as the protein template for the fabrication of metallic nanostructures. The two-dimensional protein crystal shows a semiconductorlike behavior with a gap value of ˜3.0 eV and the Fermi energy close to the bottom of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital. We anticipate that these results will open up new possibilities for the electric addressability of biotemplated low-dimensional hybrid structures.

  16. Numerical simulation of controlled large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Ralph

    1989-01-01

    Large Space Structures do not have much damping, which necessitates the installation of a controller onto the structure. If the controller is improperly designed, the structure may become unstable and be destroyed. Since Large Space Structures are extremely expensive pieces of hardware, new controllers must not be tested first on the structure. They must first be tested in computer simulations. Until now, the usual procedure for simulating controlled Large Space Structures is to compute a reduced order modal representation of the structure and then apply the controller. However, this procedure entails modal truncation error. A new software package which is free from this error is currently under development within the Center for Space Construction. The more accurate finite element representation of the structure is used in the simulation, instead of the less accurate reduced order modal representation. This software also features an efficient matrix storage scheme, which effectively deals with the asymmetric system matrices which occur when control is added to the structure. Also, an integration algorithm was chosen so that the simulation is a reliable indicator of system stability or instability. The software package is fairly general in nature. Linearity of the finite element model and of the controller is the only assumption made. Actuator dynamics, sensor dynamics, noise, and disturbances can be handled by the package. In addition, output feedback of displacement, velocity, and/or acceleration signals can be simulated. Kalman state estimation was also implemented. This software was tested on a finite element model of a real Large Space Structure: The Mini-Mast Truss. Mini-Mast is a testbed at NASA-Langley which is currently under development. A 714 degree of freedom finite element model was computed, and a 19 state controller was designed for it. Torque wheel dynamics were added to the model, and the entire closed loop system was simulated with the software

  17. Simulation of relativistically colliding laser-generated electron flows

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xiaohu; Sarri, Gianluca; Borghesi, Marco

    2012-01-01

    The plasma dynamics resulting from the simultaneous impact, of two equal, ultra-intense laser pulses, in two spatially separated spots, onto a dense target is studied via particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The simulations show that electrons accelerated to relativistic speeds, cross the target and exit at its rear surface. Most energetic electrons are bound to the rear surface by the ambipolar electric field and expand along it. Their current is closed by a return current in the target, and this current configuration generates strong surface magnetic fields. The two electron sheaths collide at the midplane between the laser impact points. The magnetic repulsion between the counter-streaming electron beams separates them along the surface normal direction, before they can thermalize through other beam instabilities. This magnetic repulsion is also the driving mechanism for the beam-Weibel (filamentation) instability, which is thought to be responsible for magnetic field growth close to the internal shocks of ...

  18. Electronic structure theory of the superheavy elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliav, Ephraim, E-mail: ephraim@tau.ac.il [School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University, 6997801 Tel Aviv (Israel); Fritzsche, Stephan, E-mail: s.fritzsche@gsi.de [Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Theoretisch-Physikalisches Institut, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Kaldor, Uzi, E-mail: kaldor@tau.ac.il [School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University, 6997801 Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2015-12-15

    High-accuracy calculations of atomic properties of the superheavy elements (SHE) up to element 122 are reviewed. The properties discussed include ionization potentials, electron affinities and excitation energies, which are associated with the spectroscopic and chemical behavior of these elements, and are therefore of considerable interest. Accurate predictions of these quantities require high-order inclusion of relativity and electron correlation, as well as large, converged basis sets. The Dirac–Coulomb–Breit Hamiltonian, which includes all terms up to second order in the fine-structure constant α, serves as the framework for the treatment; higher-order Lamb shift terms are considered in some selected cases. Electron correlation is treated by either the multiconfiguration self-consistent-field approach or by Fock-space coupled cluster theory. The latter is enhanced by the intermediate Hamiltonian scheme, allowing the use of larger model (P) spaces. The quality of the calculations is assessed by applying the same methods to lighter homologs of the SHEs and comparing with available experimental information. Very good agreement is obtained, within a few hundredths of an eV, and similar accuracy is expected for the SHEs. Many of the properties predicted for the SHEs differ significantly from what may be expected by straightforward extrapolation of lighter homologs, demonstrating that the structure and chemistry of SHEs are strongly affected by relativity. The major scientific challenge of the calculations is to find the electronic structure and basic atomic properties of the SHE and assign its proper place in the periodic table. Significant recent developments include joint experimental–computational studies of the excitation spectrum of Fm and the ionization energy of Lr, with excellent agreement of experiment and theory, auguring well for the future of research in the field.

  19. Electronic Structure Rearrangements in Hybrid Ribozyme/Protein Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jiyoung; Kino, Hiori; Field, Martin J.; Tateno, Masaru

    2017-04-01

    We analyzed the electronic structural changes that occur in the reaction cycle of a biological catalyst composed of RNA and protein, and elucidated the dynamical rearrangements of the electronic structure that was obtained from our previous study in which ab initio quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics molecular dynamics simulations were performed. Notable results that we obtained include the generation of a reactive HOMO that is responsible for bond formation in the initial stages of the reaction, and the appearance of a reactive LUMO that is involved in the bond rupture that leads to products. We denote these changes as dynamical induction of the reactive HOMO (DIRH) and LUMO (DIRL), respectively. Interestingly, we also find that the induction of the reactive HOMO is enhanced by the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond (LBHB), which, to the best of our knowledge, represents a novel role for LBHBs in enzymatic systems.

  20. Evolving Nonthermal Electron Distributions in Simulations of Sgr A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chael, Andrew; Narayan, Ramesh

    2018-01-01

    The accretion flow around Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the black hole at the Galactic Center, produces strong variability from the radio to X-rays on timescales of minutes to hours. This rapid, powerful variability is thought to be powered by energetic particle acceleration by plasma processes like magnetic reconnection and shocks. These processes can accelerate particles into non-thermal distributions which do not quickly isothermal in the low densities found around hot accretion flows. Current state-of-the-art simulations of accretion flows around black holes assume either a single-temperature gas or, at best, a two-temperature gas with thermal ions and electrons. We present results from incorporating the self-consistent evolution of a non-thermal electron population in a GRRMHD simulation of Sgr A*. The electron distribution is evolved across space, time, and Lorentz factor in parallel with background thermal ion, electron, and radiation fluids. Energy injection into the non-thermal distribution is modeled with a sub-grid prescription based on results from particle-in-cell simulations of magnetic reconnection. The energy distribution of the non-thermal electrons shows strong variability, and the spectral shape traces the complex interplay between the local viscous heating rate, magnetic field strength, and fluid velocity. Results from these simulations will be used in interpreting forthcoming data from the Event Horizon Telescope that resolves Sgr A*'s sub-mm variability in both time and space.

  1. Xyce parallel electronic simulator reference guide, version 6.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Sholander, Peter E.; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Verley, Jason C.; Baur, David Gregory

    2014-03-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users Guide [1] . The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users Guide [1] .

  2. Xyce parallel electronic simulator reference guide, version 6.0.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Verley, Jason C.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd S; Pawlowski, Roger P; Warrender, Christina E.; Baur, David Gregory.

    2013-08-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users Guide [1] . The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users Guide [1] .

  3. Xyce™ Parallel Electronic Simulator: Reference Guide, Version 5.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical and Microsystems Modeling; Mei, Ting [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical and Microsystems Modeling; Russo, Thomas V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical and Microsystems Modeling; Rankin, Eric Lamont [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical and Microsystems Modeling; Schiek, Richard Louis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical and Microsystems Modeling; Santarelli, Keith R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical and Microsystems Modeling; Thornquist, Heidi K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical and Microsystems Modeling; Fixel, Deborah A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical and Microsystems Modeling; Coffey, Todd S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Applied Mathematics and Applications; Pawlowski, Roger P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Applied Mathematics and Applications

    2009-11-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users’ Guide. The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users’ Guide.

  4. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator : reference guide, version 4.1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Ting; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Santarelli, Keith R.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd Stirling; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Keiter, Eric Richard; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick

    2009-02-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users Guide. The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users Guide.

  5. Xyce™ Parallel Electronic Simulator Reference Guide Version 6.8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Aadithya, Karthik Venkatraman [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mei, Ting [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Russo, Thomas V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schiek, Richard L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sholander, Peter E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thornquist, Heidi K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Verley, Jason C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users' Guide. The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce . This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users' Guide.

  6. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator : reference guide, version 2.0.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoekstra, Robert John; Waters, Lon J.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Fixel, Deborah A.; Russo, Thomas V.; Keiter, Eric Richard; Hutchinson, Scott Alan; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Wix, Steven D.

    2004-06-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users' Guide. The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users' Guide.

  7. Simulation of avalanche electron multiplication in photodetectors with blocked jump conductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Sinitsa, S P

    2002-01-01

    The process of the avalanche electron multiplication in silicon BIB-structure is simulated by Monte Carlo method for the regime single-photon counting. The electron acceleration in the linear electric field, the elastic scattering of electrons on longitudinal acoustic phonons the inelastic scattering of electrons on intervalley phonons and ionization of neutral impurity centers are taken into account during electron motion. The simple algorithm is proposed to calculate coordinates of all ionized centers in the avalanche and the probability function of N electron yield from the avalanche at entering one electron into the multiplication range. It is shown that this function has maximum near the average value that correlates with experimental data

  8. Thermal transfer structures coupling electronics card(s) to coolant-cooled structure(s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Milnes P; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Parida, Pritish R; Schmidt, Roger R

    2014-12-16

    Cooling apparatuses and coolant-cooled electronic systems are provided which include thermal transfer structures configured to engage with a spring force one or more electronics cards with docking of the electronics card(s) within a respective socket(s) of the electronic system. A thermal transfer structure of the cooling apparatus includes a thermal spreader having a first thermal conduction surface, and a thermally conductive spring assembly coupled to the conduction surface of the thermal spreader and positioned and configured to reside between and physically couple a first surface of an electronics card to the first surface of the thermal spreader with docking of the electronics card within a socket of the electronic system. The thermal transfer structure is, in one embodiment, metallurgically bonded to a coolant-cooled structure and facilitates transfer of heat from the electronics card to coolant flowing through the coolant-cooled structure.

  9. Electronic structure investigation of novel superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buling, Anna

    2014-05-15

    The discovery of superconductivity in iron-based pnictides in 2008 gave rise to a high advance in the research of high-temperature superconductors. But up to now there is no generally admitted theory of the non-BCS mechanism of these superconductors. The electron and hole doped Ba122 (BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}) compounds investigated in this thesis are supposed to be suitable model systems for studying the electronic behavior in order to shed light on the superconducting mechanisms. The 3d-transition metal doped Ba122 compounds are investigated using the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), while the completely hole doped K122 is observed using XPS. The experimental measurements are complemented by theoretical calculations. A further new class of superconductors is represented by the electride 12CaO*7Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}: Here superconductivity can be realized by electrons accommodated in the crystallographic sub-nanometer-sized cavities, while the mother compound is a wide band gap insulator. Electronic structure investigations, represented by XPS, XAS and resonant X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ResPES), carried out in this work, should help to illuminate this unconventional superconductivity and resolve a debate of competing models for explaining the existence of superconductivity in this compound.

  10. Electron structure of topologically disordered metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Yakibchuk

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Here two methods for calculating the density of states of electrons in conduction band of disordered metals are investigated. The first one is based on the usage of one-parameter trial electron wave function. The equation for density of states gotten within this method is more general as compared to the results of perturbation theory. Electron-ion interaction is applied in the form of electron-ion structure factor, which makes it possible to use this method for a series of systems where potential form factor is not a small value and the perturbation theory fails. It also gives us well-known results of Relel-Schrodinger and Brilliuen-Vigner perturbation theory in case of small potential. Basically, the second approach is a common perturbation theory for pseudo-potential and Green's function method. It considers the contributions up to the third order. The results of computation for density of states in some non-transition metals are presented. The deviation of density of states causing the appearance of pseudo-gap is clearly recognized.

  11. Photoelectron spectroscopy bulk and surface electronic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Suga, Shigemasa

    2014-01-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is now becoming more and more required to investigate electronic structures of various solid materials in the bulk, on surfaces as well as at buried interfaces. The energy resolution was much improved in the last decade down to 1 meV in the low photon energy region. Now this technique is available from a few eV up to 10 keV by use of lasers, electron cyclotron resonance lamps in addition to synchrotron radiation and X-ray tubes. High resolution angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) is now widely applied to band mapping of materials. It attracts a wide attention from both fundamental science and material engineering. Studies of the dynamics of excited states are feasible by time of flight spectroscopy with fully utilizing the pulse structures of synchrotron radiation as well as lasers including the free electron lasers (FEL). Spin resolved studies also made dramatic progress by using higher efficiency spin detectors and two dimensional spin detectors. Polarization depend...

  12. Electromagnetic Radiation of Electrons in Periodic Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Potylitsyn, Alexander Petrovich

    2011-01-01

    Periodic magnetic structures (undulators) are widely used in accelerators to generate monochromatic undulator radiation (UR) in the range from far infrared to the hard X-ray region. Another periodic crystalline structure is used to produce quasimonochromatic polarized photon beams via the coherent bremsstrahlung mechanism (CBS). Due to such characteristics as monochromaticity, polarization and adjustability, these types of radiation is of large interest for applied and basic research of accelerator-emitted radiation. The book provides a detailed overview of the fundamental principles behind electromagnetic radiation emitted from accelerated charged particles (e.g. UR, CBS, radiation of fast electrons in Laser flash fields) as well as a unified description of relatively new radiation mechanisms which attracted great interest in recent years. This are the so-called polarization radiation excited by the Coulomb field of incident particles in periodic structures, parametric X-rays, resonant transition radiation a...

  13. Vlasov simulations of electron hole dynamics in inhomogeneous magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzichev, Ilya; Vasko, Ivan; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Mozer, Forrest; Artemyev, Anton

    2017-04-01

    particular, our simulations suggest that slow EHs (which generation is usually attributed to the Buneman instability) can arise due to slowing down of fast EH generated by electron-beam instability. The estimate of the potential drop along EHs allow to estimate the parallel potential drop provided by EHs in a particular plasma system. 1. Matsumoto, H., H. Kojima, T. Miyatake, Y. Omura, M. Okada, I. Nagano, and M. Tsutsui, Electrotastic Solitary Waves (ESW) in the magnetotail: BEN wave forms observed by GEOTAIL, Geophys. Res. Lett., 21, 2915-2918, doi:10.1029/94GL01284, 1994. 2. Norgren, C., M. Andŕe, A. Vaivads, and Y. V. Khotyaintsev, Slow electron phase space holes: Magnetotail observations, Geophys. Res. Lett., 42, 1654-1661, doi:10.1002/2015GL063218, 2015. 3. Malaspina, D. M., J. R. Wygant, R. E. Ergun, G. D. Reeves, R. M. Skoug, and B. A. Larsen, Electric field structures and waves at plasma boundaries in the inner magnetosphere, Journal of Geophysical Research (Space Physics), 120, 4246-4263, doi:10.1002/2015JA021137, 2015. 4. Franz, J. R., P. M. Kintner, J. S. Pickett, and L.-J. Chen, Properties of small-amplitude electron phase-space holes observed by Polar, Journal of Geophysical Research (Space Physics), 110, A09212, doi:10.1029/2005JA011095, 2005. 5. Cattell, C., C. Neiman, J. Dombeck, J. Crumley, J. Wygant, C. A. Kletzing, W. K. Peterson, F. S. Mozer, and M. André (2003), Large amplitude solitary waves in and near the Earth's magnetosphere, magnetopause and bow shock: Polar and Cluster observations, Nonlinear Processes Geophys., 10, 13-26. 6. Mandrake, L., P. L. Pritchett, and F. V. Coroniti, Electron beam generated solitary structures in a nonuniform plasma system, Geophys. Res. Lett., 27, 2869-2872, doi:10.1029/2000GL003785, 2000. The work of I.K. was supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research 16-32-00721 mol_a. The work of I.V., O.A. and F.M. was supported by JHU/APL contract 922613 (RBSPEFW).

  14. Simulations of space charge neutralization in a magnetized electron cooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerity, James [Texas A-M; McIntyre, Peter M. [Texas A-M; Bruhwiler, David Leslie [RadiaSoft, Boulder; Hall, Christopher [RadiaSoft, Boulder; Moens, Vince Jan [Ecole Polytechnique, Lausanne; Park, Chong Shik [Fermilab; Stancari, Giulio [Fermilab

    2017-02-02

    Magnetized electron cooling at relativistic energies and Ampere scale current is essential to achieve the proposed ion luminosities in a future electron-ion collider (EIC). Neutralization of the space charge in such a cooler can significantly increase the magnetized dynamic friction and, hence, the cooling rate. The Warp framework is being used to simulate magnetized electron beam dynamics during and after the build-up of neutralizing ions, via ionization of residual gas in the cooler. The design follows previous experiments at Fermilab as a verification case. We also discuss the relevance to EIC designs.

  15. Gyrophase-bunched Electrons: Cluster Observations and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgiolo, C.; Vinas, A. F.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of the solar wind with the Earth's bow shock is responsible for a number of phenomena both upstream and downstream. One of the least understood and studied of these is the generation of gyrophase-bunched electrons. We will describe initial work searching for and analyzing such events in (Plasma Electron And Current Experiment (PEACE) data from CLUSTER. Plasma simulations will complement the data analysis. Recent analyses suggest that gyrophase-bunched electrons are present rather frequently in the upstream region, due either to energization in the reflection off the shock front or, more likely, to phase trapping in locally produced whistler wave fields.

  16. Dynamical simulation of structural multiplicity in grain boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majid, I.; Bristowe, P.D.

    1987-06-01

    Work on a computer simulation study of a low-energy high-angle boundary structure which is not periodic have been recently reported. This result is of interest since grain boundary structures are usually assumed to have a periodicity corresponding to the appropriate coincidence site lattice (CSL) and many experimental observations of the structure of grain boundaries performed using conventional and high-resolution electron microscopy, electron diffraction and x-ray diffraction appear to support this work. However, this work, using empirical interatomic pair potentials and the relaxation method of molecular statics, have simulated a ..sigma.. = 5 36.87/sup 0/ (001) twist boundary and found a low energy structure having a larger repeat cell than the CSL and is composed of two different types of structural unit that are randomly distributed in the boundary plane. This result, which has been termed the multiplicity of grain boundary structures, has also been found in the simulation of tilt boundaries. The multiplicity phenomenon is of special interest in twist boundaries since it is used as a structural model to explain the x-ray scattering from a ..sigma.. = 5 boundary in gold. These scattering patterns had previously remained unexplained using stable structures that had simple CSL periodicity. Also, the effect of having a multiple number of low energy structural units coexisting in the grain boundary is of more general interest since it implies that the boundary structures may be quasi-periodic and, in some circumstances, may even result in a roughening of the boundary plane. This paper extends this work by showing, using molecular dynamics, that a multiplicity of structural units can actually nucleate spontaneously in a high-angle grain boundary at finite temperatures.

  17. Dynamical simulation of structural multiplicity in grain boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, I.; Bristowe, P. D.

    1987-06-01

    Work on a computer simulation study of a low-energy high-angle boundary structure which is not periodic have been recently reported. This result is of interest since grain boundary structures are usually assumed to have a periodicity corresponding to the appropriate coincidence site lattice (CSL) and many experimental observations of the structure of grain boundaries performed using conventional and high-resolution electron microscopy, electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction appear to support this work. However, this work, using empirical interatomic pair potentials and the relaxation method of molecular statics, have simulated a Sigma=5 (36.87 deg)(001) twist boundary and found a low energy structure having a larger repeat cell than the CSL and is composed of two different types of structural unit randomly distributed in the boundary plane. This result, termed the multiplicity of grain boundary structures, has also been found in the simulation of tilt boundaries. The multiplicity phenomenon is of special interest in twist boundaries since it is used as a structural model to explain the X-ray scattering from a Sigma=5 boundary in gold. These scattering patterns had previously remained unexplained using stable structures that had simple CSL periodicity. Also, the effect of having a multiple number of low energy structural units coexisting in the grain boundary is of more general interest since it implies that the boundary structures may be quasi-periodic and, in some circumstances, may even result in a roughening of the boundary plane. This work is extended by showing, using molecular dynamics, that a multiplicity of structural units can actually nucleate spontaneously in a high-angle grain boundary at finite temperatures.

  18. Theoretical study on the electronic structure of triphenyl sulfonium salts: Electronic excitation and electron transfer processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsalakis, Ioannis D.; Theodorakopoulos, Giannoula; Lathiotakis, Nektarios N.; Georgiadou, Dimitra G.; Vasilopoulou, Maria; Argitis, Panagiotis

    2014-05-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) and Time Dependent DFT calculations on triphenyl sulfonium cation (TPS) and the salts of TPS with triflate, nonaflate, perfluoro-1-octanesulfonate and hexafluoro antimonate anions are presented. These systems are widely used as cationic photoinitiators and as electron ejection layer for polymer light-emitting diodes. While some differences exist in the electronic structure of the different salts, their lowest energy intense absorption maxima are calculated at nearly the same energy for all systems. The first excited state of TPS and of the TPS salts is dissociating. Electron addition to the TPS salts lowers their energy by 1.0-1.33 eV.

  19. Quantum simulation of nuclear rearrangement in electron transfer reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Chong; McCammon, J. Andrew; Wolynes, Peter G.

    1989-01-01

    A quantum simulation scheme based on the path integral molecular dynamics technique has been used to calculate the effective activation energies associated with nuclear rearrangement in the electron transfer reactions Co(NH3)62+ + Co(NH3)63+ → Co(NH3)63+ + Co(NH3)62+ and Ru(NH3)62+ + Ru(NH3)63+ → Ru(NH3)63+ + Ru(NH3)62+. Even with a simple Hamiltonian and short time dynamic simulations, the results are in satisfactory agreement with other theoretical calculations. This simulation approach can...

  20. Surface electronic structure of rare earth metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blyth, R.I.R.; Dhesi, S.S.; Gravil, P.A.; Newstead, K.; Cosso, R.; Cole, R.J.; Patchett, A.J.; Mitrelias, T. (Surface Science Research Centre, Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom)); Prince, N.P.; Barrett, S.D. (Surface Science Research Centre, Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom) Oliver Lodge Lab., Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom))

    1992-03-25

    Angle-resolved UV photoemission has been used to investigate the electronic structure of the (0001) surfaces of scandium, yttrium, praseodymium and gadolinium. Off-normal emission spectra were recorded with high angular resolution, enabling detailed mapping of the dispersion of valence band features. Yttrium and gadolinium show similar results to published data from Ho(0001), suggesting minimal 4f influence in the lanthanide bandstructures. Differences seen on praseodymium and scandium may be due to 4f-derived states and surface states respectively. (orig.).

  1. Cobalamins uncovered by modern electronic structure calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta; Ryde, Ulf

    2009-01-01

    This review describes how computational methods have contributed to the held of cobalamin chemistry since the start of the new millennium. Cobalamins are cobalt-dependent cofactors that are used for alkyl transfer and radical initiation by several classes of enzymes. Since the entry of modern...... electronic-structure calculations, in particular density functional methods, the understanding of the molecular mechanism of cobalamins has changed dramatically, going from a dominating view of trans-steric strain effects to a much more complex view involving an arsenal of catalytic strategies. Among...

  2. The electronic structure of impurities in semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    Nylandsted larsen, A; Svane, A

    2002-01-01

    The electronic structure of isolated substitutional or interstitial impurities in group IV, IV-IV, and III-V compound semiconductors will be studied. Mössbauer spectroscopy will be used to investigate the incorporation of the implanted isotopes on the proper lattice sites. The data can be directly compared to theoretical calculations using the LMTO scheme. Deep level transient spectroscopy will be used to identify the band gap levels introduced by metallic impurities, mainly in Si~and~Si$ _{x}$Ge$_{1-x}$. \\\\ \\\\

  3. Atomic Reference Data for Electronic Structure Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Kotochigova, S; Shirley, E L

    We have generated data for atomic electronic structure calculations, to provide a standard reference for results of specified accuracy under commonly used approximations. Results are presented here for total energies and orbital energy eigenvalues for all atoms from H to U, at microHartree accuracy in the total energy, as computed in the local-density approximation (LDA) the local-spin-density approximation (LSD); the relativistic local-density approximation (RLDA); and scalar-relativistic local-density approximation (ScRLDA).

  4. Three-dimensional simulation of laser–plasma-based electron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A sequential three-dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell simulation code PICPSI-3D with a user friendly graphical user interface (GUI) has been developed and used to study the interaction of plasma with ultrahigh intensity laser radiation. A case study of laser–plasma-based electron acceleration has been carried out ...

  5. Three-dimensional simulation of laser–plasma-based electron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A sequential three-dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell simulation code PICPSI-3D with a user friendly graphical user interface (GUI) has been developed and used to study the interaction of plasma with ultrahigh intensity laser radiation. A case study of laser–plasma-based electron acceleration has been carried out to assess ...

  6. Simulation Tools for Power Electronics Courses Based on Java Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canesin, Carlos A.; Goncalves, Flavio A. S.; Sampaio, Leonardo P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents interactive power electronics educational tools. These interactive tools make use of the benefits of Java language to provide a dynamic and interactive approach to simulating steady-state ideal rectifiers (uncontrolled and controlled; single-phase and three-phase). Additionally, this paper discusses the development and use of…

  7. Kinetic simulations of ladder climbing by electron plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kentaro; Barth, Ido; Kaminski, Erez; Dodin, I. Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2017-05-01

    The energy of plasma waves can be moved up and down the spectrum using chirped modulations of plasma parameters, which can be driven by external fields. Depending on whether the wave spectrum is discrete (bounded plasma) or continuous (boundless plasma), this phenomenon is called ladder climbing (LC) or autoresonant acceleration of plasmons. It was first proposed by Barth et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 075001 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.075001] based on a linear fluid model. In this paper, LC of electron plasma waves is investigated using fully nonlinear Vlasov-Poisson simulations of collisionless bounded plasma. It is shown that, in agreement with the basic theory, plasmons survive substantial transformations of the spectrum and are destroyed only when their wave numbers become large enough to trigger Landau damping. Since nonlinear effects decrease the damping rate, LC is even more efficient when practiced on structures like quasiperiodic Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal (BGK) waves rather than on Langmuir waves per se.

  8. Communication: Relaxation-limited electronic currents in extended reservoir simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruss, Daniel; Smolyanitsky, Alex; Zwolak, Michael

    2017-10-01

    Open-system approaches are gaining traction in the simulation of charge transport in nanoscale and molecular electronic devices. In particular, "extended reservoir" simulations, where explicit reservoir degrees of freedom are present, allow for the computation of both real-time and steady-state properties but require relaxation of the extended reservoirs. The strength of this relaxation, γ, influences the conductance, giving rise to a "turnover" behavior analogous to Kramers turnover in chemical reaction rates. We derive explicit, general expressions for the weak and strong relaxation limits. For weak relaxation, the conductance increases linearly with γ and every electronic state of the total explicit system contributes to the electronic current according to its "reduced" weight in the two extended reservoir regions. Essentially, this represents two conductors in series—one at each interface with the implicit reservoirs that provide the relaxation. For strong relaxation, a "dual" expression-one with the same functional form-results, except now proportional to 1/γ and dependent on the system of interest's electronic states, reflecting that the strong relaxation is localizing electrons in the extended reservoirs. Higher order behavior (e.g., γ2 or 1/γ2) can occur when there is a gap in the frequency spectrum. Moreover, inhomogeneity in the frequency spacing can give rise to a pseudo-plateau regime. These findings yield a physically motivated approach to diagnosing numerical simulations and understanding the influence of relaxation, and we examine their occurrence in both simple models and a realistic, fluctuating graphene nanoribbon.

  9. Communication: Relaxation-limited electronic currents in extended reservoir simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruss, Daniel; Smolyanitsky, Alex; Zwolak, Michael

    2017-10-14

    Open-system approaches are gaining traction in the simulation of charge transport in nanoscale and molecular electronic devices. In particular, "extended reservoir" simulations, where explicit reservoir degrees of freedom are present, allow for the computation of both real-time and steady-state properties but require relaxation of the extended reservoirs. The strength of this relaxation, γ, influences the conductance, giving rise to a "turnover" behavior analogous to Kramers turnover in chemical reaction rates. We derive explicit, general expressions for the weak and strong relaxation limits. For weak relaxation, the conductance increases linearly with γ and every electronic state of the total explicit system contributes to the electronic current according to its "reduced" weight in the two extended reservoir regions. Essentially, this represents two conductors in series-one at each interface with the implicit reservoirs that provide the relaxation. For strong relaxation, a "dual" expression-one with the same functional form-results, except now proportional to 1/γ and dependent on the system of interest's electronic states, reflecting that the strong relaxation is localizing electrons in the extended reservoirs. Higher order behavior (e.g., γ(2) or 1/γ(2)) can occur when there is a gap in the frequency spectrum. Moreover, inhomogeneity in the frequency spacing can give rise to a pseudo-plateau regime. These findings yield a physically motivated approach to diagnosing numerical simulations and understanding the influence of relaxation, and we examine their occurrence in both simple models and a realistic, fluctuating graphene nanoribbon.

  10. Efficient electron open boundaries for simulating electrochemical cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zauchner, Mario G.; Horsfield, Andrew P.; Todorov, Tchavdar N.

    2018-01-01

    Nonequilibrium electrochemistry raises new challenges for atomistic simulation: we need to perform molecular dynamics for the nuclear degrees of freedom with an explicit description of the electrons, which in turn must be free to enter and leave the computational cell. Here we present a limiting form for electron open boundaries that we expect to apply when the magnitude of the electric current is determined by the drift and diffusion of ions in a solution and which is sufficiently computationally efficient to be used with molecular dynamics. We present tight-binding simulations of a parallel-plate capacitor with nothing, a dimer, or an atomic wire situated in the space between the plates. These simulations demonstrate that this scheme can be used to perform molecular dynamics simulations when there is an applied bias between two metal plates with, at most, weak electronic coupling between them. This simple system captures some of the essential features of an electrochemical cell, suggesting this approach might be suitable for simulations of electrochemical cells out of equilibrium.

  11. Simulating electron spin entanglement in a double quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Moreno, M. A.; Hernandez de La Luz, A. D.; Meza-Montes, Lilia

    2011-03-01

    One of the biggest advantages of having a working quantum-computing device when compared with a classical one, is the exponential speedup of calculations. This exponential increase is based on the ability of a quantum system to create and operate on entangled states. In order to study theoretically the entanglement between two electron spins, we simulate the dynamics of two electron spins in an electrostatically-defined double quantum dot with a finite barrier height between the dots. Electrons are initially confined to separated quantum dots. Barrier height is varied and the spin entanglement as a function of this variation is investigated. The evolution of the system is simulated by using a numerical approach for solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for two particles. Partially supported by VIEP-BUAP.

  12. Simulation of electron beam dynamics in a high-energy electron cooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A.V. [BINP, Acad.Lavrentiev, 11, BudkerINP, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: a.v.ivanov@inp.nsk.su; Panasyuk, V.M. [BINP, Acad.Lavrentiev, 11, BudkerINP, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Parkhomchuk, V.V. [BINP, Acad.Lavrentiev, 11, BudkerINP, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Reva, V.B. [BINP, Acad.Lavrentiev, 11, BudkerINP, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Tiunov, M.A. [BINP, Acad.Lavrentiev, 11, BudkerINP, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2006-03-01

    Electron cooling is now a standard tool for improvement of ion beam parameters in storage rings. In BINP, after successful development of several low-energy electron cooling devices, a project involving a high-energy electron cooler for GSI has been proposed. This cooler has a classical electrostatic scheme with electron energy of up to 8 MeV. Here we present results of numerical simulations of electron beam formation, acceleration and collection for this project. Special attention is paid to a description of the new codes developed in BINP. The electron gun and collector are simulated by the 2D USAM code. This code is modified to calculate collector performance with consideration of secondary emission. The BEAM code is used for simulation of dynamics in the accelerating section. A new 3D electrostatic code, ELEC3D, developed for the simulation of beam dynamics in bends with electrostatic compensation of the centrifugal drift, is described. This code is combined with the existing MAG3D magnetostatic code to provide a universal tool for 3D static calculations.

  13. Electronic structure and magnetism of complex materials

    CERN Document Server

    Papaconstantopoulos, D A

    2003-01-01

    Recent developments in electronic structure theory have led to a new understanding of magnetic materials at the microscopic level. This enables a truly first-principles approach to investigations of technologically important magnetic materials. Among these advances have been practical schemes for handling non-collinear magnetic systems, including relativity, understanding of the origins and role of orbital magnetism within band structure formalisms, density functional approaches for magnons and low-lying spin excitations, understanding of the interplay of orbital, spin and lattice orderings in complex oxides, transport theories for layered systems, and the theory of magnetic interactions in doped semiconductors. The book covers these recent developments with review articles by some of the main originators of these advances.

  14. Electronic structure of hcp transition metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, O.; Andersen, O. Krogh; Mackintosh, A. R.

    1975-01-01

    experimental evidence is available for this metal. Some comments are made about the calculational method, which has proved to be physically transparent, accurate and extremely fast, and the adequacy of the standard potential, which has now been successfully employed in calculations on the great majority......Using the linear muffin-tin-orbital method described in the previous paper, we have calculated the electronic structures of the hcp transition metals, Zr, Hf, Ru, and Os. We show how the band structures of these metals may be synthesized from the sp and d bands, and illustrate the effects...... of states of the four metals are presented, and the calculated heat capacities compared with experiment. The Fermi surfaces of both Ru and Os are found to be in excellent quantitative agreement with de Haas-van Alphen measurements, indicating that the calculated d-band position is misplaced by less than 10...

  15. Deep learning and the electronic structure problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Kyle; Spanner, Michael; Tamblyn, Isaac

    In the past decade, the fields of artificial intelligence and computer vision have progressed remarkably. Supported by the enthusiasm of large tech companies, as well as significant hardware advances and the utilization of graphical processing units to accelerate computations, deep neural networks (DNN) are gaining momentum as a robust choice for many diverse machine learning applications. We have demonstrated the ability of a DNN to solve a quantum mechanical eigenvalue equation directly, without the need to compute a wavefunction, and without knowledge of the underlying physics. We have trained a convolutional neural network to predict the total energy of an electron in a confining, 2-dimensional electrostatic potential. We numerically solved the one-electron Schrödinger equation for millions of electrostatic potentials, and used this as training data for our neural network. Four classes of potentials were assessed: the canonical cases of the harmonic oscillator and infinite well, and two types of randomly generated potentials for which no analytic solution is known. We compare the performance of the neural network and consider how these results could lead to future advances in electronic structure theory.

  16. Unfolding the band structure of electronic and photonic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maspero, Ross

    In this thesis, we develop a generalised unfolding formalism to investigate the electronic and photonic properties of aperiodically-structured materials. We initially focus on GaAsBi alloys for electronic systems and Penrose-structured materials for photonic systems, aperiodic materials that cannot be easily studied using conventional band structure methods. We then extend our study to the supercell approach which facilitates an accurate modelling of the aperiodic structures at the price of obscuring essential physical information, due to a band folding effect. Then introducing a generalised unfolding algorithm, we return the supercell band structure to a traditional form that can again be used to analyse the electronic and photonic properties of the system. GaAsBi, which is a material with the potential to suppress the dominant loss mechanisms in telecommunications devices, was studied using the unfolded supercell band structure approach. We investigated the effect of bismuth on the properties of a host GaAs structure, including band movement, band broadening and effective mass. We validated our approach through a detailed comparison of both band movement and effective masses to the currently available experimental data. Then, we introduced a formalism for calculating the CHSH Auger recombination rates from our unfolded band structure, which will assist in determining the efficiency of the material. Quasicrystalline photonic materials built on the skeleton of Penrose lattices have proven to display photonic properties comparable to the ones found in photonic crystals, but with the added promise of increased isotropy. The photonic band structure of these materials is a prime target for the unfolding formalism because it allows a full exploration of the influence of the increased geometrical symmetry on their photonic characteristics. Furthermore, the network structure investigated demonstrated the existence of a sub-fundamental photonic band gap, a characteristic

  17. Complete model description of an electron beam using ACCEPT Monte Carlo simulation code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, D.E. [Corporate Research Process Technologies Lab., St. Paul, MN (United States); Kensek, R.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-12-31

    A 3D model of a low voltage electron beam has been constructed using the ITS/ACCEPT Monte Carlo code in order to validate the code for this application and improve upon 1D slab geometry simulations. A line source description update to the code allows complete simulation of a low voltage electron beam with any filament length. Faithful reproduction of the geometric elements involved, especially the window support structure, can account for 90--95% of the dose received by routine dosimetry. With a 3D model, dose distributions in non-web articles can be determined and the effects of equipment modifications can be anticipated in advance.

  18. Beam distribution reconstruction simulation for electron beam probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yong-Chun; Mao, Rui-Shi; Li, Peng; Kang, Xin-Cai; Yin, Yan; Liu, Tong; You, Yao-Yao; Chen, Yu-Cong; Zhao, Tie-Cheng; Xu, Zhi-Guo; Wang, Yan-Yu; Yuan, You-Jin

    2017-07-01

    An electron beam probe (EBP) is a detector which makes use of a low-intensity and low-energy electron beam to measure the transverse profile, bunch shape, beam neutralization and beam wake field of an intense beam with small dimensions. While it can be applied to many aspects, we limit our analysis to beam distribution reconstruction. This kind of detector is almost non-interceptive for all of the beam and does not disturb the machine environment. In this paper, we present the theoretical aspects behind this technique for beam distribution measurement and some simulation results of the detector involved. First, a method to obtain a parallel electron beam is introduced and a simulation code is developed. An EBP as a profile monitor for dense beams is then simulated using the fast scan method for various target beam profiles, including KV distribution, waterbag distribution, parabolic distribution, Gaussian distribution and halo distribution. Profile reconstruction from the deflected electron beam trajectory is implemented and compared with the actual profile, and the expected agreement is achieved. Furthermore, as well as fast scan, a slow scan, i.e. step-by-step scan, is considered, which lowers the requirement for hardware, i.e. Radio Frequency deflector. We calculate the three-dimensional electric field of a Gaussian distribution and simulate the electron motion in this field. In addition, a fast scan along the target beam direction and slow scan across the beam are also presented, and can provide a measurement of longitudinal distribution as well as transverse profile simultaneously. As an example, simulation results for the China Accelerator Driven Sub-critical System (CADS) and High Intensity Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility (HIAF) are given. Finally, a potential system design for an EBP is described.

  19. Structural and electronic properties of copper-doped chalcogenide glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, David M.; Strachan, Alejandro

    2017-10-01

    Using ab initio molecular dynamics based on density functional theory, we study the atomic and electronic structure, and transport properties of copper-doped germanium-based chalcogenide glasses. These mixed ionic-electronic conductor materials exhibit resistance or threshold switching under external electric field depending on slight variations of chemical composition. Understanding the origin of the transport character is essential for the functionalization of glassy chalcogenides for nanoelectronics applications. To this end, we generated atomic structures for GeX3 and GeX6 (X = S, Se, Te) at different copper concentrations and characterized the atomic origin of electronic states responsible for transport and the tendency of copper clustering as a function of metal concentration. Our results show that copper dissolution energies explain the tendency of copper to agglomerate in telluride glasses, consistent with filamentary conduction. In contrast, copper is less prone to cluster in sulfides and selenides leading to hysteresisless threshold switching where the nature of transport is dominated by electronic midgap defects derived from polar chalcogen bonds and copper atoms. Simulated I -V curves show that at least 35% by weight of copper is required to achieve the current demands of threshold-based devices for memory applications.

  20. Short-duration Electron Precipitation Studied by Test Particle Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaejin Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Energy spectra of electron microbursts from 170 keV to 340 keV have been measured by the solid-state detectors aboard the low-altitude (680 km polar-orbiting Korean STSAT-1 (Science and Technology SATellite. These measurements have revealed two important characteristics unique to the microbursts: (1 They are produced by a fast-loss cone-filling process in which the interaction time for pitch-angle scattering is less than 50 ms and (2 The e-folding energy of the perpendicular component is larger than that of the parallel component, and the loss cone is not completely filled by electrons. To understand how wave-particle interactions could generate microbursts, we performed a test particle simulation and investigated how the waves scattered electron pitch angles within the timescale required for microburst precipitation. The application of rising-frequency whistler-mode waves to electrons of different energies moving in a dipole magnetic field showed that chorus magnetic wave fields, rather than electric fields, were the main cause of microburst events, which implied that microbursts could be produced by a quasi-adiabatic process. In addition, the simulation results showed that high-energy electrons could resonate with chorus waves at high magnetic latitudes where the loss cone was larger, which might explain the decreased e-folding energy of precipitated microbursts compared to that of trapped electrons.

  1. Numerical simulation of RCS for carrier electronic warfare airplanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Kuizhi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the radar cross section (RCS of carrier electronic warfare airplanes. Under the typical naval operations section, the mathematical model of the radar wave’s pitch angle incidence range analysis is established. Based on the CATIA software, considering dynamic deflections of duck wing leading edge flaps, flaperons, horizontal tail, and rudder, as well as aircraft with air-to-air missile, anti-radiation missile, electronic jamming pod, and other weapons, the 3D models of carrier electronic warfare airplanes Model A and Model B with weapons were established. Based on the physical optics method and the equivalent electromagnetic flow method, by the use of the RCSAnsys software, the characteristics of carrier electronic warfare airplanes’ RCS under steady and dynamic flights were simulated under the UHF, X, and S radar bands. This paper researches the detection probability of aircraft by radars under the condition of electronic warfare, and completes the mathematical statistical analysis of the simulation results. The results show that: The Model A of carrier electronic warfare airplane is better than Model B on stealth performance and on discover probability by radar detection effectively.

  2. Theory and Simulation of an Inverse Free Electron Laser Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S. K.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fang, J. M.; Marshall, T. C.

    1996-11-01

    An experimental demonstration of the acceleration of electrons using a high power CO2 laser in an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) is underway at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. This experiment has generated data, which we are attempting to simulate. Included in our studies are such effects as: a low-loss metallic waveguide with a dielectric coating on the walls; multi-mode coupling due to self-consistent interaction between the electrons and the optical wave; space charge (which is significant at lower laser power); energy-spread of the electrons; arbitrary wiggler field profile; and slippage. Two types of wiggler profile have been considered: a linear taper of the period, and a step-taper of the period (the period is ~ 3cm, the field is ~ 1T, and the wiggler length is 47cm). The energy increment of the electrons ( ~ 1-2%) is analyzed in detail as a function of laser power, wiggler parameters, and the initial beam energy (40MeV). For laser power ~ 0.5GW, the predictions of the simulations are in good accord with experimental results. A matter currently under study is the discrepancy between theory and observations for the electron energy distribution observed at the end of the IFEL. This work is supported by the Department of Energy.

  3. Electronic band structure of beryllium oxide

    CERN Document Server

    Sashin, V A; Kheifets, A S; Ford, M J

    2003-01-01

    The energy-momentum resolved valence band structure of beryllium oxide has been measured by electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS). Band dispersions, bandwidths and intervalence bandgap, electron momentum density (EMD) and density of occupied states have been extracted from the EMS data. The experimental results are compared with band structure calculations performed within the full potential linear muffin-tin orbital approximation. Our experimental bandwidths of 2.1 +- 0.2 and 4.8 +- 0.3 eV for the oxygen s and p bands, respectively, are in accord with theoretical predictions, as is the s-band EMD after background subtraction. Contrary to the calculations, however, the measured p-band EMD shows large intensity at the GAMMA point. The measured full valence bandwidth of 19.4 +- 0.3 eV is at least 1.4 eV larger than the theory. The experiment also finds a significantly higher value for the p-to-s-band EMD ratio in a broad momentum range compared to the theory.

  4. Computer simulation of electronic excitation in atomic collision cascades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvenbeck, A.

    2007-04-05

    The impact of an keV atomic particle onto a solid surface initiates a complex sequence of collisions among target atoms in a near-surface region. The temporal and spatial evolution of this atomic collision cascade leads to the emission of particles from the surface - a process usually called sputtering. In modern surface analysis the so called SIMS technology uses the flux of sputtered particles as a source of information on the microscopical stoichiometric structure in the proximity of the bombarded surface spots. By laterally varying the bombarding spot on the surface, the entire target can be scanned and chemically analyzed. However, the particle detection, which bases upon deflection in electric fields, is limited to those species that leave the surface in an ionized state. Due to the fact that the ionized fraction of the total flux of sputtered atoms often only amounts to a few percent or even less, the detection is often hampered by rather low signals. Moreover, it is well known, that the ionization probability of emitted particles does not only depend on the elementary species, but also on the local environment from which a particle leaves the surface. Therefore, the measured signals for different sputtered species do not necessarily represent the stoichiometric composition of the sample. In the literature, this phenomenon is known as the Matrix Effect in SIMS. In order to circumvent this principal shortcoming of SIMS, the present thesis develops an alternative computer simulation concept, which treats the electronic energy losses of all moving atoms as excitation sources feeding energy into the electronic sub-system of the solid. The particle kinetics determining the excitation sources are delivered by classical molecular dynamics. The excitation energy calculations are combined with a diffusive transport model to describe the spread of excitation energy from the initial point of generation. Calculation results yield a space- and time-resolved excitation

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of electron irradiated PVDF nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Jiayuan; Bhatta, Ram; Kisielowski, Christian; Lolla, Dinesh; Reneker, Darrell; Tsige, Mesfin; Taylor, Philip

    2014-03-01

    High-resolution, aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy was used to observe morphological changes and segmental motion of electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride) nanofibers in an 80 kilovolt electron beam. Atomic and molecular scale high-resolution images of fibers were made with an aberration corrected electron microscope. Chemical and morphological changes, which include the breaking of the fiber, loss of fluorine atoms and cross-linking of chains, caused by the high-energy electron beam were observed. We present the results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of such atomic and molecular level observations. The calculational models include the influence of chain scission, chain recoiling, and torsional defects on the morphology of a nanofiber. The effects of the loss of fluorine atoms and the applied tension on the morphology of the fibers were also investigated. Work supported by the Petroleum Research Fund of the American Chemical Society.

  6. Computer simulation of cluster impact induced electronic excitation of solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidtmann, B.; Hanke, S.; Duvenbeck, A. [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Duisburg-Essen, 47048 Duisburg (Germany); Wucher, A., E-mail: andreas.wucher@uni-deu.de [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Duisburg-Essen, 47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    We present a computational study of electronic excitation upon bombardment of a metal surface with cluster projectiles. Our model employs a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to calculate the particle dynamics following the projectile impact. Kinetic excitation is implemented via two mechanisms describing the electronic energy loss of moving particles: autoionization in close binary collisions and a velocity proportional friction force resulting from direct atom–electron collisions. Two different friction models are compared with respect to the predicted sputter yields after single atom and cluster bombardment. We find that a density dependent friction coefficient leads to a significant reduction of the total energy transferred to the electronic sub-system as compared to the Lindhard friction model, thereby strongly enhancing the predicted sputter yield under cluster bombardment conditions. In contrast, the yield predicted for monoatomic projectile bombardment remains practically unchanged.

  7. X-ray and photoelectron spectroscopy of the structure, reactivity, and electronic structure of semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamad, Kimberly Sue [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals are a system which has been the focus of interest due to their size dependent properties and their possible use in technological applications. Many chemical and physical properties vary systematically with the size of the nanocrystal and thus their study enables the investigation of scaling laws. Due to the increasing surface to volume ratio as size is decreased, the surfaces of nanocrystals are expected to have a large influence on their electronic, thermodynamic, and chemical behavior. In spite of their importance, nanocrystal surfaces are still relatively uncharacterized in terms of their structure, electronic properties, bonding, and reactivity. Investigation of nanocrystal surfaces is currently limited by what techniques to use, and which methods are suitable for nanocrystals is still being determined. This work presents experiments using x-ray and electronic spectroscopies to explore the structure, reactivity, and electronic properties of semiconductor (CdSe, InAs) nanocrystals and how they vary with size. Specifically, x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with multiple scattering simulations affords information about the structural disorder present at the surface of the nanocrystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) probe the electronic structure in terms of hole screening, and also give information about band lineups when the nanocrystal is placed in electric contact with a substrate. XPS of the core levels of the nanocrystal as a function of photo-oxidation time yields kinetic data on the oxidation reaction occurring at the surface of the nanocrystal.

  8. PIC simulation of electron acceleration in an underdense plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Darvish Molla

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the interesting Laser-Plasma phenomena, when the laser power is high and ultra intense, is the generation of large amplitude plasma waves (Wakefield and electron acceleration. An intense electromagnetic laser pulse can create plasma oscillations through the action of the nonlinear pondermotive force. electrons trapped in the wake can be accelerated to high energies, more than 1 TW. Of the wide variety of methods for generating a regular electric field in plasmas with strong laser radiation, the most attractive one at the present time is the scheme of the Laser Wake Field Accelerator (LWFA. In this method, a strong Langmuir wave is excited in the plasma. In such a wave, electrons are trapped and can acquire relativistic energies, accelerated to high energies. In this paper the PIC simulation of wakefield generation and electron acceleration in an underdense plasma with a short ultra intense laser pulse is discussed. 2D electromagnetic PIC code is written by FORTRAN 90, are developed, and the propagation of different electromagnetic waves in vacuum and plasma is shown. Next, the accuracy of implementation of 2D electromagnetic code is verified, making it relativistic and simulating the generating of wakefield and electron acceleration in an underdense plasma. It is shown that when a symmetric electromagnetic pulse passes through the plasma, the longitudinal field generated in plasma, at the back of the pulse, is weaker than the one due to an asymmetric electromagnetic pulse, and thus the electrons acquire less energy. About the asymmetric pulse, when front part of the pulse has smaller time rise than the back part of the pulse, a stronger wakefield generates, in plasma, at the back of the pulse, and consequently the electrons acquire more energy. In an inverse case, when the rise time of the back part of the pulse is bigger in comparison with that of the back part, a weaker wakefield generates and this leads to the fact that the electrons

  9. Reversible Hydrogen Storage Materials – Structure, Chemistry, and Electronic Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Ian M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Johnson, Duane D. [Ames Lab., Iowa

    2014-06-21

    To understand the processes involved in the uptake and release of hydrogen from candidate light-weight metal hydride storage systems, a combination of materials characterization techniques and first principle calculation methods have been employed. In addition to conventional microstructural characterization in the transmission electron microscope, which provides projected information about the through thickness microstructure, electron tomography methods were employed to determine the three-dimensional spatial distribution of catalyst species for select systems both before and after dehydrogenation. Catalyst species identification as well as compositional analysis of the storage material before and after hydrogen charging and discharging was performed using a combination of energy dispersive spectroscopy, EDS, and electron energy loss spectroscopy, EELS. The characterization effort was coupled with first-principles, electronic-structure and thermodynamic techniques to predict and assess meta-stable and stable phases, reaction pathways, and thermodynamic and kinetic barriers. Systems studied included:NaAlH4, CaH2/CaB6 and Ca(BH4)2, MgH2/MgB2, Ni-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, TiH2-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, LiBH4, Aluminum-based systems and Aluminum

  10. Trapped Electron Instability of Electron Plasma Waves: Vlasov simulations and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Richard; Chapman, Thomas; Brunner, Stephan

    2013-10-01

    The growth of sidebands of a large-amplitude electron plasma wave is studied with Vlasov simulations for a range of amplitudes (. 001 vph = +/-ωbe , where vph =ω0 /k0 and ωbe is the bounce frequency of a deeply trapped electron. In 2D simulations, we find that the instability persists and co-exists with the filamentation instability. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and funded by the Laboratory Research and Development Program at LLNL under project tracking code 12-ERD.

  11. Simulation of differential electron spectra in the KATRIN WGTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haussmann, Norman [Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal (Germany); Collaboration: KATRIN-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment aims to measure the effective electron antineutrino mass in a model-independent way with a sensitivity of 200 meV/c{sup 2} (90 % C.L.). In order to extract the neutrino mass the Windowless Gaseous Tritium Source (WGTS) properties of KATRIN need to be known to a high precision. For this reason several monitoring systems are installed. One of them, situated in the transport section, is the Forward Beam Monitor (FBM). The FBM is capable of recording the electron rate (10{sup 6} e/s.mm{sup 2}) and the differential electron spectra with a high energy resolution and precision. The electrons in the WGTS are emitted isotropically and guided magnetically. Thereby, the electrons undergo different effects changing their kinetic energy and angle to the guiding field. The major influence herein is elastic and inelastic scattering. Changes in the column density are expected to have a great influence on lower energetic electrons and thereby change the spectrum and count rate at the FBM-detector. Monte-Carlo simulations have been performed to understand the influences of varying column densities and temperature fluctuations on the expected count rate and spectra by tracking the emitted electrons. The results will be shown in this talk.

  12. Annular dark field transmission electron microscopy for protein structure determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeck, Philip J.B., E-mail: Philip.Koeck@ki.se

    2016-02-15

    Recently annular dark field (ADF) transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been advocated as a means of recording images of biological specimens with better signal to noise ratio (SNR) than regular bright field images. I investigate whether and how such images could be used to determine the three-dimensional structure of proteins given that an ADF aperture with a suitable pass-band can be manufactured and used in practice. I develop an approximate theory of ADF-TEM image formation for weak amplitude and phase objects and test this theory using computer simulations. I also test whether these simulated images can be used to calculate a three-dimensional model of the protein using standard software and discuss problems and possible ways to overcome these. - Highlights: • I present theory and simulations for imaging proteins using annular dark field transmission electron microscopy and investigate its suitability for 3D-reconstruction. • I show that the images are approximately proportional to the square of the projected electrostatic potential within a given passband ). • 3D-reconstructions show errors in the interior of the molecule. More accurate maps might be calculated by reconstruction algorithms that take into account non-linear image formation.

  13. GEANT4 simulation of electron energy deposition in extended media

    CERN Document Server

    Kadri, O; Gharbi, F; Trabelsi, A

    2007-01-01

    The present work demonstrates that GEANT4 yields a consistent description of electron transport processes in semi-infinite homogeneous and heterogeneous extended media. This comparison covers the e− energy deposition profiles in a range of elements from aluminum to tantalum through molybdenum at source energies from 0.3 to 1.0 MeV and at incident angles from 0° to 60°. The good agreement between simulation results and data confirms that the Monte Carlo used code is capable of accurate electron beam energy deposition calculation even under such conditions.

  14. New electron multiple scattering distributions for Monte Carlo transport simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chibani, Omar (Haut Commissariat a la Recherche (C.R.S.), 2 Boulevard Franz Fanon, Alger B.P. 1017, Alger-Gare (Algeria)); Patau, Jean Paul (Laboratoire de Biophysique et Biomathematiques, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques, Universite Paul Sabatier, 35 Chemin des Maraichers, 31062 Toulouse cedex (France))

    1994-10-01

    New forms of electron (positron) multiple scattering distributions are proposed. The first is intended for use in the conditions of validity of the Moliere theory. The second distribution takes place when the electron path is so short that only few elastic collisions occur. These distributions are adjustable formulas. The introduction of some parameters allows impositions of the correct value of the first moment. Only positive and analytic functions were used in constructing the present expressions. This makes sampling procedures easier. Systematic tests are presented and some Monte Carlo simulations, as benchmarks, are carried out. ((orig.))

  15. Numerical Simulation of Transient Moisture Transfer into an Electronic Enclosure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shojaee Nasirabadi, Parizad; Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    inside the enclosures to be able to protect the electronic systems.In this work, moisture transfer into a typical electronic enclosure is numerically studied using CFD. In order to reduce theCPU-time and make a way for subsequent factorial design analysis, a simplifying modification is applied in which...... the real3D geometry is approximated by a 2D axial symmetry one. The results for 2D and 3D models were compared in order tocalibrate the 2D representation. Furthermore, simulation results were compared with experimental data and good agreementwas found....

  16. IrPd nanoalloys: simulations, from surface segregation to local electronic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andriamiharintsoa, T. H. [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg CNRS-UDS UMR 7504 (France); Rakotomahevitra, A. [Institut pour la Maîtrise de l’Énergie, Faculté des sciences d’Antananarivo (Madagascar); Piccolo, L. [Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse et l’Environnement de Lyon IRCELYON, UMR 5256 CNRS and Université Lyon 1 (France); Goyhenex, C., E-mail: christine.goyhenex@ipcms.unistra.fr [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg CNRS-UDS UMR 7504 (France)

    2015-05-15

    Using semi-empirical modeling, namely tight-binding at different levels of accuracy, the chemical, crystallographic, and electronic structures of bimetallic IrPd nanoparticles are characterized. For the purpose, model cuboctahedral particles containing 561 atoms are considered. Atomistic simulations show that core–shell nanoparticles are highly stable, with a strong surface segregation of Pd, at least for one atomic shell thickness. Within self-consistent tight-binding calculations founded on the density functional theory, an accurate insight is given into the electronic structure of these materials which have a high potential as catalysts.

  17. Xyce™ Parallel Electronic Simulator Reference Guide, Version 6.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical Models and Simulation; Aadithya, Karthik V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical Models and Simulation; Mei, Ting [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical Models and Simulation; Russo, Thomas V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical Models and Simulation; Schiek, Richard L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical Models and Simulation; Sholander, Peter E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical Models and Simulation; Thornquist, Heidi K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical Models and Simulation; Verley, Jason C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical Models and Simulation

    2016-06-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users’ Guide. The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users’ Guide. The information herein is subject to change without notice. Copyright © 2002-2016 Sandia Corporation. All rights reserved.

  18. Computational electronics semiclassical and quantum device modeling and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Vasileska, Dragica; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Starting with the simplest semiclassical approaches and ending with the description of complex fully quantum-mechanical methods for quantum transport analysis of state-of-the-art devices, Computational Electronics: Semiclassical and Quantum Device Modeling and Simulation provides a comprehensive overview of the essential techniques and methods for effectively analyzing transport in semiconductor devices. With the transistor reaching its limits and new device designs and paradigms of operation being explored, this timely resource delivers the simulation methods needed to properly model state-of

  19. Electron Liquids in Semiconductor Quantum Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aron Pinczuk

    2009-05-25

    The groups led by Stormer and Pinczuk have focused this project on goals that seek the elucidation of novel many-particle effects that emerge in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) as the result from fundamental quantum interactions. This experimental research is conducted under extreme conditions of temperature and magnetic field. From the materials point of view, the ultra-high mobility systems in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum structures continue to be at the forefront of this research. The newcomer materials are based on graphene, a single atomic layer of graphite. The graphene research is attracting enormous attention from many communities involved in condensed matter research. The investigated many-particle phenomena include the integer and fractional quantum Hall effect, composite fermions, and Dirac fermions, and a diverse group of electron solid and liquid crystal phases. The Stormer group performed magneto-transport experiments and far-infrared spectroscopy, while the Pinczuk group explores manifestations of such phases in optical spectra.

  20. Electronic structure and catalysis on metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, Jeff; Nørskov, Jens K; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2002-01-01

    The powerful computational resources available to scientists today, together with recent improvements in electronic structure calculation algorithms, are providing important new tools for researchers in the fields of surface science and catalysis. In this review, we discuss first principles calculations that are now capable of providing qualitative and, in many cases, quantitative insights into surface chemistry. The calculations can aid in the establishment of chemisorption trends across the transition metals, in the characterization of reaction pathways on individual metals, and in the design of novel catalysts. First principles studies provide an excellent fundamental complement to experimental investigations of the above phenomena and can often allow the elucidation of important mechanistic details that would be difficult, if not impossible, to determine from experiments alone.

  1. Electronic structures of reconstructed zigzag silicene nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yi, E-mail: dingyi2001@tsinghua.org.cn, E-mail: wangyanli-04@tsinghua.org.cn [Department of Physics, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310036 (China); Wang, Yanli, E-mail: dingyi2001@tsinghua.org.cn, E-mail: wangyanli-04@tsinghua.org.cn [Department of Physics, Center for Optoelectronics Materials and Devices, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Xiasha College Park, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310018 (China)

    2014-02-24

    Edge states and magnetism are crucial for spintronic applications of nanoribbons. Here, using first-principles calculations, we explore structural stabilities and electronic properties of zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs) with Klein and pentagon-heptagon reconstructions. Comparing to unreconstructed zigzag edges, deformed bare pentagon-heptagon ones are favored under H-poor conditions, while H-rich surroundings stabilize di-hydrogenated Klein edges. These Klein edges have analogous magnetism to zigzag ones, which also possess the electric-field-induced half-metallicity of nanoribbons. Moreover, diverse magnetic states can be achieved by asymmetric Klein and zigzag edges into ZSiNRs, which could be transformed from antiferromagnetic-semiconductors to bipolar spin-gapless-semiconductors and ferromagnetic-metals depending on edge hydrogenations.

  2. Surface Structure of Hydroxyapatite from Simulated Annealing Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Xu, Dingguo; Yang, Mingli; Zhang, Xingdong

    2016-05-10

    The surface structure of hydroxyapatite (HAP) is crucial for its bioactivity. Using a molecular dynamics simulated annealing method, we studied the structure and its variation with annealing temperature of the HAP (100) surface. In contrast to the commonly used HAP surface model, which is sliced from HAP crystal and then relaxed at 0 K with first-principles or force-field calculations, a new surface structure with gradual changes from ordered inside to disordered on the surface was revealed. The disordering is dependent on the annealing temperature, Tmax. When Tmax increases up to the melting point, which was usually adopted in experiments, the disordering increases, as reflected by its radial distribution functions, structural factors, and atomic coordination numbers. The disordering of annealed structures does not show significant changes when Tmax is above the melting point. The thickness of disordered layers is about 10 Å. The surface energy of the annealed structures at high temperature is significantly less than that of the crystal structure relaxed at room temperature. A three-layer model of interior, middle, and surface was then proposed to describe the surface structure of HAP. The interior layer retains the atomic configurations in crystal. The middle layer has its atoms moved and its groups rotated about their original locations. In the surface layer, the atomic arrangements are totally different from those in crystal. In particular for the hydroxyl groups, they move outward and cover the Ca(2+) ions, leaving holes occupied by the phosphate groups. Our study suggested a new model with disordered surface structures for studying the interaction of HAP-based biomaterials with other molecules.

  3. CMS: Simulated Higgs to two jets and two electrons

    CERN Multimedia

    1997-01-01

    This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the CMS detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in 2008. Here a Higgs boson is produced which decays into two jets of hadrons and two electrons. The lines represent the possible paths of particles produced by the proton-proton collision in the detector while the energy these particles deposit is shown in blue.

  4. Modelling and simulation of beam formation in electron guns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabchevski, S. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. po Elektronika; Mladenov, G. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. po Elektronika; Titov, A. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Barbarich, I. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1996-11-01

    This paper describes a new PC version of the software package GUN-EBT for computer simulation of beam formation in rotationally symmetric electron guns with thermionic cathodes. It is based on a self-consistent physical model which takes into account the beam space charge and the initial velocity effects. The theoretical framework used for both the formulation of the model and for the interpretation of the results of numerical experiments is the formalism of the charged particle dynamics in phase space. This enables not only a trajectory analysis (ray tracing) but also a phase-space analysis of beams to be performed. The package can be used as an effective tool for computer aided design and optimization of electron guns in various electron-optical systems. The operation of the package is illustrated with a typical example. (orig.).

  5. Hybrid Method Simulation of Slender Marine Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Niels Hørbye

    This present thesis consists of an extended summary and five appended papers concerning various aspects of the implementation of a hybrid method which combines classical simulation methods and artificial neural networks. The thesis covers three main topics. Common for all these topics...... is that they deal with time domain simulation of slender marine structures such as mooring lines and flexible risers used in deep sea offshore installations. The first part of the thesis describes how neural networks can be designed and trained to cover a large number of different sea states. Neural networks can...... to simulate dynamic response of specific critical hot spots on a flexible riser. In the design of mooring lines only top tension forces are considered. These forces can easily be determined by a single neural network. Riser design, depending on the applied configuration, requires detailed analysis of several...

  6. Discrete simulation applied to the production process of electronic components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willians dos Santos Lúcio

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to demonstrate through simulation techniques and analyses performed in production systems of a company located in the city of Guarulhos and which produces an electronic component that has plastic, acrylic and steel, the improvements that can be applied in it with the use of a specialist software to assist in troubleshooting and help the manager in decision making. For the study, concepts of simulation, Monte Carlo method, queueing theory and the software Arena will be used. By simulating processes and evaluating performance, the software offers reports that assist the manager to see more clearly potential bottlenecks and points of improvement in process, thus effectively contributing to the company's competitiveness on the market. With the study presented in this article it will be possible to verify the importance of the use of this tool.

  7. III - V semiconductor structures for biosensor and molecular electronics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luber, S.M.

    2007-01-15

    The present work reports on the employment of III-V semiconductor structures to biosensor and molecular electronics applications. In the first part a sensor based on a surface-near two dimensional electron gas for a use in biological environment is studied. Such a two dimensional electron gas inherently forms in a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown, doped aluminum gallium arsenide - gallium arsenide (AlGaAs-GaAs) heterostructure. Due to the intrinsic instability of GaAs in aqueous solutions the device is passivated by deposition of a monolayer of 4'-substituted mercaptobiphenyl molecules. The influence of these molecules which bind to the GaAs via a sulfur group is investigated by Kelvin probe measurements in air. They reveal a dependence of GaAs electron affinity on the intrinsic molecular dipole moment of the mercaptobiphenyls. Furthermore, transient surface photovoltage measurements are presented which demonstrate an additional influence of mercaptobiphenyl chemisorption on surface carrier recombination rates. As a next step, the influence of pH-value and salt concentration upon the sensor device is discussed based on the results obtained from sensor conductance measurements in physiological solutions. A dependence of the device surface potential on both parameters due to surface charging is deduced. Model calculations applying Poisson-Boltzmann theory reveal as possible surface charging mechanisms either the adsorption of OH- ions on the surface, or the dissociation of OH groups in surface oxides. A comparison between simulation settings and physical device properties indicate the OH- adsorption as the most probable mechanism. In the second part of the present study the suitability of MBE grown III-V semiconductor structures for molecular electronics applications is examined. In doing so, a method to fabricate nanometer separated, coplanar, metallic electrodes based on the cleavage of a supporting AlGaAs-GaAs heterostructure is presented. This is followed

  8. The Electronic Structure of Cd33Se33 Quantum Dots Passivated with Various [Me(bpy)3]2+ Complexes: A Comparative Study Based on DFT and TDDFT Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Peng; Mayo, Michael; Kilina, Svetlana

    2013-03-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have attracted a great deal of attention in recent years, in part, due to their tunable photoelectric properties. In particular, the use of ligands to passivate the surface of QDs was found to introduce hybrid band structures which could affect the photoelectric properties of QDs. Specifically, it has been shown that the photon-electron relaxation rate of QDs can be accelerated by surface passivation with ligands. The bipyridine dye has the lowest exciting energy due to the metal to ligand charge transfer in nature, so in this study we investigated different tris(bipyridine) metal(II) complex ([Me(bpy)3]2+ (Me =Cadmium, Chromium, Iron, Osmium, Nickel, Ruthenium) ligands to passivate the surface of Cd33Se33 (QDs). We also investigate the hybrid band structure and absorption spectrum. The QDs-[Me(bpy)3]2+ structure was optimized through density functional method (DFT), and the density of states of different components of QDs-[Me(bpy)3]2+ was revealed. The bypiridine was found to introduce a lower conduction band into QDs, and the valence band of the metal was found close to the edge of valence band of QDs after adding solvent. In addition, we use time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) to study the excited electron states of the hybrid structure.

  9. Xyce parallel electronic simulator : users' guide.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Ting; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Santarelli, Keith R.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd Stirling; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Warrender, Christina E.; Keiter, Eric Richard; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick

    2011-05-01

    This manual describes the use of the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator. Xyce has been designed as a SPICE-compatible, high-performance analog circuit simulator, and has been written to support the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. This development has focused on improving capability over the current state-of-the-art in the following areas: (1) Capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel computing platforms (up to thousands of processors). Note that this includes support for most popular parallel and serial computers; (2) Improved performance for all numerical kernels (e.g., time integrator, nonlinear and linear solvers) through state-of-the-art algorithms and novel techniques. (3) Device models which are specifically tailored to meet Sandia's needs, including some radiation-aware devices (for Sandia users only); and (4) Object-oriented code design and implementation using modern coding practices that ensure that the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator will be maintainable and extensible far into the future. Xyce is a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase - a message passing parallel implementation - which allows it to run efficiently on the widest possible number of computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel as well as heterogeneous platforms. Careful attention has been paid to the specific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiency is achieved as the number of processors grows. The development of Xyce provides a platform for computational research and development aimed specifically at the needs of the Laboratory. With Xyce, Sandia has an 'in-house' capability with which both new electrical (e.g., device model development) and algorithmic (e.g., faster time-integration methods, parallel solver algorithms) research and development can be performed. As a result, Xyce is

  10. Geometry, mechanics, and electronics of singular structures and wrinkles in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Vitor M; Castro Neto, A H; Liang, H Y; Mahadevan, L

    2010-10-08

    As the thinnest atomic membrane, graphene presents an opportunity to combine geometry, elasticity, and electronics at the limits of their validity. We describe the transport and electronic structure in the neighborhood of conical singularities, the elementary excitations of the ubiquitous wrinkled and crumpled graphene. We use a combination of atomistic mechanical simulations, analytical geometry, and transport calculations in curved graphene, and exact diagonalization of the electronic spectrum to calculate the effects of geometry on electronic structure, transport, and mobility in suspended samples, and how the geometry-generated pseudomagnetic and pseudoelectric fields might disrupt Landau quantization.

  11. Kinematic structures in galactic disc simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca-Fàbrega, S.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Figueras, F.; Antoja, T.; Valenzuela, O.

    2011-10-01

    N-body and test particle simulations have been used to characterize the stellar streams in the galactic discs of Milky Way type galaxies. Tools such as the second and third order moments of the velocity ellipsoid and clustering methods -EM-WEKA and FoF- allow characterizing these kinematic structures and linking them to the stellar overdensities and to the resonant regions all through the disc.

  12. Full 3D opto-electronic simulation tool for nanotextured solar cells (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michallon, Jérôme; Collin, Stéphane

    2017-04-01

    Increasing efforts on the photovoltaics research have recently been devoted to material savings, leading to the emergence of new designs based on nanotextured and nanowire-based solar cells. The use of small absorber volumes, light-trapping nanostructures and unconventional carrier collection schemes (radial nanowire junctions, point contacts in planar structures,…) increases the impact of surfaces recombination and induces homogeneity in the photogenerated carrier concentrations. The investigation of their impacts on the device performances need to be addressed using full 3D coupled opto-electrical modeling. In this context, we have developed a new tool for full 3D opto-electrical simulation using the most advanced optical and electrical simulation techniques. We will present an overview of its simulation capabilities and the key issues that have been solved to make it fully operational and reliable. We will provide various examples of opto-electronic simulation of (i) nanostructured solar cells with localized contacts and (ii) nanowire solar cells. We will also show how opto-electronic simulation can be used to simulate light- and electron-beam induced current (LBIC/EBIC) experiments, targeting quantitative analysis of the passivation properties of surfaces.

  13. Theory and simulation of an inverse free-electron laser experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, S. K.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fang, J.-M.; Marshall, T. C.

    1997-03-01

    An experimental demonstration of the acceleration of electrons using a high-power CO2 laser interacting with a relativistic electron beam moving along a wiggler has been carried out at the Accelerator Test Facility of the Brookhaven National Laboratory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 2690 (1996)]. The data generated by this inverse free-electron-laser (IFEL) experiment are studied by means of theory and simulation. Included in the simulations are such effects as: a low-loss metallic waveguide with a dielectric coating on the walls; multi-mode coupling due to self-consistent interaction between the electrons and the optical wave; space charge; energy spread of the electrons; and arbitrary wiggler-field profile. Two types of wiggler profile are considered: a linear taper of the period, and a step-taper of the period. (The period of the wiggler is ˜3 cm, its magnetic field is ˜1 T, and the wiggler length is 0.47 m.) The energy increment of the electrons (˜1-2%) is analyzed in detail as a function of laser power, wiggler parameters, and the initial beam energy (˜40 MeV). At a laser power level ˜0.5 Gw, the simulation results on energy gain are in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. Preliminary results on the electron energy distribution at the end of the IFEL are presented. Whereas the experiment produces a near-monotone distribution of electron energies with the peak shifted to higher energy, the simulation shows a more structured and non-monotonic distribution at the end of the wiggler. Effects that may help reconcile these differences are considered.

  14. Nuclear structure functions at a future electron-ion collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenauer, E. C.; Fazio, S.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Paukkunen, H.; Zurita, P.

    2017-12-01

    The quantitative knowledge of heavy nuclei's partonic structure is currently limited to rather large values of momentum fraction x —robust experimental constraints below x ˜10-2 at low resolution scale Q2 are particularly scarce. This is in sharp contrast to the free proton's structure which has been probed in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) measurements down to x ˜10-5 at perturbative resolution scales. The construction of an electron-ion collider (EIC) with a possibility to operate with a wide variety of nuclei, will allow one to explore the low-x region in much greater detail. In the present paper we simulate the extraction of the nuclear structure functions from measurements of inclusive and charm reduced cross sections at an EIC. The potential constraints are studied by analyzing simulated data directly in a next-to-leading order global fit of nuclear Parton Distribution Functions based on the recent EPPS16 analysis. A special emphasis is placed on studying the impact an EIC would have on extracting the nuclear gluon parton distribution function, the partonic component most prone to nonlinear effects at low Q2. In comparison to the current knowledge, we find that the gluon parton distribution function can be measured at an EIC with significantly reduced uncertainties.

  15. Electronic Structure of the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, B.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1982-01-01

    itinerant to localized 5f electron behaviour calculated to take place between plutonium and americium. From experimental data it is shown that the screening of deep core-holes is due to 5f electrons for the lighter actinide elements and 6d electrons for the heavier elements. A simplified model for the full...

  16. Ion and electron heating during magnetic reconnection in simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, Colby C.

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental plasma process that converts energy stored in magnetic fields into kinetic energy. Reconnection is believed to occur in astrophysical, heliospheric and laboratory plasma. In this thesis we examine how magnetic energy is converted into electron and ion thermal energy during collisionless magnetic reconnection using fully kinetic 2.5D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. We find that both ion and electron heating are reasonably well correlated with the inflowing available magnetic energy per ion electron pair, or more succinctly, to an energy associated with the upstream Alfven speed (micAup 2). We also show that while the upstream Alfven speed is the primary factor controlling the heating, other factors, including the strength of a guide field and the electron to ion temperature ratio, affect the heating as well. Ion heating is found to be inversely proportional to the strength of the guide field relative to the reconnecting field. In anti-parallel reconnection, ion heating is suppressed by an upstream electron to ion temperature ratio greater than unity; conversely, electron heating is found to be enhanced by these upstream parameters. It is also shown that increasing the upstream ion temperature normalized to the Alfven speed squared (beta i) reduces the reconnection outflow velocity in the exhaust for anti-parallel reconnection. The firehose instability in the exhaust limits the field line (and thus the outflow) velocity and it is shown that v0 = ⅓cAr2/√ Ti||/mi, where v 0 is the outflow velocity and Ti|| is the ion parallel temperature in the exhaust. While the upstream temperatures appear to cause the heating to deviate from scaling with mic Aup2, the total heating (ion + electron) is significantly better correlated with micAup 2, giving DeltaTi + Delta Te = 0.14, micAup 2. This implies that the total fraction of magnetic energy released into thermal energy is a constant, and this constant fraction of magnetic energy is

  17. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator Reference Guide Version 6.7.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Aadithya, Karthik Venkatraman [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mei, Ting [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Russo, Thomas V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schiek, Richard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sholander, Peter E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thornquist, Heidi K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Verley, Jason [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users' Guide [1] . The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce . This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users' Guide [1] . The information herein is subject to change without notice. Copyright c 2002-2017 Sandia Corporation. All rights reserved. Trademarks Xyce TM Electronic Simulator and Xyce TM are trademarks of Sandia Corporation. Orcad, Orcad Capture, PSpice and Probe are registered trademarks of Cadence Design Systems, Inc. Microsoft, Windows and Windows 7 are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. Medici, DaVinci and Taurus are registered trademarks of Synopsys Corporation. Amtec and TecPlot are trademarks of Amtec Engineering, Inc. All other trademarks are property of their respective owners. Contacts World Wide Web http://xyce.sandia.gov https://info.sandia.gov/xyce (Sandia only) Email xyce@sandia.gov (outside Sandia) xyce-sandia@sandia.gov (Sandia only) Bug Reports (Sandia only) http://joseki-vm.sandia.gov/bugzilla http://morannon.sandia.gov/bugzilla

  18. Electronic structure and properties of Cu2O

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz Sabín, Eliseo; Álvarez, Santiago (Álvarez Reverter); Alemany i Cahner, Pere; Evarestov, R. A. (Robert Aleksandrovich)

    1997-01-01

    The structural and electronic properties of Cu2O have been investigated using the periodic Hartree-Fock method and a posteriori density-functional corrections. The lattice parameter, bulk modulus, and elastic constants have been calculated. The electronic structure of and bonding in Cu2O are analyzed and compared with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra, showing a good agreement for the valence-band states. To check the quality of the calculated electron density, static structure factors...

  19. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator Reference Guide Version 6.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mei, Ting [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Russo, Thomas V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schiek, Richard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sholander, Peter E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thornquist, Heidi K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Verley, Jason [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Baur, David Gregory [Raytheon, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users' Guide [1] . The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce . This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users' Guide [1] . Trademarks The information herein is subject to change without notice. Copyright c 2002-2015 Sandia Corporation. All rights reserved. Xyce TM Electronic Simulator and Xyce TM are trademarks of Sandia Corporation. Portions of the Xyce TM code are: Copyright c 2002, The Regents of the University of California. Produced at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Written by Alan Hindmarsh, Allan Taylor, Radu Serban. UCRL-CODE-2002-59 All rights reserved. Orcad, Orcad Capture, PSpice and Probe are registered trademarks of Cadence Design Systems, Inc. Microsoft, Windows and Windows 7 are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. Medici, DaVinci and Taurus are registered trademarks of Synopsys Corporation. Amtec and TecPlot are trademarks of Amtec Engineering, Inc. Xyce 's expression library is based on that inside Spice 3F5 developed by the EECS Department at the University of California. The EKV3 MOSFET model was developed by the EKV Team of the Electronics Laboratory-TUC of the Technical University of Crete. All other trademarks are property of their respective owners. Contacts Bug Reports (Sandia only) http://joseki.sandia.gov/bugzilla http://charleston.sandia.gov/bugzilla World Wide Web http://xyce.sandia.gov http://charleston.sandia.gov/xyce (Sandia only) Email xyce@sandia.gov (outside Sandia) xyce-sandia@sandia.gov (Sandia only)

  20. Numerical simulation of electron beam welding with beam oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trushnikov, D. N.; Permyakov, G. L.

    2017-02-01

    This research examines the process of electron-beam welding in a keyhole mode with the use of beam oscillations. We study the impact of various beam oscillations and their parameters on the shape of the keyhole, the flow of heat and mass transfer processes and weld parameters to develop methodological recommendations. A numerical three-dimensional mathematical model of electron beam welding is presented. The model was developed on the basis of a heat conduction equation and a Navier-Stokes equation taking into account phase transitions at the interface of a solid and liquid phase and thermocapillary convection (Marangoni effect). The shape of the keyhole is determined based on experimental data on the parameters of the secondary signal by using the method of a synchronous accumulation. Calculations of thermal and hydrodynamic processes were carried out based on a computer cluster, using a simulation package COMSOL Multiphysics.

  1. Nonlinear growth of structure in cosmological simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukic, Zarija

    2008-06-01

    Upcoming cosmological observations (South Pole Telescope, Atacama Cosmology Telescope, Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, and Planck) will allow for accurately probing structures and their growth, some into highly nonlinear regimes. These observations, in combination with already very accurate measurements of the expansion rate of the universe, will not only constrain cosmological parameters to a percent level, but will also answer what is the theory of gravity on the largest scales. In order to obtain theoretical predictions for different measurables (like the distribution of masses, spatial correlations), large numerical simulations have to be carried out. In this context, their main goal is to quantify how are such measurables affected by a change of cosmological parameters. The promised high accuracy of observations make the simulation task very demanding, as the theoretical predictions have to be at least as accurate as the observations. In this thesis, we study the formation and evolution of dark matter halos in ACDM models over a wide range of cosmological epochs, from redshift z=20 to the present. First, we focus on the halo mass function, likely a key probe of cosmological growth of structure. By performing a large suite (60 simulations) of nested- box N-body simulations with careful convergence and error controls, we determine the mass function and its evolution with excellent statistical and systematic errors, reaching a few percent over most of the considered redshift and mass range. Our results are consistent with a 'universal' form for the mass function, and are in a good agreement with the Warren et al. analytic fit. Next, we study the structure of halos and ramification of different halo mass definitions. This analysis is important for connecting structure formation theory with observations, and also impacts the widely used approaches of assigning visible galaxies to dark matter halos - the halo occupancy distribution models. We find that the

  2. Simulation and Characterization of a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Jerman, Gregory A.; Medley, Stephanie; Gregory, Don; Abbott, Terry O.; Sampson, Allen R.

    2011-01-01

    A miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope (mSEM) for in-situ lunar investigations is being developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center with colleagues from the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), Advanced Research Systems (ARS), the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (UTK) and Case Western Reserve University (CWRU). This effort focuses on the characterization of individual components of the mSEM and simulation of the complete system. SEMs can provide information on the size, shape, morphology and chemical composition of lunar regolith. Understanding these basic properties will allow us to better estimate the challenges associated with In-Situ Resource Utilization and to improve our basic science knowledge of the lunar surface (either precluding the need for sample return or allowing differentiation of unique samples to be returned to Earth.) The main components of the mSEM prototype includes: a cold field emission electron gun (CFEG), focusing lens, deflection/scanning system and backscatter electron detector. Of these, the electron gun development is of particular importance as it dictates much of the design of the remaining components. A CFEG was chosen for use with the lunar mSEM as its emission does not depend on heating of the tungsten emitter (lower power), it offers a long operation lifetime, is orders of magnitude brighter than tungsten hairpin guns, has a small source size and exhibits low beam energy spread.

  3. Database for Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA)Database for Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 100 Database for Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA)Database for Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA) (PC database for purchase)   This database has been designed to facilitate quantitative interpretation of Auger-electron and X-ray photoelectron spectra and to improve the accuracy of quantitation in routine analysis. The database contains all physical data needed to perform quantitative interpretation of an electron spectrum for a thin-film specimen of given composition. A simulation module provides an estimate of peak intensities as well as the energy and angular distributions of the emitted electron flux.

  4. Numerical simulation of electron beam welding and instrumental technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carin, M.; Rogeon, P.; Carron, D.; Le Masson, P.; Couedel, D. [Universite de Bretagne Sud, Centre de Recherche, Lab. d' Etudes Thermiques Energetique et Environnement, 56 - Lorient (France)

    2004-07-01

    In the present work, thermal cycles measured with thermocouples embedded in specimens are employed to validate a numerical thermo-metallurgical model of an Electron Beam welding process. The implemented instrumentation techniques aim at reducing the perturbations induced by the sensors in place. The numerical model is based on the definition of a heat source term linked to the keyhole geometry predicted by a model of pressure balance using the FEMLAB code. The heat source term is used by the thermo-metallurgical simulation carried out with the finite element code SYSWELD. Kinetics parameters are extracted from dilatometric experiments achieved in welding austenitization conditions at constant cooling rates. (authors)

  5. A New Simulation Framework for the Electron-Ion Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrington, John

    2017-09-01

    Last year, a collaboration between Physics Division and High-Energy Physics at Argonne was formed to enable significantly broader contributions to the development of the Electron-Ion Collider. This includes efforts in accelerator R&D, theory, simulations, and detector R&D. I will give a brief overview of the status of these efforts, with emphasis on the aspects aimed at enabling the community to more easily become involved in evaluation of physics, detectors, and details of spectrometer designs. We have put together a new, easy-to-use simulation framework using flexible software tools. The goal is to enable detailed simulations to evaluate detector performance and compare detector designs. In addition, a common framework capable of providing detailed simulations of different spectrometer designs will allow for fully consistent evaluations of the physics reach of different spectrometer designs or detector systems for a variety of physics channels. In addition, new theory efforts will provide self-consistent models of GPDs (including QCD evolution) and TMDs in nucleons and light nuclei, as well as providing more detailed physics input for the evaluation of some new observables. This material is based upon work supported by Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) funding from Argonne National Laboratory, provided by the Director, Office of Science, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  6. Dramatic changes in electronic structure revealed by fractionally charged nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Aron J. [Department of Chemistry, Lensfield Rd., University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom); Mori-Sánchez, Paula, E-mail: paula.mori@uam.es [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-01-28

    Discontinuous changes in the electronic structure upon infinitesimal changes to the Hamiltonian are demonstrated. These are revealed in one and two electron molecular systems by full configuration interaction (FCI) calculations when the realm of the nuclear charge is extended to be fractional. FCI electron densities in these systems show dramatic changes in real space and illustrate the transfer, hopping, and removal of electrons. This is due to the particle nature of electrons seen in stretched systems and is a manifestation of an energy derivative discontinuity at constant number of electrons. Dramatic errors of density functional theory densities are seen in real space as this physics is missing from currently used approximations. The movements of electrons in these simple systems encapsulate those in real physical processes, from chemical reactions to electron transport and pose a great challenge for the development of new electronic structure methods.

  7. The atomic and electronic structure of amorphous silicon nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez, F

    2002-01-01

    Using a novel approach to the ab initio generation of random networks we constructed two nearly stoichiometric samples of amorphous silicon nitride with the same content x= 1.29. The two 64-atom periodically-continued cubic diamond-like cells contain 28 silicons and 36 nitrogens randomly substituted, and were amorphized with a 6 f s time step by heating them to just below their melting temperature with a Harris-functional based, molecular dynamics code in the LDA approximation. The averaged total radial distribution function (RDF) obtained is compared with some existing Tersoff-like potential simulations and with experiment; ours agree with experiment. All the partial radial features are calculated and the composition of the second peak also agrees with experiment. The electronic structure is calculated and the optical gaps obtained using both a HOMO-LUMO approach and the Tauc-like procedure developed recently that gives reasonable gaps. (Author)

  8. Quantum Monte Carlo for electronic structure: Recent developments and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriquez, Maria Milagos Soto [Lawrence Berkeley Lab. and Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-04-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods have been found to give excellent results when applied to chemical systems. The main goal of the present work is to use QMC to perform electronic structure calculations. In QMC, a Monte Carlo simulation is used to solve the Schroedinger equation, taking advantage of its analogy to a classical diffusion process with branching. In the present work the author focuses on how to extend the usefulness of QMC to more meaningful molecular systems. This study is aimed at questions concerning polyatomic and large atomic number systems. The accuracy of the solution obtained is determined by the accuracy of the trial wave function`s nodal structure. Efforts in the group have given great emphasis to finding optimized wave functions for the QMC calculations. Little work had been done by systematically looking at a family of systems to see how the best wave functions evolve with system size. In this work the author presents a study of trial wave functions for C, CH, C2H and C2H2. The goal is to study how to build wave functions for larger systems by accumulating knowledge from the wave functions of its fragments as well as gaining some knowledge on the usefulness of multi-reference wave functions. In a MC calculation of a heavy atom, for reasonable time steps most moves for core electrons are rejected. For this reason true equilibration is rarely achieved. A method proposed by Batrouni and Reynolds modifies the way the simulation is performed without altering the final steady-state solution. It introduces an acceleration matrix chosen so that all coordinates (i.e., of core and valence electrons) propagate at comparable speeds. A study of the results obtained using their proposed matrix suggests that it may not be the optimum choice. In this work the author has found that the desired mixing of coordinates between core and valence electrons is not achieved when using this matrix. A bibliography of 175 references is

  9. Simulation of Cross Set in Frame Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Dragun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with modeling methods of frame structures, used in rocket technology. To estimate their inertia, stiffness and strength properties there is a need to create its calculation model. For this purpose now a finite element method is generally used. These models may use various finite elements and combinations thereof. It is obvious that the calculation has found that parameters of the structure under study depend on the selected calculation model.The paper discusses some issues concerning the idealization of elements of the hypothetical frame structure. To simulate the element properties of a longitudinal set (stringers and longerons and struts as well is offered idealization of beam, because their crosswise dimensions are substantially smaller than the longitudinal ones. Elements of a crosswise force set (frames represent a welded plate structure that has arch-curved shape of variable cross-section with holes. Welded tubes of different diameter reinforce holes in plates. In vertical plates there are cutouts to mount stringers. To take in full into consideration these features in the rod idealization of frames is impossible. Therefore it seems more appropriate to use plate finite elements to simulate frames.The paper considers two possible frame models the to show their stiffness properties, namely a rod model and a plate one. It shows the advantages and disadvantages of given design schemes of the frame. Based on the test calculations the paper shows which errors in calculating the stiffness properties of the frame under consideration can be obtained using the rod model.  Recommendations for judicious use of possible models of the frame at different designing stages are made.To create the studied frame models and their test calculations and analyze the results of calculation was used a SADAS software package developed at the SM8 Department of BMSTU.

  10. Orbital Models and Electronic Structure Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderberg, Jan

    2012-01-01

    This tribute to the work by Carl Johan Ballhausen focuses on the emergence of quantitative means for the study of the electronic properties of complexes and molecules. Development, refinement and application of the orbital picture elucidated electric and magnetic features of ranges of molecules w...... when used for the interpretation of electronic transitions, electron spin resonance parameters, rotatory dispersion, nuclear quadrupole couplings as well as geometric bonding patterns. Ballhausen's profound impact on the field cannot be overestimated.......This tribute to the work by Carl Johan Ballhausen focuses on the emergence of quantitative means for the study of the electronic properties of complexes and molecules. Development, refinement and application of the orbital picture elucidated electric and magnetic features of ranges of molecules...

  11. Multiscale simulation of microbe structure and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Harshad; Singharoy, Abhishek; Sereda, Yuriy V; Cheluvaraja, Srinath C; Ortoleva, Peter J

    2011-10-01

    A multiscale mathematical and computational approach is developed that captures the hierarchical organization of a microbe. It is found that a natural perspective for understanding a microbe is in terms of a hierarchy of variables at various levels of resolution. This hierarchy starts with the N -atom description and terminates with order parameters characterizing a whole microbe. This conceptual framework is used to guide the analysis of the Liouville equation for the probability density of the positions and momenta of the N atoms constituting the microbe and its environment. Using multiscale mathematical techniques, we derive equations for the co-evolution of the order parameters and the probability density of the N-atom state. This approach yields a rigorous way to transfer information between variables on different space-time scales. It elucidates the interplay between equilibrium and far-from-equilibrium processes underlying microbial behavior. It also provides framework for using coarse-grained nanocharacterization data to guide microbial simulation. It enables a methodical search for free-energy minimizing structures, many of which are typically supported by the set of macromolecules and membranes constituting a given microbe. This suite of capabilities provides a natural framework for arriving at a fundamental understanding of microbial behavior, the analysis of nanocharacterization data, and the computer-aided design of nanostructures for biotechnical and medical purposes. Selected features of the methodology are demonstrated using our multiscale bionanosystem simulator DeductiveMultiscaleSimulator. Systems used to demonstrate the approach are structural transitions in the cowpea chlorotic mosaic virus, RNA of satellite tobacco mosaic virus, virus-like particles related to human papillomavirus, and iron-binding protein lactoferrin. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ultra-large-scale electronic structure theory and numerical algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Hoshi, Takeo

    2008-01-01

    This article is composed of two parts; In the first part (Sec. 1), the ultra-large-scale electronic structure theory is reviewed for (i) its fundamental numerical algorithm and (ii) its role in nano-material science. The second part (Sec. 2) is devoted to the mathematical foundation of the large-scale electronic structure theory and their numerical aspects.

  13. Effects of thickness on electronic structure of titanium thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effects of thickness on the electronic structure of e-beam evaporated thin titanium films were studied using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) technique at titanium 2,3 edge in total electron yield (TEY) mode and transmission yield mode. Thickness dependence of 2,3 branching ratio (BR) of titanium was ...

  14. Structural and electronic properties of non-magnetic intermetallic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 1. Structural and electronic properties of non-magnetic intermetallic YAuX (X = Ge and Si) in ... The calculated lattice parameters were in good agreement with experiment. Also, the structural and electronic properties of the non-magnetic half-Heusler YAuPb ...

  15. Empirical pseudo-potential studies on electronic structure of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 31; Issue 3. Empirical pseudo-potential studies on electronic structure of semiconducting quantum dots. Anjali Kshirsagar Neelesh ... Theoretical investigations of electronic structure of quantum dots is of current interest in nanophase materials. Empirical theories such ...

  16. Electronic structure of Mo and W investigated with positron annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutschke, Markus [Theoretical Physics III, Center for Electronic Correlations and Magnetism, Institute of Physics, University of Augsburg (Germany); Sekania, Michael [Theoretical Physics III, Center for Electronic Correlations and Magnetism, Institute of Physics, University of Augsburg (Germany); Andronikashvili Institute of Physics, Tbilisi (Georgia); Benea, Diana [Faculty of Physics, Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Department of Chemistry, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich (Germany); Ceeh, Hubert; Weber, Joseph A.; Hugenschmidt, Christoph [FRM II, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Chioncel, Liviu [Theoretical Physics III, Center for Electronic Correlations and Magnetism, Institute of Physics, University of Augsburg (Germany); Augsburg Center for Innovative Technologies, University of Augsburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    We perform electronic structure calculations to analyze the momentum distribution of the transition metals molybdenum and tungsten. We study the influence of positron-electron and the electron-electron interactions on the shape of the two-dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) spectra. Our analysis is performed within the framework of the combined Density Functional (DFT) and Dynamical Mean-Field Theory (DMFT). Computed spectra are compared with recent experimental investigations.

  17. Assessment of Electron Propagator Methods for the Simulation of Vibrationally Resolved Valence and Core Photoionization Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiardi, A; Paoloni, L; Barone, V; Zakrzewski, V G; Ortiz, J V

    2017-07-11

    The analysis of photoelectron spectra is usually facilitated by quantum mechanical simulations. Because of the recent improvement of experimental techniques, the resolution of experimental spectra is rapidly increasing, and the inclusion of vibrational effects is usually mandatory to obtain a reliable reproduction of the spectra. With the aim of defining a robust computational protocol, a general time-independent formulation to compute different kinds of vibrationally resolved electronic spectra has been generalized to also support photoelectron spectroscopy. The electronic structure data underlying the simulation are computed using different electron propagator approaches. In addition to the more standard approaches, a new and robust implementation of the second-order self-energy approximation of the electron propagator based on a transition operator reference (TOEP2) is presented. To validate our implementation, a series of molecules has been used as test cases. The result of the simulations shows that, for ultraviolet photoionization spectra, the more accurate nondiagonal approaches are needed to obtain a reliable reproduction of vertical ionization energies but that diagonal approaches are sufficient for energy gradients and pole strengths. For X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the TOEP2 approach, besides being more efficient, is also the most accurate in the reproduction of both vertical ionization energies and vibrationally resolved bandshapes.

  18. Impact of electron-hole correlations on the 1T-TiSe_{2} electronic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monney, G; Monney, C; Hildebrand, B; Aebi, P; Beck, H

    2015-02-27

    Several experiments have been performed on 1T-TiSe_{2} in order to identify whether the electronic structure is semimetallic or semiconducting without reaching a consensus. In this Letter, we theoretically study the impact of electron-hole and electron-phonon correlations on the bare semimetallic and semiconducting electronic structure. The resulting electron spectral functions provide a direct comparison of both cases and demonstrate that 1T-TiSe_{2} is of predominant semiconducting character with some spectral weight crossing the Fermi level.

  19. Development of a model electronic Hamiltonian for understanding electronic relaxation dynamics of [Fe(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+} through molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iuchi, Satoru; Koga, Nobuaki [Graduate School of Information Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    A model electronic Hamiltonian of [Fe(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+}, which was recently refined for use in molecular dynamics simulations, is reviewed with some additional results. In particular, the quality of the refined model Hamiltonian is examined in terms of the vibrational frequencies and solvation structures of the lowest singlet and quintet states.

  20. Image simulations of kinked vortices for transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beleggia, Marco; Pozzi, G.; Tonomura, A.

    2010-01-01

    We present an improved model of kinked vortices in high-Tc superconductors suitable for the interpretation of Fresnel or holographic observations carried out with a transmission electron microscope. A kinked vortex is composed of two displaced half-vortices, perpendicular to the film plane......, connected by a horizontal flux-line in the plane, resembling a connecting Josephson vortex (JV) segment. Such structures may arise when a magnetic field is applied almost in the plane, and the line tension of the fluxon breaks down under its influence. The existence of kinked vortices was hinted in earlier...... observations of high-Tc superconducting films, where the Fresnel contrast associated with some vortices showed a dumbbell like appearance. Here, we show that under suitable conditions the JV segment may reveal itself in Fresnel imaging or holographic phase mapping in a transmission electron microscope....

  1. PIC simulations of the trapped electron filamentation instability in finite-width electron plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winjum, B. J.; Banks, J. W.; Berger, R. L.; Cohen, B. I.; Chapman, T.; Hittinger, J. A. F.; Rozmus, W.; Strozzi, D. J.; Brunner, S.

    2012-10-01

    We present results on the kinetic filamentation of finite-width nonlinear electron plasma waves (EPW). Using 2D simulations with the PIC code BEPS, we excite a traveling EPW with a Gaussian transverse profile and a wavenumber k0λDe= 1/3. The transverse wavenumber spectrum broadens during transverse EPW localization for small width (but sufficiently large amplitude) waves, while the spectrum narrows to a dominant k as the initial EPW width increases to the plane-wave limit. For large EPW widths, filaments can grow and destroy the wave coherence before transverse localization destroys the wave; the filaments in turn evolve individually as self-focusing EPWs. Additionally, a transverse electric field develops that affects trapped electrons, and a beam-like distribution of untrapped electrons develops between filaments and on the sides of a localizing EPW. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and funded by the Laboratory Research and Development Program at LLNL under project tracking code 12-ERD-061. Supported also under Grants DE-FG52-09NA29552 and NSF-Phy-0904039. Simulations were performed on UCLA's Hoffman2 and NERSC's Hopper.

  2. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator Reference Guide Version 6.6.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Aadithya, Karthik Venkatraman [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mei, Ting [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Russo, Thomas V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schiek, Richard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sholander, Peter E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thornquist, Heidi K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Verley, Jason [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users' Guide [1] . The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce . This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users' Guide [1] . The information herein is subject to change without notice. Copyright c 2002-2016 Sandia Corporation. All rights reserved. Acknowledgements The BSIM Group at the University of California, Berkeley developed the BSIM3, BSIM4, BSIM6, BSIM-CMG and BSIM-SOI models. The BSIM3 is Copyright c 1999, Regents of the University of California. The BSIM4 is Copyright c 2006, Regents of the University of California. The BSIM6 is Copyright c 2015, Regents of the University of California. The BSIM-CMG is Copyright c 2012 and 2016, Regents of the University of California. The BSIM-SOI is Copyright c 1990, Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. The Mextram model has been developed by NXP Semiconductors until 2007, Delft University of Technology from 2007 to 2014, and Auburn University since April 2015. Copyrights c of Mextram are with Delft University of Technology, NXP Semiconductors and Auburn University. The MIT VS Model Research Group developed the MIT Virtual Source (MVS) model. Copyright c 2013 Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The EKV3 MOSFET model was developed by the EKV Team of the Electronics Laboratory-TUC of the Technical University of Crete. Trademarks Xyce TM Electronic Simulator and Xyce TM are trademarks of Sandia Corporation. Orcad, Orcad Capture, PSpice and Probe are registered trademarks of Cadence Design Systems, Inc. Microsoft, Windows and Windows 7 are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. Medici, DaVinci and Taurus are registered trademarks of Synopsys Corporation. Amtec and Tec

  3. Surface and Core Electronic Structure of Oxidized Silicon Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor A. Nama

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio restricted Hartree-Fock method within the framework of large unit cell formalism is used to simulate silicon nanocrystals between 216 and 1000 atoms (1.6–2.65 nm in diameter that include Bravais and primitive cell multiples. The investigated properties include core and oxidized surface properties. Results revealed that electronic properties converge to some limit as the size of the nanocrystal increases. Increasing the size of the core of a nanocrystal resulted in an increase of the energy gap, valence band width, and cohesive energy. The lattice constant of the core and oxidized surface parts shows a decreasing trend as the nanocrystal increases in a size that converges to 5.28 Ǻ in a good agreement with the experiment. Surface and core convergence to the same lattice constant reflects good adherence of oxide layer at the surface. The core density of states shows highly degenerate states that split at the oxygenated (001-(1×1 surface due to symmetry breaking. The nanocrystal surface shows smaller gap and higher valence and conduction bands when compared to the core part, due to oxygen surface atoms and reduced structural symmetry. The smaller surface energy gap shows that energy gap of the nanocrystal is controlled by the surface part. Unlike the core part, the surface part shows a descending energy gap that proves its obedience to quantum confinement effects. Nanocrystal geometry proved to have some influence on all electronic properties including the energy gap.

  4. Electronic structures of peanut-shaped fullerene tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Nakayama, Tomoya Ono, Hidekazu Goto and Kikuji Hirose

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated electronic structures of the peanut-shaped polymerized fullerene with so-called P55, P56 and P66 tubular linkage structures. The stable atomic configurations in these one-dimensional or two-dimensionally bundled tubes are searched out by a tight-binding calculation, and then their electronic structures are evaluated by using an ab initio density functional calculation. The electronic structures change drastically depending on the bonding interaction between the tubes. The P66 tube can show metallic conduction when it is bundled two-dimensionally.

  5. DNA strand breaks induced by electrons simulated with Nanodosimetry Monte Carlo Simulation Code: NASIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junli; Li, Chunyan; Qiu, Rui; Yan, Congchong; Xie, Wenzhang; Wu, Zhen; Zeng, Zhi; Tung, Chuanjong

    2015-09-01

    The method of Monte Carlo simulation is a powerful tool to investigate the details of radiation biological damage at the molecular level. In this paper, a Monte Carlo code called NASIC (Nanodosimetry Monte Carlo Simulation Code) was developed. It includes physical module, pre-chemical module, chemical module, geometric module and DNA damage module. The physical module can simulate physical tracks of low-energy electrons in the liquid water event-by-event. More than one set of inelastic cross sections were calculated by applying the dielectric function method of Emfietzoglou's optical-data treatments, with different optical data sets and dispersion models. In the pre-chemical module, the ionised and excited water molecules undergo dissociation processes. In the chemical module, the produced radiolytic chemical species diffuse and react. In the geometric module, an atomic model of 46 chromatin fibres in a spherical nucleus of human lymphocyte was established. In the DNA damage module, the direct damages induced by the energy depositions of the electrons and the indirect damages induced by the radiolytic chemical species were calculated. The parameters should be adjusted to make the simulation results be agreed with the experimental results. In this paper, the influence study of the inelastic cross sections and vibrational excitation reaction on the parameters and the DNA strand break yields were studied. Further work of NASIC is underway. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Numerical simulation of condensation on structured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaowu; Yao, Zhaohui; Hao, Pengfei

    2014-11-25

    Condensation of liquid droplets on solid surfaces happens widely in nature and industrial processes. This phase-change phenomenon has great effect on the performance of some microfluidic devices. On the basis of micro- and nanotechnology, superhydrophobic structured surfaces can be well-fabricated. In this work, the nucleating and growth of droplets on different structured surfaces are investigated numerically. The dynamic behavior of droplets during the condensation is simulated by the multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), which has the ability to incorporate the microscopic interactions, including fluid-fluid interaction and fluid-surface interaction. The results by the LBM show that, besides the chemical properties of surfaces, the topography of structures on solid surfaces influences the condensation process. For superhydrophobic surfaces, the spacing and height of microridges have significant influence on the nucleation sites. This mechanism provides an effective way for prevention of wetting on surfaces in engineering applications. Moreover, it suggests a way to prevent ice formation on surfaces caused by the condensation of subcooled water. For hydrophilic surfaces, however, microstructures may be submerged by the liquid films adhering to the surfaces. In this case, microstructures will fail to control the condensation process. Our research provides an optimized way for designing surfaces for condensation in engineering systems.

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of heavy ion induced kinetic electron emission from an Al surface

    CERN Document Server

    Ohya, K

    2002-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation is performed in order to study heavy ion induced kinetic electron emission from an Al surface. In the simulation, excitation of conduction band electrons by the projectile ion and recoiling target atoms is treated on the basis of the partial wave expansion method, and the cascade multiplication process of the excited electrons is simulated as well as collision cascade of the recoiling target atoms. Experimental electron yields near conventional threshold energies of heavy ions are simulated by an assumption of a lowering in the apparent surface barrier for the electrons. The present calculation derives components for electron excitations by the projectile ion, the recoiling target atoms and the electron cascades, from the calculated total electron yield. The component from the recoiling target atoms increases with increasing projectile mass, whereas the component from the electron cascade decreases. Although the components from the projectile ion and the electron cascade increase with...

  8. Vlasov simulations of electron trapping on auroral field lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunell, H.; Mann, I.; De Keyser, J.; Andersson, L.

    2012-04-01

    In the auroral zone, electric fields that are parallel to the earth's magnetic field are known to exist and to contribute to the acceleration of auroral electrons. Transverse electric fields at high altitude result in parallel electric fields as a consequence of the closure of the field-aligned currents through the conducting ionosphere (L. R. Lyons, JGR, vol. 85, 1724, 1980). These parallel electric fields can be supported by the magnetic mirror field (Alfvén and Fälthammar, Cosmical Electrodynamics, 2nd ed., 1963). Stationary kinetic models have been used to study the current-voltage characteristics of the auroral current circuit (Knight, Planet. and Space Sci., vol. 21, 741-750, 1973). Fluid and hybrid simulations have been used to model parallel electric fields and Alfvén waves, and to study the relationship between them (e.g., Vedin and Rönnmark, JGR, vol. 111, 12201, 2006). Ergun, et al. (GRL, vol. 27, 4053-4056, 2000) found stationary Vlasov solutions over regions extending several Earth radii, and Main, et al. (PRL, vol. 97, 185001, 2006) performed Vlasov simulations of the auroral acceleration region. Observations have shown that field-aligned potential drops often are concentrated in electric double layers (e.g. Ergun, et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 9, 3685-3694, 2002). In the upward current region, 20-50% of the total potential drop has been identified as localised. How the rest of the potential is spread out as function of altitude is not yet known from observations. Gunell et al. (submitted to GRL, 2012) performed Vlasov simulations, using a model that is one-dimensional in configuration space and two-dimensional in velocity space, and found that about half of the potential drop is found in a thin double layer. The other half is in a region, which extends a few earth radii above it. The double layer itself is stationary, while there are oscillations in the longer low-field region. The current-voltage characteristic approximately follows the Knight

  9. THEORETICAL STUDY ON ELECTRONIC STRUCTURES AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Luminescent materials [1, 2] have extensive applications in medical diagnostics, molecular biology, aviation, and material science. The incorporation of boron atoms into extended organic π-systems is widely studied due to intriguing electronic and photophysical properties. These properties are commonly arisen from the ...

  10. Simulation of cooling efficiency via miniaturised channels in multilayer LTCC for power electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrikova, Alena; Girasek, Tomas; Lukacs, Peter; Welker, Tilo; Müller, Jens

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this paper is detailed investigation of thermal resistance, flow analysis and distribution of coolant as well as thermal distribution inside multilayer LTCC substrates with embedded channels for power electronic devices by simulation software. For this reason four various structures of internal channels in the multilayer LTCC substrates were designed and simulated. The impact of the volume flow, structures of channels, and power loss of chip was simulated, calculated and analyzed by using the simulation software Mentor Graphics FloEFDTM. The structure, size and location of channels have the significant impact on thermal resistance, pressure of coolant as well as the effectivity of cooling power components (chips) that can be placed on the top of LTCC substrate. The main contribution of this paper is thermal analyze, optimization and impact of 4 various cooling channels embedded in LTCC multilayer structure. Paper investigate, the effect of volume flow in cooling channels for achieving the least thermal resistance of LTCC substrate that is loaded by power thermal chips. Paper shows on the impact of the first chips thermal load on the second chip as well as. This possible new technology could ensure in the case of practical realization effective cooling and increasing reliability of high power modules.

  11. On the Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport in the sub-1 keV energy range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Rowan M; Kawrakow, Iwan

    2011-08-01

    The validity of "classic" Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of electron and positron transport at sub-1 keV energies is investigated in the context of quantum theory. Quantum theory dictates that uncertainties on the position and energy-momentum four-vectors of radiation quanta obey Heisenberg's uncertainty relation; however, these uncertainties are neglected in "classical" MC simulations of radiation transport in which position and momentum are known precisely. Using the quantum uncertainty relation and electron mean free path, the magnitudes of uncertainties on electron position and momentum are calculated for different kinetic energies; a validity bound on the classical simulation of electron transport is derived. In order to satisfy the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, uncertainties of 5% must be assigned to position and momentum for 1 keV electrons in water; at 100 eV, these uncertainties are 17 to 20% and are even larger at lower energies. In gaseous media such as air, these uncertainties are much smaller (less than 1% for electrons with energy 20 eV or greater). The classical Monte Carlo transport treatment is questionable for sub-1 keV electrons in condensed water as uncertainties on position and momentum must be large (relative to electron momentum and mean free path) to satisfy the quantum uncertainty principle. Simulations which do not account for these uncertainties are not faithful representations of the physical processes, calling into question the results of MC track structure codes simulating sub-1 keV electron transport. Further, the large difference in the scale at which quantum effects are important in gaseous and condensed media suggests that track structure measurements in gases are not necessarily representative of track structure in condensed materials on a micrometer or a nanometer scale.

  12. Ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulation of electron transfer process: fractional electron approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiancheng; Hu, Hao; Hu, Xiangqian; Cohen, Aron J; Yang, Weitao

    2008-03-28

    Electron transfer (ET) reactions are one of the most important processes in chemistry and biology. Because of the quantum nature of the processes and the complicated roles of the solvent, theoretical study of ET processes is challenging. To simulate ET processes at the electronic level, we have developed an efficient density functional theory (DFT) quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular mechanical (MM) approach that uses the fractional number of electrons as the order parameter to calculate the redox free energy of ET reactions in solution. We applied this method to study the ET reactions of the aqueous metal complexes Fe(H(2)O)(6)(2+/3+) and Ru(H(2)O)(6)(2+/3+). The calculated oxidation potentials, 5.82 eV for Fe(II/III) and 5.14 eV for Ru(II/III), agree well with the experimental data, 5.50 and 4.96 eV, for iron and ruthenium, respectively. Furthermore, we have constructed the diabatic free energy surfaces from histogram analysis based on the molecular dynamics trajectories. The resulting reorganization energy and the diabatic activation energy also show good agreement with experimental data. Our calculations show that using the fractional number of electrons (FNE) as the order parameter in the thermodynamic integration process leads to efficient sampling and validate the ab initio QM/MM approach in the calculation of redox free energies.

  13. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator Users Guide Version 6.2.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R.; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Sholander, Peter E.; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Verley, Jason C.; Baur, David Gregory

    2014-09-01

    This manual describes the use of the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator. Xyce has been de- signed as a SPICE-compatible, high-performance analog circuit simulator, and has been written to support the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. This development has focused on improving capability over the current state-of-the-art in the following areas: Capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel com- puting platforms (up to thousands of processors). This includes support for most popular parallel and serial computers. A differential-algebraic-equation (DAE) formulation, which better isolates the device model package from solver algorithms. This allows one to develop new types of analysis without requiring the implementation of analysis-specific device models. Device models that are specifically tailored to meet Sandia's needs, including some radiation- aware devices (for Sandia users only). Object-oriented code design and implementation using modern coding practices. Xyce is a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase -- a message passing parallel implementation -- which allows it to run efficiently a wide range of computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel platforms. Attention has been paid to the specific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiency is achieved as the number of processors grows. Trademarks The information herein is subject to change without notice. Copyright c 2002-2014 Sandia Corporation. All rights reserved. Xyce TM Electronic Simulator and Xyce TM are trademarks of Sandia Corporation. Portions of the Xyce TM code are: Copyright c 2002, The Regents of the University of California. Produced at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Written by Alan Hindmarsh, Allan Taylor, Radu Serban. UCRL-CODE-2002-59 All rights reserved. Orcad, Orcad Capture, PSpice and Probe are

  14. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator Users Guide Version 6.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mei, Ting [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Russo, Thomas V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schiek, Richard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sholander, Peter E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thornquist, Heidi K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Verley, Jason [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Baur, David Gregory [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This manual describes the use of the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator. Xyce has been de- signed as a SPICE-compatible, high-performance analog circuit simulator, and has been written to support the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. This development has focused on improving capability over the current state-of-the-art in the following areas: Capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel com- puting platforms (up to thousands of processors). This includes support for most popular parallel and serial computers. A differential-algebraic-equation (DAE) formulation, which better isolates the device model package from solver algorithms. This allows one to develop new types of analysis without requiring the implementation of analysis-specific device models. Device models that are specifically tailored to meet Sandia's needs, including some radiation- aware devices (for Sandia users only). Object-oriented code design and implementation using modern coding practices. Xyce is a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase -- a message passing parallel implementation -- which allows it to run efficiently a wide range of computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel platforms. Attention has been paid to the specific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiency is achieved as the number of processors grows. Trademarks The information herein is subject to change without notice. Copyright c 2002-2015 Sandia Corporation. All rights reserved. Xyce TM Electronic Simulator and Xyce TM are trademarks of Sandia Corporation. Portions of the Xyce TM code are: Copyright c 2002, The Regents of the University of California. Produced at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Written by Alan Hindmarsh, Allan Taylor, Radu Serban. UCRL-CODE-2002-59 All rights reserved. Orcad, Orcad Capture, PSpice and Probe are

  15. Crystal structure from one-electron theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have studied the crystal structure of all the 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals at zero pressure and temperature by means of the linear muffin-tin orbital method and Andersen's force theorem. They find that, although the structural energy differences seem to be overestimated by the the......The authors have studied the crystal structure of all the 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals at zero pressure and temperature by means of the linear muffin-tin orbital method and Andersen's force theorem. They find that, although the structural energy differences seem to be overestimated...

  16. Simulation tools for pinched-electron-beam radiographic diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Humphries

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe capabilities of an integrated software suite to simulate pinched-electron-beam diodes for pulsed radiography. In contrast to other reported work using particle-in-cell methods, we employ a ray-tracing code (Trak with advanced capabilities for modeling beam-generated magnetic fields. Ray tracing is a direct approach to a steady-state solution and involves less work than a particle-in-cell calculation. The second software component, GamBet, is a new Monte Carlo code for radiation transport that incorporates effects of the complex electric and magnetic fields at the radiation target. The ray-tracing approach exhibits good convergence in calculations for the diode geometry of the compact radiography (CRAD program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. With a 1.5 MV, 30 ns driver, we predict that the diode can produce a beam with axial length ∼1  mm that generates isotropic bremsstrahlung radiation exceeding 1 rad at 1 m. The ray-tracing procedure encounters convergence problems when applied to the rod-pinch geometry, a configuration used in several pulsed radiographic machines. We observe a fundamental difference in the nature of electron orbits in the two diodes. There is an increased chance for particle-orbit feedback in the rod pinch, so that equilibrium solutions are sensitive to small changes in emission characteristics.

  17. Airflow Simulations around OA Intake Louver with Electronic Velocity Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hwataik; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

    2009-04-01

    It is important to control outdoor airflow rates into HVAC systems in terms of energy conservation and healthy indoor environment. Technologies are being developed to measure outdoor air (OA) flow rates through OA intake louvers on a real time basis. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the airflow characteristics through an OA intake louver numerically in order to provide suggestions for sensor installations. Airflow patterns are simulated with and without electronic air velocity sensors within cylindrical probes installed between louver blades or at the downstream face of the louver. Numerical results show quite good agreements with experimental data, and provide insights regarding measurement system design. The simulations indicate that velocity profiles are more spatially uniform at the louver outlet relative to between louver blades, that pressure drops imposed by the sensor bars are smaller with sensor bars at the louver outlet, and that placement of the sensor bars between louver blades substantially increases air velocities inside the louver. These findings suggest there is an advantage to placing the sensor bars at the louver outlet face.

  18. Electronic Structures of LNA Phosphorothioate Oligonucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik G.; Shim, Irene; Stein, Cy

    2017-01-01

    Important oligonucleotides in anti-sense research have been investigated in silico and experimentally. This involves quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and chromatography experiments on locked nucleic acid (LNA) phosphorothioate (PS) oligonucleotides. iso-potential electrostatic surfaces...... or differentiate between the individual PS diastereoisomers determined by the position of sulfur atoms. Rules are derived from the electronic calculations of these molecules and include the effects of the phosphorothioate chirality and formation of electrostatic potential surfaces. Physical and electrochemical...

  19. THEORETICAL STUDY ON ELECTRONIC STRUCTURES AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At the same time, the first absorptions in the electronic spectra and the stretching vibrations of the C-C as well as C-H bonds in the IR spectra of these compounds compared with those of the parent compound are red-shifted. Also, the 13C chemical shifts of the carbon atoms on the phenyl rings in these compounds are ...

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Strong Shock Waves Propagating in Dense Deuterium With the Effect of Excited Electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Hao; Kang, Wei; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Huiling; He, X T

    2016-01-01

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation of shock waves propagating in dense deuterium with the electron force field method [J. T. Su and W. A. Goddard, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 185003 (2007)], which explicitly takes the excitation of electrons into consideration. Non-equilibrium features associated with the excitation of electrons are systematically investigated. We show that chemical bonds in D$_2$ molecules lead to a more complicated shock wave structure near the shock front, compared with the results of classical molecular dynamics simulation. Charge separation can bring about accumulation of net charges on the large scale, instead of the formation of a localized dipole layer, which might cause extra energy for the shock wave to propagate. In addition, the simulations also display that molecular dissociation at the shock front is the major factor corresponding to the "bump" structure in the principal Hugoniot. These results could help to build a more realistic picture of shock wave propagation in fuel mater...

  1. Electron Energization and Structure of the Diffusion Region During Asymmetric Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Jen; Hesse, Michael; Wang, Shan; Bessho, Naoki; Daughton, William

    2016-01-01

    Results from particle-in-cell simulations of reconnection with asymmetric upstream conditions are reported to elucidate electron energization and structure of the electron diffusion region (EDR). Acceleration of unmagnetized electrons results in discrete structures in the distribution functions and supports the intense current and perpendicular heating in the EDR. The accelerated electrons are cyclotron turned by the reconnected magnetic field to produce the outflow jets, and as such, the acceleration by the reconnection electric field is limited, leading to resistivity without particle-particle or particle-wave collisions. A map of electron distributions is constructed, and its spatial evolution is compared with quantities previously proposed to be EDR identifiers to enable effective identifications of the EDR in terrestrial magnetopause reconnection.

  2. Structural Uncertainty in Antarctic sea ice simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, D. P.

    2016-12-01

    The inability of the vast majority of historical climate model simulations to reproduce the observed increase in Antarctic sea ice has motivated many studies about the quality of the observational record, the role of natural variability versus forced changes, and the possibility of missing or inadequate forcings in the models (such as freshwater discharge from thinning ice shelves or an inadequate magnitude of stratospheric ozone depletion). In this presentation I will highlight another source of uncertainty that has received comparatively little attention: Structural uncertainty, that is, the systematic uncertainty in simulated sea ice trends that arises from model physics and mean-state biases. Using two large ensembles of experiments from the Community Earth System Model (CESM), I will show that the model is predisposed towards producing negative Antarctic sea ice trends during 1979-present, and that this outcome is not simply because the model's decadal variability is out-of-synch with that in nature. In the "Tropical Pacific Pacemaker" ensemble, in which observed tropical Pacific SST anomalies are prescribed, the model produces very realistic atmospheric circulation trends over the Southern Ocean, yet the sea ice trend is negative in every ensemble member. However, if the ensemble-mean trend (commonly interpreted as the forced response) is removed, some ensemble members show a sea ice increase that is very similar to the observed. While this results does confirm the important role of natural variability, it also suggests a strong bias in the forced response. I will discuss the reasons for this systematic bias and explore possible remedies. This an important problem to solve because projections of 21st -Century changes in the Antarctic climate system (including ice sheet surface mass balance changes and related changes in the sea level budget) have a strong dependence on the mean state of and changes in the Antarctic sea ice cover. This problem is not unique to

  3. Structural disorder and electron transport in graphene at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobenko, N. G.; Egorushkin, V. E.; Melnikova, N. V.; Ponomarev, A. N.; Belosludtseva, A. A.; Barkalov, L. D.

    2017-12-01

    A theoretical study of electron transport characteristics of metalized epitaxial graphene with impurities and structural inhomogeneous of the short-range order type was performed. The electron relaxation time, mean free path, and diffusion coefficient were calculated and shown to be of the same order of magnitude as the corresponding values for phonon characteristics. It means that electron scattering on the short-range ordered domains has to be taken into account, especially at low temperatures when it may dominate phonon scattering.

  4. Site-specific electronic structure of bacterial surface protein layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyalikh, D. V.; Kummer, K.; Kade, A.; Blüher, A.; Katzschner, B.; Mertig, M.; Molodtsov, S. L.

    2009-03-01

    We applied resonant photoemission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy for a detailed characterization of the valence electronic structure of the regular two-dimensional bacterial surface protein layer of Bacillus sphaericus NCTC 9602. Using this approach, we detected valence electron emission from specific chemical sites. In particular, it was found that electrons from the π clouds of aromatic systems make large contributions to the highest occupied molecular orbitals.

  5. Electronic Structure of Au25 Clusters: Between Discrete and Continuous

    KAUST Repository

    Katsiev, Khabiboulakh

    2016-07-15

    Here, an approach based on synchrotron resonant photoemission is emplyed to explore the transition between quantization and hybridization of the electronic structure in atomically precise ligand-stabilized nanoparticles. While the presence of ligands maintains quantization in Au25 clusters, their removal renders increased hybridization of the electronic states at the vicinity of the Fermi level. These observations are supported by DFT studies.

  6. Electronic structure and equilibrium properties of hcp titanium and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electronic structures of hexagonal-close-packed divalent titanium (3-d) and zirconium (4-d) transition metals are studied by using a non-local model potential method. From the present calculation of energy bands, Fermi energy, density of states and the electronic heat capacity of these two metals are determined and ...

  7. NMR Probe for Electrons in Semiconductor Mesoscopic Structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-11-14

    Nov 14, 2009 ... Strongly correlated electron systems: Overview. Problem: How to detect the electronic state in nanoscale structures. Two examples where the usual methods don't work. Solution: We showed NMR techniques can be very useful in such circumstances. Outline ...

  8. Small round structured viruses (SRSVs) and transmission electron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Small round structured viruses (SRSVs) and transmission electron microscopy. Etsuko Tajiri-Utagawa. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Article Metrics. Metrics Loading ... Metrics powered by PLOS ALM

  9. Structure and electron-ion correlation of liquid germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakita, Y. [Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)]. E-mail: kawakita@rc.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Fujita, S. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kohara, S. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto Mikazuki-cho, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ohshima, K. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Fujii, H. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Yokota, Y. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Takeda, S. [Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)

    2005-08-15

    Structure factor of liquid germanium (Ge) has a shoulder at {theta} = 3.2 A{sup -1} in the high-momentum-transfer region of the first peak. To investigate the origin of such a non-simplicity in the structure, high energy X-ray diffraction measurements have been performed using 113.26 keV incident X-ray, at BL04B2 beamline of SPring-8. By a combination of the obtained structure factor with the reported neutron diffraction data, charge density function and electron-ion partial structure factor have been deduced. The peak position of the charge distribution is located at about 1 A, rather smaller r value than the half value of nearest neighbor distance ({approx}2.7 A), which suggests that valence electrons of liquid Ge play a role of screening electrons around a metallic ion rather than covalently bonding electrons.

  10. The electronic structure of MnBi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coehoorn, R.; Groot, R.A. de

    1985-01-01

    The first self-consistent spin-polarised band-structure calculation of the ferromagnetic compound MnBi in its low-temperature phase has been performed. The spin-orbit interaction was treated as a perturbation using scalar-relativistic wavefunctions. On the Mn atoms an effective 3d5.5 configuration

  11. Electron Diffraction Determination of Nanoscale Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, Joel H

    2013-03-01

    Dominant research results on adsorption on gold clusters are reviewed, including adsorption of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} on gold cluster cations and anions, kinetics of CO adsorption to middle sized gold cluster cations, adsorption of CO on Au{sub n}{sup +} with induced changes in structure, and H{sub 2}O enhancement of CO adsorption.

  12. Atomic and electronic structure transformations of silver nanoparticles under rapid cooling conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Lobato, I.; Rojas, J.; Landauro, C.V.; Torres, J

    2008-01-01

    The structural evolution and dynamics of silver nanodrops Ag${}_{2896}$ (4.4 nm in diameter) during rapid cooling conditions has been studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations and electronic density of state calculations. The interaction of silver atoms is modeled by a tight-binding semiempirical interatomic potential proposed by Cleri and Rosato. The pair correlation functions and the pair analysis technique is applied to reveal the structural transition in the process of solidifica...

  13. Ordered structure formation in 2D mass asymmetric electron-hole plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filinov, V.S. [Institute for High Energy Density, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13/19, Moscow 127412 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: vladimir_filinov@mail.ru; Fehske, H. [Institut fuer Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 6, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany); Bonitz, M. [Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Leibnizstrasse 15, 24098 Kiel (Germany); Fortov, V.E.; Levashov, P. [Institute for High Energy Density, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13/19, Moscow 127412 (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-28

    We study strong Coulomb correlations in dense two-dimensional electron-hole plasmas by means of direct path integral Monte Carlo simulations. In particular, the formation and dissociation of bound states, such as excitons, bi-excitons and many particle clusters, is analyzed and the density-temperature regions of their occurrence are identified. At high density, the Mott transition to the fully ionized state (electron-hole hexatic liquid) is detected. Particular attention is paid to the influence of the hole to electron mass ratio M on the properties of the plasma. For high enough values of M we observed the formation of Coulomb hole crystal-like structures.

  14. The electronic structure of TiN and VN : X-ray and electron spectra compared to band structure calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soriano, L; Abbate, M; Pen, H; Prieto, P; Sanz, JM

    We studied the electronic structure of TiN and VN by means of band structure calculations and spectroscopic techniques. The band structure calculations show that the bonding in these compounds is mostly covalent. The Fermi level intersects the transition metal 3d bands giving rise to the metallic

  15. The Strength of Chaos: Accurate Simulation of Resonant Electron Scattering by Many-Electron Ions and Atoms in the Presence of Quantum Chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-20

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0012 The Strength of Chaos: accurate simulation of resonant electron scattering by many-electron ions and atoms in the presence...SUBTITLE The Strength of Chaos: accurate simulation of resonant electron scattering by many- electron ions and atoms in the presence of quantum chaos...Strength of Chaos: accurate simulation of resonant electron scattering by many-electron ions and atoms in the presence of quantum chaos” Date 13

  16. Electron-Phonon Renormalization of Electronic Band Structures of C Allotropes and BN Polymorphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutchton, Roxanne M.; Marchbanks, Christopher; Wu, Zhigang

    The effect of lattice vibration on electronic band structures has been mostly neglected in first-principles calculations because the electron-phonon (e-ph) renormalization of quasi-particle energies is often small (Career Award (Grant No. DE-SC0006433). Computations were carried out at the Golden Energy Computing Organization at CSM and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC).

  17. Time-Dependent, Three-Dimensional Simulation of Free-Electron-Laser Oscillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Freund, H.P.; Miner Jr., W.H.; Benson, S.V.; Shinn, M.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a procedure for the simulation of free-electron-laser (FEL) oscillators. The simulation uses a combination of the MEDUSA simulation code for the FEL interaction and the OPC code to model the resonator. The simulations are compared with recent observations of the oscillator at the Thomas

  18. Fluid Simulation of relativistic electron beam driven wakefield in the blowout regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Ratan Kumar; Das, Amita; Sengupta, Sudip

    2017-10-01

    Two-dimensional Fluid simulations are employed to study the Wakefield driven by an electron beam in a plasma medium. The 1-D results are recovered when the transverse extent of the beam is chosen to be much longer than its longitudinal extent. Furthermore, it is shown that the blowout structure matches closely with the PIC observations, before the phase mixing. A close comparison of the fluid observations with the analytical modeling made by Lu et al. to PIC observations, have been provided. It is thus interesting to note that a simplified fluid simulation adequately represents the form of the wake potential obtained by sophisticated PIC studies. We also address issues related to particle acceleration in such a potential structure by studying the evolution of injected test particles. A maximum energy gain of 2.8 GeV by the electrons from the back of the driver beam of energy 28.5 GeV in a 10 cm long plasma is shown to be achieved. This is in conformity with the experimental result of Ref.. We observe that maximum energy gain can get doubled to 5.7 GeV when the bunch of test particles was placed near the axial edge of the first blowout structure. Inst. for Plasma Research.

  19. Simulations of pulsed electron beam injection during active experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winglee, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    Two-dimensional electromagnetic particle simulations are used to investigate the characteristics of the spacecraft charging, particle acceleration, and wave emissions during beam injection, turnoff and subsequent pulsing of the beam. It is shown that, during beam injection, the beam current is neutralized by a spatially separate return current region extending several tens of meters from the beam region, with the currents being closed across the field lines by the perpendicular acceleration of ambient plasma ions into the beam region. After beam turnoff, this current system reverses after a time lag of about an ion plasma period. The current reversal is accompanied by prolonged electron collection by the spacecraft near the beam region, preferential ion collection by sections of the spacecraft magnetically connected to the initial return current regions, and the creation of hot plasma extending well into the return current regions. Because of the time lag, the currents induced in the plasma during periodic beam injection can be strongly modified from the imposed beam current.

  20. Numerical simulation and transonic wind-tunnel test for elastic thin-shell structure considering fluid–structure interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunju Yan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic force can lead to the strong structural vibration of flying aircraft at a high speed. This harmful vibration can bring damage or failure to the electronic equipment fixed in aircraft. It is necessary to predict the structural dynamic response in the design course. This paper presents a new numerical algorithm and scheme to solve the structural dynamics responses when considering fluid–structure interaction (FSI. Numerical simulation for a free-flying structural model in transonic speed is completed. Results show that the small elastic deformation of the structure can greatly affect the FSI. The FSI vibration tests are carried out in a transonic speed wind-tunnel for checking numerical theory and algorithms, and the wind-tunnel test results well accord with that of the numerical simulation. This indicates that the presented numerical method can be applied to predicting the structural dynamics responses when containing the FSI.

  1. Structural complexities in the active layers of organic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stephanie S; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2010-01-01

    The field of organic electronics has progressed rapidly in recent years. However, understanding the direct structure-function relationships between the morphology in electrically active layers and the performance of devices composed of these materials has proven difficult. The morphology of active layers in organic electronics is inherently complex, with heterogeneities existing across multiple length scales, from subnanometer to micron and millimeter range. A major challenge still facing the organic electronics community is understanding how the morphology across all of the length scales in active layers collectively determines the device performance of organic electronics. In this review we highlight experiments that have contributed to the elucidation of structure-function relationships in organic electronics and also point to areas in which knowledge of such relationships is still lacking. Such knowledge will lead to the ability to select active materials on the basis of their inherent properties for the fabrication of devices with prespecified characteristics.

  2. Radiation of relativistic electrons in a periodic wire structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soboleva, V.V., E-mail: sobolevaveronica@mail.ru; Naumenko, G.A.; Bleko, V.V.

    2015-07-15

    We present in this work the experimental investigation of the interaction of relativistic electron field with periodic wire structures. We used two types of the targets in experiments: flat wire target and sandwich wire target that represent the right triangular prism. The measurements were done in millimeter wavelength region (10–40 mm) on the relativistic electron beam with energy of 6.2 MeV in far-field zone. We showed that bunched electron beam passing near wire metamaterial prism generates coherent Cherenkov radiation. The experiments with flat wire target were carried out in two geometries. In the first geometry the electron beam passed close to the flat wire target surface. In the second case the electron beam passed through the flat wire structure with generation of a coherent backward transition radiation (CBTR). The comparison of the Cherenkov radiation intensity and BTR intensity from the flat wire target and from the flat conductive target (conventional BTR) was made.

  3. Electrons and photons in periodic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor

    with the numerically exact results we discuss the validity of certain approximative methods for calculating the exchange interaction. These ideas are applied also to graphene, where the emergence of a band gap is in itself interesting in that it turns the otherwise semimetallic graphene into a semiconductor, paving...... the way for graphene transistors. Photonic band gaps can be engineered using structures with a periodic modulations of the refractive index, commonly referred to as photonic crystal. We discuss the application of photonic crystals to slow light phenomena, where advantage is taken of the divergence...

  4. Accelerating VASP electronic structure calculations using graphic processing units

    KAUST Repository

    Hacene, Mohamed

    2012-08-20

    We present a way to improve the performance of the electronic structure Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package (VASP) program. We show that high-performance computers equipped with graphics processing units (GPUs) as accelerators may reduce drastically the computation time when offloading these sections to the graphic chips. The procedure consists of (i) profiling the performance of the code to isolate the time-consuming parts, (ii) rewriting these so that the algorithms become better-suited for the chosen graphic accelerator, and (iii) optimizing memory traffic between the host computer and the GPU accelerator. We chose to accelerate VASP with NVIDIA GPU using CUDA. We compare the GPU and original versions of VASP by evaluating the Davidson and RMM-DIIS algorithms on chemical systems of up to 1100 atoms. In these tests, the total time is reduced by a factor between 3 and 8 when running on n (CPU core + GPU) compared to n CPU cores only, without any accuracy loss. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Electron beam melting of advanced materials and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahale, Tushar Ramkrishna

    Layered manufacturing has for long been used for the fabrication of non-functional parts using polymer-based processes. Developments in laser beam and electron beam welding technologies and their adoption to layered manufacturing has made it possible to fabricate high-density functional parts in metal irrespective of the level of complexity. The Electron Beam Melting (EBM) process by Arcam AB is one such layered manufacturing process that utilizes a focused electron beam to process metal powder, layer by layer, in a vacuum environment. Research conducted as part of this body of work looks into the development of both bulk materials in the form of metal alloys and ceramic metal-matrix composites as well as the development of tunable mechanical & thermal metamaterials. Simulation models to approximate electron beam melting were suggested using commercial finite element analysis packages. A framework was developed based on the finite difference method to simulate layered manufacturing using Arcam AB's electron beam melting process. The outputs from the simulation data could be used to better understand the local melting, grain evolution, composition and internal stresses within freeform-fabricated metal parts.

  6. MATERIALS WITH COMPLEX ELECTRONIC/ATOMIC STRUCTURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. PARKIN; L. CHEN; ET AL

    2000-09-01

    We explored both experimentally and theoretically the behavior of materials at stresses close to their theoretical strength. This involves the preparation of ultra fine scale structures by a variety of fabrication methods. In the past year work has concentrated on wire drawing of in situ composites such as Cu-Ag and Cu-Nb. Materials were also fabricated by melting alloys in glass and drawing them into filaments at high temperatures by a method known as Taylor wire technique. Cu-Ag microwires have been drawn by this technique to produce wires 10 {micro}m in diameter that consist of nanoscale grains of supersaturated solid solution. Organogels formed from novel organic gelators containing cholesterol tethered to squaraine dyes or trans-stilbene derivatives have been studied from several different perspectives. The two types of molecules are active toward several organic liquids, gelling in some cases at w/w percentages as low as 0.1. While relatively robust, acroscopically dry gels are formed in several cases, studies with a variety of probes indicate that much of the solvent may exist in domains that are essentially liquid-like in terms of their microenvironment. The gels have been imaged by atomic force microscopy and conventional and fluorescence microscopy, monitoring both the gelator fluorescence in the case of the stilbene-cholesterol gels and, the fluorescence of solutes dissolved in the solvent. Remarkably, our findings show that several of the gels are composed of similarly appearing fibrous structures visible at the nano-, micro-, and macroscale.

  7. Modeling a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope Focusing Column - Lessons Learned in Electron Optics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, Jody; Gregory, Don; Gaskin, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    /Fourier series hybrid approach. The presentation will give background remarks about the MSFC mini Lunar SEM concept and electron optics modeling, followed by a description of the alternate field modeling techniques that were tried, along with their incorporation into a ray-trace simulation. Next, the validation of this simulation against commercially available software will be discussed using an example lens as a test case. Then, the efficacy of aberration assessment using direct ray-tracing will be demonstrated, using this same validation case. The discussion will include practical error checks of the field solution. Finally, the ray-trace assessment of the MSFC mini Lunar SEM concept will be shown and discussed. The authors believe this presentation will be of general interest to practitioners of modeling and simulation, as well as those with a general optics background. Because electron optics and photon optics share many basic concepts (e.g., lenses, images, aberrations, etc.), the appeal of this presentation need not be restricted to just those interested in charged particle optics.

  8. One-Electron Theory of Metals. Cohesive and Structural Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    by means of the Linear Muffin-Tin Orbital (LMTO) method. It has been the goal of the work to establish how well this one-electron approach describes physical properties such as the crystal structures of the transition metals, the structural phase transitions in the alkali, alkaline earth, and rare earth...... metals, and the localization of 3d, 4f, and 5f electrons in the 3d metal monoxides, the light lanthanides, and the actinides, respectively, as well as the cohesive properties of metals in general.!......The work described in the report r.nd the 16 accompanying publications is based upon a one-electron theory obtained within the local approximation to density-functional theory, and deals with the ground state of metals as obtained from selfconsistent electronic-structure calculations performed...

  9. Electronic spectra of structurally deformed lutein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macernis, Mindaugas; Sulskus, Juozas; Duffy, Christopher D P; Ruban, Alexander V; Valkunas, Leonas

    2012-10-11

    Quantum chemical calculations have been employed for the investigation of the lowest excited electronic states of lutein, with particular reference to its function within light harvesting antenna complexes of higher plants. Through comparative analysis obtained by using different methods based on gas-phase calculations of the spectra, it was determined that variations in the lengths of the long C-C valence bonds and the dihedral angles of the polyene chain are the dominant factors in determining the spectral properties of Lut 1 and Lut 2 corresponding to the deformed lutein molecules taken from crystallographic data of the major pigment-protein complex of photosystem II. By MNDO-CAS-CI method, it was determined that the two singlet B(u) states of lutein (nominally 1B(u)(-)* and 1B(u)(+)) arise as a result of mixing of the canonical 1B(u)(-) and 1B(u)(+) states of the all-trans polyene due to the presence of the ending rings in lutein. The 1B(u)(-)* state of lutein is optically allowed, while the 1B(u)(-) of a pure all-trans polyene chain is optically forbidden. As demonstrated, the B(u) states are much more sensitive to minor distortions of the conjugated chain due to mixing of the canonical states, resulting in states of poorly defined particle-hole symmetry. Conversely, the A(g) states are relatively robust with respect to geometric distortion, and their respective inversion and particle-hole symmetries remain relatively well-defined.

  10. Writing Electron Dot Structures: Abstract of Issue 9905M

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnell, Kenneth R.

    1999-10-01

    Writing Electron Dot Structures is a computer program for Mac OS that provides drill with feedback for students learning to write electron dot structures. While designed for students in the first year of college general chemistry it may also be used by high school chemistry students. A systematic method similar to that found in many general chemistry texts is employed: determine the number of valence shell electrons, select the central atom, construct a skeleton, add electrons to complete octets, examine the structure for resonance forms. During the construction of a structure, the student has the option of quitting, selecting another formula, or returning to a previous step. If an incorrect number of electrons is entered the student may not proceed until the correct number is entered. The symbol entered for the central atom must follow accepted upper/lower case practice, and entry of the correct symbol must be accomplished before proceeding to the next step. A periodic table is accessible and feedback provides assistance for these steps. Construction of the skeleton begins with the placement of the central atom. Atoms can be added, moved, or removed. Prompts and feedback keep the student informed of progress and problems. A correct skeleton is required before proceeding to the next step. Completion of the structure begins with the addition of electron pairs to form the required bonds. Remaining electrons are added to complete the formation of multiple bonds, assure compliance with the octet rule, and form expanded octets. Resonance forms are made by moving or removing and replacing electron pairs in the existing skeleton. Prompts and feedback guide the student through this process. A running tally of bond pairs, unshared pairs, octets, electrons used, and electrons remaining is provided during this step. Screens from Writing Electron Dot Structures Hardware and Software Requirements Hardware and software requirements for Writing Electron Dot Structures are shown

  11. The stabilities and electron structures of Al-Mg clusters with 18 and 20 valence electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huihui; Chen, Hongshan

    2017-07-01

    The spherical jellium model predicts that metal clusters having 18 and 20 valence electrons correspond to the magic numbers and will show specific stabilities. We explore in detail the geometric structures, stabilities and electronic structures of Al-Mg clusters containing 18 and 20 valence electrons by using genetic algorithm combined with density functional theories. The stabilities of the clusters are governed by the electronic configurations and Mg/Al ratios. The clusters with lower Mg/Al ratios are more stable. The molecular orbitals accord with the shell structures predicted by the jellium model but the 2S level interweaves with the 1D levels and the 2S and 1D orbitals form a subgroup. The clusters having 20 valence electrons form closed 1S21P61D102S2 shells and show enhanced stability. The Al-Mg clusters with a valence electron count of 18 do not form closed shells because one 1D orbital is unoccupied. The ionization potential and electron affinity are closely related to the electronic configurations; their values are determined by the subgroups the HOMO or LUMO belong to. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://https://doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2017-80042-9

  12. Structure and electronic properties of amorphous WO3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijs, G.A. de; Groot, R.A. de

    1999-01-01

    The structure and electronic structure of amorphous WO3 were studied with first-principles density-functional calculations. Upon amorphization, a large increase of the band gap is observed. The empty states exhibit a tendency towards localization. We studied the filling of these states as induced by

  13. Electronic band structure of PuCoGa sub 5

    CERN Document Server

    Szajek, A

    2003-01-01

    The electronic band structure is presented for PuCoGa sub 5 , the recently discovered superconductor with T sub C approx 18 K. The band structure is calculated by the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital method in the atomic sphere approximation. (letter to the editor)

  14. Determination of conduction and valence band electronic structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electronic structures of rutile and anatase polymorph of TiO2 were determined by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering measurements and FEFF9.0 calculations. Difference between crystalline structures led to shifts in the rutile Ti -band to lower energy with respect to anatase, i.e., decrease in band gap. Anatase possesses ...

  15. Electronic band-structure calculations of some magnetic chromium compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANBRUGGEN, CF; HAAS, C; DEGROOT, RA

    1989-01-01

    In this paper band-structure calculations of CrS, CrSe, Cr3Se4 and CrSb are presented. Together with our accompanying results for the chromium tellurides, these calculations give a coherent picture of the changes in the electronic structure caused by anion substitution and by introduction of cation

  16. Chemical modulation of electronic structure at the excited state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F.; Song, C.; Gu, Y. D.; Saleem, M. S.; Pan, F.

    2017-12-01

    Spin-polarized electronic structures are the cornerstone of spintronics, and have thus attracted a significant amount of interest; in particular, researchers are looking into how to modulate the electronic structure to enable multifunctional spintronics applications, especially in half-metallic systems. However, the control of the spin polarization has only been predicted in limited two-dimensional systems with spin-polarized Dirac structures and is difficult to achieve experimentally. Here, we report the modulation of the electronic structure in the light-induced excited state in a typical half-metal, L a1 /2S r1 /2Mn O3 -δ . According to the spin-transport measurements, there appears a light-induced increase in magnetoresistance due to the enhanced spin scattering, which is closely associated with the excited spin polarization. Strikingly, the light-induced variation can be enhanced via alcohol processing and reduced by oxygen annealing. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements show that in the chemical process, a redox reaction occurs with a change in the valence of Mn. Furthermore, first-principles calculations reveal that the change in the valence of Mn alters the electronic structure and consequently modulates the spin polarization in the excited state. Our findings thus report a chemically tunable electronic structure, demonstrating interesting physics and the potential for multifunctional applications and ultrafast spintronics.

  17. Extraction of High Charge Electron Bunch from the ELSA RF Injector Comparison Between Simulation and Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lemaire, J; Binet, A; Lagniel, J M; Le Flanchec, V; Pichoff, N

    2004-01-01

    A new scheme based on a photoinjector and a RF linear accelerator operating at 352 MHz has been recently proposed as a versatile radiographic facility. Beam pulses of 60 ns duration contain 20 succesive electron bunches which will be extracted at 2.5 MeV from a photoinjector then accelerated through the next structure to the final energy of 51 MeV. Bunches carrying 100 nC are required for this purpose. As a first demonstrating step, 50 nC electron bunches have been produced and accelerated to 2.5 MeV with the 144 MHz ELSA photoinjector at Bruyères le Chatel. For this experiment, we compare the results and the numerical simulations made with PARMELA, MAGIC and MAFIA codes.

  18. Orbital approach to the electronic structure of solids

    CERN Document Server

    Canadell, Enric; Iung, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    This book provides an intuitive yet sound understanding of how structure and properties of solids may be related. The natural link is provided by the band theory approach to the electronic structure of solids. The chemically insightful concept of orbital interaction and the essential machinery of band theory are used throughout the book to build links between the crystal and electronic structure of periodic systems. In such a way, it is shown how important tools for understandingproperties of solids like the density of states, the Fermi surface etc. can be qualitatively sketched and used to ei

  19. Design Considerations for Optimized Lateral Spring Structures for Wearable Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Aftab M.

    2016-03-07

    The market for wearable electronics has been gaining momentum in the recent years. For completely electronic wearable textiles with integrated sensors, actuators, computing units and communication circuitry, it is important that there is significant stretchability. This stretchability can be obtained by introducing periodic stretchable structures between the electronic circuits. In this work, we derive the equations and constraints governing the stretchability in horseshoe lateral spring structures. We have derived the optimum design and the parameters therein, to help develop the best spring structures for a given stretchability. We have also developed a figure of merit, called area efficiency of stretchability, to compare all twodimensional stretchable systems. Finally, we experimentally verify the validity of our equations by fabricating a metal/polymer bilayer thin film based stretchable horseshoe lateral spring structures. We obtain a stretchability of 1.875 which is comparable to the theoretical maxima of 2.01 for the given parameters.

  20. Studies on electronic structure of GaN(0001) surface

    CERN Document Server

    Xie Chang Kun; Xu Fa Qiang; Deng Rui; Liu Feng; Yibulaxin, K

    2002-01-01

    An electronic structure investigation on GaN(0001) is reported. The authors employ a full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FPLAPW) approach to calculate the partial density of state, which is in agreement with previous experimental results. The effects of the Ga3d semi-core levels on the electronic structure of GaN are discussed. The valence-electronic structure of the wurtzite GaN(0001) surface is investigated using synchrotron radiation excited angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The bulk bands dispersion along GAMMA A direction in the Brillouin zones is measured using normal-emission spectra by changing photon-energy. The band structure derived from authors' experimental data is compared well with the results of authors' FPLAPW calculation. Furthermore, off-normal emission spectra are also measured along the GAMMA K and GAMMA M directions. Two surface states are identified, and their dispersions are characterized

  1. Ion dynamics in electron beam–plasma interaction: particle-in-cell simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Baumgärtel

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Electron beam–plasma interaction including ions is studied by particle-in-cell (PIC simulations using a one-dimensional, electrostatic code. Evidence for Langmuir wave decay is given for sufficiently energetic beams, as in previous Vlasov–Maxwell simulations. The mechanism for the generation of localized finite-amplitude ion density fluctuations is analyzed. Amplitude modulation due to interference between the beam-generated Langmuir waves causes random wave localization including strong transient spikes in field intensity which create bursty ion density structures via ponderomotive forces. More dense beams may quench the decay instability and generate low-frequency variations dominated by the wave number of the fastest growing Langmuir mode.

  2. Structure and electronic properties of lead-selenide nanocrystal solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitham, Kevin

    Recent advances in the controlled formation of nanocrystal superlattices have potential for creating materials with properties by design. The ability to tune nanocrystal size, shape and composition as well as symmetry of the superlattice opens routes to new materials. Calculations of such materials predict interesting electronic phenomena including topological states and Dirac cones, however experimental support is lacking. We have investigated electron localization in nanocrystal superlattices using a combination of advanced structural characterization techniques and charge transport measurements. Recent experimental efforts to improve the electronic properties of nanocrystal solids have focused on increasing inter-dot coupling. However, this approach only leads to electronic bands if the coupling energy can overcome energetic and translational disorder. We have investigated oriented-attachment as a method to create nanocrystal superlattices with increased coupling and translational order. We show that epitaxially connected superlattices form by a coherent phase transformation that is sensitive to structural defects and ligand length. In order to measure intrinsic electronic properties we demonstrate control over electronic defects by tailoring surface chemistry and device architecture. To probe charge transport in these structures we performed variable temperature field-effect measurements. By integrating structure analysis, surface chemistry, and transport measurements we find that carriers are localized to a few superlattice constants due to disorder. Importantly, our analysis shows that greater delocalization is possible by optimizing dot-to-dot bonding, thus providing a path forward to create quantum dot solids in which theoretically predicted properties can be realized.

  3. Membrane protein structures without crystals, by single particle electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R

    2015-08-01

    It is an exciting period in membrane protein structural biology with a number of medically important protein structures determined at a rapid pace. However, two major hurdles still remain in the structural biology of membrane proteins. One is the inability to obtain large amounts of protein for crystallization and the other is the failure to get well-diffracting crystals. With single particle electron cryomicroscopy, both these problems can be overcome and high-resolution structures of membrane proteins and other labile protein complexes can be obtained with very little protein and without the need for crystals. In this review, I highlight recent advances in electron microscopy, detectors and software, which have allowed determination of medium to high-resolution structures of membrane proteins and complexes that have been difficult to study by other structural biological techniques. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Electron-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of electron scale current sheet dynamics in the Vineta.II guide field reconnection experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Neeraj; von Stechow, Adrian; Muñoz, Patricio A.; Büchner, Jörg; Grulke, Olaf; Klinger, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Three dimensional electron-magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) simulations of electron current sheet dynamics in a background of stationary and unmagnetized ions and the subsequent generation of electromagnetic fluctuations are carried out. The physical parameters and initial magnetic configuration in the simulations are chosen to be similar to those in the Vineta.II magnetic reconnection experiment. Consistent with the experimental results, our 3D EMHD simulations show the formation of an elongated electron scale current sheet together with the excitation of electromagnetic fluctuations within this sheet. The fluctuations in the simulations are generated by an electron shear flow instability growing on the in-plane (perpendicular to the direction of the main current in the sheet) electron shear flow (or current) developed during the current sheet evolution. Similar to the experiments, the magnetic field fluctuations perpendicular to the guide magnetic field exhibit a broadband frequency spectrum following a power law and a positive correlation with the axial current density. Although the experimental results show that ions influence the spectral properties of the fluctuations, the simulations suggest that the electron dynamics, even in the absence of ion motion, primarily determines the formation of the current sheet and the generation of electromagnetic fluctuations observed in the experiments.

  5. Grain structure evolution in Inconel 718 during selective electron beam melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmer, H.; Bauereiß, A., E-mail: Andreas.Bauereiss@fau.de; Singer, R.F.; Körner, C.

    2016-06-21

    Selective electron beam melting (SEBM) is an additive manufacturing method where complex parts are built from metal powders in layers of typically 50 µm. An electron beam is used for heating (about 900 °C building temperature) and selective melting of the material. The grain structure evolution is a result of the complex thermal and hydrodynamic conditions in the melt pool. We show how different scanning strategies can be used to produce either a columnar grain structure with a high texture in building direction or an equiaxed fine grained structure. Numerical simulations of the selective melting process are applied to study the fundamental mechanisms responsible for differing grain structures. It is shown, that the direction of the thermal gradient during solidification can be altered by scanning strategies to acquire either epitaxial growth or stray grains. We show that it is possible to locally alter the grain structure of a part, thus allowing tailoring of the mechanical properties.

  6. Electronic simulation of a barometric pressure sensor for the meteorological monitor assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiar, C. N.; Duff, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    An analysis of the electronic simulation of barometric pressure used to self-test the counter electronics of the digital barometer is presented. The barometer is part of the Meteorological Monitor Assembly that supports navigation in deep space communication. The theory of operation of the digital barometer, the design details, and the verification procedure used with the barometric pressure simulator are presented.

  7. Efficient electronic structure methods applied to metal nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ask Hjorth

    Nano-scale structures are increasingly applied in the design of catalysts and electronic devices. A theoretical understanding of the basic properties of such systems is enabled through modern electronic structure methods such as density functional theory. This thesis describes the development of ...... the total energy through the creation of gaps. Clusters larger than 100 atoms can elongate systematically by up to 15 %. This demonstrates a complex interdependence between electronic and geometric structure in a size regime which in most cases has been studied semiempirically.......Nano-scale structures are increasingly applied in the design of catalysts and electronic devices. A theoretical understanding of the basic properties of such systems is enabled through modern electronic structure methods such as density functional theory. This thesis describes the development......Gene/P architecture. Real-space calculations are performed to investigate the convergence of chemical properties of Au and Pt clusters toward the bulk limit. Specically we study chemisorption of O and CO on cuboctahedral clusters up to 1415 atoms using up to 65536 CPU cores. Small clusters almost universally bind...

  8. Variability of Protein Structure Models from Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Lyman; Terashi, Genki; Kihara, Daisuke

    2017-04-04

    An increasing number of biomolecular structures are solved by electron microscopy (EM). However, the quality of structure models determined from EM maps vary substantially. To understand to what extent structure models are supported by information embedded in EM maps, we used two computational structure refinement methods to examine how much structures can be refined using a dataset of 49 maps with accompanying structure models. The extent of structure modification as well as the disagreement between refinement models produced by the two computational methods scaled inversely with the global and the local map resolutions. A general quantitative estimation of deviations of structures for particular map resolutions are provided. Our results indicate that the observed discrepancy between the deposited map and the refined models is due to the lack of structural information present in EM maps and thus these annotations must be used with caution for further applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Studying atomic structures by aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Knut W

    2008-07-25

    Seventy-five years after its invention, transmission electron microscopy has taken a great step forward with the introduction of aberration-corrected electron optics. An entirely new generation of instruments enables studies in condensed-matter physics and materials science to be performed at atomic-scale resolution. These new possibilities are meeting the growing demand of nanosciences and nanotechnology for the atomic-scale characterization of materials, nanosynthesized products and devices, and the validation of expected functions. Equipped with electron-energy filters and electron-energy-loss spectrometers, the new instruments allow studies not only of structure but also of elemental composition and chemical bonding. The energy resolution is about 100 milli-electron volts, and the accuracy of spatial measurements has reached a few picometers. However, understanding the results is generally not straightforward and only possible with extensive quantum-mechanical computer calculations.

  10. Electronic structure of hafnium: A Compton profile study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The calculations were done for the hexagonal (P63/mmc) structure of Hf with lattice parameters a = 3.195 Å and c = 5.051 Å. ECP's have been taken from [25] and the valence basis sets for 5d and 6s electrons have been used after reoptimiza- tion. It may be mentioned that due to the non-availability of all electron basis sets.

  11. Electronic Structures of Clusters of Hydrogen Vacancies on Graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Bi-Ru Wu; Chih-Kai Yang

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen vacancies in graphane are products of incomplete hydrogenation of graphene. The missing H atoms can alter the electronic structure of graphane and therefore tune the electronic, magnetic, and optical properties of the composite. We systematically studied a variety of well-separated clusters of hydrogen vacancies in graphane, including the geometrical shapes of triangles, parallelograms, hexagons, and rectangles, by first-principles density functional calculation. The results indicate...

  12. Moving solvated electrons with light: nonadiabatic mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations of the relocalization of photoexcited solvated electrons in tetrahydrofuran (THF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard-Hearn, Michael J; Larsen, Ross E; Schwartz, Benjamin J

    2006-11-21

    Motivated by recent ultrafast spectroscopic experiments [Martini et al., Science 293, 462 (2001)], which suggest that photoexcited solvated electrons in tetrahydrofuran (THF) can relocalize (that is, return to equilibrium in solvent cavities far from where they started), we performed a series of nonequilibrium, nonadiabatic, mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations that mimic one-photon excitation of the THF-solvated electron. We find that as photoexcited THF-solvated electrons relax to their ground states either by continuous mixing from the excited state or via nonadiabatic transitions, approximately 30% of them relocalize into cavities that can be over 1 nm away from where they originated, in close agreement with the experiments. A detailed investigation shows that the ability of excited THF-solvated electrons to undergo photoinduced relocalization stems from the existence of preexisting cavity traps that are an intrinsic part of the structure of liquid THF. This explains why solvated electrons can undergo photoinduced relocalization in solvents like THF but not in solvents like water, which lack the preexisting traps necessary to stabilize the excited electron in other places in the fluid. We also find that even when they do not ultimately relocalize, photoexcited solvated electrons in THF temporarily visit other sites in the fluid, explaining why the photoexcitation of THF-solvated electrons is so efficient at promoting recombination with nearby scavengers. Overall, our study shows that the defining characteristic of a liquid that permits the photoassisted relocalization of solvated electrons is the existence of nascent cavities that are attractive to an excess electron; we propose that other such liquids can be found from classical computer simulations or neutron diffraction experiments.

  13. Theoretical studies of the electronic structure of small metal clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, K. D.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical studies of the electronic structure of metal clusters, in particular clusters of Group IIA and IIB atoms were conducted. Early in the project it became clear that electron correlation involving d orbitals plays a more important role in the binding of these clusters than had been previously anticipated. This necessitated that computer codes for calculating two electron integrals and for constructing the resulting CI Hamiltonions be replaced with newer, more efficient procedures. Program modification, interfacing and testing were performed. Results of both plans are reported.

  14. Super instruction architecture of petascale electronic structure software: the story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotrich, V. F.; Ponton, J. M.; Perera, A. S.; Deumens, E.; Bartlett, R. J.; Sanders, B. A.

    2010-11-01

    Theoretical methods in chemistry lead to algorithms for the computation of electronic energies and other properties of electronic wave functions that require large numbers of floating point operations and involve large data sets. Thus, computational chemists are very interested in using massively parallel computer systems and in particular the new petascale systems. In this paper we discuss a new programming paradigm that was developed at the Quantum Theory Project to construct electronic structure software that can scale to large numbers of cores of the order of 100,000 and beyond to solve problems in materials engineering relevant to the problems facing society today.

  15. Atomic and Electronic Structure of Defects in Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-01

    Ultramicroscopy, (1981) Vol 7, p. 59-64. 3. "Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy as a probe of the Local Atomic Environment" O.L. Krivanek , M.M. Disko, J...Electron Energy-Loss Spectra, M.M. Disko, O.L. Krivanek and P. Rez, Phys. Rev. B15, #6, p. 4252 (1982). 8. "Electronic Structure of the Unreconstructed 30...and Preliminary Orientation Depencence Results" M. Disko, 0. Krivanek and J.C.H. Spence, Proc. EMSA, 1981. G.W. Bailey, Ed, Claitors Publishing Division

  16. Structure and thermodynamic properties of relativistic electron gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Wu, Jianzhong

    2014-07-01

    Relativistic effect is important in many quantum systems but theoretically complicated from both fundamental and practical perspectives. Herein we introduce an efficient computational procedure to predict the structure and energetic properties of relativistic quantum systems by mapping the Pauli principle into an effective pairwise-additive potential such that the properties of relativistic nonquantum systems can be readily predicted from conventional liquid-state methods. We applied our theoretical procedure to relativistic uniform electron gases and compared the pair correlation functions with those for systems of nonrelativistic electrons. A simple analytical expression has been developed to correlate the exchange-correlation free energy of relativistic uniform electron systems.

  17. Electron confinement in thin metal films. Structure, morphology and interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dil, J.H.

    2006-05-15

    This thesis investigates the interplay between reduced dimensionality, electronic structure, and interface effects in ultrathin metal layers (Pb, In, Al) on a variety of substrates (Si, Cu, graphite). These layers can be grown with such a perfection that electron confinement in the direction normal to the film leads to the occurrence of quantum well states in their valence bands. These quantum well states are studied in detail, and their behaviour with film thickness, on different substrates, and other parameters of growth are used here to characterise a variety of physical properties of such nanoscale systems. The sections of the thesis deal with a determination of quantum well state energies for a large data set on different systems, the interplay between film morphology and electronic structure, and the influence of substrate electronic structure on their band shape; finally, new ground is broken by demonstrating electron localization and correlation effects, and the possibility to measure the influence of electron-phonon coupling in bulk bands. (orig.)

  18. Quasiparticle GW calculations within the GPAW electronic structure code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüser, Falco

    are explained in detail and many examples are given. This provides a full understanding of how the code works and how the outcome should be interpreted. Secondly, it gives an extensive discussion of calculated results for the electronic structure of 3-dimensional, 2-dimensional and finite systems and comparison......The GPAW electronic structure code, developed at the physics department at the Technical University of Denmark, is used today by researchers all over the world to model the structural, electronic, optical and chemical properties of materials. They address fundamental questions in material science...... and use their knowledge to design new materials for a vast range of applications. Todays hottest topics are, amongst many others, better materials for energy conversion (e.g. solar cells), energy storage (batteries) and catalysts for the removal of environmentally dangerous exhausts. The mentioned...

  19. Structural and electronic properties of dense liquid and amorphous nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boates, B; Bonev, S A

    2011-02-11

    We present first-principles calculations of the structural and electronic properties of liquid nitrogen in the pressure-temperature range of 0-200 GPa and 2000-6000 K. The molecular-polymerization and molecular-atomic liquid phase boundaries have been mapped over this region. We find the polymeric liquid to be metallic, similar to what has been reported for the higher-temperature atomic fluid. An explanation of the electronic properties is given based on the structure and bonding character of the transformed liquids. We discuss the structural and bonding differences between the polymeric liquid and insulating solid cubic-gauche nitrogen to explain the differences in their electronic properties. Furthermore, we discuss the mechanism responsible for charge transport in polymeric nitrogen systems to explain the conductivity of the polymeric fluid and the semi-conducting nature of low-temperature amorphous nitrogen.

  20. First-principles electron dynamics control simulation of diamond under femtosecond laser pulse train irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Feng; Li, Xin; Yuan, Yanping; Xiao, Hai; Tsai, Hai-Lung; Lu, Yongfeng

    2012-07-11

    A real-time and real-space time-dependent density functional is applied to simulate the nonlinear electron-photon interactions during shaped femtosecond laser pulse train ablation of diamond. Effects of the key pulse train parameters such as the pulse separation, spatial/temporal pulse energy distribution and pulse number per train on the electron excitation and energy absorption are discussed. The calculations show that photon-electron interactions and transient localized electron dynamics can be controlled including photon absorption, electron excitation, electron density, and free electron distribution by the ultrafast laser pulse train.

  1. Three-dimensional simulations of ion dynamics in an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijers, J. P. M.; Mironov, V.

    We present a three-dimensional simulation of the ion dynamics in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source. Ion trajectories in the min-B field of the source are calculated taking ion-ion and electron-ion collisions into account. The electrons are not tracked but considered as a neutralizing

  2. Probing the band structure and local electronic properties of low-dimensional semiconductor structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walrath, Jenna Cherie

    Low-dimensional semiconductor structures are important for a wide variety of applications, and recent advances in nanoscale fabrication are paving the way for increasingly precise nano-engineering of a wide range of materials. It is therefore essential that the physics of materials at the nanoscale are thoroughly understood to unleash the full potential of nanotechnology, requiring the development of increasingly sophisticated instrumentation and modeling. Of particular interest is the relationship between the local density of states (LDOS) of low-dimensional structures and the band structure and local electronic properties. This dissertation presents the investigation of the band structure, LDOS, and local electronic properties of nanostructures ranging from zero-dimensional (0D) quantum dots (QDs) to two-dimensional (2D) thin films, synthesizing computational and experimental approaches including Poisson-Schrodinger band structure calculations, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), and scanning thermoelectric microscopy (SThEM). A method is presented for quantifying the local Seebeck coefficient (S) with SThEM, using a quasi-3D conversion matrix approach to directly convert temperature gradient-induced voltages S. For a GaAs p-n junction, the resulting S-profile is consistent with that computed using the free carrier concentration profile. This combined computational-experimental approach is expected to enable nanoscale measurements of S across a wide variety of heterostructure interfaces. The local carrier concentration, n, is profiled across epitaxial InAs/GaAs QDs, where SThEM is used to profile the temperature gradient-induced voltage, which is converted to a profile of the local S and finally to an n profile. The S profile is converted to a conduction band-edge profile and compared with Poisson-Schrodinger band-edge simulations. The combined computational-experimental approach suggests a reduced n in the QD center in

  3. Electronic structure of one electron confined in three-dimensional quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Huda; Nammas, F. S.; Al Shorman, M. M.; Shukri, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    We study the electronic structure of three-dimensional quantum dots with one electron using the canonical formalism. The confining potential is assumed to be spatially isotropic and harmonic. For one electron the energy spectrum, heat capacity and Helmholtz free energy are calculated as a function of temperature and confinement strength. We find that the internal energy for one-electron artificial atoms and the heat capacity are nearly independent of confinement frequency at high temperatures, while at low temperatures the energy-level structure and heat capacity are shown to be strongly dependent on the confinement strength. In addition, the heat capacity decreases less rapidly with increasing confinement frequency at appropriate temperatures and energy levels are almost linear. Also, the Helmholtz-free energy is obtained to test the confinement and stability of the system.

  4. Coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo simulation of hydrogen molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rillo, Giovanni; Morales, Miguel A.; Ceperley, David M.; Pierleoni, Carlo

    2018-03-01

    We performed simulations for solid molecular hydrogen at high pressures (250 GPa ≤ P ≤ 500 GPa) along two isotherms at T = 200 K (phase III) and at T = 414 K (phase IV). At T = 200 K, we considered likely candidates for phase III, the C2c and Cmca12 structures, while at T = 414 K in phase IV, we studied the Pc48 structure. We employed both Coupled Electron-Ion Monte Carlo (CEIMC) and Path Integral Molecular Dynamics (PIMD). The latter is based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) with the van der Waals approximation (vdW-DF). The comparison between the two methods allows us to address the question of the accuracy of the exchange-correlation approximation of DFT for thermal and quantum protons without recurring to perturbation theories. In general, we find that atomic and molecular fluctuations in PIMD are larger than in CEIMC which suggests that the potential energy surface from vdW-DF is less structured than the one from quantum Monte Carlo. We find qualitatively different behaviors for systems prepared in the C2c structure for increasing pressure. Within PIMD, the C2c structure is dynamically partially stable for P ≤ 250 GPa only: it retains the symmetry of the molecular centers but not the molecular orientation; at intermediate pressures, it develops layered structures like Pbcn or Ibam and transforms to the metallic Cmca-4 structure at P ≥ 450 GPa. Instead, within CEIMC, the C2c structure is found to be dynamically stable at least up to 450 GPa; at increasing pressure, the molecular bond length increases and the nuclear correlation decreases. For the other two structures, the two methods are in qualitative agreement although quantitative differences remain. We discuss various structural properties and the electrical conductivity. We find that these structures become conducting around 350 GPa but the metallic Drude-like behavior is reached only at around 500 GPa, consistent with recent experimental claims.

  5. Dielectric laser acceleration of non-relativistic electrons at a photonic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuer, John

    2013-08-29

    This thesis reports on the observation of dielectric laser acceleration of non-relativistic electrons via the inverse Smith-Purcell effect in the optical regime. Evanescent modes in the vicinity of a periodic grating structure can travel at the same velocity as the electrons along the grating surface. A longitudinal electric field component is used to continuously impart momentum onto the electrons. This is only possible in the near-field of a suitable photonic structure, which means that the electron beam has to pass the structure within about one wavelength. In our experiment we exploit the third spatial harmonic of a single fused silica grating excited by laser pulses derived from a Titanium:sapphire oscillator and accelerate non-relativistic 28 keV electrons. We measure a maximum energy gain of 280 eV, corresponding to an acceleration gradient of 25 MeV/m, already comparable with state-of-the-art radio-frequency linear accelerators. To experience this acceleration gradient the electrons approach the grating closer than 100 nm. We present the theory behind grating-based particle acceleration and discuss simulation results of dielectric laser acceleration in the near-field of photonic grating structures, which is excited by near-infrared laser light. Our measurements show excellent agreement with our simulation results and therefore confirm the direct acceleration with the light field. We further discuss the acceleration inside double grating structures, dephasing effects of non-relativistic electrons as well as the space charge effect, which can limit the attainable peak currents of these novel accelerator structures. The photonic structures described in this work can be readily concatenated and therefore represent a scalable realization of dielectric laser acceleration. Furthermore, our structures are directly compatible with the microstructures used for the acceleration of relativistic electrons demonstrated in parallel to this work by our collaborators in

  6. Polymeric Thin Films for Organic Electronics: Properties and Adaptive Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Pignataro

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This review deals with the correlation between morphology, structure and performance of organic electronic devices including thin film transistors and solar cells. In particular, we report on solution processed devices going into the role of the 3D supramolecular organization in determining their electronic properties. A selection of case studies from recent literature are reviewed, relying on solution methods for organic thin-film deposition which allow fine control of the supramolecular aggregation of polymers confined at surfaces in nanoscopic layers. A special focus is given to issues exploiting morphological structures stemming from the intrinsic polymeric dynamic adaptation under non-equilibrium conditions.

  7. Electronic structure of ordered and disordered Fe sub 3 Pt

    CERN Document Server

    Major, Z; Jarlborg, T; Bruno, E; Ginatempo, B; Staunton, J B; Poulter, J

    2003-01-01

    The electronic structure of invar alloys (i.e. materials in which the near absence of thermal expansion is observed) has been the focus of much study, owing both to the technological applications of these materials and interest in the fundamental mechanism that is responsible for the effect. Here, calculations of the magnetic Compton profiles are presented for ordered and disordered Fe sub 3 Pt alloys. Using linear muffin-tin orbital and KKR methods, the latter incorporating the coherent potential approximation to describe the substitutional disorder, the electronic band structure and measurable quantities such as the Fermi surface topology are presented.

  8. Comparison of electronic structure between monolayer silicenes on Ag (111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun-Liang, Lin; Ryuichi, Arafune; Maki, Kawai; Noriaki, Takagi

    2015-08-01

    The electronic structures of monolayer silicenes (4 × 4 and ) grown on Ag (111) surface are studied by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. While both phases have similar electronic structures around the Fermi level, significant differences are observed in the higher energy unoccupied states. The DFT calculations show that the contributions of Si 3pz orbitals to the unoccupied states are different because of their different buckled configurations. Project supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) through Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Grant Nos. 24241040 and 25110008) and the World Premier International Research Center Initiative (WPI), MEXT, Japan.

  9. Structure, dynamics, and reactivity of hydrated electrons by ab initio molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsalek, Ondrej; Uhlig, Frank; VandeVondele, Joost; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2012-01-17

    Understanding the properties of hydrated electrons, which were first observed using pulse radiolysis of water in 1962, is crucial because they are key species in many radiation chemistry processes. Although time-resolved spectroscopic studies and molecular simulations have shown that an electron in water (prepared, for example, by water photoionization) relaxes quickly to a localized, cavity-like structure ∼2.5 Å in radius, this picture has recently been questioned. In another experimental approach, negatively charged water clusters of increasing size were studied with photoelectron and IR spectroscopies. Although small water clusters can bind an excess electron, their character is very different from bulk hydrated species. As data on electron binding in liquid water have become directly accessible experimentally, the cluster-to-bulk extrapolations have become a topic of lively debate. Quantum electronic structure calculations addressing experimental measurables have, until recently, been largely limited to small clusters; extended systems were approached mainly with pseudopotential calculations combining a classical description of water with a quantum mechanical treatment of the excess electron. In this Account, we discuss our investigations of electrons solvated in water by means of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. This approach, applied to a model system of a negatively charged cluster of 32 water molecules, allows us to characterize structural, dynamical, and reactive aspects of the hydrated electron using all of the system's valence electrons. We show that under ambient conditions, the electron localizes into a cavity close to the surface of the liquid cluster. This cavity is, however, more flexible and accessible to water molecules than an analogous area around negatively charged ions. The dynamical process of electron attachment to a neutral water cluster is strongly temperature dependent. Under ambient conditions, the electron relaxes in the

  10. Structural and electronic properties of monolayer group III monochalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, S.; Avazlı, N.; Durgun, E.; Cahangirov, S.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of the two-dimensional hexagonal structure of group III-VI binary monolayers, M X (M =B , Al, Ga, In and X =O , S, Se, Te) using first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory. The structural optimization calculations and phonon spectrum analysis indicate that all of the 16 possible binary compounds are thermally stable. In-plane stiffness values cover a range depending on the element types and can be as high as that of graphene, while the calculated bending rigidity is found to be an order of magnitude higher than that of graphene. The obtained electronic band structures show that M X monolayers are indirect band-gap semiconductors. The calculated band gaps span a wide optical spectrum from deep ultraviolet to near infrared. The electronic structure of oxides (M O ) is different from the rest because of the high electronegativity of oxygen atoms. The dispersions of the electronic band edges and the nature of bonding between atoms can also be correlated with electronegativities of constituent elements. The unique characteristics of group III-VI binary monolayers can be suitable for high-performance device applications in nanoelectronics and optics.

  11. Structure and electronic states of a graphene double vacancy with an embedded Si dopant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieman, Reed; Aquino, Adélia J. A.; Hardcastle, Trevor P.; Kotakoski, Jani; Susi, Toma; Lischka, Hans

    2017-11-01

    Silicon represents a common intrinsic impurity in graphene, bonding to either three or four carbon neighbors, respectively, in a single or double carbon vacancy. We investigate the effect of the latter defect (Si-C4) on the structural and electronic properties of graphene using density functional theory. Calculations based both on molecular models and with periodic boundary conditions have been performed. The two-carbon vacancy was constructed from pyrene (pyrene-2C) which was then expanded to circumpyrene-2C. The structural characterization of these cases revealed that the ground state is slightly non-planar, with the bonding carbons displaced from the plane by up to ±0.2 Å. This non-planar structure was confirmed by embedding the defect into a 10 × 8 supercell of graphene, resulting in 0.22 eV lower energy than the previously considered planar structure. Natural bond orbital analysis showed sp3 hybridization at the silicon atom for the non-planar structure and sp2d hybridization for the planar structure. Atomically resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy and corresponding spectrum simulations provide a mixed picture: a flat structure provides a slightly better overall spectrum match, but a small observed pre-peak is only present in the corrugated simulation. Considering the small energy barrier between the two equivalent corrugated conformations, both structures could plausibly exist as a superposition over the experimental time scale of seconds.

  12. Measurement of the Electron Structure Function at LEP energies

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, U; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W-D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Asman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, P; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, D; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, M; Baubillier, M; Becks, K-H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N; Benvenuti, A; Berat, C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Besancon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Bruckman, P; Brunet, J M; Buschbeck, B; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F; Chapkin, M; Charpentier, Ph; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crennell, D; Cuevas, J; D'Hondt, J; da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; De Boer, W; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; de Paula, L; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Eigen, G; Ekelof, T; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Foeth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J; Gandelman, M; Garcia, C; Gavillet, Ph; Gazis, E; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S-O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E; Kernel, G; Kersevan, B P; Kerzel, U; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kouznetsov, O; Krumstein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; Lopez, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Marechal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J-C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martinez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; Mc Nulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W; Mjoernmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Moenig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Mueller, U; Muenich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, G; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, F; Nawrocki, K; Nemecek, S; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Olshevski, A; Onofre, A; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, Th D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Pozdniakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, A; Radojicic, D; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P; Richard, F; Ridky, J; Rivero, M; Rodriguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, P; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovsky, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Sander, C; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Sekulin, R; Siebel, M; Sisakian, A; Slominski, W; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassov, T; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Szwed, J; Tabarelli, T; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tome, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O; Zalewska, A; Zalewski, P; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zintchenko, A; Zupan, M

    2010-01-01

    The hadronic part of the Electron Structure Function (ESF) has been measured for the first time, using e+e- data collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP, at centre-of-mass energies sqrt(s) = 91.2-209.5 GeV. The data analysis is simpler than that of the measurement of the photon structure function. The ESF data are compared to predictions of phenomenological models based on the photon structure function. It is shown that the quasi-real photon virtuality contribution is significant. The presented data can serve as a cross-check of the photon structure function analyses and help in refining existing parametrizations.

  13. 3D Simulations of Ultra-small MOSFETs with Real-space Treatment of the ElectronElectron and Electron-ion Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Gross, W. J.; Vasileska, D.; Ferry, D. K.

    2000-01-01

    We present a 3D Ensemble Monte Carlo particle-based simulator with a novel realspace treatment of the short-range electronelectron and electron-ion interactions. By using a corrected Coulomb force in conjunction with a proper cutoff range, the shortrange portion of the force is properly accounted for, and the ‘double counting’ of the long-range interaction is eliminated. The proposed method naturally incorporates the multi-ion contributions, local distortions in the scatteri...

  14. Visualizing Structure and Dynamics of Disaccharide Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, J. F.; Beckham, G. T.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the effect of several solvent models on the conformational properties and dynamics of disaccharides such as cellobiose and lactose. Significant variation in timescale for large scale conformational transformations are observed. Molecular dynamics simulation provides enough detail to enable insight through visualization of multidimensional data sets. We present a new way to visualize conformational space for disaccharides with Ramachandran plots.

  15. A New XOR Structure Based on Resonant-Tunneling High Electron Mobility Transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Sharifi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new structure for an exclusive-OR (XOR gate based on the resonant-tunneling high electron mobility transistor (RTHEMT is introduced which comprises only an RTHEMT and two FETs. Calculations are done by utilizing a new subcircuit model for simulating the RTHEMT in the SPICE simulator. Details of the design, input, and output values and margins, delay of each transition, maximum operating frequency, static and dynamic power dissipations of the new structure are discussed and calculated and the performance is compared with other XOR gates which confirm that the presented structure has a high performance. Furthermore, to the best of authors' knowledge, it has the least component count in comparison to the existing structures.

  16. Toward Single Electron Nanoelectronics Using Self-Assembled DNA Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapio, Kosti; Leppiniemi, Jenni; Shen, Boxuan; Hytönen, Vesa P; Fritzsche, Wolfgang; Toppari, J Jussi

    2016-11-09

    DNA based structures offer an adaptable and robust way to develop customized nanostructures for various purposes in bionanotechnology. One main aim in this field is to develop a DNA nanobreadboard for a controllable attachment of nanoparticles or biomolecules to form specific nanoelectronic devices. Here we conjugate three gold nanoparticles on a defined size TX-tile assembly into a linear pattern to form nanometer scale isolated islands that could be utilized in a room temperature single electron transistor. To demonstrate this, conjugated structures were trapped using dielectrophoresis for current-voltage characterization. After trapping only high resistance behavior was observed. However, after extending the islands by chemical growth of gold, several structures exhibited Coulomb blockade behavior from 4.2 K up to room temperature, which gives a good indication that self-assembled DNA structures could be used for nanoelectronic patterning and single electron devices.

  17. Electronic structure of disordered alloys, surfaces and interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Turek, Ilja; Kudrnovský, Josef; Šob, Mojmír; Weinberger, Peter

    1997-01-01

    At present, there is an increasing interest in the prediction of properties of classical and new materials such as substitutional alloys, their surfaces, and metallic or semiconductor multilayers. A detailed understanding based on a thus of the utmost importance for fu­ microscopic, parameter-free approach is ture developments in solid state physics and materials science. The interrela­ tion between electronic and structural properties at surfaces plays a key role for a microscopic understanding of phenomena as diverse as catalysis, corrosion, chemisorption and crystal growth. Remarkable progress has been made in the past 10-15 years in the understand­ ing of behavior of ideal crystals and their surfaces by relating their properties to the underlying electronic structure as determined from the first principles. Similar studies of complex systems like imperfect surfaces, interfaces, and mul­ tilayered structures seem to be accessible by now. Conventional band-structure methods, however, are of limited use ...

  18. Electronic structure of nitrides PuN and UN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukoyanov, A. V., E-mail: lukoyanov@imp.uran.ru; Anisimov, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Mikheev Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    The electronic structure of uranium and plutonium nitrides in ambient conditions and under pressure is investigated using the LDA + U + SO band method taking into account the spin–orbit coupling and the strong correlations of 5f electrons of actinoid ions. The parameters of these interactions for the equilibrium cubic structure are calculated additionally. The application of pressure reduces the magnetic moment in PuN due to predominance of the f{sup 6} configuration and the jj-type coupling. An increase in the occupancy of the 5f state in UN leads to a decrease in the magnetic moment, which is also detected in the trigonal structure of the UN{sub x} β phase (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-type structure). The theoretical results are in good agreement with the available experimental data.

  19. Simulation of Adaptive Kinetic Architectural Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2010-01-01

    to obtain the control forces that must be known in order to control the shape of a real variable geometry truss structure. An experimental test of the of the shape control approach has been implemented using VGT truss structure and a low-cost data acquisition system based on the open-source Arduino...

  20. Effects of front-surface target structures on properties of relativistic laser-plasma electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, S; Krygier, A G; Schumacher, D W; Akli, K U; Freeman, R R

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of a study of the role of prescribed geometrical structures on the front of a target in determining the energy and spatial distribution of relativistic laser-plasma electrons. Our three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation studies apply to short-pulse, high-intensity laser pulses, and indicate that a judicious choice of target front-surface geometry provides the realistic possibility of greatly enhancing the yield of high-energy electrons while simultaneously confining the emission to narrow (<5°) angular cones.

  1. Structural analysis, electronic properties, and band gaps of a graphene nanoribbon: A new 2D materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dass, Devi

    2018-03-01

    Graphene nanoribbon (GNR), a new 2D carbon nanomaterial, has some unique features and special properties that offer a great potential for interconnect, nanoelectronic devices, optoelectronics, and nanophotonics. This paper reports the structural analysis, electronic properties, and band gaps of a GNR considering different chirality combinations obtained using the pz orbital tight binding model. In structural analysis, the analytical expressions for GNRs have been developed and verified using the simulation for the first time. It has been found that the total number of unit cells and carbon atoms within an overall unit cell and molecular structure of a GNR have been changed with the change in their chirality values which are similar to the values calculated using the developed analytical expressions thus validating both the simulation as well as analytical results. Further, the electronic band structures at different chirality values have been shown for the identification of metallic and semiconductor properties of a GNR. It has been concluded that all zigzag edge GNRs are metallic with very small band gaps range whereas all armchair GNRs show both the metallic and semiconductor nature with very small and high band gaps range. Again, the total number of subbands in each electronic band structure is equal to the total number of carbon atoms present in overall unit cell of the corresponding GNR. The semiconductors GNRs can be used as a channel material in field effect transistor suitable for advanced CMOS technology whereas the metallic GNRs could be used for interconnect.

  2. Revealing electronic structure in atomically-engineered manganite thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monkman, Eric Justin

    Semiconductor technology is based on tuning the properties of devices by manipulating thin films and interfaces. Recently, this approach has been extended to complex oxides, where quantum many-body interactions give rise to emergent ground states not present in the parent materials. Rationally controlling and engineering correlated electronic phases has the potential to revolutionize modern electronics, but is hindered by the inability of current theory to account for the effects of many-body interactions on the underlying electronic structure. Manganites provide a particularly model system for studying many-body effects due to their complex electronic and magnetic phase diagrams, which give rise to many potentially useful properties. Despite extensive work on manganite films demonstrating numerous electronic phase transitions, little is directly known about how the electronic structure responds to the 'control parameters' accessible in thin films. This dissertation presents direct measurements of the electronic structure in La1-- xSrxMnO3 based thin films and interfaces through several phase transitions using a unique integrated oxide molecular-beam epitaxy and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy system. We observe the full Fermi surface and near-EF electronic structure of the ferromagnetic and A-type antiferromagnetic metallic phases, reconciling first-principles calculations with experiment for the first time. Furthermore, our results provide key insights into the polaronic nature of the metallic charge carriers. We then explore the mechanism underlying the insulating ground state for La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 under strong tensile strain. Our measurements rule out the scenarios of bandwidth or localization-driven metal-insulator transitions, and reveal an instability of the strongly interacting metal towards an ordered insulating phase that can be accessed through epitaxial strain. By next studying atomically precise interfaces in (LaMnO3)2n/(SrMnO 3)n superlattices

  3. Near-native Protein Structure Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefka Fidanova

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The protein folding problem is a fundamental problem in computational molecular biology and biochemical physics. The high resolution 3D structure of a protein is the key to the understanding and manipulating of its biochemical and cellular functions. All information necessary to fold a protein to its native structure is contained in its amino-acid sequence. Proteins structure could be calculated from knowledge of its sequence and our understanding of the sequence-structure relationships. Various optimization methods have been applied to formulation of the folding problem. There are two main approaches. The one is based on properties of homologous proteins. Other is based on reduced models of proteins structure like hydrophobic-polar (HP protein model. After that, the folding problem is defined like optimization problem. It is a hard optimization problem and most of the authors apply Monte Carlo or metaheuristic methods to solve it. In this paper other approach will be used. By HP model is explained the structures of proteins conformation observed by biologists and is studied the correspondence between the primary and tertiary structures of the proteins.

  4. Electron Diffraction and High-Resolution Electron Microscopy of Mineral Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord, Gordon L., Jr.

    This book is a well-written English translation of the original 1981 Russian edition, Strukturnoye issledovaniye mineralov metodami mikrodifraktsii i elechtronnoi mikroskopii vysokogo razresheniya. The 1987 English version has been extensively updated and includes references up to 1986. The book is essentially a text on the theoretical and experimental aspects of transmission electron microscopy and has chapters on the reciprocal lattice, electron diffraction (both kinematic and dynamic), and high-resolution electron microscopy.Electron diffraction is emphasized, especially its use for structure analysis of poorly crystalline and fine-grained phases not readily determined by the more exact X ray diffraction method. Two methods of electron diffraction are discussed: selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and oblique-texture electron diffraction (OTED); the latter technique is rarely used in the west and is never discussed in western electron microscopy texts. A SAED pattern is formed by isolating a small micrometer-size area with an aperture and obtaining single-crystal patterns from the diffracted beams. By tilting the sample and obtaining many patterns, a complete picture of the reciprocal lattice can be taken. An OTED pattern is formed when the incident electron beam passes through an inclined preparation consisting of a great number of thin platy crystals lying normal to the texture axis (axis normal to the support grid). To form an OTED pattern, the plates must all lie on a common face, such as a basal plane in phyllosilicates. Upon tilting the plates, an elliptical powder diffraction pattern is formed. Intensities measured from these patterns are used for a structural analysis of the platy minerals.

  5. Investigation of voltages and electric fields in silicon semi 3D radiation detectors using Silvaco/ATLAS simulation tool and a scanning electron microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Palviainen, T; Tuuva, T; Eranen, S; Härkönen, J; Luukka, P; Tuovinen, E

    2006-01-01

    The structure of silicon semi three-dimensional radiation detector is simulated on purpose to find out its electrical characteristics such as the depletion voltage and electric field. Two-dimensional simulation results are compared to voltage and electric field measurements done by a scanning electron microscope.

  6. Two-dimensional simulation research of secondary electron emission avalanche discharge on vacuum insulator surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Libing; Wang, Jianguo; Zhu, Xiangqin; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Dianhui

    2015-01-01

    Based on the secondary electron emission avalanche (SEEA) model, the SEEA discharge on the vacuum insulator surface is simulated by using a 2D PIC-MCC code developed by ourselves. The evolutions of the number of discharge electrons, insulator surface charge, current, and 2D particle distribution are obtained. The effects of the strength of the applied electric field, secondary electron yield coefficient, rise time of the pulse, length of the insulator on the discharge are investigated. The results show that the number of the SEEA electrons presents a quadratic dependence upon the applied field strength. The SEEA current, which is on the order of Ampere, is directly proportional to the field strength and secondary electron yield coefficient. Finally, the electron-stimulated outgassing is included in the simulation code, and a three-phase discharge curve is presented by the simulation, which agrees with the experimental data.

  7. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Ákos K; Rauch, Edgar F; Lábár, János L

    2016-04-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Structural, energetic and electronic properties of intercalated boron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effects of chirality and the intercalation of transitional metal atoms inside single walled BN nano- tubes on structural, energetic and electronic properties have been considered in this paper. The thermodynamic stability of BN nanotubes can be improved by the intercalation of cobalt or nickel. BN nanotubes can ...

  9. CLOPW; a mixed basis set full potential electronic structure method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, H.G.; Bekker, Hermie Gerhard

    1997-01-01

    This thesis is about the development of the full potental CLOPW package for electronic structure calculations. Chapter 1 provides the necessary background in the theory of solid state physics. It gives a short overview of the effective one particle model as commonly used in solid state physics. It

  10. Effect of electron beam irradiation on the structure and optical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This work reports the effect of electron beam (EB) irradiation on the structure and optical properties of nanocrystalline nickel oxide (NiO) cubes. NiO nanocubes were synthesized by the chemical precipitation method. The characterization was carried out by employing analytical techniques like X-ray diffraction, ...

  11. Understanding the structure and electronic properties of N-doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Structures and electronic properties of zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) with pyridine (3NVZGNR) functionalized by Scandium (Sc) at the edge were studied through quantum chemical calculations in the formalism of density-functional theory (DFT). Pyridine-like nitrogen defects is very crucial for enhancing the Sc atom ...

  12. Electronic structure and optical properties of prominent phases of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-06-19

    Jun 19, 2017 ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 89; Issue 1. Electronic structure and optical properties of prominent phases of ... SINGH1 MADHVENDRA NATH TRIPATHI1. Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Guru Ghasidas Vishwavidyalaya (Central University), Koni, Bilaspur 495 009, India ...

  13. Effect of alloying on the electronic structure and magnetic properties ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. We use the self-consistent, augmented space recursion technique to study the electronic structure and magnetic properties of alloys of the transition metals, Fe, Co and Ni with the noble metals, Ag and Au. We analyse the effect of local environment and the hybridization between the constituent bands on the elec-.

  14. Electronic structure and superconductivity of MgB2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Results of ab initio electronic structure calculations on the compound, MgB2, using the FPLAPW method employing GGA for the exchange–correlation energy are presented. Total energy minimization enables us to estimate the equilibrium volume, / ratio and the bulk modulus, all of which are in excellent agreement with ...

  15. Empirical pseudo-potential studies on electronic structure of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) as a function of shape and size of the quantum dots. Our studies explain the ... Keywords. Quantum dots; empirical pseudo-potential; electronic structure; HOMO–LUMO gap. 1. Introduction ...... both the finite and infinite well EMA breaks down and introduces significant ...

  16. Structural, energetic and electronic properties of intercalated boron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effects of chirality and the intercalation of transitional metal atoms inside single walled BN nanotubes on structural, energetic and electronic properties have been considered in this paper. The thermodynamic stability of BN nanotubes can be improved by the intercalation of cobalt or nickel. BN nanotubes can behave ...

  17. Quantitative structural analysis of binary nanocrystal superlattices by electron tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedrich, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837350; Gommes, C.J.; Overgaag, K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304848603; Meeldijk, J.D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323921647; Evers, W.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315553146; de Nijs, B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315556749; Boneschanscher, M.P.; de Jongh, P.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/186125372; Verkleij, A.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/067490808; de Jong, K.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06885580X; van Blaaderen, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/092946488; Vanmaekelbergh, D.A.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829137

    2009-01-01

    Binary nanocrystal superlattices, that is, ordered structures of two sorts of nanocolloids, hold promise for a series of functional materials with novel collective properties. Here we show that based on electron tomography a comprehensive, quantitative, three-dimensional characterization of these

  18. Determination of conduction and valence band electronic structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    insufficient to study in-depth unoccupied states of investigated materials because it overlooks the shallow traps. Keywords. Photo-catalysis; high-resolution RIXS; electronic structure. 1. Introduction. Photocatalysis is an emerging field that offers poten- tial to address some of the energy and waste manage- ment challenges.

  19. Electronic Structure, Localization and 5f Occupancy in Pu Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joyce, John J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beaux, Miles F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Durakiewicz, Tomasz [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Graham, Kevin S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bauer, Eric D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, Jeremy N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobash, Paul H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmond, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-03

    The electronic structure of delta plutonium ({delta}-Pu) and plutonium compounds is investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Results for {delta}-Pu show a small component of the valence electronic structure which might reasonably be associated with a 5f{sup 6} configuration. PES results for PuTe are used as an indication for the 5f{sup 6} configuration due to the presence of atomic multiplet structure. Temperature dependent PES data on {delta}-Pu indicate a narrow peak centered 20 meV below the Fermi energy and 100 meV wide. The first PES data for PuCoIn5 indicate a 5f electronic structure more localized than the 5fs in the closely related PuCoGa{sub 5}. There is support from the PES data for a description of Pu materials with an electronic configuration of 5f{sup 5} with some admixture of 5f{sup 6} as well as a localized/delocalized 5f{sup 5} description.

  20. Electronic structure of Fe- vs. Ru-based dye molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Phillip S.; Cook, Peter L.; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    In order to explore whether Ru can be replaced by inexpensive Fe in dye molecules for solar cells, the differences in the electronic structure of Fe- and Ru-based dyes are investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and first-principles calculations. Molecules with the metal in a sixfold...

  1. Three real-space discretization techniques in electronic structure calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torsti, T; Eirola, T; Enkovaara, J; Hakala, T; Havu, P; Havu, [No Value; Hoynalanmaa, T; Ignatius, J; Lyly, M; Makkonen, [No Value; Rantala, TT; Ruokolainen, J; Ruotsalainen, K; Rasanen, E; Saarikoski, H; Puska, MJ

    A characteristic feature of the state-of-the-art of real-space methods in electronic structure calculations is the diversity of the techniques used in the discretization of the relevant partial differential equations. In this context, the main approaches include finite-difference methods, various

  2. Strain effects in the electronic structure of CrN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Tomas; Ulloa, Sergio E.

    Chromium nitride (CrN) has a promising future for its resistance to corrosion and hardness, and fascinating magnetic and electronic properties. CrN presents a phase transition in which the crystal structure, magnetic ordering, and electronic properties change at a (Neel) temperature 280K. Thin films from different groups exhibit varied conductance behavior at low temperature. We have performed ab initio calculations using the LSDA+U method, and estimate the interaction between the Cr-3d and N-2p orbitals, by analyzing the band structure near the optical gap (0.2 eV). We also calculate effective masses and investigate the effect of strain fields on the electronic structure. Our results show that for compressive strain 1.3 % the band gap closes, suggesting that realistic strains could cause a significant change in the electronic structure and could contribute to explain under what experimental conditions the material has metallic behavior. The changes in the effective mass derived from our calculations show a large anisotropy, which would result in anisotropic charge carrier mobility. The mass anisotropy is found to be connected with the magnetic ordering in the lattice. Supported by NSF-DMR 1508325, and the Ohio Supercomputer Center.

  3. First principles calculations of structural, electronic and thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    2013-07-28

    Jul 28, 2013 ... full-potential linear augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method are investigated. The exchange–correlation energy ... The electronic band structure shows that the fundamental energy gap is direct (L–L) for all the compounds. Thermal ... voltaic energy converters (Zogg et al 1994). The semi- conductors PbS ...

  4. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on the structural, elastic and electronic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The results showed a phase transition pressure from the zinc blende to rock-salt phase at around 1.56 Mbar, which is in good agreement with the theoretical data reported in the literature. Keywords. Hydrostatic pressure effect; structural, elastic and electronic properties; (B3) boron phosphide. PACS Nos 45.10.Ab; 62.20.

  5. Structural preablation dynamics of graphite observed by ultrafast electron crystallography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carbone, Fabrizio; Baum, Peter; Rudolf, Petra; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2008-01-01

    By means of time-resolved electron crystallography, we report direct observation of the structural dynamics of graphite, providing new insights into the processes involving coherent lattice motions and ultrafast graphene ablation. When graphite is excited by an ultrashort laser pulse, the excited

  6. Ab initio simulations of the dynamic ion structure factor of warm dense lithium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, B. B. L.; Shihab, M.; Glenzer, S. H.; Redmer, R.

    2017-04-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulations based on finite-temperature density functional theory that determine self-consistently the dynamic ion structure factor and the electronic form factor in lithium. Our comprehensive data set allows for the calculation of the dispersion relation for collective excitations, the calculation of the sound velocity, and the determination of the ion feature from the total electronic form factor and the ion structure factor. The results are compared with available experimental x-ray and neutron scattering data. Good agreement is found for both the liquid metal and warm dense matter domain. Finally, we study the impact of possible target inhomogeneities on x-ray scattering spectra.

  7. Equation of state of metallic hydrogen from coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Miguel A; Pierleoni, Carlo; Ceperley, D M

    2010-02-01

    We present a study of hydrogen at pressures higher than molecular dissociation using the coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo method. These calculations use the accurate reptation quantum Monte Carlo method to estimate the electronic energy and pressure while doing a Monte Carlo simulation of the protons. In addition to presenting simulation results for the equation of state over a large region of the phase diagram, we report the free energy obtained by thermodynamic integration. We find very good agreement with density-functional theory based molecular-dynamics calculations for pressures beyond 600 GPa and densities above rho=1.4 g/cm(3) , both for thermodynamic and structural properties. This agreement provides a strong support to the different approximations employed in the density-functional treatment of the system, specifically the approximate exchange-correlation potential and the use of pseudopotentials for the range of densities considered. We find disagreement with chemical models, which suggests that a reinvestigation of planetary models--previously constructed using the Saumon-Chabrier-Van Horn equations of state--might be needed.

  8. Coherent Structures in Numerically Simulated Plasma Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed-Hansen, O.; Pécseli, H.L.; Trulsen, J.

    1989-01-01

    Low level electrostatic ion acoustic turbulence generated by the ion-ion beam instability was investigated numerically. The fluctuations in potential were investigated by a conditional statistical analysis revealing propagating coherent structures having the form of negative potential wells which...

  9. PENELOPE, an algorithm and computer code for Monte Carlo simulation of electron-photon showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvat, F.; Fernandez-Varea, J.M.; Baro, J.; Sempau, J.

    1996-07-01

    The FORTRAN 77 subroutine package PENELOPE performs Monte Carlo simulation of electron-photon showers in arbitrary for a wide energy range, from 1 keV to several hundred MeV. Photon transport is simulated by means of the standard, detailed simulation scheme. Electron and positron histories are generated on the basis of a mixed procedure, which combines detailed simulation of hard events with condensed simulation of soft interactions. A simple geometry package permits the generation of random electron-photon showers in material systems consisting of homogeneous bodies limited by quadric surfaces, i.e. planes, spheres, cylinders, etc. This report is intended not only to serve as a manual of the simulation package, but also to provide the user with the necessary information to understand the details of the Monte Carlo algorithm. (Author) 108 refs.

  10. PENELOPE, and algorithm and computer code for Monte Carlo simulation of electron-photon showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvat, F.; Fernandez-Varea, J.M.; Baro, J.; Sempau, J.

    1996-10-01

    The FORTRAN 77 subroutine package PENELOPE performs Monte Carlo simulation of electron-photon showers in arbitrary for a wide energy range, from similar{sub t}o 1 KeV to several hundred MeV. Photon transport is simulated by means of the standard, detailed simulation scheme. Electron and positron histories are generated on the basis of a mixed procedure, which combines detailed simulation of hard events with condensed simulation of soft interactions. A simple geometry package permits the generation of random electron-photon showers in material systems consisting of homogeneous bodies limited by quadric surfaces, i.e. planes, spheres cylinders, etc. This report is intended not only to serve as a manual of the simulation package, but also to provide the user with the necessary information to understand the details of the Monte Carlo algorithm.

  11. Simulation of non-equilibrium many body electrons in RTD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Rezvani

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available   We inspected the exact solution of double barrier quantum well. The choice of proper boundary conditions has been taken into account. We eveluated the mechanism of resonant in this device. The density correlation matrix was calculated by using the exact solution of the time-dependent generalized nonlinear Schrodinger equation in the presence of electron-electron interaction. The result shows that there is no correlation dependence among the electrons at the equilibrium between contact regions. After biasing, we have calculated the density correlation matrix in the transient and steady state. The results of our calculations show the oscillatory plasmon current in the state of transient, while in the steaby state the correlation among the phase of electrons observed to be oscillatory in the whole region of the device.

  12. Numerical simulation of RCS for carrier electronic warfare airplanes

    OpenAIRE

    Yue, Kuizhi; Liu, Wenlin; Li, Guanxiong; Ji, Jinzu; Yu, Dazhao

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the radar cross section (RCS) of carrier electronic warfare airplanes. Under the typical naval operations section, the mathematical model of the radar wave’s pitch angle incidence range analysis is established. Based on the CATIA software, considering dynamic deflections of duck wing leading edge flaps, flaperons, horizontal tail, and rudder, as well as aircraft with air-to-air missile, anti-radiation missile, electronic jamming pod, and other weapons, the 3D models of carr...

  13. Theoretical study of electron transport throughout some molecular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Mohammed A. A.; Hanoon, Falah H.; Al-Badry, Lafy F.

    2017-11-01

    The present work is a theoretical study of the electronic properties of some molecular structures. The system that takes into account in the study is left lead-donor-molecule-acceptor-right lead. The molecule, such as (phenyl, biphenyl, triphenyl, naphthalene, anthracene, and phenanthrene), is threaded by magnetic flux. This work contains two parts. First is computing density of states of the molecular structures as a closed system by density functional theory (DFT). Second is calculating the transmission probability and electric current of such molecular structures as an open system by steady-state theoretical model. Furthermore, the most important effects, taking into consideration are quantum interference, magnetic flux, and interface structure. Our results show that the connection of the molecule to the two leads, the number of rings, the magnetic flux, and the geometrical structure of the molecule play an important role in determining the energy gap of molecular structures.

  14. Simulation algorithm for spiral case structure in hydropower station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-yong Xu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the damage-plasticity model for concrete that was verified by the model experiment was used to calculate the damage to a spiral case structure based on the damage mechanics theory. The concrete structure surrounding the spiral case was simulated with a three-dimensional finite element model. Then, the distribution and evolution of the structural damage were studied. Based on investigation of the change of gap openings between the steel liner and concrete structure, the impact of the non-uniform variation of gaps on the load-bearing ratio between the steel liner and concrete structure was analyzed. The comparison of calculated results of the simplified and simulation algorithms shows that the simulation algorithm is a feasible option for the calculation of spiral case structures. In addition, the shell-spring model was introduced for optimization analysis, and the results were reasonable.

  15. Structural and Electronic Investigations of Complex Intermetallic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Hyunjin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    In solid state chemistry, numerous investigations have been attempted to address the relationships between chemical structure and physical properties. Such questions include: (1) How can we understand the driving forces of the atomic arrangements in complex solids that exhibit interesting chemical and physical properties? (2) How do different elements distribute themselves in a solid-state structure? (3) Can we develop a chemical understanding to predict the effects of valence electron concentration on the structures and magnetic ordering of systems by both experimental and theoretical means? Although these issues are relevant to various compound classes, intermetallic compounds are especially interesting and well suited for a joint experimental and theoretical effort. For intermetallic compounds, the questions listed above are difficult to answer since many of the constituent atoms simply do not crystallize in the same manner as in their separate, elemental structures. Also, theoretical studies suggest that the energy differences between various structural alternatives are small. For example, Al and Ga both belong in the same group on the Periodic Table of Elements and share many similar chemical properties. Al crystallizes in the fcc lattice with 4 atoms per unit cell and Ga crystallizes in an orthorhombic unit cell lattice with 8 atoms per unit cell, which are both fairly simple structures (Figure 1). However, when combined with Mn, which itself has a very complex cubic crystal structure with 58 atoms per unit cell, the resulting intermetallic compounds crystallize in a completely different fashion. At the 1:1 stoichiometry, MnAl forms a very simple tetragonal lattice with two atoms per primitive unit cell, while MnGa crystallizes in a complicated rhombohedral unit cell with 26 atoms within the primitive unit cell. The mechanisms influencing the arrangements of atoms in numerous crystal structures have been studied theoretically by calculating electronic

  16. Electronic and chemical properties of graphene-based structures:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanin, Marco

    In the present thesis several aspects of graphene-based structures have been investigated using density functional theory calculations to solve the electronic structure problem. A review of the implementation of a localized basis-set within the projector augmented wave method - the way of describ......In the present thesis several aspects of graphene-based structures have been investigated using density functional theory calculations to solve the electronic structure problem. A review of the implementation of a localized basis-set within the projector augmented wave method - the way...... of describing the core electrons employed - is also presented. The investigation of the binding of graphene on metallic model surfaces is presented comparing the results from traditional exchange and correlation functionals to the results obtained with a new type of non-local functional, which includes van der...... are easier to remove and therefore only zigzag edges are left. Finally, functionalized graphene has been investigated as catalyst for the electrochemical reduction of CO2 to chemical fuels and comparisons are made with traditional transition-metal surfaces. The investigated porphyrin-like structures...

  17. Structural electronic and phonon properties of some transition metal aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Bushra; Pandit, Premlata; Sanyal, Sankar P.

    2012-06-01

    The structural and electronic properties of some Transition metal Aluminides (TMAl) namely ruthenium aluminide (RuAl), nickel aluminide (NiAl) and cobalt aluminide (CoAl) have been studied using plane wave pseudopotential method (PWSCF) within the local density approximation (LDA). The three TMAl's crystallizes in the CsCl-type structure (B2 phase). From the analysis of band structure and density of state, we found that these TMAl's are metallic in nature. The vibrational properties in terms of phonon dispersion curves and density of state have also been reported for RuAl using density functional perturbation theory (DFPT).

  18. Electronics speckle interferometry applications for NDE of spacecraft structural components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M. V.; Samuel, R.; Ananthan, A.; Dasgupta, S.; Nair, P. S.

    2008-09-01

    The spacecraft components viz., central cylinder, deck plates, solar panel substrates, antenna reflectors are made of aluminium/composite honeycomb sandwich construction. Detection of these defects spacecraft structural components is important to assess the integrity of the spacecraft structure. Electronic Speckle Interferometry (ESI) techniques identify the defects as anomalous regions in the interferometric fringe patterns of the specklegram while the component is suitably stressed to give rise to differential displacement/strain around the defective region. Calibration studies, different phase shifting methods associated with ESI and the development of a prototype Twin Head ESSI System (THESSIS) and its use for the NDE of a typical satellite structural component are presented.

  19. Weighted Branching Simulation Distance for Parametric Weighted Kripke Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foshammer, Louise; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Mariegaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    This paper concerns branching simulation for weighted Kripke structures with parametric weights. Concretely, we consider a weighted extension of branching simulation where a single transitions can be matched by a sequence of transitions while preserving the branching behavior. We relax this notion...

  20. Characterization of electronic structure of periodically strained graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslani, Marjan; Garner, C. Michael, E-mail: mcgarner@stanford.edu; Nishi, Yoshio [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Kumar, Suhas [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, 1501 Page Mill Road, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Nordlund, Dennis [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Pianetta, Piero [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2015-11-02

    We induced periodic biaxial tensile strain in polycrystalline graphene by wrapping it over a substrate with repeating pillar-like structures with a periodicity of 600 nm. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determined to have introduced biaxial strains in graphene in the range of 0.4% to 0.7%. Its band structure was characterized using photoemission from valance bands, shifts in the secondary electron emission, and x-ray absorption from the carbon 1s levels to the unoccupied graphene conduction bands. It was observed that relative to unstrained graphene, strained graphene had a higher work function and higher density of states in the valence and conduction bands. We measured the conductivity of the strained and unstrained graphene in response to a gate voltage and correlated the changes in their behavior to the changes in the electronic structure. From these sets of data, we propose a simple band diagram representing graphene with periodic biaxial strain.

  1. First principles investigations of electronic structure and transport properties of graphitic structures and single molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Jonathan R.

    In this work, we first present two powerful methods for understanding the electronic, structural, conducting, and energetic properties of nano-materials: density functional theory (DFT) and quantum transport. The basics of the theory and background of both methods are discussed thoroughly. After establishing a firm foundation, we turn our attention to using these tools to solve practical problems, often in collaboration with experimental colleagues. The first two projects pertain to nitrogen doping in graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). We study nitrogen doping in two different schema: concentration-based (N_x-doped) and structural based (N_2. {AA}-doped). Concentration based doping is explored in the context of experimental measurements of IV curves on GNRs with differing dopant concentrations. These results show a shift towards semi-conducting behavior with an increase in dopant concentration. We combine first principles calculations (DFT) and transport calculations in the Landauer formalism to compute the density-of-states (DOS) and transport curves for various dopant concentrations (0.46%, 1.39%, 1.89%, and 2.31%), which corroborate the experimental observations. The N_2. {AA}-doped GNR study was inspired by experimental observation of an atomically precise nitrogen doping scheme in bulk graphene. Experimental STM images, combined with simulated STM images, revealed that the majority (80%) of doping sites consist of nitrogen atoms on neighboring sites of the same sublattice (A) in graphene, hence N_2. {AA} doping. We examine this doping scheme applied to zigzag and armchair GNRs under different orientations of the dopants. We present spin-resolved charge densities, energetics, transport, DOS, and simulated STM images for all four systems studied. Our results show the possibility of spin-filtered devices and the STM images provide an aid in helping experimentalist identify the dopant patterns, if these GNRs are fabricated. We next venture to explain different observed

  2. Accurate simulation of the electron cloud in the Fermilab Main Injector with VORPAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebrun, Paul L.G.; Spentzouris, Panagiotis; /Fermilab; Cary, John R.; Stoltz, Peter; Veitzer, Seth A.; /Tech-X, Boulder

    2010-05-01

    Precision simulations of the electron cloud at the Fermilab Main Injector have been studied using the plasma simulation code VORPAL. Fully 3D and self consistent solutions that includes E.M. field maps generated by the cloud and the proton bunches have been obtained, as well detailed distributions of the electron's 6D phase space. We plan to include such maps in the ongoing simulation of the space charge effects in the Main Injector. Simulations of the response of beam position monitors, retarding field analyzers and microwave transmission experiments are ongoing.

  3. Modeling and Simulation of DC Power Electronics Systems Using Harmonic State Space (HSS) Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwon, Jun Bum; Wang, Xiongfei; Bak, Claus Leth

    2015-01-01

    based on the state-space averaging and generalized averaging, these also have limitations to show the same results as with the non-linear time domain simulations. This paper presents a modeling and simulation method for a large dc power electronic system by using Harmonic State Space (HSS) modeling....... Through this method, the required computation time and CPU memory for large dc power electronics systems can be reduced. Besides, the achieved results show the same results as with the non-linear time domain simulation, but with the faster simulation time which is beneficial in a large network....

  4. Optimisation of 12 MeV electron beam simulation using variance reduction technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayamani, J.; Termizi, N. A. S. Mohd; Kamarulzaman, F. N. Mohd; Aziz, M. Z. Abdul

    2017-05-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for electron beam radiotherapy consumes a long computation time. An algorithm called variance reduction technique (VRT) in MC was implemented to speed up this duration. This work focused on optimisation of VRT parameter which refers to electron range rejection and particle history. EGSnrc MC source code was used to simulate (BEAMnrc code) and validate (DOSXYZnrc code) the Siemens Primus linear accelerator model with the non-VRT parameter. The validated MC model simulation was repeated by applying VRT parameter (electron range rejection) that controlled by global electron cut-off energy 1,2 and 5 MeV using 20 × 107 particle history. 5 MeV range rejection generated the fastest MC simulation with 50% reduction in computation time compared to non-VRT simulation. Thus, 5 MeV electron range rejection utilized in particle history analysis ranged from 7.5 × 107 to 20 × 107. In this study, 5 MeV electron cut-off with 10 × 107 particle history, the simulation was four times faster than non-VRT calculation with 1% deviation. Proper understanding and use of VRT can significantly reduce MC electron beam calculation duration at the same time preserving its accuracy.

  5. Simulation and optimization of a 10 A electron gun with electrostatic compression for the electron beam ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pikin, A.; Beebe, E. N.; Raparia, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Increasing the current density of the electron beam in the ion trap of the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) in BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider facility would confer several essential benefits. They include increasing the ions' charge states, and therefore, the ions' energy out of the Booster for NASA applications, reducing the influx of residual ions in the ion trap, lowering the average power load on the electron collector, and possibly also reducing the emittance of the extracted ion beam. Here, we discuss our findings from a computer simulation of an electron gun with electrostatic compression for electron current up to 10 A that can deliver a high-current-density electron beam for EBIS. The magnetic field in the cathode-anode gap is formed with a magnetic shield surrounding the gun electrodes and the residual magnetic field on the cathode is (5 Division-Sign 6) Gs. It was demonstrated that for optimized gun geometry within the electron beam current range of (0.5 Division-Sign 10) A the amplitude of radial beam oscillations can be maintained close to 4% of the beam radius by adjusting the injection magnetic field generated by a separate magnetic coil. Simulating the performance of the gun by varying geometrical parameters indicated that the original gun model is close to optimum and the requirements to the precision of positioning the gun elements can be easily met with conventional technology.

  6. SPH simulations of structures in protoplanetary disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidova, T. V.; Grinin, V. P.

    2017-02-01

    Using the GADGET-2 code modified by us, we have computed hydrodynamic models of a protoplanetary disk perturbed by a low-mass companion. We have considered the cases of circular and eccentric orbits coplanar with the disk and inclined relative to its midplane. During our simulations we computed the column density of test particles on the line of sight between the central star and observer. On this basis we computed the column density of circumstellar dust by assuming the dust and gas to be well mixed with a mass ratio of 1: 100. To study the influence of the disk orientation relative to the observer on the interstellar extinction, we performed our computations for four inclinations of the line of sight to the disk plane and eight azimuthal directions. The column densities in the circumstellar disk of the central star and the circumbinary disk were computed separately. Our computations have shown that periodic column density oscillations can arise in both inner and circumbinary disks. The amplitude and shape of these oscillations depend on the system's parameters (the orbital eccentricity and inclination, the component mass ratio) and its orientation in space. The results of our simulations can be used to explain the cyclic brightness variations of young UX Ori stars.

  7. Bistable solutions for the electron energy distribution function in electron swarms in xenon via Boltzmann equation analysis and particle simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Dyatko, Nikolay

    2015-01-01

    At low reduced electric fields the electron energy distribution function in heavy noble gases can take two distinct shapes. This bistability effect - in which electron-electron (Coulomb) collisions play an essential role - is analyzed here with a Boltzmann equation approach and with a first principles particle simulation method. The latter is based on a combination of a molecular dynamics technique that accounts for the many-body interaction within the electron gas and a Monte Carlo treatment of the collisions between electrons and the background gas atoms. The good agreement found between the results of the two techniques confirms the existence of the two different stable solutions for the EEDF under swarm conditions at low electric fields.

  8. Characterization of strained semiconductor structures using transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezdoel, Vasfi Burak

    2011-08-15

    Today's state-of-the-art semiconductor electronic devices utilize the charge transport within very small volumes of the active device regions. The structural, chemical and optical material properties in these small dimensions can critically affect the performance of these devices. The present thesis is focused on the nanometer scale characterization of the strain state in semiconductor structures using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Although high-resolution TEM has shown to provide the required accuracy at the nanometer scale, optimization of imaging conditions is necessary for accurate strain measurements. An alternative HRTEM method based on strain mapping on complex-valued exit face wave functions is developed to reduce the artifacts arising from objective lens aberrations. However, a much larger field of view is crucial for mapping strain in the active regions of complex structures like latest generation metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). To overcome this, a complementary approach based on electron holography is proposed. The technique relies on the reconstruction of the phase shifts in the diffracted electron beams from a focal series of dark-field images using recently developed exit-face wave function reconstruction algorithm. Combining high spatial resolution, better than 1 nm, with a field of view of about 1 {mu}m in each dimension, simultaneous strain measurements on the array of MOSFETs are possible. Owing to the much lower electron doses used in holography experiments when compared to conventional quantitative methods, the proposed approach allows to map compositional distribution in electron beam sensitive materials such as InGaN heterostructures without alteration of the original morphology and chemical composition. Moreover, dark-field holography experiments can be performed on thicker specimens than the ones required for high-resolution TEM, which in turn reduces the thin foil relaxation. (orig.)

  9. Simulations of the electron cloud buildup and its influence on the microwave transmission measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Oliver Sebastian; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver; Petrov, Fedor

    2013-11-01

    An electron cloud density in an accelerator can be measured using the Microwave Transmission (MWT) method. The aim of our study is to evaluate the influence of a realistic, nonuniform electron cloud on the MWT. We conduct electron cloud buildup simulations for beam pipe geometries and bunch parameters resembling roughly the conditions in the CERN SPS. For different microwave waveguide modes the phase shift induced by a known electron cloud density is obtained from three different approaches: 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation of the electron response, a 2D eigenvalue solver for waveguide modes assuming a dielectric response function for cold electrons, a perturbative method assuming a sufficiently smooth density profile. While several electron cloud parameters, such as temperature, result in minor errors in the determined density, the transversely inhomogeneous density can introduce a large error in the measured electron density. We show that the perturbative approach is sufficient to describe the phase shift under realistic electron cloud conditions. Depending on the geometry of the beam pipe, the external magnetic field configuration and the used waveguide mode, the electron cloud density can be concentrated at the beam pipe or near the beam pipe center, leading to a severe over- or underestimation of the electron density. Electron cloud distributions are very inhomogeneous, especially in dipoles. These inhomogeneities affect the microwave transmission measurement results. Electron density might be over- or underestimated, depending on setup. This can be quantified with several models, e.g. a perturbative approach.

  10. Electron-Poor Polar Intermetallics: Complex Structures, Novel Clusters, and Intriguing Bonding with Pronounced Electron Delocalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qisheng; Miller, Gordon J

    2018-01-16

    Intermetallic compounds represent an extensive pool of candidates for energy related applications stemming from magnetic, electric, optic, caloric, and catalytic properties. The discovery of novel intermetallic compounds can enhance understanding of the chemical principles that govern structural stability and chemical bonding as well as finding new applications. Valence electron-poor polar intermetallics with valence electron concentrations (VECs) between 2.0 and 3.0 e - /atom show a plethora of unprecedented and fascinating structural motifs and bonding features. Therefore, establishing simple structure-bonding-property relationships is especially challenging for this compound class because commonly accepted valence electron counting rules are inappropriate. During our efforts to find quasicrystals and crystalline approximants by valence electron tuning near 2.0 e - /atom, we observed that compositions close to those of quasicrystals are exceptional sources for unprecedented valence electron-poor polar intermetallics, e.g., Ca 4 Au 10 In 3 containing (Au 10 In 3 ) wavy layers, Li 14.7 Mg 36.8 Cu 21.5 Ga 66 adopting a type IV clathrate framework, and Sc 4 Mg x Cu 15-x Ga 7.5 that is incommensurately modulated. In particular, exploratory syntheses of AAu 3 T (A = Ca, Sr, Ba and T = Ge, Sn) phases led to interesting bonding features for Au, such as columns, layers, and lonsdaleite-type tetrahedral frameworks. Overall, the breadth of Au-rich polar intermetallics originates, in part, from significant relativistics effect on the valence electrons of Au, effects which result in greater 6s/5d orbital mixing, a small effective metallic radius, and an enhanced Mulliken electronegativity, all leading to ultimate enhanced binding with nearly all metals including itself. Two other successful strategies to mine electron-poor polar intermetallics include lithiation and "cation-rich" phases. Along these lines, we have studied lithiated Zn-rich compounds in which structural

  11. Simulation of High Resolution Vibrational and Electronic Spectra with a Multifrequency Virtual Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2013-06-01

    Moving from the common practice of extracting numerical data from experiment to be compared with quantum mechanical (QM) results toward a direct vis-à-vis} comparison of experimental and simulated spectra would strongly reduce any arbitrariness in analysis of complex experimental outcomes and allow a proper account of the information connected to both position and shape of spectral bands. The development of such ``virtual ab initio spectrometers'' for a wide range of wavelengths has been one of our major research goals in the last years [1,2]. Recent methodological advances from our group allow simulation of optical (IR, Raman, UV-vis, etc.) spectra line-shapes for medium-to-large closed- and open-shell molecular systems. Vibrational spectra are computed including anharmonicities through perturbative corrections while electronic spectra line-shapes are simulated accounting for the vibrational structure. Well resolved and accurate theoretical spectra provide data as close as possible to the results directly available from experiment allowing to avoid ambiguities in analysis of the latter. Several examples illustrating interpretation, assignment or revision of experimental spectra for prototypes of bio-molecular systems (phenyl radical, glycine, thymine, pyrimidine, anisole dimer) will be presented. 1. V. Barone, A. Baiardi, M. Biczysko, J. Bloino, C. Cappelli, F. Lipparini Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys, 14, 12404, 2012 2. M. Biczysko, J. Bloino, G. Brancato, et al. Theor. Chem. Acc. 113, 1201, 2012

  12. A new parametrizable model of molecular electronic structure

    CERN Document Server

    Laikov, Dimitri N

    2011-01-01

    A new electronic structure model is developed in which the ground state energy of a molecular system is given by a Hartree-Fock-like expression with parametrized one- and two-electron integrals over an extended (minimal + polarization) set of orthogonalized atom-centered basis functions, the variational equations being solved formally within the minimal basis but the effect of polarization functions being included in the spirit of second-order perturbation theory. It is designed to yield good dipole polarizabilities and improved intermolecular potentials with dispersion terms. The molecular integrals include up to three-center one-electron and two-center two-electron terms, all in simple analytical forms. A method to extract the effective one-electron Hamiltonian of nonlocal-exchange Kohn-Sham theory from the coupled-cluster one-electron density matrix is designed and used to get its matrix representation in a molecule-intrinsic minimal basis as an input to the paramtrization procedure -- making a direct link...

  13. Advanced vectorial simulation of VCSELs with nano structures invited paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    The single-mode properties and design issues of three vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) structures incorporating nano structures are rigorously investigated. Nano structuring enables to deliver selective pumping or loss to the fundamental mode as well as stabilizing the output...... polarization state. Comparison of three vectorial simulation methods reveals that the modal expansion method is suitable for treating the nano structured VCSEL designs....

  14. Electronic structure and ionicity of actinide oxides from first principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petit, Leon; Svane, Axel; Szotek, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The ground-state electronic structures of the actinide oxides AO, A2O3, and AO2 (A=U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, Bk, and Cf) are determined from first-principles calculations, using the self-interaction corrected local spin-density approximation. Emphasis is put on the degree of f-electron localization, which...... for AO2 and A2O3 is found to follow the stoichiometry, namely, corresponding to A4+ ions in the dioxide and A3+ ions in the sesquioxides. In contrast, the A2+ ionic configuration is not favorable in the monoxides, which therefore become metallic. The energetics of the oxidation and reduction...

  15. Electronic Structure of Low-Dimensional Carbon Π-Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García Lastra, Juan Maria; Boukahil, Idris; Qiao, Ruimin

    2016-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is combined with density functional theory (DFT) to determine the orbitals of one- and two-dimensional carbon Π-systems (lycopene, beta-carotene, retinal, retinol, retinoic acid, coronene, triphenylene). Considerable fine structure is observed for the transition......, and the electron hole interaction. For the latter, we develop a simple model that accurately represents a full Delta-self-consistent field (ΔSCF) calculation. The distortion of the LUMO because of its interaction with the C is hole is investigated. These results illustrate the electronic states of prototypical Π...

  16. Electronic Structure of Matter Wave Functions and Density Functionals.

    CERN Document Server

    Kohn, W

    1999-01-01

    Since the 1920's Schroedinger wave functions have been the principal theoretical concept for understanding and computing the electronic structure of matter. More recently, Density Functional Theory (DFT), couched in terms of the electronic density distribution, n(r), has provided a new perspective and new computational possibilities, especially for systems consisting of very many (up to ~1000) atoms. In this talk some fundamental limitations of wave function methods for very-many-atom-systems will be discussed. The DFT approach will be explained together with some physical/chemical applications and a discussion of its strenghts and weaknesses.

  17. Local electronic structure in the Peyrard-Bishop-Holstein model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Jianxin; Rasmussen, K Oe; Balatsky, A V; Bishop, A R [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2007-04-04

    There is increasing evidence for polaronic effects on charge localization and dynamics in DNA. The Peyrard-Bishop-Holstein model has been previously suggested as an appropriate model for the description of such effects. Here we report a self-consistent study of local electronic structure within this model for both homopolymer and realistic viral P5 promoter segments. Our results indicate that both the inter-base-pair stacking interaction and the electron filling can qualitatively influence the polaronic properties in a specific DNA sequence, including features of two distinct length scales and competition with sequence-disorder induced localization.

  18. Electronic structure of superlattices of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2011-11-14

    We study the electronic structure of superlattices consisting of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride slabs, using ab initio density functional theory. We find that the system favors a short C–B bond length at the interface between the two component materials. A sizeable band gap at the Dirac point is opened for superlattices with single graphene layers but not for superlattices with graphene bilayers. The system is promising for applications in electronic devices such as field effect transistors and metal-oxide semiconductors.

  19. Structure Identification in High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopic Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Kling, Jens; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm

    2014-01-01

    . Next, a plausible neighborhood structure is estimated. Finally, atom positions are adjusted by simulation of a Markov random field model, integrating image evidence and the strong geometric prior. A pristine sample with high regularity and a sample with an induced hole are analyzed. False discovery...... rate-controlled large-scale simultaneous hypothesis testing is used as a statistical framework for interpretation of results. The first sample yields, as expected, a homogeneous distribution of carbon–carbon (C–C) bond lengths. The second sample exhibits regions of shorter C–C bond lengths...... with a preferred orientation, suggesting either strain in the structure or a buckling of the graphene sheet. The precision of the method is demonstrated on simulated model structures and by its application to multiple exposures of the two graphene samples....

  20. Electron-Anode Interactions in Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Applied-B Ion Diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, J.E.; Cuneo, M.D.; Johnson, D.J.; Mehlhorn, T.A.; Pointon, T.D.; Renk, T.J.; Stygar, W.A.; Vesey, R.A.

    1998-11-12

    Particle-in-cell simulations of applied-B ion diodes using the QUICKSILVER code have been augmented with Monte Carlo calculations of electron-anode interactions (reflection and energy deposition). Extraction diode simulations demonstrate a link between the instability evolution and increased electron loss and anode heating. Simulations of radial and extraction ion diodes show spatial non-uniformity in the predicted electron loss profile leading to hot spots on the anode that rapidly exceed the 350-450 {degree}C range, known to be sufficient for plasma formation on electron-bombarded surfaces. Thermal resorption calculations indicate complete resorption of contaminants with 15-20 kcal/mole binding energies in high-dose regions of the anode during the power pulse. Comparisons of parasitic ion emission simulations and experiment show agreement in some aspects; but also highlight the need for better ion source, plasma, and neutral gas models.

  1. Cryo-electron Microscopy Analysis of Structurally Heterogeneous Macromolecular Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonić, Slavica

    2016-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has for a long time been a technique of choice for determining structure of large and flexible macromolecular complexes that were difficult to study by other experimental techniques such as X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance. However, a fast development of instruments and software for cryo-EM in the last decade has allowed that a large range of complexes can be studied by cryo-EM, and that their structures can be obtained at near-atomic resolution, including the structures of small complexes (e.g., membrane proteins) whose size was earlier an obstacle to cryo-EM. Image analysis to identify multiple coexisting structures in the same specimen (multiconformation reconstruction) is now routinely done both to solve structures at near-atomic resolution and to study conformational dynamics. Methods for multiconformation reconstruction and latest examples of their applications are the focus of this review.

  2. The electronic structure of small nickel atom clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Harold; Newton, M. D.; Moskowitz, J. W.

    1980-11-01

    The ground state electronic structure of small nickel atom clusters (Nin, n=1-6) has been calculated using the ab initio effective core potential self-consistent field (SCF) method in a Gaussian expansion basis. The electronic configuration of the nickel atoms in the clusters is found to be very close to 3d94s1. The ground state electronic configurations for Nin generally have n unpaired 3d electrons in molecular orbitals (MO's) spanning the same irreducible representations as the 4s atomic orbitals while the n 4s electrons fill their MO's in accord with a simple three-dimensional Hückel model with overlap. Exceptions to this description are found in the cases of linear systems where the 3d holes prefer δ over σ symmetry and in octahedral Ni6 where a different preferred set of 3d holes is obtained. The SCF ground state wave functions correspond roughly to a model in which the 3d electrons can be viewed as weakly interacting localized 3d9 units. The clusters are bound together primarily by the 4s electrons with the 4p orbital contribution increasing in importance with cluster size and dimensionality. The binding energy per nickel atom generally increases as the size of the cluster increases, although at six atoms this quantity has not yet converged with cluster size. The density of states diagram for the occupied one electron energy levels in Ni6 is found to be very different from the corresponding types of diagrams obtained in the muffin tin (MT)-Xα method for small nickel atom clusters. This difference is examined in detail, with consideration given to the effects of relaxation energy and to the different orbital level filling criteria used in the two methods.

  3. Atomic structure and electronic properties of the SixSb100-x phase-change memory material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verma, Ashok K.; Modak, Paritosh; Svane, Axel

    2011-01-01

    The electronic and structural properties of SixSb100-x (x∼16) materials are investigated using first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. Crystalline-liquid-amorphous phase transitions are examined and remarkable changes in the local structure around the Si atoms are found. The average Si c....... The electronic density of states is metal-like in both the crystalline and the liquid phases, but it exhibits a pseudogap at the Fermi level in the amorphous phase, reflecting the strong abundance of fourfold coordinated Si in the amorphous phase.......The electronic and structural properties of SixSb100-x (x∼16) materials are investigated using first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. Crystalline-liquid-amorphous phase transitions are examined and remarkable changes in the local structure around the Si atoms are found. The average Si...

  4. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; Zhang, Lei; Patel, Mili; Wang, Francis; Rames, Matthew J.; Ren, Amy; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Qiu, Xiayang; Johns, Douglas G.; Charles, M. Arthur; Ren, Gang

    2015-03-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobic environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.

  5. Electronic structure and insulating gap in epitaxial VO2 polymorphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinbuhm Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Determining the origin of the insulating gap in the monoclinic V O2(M1 is a long-standing issue. The difficulty of this study arises from the simultaneous occurrence of structural and electronic transitions upon thermal cycling. Here, we compare the electronic structure of the M1 phase with that of single crystalline insulating V O2(A and V O2(B thin films to better understand the insulating phase of VO2. As these A and B phases do not undergo a structural transition upon thermal cycling, we comparatively study the origin of the gap opening in the insulating VO2 phases. By x-ray absorption and optical spectroscopy, we find that the shift of unoccupied t2g orbitals away from the Fermi level is a common feature, which plays an important role for the insulating behavior in VO2 polymorphs. The distinct splitting of the half-filled t2g orbital is observed only in the M1 phase, widening the bandgap up to ∼0.6 eV. Our approach of comparing all three insulating VO2 phases provides insight into a better understanding of the electronic structure and the origin of the insulating gap in VO2.

  6. Sensitivity of echo enabled harmonic generation to sinusoidal electron beam energy structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsing, E.; Garcia, B.; Huang, Z.; Raubenheimer, T.; Xiang, D.

    2017-06-01

    We analytically examine the bunching factor spectrum of a relativistic electron beam with sinusoidal energy structure that then undergoes an echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) transformation to produce high harmonics. The performance is found to be described primarily by a simple scaling parameter. The dependence of the bunching amplitude on fluctuations of critical parameters is derived analytically, and compared with simulations. Where applicable, EEHG is also compared with high gain harmonic generation (HGHG) and we find that EEHG is generally less sensitive to several types of energy structure. In the presence of intermediate frequency modulations like those produced by the microbunching instability, EEHG has a substantially narrower intrinsic bunching pedestal.

  7. Predictive simulation of guide-wave structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of recent developments on predictive simulation of guided wave structural health monitoring (SHM) with piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS) transducers. The predictive simulation methodology is based on the hybrid global local (HGL) concept which allows fast analytical simulation in the undamaged global field and finite element method (FEM) simulation in the local field around and including the damage. The paper reviews the main results obtained in this area by researchers of the Laboratory for Active Materials and Smart Structures (LAMSS) at the University of South Carolina, USA. After thematic introduction and research motivation, the paper covers four main topics: (i) presentation of the HGL analysis; (ii) analytical simulation in 1D and 2D; (iii) scatter field generation; (iv) HGL examples. The paper ends with summary, discussion, and suggestions for future work.

  8. Simulation of single-electron tunnelling circuits using SPICE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Haar, R.

    2004-01-01

    Single-electron tunnelling (SET) devices have very promising properties, like their extremely low power consumption, their extremely high switching speeds and their extremely small physical dimensions. Since the field of SET devices is far from being fully exploited, and their device properties seem

  9. Predictive atomistic simulations of electronic properties of realistic nanoscale devices: A multiscale modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedula, Ravi Pramod Kumar

    Scaling of CMOS towards its ultimate limits, where quantum effects and atomistic variability due to fabrication, along with recent emphasis on heterogeneous integration of non-digital devices for increasing the functional diversification presents us with fundamentally new challenges. A comprehensive understanding of design and operation of these nanoscale transistors, and other electronic devices like RF-MEMS, requires an insight into their electronic and mechanical properties that are strongly influenced by underlying atomic structure. Hence, continuum descriptions of materials and use of empirical models at these scales become questionable. This increase in complexity of electronic devices necessitates an understanding at a more fundamental level to accurately predict the performance and reliability of these devices. The objective of this thesis is to outline the application of multiscale predictive modeling methods, ranging from atoms to devices, for addressing these challenges. This capability is demonstrated using two examples: characterization of (i) dielectric charging in RF-MEMS, and (ii) transport properties of Ge-nanofins. For characterizing the dielectric charging phenomenon, a continuum dielectric charging model, augmented by first principles informed trap distributions, is used to predict current transient measurements across a broad range of voltages and temperatures. These simulations demonstrate using ab initio informed model not only reduces the empiricism (number of adjustable parameters) in the model but also leads to a more accurate model over a broad range of operating conditions, and enable the precise determination of additional material parameters. These atomistic calculations also provide detailed information about the nature of charge traps and their trapping mechanisms that are not accessible experimentally; such information could prove invaluable in defect engineering. The second problem addresses the effect of the in-homogeneous strain

  10. Electronic Structures of Silicene Doped with Galium: First Principle study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamungkas Mauludi Ariesto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Following the success of graphene which possesses unique and superior properties, 2D material other than graphene become centre of interest of material scientists.Silicene, which has the same crystal structure as graphene but consist of silicon atoms rather than carbon become intriguing material due to domination of silicon as main material of electronic component. It is common to enhance electronic properties of semiconductor by adding dopant atoms. The electronic properties of Silicene doped with Gallium are investigated using first principle calculation based on density functional theory (DFT.Ga doping changes character of silicene from semimetal to conductor except silicene with Ga doping on S-site (Ga atom substitutes one Si atom which lead to semiconductor.

  11. Ground-state electronic structure of actinide monocarbides and mononitrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petit, Leon; Svane, Axel; Szotek, Z.

    2009-01-01

    The self-interaction corrected local spin-density approximation is used to investigate the ground-state valency configuration of the actinide ions in the actinide monocarbides, AC (A=U,Np,Pu,Am,Cm), and the actinide mononitrides, AN. The electronic structure is characterized by a gradually...... to the localization transition. The calculated valence electron densities of states are in good agreement with photoemission data....... increasing degree of f electron localization from U to Cm, with the tendency toward localization being slightly stronger in the (more ionic) nitrides compared to the (more covalent) carbides. The itinerant band picture is found to be adequate for UC and acceptable for UN, while a more complex manifold...

  12. Study of wave-particle interaction between fast Magnetosonic and energetic electrons based on numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, S.

    2015-12-01

    There are many energetic electrons in the radiation belt of Earth. When the geomagnetic activity becomes stronger, the energy flux of energetic electrons will increase to more than ten times in the outer radiation belt, therefore it is very important to study how the energetic electrons generate and the lifetime of energetic electrons for space weather research. The acceleration of electrons in radiation belt is mainly depending on wave-particle interaction: the whistler mode chorus is the main driver for local acceleration mechanism, which could accelerate and loss energetic electrons; the geomagnetic pulsation ULF wave will cause energetic electron inward radial diffusion which will charge the electrons; recently observation results show us that the fast magnetosonic waves may also accelerate energetic electrons. For the reason that we try to study the wave-particle interaction between fast Magnetosonic and energetic electrons based on numerical simulation, in which the most important past is at the storm time the combination of highly warped Earth magnetic field and fast magnetosonic wave field will be applied for the electromagnetic environment of moving test particles. The energy, pitch angle and cross diffusion coefficients will be calculated respectively in this simulation to study how the electrons receive energy from fast magnetosonic wave. The diffusion coefficients within different dipole Earth magnetic field and non-dipole storm magnetic field are compared, while dynamics of electrons at selected initial energys are shown in our study.

  13. Electronic structure of a striped nickelate studied by the exact exchange for correlated electrons (EECE) approach

    KAUST Repository

    Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2009-12-01

    Motivated by a RIXS study of Wakimoto, et al.(Phys. Rev. Lett., 102 (2009) 157001) we use density functional theory to analyze the magnetic order in the nickelate La5/3Sr1/3NiO4 and the details of its crystal and electronic structure. We compare the generalized gradient approximation to the hybrid functional approach of exact exchange for correlated electrons (EECE). In contrast to the former, the latter reproduces the insulating state of the compound and the midgap states. The EECE approach, in general, appears to be appropriate for describing stripe phases in systems with orbital degrees of freedom. Copyright © EPLA, 2009.

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of MOSFET dosimeter for electron backscatter using the GEANT4 code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, James C L; Leung, Michael K K

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the body of the metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter in measuring the electron backscatter from lead. The electron backscatter factor (EBF), which is defined as the ratio of dose at the tissue-lead interface to the dose at the same point without the presence of backscatter, was calculated by the Monte Carlo simulation using the GEANT4 code. Electron beams with energies of 4, 6, 9, and 12 MeV were used in the simulation. It was found that in the presence of the MOSFET body, the EBFs were underestimated by about 2%-0.9% for electron beam energies of 4-12 MeV, respectively. The trend of the decrease of EBF with an increase of electron energy can be explained by the small MOSFET dosimeter, mainly made of epoxy and silicon, not only attenuated the electron fluence of the electron beam from upstream, but also the electron backscatter generated by the lead underneath the dosimeter. However, this variation of the EBF underestimation is within the same order of the statistical uncertainties as the Monte Carlo simulations, which ranged from 1.3% to 0.8% for the electron energies of 4-12 MeV, due to the small dosimetric volume. Such small EBF deviation is therefore insignificant when the uncertainty of the Monte Carlo simulation is taken into account. Corresponding measurements were carried out and uncertainties compared to Monte Carlo results were within +/- 2%. Spectra of energy deposited by the backscattered electrons in dosimetric volumes with and without the lead and MOSFET were determined by Monte Carlo simulations. It was found that in both cases, when the MOSFET body is either present or absent in the simulation, deviations of electron energy spectra with and without the lead decrease with an increase of the electron beam energy. Moreover, the softer spectrum of the backscattered electron when lead is present can result in a reduction of the MOSFET response due to stronger

  15. Molecular Electronics: Insight from First-Principles Transport Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsson, Magnus; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2010-01-01

    Conduction properties of nanoscale contacts can be studied using first-principles simulations. Such calculations give insight into details behind the conductance that is not readily available in experiments. For example, we may learn how the bonding conditions of a molecule to the electrodes affe...... the atomic arrangement and transport channels....

  16. Aromatic Structure in Simulates Titan Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainer, Melissa G.; Loeffler, M. J.; Anderson, C. M.; Hudson, R. L.; Samuelson, R. E.; Moore, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of Titan by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) between 560 and 20 per centimeter (approximately 18 to 500 micrometers) have been used to infer the vertical variations of Titan's ice abundances, as well as those of the aerosol from the surface to an altitude of 300 km [1]. The aerosol has a broad emission feature centered approximately at 140 per centimeter (71 micrometers). As seen in Figure 1, this feature cannot be reproduced using currently available optical constants from laboratory-generated Titan aerosol analogs [2]. The far-IR is uniquely qualified for investigating low-energy vibrational motions within the lattice structures of COITIDlex aerosol. The feature observed by CIRS is broad, and does not likely arise from individual molecules, but rather is representative of the skeletal movements of macromolecules. Since Cassini's arrival at Titan, benzene (C6H6) has been detected in the atmosphere at ppm levels as well as ions that may be polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) [3]. We speculate that the feature may be a blended composite that can be identified with low-energy vibrations of two-dimensional lattice structures of large molecules, such as PAHs or nitrogenated aromatics. Such structures do not dominate the composition of analog materials generated from CH4 and N2 irradiation. We are performing studies forming aerosol analog via UV irradiation of aromatic precursors - specifically C6H6 - to understand how the unique chemical architecture of the products will influence the observable aerosol characteristics. The optical and chemical properties of the aromatic analog will be compared to those formed from CH4/N2 mixtures, with a focus on the as-yet unidentified far-IR absorbance feature. Preliminary results indicate that the photochemically-formed aromatic aerosol has distinct chemical composition, and may incorporate nitrogen either into the ring structure or adjoined chemical groups. These compositional differences are

  17. Perspective: Explicitly correlated electronic structure theory for complex systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüneis, Andreas; Hirata, So; Ohnishi, Yu-Ya; Ten-No, Seiichiro

    2017-02-28

    The explicitly correlated approach is one of the most important breakthroughs in ab initio electronic structure theory, providing arguably the most compact, accurate, and efficient ansatz for describing the correlated motion of electrons. Since Hylleraas first used an explicitly correlated wave function for the He atom in 1929, numerous attempts have been made to tackle the significant challenges involved in constructing practical explicitly correlated methods that are applicable to larger systems. These include identifying suitable mathematical forms of a correlated wave function and an efficient evaluation of many-electron integrals. R12 theory, which employs the resolution of the identity approximation, emerged in 1985, followed by the introduction of novel correlation factors and wave function ansätze, leading to the establishment of F12 theory in the 2000s. Rapid progress in recent years has significantly extended the application range of explicitly correlated theory, offering the potential of an accurate wave-function treatment of complex systems such as photosystems and semiconductors. This perspective surveys explicitly correlated electronic structure theory, with an emphasis on recent stochastic and deterministic approaches that hold significant promise for applications to large and complex systems including solids.

  18. Electronic Structure and Geometries of Small Compound Metal Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-14

    During the tenure of the DOE grant DE-FG05-87EI145316 we have concentrated on equilibrium geometries, stability, and the electronic structure of transition metal-carbon clusters (met-cars), clusters designed to mimic the chemistry of atoms, and reactivity of homo-nuclear metal clusters and ions with various reactant molecules. It is difficult to describe all the research the authors have accomplished as they have published 38 papers. In this report, they outline briefly the salient features of their work on the following topics: (1) Designer Clusters: Building Blocks for a New Class of Solids; (2) Atomic Structure, Stability, and Electronic Properties of Metallo-Carbohedrenes; (3) Reactivity of Metal Clusters with H{sub 2} and NO; and (4) Anomalous Spectroscopy of Li{sub 4} Clusters.

  19. Electronic shell and supershell structure in graphene flakes

    CERN Document Server

    Manninen, M; Akola, J

    2008-01-01

    We use a simple tight-binding (TB) model to study electronic properties of free graphene flakes. Valence electrons of triangular graphene flakes show a shell and supershell structure which follows an analytical expression derived from the solution of the wave equation for triangular cavity. However, the solution has different selection rules for triangles with armchair and zigzag edges, and roughly 40000 atoms are needed to see clearly the first supershell oscillation. In the case of spherical flakes, the edge states of the zigzag regions dominate the shell structure which is thus sensitive to the flake diameter and center. A potential well that is made with external gates cannot have true bound states in graphene due to the zero energy band gap. However, it can cause strong resonances in the conduction band.

  20. Phase Diagram and Electronic Structure of Praseodymium and Plutonium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Lanatà

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop a new implementation of the Gutzwiller approximation in combination with the local density approximation, which enables us to study complex 4f and 5f systems beyond the reach of previous approaches. We calculate from first principles the zero-temperature phase diagram and electronic structure of Pr and Pu, finding good agreement with the experiments. Our study of Pr indicates that its pressure-induced volume-collapse transition would not occur without change of lattice structure—contrarily to Ce. Our study of Pu shows that the most important effect originating the differentiation between the equilibrium densities of its allotropes is the competition between the Peierls effect and the Madelung interaction and not the dependence of the electron correlations on the lattice structure.

  1. Atomistic simulation of the structural and elastic properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Isshiki et al [3] found that magnesite transforms to an unknown form at pressures above 115 GPa. Skorodumova et al [9] used ab initio calculations to determine that mag- nesite can transform into a pyroxene structure at 113 GPa. Oganov et al [10] performed simulations using the universal structure prediction programme ...

  2. Density Functional Theory Study on the Electronic Structures of Oxadiazole Based Dyes as Photosensitizer for Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umer Mehmood

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular structures and UV-visible absorption spectra of complex photosensitizers comprising oxadiazole isomers as the π-bridges were analyzed by density functional theory (DFT and time-dependent DFT. The ground state and excited state oxidation potentials, HOMOs and LUMOs energy levels, and electron injection from the dyes to semiconductor TiO2 have been computed in vacuum here. The results show that all of the dyes may potentially be good photosensitizers in DSSC. To justify the simulation basis, N3 dye was also simulated under the similar conditions. Simulated absorption spectrum, HOMO, LUMO, and band gap values of N3 were compared with the experimental values. We also computed the electronic structure properties and absorption spectra of dye/(TiO28 systems to elucidate the electron injection efficiency at the interface. This work is expected to give proper orientation for experimental synthesis.

  3. Modeling of a Micro-Electronic Mechanical Systems (MEMS) Deformable Mirror for Simulation and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    DATE September 2016 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE MODELING OF A MICRO-ELECTRONIC- MECHANICAL SYSTEMS...MICRO-ELECTRONIC- MECHANICAL SYSTEMS (MEMS) DEFORMABLE MIRROR FOR SIMULATION AND CHARACTERIZATION by Mark C. Mueller September 2016 Thesis ...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited. MODELING OF A

  4. Electronic structure of crystalline uranium nitride: LCAO DFT calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evarestov, R.A.; Losev, M.V.; Panin, A.I. [Department of Quantum Chemistry, St. Petersburg State University, 26 University Prospekt, Stary Peterghof, 198504 (Russian Federation); Mosyagin, N.S. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, St. Petersburg District, 188300 (Russian Federation); Titov, A.V. [Department of Quantum Chemistry, St. Petersburg State University, 26 University Prospekt, Stary Peterghof, 198504 (Russian Federation); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, St. Petersburg District, 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2008-01-15

    The results of the first LCAO DFT calculations of cohesive energy, band structure and charge distribution in uranium nitride (UN) crystal are presented and discussed. The calculations are made with the uranium atom relativistic effective core potentials, including 60, 78 and 81 electrons in the core. It is demonstrated that the chemical bonding in UN crystal has a metallic-covalent nature. Three 5f-electrons are localized on the U atom and occupy the states near the Fermi level. The metallic nature of the crystal is due to the f-character of both the valence-band top and the conduction-band bottom. The covalent bonds are formed by the interaction of 7s- and 6d-states of the uranium atom with the 2p-states of the nitrogen atom. It is shown that the inclusion of 5f-electrons in the atomic core introduces small changes in the calculated cohesive energy of UN crystal and electron charge distribution. However, the inclusion of 5s-, 5p-, 5d-electrons in the valence shell allows the better agreement with the calculated and experimental cohesive-energy value. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Dual-phase steel structure visualized by extremely slow electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikmeková, Šárka; Yamada, Katsumi; Noro, Hisato

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical properties of complex steels are affected by their multi-phase structure. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is routinely used for characterizing dual-phase (DP) steels, although the identification of steel constituents is not straightforward. In fact, there are several ways of enabling the ferrite-martensite segmentation by SEM, and a wide range of electron energies can be utilized. This study demonstrates the phase identification of DP steels at high, low and extremely low landing energies of the primary electrons from tens of keV to tens of eV. Visualization of the specimen surface at very low landing energies has been achieved by inserting an earthed detector between the pole piece and the negatively biased specimen. This 'cathode lens mode' enables the use of the full energy range up to the primary electron energies. It has been found that extremely slow electrons (phases clearly even in the images acquired at low magnification. The contrast between the phases at tens of eV can be explained by the different thickness of native oxide covering the martensite and the ferrite phase. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. An automatic chip structure optical inspection system for electronic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhichao; Xue, Bindang; Liang, Jiyuan; Wang, Ke; Chen, Junzhang; Liu, Yunhe

    2018-01-01

    An automatic chip structure inspection system based on machine vision is presented to ensure the reliability of electronic components. It consists of four major modules, including a metallographic microscope, a Gigabit Ethernet high-resolution camera, a control system and a high performance computer. An auto-focusing technique is presented to solve the problem that the chip surface is not on the same focusing surface under the high magnification of the microscope. A panoramic high-resolution image stitching algorithm is adopted to deal with the contradiction between resolution and field of view, caused by different sizes of electronic components. In addition, we establish a database to storage and callback appropriate parameters to ensure the consistency of chip images of electronic components with the same model. We use image change detection technology to realize the detection of chip images of electronic components. The system can achieve high-resolution imaging for chips of electronic components with various sizes, and clearly imaging for the surface of chip with different horizontal and standardized imaging for ones with the same model, and can recognize chip defects.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Electron-Ion Temperature Relaxation in Dense Hydrogen: Electronic Quantum Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qian; Dai, Jiayu; Zhao, Zengxiu

    2016-10-01

    The electron-ion temperature relaxation is an important non-equilibrium process in the generation of dense plasmas, particularly in Inertial Confinement Fusion. Classical molecular dynamics considers electrons as point charges, ignoring important quantum processes. We use an Electron Force Field (EFF) method to study the temperature relaxation processes, considering the nuclei as semi-classical point charges and assume electrons as Gaussian wave packets which includes the influences of the size and the radial motion of electrons. At the same time, a Pauli potential is used to describe the electronic exchange effect. At this stage, quantum effects such as exchange, tunneling can be included in this model. We compare the results from EFF and classical molecular dynamics, and find that the relaxation time is much longer with including quantum effects, which can be explained directly by the deference of collision cross sections between quantum particles and classical particles. Further, the final thermal temperature of electron and ion is different compared with classical results that the electron quantum effects cannot be neglected.

  8. Structural, elastic, electronic and optical properties of bi-alkali ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The structural parameters, elastic constants, electronic and optical properties of the bi-alkali antimonides (Na 2 KSb, Na 2 RbSb, Na 2 CsSb, K 2 RbSb, K 2 CsSb and Rb 2 CsSb) were calculated using state-of-the-art density functional theory. Different exchange-correlation potentials were adopted to predict the physical ...

  9. Strain-induced changes to the electronic structure of germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Tahini, H. A.

    2012-04-17

    Density functional theory calculations (DFT) are used to investigate the strain-induced changes to the electronic structure of biaxially strained (parallel to the (001), (110) and (111) planes) and uniaxially strained (along the [001], [110] and [111] directions) germanium (Ge). It is calculated that a moderate uniaxial strain parallel to the [111] direction can efficiently transform Ge to a direct bandgap material with a bandgap energy useful for technological applications. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  10. Strain-induced changes to the electronic structure of germanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahini, H; Chroneos, A; Grimes, R W; Schwingenschlögl, U; Dimoulas, A

    2012-05-16

    Density functional theory calculations (DFT) are used to investigate the strain-induced changes to the electronic structure of biaxially strained (parallel to the (001), (110) and (111) planes) and uniaxially strained (along the [001], [110] and [111] directions) germanium (Ge). It is calculated that a moderate uniaxial strain parallel to the [111] direction can efficiently transform Ge to a direct bandgap material with a bandgap energy useful for technological applications.

  11. Structured electron beams from nano-engineered cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueangaramwong, A. [NICADD, DeKalb; Mihalcea, D. [NICADD, DeKalb; Andonian, G. [RadiaBeam Tech.; Piot, P. [Fermilab

    2017-03-07

    The ability to engineer cathodes at the nano-scale have open new possibilities such as enhancing quantum eciency via surface-plasmon excitation, forming ultra-low-emittance beams, or producing structured electron beams. In this paper we present numerical investigations of the beam dynamics associated to this class of cathode in the weak- and strong-field regimes.We finally discuss the possible applications of some of the achievable cathode patterns when coupled with other phase space manipulations.

  12. Electronic structure design for nanoporous, electrically conductive zeolitic imidazolate frameworks

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Keith T.; Worrall, Stephen D.; Molloy, Christopher D.; Hendon, Christopher H.; Attfield, Martin P.; Dryfe, Robert A.W.; Walsh, Aron

    2017-01-01

    Electronic structure calculations are used to develop design rules for enhanced electrical conductivity in zeolitic imidazolate frameworks. The electrical resistivity of Co2+ based zeolitic imidazolate frameworks has previously been found to be ∼1000 times lower than that of Zn2+ based materials. The electrical conductivity of the frameworks can also be tuned by ligand molecule selection. Using density functional theory calculations, this controllable electrical conductivity is explained in t...

  13. Electronic and chemical structure of metal-silicon interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunthaner, P. J.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews our current understanding of the near-noble metal silicides and the interfaces formed with Si(100). Using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, we compare the chemical composition and electronic structure of the room temperature metal-silicon and reacted silicide-silicon interfaces. The relationship between the interfacial chemistry and the Schottky barrier heights for this class of metals on silicon is explored.

  14. Electronic structure and superconductivity of FeSe-related superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Zhao, Lin; He, Shaolong; He, Junfeng; Liu, Defa; Mou, Daixiang; Shen, Bing; Hu, Yong; Huang, Jianwei; Zhou, X J

    2015-05-13

    FeSe superconductors and their related systems have attracted much attention in the study of iron-based superconductors owing to their simple crystal structure and peculiar electronic and physical properties. The bulk FeSe superconductor has a superconducting transition temperature (Tc) of ~8 K and it can be dramatically enhanced to 37 K at high pressure. On the other hand, its cousin system, FeTe, possesses a unique antiferromagnetic ground state but is non-superconducting. Substitution of Se with Te in the FeSe superconductor results in an enhancement of Tc up to 14.5 K and superconductivity can persist over a large composition range in the Fe(Se,Te) system. Intercalation of the FeSe superconductor leads to the discovery of the AxFe2-ySe2 (A = K, Cs and Tl) system that exhibits a Tc higher than 30 K and a unique electronic structure of the superconducting phase. A recent report of possible high temperature superconductivity in single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films with a Tc above 65 K has generated much excitement in the community. This pioneering work opens a door for interface superconductivity to explore for high Tc superconductors. The distinct electronic structure and superconducting gap, layer-dependent behavior and insulator-superconductor transition of the FeSe/SrTiO3 films provide critical information in understanding the superconductivity mechanism of iron-based superconductors. In this paper, we present a brief review of the investigation of the electronic structure and superconductivity of the FeSe superconductor and related systems, with a particular focus on the FeSe films.

  15. Growth and electronic structure of graphene on semiconducting Ge(110)

    OpenAIRE

    Tesch, Julia; Voloshina, Elena; Fonin, Mikhail; Dedkov, Yuriy S.

    2017-01-01

    The direct growth of graphene on semiconducting or insulating substrates might help to overcome main drawbacks of metal-based synthesis, like metal-atom contaminations of graphene, transfer issues, etc. Here we present the growth of graphene on n-doped semiconducting Ge(110) by using an atomic carbon source and the study of the structural and electronic properties of the obtained interface. We found that graphene interacts weakly with the underlying Ge(110) substrate that keeps graphene's ele...

  16. Structural and electronic properties of hydrosilylated silicon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumer, A.

    2005-11-15

    The structural and electronic properties of alkyl-terminated Si surfaces prepared by thermallyinduced hydrosilylation have been studied in detail in the preceding chapters. Various surfaces have been used for the functionalization ranging from crystalline Si over amorphous hydrogenated Si to nanoscaled materials such as Si nanowires and nanoparticles. In each case, the alkyl-terminated surfaces have been compared to the native oxidized and H-terminated surfaces. (orig.)

  17. Final Technical Report: Electronic Structure Workshop (ES13)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shiwei [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2015-02-26

    The 25th Annual Workshop on Recent Developments in Electronic Structure Methods (ES2013) was successfully held at the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg VA on June 11-14, 2013. The workshop website is at http://es13.wm.edu/ , which contains updated information on the workshop and a permanent archive of the scientific contents. DOE's continued support has been instrumental to the success of the workshop.

  18. Monte Carlo simulation on a gold nanoparticle irradiated by electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, James C L; Leung, Michael K K; Jaffray, David A

    2012-06-07

    This study investigated the secondary electron production from a gold nanoparticle (GNP) irradiated by monoenergetic electron beams using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. Spherical GNPs with diameters of 2, 50 and 100 nm in water were irradiated by monoenergetic electron beams with energies equal to 50 keV, 250 keV, 1 MeV and 4 MeV. MC simulations were performed using the Geant4 toolkit to determine the energy of the secondary electrons emitted from the GNPs. The mean effective range and deflection angle of the secondary electrons were tracked. Energy depositions inside and outside the nanoparticles due to the secondary electrons were also calculated. For comparisons, simulations were repeated by replacing the GNPs with water. Our results show that the mean effective range of secondary electrons increased with an increase of the GNP size and electron beam energy. For the electron beam energy and GNP size used in this study, the mean effective range was 0.5-15 µm outside the nanoparticle, which is approximately within the dimension of a living cell. The mean deflection angles varied from 78 to 83 degrees as per our MC results. The proportion of energy deposition inside the GNP versus that outside increased with the GNP size. This is different from the results obtained from a previous study using photon beams. The secondary electron energy deposition ratio (energy deposition for GNP/energy deposition for water) was found to be highest for the smallest GNP of 2 nm diameter in this study. For the energy deposited by the secondary electron, we concluded that the addition of GNPs can increase the secondary electron energy deposition in water, though most of the energy was self-absorbed by the large nanoparticles (50 and 100 nm). In addition, an electron source in the presence of GNPs does not seem to be better than photons as the yield of secondary electrons per unit mass of gold is less than water.

  19. Electromagnetic Simulations of Helical-Based Ion Acceleration Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Scott D; Caporaso, George; Friedman, Alex; Poole, Brian R; Waldron, William

    2005-01-01

    Helix structures have been proposed* for accelerating low energy ion beams using MV/m fields in order to increase the coupling effeciency of the pulsed power system and to tailor the electromagnetic wave propagation speed with the particle beam speed as the beam gains energy. Calculations presented here show the electromagnetic field as it propagates along the helix structure, field stresses around the helix structure (for voltage breakdown determination), optimizations to the helix and driving pulsed power waveform, and simulations showing test particles interacting with the simulated time varying fields.

  20. Quaternary structure of human fatty acid synthase by electron cryomicroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Jacob; Ludtke, Steven J.; Yang, Chao-Yuh; Gu, Zei-Wei; Wakil, Salih J.; Chiu, Wah

    2002-01-01

    We present the first three-dimensional reconstruction of human fatty acid synthase obtained by electron cryomicroscopy and single-particle image processing. The structure shows that the synthase is composed of two monomers, arranged in an antiparallel orientation, which is consistent with biochemical data. The monomers are connected to each other at their middle by a bridge of density, a site proposed to be the combination of the interdomain regions of the two monomers. Each monomer subunit appears to be subdivided into three structural domains. With this reconstruction of the synthase, we propose a location for the enzyme's two fatty acid synthesis sites. PMID:11756679

  1. DFTB Parameters for the Periodic Table: Part 1, Electronic Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahiduzzaman, Mohammad; Oliveira, Augusto F; Philipsen, Pier; Zhechkov, Lyuben; van Lenthe, Erik; Witek, Henryk A; Heine, Thomas

    2013-09-10

    A parametrization scheme for the electronic part of the density-functional based tight-binding (DFTB) method that covers the periodic table is presented. A semiautomatic parametrization scheme has been developed that uses Kohn-Sham energies and band structure curvatures of real and fictitious homoatomic crystal structures as reference data. A confinement potential is used to tighten the Kohn-Sham orbitals, which includes two free parameters that are used to optimize the performance of the method. The method is tested on more than 100 systems and shows excellent overall performance.

  2. Structural studies of T4S systems by electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Redzej

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Type IV secretion (T4S systems are large dynamic nanomachines that transport DNA and/or proteins through the membranes of bacteria. Analysis of T4S system architecture is an extremely challenging task taking into account their multi protein organisation and lack of overall global symmetry. Nonetheless the last decade demonstrated an amazing progress achieved by X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. In this review we present a structural analysis of this dynamic complex based on recent advances in biochemical, biophysical and structural studies.

  3. Electronic structure of metallic antiperovskite compound GaCMn$_3$

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, J. H.; Kwon, S. K.; Min, B. I.

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated electronic structures of antiperovskite GaCMn$_3$ and related Mn compounds SnCMn$_3$, ZnCMn$_3$, and ZnNMn$_3$. In the paramagnetic state of GaCMn$_3$, the Fermi surface nesting feature along the $\\Gamma{\\rm R}$ direction is observed, which induces the antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin ordering with the nesting vector {\\bf Q} $\\sim \\Gamma{\\rm R}$. Calculated susceptibilities confirm the nesting scenario for GaCMn$_3$ and also explain various magnetic structures of other antipe...

  4. Electronic structure of erbium suicide ultra-thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veuillen, J.-Y.; Tan, T. A. Nguyen; Lollman, D. B. B.

    1993-08-01

    The electronic structure of erbium silicide ultra-thin films epitaxially grown on Si(111) has been studied by means of angle-resolved ultra-violet photoemission spectroscopy (ARUPS) in the coverage range 0.2-4 monolayers (ML). Some peaks probably related to the silicide surface atomic structure are observed at any coverage. Features that appear at normal emission in connection with an R3 superstructure are ascribed to vacancy-induced states in the silicon surface plane. No true interface states could be identified in this study.

  5. Atomic and electronic structure of MoS2 nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollinger, Mikkel; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2003-01-01

    at the edges. The electronic structure of the edge states is studied and we discuss their influence on the chemical properties of the edges. In particular, we study the reactivity towards hydrogen and show that hydrogen may form stable chemical bonds with both the two low-Miller indexed edges of MoS2. A model...... for calculating Gibbs free energy of the edges in terms of the DFT energies is also presented. This model allows us to determine the stable edge structure in thermodynamic equilibrium under different conditions. We find that both the insulating and metallic edges may be stable depending on the temperature...

  6. Probabilistic Model for the Simulation of Secondary Electron Emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furman, M

    2004-05-17

    We provide a detailed description of a model and its computational algorithm for the secondary electron emission process. The model is based on a broad phenomenological fit to data for the secondary emission yield (SEY) and the emitted-energy spectrum. We provide two sets of values for the parameters by fitting our model to two particular data sets, one for copper and the other one for stainless steel.

  7. Simulation of high-energy radiation belt electron fluxes using NARMAX-VERB coupled codes

    OpenAIRE

    I. P. Pakhotin; A. Y. Drozdov; Yuri Shprits; R. J. Boynton; D. A. Subbotin; M. A. Balikhin

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a fusion of data-driven and physics-driven methodologies of energetic electron flux forecasting in the outer radiation belt. Data-driven NARMAX (Nonlinear AutoRegressive Moving Averages with eXogenous inputs) model predictions for geosynchronous orbit fluxes have been used as an outer boundary condition to drive the physics-based Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code, to simulate energetic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt environment. The coupled system ...

  8. Structure optimization and simulation analysis of the quartz micromachined gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuezhong Wu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Structure optimization and simulation analysis of the quartz micromachined gyroscope are reported in this paper. The relationships between the structure parameters and the frequencies of work mode were analysed by finite element analysis. The structure parameters of the quartz micromachined gyroscope were optimized to reduce the difference between the frequencies of the drive mode and the sense mode. The simulation results were proved by testing the prototype gyroscope, which was fabricated by micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS technology. Therefore, the frequencies of the drive mode and the sense mode can match each other by the structure optimization and simulation analysis of the quartz micromachined gyroscope, which is helpful in the design of the high sensitivity quartz micromachined gyroscope.

  9. Transmission electron microscopy in molecular structural biology: A historical survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J Robin

    2015-09-01

    In this personal, historic account of macromolecular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), published data from the 1940s through to recent times is surveyed, within the context of the remarkable progress that has been achieved during this time period. The evolution of present day molecular structural biology is described in relation to the associated biological disciplines. The contribution of numerous electron microscope pioneers to the development of the subject is discussed. The principal techniques for TEM specimen preparation, thin sectioning, metal shadowing, negative staining and plunge-freezing (vitrification) of thin aqueous samples are described, with a selection of published images to emphasise the virtues of each method. The development of digital image analysis and 3D reconstruction is described in detail as applied to electron crystallography and reconstructions from helical structures, 2D membrane crystals as well as single particle 3D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and macromolecules. The on-going development of new software, algorithms and approaches is highlighted before specific examples of the historical progress of the structural biology of proteins and viruses are presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Structural and electronic properties of arsenic nitrogen monolayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Pei; Nie, Yao-zhuang, E-mail: yznie@csu.edu.cn; Xia, Qing-lin; Guo, Guang-hua, E-mail: guogh@mail.csu.edu.cn

    2017-03-26

    We present our first-principles calculations of a new two-dimensional material, arsenic nitrogen monolayer. The structural, electronic, and mechanical properties are investigated in detail by means of density functional theory computations. The calculated binding energy and the phonon spectra demonstrate that the AsN can form stable monolayer in puckered honeycomb structure. It is a semiconductor with indirect band gap of 0.73 eV, and displays highly anisotropic mechanical properties. Strain has obvious influence on the electronic properties of AsN monolayer. It is found that in the armchair direction, a moderate compression strain (−12%) can trigger an indirect to direct band gap transition and a tensile strain of 18% can make the AsN becoming a stable metal. In the zigzag direction, a rather smaller strain than armchair direction (12% for compression and 8% for stretch) can induce the indirect band gap to metal transition. - Highlights: • A new two-dimensional material, arsenic nitrogen monolayer is predicated by first-principles calculations. • Arsenic nitrogen monolayer displays highly anisotropic mechanical properties. • Electronic structures of arsenic nitrogen monolayer can be effectively manipulated by applied strains.

  11. Instructional Strategies Using Low-Cost Simulation for Electronic Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-01

    Independent effects can not be determined. Visual Simulation Claesroom CPE 3). The training equipment for the experimental classes consisted of...large photos In the proper locations by means of small screw heads protruding from the frame. On Station CPE 1). For each pair of students there...subdivisions at any particular stage (generally three to five sub- divisions are effective). A common mistake Ln applying the whole-to-part strategy

  12. Simulations of the Complex Hierarchical Growth of Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallman, E. J.; Ryu, D.; Kang, H.; Jones, T. W.

    2003-12-01

    We will present results from cosmological numerical hydro/n-body simulations. Specifically we target complex structures in the clusters of galaxies that form, and in their immediate environment. These features include shocks and cold fronts. Clusters are synthetically observed, and the images are analyzed for evidence of these structures. Using time-resolved movies of the simulations in progress, we examine the evolution of clusters and groups in the simulations and its observable consequences. The simulations use an Eulerian TVD type scheme for the gas and a particle mesh N-body method. The simulated volumes are (50h-1 Mpc)3 and (100h-1 Mpc)3 respectively. Each is represented by 10243 uniformly spaced grid points. The simulation evolves from early times (z 40-60), from primordial density fluctuations in a concordance model LCDM universe, until the current epoch. A wide array of complex structures form in the simulations, including filaments, accretion shocks, merger shocks and cluster internal shocks, as well as contact discontinuities which may give rise to the observed cold fronts. These features appear inside clusters, as well as in the surrounding warm/hot medium, and serve as a key diagnostic of the dynamical state of the gas, as well as a tracer of its evolution. This work is supported by the NSF and the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  13. Towards Efficient and Accurate Description of Many-Electron Problems: Developments of Static and Time-Dependent Electronic Structure Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Feizhi

    Understanding electronic behavior in molecular and nano-scale systems is fundamental to the development and design of novel technologies and materials for application in a variety of scientific contexts from fundamental research to energy conversion. This dissertation aims to provide insights into this goal by developing novel methods and applications of first-principle electronic structure theory. Specifically, we will present new methods and applications of excited state multi-electron dynamics based on the real-time (RT) time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) formalism, and new development of the multi-configuration self-consist field theory (MCSCF) for modeling ground-state electronic structure. The RT-TDHF/TDDFT based developments and applications can be categorized into three broad and coherently integrated research areas: (1) modeling of the interaction between moleculars and external electromagnetic perturbations. In this part we will first prove both analytically and numerically the gauge invariance of the TDHF/TDDFT formalisms, then we will present a novel, efficient method for calculating molecular nonlinear optical properties, and last we will study quantum coherent plasmon in metal namowires using RT-TDDFT; (2) modeling of excited-state charge transfer in molecules. In this part, we will investigate the mechanisms of bridge-mediated electron transfer, and then we will introduce a newly developed non-equilibrium quantum/continuum embedding method for studying charge transfer dynamics in solution; (3) developments of first-principles spin-dependent many-electron dynamics. In this part, we will present an ab initio non-relativistic spin dynamics method based on the two-component generalized Hartree-Fock approach, and then we will generalized it to the two-component TDDFT framework and combine it with the Ehrenfest molecular dynamics approach for modeling the interaction between electron spins and nuclear

  14. Putting structure into context: fitting of atomic models into electron microscopic and electron tomographic reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkmann, Niels

    2012-02-01

    A complete understanding of complex dynamic cellular processes such as cell migration or cell adhesion requires the integration of atomic level structural information into the larger cellular context. While direct atomic-level information at the cellular level remains inaccessible, electron microscopy, electron tomography and their associated computational image processing approaches have now matured to a point where sub-cellular structures can be imaged in three dimensions at the nanometer scale. Atomic-resolution information obtained by other means can be combined with this data to obtain three-dimensional models of large macromolecular assemblies in their cellular context. This article summarizes some recent advances in this field. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Electron emission yield for low energy electrons: Monte Carlo simulation and experimental comparison for Al, Ag, and Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierron, J.; Inguimbert, C.; Belhaj, M.; Gineste, T.; Puech, J.; Raine, M.

    2017-06-01

    The electron emission under electron impact between 10 eV and 2 keV is investigated with a Monte Carlo (MC) code in aluminum, silver, and silicon. The code is based on the complex dielectric function theory to describe the inelastic scattering and uses the Mott's model of partial waves to describe the elastic scattering. It takes into account both volume and surface plasmon excitations. The simulation results are compared with the experimental measurements of electron emission yields (EEY) and energy spectra of low energy electrons performed in ultrahigh vacuum on Ar-etched bulk samples. Our MC simulations at low energy are found to be in fairly good agreement with our experimental measurements. The peaks corresponding to the surface plasmon, the volume plasmon and its multiples and to the Auger transitions appear clearly on the energy loss spectra of aluminum, silver, and silicon. The simulated EEY are also in fairly good agreement with our measurements and with data from the literature. The EEY at normal incidence is studied for secondary and backscattered electrons. A focus is made for the EEY below 50 eV where a fairly good agreement is found with Bronstein and Fraiman's measurements on vacuum evaporated samples. Below 2 keV, for silver and aluminum, the total EEY is given for different angles of incidence θ. Some discrepancies are observed between our experimental measurements and our MC simulations for high angles of incidence. These discrepancies can be attributed to the modeling of surface plasmon excitations, surface oxidation, or roughness that occur during the Ar-etching process.

  16. Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy on Electronic Structure and Electron-Phonon Coupling in Cuprate Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X.J.

    2010-04-30

    In addition to the record high superconducting transition temperature (T{sub c}), high temperature cuprate superconductors are characterized by their unusual superconducting properties below T{sub c}, and anomalous normal state properties above T{sub c}. In the superconducting state, although it has long been realized that superconductivity still involves Cooper pairs, as in the traditional BCS theory, the experimentally determined d-wave pairing is different from the usual s-wave pairing found in conventional superconductors. The identification of the pairing mechanism in cuprate superconductors remains an outstanding issue. The normal state properties, particularly in the underdoped region, have been found to be at odd with conventional metals which is usually described by Fermi liquid theory; instead, the normal state at optimal doping fits better with the marginal Fermi liquid phenomenology. Most notable is the observation of the pseudogap state in the underdoped region above T{sub c}. As in other strongly correlated electrons systems, these unusual properties stem from the interplay between electronic, magnetic, lattice and orbital degrees of freedom. Understanding the microscopic process involved in these materials and the interaction of electrons with other entities is essential to understand the mechanism of high temperature superconductivity. Since the discovery of high-T{sub c} superconductivity in cuprates, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has provided key experimental insights in revealing the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors. These include, among others, the earliest identification of dispersion and a large Fermi surface, an anisotropic superconducting gap suggestive of a d-wave order parameter, and an observation of the pseudogap in underdoped samples. In the mean time, this technique itself has experienced a dramatic improvement in its energy and momentum resolutions, leading to a series of new discoveries not

  17. Backscattered electron emission after proton impact on carbon and gold films: Experiments and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hespeels, F.; Heuskin, A. C.; Scifoni, E.; Kraemer, M.; Lucas, S.

    2017-06-01

    This work aims at measuring the proton induced secondary electron energy spectra from nanometer thin films. Backscattered electron energy spectra were measured within an energy range from 0 to 600 eV using a Retarding Field Analyser (RFA). This paper presents energy spectra obtained for proton (0.5 MeV; 1 MeV; 1.5 MeV; 2 MeV) irradiation of thin carbon films (50 and 100 nm thick) and thin gold film (200 nm). These experimental spectra were compared with Monte Carlo simulations based on TRAX code and Geant4 simulation toolkit. Good agreement between experimental, TRAX and Geant4 results were observed for the carbon target. For the gold target, we report major differences between both Monte Carlo environments. Limitation of Geant4 models for low energy electron emission was highlighted. On the contrary, TRAX simulations present encouraging results for the modeling of low-energy electron emission from gold target.

  18. Backscattered electron emission after proton impact on carbon and gold films: Experiments and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hespeels, F.; Heuskin, A.C. [University of Namur, PMR, 61 rue de Bruxelles, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Scifoni, E. [TIFPA-INFN, Trento Institute for Fundamental Physics and Applications, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy); GSI-Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Biophysik, Max Planck-Strasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kraemer, M. [GSI-Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Biophysik, Max Planck-Strasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Lucas, S., E-mail: stephane.lucas@unamur.be [University of Namur, PMR, 61 rue de Bruxelles, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2017-06-15

    This work aims at measuring the proton induced secondary electron energy spectra from nanometer thin films. Backscattered electron energy spectra were measured within an energy range from 0 to 600 eV using a Retarding Field Analyser (RFA). This paper presents energy spectra obtained for proton (0.5 MeV; 1 MeV; 1.5 MeV; 2 MeV) irradiation of thin carbon films (50 and 100 nm thick) and thin gold film (200 nm). These experimental spectra were compared with Monte Carlo simulations based on TRAX code and Geant4 simulation toolkit. Good agreement between experimental, TRAX and Geant4 results were observed for the carbon target. For the gold target, we report major differences between both Monte Carlo environments. Limitation of Geant4 models for low energy electron emission was highlighted. On the contrary, TRAX simulations present encouraging results for the modeling of low-energy electron emission from gold target.

  19. Micro-wrinkling and delamination-induced buckling of stretchable electronic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyewole, O. K. [Department of Theoretical and Applied Physics, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10, Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kwara State University, Malete, P.M.B 1530, Ilorin, Kwara State (Nigeria); Yu, D. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Olden Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Du, J. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Olden Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, 137 Reber Building, University Park, Pennsylvania (United States); Asare, J.; Fashina, A. [Department of Theoretical and Applied Physics, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10, Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Oyewole, D. O. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10, Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Physics Advanced Laboratory, Sheda Science and Technology Complex, P.M.B 186, Garki, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Anye, V. C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10, Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Zebaze Kana, M. G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kwara State University, Malete, P.M.B 1530, Ilorin, Kwara State (Nigeria); Physics Advanced Laboratory, Sheda Science and Technology Complex, P.M.B 186, Garki, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); and others

    2015-06-21

    This paper presents the results of experimental and theoretical/computational micro-wrinkles and buckling on the surfaces of stretchable poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) coated with nano-scale Gold (Au) layers. The wrinkles and buckles are formed by the unloading of pre-stretched PDMS/Au structure after the evaporation of nano-scale Au layers. They are then characterized using atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The critical stresses required for wrinkling and buckling are analyzed using analytical models. The possible interfacial cracking that can occur along with film buckling is also studied using finite element simulations of the interfacial crack growth. The implications of the results are discussed for potential applications of micro-wrinkles and micro-buckles in stretchable electronic structures and biomedical devices.

  20. Simulation of morphologically structured photo-thermal neural stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissler, Y.; Farah, N.; Shoham, S.

    2017-10-01

    Objective. Rational design of next-generation techniques for photo-thermal excitation requires the development of tools capable of modeling the effects of spatially- and temporally-dependent temperature distribution on cellular neuronal structures. Approach. We present a new computer simulation tool for predicting the effects of arbitrary spatiotemporally-structured photo-thermal stimulation on 3D, morphologically realistic neurons. The new simulation tool is based on interfacing two generic platforms, NEURON and MATLAB and is therefore suited for capturing different kinds of stimuli and neural models. Main results. Simulation results are validated using photo-absorber induced neuro-thermal stimulation (PAINTS) empirical results, and advanced features are explored. Significance. The new simulation tool could have an important role in understanding and investigating complex optical stimulation at the single-cell and network levels.

  1. Valence band electronic structure of Pd based ternary chalcogenide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohani, H. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400085 (India); Mishra, P. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Goyal, R.; Awana, V.P.S. [National Physical Laboratory(CSIR), Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Sekhar, B.R., E-mail: sekhar@iopb.res.in [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • VB Photoemission study and DFT calculations on Pd based ternary superconductors are presented. • Nb{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.95}S{sub 5} shows a temperature dependent pseudogap. • VB spectral features of ternary superconductors are correlated to their structural geometry. - Abstract: We present a comparative study of the valence band electronic structure of Pd based ternary chalcogenide superconductors Nb{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.95}S{sub 5}, Ta{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.97}S{sub 6} and Ta{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.97}Te{sub 6} using experimental photoemission spectroscopy and density functional based theoretical calculations. We observe a qualitatively similarity between valence band (VB) spectra of Nb{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.95}S{sub 5} and Ta{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.97}S{sub 6}. Further, we find a pseudogap feature in Nb{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.95}S{sub 5} at low temperature, unlike other two compounds. We have correlated the structural geometry with the differences in VB spectra of these compounds. The different atomic packing in these compounds could vary the strength of inter-orbital hybridization among various atoms which leads to difference in their electronic structure as clearly observed in our DOS calculations.

  2. Structure of TRPV1 channel revealed by electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseenkova-Bell, Vera Y; Stanciu, Lia A; Serysheva, Irina I; Tobe, Ben J; Wensel, Theodore G

    2008-05-27

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) family of ion channels participate in many signaling pathways. TRPV1 functions as a molecular integrator of noxious stimuli, including heat, low pH, and chemical ligands. Here, we report the 3D structure of full-length rat TRPV1 channel expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and purified by immunoaffinity chromatography. We demonstrate that the recombinant purified TRPV1 channel retains its structural and functional integrity and is suitable for structural analysis. The 19-A structure of TRPV1 determined by using single-particle electron cryomicroscopy exhibits fourfold symmetry and comprises two distinct regions: a large open basket-like domain, likely corresponding to the cytoplasmic N- and C-terminal portions, and a more compact domain, corresponding to the transmembrane portion. The assignment of transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions was supported by fitting crystal structures of the structurally homologous Kv1.2 channel and isolated TRPV1 ankyrin repeats into the TRPV1 structure.

  3. Numerical Simulations of X-Ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL)

    KAUST Repository

    Antonelli, Paolo

    2014-11-04

    We study a nonlinear Schrödinger equation which arises as an effective single particle model in X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL). This equation appears as a first principles model for the beam-matter interactions that would take place in an XFEL molecular imaging experiment in [A. Fratalocchi and G. Ruocco, Phys. Rev. Lett., 106 (2011), 105504]. Since XFEL are more powerful by several orders of magnitude than more conventional lasers, the systematic investigation of many of the standard assumptions and approximations has attracted increased attention. In this model the electrons move under a rapidly oscillating electromagnetic field, and the convergence of the problem to an effective time-averaged one is examined. We use an operator splitting pseudospectral method to investigate numerically the behavior of the model versus that of its time-averaged version in complex situations, namely the energy subcritical/mass supercritical case and in the presence of a periodic lattice. We find the time-averaged model to be an effective approximation, even close to blowup, for fast enough oscillations of the external field. This work extends previous analytical results for simpler cases [P. Antonelli, A. Athanassoulis, H. Hajaiej, and P. Markowich, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal., 211 (2014), pp. 711--732].

  4. Novel low-dose imaging technique for characterizing atomic structures through scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chia-Ping; Syu, Wei-Jhe; Hsiao, Chien-Nan; Lai, Ping-Shan; Chen, Chien-Chun

    2017-08-01

    To investigate dislocations or heterostructures across interfaces is now of great interest to condensed matter and materials scientists. With the advances in aberration-corrected electron optics, the scanning transmission electron microscope has demonstrated its excellent capability of characterizing atomic structures within nanomaterials, and well-resolved atomic-resolution images can be obtained through long-exposure data acquisition. However, the sample drifting, carbon contamination, and radiation damage hinder further analysis, such as deriving three-dimensional (3D) structures from a series of images. In this study, a method for obtaining atomic-resolution images with significantly reduced exposure time was developed, using which an original high-resolution image with approximately one tenth the electron dose can be obtained by combining a fast-scan high-magnification image and a slow-scan low-magnification image. The feasibility of obtaining 3D atomic structures using the proposed approach was demonstrated through multislice simulation. Finally, the feasibility and accuracy of image restoration were experimentally verified. This general method cannot only apply to electron microscopy but also benefit to image radiation-sensitive materials using various light sources.

  5. Structural effects on the electronic characteristics of intramolecularly intercalated alkali-rubrene complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tsung-Lung, E-mail: quantum@mail.ncyu.edu.tw [Department of Electrophysics, National Chia-Yi University, 300 Hsueh-Fu Road, Chiayi, 60004, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lu, Wen-Cai, E-mail: wencailu@jlu.edu.cn [Laboratory of Fiber Materials and Modern Textile, Growing Base for State Key Laboratory, College of Physics, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong 266071 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China)

    2016-11-01

    The geometric and electronic structures of neutral monolithium- and monosodium-rubrene (Li{sub 1} Rub and Na{sub 1} Rub) isomers are investigated and compared with monopotassium-rubrene (K{sub 1} Rub). Based on the alkali binding site, all isomers of these alkali-rubrene complexes can be subdivided into two types: intramolecularly intercalated and extramolecularly adsorbed. The minimum-energy Li{sub 1} Rub and Na{sub 1} Rub are intercalated structures, whereas the minimum-energy K{sub 1} Rub is adsorbed. The fact that the intercalated Li{sub 1} Rub and Na{sub 1} Rub structures are energetically favorable over the adsorbed ones can be explained by two energy rules. First, “double” proximity of the intercalating alkali element to a pair of phenyl side groups enormously reduces the total energy. Second, accommodation of a minuscule intercalant does not significantly deform the carbon frame and, thus, increases the energy only by a small amount. Additionally, the peculiar effects of intramolecular intercalation on the electronic structures of molecules are also studied in this simulation of monoalkali intercalation. In the monoalkali-intercalated rubrene complex, only one of the two pairs of phenyl groups of rubrene is intercalated, intentionally leaving another pair pristine, which facilitates the comparison of electronic structures between the intercalated and pristine pairs of phenyl side groups in a single molecule. The uniformity of chemical environments of the phenyl groups of the intercalated Li{sub 1} Rub/Na{sub 1} Rub is deteriorated by the incorporation of the intercalant, and leads to their spectral characteristics in contrast to K{sub 1} Rub. In particular, the introduction of the intercalant promotes the carbon 2p orbitals of the intercalated phenyl pair to take part in the electronic structures of the HOMO and LUMO peaks of Li{sub 1} Rub/Na{sub 1} Rub. The unpaired electron in the HOMO is delocalized over the backbone with higher probability of

  6. Rotating structures in low temperature magnetized plasmas - Insight from particle simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre eBoeuf

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The EXB configuration of various low temperature plasma devices is often responsible for the formation of rotating structures and instabilities leading to anomalous electron transport across the magnetic field. In these devices, electrons are strongly magnetized while ions are weakly or not magnetized and this leads to specific physical phenomena that are not present in fusion plasmas where both electrons and ions are strongly magnetized. In this paper we describe basic phenomena involving rotating plasma structures in simple configurations of low temperature EXB plasma devices on the basis of PIC-MCC (Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions simulations. We focus on three examples: rotating electron vortices and rotating spokes in cylindrical magnetrons, and azimuthal electron-cyclotron drift instability in Hall thrusters. The simulations are not intended to give definite answers to the many physics issues related to low temperature EXB plasma devices but are used to illustrate and discuss some of the basic questions that need further studies.

  7. Electronic Structure of Rare-Earth Metals. II. Positron Annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, R. W.; Mackintosh, Allan

    1968-01-01

    The angular correlation of the photons emitted when positrons annihilate with electrons has been studied in single crystals of the rare-earth metals Y, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, and Er, and in a single crystal of an equiatomic alloy of Ho and Er. A comparison of the results for Y with the calculations...... of Loucks shows that the independent-particle model gives a good first approximation to the angular distribution, although correlation effects probably smear out some of the structure. The angular distributions from the heavy rare-earth metals are very similar to that from Y and can be understood...... surface normal to the c axis. The same aspects of the Fermi surface are believed to be important in determining the stability of the periodic magnetic structures formed in some of the metals, and there is a strong correlation between the structure in the angular distribution and the magnetic properties...

  8. Structure and Electronic Properties of Transition Metal Doped Kaolinite Nanoclay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liangjie; Yang, Huaming

    2017-06-01

    In this work, a series of transition metal (Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co) doped kaolinite nanoclays were investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The influence of metal doping on geometric structure and electronic structure of kaolinite was analyzed. The ferromagnetic (FM), antiferromagnetic (AFM), and nonmagnetic (NM) states of transition metal (TM) doped kaolinite structures were studied. The crystal volume, lattice parameters, bond length, charge, and spin were calculated by dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D2). The results indicated that Cr3+ and Fe3+ dopants showed more stable under AFM state, while Mn3+ preferred both AFM and FM states, and Co3+ dopant preferred NM state. Also, the transition metal doping could induce lattice volume expansion and some dopant states in the band gap.

  9. Cellular Electron Cryotomography: Toward Structural Biology In Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomou, Catherine M; Jensen, Grant J

    2017-06-20

    Electron cryotomography (ECT) provides three-dimensional views of macromolecular complexes inside cells in a native frozen-hydrated state. Over the last two decades, ECT has revealed the ultrastructure of cells in unprecedented detail. It has also allowed us to visualize the structures of macromolecular machines in their native context inside intact cells. In many cases, such machines cannot be purified intact for in vitro study. In other cases, the function of a structure is lost outside the cell, so that the mechanism can be understood only by observation in situ. In this review, we describe the technique and its history and provide examples of its power when applied to cell biology. We also discuss the integration of ECT with other techniques, including lower-resolution fluorescence imaging and higher-resolution atomic structure determination, to cover the full scale of cellular processes.

  10. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron beam control using an inductive current divider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.

    2015-11-01

    Kinetic, time-dependent, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations of the inductive current divider are presented. The inductive current divider is a passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam's return current. The current divider concept was proposed and studied theoretically in a previous publication [Swanekamp et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 023107 (2015)]. A central post carries a portion of the return current (I1), while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I2) with the injected beam current given by Ib = I1 + I2. The simulations are in agreement with the theory which predicts that the total force on the beam trajectory is proportional to (I2-I1) and the force on the beam envelope is proportional to Ib. Independent control over both the current density and the beam angle at the target is possible by choosing the appropriate current-divider geometry. The root-mean-square (RMS) beam emittance (ɛRMS) varies as the beam propagates through the current divider to the target. For applications where control of the beam trajectory is desired and the current density at the target is similar to the current density at the entrance foil, there is a modest 20% increase in ɛRMS at the target. For other applications where the beam is pinched to a current density ˜5 times larger at the target, ɛRMS is 2-3 times larger at the target.

  11. Software abstractions and computational issues in parallel structure adaptive mesh methods for electronic structure calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, S.; Weare, J.; Ong, E.; Baden, S.

    1997-05-01

    We have applied structured adaptive mesh refinement techniques to the solution of the LDA equations for electronic structure calculations. Local spatial refinement concentrates memory resources and numerical effort where it is most needed, near the atomic centers and in regions of rapidly varying charge density. The structured grid representation enables us to employ efficient iterative solver techniques such as conjugate gradient with FAC multigrid preconditioning. We have parallelized our solver using an object- oriented adaptive mesh refinement framework.

  12. A new scaling approach for the mesoscale simulation of magnetic domain structures using Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhakrishnan, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eisenbach, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burress, Timothy A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-01-24

    A new scaling approach has been proposed for the spin exchange and the dipole–dipole interaction energy as a function of the system size. The computed scaling laws are used in atomistic Monte Carlo simulations of magnetic moment evolution to predict the transition from single domain to a vortex structure as the system size increases. The width of a 180° – domain wall extracted from the simulated structures is in close agreement with experimentally values for an F–Si alloy. In conclusion, the transition size from a single domain to a vortex structure is also in close agreement with theoretically predicted and experimentally measured values for Fe.

  13. Structural simulation of natural zeolites; Simulacion estructural de zeolitas naturales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez P, E.; Carrera G, L.M. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    The application of X-ray diffraction (XRD) in the study of crystalline structures of the natural and modified zeolites allows the identification, lattice parameter determination and the crystallinity grade of the sample of interest. Until two decades ago, simulation methods of X-ray diffraction patterns were developed with which was possible to do reliable determinations of their crystalline structure. In this work it is presented the first stage of the crystalline structure simulation of zeolitic material from Etla, Oaxaca which has been studied for using it in the steam production industry and purification of industrial water. So that the natural material was modified for increasing its sodium contents and this material in its turn was put in contact with aqueous solutions of Na, Mg and Ca carbonates. All the simulations were done with the Lazy-Pulverix method. The considered phase was clinoptilolite. It was done the comparison with three clinoptilolite reported in the literature. (Author)

  14. Structure and electronic properties of graphene on ferroelectric LiNbO{sub 3} surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Jun, E-mail: dingjun@haue.edu.cn [College of Science, Henan University of Engineering, Zhengzhou 451191 (China); Wen, LiWei; Li, HaiDong [College of Science, Henan University of Engineering, Zhengzhou 451191 (China); Zhang, Ying, E-mail: yingzhang@bnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2017-05-25

    Highlights: • Interface structure of graphene on O terminated LiNbO{sub 3} surface. • Asymmetry gap around Dirac point. • Berry phase calculations confirm a valley Hall effect. - Abstract: We investigate the structural and electronic properties of graphene on the O terminated LiNbO{sub 3}(001) surface by density functional theory simulations. We observe that the first graphene layer is covalent bonded with the surface O atoms and buckles a lot. While considering second layer graphene upon the first layer, it almost recovers the planar structure and the interface interaction breaks the AB sublattice symmetry which leads to a valley Hall effect. Our results reveal the interface structure of graphene-ferroelectric heterostructure and provide the way for valleytronic applications with graphene.

  15. Efficient scattering of electrons below few keV by Time Domain Structures around injection fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasko, I.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mozer, F.; Artemyev, A.; Krasnoselskikh, V.

    2016-12-01

    Van Allen Probes observations show an abundance of non-linear large-amplitude electrostatic spikes around injection fronts in the outer radiation belt. These spikes referred to as Time Domain Structures (TDS) include electron holes, double layers and more complicated solitary waves. The electron scattering driven by TDS may not be evaluated via the standard quasi-linear theory, since TDS are in principle non-linear plasma modes. In this paper we analyze the scattering of electrons by three-dimensional TDS (with non-negligible perpendicular electric field) around injection fronts. We derive the analytical formulas describing the local scattering by single TDS and show that the most efficiently scattered electrons are those in the first cyclotron resonance (electrons crossing TDS on a time scale comparable with their gyroperiod). The analytical formulas are verified via the test-particle simulation. We compute the bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients and demonstrate their dependence on the TDS spatial distribution, individual TDS parameters and L shell. We show that TDS are able to provide the pitch-angle scattering of electrons at rate 10-2-10-4 s-1 and, thus, can be responsible for driving loss of electrons out of injections fronts on a time scale from few minutes to few hours. TDS can be, thus, responsible for driving diffuse aurora precipitations conjugated to injection fronts. We show that the pitch-angle scattering rates driven by TDS are comparable with those due to chorus waves and exceed those due to electron cyclotron harmonics. For injections fronts with no significant wave activity in the frequency range corresponding to chorus waves, TDS can be even dominant mechanism for losses of below few keV electrons.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations give insight into the conformational change, complex formation, and electron transfer pathway for cytochrome P450 reductase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sündermann, Axel; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 reductase (CYPOR) undergoes a large conformational change to allow for an electron transfer to a redox partner to take place. After an internal electron transfer over its cofactors, it opens up to facilitate the interaction and electron transfer with a cytochrome P450. The open conformation appears difficult to crystallize. Therefore, a model of a human CYPOR in the open conformation was constructed to be able to investigate the stability and conformational change of this protein by means of molecular dynamics simulations. Since the role of the protein is to provide electrons to a redox partner, the interactions with cytochrome P450 2D6 (2D6) were investigated and a possible complex structure is suggested. Additionally, electron pathway calculations with a newly written program were performed to investigate which amino acids relay the electrons from the FMN cofactor of CYPOR to the HEME of 2D6. Several possible interacting amino acids in the complex, as well as a possible electron transfer pathway were identified and open the way for further investigation by site directed mutagenesis studies. PMID:23832577

  17. Structural and electronic properties of InPBi alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianlong; Lu, Pengfei; Han, Lihong; Yu, Zhongyuan; Chen, Jun; Wang, Shumin

    2014-06-01

    First-principle calculations have been performed to systematically investigate structural and electronic properties of InPBi alloys. The formation energy of seven different configurations is studied. The strength of covalent bonding largely depends on the strong s-p hybridization among In-5s, P-3p and Bi-6p states. The band gap of InPBi shrinks clearly with the increasing Bi concentration and the band edge shifts when spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is considered. The insertion of Bi atom leads to hybridization of In/P/Bi p states which contributes a lot around Fermi level. In addition, our results show that the biaxial strain is an effective method to tune the electronic properties of the system.

  18. Protonated serotonin: Geometry, electronic structures and photophysical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidyan, Reza; Amanollahi, Zohreh; Azimi, Gholamhassan

    2017-07-01

    The geometry and electronic structures of protonated serotonin have been investigated by the aim of MP2 and CC2 methods. The relative stabilities, transition energies and geometry of sixteen different protonated isomers of serotonin have been presented. It has been predicted that protonation does not exhibit essential alteration on the S1 ← S0 electronic transition energy of serotonin. Instead, more complicated photophysical nature in respect to its neutral analogue is suggested for protonated system owing to radiative and non-radiative deactivation pathways. In addition to hydrogen detachment (HD), hydrogen/proton transfer (H/PT) processes from ammonium to indole ring along the NH+⋯ π hydrogen bond have been predicted as the most important photophysical consequences of SERH+ at S1 excited state. The PT processes is suggested to be responsible for fluorescence of SERH+ while the HD driving coordinate is proposed for elucidation of its nonradiative deactivation mechanism.

  19. Topological Signatures in the Electronic Structure of Graphene Spirals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avdoshenko, Stas.M.; Koskinen, Pekka; Sevincli, Haldun

    2013-01-01

    Topology is familiar mostly from mathematics, but also natural sciences have found its concepts useful. Those concepts have been used to explain several natural phenomena in biology and physics, and they are particularly relevant for the electronic structure description of topological insulators...... and graphene systems. Here, we introduce topologically distinct graphene forms - graphene spirals - and employ density-functional theory to investigate their geometric and electronic properties. We found that the spiral topology gives rise to an intrinsic Rashba spin-orbit splitting. Through a Hamiltonian...... constrained by space curvature, graphene spirals have topologically protected states due to time-reversal symmetry. In addition, we argue that the synthesis of such graphene spirals is feasible and can be achieved through advanced bottom-up experimental routes that we indicate in this work....

  20. Cryo electron microscopy to determine the structure of macromolecular complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroni, Marta; Saibil, Helen R

    2016-02-15

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a structural molecular and cellular biology technique that has experienced major advances in recent years. Technological developments in image recording as well as in processing software make it possible to obtain three-dimensional reconstructions of macromolecular assemblies at near-atomic resolution that were formerly obtained only by X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy. In parallel, cryo-electron tomography has also benefitted from these technological advances, so that visualization of irregular complexes, organelles or whole cells with their molecular machines in situ has reached subnanometre resolution. Cryo-EM can therefore address a broad range of biological questions. The aim of this review is to provide a brief overview of the principles and current state of the cryo-EM field. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Electronic structure of benzene adsorbed on Ni and Cu surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinelt, M.; Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Benzene has for a long time served as a prototype adsorption system of large molecules. It adsorbs with the molecular plane parallel to the surface. The bonding of benzene to a transition metal is typically viewed to involve the {pi} system. Benzene adsorbs weakly on Cu and strongly on Ni. It is interesting to study how the adsorption strength is reflected in the electronic structure of the adsorbate-substrate complex. The authors have used X-ray Emission (XE) and X-ray Absorption (XA) spectroscopies to selectively study the electronic states localized on the adsorbed benzene molecule. Using XES the occupied states can be studies and with XAS the unoccupied states. The authors have used beamline 8.0 and the Swedish endstation equipped with a grazing incidence x-ray spectrometer and a partial yield absorption detector. The resolution in the XES and XAS were 0.5 eV and 0.05 eV, respectively.

  2. Microscopical Studies of Structural and Electronic Properties of Semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The electronic and structural properties of point defects in semiconductors, e.g. radiation defects, impurities or passivating defects can excellently be studied by the hyperfine technique of Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC). The serious limitation of this method, the small number of chemically different radioactive PAC probe atoms can be widely overcome by means of ISOLDE. Providing shortliving isotopes, which represent common dopants as well as suitable PAC probe atoms, the ISOLDE facility enables a much broader application of PAC to problems in semiconductor physics.\\\\ Using the probe atom $^{111m}$ Cd , the whole class of III-V compounds becomes accessible for PAC investigations. First successful experiments in GaAs, InP and GaP have been performed, concerning impurity complex formation and plasma induced defects. In Si and Ge, the electronic properties~-~especially their influence on acceptor-donor interaction~-~could be exemplarily st...

  3. Orientation and strain modulated electronic structures in puckered arsenene nanoribbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Y. Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Orthorhombic arsenene was recently predicted as an indirect bandgap semiconductor. Here, we demonstrate that nanostructuring arsenene into nanoribbons successfully transform the bandgap to be direct. It is found that direct bandgaps hold for narrow armchair but wide zigzag nanoribbons, which is dominated by the competition between the in-plane and out-of-plane bondings. Moreover, straining the nanoribbons also induces a direct bandgap and simultaneously modulates effectively the transport property. The gap energy is largely enhanced by applying tensile strains to the armchair structures. In the zigzag ones, a tensile strain makes the effective mass of holes much higher while a compressive strain cause it much lower than that of electrons. Our results are crucial to understand and engineer the electronic properties of two dimensional materials beyond the planar ones like graphene.

  4. Electronic Structures of Clusters of Hydrogen Vacancies on Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bi-Ru; Yang, Chih-Kai

    2015-10-15

    Hydrogen vacancies in graphane are products of incomplete hydrogenation of graphene. The missing H atoms can alter the electronic structure of graphane and therefore tune the electronic, magnetic, and optical properties of the composite. We systematically studied a variety of well-separated clusters of hydrogen vacancies in graphane, including the geometrical shapes of triangles, parallelograms, hexagons, and rectangles, by first-principles density functional calculation. The results indicate that energy levels caused by the missing H are generated in the broad band gap of pure graphane. All triangular clusters of H vacancies are magnetic, the larger the triangle the higher the magnetic moment. The defect levels introduced by the missing H in triangular and parallelogram clusters are spin-polarized and can find application in optical transition. Parallelograms and open-ended rectangles are antiferromagnetic and can be used for nanoscale registration of digital information.

  5. Removal of Vesicle Structures From Transmission Electron Microscope Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Katrine Hommelhoff; Sigworth, Fred J.; Brandt, Sami Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of imaging membrane proteins for single-particle cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the isolated protein structure. More precisely, we propose a method for learning and removing the interfering vesicle signals from the micrograph, prior to reconstruction. In our approach, we estimate the subspace of the vesicle structures and project the micrographs onto the orthogonal complement of this subspace. We construct a 2d statistical model of the vesicle structure, based on higher order singular value decomposition (HOSVD), by considering the structural symmetries of the vesicles in the polar coordinate plane. We then propose to lift the HOSVD model to a novel hierarchical model by summarizing the multidimensional HOSVD coefficients by their principal components. Along with the model, a solid vesicle normalization scheme and model selection criterion are proposed to make a compact and general model. The results show that the vesicle structures are accurately separated from the background by the HOSVD model that is also able to adapt to the asymmetries of the vesicles. This is a promising result and suggests even wider applicability of the proposed approach in learning and removal of statistical structures. PMID:26642456

  6. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  7. Frequency Domain Modeling and Simulation of DC Power Electronic Systems Using Harmonic State Space Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwon, Jun Bum; Wang, Xiongfei; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    . Through this method, the required computation time and CPU memory can be reduced, where this faster simulation can be an advantage of a large network simulation. Besides, the achieved results show the same results as the non-linear time-domain simulation. Furthermore, the HSS modeling can describe how...... with different switching frequency or harmonics from ac-dc converters makes that harmonics and frequency coupling are both problems of ac system and challenges of dc system. This paper presents a modeling and simulation method for a large dc power electronic system by using Harmonic State Space (HSS) modeling...

  8. Temperature dependence of the electronic structure of semiconductors and insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poncé, S., E-mail: samuel.pon@gmail.com; Gillet, Y.; Laflamme Janssen, J.; Gonze, X. [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility and Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, Université catholique de Louvain, Chemin des étoiles 8, bte L07.03.01, B-1348 Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium); Marini, A. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Via Salaria Km 29.3, CP 10, 00016 Monterotondo Stazione (Italy); Verstraete, M. [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility and Physique des matériaux et nanostructures, Université de Liège, Allée du 6 Août 17, B-4000 Liège (Belgium)

    2015-09-14

    The renormalization of electronic eigenenergies due to electron-phonon coupling (temperature dependence and zero-point motion effect) is sizable in many materials with light atoms. This effect, often neglected in ab initio calculations, can be computed using the perturbation-based Allen-Heine-Cardona theory in the adiabatic or non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. After a short description of the recent progresses in this field and a brief overview of the theory, we focus on the issue of phonon wavevector sampling convergence, until now poorly understood. Indeed, the renormalization is obtained numerically through a slowly converging q-point integration. For non-zero Born effective charges, we show that a divergence appears in the electron-phonon matrix elements at q → Γ, leading to a divergence of the adiabatic renormalization at band extrema. This problem is exacerbated by the slow convergence of Born effective charges with electronic wavevector sampling, which leaves residual Born effective charges in ab initio calculations on materials that are physically devoid of such charges. Here, we propose a solution that improves this convergence. However, for materials where Born effective charges are physically non-zero, the divergence of the renormalization indicates a breakdown of the adiabatic harmonic approximation, which we assess here by switching to the non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. Also, we study the convergence behavior of the renormalization and develop reliable extrapolation schemes to obtain the converged results. Finally, the adiabatic and non-adiabatic theories, with corrections for the slow Born effective charge convergence problem (and the associated divergence) are applied to the study of five semiconductors and insulators: α-AlN, β-AlN, BN, diamond, and silicon. For these five materials, we present the zero-point renormalization, temperature dependence, phonon-induced lifetime broadening, and the renormalized electronic band structure.

  9. Electronic Structure of the Bismuth Family of High Temperature Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Lisa

    2002-03-07

    High temperature superconductivity remains the central intellectual problem in condensed matter physics fifteen years after its discovery. Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) directly probes the electronic structure, and has played an important role in the field of high temperature superconductors. With the recent advances in sample growth and the photoemission technique, we are able to study the electronic structure in great detail, and address regimes that were previously inaccessible. This thesis work contains systematic photoemission studies of the electronic structure of the Bi-family of high temperature superconductors, which include the single-layer system (Bi2201), the bi-layer system (Bi2212), and the tri-layer system (Bi2223). We show that, unlike conventional BCS superconductors, phase coherence information emerges in the single particle excitation spectrum of high temperature superconductors as the superconducting peak in Bi2212. The universality and various properties of this superconducting peak are studied in various systems. We argue that the origin of the superconducting peak may provide the key to understanding the mechanism of High-Tc superconductors. In addition, we identified a new experimental energy scale in the bilayer material, the anisotropic intra-bilayer coupling energy. For a long time, it was predicted that this energy scale would cause bilayer band splitting. We observe this phenomenon, for the first time, in heavily overdoped Bi2212. This new observation requires the revision of the previous picture of the electronic excitation in the Brillouin zone boundary. As the first ARPES study of a trilayer system, various detailed electronic proper- ties of Bi2223 are examined. We show that, comparing with Bi2212, both superconducting gap and relative superconducting peak intensity become larger in Bi2223, however, the strength of the interlayer coupling within each unit cell is possibly weaker. These results suggest that the

  10. Towards the Structural Characterization of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins by SAXS and MD Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Sato, Mamoru

    2011-01-01

    Dynamical structures of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and multi-domain proteins that include large ID regions between the domains are unable to be determined by such conventional methods as X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is suitable to determine low-resolution structures of proteins and protein complexes in solution, but the structural data on protein dynamics are averaged over the structural ensemble in protein solution. To overcome this problem, we have developed a novel method, named MD-SAXS, of the combined use of SAXS and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to analyze protein dynamics in solution of multi-subunit protein complexes and multi-domain proteins toward the structural characterization of IDPs. Here we show validity of the method through the structural characterization of restriction Endonuclease EcoO109I.

  11. Optical and structural characterisation of low dimensional structures using electron beam excitation systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mohammed, A

    2000-01-01

    suppressed by nonradiative recombination centres. The temperatures at which the QW luminescence starts to quench and the activation energies of luminescence quenching are found to depend on excitation conditions, sample quality and QW depth. The results of CL intensity dependence on the excitation intensity revealed that luminescence from good quality QW structures is dominated by radiative recombination processes even at high temperatures during thermal quenching. In contrast, in defected structures non-radiative recombination mechanisms dominate the luminescence properties at all temperatures. Secondary electron images of hexagonal growth hillocks of GaN obtained at a range of electron beam excitation energies vary because of the different signals involved in the imaging. Electron backscatter diffraction measurements have been used for phase identification and lattice constants determination in a strained GaN epilayer. This thesis presents studies on optical and structural characterisation of low dimensiona...

  12. Comparison of Simulated Responses Derived from Silicon Detectors Depending on the Consideration of Primary Electron Tracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Geehyun; Park, Chang Je [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    We have previously shown the alteration of the simulated spectral response from radiation detectors when the active detector volume is not as large as the penetration length, or diffusion areas of the primary and secondary electrons, i.e. the solid lines of electron path illustrated is not confined within the detector volume anymore. For thin-film-based detectors, such as nanostructure material based radiation detectors, it is important to include the incomplete charge carrier creation due to the primary electron escaping in the simulation of the spectral response and detection efficiency. If the effect due to the partial energy deposition from the primary electrons, thus limited charge creation by the initial energy deposition because of the electrons escaped from the active region is considered, the simulated spectra will reflect the effect accordingly. According to a simple simulation using PENELOPE 2011 Code, a Detector thickness of 200 μm can only embrace 70% of the recoiled electron tracks within the region. In this paper we will study how overall features in the simulated spectra, such as X-ray escape peaks, Compton continuum, the photopeak area and the peak-to-Compton ratio will be affected when the primary electron tracks are considered in a normal PIN-type silicon detectors. We used both PENELOPE and MCNP5 codes to calculate the electron particle tracks with the kinetic energy value down to the lower energy limit of each code (50 eV for PENELOPE and 1 keV for MCNP5) including variance reduction methods for the sake of extensive computing time.

  13. Simulations of the electron cloud buildup and its influence on the microwave transmission measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, Oliver Sebastian, E-mail: o.haas@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität Darmstadt, Institut für Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder, Schlossgartenstraße 8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Petrov, Fedor [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Institut für Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder, Schlossgartenstraße 8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-11-21

    An electron cloud density in an accelerator can be measured using the Microwave Transmission (MWT) method. The aim of our study is to evaluate the influence of a realistic, nonuniform electron cloud on the MWT. We conduct electron cloud buildup simulations for beam pipe geometries and bunch parameters resembling roughly the conditions in the CERN SPS. For different microwave waveguide modes the phase shift induced by a known electron cloud density is obtained from three different approaches: 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation of the electron response, a 2D eigenvalue solver for waveguide modes assuming a dielectric response function for cold electrons, a perturbative method assuming a sufficiently smooth density profile. While several electron cloud parameters, such as temperature, result in minor errors in the determined density, the transversely inhomogeneous density can introduce a large error in the measured electron density. We show that the perturbative approach is sufficient to describe the phase shift under realistic electron cloud conditions. Depending on the geometry of the beam pipe, the external magnetic field configuration and the used waveguide mode, the electron cloud density can be concentrated at the beam pipe or near the beam pipe center, leading to a severe over- or underestimation of the electron density. -- Author-Highlights: •Electron cloud distributions are very inhomogeneous, especially in dipoles. •These inhomogeneities affect the microwave transmission measurement results. •Electron density might be over- or underestimated, depending on setup. •This can be quantified with several models, e.g. a perturbative approach.

  14. Angle selective backscattered electron contrast in the low-voltage scanning electron microscope: Simulation and experiment for polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Q., E-mail: qwan2@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Masters, R.C. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Lidzey, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Abrams, K.J. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Dapor, M. [European Centre for Theoretical Studies in Nuclear Physics and Related Areas (ECT-FBK) and Trento Institute for Fundamental Physics and Applications (TIFPA-INFN), via Sommarive 18, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Plenderleith, R.A. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Rimmer, S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Claeyssens, F.; Rodenburg, C. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    Recently developed detectors can deliver high resolution and high contrast images of nanostructured carbon based materials in low voltage scanning electron microscopes (LVSEM) with beam deceleration. Monte Carlo Simulations are also used to predict under which exact imaging conditions purely compositional contrast can be obtained and optimised. This allows the prediction of the electron signal intensity in angle selective conditions for back-scattered electron (BSE) imaging in LVSEM and compares it to experimental signals. Angle selective detection with a concentric back scattered (CBS) detector is considered in the model in the absence and presence of a deceleration field, respectively. The validity of the model prediction for both cases was tested experimentally for amorphous C and Cu and applied to complex nanostructured carbon based materials, namely a Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)/Poly(ethylene glycol) Diacrylate (PNIPAM/PEGDA) semi-interpenetration network (IPN) and a Poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) film, to map nano-scale composition and crystallinity distribution by avoiding experimental imaging conditions that lead to a mixed topographical and compositional contrast - Highlights: • An optimised model for nano-scale analysis of beam sensitive materials by LVSEM. • Simulation and separation of composition and topography in a CBS detector. • Selective angle backscattered electron collection for mapping of polymers.

  15. Simulating Electron Cyclotron Maser Emission for Low Mass Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llama, Joe; Jardine, Moira

    2018-01-01

    Zeeman-Doppler Imaging (ZDI) is a powerful technique that enables us to map the large-scale magnetic fields of stars spanning the pre- and main-sequence. Coupling these magnetic maps with field extrapolation methods allow us to investigate the topology of the closed, X-ray bright corona, and the cooler, open stellar wind.Using ZDI maps of young M dwarfs with simultaneous radio light curves obtained from the VLA, we present the results of modeling the Electron-Cyclotron Maser (ECM) emission from these systems. We determine the X-ray luminosity and ECM emission that is produced using the ZDI maps and our field extrapolation model. We compare these findings with the observed radio light curves of these stars. This allows us to predict the relative phasing and amplitude of the stellar X-ray and radio light curves.This benchmarking of our model using these systems allows us to predict the ECM emission for all stars that have a ZDI map and an observed X-ray luminosity. Our model allows us to understand the origin of transient radio emission observations and is crucial for disentangling stellar and exoplanetary radio signals.

  16. Atomic and electronic structure transformations of silver nanoparticles under rapid cooling conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, I; Rojas, J; Landauro, C V; Torres, J

    2009-02-04

    The structural evolution and dynamics of silver nanodrops Ag(2869) (4.4 nm in diameter) under rapid cooling conditions have been studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations and electronic density of state calculations. The interaction of silver atoms is modelled by a tight-binding semiempirical interatomic potential proposed by Cleri and Rosato. The pair correlation functions and the pair analysis technique are used to reveal the structural transition in the process of solidification. It is shown that Ag nanoparticles evolve into different nanostructures under different cooling processes. At a cooling rate of 1.5625 × 10(13) K s(-1) the nanoparticles preserve an amorphous-like structure containing a large amount of 1551 and 1541 pairs which correspond to icosahedral symmetry. For a lower cooling rate (1.5625 × 10(12) K s(-1)), the nanoparticles transform into a crystal-like structure consisting mainly of 1421 and 1422 pairs which correspond to the face centred cubic and hexagonal close packed structures, respectively. The variations of the electronic density of states for the differently cooled nanoparticles are small, but in correspondence with the structural changes.

  17. Modern quantum chemistry introduction to advanced electronic structure theory

    CERN Document Server

    Szabo, Attila

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this graduate-level textbook is to present and explain, at other than a superficial level, modem ab initio approaches to the calculation of the electronic structure and properties of molecules. The first three chapters contain introductory material culminating in a thorough discussion of the Hartree-Fock approximation.The remaining four chapters describe a variety of more sophisticated approaches, which improve upon this approximation.Among the highlights of the seven chapters are (1) a review of the mathematics (mostly matrix algebra) required for the rest of the book, (2) an intr

  18. Electron microscopy analysis of structural changes within white etching areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichs, Annika Martina; Schwedt, A.; Mayer, J.

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, crack networks with white etching areas (WEAs) in cross-sections of bearings were investigated by a complementary use of SEM and TEM with the focus on the use of orientation contrast imaging and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Orientation contrast imaging was used...... observed within WEAs. Using EBSD analysis, evidence was obtained that WEA formation and accompanying crack growth are without relation microstructural features. In addition, an inhomogeneous chemical structure of WEA as a result of carbide dissolution is revealed by analytical investigations....

  19. Alloying effect on the electronic structures of hydrogen storage compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukawa, H.; Moringa, M.; Takahashi, Y. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Mater. Sci. and Eng.

    1997-05-20

    The electronic structures of hydrogenated LaNi{sub 5} containing various 3d transition elements were investigated by the DV-X{alpha} molecular orbital method. The hydrogen atom was found to form a strong chemical bond with the Ni rather than the La atoms. The alloying modified the chemical bond strengths between atoms in a small metal octahedron containing a hydrogen atom at the center, resulting in the change in the hydrogen absorption and desorption characteristics of LaNi{sub 5} with alloying. (orig.) 7 refs.

  20. Exploring the electronic structure of graphene quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Bikash; Sarkar, Sunandan; Sarkar, Pranab, E-mail: pranab.sarkar@visva-bharati.ac.in [Visva-Bharati University, Department of Chemistry (India)

    2012-12-15

    We present results of our theoretical investigation on the electronic structure of graphene quantum dots (QDs). We show how the HOMO-LUMO gap can be engineered by changing their size and/or shape. We also explore the possibility of tuning the gap by functionalization with different organic groups. We find that the covalent functionalization shifts both the HOMO and LUMO energies without significantly changing the HOMO-LUMO gap. This has been explained by analysing the density of states of different functionalized graphene QDs. Our theoretical results agree well with those of the experiment on recently synthesized graphene QDs.

  1. CIF2Cell: Generating geometries for electronic structure programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkman, Torbjörn

    2011-05-01

    The CIF2Cell program generates the geometrical setup for a number of electronic structure programs based on the crystallographic information in a Crystallographic Information Framework (CIF) file. The program will retrieve the space group number, Wyckoff positions and crystallographic parameters, make a sensible choice for Bravais lattice vectors (primitive or principal cell) and generate all atomic positions. Supercells can be generated and alloys are handled gracefully. The code currently has output interfaces to the electronic structure programs ABINIT, CASTEP, CPMD, Crystal, Elk, Exciting, EMTO, Fleur, RSPt, Siesta and VASP. Program summaryProgram title: CIF2Cell Catalogue identifier: AEIM_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEIM_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU GPL version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 12 691 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 74 933 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python (versions 2.4-2.7) Computer: Any computer that can run Python (versions 2.4-2.7) Operating system: Any operating system that can run Python (versions 2.4-2.7) Classification: 7.3, 7.8, 8 External routines: PyCIFRW [1] Nature of problem: Generate the geometrical setup of a crystallographic cell for a variety of electronic structure programs from data contained in a CIF file. Solution method: The CIF file is parsed using routines contained in the library PyCIFRW [1], and crystallographic as well as bibliographic information is extracted. The program then generates the principal cell from symmetry information, crystal parameters, space group number and Wyckoff sites. Reduction to a primitive cell is then performed, and the resulting cell is output to suitably named files along with documentation of the information source generated from any bibliographic information contained in the CIF

  2. Electron beam simulations of a multi-stage depressed collector, including secondary and scattered electrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geer, C. A. J.; Caplan, M.; Dionne, N.; van der Geer, S. B.; de Loos, M. J.; Verhoeven, A. G. A.; Valentini, M.; van der Wiel, M. J.; Urbanus, W. H.

    1998-01-01

    The Fusion FEM is the prototype of a high power, rapid-tunable mm-wave source, operating in the range 130-260 GHz (Urbanus, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 375 (1996) 401) [1]. The device is driven by a 2 MeV, 12 A DC electron beam. A decelerator and depressed collector will be mounted behind the mm-wave

  3. Structural insights into excitation-contraction coupling by electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serysheva, I I

    2004-11-01

    In muscle, excitation-contraction coupling is defined as the process linking depolarization of the surface membrane with Ca2+ release from cytoplasmic stores, which activates contraction of striated muscle. This process is primarily controlled by interplay between two Ca2+ channels--the voltage-gated L-type Ca2+ channel (dihydropyridine receptor, DHPR) localized in the t-tubule membrane and the Ca2+-release channel (ryanodine receptor, RyR) of the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane. The structures of both channels have been extensively studied by several groups using electron cryomicroscopy and single particle reconstruction techniques. The structures of RyR, determined at resolutions of 22-30 A, reveal a characteristic mushroom shape with a bulky cytoplasmic region and the membrane-spanning stem. While the cytoplasmic region exhibits a complex structure comprising a multitude of distinctive domains with numerous intervening cavities, at this resolution no definitive statement can be made about the location of the actual pore within the transmembrane region. Conformational changes associated with functional transitions of the Ca2+ release channel from closed to open states have been characterized. Further experiments determined localization of binding sites for various channel ligands. The structural studies of the DHPR are less developed. Although four 3D maps of the DHPR were reported recently at 24-30 A resolution from studies of frozen-hydrated and negatively stained receptors, there are some discrepancies between reported structures with respect to the overall appearance and dimensions of the channel structure. Future structural studies at higher resolution are needed to refine the structures of both channels and to substantiate a proposed molecular model for their interaction.

  4. EPR (Electronic Patient Record Laboratory - Simulated Environment to Learn about a Hospital EPR System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuko Yamamoto

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The “Electronic Patient Record (EPR Laboratory” is a computer based self-learning system developed for students to acquire practical skills and knowledge required to deal with EPRs. The system is designed to supplement conventional lectures on health information systems given as part of our undergraduate curriculum. Using the Laboratory, the students may learn not only operations of EPR systems but also the subjects connected with patient information handling, including privacy, security and health information ethics. The EPR Laboratory is composed of an eLearing system and an EPR system. The learning materials are arranged in units in the eLearning system, and in each unit, the student learns the materials and the EPR operations through practice. Tests are given at each end of unit, and if a student failed a test, the system shows which questions were answered incorrectly and indicates which parts of the unit he/she should review. For this purpose, we introduced a structure to the learning materials based on an information model. In this paper, the overview of the system, the simulated environment to learn patient flow, information flow and hospital workflow, fundamental EPR operations, and structured learning materials for the test and review cycle are described.

  5. Information diversity in structure and dynamics of simulated neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo; Aćimović, Jugoslava; Nykter, Matti; Kesseli, Juha; Ruohonen, Keijo; Yli-Harja, Olli; Linne, Marja-Leena

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal networks exhibit a wide diversity of structures, which contributes to the diversity of the dynamics therein. The presented work applies an information theoretic framework to simultaneously analyze structure and dynamics in neuronal networks. Information diversity within the structure and dynamics of a neuronal network is studied using the normalized compression distance. To describe the structure, a scheme for generating distance-dependent networks with identical in-degree distribution but variable strength of dependence on distance is presented. The resulting network structure classes possess differing path length and clustering coefficient distributions. In parallel, comparable realistic neuronal networks are generated with NETMORPH simulator and similar analysis is done on them. To describe the dynamics, network spike trains are simulated using different network structures and their bursting behaviors are analyzed. For the simulation of the network activity the Izhikevich model of spiking neurons is used together with the Tsodyks model of dynamical synapses. We show that the structure of the simulated neuronal networks affects the spontaneous bursting activity when measured with bursting frequency and a set of intraburst measures: the more locally connected networks produce more and longer bursts than the more random networks. The information diversity of the structure of a network is greatest in the most locally connected networks, smallest in random networks, and somewhere in between in the networks between order and disorder. As for the dynamics, the most locally connected networks and some of the in-between networks produce the most complex intraburst spike trains. The same result also holds for sparser of the two considered network densities in the case of full spike trains.

  6. Information Diversity in Structure and Dynamics of Simulated Neuronal Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuomo eMäki-Marttunen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal networks exhibit a wide diversity of structures, which contributes to the diversity of the dynamics therein. The presented work applies an information theoretic framework to simultaneously analyze structure and dynamics in neuronal networks. Information diversity within the structure and dynamics of a neuronal network is studied using the normalized compression distance (NCD. To describe the structure, a scheme for generating distance-dependent networks with identical in-degree distribution but variable strength of dependence on distance is presented. The resulting network structure classes possess differing path length and clustering coefficient distributions. In parallel, comparable realistic neuronal networks are generated with NETMORPH simulator and similar analysis is done on them. To describe the dynamics, network spike trains are simulated using different network structures and their bursting behaviours are analyzed. For the simulation of the network activity the Izhikevich model of spiking neurons is used together with the Tsodyks model of dynamical synapses.We show that the structure of the simulated neuronal networks affects the spontaneous bursting activity when measured with bursting frequency and a set of intraburst measures: the more locally connected networks produce more and longer bursts than the more random networks. The information diversity of the structure of a network is greatest in the most locally connected networks, smallest in random networks, and somewhere in between in the networks between order and disorder. As for the dynamics, the most locally connected networks and some of the in-between networks produce the most complex intraburst spike trains. The same result also holds for sparser of the two considered network densities in the case of full spike trains.

  7. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication of Titanium Alloy Gradient Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Craig A.; Newman, John A.; Bird, Richard Keith; Shenoy, Ravi N.; Baughman, James M.; Gupta, Vipul K.

    2014-01-01

    Historically, the structural optimization of aerospace components has been done through geometric methods. A monolithic material is chosen based on the best compromise between the competing design limiting criteria. Then the structure is geometrically optimized to give the best overall performance using the single material chosen. Functionally graded materials offer the potential to further improve structural efficiency by allowing the material composition and/or microstructural features to spatially vary within a single structure. Thus, local properties could be tailored to the local design limiting criteria. Additive manufacturing techniques enable the fabrication of such graded materials and structures. This paper presents the results of a graded material study using two titanium alloys processed using electron beam freeform fabrication, an additive manufacturing process. The results show that the two alloys uniformly mix at various ratios and the resultant static tensile properties of the mixed alloys behave according to rule-of-mixtures. Additionally, the crack growth behavior across an abrupt change from one alloy to the other shows no discontinuity and the crack smoothly transitions from one crack growth regime into another.

  8. Numerical simulations of drop impact on superhydrophobic structured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzetti, Davide; Larentis, Stefano; Pugno, Nicola

    2011-11-01

    During the last decade drop impact dynamics on superhydrophobic surfaces has been intensively investigated because of the incredible properties of water repellency exhibited by this kind of surfaces, mostly inspired by biological examples such as Lotus leave. Thanks to the recent progress in micro-fabrication technology is possible to tailor surfaces wettability defining specific pillar-like structured surfaces. In this work, the behavior of impinging drops on these pillar-like surfaces is simulated, characterizing temporal evolution of droplets contact radius and drop maximal deformation dependence on Weber number. Numerical simulations results are compared with theoretical and experimental results guaranteeing simulation reliability. Fingering patterns obtained from drop impact has been studied obtaining a correlation between number of fingers and Weber number. Drop fragmentation pattern obtained from simulations supports the proposed correlation. Different drop impact outcomes (e.g. rebound, fragmentation) on structured superhydrophobic surfaces are simulated, focusing on the influence of micro-structured surface geometrical pattern. This investigation is relevant in order to define design rules for possible reliable non wettable surfaces. Financial support by Alta Scuola Politecnica.

  9. Vortical structures in pool fires: Observation, speculation, and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tieszen, S.R.; Nicolette, V.F.; Gritzo, L.A.; Moya, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Holen, J.K. [SINTEF/NTH, Trondheim (Norway). Div. Thermodynamics; Murray, D. [Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, CA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    While all fires are complex and involve many phenomena, this report is limited to large, turbulent liquid-hydrocarbon pool fires. Large, liquid-hydrocarbon pool fires present a risk in petrochemical storage and processing facilities and transportation systems that contain large amounts of liquid hydrocarbons. This report describes observations, speculations, and numerical simulations of vortical structures in pool fires. Vortical structures are observed in fires with length scales ranging from those that bend millimeter-thick flame zones to those that entrain air many meters from the edge of the fire to its centerline. The authors propose that baroclinic vorticity generation is primarily responsible for production of rotational motion at small scale and that amalgamation is responsible for the production of large-scale rotational structures from the myriad of small-scale structures. Numerical simulations show that vortical structures having time-mean definitions can be resolved with a Reynolds-Average Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach. However, for vortical structures without time-mean definition, RANS is inappropriate, and another technique, such as Large Eddy Simulation (LES), should be employed. 39 refs., 52 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Reproducing the energy-dependent structure of Earth's electron radiation belts during quiet times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoll, J. F.; Reeves, G. D.; Santolik, O.; Cunningham, G.; Loridan, V.; Denton, M.; Kurth, W. S.; Turner, D. L.; Kletzing, C.; Henderson, M. G.; Ukhorskiy, S.

    2016-12-01

    We present and discuss dynamic simulations of energy-dependent losses in the radiation belt "slot region" and the formation of the two-belt structure for the quiet days after the 1 March storm. The simulations combine radial diffusion with a realistic scattering model, based data-driven spatially and temporally resolved whistler-mode hiss wave observations from the Van Allen Probes satellites. We will describe how the latter is generated from massively parallel computations of pitch angle diffusion at a scale never achieved in the past. The simulations reproduce Van Allen Probes observations for all energies and L shells (2-6) including (a) the strong energy dependence to the radiation belt dynamics (b) an energy-dependent outer boundary to the inner zone that extends to higher L shells at lower energies and (c) an "S-shaped" energy-dependent inner boundary to the outer zone that results from the competition between diffusive radial transport and losses. We find that the characteristic energy-dependent structure of the radiation belts and slot region is dynamic and can be formed gradually in 15 days, although the "S shape" can also be reproduced by assuming equilibrium conditions. But we will show that equilibrium states are usually not reachable as it requires very long times for most energy electrons and L-shells. The highest-energy electrons (E>300 keV) of the inner region of the outer belt (L 4-5) also constantly decay, demonstrating that hiss wave scattering affects the outer belt during times of extended plasmasphere. Through these simulations, we explain the full structure in energy and L shell of the belts and the slot formation by hiss scattering during storm recovery. We show the power and complexity of looking dynamically at the effects over all energies and L shells and the need for using data-driven and event-specific conditions.

  11. HIL Simulation of Power Electronics and Electric Drives for Automotive Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Puschmann

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Hardware-in-the-loop simulation is today a standard method for testing electronic equipment in the automotive industry. Since electric drives and power electronic devices are more and more important in automotive applications, these kinds of systems have to be integrated into the hardware-in-the-loop simulation. Power converters and electric drives are used in many different applications in vehicles today (hybrid electric or electric powertrain, electric steering systems, DC-DC converters, etc.. The wide range of applications, topologies, and power levels results in various different approaches and solutions for hardware-in-the-loop testing. This paper gives an overview of hardware-in-the-loop simulation of power electronics and electric drives in the automotive industry. The currently available technologies are described and future challenges are outlined.

  12. High performance computing in structural determination by electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, J J

    2008-10-01

    Computational advances have significantly contributed to the current role of electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) in structural biology. The needs for computational power are constantly growing with the increasing complexity of algorithms and the amount of data needed to push the resolution limits. High performance computing (HPC) is becoming paramount in cryoEM to cope with those computational needs. Since the nineties, different HPC strategies have been proposed for some specific problems in cryoEM and, in fact, some of them are already available in common software packages. Nevertheless, the literature is scattered in the areas of computer science and structural biology. In this communication, the HPC approaches devised for the computation-intensive tasks in cryoEM (single particles and tomography) are retrospectively reviewed and the future trends are discussed. Moreover, the HPC capabilities available in the most common cryoEM packages are surveyed, as an evidence of the importance of HPC in addressing the future challenges.

  13. Electronic structure and physicochemical properties of selected penicillins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Correa, Catalina; Ruiz, Juan F. Sánchez; Raya, A.; Esquivel, Rodolfo O.

    Traditionally, penicillins have been used as antibacterial agents due to their characteristics and widespread applications with few collateral effects, which have motivated several theoretical and experimental studies. Despite the latter, their mechanism of biological action has not been completely elucidated. We present a theoretical study at the Hartree-Fock and density functional theory (DFT) levels of theory of a selected group of penicillins such as the penicillin-G, amoxicillin, ampicillin, dicloxacillin, and carbenicillin molecules, to systematically determine the electron structure of full ?-lactam antibiotics. Our results allow us to analyze the electronic properties of the pharmacophore group, the aminoacyl side-chain, and the influence of the substituents (R and X) attached to the aminoacyl side-chain at 6? (in contrast with previous studies focused at the 3? substituents), and to corroborate the results of previous studies performed at the semiempirical level, solely on the ?-lactam ring of penicillins. Besides, several density descriptors are determined with the purpose of analyzing their link to the antibacterial activity of these penicillin compounds. Our results for the atomic charges (fitted to the electrostatic potential), the bond orders, and several global reactivity descriptors, such as the dipole moments, ionization potential, hardness, and the electrophilicity index, led us to characterize: the active sites, the effect of the electron-attracting substituent properties and their physicochemical features, which altogether, might be important to understand the biological activity of these type of molecules.

  14. Electronic Structure and Spectroscopy of HBr and HBr^+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Gabriel J.; Liebermann, H. P.; Lefebvre-Brion, H.

    2016-06-01

    We report preliminary ab initio electronic structure calculations of HBr and HBr^+. The computations were carried out employing the MRD-CI package, with a basis set of cc-pVQZ quality augmented with s--, p-- and d--type diffuse functions. In a first series of calculations, without inclusion of spin--orbit splitting, potential energy curves of about 20 doublet and quartet electronic states of HBr^+, and about 30 singlet and triplet (valence and Rydberg) states of HBr were computed. This exploratory step provides a perspective of the character, shape, leading configurations, energetics, and asymptotic behaviour of the electronic states. The calculations taking into account spin-orbit are currently being performed. Our study focuses mainly on the Rydberg states and their interactions with the repulsive valence states and with the bound valence ion-pair state. In particular, the current calculations seek to provide information that might be relevant to the interpretation of recent REMPI measurements which involve the interaction between the diabatic E^1Σ^+ Rydberg state and the diabatic V^1Σ^+ ion--pair state (which together constitute the adiabatic, double-well, B^1Σ^+ state). Several new states of both HBr and HBr^+ are reported. D. Zaouris, A. Kartakoullis, P. Glodic, P. C. Samartzis, H. R. Hródmarsson, Á. Kvaran, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 17, 10468 (2015)

  15. Numerical Simulation of Wave Interaction with Moving Net Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Hao; Christensen, Erik Damgaard

    2015-01-01

    was described as a sheet of porous media with prescribed rigid body motion and mesh motion was incorporated to conform the motion of the net. Free surface wave generation and absorption framework was also introduced to simulate wave interaction with moving net structures. The results showed that mesh motion...

  16. Building insightful simulation models using Petri Nets - A structured approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, D.J.

    Petri Nets have essential strengths in capturing a system's static structure and dynamics, its mathematical underpinning, and providing a graphical representation. However, visual simulation models of realistic systems based on Petri Nets are often perceived as too large and too complex to be easily

  17. Simulations of full multivariate Tweedie with flexible dependence structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuenin, Johann; Jørgensen, Bent; Kokonendji, Célestin C.

    2016-01-01

    The paper introduces a variables-in-common method for constructing and simulating multivariate Tweedie distribution, based on linear combinations of independent univariate Tweedie variables. The method is facilitated by the convolution and scaling properties of the Tweedie distributions, using th....... The method allows simulation of multivariate distributions from many known, including the Gaussian, Poisson, non-central gamma, gamma and inverse Gaussian distributions.......The paper introduces a variables-in-common method for constructing and simulating multivariate Tweedie distribution, based on linear combinations of independent univariate Tweedie variables. The method is facilitated by the convolution and scaling properties of the Tweedie distributions, using...... the cumulant generating function for characterization of the distribution and correlation structure. The method can handle both negative and positive correlations, and allows simulation of Tweedie random vectors with given values of the mean vector and dispersion matrix, similar to the Gaussian case...

  18. Electron-cloud simulation and theory for high-current heavy-ion beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Cohen

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Stray electrons can arise in positive-ion accelerators for heavy-ion fusion or other applications as a result of ionization of ambient gas or gas released from walls due to halo-ion impact, or as a result of secondary-electron emission. We summarize the distinguishing features of electron-cloud issues in heavy-ion-fusion accelerators and a plan for developing a self-consistent simulation capability for heavy-ion beams and electron clouds (also applicable to other accelerators. We also present results from several ingredients in this capability. (1 We calculate the electron cloud produced by electron desorption from computed beam-ion loss, which illustrates the importance of retaining ion reflection at the walls. (2 We simulate the effect of specified electron-cloud distributions on ion beam dynamics. We consider here electron distributions with axially varying density, centroid location, or radial shape, and examine both random and sinusoidally varying perturbations. We find that amplitude variations are most effective in spoiling ion beam quality, though for sinusoidal variations which match the natural ion beam centroid oscillation or breathing-mode frequencies, the centroid and shape perturbations can also have significant impact. We identify an instability associated with a resonance between the beam-envelope “breathing” mode and the electron perturbation. We estimate its growth rate, which is moderate (compared to the reciprocal of a typical pulse duration. One conclusion from this study is that heavy-ion beams are surprisingly robust to electron clouds, compared to a priori expectations. (3 We report first results from a long-time-step algorithm for electron dynamics, which holds promise for efficient simultaneous solution of electron and ion dynamics.

  19. Electronic structure imperfections and chemical bonding at graphene interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Brian Joseph

    nanomaterial with lateral dimensions in the hundreds of microns if not larger, with a corresponding atomic vertical thickness poses significant difficulties. Graphene's unique structure is dominated by surface area or potentially hybridized interfaces; consequently, the true realization of this remarkable nanomaterial in device constructs relies on engineering graphene interfaces at the surface in order to controllably mold the electronic structure. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and the transmission mode analogue scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) are particularly useful tools to study the unoccupied states of graphene and graphene interfaces. In addition, polarized NEXAFS and STXM studies provide information on surface orientation, bond sterics, and the extent of substrate alignment before and after interfacial hybridization. The work presented in this dissertation is fundamentally informed by NEXAFS and STXM measurements on graphene/metal, graphene/dielectric, and graphene/organic interfaces. We start with a general review of the electronic structure of freestanding graphene and graphene interfaces in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2, we investigate freestanding single-layer graphene via STXM and NEXAFS demonstrating that electronic structure heterogeneities from synthesis and processing are ubiquitous in 2-dimensional graphene. We show the mapping of discrete charge transfer regions as a result of doped impurities that decorate the surfaces of graphene and that transfer processing imparts local electronic corrugations or ripples. In corroboration with density functional theory, definitive assignments to the spectral features, global steric orientations of the localized domains, and quantitative charge transfer schemes are evidenced. In the following chapters, we deliberately (Chapter 3) incorporate substitutional nitrogen into reduced graphene oxide to induce C--N charge redistribution and improve global conductivity, (Chapter 4

  20. Structural properties of thiophenes investigated with simulations of a coarse-grained model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luettmer-Strathmann, Jutta; Almutairi, Amani

    Thiophenes have important applications in organic electronics, energy conversion, and storage. The interfacial layer of an organic semiconductor in contact with a metal electrode has important effects on the performance of thin-film devices. However, the structure of this layer is not easy to model. In recent work, we developed a coarse-grained model for alpha-oligothiophenes in the bulk and near gold surfaces. We describe the molecules as linear chains of bonded, discotic particles with Gay-Berne potential interactions between non-bonded ellipsoids. In this work, we investigate structural properties of thiophenes with simulations of our coarse-grained model.