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Sample records for simulated concrete environment

  1. Alkali-resistant glass fiber reinforced high strength concrete in simulated aggressive environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, W.H.; Cheah, C.B.; Ramli, M.; Chang, K.Y.

    2018-01-01

    The durability of the alkali-resistant (AR) glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) in three simulated aggresive environments, namely tropical climate, cyclic air and seawater and seawater immersion was investigated. Durability examinations include chloride diffusion, gas permeability, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy examination (SEM). The fiber content is in the range of 0.6 % to 2.4 %. Results reveal that the specimen containing highest AR glass fiber content suffered severe strength loss in seawater environment and relatively milder strength loss under cyclic conditions. The permeability property was found to be more inferior with the increase in the fiber content of the concrete. This suggests that the AR glass fiber is not suitable for use as the fiber reinforcement in concrete is exposed to seawater. However, in both the tropical climate and cyclic wetting and drying, the incorporation of AR glass fiber prevents a drastic increase in permeability. [es

  2. The efficiency of a corrosion inhibitor on steel in a simulated concrete environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gartner, Nina; Kosec, Tadeja, E-mail: tadeja.kosec@zag.si; Legat, Andraž

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present work was to characterize the efficiency of a corrosion inhibitor on steel in a simulated concrete pore solution. Laboratory measurements were performed at various chloride and inhibitor concentrations in order to simulate different applications of the inhibitor when used for the protection or rehabilitation of steel reinforcement in concrete. Two electrochemical techniques, i.e. potentiodynamic polarization scans and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, were used for this study. The exposed surfaces of the steel specimens were subsequently investigated by Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the inhibitor can efficiently retard the corrosion of steel in a simulated concrete pore solution at concentrations of the inhibitor >2.0% and of chlorides <0.3% at a pH 10.5. On the other hand, when these conditions are not fulfilled, localized corrosion was observed. The results of the Raman and SEM/EDS analysis showed various morphologies of corrosion products and different types of corrosion attack depending on the pH of the pore solution, and the applied concentrations of the chlorides and the inhibitor. - Highlights: • Electrochemical studies performed at various Cl{sup −} and inhibitor concentrations. • Exposed steel surfaces investigated by Raman spectroscopy and SEM. • Cl{sup −}/inhibitor ratio is important parameter for the inhibitor's efficiency. • The corrosion can re-occur if the concentration of the inhibitor is reduced. • Different corrosion behaviour and oxides in the presence of inhibitor and/or Cl{sup −}.

  3. Bond-Slip Behavior of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer Bar in Concrete Subjected to Simulated Marine Environment: Effects of BFRP Bar Size, Corrosion Age, and Concrete Strength

    OpenAIRE

    Yongmin Yang; Zhaoheng Li; Tongsheng Zhang; Jiangxiong Wei; Qijun Yu

    2017-01-01

    Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer (BFRP) bars have bright potential application in concrete structures subjected to marine environment due to their superior corrosion resistance. Available literatures mainly focused on the mechanical properties of BFRP concrete structures, while the bond-slip behavior of BFRP bars, which is a key factor influencing the safety and service life of ocean concrete structures, has not been clarified yet. In this paper, effects of BFRP bars size, corrosion age, and c...

  4. Bond-Slip Behavior of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer Bar in Concrete Subjected to Simulated Marine Environment: Effects of BFRP Bar Size, Corrosion Age, and Concrete Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongmin Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer (BFRP bars have bright potential application in concrete structures subjected to marine environment due to their superior corrosion resistance. Available literatures mainly focused on the mechanical properties of BFRP concrete structures, while the bond-slip behavior of BFRP bars, which is a key factor influencing the safety and service life of ocean concrete structures, has not been clarified yet. In this paper, effects of BFRP bars size, corrosion age, and concrete strength on the bond-slip behavior of BFRP bars in concrete cured in artificial seawater were investigated, and then an improved Bertero, Popov, and Eligehausen (BPE model was employed to describe the bond-slip behavior of BFRP bars in concrete. The results indicated that the maximum bond stress and corresponding slip decreased gradually with the increase of corrosion age and size of BFRP bars, and ultimate slip also decreased sharply. The ascending segment of bond-slip curve tends to be more rigid and the descending segment tends to be softer after corrosion. A horizontal end in bond-slip curve indicates that the friction between BFRP bars and concrete decreased sharply.

  5. TEXTILE TECHNOLOGIES IN CONCRETE ENVIRONMENTS."

    OpenAIRE

    Morrow, Ruth; Belford, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Girli Concrete is a cross disciplinary funded research project based in the University of Ulster involving a textile designer/ researcher, an architect/ academic and a concrete manufacturing firm.Girli Concrete brings together concrete and textile technologies, testing ideas ofconcrete as textile and textile as structure. It challenges the perception of textiles as only the ‘dressing’ to structure and instead integrates textile technologies into the products of building products. Girli Concre...

  6. Contributions to reinforced concrete structures numerical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badel, P.B.

    2001-07-01

    In order to be able to carry out simulations of reinforced concrete structures, it is necessary to know two aspects: the behaviour laws have to reflect the complex behaviour of concrete and a numerical environment has to be developed in order to avoid to the user difficulties due to the softening nature of the behaviour. This work deals with these two subjects. After an accurate estimation of two behaviour models (micro-plan and mesoscopic models), two damage models (the first one using a scalar variable, the other one a tensorial damage of the 2 order) are proposed. These two models belong to the framework of generalized standard materials, which renders their numerical integration easy and efficient. A method of load control is developed in order to make easier the convergence of the calculations. At last, simulations of industrial structures illustrate the efficiency of the method. (O.M.)

  7. Concrete under severe conditions. Environment and loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the CONSEC Conferences is to focus on concrete infrastructures, either subjected to severe environment or severe loading, or any combination of severe conditions. Experience from the performance of existing concrete structures, and especially under severe environmental conditions, severe accidental loading or extended lifespan, has demonstrated the need for better integration of structural and durability design, new design concepts including reliability-based durability design, performance-based material requirements, structural robustness, and an improved basis for documentation of obtained construction quality and durability properties during concrete construction. An improved basis for operation and preventive maintenance of concrete structures including repairs and retrofitting is also very important. Premature corrosion of reinforcing steel, inadequate structural design for seismic or blast loading, are examples of reduced service life of concrete structures that not only represent technical and economical problems, but also a huge waste of natural resources and hence also, an environmental and ecological problem. Experience of structures effectively submitted to severe conditions represents a unique benchmark for quantifying the actual safety and durability margin of concrete structures. In fact for several reasons, most concrete design codes, job specifications and other requirements for concrete structures have frequently shown to yield insufficient and unsatisfactory results and ability to solve the above problems, as well as issues raised by specific very long-term or very severe requirements for nuclear and industrial waste management, or civil works of strategic relevance. Recently available high to ultra-high performance concrete may find rational and valuable application in such cases. It is very important, therefore, to bring people with different professional backgrounds together to exchange experience and develop multi

  8. Mechanical properties of recycled concrete in marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianxiu; Huang, Tianrong; Liu, Xiaotian; Wu, Pengcheng; Guo, Zhiying

    2013-01-01

    Experimental work was carried out to develop information about mechanical properties of recycled concrete (RC) in marine environment. By using the seawater and dry-wet circulation to simulate the marine environment, specimens of RC were tested with different replacement percentages of 0%, 30%, and 60% after immersing in seawater for 4, 8, 12, and 16 months, respectively. Based on the analysis of the stress-strain curves (SSCs) and compressive strength, it is revealed that RC' peak value and elastic modulus decreased with the increase of replacement percentage and corroding time in marine environment. And the failure of recycled concrete was speeded up with more obvious cracks and larger angles of 65° to 85° in the surface when compared with normal concrete. Finally, the grey model (GM) with equal time intervals was constructed to investigate the law of compressive strength of recycled concrete in marine environment, and it is found that the GM is accurate and feasible for the prediction of RC compressive strength in marine environment.

  9. Computer simulation for sodium-concrete reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Bin; Zhu Jizhou

    2006-01-01

    In the liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs), direct contacts between sodium and concrete is unavoidable. Due to sodium's high chemical reactivity, sodium would react with concrete violently. Lots of hydrogen gas and heat would be released then. This would harm the ignorantly of the containment. This paper developed a program to simualte sodium-conrete reactions across-the-board. It could give the reaction zone temperature, pool temperature, penetration depth, penetration rate, hydrogen flux and reaction heat and so on. Concrete was considered to be composed of silica and water only in this paper. The variable, the quitient of sodium hydroxide, was introduced in the continuity equation to simulate the chemical reactions more realistically. The product of the net gas flux and boundary depth was ably transformed to that of penetration rate and boundary depth. The complex chemical kinetics equations was simplified under some hypothesises. All the technique applied above simplified the computer simulation consumedly. In other words, they made the computer simulation feasible. Theoretics models that applied in the program and the calculation procedure were expatiated in detail. Good agreements of an overall transient behavior were obtained in the series of sodium-concrete reaction experiment analysis. The comparison between the analytical and experimental results showed the program presented in this paper was creditable and reasonable for simulating the sodium-concrete reactions. This program could be used for nuclear safety judgement. (authors)

  10. Prediction of the Service Life of a Reinforced Concrete Column under Chloride Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad K. Alkam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, service life of a reinforced concrete column exposed to chloride environment has been predicted. This study has been based on numerical simulation of chloride ion diffusion in a concrete column during its anticipated life span. The simulation process has included the concrete cover replacement whenever chloride ion concentration has reached the critical threshold value at the reinforcement surface. Repair scheduling of the concrete column under consideration has been discussed. Effects of the concrete cover thickness and the water cement ratio on the service life of the concrete column at hand have been presented. A new approach for arranging locations of reinforcement steel bars has been introduced. This approach is intended to prolong the service life of the concrete column under consideration against chloride induced corrosion.

  11. BISEN: Biochemical simulation environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanlier, J.; Wu, F.; Qi, F.; Vinnakota, K.C.; Han, Y.; Dash, R.K.; Yang, F.; Beard, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    The Biochemical Simulation Environment (BISEN) is a suite of tools for generating equations and associated computer programs for simulating biochemical systems in the MATLAB® computing environment. This is the first package that can generate appropriate systems of differential equations for

  12. Thermal Insulating Concrete Wall Panel Design for Sustainable Built Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ao; Wong, Kwun-Wah

    2014-01-01

    Air-conditioning system plays a significant role in providing users a thermally comfortable indoor environment, which is a necessity in modern buildings. In order to save the vast energy consumed by air-conditioning system, the building envelopes in envelope-load dominated buildings should be well designed such that the unwanted heat gain and loss with environment can be minimized. In this paper, a new design of concrete wall panel that enhances thermal insulation of buildings by adding a gypsum layer inside concrete is presented. Experiments have been conducted for monitoring the temperature variation in both proposed sandwich wall panel and conventional concrete wall panel under a heat radiation source. For further understanding the thermal effect of such sandwich wall panel design from building scale, two three-story building models adopting different wall panel designs are constructed for evaluating the temperature distribution of entire buildings using finite element method. Both the experimental and simulation results have shown that the gypsum layer improves the thermal insulation performance by retarding the heat transfer across the building envelopes. PMID:25177718

  13. Influence of Concrete Properties on Molten Core-Concrete Interaction: A Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-yang Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a severe nuclear power plant accident, the molten core can be released into the reactor pit and interact with sacrificial concrete. In this paper, a simulation study is presented that aims to address the influence of sacrificial concrete properties on molten core-concrete interaction (MCCI. In particular, based on the MELCOR Code, the ferrosiliceous concrete used in European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR is taken into account with respect to the different ablation enthalpy and Fe2O3 and H2O contents. Results indicate that the concrete ablation rate as well as the hydrogen generation rate depends much on the concrete ablation enthalpy and Fe2O3 and H2O contents. In practice, the ablation enthalpy of sacrificial concrete is the higher the better, while the Fe2O3 and H2O content of sacrificial concrete is the lower the better.

  14. Durability of precast prestressed concrete piles in marine environment, part 2. Volume 1 : concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    The overall purpose of this research was to determine methods which may be applied : economically to mitigate corrosion of reinforcement in precast prestressed concrete piles in : Georgias marine environments. The research was divided into two par...

  15. Temperature Response in Hardened Concrete Subjected to Tropical Rainforest Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Egba

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to characterize concrete micro-environment temperature response to the natural climate of the tropical rainforest. The peculiar warmth, high humidity, and low pressure nature of the tropical rainforest necessitated the present study. Temperature probes were inserted into concrete specimens subjected to the sheltered and unsheltered environment to measure the micro-environment temperature of the concrete, and study the hysteresis characteristics in relation to the climate temperature. Some mathematical relationships for forecasting the internal temperature of concrete in the tropical rainforest environment were proposed and tested. The proposed relationships were found reliable. It was observed that the micro-environment temperature was lower at the crest, and higher at the trough than the climate environment temperature with a temperature difference of 1-3 oC. Also, temperature response in concrete for the unsheltered micro-environment was 1.85 times faster than the response in the sheltered micro-environment. The findings of the study may be used to assist the durability assessment of concrete.

  16. Concrete Plant Operations Optimization Using Combined Simulation and Genetic Algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, Ming; Lu, Ming; Zhang, Jian-Ping

    2004-01-01

    This work presents a new approach for concrete plant operations optimization by combining a ready mixed concrete (RMC) production simulation tool (called HKCONSIM) with a genetic algorithm (GA) based optimization procedure. A revamped HKCONSIM computer system can be used to automate the simulation

  17. Modelling and simulation of concrete leaching under outdoor exposure conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiopu, Nicoleta; Tiruta-Barna, Ligia; Jayr, Emmanuel; Mehu, Jacques; Moszkowicz, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Recently, a demand regarding the assessment of release of dangerous substances from construction products was raised by European Commission which has issued the Mandate M/366 addressed to CEN. This action is in relation with the Essential Requirement No. 3 'Hygiene, Health and Environment' of the Construction Products Directive (89/106/EC). The potential hazard for environment and health may arise in different life cycle stages of a construction product. During the service life stage, the release of substances due to contact with the rain water is the main potential hazard source, as a consequence of the leaching phenomenon. The objective of this paper is to present the development of a coupled chemical-transport model for the case of a concrete based construction product, i.e. concrete paving slabs, exposed to rain water under outdoor exposure conditions. The development of the model is based on an iterative process of comparing the experimental results with the simulated results up to an acceptable fit. The experiments were conducted at laboratory scale (equilibrium and dynamic leaching tests) and field scale. The product was exposed for one year in two types of leaching scenarios under outdoor conditions, 'runoff' and 'stagnation', and the element release was monitored. The model was calibrated using the experimental data obtained at laboratory scale and validated against measured field data, by taking into account the specific rain water balance and the atmospheric CO 2 uptake as input parameters. The numerical tool used in order to model and simulate the leaching behaviour was PHREEQC, coupled with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) thermodynamic data base. The simulation results are satisfying and the paper demonstrates the feasibility of the modelling approach for the leaching behaviour assessment of concrete type construction materials

  18. The Effect of Corrosive Environment on Geopolymer Concrete Tensile Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayuaji Ridho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study has the purpose to explore the potential of geopolymer concrete tensile strength in particular on the effects of corrosive environments. Geopolymer concrete, concrete technology used no OPC that has advantages, one of which is durability, especially for corrosive seawater environment. In addition, geopolymer concrete with polymerization mechanism does not require large energy consumption or an environmentally friendly concept. Geopolymer concrete in this study is using a type C fly ash from PT. International Power Mitsui Operation & Maintenence Indonesia (IPMOMI Paiton. The type of alkaline activator used NaOH (14 molar and Na2SiO3. Coarse and fine aggregate used are local aggregate. Geopolymer concrete molded test specimen with dimensions of (10 × 20 cm cylinder, further heating and without heating, then maintained at room temperature and seawater up to 28 days. Then to determine the mechanical properties, the tensile strength testing is done with reference. This result of study indicates the curing of geopolymer concrete at 60 ° C for 24 hours to raise the tensile strength of geopolymer concrete.

  19. A Concrete Framework for Environment Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biernacka, Malgorzata; Danvy, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    We materialize the common understanding that calculi with explicit substitutions provide an intermediate step between an abstract specification of substitution in the lambda-calculus and its concrete implementations. To this end, we go back to Curien’s original calculus of closures (an early...

  20. Electromagnetic Environments Simulator (EMES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varnado, G.B.

    1975-11-01

    A multipurpose electromagnetic environments simulator has been designed to provide a capability for performing EMR, EMP, and lightning near stroke testing of systems, subsystems and components in a single facility. This report describes the final facility design and presents the analytical and experimental verification of the design

  1. Alkali-resistant glass fiber reinforced high strength concrete in simulated aggressive environment; Hormigón de altas resistencia reforzado con fibras de vidrio resistentes a alcalis en ambientes agresivos simulados.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwan, W.H.; Cheah, C.B.; Ramli, M.; Chang, K.Y.

    2018-04-01

    The durability of the alkali-resistant (AR) glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) in three simulated aggresive environments, namely tropical climate, cyclic air and seawater and seawater immersion was investigated. Durability examinations include chloride diffusion, gas permeability, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy examination (SEM). The fiber content is in the range of 0.6 % to 2.4 %. Results reveal that the specimen containing highest AR glass fiber content suffered severe strength loss in seawater environment and relatively milder strength loss under cyclic conditions. The permeability property was found to be more inferior with the increase in the fiber content of the concrete. This suggests that the AR glass fiber is not suitable for use as the fiber reinforcement in concrete is exposed to seawater. However, in both the tropical climate and cyclic wetting and drying, the incorporation of AR glass fiber prevents a drastic increase in permeability. [Spanish] Este trabajo se centra en el estudio de la durabilidad de hormigón reforzado con fibra de vidrio resistente a álcalis (CRFVRA) en tres ambientes agresivos simulados como son, condiciones de clima tropical, ciclos de aire y agua de mar e inmersión marina. Los tests de durabilidad incluyeron la difusión de cloruros, permeabilidad de gas, difracción de rayos X (XRD) y evaluacion por microscopía electrónica de barrido (SEM). Los contenidos de fibra evaluados estuvieron en el rango desde 0.6% hasta 2.4%. Los resultados revelan que la muestra que contiene el mayor porcentaje de fibra sufre una severa pérdida de resistencia en condiciones de agua de mar, y una menor disminución de resistencia bajo condiciones cíclicas. Su permeabilidad disminuyó al incrementar el contenido de fibras en el hormigón. Lo anterior sugiere que el refuerzo con fibra resistente a alcalinos no es adecuado para su uso en hormigón en ambiente de agua de mar. Sin embargo, bajo condiciones de clima

  2. Compatibility of repair concretes in the aggressive environment of the South of Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parhizkar, T.; Ramezaniapour, A.A.; Hillemeier, B.; Ghasemi, A.M.R.; Mozafari, N.

    2006-01-01

    Deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, namely due to corrosion of reinforcement, in the south of Iran, on the coasts of the Gulf region has become a major problem in recent years. The high cost involved in repairing and strengthening of deteriorated concrete structures in this region makes it essential that the repair materials used are compatible enough to match the residual service life of the structure. This paper presents the engineering and compatibility-related properties of two repair concretes containing silica fume and styrene butadiene rubber latex (SBR) under simulated hot and humid conditions similar to the aggressive environment of the south of Iran. A normal cement-based repair concrete was used as control. Mechanical properties were assessed and the dimension stability of the repair concrete was also evaluated. The results of this investigation show that the concrete containing silica fume and the polymer-modified concrete are appropriate materials for repair in the severe environmental conditions of the Gulf region. (author)

  3. Bond slip model for the simulation of reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casanova, A.; Jason, L.; Davenne, L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a new finite element approach to model the steel-concrete bond effects. This model proposes to relate steel, represented by truss elements, with the surrounding concrete in the case where the two meshes are not necessary coincident. The theoretical formulation is described and the model is applied on a reinforced concrete tie. A characteristic stress distribution is observed, related to the transfer of bond forces from steel to concrete. The results of this simulation are compared with a computation in which a perfect relation between steel and concrete is supposed. It clearly shows how the introduction of the bond model can improve the description of the cracking process (finite number of cracks). (authors)

  4. CAPS Simulation Environment Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Douglas G.; Hoffman, James A.

    2005-01-01

    The final design for an effective Comet/Asteroid Protection System (CAPS) will likely come after a number of competing designs have been simulated and evaluated. Because of the large number of design parameters involved in a system capable of detecting an object, accurately determining its orbit, and diverting the impact threat, a comprehensive simulation environment will be an extremely valuable tool for the CAPS designers. A successful simulation/design tool will aid the user in identifying the critical parameters in the system and eventually allow for automatic optimization of the design once the relationships of the key parameters are understood. A CAPS configuration will consist of space-based detectors whose purpose is to scan the celestial sphere in search of objects likely to make a close approach to Earth and to determine with the greatest possible accuracy the orbits of those objects. Other components of a CAPS configuration may include systems for modifying the orbits of approaching objects, either for the purpose of preventing a collision or for positioning the object into an orbit where it can be studied or used as a mineral resource. The Synergistic Engineering Environment (SEE) is a space-systems design, evaluation, and visualization software tool being leveraged to simulate these aspects of the CAPS study. The long-term goal of the SEE is to provide capabilities to allow the user to build and compare various CAPS designs by running end-to-end simulations that encompass the scanning phase, the orbit determination phase, and the orbit modification phase of a given scenario. Herein, a brief description of the expected simulation phases is provided, the current status and available features of the SEE software system is reported, and examples are shown of how the system is used to build and evaluate a CAPS detection design. Conclusions and the roadmap for future development of the SEE are also presented.

  5. Mesoscale simulation of concrete spall failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knell, S.; Sauer, M.; Millon, O.; Riedel, W.

    2012-05-01

    Although intensively studied, it is still being debated which physical mechanisms are responsible for the increase of dynamic strength and fracture energy of concrete observed at high loading rates, and to what extent structural inertia forces on different scales contribute to the observation. We present a new approach for the three dimensional mesoscale modelling of dynamic damage and cracking in concrete. Concrete is approximated as a composite of spherical elastic aggregates of mm to cm size embedded in an elastic cement stone matrix. Cracking within the matrix and at aggregate interfaces in the μm range are modelled with adaptively inserted—initially rigid—cohesive interface elements. The model is applied to analyse the dynamic tensile failure observed in Hopkinson-Bar spallation experiments with strain rates up to 100/s. The influence of the key mesoscale failure parameters of strength, fracture energy and relative weakening of the ITZ on macromechanic strength, momentum and energy conservation is numerically investigated.

  6. Performance of concrete blended with pozzolanic materials in marine environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Asad-ur-Rehman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reinforced concretes structures located at or near the coast line needs to be repaired more frequently when compared to structures located elsewhere. This study is continuation of previous studies carried out at the Department of Civil Engineering, NED University of Engineering and Technology, Karachi, Pakistan to study the performance of concrete made up of cements blended by pozzolonic materials. Different pozzolanic materials (blast furnace slag, fly ash and silica fume were used in the study. Tests conducted during the study to compare the performance of samples cast from concrete of different mix designs were Compressive Strength Test (ASTM C 39, Flexural Strength Test (ASTM C 293, Rapid Migration Test (NT Build 492, Absorptivity of the oven-dried samples (ASTM C 642 and Half Cell Potential (ASTM C 876. Use of cements blended with pozzolanic materials, used during the study, proved to be effective in enhancing the performance of the concrete exposed to marine environment. Use of pozzolans in concrete not only provides a sustainable and feasible solution to the durability problems in coastal areas, it also helps in conservation of natural resources and reduction of pollution and energy leading to a green environment.

  7. Numerical simulation of impact tests on reinforced concrete beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Hua; Wang, Xiaowo; He, Shuanhai

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Predictions using advanced concrete model compare well with the impact test results. ► Several important behavior of concrete is discussed. ► Two mesh ways incorporating rebar into concrete mesh is also discussed. ► Gives a example of using EPDC model and references to develop new constitutive models. -- Abstract: This paper focuses on numerical simulation of impact tests of reinforced concrete (RC) beams by the LS-DYNA finite element (FE) code. In the FE model, the elasto-plastic damage cap (EPDC) model, which is based on continuum damage mechanics in combination with plasticity theory, is used for concrete, and the reinforcement is assumed to be elasto-plastic. The numerical results compares well with the experimental values reported in the literature, in terms of impact force history, mid-span deflection history and crack patterns of RC beams. By comparing the numerical and experimental results, several important behavior of concrete material is investigated, which includes: damage variable to describe the strain softening section of stress–strain curve; the cap surface to describe the plastic volume change; the shape of the meridian and deviatoric plane to describe the yield surface as well as two methods of incorporating rebar into concrete mesh. This study gives a good example of using EPDC model and can be utilized for the development new constitutive models for concrete in future.

  8. A Concrete Framework for Environment Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biernacka, Malgorzata; Danvy, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    calculus with explicit substitutions), we extend it minimally so that it can also express one-step reduction strategies, and we methodically derive a series of environment machines from the specification of two one-step reduction strategies for the lambda-calculus: normal order and applicative order....... The derivation extends Danvy and Nielsen’s refocusing-based construction of abstract machines with two new steps: one for coalescing two successive transitions into one, and the other for unfolding a closure into a term and an environment in the resulting abstract machine. The resulting environment machines...... include both the Krivine machine and the original version of Krivine’s machine, Felleisen et al.’s CEK machine, and Leroy’s Zinc abstract machine....

  9. Ultrasonic Measurement of Corrosion Depth Development in Concrete Exposed to Acidic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yingfang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion depth of concrete can reflect the damage state of the load-carrying capacity and durability of the concrete structures servicing in severe environment. Ultrasonic technology was studied to evaluate the corrosion depth quantitatively. Three acidic environments with the pH level of 3.5, 2.5, and 1.5 were simulated by the mixture of sulfate and nitric acid solutions in the laboratory. 354 prism specimens with the dimension of 150 mm × 150 mm × 300 mm were prepared. The prepared specimens were first immersed in the acidic mixture for certain periods, followed by physical, mechanical, computerized tomography (CT and ultrasonic test. Damage depths of the concrete specimen under different corrosion states were obtained from both CT and ultrasonic test. Based on the ultrasonic test, a bilinear regression model is proposed to estimate the corrosion depth. It is shown that the results achieved by ultrasonic and CT test are in good agreement with each other. Relation between the corrosion depth of concrete specimen and the mechanical indices such as mass loss, compressive strength, and elastic modulus is discussed in detail. It can be drawn that the ultrasonic test is a reliable nondestructive way to measure the damage depth of concrete exposed to acidic environment.

  10. Corrosion products of reinforcement in concrete in marine and industrial environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera, R.; Villarroel, M.; Carvajal, A.M.; Vera, E.; Ortiz, C.

    2009-01-01

    The corrosion products formed on embedded steel in concrete under simulated marine and industrial conditions and natural marine environment were studied. A 0.50 water/cement ratio concrete was used and 3.5% NaCl and 180 g L -1 of H 2 SO 4 with 70 ppm of chloride ions solutions were used to simulate the synthetic medium. The initial electrochemical variables of the steel and pH, chlorides and sulfates profiles were measured according to the concrete depth. The morphology of the corrosive attack was determined via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the composition of the corrosion products was determined using an X-ray analyzer and an X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The protective power of the corrosion products was evaluated through anodic polarization curves in a saturated Ca(OH) 2 solution. The results from XRD and SEM show that all the resulting corrosion products correspond to lepidocrocite, goethite and magnetite mixtures; moreover, akaganeite was also identified under natural and simulated marine environments. Siderite was only detected in samples exposed to a natural marine environment. Concerning the protective nature of the corrosion products, these show lower performance in a simulated industrial environment, where the corrosion rate of the steel is up to 1.48 μm year -1

  11. Corrosion products of reinforcement in concrete in marine and industrial environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vera, R. [Instituto de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Avenida Brasil 2950, Casilla 4059, Valparaiso (Chile)], E-mail: rvera@ucv.cl; Villarroel, M. [Instituto de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Avenida Brasil 2950, Casilla 4059, Valparaiso (Chile); Carvajal, A.M. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Escuela de Construccion Civil, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Av. Vicuna Mackenna 4860, Macul, Santiago (Chile); Vera, E.; Ortiz, C. [Universidad Pedagogica y Tecnologica de Colombia, Avenida Central Norte, Km 2, Tunja (Colombia)

    2009-03-15

    The corrosion products formed on embedded steel in concrete under simulated marine and industrial conditions and natural marine environment were studied. A 0.50 water/cement ratio concrete was used and 3.5% NaCl and 180 g L{sup -1} of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} with 70 ppm of chloride ions solutions were used to simulate the synthetic medium. The initial electrochemical variables of the steel and pH, chlorides and sulfates profiles were measured according to the concrete depth. The morphology of the corrosive attack was determined via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the composition of the corrosion products was determined using an X-ray analyzer and an X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The protective power of the corrosion products was evaluated through anodic polarization curves in a saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solution. The results from XRD and SEM show that all the resulting corrosion products correspond to lepidocrocite, goethite and magnetite mixtures; moreover, akaganeite was also identified under natural and simulated marine environments. Siderite was only detected in samples exposed to a natural marine environment. Concerning the protective nature of the corrosion products, these show lower performance in a simulated industrial environment, where the corrosion rate of the steel is up to 1.48 {mu}m year{sup -1}.

  12. Simulating distributed reinforcement effects in concrete analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchertas, A.H.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of the bond slip is brought into the TEMP-STRESS finite element code by relaxing the equal strain condition between concrete and reinforcement. This is done for the elements adjacent to the element which is cracked. A parabolic differential strain variation is assumed along the reinforcement from the crack, which is taken to be at the centroid of the cracked element, to the point where perfect bonding exists. This strain relationship is used to increase the strain of the reinforcement in the as yet uncracked elements located adjacent to a crack. By the same token the corresponding concrete strain is decreased. This estimate is made assuming preservation of strain energy in the element. The effectiveness of the model is shown by examples. Comparison of analytical results is made with structural test data. The influence of the bonding model on cracking is portrayed pictorially. 5 refs., 6 figs

  13. Experimental Study on Bond Behavior of FRP-Concrete Interface in Hygrothermal Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As the technique of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP composite material strengthened reinforced concrete structures is widely used in the field of civil engineering, durability of the strengthened structures has attracted more attention in recent years. Hygrothermal environment has an adverse effect on the bond behavior of the interface between FRP and concrete. This paper focuses on the bond durability of carbon fiber laminate- (CFL- concrete interface in hygrothermal condition which simulates the climate characteristic in South China. Twenty 100 mm × 100 mm × 720 mm specimens were divided into 6 groups based on different temperature and humidity. After pretreatment in hygrothermal environment, the specimens were tested using double shear method. Strain gauges bonded along the CFL surface and linear variation displacement transducers (LVDTs were used to measure longitudinal strains and slip of the interface. Failure mode, ultimate capacity, load-deflection relationship, and relative slip were analyzed. The bond behavior of FRP-concrete interface under hygrothermal environment was studied. Results show that the ultimate bearing capacity of the interface reduced after exposure to hygrothermal environments. The decreasing ranges were up to 27.9% after exposure at high temperature and humidity (60°C, 95% RH. The maximum strains (εmax of the specimens pretreated decreased obviously which indicated decay of the bond behavior after exposure to the hygrothermal environment.

  14. Fundamental experiment on simulated molten core/concrete interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, S.; Katsumura, Y.

    1994-01-01

    If a complete and prolonged failure of coolant flow were to occur in a LWR or FBR, fission product decay heat would cause the fuel to overheat. If no available action to cool the fuel were taken, it would eventually melt. Ibis could lead to slumping of the molten core material and to the failure of the reactor pressure vessel and deposition of these materials into the concrete reactor cavity. Consequently, the molten core could melt and decompose the concrete. Vigorous agitation of the molten core pool by concrete decomposition gases is expected to enhance the convective heat transfer process. Besides the decomposition gases, melting concrete (slag) generated under the molten core pool will be buoyed up, and will also affect the downward heat transfer. Though, in this way, the heat transfer process across the interface is complicated by the slag and the gases evolved from the decomposed concrete, it is very important to make its process clear for the safety evaluation of nuclear reactors. Therefore, in this study, fundamental experiments were performed using simulated materials to observe the behaviors of the hot pool, slag and gases at the interface. Moreover, from the experimental observation, a correlation without empirical constants was proposed to calculate the interface heat transfer. The heat transfer across the interface would depend on thermo-physical interactions between the pool, slag and concrete which are changed by their thermal properties and interface temperature and so on. For example, the molten concrete is miscible in molten oxidic core debris, but is immiscible in metallic core debris. If a contact temperature between the molten core pool and the concrete falls below the solidus of the pool, solidification of the pool will occur. In this study, the case of immiscible slag in the pool is treated and solidification of the pool does not occur. Thus, water, paraffin and air were selected as the simulated molten core pool, concrete, and decomposition

  15. Steel-concrete bond model for the simulation of reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mang, Chetra

    2015-01-01

    Reinforced concrete structure behavior can be extremely complex in the case of exceeding the cracking threshold. The composite characteristics of reinforced concrete structure should be finely presented especially in the distribution stress zone between steel-concrete at their interface. In order to compute the industrial structures, a perfect relation hypothesis between steel and concrete is supposed in which the complex phenomenon of the two-material relation is not taken into account. On the other hand, this perfect relation is unable to predict the significant disorders, the repartition, and the distribution of the cracks, which is directly linked to the steel. In literature, several numerical methods are proposed in order to finely study the concrete-steel bond behavior, but these methods give many difficulties in computing complex structures in 3D. With the results obtained in the thesis framework of Torre-Casanova (2012), the new concrete-steel bond model has been developed to improve performances (iteration numbers and computational time) and the representation (cyclic behavior) of the initial one. The new model has been verified with analytical solution of steel-concrete tie and validated with the experimental results. The new model is equally tested with the structural scale to compute the shear wall behavior in the French national project (CEOS.fr) under monotonic load. Because of the numerical difficulty in post-processing the crack opening in the complex crack formation, a new crack opening method is also developed. This method consists of using the discontinuity of relative displacement to detect the crack position or using the slip sign change between concrete-steel. The simulation-experiment comparison gives validation of not only the new concrete-steel bond model but also the new crack post-processing method. Finally, the cyclic behavior of the bond law with the non-reduced envelope is adopted and integrated in the new bond model in order to take

  16. A dissolution-precipitation mechanism is at the origin of concrete creep in moist environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pignatelli, Isabella [Laboratory for the Chemistry of Construction Materials (LC2), Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Kumar, Aditya [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States); Alizadeh, Rouhollah [Giatec Scientific, Ottawa, Ontario K2H 9C4 (Canada); Le Pape, Yann [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Bauchy, Mathieu, E-mail: bauchy@ucla.edu, E-mail: gsant@ucla.edu [Physics of AmoRphous and Inorganic Solids Laboratory (PARISlab), Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Sant, Gaurav, E-mail: bauchy@ucla.edu, E-mail: gsant@ucla.edu [Laboratory for the Chemistry of Construction Materials (LC2), Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California Nanosystems Institute (CNSI), University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2016-08-07

    Long-term creep (i.e., deformation under sustained load) is a significant material response that needs to be accounted for in concrete structural design. However, the nature and origin of concrete creep remain poorly understood and controversial. Here, we propose that concrete creep at relative humidity ≥ 50%, but fixed moisture content (i.e., basic creep), arises from a dissolution-precipitation mechanism, active at nanoscale grain contacts, as has been extensively observed in a geological context, e.g., when rocks are exposed to sustained loads, in liquid-bearing environments. Based on micro-indentation and vertical scanning interferometry data and molecular dynamics simulations carried out on calcium–silicate–hydrate (C–S–H), the major binding phase in concrete, of different compositions, we show that creep rates are correlated with dissolution rates—an observation which suggests a dissolution-precipitation mechanism as being at the origin of concrete creep. C–S–H compositions featuring high resistance to dissolution, and, hence, creep are identified. Analyses of the atomic networks of such C–S–H compositions using topological constraint theory indicate that these compositions present limited relaxation modes on account of their optimally connected (i.e., constrained) atomic networks.

  17. Durability of precast prestressed concrete piles in marine environment : reinforcement corrosion and mitigation - Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Research conducted in Part 1 has verified that precast prestressed concrete piles in : Georgias marine environment are deteriorating. The concrete is subjected to sulfate and : biological attack and the prestressed and nonprestressed reinforcement...

  18. Simulation of the behavior of pressurized underwater concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Mohamed Heniegal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Under-Water Concrete (UWC contains Anti-Washout Admixtures (AWA (0.0%, 0.2%, 0.3%, 0.4% and 0.5% by weight of cement with cement contents (400, 450, 500 and 550 kg/m3. All concrete mix contains silica fume and high-range water reducing (15% and 4% respectively by weight of cement. The fine to steel slag coarse aggregate was 1:1. The concrete mix was tested for slump, slump flow, compressive strength and washout resistance using two test methods based on different principles. The first method is the plunge test CRDC61 which is widely used in North America, and the second method is the pressurized air tube which has been manufactured for this research and developed to simulate the effect of water pressure on washout resistance of underwater mix. The results of compressive strength test were compared to concrete cast underwater with that cast in air. Test results indicated that the use of an AWA facilitates the production of UWC mix with the added benefit of lower washout resistance. New technique of simulating pressurized UWC is reliable for detecting UWC properties. Adding AWA (0.3–0.5% by weight of cement makes all mix acceptable according to Japanese Society of Civil Engineers.

  19. Instructional environments for simulations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berkum, J.J.A.; de Jong, T.

    1991-01-01

    The use of computer simulations in education and training can have substantial advantages over other approaches. In comparison with alternatives such as textbooks, lectures, and tutorial courseware, a simulation-based approach offers the opportunity to learn in a relatively realistic problem-solving

  20. Instructional environments for simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berkum, Jos J.A.; de Jong, Anthonius J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The use of computer simulations in education and training can have substantial advantages over other approaches. In comparison with alternatives such as textbooks, lectures, and tutorial courseware, a simulation-based approach offers the opportunity to learn in a relatively realistic problem-solving

  1. Simulation of reinforced concrete NPP structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zverev, A.B.; Yaskevich, E.E.; Tarannikov, V.N.; Loginov, A.Ya.; Lagutov, V.I.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of stress-strained state of NPP frame structures at different stages of their operation using the method of physical simulation, is conducted. Comparison of model investigations to the data of full-scale deformation measurement allows one to define the strength resource of the structures under operation. Bench test layout and results of investigations into strength, deformation, thermal-physical and acoustic emission parameters of the investigated processes during model loading, are presented

  2. Studies of detailed biofilm characterization on fly ash concrete in comparison with normal and superplasticizer concrete in seawater environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarmaa, Vinita; George, R P; Ramachandran, D; Anandkumar, B; Mudalib, U Kamachi

    2014-01-01

    In cooling water systems, many concrete structures in the form of tanks, pillars and reservoirs that come in contact with aggressive seawater are being deteriorated by chemical and biological factors. The nuclear industry has decided to partially replace the Portland cement with appropriate pozzolans such as fly ash, which could densify the matrix and make the concrete impermeable. Three types of concrete mixes, viz., normal concrete (NC), concrete with fly ash and superplasticizer (FA) and concrete with only superplasticizer (SP) were fabricated for short- and long-term exposure studies and for screening out the better concrete in seawater environments. Biofilm characterization studies and microscopic studies showed excellent performance of FA concrete compared to the other two. Laboratory exposure studies in pure cultures of Thiobacillus thiooxidans and Fusarium oxysporum were demonstrated for the inhibition of microbial growth on fly ash. Epifluorescence and scanning electron microscopic studies supported the better performance of the FA specimen. Thus, the present study clearly showed that FA concrete is less prone to biofilm formation and biodeterioration.

  3. SIMULATION MODELS OF RESISTANCE TO CONCRETE MOVEMENT IN THE CONCRETE CONVEYING PIPE OF THE AUTOCONCRETE PUMP

    OpenAIRE

    Anofriev, P. G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. In modern construction the placing of concrete is often performed using distribution equipment of concrete pumps. Increase of productivity and quality of this construction work requires improvement of both concrete pumps and their tooling. The concrete pumps tooling consists of standardized concrete conveying pipes and connector bends radius of up to 2 m. A promising direction of tooling improvement is the reduce of resistance to movement of the concrete in the concrete conveying pip...

  4. Steel Fibers Reinforced Concrete Pipes - Experimental Tests and Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doru, Zdrenghea

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents in the first part a state of the art review of reinforced concrete pipes used in micro tunnelling realised through pipes jacking method and design methods for steel fibres reinforced concrete. In part two experimental tests are presented on inner pipes with diameters of 1410mm and 2200mm, and specimens (100x100x500mm) of reinforced concrete with metal fibres (35 kg / m3). In part two experimental tests are presented on pipes with inner diameters of 1410mm and 2200mm, and specimens (100x100x500mm) of reinforced concrete with steel fibres (35 kg / m3). The results obtained are analysed and are calculated residual flexural tensile strengths which characterise the post-cracking behaviour of steel fibres reinforced concrete. In the third part are presented numerical simulations of the tests of pipes and specimens. The model adopted for the pipes test was a three-dimensional model and loads considered were those obtained in experimental tests at reaching breaking forces. Tensile stresses determined were compared with mean flexural tensile strength. To validate tensile parameters of steel fibres reinforced concrete, experimental tests of the specimens were modelled with MIDAS program to reproduce the flexural breaking behaviour. To simulate post - cracking behaviour was used the method σ — ε based on the relationship stress - strain, according to RILEM TC 162-TDF. For the specimens tested were plotted F — δ diagrams, which have been superimposed for comparison with the similar diagrams of experimental tests. The comparison of experimental results with those obtained from numerical simulation leads to the following conclusions: - the maximum forces obtained by numerical calculation have higher values than the experimental values for the same tensile stresses; - forces corresponding of residual strengths have very similar values between the experimental and numerical calculations; - generally the numerical model estimates a breaking force greater

  5. Bacteria-based self-healing concrete for application in the marine environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palin, D.; Wiktor, V.; Jonkers, H.M.

    2013-01-01

    Marine concrete structures are exposed to one of the most hostile of natural environments. Many physical and chemical phenomena are usually interdependent and mutually reinforcing in the deterioration of marine exposed concrete: expansion and microcracking due to physical effects increases concrete

  6. Process of cracking in reinforced concrete beams (simulation and experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Shardakov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of experimental and theoretical investigations of the mechanisms of crack formation in reinforced concrete beams subjected to quasi-static bending. The boundary-value problem has been formulated in the framework of brittle fracture mechanics and solved using the finite-element method. Numerical simulation of the vibrations of an uncracked beam and a beam with cracks of different size serves to determine the pattern of changes in the spectrum of eigenfrequencies observed during crack evolution. A series of sequential quasi-static 4-point bend tests leading to the formation of cracks in a reinforced concrete beam were performed. At each loading step, the beam was subjected to an impulse load to induce vibrations. Two stages of cracking were detected. During the first stage the nonconservative process of deformation begins to develope, but has not visible signs. The second stage is an active cracking, which is marked by a sharp change in eingenfrequencies. The boundary of a transition from one stage to another is well registered. The vibration behavior was examined for the ordinary concrete beams and the beams strengthened with a carbon-fiber polymer. The obtained results show that the vibrodiagnostic approach is an effective tool for monitoring crack formation and assessing the quality of measures aimed at strengthening concrete structures

  7. KAPOOL experiments to simulate molten corium - sacrificial concrete interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eppinger, B.; Fieg, G.; Tromm, W.

    2001-01-01

    In future Light Water Reactors special devices (core catchers) might be required to prevent containment failure by basement erosion after reactor pressure vessel melt-through during a core meltdown accident. In the planned European Pressurized Reactor (EPR) the core melt is retained in the reactor cavity for ∼ 1 h to pick up late melts after the failure of the reactor pressure vessel. The reactor cavity is protected by a layer of sacrificial concrete and closed by a melt gate at the bottom towards the spreading compartment. After erosion of the sacrificial concrete and melt-through of the gate the core melt should be distributed homogeneously into the spreading compartment. There the melt is cooled by flooding with water. The knowledge of the sacrificial concrete erosion phase in the reactor cavity is essential for the severe accident assessment. Several KAPOOL experiments have been performed to investigate the erosion of two possible compositions of sacrificial concretes using alumina-iron thermite melts as a simulant for the core melt. Erosion rates as a function of the melt temperature and the inhomogeneity of the melt front are presented in this paper. (authors)

  8. 3D-finite element impact simulation on concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heider, N.

    1989-12-15

    The analysis of impact processes is an interesting application of full 3D Finite Element calculations. This work presents a simulation of the penetration process of a Kinetic Energy projectile into a concrete target. Such a calculation requires an adequate FE model, especially a proper description of the crack opening process in front of the projectile. The aim is the prediction of the structural survival of the penetrator case with the help of an appropriate failure criterion. Also, the computer simulation allows a detailed analysis of the physical phenomena during impact. (orig.) With 4 refs., 14 figs.

  9. Contributions to reinforced concrete structures numerical simulations; Contributions a la simulation numerique de structures en beton arme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badel, P.B

    2001-07-15

    In order to be able to carry out simulations of reinforced concrete structures, it is necessary to know two aspects: the behaviour laws have to reflect the complex behaviour of concrete and a numerical environment has to be developed in order to avoid to the user difficulties due to the softening nature of the behaviour. This work deals with these two subjects. After an accurate estimation of two behaviour models (micro-plan and mesoscopic models), two damage models (the first one using a scalar variable, the other one a tensorial damage of the 2 order) are proposed. These two models belong to the framework of generalized standard materials, which renders their numerical integration easy and efficient. A method of load control is developed in order to make easier the convergence of the calculations. At last, simulations of industrial structures illustrate the efficiency of the method. (O.M.)

  10. Passivation and electrochemical behavior of 316L stainless steel in chlorinated simulated concrete pore solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Dong, Chaofang; Li, Xiaogang

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the passivation and electrochemical behavior of 316L stainless steel in chlorinated simulated concrete pore solutions at different pH was evaluated by potentiodynamic measurements, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The composition of the passive film and surface morphology were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The results reveal that metastable pitting susceptibility, stable pitting corrosion, and composition of the passive film are influenced by pH value. After long time immersion, a bilayer structure passive film can be formed in this environment. The appearance of molybdates on the outermost surface layer, further enhancing the stability of the passive film. Moreover, the good pitting corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel in simulated concrete pore solution without carbonated is mainly due to the presence of high Cr/Fe ratio and molybdates ions within the passive film.

  11. Influence of Simulated Acid Rain Corrosion on the Uniaxial Tensile Mechanical Properties of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-zi Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study on the uniaxial tensile property of concrete exposed to the acid rain environment was carried out. Acid rain with pH level of 1.0 was deposed by the mixture of sulfate and nitric acid solution in the laboratory. Dumbbell-shaped concrete specimens were immersed in the simulated acid rain completely. After being exposed to the deposed mixture for a certain period, uniaxial tensile test was performed on the concrete specimens. The results indicate that elastic modulus, tensile strength, and peak strain have a slight increase at the initial corrosion stage, and with the extension of corrosion process, elastic modulus and tensile strength decrease gradually, while the peak strain still increases. It is found that the compressive strength is more sensitive than the tensile strength in aggressive environment. Based on the experimental results, an equation was proposed to describe the ascending branch of the stress-strain curve of the concrete corroded by acid rain.

  12. Weightless environment simulation test; Mujuryo simulation shiken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Kato, F. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    1997-07-20

    Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., delivered a Weightless Environment Test System (WETS) to National Space Development Agency of Japan in 1994. This system creates a weightless environment similar to that in space by balancing gravity and buoyancy in the water, and is constituted of a large water tank, facilities to supply air and cooling water to space suits worn in the water, etc. In this report, a weightless environment simulation test and the facilities to supply air and cooling water are described. In the weightless environment simulation test, the astronaut to undergo tests and training wears a space suit quite similar to the suit worn on the orbit, and performs EVA/IVA (extravehicular activities/intravehicular activities) around a JEM (Japanese Experimental Module) mockup installed in the water verifying JEM design specifications, preparing manuals for operations on the orbit, or receives basic space-related drill and training. An EVA weightless environment simulation test No. 3 was accomplished with success in January, 1997, when the supply of breathing water and cooling water to the space suit, etc., were carried out with safety and reliability. 2 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Structure simulation of a pre-stressed concrete containment model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebner, H.; Sievers, J.

    2004-01-01

    An axisymmetric Finite-Element-Model of the 1:4 pre-stressed containment model tested at SANDIA was developed. The model is loaded by the pre-stressing of the tendons and by increasing internal pressure (up to 1.3 MPa). The analyses results in terms of displacements and strains in the liner, the rebars, the tendons and the concrete of the cylindrical part agree well with measured data up to about 0.6 MPa internal pressure (i.e. 1.5 times design pressure). First circumferential micro-cracks in the concrete are found at about 0.75 MPa. With increasing pressure micro-cracks are present through the whole wall. Above about 0.9 MPa the formation of micro-cracks in radial and meridional direction is calculated. At the maximum load (1.3 MPa) almost all concrete parts of the model have micro-cracks which may cause leaks. Nevertheless the failure of the containment model is not expected for loads up to 1.3 MPa without consideration of geometric inhomogeneities due to penetrations in the wall. Although the calculated strains in liner, rebars and tendons show some plastification, the maximum values are below the critical ones. The safety margin against failure is smallest in some hoop tendons. At present parametric studies are performed to investigate the differences between calculations and measured data. Furthermore three-dimensional models are developed for a better simulation of the meridional tendons in the dome region. (orig.)

  14. Surface treatment systems for concrete in marine environment: Effect of concrete cover thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Henrique Farias de Medeiros

    Full Text Available Abstract There are some ways to extend the service life of a reinforced concrete structure. This paper focuses on the extension of the service life by treating the surface of reinforced concrete, specifically on the effect of the concrete cover thickness on the surface treatment system efficacy. Thus, chloride migration tests were performed and diffusion chloride coefficients were calculated. The service life of each case (treated or non-treated concrete was estimated using these data and Fick's second law of diffusion. Results indicated that the thicker the concrete cover is, the greater the efficacy of the concrete surface treatment system will be. The dissemination of this information is important, since it is almost intuitive to think that the effect of a surface treatment system depends only on itself and this study shows the opposite.

  15. Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Concrete is a component of coherent transition between a concrete base and a wooden construction. The structure is based on a quantity of investigations of the design possibilities that arise when combining digital fabrication tools and material capacities. Through tangible experiments the project...... specific for this to happen. And the knowledge and intention behind the drawing becomes specialised through the understanding of the fabrication processes and their affect on the materials.The structure Concrete is a result of a multi-angled kerf series in ash wood and a concrete base. The ash wood is cut...... using a 5-axis CNC router with a thin saw blade attached. The programming of the machining results in variations of kerfs that lets the ash wood twist into unique shapes.The shapes of the revolving ash ribbons continue into the concrete creating a cohesive shape. The form for the concrete itself is made...

  16. Numerical simulation of deformation and fracture of space protective shell structures from concrete and fiber concrete under pulse loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radchenko, P A; Batuev, S P; Radchenko, A V; Plevkov, V S

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents results of numerical simulation of interaction between aircraft Boeing 747-400 and protective shell of nuclear power plant. The shell is presented as complex multilayered cellular structure comprising layers of concrete and fiber concrete bonded with steel trusses. Numerical simulation was held three-dimensionally using the author's algorithm and software taking into account algorithms for building grids of complex geometric objects and parallel computations. The dynamics of stress-strain state and fracture of structure were studied. Destruction is described using two-stage model that allows taking into account anisotropy of elastic and strength properties of concrete and fiber concrete. It is shown that wave processes initiate destruction of shell cellular structure—cells start to destruct in unloading wave, originating after output of compression wave to the free surfaces of cells. (paper)

  17. Effect of steel surface conditions on reinforcing steel corrosion in concrete exposed to marine environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anzola, E.

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory methods and experimental tests were deployed in the present study to evaluate corrosion in reinforced concrete exposed to marine environments. Reinforcing steel exhibiting two different surface conditions prior to embedment in concrete were studied, one the one hand to assess the electrochemical behaviour of the bars during exposure of the concrete specimens to a simulated marine environment, and on the other to determine the strength of the steel/concrete bond. The reinforced concrete specimens prepared were adapted as required for electrochemical potential and corrosion rate testing. A total of 56 7x15-cm cylindrical specimens containing 3/8" steel rods anchored at a depth of 11.5 cm were made to evaluate the steel / concrete bond and exposed to a natural marine environment for 28 or 190 days prior to testing. All the specimens were made with ready-mixed concrete. It may be concluded from the results of the corrosion tests on reinforcing steel with different surface conditions that the oxide initially covering the bars was dissolved and the steel passivated by the alkalinity in the concrete. The chief finding of the bonding study was that the layer of oxide formed in pre-embedment steel deterioration contributed to establishing a better bond.

    En el contexto de esta investigación, se tomaron en consideración métodos y ensayos experimentales de laboratorio, que permiten hacer una evaluación de la corrosión del hormigón armado expuesto en ambientes marinos. Por una parte se evaluó el comportamiento electroquímico de dos condiciones de estados superficiales del acero embebido en el hormigón, exponiéndolo en un ambiente marino simulado y, por otra parte, se estudió la adherencia entre el acero y el hormigón, con los mismos estados superficiales usados para la evaluación electroquímica. Las probetas se fabricaron de hormigón con acero de refuerzo en su interior, adecuándolas para realizar los ensayos de potenciales

  18. Determination of the neutralization depth of concrete under the aggressive environment influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morzhukhina, Anastasia; Nikitin, Stanislav; Akimova, Elena

    2018-03-01

    Aggressive environments have a significant impact on destruction of many reinforced concrete structures, such as high-rise constructions or chemical plants. For example, some high-rise constructions are equipped with a swimming pool, so they are exposed to chloride ions in the air. Penetration of aggressive chemical substances into the body of concrete contributes to acceleration of reinforced concrete structure corrosion that in turn leads to load bearing capacity loss and destruction of the building. The article considers and analyzes the main technologies for calculating penetration depth of various aggressive substances into the body of concrete. The calculation of corrosion depth was made for 50-year service life.

  19. Microstructural and Microanalytical Study on Concrete Exposed to the Sulfate Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Fang; Beixing, Li; Jiangang, Yin; Xiaolu, Yuan

    2017-11-01

    Microstructural properties have been examined to investigate the effect of mineral admixtures on the sulfate resistance of concrete. Concrete and cement paste specimens made with ordinary Portland cement (OPC) or ordinary Portland cement incorporating 20% fly ash (FA) or 30% ground blast furnace slag (GBFS), were made and exposed to 250 cycles of the cyclic sulfate environment. Microstructural and Microanalytical study was conducted by means of x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). Results indicate that the pore structure of concrete after sulfate exposure possesses the fractal feature. The OPC concrete presents more complex pore internal surface, higher porosity and less micro-pores than the concrete incorporating fly ash and GBFS. Portlandite in OPC concrete and OPC-FA concrete is mainly converted to gypsum; while for OPC-GBFS concrete, both gypsum and ettringite are formed. In the cyclic sulfate environment, repeated hydration and dehydration of sulfates produce the expansive stress in pores, aggravating the demolishment of concrete structure.

  20. Summary of Uranium Solubility Studies in Concrete Waste Forms and Vadose Zone Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bovaird, Chase C.

    2011-09-30

    One of the methods being considered for safely disposing of Category 3 low-level radioactive wastes is to encase the waste in concrete. Concrete encasement would contain and isolate the waste packages from the hydrologic environment and act as an intrusion barrier. The current plan for waste isolation consists of stacking low-level waste packages on a trench floor, surrounding the stacks with reinforced steel, and encasing these packages in concrete. These concrete-encased waste stacks are expected to vary in size with maximum dimensions of 6.4 m long, 2.7 m wide, and 4 m high. The waste stacks are expected to have a surrounding minimum thickness of 15 cm of concrete encasement. These concrete-encased waste packages are expected to withstand environmental exposure (solar radiation, temperature variations, and precipitation) until an interim soil cover or permanent closure cover is installed and to remain largely intact thereafter. Any failure of concrete encasement may result in water intrusion and consequent mobilization of radionuclides from the waste packages. This report presents the results of investigations elucidating the uranium mineral phases controlling the long-term fate of uranium within concrete waste forms and the solubility of these phases in concrete pore waters and alkaline, circum-neutral vadose zone environments.

  1. Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Kruse Aagaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Concrete is a component of coherent transition between a concrete base and a wooden construction. The structure is based on a quantity of investigations of the design possibilities that arise when combining digital fabrication tools and material capacities.Through tangible experiments the project discusses materiality and digitally controlled fabrications tools as direct expansions of the architect’s digital drawing and workflow. The project sees this expansion as an opportunity to connect th...

  2. Heavy vehicle simulator testing on pre-cast concrete panels

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, L

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available commonly found in California, pre-cast concrete slabs are considered to be a very suitable repair material for extending the service life of intermittently distressed concrete pavements. This is because of the long life expectancy of concrete slabs cast...

  3. Simulation analysis of impact tests of steel plate reinforced concrete and reinforced concrete slabs against aircraft impact and its validation with experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadiq, Muhammad; Xiu Yun, Zhu; Rong, Pan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Simulation analysis is carried out with two constitutive concrete models. • Winfrith model can better simulate nonlinear response of concrete than CSCM model. • Performance of steel plate concrete is better than reinforced concrete. • Thickness of safety related structures can be reduced by adopting steel plates. • Analysis results, mainly concrete material models should be validated. - Abstract: The steel plate reinforced concrete and reinforced concrete structures are used in nuclear power plants for protection against impact of an aircraft. In order to compare the impact resistance performance of steel plate reinforced concrete and reinforced concrete slabs panels, simulation analysis of 1/7.5 scale model impact tests is carried out by using finite element code ANSYS/LS-DYNA. The damage modes of all finite element models, velocity time history curves of the aircraft engine and damage to aircraft model are compared with the impact test results of steel plate reinforced concrete and reinforced concrete slab panels. The results indicate that finite element simulation results correlate well with the experimental results especially for constitutive winfrith concrete model. Also, the impact resistance performance of steel plate reinforced concrete slab panels is better than reinforced concrete slab panels, particularly the rear face steel plate is very effective in preventing the perforation and scabbing of concrete than conventional reinforced concrete structures. In this way, the thickness of steel plate reinforced concrete structures can be reduced in important structures like nuclear power plants against impact of aircraft. It also demonstrates the methodology to validate the analysis procedure with experimental and analytical studies. It may be effectively employed to predict the precise response of safety related structures against aircraft impact

  4. Research on strength attenuation law of concrete in freezing - thawing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, qianhui; Cao, zhiyuan; Li, qiang

    2018-03-01

    By rapid freezing and thawing method, the experiments of concrete have been 300 freeze-thaw cycles specimens in the water. The cubic compression strength value under different freeze-thaw cycles was measured. By analyzing the test results, the water-binder ratio of the concrete under freeze-thaw environments, fly ash and air entraining agent is selected dosage recommendations. The exponential attenuation prediction model and life prediction model of compression strength of concrete under freezing-thawing cycles considering the factors of water-binder ratio, fly ash content and air-entraining agent dosage were established. The model provides the basis for predicting the durability life of concrete under freezing-thawing environment. It also provides experimental basis and references for further research on concrete structures with antifreeze requirements.

  5. Nonlocal Peridynamic Modeling and Simulation on Crack Propagation in Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An extended peridynamic approach for crack propagation analysis in concrete structures was proposed. In the peridynamic constitutive model, concrete material was described as a series of interacting particles, and the short-range repulsive force and anisotropic behavior of concrete were taken into account in the expression of the interactive bonding force, which was given in terms of classical elastic constants and peridynamic horizon. The damage of material was defined locally at the level of pairwise bond, and the critical stretch of material bond was described as a function of fracture strength in the classical concrete failure theory. The efficiency and accuracy of the proposed model and algorithms were validated by simulating the propagation of mode I and I-II mixed mode cracks in concrete slabs. Furthermore, crack propagation in a double-edge notched concrete beam subjected to four-point load was simulated, in which the experimental observations are captured naturally as a consequence of the solution.

  6. Shrinkage modeling of concrete reinforced by palm fibres in hot dry environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akchiche, Hamida; Kriker, Abdelouahed

    2017-02-01

    The cement materials, such as concrete and conventional mortar present very little resistance to traction and cracking, these hydraulic materials which induces large withdrawals on materials and cracks in structures. The hot dry environments such as: the Saharan regions of Algeria, Indeed, concrete structures in these regions are very fragile, and present high shrinkage. Strengthening of these materials by fibers can provide technical solutions for improving the mechanical performance. The aim of this study is firstly, to reduce the shrinkage of conventional concrete with its reinforcement with date palm fibers. In fact, Algeria has an extraordinary resources in natural fibers (from Palm, Abaca, Hemp) but without valorization in practical areas, especially in building materials. Secondly, to model the shrinkage behavior of concrete was reinforced by date palm fibers. In the literature, several models for still fiber concrete were founded but few are offers for natural fiber concretes. To do so, a still fiber concretes model of YOUNG - CHERN was used. According to the results, a reduction of shrinkage with reinforcement by date palm fibers was showed. A good ability of molding of shrinkage of date palm reinforced concrete with YOUNG - CHERN Modified model was obtained. In fact, a good correlation between experimental data and the model data was recorded.

  7. 3-D Temperature and Stress Simulations of Hardening Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Poul; Buhr, Birit; Thorborg, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    When concrete is cast, heat develops. When the concrete cools down there is a risk that thermal gradients induce cracks in the structure. In the Middle East this is especially important as extensive heat builds up due to the high ambient temperatures. Possible formed cracks will have a detrimenta...

  8. Dynamic simulation of collisions of heavy high-speed trucks with concrete barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Yoshito; Liu, Chunlu; Kusama, Ryuichi

    2007-01-01

    Real vehicle collision experiments on full-scale road safety barriers are important to determine the outcome of a vehicle versus barrier impact accident. However, such experiments require large investment of time and money. Numerical simulation has therefore been imperative as an alternative method for testing concrete barriers. In this research, spring subgrade models were first developed to simulate the ground boundary of concrete barriers. Both heavy trucks and concrete barriers were modeled using finite element methods (FEM) to simulate dynamic collision performances. Comparison of the results generated from computer simulations and on-site full-scale experiments demonstrated that the developed models could be applied to simulate the collision of heavy trucks with concrete barriers to provide the data to design new road safety barriers and analyze existing ones

  9. Corrosion Mechanism and Bond-Strength Study on Galvanized Steel in Concrete Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouril, M.; Pokorny, P.; Stoulil, J. [University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2017-04-15

    Zinc coating on carbon steels give the higher corrosion resistance in chloride containing environments and in carbonated concrete. However, hydrogen evolution accompanies the corrosion of zinc in the initial activity in fresh concrete, which can lead to the formation of a porous structure at the reinforcement -concrete interface, which can potentially reduce the bond-strength of the reinforcement with concrete. The present study examines the mechanism of the corrosion of hot-dip galvanized steel in detail, as in the model pore solutions and real concrete. Calcium ion plays an important role in the corrosion mechanism, as it prevents the formation of passive layers on zinc at an elevated alkalinity. The corrosion rate of galvanized steel decreases in accordance with the exposure time; however, the reason for this is not the zinc transition into passivity, but the consumption of the less corrosion-resistant phases of hot-dip galvanizing in the concrete environment. The results on the electrochemical tests have been confirmed by the bond-strength test for the reinforcement of concrete and by evaluating the porosity of the cement adjacent to the reinforcement.

  10. Effect of Curing Temperature on the Durability of Concrete under Highly Geothermal Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Tang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the durability of concrete in the actual temperature and humidity of the tunnel environment, this study investigates the mechanical properties, permeability of chloride ion, relative dynamic elastic modulus, and mass loss ratio of concrete specimens cured in the temperature which varied from normal, 40, 60, 75, and 90°C, and the humidity was kept at 90% continuously. Experimental results reveal that the hot temperature curing environment may benefit early stage strength development but reduce the long-term strength. It is proved that 60°C is a critical point. At above 60°C, the strength of the concrete material and its resistance to chloride ion permeability showed a decreasing trend; however, in the appropriate temperature range, the frost resistance properties of the concrete are improved with increasing temperature.

  11. Effect of hot-dry environment on fiber-reinforced self-compacting concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tioua, Tahar; Kriker, Abdelouahed; Salhi, Aimad; Barluenga, Gonzalo

    2016-07-01

    Drying shrinkage can be a major reason for the deterioration of concrete structures. Variation in ambient temperature and relative humidity cause changes in the properties of hardened concrete which can affect their mechanical and drying shrinkage characteristics. The present study investigated mechanical strength and particularly drying shrinkage properties of self-compacting concretes (SCC) reinforced with date palm fiber exposed to hot and dry environment. In this study a total of nine different fibers reinforced self compacting concrete (FRSCC) mixtures and one mixture without fiber were prepared. The volume fraction and the length of fibers reinforcement were 0.1-0.2-0.3% and 10-20-30 mm. It was observed that drying shrinkage lessened with adding low volumetric fraction and short length of fibers in curing condition (T = 20 °C and RH = 50 ± 5 %), but increased in hot and dry environment.

  12. Thermo-mechanical simulations of early-age concrete cracking with durability predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlásek, Petr; Šmilauer, Vít; Hájková, Karolina; Baquerizo, Luis

    2017-09-01

    Concrete performance is strongly affected by mix design, thermal boundary conditions, its evolving mechanical properties, and internal/external restraints with consequences to possible cracking with impaired durability. Thermo-mechanical simulations are able to capture those relevant phenomena and boundary conditions for predicting temperature, strains, stresses or cracking in reinforced concrete structures. In this paper, we propose a weakly coupled thermo-mechanical model for early age concrete with an affinity-based hydration model for thermal part, taking into account concrete mix design, cement type and thermal boundary conditions. The mechanical part uses B3/B4 model for concrete creep and shrinkage with isotropic damage model for cracking, able to predict a crack width. All models have been implemented in an open-source OOFEM software package. Validations of thermo-mechanical simulations will be presented on several massive concrete structures, showing excellent temperature predictions. Likewise, strain validation demonstrates good predictions on a restrained reinforced concrete wall and concrete beam. Durability predictions stem from induction time of reinforcement corrosion, caused by carbonation and/or chloride ingress influenced by crack width. Reinforcement corrosion in concrete struts of a bridge will serve for validation.

  13. Numerical Simulation on the Dynamic Splitting Tensile Test of reinforced concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhuan; Jia, Haokai; Jing, Lin

    2018-03-01

    The research for crack resistance was of RC was based on the split Hopkinson bar and numerical simulate software LS-DYNA3D. In the research, the difference of dynamic splitting failure modes between plane concrete and reinforced concrete were completed, and the change rule of tensile stress distribution with reinforcement ratio was studied; also the effect rule with the strain rate and the crack resistance was also discussed by the radial tensile stress time history curve of RC specimen under different loading speeds. The results shows that the reinforcement in the concrete can impede the crack extension, defer the failure time of concrete, increase the tension intensity of concrete; with strain rate of concrete increased, the crack resistance of RC increased.

  14. Simulation of concrete deterioration in Finnish rock cavern conditions for final disposal of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kari, O.P.; Puttonen, J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Concrete deterioration in Finnish rock cavern disposal conditions was simulated. • Simulation requires advanced models instead of traditional linear diffusion models. • Concrete analysed performed moderately during the period of 500 years. • Corrosion of steel reinforcement cannot be excluded during the period analysed. - Abstract: A simulation of concrete ageing in Finnish rock cavern disposal conditions showed that the concrete undergoes complex deterioration processes during the period required for lowering the level of radiation. In respect of the concrete ageing, the life time of the disposal facilities shall be divided into the periods before and after the closing of the caverns. Generally, the sulphate-resistant type of concrete analysed performed moderately during the analysed period of 500 years contrary to the corrosion of steel reinforcement, which cannot be excluded. Simulation of ageing clearly requires thermodynamical methods instead of linear diffusion models based on Fick’s law, which are traditionally used in construction industry. The study proves that the thermodynamical simulation method developed with adequate experimental data also makes it possible to observe latent factors of concrete deterioration

  15. Passivation and electrochemical behavior of 316L stainless steel in chlorinated simulated concrete pore solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Hong, E-mail: luohong@hhu.edu.cn [College of Mechanics and Materials, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); Su, Huaizhi [State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098,China (China); Dong, Chaofang; Li, Xiaogang [Institute of Advanced Materials and Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083,China (China)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • The pH value play an important role on passive mechanism of stainless steel. • The relationship between Cr/Fe ratio within the passive film and pH is non-linear. • Better corrosion resistance due to high Cr/Fe ratio and molybdates ions. - Abstract: In this paper, the passivation and electrochemical behavior of 316L stainless steel in chlorinated simulated concrete pore solutions at different pH was evaluated by potentiodynamic measurements, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The composition of the passive film and surface morphology were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The results reveal that metastable pitting susceptibility, stable pitting corrosion, and composition of the passive film are influenced by pH value. After long time immersion, a bilayer structure passive film can be formed in this environment. The appearance of molybdates on the outermost surface layer, further enhancing the stability of the passive film. Moreover, the good pitting corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel in simulated concrete pore solution without carbonated is mainly due to the presence of high Cr/Fe ratio and molybdates ions within the passive film.

  16. Passivation and electrochemical behavior of 316L stainless steel in chlorinated simulated concrete pore solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Dong, Chaofang; Li, Xiaogang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The pH value play an important role on passive mechanism of stainless steel. • The relationship between Cr/Fe ratio within the passive film and pH is non-linear. • Better corrosion resistance due to high Cr/Fe ratio and molybdates ions. - Abstract: In this paper, the passivation and electrochemical behavior of 316L stainless steel in chlorinated simulated concrete pore solutions at different pH was evaluated by potentiodynamic measurements, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The composition of the passive film and surface morphology were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The results reveal that metastable pitting susceptibility, stable pitting corrosion, and composition of the passive film are influenced by pH value. After long time immersion, a bilayer structure passive film can be formed in this environment. The appearance of molybdates on the outermost surface layer, further enhancing the stability of the passive film. Moreover, the good pitting corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel in simulated concrete pore solution without carbonated is mainly due to the presence of high Cr/Fe ratio and molybdates ions within the passive film.

  17. APPLICATION OF FLOW SIMULATION FOR EVALUATION OF FILLING-ABILITY OF SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urano, Shinji; Nemoto, Hiroshi; Sakihara, Kohei

    In this paper, MPS method was applied to fluid an alysis of self-compacting concrete. MPS method is one of the particle method, and it is suitable for the simulation of moving boundary or free surface problems and large deformation problems. The constitutive equation of self-compacting concrete is assumed as bingham model. In order to investigate flow Stoppage and flow speed of self-compacting concrete, numerical analysis examples of slump flow and L-flow test were performed. In addition, to evaluate verification of compactability of self-compacting concrete, numerical analys is examples of compaction at the part of CFT diaphragm were performed. As a result, it was found that the MPS method was suitable for the simulation of compaction of self-compacting concrete, and a just appraisal was obtained by setting shear strain rate of flow-limit πc and limitation point of segregation.

  18. Long-term durability experiments with concrete-based waste packages in simulated repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ipatti, A.

    1993-03-01

    Two extensive experiments on long-term durability of waste packages in simulated repository conditions are described. The first one is a 'half-scale experiment' comprising radioactive waste product and half-scale concrete containers in site specific groundwater conditions. The second one is 'full-scale experiment' including simulated inactive waste product and full-scale concrete container stored in slowly flowing fresh water. The scope of the experiments is to demonstrate long-term behaviour of the designed waste packages in contact with moderately concrete aggressive groundwater, and to evaluate the possible interactions between the waste product, concrete container and ground water. As the waste packages are made of high-quality concrete, provisions have been made to continue the experiments for several years

  19. Model abstraction addressing long-term simulations of chemical degradation of large-scale concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacques, D.; Perko, J.; Seetharam, S.; Mallants, D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology to assess the spatial-temporal evolution of chemical degradation fronts in real-size concrete structures typical of a near-surface radioactive waste disposal facility. The methodology consists of the abstraction of a so-called full (complicated) model accounting for the multicomponent - multi-scale nature of concrete to an abstracted (simplified) model which simulates chemical concrete degradation based on a single component in the aqueous and solid phase. The abstracted model is verified against chemical degradation fronts simulated with the full model under both diffusive and advective transport conditions. Implementation in the multi-physics simulation tool COMSOL allows simulation of the spatial-temporal evolution of chemical degradation fronts in large-scale concrete structures. (authors)

  20. Evaluation of precast concrete slabs using a heavy vehicle simulator

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kohler, E

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Precast slabs are considered an attractive pavement option for rehabilitation or reconstruction cases where traffic closures of less than eight hours are required. Benefits include long life expectancy of concrete cast in factory...

  1. Soft projectile impacts analysis on thin reinforced concrete slabs: Tests, modelling and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontiroli, C.; Rouquand, A.; Daudeville, L.; Baroth, J.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations of reinforced concrete structures subjected to high velocity impacts and explosions remain a difficult task today. For 10 years and more now, the CEA-Gramat has maintained a continuous research effort with the help of different French universities in order to overcome encountered difficulties in modelling the behaviour of concrete structures under severe loading. To get more data on aircraft impact problems and then validate numerical models, soft projectile impacts tests at small scale on thin reinforced concrete slabs has been carried out at CEA-Gramat. Numerical simulations of these tests have been carried out and compared with experimental results to validate our numerical approach. (authors)

  2. Heavy vehicle simulator (HVS) evaluation of load transfer efficiency and continuously reinforced concrete inlays on the N3 near Pietermartizburg

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, L

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses two different heavy Vehicle Simulator (HVS) studies conducted on concrete: Load transfer through aggregate interlock and the use of dowels and the evaluation of the performance of an in-service continuously reinforced concrete...

  3. Carbon paint anode for reinforced concrete bridges in coastal environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Russell, James H.; Cryer, C.B. (ODOT); Laylor, H.M. (ODOT)

    2002-01-01

    Solvent-based acrylic carbon paint anodes were installed on the north approach spans of the Yaquina Bay Bridge (Newport OR) in 1985. The anodes continue to perform satisfactorily after more than 15 years service. The anodes were inexpensive to apply and field repairs are easily made. Depolarization potentials are consistently above 100 mV with long-term current densities around 2 mA/m 2. Bond strength remains adequate, averaging 0.50 MPa (73 psi). Some deterioration of the anode-concrete interface has occurred in the form of cracks and about 4% of the bond strength measurements indicated low or no bond. Carbon anode consumption appears low. The dominant long-term anode reaction appears to be chlorine evolution, which results in limited further acidification of the anode-concrete interface. Chloride profiles were depressed compared to some other coastal bridges suggesting chloride extraction by the CP system. Further evidence of outward chloride migration was a flat chloride profile between the anode and the outer rebar.

  4. The Ecology of Acidophilic Microorganisms in the Corroding Concrete Sewer Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangming Jiang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Concrete corrosion is one of the most significant problems affecting valuable sewer infrastructure on a global scale. This problem occurs in the aerobic zone of the sewer, where a layer of surface corrosion develops on the exposed concrete and the surface pH is typically lowered from around 11–10 (pristine concrete to pH 2–4. Acidophilic microorganisms become established as biofilms within the concrete corrosion layer and enhance the loss of concrete mass. Until recently, the acidophilic community was considered to comprise relatively few species of microorganisms, however, the biodiversity of the corrosion community is now recognized as being extensive and varying from different sewer environmental conditions. The diversity of acidophiles in the corrosion communities includes chemolithoautotrophs, chemolithoheterotrophs, and chemoorganoheterotrophs. The activity of these microorganisms is strongly affected by H2S levels in the sewer gas phase, although CO2, organic matter, and iron in the corrosion layer influence this acidic ecosystem. This paper briefly presents the conditions within the sewer that lead to the development of concrete corrosion in that environment. The review focuses on the acidophilic microorganisms detected in sewer corrosion environments, and then summarizes their proposed functions and physiology, especially in relation to the corrosion process. To our knowledge, this is the first review of acidophilic corrosion microbial communities, in which, the ecology and the environmental conditions (when available are considered. Ecological studies of sewer corrosion are limited, however, where possible, we summarize the important metabolic functions of the different acidophilic species detected in sewer concrete corrosion layers. It is evident that microbial functions in the acidic sewer corrosion environment can be linked to those occurring in the analogous acidic environments of acid mine drainage and bioleaching.

  5. Mathematical modeling for corrosion environment estimation based on concrete resistivity measurement directly above reinforcement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Young-Chul; Lee, Han-Seung; Noguchi, Takafumi

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to formulate a resistivity model whereby the concrete resistivity expressing the environment of steel reinforcement can be directly estimated and evaluated based on measurement immediately above reinforcement as a method of evaluating corrosion deterioration in reinforced concrete structures. It also aims to provide a theoretical ground for the feasibility of durability evaluation by electric non-destructive techniques with no need for chipping of cover concrete. This Resistivity Estimation Model (REM), which is a mathematical model using the mirror method, combines conventional four-electrode measurement of resistivity with geometric parameters including cover depth, bar diameter, and electrode intervals. This model was verified by estimation using this model at areas directly above reinforcement and resistivity measurement at areas unaffected by reinforcement in regard to the assessment of the concrete resistivity. Both results strongly correlated, proving the validity of this model. It is expected to be applicable to laboratory study and field diagnosis regarding reinforcement corrosion. (author)

  6. Corrosion Resistance of Calcium Aluminate Cement Concrete Exposed to a Chloride Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ann, Ki Yong; Cho, Chang-Geun

    2014-01-28

    The present study concerns a development of calcium aluminate cement (CAC) concrete to enhance the durability against an externally chemically aggressive environment, in particular, chloride-induced corrosion. To evaluate the inhibition effect and concrete properties, CAC was partially mixed with ordinary Portland cement (OPC), ranging from 5% to 15%, as a binder. As a result, it was found that an increase in the CAC in binder resulted in a dramatic decrease in the setting time of fresh concrete. However, the compressive strength was lower, ranging about 20 MPa, while OPC indicated about 30-35 MPa at an equivalent age. When it comes to chloride transport, there was only marginal variation in the diffusivity of chloride ions. The corrosion resistance of CAC mixture was significantly enhanced: its chloride threshold level for corrosion initiation exceeded 3.0% by weight of binder, whilst OPC and CAC concrete indicated about 0.5%-1.0%.

  7. Cracking behavior of reinforced concrete beams: experiment and simulations on the numerical influence of the steel-concrete bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jason, L.; Torre-Casanova, A.; Pinelli, X.; Davenne, L.

    2013-01-01

    Experimental and numerical results are provided in this contribution to study the global and cracking behaviors of two reinforced concrete beams subjected to four point bending. Experimentally, the use of image correlation technique enables to obtain precise information concerning the cracking properties (spacing, cumulated, maximum and mean values of the opening). Numerically, two simulations are compared taking into account a bond model between steel and concrete or supposing a perfect relation between the two materials. In both cases, a good agreement is achieved between numerical and experimental results even if the introduction of the bond effects has a direct influence during the development of the cracks (better agreement during the 'active' cracking phase). (authors)

  8. Numerical simulation of CFRP-repaired reinforced concrete columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The overarching goal of this study was to investigate the influence of repair to individual reinforced concrete bridge columns on the : post-repair seismic performance of the bridge system. A method was developed to rapidly repair an earthquake-damag...

  9. Numerical simulations of concrete flow: A benchmark comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roussel, Nicolas; Gram, Annika; Cremonesi, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    First, we define in this paper two benchmark flows readily usable by anyone calibrating a numerical tool for concrete flow prediction. Such benchmark flows shall allow anyone to check the validity of their computational tools no matter the numerical methods and parameters they choose. Second, we ...

  10. The effects of pressure dependent constitutive model to simulate concrete structures failure under impact loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhatar, S. N.; Sonoda, Y.; Kamarudin, A. F.; Noh, M. S. Md; Tokumaru, S.

    2018-04-01

    The main objective of this paper is to explore the effect of confining pressure in the compression and tension zone by simulating the behaviour of reinforced concrete/mortar structures subjected to the impact load. The analysis comprises the numerical simulation of the influences of high mass low speed impact weight dropping on concrete structures, where the analyses are incorporated with meshless method namely as Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method. The derivation of the plastic stiffness matrix of Drucker-Prager (DP) that extended from Von-Mises (VM) yield criteria to simulate the concrete behaviour were presented in this paper. In which, the displacements for concrete/mortar structures are assumed to be infinitesimal. Furthermore, the influence of the different material model of DP and VM that used numerically for concrete and mortar structures are also discussed. Validation upon existing experimental test results is carried out to investigate the effect of confining pressure, it is found that VM criterion causes unreal impact failure (flexural cracking) of concrete structures.

  11. CFD Simulation of a Concrete Cubicle to Analyze the Thermal Effect of Phase Change Materials in Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Míguez

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a CFD-based model is proposed to analyse the effect of phase change materials (PCMs on the thermal behaviour of the walls of a cubicle exposed to the environment and on the resistance of the walls to climate changes. The effect of several days of exposure to the environment was simulated using the proposed method. The results of the simulation are compared with experimental data to contrast the models. The effects of exposure on the same days were simulated for several walls of a cubicle made of a mixture of concrete and PCM. The results show that the PCM stabilizes temperatures within the cubicle and decreases energy consumption of refrigeration systems.

  12. The corrosion pattern of reinforcement and its influence on serviceability of reinforced concrete members in chloride environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ruijin; Castel, Arnaud; Francois, Raoul

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with two corroded reinforcement concrete beams, which have been stored under sustained load in a chloride environment for 14 and 23 years respectively. The evolution of corrosion pattern of reinforcement and its influence on serviceability are studied. In chloride-induced corrosion process, corrosion cracking affects significantly the corrosion pattern. During the corrosion cracking initiation period, only local pitting corrosion occurs. At early stage of cracking propagation, localized pitting corrosion is still predominant as cracks widths are very small and cracks are not interconnected, but a general corrosion slowly develops as the cracks widen. At late cracking stage, interconnected cracking with wide width develops along large parts of the beam leading to a general corrosion pattern. Macrocells and microcells concepts are used for the interpretation of the results. Mechanical experiments and corrosion simulation tests are performed to clarify the influence of this corrosion pattern evolution on the serviceability of the beams (deflection increase). Experimental results show that, when the corrosion is localized (early cracking stage), the steel-concrete bond loss is the main factor affecting the beams serviceability. The local cross-section loss resulting from pitting attack does not significantly influence the deflection of the beam. When corrosion is generalized (late cracking stage), as the steel-concrete bond is already lost, the generalized steel cross-section reduction becomes the main factor affecting the beams serviceability. But, at this stage, the deflection increase is slower due to the low general corrosion rate.

  13. Numerical simulation of tornado-borne missile impact on reinforced concrete targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, D.K.; Larder, R.

    1979-02-01

    This study is a continuation of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) effort to evaluate the applicability of using the finite element procedure to numerically simulate the impact of tornado-borne missiles on reinforced concrete targets. The objective of this study is to assess the back-face scab threshold of a reinforced concrete target impacted by deformable and nondeformable missiles. Several simulations were run using slug and pipe-type impacting missiles. The numerical results were compared with full-scale experimental field tests

  14. Service-life prediction of reinforced concrete structures in subsurface environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Ki Jung; Jung, Hae Ryong; Park, Joo Wan [Korea Radioactive Waste Agency, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    This paper focuses on the estimation of durability and service-life of reinforced concrete structures in Wolsong Low- and intermediate-level wastes Disposal Center (WLDC) in Korea. There are six disposal silos located in the saturated environment. The silo concrete is degraded due to reactions with groundwater and chemical attacks, and finally it will lose its properties as a transport barrier. The infiltration of sulfate and magnesium, leaching of potassium hydroxide, and chlorine induced corrosion are the most significant factors for degradation of reinforced concrete structure in underground environment. From the result of evaluation of the degradation time for each factor, the degradation rate of the reinforced concrete due to sulfate and magnesium is 1.308×10{sup -3} cm/yr, and it is estimated to take 48,000 years for full degradation while potassium hydroxide is leached in depth of less than 1.5 cm at 1,000 years after the initiation of degradation. In case of chlorine induced corrosion, it takes 1,648 years to initiate corrosion in the main reinforced bar and 2,288 years to reach the lifetime limit of the structural integrity, and thus it is evaluated as the most significant factor.

  15. Durability and service life prediction of GFRP bars embedded in concrete under acid environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Jikai, E-mail: jkzhou@hotmail.com [College of Civil and Transportation Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210098 (China); Chen Xudong, E-mail: cxdong1985@hotmail.com [College of Civil and Transportation Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210098 (China); Chen Shixue, E-mail: 710567525@qq.com [College of Civil and Transportation Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210098 (China)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: > Bond strength of GFRP bars decrease with an increase in pH of acid solutions. > Bond strength of steel bars decrease with an increase in pH of acid solutions. > Durability of GFRP bars could be predicted by modified Arrhenius relation. - Abstract: In recent years, glass fiber reinforcing polymers (GFRP) has emerged as an alternative to conventional steel reinforcing bars in concrete structures. The bond behavior of GFRP bars to concrete under acidic environment is important because of increasing acid rain in China nowadays. This paper presents an experimental investigation into comparison of the durability of the bond between GFRP and steel bars to concrete under acid environment. The specimens were subject to corrosion by immersion in acid solutions with different concentration. One hundred and twenty pullout specimens were used to study the effect of different environment on bond strength of GFRP and steel bars to concrete. Experimental results showed that, For GFRP bars, at the end of 75 days of conditioning duration, maximum bond strength loss of 11%, 22%, 17.2% and 14% were observed in tap water, pH = 2, pH = 3, and pH = 4 environment, respectively. For steel bars, at the end of 75 days of conditioning duration, maximum bond strength loss of 19.6% and 12.3% were observed in pH = 2 and pH = 3 environment, respectively. The influence of solution concentration on bond strength of GFRP bars was determined using Arrhenius equation and time shift method (TSF).

  16. Air permeability for a concrete shear wall after a damaging seismic load simulation cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girrens, S.P.; Farrar, C.R.

    1991-01-01

    A study was initiated to estimate air leakage, driven by wind-generated pressure gradients, from a seismically damaged concrete structure. This paper describes an experiment performed to measure the air permeability in a reinforced concrete shear wall, both before and after simulated seismic loading. Static load-cycle testing was used to simulate earthquake loading. Permeability measurements were made by pressurizing one side of the shear wall above atmospheric conditions and recording the transient-pressure decay. Air permeability measurements made on the shear wall before loading fell within the range of values for concrete permeability published in the literature. As long as the structure exhibited linear load-displacement response, no variation in the air permeability was detected. However, experimental results indicate that the air permeability in the shear wall increased by a factor of 40 after the wall had been damaged (cracked)

  17. Effect of flexural crack on plain concrete beam failure mechanism A numerical simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoullah Namdar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The flexural failure of plain concrete beam occurs along with development of flexural crack on beam. In this paper by using ABAQUS, mechanism failure of plain concrete beam under three steps have been simulated. The cracking moment has been analytically calculated and applied on the both sides of the fixed beam, and flexural crack has been simulated on beam. Displacement, von Mises, load reaction, displacementcrack length, von Mises-crack length and von Mises-displacement of beams have been graphical depicted. Results indicated that, the flexural crack governs beam mechanism failure and its effects on beam resistance failure. It has been found that the flexural crack in initial stage it developed slowly and changes to be fast at the final stage of collapsing beam due to reduction of the flexural resistance of beam. Increasing mechanical properties of concrete, collapse displacement is reduced.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Shock Response and Dynamic Fracture of a Concrete Dam Subjected to Impact Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The shock response and dynamic fracture of concrete gravity dams under impact load are the key problems to evaluate the antiknock safety of the dam. This study aims at understanding the effects of impact shock on the elastic response and dynamic fracture of concrete gravity dams. Firstly, this paper uses acceleration records of a concrete gravity dam under impact to establish the correct way to determine the concrete gravity dam of the fundamental frequency and present cut sheets multi-degree-of-freedom dynamic modeling. Under strong impact loading, the constitutive relation of concrete gravity dam and the highest frequency of the impact are uncertain. So, the main advantage of this method is avoiding the use of elastic modulus in the calculation. The result indicates that the calculation method is a reliable computational method for concrete gravity dams subjected to impact. Subsequently, the failure process of dam models was numerically simulated based on ABAQUS commercial codes. Finally, this paper puts forward suggestions for future research based on the results of the analysis.

  19. Virtual environments simulation in research reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamad, Shalina Bt. Sheik; Bahrin, Muhammad Hannan Bin

    2017-01-01

    Virtual reality based simulations are interactive and engaging. It has the useful potential in improving safety training. Virtual reality technology can be used to train workers who are unfamiliar with the physical layout of an area. In this study, a simulation program based on the virtual environment at research reactor was developed. The platform used for virtual simulation is 3DVia software for which it's rendering capabilities, physics for movement and collision and interactive navigation features have been taken advantage of. A real research reactor was virtually modelled and simulated with the model of avatars adopted to simulate walking. Collision detection algorithms were developed for various parts of the 3D building and avatars to restrain the avatars to certain regions of the virtual environment. A user can control the avatar to move around inside the virtual environment. Thus, this work can assist in the training of personnel, as in evaluating the radiological safety of the research reactor facility.

  20. Simulation of mechanical shock environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalanne, Christian.

    1975-07-01

    Shocks can produce a severe mechanical environment which must be taken into account when designing and developing new equipments. After some mathematical (Laplace and Fourier transforms) and mechanical recalls (response of a one degree freedom system to a sinusoidal excitation), different analysis methods are compared, these methods being the most used now to compare relative severities of tests and establish specifications. A few chapter deal with the different properties of simple, easy to produce, shock shapes. Then some now-in-use programmators or shock-machines specifications are shown. A final chapter concerns acceleration transducers [fr

  1. Development of Sustainable and Low Carbon Concretes for the Gulf Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Abu Saleh, Mohammod

    2014-01-01

    Massive construction activities in the countries of Arabian Peninsula have raised legitimate concerns about the associated impact on the environment in terms of emission of greenhouse gas and other environmental factors. As concrete is the most commonly used building materials, reduction of eCO2 and other impacts are a necessity. Use of high volume of Supplementary Cementitious Materials (SCMs) such as GGBS, fly ash, microsilica and rice husk ash together with Portland cement in different com...

  2. Thermal changes of the environment and their influence on reinforced concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojtik, R.; Cajka, R.

    2018-04-01

    The thermal expansion of concrete elements concerns both monolithic and prefabricated structures. Inappropriate design of dilation segments may cause minor but even larger failures. Critical environment factors are temperature-changing operations, such as unheated underground garages, where temperature fluctuations may occur depending on the exterior conditions. This paper numerically and experimentally analyses the thermal deformation of selected girders in the underground garages and the consequent structure failures, their causes, possible prevention and appropriate remediation.

  3. Virtual Environments for Advanced Trainers and Simulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jense, G.J.; Kuijper, F.

    1993-01-01

    Virtual environment technology is expected to make a big impact on future training and simulation systems. Direct stimulation of human senses (eyesight, auditory, tactile) and new paradigms for user input will improve the realism of simulations and thereby the effectiveness of training systems.

  4. Simulation of reinforced concrete short shear wall subjected to cyclic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parulekar, Y.M.; Reddy, G.R.; Vaze, K.K.; Pegon, P.; Wenzel, H.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Prediction of the capacity of squat shear wall using tests and analysis. • Modification of model of concrete in the softening part. • Pushover analysis using softened truss theory and FE analysis is performed. • Modified concrete model gives reasonable accurate peak load and displacement. • The ductility, ultimate load and also crack pattern can be accurately predicted. - Abstract: This paper addresses the strength and deformation capacity of stiff squat shear wall subjected to monotonic and pseudo-static cyclic loading using experiments and analysis. Reinforced concrete squat shear walls offer great potential for lateral load resistance and the failure mode of these shear walls is brittle shear mode. Shear strength of these shear walls depend strongly on softening of concrete struts in principal compression direction due to principal tension in other direction. In this work simulation of the behavior of a squat shear wall is accurately predicted by finite element modeling by incorporating the appropriate softening model in the program. Modification of model of concrete in the softening part is suggested and reduction factor given by Vecchio et al. (1994) is used in the model. The accuracy of modeling is confirmed by comparing the simulated response with experimental one. The crack pattern generated from the 3D model is compared with that obtained from experiments. The load deflection for monotonic loads is also obtained using softened truss theory and compared with experimental one

  5. Soft projectile impacts on thin reinforced concrete slabs: tests, modelling and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontiroli, C.; Rouquand, A.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulations of reinforced concrete structures subjected to high velocity impacts and explosions remain a difficult task today. Since ten years and more now, the CEA-Gramat has maintained a continuous research effort with the help of different French universities in order to overcome encountered difficulties in modelling the behaviour of concrete structures under severe loading. These difficulties are related to numerical aspects (convergence difficulties of the non linear stress strain relation in 3D configuration, efficiency of the numerical procedure and robustness), but also due to the ability of the material model to simulate the accurately behaviour of a very complex and heterogeneous material like concrete. A new concrete model, named PRM model, has been developed at CEA-Gramat (Pontiroli, Rouquand and Mazars) to predict the concrete response under a large range of dynamic loadings. Works presented in this paper have been performed in the framework of the French VULCAIN PGCU 2007 research project (founded by the French National Research Agency). This project aims at defining a theoretical and probabilistic methodology in order to assess the structural safety of industrial structures that might be submitted to transient loadings such as blasts or impacts generated by various projectiles. A complementary objective is to improve diagnosis, prevention or protection actions. This scientific program gathers well-known and complementary scientific institutes, firms and universities in France. (authors)

  6. Chemical, Mechanical, and Durability Properties of Concrete with Local Mineral Admixtures under Sulfate Environment in Northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Qingke; Zhou, Changjun; Shu, Xiang; He, Qiang; Huang, Baoshan

    2014-05-13

    Over the vast Northwest China, arid desert contains high concentrations of sulfate, chloride, and other chemicals in the ground water, which poses serious challenges to infrastructure construction that routinely utilizes portland cement concrete. Rapid industrialization in the region has been generating huge amounts of mineral admixtures, such as fly ash and slags from energy and metallurgical industries. These industrial by-products would turn into waste materials if not utilized in time. The present study evaluated the suitability of utilizing local mineral admixtures in significant quantities for producing quality concrete mixtures that can withstand the harsh chemical environment without compromising the essential mechanical properties. Comprehensive chemical, mechanical, and durability tests were conducted in the laboratory to characterize the properties of the local cementitious mineral admixtures, cement mortar and portland cement concrete mixtures containing these admixtures. The results from this study indicated that the sulfate resistance of concrete was effectively improved by adding local class F fly ash and slag, or by applying sulfate resistance cement to the mixtures. It is noteworthy that concrete containing local mineral admixtures exhibited much lower permeability (in terms of chloride ion penetration) than ordinary portland cement concrete while retaining the same mechanical properties; whereas concrete mixtures made with sulfate resistance cement had significantly reduced strength and much increased chloride penetration comparing to the other mixtures. Hence, the use of local mineral admixtures in Northwest China in concrete mixtures would be beneficial to the performance of concrete, as well as to the protection of environment.

  7. Quality control analysis : part IV : field simulation of asphaltic concrete specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-02-01

    The report present some of the major findings, from a simulated study of statistical specifications, on three asphaltic concrete projects representing a total of approximately 30, 000 tons of hot mix. The major emphasis of the study has been on the a...

  8. Simulation of the Test Method "L-Box" for Self-Compacting Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Lars Nyholm; Szabo, Peter; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2004-01-01

    Both filling and passing ability are important properties to be considered for self-compacting concrete. This paper presents simulations of the L-box test and corresponding experiments. The assumption of a continuum mechanical approach, where the fluid rheology is described by the Bingham model...

  9. HTGR Base Technology Program. Task 2: concrete properties in nuclear environment. A review of concrete material systems for application to prestressed concrete pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.

    1981-05-01

    Prestressed concrete pressure vessels (PCPVs) are designed to serve as primary pressure containment structures. The safety of these structures depends on a correct assessment of the loadings and proper design of the vessels to accept these loadings. Proper vessel design requires a knowledge of the component (material) properties. Because concrete is one of the primary constituents of PCPVs, knowledge of its behavior is required to produce optimum PCPV designs. Concrete material systems are reviewed with respect to constituents, mix design, placing, curing, and strength evaluations, and typical concrete property data are presented. Effects of extreme loadings (elevated temperature, multiaxial, irradiation) on concrete behavior are described. Finally, specialty concrete material systems (high strength, fibrous, polymer, lightweight, refractory) are reviewed. 235 references

  10. Short-Term Behavior of Slag Concretes Exposed to a Real In Situ Mediterranean Climate Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, José Marcos; Sánchez, Isidro; Cabeza, Marta; Climent, Miguel Ángel

    2017-08-08

    At present, one of the most suitable ways to get a more sustainable cement industry is to reduce the CO₂ emissions generated during cement production. In order to reach that goal, the use of ground granulated blast-furnace slag as clinker replacement is becoming increasingly popular. Although the effects of this addition in the properties of cementitious materials are influenced by their hardening conditions, there are not too many experimental studies in which slag concretes have been exposed to real in situ environments. Then, the main objective of this research is to study the short-term effects of exposure to real Mediterranean climate environment of an urban site, where the action of airborne chlorides from sea water and the presence of CO₂ are combined, in the microstructure and service properties of a commercial slag cement concrete, compared to ordinary Portland cement (OPC). The microstructure was studied with mercury intrusion porosimetry. The effective porosity, capillary suction coefficient, chloride migration coefficient, carbonation front depth, and compressive strength were also analyzed. Considering the results obtained, slag concretes exposed to a real in situ Mediterranean climate environment show good service properties in the short-term (180 days), in comparison with OPC.

  11. Effect of silica fume on compressive strength of oil-polluted concrete in different marine environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrabadi, Hamid; Sayareh, Sina; Sarkardeh, Hamed

    2017-12-01

    In the present research, effect of silica fume as an additive and oil polluted sands as aggregates on compressive strength of concrete were investigated experimentally. The amount of oil in the designed mixtures was assumed to be constant and equal to 2% of the sand weight. Silica fume accounting for 10%, 15% and 20% of the weight is added to the designed mixture. After preparation and curing, concrete specimens were placed into the three different conditions: fresh, brackish and saltwater environments (submerged in fresh water, alternation of exposed in air & submerged in sea water and submerged in sea water). The result of compressive strength tests shows that the compressive strength of the specimens consisting of silica fume increases significantly in comparison with the control specimens in all three environments. The compressive strength of the concrete with 15% silica fume content was about 30% to 50% higher than that of control specimens in all tested environments under the condition of using polluted aggregates in the designed mixture.

  12. GEOMETRIC AND MATERIAL NONLINEAR ANALYSIS OF REINFORCED CONCRETE SLABS AT FIRE ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayad A. Abdul -Razzak

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study a nonlinear finite element analysis is presented  to predict the fire resistance of reinforced concrete slabs at fire environment. An eight node layered degenerated shell element utilizing Mindlin/Reissner thick plate theory is employed. The proposed model considered cracking, crushing and yielding of concrete and steel at elevated temperatures. The layered approach is used to represent the steel reinforcement and discretize the concrete slab through the thickness. The reinforcement steel is represented as a smeared layer of equivalent thickness with uniaxial strength and rigidity properties.Geometric nonlinear analysis may play an important role in the behavior of reinforced concrete slabs at high temperature. Geometrical nonlinearity in the layered approach is considered in the mathematical model, which is based on the total Lagrangian approach taking into account Von Karman assumptions.Finally two examples for which experimental results are available are analyzed, using the proposed model .The comparison showed good agreement with experimental results. 

  13. Broadband electromagnetic environments simulator (EMES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollard, N.

    1977-01-01

    A new test facility has been developed by Sandia Laboratories for determining the effects of electromagnetic environments on systems and components. The facility is capable of producing uniform, vertically polarized, continuous wave (CW) and pulsed fields over the frequency range of dc to 10 GHz. This broadband capability addresses the electromagnetic radiation (EMR) threat and is ideally suited to computer controlled sweeping and data acquisition. EMES is also capable of producing uniform transient fields having the wave shape and magnitude characteristic of a nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) and near lightning. The design consists of a truncated, triplate, rectangular coaxial transmission line. The spacing between the flat center conductor and the ground planes is 4 meters. The line is terminated in its characteristic impedance of 50 ohms. At frequencies below the first resonance of the facility it behaves as a typical coaxial system. Above resonance, a wall of electromagnetic absorbing material provides a nonreflecting termination. Thus, EMES essentially combines the elements of a transmission line and an anechoic chamber. It will not radiate electromagnetic energy into the surrounding area because it is a shielded transmission line

  14. SELF-HEALING CAPACITY OF CONCRETE - COMPUTER SIMULATION STUDY OF UNHYDRATED CEMENT STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan He

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Aggregate occupies at least three-quarters of the volume of concrete, so its impact on concrete's properties is large. The aggregate's influence on the non-hydrated part of the matured paste is assessed by concurrent algorithm-based computer simulation system SPACE in this paper. A distinction is made between interfacial zones (ITZs and bulk paste. Containers with rigid boundaries were employed for the production of series of cement pastes. They were subjected to quantitative microstructure analysis. Relevant gradient structures in the ITZ and bulk are presented and discussed. The relevance of this structure information for possible selfhealing of cracks is briefly discussed.

  15. Durability of precast prestressed concrete piles in marine environment, part 2. Volume 2 : stainless steel prestressing strand and wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    The overall purpose of this research was to determine methods which may be applied : economically to mitigate corrosion of reinforcement in precast prestressed concrete piles in : Georgias marine environments. The research was divided into two par...

  16. Assessment of Fine Aggregates from Different Sources in Ibadan and Environs for Concrete Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. O. Ajagbe

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of natural sand being used as fine aggregate for concrete production in Ibadan and its environs was carried out. Ten sources (F1 – F10 were selected for the study; four (F5, F6, F7, F8 were river sand sources while six (F1, F2, F3, F4, F9, F10 were burrow pit sand sources. Samples from each source were subjected to sieve analysis, atterberg limit, bulk density, specific gravity, water absorption, sand equivalent, clay lumps and friable particles, amount of materials passing 75μm and organic impurities adopting ASTM standard procedures. Results revealed that sand from river sources met all the criteria for concrete production stated in ASTM standard while sand from burrow pits deviated from limits of the standard in some respects. F10 had water absorption of 2.6% which exceeded maximum 2% specified, F9 was not free from clay lumps and friable particles with a significant value of 6% as against 3% maximum specification. F1, F2, F3, F4, F9 and F10 have more amounts of materials passing the 75μm sieve ranging from 10.8% for F9 to 20.1% for F10 than maximum of 5% in standard specification while F1, F9 and F10 showed an indication of having organic impurities. It is recommended that performance test be conducted on concrete made from burrow pits sand before use for concrete production. The knowledge of this study can be used as a prospecting tool for selecting suitable sand for the production of quality concrete.

  17. Simulation of heat and mass transfer processes in molten core debris-concrete systems. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felde, D K

    1979-01-01

    The heat and mass transport phenomena taking place in volumetrically-heated fluids have become of interest in recent years due to their significance in assessments of fast reactor safety and post-accident heat removal (PAHR). Following a hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA), the core and reactor internals may melt down. The core debis melting through the reactor vessel and guard vessel may eventually contact the concrete of the reactor cell floor. The interaction of the core debris with the concrete as well as the melting of the debris pool into the concrete will significantly affect efforts to prevent breaching of the containment and the resultant release of radioactive effluents to the environment.

  18. Evaluation of transmitted spectra of megavoltage X rays through concrete using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordeiro, Thaiana de Paula Vieira; Silva, Ademir Xavier da

    2010-01-01

    With the improvement of technology in radiotherapic centers, medical linear accelerators are largely replacing Cobalt-60 teletherapy units. In most of the cases, the same room that, before, was used to place a 60 Co teletherapy unit is reused to install, in replacement, a linear accelerator. When the room physical space can not be changed, high - density concrete is employed to provide shielding against the primary, scatter and leakage radiation. This work presents a study based on Monte Carlo simulations of transmission of some clinical photon spectra (of 10, 15 and 25 MV accelerators) through concrete of two different densities. Concrete walls of thickness 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 m were irradiated with 30 cm x 30 cm primary beam spectra. The results show that the thickness of the barrier decreases up to approximately 35%, when barite (high - density concrete) is used instead of ordinary concrete. The average energies of primary and transmitted beam spectra were also calculated. (author)

  19. Evaluation of transmitted spectra of megavoltage X rays through concrete using Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordeiro, Thaiana de Paula Vieira; Silva, Ademir Xavier da, E-mail: tcordeiro@con.ufrj.b, E-mail: Ademir@con.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2010-07-01

    With the improvement of technology in radiotherapic centers, medical linear accelerators are largely replacing Cobalt-60 teletherapy units. In most of the cases, the same room that, before, was used to place a {sup 60}Co teletherapy unit is reused to install, in replacement, a linear accelerator. When the room physical space can not be changed, high - density concrete is employed to provide shielding against the primary, scatter and leakage radiation. This work presents a study based on Monte Carlo simulations of transmission of some clinical photon spectra (of 10, 15 and 25 MV accelerators) through concrete of two different densities. Concrete walls of thickness 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 m were irradiated with 30 cm x 30 cm primary beam spectra. The results show that the thickness of the barrier decreases up to approximately 35%, when barite (high - density concrete) is used instead of ordinary concrete. The average energies of primary and transmitted beam spectra were also calculated. (author)

  20. Thermal Performance of Precast Concrete Sandwich Panel (PCSP) Design for Sustainable Built Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ern, Peniel Ang Soon; Ling, Lim Mei; Kasim, Narimah; Hamid, Zuhairi Abd; Masrom, Md Asrul Nasid Bin

    2017-10-01

    Malaysia’s awareness of performance criteria in construction industry towards a sustainable built environment with the use of precast concrete sandwich panel (PCSP) system is applied in the building’s wall to study the structural behaviour. However, very limited studies are conducted on the thermal insulation of exterior and interior panels in PCSP design. In hot countries such as Malaysia, proper designs of panel are important to obtain better thermal insulation for building. This study is based on thermal performance of precast concrete sandwich panel design for sustainable built environment in Malaysia. In this research, three full specimens, which are control specimen (C), foamed concrete (FC) panels and concrete panels with added palm oil fuel ash (FC+ POFA), where FC and FC+POFA sandwiched with gypsum board (G) were produced to investigate their thermal performance. Temperature difference of exterior and interior surface of specimen was used as indicators of thermal-insulating performance of PCSP design. Heat transfer test by halogen lamp was carried out on three specimens where the exterior surface of specimens was exposed to the halogen lamp. The temperature reading of exterior and interior surface for three specimens were recorded with the help of thermocouple. Other factors also studied the workability, compressive strength and axial compressive strength of the specimens. This study has shown that FC + POFA specimen has the strength nearer to normal specimen (C + FC specimen). Meanwhile, the heat transfer results show that the FC+POFA has better thermal insulation performance compared to C and FC specimens with the highest temperature difference, 3.4°C compared to other specimens. The results from this research are useful to be implemented in construction due to its benefits such as reduction of energy consumption in air-conditioning, reduction of construction periods and eco-friendly materials.

  1. Development of marine flyash concrete and evaluation of its performance with respect to physico-chemical and biological factors in marine environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayakumar, S.; VijayKumar, V.; Kundaikar, T.J.; Venugopal, C.; Sawant, S.S.

    The aim of the research was to develop flyash concrete and assess various factors controlling its durability in the marine environment. Hence the research was planned with the following objectives in mind: (1) Development of flyash concrete...

  2. Development of heat resistant concrete and its application to concrete casks. Improvement of neutron shielding performance of concrete in high temperature environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owaki, Eiji; Hata, Akihito; Sugihara, Yutaka; Shimojo, Jun; Taniuchi, Hiroaki; Mantani, Kenichi

    2003-01-01

    Heat resistant concrete with hydrogen, which is able to shield neutron at more than 100degC, was developed. Using this new type concrete, a safety concrete cask having the same concept of metal casks was designed and produced. The new type cask omitted the inhalation and exhaust vent of the conventional type concrete casks. The new concrete consists of Portland cement added calcium hydroxide, iron powder and iron fiber. It showed 2.17 g/cm 3 density, 10.8 mass% water content, 1.4 W/(m·K) thermal conductivity at 150degC. Increasing of heat resistance made possible to produce the perfect sealing type structure, which had high shielding performance of radiation no consideration for streaming of radiation. Moreover, a monitor of sealing can be set. General view of concrete casks, outer view of 1/3 scaled model, cask storage system in the world, properties of new developed heat resistant concrete, results of shielding calculation are contained. (S.Y.)

  3. A lattice-particle approach for the simulation of fracture processes in fiber-reinforced high-performance concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montero-Chacón, F.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.; Medina, F.

    2013-01-01

    The use of fiber-reinforced high-performance concrete (FRHPC) is becoming more extended; therefore it is necessary to develop tools to simulate and better understand its behavior. In this work, a discrete model for the analysis of fracture mechanics in FRHPC is presented. The plain concrete matrix,

  4. Experimentation and numerical simulation of steel fibre reinforced concrete pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuente, A. de la; Domingues de Figueiredo, A.; Aguado, A.; Molins, C.; Chama Neto, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    The results concerning on an experimental and a numerical study related to SFRCP are presented. Eighteen pipes with an internal diameter of 600 mm and fibre dosages of 10, 20 and 40 kg/m3 were manufactured and tested. Some technological aspects were concluded. Likewise, a numerical parameterized model was implemented. With this model, the simulation of the resistant behaviour of SFRCP can be performed. In this sense, the results experimentally obtained were contrasted with those suggested by means MAP reaching very satisfactory correlations. Taking it into account, it could be said that the numerical model is a useful tool for the optimal design of the SFRCP fibre dosages, avoiding the need of the systematic employment of the test as an indirect design method. Consequently, the use of this model would reduce the overall cost of the pipes and would give fibres a boost as a solution for this structural typology. (Author) 27 refs.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Recycled Concrete Using Convex Aggregate Model and Base Force Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijiang Peng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available By using the Base Force Element Method (BFEM on potential energy principle, a new numerical concrete model, random convex aggregate model, is presented in this paper to simulate the experiment under uniaxial compression for recycled aggregate concrete (RAC which can also be referred to as recycled concrete. This model is considered as a heterogeneous composite which is composed of five mediums, including natural coarse aggregate, old mortar, new mortar, new interfacial transition zone (ITZ, and old ITZ. In order to simulate the damage processes of RAC, a curve damage model was adopted as the damage constitutive model and the strength theory of maximum tensile strain was used as the failure criterion in the BFEM on mesomechanics. The numerical results obtained in this paper which contained the uniaxial compressive strengths, size effects on strength, and damage processes of RAC are in agreement with experimental observations. The research works show that the random convex aggregate model and the BFEM with the curve damage model can be used for simulating the relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties of RAC.

  6. A sophisticated simulation for the fracture behavior of concrete material using XFEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Changhai; Wang, Xiaomin; Kong, Jingchang; Li, Shuang; Xie, Lili

    2017-10-01

    The development of a powerful numerical model to simulate the fracture behavior of concrete material has long been one of the dominant research areas in earthquake engineering. A reliable model should be able to adequately represent the discontinuous characteristics of cracks and simulate various failure behaviors under complicated loading conditions. In this paper, a numerical formulation, which incorporates a sophisticated rigid-plastic interface constitutive model coupling cohesion softening, contact, friction and shear dilatation into the XFEM, is proposed to describe various crack behaviors of concrete material. An effective numerical integration scheme for accurately assembling the contribution to the weak form on both sides of the discontinuity is introduced. The effectiveness of the proposed method has been assessed by simulating several well-known experimental tests. It is concluded that the numerical method can successfully capture the crack paths and accurately predict the fracture behavior of concrete structures. The influence of mode-II parameters on the mixed-mode fracture behavior is further investigated to better determine these parameters.

  7. Numerical simulations and experimental measurements of steel and ice impacts on concrete for acoustic interrogation of delaminations in bridge decks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzeo, Brian A.; Patil, Anjali N.; Klis, Jeffrey M. [Brigham Young University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Provo, Utah, 84602 (United States); Hurd, Randy C.; Truscott, Tadd T. [Brigham Young University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Provo, Utah, 84602 (United States); Guthrie, W. Spencer [Brigham Young University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Provo, Utah, 84602 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    Delaminations in bridge decks typically result from corrosion of the top mat of reinforcing steel, which leads to a localized separation of the concrete cover from the underlying concrete. Because delaminations cannot be detected using visual inspection, rapid, large-area interrogation methods are desired to characterize bridge decks without disruption to traffic, without the subjectivity inherent in existing methods, and with increased inspector safety. To this end, disposable impactors such as water droplets or ice chips can be dropped using automatic dispensers onto concrete surfaces to excite mechanical vibrations while acoustic responses can be recorded using air-coupled microphones. In this work, numerical simulations are used to characterize the flexural response of a model concrete bridge deck subject to both steel and ice impactors, and the results are compared with similar experiments performed in the laboratory on a partially delaminated concrete bridge deck slab. The simulations offer greater understanding of the kinetics of impacts and the responses of materials.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Moving Load on Concrete Pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lajčáková Gabriela

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of the development with time of the strain and stress states in pavement structures is needed in the solution of various engineering tasks as the design fatigue lifetime reliability maintenance and structure development. The space computing model of the truck TATRA 815 is introduced. The pavement computing model is created in the sense of Kirchhof theory of the thin slab on elastic foundation. The goal of the calculation is to obtain the vertical deflection in the middle of the slab and the time courses of vertical tire forces. The equations of motion are derived in the form of differential equations. The assumption about the shape of the slab deflection area is adopted. The equations of the motion are solved numerically in the environment of program system MATLAB. The dependences following the influence of various parameters (speed of vehicle motion, stiffness of subgrade, slab thickness, road profile on the pavement vertical deflections and the vertical tire forces are introduced. The results obtained from the plate computing model are compared with the results obtained by the FEM analysis. The outputs of the numerical solution in the time domain can be transformed into a frequency domain and subsequently used to solve various engineering tasks.

  9. Finite Element Simulation of GFRP Reinforced Concrete Beam Externally Strengthened With CFRP Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salleh Norhafizah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction technology now has become more and more advanced allowing the development of new technologies or material to replace the previous one and also solved some of the troubles confronted by construction experts. The Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer (GFRP composite is an alternative to replace the current usage of steel as it is rust proof and stronger in terms of stiffness compared to steel. Furthermore, GFRP bars have a high strength-to-weight ratio, making them attractive as reinforcement for concrete structures. However, the tensile behavior of GFRP bars is characterized by a linear elastic stress–strain relationship up to failure and, therefore, concrete elements reinforced with GFRP reinforcement exhibit brittle failure without warning. Design codes encourage over-reinforced GFRP design since it is more progressive and leads to a less catastrophic failure with a higher degree of deformability. Moreover, because of GFRP low modulus of elasticity, GFRP reinforced concrete members exhibit larger deflections and wider cracks width than steel reinforced concrete. This aims of this paper is to developed 2D Finite Element (FE models that can accurately simulate the respond on an improvement in the deflection of GFRP reinforced concrete beam externally strengthened with CFRP plates on the tension part of beam. The prediction of flexural response according to RCCSA software was also discussed. It was observed that the predicted FE results are given similar result with the experimental measured test data. Base on this good agreement, a parametric study was the performed using the validation FE model to investigate the effect of flexural reinforcement ratio and arrangement of the beams strengthened with different regions of CFRP plates.

  10. Modeling and Simulation of Electromutagenic Processes for Multiscale Modification of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela S. Mainardi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Concrete contains numerous pores that allow degradation when chloride ions migrate through these paths and make contact with the steel reinforcement in a structure. Chlorides come mainly from the sea or de-icing salts. To keep the reinforcement from being exposed to chlorides, it is possible to electrokinetically force nanoparticles into the pores, blocking access. This procedure is called electrokinetic nanoparticle treatment. When the particles used are reactive in nature, the process becomes both structural and chemical in nature. We use the term electromutagenic processing to describe such extensive electrochemical remodeling. Filling the pores in a block of concrete with solid materials or nanoparticles tends to improve the strength significantly. In this paper, results obtained from modeling and simulation were aimed at multi-scale porosity reduction of concrete. Since nanoparticles and pores were modeled with spheres and cylinders having different sizes, the results were compared with traditional sphere packing problems in mathematics. There were significant differences observed related to the sizes of spheres and allowable boundary conditions. From traditional sphere packing analysis the highest porosity reduction anticipated was 74%. In contrast, the highest pore reduction obtained in this work was approximately 50%, which matched results from actual electrokinetic nanoparticle treatments. This work also compared the analytical and simulation methods used for several sizes of nanoparticles and pores.

  11. Experimental assessment of air permeability in a concrete shear wall subjected to simulated seismic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girrens, S.P.; Farrar, C.R.

    1991-07-01

    A safety concern for the proposed Special Nuclear Materials Laboratory (SNML) facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory was air leakage from the facility if it were to experience a design basis earthquake event. To address this concern, a study was initiated to estimate air leakage, driven by wind-generated pressure gradients, from a seismically damaged concrete structure. This report describes a prototype experiment developed and performed to measure the air permeability in a reinforced concrete shear wall, both before and after simulated seismic loading. A shear wall test structure was fabricated with standard 4000-psi concrete mix. Static load-cycle testing was used to simulate earthquake loading. Permeability measurements were made by pressurizing one side of the shear wall above atmospheric conditions and recording the transient pressure decay. As long as the structure exhibited linear load displacement response, no variation in the air permeability was detected. However, experimental results indicate that the air permeability in the shear wall increased by a factor of 40 after the wall had been damaged (cracked). 17 figs., 8 tabs

  12. Performance of "Waterless Concrete"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutanji, H. A.; Grugel, R. N.

    2009-01-01

    Waterless concrete consists of molten elementary sulfur and aggregate. The aggregates in a lunar environment will be lunar rocks and soil. Sulfur is present on the Moon in Troilite soil (FeS) and, by oxidation of the soil, iron and sulfur can be produced. Sulfur concrete specimens were cycled between liquid nitrogen (approx.]91 C) and room temperature (^21 C) to simulate exposure to a lunar environment. Cycled and control specimens were subsequently tested in compression at room temperatures (^21 C) and ^-101 C. Test results showed that due to temperature cycling, the compressive strength of cycled specimens was 20% of those non-cycled. This reduction in strength can be attributed to the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion of the materials constituting the concrete which promoted cracking. Similar sulfur concrete mixtures were strengthened with short and long glass fibres. The lunar regolith simulant was melted in a 25 cc Pt- Rh crucible in a Sybron Thermoline high temperature MoSi2 furnace at melting temperatures of 1450 to 1600 C for times of 30 min to i hour. Glass fibres and small rods were pulled from the melt. The glass fibres were used to reinforce sulfur concrete plated to improve the flexural strength of the sulfur concrete. Beams strengthened with glass fibres showed to exhibit an increase in the flexural strength by as much as 45%.

  13. Simulation of crack propagation in fiber-reinforced concrete by fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jun; Li, Victor C.

    2004-01-01

    Mode I crack propagation in fiber-reinforced concrete (FRC) is simulated by a fracture mechanics approach. A superposition method is applied to calculate the crack tip stress intensity factor. The model relies on the fracture toughness of hardened cement paste (K IC ) and the crack bridging law, so-called stress-crack width (σ-δ) relationship of the material, as the fundamental material parameters for model input. As two examples, experimental data from steel FRC beams under three-point bending load are analyzed with the present fracture mechanics model. A good agreement has been found between model predictions and experimental results in terms of flexural stress-crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD) diagrams. These analyses and comparisons confirm that the structural performance of concrete and FRC elements, such as beams in bending, can be predicted by the simple fracture mechanics model as long as the related material properties, K IC and (σ-δ) relationship, are known

  14. 3D Simulation of Self-Compacting Concrete Flow Based on MRT-LBM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu-Chao Qiu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method (MRT-LBM with a D3Q27 discrete velocity model is applied for simulation of self-compacting concrete (SCC flows. In the present study, the SCC is assumed as a non-Newtonian fluid, and a modified Herschel–Bulkley model is used as constitutive mode. The mass tracking algorithm was used for modeling the liquid-gas interface. Two numerical examples of the slump test and enhanced L-box test were performed, and the calculated results are compared with available experiments in literatures. The numerical results demonstrate the capability of the proposed MRT-LBM in modeling of self-compacting concrete flows.

  15. DUST, Albedo Monte-Carlo Simulation of Neutron Streaming in Multi-legged Square Concrete Ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: DUST simulates the thermal neutron streaming through multi-legged square concrete ducts. 2 - Method of solution: DUST uses the albedo Monte Carlo method. The albedo data used are in the form of empirical formulae based on the measured doubly differential albedo data. Sampling of the reflected polar and azimuthal angles is done by the rejection method. Variance reduction devices such as Russian Roulette are used. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: - The albedo data and the subroutines for sampling the reflected polar and azimuthal angles are specific for concrete ducts. The maximum number of legs (as specified by dimension statements) is 5 and the maximum number of dose points is 50. The dose points considered are only in the last leg of the multi-legged duct

  16. Empirical Validation of Heat Transfer Performance Simulation of Graphite/PCM Concrete Materials for Thermally Activated Building System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hee Song

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To increase the heat capacity in lightweight construction materials, a phase change material (PCM can be introduced to building elements. A thermally activated building system (TABS with graphite/PCM concrete hollow core slab is suggested as an energy-efficient technology to shift and reduce the peak thermal load in buildings. An evaluation of heat storage and dissipation characteristics of TABS in graphite/PCM concrete has been conducted using dynamic simulations, but empirical validation is necessary to acceptably predict the thermal behavior of graphite/PCM concrete. This study aimed to validate the thermal behavior of graphite/PCM concrete through a three-dimensional transient heat transfer simulation. The simulation results were compared to experimental results from previous studies of concrete and graphite/PCM concrete. The overall thermal behavior for both materials was found to be similar to experiment results. Limitations in the simulation modeling, which included determination of the indoor heat transfer coefficient, assumption of constant thermal conductivity with temperature, and assumption of specimen homogeneity, led to slight differences between the measured and simulated results.

  17. Assessment of Mechanical Properties and Damage of High Performance Concrete Subjected to Magnesium Sulfate Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Cang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfate attack is one of the most important problems affecting concrete structures, especially magnesium sulfate attack. This paper presents an investigation on the mechanical properties and damage evolution of high performance concrete (HPC with different contents of fly ash exposure to magnesium sulfate environment. The microstructure, porosity, mass loss, dimensional variation, compressive strength, and splitting tensile strength of HPC were investigated at various erosion times up to 392 days. The ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV propagation in HPC at different erosion time was determined by using ultrasonic testing technique. A relationship between damage and UPV of HPC was derived according to damage mechanics, and a correlation between the damage of HPC and erosion time was obtained eventually. The results indicated that (1 the average increasing amplitude of porosity for HPCs was 34.01% before and after exposure to magnesium sulfate solution; (2 the damage evolution of HPCs under sulfate attack could be described by an exponential fitting; (3 HPC containing 20% fly ash had the strongest resistance to magnesium sulfate attack.

  18. Electrochemical and passive behaviour of tin alloyed ferritic stainless steel in concrete environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Li, Baosong; Ying, Guobing

    2018-05-01

    In the present work, the electrochemical behavior and semiconducting properties of a tin alloyed ferritic stainless steel in simulated concrete solution in presence of NaCl were estimated by conventional electrochemical methods such as potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and capacitance measurement (Mott-Schottky approach). The surface passive film was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results revealed a good agreement between pitting corrosion, electrochemical behaviour, and electronic properties. The p and n-type bilayer structure passive film were observed. The increase of Sn4+ oxide species in the passive film shows no beneficial effects on the pitting corrosion. In addition, the dehydration of the passive film was further discussed.

  19. On the corrosion behaviour of phosphoric irons in simulated concrete pore solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Gadadhar; Balasubramaniam, R.

    2008-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of three phosphoric irons P 1 (Fe-0.11P-0.028C), P 2 (Fe-0.32P-0.026C) and P 3 (Fe-0.49P-0.022C) has been studied in simulated concrete pore solution (saturated Ca(OH) 2 solution) containing different chloride concentration. This has been compared with that of two commercial concrete reinforcement steels, a low carbon steel TN (Fe-0.148C-0.542Mn-0.128Si) and a microalloyed corrosion resistant steel CS (Fe-0.151C-0.088P-0.197Si-0.149Cr-0.417Cu). The beneficial aspect of phosphoric irons was revealed from potentiodynamic polarization experiments. The pitting potentials and pitting nucleation resistances for phosphoric irons and CS were higher than that for TN. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies revealed thickening and growth of passive film as a function of time in case of phosphoric irons and CS in saturated Ca(OH) 2 pore solutions without chloride and in the same solution with 0.05% Cl - and 0.1% Cl - . In case of TN, breakdown of passive film resulted in active corrosion in simulated pore solution containing 0.1% Cl - . Linear polarization resistance measurements complemented EIS results. Visual observations indicated that phosphoric iron P 3 was immune to corrosion even after 125 days of immersion in saturated Ca(OH) 2 solution containing 5% NaCl. The good corrosion resistance of phosphoric irons in simulated concrete pore solution containing chloride ions has been related to the formation of phosphate, based on ultraviolet spectrophotometric analysis and Pourbaix diagram of phosphorus-water system

  20. A p-version embedded model for simulation of concrete temperature fields with cooling pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Qiang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pipe cooling is an effective method of mass concrete temperature control, but its accurate and convenient numerical simulation is still a cumbersome problem. An improved embedded model, considering the water temperature variation along the pipe, was proposed for simulating the temperature field of early-age concrete structures containing cooling pipes. The improved model was verified with an engineering example. Then, the p-version self-adaption algorithm for the improved embedded model was deduced, and the initial values and boundary conditions were examined. Comparison of some numerical samples shows that the proposed model can provide satisfying precision and a higher efficiency. The analysis efficiency can be doubled at the same precision, even for a large-scale element. The p-version algorithm can fit grids of different sizes for the temperature field simulation. The convenience of the proposed algorithm lies in the possibility of locating more pipe segments in one element without the need of so regular a shape as in the explicit model.

  1. Performance of Waterless Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutanji, Houssam; Evans, Steve; Grugel, Richard N.

    2010-01-01

    The development of permanent lunar bases is constrained by performance of construction materials and availability of in-situ resources. Concrete seems a suitable construction material for the lunar environment, but water, one of its major components, is an extremely scarce resource on the Moon. This study explores an alternative to hydraulic concrete by replacing the binding mix of concrete (cement and water) with sulfur. Sulfur is a volatile element on the lunar surface that can be extracted from lunar soils by heating. Sulfur concrete mixes were prepared to investigate the effect of extreme environmental conditions on the properties of sulfur concrete. A hypervelocity impact test was conducted, having as its target a 5-cm cubic sample of sulfur concrete. This item consisted of JSC-1 lunar regolith simulant (65%) and sulfur (35%). The sample was placed in the MSFC Impact Test Facility s Micro Light Gas Gun target chamber, and was struck by a 1-mm diameter (1.4e-03 g) aluminum projectile at 5.85 km/s. In addition, HZTERN code, provided by NASA was used to study the effectiveness of sulfur concrete when subjected to space radiation.

  2. Mesoscopic Modeling and Simulation of the Dynamic Tensile Behavior of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ronnie; Simone, A.; Sluys, L. J.

    2013-01-01

    of the most significant constitutive model parameters on global and local response. Different distributions and shapes of the aggregate grains are tested. Three model parameter sets, corresponding to different moisture conditions, are employed in the analysis of two specimens in which the applied loading rate......We present a two-dimensional mesoscopic finite element model for simulating the rate- and moisture-dependent material behavior of concrete. The idealized mesostructure consists of aggregate grains surrounded by an interfacial transition zone embedded in the bulk material. We examine the influence...

  3. Corrosion protection of the reinforcing steels in chloride-laden concrete environment through epoxy/polyaniline–camphorsulfonate nanocomposite coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pour-Ali, Sadegh; Dehghanian, Changiz; Kosari, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Epoxy/polyaniline–camphorsulfonate nanocomposite coating well protects steel rebar. • Coating performance is evaluated by impedance measurements up to 1 year. • Ultimate bond strength between the coated rebars and concrete is measured. • Self-compacting concrete shows better anticorrosive property compared to normal one. - Abstract: In this study, an epoxy/polyaniline–camphorsulfonate nanocomposite (epoxy/PANI–CSA) is employed to protect reinforcing steels in chloride-laden concrete environment. The synthesized nanocomposite was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Bare, epoxy-coated and epoxy/PANI–CSA nanocomposite-coated steel rebars were embedded in normal and self-compacting concretes. To evaluate their corrosion behaviors, open circuit potential and impedance measurements were performed for the duration of 1 year. Ultimate bond strength of concrete with the reinforcement bars were measured in corroded and uncorroded conditions. It was found that epoxy/PANI–CSA coating provides good corrosion resistance and durable bond strength with concrete for steel rebars

  4. Small-scale multi-axial hybrid simulation of a shear-critical reinforced concrete frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghian, Vahid; Kwon, Oh-Sung; Vecchio, Frank

    2017-10-01

    This study presents a numerical multi-scale simulation framework which is extended to accommodate hybrid simulation (numerical-experimental integration). The framework is enhanced with a standardized data exchange format and connected to a generalized controller interface program which facilitates communication with various types of laboratory equipment and testing configurations. A small-scale experimental program was conducted using a six degree-of-freedom hydraulic testing equipment to verify the proposed framework and provide additional data for small-scale testing of shearcritical reinforced concrete structures. The specimens were tested in a multi-axial hybrid simulation manner under a reversed cyclic loading condition simulating earthquake forces. The physical models were 1/3.23-scale representations of a beam and two columns. A mixed-type modelling technique was employed to analyze the remainder of the structures. The hybrid simulation results were compared against those obtained from a large-scale test and finite element analyses. The study found that if precautions are taken in preparing model materials and if the shear-related mechanisms are accurately considered in the numerical model, small-scale hybrid simulations can adequately simulate the behaviour of shear-critical structures. Although the findings of the study are promising, to draw general conclusions additional test data are required.

  5. A simulation environment for ITER PCS development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, M.L.; Ambrosino, G.; De Tommasi, G.; Humphreys, D.A.; Mattei, M.; Neu, G.; Raupp, G.; Treutterer, W.; Winter, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Describes task to develop simulation tool to aid development/testing of ITER PCS. • Requirements and use cases and preliminary architecture have been delivered. • Detailed design is now being developed. • Provides overview of use cases and requirements. • Provides overview of architecture and status of development. - Abstract: A simulation environment known as the Plasma Control System Simulation Platform (PCSSP), specifically designed to support development of the ITER Plasma Control System (PCS), is currently under construction by an international team encompassing a cross-section of expertise in simulation and exception handling for plasma control. The proposed design addresses the challenging requirements of supporting the PCS design. This paper provides an overview of the PCSSP project and a discussion of some of the major features of its design. Plasma control for the ITER tokamak will be significantly more challenging than for existing fusion devices. An order of magnitude greater performance (e.g. [1,2]) is needed for some types of control, which together with limited actuator authority, implies that optimized individual controllers and nonlinear saturation logic are required. At the same time, consequences of control failure are significantly more severe, which implies a conflicting requirement for robust control. It also implies a requirement for comprehensive and robust exception handling. Coordinated control of multiple competing objectives with significant interactions, together with many shared uses of actuators to control multiple variables, implies that highly integrated control logic and shared actuator management will be required. It remains a challenge for the integrated technologies to simultaneously address these multiple and often competing requirements to be demonstrated on existing fusion devices and adapted for ITER in time to support its operational schedule. We describe ways in which the PCSSP will help address

  6. Cell survival in a simulated Mars environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Paul; Kurk, Michael Andy; Boland, Eugene; Thomas, David

    2016-07-01

    The most ancient life forms on earth date back comfortably to the time when liquid water was believed to be abundant on Mars. These ancient life forms include cyanobacteria, contemporary autotrophic earth organisms believed to have descended from ancestors present as long as 3.5 billion years ago. Contemporary cyanobacteria have adapted to the earth environment's harshest conditions (long-term drying, high and low temperature), and, being autotrophic, they are among the most likely life forms to withstand space travel and the Mars environment. However, it is unlikely that humans would unwittingly contaminate a planetary spacecraft with these microbes. One the other hand, heterotrophic microbes that co-habit with humans are more likely spacecraft contaminants, as history attests. Indeed, soil samples from the Atacama desert have yielded colony-forming organisms resembling enteric bacteria. There is a need to understand the survivability of cyanobacteria (likely survivors, unlikely contaminants) and heterotrophic eubacteria (unlikely survivors, likely contaminants) under simulated planetary conditions. A 35-day test was performed in a commercial planetary simulation system (Techshot, Inc., Greenville, IN) in which the minimum night-time temperature was -80 C, the maximum daytime temperature was +26 C, the simulated day-night light cycle in earth hours was 12-on and 12-off, and the total pressure of the pure CO _{2} atmosphere was maintained below 11 mbar. Any water present was allowed to equilibrate with the changing temperature and pressure. The gas phase was sampled into a CR1-A low-pressure hygrometer (Buck Technologies, Boulder, CO), and dew/frost point was measured once every hour and recorded on a data logger, along with the varying temperature in the chamber, from which the partial pressure of water was calculated. According to measurements there was no liquid water present throughout the test except during the initial pump-down period when aqueous specimens

  7. Mechanical and Durability Properties of Fly Ash Based Concrete Exposed to Marine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagadgar, Sarfaraz Ahmed; Saha, Suman; Rajasekaran, C.

    2017-06-01

    Efforts over the past few years for improving the performance of concrete suggest that cement replacement with mineral admixtures can enhance the strength and durability of concrete. Feasibility of producing good quality concrete by using alccofine and fly ash replacements is investigated and also the potential benefits from their incorporation were looked into. In this study, an attempt has been made to assess the performance of concrete in severe marine conditions exposed upto a period of 150 days. This work investigates the influence of alccofine and fly ash as partial replacement of cement in various percentages (Alccofine - 5% replacement to cement content) and (fly ash - 0%, 15%, 30%, 50% & 60% to total cementitious content) on mechanical and durability properties (Permit ion permeability test and corrosion current density) of concrete. Usage of alccofine and high quantity of fly ash as additional cementitious materials in concrete has resulted in higher workability of concrete. Inclusion of alccofine shows an early strength gaining property whereas fly ash results in gaining strength at later stage. Concrete mixes containing 5% alccofine with 15% fly ash replacement reported greater compressive strength than the other concrete mixes cured in both curing conditions. Durability test conducted at 56 and 150 days indicated that concrete containing higher percentages of fly ash resulted in lower permeability as well lesser corrosion density.

  8. Psychological Effects towards Humans Living in the Environment Made of Biological Concrete in Malaysia at 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirreza Talaiekhozani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In day-to-day life concrete become a compulsory material in the construction field as to make it a real concern among researchers for producing concrete with improved properties. Biological method is one of the new methods to improve concrete properties. Although, much research about biological concrete has been carried out, but till now nobody has not studied for the psychological effects of using a house or offices made up of biological concrete. The aim of this study is to investigate and find out the person's opinion about staying in a house or offices made up of biological concrete. In this study, a questionnaire containing eight questions was prepared and distributed among 21 persons in Malaysia University of Technology including students, academic and non-academic staffs among which few of them was an expert in the field of biological concrete and others did not have any knowledge about the bioconcrete. Finally, the results obtained from the questionnaires were analyzed. The results showed that 81% of participants in this study would like to stay in a house or office made up of biological concrete. However, 38% of participants believe that staying in a house or office made of biological concrete can cause health related problems. The current research paper can be considered significant for architects and civil engineers to have the insight to look into the psychological aspects of using biological concrete for various applications in the field of construction.

  9. Shielding of radiation fields generated by 252Cf in a concrete maze. Part 2 -- Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fasso, A.; Ipe, N.E.; Reyna, A.

    1998-03-01

    A streaming experiment performed in a concrete maze of shape and size typical of a radiotherapy room was simulated with the Monte Carlo program FLUKA. The purpose of the calculation was to test the performance of the code in the low energy neutron range, and at the same time to provide additional information which could help in optimizing shielding of medical facilities. Instrument responses were calculated at different maze locations for several experimental configurations and were compared with measurements. In addition, neutron and gamma fluence, ambient dose equivalent and effective dose were calculated at the same positions. Both sources used in the experiment, namely a bare 252 Cf source and one shielded by a tungsten shell 5 cm thick, were considered in the simulation

  10. Construction Simulation Analysis of 60m-span Concrete Filled Steel Tube arch bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jing Xian; Ding, Qing Hua

    2018-06-01

    The construction process of the CFST arch bridge is complicated. The construction process not only affects the structural stress in the installation, but also determines the form a bridge and internal force of the bridge. In this paper, a 60m span concrete filled steel tube tied arch bridge is taken as the background, and a three-dimensional finite element simulation model is established by using the MIDAS/Civil bridge structure analysis software. The elevation of the main arch ring, the beam stress, the forces in hanger rods and the modal frequency of the main arch during the construction stage are calculated, and the construction process is simulated and analyzed. Effectively and reasonably guide the construction and ensure that the line and force conditions of the completed bridge meet the design requirements and provides a reliable technical guarantee for the safe construction of the bridge.

  11. Shielding of radiation fields generated by {sup 252}Cf in a concrete maze. Part 2 -- Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasso, A.; Ipe, N.E.; Reyna, A. [Stanford Univ., CA (US). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; McCall, R.C. [McCall Associates, Woodside, CA (US)

    1998-03-01

    A streaming experiment performed in a concrete maze of shape and size typical of a radiotherapy room was simulated with the Monte Carlo program FLUKA. The purpose of the calculation was to test the performance of the code in the low energy neutron range, and at the same time to provide additional information which could help in optimizing shielding of medical facilities. Instrument responses were calculated at different maze locations for several experimental configurations and were compared with measurements. In addition, neutron and gamma fluence, ambient dose equivalent and effective dose were calculated at the same positions. Both sources used in the experiment, namely a bare {sup 252}Cf source and one shielded by a tungsten shell 5 cm thick, were considered in the simulation.

  12. Simulation of deformation on aged concrete dam using the date of nondestructive evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobori, O.; Yamaguchi, S.; Udagawa, Y.; Hirano, M.

    2006-01-01

    Stress and deformation analysis was achieved by FEM in this paper. The simulation model is concrete dam constructed more than twenty years ago and pointed out the degradation year by year such as Alkali-aggregate reaction and salt. At first to have the useful numerical data, ultrasonic traveling velocity was measured in the field. Crack length and wide are inspected by observation. And sampling cores were extracted from several spots. Elastic constants (Young's Modulus and Poisson's ratio) and density of material in dam are decided from the experimental results. Deformation and Stress distribution to horizontal and vertical cracks, crack length were calculated by FEM with some assumption, considering the boundary conditions, earth pressure, existence of additional pressure. Simulation results is shown that, distortion of the dam is now small to the only earth pressure as it is, horizontal crack will cause the more displacement than crack, and high stress occurs around the cracks.

  13. Computer simulation of spacecraft/environment interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupnikov, K.K.; Makletsov, A.A.; Mileev, V.N.; Novikov, L.S.; Sinolits, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents some examples of a computer simulation of spacecraft interaction with space environment. We analysed a set data on electron and ion fluxes measured in 1991-1994 on geostationary satellite GORIZONT-35. The influence of spacecraft eclipse and device eclipse by solar-cell panel on spacecraft charging was investigated. A simple method was developed for an estimation of spacecraft potentials in LEO. Effects of various particle flux impact and spacecraft orientation are discussed. A computer engineering model for a calculation of space radiation is presented. This model is used as a client/server model with WWW interface, including spacecraft model description and results representation based on the virtual reality markup language

  14. Computer simulation of spacecraft/environment interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Krupnikov, K K; Mileev, V N; Novikov, L S; Sinolits, V V

    1999-01-01

    This report presents some examples of a computer simulation of spacecraft interaction with space environment. We analysed a set data on electron and ion fluxes measured in 1991-1994 on geostationary satellite GORIZONT-35. The influence of spacecraft eclipse and device eclipse by solar-cell panel on spacecraft charging was investigated. A simple method was developed for an estimation of spacecraft potentials in LEO. Effects of various particle flux impact and spacecraft orientation are discussed. A computer engineering model for a calculation of space radiation is presented. This model is used as a client/server model with WWW interface, including spacecraft model description and results representation based on the virtual reality markup language.

  15. Exploring the relationship between structurally defined geometrical parameters of reinforced concrete beams and the thermal comfort on indoor environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Daniel Sang-Hoon; Naboni, Emanuele

    2017-01-01

    mass effect (and the implication on thermal comfort) and the given geometrical parameters of exposed soffit reinforced concrete beams are explored. The geometrical parameters of the beams are initially defined in means of structural optimisation. The beams consist of flange and web in likeness of T...... the resultant heat exchange behaviour, and the implication on thermal comfort indoor environment. However, the current paper presents the thermal mass characteristics of one geometrical type. The study is based on results derived from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis, where Rhino 3D is used......The paper presents a research exploring the thermal mass effect of reinforced concrete beams with structurally optimised geometrical forms. Fully exposed concrete soffits in architectural contexts create more than just visual impacts on the indoor climate through their possible interferences...

  16. Human Performance in Simulated Reduced Gravity Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Matthew; Harvill, Lauren; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2014-01-01

    NASA is currently designing a new space suit capable of working in deep space and on Mars. Designing a suit is very difficult and often requires trade-offs between performance, cost, mass, and system complexity. Our current understanding of human performance in reduced gravity in a planetary environment (the moon or Mars) is limited to lunar observations, studies from the Apollo program, and recent suit tests conducted at JSC using reduced gravity simulators. This study will look at our most recent reduced gravity simulations performed on the new Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) compared to the C-9 reduced gravity plane. Methods: Subjects ambulated in reduced gravity analogs to obtain a baseline for human performance. Subjects were tested in lunar gravity (1.6 m/sq s) and Earth gravity (9.8 m/sq s) in shirt-sleeves. Subjects ambulated over ground at prescribed speeds on the ARGOS, but ambulated at a self-selected speed on the C-9 due to time limitations. Subjects on the ARGOS were given over 3 minutes to acclimate to the different conditions before data was collected. Nine healthy subjects were tested in the ARGOS (6 males, 3 females, 79.5 +/- 15.7 kg), while six subjects were tested on the C-9 (6 males, 78.8 +/- 11.2 kg). Data was collected with an optical motion capture system (Vicon, Oxford, UK) and was analyzed using customized analysis scripts in BodyBuilder (Vicon, Oxford, UK) and MATLAB (MathWorks, Natick, MA, USA). Results: In all offloaded conditions, variation between subjects increased compared to 1-g. Kinematics in the ARGOS at lunar gravity resembled earth gravity ambulation more closely than the C-9 ambulation. Toe-off occurred 10% earlier in both reduced gravity environments compared to earth gravity, shortening the stance phase. Likewise, ankle, knee, and hip angles remained consistently flexed and had reduced peaks compared to earth gravity. Ground reaction forces in lunar gravity (normalized to Earth body weight) were 0.4 +/- 0.2 on

  17. Simulation of fresh concrete flow state-of-the art report of the RILEM technical committee 222-SCF

    CERN Document Server

    Gram, Annika

    2014-01-01

    This work deals with numerical simulations of fresh concrete flows. After the first introductory chapter dealing with the various physical phenomena involved in flows of fresh cementitious materials, the aim of the second chapter is to give an overview of the work carried out on simulation of flow of cement-based materials using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This includes governing equations, constitutive equations, analytical and numerical solutions, and examples showing simulations of testing, mixing and castings. The third chapter focuses on the application of Discrete Element Method (DEM) in simulating the flow of fresh concrete. The fourth chapter is an introductory text about numerical errors both in CFD and DEM whereas the fifth and last chapter give some recent examples of numerical simulations developed by various authors in order to simulate the presence of grains or fibers in a non-Newtonian cement matrix.

  18. Sea Dredged Gravel versus Crushed Granite as Coarse Aggregate for Self Compacting Concrete in Aggressive Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.; Kristensen, Lasse Frølich

    2007-01-01

    Properties of self compacting concrete (SCC) with two types of coarse aggregate - sea dredged gravel with smooth and rounded particles and crushed granite with rough and angular particles - have been studied. Sea gravel allowed a higher aggregate proportion in the concrete leading to a higher...

  19. Crash Testing and Simulation of a Cessna 172 Aircraft: Hard Landing Onto Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2016-01-01

    A full-scale crash test of a Cessna 172 aircraft was conducted at the Landing and Impact Research Facility at NASA Langley Research Center during the summer of 2015. The purpose of the test was to evaluate the performance of Emergency Locator Transmitters (ELTs) that were mounted at various locations in the aircraft and to generate impact test data for model validation. A finite element model of the aircraft was developed for execution in LSDYNA to simulate the test. Measured impact conditions were 722.4-in/s forward velocity and 276-in/s vertical velocity with a 1.5deg pitch (nose up) attitude. These conditions were intended to represent a survivable hard landing. The impact surface was concrete. During the test, the nose gear tire impacted the concrete, followed closely by impact of the main gear tires. The main landing gear spread outward, as the nose gear stroked vertically. The only fuselage contact with the impact surface was a slight impact of the rearmost portion of the lower tail. Thus, capturing the behavior of the nose and main landing gear was essential to accurately predict the response. This paper describes the model development and presents test-analysis comparisons in three categories: inertial properties, time sequence of events, and acceleration and velocity time-histories.

  20. Mathematical Modeling, Simulation and Optimization for Selected Robotic Processes related to Manufacturing of Unique Concrete Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortsen, Jens

    Denne afhandling præsenterer vores arbejde i det danske projekt Unique Concrete Structures (Unikabeton) and EU projekt TailorMade Concrete Structures (TailorCrete) med at automatisere udvalgte processer for konstruktion af unike beton bygninger. Vi har primært fokus på robotfræsning af komplekse...... dobbeltkurvede armerings gitter med to samarbejdende robotter, hvor delprocesserne er bøjning, transportering og binding af ameringsstænger. Robotinstallationen er baseret på et off-line simuleringsprogram med dynamisk simulerings support for stangnedbøjning og samtidigt robot control for at reducere...... produktionstiden. De to mindre processer som varmetråd skæring af EPS blokke før fræsning og sprøjtning af slipmiddel på de færdige formwork blokke er også præsenteret efter de to hoved processer. Til sidst præsenterer vi en række af real life betonstrukturer baseret på vores arbejde i denne afhandling...

  1. The Investigation on Flexural Toughness of Partially Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Immersed by Simulated Sea-Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng GAO

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the corrosive resistance of partially steel fiber reinforced concrete (PSFRC, the flexural toughness experiment of nine specimens subjected to corrosion by alternating wet and dry cycles in a simulated marine environment were conducted, which aims at investigating the effect of corrosion time, steel fiber volume fraction and SFRC thickness on PSFRC toughness. The experimental results showed that both the mechanical and ductile characteristics of PSFRC got worse due to corrosion even if increasing the steel fiber volume. Additionally, the effect of steel fiber content on the toughness and ultimate load are greater than PSFRC thickness (t. The increase of 56.6% and 171% could be obtained in the mean ultimate load and I10 if the increase of steel fiber volume is from 0.5 % to 2.0%, respectively. This paper could offer a reference to the application of PSFRC in sea-water environment.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.4.17049

  2. Experiment on heat transfer in simulated molten core/concrete interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsumura, Yukihiro; Hashizume, Hidetoshi; Toda, Saburo; Kawaguchi, Takahiro.

    1993-01-01

    In order to investigate heat transfer between molten core and concrete in LWR severe accidents, experiments were performed using water as the molten core, paraffin as the concrete, and air as gases from the decomposition of concrete. It was found that the heat transfer on the interface between paraffin and water were promoted strongly by the air gas. (author)

  3. Modified chloride diffusion model for concrete under the coupling effect of mechanical load and chloride salt environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Mingfeng; Lin, Dayong; Liu, Jianwen; Shi, Chenghua; Ma, Jianjun; Yang, Weichao; Yu, Xiaoniu

    2018-03-01

    For the purpose of investigating lining concrete durability, this study derives a modified chloride diffusion model for concrete based on the odd continuation of boundary conditions and Fourier transform. In order to achieve this, the linear stress distribution on a sectional structure is considered, detailed procedures and methods are presented for model verification and parametric analysis. Simulation results show that the chloride diffusion model can reflect the effects of linear stress distribution of the sectional structure on the chloride diffusivity with reliable accuracy. Along with the natural environmental characteristics of practical engineering structures, reference value ranges of model parameters are provided. Furthermore, a chloride diffusion model is extended for the consideration of multi-factor coupling of linear stress distribution, chloride concentration and diffusion time. Comparison between model simulation and typical current research results shows that the presented model can produce better considerations with a greater universality.

  4. NANOMODIFIED CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Khroustalev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main directions in construction material science is the development of  next generation concrete that is ultra-dense, high-strength, ultra-porous, high heat efficient, extra corrosion-resistant. Selection of such direction is caused by extreme operational impacts on the concrete, namely: continuously increasing load on the concrete and various dynamics of such loads; the necessity in operation of concrete products in a wide temperature range and their exposure to various chemical and physical effects.The next generation concrete represents high-tech concrete mixtures with additives that takes on and retain the required properties when hardening and being used under any operational conditions. A differential characteristic of the next generation concrete is its complexity that presumes usage of various mineral dispersed components, two- and three fractional fine and coarse aggregates, complex chemical additives, combinations of polymer and iron reinforcement.Design strength and performance properties level of the next generation concrete is achieved by high-quality selection of the composition, proper selection of manufacturing techniques, concrete curing, bringing the quality of concrete items to the required level of technical condition during the operational phase. However, directed formation of its structure is necessary in order to obtain high-tech concrete.Along with the traditional methods for regulation of the next generation concrete structure, modification of concrete while using silica nanoparticles is also considered as a perspective one because the concrete patterning occurs due to introduction of a binder in a mineral matrix. Due to this it is possible to obtain nano-modified materials with completely new properties.The main problem with the creation of nano-modified concrete is a uniform distribution of nano-materials in the volume of the cement matrix which is particularly important in the cases of adding a modifier in

  5. Study on Real-Time Simulation Analysis and Inverse Analysis System for Temperature and Stress of Concrete Dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the concrete dam construction, it is very necessary to strengthen the real-time monitoring and scientific management of concrete temperature control. This paper constructs the analysis and inverse analysis system of temperature stress simulation, which is based on various useful data collected in real time in the process of concrete construction. The system can produce automatically data file of temperature and stress calculation and then achieve the remote real-time simulation calculation of temperature stress by using high performance computing techniques, so the inverse analysis can be carried out based on a basis of monitoring data in the database; it fulfills the automatic feedback calculation according to the error requirement and generates the corresponding curve and chart after the automatic processing and analysis of corresponding results. The system realizes the automation and intellectualization of complex data analysis and preparation work in simulation process and complex data adjustment in the inverse analysis process, which can facilitate the real-time tracking simulation and feedback analysis of concrete temperature stress in construction process and enable you to discover problems timely, take measures timely, and adjust construction scheme and can well instruct you how to ensure project quality.

  6. Assessment of dynamic mechanical behaviour of reinforced concrete beams using a blast simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peroni Marco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical infrastructures may become the target of terrorist bombing attacks or may have to withstand explosive loads due to accidents. The impulsive load connected to explosions is delivered to the structure in a few milliseconds forcing it to respond or fail in a peculiar mode. With reference to the above scientific framework this work presents an innovative apparatus designed and developed at the European Laboratory for Structural Assessment to reproduce a blast pressure history without using explosives. This apparatus is practically a hybrid nitrogen-spring-driven actuator that accelerates masses of up to 100 kg to a maximum velocity of about 25 m/s that impact against the tested structure. The pressure-load history applied to the structure is modulated and reshaped using appropriate layers of elastic soft materials (such as polymeric foams placed between the specimen and the impacting masses. Specific instrumentation has extensively been utilised to investigate the blast simulator performance and to precisely measure the pressure loads applied to the specimen. A series of tests on real scale reinforced concrete beams/columns (250 × 250 × 2200 mm has been performed to efficiently assess the performance and potentiality of the new blast simulator. Results are under evaluation. In addition to the experimental work, a series of numerical simulations by means of the explicit FEM code EUROPLEXUS have been carried out to support and improve the equipment design.

  7. Microstructure and mechanical properties of recycled aggregate concrete in seawater environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Pengjun; Tan, Zhuoying; Guo, Zhiying

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to conduct research about the microstructure and basic properties of recycled aggregate concrete under seawater corrosion. Concrete specimens were fabricated and tested with different replacement percentages of 0%, 30%, and 60% after immersing in seawater for 4, 8, 12, and 16 months, respectively. The basic properties of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) including the compressive strength, the elastic modulus, and chloride penetration depth were explicitly investigated. And the microstructure of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) was revealed to find the seawater corrosion by using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results showed that higher amount of the RCA means more porosity and less strength, which could lower both the compressive strength and resistance to chloride penetration. This research could be a guide in theoretical and numerical analysis for the design of RAC structures.

  8. Performance Analysis of a Recycled Concrete Interfacial Transition Zone in a Rapid Carbonization Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongbing Yue

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the characteristics of recycled concrete interface structures, a multi-interface reconstruction model was established. To study the microstructure evolution of the interfacial transition zone (ITZ during the carbonization process of recycled concrete, the microstructure characteristics of the ITZ of C30, C40, and C50 grade recycled concrete and the mortar matrix before and after carbonization were studied through the microhardness tester and SEM. The results show that the microhardness values of the ITZ and the mortar matrix are obviously increased and that the width of the ITZ decreases, while the ITZ performance of the C50 grade recycled concrete is not significantly changed. The ITZ exhibits a large amount of granular CaCO3 after carbonization, the pores are refined, and microcracks are generated. Overall, there are significant differences in the microstructures between the ITZ and the mortar matrix before and after carbonization.

  9. An intelligent dynamic simulation environment: An object-oriented approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, J.T.; Kisner, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a prototype simulation environment for nuclear power plants which illustrates the application of object-oriented programming to process simulation. Systems are modeled using this technique as a collection of objects which communicate via message passing. The environment allows users to build simulation models by selecting iconic representations of plant components from a menu and connecting them with the aid of a mouse. Models can be modified graphically at any time, even as the simulation is running, and the results observed immediately via real-time graphics. This prototype illustrates the use of object-oriented programming to create a highly interactive and automated simulation environment. 9 refs., 4 figs

  10. Horizontal loading test by whole model specimen simulating inner concrete structure of PWR type nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Noriyuki; Sekine, Masataka; Kimura, Kozo; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Yamaguchi, Tsuneo; Takeda, Toshikazu

    1985-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center has performed a horizontal loading test by a whole model specimen simulating the inner concrete structure of a PWR type nuclear power plant in order to investigate restoring force characteristics of reactor buildings. This report describes the results of examination of applicability to the test results of analysis methods based on elastic theory. The analysis results of elastic stiffness, concrete cracking load, rebar yielding loads and ultimate strength were compared with the test results. According to this examination, it is recognized that even these analysis methods based on elastic theory are comparatively effective for analysis of an inner concrete structure of fairly complex configuration, although there are limits of the scope of applicability. (author)

  11. Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP): Using the CBP Software Toolbox to Simulate Sulfate Attack and Carbonation of Concrete Structures - 13481

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, K.G.; Kosson, D.S.; Garrabrants, A.C.; Sarkar, S. [Vanderbilt University, School of Engineering, CRESP, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Flach, G.; Langton, C.; Smith, F.G.III; Burns, H. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Van der Sloot, H. [Hans Van der Sloot Consultancy, Dorpsstraat 216, 1721BV Langedijk (Netherlands); Meeussen, J.C.L. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, Petten (Netherlands); Seignette, P.F.A.B. [Energy Research Center of The Netherlands, Petten (Netherlands); Samson, E. [SIMCO Technologies, Inc., Quebec (Canada); Mallick, P.; Suttora, L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Esh, D.; Fuhrmann, M.; Philip, J. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) Project is a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional collaboration supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Tank Waste Management. The CBP project has developed a set of integrated modeling tools and leaching test methods to help improve understanding and prediction of the long-term hydraulic and chemical performance of cementitious materials used in nuclear applications. State-of-the-art modeling tools, including LeachXS{sup TM}/ORCHESTRA and STADIUM{sup R}, were selected for their demonstrated abilities to simulate reactive transport and degradation in cementitious materials. The new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency leaching test methods based on the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF), now adopted as part of the SW-846 RCRA methods, have been used to help make the link between modeling and experiment. Although each of the CBP tools has demonstrated utility as a standalone product, coupling the models over relevant spatial and temporal solution domains can provide more accurate predictions of cementitious materials behavior over relevant periods of performance. The LeachXS{sup TM}/ORCHESTRA and STADIUM{sup R} models were first linked to the GoldSim Monte Carlo simulator to better and more easily characterize model uncertainties and as a means to coupling the models allowing linking to broader performance assessment evaluations that use CBP results for a source term. Two important degradation scenarios were selected for initial demonstration: sulfate ingress / attack and carbonation of cementitious materials. When sufficient sulfate is present in the pore solution external to a concrete barrier, sulfate can diffuse into the concrete, react with the concrete solid phases, and cause cracking that significantly changes the transport and structural properties of the concrete. The penetration of gaseous carbon dioxide within partially saturated concrete usually initiates a series of carbonation

  12. Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP): Using the CBP Software Toolbox to Simulate Sulfate Attack and Carbonation of Concrete Structures - 13481

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.G.; Kosson, D.S.; Garrabrants, A.C.; Sarkar, S.; Flach, G.; Langton, C.; Smith, F.G.III; Burns, H.; Van der Sloot, H.; Meeussen, J.C.L.; Seignette, P.F.A.B.; Samson, E.; Mallick, P.; Suttora, L.; Esh, D.; Fuhrmann, M.; Philip, J.

    2013-01-01

    The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) Project is a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional collaboration supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Tank Waste Management. The CBP project has developed a set of integrated modeling tools and leaching test methods to help improve understanding and prediction of the long-term hydraulic and chemical performance of cementitious materials used in nuclear applications. State-of-the-art modeling tools, including LeachXS TM /ORCHESTRA and STADIUM R , were selected for their demonstrated abilities to simulate reactive transport and degradation in cementitious materials. The new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency leaching test methods based on the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF), now adopted as part of the SW-846 RCRA methods, have been used to help make the link between modeling and experiment. Although each of the CBP tools has demonstrated utility as a standalone product, coupling the models over relevant spatial and temporal solution domains can provide more accurate predictions of cementitious materials behavior over relevant periods of performance. The LeachXS TM /ORCHESTRA and STADIUM R models were first linked to the GoldSim Monte Carlo simulator to better and more easily characterize model uncertainties and as a means to coupling the models allowing linking to broader performance assessment evaluations that use CBP results for a source term. Two important degradation scenarios were selected for initial demonstration: sulfate ingress / attack and carbonation of cementitious materials. When sufficient sulfate is present in the pore solution external to a concrete barrier, sulfate can diffuse into the concrete, react with the concrete solid phases, and cause cracking that significantly changes the transport and structural properties of the concrete. The penetration of gaseous carbon dioxide within partially saturated concrete usually initiates a series of carbonation reactions with

  13. A Mesoscopic Simulation for the Early-Age Shrinkage Cracking Process of High Performance Concrete in Bridge Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available On a mesoscopic level, high performance concrete (HPC was assumed to be a heterogeneous composite material consisting of aggregates, mortar, and pores. The concrete mesoscopic structure model had been established based on CT image reconstruction. By combining this model with continuum mechanics, damage mechanics, and fracture mechanics, a relatively complete system for concrete mesoscopic mechanics analysis was established to simulate the process of early-age shrinkage cracking in HPC. This process was based on the dispersion crack model. The results indicated that the interface between the aggregate and mortar was the crack point caused by shrinkage cracks in HPC. The locations of early-age shrinkage cracks in HPC were associated with the spacing and the size of the aggregate particle. However, the shrinkage deformation size of the mortar was related to the scope of concrete cracking and was independent of the crack position. Whereas lower water to cement ratios can improve the early strength of concrete, this ratio cannot control early-age shrinkage cracks in HPC.

  14. Photocatalyticpaving concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Lyapidevskaya Ol'ga Borisovna; Fraynt Mikhail Aleksandrovich

    2014-01-01

    Today bituminous concrete is a conventional paving material. Among its advantages one can name dustlessness and noiselessness, fine wear (up to 1 mm a year) and fine maintainability. As the main disadvantages of this material one can name high slipperiness under humidification, low durability and weather resistance. Besides that, during placement of the bituminous concrete a lot of different air pollutants are emitted, which are harmful for environment and human’s health (they are listed in t...

  15. Virtual Collaborative Simulation Environment for Integrated Product and Process Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulli, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    Deneb Robotics is a leader in the development of commercially available, leading edge three- dimensional simulation software tools for virtual prototyping,, simulation-based design, manufacturing process simulation, and factory floor simulation and training applications. Deneb has developed and commercially released a preliminary Virtual Collaborative Engineering (VCE) capability for Integrated Product and Process Development (IPPD). This capability allows distributed, real-time visualization and evaluation of design concepts, manufacturing processes, and total factory and enterprises in one seamless simulation environment.

  16. Using IMPRINT to Guide Experimental Design with Simulated Task Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-18

    USING IMPRINT TO GUIDE EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN OF SIMULATED TASK ENVIRONMENTS THESIS Gregory...ENG-MS-15-J-052 USING IMPRINT TO GUIDE EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN WITH SIMULATED TASK ENVIRONMENTS THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department...Civilian, USAF June 2015 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT-ENG-MS-15-J-052 USING IMPRINT

  17. Passivation of duplex stainless steel in solutions simulating chloride-contaminated concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takenouti, H.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Most studies published to date on the corrosion behaviour of stainless reinforcing steel are based on austenitic steel. The market presence of corrugated duplex steel is growing, however. The present study compared passivity in 2205 type duplex and 304 type austenitic stainless steel. Polarization tests in chloride-containing Ca(OH2 solutions confirmed the exceptional performance of duplex steels. X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy (XPS showed that the passive layer generated on duplex stainless steel in media simulating concrete pore solutions had a higher Cr content than the layer formed on steel in contact with the air. The XPS results also revealed that in duplex steel the form adopted by the passive layer Fe oxides was Fe3O4 in the solutions simulating concrete, rather than Fe2O3, as in duplex steel exposed to air. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS can be used to monitor the transformations taking place in the passive layer and analyze the factors involved.La mayoría de los estudios publicados hasta el momento sobre el comportamiento frente a la corrosión de armaduras de acero inoxidable se basan en aceros austeníticos. Sin embargo, la presencia en el mercado de aceros corrugados dúplex es cada vez más importante. En este trabajo se analiza la pasividad de un acero inoxidable dúplex tipo 2205 en comparación con la de un inoxidable austenítico tipo 304. Los ensayos de polarización en disoluciones de Ca(OH2 con cloruros confirman el excepcional comportamiento de los aceros dúplex. La espectroscopía fotoelectrónica de rayos X (XPS informa de que la capa pasiva generada en aceros inoxidables dúplex en medios que simulan la disolución de los poros del hormigón posee mayor contenido en óxidos de Cr que la formada en aire. También se puede deducir de los resultados de XPS que los óxidos de Fe de la capa pasiva de los aceros dúplex se encuentran en forma de Fe3O4 en las disoluciones que simulan el hormigón en vez de en

  18. Modelling concrete behaviour at early-age: multi-scale analysis and simulation of a massive disposal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honorio-De-Faria, Tulio

    2015-01-01

    The accurate prediction of the long and short-term behaviour of concrete structures in the nuclear domain is essential to ensure optimal performances (integrity, containment properties) during their service life. In the particular case of massive concrete structures, at early age the heat produced by hydration reactions cannot be evacuated fast enough so that high temperatures may be reached and the resulting gradients of temperature might lead to cracking according to the external and internal restraints to which the structures are subjected. The goals of this study are (1) to perform numerical simulations in order to describe and predict the thermo-chemo-mechanical behaviour at early-age of a massive concrete structure devoted to nuclear waste disposal on surface, and (2) to develop and apply up-scaling tools to estimate rigorously the key properties of concrete needed in an early-age analysis from the composition of the material. Firstly, a chemo-thermal analysis aims at determining the influence of convection, solar radiation, re-radiation and hydration heat on the thermal response of the structure. Practical recommendations regarding concreting temperatures are provided in order to limit the maximum temperature reached within the structure. Then, by means of a mechanical analysis, simplified and more complex (i.e. accounting for coupled creep and damage) modelling strategies are used to assess scenarios involving different boundary conditions defined from the previous chemo-thermal analysis. Secondly, a study accounting for the multi-scale character of concrete is performed. A simplified model of cement hydration kinetics is proposed. The evolution of the different phases at the cement paste level can be estimated. Then, analytical and numerical tools to upscale the ageing properties are presented and applied to estimate the mechanical and thermal properties of cement based materials. Finally, the input data used in the structural analysis are compared with

  19. Concrete aggregate durability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    There are many factors that affect the durability of Portland cement concrete (PCC), including the mix design and the : materials used, the quality of construction, and the environment. Durability is not an intrinsic property of the concrete, but : i...

  20. Development of a Smart Grid Simulation Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Delamare, J; Bitachon, B.; Peng, Z.; Wang, Y.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.; Jongerden, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    With the increased integration of renewable energy sources the interaction between energy producers and consumers has become a bi-directional exchange. Therefore, the electrical grid must be adapted into a smart grid which effectively regulates this two-way interaction. With the aid of simulation, stakeholders can obtain information on how to properly develop and control the smart grid. In this paper, we present the development of an integrated smart grid simulation model, using the Anylogic ...

  1. Evaluation of the Efficiency of Limestone Powder in Concrete and the Effects on the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo-Jae Kim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The major environmental impact of concrete comes from the CO2 emissions, produced during the cement manufacturing process. The main goal of this research project is to evaluate the efficiency of limestone powder as a partial cement replacement, in order to reduce energy consumption and CO2 emissions. This study utilizes limestone powders, with different particle sizes, to replace a portion of Portland cement using various ratios. Due to the dilution effect when partially replacing cement, there is a reduction in the concrete’s physical properties. To assess the dilution effect, a modification to Féret’s equation is used to calculate an efficiency factor for the limestone powder when compared to cement. To measure the environmental impact, a life cycle assessment is conducted on concrete made with limestone powder combined with cement. This allows for an evaluation of the various cement/limestone powder ratios that will maximize the environmental benefit, with minimal reduction in concrete strength. Additional microstructural analysis using petrographic examination was completed to provide a visual understanding of the distribution of the limestone particles within the cement paste. The results indicate that the efficiency of limestone powder in partially replacing cement can be achieved by particle packing and particle distribution in the concrete and the benefits of emission reductions exceed the loss in compressive strength when higher levels of limestone powder is used to replace cement.

  2. CHAVIR: A virtual site simulation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leservot, Arnauld; Chodorge, Laurent

    2006-01-01

    In nuclear field, any companies involved in the management and/or the design and performance of an intervention aim at preparing it, by finding the most appropriate scenario(s) under several needs: - Technical requirements: feasibility, kind of means to engage, operating modes, tasks scheduling; - economical requirements: global mission cost minimization; - Environmental requirements: take into account the individual and collective dose rate received by the human operators involved in the intervention(s), according to the ALARA principle. Today, they also must answer complex questions to design their interventions with increasing reactivity and always lowering costs. Besides, they must be brought to answer unexpected situations during the effective realization of their nuclear interventions, and naturally to consolidate their experience feedback of the missions. An interesting way to help them in these different needs consists in taking advantage of simulation. The paper has the following contents: - Introduction; - CHAVIR project; - Goal; - Simulation and virtual reality; - Strategy; - Interactive dose evaluation; - Requirements; - Physical algorithm; - Objects representation; - Calculation optimization; - Interactive mechanical simulation; - First study cases; - Conclusion - prospects. To summarize, the authors succeeded in developing a software simulation tool, helping the users from nuclear field to prepare their interventions. CHAVIR allows interactive evaluation of dose rate, when taking into account real industrial models coming from CAD world. One can also perform mechanical simulations, to address accessibilities issues and design scenario involving either manual tasks of robotic interventions. CHAVIR is already entered the industrialization process. It aims at becoming shortly a commercial software tool for dismantling site simulation, adapted to the professional needs in order to respect the ALARA principle. It should efficiently contribute to optimize

  3. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electrochemical studies of mild steel FeE500 passivation in concrete simulated water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miserque, F.; Huet, B.; Azou, G.; Bendjaballah, D.; L'Hostis, V.

    2006-11-01

    In the context of the prediction of the long-term behaviour of reinforced concrete structures involved in the nuclear waste storage, the corrosion mechanisms of steels have to be assessed. When mild steel rebars are embedded in concrete, the chemical environment of the reinforcement is progressively modified, due to the carbonation of the concrete matrix. This modification leads to the variation of iron oxides properties formed at the steel/concrete interface, and the active corrosion can be initiated. The aim of this study is to evaluate the passivation behaviour and to provide insights into the depassivation of mild steel in concrete pore solution. In a young concrete, due to the alkalinity of the interstitial solution, steel reinforcement remains passive. Immersion tests of mild steel substrate in various alkaline solutions (from pH 13 to 10) have been performed. Due to the low thickness of the corrosion layers formed, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to characterize them. In the passive domain, the corrosion products are similar for the various solutions. The corrosion layer is composed of a mixture of Fe3+ and Fe2+. A similar approach is used to determine the depassivation mechanism. The effect of various components such as carbonates, sulfates and silicates resulting from the dissolution of minerals of cement during the carbonation process is investigated. In addition to the surface analysis, the evolution of the electrochemical behaviour as function of the solution nature (pH) is evaluated with the help of electrochemical measurements (free corrosion potential, cyclic voltamperometry).

  4. Survey of Experience Using Reinforced Concrete in Floating Marine Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    analyzed in several steps. The load history can be simulated by .. using load increments and independent load vectors . 4.31 NTH is not only active in...NILSEN, N., " FEILD TEST OF REINFORCEMENT CORROSION IN CONCRETE", PERFORMANCE OF CONCRETE IN MARINE ENVIRONMENT, ACI SPECIAL PUBLICATION SP-65, 1980. 136

  5. Comparison of the quasi-static method and the dynamic method for simulating fracture processes in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J. X.; Deng, S. C.; Liang, N. G.

    2008-02-01

    Concrete is heterogeneous and usually described as a three-phase material, where matrix, aggregate and interface are distinguished. To take this heterogeneity into consideration, the Generalized Beam (GB) lattice model is adopted. The GB lattice model is much more computationally efficient than the beam lattice model. Numerical procedures of both quasi-static method and dynamic method are developed to simulate fracture processes in uniaxial tensile tests conducted on a concrete panel. Cases of different loading rates are compared with the quasi-static case. It is found that the inertia effect due to load increasing becomes less important and can be ignored with the loading rate decreasing, but the inertia effect due to unstable crack propagation remains considerable no matter how low the loading rate is. Therefore, an unrealistic result will be obtained if a fracture process including unstable cracking is simulated by the quasi-static procedure.

  6. Development of a Smart Grid Simulation Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delamare, J; Bitachon, B.; Peng, Z.; Wang, Y.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.; Jongerden, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    With the increased integration of renewable energy sources the interaction between energy producers and consumers has become a bi-directional exchange. Therefore, the electrical grid must be adapted into a smart grid which effectively regulates this two-way interaction. With the aid of simulation,

  7. Runoff of pyrethroid insecticides from concrete surfaces following simulated and natural rainfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weiying; Haver, Darren; Rust, Michael; Gan, Jay

    2012-03-01

    Intensive residential use of insecticides has resulted in their ubiquitous presence as contaminants in urban surface streams. For pest eradication, urban hard surfaces such as concrete are often directly treated with pesticides, and wind/water can also carry pesticides onto hard surfaces from surrounding areas. This study expanded on previous bench-scale studies by considering pesticide runoff caused by irrigation under dry weather conditions and rain during the wet season, and evaluated the effects of pesticide residence time on concrete, single versus recurring precipitations, precipitation intensity, and concrete surface conditions, on pesticide transferability to runoff water. Runoff from concrete 1 d after pesticide treatment contained high levels of bifenthrin (82 μg/L) and permethrin (5143 μg/L for cis and 5518 μg/L for trans), indicating the importance of preventing water contact on concrete after pesticide treatments. Although the runoff transferability quickly decreased as the pesticide residence time on concrete increased, detectable residues were still found in runoff water after 3 months (89 d) exposure to hot and dry summer conditions. ANOVA analysis showed that precipitation intensities and concrete surface conditions (i.e., acid wash, silicone seal, stamping, and addition of microsilica) did not significantly affect the pesticide transferability to runoff. For concrete slabs subjected to natural rainfalls during the winter wet season, pesticide levels in the runoff decreased as the time interval between pesticide application and the rain event increased. However, bifenthrin and permethrin were still detected at 0.15-0.17 and 0.75-1.15 μg/L in the rain runoff after 7 months (221 d) from the initial treatment. In addition, pesticide concentrations showed no decrease between the two rainfall events, suggesting that concrete surfaces contaminated by pesticides may act as a reservoir for pesticide residues, leading to sustained urban runoff

  8. Simulation of the degradation of a concrete/clay interface: influence of temperature, unsaturated conditions and porosity variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnol, A.; Dupros, F.; Spycher, N.; Xu, T.; Gaucher, E.C.

    2006-01-01

    For long-lived intermediate-level radioactive waste, the use of concrete as engineering barrier and Callovian-Oxfordian clay as geological barrier at a depth of 500 m is considered in the French disposal concept (ANDRA, 2005). Upon emplacement, initially unsaturated concrete is expected to experience coupled processes involving heating, re-saturation with groundwater from the clay formation, gas exchanges and geochemical reactions. After an early period of re-saturation, solute transport is supposed to be diffusion-controlled because of the extremely low permeability of the two media. These coupled processes may lead to changes in the porosity of the concrete or clay barriers. In the present paper, a fully coupled Thermo-Hydro-Chemical (THC) response of a two-phase (gas and solution) mass-transfer model was evaluated and tested by a sensitivity analysis. This study is an extension of a previous model applied to an isothermal and fully saturated concrete/clay interface (Burnol et al., 2005); it investigated the coupled effect of temperature and unsaturated conditions assuming no production of H2(g). The system was simulated for a 2000-year period, which covers the most predominant thermal perturbation

  9. Flow simulation of fiber reinforced self compacting concrete using Lattice Boltzmann method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svec, Oldrich; Skocek, Jan; Stang, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Self compacting concrete (SCC) is a promising material in the civil engineering industry. One of the benefits of the SCC is a fast and simplified casting followed by decreased labor costs. The SCC as any other type of concrete has a significantly lower tensile and shear strength in comparison to ....... A relatively new group of models - Lattice Boltzmann Modeling (LBM) - is presented in this paper. The conventional LBM is modified to include fiber and particle suspensions and non-Newtonian rheology and is used to model the fiber reinforced self compacting concrete flow....

  10. Solubility of radionuclides in a concrete environment for provisional safety analyses for SGT-E2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berner, U.

    2014-08-15

    Within stage 2 of the sectoral plan for deep geological repositories for radioactive waste in Switzerland, safety analyses are carried out. In the case of the repository for long lived intermediate level waste (ILW) retention mechanisms include the concentration limits of safety relevant elements in the pore water of the engineered concrete system. The present work describes the evaluation of solubility limits for the safety relevant elements Be, C, Cl, K, Ca, Co, Ni, Se, Sr, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Pd, Ag, Sn, I, Cs, Sm, Eu, Ho, Pb, Po, Ra, Ac, Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm in the pore water of a concrete system corresponding to a degradation stage characterised by portlandite saturation and by the absence of (Na,K)OH solutes. The term solubility limit denotes the maximum amount of an element dissolving in the pore solution of the considered chemical reference system. For a given solid phase equilibrium, thermodynamics predicts the amount of substance dissolving in the solution and describes the speciation of the considered element in solution. The principles of chemical equilibrium will be the primary work hypothesis in the present work. Solubility calculations were performed with the most recent version of GEMS/PSI using the PSI/Nagra Chemical Thermodynamic Data Base 12/07. The database was complemented with other datasets for elements that were not considered in the mentioned update. Reference values solubilities as well as lower and upper guideline values are evaluated. For many formation constants of solids and solutes, uncertainties are known and allow conveying lower and upper guideline values. In many cases it is not clear whether the most stable solid is formed. In such cases the (kinetically driven) formation of alternative solid phases is included in the derivation of reference and guideline values. Corresponding justifications are given for the individual elements and are an important part of this work. A similar report for an almost identical chemical

  11. Solubility of radionuclides in a concrete environment for provisional safety analyses for SGT-E2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berner, U.

    2014-08-01

    Within stage 2 of the sectoral plan for deep geological repositories for radioactive waste in Switzerland, safety analyses are carried out. In the case of the repository for long lived intermediate level waste (ILW) retention mechanisms include the concentration limits of safety relevant elements in the pore water of the engineered concrete system. The present work describes the evaluation of solubility limits for the safety relevant elements Be, C, Cl, K, Ca, Co, Ni, Se, Sr, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Pd, Ag, Sn, I, Cs, Sm, Eu, Ho, Pb, Po, Ra, Ac, Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm in the pore water of a concrete system corresponding to a degradation stage characterised by portlandite saturation and by the absence of (Na,K)OH solutes. The term solubility limit denotes the maximum amount of an element dissolving in the pore solution of the considered chemical reference system. For a given solid phase equilibrium, thermodynamics predicts the amount of substance dissolving in the solution and describes the speciation of the considered element in solution. The principles of chemical equilibrium will be the primary work hypothesis in the present work. Solubility calculations were performed with the most recent version of GEMS/PSI using the PSI/Nagra Chemical Thermodynamic Data Base 12/07. The database was complemented with other datasets for elements that were not considered in the mentioned update. Reference values solubilities as well as lower and upper guideline values are evaluated. For many formation constants of solids and solutes, uncertainties are known and allow conveying lower and upper guideline values. In many cases it is not clear whether the most stable solid is formed. In such cases the (kinetically driven) formation of alternative solid phases is included in the derivation of reference and guideline values. Corresponding justifications are given for the individual elements and are an important part of this work. A similar report for an almost identical chemical

  12. Cloning simulation in the cage environment.

    OpenAIRE

    Douthart, R J; Thomas, J J; Rosier, S D; Schmaltz, J E; West, J W

    1986-01-01

    The CAGE/GEM(TM) software toolkit for genetic engineering is briefly described. The system functionally uses color graphics and is menu driven. It integrates genetics and features information ("Overlays") with information based on sequence analysis ("Representations"). The system is structured around CAD (Computer Aided Design) principles. The CAGE (Computer Aided Genetic Engineering) aspects of the software are emphasized and illustrated by a simulated cloning of the hepatitis B core antigen...

  13. Simulating tumor growth in confined heterogeneous environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevertz, Jana L; Torquato, Salvatore; Gillies, George T

    2008-01-01

    The holy grail of computational tumor modeling is to develop a simulation tool that can be utilized in the clinic to predict neoplastic progression and propose individualized optimal treatment strategies. In order to develop such a predictive model, one must account for many of the complex processes involved in tumor growth. One interaction that has not been incorporated into computational models of neoplastic progression is the impact that organ-imposed physical confinement and heterogeneity have on tumor growth. For this reason, we have taken a cellular automaton algorithm that was originally designed to simulate spherically symmetric tumor growth and generalized the algorithm to incorporate the effects of tissue shape and structure. We show that models that do not account for organ/tissue geometry and topology lead to false conclusions about tumor spread, shape and size. The impact that confinement has on tumor growth is more pronounced when a neoplasm is growing close to, versus far from, the confining boundary. Thus, any clinical simulation tool of cancer progression must not only consider the shape and structure of the organ in which a tumor is growing, but must also consider the location of the tumor within the organ if it is to accurately predict neoplastic growth dynamics

  14. Photocatalyticpaving concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyapidevskaya Ol'ga Borisovna

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Today bituminous concrete is a conventional paving material. Among its advantages one can name dustlessness and noiselessness, fine wear (up to 1 mm a year and fine maintainability. As the main disadvantages of this material one can name high slipperiness under humidification, low durability and weather resistance. Besides that, during placement of the bituminous concrete a lot of different air pollutants are emitted, which are harmful for environment and human’s health (they are listed in the paper according to the US Environmental Protection Agency materials. As an alternative, one can use cement-concrete pavement, which is in many ways more efficient than the bituminous concrete. It is proposed to enhance environmental performance of the cement-concrete pavement via usage of photocatalysis. The mechanism of different photocatalytic reactions is described in the paper, namely heterogeneous and homogeneous photocatalysis, photo-induces, photoactivated catalysis and catalytical photoreactions. It is pro-posed to use heterogeneous photocatalysis with titanium dioxide as a photocatalyst. The mechanism of photo oxidation of air contaminants, with the usage of titanium dioxide is2described. The paper sets problems, connected with the sensibilization of TiOto thevisible light (it is proposed to use titanium dioxide, doped with the atoms of certain elements to increase its sensibility to the visible light and with the development of a new photocatalytic paving concrete, which will meet the requirements, specified for paving in the climatic and traffic conditions of the Russian Federation.

  15. The effect of functionalized polycarboxylate structures as corrosion inhibitors in a simulated concrete pore solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazayel, A. S.; Khorasani, M.; Sarabi, A. A.

    2018-05-01

    In this study, the effects of polycarboxylate derivatives with different comonomers and functional groups on the control or reduction of corrosion in steel specimens were evaluated through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic analysis. A highly alkaline contaminated concrete pore solution (CPS) containing chlorides was used to simulate the pitting corrosion, and according to the results, the mechanism of inhibitive action was determined. Both the inhibition efficiency and pitting corrosion inhibition of methacrylate-copolymers were in the order of poly methacrylate-co acrylamide > poly methacrylate-co-2-acrylamido-2 methylpropane sulfonic acid > poly methacrylate-co-hydroxyethyl methacrylate. In addition, the corrosion potential of steel specimens in all studied concentrations of NaCl with different concentrations of polymethacrylate-co acrylamide (as the best inhibitor in this study) in saturated Ca(OH)2 solution showed almost an identical trend. Polymethacrylic acid-co-acrylamide showed a 92.35% inhibitor efficiency in the saturated Ca(OH)2 solution containing 1.8 wt.% chlorides and could effectively reduce the corrosion rate. Even at 3.5 wt.% of NaCl, this inhibitor could remarkably reduce the destructive effect of chloride ion attacks on the steel surface and passive film. The inhibition effect of these polymeric inhibitors seemed to be due to the formation of a barrier layer on the metal surface, approved by the well-known adsorption mechanism of organic molecules at the metal/solution interface. The results of SEM, EDS and AFM investigations were also in agreement with the outcomes of electrochemical studies.

  16. Numerical simulation of the throwing power of cathodic prevention applied to marine reinforced concrete piles by means of sacrificial anodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolini, Luca; Redaelli, Elena [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica ' G. Natta' , Via Mancinelli, 7, 20131 Milan (Italy)

    2004-07-01

    The paper deals with the determination of current and potential distribution in reinforced concrete elements partially submerged in seawater aimed at predicting the throwing power of cathodic prevention applied by means of sacrificial anodes. Previous laboratory studies carried out on reinforced concrete columns 15 cm x 15 cm x 120 cm showed that the use of sacrificial anodes placed in the solution at the bottom of the column could provide protection of corroding steel bars in the emerged part of the pile up to about 60 cm from the water level. However, if sacrificial anodes were applied when the concrete was chloride free and steel bars were still passive, even the highest bar, placed at 1 m from the level of water, was protected. This is due to the higher polarizability of passive steel, that makes the throwing power of cathodic prevention higher compared to that of cathodic protection. In order to extend the results obtained on small-scale specimens to elements of higher dimensions, numerical simulations of current and potential distribution were carried out. Two-dimensional models were set up of reinforced concrete piles containing steel bars at different heights protected with sacrificial anodes placed in the water in which they were partially submerged. Boundary conditions describing the electrochemical behaviour of bars were obtained from polarisation curves measured on the previously mentioned columns. Values of concrete conductivity at different heights from the water level were also obtained from those tests. Several cases were considered, representative of conditions differing in electrochemical behaviour of steel bars, dimensions of element, position of sacrificial anodes. The paper discusses the results obtained from the models and compares them in terms of the throwing power that can be reached by using sacrificial anodes immersed in the seawater to protect reinforcing steel bars in the emerged part of a pile. (authors)

  17. A Collaborative Extensible User Environment for Simulation and Knowledge Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Lansing, Carina S.; Porter, Ellen A.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Guillen, Zoe C.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Gorton, Ian

    2015-06-01

    In scientific simulation, scientists use measured data to create numerical models, execute simulations and analyze results from advanced simulators executing on high performance computing platforms. This process usually requires a team of scientists collaborating on data collection, model creation and analysis, and on authorship of publications and data. This paper shows that scientific teams can benefit from a user environment called Akuna that permits subsurface scientists in disparate locations to collaborate on numerical modeling and analysis projects. The Akuna user environment is built on the Velo framework that provides both a rich client environment for conducting and analyzing simulations and a Web environment for data sharing and annotation. Akuna is an extensible toolset that integrates with Velo, and is designed to support any type of simulator. This is achieved through data-driven user interface generation, use of a customizable knowledge management platform, and an extensible framework for simulation execution, monitoring and analysis. This paper describes how the customized Velo content management system and the Akuna toolset are used to integrate and enhance an effective collaborative research and application environment. The extensible architecture of Akuna is also described and demonstrates its usage for creation and execution of a 3D subsurface simulation.

  18. Prediction model for carbonation depth of concrete subjected to freezing-thawing cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qian Hui; Li, Qiang; Guan, Xiao; Xian Zou, Ying

    2018-03-01

    Through the indoor simulation test of the concrete durability under the coupling effect of freezing-thawing and carbonation, the variation regularity of concrete neutralization depth under freezing-thawing and carbonation was obtained. Based on concrete carbonation mechanism, the relationship between the air diffusion coefficient and porosity in concrete was analyzed and the calculation method of porosity in Portland cement concrete and fly ash cement concrete was investigated, considering the influence of the freezing-thawing damage on the concrete diffusion coefficient. Finally, a prediction model of carbonation depth of concrete under freezing-thawing circumstance was established. The results obtained using this prediction model agreed well with the experimental test results, and provided a theoretical reference and basis for the concrete durability analysis under multi-factor environments.

  19. Applying virtual environments to training and simulation (abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jense, G.J.; Kuijper, F.

    1993-01-01

    Virtual environment (VE) technology is expected to make a big impact on future training and simulation systems. Direct stimulation of human-senses (eyesight, auditory, tactile) and new paradigms for user input will improve the realism of simulations and thereby the effectiveness of training systems.

  20. NECTAR: Simulation and Visualization in a 3D Collaborative Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Law, Y.W.; Chan, K.Y.

    For simulation and visualization in a 3D collaborative environment, an architecture called the Nanyang Experimental CollaboraTive ARchitecture (NECTAR) has been developed. The objective is to support multi-user collaboration in a virtual environment with an emphasis on cost-effectiveness and

  1. Simulation environment for algorithms and agents evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo CHAMOSO

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an adaptive platform that can simulate the centralized control of different smart city areas. For example, public lighting and intelligent management, public zones of buildings, energy distribution, etc. It can operate the hardware infrastructure and perform optimization both in energy consumption and economic control from a modular architecture which is fully adaptable to most cities. Machine-to-machine (M2M permits connecting all the sensors of the city so that they provide the platform with a perfect perspective of the global city status. To carry out this optimization, the platform offers the developers a software that operates on the hardware infrastructure and merges various techniques of artificial intelligence (AI and statistics, such as artificial neural networks (ANN, multi-agent systems (MAS or a Service Oriented Approach (SOA, forming an Internet of Services (IoS. Different case studies were tested by using the presented platform, and further development is still underway with additional case studies.

  2. Environments for online maritime simulators with cloud computing capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raicu, Gabriel; Raicu, Alexandra

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents the cloud computing environments, network principles and methods for graphical development in realistic naval simulation, naval robotics and virtual interactions. The aim of this approach is to achieve a good simulation quality in large networked environments using open source solutions designed for educational purposes. Realistic rendering of maritime environments requires near real-time frameworks with enhanced computing capabilities during distance interactions. E-Navigation concepts coupled with the last achievements in virtual and augmented reality will enhance the overall experience leading to new developments and innovations. We have to deal with a multiprocessing situation using advanced technologies and distributed applications using remote ship scenario and automation of ship operations.

  3. A Simulated Learning Environment for Teaching Medicine Dispensing Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Jenny; Styles, Kim; Sewell, Keith; Trinder, Peta; Marriott, Jennifer; Maher, Sheryl; Naidu, Som

    2016-02-25

    To develop an authentic simulation of the professional practice dispensary context for students to develop their dispensing skills in a risk-free environment. A development team used an Agile software development method to create MyDispense, a web-based simulation. Modeled on virtual learning environments elements, the software employed widely available standards-based technologies to create a virtual community pharmacy environment. Assessment. First-year pharmacy students who used the software in their tutorials, were, at the end of the second semester, surveyed on their prior dispensing experience and their perceptions of MyDispense as a tool to learn dispensing skills. The dispensary simulation is an effective tool for helping students develop dispensing competency and knowledge in a safe environment.

  4. An intelligent simulation environment for control system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory is currently assisting in the development of advanced control systems for the next generation of nuclear power plants. This paper presents a prototype interactive and intelligent simulation environment being developed to support this effort. The environment combines tools from the field of Artificial Intelligence; in particular object-oriented programming, a LISP programming environment, and a direct manipulation user interface; with traditional numerical methods for simulating combined continuous/discrete processes. The resulting environment is highly interactive and easy to use. Models may be created and modified quickly through a window oriented direct manipulation interface. Models may be modified at any time, even as the simulation is running, and the results observed immediately via real-time graphics. 8 refs., 3 figs

  5. How Concrete Is Concrete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravemeijer, Koeno

    2011-01-01

    If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, "manipulatives", in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own,…

  6. Numerical simulation of a reinforced concrete shield around a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahama, Mumuni Salifu

    1996-02-01

    Ghana currently operates a Research Reactor and other nuclear facilities including a Gamma Irradiation Facility, a Radiographic Non-Destructive Testing laboratory and would be operating in the nearest future a Radiotherapy Centre. Each of these has a concrete radiation shield as a major safety device. In carrying out its functions, a concrete radiation shield may be subjected to thermal and mechanical stresses. A facility for analysing these stresses is desirable. Two computer codes have been developed under this programme for radiation shielding computation and stress analysis of cylindrical reactor shields. (au)

  7. Conducting Simulation Studies in the R Programming Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Kevin A

    2013-10-12

    Simulation studies allow researchers to answer specific questions about data analysis, statistical power, and best-practices for obtaining accurate results in empirical research. Despite the benefits that simulation research can provide, many researchers are unfamiliar with available tools for conducting their own simulation studies. The use of simulation studies need not be restricted to researchers with advanced skills in statistics and computer programming, and such methods can be implemented by researchers with a variety of abilities and interests. The present paper provides an introduction to methods used for running simulation studies using the R statistical programming environment and is written for individuals with minimal experience running simulation studies or using R. The paper describes the rationale and benefits of using simulations and introduces R functions relevant for many simulation studies. Three examples illustrate different applications for simulation studies, including (a) the use of simulations to answer a novel question about statistical analysis, (b) the use of simulations to estimate statistical power, and (c) the use of simulations to obtain confidence intervals of parameter estimates through bootstrapping. Results and fully annotated syntax from these examples are provided.

  8. Shrinkage Reducing Admixture for Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    Concrete shrinkage cracking is a common problem in all types of concrete structures, especially for structures and environments where the cracks are prevalent and the repercussions are most severe. A liquid shrinkage reducing admixture for concrete, developed by GRACE Construction Products and ARCO Chemical Company, that reduces significantly the shrinkage during concrete drying and potentially reduces overall cracking over time.

  9. Towards an integrated simulation of casting and structural performance of flowable fibre-reinforced concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vidal Sarmiento, E.; Hendriks, M.A.N.; Geiker, M. R.; Kanstad, T.

    2016-01-01

    Most recent studies on fibre-reinforced self-compacting concrete agree on the impact of the casting conditions on the fibre orientation and distribution, and its consequence thereof on the structural performance. A substantial number of investigations are continuously contributing to gain experience

  10. Conducting Simulation Studies in the R Programming Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A. Hallgren

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Simulation studies allow researchers to answer specific questions about data analysis, statistical power, and best-practices for obtainingaccurate results in empirical research. Despite the benefits that simulation research can provide, many researchers are unfamiliar with available tools for conducting their own simulation studies. The use of simulation studies need not be restricted toresearchers with advanced skills in statistics and computer programming, and such methods can be implemented by researchers with a variety of abilities and interests. The present paper provides an introduction to methods used for running simulationstudies using the R statistical programming environment and is written for individuals with minimal experience running simulation studies or using R. The paper describes the rationale and benefits of using simulations and introduces R functions relevant for many simulation studies. Three examples illustrate different applications for simulation studies, including (a the use of simulations to answer a novel question about statistical analysis, (b the use of simulations to estimate statistical power, and (c the use of simulations to obtain confidence intervals of parameter estimates throughbootstrapping. Results and fully annotated syntax from these examples are provided.

  11. Micro-deformation measurement on the concrete roadway surface slabs using Fiber Bragg Grating and analysis by computational simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serpa, C M; Gomez, N D [Instituto Tecnologico Metropolitano Institucion Universitaria (ITM), Medellin A. A. 54954 (Colombia); Velez, F J, E-mail: claudiaserpa@itm.edu.co [Universidad EAFIT, Medellin (Colombia)

    2011-01-01

    This work shows a non-invasive method for micro-deformation measurements on concrete structures using Bragg grating sensors in optical fibers adhered to the surface. We present the measurements on roadway slabs under a load of 10 kN, and we find an approximated ratio of 2:1 between the deformation registered by the sensors and the values from a computational simulation with the finite element method. We propose the use of these sensors for structural monitoring of the slabs and this installation shape for avoiding bends that can damage the edges in the optical fiber in embebed sensors in vertical shape.

  12. Simulation based virtual learning environment in medical genetics counseling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makransky, Guido; Bonde, Mads T.; Wulff, Julie S. G.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Simulation based learning environments are designed to improve the quality of medical education by allowing students to interact with patients, diagnostic laboratory procedures, and patient data in a virtual environment. However, few studies have evaluated whether simulation based...... the perceived relevance of medical educational activities. The results suggest that simulations can help future generations of doctors transfer new understanding of disease mechanisms gained in virtual laboratory settings into everyday clinical practice....... learning environments increase students' knowledge, intrinsic motivation, and self-efficacy, and help them generalize from laboratory analyses to clinical practice and health decision-making. METHODS: An entire class of 300 University of Copenhagen first-year undergraduate students, most with a major...

  13. Sustainable Concrete Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sim J.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The growing concern over global warming and significant ecological changes requires sustainable development in all fields of science and technology. Concrete not only consumes huge amount of energy and natural sources, but also emits large amount of CO2, mainly due to the production of cement. It is evident that such large amount of concrete production has put significant impact on the energy, resource, environment, and ecology of the society. Hence, how to develop the concrete technology in a sustainable way has become a significant issue. In this paper, some of Korean researches for sustainable development of concrete are presented. These are sustainable strengthening for deteriorated concrete structure, sustainable reinforcement of new concrete structure, sustainable concrete using recycled aggregate and supplementary cementing materials and finally application of each technique to precast concrete.

  14. A simulation and training environment for robotic radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlaefer, Alexander [University of Luebeck, Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, Luebeck (Germany); Stanford University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford, CA (United States); Gill, Jakub; Schweikard, Achim [University of Luebeck, Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, Luebeck (Germany)

    2008-09-15

    To provide a software environment for simulation of robotic radiosurgery, particularly to study the effective robot workspace with respect to the treatment plan quality, and to illustrate the concepts of robotic radiosurgery. A simulation environment for a robotic radiosurgery system was developed using Java and Java3D. The kinematics and the beam characteristics were modeled and linked to a treatment planning module. Simulations of different robot workspace parameters for two example radiosurgical patient cases were performed using the novel software tool. The first case was an intracranial lesion near the left inner ear, the second case was a spinal lesion. The planning parameters for both cases were visualized with the novel simulation environment. An incremental extension of the robot workspace had limited effect for the intracranial case, where the original workspace already covered the left side of the patient. For the spinal case, a larger workspace resulted in a noticeable improvement in plan quality and a large portion of the beams being delivered from the extended workspace. The new software environment is useful to simulate and analyze parameters and configurations for robotic radiosurgery. An enlarged robot workspace may result in improved plan quality depending on the location of the target region. (orig.)

  15. A simulation and training environment for robotic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlaefer, Alexander; Gill, Jakub; Schweikard, Achim

    2008-01-01

    To provide a software environment for simulation of robotic radiosurgery, particularly to study the effective robot workspace with respect to the treatment plan quality, and to illustrate the concepts of robotic radiosurgery. A simulation environment for a robotic radiosurgery system was developed using Java and Java3D. The kinematics and the beam characteristics were modeled and linked to a treatment planning module. Simulations of different robot workspace parameters for two example radiosurgical patient cases were performed using the novel software tool. The first case was an intracranial lesion near the left inner ear, the second case was a spinal lesion. The planning parameters for both cases were visualized with the novel simulation environment. An incremental extension of the robot workspace had limited effect for the intracranial case, where the original workspace already covered the left side of the patient. For the spinal case, a larger workspace resulted in a noticeable improvement in plan quality and a large portion of the beams being delivered from the extended workspace. The new software environment is useful to simulate and analyze parameters and configurations for robotic radiosurgery. An enlarged robot workspace may result in improved plan quality depending on the location of the target region. (orig.)

  16. Visual simulation study of equipment maintenance in dangerous environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Bo; Yang Yanhua; Li Shiting

    2010-01-01

    The maintenance characteristics in dangerous environments are analyzed, and the application characteristics of visualized maintenance technology are introduced. The interactive method to implement maintenance simulation is presented using EON simulation platform. Then an interacted Virtual Maintenance Training System (VMTS) is further developed, and the composition and function are described in details. The VMTS can be used in extensive array of application scopes, and it is well compatible to the hardware of virtual reality. (author)

  17. IMPETUS - Interactive MultiPhysics Environment for Unified Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Vi Q; Lykotrafitis, George

    2016-12-08

    We introduce IMPETUS - Interactive MultiPhysics Environment for Unified Simulations, an object oriented, easy-to-use, high performance, C++ program for three-dimensional simulations of complex physical systems that can benefit a large variety of research areas, especially in cell mechanics. The program implements cross-communication between locally interacting particles and continuum models residing in the same physical space while a network facilitates long-range particle interactions. Message Passing Interface is used for inter-processor communication for all simulations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A SIMULATION ENVIRONMENT FOR AUTOMATIC NIGHT DRIVING AND VISUAL CONTROL

    OpenAIRE

    Arroyo Rubio, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    This project consists on developing an automatic night driving system in a simulation environment. The simulator I have used is TORCS. TORCS is an Open Source car racing simulator written in C++. It is used as an ordinary car racing game, as a IA racing game and as a research platform. The goal of this thesis is to implement an automatic driving system to control the car under night conditions using computer vision. A camera is implemented inside the vehicle and it will detect the reflective ...

  19. M-S-H precipitation in low-pH concretes in clayey environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dauzeres, A.; Achiedo, G.; Nied, D.; L'Hopital, E.; Alahrache, S.; Lothenbach, B.

    2015-01-01

    In the framework of the CI-project (Cement Clay Interaction Experiment), two different low-pH cements were emplaced at Mont Terri rock laboratory to study their interactions with the surrounding Opalinus Clay (OPA): ESDRED (shotcrete mixture: 60% of CEM-I 42.5 N + 40% of silica fume + aluminium sulphate salt as accelerator) and LAC composed of CEM-III/B 42.5 L (60% of blast furnace slag + 10% nano silica). After 5 years of interactions in the Mont Terri rock laboratory, SEM-EDS analyses show a systematic Mg-perturbation associated with a high decalcification near the surface of both cementitious materials. TGA (Thermogravimetric Analysis) and XRD (X-ray diffraction) investigations associate this Mg-enrichment to the possible formation of M-S-H. This result is confirmed by 29 Si NMR analyses, showing a high polymerisation degree of the Si-network in the Mg-enriched zone typical of a sheet-like structure. Tem/EDS investigations of a FIB section carried out in the Mg zone of both LAC and ESDRED concretes indicate that the Mg phase exhibits a gel-like structure similar to C-S-H gel. This experimentally observed Mg-enrichment in the interaction zone is well reproduced by reactive transport modelling of the LAC/Opalinus clay with the HYTEC code. (authors)

  20. MARS: An Educational Environment for Multiagent Robot Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Casini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Undergraduate robotics students often find it difficult to design and validate control algorithms for teams of mobile robots. This is mainly due to two reasons. First, very rarely, educational laboratories are equipped with large teams of robots, which are usually expensive, bulky, and difficult to manage and maintain. Second, robotics simulators often require students to spend much time to learn their use and functionalities. For this purpose, a simulator of multiagent mobile robots named MARS has been developed within the Matlab environment, with the aim of helping students to simulate a wide variety of control algorithms in an easy way and without spending time for understanding a new language. Through this facility, the user is able to simulate multirobot teams performing different tasks, from cooperative to competitive ones, by using both centralized and distributed controllers. Virtual sensors are provided to simulate real devices. A graphical user interface allows students to monitor the robots behaviour through an online animation.

  1. Simulation of Molten Core-Concrete Interaction in oxide/metal stratified configuration with the TOLBIAC-ICB code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourniaire, B.; Spindler, B.

    2005-01-01

    The frame of this work is the validation of the TOLBIAC-ICB code which is devoted to the simulation of Molten Core-Concrete Interaction (MCCI) for reactor safety analysis. Attention focuses here on the validation of TOLBIAC-ICB in configurations expected to be representative of the long term phase of MCCI i.e. during an interaction between an oxide/metal stratified corium melt and a concrete structure. Up to now the BETA tests performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FzK) are the only tests available to study such kind of interaction. The BETA tests are first described and the operating conditions are reminded. The TOLBIAC-ICB code is then briefly described, with emphasis on the models used for stratified configurations. The results of the simulations are discussed. A sensitivity study is also performed with the power generated in the oxide layer instead of the metal layer as in the test. This last calculation shows that the large axial ablation observed in the tests is probably due to the peculiar configuration of the test with input power in the bottom metal layer. Since in the reactor case the residual power would be mainly concentrated in the upper oxide layer, the conclusions of the BETA tests for the reactor applications, in term of axial ablation, must be derived with caution. (author)

  2. Anisotropic 3D delay-damage model to simulate concrete structures

    OpenAIRE

    Gatuingt , Fabrice; Desmorat , Rodrigue; Chambart , Marion; Combescure , Didier; Guilbaud , Daniel

    2008-01-01

    International audience; High dynamic loadings lead to material degradation and structural failure. This is even more the case for concrete structures where the parts initially in compression break in ten- sion due to waves propagation and reflection. The dissymmetry of the material behavior plays a major role in such cases, dissymmetry mainly due to damage induced anisotropy. Loading induced damage is most often anisotropic and one proposes here to take advantage of such a feature to build a ...

  3. Open Source Power Plant Simulator Development Under Matlab Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratemi, W.M.; Fadilah, S.M.; Abonoor, N

    2008-01-01

    In this paper an open source programming approach is targeted for the development of power plant simulator under Matlab environment. With this approach many individuals can contribute to the development of the simulator by developing different orders of complexities of the power plant components. Such modules can be modeled based on physical principles, or using neural networks or other methods. All of these modules are categorized in Matlab library, of which the user can select and build up his simulator. Many international companies developed its own authoring tool for the development of its simulators, and hence it became its own property available for high costs. Matlab is a general software developed by mathworks that can be used with its toolkits as the authoring tool for the development of components by different individuals, and through the appropriate coordination, different plant simulators, nuclear, traditional , or even research reactors can be computerly assembled. In this paper, power plant components such as a pressurizer, a reactor, a steam generator, a turbine, a condenser, a feedwater heater, a valve, a pump are modeled based on physical principles. Also a prototype modeling of a reactor ( a scram case) based on neural networks is developed. These modules are inserted in two different Matlab libraries one called physical and the other is called neural. Furthermore, during the simulation one can pause and shuffle the modules selected from the two libraries and then proceed the simulation. Also, under the Matlab environment a PID controller is developed for multi-loop plant which can be integrated for the control of the appropriate developed simulator. This paper is an attempt to base the open source approach for the development of power plant simulators or even research reactor simulators. It then requires the coordination among interested individuals or institutions to set it to professionalism. (author)

  4. Development of concrete mixtures containing highly reactive Pozzolans for improved durability in Florida environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    The report describes research that evaluated the use of supplementary cementitious materials (SCM) to improve the service life of bridges constructed in severe marine environments. The SCM studied included ultra-fine fly ash, ground granulated blast ...

  5. TACOP : A cognitive agent for a naval training simulation environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doesburg, W.A. van; Heuvelink, A.; Broek, E.L. van den

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes how cognitive modeling can be exploited in the design of software agents that support naval training sessions. The architecture, specifications, and embedding of the cognitive agent in a simulation environment are described. Subsequently, the agent's functioning was evaluated in

  6. TACOP: A Cognitive Agent for a Naval Training Simulation Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doesburg, W.A.; Verbeeck, K.; Heuvelink, A.; Tuyls, K.; Nowé, A.; van den Broek, Egon; Manderick, B.; Kuijpers, B.

    2005-01-01

    The full version of this paper appeared in: Doesburg, W. A. van, Heuvelink, A., and Broek, E. L. van den (2005). TACOP: A cognitive agent for a naval training simulation environment. In M. Pechoucek, D. Steiner, and S. Thompson (Eds.), Proceedings of the Industry Track of the Fourth International

  7. Status Report of Simulated Space Radiation Environment Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Phil Hyun; Nho, Young Chang; Jeun, Joon Pyo; Choi, Jae Hak; Lim, Youn Mook; Jung, Chan Hee; Jeon, Young Kyu

    2007-11-15

    The technology for performance testing and improvement of materials which are durable at space environment is a military related technology and veiled and securely regulated in advanced countries such as US and Russia. This core technology cannot be easily transferred to other country too. Therefore, this technology is the most fundamental and necessary research area for the successful establishment of space environment system. Since the task for evaluating the effects of space materials and components by space radiation plays important role in satellite lifetime extension and running failure percentage decrease, it is necessary to establish simulated space radiation facility and systematic testing procedure. This report has dealt with the status of the technology to enable the simulation of space environment effects, including the effect of space radiation on space materials. This information such as the fundamental knowledge of space environment and research status of various countries as to the simulation of space environment effects of space materials will be useful for the research on radiation hardiness of the materials. Furthermore, it will be helpful for developer of space material on deriving a better choice of materials, reducing the design cycle time, and improving safety.

  8. Status Report of Simulated Space Radiation Environment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Phil Hyun; Nho, Young Chang; Jeun, Joon Pyo; Choi, Jae Hak; Lim, Youn Mook; Jung, Chan Hee; Jeon, Young Kyu

    2007-11-01

    The technology for performance testing and improvement of materials which are durable at space environment is a military related technology and veiled and securely regulated in advanced countries such as US and Russia. This core technology cannot be easily transferred to other country too. Therefore, this technology is the most fundamental and necessary research area for the successful establishment of space environment system. Since the task for evaluating the effects of space materials and components by space radiation plays important role in satellite lifetime extension and running failure percentage decrease, it is necessary to establish simulated space radiation facility and systematic testing procedure. This report has dealt with the status of the technology to enable the simulation of space environment effects, including the effect of space radiation on space materials. This information such as the fundamental knowledge of space environment and research status of various countries as to the simulation of space environment effects of space materials will be useful for the research on radiation hardiness of the materials. Furthermore, it will be helpful for developer of space material on deriving a better choice of materials, reducing the design cycle time, and improving safety

  9. Application of the Hybrid Simulation Method for the Full-Scale Precast Reinforced Concrete Shear Wall Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaixian Chen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The hybrid simulation (HS testing method combines physical test and numerical simulation, and provides a viable alternative to evaluate the structural seismic performance. Most studies focused on the accuracy, stability and reliability of the HS method in the small-scale tests. It is a challenge to evaluate the seismic performance of a twelve-story pre-cast reinforced concrete shear-wall structure using this HS method which takes the full-scale bottom three-story structural model as the physical substructure and the elastic non-linear model as the numerical substructure. This paper employs an equivalent force control (EFC method with implicit integration algorithm to deal with the numerical integration of the equation of motion (EOM and the control of the loading device. Because of the arrangement of the test model, an elastic non-linear numerical model is used to simulate the numerical substructure. And non-subdivision strategy for the displacement inflection point of numerical substructure is used to easily realize the simulation of the numerical substructure and thus reduce the measured error. The parameters of the EFC method are calculated basing on analytical and numerical studies and used to the actual full-scale HS test. Finally, the accuracy and feasibility of the EFC-based HS method is verified experimentally through the substructure HS tests of the pre-cast reinforced concrete shear-wall structure model. And the testing results of the descending stage can be conveniently obtained from the EFC-based HS method.

  10. Classroom Simulation for Trainee Teachers Using 3D Virtual Environments and Simulated Smartbot Student Behaviours

    OpenAIRE

    Alotaibi, Fahad Mazaed

    2014-01-01

    his thesis consists of an analysis of a classroom simulation using a Second Life (SL) experiment that aims to investigate the teaching impact on smartbots (virtual students) from trainee teacher avatars with respect to interaction, simulated behaviour, and observed teaching roles. The classroom-based SL experiments’ motivation is to enable the trainee teacher to acquire the necessary skills and experience to manage a real classroom environment through simulations of a real classroom. This ty...

  11. A Multiagent Modeling Environment for Simulating Work Practice in Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierhuis, Maarten; Clancey, William J.; vanHoof, Ron

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we position Brahms as a tool for simulating organizational processes. Brahms is a modeling and simulation environment for analyzing human work practice, and for using such models to develop intelligent software agents to support the work practice in organizations. Brahms is the result of more than ten years of research at the Institute for Research on Learning (IRL), NYNEX Science & Technology (the former R&D institute of the Baby Bell telephone company in New York, now Verizon), and for the last six years at NASA Ames Research Center, in the Work Systems Design and Evaluation group, part of the Computational Sciences Division (Code IC). Brahms has been used on more than ten modeling and simulation research projects, and recently has been used as a distributed multiagent development environment for developing work practice support tools for human in-situ science exploration on planetary surfaces, in particular a human mission to Mars. Brahms was originally conceived of as a business process modeling and simulation tool that incorporates the social systems of work, by illuminating how formal process flow descriptions relate to people s actual located activities in the workplace. Our research started in the early nineties as a reaction to experiences with work process modeling and simulation . Although an effective tool for convincing management of the potential cost-savings of the newly designed work processes, the modeling and simulation environment was only able to describe work as a normative workflow. However, the social systems, uncovered in work practices studied by the design team played a significant role in how work actually got done-actual lived work. Multi- tasking, informal assistance and circumstantial work interactions could not easily be represented in a tool with a strict workflow modeling paradigm. In response, we began to develop a tool that would have the benefits of work process modeling and simulation, but be distinctively able to

  12. Multi-scale modelling and simulation of the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of concrete with explicit representation of cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tognevi, Amen

    2012-01-01

    The concrete structures of nuclear power plants can be subjected to moderate thermo-hydric loadings characterized by temperatures of the order of hundred of degrees in service conditions as well as in accidental ones. These loadings can be at the origin of important disorders, in particular cracking which accelerate hydric transfers in the structure. In the framework of the study of durability of these structures, a coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical model denoted THMs has been developed at Laboratoire d'Etude du Comportement des Betons et des Argiles (LECBA) of CEA Saclay in order to perform simulations of the concrete behavior submitted to such loadings. In this work, we focus on the improvement in the model THMs in one hand of the assessment of the mechanical and hydro-mechanical parameters of the unsaturated micro-cracked material and in the other hand of the description of cracking in terms of opening and propagation. The first part is devoted to the development of a model based on a multi-scale description of cement-based materials starting from the scale of the main hydrated products (portlandite, ettringite, C-S-H etc.) to the macroscopic scale of the cracked material. The investigated parameters are obtained at each scale of the description by applying analytical homogenization techniques. The second part concerns a fine numerical description of cracking. To this end, we choose to use combined finite element and discrete element methods. This procedure is presented and illustrated through a series of mechanical tests in order to show the feasibility of the method and to proceed to its validation. Finally, we apply the procedure to a heated wall and the proposed method for estimating the permeability shows the interest to take into account an anisotropic permeability tensor when dealing with mass transfers in cracked concrete structures. (author) [fr

  13. Simulation of LOCA and ageing effect with containment liner mockup for analysis of liner-concrete interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wienand, B.; Fila, A.; Hermann, N.; Mueller, M.

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of the pre-stressed concrete wall behavior including the liner during LOCA conditions is important for the assessment of the structural integrity of the structure and the leak tightness of the liner. In the frame of the NUGENIA ACCEPPT project WP1 G4 'Structural interaction of liner with the concrete', a load test on a reactor containment liner mockup was carried out. The pre-stressed mockup represents a cylindrical part of the liner, embedded in the concrete wall, but without the wall curvature which is not test relevant. It correlates in material and geometrical properties to the EPR containment. The purpose of the test was to check the liners structural behavior and its integrity for Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) load combination considering pre-stressing forces and ageing effects due to creep and shrinkage including liner buckling. The test was carried out at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in September 2013. This article presents the measurement technology, the results and the development of a calculation method for the embedded liner structure. It appears that the liner deformation results are exemplarily shown at the locations of the imperfections, where the liner buckling is anticipated. The measured liner surface strains ranged between +2 and -10 per thousand. The compressive strains are higher than the tensile strains due to the compressive membrane strains caused by pre-stressing and heating. Although the liner got plastic deformations, the liner strains are still far below the elongation at rupture, which indicates that the liner integrity is ensured. We can conclude that the liner mockup test proceeded as planned. The evaluation results show that the purpose of the liner mockup to simulate LOCA + ageing conditions and liner buckling has fully been achieved

  14. Generic Simulator Environment for Realistic Simulation - Autonomous Entity Proof and Emotion in Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickaël Camus

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Simulation is usually used as an evaluation and testing system. Many sectors are concerned such as EUROPEAN SPACE AGENCY or the EUROPEAN DEFENCE. It is important to make sure that the project is error-free in order to continue it. The difficulty is to develop a realistic environment for the simulation and the execution of a scenario. This paper presents PALOMA, a Generic Simulator Environment. This project is based essantially on the Chaos Theory and Complex Systems to create and direct an environment for a simulation. An important point is the generic aspect. PALOMA will be able to create an environment for different sectors (Aero-space, Biology, Mathematic, .... PALOMA includes six components : the Simulation Engine, the Direction Module, the Environment Generator, the Natural Behavior Restriction, the Communication API and the User API. Three languages are used to develop this simulator. SCHEME for the Direction language, C/C++ for the development of modules and OZ/MOZART for the heart of PALOMA.

  15. Simulation Environment Synchronizing Real Equipment for Manufacturing Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inukai, Toshihiro; Hibino, Hironori; Fukuda, Yoshiro

    Recently, manufacturing industries face various problems such as shorter product life cycle, more diversified customer needs. In this situation, it is very important to reduce lead-time of manufacturing system constructions. At the manufacturing system implementation stage, it is important to make and evaluate facility control programs for a manufacturing cell, such as ladder programs for programmable logical controllers (PLCs) rapidly. However, before the manufacturing systems are implemented, methods to evaluate the facility control programs for the equipment while mixing and synchronizing real equipment and virtual factory models on the computers have not been developed. This difficulty is caused by the complexity of the manufacturing system composed of a great variety of equipment, and stopped precise and rapid support of a manufacturing engineering process. In this paper, a manufacturing engineering environment (MEE) to support manufacturing engineering processes using simulation technologies is proposed. MEE consists of a manufacturing cell simulation environment (MCSE) and a distributed simulation environment (DSE). MCSE, which consists of a manufacturing cell simulator and a soft-wiring system, is emphatically proposed in detail. MCSE realizes making and evaluating facility control programs by using virtual factory models on computers before manufacturing systems are implemented.

  16. A virtual environment for simulation of radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Tadeu Augusto de Almeida; Farias, Oscar Luiz Monteiro de

    2013-01-01

    A virtual environment is a computer environment, representative of a subset of the real world, and where models of the real world entities, process and events are included in a virtual (three-dimensional) space. Virtual environments are ideal tools for simulation of certain critical processes, such as radiological accidents, where human beings or properties can suffer irreversible or long term damages. Radiological accidents are characterized by the significant exposure to radiation of specialized workers and general public. The early detection of a radiological accident and the determination of its possible extension are essential factors for the planning of prompt answers and emergency actions. This paper proposes the integration of georeferenced representation of the three-dimensional space and agent-based models, with the objective to construct virtual environments that have the capacity to simulate radiological accidents. The three-dimensional georeferenced representations of space candidates are: 1) the spatial representation of traditional geographical information systems (GIS); 2) the representation adopted by Google Maps®. Adding agents to these spatial representations allow us to simulate radiological accidents, quantify the doses received by members of the public, obtain a possible spatial distribution of people contaminated, estimate the number of contaminated individuals, estimate the impact on the health-network, estimate environmental impacts, generate exclusion zones, build alternative scenarios and train staff to deal with radiological accidents. (author)

  17. A virtual environment for simulation of radiological accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Tadeu Augusto de Almeida, E-mail: tedsilva@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Farias, Oscar Luiz Monteiro de, E-mail: fariasol@eng.uerj.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    A virtual environment is a computer environment, representative of a subset of the real world, and where models of the real world entities, process and events are included in a virtual (three-dimensional) space. Virtual environments are ideal tools for simulation of certain critical processes, such as radiological accidents, where human beings or properties can suffer irreversible or long term damages. Radiological accidents are characterized by the significant exposure to radiation of specialized workers and general public. The early detection of a radiological accident and the determination of its possible extension are essential factors for the planning of prompt answers and emergency actions. This paper proposes the integration of georeferenced representation of the three-dimensional space and agent-based models, with the objective to construct virtual environments that have the capacity to simulate radiological accidents. The three-dimensional georeferenced representations of space candidates are: 1) the spatial representation of traditional geographical information systems (GIS); 2) the representation adopted by Google Maps®. Adding agents to these spatial representations allow us to simulate radiological accidents, quantify the doses received by members of the public, obtain a possible spatial distribution of people contaminated, estimate the number of contaminated individuals, estimate the impact on the health-network, estimate environmental impacts, generate exclusion zones, build alternative scenarios and train staff to deal with radiological accidents. (author)

  18. Modeling reinforced concrete durability : [summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Many Florida bridges are built of steel-reinforced concrete. Floridas humid and marine : environments subject steel in these structures : to corrosion once water and salt penetrate the : concrete and contact the steel. Corroded steel : takes up mo...

  19. TRANSPARENT CONCRETE

    OpenAIRE

    Sandeep Sharma*, Dr. O.P. Reddy

    2017-01-01

    Transparent concrete is the new type of concrete introduced in todays world which carries special property of light transmitting due to presence of light Optical fibres. Which is also known as translucent concrete or light transmitting concrete, it is achieved by replacing coarse aggregates with transparent alternate materials (Optical fibres). The binding material in transparent concrete may be able to transmit light by using clear resins the concrete mix. The concrete used in industry in pr...

  20. Qualified operator training in the simulated control room environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu, Teodor; Studineanu, Emil; Radulescu, Catalina; Bolocan, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Mainly designed for the training of the Cernavoda NPP Unit 2 operators, the virtual simulated environment allows the training of the already qualified operators for Cernavoda NPP Unit 1, adding to the already trained knowledge, the differences which has occurred in the Unit 2 design. Using state-of-the-art computers and displays and qualified software, the virtual simulated panels could offer a viable alternative to classic hardware-based training. This approach allows quick training of the new procedures required by the new configuration of the re-designed operator panels in the main control room of Cernavoda NPP Unit 2. (authors)

  1. Qualified operator training in the simulated control room environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu, Teodor; Studineanu, Emil; Radulescu, Catalina; Bolocan, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    Mainly designed for the training of the Cernavoda NPP Unit 2 operators, the virtual simulated environment allows the training of the already qualified operators for Cernavoda NPP Unit 1, adding to the already trained knowledge, the differences which have occurred in the Unit 2 design. Using state-of-the-art computers and displays and qualified software, the virtual simulated panels could offer a viable alternative to classic hardware-based training. This approach allows quick training of the new procedures required by the new configuration of the re-designed operator panels in the main control room of Cernavoda NPP Unit 2. (authors)

  2. Simulation-Aided Design of Tubular Polymeric Capsules for Self-Healing Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šavija, Branko; Feiteira, João; Araújo, Maria; Chatrabhuti, Sutima; Raquez, Jean-Marie; Van Tittelboom, Kim; Gruyaert, Elke; De Belie, Nele; Schlangen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Polymeric capsules can have an advantage over glass capsules used up to now as proof-of-concept carriers in self-healing concrete. They allow easier processing and afford the possibility to fine tune their mechanical properties. Out of the multiple requirements for capsules used in this context, the capability of rupturing when crossed by a crack in concrete of a typical size is one of the most relevant, as without it no healing agent is released into the crack. This study assessed the fitness of five types of polymeric capsules to fulfill this requirement by using a numerical model to screen the best performing ones and verifying their fitness with experimental methods. Capsules made of a specific type of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) were considered fit for the intended application, rupturing at average crack sizes of 69 and 128 μm, respectively for a wall thickness of ~0.3 and ~0.7 mm. Thicker walls were considered unfit, as they ruptured for crack sizes much higher than 100 μm. Other types of PMMA used and polylactic acid were equally unfit for the same reason. There was overall good fitting between model output and experimental results and an elongation at break of 1.5% is recommended regarding polymers for this application. PMID:28772370

  3. Electrophysiological measurement of interest during walking in a simulated environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Yuji; Okuma, Takashi; Kimura, Motohiro; Kurata, Takeshi; Takenaka, Takeshi; Iwaki, Sunao

    2014-09-01

    A reliable neuroscientific technique for objectively estimating the degree of interest in a real environment is currently required in the research fields of neuroergonomics and neuroeconomics. Toward the development of such a technique, the present study explored electrophysiological measures that reflect an observer's interest in a nearly-real visual environment. Participants were asked to walk through a simulated shopping mall and the attractiveness of the shopping mall was manipulated by opening and closing the shutters of stores. During the walking task, participants were exposed to task-irrelevant auditory probes (two-stimulus oddball sequence). The results showed a smaller P2/early P3a component of task-irrelevant auditory event-related potentials and a larger lambda response of eye-fixation-related potentials in an interesting environment (i.e., open-shutter condition) than in a boring environment (i.e., closed-shutter condition); these findings can be reasonably explained by supposing that participants allocated more attentional resources to visual information in an interesting environment than in a boring environment, and thus residual attentional resources that could be allocated to task-irrelevant auditory probes were reduced. The P2/early P3a component and the lambda response may be useful measures of interest in a real visual environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Temperature field simulation of complex structures in fire environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Weifen; Hao Zhiming; Li Minghai

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the typical model of the system of dangerous goods - steel - wood composite structure including components of explosives is used as the research object. Using MARC program, the temperature field of the structure in the fire environment is simulated. Radiation, conduction and convection heat transfer within the gap of the structure are taken into account, contact heat transfer is also considered. The phenomenon of thermal decomposition of wood in high temperature is deal with by equivalent method. The results show that the temperature of the explosives is not high in the fire environment. The timber inside the composite structure has played a very good insulation effect of explosives.

  5. Electrochemistry of lead in simulated ground water environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joerg, E.A.; Devereux, O.F.

    1996-01-01

    Lead and lead alloys are used commonly as moisture barriers for underground cables. Lead exhibits excellent corrosion resistance in a variety of environments, but areas of localized attack have been found. These can result in able failures. The susceptibility of lead to pitting in several simulated ground water (SGW) environments was assessed using cyclic potentiodynamic pitting scans (PPS) and microscopy. Although general corrosion was observed, PPS demonstrated pitting did not occur in the same sense as in alloys known to be susceptible to pitting (i.e., very localized pit formation without general corrosion). However, areas of nonuniform general attack did occur, resulting in pitted surface morphologies

  6. Experiences with a simulated learning environment - the SimuScape©: Virtual environments in medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Lena Thies

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Simulation as a tool for medical education has gained considerable importance in the past years. Various studies have shown that the mastering of basic skills happens best if taught in a realistic and workplace-based context. It is necessary that simulation itself takes place in the realistic background of a genuine clinical or in an accordingly simulated learning environment. METHODS: A panoramic projection system that allows the simulation of different scenarios has been created at the medical school of the Westphalian Wilhelms-University  Muenster/Germany. The SimuScape© is a circular training room of six meters in diameter and has the capacity to generate pictures or moving images as well as the corresponding background noises for medical students, who are then able to interact with simulated patients inside a realistic environment. RESULTS: About 1,000 students have been instructed using the SimuScape© in the courses of emergency medicine, family medicine and anesthesia. The SimuScape©, with its 270°-panoramic projection, gives the students the impression “of being right in the center of action”.  It is a flexible learning environment that can be easily integrated into curricular teaching and which is in full operation for 10 days per semester. CONCLUSION: The SimuScape© allows the establishment of new medical areas outside the hospital and surgery for simulation and it is an extremely adaptable and cost-effective utilization of a lecture room. In this simulated environment it is possible to teach objectives like self-protection and patient care during disturbing environmental influences in practice.

  7. Simulation based virtual learning environment in medical genetics counseling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makransky, Guido; Bonde, Mads T; Wulff, Julie S G

    2016-01-01

    learning environments increase students' knowledge, intrinsic motivation, and self-efficacy, and help them generalize from laboratory analyses to clinical practice and health decision-making. METHODS: An entire class of 300 University of Copenhagen first-year undergraduate students, most with a major...... in medicine, received a 2-h training session in a simulation based learning environment. The main outcomes were pre- to post- changes in knowledge, intrinsic motivation, and self-efficacy, together with post-intervention evaluation of the effect of the simulation on student understanding of everyday clinical...... practice were demonstrated. RESULTS: Knowledge (Cohen's d = 0.73), intrinsic motivation (d = 0.24), and self-efficacy (d = 0.46) significantly increased from the pre- to post-test. Low knowledge students showed the greatest increases in knowledge (d = 3.35) and self-efficacy (d = 0.61), but a non...

  8. Passive behaviour of alloy corrosion-resistant steel Cr10Mo1 in simulating concrete pore solutions with different pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ai, Zhiyong; Jiang, Jinyang; Sun, Wei; Song, Dan; Ma, Han; Zhang, Jianchun; Wang, Danqian

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new alloy corrosion-resistant steel Cr10Mo1 is developed for reinforcing rebar of concrete in severe environments. • The effects of pH on the passive behaviour of Cr10Mo1 steel compared with plain carbon steel were studied systematically by electrochemical techniques and surface analysis. • The mechanism for self-reinforcing passivity against carbonation of the corrosion-resistant steel is revealed. - Abstract: The passive behaviour of new alloy corrosion-resistant steel Cr10Mo1 and plain carbon steel (as a comparison) in simulating concrete pore solutions of different pH (ranging from 13.5 to 9.0) under open circuit potential conditions, was evaluated by various electrochemical techniques: potentiodynamic polarization, capacitance measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The chemical composition and structure of passive films were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The electrochemical responses of passive films show that Cr10Mo1 steel has an increasing passivity with pH decreasing while carbon steel dose conversely, revealing carbonation does no negative effect on passivation of the corrosion-resistant steel. SIMS reveals that the passive film on the corrosion-resistant steel presents a bilayer structure: an outer layer mainly consisting of Fe oxides and hydroxides, and an inner layer enriched in Cr species, while only a Fe-concentrated layer for carbon steel. According to the XPS analysis results, as the pH decreases, more stable and protective Cr oxides are enriched in the film on Cr10Mo1 steel while Fe oxides gradually decompose. Higher content of Cr oxides in the film layer provides Cr10Mo1 corrosion-resistant steel more excellent passivity at lower pH.

  9. Passive behaviour of alloy corrosion-resistant steel Cr10Mo1 in simulating concrete pore solutions with different pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ai, Zhiyong, E-mail: 230139452@seu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Construction Materials, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Jiang, Jinyang, E-mail: jiangjinyang16@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Construction Materials, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Sun, Wei, E-mail: sunwei@seu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Construction Materials, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Song, Dan, E-mail: songdancharls@hhu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Construction Materials, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); College of Mechanics and Materials, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098, Jiangsu (China); Ma, Han, E-mail: mahan-iris@shasteel.cn [Research Institute of Jiangsu Shasteel Iron and Steel, Zhangjiagang 215625, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Jianchun, E-mail: Zhangjc-iris@shasteel.cn [Research Institute of Jiangsu Shasteel Iron and Steel, Zhangjiagang 215625, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Danqian, E-mail: wonderbaba@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Construction Materials, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A new alloy corrosion-resistant steel Cr10Mo1 is developed for reinforcing rebar of concrete in severe environments. • The effects of pH on the passive behaviour of Cr10Mo1 steel compared with plain carbon steel were studied systematically by electrochemical techniques and surface analysis. • The mechanism for self-reinforcing passivity against carbonation of the corrosion-resistant steel is revealed. - Abstract: The passive behaviour of new alloy corrosion-resistant steel Cr10Mo1 and plain carbon steel (as a comparison) in simulating concrete pore solutions of different pH (ranging from 13.5 to 9.0) under open circuit potential conditions, was evaluated by various electrochemical techniques: potentiodynamic polarization, capacitance measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The chemical composition and structure of passive films were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The electrochemical responses of passive films show that Cr10Mo1 steel has an increasing passivity with pH decreasing while carbon steel dose conversely, revealing carbonation does no negative effect on passivation of the corrosion-resistant steel. SIMS reveals that the passive film on the corrosion-resistant steel presents a bilayer structure: an outer layer mainly consisting of Fe oxides and hydroxides, and an inner layer enriched in Cr species, while only a Fe-concentrated layer for carbon steel. According to the XPS analysis results, as the pH decreases, more stable and protective Cr oxides are enriched in the film on Cr10Mo1 steel while Fe oxides gradually decompose. Higher content of Cr oxides in the film layer provides Cr10Mo1 corrosion-resistant steel more excellent passivity at lower pH.

  10. The influence of blast furnace slag, fly ash and silica fume on corrosion of reinforced concrete in marine environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.

    1996-01-01

    Chloride penetration from sea water may cause corrosion of reinforcement in concrete structures. Adding reactive inorganic materials such as blast furnace slag, fly ash or silica fume to the cement matrix improves the resistance against chloride penetration as compared to Portland cement concrete. A

  11. DIGITAL SIMULATIONS FOR IMPROVING EDUCATION: Learning Through Artificial Teaching Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Reviewed by Özlem OZAN

    2009-01-01

    DIGITAL SIMULATIONS FOR IMPROVING EDUCATION:Learning Through Artificial Teaching EnvironmentsGibson, David, Ed.D.; Information Science Reference, Hershey, PA,SBN-10: 1605663239, ISBN-13: 9781605663234, p.514 Jan 2009Reviewed byÖzlem OZANFaculty of Education, Eskişehir Osmangazi University,Eskisehir-TURKEYSimulations in education, both for children and adults,become popular with the development of computer technology, because they are fun and engaging and allow learners to internalize knowledg...

  12. Virtual environment display for a 3D audio room simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, William L.; Foster, Scott

    1992-06-01

    Recent developments in virtual 3D audio and synthetic aural environments have produced a complex acoustical room simulation. The acoustical simulation models a room with walls, ceiling, and floor of selected sound reflecting/absorbing characteristics and unlimited independent localizable sound sources. This non-visual acoustic simulation, implemented with 4 audio ConvolvotronsTM by Crystal River Engineering and coupled to the listener with a Poihemus IsotrakTM, tracking the listener's head position and orientation, and stereo headphones returning binaural sound, is quite compelling to most listeners with eyes closed. This immersive effect should be reinforced when properly integrated into a full, multi-sensory virtual environment presentation. This paper discusses the design of an interactive, visual virtual environment, complementing the acoustic model and specified to: 1) allow the listener to freely move about the space, a room of manipulable size, shape, and audio character, while interactively relocating the sound sources; 2) reinforce the listener's feeling of telepresence into the acoustical environment with visual and proprioceptive sensations; 3) enhance the audio with the graphic and interactive components, rather than overwhelm or reduce it; and 4) serve as a research testbed and technology transfer demonstration. The hardware/software design of two demonstration systems, one installed and one portable, are discussed through the development of four iterative configurations. The installed system implements a head-coupled, wide-angle, stereo-optic tracker/viewer and multi-computer simulation control. The portable demonstration system implements a head-mounted wide-angle, stereo-optic display, separate head and pointer electro-magnetic position trackers, a heterogeneous parallel graphics processing system, and object oriented C++ program code.

  13. Acoustic emission from fuel pellets in a simulated reactor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.S.; Kennedy, C.R.; Reimann, K.J.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal-shock damage of nuclear reactor fuel pellets in a simulated reactor environment has been correlated with acoustic-emission data obtained from sensors placed on extensions of the electrical feedthroughs. Ringdown counts, rms output data, and event-location data has been acquired for experiments carried out with single pellets as well as multiple pellet stacks. These tests have shown that acoustic-emission monitoring can provide information indicating the onset and the extent of cracking

  14. Simulated learning environment experience in nursing students for paediatric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Maldonado, Yessy; Barría-Pailaquilén, René Mauricio

    The training of health professionals requires the acquisition of clinical skills in a safe and efficient manner, which is facilitated by a simulated learning environment (SLE). It is also an efficient alternative when there are limitations for clinical practice in certain areas. This paper shows the work undertaken in a Chilean university in implementing paediatric practice using SLE. Over eight days, the care experience of a hospitalized infant was studied applying the nursing process. The participation of a paediatrician, resident physician, nursing technician, and simulated user was included in addition to the use of a simulation mannequin and equipment. Simulation of care was integral and covered interaction with the child and family and was developed in groups of six students by a teacher. The different phases of the simulation methodology were developed from a pedagogical point of view. The possibility of implementing paediatric clinical practice in an efficient and safe way was confirmed. The experience in SLE was highly valued by the students, allowing them to develop different skills and abilities required for paediatric nursing through simulation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Study some mechanical properties of self-compacting concrete with nano silica under severe saline environment conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habeeb Ghalib

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this research is to evaluate the performance of Nano silica self-compacting concrete which is subjected to severe saline conditions that contain sulfates and chlorides at concentrations similar to those existing in the soils and ground water of the middle and southern parts of Iraq. For this purpose, ordinary and sulfate resistant Portland cement without and with 3% Nano silica addition by weight of cementitious materials were used. Splitting tensile strength, flexural strength, static modulus of elasticity and ultrasonic pulse velocity were investigated for all exposure conditions and all types of mixes of self-compacting concrete at ages of 28, 60, 90, 120 and 180 days. Test results revealed that the inclusion of Nano Silica in concrete mixes improved clearly the mechanical properties of self-compacting concrete compared with reference concrete.

  16. Simulated Space Environment Effects on a Candidate Solar Sail Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Bryant, Robert G.; Wilkie, W. Keats; Wadsworth, Heather M.; Craven, Paul D.; Nehls, Mary K.; Vaughn, Jason A.

    2017-01-01

    For long duration missions of solar sails, the sail material needs to survive harsh space environments and the degradation of the sail material controls operational lifetime. Therefore, understanding the effects of the space environment on the sail membrane is essential for mission success. In this study, we investigated the effect of simulated space environment effects of ionizing radiation, thermal aging and simulated potential damage on mechanical, thermal and optical properties of a commercial off the shelf (COTS) polyester solar sail membrane to assess the degradation mechanisms on a feasible solar sail. The solar sail membrane was exposed to high energy electrons (about 70 keV and 10 nA/cm2), and the physical properties were characterized. After about 8.3 Grad dose, the tensile modulus, tensile strength and failure strain of the sail membrane decreased by about 20 95%. The aluminum reflective layer was damaged and partially delaminated but it did not show any significant change in solar absorbance or thermal emittance. The effect on mechanical properties of a pre-cracked sample, simulating potential impact damage of the sail membrane, as well as thermal aging effects on metallized PEN (polyethylene naphthalate) film will be discussed.

  17. Expanding the modeling capabilities of the cognitive environment simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.M.; Mumaw, R.J.; Pople, H.E. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has been conducting a research program to develop more effective tools to model the cognitive activities that underlie intention formation during nuclear power plant (NPP) emergencies. Under this program an artificial intelligence (AI) computer simulation called Cognitive Environment Simulation (CES) has been developed. CES simulates the cognitive activities involved in responding to a NPP accident situation. It is intended to provide an analytic tool for predicting likely human responses, and the kinds of errors that can plausibly arise under different accident conditions to support human reliability analysis. Recently CES was extended to handle a class of interfacing loss of coolant accidents (ISLOCAs). This paper summarizes the results of these exercises and describes follow-on work currently underway

  18. How Concrete is Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Koeno Gravemeijer

    2010-01-01

    If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, ‘manipulatives’, in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own, abstract, knowledge; in the latter, we try to find an example that the others will be familiar with. This article first looks at the tension between these two diff...

  19. Virtual environment simulation as a tool to support evacuation planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mol, Antonio C.; Grecco, Claudio H.S.; Santos, Isaac J.A.L.; Carvalho, Paulo V.R.; Jorge, Carlos A.F.; Sales, Douglas S.; Couto, Pedro M.; Botelho, Felipe M.; Bastos, Felipe R.

    2007-01-01

    This work is a preliminary study of the use of a free game-engine as a tool to build and to navigate in virtual environments, with a good degree of realism, for virtual simulations of evacuation from building and risk zones. To achieve this goal, some adjustments in the game engine have been implemented. A real building with four floors, consisting of some rooms with furniture and people, has been virtually implemented. Simulations of simple different evacuation scenarios have been performed, measuring the total time spent in each case. The measured times have been compared with their corresponding real evacuation times, measured in the real building. The first results have demonstrated that the virtual environment building with the free game engine is capable to reproduce the real situation with a satisfactory level. However, it is important to emphasize that such virtual simulations serve only as an aid in the planning of real evacuation simulations, and as such must never substitute the later. (author)

  20. Construction material processed using lunar simulant in various environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Stan; Ocallaghan-Hay, Bridget; Housman, Ralph; Kindig, Michael; King, John; Montegrande, Kevin; Norris, Raymond; Vanscotter, Ryan; Willenborg, Jonathan; Staubs, Harry

    1995-01-01

    The manufacture of construction materials from locally available resources in space is an important first step in the establishment of lunar and planetary bases. The objective of the CoMPULSIVE (Construction Material Processed Using Lunar Simulant In Various Environments) experiment is to develop a procedure to produce construction materials by sintering or melting Johnson Space Center Simulant 1 (JSC-1) lunar soil simulant in both earth-based (1-g) and microgravity (approximately 0-g) environments. The characteristics of the resultant materials will be tested to determine its physical and mechanical properties. The physical characteristics include: crystalline, thermal, and electrical properties. The mechanical properties include: compressive tensile, and flexural strengths. The simulant, placed in a sealed graphite crucible, will be heated using a high temperature furnace. The crucible will then be cooled by radiative and forced convective means. The core furnace element consists of space qualified quartz-halogen incandescent lamps with focusing mirrors. Sample temperatures of up to 2200 C are attainable using this heating method.

  1. Stochastic Simulation of Chloride Ingress into Reinforced Concrete Structures by Means of Multi-Dimensional Gaussian Random Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frier, Christian; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2005-01-01

    For many reinforced concrete structures corrosion of the reinforcement is an important problem since it can result in expensive maintenance and repair actions. Further, a significant reduction of the load-bearing capacity can occur. One mode of corrosion initiation occurs when the chloride content...... is modeled by a 2-dimensional diffusion process by FEM (Finite Element Method) and the diffusion coefficient, surface chloride concentration and reinforcement cover depth are modeled by multidimensional stochastic fields, which are discretized using the EOLE (Expansion Optimum Linear Estimation) approach....... As an example a bridge pier in a marine environment is considered and the results are given in terms of the distribution of the time for initialization of corrosion...

  2. Creating pedestrian crash scenarios in a driving simulator environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysler, Susan T; Ahmad, Omar; Schwarz, Chris W

    2015-01-01

    In 2012 in the United States, pedestrian injuries accounted for 3.3% of all traffic injuries but, disproportionately, pedestrian fatalities accounted for roughly 14% of traffic-related deaths (NHTSA 2014 ). In many other countries, pedestrians make up more than 50% of those injured and killed in crashes. This research project examined driver response to crash-imminent situations involving pedestrians in a high-fidelity, full-motion driving simulator. This article presents a scenario development method and discusses experimental design and control issues in conducting pedestrian crash research in a simulation environment. Driving simulators offer a safe environment in which to test driver response and offer the advantage of having virtual pedestrian models that move realistically, unlike test track studies, which by nature must use pedestrian dummies on some moving track. An analysis of pedestrian crash trajectories, speeds, roadside features, and pedestrian behavior was used to create 18 unique crash scenarios representative of the most frequent and most costly crash types. For the study reported here, we only considered scenarios where the car is traveling straight because these represent the majority of fatalities. We manipulated driver expectation of a pedestrian both by presenting intersection and mid-block crossing as well as by using features in the scene to direct the driver's visual attention toward or away from the crossing pedestrian. Three visual environments for the scenarios were used to provide a variety of roadside environments and speed: a 20-30 mph residential area, a 55 mph rural undivided highway, and a 40 mph urban area. Many variables of crash situations were considered in selecting and developing the scenarios, including vehicle and pedestrian movements; roadway and roadside features; environmental conditions; and characteristics of the pedestrian, driver, and vehicle. The driving simulator scenarios were subjected to iterative testing to

  3. How Concrete is Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koeno Gravemeijer

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, ‘manipulatives’, in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own, abstract, knowledge; in the latter, we try to find an example that the others will be familiar with. This article first looks at the tension between these two different ways of making things concrete. Next another role of manipulatives, will be discussed, namely that of means for scaffolding and communication. In this role, manipulatives may function as means of support in a process that aims at helping students to build on their own thinking while constructing more sophisticated mathematics

  4. Construction of the quantitative analysis environment using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakawa, Seiji; Ushiroda, Tomoya; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Tadokoro, Masanori; Uno, Masaki; Tsujimoto, Masakazu; Ishiguro, Masanobu; Toyama, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The thoracic phantom image was acquisitioned of the axial section to construct maps of the source and density with Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The phantom was Heart/Liver Type HL (Kyoto Kagaku Co., Ltd.) single photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT machine was Symbia T6 (Siemence) with the collimator LMEGP (low-medium energy general purpose). Maps were constructed from CT images with an in-house software using Visual studio C Sharp (Microsoft). The code simulation of imaging nuclear detectors (SIMIND) was used for MC simulation, Prominence processor (Nihon Medi-Physics) for filter processing and image reconstruction, and the environment DELL Precision T7400 for all image processes. For the actual experiment, the phantom was given 15 MBq of 99m Tc assuming the uptake 2% at the dose of 740 MBq in its myocardial portion and SPECT image was acquisitioned and reconstructed with Butter-worth filter and filter back projection method. CT images were similarly obtained in 0.3 mm thick slices, which were filed in one formatted with digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM), and then processed for application to SIMIND for mapping the source and density. Physical and mensuration factors were examined in ideal images by sequential exclusion and simulation of those factors as attenuation, scattering, spatial resolution deterioration and statistical fluctuation. Gamma energy spectrum, SPECT projection and reconstructed images given by the simulation were found to well agree with the actual data, and the precision of MC simulation was confirmed. Physical and mensuration factors were found to be evaluable individually, suggesting the usefulness of the simulation for assessing the precision of their correction. (T.T.)

  5. Conceptual model for concrete long time degradation in a deep nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagerblad, B.; Traegaardh, J.

    1994-02-01

    This report is mainly a state-of-the-art report of concrete long time durability in the environment expected in a deep site underground nuclear waste repository in Swedish crystalline bedrock. The report treats how the concrete and the surrounding groundwater will interact and how they will be affected by cement chemistry, type of aggregate etc. The different mechanisms for concrete alteration treated include sulphate attack, carbonation, chloride attack, alkali-silica reaction and leaching phenomena. In a long time perspective, the chemical alterations in concrete is mainly governed by the surrounding groundwater composition. After closure the composition of the groundwater will change character from a modified meteoric to a saline composition. Therefore two different simulated groundwater compositions have been used in modelling the chemical interaction between concrete and groundwater. The report also includes a study of old and historical concrete which show observations concerning recrystallization phenomena in concrete. 72 refs, 39 figs

  6. Conceptual model for concrete long time degradation in a deep nuclear waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagerblad, B; Traegaardh, J [Swedish Cement and Concrete Research Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1994-02-01

    This report is mainly a state-of-the-art report of concrete long time durability in the environment expected in a deep site underground nuclear waste repository in Swedish crystalline bedrock. The report treats how the concrete and the surrounding groundwater will interact and how they will be affected by cement chemistry, type of aggregate etc. The different mechanisms for concrete alteration treated include sulphate attack, carbonation, chloride attack, alkali-silica reaction and leaching phenomena. In a long time perspective, the chemical alterations in concrete is mainly governed by the surrounding groundwater composition. After closure the composition of the groundwater will change character from a modified meteoric to a saline composition. Therefore two different simulated groundwater compositions have been used in modelling the chemical interaction between concrete and groundwater. The report also includes a study of old and historical concrete which show observations concerning recrystallization phenomena in concrete. 72 refs, 39 figs.

  7. Evaluation of anodes for galvanic cathodic prevention of steel corrosion in prestressed concrete piles in marine environments in Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    Many of the major highway crossings over coastal waters in the Hampton area of Virginia are supported by prestressed concrete piles, some of which are showing signs of reinforcement corrosion. Grout jacketing alone is an inadequate protection against...

  8. GRIZZLY Model of Multi-Reactive Species Diffusion, Moisture/Heat Transfer and Alkali-Silica Reaction for Simulating Concrete Aging and Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Hai [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spencer, Benjamin W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cai, Guowei [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Concrete is widely used in the construction of nuclear facilities because of its structural strength and its ability to shield radiation. The use of concrete in nuclear power plants for containment and shielding of radiation and radioactive materials has made its performance crucial for the safe operation of the facility. As such, when life extension is considered for nuclear power plants, it is critical to have accurate and reliable predictive tools to address concerns related to various aging processes of concrete structures and the capacity of structures subjected to age-related degradation. The goal of this report is to document the progress of the development and implementation of a fully coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical model in GRIZZLY code with the ultimate goal to reliably simulate and predict long-term performance and response of aged NPP concrete structures subjected to a number of aging mechanisms including external chemical attacks and volume-changing chemical reactions within concrete structures induced by alkali-silica reactions and long-term exposure to irradiation. Based on a number of survey reports of concrete aging mechanisms relevant to nuclear power plants and recommendations from researchers in concrete community, we’ve implemented three modules during FY15 in GRIZZLY code, (1) multi-species reactive diffusion model within cement materials; (2) coupled moisture and heat transfer model in concrete; and (3) anisotropic, stress-dependent, alkali-silica reaction induced swelling model. The multi-species reactive diffusion model was implemented with the objective to model aging of concrete structures subjected to aggressive external chemical attacks (e.g., chloride attack, sulfate attack, etc.). It considers multiple processes relevant to external chemical attacks such as diffusion of ions in aqueous phase within pore spaces, equilibrium chemical speciation reactions and kinetic mineral dissolution/precipitation. The moisture

  9. Simulation Environment Based on the Universal Verification Methodology

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)697338

    2017-01-01

    Universal Verification Methodology (UVM) is a standardized approach of verifying integrated circuit designs, targeting a Coverage-Driven Verification (CDV). It combines automatic test generation, self-checking testbenches, and coverage metrics to indicate progress in the design verification. The flow of the CDV differs from the traditional directed-testing approach. With the CDV, a testbench developer, by setting the verification goals, starts with an structured plan. Those goals are targeted further by a developed testbench, which generates legal stimuli and sends them to a device under test (DUT). The progress is measured by coverage monitors added to the simulation environment. In this way, the non-exercised functionality can be identified. Moreover, the additional scoreboards indicate undesired DUT behaviour. Such verification environments were developed for three recent ASIC and FPGA projects which have successfully implemented the new work-flow: (1) the CLICpix2 65 nm CMOS hybrid pixel readout ASIC desi...

  10. Improved climate risk simulations for rice in arid environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pepijn A J van Oort

    Full Text Available We integrated recent research on cardinal temperatures for phenology and early leaf growth, spikelet formation, early morning flowering, transpirational cooling, and heat- and cold-induced sterility into an existing to crop growth model ORYZA2000. We compared for an arid environment observed potential yields with yields simulated with default ORYZA2000, with modified subversions of ORYZA2000 and with ORYZA_S, a model developed for the region of interest in the 1990s. Rice variety 'IR64' was sown monthly 15-times in a row in two locations in Senegal. The Senegal River Valley is located in the Sahel, near the Sahara desert with extreme temperatures during day and night. The existing subroutines underestimated cold stress and overestimated heat stress. Forcing the model to use observed spikelet number and phenology and replacing the existing heat and cold subroutines improved accuracy of yield simulation from EF = -0.32 to EF =0.70 (EF is modelling efficiency. The main causes of improved accuracy were that the new model subversions take into account transpirational cooling (which is high in arid environments and early morning flowering for heat sterility, and minimum rather than average temperature for cold sterility. Simulations were less accurate when also spikelet number and phenology were simulated. Model efficiency was 0.14 with new heat and cold routines and improved to 0.48 when using new cardinal temperatures for phenology and early leaf growth. The new adapted subversion of ORYZA2000 offers a powerful analytic tool for climate change impact assessment and cropping calendar optimisation in arid regions.

  11. The Passive Film Growth Mechanism of New Corrosion-Resistant Steel Rebar in Simulated Concrete Pore Solution: Nanometer Structure and Electrochemical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jin-Yang; Wang, Danqian; Chu, Hong-Yan; Ma, Han; Liu, Yao; Gao, Yun; Shi, Jinjie; Sun, Wei

    2017-04-14

    An elaborative study was carried out on the growth mechanism and properties of the passive film for a new kind of alloyed corrosion-resistant steel (CR steel). The passive film naturally formed in simulated concrete pore solutions (pH = 13.3). The corrosion resistance was evaluated by various methods including open circuit potential (OCP), linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Meanwhile, the 2205 duplex stainless steel (SS steel) was evaluated for comparison. Moreover, the passive film with CR steel was studied by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), and the Mott‑Schottky approach. The results showed that the excellent passivity of CR steel could be detected in a high alkaline environment. The grain boundaries between the fine passive film particles lead to increasing Cr oxide content in the later passivation stage. The filling of cation vacancies in the later passivation stage as well as the orderly crystalized inner layer contributed to the excellent corrosion resistance of CR steel. A passive film growth model for CR steel was proposed.

  12. Concrete Infill Monitoring in Concrete-Filled FRP Tubes Using a PZT-Based Ultrasonic Time-of-Flight Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mingzhang; Li, Weijie; Hei, Chuang; Song, Gangbing

    2016-12-07

    Concrete-filled fiber-reinforced polymer tubes (CFFTs) have attracted interest for their structural applications in corrosive environments. However, a weak interfacial strength between the fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) tube and the concrete infill may develop due to concrete shrinkage and inadequate concrete compaction during concrete casting, which will destroy the confinement effect and thereby reduce the load bearing capacity of a CFFT. In this paper, the lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-based ultrasonic time-of-flight (TOF) method was adopted to assess the concrete infill condition of CFFTs. The basic idea of this method is that the velocity of the ultrasonic wave propagation in the FRP material is about half of that in concrete material. Any voids or debonding created along the interface between the FRP tube and the concrete will delay the arrival time between the pairs of PZT transducers. A comparison of the arrival times of the PZT pairs between the intact and the defected CFFT was made to assess the severity of the voids or the debonding. The feasibility of the methodology was analyzed using a finite-difference time-domain-based numerical simulation. Experiments were setup to validate the numerical results, which showed good agreement with the numerical findings. The results showed that the ultrasonic time-of-flight method is able to detect the concrete infill condition of CFFTs.

  13. Concrete Infill Monitoring in Concrete-Filled FRP Tubes Using a PZT-Based Ultrasonic Time-of-Flight Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mingzhang; Li, Weijie; Hei, Chuang; Song, Gangbing

    2016-01-01

    Concrete-filled fiber-reinforced polymer tubes (CFFTs) have attracted interest for their structural applications in corrosive environments. However, a weak interfacial strength between the fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) tube and the concrete infill may develop due to concrete shrinkage and inadequate concrete compaction during concrete casting, which will destroy the confinement effect and thereby reduce the load bearing capacity of a CFFT. In this paper, the lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-based ultrasonic time-of-flight (TOF) method was adopted to assess the concrete infill condition of CFFTs. The basic idea of this method is that the velocity of the ultrasonic wave propagation in the FRP material is about half of that in concrete material. Any voids or debonding created along the interface between the FRP tube and the concrete will delay the arrival time between the pairs of PZT transducers. A comparison of the arrival times of the PZT pairs between the intact and the defected CFFT was made to assess the severity of the voids or the debonding. The feasibility of the methodology was analyzed using a finite-difference time-domain-based numerical simulation. Experiments were setup to validate the numerical results, which showed good agreement with the numerical findings. The results showed that the ultrasonic time-of-flight method is able to detect the concrete infill condition of CFFTs. PMID:27941617

  14. ESSE: Engineering Super Simulation Emulation for Virtual Reality Systems Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Kune Y.; Yeon, Choul W.

    2008-01-01

    The trademark 4 + D Technology TM based Engineering Super Simulation Emulation (ESSE) is introduced. ESSE resorting to three-dimensional (3D) Virtual Reality (VR) technology pledges to provide with an interactive real-time motion, sound and tactile and other forms of feedback in the man machine systems environment. In particular, the 3D Virtual Engineering Neo cybernetic Unit Soft Power (VENUS) adds a physics engine to the VR platform so as to materialize a physical atmosphere. A close cooperation system and prompt information share are crucial, thereby increasing the necessity of centralized information system and electronic cooperation system. VENUS is further deemed to contribute towards public acceptance of nuclear power in general, and safety in particular. For instance, visualization of nuclear systems can familiarize the public in answering their questions and alleviating misunderstandings on nuclear power plants answering their questions and alleviating misunderstandings on nuclear power plants (NPPs) in general, and performance, security and safety in particular. An in-house flagship project Systemic Three-dimensional Engine Platform Prototype Engineering (STEPPE) endeavors to develop the Systemic Three-dimensional Engine Platform (STEP) for a variety of VR applications. STEP is home to a level system providing the whole visible scene of virtual engineering of man machine system environment. The system is linked with video monitoring that provides a 3D Computer Graphics (CG) visualization of major events. The database linked system provides easy access to relevant blueprints. The character system enables the operators easy access to visualization of major events. The database linked system provides easy access to relevant blueprints. The character system enables the operators to access the virtual systems by using their virtual characters. Virtually Engineered NPP Informative systems by using their virtual characters. Virtually Engineered NPP Informative

  15. Comparison of discrete event simulation tools in an academic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Jadrić

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A new research model for simulation software evaluation is proposed consisting of three main categories of criteria: modeling and simulation capabilities of the explored tools, and tools’ input/output analysis possibilities, all with respective sub-criteria. Using the presented model, two discrete event simulation tools are evaluated in detail using the task-centred scenario. Both tools (Arena and ExtendSim were used for teaching discrete event simulation in preceding academic years. With the aim to inspect their effectiveness and to help us determine which tool is more suitable for students i.e. academic purposes, we used a simple simulation model of entities competing for limited resources. The main goal was to measure subjective (primarily attitude and objective indicators while using the tools when the same simulation scenario is given. The subjects were first year students of Master studies in Information Management at the Faculty of Economics in Split taking a course in Business Process Simulations (BPS. In a controlled environment – in a computer lab, two groups of students were given detailed, step-by-step instructions for building models using both tools - first using ExtendSim then Arena or vice versa. Subjective indicators (students’ attitudes were collected using an online survey completed immediately upon building each model. Subjective indicators primarily include students’ personal estimations of Arena and ExtendSim capabilities/features for model building, model simulation and result analysis. Objective indicators were measured using specialised software that logs information on user's behavior while performing a particular task on their computer such as distance crossed by mouse during model building, the number of mouse clicks, usage of the mouse wheel and speed achieved. The results indicate that ExtendSim is well preferred comparing to Arena with regards to subjective indicators while the objective indicators are

  16. A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Adel Sarofim; Connie Senior

    2004-12-22

    In this report is described the work effort to develop and demonstrate a software framework to support advanced process simulations to evaluate the performance of advanced power systems. Integrated into the framework are a broad range of models, analysis tools, and visualization methods that can be used for the plant evaluation. The framework provides a tightly integrated problem-solving environment, with plug-and-play functionality, and includes a hierarchy of models, ranging from fast running process models to detailed reacting CFD models. The framework places no inherent limitations on the type of physics that can be modeled, numerical techniques, or programming languages used to implement the equipment models, or the type or amount of data that can be exchanged between models. Tools are provided to analyze simulation results at multiple levels of detail, ranging from simple tabular outputs to advanced solution visualization methods. All models and tools communicate in a seamless manner. The framework can be coupled to other software frameworks that provide different modeling capabilities. Three software frameworks were developed during the course of the project. The first framework focused on simulating the performance of the DOE Low Emissions Boiler System Proof of Concept facility, an advanced pulverized-coal combustion-based power plant. The second framework targeted simulating the performance of an Integrated coal Gasification Combined Cycle - Fuel Cell Turbine (IGCC-FCT) plant configuration. The coal gasifier models included both CFD and process models for the commercially dominant systems. Interfacing models to the framework was performed using VES-Open, and tests were performed to demonstrate interfacing CAPE-Open compliant models to the framework. The IGCC-FCT framework was subsequently extended to support Virtual Engineering concepts in which plant configurations can be constructed and interrogated in a three-dimensional, user-centered, interactive

  17. Optical intensity scintillation in the simulated atmospherical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, Lukas; Latal, Jan; Vanderka, Ales; Vitasek, Jan; Bojko, Marian; Bednarek, Lukas; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    There are several parameters of the atmospheric environment which have an effect on the optical wireless connection. Effects like fog, snow or rain are ones of the effects which appears tendentiously and which are bound by season, geographic location, etc. One of the effects that appear with various intensity for the whole time is airflow. The airflow changes the local refractive index of the air and areas with lower or higher refractive index form. The light going through these areas refracts and due to the optical intensity scintillates on the detector of the receiver. The airflow forms on the basis of two effects in the atmosphere. The first is wind cut and flowing over barriers. The other is thermal flow when warm air rises to the higher layers of the atmosphere. The heart of this article is creation such an environment that will form airflow and the refractive index will scintillate. For the experiment, we used special laboratory box with high-speed ventilators and heating units to simulate atmospheric turbulence. We monitor the impact of ventilator arrangement and air temperature on the scintillation of the gas laser with wavelength 633 nm/15 mW. In the experiment, there is watched the difference in behavior between real measurement and flow simulation with the same peripheral conditions of the airflow in the area of 500 x 500 cm.

  18. Simulation and Verification of Form Filling with Self-Compacting Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Lars Nyholm

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a form filling experiment and the corresponding 3D simulation. One side of the form is made of a transparent acrylic plate and to improve the visual observations of the flow behaviour, the first and second half of the form is cast with normal grey and red-pigmented SCC, respec...

  19. Experimental investigation of interface conditions between oxidic melt and ablating concrete during MCCI by means of simulating material experiments: the Artemis program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veteau, J.M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, DEN/DTN/SE2T/LPTM, 17 rue des Martyrs 38 - Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: In the frame work of R and D on Severe Accidents in PWR plants, an estimation by codes of time of basemat melt-through by Corium is required. For this, the heat flux distribution along the cavity wall must be properly modelled. Hence the knowledge of the heat transfer coefficient as well as the temperature at the interface between the melt and the solid become key issues. Phase diagram of the melt and composition governs the interface temperature which controls, at least partly, the thickness of the Corium crust formed on the molten concrete. Crust behaviour (time evolution of thickness, mechanical interaction with gas) implies a release mode of molten concrete in Corium which in turn alters the melt composition. Clearly, the molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) phenomenon is the result of a strong coupling between physico-chemistry and thermohydraulics. The main goal of the first test series of the Artemis program is to make a link between the interface temperature and the physico-chemistry of the melt (phase diagram) through tests conducted with simulating materials and to provide an insight on the existence, the behaviour and the composition of the crust. This test series considers 1D MCCI using a non eutectic LiCl-BaCl{sub 2} mixture poured at 1000 deg. C in a cylindrical test section (internal diameter 0.3 m) to interact with the 0.35 m deep basemat made of the same salt mixture at the eutectic composition. This 'concrete' was especially manufactured with sintered granulates to allow gas flow from the bottom (argon), then simulating gas released by concrete in the reactor case. Constant power is applied in the pool with an helical coil and 1D MCCI is ensured by counterbalancing heat losses by controlled heating at the lateral walls and at the top of the test section. Concrete ablation is followed from the output of 45 0.5 mm diameter thermocouples. An instrumented rod periodically investigates the temperature

  20. Experimental investigation of interface conditions between oxidic melt and ablating concrete during MCCI by means of simulating material experiments: the Artemis program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veteau, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In the frame work of R and D on Severe Accidents in PWR plants, an estimation by codes of time of basemat melt-through by Corium is required. For this, the heat flux distribution along the cavity wall must be properly modelled. Hence the knowledge of the heat transfer coefficient as well as the temperature at the interface between the melt and the solid become key issues. Phase diagram of the melt and composition governs the interface temperature which controls, at least partly, the thickness of the Corium crust formed on the molten concrete. Crust behaviour (time evolution of thickness, mechanical interaction with gas) implies a release mode of molten concrete in Corium which in turn alters the melt composition. Clearly, the molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) phenomenon is the result of a strong coupling between physico-chemistry and thermohydraulics. The main goal of the first test series of the Artemis program is to make a link between the interface temperature and the physico-chemistry of the melt (phase diagram) through tests conducted with simulating materials and to provide an insight on the existence, the behaviour and the composition of the crust. This test series considers 1D MCCI using a non eutectic LiCl-BaCl 2 mixture poured at 1000 deg. C in a cylindrical test section (internal diameter 0.3 m) to interact with the 0.35 m deep basemat made of the same salt mixture at the eutectic composition. This 'concrete' was especially manufactured with sintered granulates to allow gas flow from the bottom (argon), then simulating gas released by concrete in the reactor case. Constant power is applied in the pool with an helical coil and 1D MCCI is ensured by counterbalancing heat losses by controlled heating at the lateral walls and at the top of the test section. Concrete ablation is followed from the output of 45 0.5 mm diameter thermocouples. An instrumented rod periodically investigates the temperature and the position

  1. Augmenting Sand Simulation Environments through Subdivision and Particle Refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clothier, M.; Bailey, M.

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances in computer graphics and parallel processing hardware have provided disciplines with new methods to evaluate and visualize data. These advances have proven useful for earth and planetary scientists as many researchers are using this hardware to process large amounts of data for analysis. As such, this has provided opportunities for collaboration between computer graphics and the earth sciences. Through collaboration with the Oregon Space Grant and IGERT Ecosystem Informatics programs, we are investigating techniques for simulating the behavior of sand. We are also collaborating with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) DARTS Lab to exchange ideas and gain feedback on our research. The DARTS Lab specializes in simulation of planetary vehicles, such as the Mars rovers. Their simulations utilize a virtual "sand box" to test how a planetary vehicle responds to different environments. Our research builds upon this idea to create a sand simulation framework so that planetary environments, such as the harsh, sandy regions on Mars, are more fully realized. More specifically, we are focusing our research on the interaction between a planetary vehicle, such as a rover, and the sand beneath it, providing further insight into its performance. Unfortunately, this can be a computationally complex problem, especially if trying to represent the enormous quantities of sand particles interacting with each other. However, through the use of high-performance computing, we have developed a technique to subdivide areas of actively participating sand regions across a large landscape. Similar to a Level of Detail (LOD) technique, we only subdivide regions of a landscape where sand particles are actively participating with another object. While the sand is within this subdivision window and moves closer to the surface of the interacting object, the sand region subdivides into smaller regions until individual sand particles are left at the surface. As an example, let's say

  2. Behavior’s Evolution of Micro-Concretes in Combined Sulphate and Magnesium Aggressive Environments, at Three -Years Old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Rujanu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper is analysed concrete behavior from strength structure elements, subjected to combined sulphatic and magnesian aggressive actions. In order to clearly relieve cement influence regarding corrosion behavior and to be as close as possible of concrete structural characteristics, tests are realized on standard mortars, which from compositional point of view are mocro-concretes. These were used different W/C ratios in order to obtain different structural characteristics, knowing that in the first period after casting, when concrete porosity is sensibly higher, corrosion process is more emphatic, with subsequent negative effects. It was taken into account the fact that sulphatic corrosion effect appears after a long duration of aggressive agent action, in the present paper proposing a three year duration for aggressive attack. In the same time it was considered the fact that usual cement for structural elements is composite cement type CEM II/A-S 32,5, studying combined sulphatic and magnesian corrosion evolution on a large type of micro-concrete compositions with different compactness and aggressive agent concentrations.

  3. A High-Fidelity Batch Simulation Environment for Integrated Batch and Piloted Air Combat Simulation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Kenneth H.; McManus, John W.; Chappell, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    A batch air combat simulation environment known as the Tactical Maneuvering Simulator (TMS) is presented. The TMS serves as a tool for developing and evaluating tactical maneuvering logics. The environment can also be used to evaluate the tactical implications of perturbations to aircraft performance or supporting systems. The TMS is capable of simulating air combat between any number of engagement participants, with practical limits imposed by computer memory and processing power. Aircraft are modeled using equations of motion, control laws, aerodynamics and propulsive characteristics equivalent to those used in high-fidelity piloted simulation. Databases representative of a modern high-performance aircraft with and without thrust-vectoring capability are included. To simplify the task of developing and implementing maneuvering logics in the TMS, an outer-loop control system known as the Tactical Autopilot (TA) is implemented in the aircraft simulation model. The TA converts guidance commands issued by computerized maneuvering logics in the form of desired angle-of-attack and wind axis-bank angle into inputs to the inner-loop control augmentation system of the aircraft. This report describes the capabilities and operation of the TMS.

  4. Standard test method for determining effects of chemical admixtures on corrosion of embedded steel reinforcement in concrete exposed to chloride environments

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for determining the effects of chemical admixtures on the corrosion of metals in concrete. This test method can be used to evaluate materials intended to inhibit chloride-induced corrosion of steel in concrete. It can also be used to evaluate the corrosivity of admixtures in a chloride environment. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  5. Characterisation and management of concrete grinding residuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Matt; Gupta, Nautasha; Watts, Ben; Chadik, Paul A; Ferraro, Christopher; Townsend, Timothy G

    2018-02-01

    Concrete grinding residue is the waste product resulting from the grinding, cutting, and resurfacing of concrete pavement. Potential beneficial applications for concrete grinding residue include use as a soil amendment and as a construction material, including as an additive to Portland cement concrete. Concrete grinding residue exhibits a high pH, and though not hazardous, it is sufficiently elevated that precautions need to be taken around aquatic ecosystems. Best management practices and state regulations focus on reducing the impact on such aquatic environment. Heavy metals are present in concrete grinding residue, but concentrations are of the same magnitude as typically recycled concrete residuals. The chemical composition of concrete grinding residue makes it a useful product for some soil amendment purposes at appropriate land application rates. The presence of unreacted concrete in concrete grinding residue was examined for potential use as partial replacement of cement in new concrete. Testing of Florida concrete grinding residue revealed no dramatic reactivity or improvement in mortar strength.

  6. How Concrete is Concrete?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koeno Gravemeijer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, ‘manipulatives’, in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own, abstract, knowledge; in the latter, we try to find an example that the others will be familiar with. This article first looks at the tension between these two different ways of making things concrete. Next another role of manipulatives, will be discussed, namely that of means for scaffolding and communication. In this role, manipulatives may function as means of support in a process that aims at helping students to build on their own thinking while constructing more sophisticated mathematics.Key words:  Conceret Learning Materials, School Math, Common Sense, Scaffolding, Communication DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jme.2.1.780.1-14

  7. Plasma environment of Titan: a 3-D hybrid simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Simon

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Titan possesses a dense atmosphere, consisting mainly of molecular nitrogen. Titan's orbit is located within the Saturnian magnetosphere most of the time, where the corotating plasma flow is super-Alfvénic, yet subsonic and submagnetosonic. Since Titan does not possess a significant intrinsic magnetic field, the incident plasma interacts directly with the atmosphere and ionosphere. Due to the characteristic length scales of the interaction region being comparable to the ion gyroradii in the vicinity of Titan, magnetohydrodynamic models can only offer a rough description of Titan's interaction with the corotating magnetospheric plasma flow. For this reason, Titan's plasma environment has been studied by using a 3-D hybrid simulation code, treating the electrons as a massless, charge-neutralizing fluid, whereas a completely kinetic approach is used to cover ion dynamics. The calculations are performed on a curvilinear simulation grid which is adapted to the spherical geometry of the obstacle. In the model, Titan's dayside ionosphere is mainly generated by solar UV radiation; hence, the local ion production rate depends on the solar zenith angle. Because the Titan interaction features the possibility of having the densest ionosphere located on a face not aligned with the ram flow of the magnetospheric plasma, a variety of different scenarios can be studied. The simulations show the formation of a strong magnetic draping pattern and an extended pick-up region, being highly asymmetric with respect to the direction of the convective electric field. In general, the mechanism giving rise to these structures exhibits similarities to the interaction of the ionospheres of Mars and Venus with the supersonic solar wind. The simulation results are in agreement with data from recent Cassini flybys.

  8. Plasma environment of Titan: a 3-D hybrid simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Simon

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Titan possesses a dense atmosphere, consisting mainly of molecular nitrogen. Titan's orbit is located within the Saturnian magnetosphere most of the time, where the corotating plasma flow is super-Alfvénic, yet subsonic and submagnetosonic. Since Titan does not possess a significant intrinsic magnetic field, the incident plasma interacts directly with the atmosphere and ionosphere. Due to the characteristic length scales of the interaction region being comparable to the ion gyroradii in the vicinity of Titan, magnetohydrodynamic models can only offer a rough description of Titan's interaction with the corotating magnetospheric plasma flow. For this reason, Titan's plasma environment has been studied by using a 3-D hybrid simulation code, treating the electrons as a massless, charge-neutralizing fluid, whereas a completely kinetic approach is used to cover ion dynamics. The calculations are performed on a curvilinear simulation grid which is adapted to the spherical geometry of the obstacle. In the model, Titan's dayside ionosphere is mainly generated by solar UV radiation; hence, the local ion production rate depends on the solar zenith angle. Because the Titan interaction features the possibility of having the densest ionosphere located on a face not aligned with the ram flow of the magnetospheric plasma, a variety of different scenarios can be studied. The simulations show the formation of a strong magnetic draping pattern and an extended pick-up region, being highly asymmetric with respect to the direction of the convective electric field. In general, the mechanism giving rise to these structures exhibits similarities to the interaction of the ionospheres of Mars and Venus with the supersonic solar wind. The simulation results are in agreement with data from recent Cassini flybys.

  9. Measurements and Monte-Carlo simulations of the particle self-shielding effect of B4C grains in neutron shielding concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiJulio, D. D.; Cooper-Jensen, C. P.; Llamas-Jansa, I.; Kazi, S.; Bentley, P. M.

    2018-06-01

    A combined measurement and Monte-Carlo simulation study was carried out in order to characterize the particle self-shielding effect of B4C grains in neutron shielding concrete. Several batches of a specialized neutron shielding concrete, with varying B4C grain sizes, were exposed to a 2 Å neutron beam at the R2D2 test beamline at the Institute for Energy Technology located in Kjeller, Norway. The direct and scattered neutrons were detected with a neutron detector placed behind the concrete blocks and the results were compared to Geant4 simulations. The particle self-shielding effect was included in the Geant4 simulations by calculating effective neutron cross-sections during the Monte-Carlo simulation process. It is shown that this method well reproduces the measured results. Our results show that shielding calculations for low-energy neutrons using such materials would lead to an underestimate of the shielding required for a certain design scenario if the particle self-shielding effect is not included in the calculations.

  10. THE SIMULATION DIAGNOSTIC METHODS AND REGENERATION WAYS OF REINFORCED - CONCRETE CONSTRUCTIONS OF BRIDGES IN PROVIDING THEIR OPERATING RELIABILITY AND LONGEVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. V. Savchinskiy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of analysis of existing diagnostic methods and regeneration ways of reinforced-concrete constructions of bridges the recommendations on introduction of new modern technologies of renewal of reinforced-concrete constructions of bridges in providing their operating reliability and longevity are offered.

  11. THE SIMULATION DIAGNOSTIC METHODS AND REGENERATION WAYS OF REINFORCED - CONCRETE CONSTRUCTIONS OF BRIDGES IN PROVIDING THEIR OPERATING RELIABILITY AND LONGEVITY

    OpenAIRE

    B. V. Savchinskiy

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of analysis of existing diagnostic methods and regeneration ways of reinforced-concrete constructions of bridges the recommendations on introduction of new modern technologies of renewal of reinforced-concrete constructions of bridges in providing their operating reliability and longevity are offered.

  12. Flow induced particle migration in fresh concrete: Theoretical frame, numerical simulations and experimental results on model fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spangenberg, J.; Roussel, N.; Hattel, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe and compare the various physical phenomena which potentially lead to flow induced particle migration in concrete. We show that, in the case of industrial casting of concrete, gravity induced particle migration dominates all other potential sources of heterogeneities ind...

  13. Specification of requirements for the virtual environment for reactor applications simulation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, S. M.; Pytel, M.

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the United States Dept. of Energy initiated a research and development effort to develop modern modeling and simulation methods that could utilize high performance computing capabilities to address issues important to nuclear power plant operation, safety and sustainability. To respond to this need, a consortium of national laboratories, academic institutions and industry partners (the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors - CASL) was formed to develop an integrated Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA) modeling and simulation capability. A critical element for the success of the CASL research and development effort was the development of an integrated set of overarching requirements that provides guidance in the planning, development, and management of the VERA modeling and simulation software. These requirements also provide a mechanism from which the needs of a broad array of external CASL stakeholders (e.g. reactor / fuel vendors, plant owner / operators, regulatory personnel, etc.) can be identified and integrated into the VERA development plans. This paper presents an overview of the initial set of requirements contained within the VERA Requirements Document (VRD) that currently is being used to govern development of the VERA software within the CASL program. The complex interdisciplinary nature of these requirements together with a multi-physics coupling approach to realize a core simulator capability pose a challenge to how the VRD should be derived and subsequently revised to accommodate the needs of different stakeholders. Thus, the VRD is viewed as an evolving document that will be updated periodically to reflect the changing needs of identified CASL stakeholders and lessons learned during the progress of the CASL modeling and simulation program. (authors)

  14. Home automation and simulation of presence in empty environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marques Israel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Since their humble beginnings at the dawn of the 20th Century until contemporary age, automation and control systems have grown exponentially in both complexity and importance. Its relevance on human activities, be they mundane tasks or crucial processes, is self-evident. Among its many utilities, automated systems acquire a noble mission when put in service to protect life and property from aggressors of any kind. This paper discusses how home automation components can be utilized to implement an alternative domestic security strategy that consists in simulating the presence of an individual in an empty environment in the absence of its owner in order dissuade potential trespassing criminals, once they would feel highly discouraged to carry the criminal act should they believe the property is occupied.

  15. Calculation and simulation of atmospheric refraction effects in maritime environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, Denis, Jr.; Gardenal, Lionel; Lahaie, P.; Forand, J. Luc

    2001-01-01

    Near the sea surface, atmospheric refraction and turbulence affect both IR transmission and image quality. This produces an impact on both the detection and classification/identification of targets. With the financial participation of the U.S. Office of Naval Research (ONR), Canada's Defence Research Establishment Valcartier (DREV) is developing PRIME (Propagation Resources In the Maritime Environment), a computer model aimed at describing the overall atmospheric effects on IR imagery systems in the marine surface layer. PRIME can be used as a complement to MODTRAN to compute the effective transmittance in the marine surface layer, taking into account the lens effects caused by refraction. It also provides information on image degradation caused by both refraction and turbulence. This paper reviews the refraction phenomena that take place in the surface layer and discusses their effects on target detection and identification. We then show how PRIME can benefit detection studies and image degradation simulations.

  16. Simulation of Seismic Response of Reinforced Concrete Beam-Column Joints with Nurbs Surface Fitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirhosseini R. Tabatabaei

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an approach based on NURBS (non-uniform rational B-splines to achieve a seismic response surface (SRS from a group of points obtained by using an analytical model of RC joints. NURBS based on the genetic algorithm is an important mathematical tool and consists of generalizations of Bezier curves and surfaces and B-splines. Generally, the accuracy of the design process of joints depends on the number of control points that are captured in the results of experimental research on real specimens. The values obtained from the specimens are the best tools to use in seismic analysis, though more expensive when compared to values simulated by SRSs. The SRS proposed in this paper can be applied to obtain surfaces that show site effect results on destructions of beam-column joint, taking into account different site conditions for a specific earthquake. The efficiency of this approach is demonstrated by the retrieval of simulated-versus-analytical results.

  17. Flexible Environments for Grand-Challenge Simulation in Climate Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrehumbert, R.; Tobis, M.; Lin, J.; Dieterich, C.; Caballero, R.

    2004-12-01

    Current climate models are monolithic codes, generally in Fortran, aimed at high-performance simulation of the modern climate. Though they adequately serve their designated purpose, they present major barriers to application in other problems. Tailoring them to paleoclimate of planetary simulations, for instance, takes months of work. Theoretical studies, where one may want to remove selected processes or break feedback loops, are similarly hindered. Further, current climate models are of little value in education, since the implementation of textbook concepts and equations in the code is obscured by technical detail. The Climate Systems Center at the University of Chicago seeks to overcome these limitations by bringing modern object-oriented design into the business of climate modeling. Our ultimate goal is to produce an end-to-end modeling environment capable of configuring anything from a simple single-column radiative-convective model to a full 3-D coupled climate model using a uniform, flexible interface. Technically, the modeling environment is implemented as a Python-based software component toolkit: key number-crunching procedures are implemented as discrete, compiled-language components 'glued' together and co-ordinated by Python, combining the high performance of compiled languages and the flexibility and extensibility of Python. We are incrementally working towards this final objective following a series of distinct, complementary lines. We will present an overview of these activities, including PyOM, a Python-based finite-difference ocean model allowing run-time selection of different Arakawa grids and physical parameterizations; CliMT, an atmospheric modeling toolkit providing a library of 'legacy' radiative, convective and dynamical modules which can be knitted into dynamical models, and PyCCSM, a version of NCAR's Community Climate System Model in which the coupler and run-control architecture are re-implemented in Python, augmenting its flexibility

  18. Effects of slag and fly ash on reinforcement corrosion in concrete in chloride environment. Research from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.

    2012-01-01

    A review is given of research on the durability performance of concrete made with blast furnace slag and fly ash related to chloride induced reinforcement corrosion, carried out in the Netherlands, where slag has been used in cement for almost a century. Results are presented from field studies on

  19. Effects of slag and fly ash on reinforcement corrosion in concrete in chloride environment : Research from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.

    2012-01-01

    A review is given of research on the durability performance of concrete made with blast furnace slag and fly ash related to chloride induced reinforcement corrosion, carried out in the Netherlands, where slag has been used in cement for almost a century. Results are presented from field studies on

  20. Energy conservation and recycling of wall and concrete may give large environmental profits in the construction industry. Environment taken seriously

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nestvold, Veslemoey

    2000-01-01

    The article reviews some results from the 5 year project ''Oekobygg'', started in 1998, which studies energy conservation and recycling of wall and concrete in the construction industry. Reduction of the waste amounts, industrial recycling and ''smart housing'' are discussed. Recycling will result in the largest environmental benefits

  1. Flight Simulation of ARES in the Mars Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, P. Sean; Croom, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    A report discusses using the Aerial Regional- scale Environmental Survey (ARES) light airplane as an observation platform on Mars in order to gather data. It would have to survive insertion into the atmosphere, fly long enough to meet science objectives, and provide a stable platform. The feasibility of such a platform was tested using the Langley Standard Real- Time Simulation in C++. The unique features of LaSRS++ are: full, six-degrees- of-freedom flight simulation that can be used to evaluate the performance of the aircraft in the Martian environment; capability of flight analysis from start to finish; support of Monte Carlo analysis of aircraft performance; and accepting initial conditions from POST results for the entry and deployment of the entry body. Starting with a general aviation model, the design was tweaked to maintain a stable aircraft under expected Martian conditions. Outer mold lines were adjusted based on experience with the Martian atmosphere. Flight control was modified from a vertical acceleration control law to an angle-of-attack control law. Navigation was modified from a vertical acceleration control system to an alpha control system. In general, a pattern of starting with simple models with well-understood behaviors was selected and modified during testing.

  2. Simulation of machine-maintenance training in virtual environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Tezuka, Tetsuo; Kashiwa, Ken-ichiro; Ishii, Hirotake

    1997-01-01

    The periodical inspection of nuclear power plants needs a lot of workforces with a high degree of technical skill for the maintenance of various sorts of machines. Therefore, a new type of maintenance training system is required, where trainees can get training safely, easily and effectively. In this study we developed a training simulation system for disassembling a check valve in virtual environment (VE). The features of this system are as follows: Firstly, the trainees can execute tasks even in wrong order, and can experience the resultant conditions. In order to realize this environment, we developed a new Petri-net model for representing the objects' states in VE. This Petri-net model has several original characteristics, which make it easier to manage the change of the objects' states. Furthermore, we made a support system for constructing the Petri-net model of machine-disassembling training, because the Petri-net model is apt to become of large size. The effectiveness of this support system is shown through the system development. Secondly, this system can perform appropriate tasks to be done next in VE whenever the trainee wants even after some mistakes have been made. The effectiveness of this function has also been confirmed by experiments. (author)

  3. Simulation environment based on the Universal Verification Methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiergolski, A.

    2017-01-01

    Universal Verification Methodology (UVM) is a standardized approach of verifying integrated circuit designs, targeting a Coverage-Driven Verification (CDV). It combines automatic test generation, self-checking testbenches, and coverage metrics to indicate progress in the design verification. The flow of the CDV differs from the traditional directed-testing approach. With the CDV, a testbench developer, by setting the verification goals, starts with an structured plan. Those goals are targeted further by a developed testbench, which generates legal stimuli and sends them to a device under test (DUT). The progress is measured by coverage monitors added to the simulation environment. In this way, the non-exercised functionality can be identified. Moreover, the additional scoreboards indicate undesired DUT behaviour. Such verification environments were developed for three recent ASIC and FPGA projects which have successfully implemented the new work-flow: (1) the CLICpix2 65 nm CMOS hybrid pixel readout ASIC design; (2) the C3PD 180 nm HV-CMOS active sensor ASIC design; (3) the FPGA-based DAQ system of the CLICpix chip. This paper, based on the experience from the above projects, introduces briefly UVM and presents a set of tips and advices applicable at different stages of the verification process-cycle.

  4. Simulating cloud environment for HIS backup using secret sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Tomohiro; Kimura, Eizen; Matsumura, Yasushi; Yamashita, Yoshinori; Hiramatsu, Haruhiko; Kume, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    In the face of a disaster hospitals are expected to be able to continue providing efficient and high-quality care to patients. It is therefore crucial for hospitals to develop business continuity plans (BCPs) that identify their vulnerabilities, and prepare procedures to overcome them. A key aspect of most hospitals' BCPs is creating the backup of the hospital information system (HIS) data at multiple remote sites. However, the need to keep the data confidential dramatically increases the costs of making such backups. Secret sharing is a method to split an original secret message so that individual pieces are meaningless, but putting sufficient number of pieces together reveals the original message. It allows creation of pseudo-redundant arrays of independent disks for privacy-sensitive data over the Internet. We developed a secret sharing environment for StarBED, a large-scale network experiment environment, and evaluated its potential and performance during disaster recovery. Simulation results showed that the entire main HIS database of Kyoto University Hospital could be retrieved within three days even if one of the distributed storage systems crashed during a disaster.

  5. Shrinkage stress in concrete under dry-wet cycles: an example with concrete column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Jun; Luosun, Yiming

    2014-02-01

    This paper focuses on the simulation of shrinkage stress in concrete structures under dry-wet environments. In the modeling, an integrative model for autogenous and drying shrinkage predictions of concrete under dry-wet cycles is introduced first. Second, a model taking both cement hydration and moisture diffusion into account synchronously is used to calculate the distribution of interior humidity in concrete. Using the above two models, the distributions of shrinkage strain and stress in concrete columns made by normal and high strength concrete respectively under dry-wet cycles are calculated. The model results show that shrinkage gradient along the radial direction of the column from the center to outer surface increases with age as the outer circumference suffers to dry. The maximum and minimum shrinkage occur at the outer surface and the center of the column, respectively, under drying condition. As wetting starts, the shrinkage strain decreases with increase of interior humidity. The closer to the wetting face, the higher the humidity and the lower the shrinkage strain, as well as the lower the shrinkage stress. As results of the dry-wet cycles acting on the outer circumference of the column, cyclic stress status is developed within the area close to the outer surface of the column. The depth of the influencing zone of dry-wet cyclic action is influenced by concrete strength and dry-wet regime. For low strength concrete, relatively deeper influencing zone is expected compared with that of high strength concrete. The models are verified by concrete-steel composite ring tests and a good agreement between model and test results is found.

  6. DYNAMIC COMPUTER SIMULATION OF CONCRETE ON DIFFERENT LEVELS OF THE MICROSTRUCTURE – PART 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piet Stroeven

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of an experimental basis for the dependence of a mechanical property on certain structural features (and the associated micro-mechanical properties would require extensive, cumbersome and complicated testing: mechanical testing for defining the very property, quantitative (section image analysis and stereological three-dimensional assessment of the relevant structural features. 'Realistic' simulation of material structure by computer would therefore offer an interesting alternative. This paper introduces the SPACE system (Software Package for the Assessment of Compositional Evolution as the most recent development in this field. It has been developed to assess the composition as well as configuration characteristics of dense random packing situations in opaque materials. This paper presents an introduction to the system and will thereupon highlight by means of illustrative examples of typical applications on different levels of the microstructure the system's capabilities. Although only a single application can be presented in this framework, they all concern areas of major engineering interest.

  7. The concrete canister program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, M.M.

    1978-02-01

    In the spring of 1974, WNRE began development and demonstration of a dry storage concept, called the concrete canister, as a possible alternative to storage of irradiated CANDU fuel in water pools. The canister is a thick-walled concrete monolith containing baskets of fuel in the dry state. The decay heat from the fuel is dissipated to the environment by natural heat transfer. Four canisters were designed and constructed. Two canisters containing electric heaters have been subjected to heat loads of 2.5 times the design, ramp heat-load cycling, and simulated weathering tests. The other two canisters were loaded with irradiated fuel, one containing fuel bundles of uniform decay heat and the other containing bundles of non-uniform decay heat in a non-symmetrical radial and axial array. The collected data were used to verify the analytical tools for prediction of effectiveness of heat transfer and radiation shielding and to verify the design of the basket and canisters. The demonstration canisters have shown that this concept is a viable alternative to water pools for the storage of irradiated CANDU fuel. (author)

  8. Development of Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) micro-mechanical simulations of concrete specimens characterized by micro-X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giorla, Alain B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Concrete in Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) can be exposed to a wide range of degradation phenomena. In the past years, the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program has investigated Radiation-Induced Volumetric Expansion (RIVE) as a potential degradation mechanism for concrete biological shields [Graves et al., 2014, Rosseel et al., 2016]. RIVE causes swelling and micro-mechanical damage in concrete due to the amorphization of mineral phases contained in the aggregates under neutron irradiation [Hilsdorf et al., 1978, Rosseel et al., 2016]. For long-term operations, it is critical to assess the durability of concrete after 60 or 80 years of exposure to NPP operating conditions against this phenomenon. RIVE is dependent on the composition of the aggregates used in concrete. Quartz-bearing aggregates are more sensitive to RIVE than calcite-bearing aggregates, for example. However, the aggregate composition of a specific plant is generally not explicitly given in the concrete formulation, which makes it nearly impossible to predict the resistance of that concrete to RIVE. Additional characterization is needed to identify the radiation-sensitive mineral phases contained in the aggregates.

  9. Estimation of Corrosion-Free Life for Concrete Containing Ground Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag under a Chloride-Bearing Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung In Hong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The rate of chloride transport by diffusion in concrete containing ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBS was mathematically estimated to predict the corrosion-free service life of concrete structures exposed to seawater environment. As a factor to corrosiveness of steel embedment, replacement ratio of GGBS was selected, accounting for 25 and 50% to total binder. As a result, it was found that an increase in the GGBS content resulted in an increase in the chloride binding capacity, which would give rise to a lower chloride diffusion rate, thereby reducing the risk of chloride-induced corrosion. When it comes to the sensitivity of parameters to service life, the effective diffusivity showed a marginal influence on serviceability, irrespective of GGBS contents while surface chloride content and critical threshold concentration revealed more crucial factors to long term chloride diffusion. As the GGBS replacement increased, the variation in service life has become less influential with changing parameters. Substantially, GGBS concrete at high replacement ratio enhanced the service life due to a combination of dense pore structure and enhanced chloride binding capacity.

  10. Mathematical simulation of gas pressure in fibre-reinforced concrete container at radiation and biological decomposition of cellulose, bituminized and concrete radwastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruc, J.; Kvito, P.

    2005-01-01

    Fibre-reinforced concrete container (FRCC) are used for long-time repository of radioactive wastes. Low- and middle-active radwastes from operation of the NPPs V-1, V-2 Jaslovske Bohunice, Mochovce NPP and from decommissioned NPP A-1 (Jaslovske Bohunice) are treated in the plant SE-VYZ in Jaslovske Bohunice and after immobilisation are deposited in National Radwaste Repository Mochovce (RU RAO). After filling of the RU RAO, FRCC will be stored during 300 years. During this time the integrity of the FRCC must be guaranteed. By the influence of autoradiolysis of the cellulose and bituminized radwastes as well as in cement grout the gases are formed, mainly the hydrogen, methane and carbon dioxide. In the case of presence of available water (a w ≥ 0.63) and in presence of microbes and moulds at appropriate conditions the biological decomposition of cellulose materials may proceed with formation of H 2 , CH 4 a CO 2 . With increasing of developed gases may increase pressure in FRCC, that may initiate the loss of integrity of the FRCC with following endangering of radiation safety of the RU RAO, respectively of the territory over the repository.Authors developed the new mathematical model of pressure of gases in FRCC and in deposited barrels with cellulose and bituminized radwastes. The mathematical model is based on biological decomposition of cellulose materials as well as on radiation decomposition of cellulose, bitumen and concrete. In this mathematical model the diffusion through the walls of FRCC is the main process responsible for decreasing of the pressure. This model was developed in two basic variants: (1) Mathematical model of gas pressure in FRCC as function of dose; (2) Mathematical model of gas pressure in FRCC as function of mass of cellulose

  11. STSE: Spatio-Temporal Simulation Environment Dedicated to Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerber Susanne

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, the availability of high-resolution microscopy together with the advancements in the development of biomarkers as reporters of biomolecular interactions increased the importance of imaging methods in molecular cell biology. These techniques enable the investigation of cellular characteristics like volume, size and geometry as well as volume and geometry of intracellular compartments, and the amount of existing proteins in a spatially resolved manner. Such detailed investigations opened up many new areas of research in the study of spatial, complex and dynamic cellular systems. One of the crucial challenges for the study of such systems is the design of a well stuctured and optimized workflow to provide a systematic and efficient hypothesis verification. Computer Science can efficiently address this task by providing software that facilitates handling, analysis, and evaluation of biological data to the benefit of experimenters and modelers. Results The Spatio-Temporal Simulation Environment (STSE is a set of open-source tools provided to conduct spatio-temporal simulations in discrete structures based on microscopy images. The framework contains modules to digitize, represent, analyze, and mathematically model spatial distributions of biochemical species. Graphical user interface (GUI tools provided with the software enable meshing of the simulation space based on the Voronoi concept. In addition, it supports to automatically acquire spatial information to the mesh from the images based on pixel luminosity (e.g. corresponding to molecular levels from microscopy images. STSE is freely available either as a stand-alone version or included in the linux live distribution Systems Biology Operational Software (SB.OS and can be downloaded from http://www.stse-software.org/. The Python source code as well as a comprehensive user manual and video tutorials are also offered to the research community. We discuss main concepts

  12. STSE: Spatio-Temporal Simulation Environment Dedicated to Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoma, Szymon; Fröhlich, Martina; Gerber, Susanne; Klipp, Edda

    2011-04-28

    Recently, the availability of high-resolution microscopy together with the advancements in the development of biomarkers as reporters of biomolecular interactions increased the importance of imaging methods in molecular cell biology. These techniques enable the investigation of cellular characteristics like volume, size and geometry as well as volume and geometry of intracellular compartments, and the amount of existing proteins in a spatially resolved manner. Such detailed investigations opened up many new areas of research in the study of spatial, complex and dynamic cellular systems. One of the crucial challenges for the study of such systems is the design of a well stuctured and optimized workflow to provide a systematic and efficient hypothesis verification. Computer Science can efficiently address this task by providing software that facilitates handling, analysis, and evaluation of biological data to the benefit of experimenters and modelers. The Spatio-Temporal Simulation Environment (STSE) is a set of open-source tools provided to conduct spatio-temporal simulations in discrete structures based on microscopy images. The framework contains modules to digitize, represent, analyze, and mathematically model spatial distributions of biochemical species. Graphical user interface (GUI) tools provided with the software enable meshing of the simulation space based on the Voronoi concept. In addition, it supports to automatically acquire spatial information to the mesh from the images based on pixel luminosity (e.g. corresponding to molecular levels from microscopy images). STSE is freely available either as a stand-alone version or included in the linux live distribution Systems Biology Operational Software (SB.OS) and can be downloaded from http://www.stse-software.org/. The Python source code as well as a comprehensive user manual and video tutorials are also offered to the research community. We discuss main concepts of the STSE design and workflow. We

  13. Self-compacting concrete (SCC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Mette Rica

    2008-01-01

    In many aspects Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC, “Self-Consolidating Concrete” in North America) can be considered the concrete of the future. SCC is a family of tailored concretes with special engineered properties in the fresh state. SCC flows into the formwork and around even complicated...... reinforcement arrangements under its own weight. Thus, SCC is not vibrated like conventional concrete. This drastically improves the working environment during construction, the productivity, and potentially improves the homogeneity and quality of the concrete. In addition SCC provides larger architectural...

  14. Application limits of finite element models for simulation of shock transfer processes in concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krutzik, Norbert J.; Eibl, Josef

    2005-01-01

    Shocks on building structures due to impact loads (drop of wreckage and heavy masses from accidents, transport operations, explosions, etc.), especially in case of a postulated aircraft crash, may lead to feasibility problems due to high-induced vibrations and large expenditures at safety-related systems accommodated inside the building structures. A rational and cost-effective qualification of the functionality of such systems requires the prediction of reliable information about the nature of structural responses induced by impact loading in the corresponding regions of the structure. The analytic derivation of realistic and reliable structural responses requires the application of adequate mathematical models and methods as well as a critical evaluation of all factors that influence the entire shock transmission path, from the area of impact to the site of installation of the affected component or system in the structure. Despite extensive studies and computational analyses of impact-induced shocks performed using finite element simulation method, limited and insufficient experimental results to date have precluded a complete investigation and clarification of several 'peculiarities' in the field of shock transmission in finite element models. This refers mainly to the divergence of results observed using FE models when not considering a the required FE element discretization ratio as well as to the attenuation and scatter behavior of the dynamic response results obtained for large building structures and given large distances between the load impact application areas and the component anchoring locations. The cause for such divergences are related to several up to now not clarified 'phenomena' of FE models especially the low-pass filtering effects and dispersion characteristics of FE models

  15. Investigation on impact resistance of steel plate reinforced concrete barriers against aircraft impact. Pt.2: Simulation analysis of scale model impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun Mizuno; Norihide Koshika; Hiroshi Morikawa; Kentaro Wakimoto; Ryusuke Fukuda

    2005-01-01

    Steel plate reinforced concrete (SC) structure is one in which the rebars of conventional reinforced concrete (RC) structures are replaced with external steel plates attached to inner concrete with headed studs. SC structures are considered to be more effective than RC structures against aircraft impact, so their application to outer walls and roofs of risk-sensitive structures such as nuclear-related structures is expected to mitigate damage to critical components. The objective of this study was to investigate the fracture behavior and perforation thickness of SC panels against aircraft impact through impact tests and simulation analyses. Objectives of this paper are to analytically investigate the protection performance of SC panels against aircraft model impact through simulation analyses of 1/7.5 scale aircraft model impact tests presented in Part 1 of this study using a discrete element method (DEM), and to examine the applicability and validity of the DEM. Simulation analyses by a finite element method (FEM) were also performed to evaluate its applicability. The fracture process and damage to the SC test panels as well as the aircraft models are closely simulated by the discrete element analyses. The various impact responses and failure mechanisms, such as deceleration curves of projectile, velocity of debris from rear face and deformation mode of SC panels, are also simulated closely by the DEM analyses. The results of analyses confirm the shock-proof performance of SC panels against aircraft impact, and the applicability and validity of DEM for evaluating the complex phenomena of an aircraft impact against an SC panel. The finite element analysis closely simulates the deformation of the SC test panel and strains of rear steel plate where the global bending deformation mode is dominant. (authors)

  16. Comparative Study of the Effectiveness of Three Learning Environments: Hyper-Realistic Virtual Simulations, Traditional Schematic Simulations and Traditional Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Guadalupe; Naranjo, Francisco L.; Perez, Angel L.; Suero, Maria Isabel; Pardo, Pedro J.

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the educational effects of computer simulations developed in a hyper-realistic virtual environment with the educational effects of either traditional schematic simulations or a traditional optics laboratory. The virtual environment was constructed on the basis of Java applets complemented with a photorealistic visual output.…

  17. LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETE BASED GRANSHLAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NETESA M. I.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Raising of problem. Concrete advisable to obtain a low strength with local secondary resources for recycling and reduce the environmental burden on the environment. But it is important to design such concrete compositions with a reduced flow of cement. It is known that the coefficient of efficiency of use of cement in the concrete of the heavy and B10 is less than about 0.5, which is almost two times smaller than in class B15 concrete and above. Even lower coefficient of efficiency in light concrete cement low strength. Therefore, it is important to find patterns determining the composition of lightweight concrete based on local-products industry with more efficient use of cement in them. Purpose.. Based on the analysis of earlier research results, including with the use of methods of mathematical planning of experiments to determine the concrete contents, which can provide the requirements for the underlying layers of the floor, the compressive strength of which should correspond to the class B5. It is important to provide the required strength at minimum flow of the cement, which is the most expensive and energy-intensive part of concrete. Conclusion. Analysis of the test results of control samples of concrete in 28-day-old, the following laws. The required tensile strength of concrete compressive strength of 7.0 MPa can be obtained in the test range when used in formulations as a filler as the Dnieper hydroelectric power station fly ash and tailings Krivoy Rog iron ore YuGOK. To ensure providing the required characteristic strength of the concrete in the underlying layers of the floor is advisable to use a nominal composition per cubic meter of concrete: cement 160 kg granshlaka Plant named after Petrovsky, 675 kg of fly ash Dnieper HPP 390 kg, 400 kg of sand, 230 liters of water. Thus, while ensuring rational grain composition components can obtain the desired strength lightweight concrete based granshlaka plant Petrovsky, using as fillers

  18. Pervious Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Torsvik, Øyvind André Hoff

    2012-01-01

    Pervious concrete is a material with a high degree of permeability but generally low strength. The material is primarily used for paving applications but has shown promise in many other areas of usage. This thesis investigates the properties of pervious concrete using normal Norwegian aggregates and practices. An overview of important factors when it comes to designing and producing pervious concrete is the result of this investigation. Several experiments have been performed in the concrete ...

  19. Chloride-induced corrosion of steel in cracked concrete – Part I: Experimental studies under accelerated and natural marine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otieno, M.; Beushausen, H.; Alexander, M.

    2016-01-01

    Parallel corrosion experiments were carried out for 2¼ years by exposing one half of 210 beam specimens (120 × 130 × 375 mm long) to accelerated laboratory corrosion (cyclic wetting and drying) while the other half underwent natural corrosion in a marine tidal zone. Experimental variables were crack width w cr (0, incipient crack, 0.4, 0.7 mm), cover c (20, 40 mm), binder type (PC, PC/GGBS, PC/FA) and w/b ratio (0.40, 0.55). Results show that corrosion rate (i corr ) was affected by the experimental variables in the following manner: i corr increased with increase in crack width, and decreased with increase in concrete quality and cover depth. The results also show that the corrosion performance of concretes in the field under natural corrosion cannot be inferred from its performance in the laboratory under accelerated corrosion. Other factors such as corrosion process should be taken into account.

  20. Structural Precast Concrete Handbook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærbye, Per Oluf H

    Structural concept for precast concrete systems. Design og precast reinforced concrete components. Design of precast concrete connections. Illustrations on design of precast concrete buildings. Precast concrete assembly.......Structural concept for precast concrete systems. Design og precast reinforced concrete components. Design of precast concrete connections. Illustrations on design of precast concrete buildings. Precast concrete assembly....

  1. The Development and Evaluation of a Computer-Simulated Science Inquiry Environment Using Gamified Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Fu-Hsing

    2018-01-01

    This study developed a computer-simulated science inquiry environment, called the Science Detective Squad, to engage students in investigating an electricity problem that may happen in daily life. The environment combined the simulation of scientific instruments and a virtual environment, including gamified elements, such as points and a story for…

  2. WinGraphics: An optimized windowing environment for interactive real-time simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verboncoeur, J.P.; Vahedi, V.

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a customized windowing environment, Win Graphics, which provides particle simulation codes with an interactive user interface. The environment supports real-time animation of the simulation, displaying multiple diagnostics as they evolve in time. In addition, keyboard and printer (PostScript and dot matrix) support is provided. This paper describes this environment

  3. Sulfur polymer cement concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, H.H.; McBee, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    Sulfur-based composite materials formulated using sulfur polymer cement (SPC) and mineral aggregates are described and compared with conventional portland cement based materials. Materials characteristics presented include mechanical strength, chemical resistance, impact resistance, moisture permeation, and linear shrinkage during placement and curing. Examples of preparation and placement of sulfur polymer cement concrete (SC) are described using commercial scale equipment. SC applications presented are focused into hostile chemical environments where severe portland cement concrete (PCC) failure has occurred

  4. Modes of Disintegration of Solid Foods in Simulated Gastric Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fanbin

    2009-01-01

    A model stomach system was used to investigate disintegration of various foods in simulated gastric environment. Food disintegration modes and typical disintegration profiles are summarized in this paper. Mechanisms contributing to the disintegration kinetics of different foods were investigated as related to acidity, temperature, and enzymatic effect on the texture and changes in microstructure. Food disintegration was dominated by either fragmentation or erosion, depending on the physical forces acting on food and the cohesive force within the food matrix. The internal cohesive forces changed during digestion as a result of water penetration and acidic and enzymatic hydrolysis. When erosion was dominant, the disintegration data (weight retention vs. disintegration time) may be expressed with exponential, sigmoidal, and delayed-sigmoidal profiles. The different profiles are the result of competition among the rates of water absorption, texture softening, and erosion. A linear-exponential equation was used to describe the different disintegration curves with good fit. Acidity and temperature of gastric juice showed a synergistic effect on carrot softening, while pepsin was the key factor in disintegrating high-protein foods. A study of the change of carrot microstructure during digestion indicated that degradation of the pectin and cell wall was responsible for texture softening that contributed to the sigmoidal profile of carrot disintegration. PMID:20401314

  5. Simulated learning environment (SLE) in audiology education: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzulkarnain, Ahmad Aidil Arafat; Wan Mhd Pandi, Wan Mahirah; Rahmat, Sarah; Zakaria, Nur 'Azzah

    2015-01-01

    To systematically review the relevant peer-review literature investigating the outcome of simulated learning environment (SLE) training in audiology education. A systematic review research design. Fifteen databases were searched with four studies meeting the inclusion criteria. Three of the four studies revealed positive findings for the use of an SLE (that is, the SLE group showed a higher post-training score compared to the traditional training group or a significantly higher post-training score than the non-training groups). One study revealed negative findings where the traditional training group showed a significantly higher post-training score than the SLE group. In addition, both the studies comparing post- and pre-training scores reported significantly higher post-training scores than the pre-training scores of the participants that underwent SLE training. Overall, this review supports the notions that SLE training is an effective learning tool and can be used for basic clinical training. This conclusion should be treated with caution, considering the limited numbers of studies published in this area and future research should be conducted to cope with the gaps highlighted in this review.

  6. Thermal System Upgrade of the Space Environment Simulation Test Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Ashok B.

    1997-01-01

    The paper deals with the refurbishing and upgrade of the thermal system for the existing thermal vacuum test facility, the Space Environment Simulator, at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The chamber is the largest such facility at the center. This upgrade is the third phase of the long range upgrade of the chamber that has been underway for last few years. The first phase dealt with its vacuum system, the second phase involved the GHe subsystem. The paper describes the considerations of design philosophy options for the thermal system; approaches taken and methodology applied, in the evaluation of the remaining "life" in the chamber shrouds and related equipment by conducting special tests and studies; feasibility and extent of automation, using computer interfaces and Programmable Logic Controllers in the control system and finally, matching the old components to the new ones into an integrated, highly reliable and cost effective thermal system for the facility. This is a multi-year project just started and the paper deals mainly with the plans and approaches to implement the project successfully within schedule and costs.

  7. Glazed Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Anja Margrethe

    2010-01-01

    Why glazed concrete? Concrete hardens and finds its strength at room temperature whereas clay products must first be fired before they achieve this strength. They are stronger and three times as durable as clay products, which is a weighty reason for choosing concrete.5 Another reason, which....... If this succeeds, it will be possible to manufacture thin, large-scale glazed concrete panels comparable in size to concrete sandwich construction and larger which, with or without back-casting, can work as load-bearing construction elements....

  8. Biodecontamination of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M.A.; Rogers, R.D.; Benson, J.

    1996-01-01

    A novel technology for biologically decontaminating concrete is being jointly developed by scientists at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL). The technology exploits a naturally occurring phenomenon referred to as microbially influenced degradation (MID) in which bacteria produce acids that dissolve the cement matrix of concrete. Most radionuclide contamination of concrete is fixed in the outer few mm of the concrete surface. By capturing and controlling this natural process, a biological method of removing the surface of concrete to depths up to several mm is being developed. Three types of bacteria are known to be important in MID of concrete: nitrifying bacteria that produce nitric acid, sulfur oxidizing bacteria that produce sulfuric acid, and certain heterotrophic bacteria that produce organic acids. An investigation of natural environments demonstrated with scanning electron microscopy the presence of bacteria on concrete surfaces of a variety of structures, such as bridges and dams, where corrosion is evident. Enumeration of sulfur oxidizing and nitrifying bacteria revealed their presence and activity on structures to varying degrees in different environments. Under ideal conditions, Thiobacillus thiooxidans, a sulfur oxidizing bacteria, attached to and colonized the surface of concrete specimens. Over 1mm depth of material from a 10 cm x 10 cm square surface was removed in 68 days in the Thiobacillus treated specimen compared to a sterile control. Laboratory and field demonstrations are currently being conducted using experimental chambers designed to be mounted directly to concrete surfaces where radionuclide contamination exists. Data is being obtained in order to determine actual rates of surface removal and limitations to the system. This information will be used to develop a full scale decontamination technology

  9. Concrete Hinges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halding, Philip Skov; Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup

    2014-01-01

    In the first part of the 20th century concrete hinges developed by Freyssinet and Mesnager were widely tested and implemented in concrete structures. The concrete hinges were used a great deal in closed-spandrel arch bridges. Since such a bridge type has not been competitive for the past 40 years......, the research in concrete hinges has not evolved significantly in that period. But introducing a new state-of-the-art concrete arch bridge solution (Pearl-Chain arches invented at the Technical University of Denmark) creates a necessity of a concrete hinge research based on modern standards. Back when research...... in concrete hinges was more common different designs were proposed for the geometry and reinforcement. Previous research focused on fatigue, multi-axial stresses around the hinge throat, and the relation between rotation- and moment. But many different test-setups were proposed by different researchers...

  10. Concrete structures

    CERN Document Server

    Setareh, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    This revised, fully updated second edition covers the analysis, design, and construction of reinforced concrete structures from a real-world perspective. It examines different reinforced concrete elements such as slabs, beams, columns, foundations, basement and retaining walls and pre-stressed concrete incorporating the most up-to-date edition of the American Concrete Institute Code (ACI 318-14) requirements for the design of concrete structures. It includes a chapter on metric system in reinforced concrete design and construction. A new chapter on the design of formworks has been added which is of great value to students in the construction engineering programs along with practicing engineers and architects. This second edition also includes a new appendix with color images illustrating various concrete construction practices, and well-designed buildings. The ACI 318-14 constitutes the most extensive reorganization of the code in the past 40 years. References to the various sections of the ACI 318-14 are pro...

  11. Full immersion simulation: validation of a distributed simulation environment for technical and non-technical skills training in Urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewin, James; Tang, Jessica; Dasgupta, Prokar; Khan, Muhammad S; Ahmed, Kamran; Bello, Fernando; Kneebone, Roger; Jaye, Peter

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the face, content and construct validity of the distributed simulation (DS) environment for technical and non-technical skills training in endourology. To evaluate the educational impact of DS for urology training. DS offers a portable, low-cost simulated operating room environment that can be set up in any open space. A prospective mixed methods design using established validation methodology was conducted in this simulated environment with 10 experienced and 10 trainee urologists. All participants performed a simulated prostate resection in the DS environment. Outcome measures included surveys to evaluate the DS, as well as comparative analyses of experienced and trainee urologist's performance using real-time and 'blinded' video analysis and validated performance metrics. Non-parametric statistical methods were used to compare differences between groups. The DS environment demonstrated face, content and construct validity for both non-technical and technical skills. Kirkpatrick level 1 evidence for the educational impact of the DS environment was shown. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effect of simulated operating room training on real operating room performance. This study has shown the validity of the DS environment for non-technical, as well as technical skills training. DS-based simulation appears to be a valuable addition to traditional classroom-based simulation training. © 2014 The Authors BJU International © 2014 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A novel natural environment background model for Monte Carlo simulation and its application in the simulation of anticoincidence measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sangang; Wang, Lei; Cheng, Yi; Tuo, Xianguo; Liu, Mingzhe; Yao, Fuliang; Leng, Fengqing; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Cai, Ting; Zhou, Yan

    2016-02-01

    This study proposes a novel natural environment background model by modeling brief environment conditions. It uses Geant4 program to simulate decays of (238)U, (232)Th, and (40)K in soil and obtains compositions of different-energy gamma rays in the natural environment background. The simulated gamma spectrum of the natural environment background agrees well with the experimental spectrum, particularly above 250 keV. The model is used in the simulation of anticoincidence measurement, indicating that the natural environment background can be decreased by approximately 88%, and the Compton attenuation factor is 2.22. The simulation of anticoincidence measurement can improve the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of the detection system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A novel natural environment background model for Monte Carlo simulation and its application in the simulation of anticoincidence measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Sangang; Wang, Lei; Cheng, Yi; Tuo, Xianguo; Liu, Mingzhe; Yao, Fuliang; Leng, Fengqing; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Cai, Ting; Zhou, Yan

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a novel natural environment background model by modeling brief environment conditions. It uses Geant4 program to simulate decays of "2"3"8U, "2"3"2Th, and "4"0K in soil and obtains compositions of different-energy gamma rays in the natural environment background. The simulated gamma spectrum of the natural environment background agrees well with the experimental spectrum, particularly above 250 keV. The model is used in the simulation of anticoincidence measurement, indicating that the natural environment background can be decreased by approximately 88%, and the Compton attenuation factor is 2.22. The simulation of anticoincidence measurement can improve the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of the detection system. - Highlights: • This study proposes a novel natural environment background model by simulating decays of "2"3"8U, "2"3"2Th, and "4"0K in soil. • The simulated gamma spectrum of the natural environment background agrees well with the experimental spectrum, particularly above 250 keV. • The proposed environment background model is applied to study the properties of anticoincidence detector.

  14. Simulations of embodied evolving semiosis: Emergent semantics in artificial environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, L.M.; Joslyn, C.

    1998-02-01

    As we enter this amazing new world of artificial and virtual systems and environments in the context of human communities, we are interested in the development of systems and environments which have the capacity to grow and evolve their own meanings in the context of this community of interaction. In this paper the authors analyze the necessary conditions to achieve systems and environments with these properties: (1) a coupled interaction between a system and its environment; (2) an environment with sufficient initial richness and structure to allow for; (3) embodied emergent classification of that environment system coupling; and (4) which is subject to pragmatic selection.

  15. Eco-engineered rock pools: a concrete solution to biodiversity loss and urban sprawl in the marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, Louise B.; Browne, Keith A.; Knights, Antony M.; Hawkins, Stephen J.; Nash, Róisín

    2016-09-01

    In coastal habitats artificial structures typically support lower biodiversity and can support greater numbers of non-native and opportunistic species than natural rocky reefs. Eco-engineering experiments are typically trialed to succeed; but arguably as much is learnt from failure than from success. Our goal was to trial a generic, cost effective, eco-engineering technique that could be incorporated into rock armouring anywhere in the world. Artificial rock pools were created from manipulated concrete between boulders on the exposed and sheltered sides of a causeway. Experimental treatments were installed in locations where they were expected to fail and compared to controls installed in locations in which they were expected to succeed. Control pools were created lower on the structure where they were immersed on every tidal cycle; experimental pools were created above mean high water spring tide which were only immersed on spring tides. We hypothesised that lower and exposed pools would support significantly higher taxon and functional diversity than upper and sheltered pools. The concrete pools survived the severe winter storms of 2013/14. After 12 months, non-destructive sampling revealed significantly higher mean taxon and functional richness in lower pools than upper pools on the exposed side only. After 24 months the sheltered pools had become inundated with sediments, thus failing to function as rock pools as intended. Destructive sampling on the exposed side revealed significantly higher mean functional richness in lower than upper pools. However, a surprisingly high number of taxa colonised the upper pools leading to no significant difference in mean taxon richness among shore heights. A high number of rare taxa in the lower pools led to total taxon richness being almost twice that of upper pools. These findings highlight that even when expected to fail concrete pools supported diverse assemblages, thus representing an affordable, replicable means of

  16. High Fidelity Simulation of Littoral Environments: Applications and Coupling of Participating Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allard, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The High Fidelity Simulation of Littoral Environments (HFSoLE) Challenge Project (C75) encompasses a suite of seven oceanographic models capable of exchanging information in a physically meaningful sense across the littoral environment...

  17. Experimental Study and Reactive Transport Modeling of Boric Acid Leaching of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiang K.-T. K.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Borated water leakage through spent fuel pools (SFPs at pressurized water reactors is a concern because it could cause corrosion of reinforcement steel in the concrete structure, compromise the integrity of the structure, or cause unmonitored releases of contaminated water to the environment. Experimental data indicate that pH is a critical parameter that determines the corrosion susceptibility of rebar in borated water and the degree of concrete degradation by boric acid leaching. In this study, reactive transport modeling of concrete leaching by borated water was performed to provide information on the solution pH in the concrete crack or matrix and the degree of concrete degradation at different locations of an SFP concrete structure exposed to borated water. Simulations up to 100 years were performed using different boric acid concentrations, crack apertures, and solution flow rates. Concrete cylinders were immersed in boric acid solutions for several months and the mineralogical changes and boric acid penetration in the concrete cylinder were evaluated as a function of time. The depths of concrete leaching by boric acid solution derived from the reactive transport simulations were compared with the measured boric acid penetration depth.

  18. BioNessie - a grid enabled biochemical networks simulation environment

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, X.; Jiang, J.; Ajayi, O.; Gu, X.; Gilbert, D.; Sinnott, R.O.

    2008-01-01

    The simulation of biochemical networks provides insight and understanding about the underlying biochemical processes and pathways used by cells and organisms. BioNessie is a biochemical network simulator which has been developed at the University of Glasgow. This paper describes the simulator and focuses in particular on how it has been extended to benefit from a wide variety of high performance compute resources across the UK through Grid technologies to support larger scale simulations.

  19. Comparison of portable oxygen concentrators in a simulated airplane environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Rainald; Wanka, Eva R; Einhaeupl, Franziska; Voll, Klaus; Schiffl, Helmut; Lang, Susanne M; Gruss, Martin; Ferrari, Uta

    2013-01-01

    Portable oxygen concentrators (POC) are highly desirable for patients with lung disease traveling by airplane, as these devices allow theoretically much higher travel times if additional batteries can be used. However, it is unclear whether POCs produce enough oxygen in airplanes at cruising altitude, even if complying with aviation regulations. We evaluated five frequently used POCs (XPO2 (Invacare, USA), Freestyle (AirSep C., USA), Evergo (Philipps Healthcare, Germany), Inogen One (Inogen, USA), Eclipse 3 (Sequal, USA)) at an altitude of 2650 m (as simulated airplane environment) in 11 patients with chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) and compared theses POCs with the standard oxygen system (WS120, EMS Ltd., Germany) used by Lufthansa. Oxygen was delivered by each POC for 30 min to each patient at rest, blood gases were then drawn from the arterialized ear lobe. All POCs were able to deliver enough oxygen to increase the PaO(2) of our subjects by at least 1.40 kPa (10 mmHg). However, to achieve this increase, the two most lightweight POCs (Freestyle and Invacare XPO2) had to be run at their maximum level. This causes a significant reduction of battery life. The three other POCs (EverGo, Inogen One, Eclipse 3) and the WS120 were able to increase the PaO(2) by more than 2.55 kPa (20 mmHg), which provides extra safety for patients with more severe basal hypoxemia. When choosing the right oxygen system for air travel in patients in COPD, not only weight, but also battery life and maximum possible oxygen output must be considered carefully. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Life Cycle Assessment of Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjunnesson, Jeannette

    2005-09-15

    This is an environmental study on concrete that follows the standard protocol of life cycle assessment (LCA). The study is done for two types of concrete, ordinary and frost-resistant concrete, and has an extra focus on the superplasticizers used as admixtures. The utilization phase is not included in this study since the type of construction for which the concrete is used is not defined and the concrete is assumed to be inert during this phase. The results show that it is the production of the raw material and the transports involved in the life cycle of concrete that are the main contributors to the total environmental load. The one single step in the raw material production that has the highest impact is the production of cement. Within the transportation operations the transportation of concrete is the largest contributor, followed by the transportation of the cement. The environmental impact of frost-resistant concrete is between 24-41 % higher than that of ordinary concrete due to its higher content of cement. Superplasticizers contribute with approximately 0.4-10.4 % of the total environmental impact of concrete, the least to the global warming potential (GWP) and the most to the photochemical ozone creation potential (POCP). Also the toxicity of the superplasticizers is investigated and the conclusion is that the low amount of leakage of superplasticizers from concrete leads to a low risk for the environment and for humans.

  1. Simulation training tools for nonlethal weapons using gaming environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donne, Alexsana; Eagan, Justin; Tse, Gabriel; Vanderslice, Tom; Woods, Jerry

    2006-05-01

    Modern simulation techniques have a growing role for evaluating new technologies and for developing cost-effective training programs. A mission simulator facilitates the productive exchange of ideas by demonstration of concepts through compellingly realistic computer simulation. Revolutionary advances in 3D simulation technology have made it possible for desktop computers to process strikingly realistic and complex interactions with results depicted in real-time. Computer games now allow for multiple real human players and "artificially intelligent" (AI) simulated robots to play together. Advances in computer processing power have compensated for the inherent intensive calculations required for complex simulation scenarios. The main components of the leading game-engines have been released for user modifications, enabling game enthusiasts and amateur programmers to advance the state-of-the-art in AI and computer simulation technologies. It is now possible to simulate sophisticated and realistic conflict situations in order to evaluate the impact of non-lethal devices as well as conflict resolution procedures using such devices. Simulations can reduce training costs as end users: learn what a device does and doesn't do prior to use, understand responses to the device prior to deployment, determine if the device is appropriate for their situational responses, and train with new devices and techniques before purchasing hardware. This paper will present the status of SARA's mission simulation development activities, based on the Half-Life gameengine, for the purpose of evaluating the latest non-lethal weapon devices, and for developing training tools for such devices.

  2. Concrete Fibrations

    OpenAIRE

    Pagnan, Ruggero

    2017-01-01

    As far as we know, no notion of concrete fibration is available. We provide one such notion in adherence to the foundational attitude that characterizes the adoption of the fibrational perspective in approaching fundamental subjects in category theory and discuss it in connection with the notion of concrete category and the notions of locally small and small fibrations. We also discuss the appropriateness of our notion of concrete fibration for fibrations of small maps, which is relevant to a...

  3. Pressurized water reactor simulation in the training environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, A.G.

    1990-01-01

    The paper gives a brief history of PWR Simulation within the DNST and an outline of the training courses leading to the requirement for the Display Array Simulation System. Focus is then placed upon the flexible use of real time simulation in the teaching of plant dynamics by the use of model generated data. The use of interactive consoles and a large scale colour graphic display has led to the success of the Display Array Simulation System within the DNST. Realisation of the potential of the system has led to many other proposed uses for the installed system and the paper concludes by discussing some of these. (orig./DG)

  4. Initial Development of a Quadcopter Simulation Environment for Auralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Andrew; Lawrence, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a recently created computer simulation of quadcopter flight dynamics for the NASA DELIVER project. The goal of this effort is to produce a simulation that includes a number of physical effects that are not usually found in other dynamics simulations (e.g., those used for flight controller development). These effects will be shown to have a significant impact on the fidelity of auralizations - entirely synthetic time-domain predictions of sound - based on this simulation when compared to a recording. High-fidelity auralizations are an important precursor to human subject tests that seek to understand the impact of vehicle configurations on noise and annoyance.

  5. Simulation Assessment Validation Environment (SAVE). Software User’s Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-01

    TOOL USAGE Figure 2-14: Factory Simulation Tool Usage This tool directly emulates real-world system behaviors that are associated with each resource...manufacturing simulation tools and Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools. The Factory/Schedule Simulation tool is used to simulate real-world system behaviors ...char Name>_pfchar Part Usage(Produced)/Part/Feature/Char <partuseName>_<partName>_<matName>_<char Name>_cmat PartUsage( Comsumed )/Part/Material

  6. micro-mechanical modeling and numerical simulation of creep in concrete taking into account the effects of micro-cracking and hygro-thermal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thai, M.Q.

    2012-01-01

    Concrete is a complex heterogeneous material whose deformations include a delayed part that is affected by a number of factors such as temperature, relative humidity and microstructure evolution. Taking into account differed deformations and in particular creep is essential in the computation of concrete structures such as those dedicated to radioactive waste storage. The present work aims: (1) at elaborating a simple and robust model of creep for concrete by using micro-mechanics and accounting for the effects of damage, temperature and relative humidity; (2) at numerically implementing the creep model developed in a finite element code so as to simulate the behavior of simple structural elements in concrete. To achieve this twofold objective, the present work is partitioned into three parts. In the first part the cement-based material at the microscopic scale is taken to consist of a linear viscoelastic matrix characterized by a generalized Maxwell model and of particulate phases representing elastic aggregates and pores. The Mori-Tanaka micro-mechanical scheme, the Laplace-Carson transform and its inversion are then used to obtain analytical or numerical estimates for the mechanical and hydro-mechanical parameters of the material. Next, the original micromechanical model of creep is coupled to the damage model of Mazars through the concept of pseudo-deformations introduced by Schapery. The parameters involved in the creep-damage model thus established are systematically identified using available experimental data. Finally, the effects of temperature and relative humidity are accounted for in the creep-damage model by using the equivalent time method; the efficiency of this approach is demonstrated and discussed in the case of simple creep tests. (author) [fr

  7. Fibre reinforced self-compacting concrete flow simulations in comparison with l-box experiments using carbopol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svec, Oldrich; Skocek, Jan; Olesen, John Forbes

    An evolution of distribution and orientation of fibres in the fibre reinforced self-compacting concrete during the casting process is an important matter as the final orientation and distribution of fibres can significantly influence mechanical properties of the structural elements. A two-way cou...

  8. Design of concrete waste basin in Integrated Temporarily Sanitary Landfill (ITSL) in Siosar, Karo Regency, Indonesia on supporting clean environment and sustainable fertilizers for farmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginting, N.; Siahaan, J.; Tarigan, A. P.

    2018-03-01

    A new settlement in Siosar village of Karo Regency has been developed for people whose villages have been completely destroyed by the prolong eruptions of Sinabung. An integrated temporarily sanitary landfill (ITSL) was built there to support the new living environment. The objective of this study is to investigate the organic waste decomposing in order to improve the design of the conventional concrete waste basin installed in the ITSL. The study was last from May until August 2016. The used design was Completely Randomized Design (CRD) in which organic waste was treated using decomposer with five replications in three composter bins. Decomposting process lasted for three weeks. Research parameters were pH, temperature, waste reduction in weight, C/N, and organic fertilizer production(%). The results of waste compost as follows : pH was 9.45, ultimate temperature was 31.6°C, C/N was in the range of 10.5-12.4, waste reduction was 53% and organic fertilizer production was 47%. Based on the decomposting process and the analysis, it is recommended that the conventional concrete waste basin should be divided into three colums and each column would be filled with waste when previous column is fulled. It is predicted that when the third column is fully occupied then the waste in the first column already become a sustainable fertilizer.

  9. Polymer concrete composites for the production of high strength pipe and linings in high temperature corrosive environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeldin, A.; Carciello, N.; Fontana, J.; Kukacka, L.

    High temperature corrosive resistant, non-aqueous polymer concrete composites are described. They comprise about 12 to 20% by weight of a water-insoluble polymer binder polymerized in situ from a liquid monomer mixture consisting essentially of about 40 to 70% by weight of styrene, about 25 to 45% by weight acrylonitrile and about 2.5 to 7.5% by weight acrylamide or methacrylamide and about 1 to 10% by weight of a crosslinking agent. This agent is selected from the group consisting of trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate and divinyl benzene; and about 80 to 88% by weight of an inert inorganic filler system containing silica sand and portland cement, and optionally Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ or carbon black or mica. A free radical initiator such as di-tert-butyl peroxide, azobisisobutyronitrile, benzoyl peroxide, lauryl peroxide, other organic peroxides and combinations thereof to initiate crosspolymerization of the monomer mixture in the presence of said inorganic filler.

  10. OPPORTUNITIES TO INCREASE OF ESTABLISHMENT´S COMPETITIVENESS APPLYING RESOURCES OF INFORMATION LOGISTICS IN THE CONCRETE COMPANY´S ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristína Ignáczová

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article solves the problem about ensuring and managing of the information flow by the institution for higher education – the Technical University of Košice (TUKE and one of its faculty, the Faculty of Mining, Ecology, Process Control and Geotechnology (FBERG. It is paid attention to the university´s official website and its complicacy. TUKE homepage is chosen for the primary source of information and the article explains the opportunities of its improvement for the purpose of streamlining the information behavior of both organizations. The implementations of concrete solution´s offer expects an increasing of organizations´s competitiveness that will promote the status and awareness of the organizations in society.

  11. Launch Environment Water Flow Simulations Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Berg, Jared J.; Harris, Michael F.; Crespo, Alejandro C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) to simulate the water flow from the rainbird nozzle system used in the sound suppression system during pad abort and nominal launch. The simulations help determine if water from rainbird nozzles will impinge on the rocket nozzles and other sensitive ground support elements.

  12. Influence of High Temperatures on the Workability of Fresh Ready-Mixed Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Sampebulu'

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Properties of fresh concrete made in tropical countries, which is mixed, transported (with agitation, placed and initially cured in places where the temperature ranges from about 20oC to 40oC and relative humidity above 60%, are not completely understood. Applicable requirements also differ from country to country and government agencies and private enterprises have their own specifications. Assuming such temperature and relative humidity conditions, the present study is an attempt at evaluating the properties of hot weather concrete in fresh state with using a method of ready–mixed concrete. The fresh concrete was mixed and agitated at varying concrete and ambient temperatures. Three groups of the component materials, each material having such temperature as to bring resulting temperature of the fresh concrete to about 20oC, 30oC, 35oC, were chosen. The temperature of cement was conditioned to about20o, 40oC and 60oC for each of groups respectively. The aggregate was made warm enough to simulate the condition of outdoor pile in ready-mixed concrete plant. The temperature of tap water was always 20oC as it was easily controlled and unlikely affected by outdoor temperature. With the fresh concrete prevented from evaporation, slump loss is caused solely by increased temperature of concrete. During agitation, the slump loss increases rapidly during the first 30 minutes but moderately during the remaining period. Concrete-placing temperature (upon arrival at the work site could be estimated by a proposed formula derived from this study. Besides the freshly mixed concrete temperature, this formula also takes into consideration the ambient temperature, agitating time in transit and hydration heat. The achievement as described in this study may be useful to control concrete quality in terms of strength, shrinkage and other properties of concrete to be placed in hot-humid environment.

  13. Evaluation and development the routing protocol of a fully functional simulation environment for VANETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Azhar Tareq; Warip, Mohd Nazri Mohd; Yaakob, Naimah; Abduljabbar, Waleed Khalid; Atta, Abdu Mohammed Ali

    2017-11-01

    Vehicular Ad-hoc Networks (VANETs) is an area of wireless technologies that is attracting a great deal of interest. There are still several areas of VANETS, such as security and routing protocols, medium access control, that lack large amounts of research. There is also a lack of freely available simulators that can quickly and accurately simulate VANETs. The main goal of this paper is to develop a freely available VANETS simulator and to evaluate popular mobile ad-hoc network routing protocols in several VANETS scenarios. The VANETS simulator consisted of a network simulator, traffic (mobility simulator) and used a client-server application to keep the two simulators in sync. The VANETS simulator also models buildings to create a more realistic wireless network environment. Ad-Hoc Distance Vector routing (AODV), Dynamic Source Routing (DSR) and Dynamic MANET On-demand (DYMO) were initially simulated in a city, country, and highway environment to provide an overall evaluation.

  14. Discrete event simulation in an artificial intelligence environment: Some examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, D.J.; Farish, T.

    1991-01-01

    Several Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) object-oriented discrete-event simulation efforts have been completed during the past three years. One of these systems has been put into production and has a growing customer base. Another (started two years earlier than the first project) was completed but has not yet been used. This paper will describe these simulation projects. Factors which were pertinent to the success of the one project, and to the failure of the second project will be discussed (success will be measured as the extent to which the simulation model was used as originally intended). 5 figs

  15. Simulating Nonmodel-Fitting Responses in a CAT Environment. ACT Research Report Series 98-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Qing; Nering, Michael L.

    This study developed a model to simulate nonmodel-fitting responses in a computerized adaptive testing (CAT) environment, and to examine the effectiveness of the model. The underlying idea was to simulate examinees' test behaviors realistically. This study simulated a situation in which examinees are exposed to or are coached on test items before…

  16. Simulations of depleted CMOS sensors for high-radiation environments

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, J.; Bhat, S.; Breugnon, P.; Caicedo, I.; Chen, Z.; Degerli, Y.; Godiot-Basolo, S.; Guilloux, F.; Hemperek, T.; Hirono, T.; Hügging, F.; Krüger, H.; Moustakas, K.; Pangaud, P.; Rozanov, A.; Rymaszewski, P.; Schwemling, P.; Wang, M.; Wang, T.; Wermes, N.; Zhang, L.

    2017-01-01

    After the Phase II upgrade for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the increased luminosity requests a new upgraded Inner Tracker (ITk) for the ATLAS experiment. As a possible option for the ATLAS ITk, a new pixel detector based on High Voltage/High Resistivity CMOS (HV/HR CMOS) technology is under study. Meanwhile, a new CMOS pixel sensor is also under development for the tracker of Circular Electron Position Collider (CEPC). In order to explore the sensor electric properties, such as the breakdown voltage and charge collection efficiency, 2D/3D Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) simulations have been performed carefully for the above mentioned both of prototypes. In this paper, the guard-ring simulation for a HV/HR CMOS sensor developed for the ATLAS ITk and the charge collection efficiency simulation for a CMOS sensor explored for the CEPC tracker will be discussed in details. Some comparisons between the simulations and the latest measurements will also be addressed.

  17. Comparative study of the effectiveness of three learning environments: Hyper-realistic virtual simulations, traditional schematic simulations and traditional laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabel Suero

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the educational effects of computer simulations developed in a hyper-realistic virtual environment with the educational effects of either traditional schematic simulations or a traditional optics laboratory. The virtual environment was constructed on the basis of Java applets complemented with a photorealistic visual output. This new virtual environment concept, which we call hyper-realistic, transcends basic schematic simulation; it provides the user with a more realistic perception of a physical phenomenon being simulated. We compared the learning achievements of three equivalent, homogeneous groups of undergraduates—an experimental group who used only the hyper-realistic virtual laboratory, a first control group who used a schematic simulation, and a second control group who used the traditional laboratory. The three groups received the same theoretical preparation and carried out equivalent practicals in their respective learning environments. The topic chosen for the experiment was optical aberrations. An analysis of variance applied to the data of the study demonstrated a statistically significant difference (p value <0.05 between the three groups. The learning achievements attained by the group using the hyper-realistic virtual environment were 6.1 percentage points higher than those for the group using the traditional schematic simulations and 9.5 percentage points higher than those for the group using the traditional laboratory.

  18. Evaluating the integrity of the reinforced concrete structure repaired by epoxy injection using simulated transfer function of impact-echo response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Chia-Chi; Yu, Chih-peng; Wu, Jiunn-Hong; Hsu, Keng-Tsan; Ke, Ying-Tsu [Chaoyang University of Technology, Department of Construction Engineering, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-18

    Cracks and honeycombs are often found inside reinforced concrete (RC) structure caused by excessive external force, or improper casting of concrete. The repairing method usually involves epoxy injection. The impact-echo method, which is a sensitive for detecting of the interior voids, may not be applicable to assess the integrity of the repaired member as both air and epoxy are less in acoustic impedances. In this study, the repaired RC structure was evaluated by the simulated transfer function of the IE displacement waveform where the R-wave displacement waveform is used as a base of a simulated force-time function. The effect of different thickness of the epoxy layer to the amplitude corresponding to the interface is studied by testing on specimen containing repaired naturally delaminated cracks with crack widths about 1 mm, 3 mm and 5 mm. The impact-echo responses were compared with the drilling cores at the test positions. The results showed the cracks were not fully filled with epoxy when the peak amplitude corresponding to the interface dropped less than 20%. The peak corresponding to the thicker epoxy layer tends to be larger in amplitude. A field study was also performed on a column damaged by earthquake before and after repairing.

  19. An Accelerated Test Method of Simultaneous Carbonation and Chloride Ion Ingress: Durability of Silica Fume Concrete in Severe Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Ghahari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of simultaneous carbonation and chloride ion attack on mechanical characteristics and durability of concrete containing silica fume have been investigated through an accelerated test method. Specimens containing different amounts of silica fume were maintained in an apparatus in which carbon dioxide pressure and concentration and relative humidity were kept constant, and wetting and drying cycles in saline water were applied. Surface resistivity, sorptivity, CO2 consumption, and carbonation and chloride ion ingress depths measurements were taken. Phase change due to carbonation and chloride ion attack was monitored by XRD analysis, and microstructures and interfacial transition zones were studied by implementing SEM as well as mercury intrusion porosimetry. It was expected to have a synergistic effect in the tidal zone where simultaneous carbonation and chloride ion attack happen. However, the observed reduced surface resistivity, compared to specimens maintained in CO2 gas, could be due to the moisture that is available near the surface, hindering CO2 from penetrating into the pores of the specimens. Moreover, the porosity analysis of the specimens showed that the sample containing silica fume cured in the tidal zone had 50.1% less total porosity than the plain cement paste cured in the same condition.

  20. Mechanical Properties and Durability of "Waterless Concrete"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutanji, Houssam; Grugel, Richard N.

    2008-01-01

    Waterless concrete consists of molten elementary sulfur and aggregate. The aggregates in lunar environment will be lunar rocks and soil. Sulfur is present on the Moon in Troilite soil (FeS) and by oxidation soil iron and sulfur can be produced. Iron can be used to reinforce the sulfur concrete. Sulfur concrete specimens were cycled between liquid nitrogen (approximately 191 C) and room temperature (approximately 21 C) to simulate exposure to a lunar environment. Cycled and control specimens were subsequently tested in compression at room temperatures (approximately 21 C) and approximately 101 C. Test results showed that due to temperature cycling, compressive strength of cycled specimens was 20% of those non-cycled. Microscopic examination of the fracture surfaces from the cycled samples showed clear de-bonding of the sulfur from the aggregate material whereas it was seen well bonded in those non-cycled. This reduction in strength can be attributed to the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion of the materials constituting the concrete which promoted cracking. Similar sulfur concrete mixtures were strengthened with short and long glass fibers. The glass fibers from lunar regolith simulant was melted in a 25 cc Pt-Rh crucible in a Sybron Thermoline high temperature MoSi2 furnace at melting temperatures of 1450 to 1600 C for times of 30 min to 1 hour. Glass fibers were cast from the melt into graphite crucibles and were annealed for a couple of hours at 600 C. Glass fibers and small rods were pulled from the melt. The glass melt wets the ceramic rod and long continuous glass fibers were easily hand drawn. The glass fibers were immediately coated with a protective polymer to maintain the mechanical strength. The glass fibers were used to reinforce sulfur concrete plated to improve the flexural strength of the sulfur concrete. Prisms beams strengthened with glass fibers were tested in 4-point bending test. Beams strengthened with glass fiber showed to

  1. Multiscale simulation of molecular processes in cellular environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiricotto, Mara; Sterpone, Fabio; Derreumaux, Philippe; Melchionna, Simone

    2016-11-13

    We describe the recent advances in studying biological systems via multiscale simulations. Our scheme is based on a coarse-grained representation of the macromolecules and a mesoscopic description of the solvent. The dual technique handles particles, the aqueous solvent and their mutual exchange of forces resulting in a stable and accurate methodology allowing biosystems of unprecedented size to be simulated.This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling at the physics-chemistry-biology interface'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  2. Cooperative visualization and simulation in a supercomputer environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruehle, R.; Lang, U.; Wierse, A.

    1993-01-01

    The article takes a closer look on the requirements being imposed by the idea to integrate all the components into a homogeneous software environment. To this end several methods for the distribtuion of applications in dependence of certain problem types are discussed. The currently available methods at the University of Stuttgart Computer Center for the distribution of applications are further explained. Finally the aims and characteristics of a European sponsored project, called PAGEIN, are explained, which fits perfectly into the line of developments at RUS. The aim of the project is to experiment with future cooperative working modes of aerospace scientists in a high speed distributed supercomputing environment. Project results will have an impact on the development of real future scientific application environments. (orig./DG)

  3. Modelling reinforcement corrosion in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Geiker, Mette Rica; Stang, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    A physio-chemical model for the simulation of reinforcement corrosion in concrete struc-tures was developed. The model allows for simulation of initiation and subsequent propaga-tion of reinforcement corrosion. Corrosion is assumed to be initiated once a defined critical chloride threshold......, a numerical example is pre-sented, that illustrates the formation of corrosion cells as well as propagation of corrosion in a reinforced concrete structure....

  4. Simulation of maize growth under conservation farming in tropical environments.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroosnijder, L.; Kiepe, P.

    1998-01-01

    This book is written for students and researchers with a keen interest in the quantification of the field soil water balance in tropical environments and the effect of conservation farming on crop production. Part 1 deals with the potential production, i.e. crop growth under ample supply of water

  5. Improved climate risk simulations for rice in arid environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, van P.A.J.; Vries, de M.; Yoshida, H.; Saito, K.

    2015-01-01

    We integrated recent research on cardinal temperatures for phenology and early leaf growth, spikelet formation, early morning flowering, transpirational cooling, and heat- and cold-induced sterility into an existing to crop growth model ORYZA2000. We compared for an arid environment observed

  6. Simulation of indoor environment in low energy housing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vagiannis, Georgios; Knudsen, Henrik N.; Toftum, Jørn

    2012-01-01

    was selected and sensitivity analyses were conducted for the importance of occupancy, ventilation, window opening, and heat recovery efficiency. In particular occupancy and venting played significant roles for the indoor environment and energy consumption. It was also shown that with passive measures, but also...

  7. Study of technological features of tubular compressed concrete members in concreting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voskobiinyk Olena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The technological features of core concreting were analyzed as the main factor in ensuring of strength and reliability of compressed concrete-filled steel tubular (CFST members. We have conducted the analysis of existing concreting methods of CFST members. In this respect, the most dangerous types of possible technological defects of concrete core of CFST members are inhomogeneity along the height, voids, caverns, and concrete “weak spots”. The authors considered the influence of such technological factors of concreting: placeability, time, concrete mixture compaction method, concreting height on the concrete core strength of CFST members. Based on the experimental studies conducted we suggested the regression correlations for determining the concrete strength of CFST members of different length depending on the movability of concrete mixture and a time for its compaction. The authors performed the correlation analysis of technological factors of concreting on the strength of the concrete core. We carried out the comparison of data on the concrete core strength of CFST members, that were determined by non-destructive methods (sclerometer test results, ultrasonic method and direct compression strength tests. We experimentally proved that using movable mixtures with the slump of about 4 – 9 cm the overall variation coefficient of concrete core strength of CFST members along the height reaches nearly 13%. Based on the experimental studies conducted we suggested the guidelines on optimal regimes of concrete compaction during manufacturing CFST members at a construction site environment.

  8. Computer simulation of defect behavior under fusion irradiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muroga, T.; Ishino, S.

    1983-01-01

    To simulate defect behavior under irradiation, three kinds of cascade-annealing calculations have been carried out in alpha-iron using the codes MARLOWE, DAIQUIRI and their modifications. They are (1) cascade-annealing calculation with different masses of projectile, (2) defect drifting near dislocations after cascade production and (3) cascade-overlap calculation. The defect survival ratio is found to increase as decreasing mass of the projectile both after athermal close-pair recombination and after thermal annealing. It is shown that at moderate temperatures vacancy clustering is enhanced near dislocations. Cascade-overlap is found to decrease the defect survivability. In addition, the role of helium in vacancy clustering has been calculated in aluminium lattices and its effect is found to depend strongly on temperature, interstitials and the mobility of small clusters. These results correspond well to the experimental data and will be helpful for correlating between fusion and simulation irradiations. (orig.)

  9. 3D hybrid simulation of the Titan's plasma environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, Alexander; Sittler, Edward, Jr.; Hartle, Richard

    2007-11-01

    Titan plays an important role as a simulation laboratory for multiscale kinetic plasma processes which are key processes in space and laboratory plasmas. A development of multiscale combined numerical methods allows us to use more realistic plasma models at Titan. In this report, we describe a Particle-Ion--Fluid-Ion--Fluid--Electron method of kinetic ion-neutral simulation code. This method takes into account charge-exchange and photoionization processes. The model of atmosphere of Titan was based on a paper by Sittler, Hartle, Vinas et al., [2005]. The background ions H^+, O^+ and pickup ions H2^+, CH4^+ and N2^+ are described in a kinetic approximation, where the electrons are approximated as a fluid. In this report we study the coupling between background ions and pickup ions on the multiple space scales determined by the ion gyroradiis. The first results of such a simulation of the dynamics of ions near Titan are discussed in this report and compared with recent measurements made by the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS, [Hartle, Sittler et al., 2006]). E C Sittler Jr., R E Hartle, A F Vinas, R E Johnson, H T Smith and I Mueller-Wodarg, J. Geophys. Res., 110, A09302, 2005.R E Hartle, E C Sittler, F M Neubauer, R E Johnson, et al., Planet. Space Sci., 54, 1211, 2006.

  10. A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison

    2002-01-01

    This is the fifth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT41047. The goal of the project is to develop and demonstrate a computational workbench for simulating the performance of Vision 21 Power Plant Systems. Within the last quarter, our efforts have become focused on developing an improved workbench for simulating a gasifier based Vision 21 energyplex. To provide for interoperability of models developed under Vision 21 and other DOE programs, discussions have been held with DOE and other organizations developing plant simulator tools to review the possibility of establishing a common software interface or protocol to use when developing component models. A component model that employs the CCA protocol has successfully been interfaced to our CCA enabled workbench. To investigate the software protocol issue, DOE has selected a gasifier based Vision 21 energyplex configuration for use in testing and evaluating the impacts of different software interface methods. A Memo of Understanding with the Cooperative Research Centre for Coal in Sustainable Development (CCSD) in Australia has been completed that will enable collaborative research efforts on gasification issues. Preliminary results have been obtained for a CFD model of a pilot scale, entrained flow gasifier. A paper was presented at the Vision 21 Program Review Meeting at NETL (Morgantown) that summarized our accomplishments for Year One and plans for Year Two and Year Three

  11. Influence of reinforcement mesh configuration for improvement of concrete durability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chong-gen; Jin, Wei-liang; Mao, Jiang-hong; Zhang, Hua; Sun, Li-hao; Wei, Dong

    2017-10-01

    Steel bar in concrete structures under harsh environmental conditions, such as chlorine corrosion, seriously affects its service life. Bidirectional electromigration rehabilitation (BIEM) is a new method of repair technology for reinforced concrete structures in such chloride corrosion environments. By applying the BIEM, chloride ions can be removed from the concrete and the migrating corrosion inhibit can be moved to the steel surface. In conventional engineering, the concrete structure is often configured with a multi-layer steel mesh. However, the effect of the BIEM in such structures has not yet been investigated. In this paper, the relevant simulation test is carried out to study the migration law of chloride ions and the migrating corrosion inhibitor in a concrete specimen with complex steel mesh under different energizing modes. The results show that the efficiency of the BIEM increases 50% in both the monolayer steel mesh and the double-layer steel mesh. By using the single-sided BIEM, 87% of the chloride ions are removed from the steel surface. The different step modes can affect the chloride ion removal. The chloride ions within the range of the reinforcement protective cover are easier to be removed than those in the concrete between the two layers of steel mesh. However, the amount of migrating corrosion inhibitor is larger in the latter circumstances.

  12. Applied environmetrics. Simulation applied to the physical environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, T

    1988-02-01

    Environmetrics is the application of quantitative methods to all aspects of the social and natural environment. This includes forecasting, mathematical modelling, data analysis, and statistics. Applied Environmetrics as a discipline involves the analysis of environmental data through the use of packaged, or specially designed computer software. Two case studies of recent implementations of applied environmetrics within the Australian mining industry are dealt with. 3 figs., 5 refs.

  13. High performance computing network for cloud environment using simulators

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, N. Ajith; Hemalatha, M.

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing is the next generation computing. Adopting the cloud computing is like signing up new form of a website. The GUI which controls the cloud computing make is directly control the hardware resource and your application. The difficulty part in cloud computing is to deploy in real environment. Its' difficult to know the exact cost and it's requirement until and unless we buy the service not only that whether it will support the existing application which is available on traditional...

  14. Concrete domains

    OpenAIRE

    Kahn, G.; Plotkin, G.D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper introduces the theory of a particular kind of computation domains called concrete domains. The purpose of this theory is to find a satisfactory framework for the notions of coroutine computation and sequentiality of evaluation.

  15. Ultrasonic imaging in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribay, G.; Paris, O.; Rambach, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The third and final protection barrier confining nuclear reactors is usually a concrete containment structure. Monitoring the structural integrity of these barriers is critical in ensuring the safety of nuclear power plants. The Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) in France in collaboration with the French Atomic commission (CEA/LIST) has developed an ultrasonic phased-array technique capable of inspecting thick concrete walls. The non-destructive method is dedicated to detect cracks and bulk defects. Given the thickness of the structure (1.2 m) undergoing inspection and the heterogeneity of the concrete, the optimal frequency lies in the 50-300 kHz range. At these frequencies, the ultrasonic beam profiles are widespread (non-directive) with poor signal-to-noise ratio. Previous studies have shown the potential of using phased-array techniques (i.e., beam focusing and beam steering) in order to improve detection resolution and sizing accuracy. In this paper we present experimental studies performed with array up to 16 transducers working at 200 kHz. Experiments are carried out on representative concrete blocks containing artificial defects. One is a reinforced mock-up representative of the first reinforcing mesh of wall containment. Experimental results show that in spite of the reinforcement, artificial defects deep as half a meter can be detected. Reconstructed images resulting from phased array acquisitions on an artificial crack embedded in a concrete block are also presented and discussed. The presented method allows detecting oriented defects in concrete with improved signal to noise ratio and sensibility. A simulation model of the interaction of ultrasound with a heterogeneous medium like concrete is briefly commented. (authors)

  16. Offshore concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamas Pardo, M.; Carral Couce, L. M.

    2011-01-01

    proof that in certain cases the benefits to the steel tip the lance toward the concrete. concrete Gravity Baseplaforms type Con deep have been building since the first unit became operational in 1976, together with a few floating platforms, that in its geometry are similar to those made of steel (barges, semi-submersibles and TLP type platforms). Some of the concepts in concrete that are being emerging last years are floating and gravity base platforms for use as offshore LNG terminals and as offshore industrial plants. The life of these barges can be designed up to 200 years, as the floating Nkossabarge, so they con be a good alternative to the construction of these facilities an land, thus avoiding landfills on the coast that degrade the already punished coast in industrialized countries. the challenge is precisely to optimize their capital costs to complete for an offshore installation against a shore facility. The environment will undoubtedly benefit from this great challenge that lies ahead in the XXI century. (Author) 29 refs.

  17. Training and learning for crisis management using a virtual simulation/gaming environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walker, W.E.; Giddings, J.; Armstrong, S.

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in computers, networking, and telecommunications offer new opportunities for using simulation and gaming as methodological tools for improving crisis management. It has become easy to develop virtual environments to support games, to have players at distributed workstations

  18. An Open-Source Simulation Environment for Model-Based Engineering, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed work is a new spacecraft simulation environment for model-based engineering of flight algorithms and software. The goal is to provide a much faster way...

  19. The Use of Computer Simulation to Compare Student performance in Traditional versus Distance Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retta Guy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Simulations have been shown to be an effective tool in traditional learning environments; however, as distance learning grows in popularity, the need to examine simulation effectiveness in this environment has become paramount. A casual-comparative design was chosen for this study to determine whether students using a computer-based instructional simulation in hybrid and fully online environments learned better than traditional classroom learners. The study spans a period of 6 years beginning fall 2008 through spring 2014. The population studied was 281 undergraduate business students self-enrolled in a 200-level microcomputer application course. The overall results support previous studies in that computer simulations are most effective when used as a supplement to face-to-face lectures and in hybrid environments.

  20. A Virtual Simulation Environment for Lunar Rover: Framework and Key Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-chun Yang

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Lunar rover development involves a large amount of validation works in realistic operational conditions, including its mechanical subsystem and on-board software. Real tests require equipped rover platform and a realistic terrain. It is very time consuming and high cost. To improve the development efficiency, a rover simulation environment called RSVE that affords real time capabilities with high fidelity has been developed. It uses fractional Brown motion (fBm technique and statistical properties to generate lunar surface. Thus, various terrain models for simulation can be generated through changing several parameters. To simulate lunar rover evolving on natural and unstructured surface with high realism, the whole dynamics of the multi-body systems and complex interactions with soft ground is integrated in this environment. An example for path planning algorithm and controlling algorithm testing in this environment is tested. This simulation environment runs on PC or Silicon Graphics.

  1. A Virtual Simulation Environment for Lunar Rover: Framework and Key Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-chun Yang

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Lunar rover development involves a large amount of validation works in realistic operational conditions, including its mechanical subsystem and on-board software. Real tests require equipped rover platform and a realistic terrain. It is very time consuming and high cost. To improve the development efficiency, a rover simulation environment called RSVE that affords real time capabilities with high fidelity has been developed. It uses fractional Brown motion (fBm technique and statistical properties to generate lunar surface. Thus, various terrain models for simulation can be generated through changing several parameters. To simulate lunar rover evolving on natural and unstructured surface with high realism, the whole dynamics of the multi-body systems and complex interactions with soft ground is integrated in this environment. An example for path planning algorithm and controlling algorithm testing in this environment is tested. This simulation environment runs on PC or Silicon Graphics.

  2. Tutoring electronic troubleshooting in a simulated maintenance work environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gott, Sherrie P.

    1987-01-01

    A series of intelligent tutoring systems, or intelligent maintenance simulators, is being developed based on expert and novice problem solving data. A graded series of authentic troubleshooting problems provides the curriculum, and adaptive instructional treatments foster active learning in trainees who engage in extensive fault isolation practice and thus in conditionalizing what they know. A proof of concept training study involving human tutoring was conducted as a precursor to the computer tutors to assess this integrated, problem based approach to task analysis and instruction. Statistically significant improvements in apprentice technicians' troubleshooting efficiency were achieved after approximately six hours of training.

  3. Lithium-ion Battery Electrothermal Model, Parameter Estimation, and Simulation Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Orcioni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The market for lithium-ion batteries is growing exponentially. The performance of battery cells is growing due to improving production technology, but market request is growing even more rapidly. Modeling and characterization of single cells and an efficient simulation environment is fundamental for the development of an efficient battery management system. The present work is devoted to defining a novel lumped electrothermal circuit of a single battery cell, the extraction procedure of the parameters of the single cell from experiments, and a simulation environment in SystemC-WMS for the simulation of a battery pack. The electrothermal model of the cell was validated against experimental measurements obtained in a climatic chamber. The model is then used to simulate a 48-cell battery, allowing statistical variations among parameters. The different behaviors of the cells in terms of state of charge, current, voltage, or heat flow rate can be observed in the results of the simulation environment.

  4. MathModelica - An Extensible Modeling and Simulation Environment with Integrated Graphics and Literate Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Fritzson, Peter; Gunnarsson, Johan; Jirstrand, Mats

    2002-01-01

    MathModelica is an integrated interactive development environment for advanced system modeling and simulation. The environment integrates Modelica-based modeling and simulation with graphic design, advanced scripting facilities, integration of program code, test cases, graphics, documentation, mathematical type setting, and symbolic formula manipulation provided via Mathematica. The user interface consists of a graphical Model Editor and Notebooks. The Model Editor is a graphical user interfa...

  5. Fatigue cracking of alloy 600 in simulated steam generator crevice environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogundele, G.; Lepik, O.

    1998-01-01

    Investigations were carried out to generate fatigue life (S-N) and near-threshold fatigue crack propagation (da/dN) data to determine the environmental influence on fatigue behavior for Alloy 600 in air, deionized water and in simulated Bruce Nuclear Generating Station 'A' crevice environments under appropriate loading conditions. In the low cycle fatigue regime, the simulated crevice environment did not affect the fatigue life of Alloy 600 under the applied loading conditions. The near-threshold fatigue crack growth rates of Alloy 600 in the simulated crevice environment were significantly lower compared to either pure water or air environments and is believed to be the result of higher crack closure in the crevice environment. (author)

  6. Self-Placing Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    Certain concrete pours have areas where the congestion of reinforcing bars make placement of concrete almost impossible. Using conventional placing and vibration techniques, the resulting concrete can have considerable honeycombing due to the development of voids. Self-placing concrete is a possible solution to the problem. Also known as self-compactable concrete, self-consolidating concrete, flowable concrete, and non-vibration concrete. These concretes eliminate the need for vibration in a ...

  7. Simulation of worst-case operating conditions for integrated circuits operating in a total dose environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhuva, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Degradations in the circuit performance created by the radiation exposure of integrated circuits are so unique and abnormal that thorough simulation and testing of VLSI circuits is almost impossible, and new ways to estimate the operating performance in a radiation environment must be developed. The principal goal of this work was the development of simulation techniques for radiation effects on semiconductor devices. The mixed-mode simulation approach proved to be the most promising. The switch-level approach is used to identify the failure mechanisms and critical subcircuits responsible for operational failure along with worst-case operating conditions during and after irradiation. For precise simulations of critical subcircuits, SPICE is used. The identification of failure mechanisms enables the circuit designer to improve the circuit's performance and failure-exposure level. Identification of worst-case operating conditions during and after irradiation reduces the complexity of testing VLSI circuits for radiation environments. The results of test circuits for failure simulations using a conventional simulator and the new simulator showed significant time savings using the new simulator. The savings in simulation time proved to be circuit topology-dependent. However, for large circuits, the simulation time proved to be orders of magnitude smaller than simulation time for conventional simulators

  8. Retention Capability of Local Backfill Materials 1-Simulated Disposal Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghattas, N.K.; Eskander, S.B.; El-Adham, K.A.; Mahmoud, N.S.

    2001-01-01

    In Egypt, a shallow ground disposal facility was the chosen option for the disposal of low and and intermediate radioactive wastes. The impact of the waste disposal facility on the environment depends on the nature of the barriers, which intend to limit and control contaminant migration. Owing to their physical, chemical and mechanical characteristics. Local soil materials were studied to illustrate the role of the back fill as part of an optimized safety multi-barrier system, which can provide the required level of protection of the environment and meet economic and regulatory requirements. A theoretical model was proposed to calculate the transport phenomena through the backfill materials. The credibility and validity of the proposed model was checked by the experimental results obtained from a three-arms arrangement system. The obtained data for the distribution coefficient (K d ) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (D a ) were in good agreement with those previously obtained in the literatures. Taking in consideration the prevailing initial conditions, the data calculated by the theoretical model applied show a reasonable agreement with the results obtained from experimental work. Prediction of radioactive cesium migration through the backfill materials using the proposed model was performed as a function of distance. The results obtained show that after 100 years, a fraction not exceeding 1E-9 of the original activity could be detected at 1m distance away from the waste material

  9. Application of numerical simulation to study the behavior of deep beams of reinforced concrete; Aplicacion de la simulacion numerica al estudio del comportamiento de vigas de gran peralto de hormigon armado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Plasencia, G.; Douglas Bonilla Rocha, J.; Hernandez Santana, J. J.

    2012-07-01

    In this investigation a preliminary study is carried out of the behaviour of deep beams of reinforced concrete under static loads with the prevalence of the shear force, starting from the numerical simulation of the experimental studies. A bilinear model is considered for steel and the Drucker-Prager model is considered for concrete. ABAQUS (2008) is utilized to model the deep beams test. the numerical results obtained have goad correspondence with the experimental values; this fact demonstrates the validity and effectiveness of the Finite element Method for the study of the behaviour of deep beams of reinforced concrete. Moreover, taking advantage of the benefits of numerical simulation, the stress states are analysed through the stress iso lines and iso zones obtained. Also parameters that are decisive in the tension-deformational behaviour of these types of structures are numerically analysed. (Author) 19 refs.

  10. Computer simulation of population dynamics inside the urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, A. S.; Inovenkov, I. N.; Echkina, E. Yu.; Nefedov, V. V.; Ponomarenko, L. S.; Tikhomirov, V. V.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper using a mathematical model of the so-called “space-dynamic” approach we investigate the problem of development and temporal dynamics of different urban population groups. For simplicity we consider an interaction of only two population groups inside a single urban area with axial symmetry. This problem can be described qualitatively by a system of two non-stationary nonlinear differential equations of the diffusion type with boundary conditions of the third type. The results of numerical simulations show that with a suitable choice of the diffusion coefficients and interaction functions between different population groups we can receive different scenarios of population dynamics: from complete displacement of one population group by another (originally more “aggressive”) to the “peaceful” situation of co-existence of them together.

  11. Computer simulations of polymers in a confined environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikorski, Andrzej; Romiszowski, Piotr

    2007-01-01

    A coarse-grained model of star-branched polymers confined in a slit formed by two parallel impenetrable surfaces, which were attractive for polymer segments, was developed and studied. The model chains were regular stars consisting of f = 3 branches of equal length. The flexible chains were constructed of united atoms (segments) and were restricted to vertices of a simple cubic lattice. Good solvent conditions were modelled and, thus, the macromolecules interacted only with the excluded volume. The properties of the model chains were determined by means of Monte Carlo simulations with a sampling algorithm based on the local changes of conformation of the chains. It appeared that the strongly adsorbed chains located in slits of appropriate width could swap between both confining surfaces. The influence of the chain length, width of the slit and the temperature on the frequency of such jumps was studied. The mechanism of the chain motion is also discussed

  12. Behavioral finance and games: simulations in the academic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Marcia Martins Fittipaldi Torga

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The contribution from this study lies in its reflection on the factors that influence market efficiency, which requires a multidisciplinary view to analyze the intervening factors that impact results of the financial system. It also contributes by reflecting on the need for new approaches for training professionals who will go on to work in financial and related areas and preparing them by using different financial analysis techniques; by reflecting on the fact that analytical practices are influenced by social, cognitive, and emotional aspects, enabling the students to be better prepared to act in the financial market; by presenting various technical possibilities and providing more comprehensive knowledge to choose the one that best suits the object of analysis and their preferences; and by reflecting on different ways of perceiving investment opportunities and risk, which can be expanded on in other studies on the segmentation of clients according to their preferences in the investor market. The aim of this study was to analyze how social and psychological aspects influenced the decisions involved in simulated trading operations. The relevance lies in its discussion of the philosophical and epistemological position in finance, which suffers from a vision that only focuses on the rationality of means and does not explain the anomalies verified in the financial market. The study originated from the application of a company game simulating the work of stock market trading desk operators, applied in the Stock Market Operations course and using fundamental, technical, and graphical techniques. The population was intentional and made up of undergraduate and graduate students from one of the four best Brazilian federal universities. The data analysis was performed by analyzing the content of the questionnaires applied and the journal entries made during participant observation.

  13. D-VASim: An Interactive Virtual Laboratory Environment for the Simulation and Analysis of Genetic Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baig, Hasan; Madsen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    runtime. The runtime interaction gives the user a feeling of being in the lab performing a real world experiment. In this work, we present a user-friendly software tool named D-VASim (Dynamic Virtual Analyzer and Simulator), which provides a virtual laboratory environment to simulate and analyze...

  14. Using Blackboard Wiki Pages as a Shared Space for Simulating the Professional Translation Work Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vine, Juliet

    2015-01-01

    The Work-Integrated Simulation for Translators module is part of a three year undergraduate degree in translation. The semester long module aims to simulate several aspects of the translation process using the Blackboard virtual learning environment's Wikis as the interface for completing translation tasks. For each translation task, one of the…

  15. Optimizing NEURON Simulation Environment Using Remote Memory Access with Recursive Doubling on Distributed Memory Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Shehzad, Danish; Bozkuş, Zeki

    2016-01-01

    Increase in complexity of neuronal network models escalated the efforts to make NEURON simulation environment efficient. The computational neuroscientists divided the equations into subnets amongst multiple processors for achieving better hardware performance. On parallel machines for neuronal networks, interprocessor spikes exchange consumes large section of overall simulation time. In NEURON for communication between processors Message Passing Interface (MPI) is used. MPI_Allgather collecti...

  16. Intelligent manufacturing through participation : a participative simulation environment for integral manufacturing enterprise renewal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijnatten, F.M. van

    2002-01-01

    This book deals with a 'Participative Simulation environment for Intelligent Manufacturing' (PSIM). PSIM is a software environment for use in assembly operations and it is developed and pilot-demonstrated in five companies: Volvo (Sweden), Finland Post, Fiat (Italy), Yamatake (Japan), Ford (USA).

  17. Application of computational fluid dynamics in building performance simulation for the outdoor environment: an overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blocken, B.J.E.; Stathopoulos, T.; Carmeliet, J.; Hensen, J.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the application of CFD in building performance simulation for the outdoor environment, focused on four topics: (1) pedestrian wind environment around buildings, (2) wind-driven rain on building facades, (3) convective heat transfer coefficients at exterior building

  18. The Potential of Simulated Environments in Teacher Education: Current and Future Possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieker, Lisa A.; Rodriguez, Jacqueline A.; Lignugaris/Kraft, Benjamin; Hynes, Michael C.; Hughes, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    The future of virtual environments is evident in many fields but is just emerging in the field of teacher education. In this article, the authors provide a summary of the evolution of simulation in the field of teacher education and three factors that need to be considered as these environments further develop. The authors provide a specific…

  19. Properties of concrete containing foamed concrete block waste as fine aggregate replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthusamy, K.; Budiea, A. M. A.; Zaidan, A. L. F.; Rasid, M. H.; Hazimmah, D. S.

    2017-11-01

    Environmental degradation due to excessive sand mining dumping at certain places and disposal of foamed concrete block waste from lightweight concrete producing industry are issues that should be resolved for a better and cleaner environment of the community. Thus, the main intention of this study is to investigate the potential of foamed concrete block waste as partial sand replacement in concrete production. The foamed concrete waste (FCW) used in this research that were supplied by a local lightweight concrete producing industry. The workability and compressive strength of concrete containing various percentage of foamed concrete waste as partial sand replacement has been investigated. Prior to the use, the foamed concrete waste were crushed to produce finer particles. Six concrete mixes containing various content of crushed foamed concrete waste that are 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% were used in this experimental work. Then the prepared specimens were placed in water curing until the testing age. Compressive strength test and flexural strength tests were conducted at 7, 14 and 28 days. The result shows that integration of crushed foamed concrete waste as partial sand replacement in concrete reduces the mix workability. It is interesting to note that both compressive strength and flexural strength of concrete improves when 30% crushed foamed concrete waste is added as partial sand replacement.

  20. Learner-Centered Instruction (LCI): Volume IV, The Simulated Maintenance Task Environment (SMTE): A Job Specific Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifkin, Kenneth I.; And Others

    The purpose of the simulated maintenance task environment is to provide a means for training and job performance testing of the flight line weapon control systems mechanic/technician for the F-111A aircraft. It provides practice in flight line equipment checkout, troubleshooting, and removal and replacement of line replaceable units in the…

  1. Corrosion behavior of reinforcing steel in concrete for nuclear facilities exposed in high chloride and low pH environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Toshiyasu; Raman, Vedarajan

    2010-01-01

    The Cl ion concentration and pH were monitored by inserting micro-electrodes into artificial pores in the mortar which was exposed in 0.5 mol/l chloride solution (pH 4.0). At the same time, the electrochemical behavior of the reinforcing steel was investigated by EIS. The Cl ion concentration in the mortar was obtained using Ag/AgCl micro-electrodes, showing that this behavior is generally controlled by diffusion. When the diffusion equation was used in this work, the diffusion coefficient (D c ) showed a high value of D c = 9.5 x 10 -5 mm 2 /s. Similarly, the pH in the mortar was obtained using W/WO x micro-electrodes. With a 10 mm cover thickness, pH continued to decrease to pH 8.0, which was considered by penetration of H + ions from the surface. Based on the results of monitoring with the micro-electrodes, solutions simulating those in the pores in mortar were prepared and used in EIS measurements. The charge transfer resistance R ct in the simulated solutions showed good correspondence with the impedance Z (Z 1mHz -Z sol ) in the actual mortar. This is attributed to the fact that the corrosion of reinforcing steel was controlled by the solution conditions (mainly Cl concentration and pH) in the pores in mortar.

  2. Real-Time and High-Fidelity Simulation Environment for Autonomous Ground Vehicle Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Jonathan; Myint, Steven; Kuo, Calvin; Jain, Abhi; Grip, Havard; Jayakumar, Paramsothy; Overholt, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a collaborative project between U.S. Army TARDEC and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to develop a unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) simulation model using the ROAMS vehicle modeling framework. Besides modeling the physical suspension of the vehicle, the sensing and navigation of the HMMWV vehicle are simulated. Using models of urban and off-road environments, the HMMWV simulation was tested in several ways, including navigation in an urban environment with obstacle avoidance and the performance of a lane change maneuver.

  3. Gas leakage rate through reinforced concrete shear walls: Numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ting; Hutchinson, Tara C.

    2005-01-01

    Unlined reinforced concrete shear walls are often used as 'tertiary boundaries' in the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to house dangerous gases. An unanticipated event, such as an earthquake, may cause gases stored inside the walls to disperse into the environment resulting in excess pollution. To address this concern, in this paper, a methodology to numerically predict the gas leakage rate through these shear walls under lateral loading conditions is proposed. This methodology involves finite element and flow rate analysis. Strain distributions are obtained from the finite element analysis, and then used to simulate the crack characteristics on the concrete specimen. The flow rate through the damaged concrete specimen is then estimated using flow rate formulas available from the literature. Results from an experimental specimen are used to evaluate the methodology, and particularly its robustness in the flow rate estimation

  4. Monitoring, Modeling, and Diagnosis of Alkali-Silica Reaction in Small Concrete Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Vivek [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cai, Guowei [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gribok, Andrei V. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mahadevan, Sankaran [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear power plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code margins of safety. Structural health monitoring of concrete structures aims to understand the current health condition of a structure based on heterogeneous measurements to produce high-confidence actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. This report describes alkali-silica reaction (ASR) degradation mechanisms and factors influencing the ASR. A fully coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical model developed by Saouma and Perotti by taking into consideration the effects of stress on the reaction kinetics and anisotropic volumetric expansion is presented in this report. This model is implemented in the GRIZZLY code based on the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment. The implemented model in the GRIZZLY code is randomly used to initiate ASR in a 2D and 3D lattice to study the percolation aspects of concrete. The percolation aspects help determine the transport properties of the material and therefore the durability and service life of concrete. This report summarizes the effort to develop small-size concrete samples with embedded glass to mimic ASR. The concrete samples were treated in water and sodium hydroxide solution at elevated temperature to study how ingress of sodium ions and hydroxide ions at elevated temperature impacts concrete samples embedded with glass. Thermal camera was used to monitor the changes in the concrete sample and results are summarized.

  5. A comparison of the accuracy of intraoral scanners using an intraoral environment simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Nan; Lim, Young-Jun; Yi, Won-Jin; Han, Jung-Suk; Lee, Seung-Pyo

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to design an intraoral environment simulator and to assess the accuracy of two intraoral scanners using the simulator. A box-shaped intraoral environment simulator was designed to simulate two specific intraoral environments. The cast was scanned 10 times by Identica Blue (MEDIT, Seoul, South Korea), TRIOS (3Shape, Copenhagen, Denmark), and CS3500 (Carestream Dental, Georgia, USA) scanners in the two simulated groups. The distances between the left and right canines (D3), first molars (D6), second molars (D7), and the left canine and left second molar (D37) were measured. The distance data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test. The differences in intraoral environments were not statistically significant ( P >.05). Between intraoral scanners, statistically significant differences ( P Kruskal-Wallis test with regard to D3 and D6. No difference due to the intraoral environment was revealed. The simulator will contribute to the higher accuracy of intraoral scanners in the future.

  6. Repeated Induction of Inattentional Blindness in a Simulated Aviation Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Kellie D.; Stephens, Chad L.; Williams, Ralph A.; Schutte, Paul C.

    2017-01-01

    The study reported herein is a subset of a larger investigation on the role of automation in the context of the flight deck and used a fixed-based, human-in-the-loop simulator. This paper explored the relationship between automation and inattentional blindness (IB) occurrences in a repeated induction paradigm using two types of runway incursions. The critical stimuli for both runway incursions were directly relevant to primary task performance. Sixty non-pilot participants performed the final five minutes of a landing scenario twice in one of three automation conditions: full automation (FA), partial automation (PA), and no automation (NA). The first induction resulted in a 70 percent (42 of 60) detection failure rate with those in the PA condition significantly more likely to detect the incursion compared to the FA condition or the NA condition. The second induction yielded a 50 percent detection failure rate. Although detection improved (detection failure rates declined) in all conditions, those in the FA condition demonstrated the greatest improvement with doubled detection rates. The detection behavior in the first trial did not preclude a failed detection in the second induction. Group membership (IB vs. Detection) in the FA condition showed a greater improvement than those in the NA condition and rated the Mental Demand and Effort subscales of the NASA-TLX (NASA Task Load Index) significantly higher for Time 2 compared Time 1. Participants in the FA condition used the experience of IB exposure to improve task performance whereas those in the NA condition did not, indicating the availability and reallocation of attentional resources in the FA condition. These findings support the role of engagement in operational attention detriment and the consideration of attentional failure causation to determine appropriate mitigation strategies.

  7. Reliability Verification of DBE Environment Simulation Test Facility by using Statistics Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Kyung Nam; Kim, Jong Soeg; Jeong, Sun Chul; Kyung Heum

    2011-01-01

    In the nuclear power plant, all the safety-related equipment including cables under the harsh environment should perform the equipment qualification (EQ) according to the IEEE std 323. There are three types of qualification methods including type testing, operating experience and analysis. In order to environmentally qualify the safety-related equipment using type testing method, not analysis or operation experience method, the representative sample of equipment, including interfaces, should be subjected to a series of tests. Among these tests, Design Basis Events (DBE) environment simulating test is the most important test. DBE simulation test is performed in DBE simulation test chamber according to the postulated DBE conditions including specified high-energy line break (HELB), loss of coolant accident (LOCA), main steam line break (MSLB) and etc, after thermal and radiation aging. Because most DBE conditions have 100% humidity condition, in order to trace temperature and pressure of DBE condition, high temperature steam should be used. During DBE simulation test, if high temperature steam under high pressure inject to the DBE test chamber, the temperature and pressure in test chamber rapidly increase over the target temperature. Therefore, the temperature and pressure in test chamber continue fluctuating during the DBE simulation test to meet target temperature and pressure. We should ensure fairness and accuracy of test result by confirming the performance of DBE environment simulation test facility. In this paper, in order to verify reliability of DBE environment simulation test facility, statistics method is used

  8. Design and testing of tubular polymeric capsules for self-healing of concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, M.; Van Tittelboom, K.; Feiteira, J.; Gruyaert, E.; Chatrabhuti, S.; Raquez, J.-M.; Šavija, B.; Alderete, N.; Schlangen, E.; De Belie, N.

    2017-10-01

    Polymeric healing agents have proven their efficiency to heal cracks in concrete in an autonomous way. However, the bottleneck for valorisation of self-healing concrete with polymeric healing agents is their encapsulation. In the present work, the suitability of polymeric materials such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polystyrene (PS) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) as carriers for healing agents in self-healing concrete has been evaluated. The durability of the polymeric capsules in different environments (demineralized water, salt water and simulated concrete pore solution) and their compatibility with various healing agents have been assessed. Next, a numerical model was used to simulate capsule rupture when intersected by a crack in concrete and validated experimentally. Finally, two real-scale self-healing concrete beams were made, containing the selected polymeric capsules (with the best properties regarding resistance to concrete mixing and breakage upon crack formation) or glass capsules and a reference beam without capsules. The self-healing efficiency was determined after crack creation by 3-point-bending tests.

  9. Virtual X-ray imaging techniques in an immersive casting simulation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ning; Kim, Sung-Hee; Suh, Ji-Hyun; Cho, Sang-Hyun; Choi, Jung-Gil; Kim, Myoung-Hee

    2007-01-01

    A computer code was developed to simulate radiograph of complex casting products in a CAVE TM -like environment. The simulation is based on the deterministic algorithms and ray tracing techniques. The aim of this study is to examine CAD/CAE/CAM models at the design stage, to optimize the design and inspect predicted defective regions with fast speed, good accuracy and small numerical expense. The present work discusses the algorithms for the radiography simulation of CAD/CAM model and proposes algorithmic solutions adapted from ray-box intersection algorithm and octree data structure specifically for radiographic simulation of CAE model. The stereoscopic visualization of full-size of product in the immersive casting simulation environment as well as the virtual X-ray images of castings provides an effective tool for design and evaluation of foundry processes by engineers and metallurgists

  10. Elastic-plastic constitutive modeling of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Y.

    1983-03-01

    The need to understand concrete behavior under high temperatures in the nuclear industry has become rather accute. For this purpose, a constitutive model of concrete especially developed for this severe environment is indispensable. This report reviews the presently available constitutive models of concrete at standard-temperature conditions and considers their advantages and drawbacks. A rather simple but effective approach is selected to treat concrete behavior at high temperatures. Special emphasis is devoted to the modeling of concrete up to and including failure. The derived constitutive model is checked with biaxial and triaxial benchmark experimental results. Very good agreement is obtained

  11. Concrete durability

    OpenAIRE

    Gaspar Tébar, Demetrio

    1991-01-01

    The evidence that the concrete is not a material for ever was noticed from the beginning of its industrial use. In the present work, the author describes the studies carried out during the last century and the early ages of the present one, mainly devoted to the study of the durability in sea water. At the present days, and in spite of the numerous papers published from then, the study of the concrete durability continues focusing the research priorities and economical resources of rese...

  12. Simulation of sustainability aspects within the industrial environment and their implication on the simulation technique

    OpenAIRE

    Rabe, M.; Jäkel, F.-W.; Weinaug, H.

    2010-01-01

    Simulation is a broadly excepted analytic instrument and planning tool. Today, industrial simulation is mainly applied for engineering and physical purposes and covers a short time horizon compared to intergenerational justice. In parallel, sustainability is gaining more importance for the industrial planning because themes like global warming, child labour, and compliance with social and environmental standards have to be taken into account. Sustainability is characterized by comprehensively...

  13. MaGate Simulator: A Simulation Environment for a Decentralized Grid Scheduler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ye; Brocco, Amos; Courant, Michele; Hirsbrunner, Beat; Kuonen, Pierre

    This paper presents a simulator for of a decentralized modular grid scheduler named MaGate. MaGate’s design emphasizes scheduler interoperability by providing intelligent scheduling serving the grid community as a whole. Each MaGate scheduler instance is able to deal with dynamic scheduling conditions, with continuously arriving grid jobs. Received jobs are either allocated on local resources, or delegated to other MaGates for remote execution. The proposed MaGate simulator is based on GridSim toolkit and Alea simulator, and abstracts the features and behaviors of complex fundamental grid elements, such as grid jobs, grid resources, and grid users. Simulation of scheduling tasks is supported by a grid network overlay simulator executing distributed ant-based swarm intelligence algorithms to provide services such as group communication and resource discovery. For evaluation, a comparison of behaviors of different collaborative policies among a community of MaGates is provided. Results support the use of the proposed approach as a functional ready grid scheduler simulator.

  14. Historic Concrete : From Concrete Repair to Concrete Conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinemann, H.A.

    2013-01-01

    Concrete like materials were already applied during the Roman Empire. After the decline of the Roman Empire, a wide scale application of concrete only reappeared in the 19th century. Here lies also the origin of modern (reinforced) concrete. Since then, both concrete application and composition have

  15. Comportement du béton à l'eau de mer. Synthèse bibliographique Concrete Behavior in Marine Environment. a Review Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesage J.

    2006-11-01

    énéral y remédier, puisque certaines structures en béton ont été immergées plus de cinquante ans sans dommages. Ce qui est encore mal connu, bien que des publications commencent à apparaitre sur le sujet, c'est le comportement du béton à la fatigue en milieu marin. Il est clair que les expérimentations dans ce domaine présentent un grand intérêt pour les réalisations futures de structures off-shore. Recently, concrete structures have become a popular design alternativeto traditional steel structures, especially in rough secs such as in the case of the North Sea. This is why it seems pertinant to understand concrete behavior in a marine environment. The most important problems were found to be in the tidal range arec : mechanical stresses, permeability, freezing and thawing. Most of these have been solved by using highly resistant structures, by the choice of structural forms and by using high quality concrete of low permeability and adequate workability.

  16. Generation of large scale urban environments to support advanced sensor and seeker simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Joseph; Hershey, Daniel; McKeown, David, Jr.; Willis, Carla; Van, Tan

    2009-05-01

    One of the key aspects for the design of a next generation weapon system is the need to operate in cluttered and complex urban environments. Simulation systems rely on accurate representation of these environments and require automated software tools to construct the underlying 3D geometry and associated spectral and material properties that are then formatted for various objective seeker simulation systems. Under an Air Force Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) contract, we have developed an automated process to generate 3D urban environments with user defined properties. These environments can be composed from a wide variety of source materials, including vector source data, pre-existing 3D models, and digital elevation models, and rapidly organized into a geo-specific visual simulation database. This intermediate representation can be easily inspected in the visible spectrum for content and organization and interactively queried for accuracy. Once the database contains the required contents, it can then be exported into specific synthetic scene generation runtime formats, preserving the relationship between geometry and material properties. To date an exporter for the Irma simulation system developed and maintained by AFRL/Eglin has been created and a second exporter to Real Time Composite Hardbody and Missile Plume (CHAMP) simulation system for real-time use is currently being developed. This process supports significantly more complex target environments than previous approaches to database generation. In this paper we describe the capabilities for content creation for advanced seeker processing algorithms simulation and sensor stimulation, including the overall database compilation process and sample databases produced and exported for the Irma runtime system. We also discuss the addition of object dynamics and viewer dynamics within the visual simulation into the Irma runtime environment.

  17. Analysis of the effects of simulated synergistic LEO environment on solar panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegri, G.; Corradi, S.; Marchetti, M.; Scaglione, S.

    2007-02-01

    The effects due to the LEO environment exposure of a solar array primary structure are here presented and discussed in detail. The synergistic damaging components featuring LEO environment are high vacuum, thermal cycling, neutral gas, ultraviolet (UV) radiation and cold plasma. The synergistic effects due to these environmental elements are simulated by "on ground" tests, performed in the Space Environment Simulator (SAS) at the University of Rome "La Sapienza"; numerical simulations are performed by the Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS), developed by the European Space Agency (ESA). A "safe life" design for a solar array primary structure is developed, taking into consideration the combined damaging action of the LEO environment components; therefore results from both numerical and experimental simulations are coupled within the framework of a standard finite element method (FEM) based design. The expected durability of the solar array primary structure, made of laminated sandwich composite, is evaluated assuming that the loads exerted on the structure itself are essentially dependent on thermo-elastic stresses. The optical degradation of surface materials and the stiffness and strength degradation of structural elements are taken into account to assess the global structural durability of the solar array under characteristic operative conditions in LEO environment.

  18. Capability of GGBS concrete exposed to sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salihuddin Radin Sumadi; Rosli Hamir; Abu Bakar Mohamad Diah

    1999-01-01

    This paper reported studies the penetration of chloride into ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS) concrete with exposure on marine environment. Test were conducted on ordinary portland cement (OPC) concrete and 60% (by weight) of OPC replaced GGBS (S-60). The specimens immersed in sea water were tested for chloride penetration. The results show that higher replacement level of GGBS in concrete significantly reduce the chloride content in concrete. The results also show that chloride concentration decreases with increasing depth into concrete. (author)

  19. Interactive Learning Environment: Web-based Virtual Hydrological Simulation System using Augmented and Immersive Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, I.

    2014-12-01

    Recent developments in internet technologies make it possible to manage and visualize large data on the web. Novel visualization techniques and interactive user interfaces allow users to create realistic environments, and interact with data to gain insight from simulations and environmental observations. The hydrological simulation system is a web-based 3D interactive learning environment for teaching hydrological processes and concepts. The simulation systems provides a visually striking platform with realistic terrain information, and water simulation. Students can create or load predefined scenarios, control environmental parameters, and evaluate environmental mitigation alternatives. The web-based simulation system provides an environment for students to learn about the hydrological processes (e.g. flooding and flood damage), and effects of development and human activity in the floodplain. The system utilizes latest web technologies and graphics processing unit (GPU) for water simulation and object collisions on the terrain. Users can access the system in three visualization modes including virtual reality, augmented reality, and immersive reality using heads-up display. The system provides various scenarios customized to fit the age and education level of various users. This presentation provides an overview of the web-based flood simulation system, and demonstrates the capabilities of the system for various visualization and interaction modes.

  20. Probabilistic design of fibre concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukl, R.; Novák, D.; Sajdlová, T.; Lehký, D.; Červenka, J.; Červenka, V.

    2017-09-01

    Advanced computer simulation is recently well-established methodology for evaluation of resistance of concrete engineering structures. The nonlinear finite element analysis enables to realistically predict structural damage, peak load, failure, post-peak response, development of cracks in concrete, yielding of reinforcement, concrete crushing or shear failure. The nonlinear material models can cover various types of concrete and reinforced concrete: ordinary concrete, plain or reinforced, without or with prestressing, fibre concrete, (ultra) high performance concrete, lightweight concrete, etc. Advanced material models taking into account fibre concrete properties such as shape of tensile softening branch, high toughness and ductility are described in the paper. Since the variability of the fibre concrete material properties is rather high, the probabilistic analysis seems to be the most appropriate format for structural design and evaluation of structural performance, reliability and safety. The presented combination of the nonlinear analysis with advanced probabilistic methods allows evaluation of structural safety characterized by failure probability or by reliability index respectively. Authors offer a methodology and computer tools for realistic safety assessment of concrete structures; the utilized approach is based on randomization of the nonlinear finite element analysis of the structural model. Uncertainty of the material properties or their randomness obtained from material tests are accounted in the random distribution. Furthermore, degradation of the reinforced concrete materials such as carbonation of concrete, corrosion of reinforcement, etc. can be accounted in order to analyze life-cycle structural performance and to enable prediction of the structural reliability and safety in time development. The results can serve as a rational basis for design of fibre concrete engineering structures based on advanced nonlinear computer analysis. The presented

  1. Demonstration Of LEACHXS(trademark)/Orchestra Capabilities By Simulating Constituent Release From A Cementitious Waste Form In A Reinforced Concrete Vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C.; Meeussen, J.; Sloot, H.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the work described in this report is to demonstrate the capabilities of the current version of LeachXS(trademark)/ORCHESTRA for simulating chemical behavior and constituent release processes in a range of applications that are relevant to the CBP. This report illustrates the use of LeachXS(trademark)/ORCHESTRA for the following applications: (1) Comparing model and experimental results for leaching tests for a range of cementitious materials including cement mortars, grout, stabilized waste, and concrete. The leaching test data includes liquid-solid partitioning as a function of pH and release rates based on laboratory column, monolith, and field testing. (2) Modeling chemical speciation of constituents in cementitious materials, including liquid-solid partitioning and release rates. (3) Evaluating uncertainty in model predictions based on uncertainty in underlying composition, thermodynamic, and transport characteristics. (4) Generating predominance diagrams to evaluate predicted chemical changes as a result of material aging using the example of exposure to atmospheric conditions. (5) Modeling coupled geochemical speciation and diffusion in a three layer system consisting of a layer of Saltstone, a concrete barrier, and a layer of soil in contact with air. The simulations show developing concentration fronts over a time period of 1000 years. (6) Modeling sulfate attack and cracking due to ettringite formation. A detailed example for this case is provided in a separate article by the authors (Sarkar et al. 2010). Finally, based on the computed results, the sensitive input parameters for this type of modeling are identified and discussed. The chemical speciation behavior of substances is calculated for a batch system and also in combination with transport and within a three layer system. This includes release from a barrier to the surrounding soil as a function of time. As input for the simulations, the physical and chemical properties of the

  2. Physics-based statistical model and simulation method of RF propagation in urban environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pao, Hsueh-Yuan; Dvorak, Steven L.

    2010-09-14

    A physics-based statistical model and simulation/modeling method and system of electromagnetic wave propagation (wireless communication) in urban environments. In particular, the model is a computationally efficient close-formed parametric model of RF propagation in an urban environment which is extracted from a physics-based statistical wireless channel simulation method and system. The simulation divides the complex urban environment into a network of interconnected urban canyon waveguides which can be analyzed individually; calculates spectral coefficients of modal fields in the waveguides excited by the propagation using a database of statistical impedance boundary conditions which incorporates the complexity of building walls in the propagation model; determines statistical parameters of the calculated modal fields; and determines a parametric propagation model based on the statistical parameters of the calculated modal fields from which predictions of communications capability may be made.

  3. Using numeric simulation in an online e-learning environment to teach functional physiological contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Andreas; Thews, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Mathematical models are suitable to simulate complex biological processes by a set of non-linear differential equations. These simulation models can be used as an e-learning tool in medical education. However, in many cases these mathematical systems have to be treated numerically which is computationally intensive. The aim of the study was to develop a system for numerical simulation to be used in an online e-learning environment. In the software system the simulation is located on the server as a CGI application. The user (student) selects the boundary conditions for the simulation (e.g., properties of a simulated patient) on the browser. With these parameters the simulation on the server is started and the simulation result is re-transferred to the browser. With this system two examples of e-learning units were realized. The first one uses a multi-compartment model of the glucose-insulin control loop for the simulation of the plasma glucose level after a simulated meal or during diabetes (including treatment by subcutaneous insulin application). The second one simulates the ion transport leading to the resting and action potential in nerves. The student can vary parameters systematically to explore the biological behavior of the system. The described system is able to simulate complex biological processes and offers the possibility to use these models in an online e-learning environment. As far as the underlying principles can be described mathematically, this type of system can be applied to a broad spectrum of biomedical or natural scientific topics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Nuclear Power Plant Concrete Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Prabir [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Labbe, Pierre [Electricity of France (EDF); Naus, Dan [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2013-01-01

    A nuclear power plant (NPP) involves complex engineering structures that are significant items of the structures, systems and components (SSC) important to the safe and reliable operation of the NPP. Concrete is the commonly used civil engineering construction material in the nuclear industry because of a number of advantageous properties. The NPP concrete structures underwent a great degree of evolution, since the commissioning of first NPP in early 1960. The increasing concern with time related to safety of the public and environment, and degradation of concrete structures due to ageing related phenomena are the driving forces for such evolution. The concrete technology underwent rapid development with the advent of chemical admixtures of plasticizer/super plasticizer category as well as viscosity modifiers and mineral admixtures like fly ash and silica fume. Application of high performance concrete (HPC) developed with chemical and mineral admixtures has been witnessed in the construction of NPP structures. Along with the beneficial effect, the use of admixtures in concrete has posed a number of challenges as well in design and construction. This along with the prospect of continuing operation beyond design life, especially after 60 years, the impact of extreme natural events ( as in the case of Fukushima NPP accident) and human induced events (e.g. commercial aircraft crash like the event of September 11th 2001) has led to further development in the area of NPP concrete structures. The present paper aims at providing an account of evolution of NPP concrete structures in last two decades by summarizing the development in the areas of concrete technology, design methodology and construction techniques, maintenance and ageing management of concrete structures.

  5. Simulation-based computation of dose to humans in radiological environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breazeal, N.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Davis, K.R.; Watson, R.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vickers, D.S. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Ford, M.S. [Battelle Pantex, Amarillo, TX (United States). Dept. of Radiation Safety

    1996-03-01

    The Radiological Environment Modeling System (REMS) quantifies dose to humans working in radiological environments using the IGRIP (Interactive Graphical Robot Instruction Program) and Deneb/ERGO simulation software. These commercially available products are augmented with custom C code to provide radiation exposure information to, and collect radiation dose information from, workcell simulations. Through the use of any radiation transport code or measured data, a radiation exposure input database may be formulated. User-specified IGRIP simulations utilize these databases to compute and accumulate dose to programmable human models operating around radiation sources. Timing, distances, shielding, and human activity may be modeled accurately in the simulations. The accumulated dose is recorded in output files, and the user is able to process and view this output. The entire REMS capability can be operated from a single graphical user interface.

  6. Simulation-based computation of dose to humans in radiological environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breazeal, N.L.; Davis, K.R.; Watson, R.A.; Vickers, D.S.; Ford, M.S.

    1996-03-01

    The Radiological Environment Modeling System (REMS) quantifies dose to humans working in radiological environments using the IGRIP (Interactive Graphical Robot Instruction Program) and Deneb/ERGO simulation software. These commercially available products are augmented with custom C code to provide radiation exposure information to, and collect radiation dose information from, workcell simulations. Through the use of any radiation transport code or measured data, a radiation exposure input database may be formulated. User-specified IGRIP simulations utilize these databases to compute and accumulate dose to programmable human models operating around radiation sources. Timing, distances, shielding, and human activity may be modeled accurately in the simulations. The accumulated dose is recorded in output files, and the user is able to process and view this output. The entire REMS capability can be operated from a single graphical user interface

  7. Multiple wavelength spectral system simulating background light noise environment in satellite laser communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Sun, Jianfeng; Hou, Peipei; Xu, Qian; Xi, Yueli; Zhou, Yu; Zhu, Funan; Liu, Liren

    2017-08-01

    Performance of satellite laser communications between GEO and LEO satellites can be influenced by background light noise appeared in the field of view due to sunlight or planets and some comets. Such influences should be studied on the ground testing platform before the space application. In this paper, we introduce a simulator that can simulate the real case of background light noise in space environment during the data talking via laser beam between two lonely satellites. This simulator can not only simulate the effect of multi-wavelength spectrum, but also the effects of adjustable angles of field-of-view, large range of adjustable optical power and adjustable deflection speeds of light noise in space environment. We integrate these functions into a device with small and compact size for easily mobile use. Software control function is also achieved via personal computer to adjust these functions arbitrarily. Keywords:

  8. Corrosion of metal materials embedded in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffo, G.S.; Farina, S.B.; Schulz, F.M.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon steel is the material most frequently used to strengthen reinforced concrete structures; however, stainless steel and galvanized steel reinforcements are also used in construction concretes; and they are not often used in Latin America. Meanwhile, there are other metals that are embedded in the concrete forming part of the openings (aluminum) or in tubing systems (copper and lead). The use of concrete as a cementing material is also useful for immobilizing wastes, such as for example those generated by the nuclear industry. There is a great deal of research and development on the corrosion of steel reinforcements, but the same is not true for the behavior of other metals embedded in concrete and that also undergo corrosive processes. This work aims to study the corrosion of different metals: copper, lead, aluminum, zinc, stainless steel and carbon steel; embedded in concrete with and without the presence of aggressive species for the metal materials. Test pieces were made of mortar containing rods of different materials for testing, and with chlorides added in concentrations of 0; 0.3 % and 1% (mass of chloride per mass of cement). The test pieces were exposed to different conditions; laboratory environment with a relative humidity (RH) of 45%, a controlled atmosphere with 98% RH and submerged in a solution of 3.5% NaCl. The susceptibility to corrosion of the different metals was evaluated using techniques to monitor the corrosion potential, the resistivity of the mortar and the polarization resistance (PR). The rods were weighed before being placed inside the test pieces to later determine the loss of weight generated by the corrosion process. Polarization curves for the metals were also traced in a simulated pore solution (SPS) and in SPS with added chloride. The results obtained to date show that, of all the metals analyzed, aluminum is the most susceptible to corrosion, and that the test specimens with 0% and 1% of chloride exposed to the laboratory

  9. Hardware in the loop radar environment simulation on wideband DRFM platforms

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Strydom, JJ

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available @csir.co.za, dnaiker@csir.co.za, kolivier@csir.co.za Keywords: DRFM, ECM, Complex Targets, Clutter, HIL, radar environment, simulation. Abstract This paper describes the development and testing of a digital radio frequency memory (DRFM) kernel, as well... as follows: Section 2 describes the design of a high performance DRFM kernel. Section 3 describes the integration of this kernel into a radar environment simulator system. Sections 4, 5 and 6 then present the generation of realistic targets, ECM...

  10. New Fiber Reinforced Waterless Concrete for Extraterrestrial Structural Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutanji, H.; Tucker, D.; Ethridge, E.

    2005-01-01

    Commercial use of sulfur concrete on Earth is well established, particularly in corrosive, e.g., acid and salt, environments. Having found troilite (FeS) on the Moon raises the question of using extracted sulfur as a lunar construction mate: iii an attractive alternative to conventional concrete as it does not require water For the purpose of this paper it is assumed that lunar ore is mined, refined, and the raw sulfur processed with appropriate lunar regolith to form, for example, brick and beam elements. Glass fibers produced from regolith were used as a reinforcement to improve the mechanical properties of the sulfur concrete. Glass fibers and glass rebar were produced by melting the lunar regolith simulant. Lunar regolith stimulant was melted in a 25 cc Pt-Rh crucible in a Sybron Thermoline 46100 high temperature MoSi2 furnace at melting temperatures of 1450 to 1600G. The glass melt wets the ceramic rod and long continuous glass fibers were easily hand drawn. The glass fibers were immediately coated with a protective polymer to maintain the mechanical strength. The viability of sulfur concrete as a construction material for extraterrestrial application is presented. The mechanical properties of the glass fiber reinforced sulfur concrete were investigated.

  11. Integrated Simulation Environment for Unmanned Autonomous Systems—Towards a Conceptual Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Perhinschi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper initiates a comprehensive conceptual framework for an integrated simulation environment for unmanned autonomous systems (UAS that is capable of supporting the design, analysis, testing, and evaluation from a “system of systems” perspective. The paper also investigates the current state of the art of modeling and performance assessment of UAS and their components and identifies directions for future developments. All the components of a comprehensive simulation environment focused on the testing and evaluation of UAS are identified and defined through detailed analysis of current and future required capabilities and performance. The generality and completeness of the simulation environment is ensured by including all operational domains, types of agents, external systems, missions, and interactions between components. The conceptual framework for the simulation environment is formulated with flexibility, modularity, generality, and portability as key objectives. The development of the conceptual framework for the UAS simulation reveals important aspects related to the mechanisms and interactions that determine specific UAS characteristics including complexity, adaptability, synergy, and high impact of artificial and human intelligence on system performance and effectiveness.

  12. A web-based, collaborative modeling, simulation, and parallel computing environment for electromechanical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Yin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Complex electromechanical system is usually composed of multiple components from different domains, including mechanical, electronic, hydraulic, control, and so on. Modeling and simulation for electromechanical system on a unified platform is one of the research hotspots in system engineering at present. It is also the development trend of the design for complex electromechanical system. The unified modeling techniques and tools based on Modelica language provide a satisfactory solution. To meet with the requirements of collaborative modeling, simulation, and parallel computing for complex electromechanical systems based on Modelica, a general web-based modeling and simulation prototype environment, namely, WebMWorks, is designed and implemented. Based on the rich Internet application technologies, an interactive graphic user interface for modeling and post-processing on web browser was implemented; with the collaborative design module, the environment supports top-down, concurrent modeling and team cooperation; additionally, service-oriented architecture–based architecture was applied to supply compiling and solving services which run on cloud-like servers, so the environment can manage and dispatch large-scale simulation tasks in parallel on multiple computing servers simultaneously. An engineering application about pure electric vehicle is tested on WebMWorks. The results of simulation and parametric experiment demonstrate that the tested web-based environment can effectively shorten the design cycle of the complex electromechanical system.

  13. Simulation experience enhances physical therapist student confidence in managing a patient in the critical care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtake, Patricia J; Lazarus, Marcilene; Schillo, Rebecca; Rosen, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Rehabilitation of patients in critical care environments improves functional outcomes. This finding has led to increased implementation of intensive care unit (ICU) rehabilitation programs, including early mobility, and an associated increased demand for physical therapists practicing in ICUs. Unfortunately, many physical therapists report being inadequately prepared to work in this high-risk environment. Simulation provides focused, deliberate practice in safe, controlled learning environments and may be a method to initiate academic preparation of physical therapists for ICU practice. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of participation in simulation-based management of a patient with critical illness in an ICU setting on levels of confidence and satisfaction in physical therapist students. A one-group, pretest-posttest, quasi-experimental design was used. Physical therapist students (N=43) participated in a critical care simulation experience requiring technical (assessing bed mobility and pulmonary status), behavioral (patient and interprofessional communication), and cognitive (recognizing a patient status change and initiating appropriate responses) skill performance. Student confidence and satisfaction were surveyed before and after the simulation experience. Students' confidence in their technical, behavioral, and cognitive skill performance increased from "somewhat confident" to "confident" following the critical care simulation experience. Student satisfaction was highly positive, with strong agreement the simulation experience was valuable, reinforced course content, and was a useful educational tool. Limitations of the study were the small sample from one university and a control group was not included. Incorporating a simulated, interprofessional critical care experience into a required clinical course improved physical therapist student confidence in technical, behavioral, and cognitive performance measures and was associated with high

  14. A Versatile Simulation Environment of FTC Architectures for Large Transport Aircraft

    OpenAIRE

    Ossmann, Daniel; Varga, Andreas; Simon, Hecker

    2010-01-01

    We present a simulation environment with 3-D stereo visualization facilities destined for an easy setup and versatile assessment of fault detection and diagnosis based fault tolerant control systems. This environment has been primarily developed as a technology demonstrator of advanced reconfigurable flight control systems and is based on a realistic six degree of freedom flexible aircraft model. The aircraft control system architecture includes a flexible fault detection and diagnosis syste...

  15. Behavior of HfB2-SiC Materials in Simulated Re-Entry Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerby, Don; Beckman, Sarah; Irby, Edward; Johnson, Sylvia M.; Gunsman, Michael; Gasch, Matthew; Ridge, Jerry; Martinez, Ed; Squire, Tom; Olejniczak, Joe

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of this research are to: 1) Investigate the oxidation/ablation behavior of HfB2/SiC materials in simulated re-entry environments; 2) Use the arc jet test results to define appropriate use environments for these materials for use in vehicle design. The parameters to be investigated include: surface temperature, stagnation pressure, duration, number of cycles, and thermal stresses.

  16. A review on carbonation study in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat Rao, N.; Meena, T.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper the authors have reviewed the carbonation studies which are a vital durability property of concrete. One of the major causes for deterioration and destruction of concrete is carbonation. The mechanism of carbonation involves the penetration carbon dioxide (CO2) into the concrete porous system to form an environment by reducing the pH around the reinforcement and initiation of the corrosion process. The paper also endeavours to focus and elucidate the gravity of importance, the process and chemistry of carbonate and how the various parameters like water/cement ratio, curing, depth of concrete cones, admixtures, grade of concrete, strength of concrete, porosity and permeability effect carbonation in concrete. The role of Supplementary Cementitious Materials (SCMs) like Ground granulated Blast Furnace Slag (GGBS) and Silica Fume (SF) has also been reviewed along with the influence of depth of carbonation.

  17. A Data Stream Model For Runoff Simulation In A Changing Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Q.; Shao, J.; Zhang, H.; Wang, G.

    2017-12-01

    Runoff simulation is of great significance for water engineering design, water disaster control, water resources planning and management in a catchment or region. A large number of methods including concept-based process-driven models and statistic-based data-driven models, have been proposed and widely used in worldwide during past decades. Most existing models assume that the relationship among runoff and its impacting factors is stationary. However, in the changing environment (e.g., climate change, human disturbance), their relationship usually evolves over time. In this study, we propose a data stream model for runoff simulation in a changing environment. Specifically, the proposed model works in three steps: learning a rule set, expansion of a rule, and simulation. The first step is to initialize a rule set. When a new observation arrives, the model will check which rule covers it and then use the rule for simulation. Meanwhile, Page-Hinckley (PH) change detection test is used to monitor the online simulation error of each rule. If a change is detected, the corresponding rule is removed from the rule set. In the second step, for each rule, if it covers more than a given number of instance, the rule is expected to expand. In the third step, a simulation model of each leaf node is learnt with a perceptron without activation function, and is updated with adding a newly incoming observation. Taking Fuxi River catchment as a case study, we applied the model to simulate the monthly runoff in the catchment. Results show that abrupt change is detected in the year of 1997 by using the Page-Hinckley change detection test method, which is consistent with the historic record of flooding. In addition, the model achieves good simulation results with the RMSE of 13.326, and outperforms many established methods. The findings demonstrated that the proposed data stream model provides a promising way to simulate runoff in a changing environment.

  18. Concrete debris assessment for road construction activities : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Two distinct but related issues of importance to FDOT were investigated: (1) the possible impact of : recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) used as road base on the subsurface environment and (2) the : management of concrete grinding residuals (CGR) resu...

  19. Concrete debris assessment for road construction activities : summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    University of Florida researchers studied the possible : impact of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) used in : roadway base layers on the acid/base balance of the : subsurface environment. They also examined a related : issue: management of concrete ...

  20. A corrosion monitoring system for existing reinforced concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated a multi-parameter corrosion monitoring system for existing reinforced concrete structures in chloride-laden service environments. The system was fabricated based on a prototype concrete corrosion measurement system that : had bee...

  1. Durability of concrete: characterization and modeling of physical and chemical degradation of cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adenot, Frederic

    1992-01-01

    Within the frame of nuclear waste management, and more particularly waste storage by confinement in parcels, concrete and geological environment, this research aims at predicting the durability of a concrete paste and of all concrete works. This prediction is based on a material characterization (determination of the thickness and composition of the attacked area) whatever the degradation duration is. The adopted approach is to model concrete lixiviation and to compare model results with experimental results. The model is also used to assess the influence of a great number of parameters, and to simulate non experimented cases. Thus, the author reports a bibliographical study on cement, and presents the equations of a lixiviation model. He reports experiments aimed at verifying modelling hypotheses and at acquiring necessary data. The model is then numerically solved, and applied to an experimental case. Experimental results are compared with modelling results, and a prediction is performed for a 300 year-duration [fr

  2. Calculation of concrete shielding wall thickness for 450kVp X-ray tube with MCNP simulation and result comparison with half value layer method calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Heon; Lee, Eun Joong; Kim, Chan Kyu; Cho, Gyu Seong [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hur, Sam Suk [Sam Yong Inspection Engineering Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Radiation generating devices must be properly shielded for their safe application. Although institutes such as US National Bureau of Standards and National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) have provided guidelines for shielding X-ray tube of various purposes, industry people tend to rely on 'Half Value Layer (HVL) method' which requires relatively simple calculation compared to the case of those guidelines. The method is based on the fact that the intensity, dose, and air kerma of narrow beam incident on shielding wall decreases by about half as the beam penetrates the HVL thickness of the wall. One can adjust shielding wall thickness to satisfy outside wall dose or air kerma requirements with this calculation. However, this may not always be the case because 1) The strict definition of HVL deals with only Intensity, 2) The situation is different when the beam is not 'narrow'; the beam quality inside the wall is distorted and related changes on outside wall dose or air kerma such as buildup effect occurs. Therefore, sometimes more careful research should be done in order to verify the effect of shielding specific radiation generating device. High energy X-ray tubes which is operated at the voltage above 400 kV that are used for 'heavy' nondestructive inspection is an example. People have less experience in running and shielding such device than in the case of widely-used low energy X-ray tubes operated at the voltage below 300 kV. In this study, Air Kerma value per week, outside concrete shielding wall of various thickness surrounding 450 kVp X-ray tube were calculated using MCNP simulation with the aid of Geometry Splitting method which is a famous Variance Reduction technique. The comparison between simulated result, HVL method result, and NCRP Report 147 safety goal 0.02 mGy wk-1 on Air Kerma for the place where the public are free to pass showed that concrete wall of thickness 80 cm is needed to achieve the

  3. Calculation of concrete shielding wall thickness for 450kVp X-ray tube with MCNP simulation and result comparison with half value layer method calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Heon; Lee, Eun Joong; Kim, Chan Kyu; Cho, Gyu Seong; Hur, Sam Suk

    2016-01-01

    Radiation generating devices must be properly shielded for their safe application. Although institutes such as US National Bureau of Standards and National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) have provided guidelines for shielding X-ray tube of various purposes, industry people tend to rely on 'Half Value Layer (HVL) method' which requires relatively simple calculation compared to the case of those guidelines. The method is based on the fact that the intensity, dose, and air kerma of narrow beam incident on shielding wall decreases by about half as the beam penetrates the HVL thickness of the wall. One can adjust shielding wall thickness to satisfy outside wall dose or air kerma requirements with this calculation. However, this may not always be the case because 1) The strict definition of HVL deals with only Intensity, 2) The situation is different when the beam is not 'narrow'; the beam quality inside the wall is distorted and related changes on outside wall dose or air kerma such as buildup effect occurs. Therefore, sometimes more careful research should be done in order to verify the effect of shielding specific radiation generating device. High energy X-ray tubes which is operated at the voltage above 400 kV that are used for 'heavy' nondestructive inspection is an example. People have less experience in running and shielding such device than in the case of widely-used low energy X-ray tubes operated at the voltage below 300 kV. In this study, Air Kerma value per week, outside concrete shielding wall of various thickness surrounding 450 kVp X-ray tube were calculated using MCNP simulation with the aid of Geometry Splitting method which is a famous Variance Reduction technique. The comparison between simulated result, HVL method result, and NCRP Report 147 safety goal 0.02 mGy wk-1 on Air Kerma for the place where the public are free to pass showed that concrete wall of thickness 80 cm is needed to achieve the safety goal

  4. SpiCAD: Integrated environment for circuitry simulation with SPICE code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Amore, D; Padovini, G; Santomauro, M [Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dip. di Elettronica

    1991-11-01

    SPICE is one of the most commonly used programs for the simulation of the behaviour of electronic circuits. This article describes in detail the key design characteristics and capabilities of a computer environment called SpiCAD which integrates all the different phases of SPICE based circuitry simulation on a personal computer, i.e., the tracing of the electronics scheme, simulation and visualization of the results so as to help define semiconductor device models, determine input signals, construct macro-models and convert design sketches into formats acceptable to graphic systems.

  5. High Performance Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Traian Oneţ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the last studies and researches accomplished in Cluj-Napoca related to high performance concrete, high strength concrete and self compacting concrete. The purpose of this paper is to raid upon the advantages and inconveniences when a particular concrete type is used. Two concrete recipes are presented, namely for the concrete used in rigid pavement for roads and another one for self-compacting concrete.

  6. Simulating The Dynamical Evolution Of Galaxies In Group And Cluster Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, Rukmani

    2015-07-01

    Galaxy clusters are harsh environments for their constituent galaxies. A variety of physical processes effective in these dense environments transform gas-rich, spiral, star-forming galaxies to elliptical or spheroidal galaxies with very little gas and therefore minimal star formation. The consequences of these processes are well understood observationally. Galaxies in progressively denser environments have systematically declining star formation rates and gas content. However, a theoretical understanding of of where, when, and how these processes act, and the interplay between the various galaxy transformation mechanisms in clusters remains elusive. In this dissertation, I use numerical simulations of cluster mergers as well as galaxies evolving in quiescent environments to develop a theoretical framework to understand some of the physics of galaxy transformation in cluster environments. Galaxies can be transformed in smaller groups before they are accreted by their eventual massive cluster environments, an effect termed `pre-processing'. Galaxy cluster mergers themselves can accelerate many galaxy transformation mechanisms, including tidal and ram pressure stripping of galaxies and galaxy-galaxy collisions and mergers that result in reassemblies of galaxies' stars and gas. Observationally, cluster mergers have distinct velocity and phase-space signatures depending on the observer's line of sight with respect to the merger direction. Using dark matter only as well as hydrodynamic simulations of cluster mergers with random ensembles of particles tagged with galaxy models, I quantify the effects of cluster mergers on galaxy evolution before, during, and after the mergers. Based on my theoretical predictions of the dynamical signatures of these mergers in combination with galaxy transformation signatures, one can observationally identify remnants of mergers and quantify the effect of the environment on galaxies in dense group and cluster environments. The presence of

  7. A novel approach to simulate gene-environment interactions in complex diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicodemi Mario

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex diseases are multifactorial traits caused by both genetic and environmental factors. They represent the major part of human diseases and include those with largest prevalence and mortality (cancer, heart disease, obesity, etc.. Despite a large amount of information that has been collected about both genetic and environmental risk factors, there are few examples of studies on their interactions in epidemiological literature. One reason can be the incomplete knowledge of the power of statistical methods designed to search for risk factors and their interactions in these data sets. An improvement in this direction would lead to a better understanding and description of gene-environment interactions. To this aim, a possible strategy is to challenge the different statistical methods against data sets where the underlying phenomenon is completely known and fully controllable, for example simulated ones. Results We present a mathematical approach that models gene-environment interactions. By this method it is possible to generate simulated populations having gene-environment interactions of any form, involving any number of genetic and environmental factors and also allowing non-linear interactions as epistasis. In particular, we implemented a simple version of this model in a Gene-Environment iNteraction Simulator (GENS, a tool designed to simulate case-control data sets where a one gene-one environment interaction influences the disease risk. The main aim has been to allow the input of population characteristics by using standard epidemiological measures and to implement constraints to make the simulator behaviour biologically meaningful. Conclusions By the multi-logistic model implemented in GENS it is possible to simulate case-control samples of complex disease where gene-environment interactions influence the disease risk. The user has full control of the main characteristics of the simulated population and a Monte

  8. Concrete spirituality

    OpenAIRE

    Kritzinger, Johannes N.J.

    2014-01-01

    This article reflects on a number of liturgical innovations in the worship of Melodi ya Tshwane, an inner-city congregation of the Uniting Reformed Church in Southern Africa (URCSA). The focus of the innovations was to implement the understanding of justice in Article 4 of the Confession of Belhar, a confessional standard of the URCSA. The basic contention of the article is that well designed liturgies that facilitate experiences of beauty can nurture a concrete spirituality to mobilise urba...

  9. Virtual Property Manager: Providing a Simulated Learning Environment in a New University Program of Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Carswell

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper relates the experience that students have while accessing Virtual Property Manager (VPM, a Web-based simulation learning tool designed to introduce students to a new discipline being offered at the university – Residential Property Management. The VPM simulation was designed in part to develop student interest in the new program. Results indicate that this simple simulation device did make a notable impact on student interest. Additionally, student acceptance and self-reported impact differed significantly based upon the delivery context. Adding a competitive reward element to the simulation experience improved student's evaluation of the software and self-reported interest in the field. Results indicate that educational simulation evaluation, acceptance, and performance may often be substantially influenced by the delivery context, rather than simply the program itself. Developers may do well to focus "outside the box" of program content to promote audience-specific delivery environments.

  10. Phyllanthus muellerianus and C6H15NO3 synergistic effects on 0.5 M H2SO4-immersed steel-reinforced concrete: Implication for clean corrosion-protection of wind energy structures in industrial environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeniyi, Joshua Olusegun; Omotosho, Olugbenga Adeshola; Popoola, Abimbola Patricia Idowu; Loto, Cleophas Akintoye

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates Phyllanthus muellerianus leaf-extract and C6H15NO3 (triethanolamine: TEA) synergistic effects on reinforcing-steel corrosion-inhibition and the compressive-strength of steel-reinforced concrete immersed in 0.5 M H2SO4. This is to assess suitability of the synergistic admixture usage for wind-energy steel-reinforced concrete structures designed for industrial environments. Steel-reinforced concrete specimens were admixed with individual and synergistic designs of Phyllanthus muellerianus leaf-extract and C6H15NO3 admixtures and immersed in the 0.5 M H2SO4. Electrochemical monitoring of corrosion potential, as per ASTM C876-91 R99, and corrosion current were obtained and statistically analysed, as per ASTM G16-95 R04, for modelling noise resistance. Post-immersion compressive-strength testing then followed, as per ASTM C39/C39M-03, for detailing the admixture effect on load-bearing strength of the steel-reinforced concrete specimens. Results showed that while individual Phyllanthus muellerianus leaf-extract concentrations exhibited better inhibition-efficiency performance than C6H15NO3, synergistic additions of C6H15NO3 to Phyllanthus muellerianus leaf-extract improved steel-rebar corrosion-inhibition. Thus, 6 g Phyllanthus muellerianus + 2 g C6H15NO3 synergistically improved inhibition-efficiency to η = 84.17%, from η = 55.28% by the optimal chemical or from η = 74.72% by the optimal plant-extract admixtures. The study also established that improved compressive strength of steel-reinforced concrete with acceptable inhibition of the steel-rebar corrosion could be attained through optimal combination of the Phyllanthus muellerianus leaf-extract and C6H15NO3 admixtures.

  11. A Language and Environment for Analysis of Dynamics by SimulaTiOn

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosse, T.; Jonker, C.M.; van der Meij, L.; Treur, J.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the language and software environment LEADSTO that has been developed to model and simulate dynamic processes in terms of both qualitative and quantitative concepts. The LEADSTO language is a declarative order-sorted temporal language, extended with quantitative notions like

  12. Teachers' Conceptions and Their Approaches to Teaching in Virtual Reality and Simulation-Based Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskitalo, Tuulikki

    2011-01-01

    This research article focuses on virtual reality (VR) and simulation-based training, with a special focus on the pedagogical use of the Virtual Centre of Wellness Campus known as ENVI (Rovaniemi, Finland). In order to clearly understand how teachers perceive teaching and learning in such environments, this research examines the concepts of…

  13. Molecular simulations in electrochemistry : Electron and proton transfer reactions mediated by flavins in different molecular environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kılıç, M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to address specific questions about the role of solvent reorganization on electron transfer in different environments and about the calculation of acidity constant, as well. Particularly, we focus on molecular simulation of flavin in water and different protein (BLUF and

  14. LEADSTO: a Language and Environment for Analysis of Dynamics by SimulaTiOn (extended abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosse, T.; Jonker, C.M.; van der Meij, L.; Treur, J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the language and software environment LEADSTO that has been developed to model and simulate dynamic processes in terms of both qualitative and quantitative concepts. The LEADSTO language is a declarative order-sorted temporal language, extended with quantitative means. Dynamic

  15. LEADSTO: a Language and Environment for Analysis of Dynamics by SimulaTiOn

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosse, T.; Jonker, C.M.; van der Meij, L.; Treur, J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the language and software environment LEADSTO that has been developed to model and simulate the dynamics of Multi-Agent Systems (MAS) in terms of both qualitative and quantitative concepts. The LEADSTO language is a declarative order-sorted temporal language, extended with

  16. A Hybrid Three Layer Architecture for Fire Agent Management in Rescue Simulation Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alborz Geramifard

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new architecture called FAIS for imple- menting intelligent agents cooperating in a special Multi Agent environ- ment, namely the RoboCup Rescue Simulation System. This is a layered architecture which is customized for solving fire extinguishing problem. Structural decision making algorithms are combined with heuristic ones in this model, so it's a hybrid architecture.

  17. A Hybrid Three Layer Architecture for Fire Agent Management in Rescue Simulation Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alborz Geramifard

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new architecture called FAIS for implementing intelligent agents cooperating in a special Multi Agent environment, namely the RoboCup Rescue Simulation System. This is a layered architecture which is customized for solving fire extinguishing problem. Structural decision making algorithms are combined with heuristic ones in this model, so it's a hybrid architecture.

  18. Market Garden: a Simulation Environment for Research and User Experience in Smart Grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.J. Liefers (Bart); F.N. Claessen (Felix); E.J. Pauwels (Eric); P.A.N. Bosman (Peter); J.A. La Poutré (Han)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractMarket Garden is a scalable research environment and demonstration tool, in which market mechanisms for smart energy systems and the interaction between end users, traders, system operators, and markets can be simulated. Users can create scenarios in a user-friendly editor in which a

  19. Agent model for the simulation of pedestrian behavior in a shopping environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, J.; Timmermans, H.J.P.; Vries, de B.

    2008-01-01

    Simulation of human behavior in the built environment is of particular interest and receives a lot of attention, especially in precarious situations like evacuation and fire alarm. Also, walking behavior in streets, railway stations and airports is subject of research for gaining a clear

  20. Bringing Reality into Calculus Classrooms: Mathematizing a Real-life Problem Simulated in a Virtual Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V. Shipulina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study explores how students, who had completed the AP calculus course, mathematized the optimal navigation real-life problem simulated in the Second Life Virtual Environment. The particular research interest was to investigate whether/how students’ empirical activity in VE influences the way of their mathematizing.

  1. Sustainability assessment and physical characterization of pervious concrete pavement made with GGBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Hassan Hilal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing use of pervious concrete as sustainable and environment-friendly paving materials is primarily owed to its ability to reduce pavement runoff. The mechanical and transport properties of pervious concrete with 50% ground-granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS replacement are examined in this paper. Open-graded 10 mm and 20 mm aggregates were used to attain porosity of 10%, 15%, and 20%. Polypropylene short cut fibers were added to the mix. The clogging potential of pervious concrete exposed to dust was also investigated. The results indicated that increasing the porosity led to a decrease in compressive and tensile strength. Similar findings were reported when smaller aggregates were used. The fiber addition was only effective in low-porosity concrete. Permeability, characterized by its coefficient k, was proportional to porosity and inversely proportional to aggregate size. After 40-year simulated dust exposure, the concrete permeability could be restored with water flushing maintenance process. In comparison to ordinary Portland cement (OPC concrete, pervious concrete incorporating GGBS is a more sustainable paving solution, offering a reduction in heat island effect and electricity consumption while also alleviating carbon emissions.

  2. Experimental and finite element analysis of bond-slip in reinforced concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. V. WOLENSKI

    Full Text Available Abstract The modeling of reinforced concrete structures has taken advantage of the increasing progress on Computational Mechanics, in such way that complex phenomena, such as cracking and crushing, creep, reinforcement yielding, steel-concrete bond loss, can be modeled in a reasonable realistic way, using the proper set of numerical and computational resources. Among several options, the ones based on the Finite Element Method (FEM allow complex analysis simulations of reinforced concrete structures, including the interaction of different nonlinear effects. This paper deals with the nonlinear finite element analysis of the bond-slip between reinforcing steel and concrete, taking into account an experimental study previously performed. The FEM analysis presented uses a combination of resources where the material behavior of concrete is described by the Microplane Constitutive Model, and an embedded reinforcement model is used to represent steel inside the concrete and take into account the effect of bond-slip. The FEM models were created using the INSANE (INteractive Structural ANalysis Environment computational system, open source software that has a set of FEM tools for nonlinear analysis of reinforced concrete structures. The correlations between numerical-experimentals results and several parameters validate the proposed combination of resources and identifies the significance of various effects on the response.

  3. SPEEDES - A multiple-synchronization environment for parallel discrete-event simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Jeff S.

    1992-01-01

    Synchronous Parallel Environment for Emulation and Discrete-Event Simulation (SPEEDES) is a unified parallel simulation environment. It supports multiple-synchronization protocols without requiring users to recompile their code. When a SPEEDES simulation runs on one node, all the extra parallel overhead is removed automatically at run time. When the same executable runs in parallel, the user preselects the synchronization algorithm from a list of options. SPEEDES currently runs on UNIX networks and on the California Institute of Technology/Jet Propulsion Laboratory Mark III Hypercube. SPEEDES also supports interactive simulations. Featured in the SPEEDES environment is a new parallel synchronization approach called Breathing Time Buckets. This algorithm uses some of the conservative techniques found in Time Bucket synchronization, along with the optimism that characterizes the Time Warp approach. A mathematical model derived from first principles predicts the performance of Breathing Time Buckets. Along with the Breathing Time Buckets algorithm, this paper discusses the rules for processing events in SPEEDES, describes the implementation of various other synchronization protocols supported by SPEEDES, describes some new ones for the future, discusses interactive simulations, and then gives some performance results.

  4. GADEN: A 3D Gas Dispersion Simulator for Mobile Robot Olfaction in Realistic Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroy, Javier; Hernandez-Bennets, Victor; Fan, Han; Lilienthal, Achim; Gonzalez-Jimenez, Javier

    2017-06-23

    This work presents a simulation framework developed under the widely used Robot Operating System (ROS) to enable the validation of robotics systems and gas sensing algorithms under realistic environments. The framework is rooted in the principles of computational fluid dynamics and filament dispersion theory, modeling wind flow and gas dispersion in 3D real-world scenarios (i.e., accounting for walls, furniture, etc.). Moreover, it integrates the simulation of different environmental sensors, such as metal oxide gas sensors, photo ionization detectors, or anemometers. We illustrate the potential and applicability of the proposed tool by presenting a simulation case in a complex and realistic office-like environment where gas leaks of different chemicals occur simultaneously. Furthermore, we accomplish quantitative and qualitative validation by comparing our simulated results against real-world data recorded inside a wind tunnel where methane was released under different wind flow profiles. Based on these results, we conclude that our simulation framework can provide a good approximation to real world measurements when advective airflows are present in the environment.

  5. Application of diamond tools when decontaminating concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, B.L.; Gossett, R.F.

    1980-01-01

    The utilization of diamond concrete cutting tools offers new potential approaches to the recurring problems of removing contaminated concrete. Innovative techniques can provide exacting removal within a dust-free environment. Present day technology allows remote control operated equipment to perform tasks heretofore considered impossible. Experience gained from years of removing concrete within the construction industry hopefully can contribute new and improved methods to D and D projects

  6. Modelling of an industrial environment, part 1.: Monte Carlo simulations of photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kis, Z.; Eged, K.; Meckbach, R.; Voigt, G.

    2002-01-01

    After a nuclear accident releasing radioactive material into the environment the external exposures may contribute significantly to the radiation exposure of the population (UNSCEAR 1988, 2000). For urban populations the external gamma exposure from radionuclides deposited on the surfaces of the urban-industrial environments yields the dominant contributions to the total dose to the public (Kelly 1987; Jacob and Meckbach 1990). The radiation field is naturally influenced by the environment around the sources. For calculations of the shielding effect of the structures in complex and realistic urban environments Monte Carlo methods turned out to be useful tools (Jacob and Meckbach 1987; Meckbach et al. 1988). Using these methods a complex environment can be set up in which the photon transport can be solved on a reliable way. The accuracy of the methods is in principle limited only by the knowledge of the atomic cross sections and the computational time. Several papers using Monte Carlo results for calculating doses from the external gamma exposures were published (Jacob and Meckbach 1987, 1990; Meckbach et al. 1988; Rochedo et al. 1996). In these papers the Monte Carlo simulations were run in urban environments and for different photon energies. The industrial environment can be defined as such an area where productive and/or commercial activity is carried out. A good example can be a factory or a supermarket. An industrial environment can rather be different from the urban ones as for the types and structures of the buildings and their dimensions. These variations will affect the radiation field of this environment. Hence there is a need to run new Monte Carlo simulations designed specially for the industrial environments

  7. Low cycle corrosion fatigue properties of F316Ti in simulated LWR primary environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xuelian; Ding Yaping; Katada, Y.; Sato, S.

    1998-11-01

    Environment effect on fatigue performance of materials used for Pressurized boundary, including fatigue life and crack growth rate, are of importance to nuclear safety. To predict the fatigue life of nuclear materials and to improve the design of nuclear materials, it is necessary to investigated the material fatigue performances in corrosive environment and to get the fatigue data under its environment to be used in. Low cycle corrosion fatigue (CF) performance investigation of domestic F316Ti in simulated BWR and PWR primary environment was carried out. The result shows that the high temperature water environment is one of the most important factors on CF properties. For the same material, the low cycle fatigue life in high temperature air is longer than that in simulated BWR and PWR primary environments. In high temperature water, domestic F316Ti has almost the same low cycle corrosion fatigue performance as F316 (made in Japan). All of the fatigue data are scattered within ASME best-fit curve and ASME design fatigue curve. In high strain range, there is no significant difference of the CF performance for F316Ti in both of BWR and PWR primary environments. With the decrease of strain amplitude, the difference appears gradually. The data is located at the short life side of the fatigue data in simulated BWR primary environment. Titanium is distributed uniformly in F316Ti manufactured in Fushun Steel Factory. Ni, Cr, Mo in this material are located at the high side of the alloy chemical composition range. So, F316Ti has a better CF property in high temperature water

  8. Simulation of UMTS Capacity and Quality of Coverage in Urban Macro- and Microcellular Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pechac

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with simulations of a radio interface of thirdgeneration (3G mobile systems operating in the WCDMA FDD modeincluding propagation predictions in macro and microcells. In the radionetwork planning of 3G mobile systems, the quality of coverage and thesystem capacity present a common problem. Both macro and microcellularconcepts are very important for implementing wireless communicationsystems, such as Universal Mobile Telecommunication Systems (UMTS indense urban areas. The aim of this paper is to introduce differentimpacts - selected bit rate, uplink (UL loading, allocation and numberof Nodes B, selected propagation prediction models, macro andmicrocellular environment - on system capacity and quality of coveragein UMTS networks. Both separated and composite simulation scenarios ofmacro and microcellular environments are presented. The necessity of aniteration-based simulation approach and site-specific propagationmodeling in microcells is proven.

  9. An expert system for automatic mesh generation for Sn particle transport simulation in parallel environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apisit, Patchimpattapong; Alireza, Haghighat; Shedlock, D.

    2003-01-01

    An expert system for generating an effective mesh distribution for the SN particle transport simulation has been developed. This expert system consists of two main parts: 1) an algorithm for generating an effective mesh distribution in a serial environment, and 2) an algorithm for inference of an effective domain decomposition strategy for parallel computing. For the first part, the algorithm prepares an effective mesh distribution considering problem physics and the spatial differencing scheme. For the second part, the algorithm determines a parallel-performance-index (PPI), which is defined as the ratio of the granularity to the degree-of-coupling. The parallel-performance-index provides expected performance of an algorithm depending on computing environment and resources. A large index indicates a high granularity algorithm with relatively low coupling among processors. This expert system has been successfully tested within the PENTRAN (Parallel Environment Neutral-Particle Transport) code system for simulating real-life shielding problems. (authors)

  10. An expert system for automatic mesh generation for Sn particle transport simulation in parallel environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apisit, Patchimpattapong [Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand, Office of Corporate Planning, Bangkruai, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Alireza, Haghighat; Shedlock, D. [Florida Univ., Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2003-07-01

    An expert system for generating an effective mesh distribution for the SN particle transport simulation has been developed. This expert system consists of two main parts: 1) an algorithm for generating an effective mesh distribution in a serial environment, and 2) an algorithm for inference of an effective domain decomposition strategy for parallel computing. For the first part, the algorithm prepares an effective mesh distribution considering problem physics and the spatial differencing scheme. For the second part, the algorithm determines a parallel-performance-index (PPI), which is defined as the ratio of the granularity to the degree-of-coupling. The parallel-performance-index provides expected performance of an algorithm depending on computing environment and resources. A large index indicates a high granularity algorithm with relatively low coupling among processors. This expert system has been successfully tested within the PENTRAN (Parallel Environment Neutral-Particle Transport) code system for simulating real-life shielding problems. (authors)

  11. Hybrid Coatings Enriched with Tetraethoxysilane for Corrosion Mitigation of Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel in Chloride Contaminated Simulated Concrete Pore Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Rita B.; Callone, Emanuela; Silva, Carlos J. R.; Pereira, Elsa V.; Dirè, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid sol-gel coatings, named U(X):TEOS, based on ureasilicate matrices (U(X)) enriched with tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), were synthesized. The influence of TEOS addition was studied on both the structure of the hybrid sol-gel films as well as on the electrochemical properties. The effect of TEOS on the structure of the hybrid sol-gel films was investigated by solid state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The dielectric properties of the different materials were investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The corrosion behavior of the hybrid coatings on HDGS was studied in chloride-contaminated simulated concrete pore solutions (SCPS) by polarization resistance measurements. The roughness of the HDGS coated with hybrids was also characterized by atomic force microscopy. The structural characterization of the hybrid materials proved the effective reaction between Jeffamine® and 3-isocyanate propyltriethoxysilane (ICPTES) and indicated that the addition of TEOS does not seem to affect the organic structure or to increase the degree of condensation of the hybrid materials. Despite the apparent lack of influence on the hybrids architecture, the polarization resistance measurements confirmed that TEOS addition improves the corrosion resistance of the hybrid coatings (U(X):TEOS) in chloride-contaminated SCPS when compared to samples prepared without any TEOS (U(X)). This behavior could be related to the decrease in roughness of the hybrid coatings (due TEOS addition) and to the different metal coating interaction resulting from the increase of the inorganic component in the hybrid matrix. PMID:28772667

  12. Improving Integrated Operation in the Joint Integrated Mission Model (JIMM) and the Simulated Warfare Environment Data Transfer (SWEDAT) Protocol

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mutschler, David W

    2005-01-01

    ...). It allows integrated operation of resources whereby the JIMM threat environment, stimulators virtual cockpits, systems under test, and other agents are combined within the same simulation exercise...

  13. A Novel CPU/GPU Simulation Environment for Large-Scale Biologically-Realistic Neural Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger V Hoang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Computational Neuroscience is an emerging field that provides unique opportunities to studycomplex brain structures through realistic neural simulations. However, as biological details are added tomodels, the execution time for the simulation becomes longer. Graphics Processing Units (GPUs are now being utilized to accelerate simulations due to their ability to perform computations in parallel. As such, they haveshown significant improvement in execution time compared to Central Processing Units (CPUs. Most neural simulators utilize either multiple CPUs or a single GPU for better performance, but still show limitations in execution time when biological details are not sacrificed. Therefore, we present a novel CPU/GPU simulation environment for large-scale biological networks,the NeoCortical Simulator version 6 (NCS6. NCS6 is a free, open-source, parallelizable, and scalable simula-tor, designed to run on clusters of multiple machines, potentially with high performance computing devicesin each of them. It has built-in leaky-integrate-and-fire (LIF and Izhikevich (IZH neuron models, but usersalso have the capability to design their own plug-in interface for different neuron types as desired. NCS6is currently able to simulate one million cells and 100 million synapses in quasi real time by distributing dataacross these heterogeneous clusters of CPUs and GPUs.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Early Age Cracking of Reinforced Concrete Bridge Decks with a Full-3D Multiscale and Multi-Chemo-Physical Integrated Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Ishida

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In November 2011, the Japanese government resolved to build “Revival Roads” in the Tohoku region to accelerate the recovery from the Great East Japan Earthquake of March 2011. Because the Tohoku region experiences such cold and snowy weather in winter, complex degradation from a combination of frost damage, chloride attack from de-icing agents, alkali–silica reaction, cracking and fatigue is anticipated. Thus, to enhance the durability performance of road structures, particularly reinforced concrete (RC bridge decks, multiple countermeasures are proposed: a low water-to-cement ratio in the mix, mineral admixtures such as ground granulated blast furnace slag and/or fly ash to mitigate the risks of chloride attack and alkali–silica reaction, anticorrosion rebar and 6% entrained air for frost damage. It should be noted here that such high durability specifications may conversely increase the risk of early age cracking caused by temperature and shrinkage due to the large amounts of cement and the use of mineral admixtures. Against this background, this paper presents a numerical simulation of early age deformation and cracking of RC bridge decks with full 3D multiscale and multi-chemo-physical integrated analysis. First, a multiscale constitutive model of solidifying cementitious materials is briefly introduced based on systematic knowledge coupling microscopic thermodynamic phenomena and microscopic structural mechanics. With the aim to assess the early age thermal and shrinkage-induced cracks on real bridge deck, the study began with extensive model validations by applying the multiscale and multi-physical integrated analysis system to small specimens and mock-up RC bridge deck specimens. Then, through the application of the current computational system, factors that affect the generation and propagation of early age thermal and shrinkage-induced cracks are identified via experimental validation and full-scale numerical simulation on real

  15. The atomic simulation environment-a Python library for working with atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth Larsen, Ask; Jørgen Mortensen, Jens; Blomqvist, Jakob; Castelli, Ivano E; Christensen, Rune; Dułak, Marcin; Friis, Jesper; Groves, Michael N; Hammer, Bjørk; Hargus, Cory; Hermes, Eric D; Jennings, Paul C; Bjerre Jensen, Peter; Kermode, James; Kitchin, John R; Leonhard Kolsbjerg, Esben; Kubal, Joseph; Kaasbjerg, Kristen; Lysgaard, Steen; Bergmann Maronsson, Jón; Maxson, Tristan; Olsen, Thomas; Pastewka, Lars; Peterson, Andrew; Rostgaard, Carsten; Schiøtz, Jakob; Schütt, Ole; Strange, Mikkel; Thygesen, Kristian S; Vegge, Tejs; Vilhelmsen, Lasse; Walter, Michael; Zeng, Zhenhua; Jacobsen, Karsten W

    2017-07-12

    The atomic simulation environment (ASE) is a software package written in the Python programming language with the aim of setting up, steering, and analyzing atomistic simulations. In ASE, tasks are fully scripted in Python. The powerful syntax of Python combined with the NumPy array library make it possible to perform very complex simulation tasks. For example, a sequence of calculations may be performed with the use of a simple 'for-loop' construction. Calculations of energy, forces, stresses and other quantities are performed through interfaces to many external electronic structure codes or force fields using a uniform interface. On top of this calculator interface, ASE provides modules for performing many standard simulation tasks such as structure optimization, molecular dynamics, handling of constraints and performing nudged elastic band calculations.

  16. Form Filling with Self-Compacting Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Lars Nyholm

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a newly started Ph.D. project with the aim of simulating the form filling ability of Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC) taking into account the form geometry, reinforcement configuration, casting technique, and the rheological properties of the concrete. Comparative studies...

  17. Lattice modeling of aggregate interlocking in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliáš, Jan; Stang, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    roughness, i.e.what is termed aggregate interlocking. We demonstrate this enhancement via the simulation of mixed-mode experiments on concrete performed at a laboratory at the Technical University of Denmark. Double notched concrete specimens were initially pre-cracked in tension. Then, various combinations...

  18. Experimentation and numerical simulation of steel fibre reinforced concrete pipes; Experimentacion y simulacion numerica de tubos de hormigon con fibras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuente, A. de la; Domingues de Figueiredo, A.; Aguado, A.; Molins, C.; Chama Neto, P. J.

    2011-07-01

    The results concerning on an experimental and a numerical study related to SFRCP are presented. Eighteen pipes with an internal diameter of 600 mm and fibre dosages of 10, 20 and 40 kg/m3 were manufactured and tested. Some technological aspects were concluded. Likewise, a numerical parameterized model was implemented. With this model, the simulation of the resistant behaviour of SFRCP can be performed. In this sense, the results experimentally obtained were contrasted with those suggested by means MAP reaching very satisfactory correlations. Taking it into account, it could be said that the numerical model is a useful tool for the optimal design of the SFRCP fibre dosages, avoiding the need of the systematic employment of the test as an indirect design method. Consequently, the use of this model would reduce the overall cost of the pipes and would give fibres a boost as a solution for this structural typology. (Author) 27 refs.

  19. Refractory concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcombe, C.E. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Novel concrete compositions comprise particles of aggregate material embedded in a cement matrix, said cement matrix produced by contacting an oxide selected from the group of Y 2 O 3 , La 2 O 3 , Nd 2 O 3 , Sm 2 O 3 , Eu 2 O 3 and Gd 2 O 3 with an aqueous solution of a salt selected from the group of NH 4 HO 3 , NH 4 Cl, YCl 3 and Mg(NO 3 ) 2 to form a fluid mixture; and allowing the fluid mixture to harden

  20. NEW TECHNOLOGY OF ASH AND SLAG CONCRETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAVLENKO T. M.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Purpose. Development of scientific-technical bases of manufacture and application of concrete on the basis of ash and slag mixes of thermal power plants. Methods. It is proposed a new technology of preparation of ash and slag concrete mixes. First the ash and slag mix is dispersed through the sieve with meshes 5 mm in a fine-grained fraction and slag. Then, in accordance with the composition of the concrete, obtained fine-grained fraction, slag, cement and tempering water are separately dosed into the mixer. Results. It is proven the high efficiency of the proposed technology of manufacture of ash and slag concretes. It is established that this technological solution allows to increase the strength of concrete by 20...30%, and in the preparation of full-strength concrete to reduce the cement consumption by 15...20%. Scientific novelty. It is developed the new technology of ash and slag mixes application. The concrete mix on the basis of ash and slag mix has an optimal particle size distribution, which ensures the best compaction and, accordingly, the greatest strength of ash and slag concrete with the given cement consumption. Practical significance. The research results promote the mass application of ash and slag mixes of thermal power plants in construction, obtaining of products from the proposed concretes of low cost with high physical-mechanical properties. Conclusion. It is proven the high efficiency of the proposed technology of production of ash and slag concretes. It is established that this technological solution allows increasing concrete strength, and obtaining full-strength concrete to reduce cement consumption. The extensive application of such concrete in construction makes it possible to solve the problem of aggregates for concrete, promotes recycling of TPP waste and consequently the protection of the environment.

  1. Premar-2: a Monte Carlo code for radiative transport simulation in atmospheric environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupini, E.

    1999-01-01

    The peculiarities of the PREMAR-2 code, aimed at radiation transport Monte Carlo simulation in atmospheric environments in the infrared-ultraviolet frequency range, are described. With respect to the previously developed PREMAR code, besides plane multilayers, spherical multilayers and finite sequences of vertical layers, each one with its own atmospheric behaviour, are foreseen in the new code, together with the refraction phenomenon, so that long range, highly slanted paths can now be more faithfully taken into account. A zenithal angular dependence of the albedo coefficient has moreover been introduced. Lidar systems, with spatially independent source and telescope, are allowed again to be simulated, and, in this latest version of the code, sensitivity analyses to be performed. According to this last feasibility, consequences on radiation transport of small perturbations in physical components of the atmospheric environment may be analyze and the related effects on searched results estimated. The availability of a library of physical data (reaction coefficients, phase functions and refraction indexes) is required by the code, providing the essential features of the environment of interest needed of the Monte Carlo simulation. Variance reducing techniques have been enhanced in the Premar-2 code, by introducing, for instance, a local forced collision technique, especially apt to be used in Lidar system simulations. Encouraging comparisons between code and experimental results carried out at the Brasimone Centre of ENEA, have so far been obtained, even if further checks of the code are to be performed [it

  2. Novel 3D/VR interactive environment for MD simulations, visualization and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doblack, Benjamin N; Allis, Tim; Dávila, Lilian P

    2014-12-18

    The increasing development of computing (hardware and software) in the last decades has impacted scientific research in many fields including materials science, biology, chemistry and physics among many others. A new computational system for the accurate and fast simulation and 3D/VR visualization of nanostructures is presented here, using the open-source molecular dynamics (MD) computer program LAMMPS. This alternative computational method uses modern graphics processors, NVIDIA CUDA technology and specialized scientific codes to overcome processing speed barriers common to traditional computing methods. In conjunction with a virtual reality system used to model materials, this enhancement allows the addition of accelerated MD simulation capability. The motivation is to provide a novel research environment which simultaneously allows visualization, simulation, modeling and analysis. The research goal is to investigate the structure and properties of inorganic nanostructures (e.g., silica glass nanosprings) under different conditions using this innovative computational system. The work presented outlines a description of the 3D/VR Visualization System and basic components, an overview of important considerations such as the physical environment, details on the setup and use of the novel system, a general procedure for the accelerated MD enhancement, technical information, and relevant remarks. The impact of this work is the creation of a unique computational system combining nanoscale materials simulation, visualization and interactivity in a virtual environment, which is both a research and teaching instrument at UC Merced.

  3. Recycled construction and demolition concrete waste as aggregate for structural concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf M. Wagih

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In major Egyptian cities there is a surge in construction and demolition waste (CDW quantities causing an adverse effect on the environment. The use of such waste as recycled aggregate in concrete can be useful for both environmental and economical aspects in the construction industry. This study discusses the possibility to replace natural coarse aggregate (NA with recycled concrete aggregate (RCA in structural concrete. An investigation into the properties of RCA is made using crushing and grading of concrete rubble collected from different demolition sites and landfill locations around Cairo. Aggregates used in the study were: natural sand, dolomite and crushed concretes obtained from different sources. A total of 50 concrete mixes forming eight groups were cast. Groups were designed to study the effect of recycled coarse aggregates quality/content, cement dosage, use of superplasticizer and silica fume. Tests were carried out for: compressive strength, splitting strength and elastic modulus. The results showed that the concrete rubble could be transformed into useful recycled aggregate and used in concrete production with properties suitable for most structural concrete applications in Egypt. A significant reduction in the properties of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC made of 100% RCA was seen when compared to natural aggregate concrete (NAC, while the properties of RAC made of a blend of 75% NA and 25% RCA showed no significant change in concrete properties.

  4. Concrete construction engineering handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Nawy, Edward G

    2008-01-01

    Provides coverage of concrete construction engineering and technology. This work features discussions focusing on: the advances in engineered concrete materials; reinforced concrete construction; specialized construction techniques; and, design recommendations for high performance.

  5. Semantic and Virtual Reality-Enhanced Configuration of Domestic Environments: The Smart Home Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Spoladore

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the Smart Home Simulator, one of the main outcomes of the D4All project. This application takes into account the variety of issues involved in the development of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL solutions, such as the peculiarity of each end-users, appliances, and technologies with their deployment and data-sharing issues. The Smart Home Simulator—a mixed reality application able to support the configuration and customization of domestic environments in AAL systems—leverages on integration capabilities of Semantic Web technologies and the possibility to model relevant knowledge (about both the dwellers and the domestic environment into formal models. It also exploits Virtual Reality technologies as an efficient means to simplify the configuration of customized AAL environments. The application and the underlying framework will be validated through two different use cases, each one foreseeing the customized configuration of a domestic environment for specific segments of users.

  6. Time-Domain Simulations of Transient Species in Experimentally Relevant Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueltschi, Tyler W.; Fischer, Sean A.; Apra, Edoardo; Tarnovsky, Alexander N.; Govind, Niranjan; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2016-02-04

    Simulating the spectroscopic properties of short-lived thermal and photochemical reaction intermediates and products is a challenging task, as these species often feature atypical molecular and electronic structures. The complex environments in which such species typically reside in practice add further complexity to the problem. Herein, we tackle this problem in silico using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations, employing iso-CHBr3, namely H(Br)C-Br-Br, as a prototypical system. This species was chosen because it features both a non-conventional C-Br-Br bonding pattern, as well as a strong dependence of its spectral features on the local environment in which it resides, as illustrated in recent experimental reports. The spectroscopic properties of iso-CHBr3 were measured by several groups that captured this transient intermediate in the photochemistry of CHBr3 in the gas phase, in rare gas matrices at 5K, and in solution under ambient laboratory conditions. We simulate the UV-Vis and IR spectra of iso-CHBr3 in all three media, including a Ne cluster (64 atoms) and a methylcyclohexane cage (14 solvent molecules) representative of the matrix isolated and solvated species. We exclusively perform fully quantum mechanical static and dynamic simulations. By comparing our condensed phase simulations to their experimental analogues, we stress the importance of (i) conformational sampling, even at cryogenic temperatures, and (ii) using a fully quantum mechanical description of both solute and bath to properly account for the experimental observables.

  7. Testing Silica Fume-Based Concrete Composites under Chemical and Microbiological Sulfate Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Estokova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Current design practices based on descriptive approaches to concrete specification may not be appropriate for the management of aggressive environments. In this study, the durability of cement-based materials with and without the addition of silica fume, subjected to conditions that leach calcium and silicon, were investigated. Chemical corrosion was simulated by employing various H2SO4 and MgSO4 solutions, and biological corrosion was simulated using Acidithiobacillus sp. bacterial inoculation, leading to disrupted and damaged surfaces; the samples’ mass changes were studied following both chemical and biological attacks. Different leaching trends were observed via X-ray fluorescence when comparing chemical with biological leaching. Lower leaching rates were found for concrete samples fortified with silica fume than those without silica fume. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy confirmed a massive sulfate precipitate formation on the concrete surface due to bacterial exposure.

  8. A simple interface to computational fluid dynamics programs for building environment simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broderick, III, C R; Chen, Q [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    It is becoming a popular practice for architects and HVAC engineers to simulate airflow in and around buildings by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods in order to predict indoor and outdoor environment. However, many CFD programs are crippled by a historically poor and inefficient user interface system, particularly for users with little training in numerical simulation. This investigation endeavors to create a simplified CFD interface (SCI) that allows architects and buildings engineers to use CFD without excessive training. The SCI can be easily integrated into new CFD programs. (author)

  9. Creating a Realistic Weather Environment for Motion-Based Piloted Flight Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Taumi S.; Schaffner, Philip R.; Evans, Emory T.; Neece, Robert T.; Young, Steve D.

    2012-01-01

    A flight simulation environment is being enhanced to facilitate experiments that evaluate research prototypes of advanced onboard weather radar, hazard/integrity monitoring (HIM), and integrated alerting and notification (IAN) concepts in adverse weather conditions. The simulation environment uses weather data based on real weather events to support operational scenarios in a terminal area. A simulated atmospheric environment was realized by using numerical weather data sets. These were produced from the High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) model hosted and run by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). To align with the planned flight simulation experiment requirements, several HRRR data sets were acquired courtesy of NOAA. These data sets coincided with severe weather events at the Memphis International Airport (MEM) in Memphis, TN. In addition, representative flight tracks for approaches and departures at MEM were generated and used to develop and test simulations of (1) what onboard sensors such as the weather radar would observe; (2) what datalinks of weather information would provide; and (3) what atmospheric conditions the aircraft would experience (e.g. turbulence, winds, and icing). The simulation includes a weather radar display that provides weather and turbulence modes, derived from the modeled weather along the flight track. The radar capabilities and the pilots controls simulate current-generation commercial weather radar systems. Appropriate data-linked weather advisories (e.g., SIGMET) were derived from the HRRR weather models and provided to the pilot consistent with NextGen concepts of use for Aeronautical Information Service (AIS) and Meteorological (MET) data link products. The net result of this simulation development was the creation of an environment that supports investigations of new flight deck information systems, methods for incorporation of better weather information, and pilot interface and operational improvements

  10. A spacecraft's own ambient environment: The role of simulation-based research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketsdever, Andrew D. [University of Colorado Colorado Springs, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Colorado Springs, CO (United States); Gimelshein, Sergey [University of Southern California, Department of Astronautical Engineering, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-12-09

    Spacecraft contamination has long been a subject of study in the rarefied gas dynamics community. Professor Mikhail Ivanov coined the term a spacecraft's 'own ambient environment' to describe the effects of natural and satellite driven processes on the conditions encountered by a spacecraft in orbit. Outgassing, thruster firings, and gas and liquid dumps all contribute to the spacecraft's contamination environment. Rarefied gas dynamic modeling techniques, such as Direct Simulation Monte Carlo, are well suited to investigate these spacebased environments. However, many advances were necessary to fully characterize the extent of this problem. A better understanding of modeling flows over large pressure ranges, for example hybrid continuum and rarefied numerical schemes, were required. Two-phase flow modeling under rarefied conditions was necessary. And the ability to model plasma flows for a new era of propulsion systems was also required. Through the work of Professor Ivanov and his team, we now have a better understanding of processes that create a spacecraft's own ambient environment and are able to better characterize these environments. Advances in numerical simulation have also spurred on the development of experimental facilities to study these effects. The relationship between numerical results and experimental advances will be explored in this manuscript.

  11. Improving the adaptability of simulated evolutionary swarm robots in dynamically changing environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Yao

    Full Text Available One of the important challenges in the field of evolutionary robotics is the development of systems that can adapt to a changing environment. However, the ability to adapt to unknown and fluctuating environments is not straightforward. Here, we explore the adaptive potential of simulated swarm robots that contain a genomic encoding of a bio-inspired gene regulatory network (GRN. An artificial genome is combined with a flexible agent-based system, representing the activated part of the regulatory network that transduces environmental cues into phenotypic behaviour. Using an artificial life simulation framework that mimics a dynamically changing environment, we show that separating the static from the conditionally active part of the network contributes to a better adaptive behaviour. Furthermore, in contrast with most hitherto developed ANN-based systems that need to re-optimize their complete controller network from scratch each time they are subjected to novel conditions, our system uses its genome to store GRNs whose performance was optimized under a particular environmental condition for a sufficiently long time. When subjected to a new environment, the previous condition-specific GRN might become inactivated, but remains present. This ability to store 'good behaviour' and to disconnect it from the novel rewiring that is essential under a new condition allows faster re-adaptation if any of the previously observed environmental conditions is reencountered. As we show here, applying these evolutionary-based principles leads to accelerated and improved adaptive evolution in a non-stable environment.

  12. Improving the Adaptability of Simulated Evolutionary Swarm Robots in Dynamically Changing Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yao; Marchal, Kathleen; Van de Peer, Yves

    2014-01-01

    One of the important challenges in the field of evolutionary robotics is the development of systems that can adapt to a changing environment. However, the ability to adapt to unknown and fluctuating environments is not straightforward. Here, we explore the adaptive potential of simulated swarm robots that contain a genomic encoding of a bio-inspired gene regulatory network (GRN). An artificial genome is combined with a flexible agent-based system, representing the activated part of the regulatory network that transduces environmental cues into phenotypic behaviour. Using an artificial life simulation framework that mimics a dynamically changing environment, we show that separating the static from the conditionally active part of the network contributes to a better adaptive behaviour. Furthermore, in contrast with most hitherto developed ANN-based systems that need to re-optimize their complete controller network from scratch each time they are subjected to novel conditions, our system uses its genome to store GRNs whose performance was optimized under a particular environmental condition for a sufficiently long time. When subjected to a new environment, the previous condition-specific GRN might become inactivated, but remains present. This ability to store ‘good behaviour’ and to disconnect it from the novel rewiring that is essential under a new condition allows faster re-adaptation if any of the previously observed environmental conditions is reencountered. As we show here, applying these evolutionary-based principles leads to accelerated and improved adaptive evolution in a non-stable environment. PMID:24599485

  13. Influence of anatomic landmarks in the virtual environment on simulated angled laparoscope navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Lorna S.; Goossens, Richard H. M.; de Ridder, Huib; Jakimowicz, Jack J.

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the presence of anatomic landmarks on the performance of angled laparoscope navigation on the SimSurgery SEP simulator. Methods Twenty-eight experienced laparoscopic surgeons (familiar with 30° angled laparoscope, >100 basic laparoscopic procedures, >5 advanced laparoscopic procedures) and 23 novices (no laparoscopy experience) performed the Camera Navigation task in an abstract virtual environment (CN-box) and in a virtual representation of the lower abdomen (CN-abdomen). They also rated the realism and added value of the virtual environments on seven-point scales. Results Within both groups, the CN-box task was accomplished in less time and with shorter tip trajectory than the CN-abdomen task (Wilcoxon test, p  0.05). In both groups, the CN tasks were perceived as hard work and more challenging than anticipated. Conclusions Performance of the angled laparoscope navigation task is influenced by the virtual environment surrounding the exercise. The task was performed better in an abstract environment than in a virtual environment with anatomic landmarks. More insight is required into the influence and function of different types of intrinsic and extrinsic feedback on the effectiveness of preclinical simulator training. PMID:20419318

  14. Chlorine signal attenuation in concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, A A; Maslehuddin, M; Ur-Rehman, Khateeb; Al-Amoudi, O S B

    2015-11-01

    The intensity of prompt gamma-ray was measured at various depths from chlorine-contaminated silica fume (SF) concrete slab concrete specimens using portable neutron generator-based prompt gamma-ray setup. The intensity of 6.11MeV chloride gamma-rays was measured from the chloride contaminated slab at distance of 15.25, 20.25, 25.25, 30.25 and 35.25cm from neutron target in a SF cement concrete slab specimens. Due to attenuation of thermal neutron flux and emitted gamma-ray intensity in SF cement concrete at various depths, the measured intensity of chlorine gamma-rays decreases non-linearly with increasing depth in concrete. A good agreement was noted between the experimental results and the results of Monte Carlo simulation. This study has provided useful experimental data for evaluating the chloride contamination in the SF concrete utilizing gamma-ray attenuation method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Monitoring of prestressed concrete pressure vessels. II. performance of selected concrete embedment strain meters under normal and extreme environmental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Hurtt, C.C.

    1978-10-01

    Unique types of instrumentation are used in prestressed concrete pressure vessels (PCPVs) to measure strains, stresses, deflections, prestressing forces, moisture content, temperatures, and possibly cracking. Their primary purpose is to monitor these complex structures throughout their 20- to 30-year operating lifetime in order to provide continuing assurance of their reliability and safety. Numerous concrete embedment instrumentation systems are available commercially. Since this instrumentation is important in providing continuing assurance of satisfactory performance of PCPVs, the information provided must be reliable. Therefore, laboratory studies were conducted to evaluate the reliability of these commercially available instrumentation systems. This report, the second in a series related to instrumentation embedded in concrete, presents performance-reliability data for 13 types of selected concrete embedment strain meters which were subjected to a variety of loading environments, including unloaded, thermally loaded, simulated PCPV, and extreme environments. Although only a limited number of meters of each type were tested in any one test series, the composite results of the investigation indicate that the majority of these meters would not be able to provide reliable data throughout the 20- to 30-year anticipated operating life of a PCPV. Specific conclusions drawn from the study are: (1) Improved corrosion-resistant materials and sealing techniques should be developed for meters that are to be used in PCPV environments. (2) There is a need for the development of meters that are capable of surviving in concretes where temperatures in excess of 66 0 C are present for extended periods of time. (3) Research should be conducted on other measurement techniques, such as inductance, capacitance, and fluidics

  16. SIMULATIONS IN TECHNOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENTS AS A TOOL FOR TRAINING IN TRANSVERSAL COMPETENCES FOR UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercè Gisbert Cervera

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper consists of a reflection on how the technological environments can play a key role in the current Higher Education scene. This reflection observes the structural configuration and the key agents of the educational process. The content is developed firstly locating the student in the University of the 21st century; the methodological renovation is analyzed from two perspectives: the development of the technologies and the new role of teacher and student in this new scene; finally the simulations in technological environments are proposed as a valuable strategy to give response to the formative needs of the student in the current society.

  17. Interaction of a 238Pu fueled-sphere assembly with a simulated terrestrial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinkruger, F.J.; Patterson, J.H.; Herrera, B.; Nelson, G.B.; Matlack, G.M.; Waterbury, G.R.; Pavone, D.

    1981-02-01

    A 238 Pu fueled sphere assembly (FSA) was exposed to a simulated humid environment on sandy soil for 3 y. After a 70-week exposure, plutonium was first detected in measurable quantities in rain and condensate samples. A core sample taken in the ninety-third week contained 302 ng of plutonium. Examination of the FSA after exposure revealed a hole in the bottom of the graphite impact shell (GIS) and a leaking weld on the vent assembly of the postimpact containment shell (PICS). These two openings may be the pathways for plutonium entry into the environment from the FSA

  18. Oxygen isotopic composition of carbonate concretions from the lower Cretaceous of Victoria, Australia: Implications for the evolution of meteoric waters on the Australian continent in a paleopolar environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, R.T.

    1989-01-01

    Oxygen isotopic data from carbonate cements in concretions have been used to infer the isotopic composition of meteoric fluids present at the time of concretion growth in terrestrial sediments that were deposited within the early Cretaceous South Polar Circle at 75-80 0 S. Carbon and oxygen isotope compositions have been determined on over 135 samples of carbonate from 45 concretions taken from 24 localities (Aptian-Albian in age) in the terrestrial sedimentary basins associated with the Otway and Strzelecki groups, southeastern Australia. The carbonate cements include calcite having -26.4≤δ 13 C≤19.6 and 3.6≤δ 18 O≤29.6 or siderite having 17.6≤δ 18 O≤30.8. Calcite-cemented concretions are more abundant and are interpreted to represent early near-surface cementation events on the basis of textural evidence such as high (>30%) porosities at the time of cementation and mineralogical evidence such as the preferential preservation within concretions of labile detrital grains including plagioclase, pyroxene, and amphibole. The oxygen isotopic data indicate that meteoric fluids with very low δ 18 O, certainly less than -15per mille and probably on the order of -20per mille, were involved in the precipitation of the early calcites. The extremely low δ 18 O values of the fluids involved in the early diagenesis of both the Otway and Strzelecki groups suggest that the catchment area of the river system that carried sediments to these basins had a cold high-latitude climate (with mean annual temperatures less than 5 0 C and quite possibly below freezing). By analogy with the relationship between modern 18 O distribution of meteoric fluids and climate, these new data suggest that the early Cretaceous polar regions may not have been ice-free. (orig.)

  19. Recycled concrete aggregate in portland cement concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Aggregates can be produced by crushing hydraulic cement concrete and are known as recycled concrete : aggregates (RCA). This report provides results from a New Jersey Department of Transportation study to identify : barriers to the use of RCA in new ...

  20. Reviewing the Carbonation Resistance of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S P Singh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the studies on one of the important durability properties of concrete i.e. Carbonation. One of the main causes of deterioration of concrete is carbonation, which occurs when carbon dioxide (CO2 penetrates the concrete’s porous system to create an environment with lower pH around the reinforcement in which corrosion can proceed. Carbonation is a major cause of degradation of concrete structures leading to expensive maintenance and conservation operations. Herein, the importance, process and effect of various parameters such as water/cement ratio, water/binder ratio, curing conditions, concrete cover, super plasticizers, type of aggregates, grade of concrete, porosity, contaminants, compaction, gas permeability, supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs/ admixtures on the carbonation of concrete has been reviewed. Various methods for estimating the carbonation depth are also reported briefly