WorldWideScience

Sample records for simple pharmacokinetic model

  1. Reconstructing Organophosphorus Pesticide Doses Using the Reversed Dosimetry Approach in a Simple Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chensheng Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We illustrated the development of a simple pharmacokinetic (SPK model aiming to estimate the absorbed chlorpyrifos doses using urinary biomarker data, 3,5,6-trichlorpyridinol as the model input. The effectiveness of the SPK model in the pesticide risk assessment was evaluated by comparing dose estimates using different urinary composite data. The dose estimates resulting from the first morning voids appeared to be lower than but not significantly different to those using before bedtime, lunch or dinner voids. We found similar trend for dose estimates using three different urinary composite data. However, the dose estimates using the SPK model for individual children were significantly higher than those from the conventional physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK modeling using aggregate environmental measurements of chlorpyrifos as the model inputs. The use of urinary data in the SPK model intuitively provided a plausible alternative to the conventional PBPK model in reconstructing the absorbed chlorpyrifos dose.

  2. Human plasma concentrations of tolbutamide and acetaminophen extrapolated from in vivo animal pharmacokinetics using in vitro human hepatic clearances and simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling for radio-labeled microdose clinical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Kunikane, Eriko; Nishiyama, Sayako; Murayama, Norie; Shimizu, Makiko; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Chiba, Koji; Ikeda, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to extrapolate the pharmacokinetics of drug substances orally administered in humans from rat pharmacokinetic data using tolbutamide and acetaminophen as model compounds. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents from rat studies based on reported plasma concentrations were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors. In this extrapolation, in vitro metabolic clearance data were obtained using liver preparations. Rates of tolbutamide elimination were roughly similar in rat and human liver microsome experiments, but acetaminophen elimination by rat liver microsomes and cytosolic preparations showed a tendency to be faster than those in humans. Using a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, estimated human plasma concentrations of tolbutamide and acetaminophen were consistent with reported concentrations. Tolbutamide cleared in a roughly similar manner in humans and rats, but medical-dose levels of acetaminophen cleared (dependent on liver metabolism) more slowly from plasma in humans than it did in rats. The data presented here illustrate how pharmacokinetic data in combination with a simple PBPK model can be used to assist evaluations of the pharmacological/toxicological potential of new drug substances and for estimating human radiation exposures from radio-labeled drugs when planning human studies. (author)

  3. Simple intake and pharmacokinetic modeling to characterize exposure of Americans to perfluoroctanoic acid, PFOA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorber, Matthew; Egeghy, Peter P

    2011-10-01

    Models for assessing intakes of perfluorooctanoic acid, PFOA, are described and applied. One model is based on exposure media concentrations and contact rates. This model is applied to general population exposures for adults and 2-year old children. The other model is a simple one-compartment, first-order pharmacokinetic (PK) model. Parameters for this model include a rate of elimination of PFOA and a blood volume of distribution. The model was applied to data from the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey, NHANES, to backcalculate intakes. The central tendency intake estimate for adults and children based on exposure media concentrations and contact rates were 70 and 26 ng/day, respectively. The central tendency adult intake derived from NHANES data was 56 and 37 ng/day for males and females, respectively. Variability and uncertainty discussions regarding the intake modeling focus on lack of data on direct exposure to PFOA used in consumer products, precursor compounds, and food. Discussions regarding PK modeling focus on the range of blood measurements in NHANES, the appropriateness of the simple PK model, and the uncertainties associated with model parameters. Using the PK model, the 10th and 95th percentile long-term average adult intakes of PFOA are 15 and 130 ng/day.

  4. Human physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for propofol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnider Thomas W

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Propofol is widely used for both short-term anesthesia and long-term sedation. It has unusual pharmacokinetics because of its high lipid solubility. The standard approach to describing the pharmacokinetics is by a multi-compartmental model. This paper presents the first detailed human physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK model for propofol. Methods PKQuest, a freely distributed software routine http://www.pkquest.com, was used for all the calculations. The "standard human" PBPK parameters developed in previous applications is used. It is assumed that the blood and tissue binding is determined by simple partition into the tissue lipid, which is characterized by two previously determined set of parameters: 1 the value of the propofol oil/water partition coefficient; 2 the lipid fraction in the blood and tissues. The model was fit to the individual experimental data of Schnider et. al., Anesthesiology, 1998; 88:1170 in which an initial bolus dose was followed 60 minutes later by a one hour constant infusion. Results The PBPK model provides a good description of the experimental data over a large range of input dosage, subject age and fat fraction. Only one adjustable parameter (the liver clearance is required to describe the constant infusion phase for each individual subject. In order to fit the bolus injection phase, for 10 or the 24 subjects it was necessary to assume that a fraction of the bolus dose was sequestered and then slowly released from the lungs (characterized by two additional parameters. The average weighted residual error (WRE of the PBPK model fit to the both the bolus and infusion phases was 15%; similar to the WRE for just the constant infusion phase obtained by Schnider et. al. using a 6-parameter NONMEM compartmental model. Conclusion A PBPK model using standard human parameters and a simple description of tissue binding provides a good description of human propofol kinetics. The major advantage of a

  5. Non-linear mixed-effects pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modelling in NLME using differential equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Agersø, Henrik; Madsen, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    The standard software for non-linear mixed-effect analysis of pharmacokinetic/phar-macodynamic (PK/PD) data is NONMEM while the non-linear mixed-effects package NLME is an alternative as tong as the models are fairly simple. We present the nlmeODE package which combines the ordinary differential...... equation (ODE) solver package odesolve and the non-Linear mixed effects package NLME thereby enabling the analysis of complicated systems of ODEs by non-linear mixed-effects modelling. The pharmacokinetics of the anti-asthmatic drug theophylline is used to illustrate the applicability of the nlme...

  6. Modelling delays in pharmacokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooqi, Z.H.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    Linear system analysis has come to form the backbone of pharmacokinetics. Natural systems usually involve time delays, thus models incorporating them would be an order closer approximation to the real world compared to those that do not. Delays may be modelled in several ways. The approach considered in this study is to have a discrete-time delay dependent rate with the delay respresenting the duration between the entry of a drug into a compartment and its release in some form (may be as a metabolite) from the compartment. Such a delay may be because of one or more of several physiological reasons, like, formation of a reservoir, slow metabolism, or receptor binding. The mathematical structure this gives rise to is a system of delay-differential equations. Examples are given of simple one and two compartment systems with drugs like bumetanide, carbamazepine, and quinolone-caffeine interaction. In these examples generally a good fit is obtained and the suggested models form a good approximation. 21 refs., 6 figs

  7. Development of a simple chromatographic method for the determination of piracetam in human plasma and its pharmacokinetic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkat, K; Ahmad, M; Minhas, M U; Malik, M Z; Sohail, M

    2014-07-01

    The objective of study was to develop an accurate and reproducible HPLC method for determination of piracetam in human plasma and to evaluate pharmacokinetic parameters of 800 mg piracetam. A simple, rapid, accurate, precise and sensitive high pressure liquid chromatography method has been developed and subsequently validated for determination of piracetam. This study represents the results of a randomized, single-dose and single-period in 18 healthy male volunteers to assess pharmacokinetic parameters of 800 mg piracetam tablets. Various pharmacokinetic parameters were determined from plasma for piracetam and found to be in good agreement with previous reported values. The data was analyzed by using Kinetica® version 4.4 according to non-compartment model of pharmacokinetic analysis and after comparison with previous studies, no significant differences were found in present study of tested product. The major pharmacokinetic parameters for piracetam were as follows: t1/2 was (4.40 ± 0.179) h; Tmax value was (2.33 ± 0.105) h; Cmax was (14.53 ± 0.282) µg/mL; the AUC(0-∞) was (59.19 ± 4.402) µg · h/mL. AUMC(0-∞) was (367.23 ± 38.96) µg. (h)(2)/mL; Ke was (0.16 ± 0.006) h; MRT was (5.80 ± 0.227) h; Vd was (96.36 ± 8.917 L). A rapid, accurate and precise high pressure liquid chromatography method was developed and validated before the study. It is concluded that this method is very useful for the analysis of pharmacokinetic parameters, in human plasma and assured the safety and efficacy of piracetam, can be effectively used in medical practice. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Development of a Pharmacokinetic Model to Describe the Complex Pharmacokinetics of Pazopanib in Cancer Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Huixin; van Erp, Nielka; Bins, Sander; Mathijssen, Ron H J; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H.; Steeghs, Neeltje; Huitema, Alwin D R

    Background and Objective: Pazopanib is a multi-targeted anticancer tyrosine kinase inhibitor. This study was conducted to develop a population pharmacokinetic (popPK) model describing the complex pharmacokinetics of pazopanib in cancer patients. Methods: Pharmacokinetic data were available from 96

  9. Development of a Pharmacokinetic Model to Describe the Complex Pharmacokinetics of Pazopanib in Cancer Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, H.; Erp, N. van; Bins, S.; Mathijssen, R.H.; Schellens, J.H.; Beijnen, J.H.; Steeghs, N.; Huitema, A.D.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Pazopanib is a multi-targeted anticancer tyrosine kinase inhibitor. This study was conducted to develop a population pharmacokinetic (popPK) model describing the complex pharmacokinetics of pazopanib in cancer patients. METHODS: Pharmacokinetic data were available from 96

  10. Vascular input function correction of inflow enhancement for improved pharmacokinetic modeling of liver DCE-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Jia; Schubert, Tilman; Johnson, Kevin M; Roldán-Alzate, Alejandro; Chen, Huijun; Yuan, Chun; Reeder, Scott B

    2018-06-01

    To propose a simple method to correct vascular input function (VIF) due to inflow effects and to test whether the proposed method can provide more accurate VIFs for improved pharmacokinetic modeling. A spoiled gradient echo sequence-based inflow quantification and contrast agent concentration correction method was proposed. Simulations were conducted to illustrate improvement in the accuracy of VIF estimation and pharmacokinetic fitting. Animal studies with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR scans were conducted before, 1 week after, and 2 weeks after portal vein embolization (PVE) was performed in the left portal circulation of pigs. The proposed method was applied to correct the VIFs for model fitting. Pharmacokinetic parameters fitted using corrected and uncorrected VIFs were compared between different lobes and visits. Simulation results demonstrated that the proposed method can improve accuracy of VIF estimation and pharmacokinetic fitting. In animal study results, pharmacokinetic fitting using corrected VIFs demonstrated changes in perfusion consistent with changes expected after PVE, whereas the perfusion estimates derived by uncorrected VIFs showed no significant changes. The proposed correction method improves accuracy of VIFs and therefore provides more precise pharmacokinetic fitting. This method may be promising in improving the reliability of perfusion quantification. Magn Reson Med 79:3093-3102, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. An Allometric Model of Remifentanil Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eleveld, Douglas J.; Proost, Johannes H.; Vereecke, Hugo; Absalom, Anthony R.; Olofsen, Erik; Vuyk, Jaap; Struys, Michel M. R. F.

    Background: Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models are used to predict and explore drug infusion schemes and their resulting concentration profiles for clinical application. Our aim was to develop a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model for remifentanil that is accurate in patients with a wide

  12. An interactive program for pharmacokinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, D R; Mao, F

    1993-05-01

    A computer program, PharmK, was developed for pharmacokinetic modeling of experimental data. The program was written in C computer language based on the high-level user-interface Macintosh operating system. The intention was to provide a user-friendly tool for users of Macintosh computers. An interactive algorithm based on the exponential stripping method is used for the initial parameter estimation. Nonlinear pharmacokinetic model fitting is based on the maximum likelihood estimation method and is performed by the Levenberg-Marquardt method based on chi 2 criterion. Several methods are available to aid the evaluation of the fitting results. Pharmacokinetic data sets have been examined with the PharmK program, and the results are comparable with those obtained with other programs that are currently available for IBM PC-compatible and other types of computers.

  13. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for inhalation of jet fuels in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sheppard A; Campbell, Jerry L; Tremblay, Raphael T; Fisher, Jeffrey W

    2012-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic behavior of the majority of jet fuel constituents has not been previously described in the framework of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for inhalation exposure. Toxic effects have been reported in multiple organ systems, though exposure methods varied across studies, utilizing either vaporized or aerosolized fuels. The purpose of this work was to assess the pharmacokinetics of aerosolized and vaporized fuels, and develop a PBPK model capable of describing both types of exposures. To support model development, n-tetradecane and n-octane exposures were conducted at 89 mg/m(3) aerosol+vapor and 1000-5000 ppm vapor, respectively. Exposures to JP-8 and S-8 were conducted at ~900-1000 mg/m(3), and ~200 mg/m(3) to a 50:50 blend of both fuels. Sub-models were developed to assess the behavior of representative constituents and grouped unquantified constituents, termed "lumps", accounting for the remaining fuel mass. The sub-models were combined into the first PBPK model for petroleum and synthetic jet fuels. Inhalation of hydrocarbon vapors was described with simple gas-exchange assumptions for uptake and exhalation. For aerosol droplets systemic uptake occurred in the thoracic region. Visceral tissues were described using perfusion and diffusion-limited equations. The model described kinetics at multiple fuel concentrations, utilizing a chemical "lumping" strategy to estimate parameters for fractions of speciated and unspeciated hydrocarbons and gauge metabolic interactions. The model more accurately simulated aromatic and lower molecular weight (MW) n-alkanes than some higher MW chemicals. Metabolic interactions were more pronounced at high (~2700-1000 mg/m(3)) concentrations. This research represents the most detailed assessment of fuel pharmacokinetics to date.

  14. Grey-Box Modelling of Pharmacokinetic /Pharmacodynamic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Jacobsen, Judith L.; Pedersen, Oluf

    2004-01-01

    Grey-box pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modelling is presented as a promising way of modelling PK/PD systems. The concept behind grey-box modelling is based on combining physiological knowledge along with information from data in the estimation of model parameters. Grey-box modelling...

  15. Modeling of corneal and retinal pharmacokinetics after periocular drug administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrite, Aniruddha C; Edelhauser, Henry F; Kompella, Uday B

    2008-01-01

    To develop pharmacokinetics models to describe the disposition of small lipophilic molecules in the cornea and retina after periocular (subconjunctival or posterior subconjunctival) administration. Compartmental pharmacokinetics analysis was performed on the corneal and retinal data obtained after periocular administration of 3 mg of celecoxib (a selective COX-2 inhibitor) to Brown Norway (BN) rats. Berkeley Madonna, a differential and difference equation-based modeling software, was used for the pharmacokinetics modeling. The data were fit to different compartment models with first-order input and disposition, and the best fit was selected on the basis of coefficient of regression and Akaike information criteria (AIC). The models were validated by using the celecoxib data from a prior study in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The corneal model was also fit to the corneal data for prednisolone at a dose of 2.61 mg in albino rabbits, and the model was validated at two other doses of prednisolone (0.261 and 26.1 mg) in these rabbits. Model simulations were performed with the finalized model to understand the effect of formulation on corneal and retinal pharmacokinetics after periocular administration. Celecoxib kinetics in the BN rat cornea can be described by a two-compartment (periocular space and cornea, with a dissolution step for periocular formulation) model, with parallel elimination from the cornea and the periocular space. The inclusion of a distribution compartment or a dissolution step for celecoxib suspension did not lead to an overall improvement in the corneal data fit compared with the two-compartment model. The more important parameter for enhanced fit and explaining the apparent lack of an increase phase in the corneal levels is the inclusion of the initial leak-back of the dose from the periocular space into the precorneal area. The predicted celecoxib concentrations from this model also showed very good correlation (r = 0.99) with the observed values in

  16. Whole body [O-15]water pharmacokinetics measured in blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maguire, RP; Spyrou, NM; Leenders, KL

    A simple pharmacokinetic model to explain the time course of [0-15]water in human whole blood after bolus injection is described. The model has been derived from measurements in twelve healthy volunteers who were measured repeatedly, resulting in 67 datasets, made in the context of PET blood flow

  17. Population pharmacokinetic model of transdermal nicotine delivered from a matrix-type patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linakis, Matthew W; Rower, Joseph E; Roberts, Jessica K; Miller, Eleanor I; Wilkins, Diana G; Sherwin, Catherine M T

    2017-12-01

    Nicotine addiction is an issue faced by millions of individuals worldwide. As a result, nicotine replacement therapies, such as transdermal nicotine patches, have become widely distributed and used. While the pharmacokinetics of transdermal nicotine have been extensively described using noncompartmental methods, there are few data available describing the between-subject variability in transdermal nicotine pharmacokinetics. The aim of this investigation was to use population pharmacokinetic techniques to describe this variability, particularly as it pertains to the absorption of nicotine from the transdermal patch. A population pharmacokinetic parent-metabolite model was developed using plasma concentrations from 25 participants treated with transdermal nicotine. Covariates tested in this model included: body weight, body mass index, body surface area (calculated using the Mosteller equation) and sex. Nicotine pharmacokinetics were best described with a one-compartment model with absorption based on a Weibull distribution and first-order elimination and a single compartment for the major metabolite, cotinine. Body weight was a significant covariate on apparent volume of distribution of nicotine (exponential scaling factor 1.42). After the inclusion of body weight in the model, no other covariates were significant. This is the first population pharmacokinetic model to describe the absorption and disposition of transdermal nicotine and its metabolism to cotinine and the pharmacokinetic variability between individuals who were administered the patch. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  18. Physiologically based pharmacokinetics model for estimating urinary excretion of short half-life nuclides in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahane, K.; Kai, M.; Konishi, E.; Kusama, T.; Aoki, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The biokinetic model in ICRP 53 is used for calculating absorbed dose to each organ of a patient in nuclear medicine. The ICRP model is a simple compartment model based on human data; however, the model cannot produce the biokinetics of radiopharmaceuticals under various physiological conditions. On the other hand, a physiologically based pharmacokinetics model (PBPK model) can describe the flow of radiopharmaceuticals as a compartment model for any physiological conditions theoretically. The PBPK model was applied especially for the kidney-bladder dynamics, and similar results obtained compared with the ICRP model. This suggests the possibility of the PBPK model for predicting the biokinetics of radiopharmaceuticals under various physiological conditions. (Author)

  19. Modeling in biopharmaceutics, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics homogeneous and heterogeneous approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Macheras, Panos

    2016-01-01

    The state of the art in Biopharmaceutics, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics Modeling is presented in this new second edition book. It shows how advanced physical and mathematical methods can expand classical models in order to cover heterogeneous drug-biological processes and therapeutic effects in the body. The book is divided into four parts; the first deals with the fundamental principles of fractals, diffusion and nonlinear dynamics; the second with drug dissolution, release, and absorption; the third with epirical, compartmental, and stochastic pharmacokinetic models, with two new chapters, one on fractional pharmacokinetics and one on bioequivalence; and the fourth mainly with classical and nonclassical aspects of pharmacodynamics. The classical models that have relevance and application to these sciences are also considered throughout. This second edition has new information on reaction limited models of dissolution, non binary biopharmaceutic classification system, time varying models, and interf...

  20. Albendazole nanocrystals with improved pharmacokinetic performance in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Alejandro J; Bruni, Sergio Sánchez; Allemandi, Daniel; Lanusse, Carlos; Palma, Santiago D

    2018-02-01

    Albendazole (ABZ) is a broad-spectrum antiparasitic agent with poor aqueous solubility, which leads to poor/erratic bioavailability and therapeutic failures. Here, we aimed to produce a novel formulation of ABZ nanocrystals (ABZNC) and assess its pharmacokinetic performance in mice. Results/methodology: ABZNC were prepared by high-pressure homogenization and spray-drying processes. Redispersion capacity and solid yield were measured in order to obtain an optimized product. The final particle size was 415.69±7.40 nm and the solid yield was 72.32%. The pharmacokinetic parameters obtained in a mice model for ABZNC were enhanced (p < 0.05) with respect to the control formulation. ABZNC with improved pharmacokinetic behavior were produced by a simple, inexpensive and potentially scalable methodology.

  1. Pharmacokinetics and absolute bioavailability of phenobarbital in neonates and young infants, a population pharmacokinetic modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsot, Amélie; Brevaut-Malaty, Véronique; Vialet, Renaud; Boulamery, Audrey; Bruguerolle, Bernard; Simon, Nicolas

    2014-08-01

    Phenobarbital is widely used for treatment of neonatal seizures. Its optimal use in neonates and young infants requires information regarding pharmacokinetics. The objective of this study is to characterize the absolute bioavailability of phenobarbital in neonates and young infants, a pharmacokinetic parameter which has not yet been investigated. Routine clinical pharmacokinetic data were retrospectively collected from 48 neonates and infants (weight: 0.7-10 kg; patient's postnatal age: 0-206 days; GA: 27-42 weeks) treated with phenobarbital, who were administered as intravenous or suspension by oral routes and hospitalized in a paediatric intensive care unit. Total mean dose of 4.6 mg/kg (3.1-10.6 mg/kg) per day was administered by 30-min infusion or by oral route. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using a nonlinear mixed-effect population model software). Data were modelled with an allometric pharmacokinetic model, using three-fourths scaling exponent for clearance (CL). The population typical mean [per cent relative standard error (%RSE)] values for CL, apparent volume of distribution (Vd ) and bioavailability (F) were 0.0054 L/H/kg (7%), 0.64 L/kg (15%) and 48.9% (22%), respectively. The interindividual variability of CL, Vd , F (%RSE) and residual variability (%RSE) was 17% (31%), 50% (27%), 39% (27%) and 7.2 mg/L (29%), respectively. The absolute bioavailability of phenobarbital in neonates and infants was estimated. The dose should be increased when switching from intravenous to oral administration. © 2013 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Prediction of human CNS pharmacokinetics using a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamamoto, Yumi; Valitalo, Pyry A.; Wong, Yin Cheong; Huntjens, Dymphy R.; Proost, Johannes H.; Vermeulen, An; Krauwinkel, Walter; Beukers, Margot W.; Kokki, Hannu; Kokki, Merja; Danhof, Meindert; van Hasselt, Johan G. C.; de Lange, Elizabeth C. M.

    2018-01-01

    Knowledge of drug concentration-time profiles at the central nervous system (CNS) target-site is critically important for rational development of CNS targeted drugs. Our aim was to translate a recently published comprehensive CNS physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model from rat to human,

  3. Evaluation of pharmacokinetic model designs for subcutaneous infusion of insulin aspart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansell, Erin J.; Schmidt, Signe; Docherty, Paul D.

    2017-01-01

    Effective mathematical modelling of continuous subcutaneous infusion pharmacokinetics should aid understanding and control in insulin therapy. Thorough analysis of candidate model performance is important for selecting the appropriate models. Eight candidate models for insulin pharmacokinetics...... included a range of modelled behaviours, parameters and complexity. The models were compared using clinical data from subjects with type 1 diabetes with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Performance of the models was compared through several analyses: R2 for goodness of fit; the Akaike Information...

  4. Two-Compartment Pharmacokinetic Models for Chemical Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanneganti, Kumud; Simon, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The transport of potassium permanganate between two continuous-stirred vessels was investigated to help chemical and biomedical engineering students understand two-compartment pharmacokinetic models. Concepts of modeling, mass balance, parameter estimation and Laplace transform were applied to the two-unit process. A good agreement was achieved…

  5. Investigation of an alternative generic model for predicting pharmacokinetic changes during physiological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Henry T; Edginton, Andrea N; Cheung, Bob

    2013-10-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models were developed using MATLAB Simulink® and PK-Sim®. We compared the capability and usefulness of these two models by simulating pharmacokinetic changes of midazolam under exercise and heat stress to verify the usefulness of MATLAB Simulink® as a generic PBPK modeling software. Although both models show good agreement with experimental data obtained under resting condition, their predictions of pharmacokinetics changes are less accurate in the stressful conditions. However, MATLAB Simulink® may be more flexible to include physiologically based processes such as oral absorption and simulate various stress parameters such as stress intensity, duration and timing of drug administration to improve model performance. Further work will be conducted to modify algorithms in our generic model developed using MATLAB Simulink® and to investigate pharmacokinetics under other physiological stress such as trauma. © The Author(s) 2013.

  6. In Silico Ocular Pharmacokinetic Modeling: Delivery of Topical FK962 to Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Ayumi; Yabuta, Chiho; Kishimoto, Yayoi; Kozai, Seiko; Ohtori, Akira; Shearer, Thomas R; Azuma, Mitsuyoshi

    2017-09-01

    To establish the in silico ocular pharmacokinetic modeling for eye drops, and to simulate the dose regimen for FK962 in human choroid/retinal diseases. Pharmacokinetics for FK962 in vivo was performed by a single instillation of drops containing 0.1% 14 C-FK962 in rabbit eyes. Permeation of FK962 across the cornea, sclera, and choroid/retina was measured in vitro. Neurite elongation by FK962 was measured in cultured rat retinal ganglion cells. Parameters from the experimental data were used in an improved in silico model of ocular pharmacokinetics of FK962 in man. The mean concentration of FK962 in ocular tissues predicted by in silico modeling was consistent with in vivo results, validating the in silico model. FK962 rapidly penetrated into the anterior and posterior segments of the eye and then diffused into the vitreous body. The in silico pharmacokinetic modeling also predicted that a dose regimen of 0.0054% FK962 twice per day would produce biologically effective concentrations of FK962 in the choroid/retina, where FK962 facilitates rat neurite elongation. Our in silico model for ocular pharmacokinetics is useful (1) for predicting drug concentrations in specific ocular tissues after topical instillation, and (2) for suggesting the optimal dose regimens for eye drops. The pharmacodynamics for FK962 produced by this model may be useful for clinical trials against retinal neuropathy.

  7. UNCERTAINTIES IN TRICHLOROETHYLENE PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the pharmacokinetics of a chemical¯its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in humans and laboratory animals ¯ is critical to the assessment of its human health risks. For trichloroethylene (TCE), numerous physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK)...

  8. Time-dependent pharmacokinetics of dexamethasone and its efficacy in human breast cancer xenograft mice: a semi-mechanism-based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Chen, Rong; Yao, Qing-Yu; Liu, Sheng-Jun; Tian, Xiu-Yun; Hao, Chun-Yi; Lu, Wei; Zhou, Tian-Yan

    2018-03-01

    Dexamethasone (DEX) is the substrate of CYP3A. However, the activity of CYP3A could be induced by DEX when DEX was persistently administered, resulting in auto-induction and time-dependent pharmacokinetics (pharmacokinetics with time-dependent clearance) of DEX. In this study we investigated the pharmacokinetic profiles of DEX after single or multiple doses in human breast cancer xenograft nude mice and established a semi-mechanism-based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model for characterizing the time-dependent PK of DEX as well as its anti-cancer effect. The mice were orally given a single or multiple doses (8 mg/kg) of DEX, and the plasma concentrations of DEX were assessed using LC-MS/MS. Tumor volumes were recorded daily. Based on the experimental data, a two-compartment model with first order absorption and time-dependent clearance was established, and the time-dependence of clearance was modeled by a sigmoid E max equation. Moreover, a semi-mechanism-based PK/PD model was developed, in which the auto-induction effect of DEX on its metabolizing enzyme CYP3A was integrated and drug potency was described using an E max equation. The PK/PD model was further used to predict the drug efficacy when the auto-induction effect was or was not considered, which further revealed the necessity of adding the auto-induction effect into the final PK/PD model. This study established a semi-mechanism-based PK/PD model for characterizing the time-dependent pharmacokinetics of DEX and its anti-cancer effect in breast cancer xenograft mice. The model may serve as a reference for DEX dose adjustments or optimization in future preclinical or clinical studies.

  9. Reporting, Visualization, and Modeling of Immunogenicity Data to Assess Its Impact on Pharmacokinetics, Efficacy, and Safety of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passey, Chaitali; Suryawanshi, Satyendra; Sanghavi, Kinjal; Gupta, Manish

    2018-02-26

    The rapidly increasing number of therapeutic biologics in development has led to a growing recognition of the need for improvements in immunogenicity assessment. Published data are often inadequate to assess the impact of an antidrug antibody (ADA) on pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy, and enable a fully informed decision about patient management in the event of ADA development. The recent introduction of detailed regulatory guidance for industry should help address many past inadequacies in immunogenicity assessment. Nonetheless, careful analysis of gathered data and clear reporting of results are critical to a full understanding of the clinical relevance of ADAs, but have not been widely considered in published literature to date. Here, we review visualization and modeling of immunogenicity data. We present several relatively simple visualization techniques that can provide preliminary information about the kinetics and magnitude of ADA responses, and their impact on pharmacokinetics and clinical endpoints for a given therapeutic protein. We focus on individual sample- and patient-level data, which can be used to build a picture of any trends, thereby guiding analysis of the overall study population. We also discuss methods for modeling ADA data to investigate the impact of immunogenicity on pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety.

  10. Development of LC-MS determination method and back-propagation ANN pharmacokinetic model of corynoxeine in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianshe; Cai, Jinzhang; Lin, Guanyang; Chen, Huilin; Wang, Xianqin; Wang, Xianchuan; Hu, Lufeng

    2014-05-15

    Corynoxeine(CX), isolated from the extract of Uncaria rhynchophylla, is a useful and prospective compound in the prevention and treatment for vascular diseases. A simple and selective liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method was developed to determine the concentration of CX in rat plasma. The chromatographic separation was achieved on a Zorbax SB-C18 (2.1 mm × 150 mm, 5 μm) column with acetonitrile-0.1% formic acid in water as mobile phase. Selective ion monitoring (SIM) mode was used for quantification using target ions m/z 383 for CX and m/z 237 for the carbamazepine (IS). After the LC-MS method was validated, it was applied to a back-propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN) pharmacokinetic model study of CX in rats. The results showed that after intravenous administration of CX, it was mainly distributed in blood and eliminated quickly, t1/2 was less than 1h. The predicted concentrations generated by BP-ANN model had a high correlation coefficient (R>0.99) with experimental values. The developed BP-ANN pharmacokinetic model can be used to predict the concentration of CX in rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Mixed-effects modelling of the interspecies pharmacokinetic scaling of pegylated human erythropoietin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolling, Koen; Perez Ruixo, Juan Jose; Hemeryck, Alex; Vermeulen, An; Greway, Tony

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model for interspecies allometric scaling of pegylated r-HuEPO (PEG-EPO) pharmacokinetics to man. A total of 927 serum concentrations from 193 rats, 6 rabbits, 34 monkeys, and 9 dogs obtained after a single dose of PEG-EPO, administered by the i.v. (dose range: 12.5-550 microg/kg) and s.c. (dose range: 12.5-500 microg/kg) routes, were pooled in this analysis. An open two-compartment model with first-order absorption and lag time (Tlag) and linear elimination from the central compartment was fitted to the data using the NONMEM V software. Body weight (WT) was used as a scaling factor and the effect of brain weight (BW), sex, and pregnancy status on the pharmacokinetic parameters was investigated. The final model was evaluated by means of a non-parametric bootstrap analysis and used to predict the PEG-EPO pharmacokinetic parameters in healthy male subjects. The systemic clearance (CL) in males was estimated to be 4.08WT1.030xBW-0.345 ml/h. In females, the CL was 90.7% of the CL in males. The volumes of the central (Vc) and the peripheral (Vp) compartment were characterized as 57.8WT0.959 ml, and 48.1WT1.150 ml, respectively. Intercompartmental flow was estimated at 2.32WT0.930 ml/h. Absorption rate constant (Ka) was estimated at 0.0538WT-0.149. The absolute s.c. bioavailability F was calculated at 52.5, 80.2, and 49.4% in rat, monkey, and dog, respectively. The interindividual variability in the population pharmacokinetic parameters was fairly low (parametric bootstrap confirmed the accuracy of the NONMEM estimates. The mean model predicted pharmacokinetic parameters in healthy male subjects of 70 kg were estimated at: CL: 26.2 ml/h; Vc: 3.6l; Q: 286 l/h; Vp: 6.9l, and Ka: 0.031 h-1. The population pharmacokinetic model developed was appropriate to describe the time course of PEG-EPO serum concentrations and their variability in different species. The model predicted pharmacokinetics of PEG-EPO in

  12. Developing a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model Knowledgebase in Support of Provisional Model Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grulke, Christopher M.; Chang, Daniel T.; Brooks, Raina D.; Leonard, Jeremy A.; Phillips, Martin B.; Hypes, Ethan D.; Fair, Matthew J.; Tornero-Velez, Rogelio; Johnson, Jeffre; Dary, Curtis C.; Tan, Yu-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Developing physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for chemicals can be resource-intensive, as neither chemical-specific parameters nor in vivo pharmacokinetic data are easily available for model construction. Previously developed, well-parameterized, and thoroughly-vetted models can be a great resource for the construction of models pertaining to new chemicals. A PBPK knowledgebase was compiled and developed from existing PBPK-related articles and used to develop new models. From 2,039 PBPK-related articles published between 1977 and 2013, 307 unique chemicals were identified for use as the basis of our knowledgebase. Keywords related to species, gender, developmental stages, and organs were analyzed from the articles within the PBPK knowledgebase. A correlation matrix of the 307 chemicals in the PBPK knowledgebase was calculated based on pharmacokinetic-relevant molecular descriptors. Chemicals in the PBPK knowledgebase were ranked based on their correlation toward ethylbenzene and gefitinib. Next, multiple chemicals were selected to represent exact matches, close analogues, or non-analogues of the target case study chemicals. Parameters, equations, or experimental data relevant to existing models for these chemicals and their analogues were used to construct new models, and model predictions were compared to observed values. This compiled knowledgebase provides a chemical structure-based approach for identifying PBPK models relevant to other chemical entities. Using suitable correlation metrics, we demonstrated that models of chemical analogues in the PBPK knowledgebase can guide the construction of PBPK models for other chemicals. PMID:26871706

  13. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for bisphenol A in pregnant mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Yuko; Matsuyama, Wakoto; Wada, Masahiro; Hishikawa, Junko; Chan, Melissa Pui Ling; Nakayama, Aki; Morisawa, Shinsuke

    2007-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a weakly estrogenic monomer used to produce polymers for food contact and other applications, so there is potential for oral exposure of humans to trace amounts via ingestion. To date, no physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model has been located for BPA in pregnant mice with or without fetuses. An estimate by a mathematical model is essential since information on humans is difficult to obtain experimentally. The PBPK model was constructed based on the pharmacokinetic data of our experiment following single oral administration of BPA to pregnant mice. The risk assessment of bisphenol A (BPA) on the development of human offspring is an important issue. There have been limited data on the exposure level of human fetuses to BPA (e.g. BPA concentration in cord blood) and no information is available on the pharmacokinetics of BPA in humans with or without fetuses. In the present study, we developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model describing the pharmacokinetics of BPA in a pregnant mouse with the prospect of future extrapolation to humans. The PBPK model was constructed based on the pharmacokinetic data of an experiment we executed on pregnant mice following single oral administration of BPA. The model could describe the rapid transfer of BPA through the placenta to the fetus and the slow disappearance from fetuses. The simulated time courses after three-time repeated oral administrations of BPA by the constructed model fitted well with the experimental data, and the simulation for the 10 times lower dose was also consistent with the experiment. This suggested that the PBPK model for BPA in pregnant mice was successfully verified and is highly promising for extrapolation to humans who are expected to be exposed more chronically to lower doses

  14. Improving Predictive Modeling in Pediatric Drug Development: Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Mechanistic Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slikker, William; Young, John F.; Corley, Rick A.; Dorman, David C.; Conolly, Rory B.; Knudsen, Thomas; Erstad, Brian L.; Luecke, Richard H.; Faustman, Elaine M.; Timchalk, Chuck; Mattison, Donald R.

    2005-07-26

    A workshop was conducted on November 18?19, 2004, to address the issue of improving predictive models for drug delivery to developing humans. Although considerable progress has been made for adult humans, large gaps remain for predicting pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) outcome in children because most adult models have not been tested during development. The goals of the meeting included a description of when, during development, infants/children become adultlike in handling drugs. The issue of incorporating the most recent advances into the predictive models was also addressed: both the use of imaging approaches and genomic information were considered. Disease state, as exemplified by obesity, was addressed as a modifier of drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics during development. Issues addressed in this workshop should be considered in the development of new predictive and mechanistic models of drug kinetics and dynamics in the developing human.

  15. A Mathematical Model of the Effect of Immunogenicity on Therapeutic Protein Pharmacokinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiaoying; Hickling, Timothy; Kraynov, Eugenia; Kuang, Bing; Parng, Chuenlei; Vicini, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    A mathematical pharmacokinetic/anti-drug-antibody (PK/ADA) model was constructed for quantitatively assessing immunogenicity for therapeutic proteins. The model is inspired by traditional pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) models, and is based on the observed impact of ADA on protein drug clearance. The hypothesis for this work is that altered drug PK contains information about the extent and timing of ADA generation. By fitting drug PK profiles while accounting for ADA-mediated drug cle...

  16. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and pharmacokinetic models in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franiel, Tobias; Hamm, Bernd; Hricak, Hedvig

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI enables noninvasive analysis of prostate vascularization as well as tumour angiogenesis and capillary permeability characteristics in prostate cancers. Pharmacokinetic models summarizing the complex information provided by signal intensity-time curves for a few quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters are increasingly being used in the routine clinical setting. This review consists of two parts. The first part discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the MR pulse sequences that can be used for performing DCE-MRI and also of the most widely used pharmacokinetic parameters and models and the parameters they describe. The second part outlines the range of current and potential future clinical applications of DCE-MRI and pharmacokinetic parametric maps in patients with prostate cancer, with reference to the current scientific literature on the topic. The potential clinical applications of DCE-MRI for prostate cancer include detection, localization, and staging, differentiation of recurrent cancer and estimation of the patient's prognosis, as well as monitoring of treatment response. (orig.)

  17. Influence of covariate distribution on the predictive performance of pharmacokinetic models in paediatric research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piana, Chiara; Danhof, Meindert; Della Pasqua, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Aims The accuracy of model-based predictions often reported in paediatric research has not been thoroughly characterized. The aim of this exercise is therefore to evaluate the role of covariate distributions when a pharmacokinetic model is used for simulation purposes. Methods Plasma concentrations of a hypothetical drug were simulated in a paediatric population using a pharmacokinetic model in which body weight was correlated with clearance and volume of distribution. Two subgroups of children were then selected from the overall population according to a typical study design, in which pre-specified body weight ranges (10–15 kg and 30–40 kg) were used as inclusion criteria. The simulated data sets were then analyzed using non-linear mixed effects modelling. Model performance was assessed by comparing the accuracy of AUC predictions obtained for each subgroup, based on the model derived from the overall population and by extrapolation of the model parameters across subgroups. Results Our findings show that systemic exposure as well as pharmacokinetic parameters cannot be accurately predicted from the pharmacokinetic model obtained from a population with a different covariate range from the one explored during model building. Predictions were accurate only when a model was used for prediction in a subgroup of the initial population. Conclusions In contrast to current practice, the use of pharmacokinetic modelling in children should be limited to interpolations within the range of values observed during model building. Furthermore, the covariate point estimate must be kept in the model even when predictions refer to a subset different from the original population. PMID:24433411

  18. Nonstandard Finite Difference Method Applied to a Linear Pharmacokinetics Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwaseun Egbelowo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We extend the nonstandard finite difference method of solution to the study of pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic models. Pharmacokinetic (PK models are commonly used to predict drug concentrations that drive controlled intravenous (I.V. transfers (or infusion and oral transfers while pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PD interaction models are used to provide predictions of drug concentrations affecting the response of these clinical drugs. We structure a nonstandard finite difference (NSFD scheme for the relevant system of equations which models this pharamcokinetic process. We compare the results obtained to standard methods. The scheme is dynamically consistent and reliable in replicating complex dynamic properties of the relevant continuous models for varying step sizes. This study provides assistance in understanding the long-term behavior of the drug in the system, and validation of the efficiency of the nonstandard finite difference scheme as the method of choice.

  19. Modeling in biopharmaceutics, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics homogeneous and heterogeneous approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Macheras, Panos

    2006-01-01

    The state of the art in Biopharmaceutics, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics Modeling is presented in this book. It shows how advanced physical and mathematical methods can expand classical models in order to cover heterogeneous drug-biological processes and therapeutic effects in the body. The book is divided into four parts; the first deals with the fundamental principles of fractals, diffusion and nonlinear dynamics; the second with drug dissolution, release, and absorption; the third with empirical, compartmental, and stochastic pharmacokinetic models, and the fourth mainly with nonclassical aspects of pharmacodynamics. The classical models that have relevance and application to these sciences are also considered throughout. Many examples are used to illustrate the intrinsic complexity of drug administration related phenomena in the human, justifying the use of advanced modeling methods. This timely and useful book will appeal to graduate students and researchers in pharmacology, pharmaceutical scienc...

  20. PK/DB: database for pharmacokinetic properties and predictive in silico ADME models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moda, Tiago L; Torres, Leonardo G; Carrara, Alexandre E; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2008-10-01

    The study of pharmacokinetic properties (PK) is of great importance in drug discovery and development. In the present work, PK/DB (a new freely available database for PK) was designed with the aim of creating robust databases for pharmacokinetic studies and in silico absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) prediction. Comprehensive, web-based and easy to access, PK/DB manages 1203 compounds which represent 2973 pharmacokinetic measurements, including five models for in silico ADME prediction (human intestinal absorption, human oral bioavailability, plasma protein binding, blood-brain barrier and water solubility). http://www.pkdb.ifsc.usp.br

  1. Pharmacokinetic models relevant to toxicity and metabolism for uranium in humans and animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrenn, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    Models to predict short and long term accumulation of uranium in the human kidney are reviewed and summarised. These are generally first order linear compartmental models or pseudo-pharmacokinetic models such as the retention model of the ICRP. Pharmacokinetic models account not only for transfer from blood to organs, but also recirculation from the organ to blood. The most recent information on mammalian and human metabolism of uranium is used to establish a revised model. The model is applied to the short term accumulation of uranium in the human kidney after a single rapid dosage to the blood, such as that obtained by inhaling UF6 or its hydrolysis products. It is shown that the maximum accumulation in the kidney under these conditions is less than the fraction of the material distributed from the blood to kidney if a true pharmacokinetic model is used. The best coefficients applicable to man in the authors' view are summarised in model V. For a half-time of two days in the mammalian kidney, the maximum concentration in kidney is 75% of that predicted by a retention model such as that used by the ICRP following a single acute intake. We conclude that one must use true pharmacokinetic models, which incorporate recirculation from the organs to the blood, in order to realistically predict time dependent uptake in the kidneys and other organs. Information is presented showing that the half-time for urinary excretion of soluble uranium in man after inhalation of UF6 is about one quarter of a day. (author)

  2. Prediction of the Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Efficacy of a Monoclonal Antibody, Using a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic FcRn Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetty, Manoranjenni; Li, Linzhong; Rose, Rachel; Machavaram, Krishna; Jamei, Masoud; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Gardner, Iain

    2015-01-01

    Although advantages of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models (PBPK) are now well established, PBPK models that are linked to pharmacodynamic (PD) models to predict pharmacokinetics (PK), PD, and efficacy of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in humans are uncommon. The aim of this study was to develop a PD model that could be linked to a physiologically based mechanistic FcRn model to predict PK, PD, and efficacy of efalizumab. The mechanistic FcRn model for mAbs with target-mediated drug disposition within the Simcyp population-based simulator was used to simulate the pharmacokinetic profiles for three different single doses and two multiple doses of efalizumab administered to virtual Caucasian healthy volunteers. The elimination of efalizumab was modeled with both a target-mediated component (specific) and catabolism in the endosome (non-specific). This model accounted for the binding between neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) and efalizumab (protective against elimination) and for changes in CD11a target concentration. An integrated response model was then developed to predict the changes in mean Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) scores that were measured in a clinical study as an efficacy marker for efalizumab treatment. PASI scores were approximated as continuous and following a first-order asymptotic progression model. The reported steady state asymptote (Y ss) and baseline score [Y (0)] was applied and parameter estimation was used to determine the half-life of progression (Tp) of psoriasis. Results suggested that simulations using this model were able to recover the changes in PASI scores (indicating efficacy) observed during clinical studies. Simulations of both single dose and multiple doses of efalizumab concentration-time profiles as well as suppression of CD11a concentrations recovered clinical data reasonably well. It can be concluded that the developed PBPK FcRn model linked to a PD model adequately predicted PK, PD, and efficacy of efalizumab. PMID

  3. Computational Analysis of Pharmacokinetic Behavior of Ampicillin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Ďurišová

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available orrespondence: Institute of Experimental Pharmacology and Toxicology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 841 04 Bratislava, Slovak Republic. Phone + 42-1254775928; Fax +421254775928; E-mail: maria.durisova@savba.sk 84 RESEARCH ARTICLE The objective of this study was to perform a computational analysis of the pharmacokinetic behavior of ampicillin, using data from the literature. A method based on the theory of dynamic systems was used for modeling purposes. The method used has been introduced to pharmacokinetics with the aim to contribute to the knowledge base in pharmacokinetics by including the modeling method which enables researchers to develop mathematical models of various pharmacokinetic processes in an identical way, using identical model structures. A few examples of a successful use of the modeling method considered here in pharmacokinetics can be found in full texts articles available free of charge at the website of the author, and in the example given in the this study. The modeling method employed in this study can be used to develop a mathematical model of the pharmacokinetic behavior of any drug, under the condition that the pharmacokinetic behavior of the drug under study can be at least partially approximated using linear models.

  4. Population pharmacokinetic model of THC integrates oral, intravenous, and pulmonary dosing and characterizes short- and long-term pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuberger, Jules A A C; Guan, Zheng; Oyetayo, Olubukayo-Opeyemi; Klumpers, Linda; Morrison, Paul D; Beumer, Tim L; van Gerven, Joop M A; Cohen, Adam F; Freijer, Jan

    2015-02-01

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannobinol (THC), the main psychoactive compound of Cannabis, is known to have a long terminal half-life. However, this characteristic is often ignored in pharmacokinetic (PK) studies of THC, which may affect the accuracy of predictions in different pharmacologic areas. For therapeutic use for example, it is important to accurately describe the terminal phase of THC to describe accumulation of the drug. In early clinical research, the THC challenge test can be optimized through more accurate predictions of the dosing sequence and the wash-out between occasions in a crossover setting, which is mainly determined by the terminal half-life of the compound. The purpose of this study is to better quantify the long-term pharmacokinetics of THC. A population-based PK model for THC was developed describing the profile up to 48 h after an oral, intravenous, and pulmonary dose of THC in humans. In contrast to earlier models, the current model integrates all three major administration routes and covers the long terminal phase of THC. Results show that THC has a fast initial and intermediate half-life, while the apparent terminal half-life is long (21.5 h), with a clearance of 38.8 L/h. Because the current model characterizes the long-term pharmacokinetics, it can be used to assess the accumulation of THC in a multiple-dose setting and to forecast concentration profiles of the drug under many different dosing regimens or administration routes. Additionally, this model could provide helpful insights into the THC challenge test used for the development of (novel) compounds targeting the cannabinoid system for different therapeutic applications and could improve decision making in future clinical trials.

  5. Evaluation of the whole body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (WB-PBPK) modeling of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Anum; Azam, Shumaila; Fazal, Sahar; Bhatti, A I

    2018-08-14

    The Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling is a supporting tool in drug discovery and improvement. Simulations produced by these models help to save time and aids in examining the effects of different variables on the pharmacokinetics of drugs. For this purpose, Sheila and Peters suggested a PBPK model capable of performing simulations to study a given drug absorption. There is a need to extend this model to the whole body entailing all another process like distribution, metabolism, and elimination, besides absorption. The aim of this scientific study is to hypothesize a WB-PBPK model through integrating absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination processes with the existing PBPK model.Absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination models are designed, integrated with PBPK model and validated. For validation purposes, clinical records of few drugs are collected from the literature. The developed WB-PBPK model is affirmed by comparing the simulations produced by the model against the searched clinical data. . It is proposed that the WB-PBPK model may be used in pharmaceutical industries to create of the pharmacokinetic profiles of drug candidates for better outcomes, as it is advance PBPK model and creates comprehensive PK profiles for drug ADME in concentration-time plots. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pharmacokinetic modeling of therapies for systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xiaoyan; Sherwin, Catherine MT; Yu, Tian; Yellepeddi, Venkata K; Brunner, Hermine I; Vinks, Alexander A

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing use of different types of therapies in treating autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), there is a need to utilize pharmacokinetic (PK) strategies to optimize the clinical outcome of these treatments. Various PK analysis approaches, including population PK modeling and physiologically based PK modeling, have been used to evaluate drug PK characteristics and population variability or to predict drug PK profiles in a mechanistic manner. This review ou...

  7. A distributed delay approach for modeling delayed outcomes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shuhua; Dunlavey, Michael; Guzy, Serge; Teuscher, Nathan

    2018-04-01

    A distributed delay approach was proposed in this paper to model delayed outcomes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics studies. This approach was shown to be general enough to incorporate a wide array of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models as special cases including transit compartment models, effect compartment models, typical absorption models (either zero-order or first-order absorption), and a number of atypical (or irregular) absorption models (e.g., parallel first-order, mixed first-order and zero-order, inverse Gaussian, and Weibull absorption models). Real-life examples were given to demonstrate how to implement distributed delays in Phoenix ® NLME™ 8.0, and to numerically show the advantages of the distributed delay approach over the traditional methods.

  8. Direct cell writing of 3D microorgan for in vitro pharmacokinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Robert; Nam, Jae; Sun, Wei

    2008-06-01

    A novel targeted application of tissue engineering is the development of an in vitro pharmacokinetic model for drug screening and toxicology. An in vitro pharmacokinetic model is needed to realistically and reliably predict in vivo human response to drug administrations and potential toxic exposures. This paper details the fabrication process development and adaptation of microfluidic devices for the creation of such a physiologically relevant pharmacokinetic model. First, an automated syringe-based, layered direct cell writing (DCW) bioprinting process creates a 3D microorgan that biomimics the cell's natural microenvironment with enhanced functionality. Next, soft lithographic micropatterning techniques are used to fabricate a microscale in vitro device to house the 3D microorgan. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of the DCW process for freeform biofabrication of 3D cell-encapsulated hydrogel-based tissue constructs with defined reproducible patterns, direct integration of 3D constructs onto a microfluidic device for continuous perfusion drug flow, and characterization of 3D tissue constructs with predictable cell viability/proliferation outcomes and enhanced functionality over traditional culture methods.

  9. Phenobarbital in intensive care unit pediatric population: predictive performances of population pharmacokinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsot, Amélie; Michel, Fabrice; Chasseloup, Estelle; Paut, Olivier; Guilhaumou, Romain; Blin, Olivier

    2017-10-01

    An external evaluation of phenobarbital population pharmacokinetic model described by Marsot et al. was performed in pediatric intensive care unit. Model evaluation is an important issue for dose adjustment. This external evaluation should allow confirming the proposed dosage adaptation and extending these recommendations to the entire intensive care pediatric population. External evaluation of phenobarbital published population pharmacokinetic model of Marsot et al. was realized in a new retrospective dataset of 35 patients hospitalized in a pediatric intensive care unit. The published population pharmacokinetic model was implemented in nonmem 7.3. Predictive performance was assessed by quantifying bias and inaccuracy of model prediction. Normalized prediction distribution errors (NPDE) and visual predictive check (VPC) were also evaluated. A total of 35 infants were studied with a mean age of 33.5 weeks (range: 12 days-16 years) and a mean weight of 12.6 kg (range: 2.7-70.0 kg). The model predicted the observed phenobarbital concentrations with a reasonable bias and inaccuracy. The median prediction error was 3.03% (95% CI: -8.52 to 58.12%), and the median absolute prediction error was 26.20% (95% CI: 13.07-75.59%). No trends in NPDE and VPC were observed. The model previously proposed by Marsot et al. in neonates hospitalized in intensive care unit was externally validated for IV infusion administration. The model-based dosing regimen was extended in all pediatric intensive care unit to optimize treatment. Due to inter- and intravariability in pharmacokinetic model, this dosing regimen should be combined with therapeutic drug monitoring. © 2017 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  10. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of diclofenac in normal and Freund's complete adjuvant-induced arthritic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Pei; Guo, Hai-fang; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiao-dong

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To characterize pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of diclofenac in Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA)-induced arthritic rats using prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) as a biomarker. Methods: The pharmacokinetics of diclofenac was investigated using 20-day-old arthritic rats. PGE2 level in the rats was measured using an enzyme immunoassay. A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model was developed to illustrate the relationship between the plasma concentration of diclofenac and the inhibition of PGE2 production. The inhibition of diclofenac on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PGE2 production in blood cells was investigated in vitro. Results: Similar pharmacokinetic behavior of diclofenac was found both in normal and FCA-induced arthritic rats. Diclofenac significantly decreased the plasma levels of PGE2 in both normal and arthritic rats. The inhibitory effect on PGE2 levels in the plasma was in proportion to the plasma concentration of diclofenac. No delay in the onset of inhibition was observed, suggesting that the effect compartment was located in the central compartment. An inhibitory effect sigmoid Imax model was selected to characterize the relationship between the plasma concentration of diclofenac and the inhibition of PGE2 production in vivo. The Imax model was also used to illustrate the inhibition of diclofenac on LPS-induced PGE2 production in blood cells in vitro. Conclusion: Arthritis induced by FCA does not alter the pharmacokinetic behaviors of diclofenac in rats, but the pharmacodynamics of diclofenac is slightly affected. A PK-PD model characterizing an inhibitory effect sigmoid Imax can be used to fit the relationship between the plasma PGE2 and diclofenac levels in both normal rats and FCA-induced arthritic rats. PMID:22842736

  11. Pharmacokinetic studies of neuromuscular blocking agents: Good Clinical Research Practice (GCRP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viby-Mogensen, J.; Østergaard, D.; Donati, F.

    2000-01-01

    Good Clinical Research Practice (GCRP), neuromuscular blocking agents, pharmacokinetics, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling, population pharmacokinetics, statistics, study design......Good Clinical Research Practice (GCRP), neuromuscular blocking agents, pharmacokinetics, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling, population pharmacokinetics, statistics, study design...

  12. A Three-Pulse Release Tablet for Amoxicillin: Preparation, Pharmacokinetic Study and Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Chai, Hongyu; Li, Yang; Chai, Xuyu; Zhao, Yan; Zhao, Yunfan; Tao, Tao; Xiang, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Amoxicillin is a commonly used antibiotic which has a short half-life in human. The frequent administration of amoxicillin is often required to keep the plasma drug level in an effective range. The short dosing interval of amoxicillin could also cause some side effects and drug resistance, and impair its therapeutic efficacy and patients' compliance. Therefore, a three-pulse release tablet of amoxicillin is desired to generate sustained release in vivo, and thus to avoid the above mentioned disadvantages. The pulsatile release tablet consists of three pulsatile components: one immediate-release granule and two delayed release pellets, all containing amoxicillin. The preparation of a pulsatile release tablet of amoxicillin mainly includes wet granulation craft, extrusion/spheronization craft, pellet coating craft, mixing craft, tablet compression craft and film coating craft. Box-Behnken design, Scanning Electron Microscope and in vitro drug release test were used to help the optimization of formulations. A crossover pharmacokinetic study was performed to compare the pharmacokinetic profile of our in-house pulsatile tablet with that of commercial immediate release tablet. The pharmacokinetic profile of this pulse formulation was simulated by physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model with the help of Simcyp®. Single factor experiments identify four important factors of the formulation, namely, coating weight of Eudragit L30 D-55 (X1), coating weight of AQOAT AS-HF (X2), the extrusion screen aperture (X3) and compression forces (X4). The interrelations of the four factors were uncovered by a Box-Behnken design to help to determine the optimal formulation. The immediate-release granule, two delayed release pellets, together with other excipients, namely, Avicel PH 102, colloidal silicon dioxide, polyplasdone and magnesium stearate were mixed, and compressed into tablets, which was subsequently coated with Opadry® film to produce pulsatile tablet of

  13. Pharmacokinetic modeling of gentamicin in treatment of infective endocarditis : Model development and validation of existing models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomes, Anna; van der Wijk, Lars; Proost, Johannes H; Sinha, Bhanu; Touw, Daan J

    2017-01-01

    Gentamicin shows large variations in half-life and volume of distribution (Vd) within and between individuals. Thus, monitoring and accurately predicting serum levels are required to optimize effectiveness and minimize toxicity. Currently, two population pharmacokinetic models are applied for

  14. A simple and sensitive method for determination of vitamins D3 and K1 in rat plasma: application for an in vivo pharmacokinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershkovich, Pavel; Ibrahim, Fady; Sivak, Olena; Darlington, Jerald W; Wasan, Kishor M

    2014-03-01

    To develop and to validate a simple but sensitive method for determination of vitamins D3 and K1 in rat plasma. The sample treatment included protein precipitation by cold acetonitrile, evaporation, reconstitution with methanol and filtration. The chromatography conditions included Xterra RP18 3.5 µm 4.6 × 100 mm column at ambient temperature and mobile phase consisting of methanol/water (93/7, v/v) at 0.5 mL/min flow rate. Vitamin D3 and probucol were detected at 265 nm and vitamin K1 at 239 nm. Rats were administered intravenously by 0.1 mg/kg of vitamin D3 or K1 and the blood samples were withdrawn pre-administration and at pre-determined time points post-administration. The pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using a non-compartmental approach. The calibration curves in rat plasma were linear up to 5000 ng/mL for both vitamins. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was 20 ng/mL for vitamin D3 and 40 ng/mL for K1. Inter- and intra-day precision and accuracy were below 15%. The pharmacokinetic parameters of vitamin D3 following intravenous administration were: AUC0-∞ = 11323 ± 1081 h × ng/mL, Vd = 218 ± 80 mL/kg, CL = 8.9 ± 0.8 mL/h/kg, t1/2 = 16.8 ± 5 h; and of vitamin K1: AUC0-∞ = 2495 ± 297 h × ng/mL, Vd = 60 ±24 mL/kg, CL = 40.5 ± 5.1 mL/h/kg, t1/2 = 1.1 ±0.5 h. The developed HPLC-UV assay is a simple and sensitive method for the determination of vitamins D3 and K1 in rat plasma. A higher dose of vitamin K1 should be used in future studies for accurate estimation of pharmacokinetic parameters. The data show the suitability of the assay for pharmacokinetic studies in rats.

  15. Sequential updating of a new dynamic pharmacokinetic model for caffeine in premature neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micallef, Sandrine; Amzal, Billy; Bach, Véronique; Chardon, Karen; Tourneux, Pierre; Bois, Frédéric Y

    2007-01-01

    Caffeine treatment is widely used in nursing care to reduce the risk of apnoea in premature neonates. To check the therapeutic efficacy of the treatment against apnoea, caffeine concentration in blood is an important indicator. The present study was aimed at building a pharmacokinetic model as a basis for a medical decision support tool. In the proposed model, time dependence of physiological parameters is introduced to describe rapid growth of neonates. To take into account the large variability in the population, the pharmacokinetic model is embedded in a population structure. The whole model is inferred within a Bayesian framework. To update caffeine concentration predictions as data of an incoming patient are collected, we propose a fast method that can be used in a medical context. This involves the sequential updating of model parameters (at individual and population levels) via a stochastic particle algorithm. Our model provides better predictions than the ones obtained with models previously published. We show, through an example, that sequential updating improves predictions of caffeine concentration in blood (reduce bias and length of credibility intervals). The update of the pharmacokinetic model using body mass and caffeine concentration data is studied. It shows how informative caffeine concentration data are in contrast to body mass data. This study provides the methodological basis to predict caffeine concentration in blood, after a given treatment if data are collected on the treated neonate.

  16. Population Pharmacokinetic Model for Vancomycin Used in Open Heart Surgery: Model-Based Evaluation of Standard Dosing Regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Saeed A; Alsultan, Abdullah S; Alqattan, Hussain M; Eldemerdash, Ahmed; Albacker, Turki B

    2018-04-23

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the population pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in patients undergoing open heart surgery. In this observational pharmacokinetic study, multiple blood samples were drawn over a 48-h period of intravenous vancomycin in patients who were undergoing open heart surgery. Blood samples were analysed using the Architect i4000SR Immunoassay Analyzer. Population pharmacokinetic models were developed using Monolix 4.4 software. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) simulations were performed to explore the ability of different dosage regimens to achieve the pharmacodynamic targets. One-hundred and sixty-eight blood samples were analysed from 28 patients. The pharmacokinetics of vancomycin was best described by a two-compartment model with between-subject variability in CL, V of the central compartment, and V of the peripheral compartment. CL and central compartment V of vancomycin were related to CL CR , body weight, and albumin concentration. Dosing simulations showed that standard dosing regimens of 1 and 1.5 g failed to achieve the PK-PD target of AUC 0--24 /MIC > 400 for an MIC of 1 mg/L, while high weight-based dosing regimens were able to achieve the PK-PD target. In summary, administration of standard doses of 1 and 1.5 g of vancomycin two times daily provided inadequate antibiotic prophylaxis in patients undergoing open heart surgery. The same findings were obtained when 15 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg doses of vancomycin were administered. Achieving the PK-PD target required higher doses (25 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg) of vancomycin. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Development of a paediatric population-based model of the pharmacokinetics of rivaroxaban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Stefan; Becker, Corina; Burghaus, Rolf; Coboeken, Katrin; Edginton, Andrea; Lippert, Jörg; Siegmund, Hans-Ulrich; Thelen, Kirstin; Mück, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism has been increasingly recognised as a clinical problem in the paediatric population. Guideline recommendations for antithrombotic therapy in paediatric patients are based mainly on extrapolation from adult clinical trial data, owing to the limited number of clinical trials in paediatric populations. The oral, direct Factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban has been approved in adult patients for several thromboembolic disorders, and its well-defined pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics and efficacy and safety profiles in adults warrant further investigation of this agent in the paediatric population. The objective of this study was to develop and qualify a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for rivaroxaban doses of 10 and 20 mg in adults and to scale this model to the paediatric population (0-18 years) to inform the dosing regimen for a clinical study of rivaroxaban in paediatric patients. Experimental data sets from phase I studies supported the development and qualification of an adult PBPK model. This adult PBPK model was then scaled to the paediatric population by including anthropometric and physiological information, age-dependent clearance and age-dependent protein binding. The pharmacokinetic properties of rivaroxaban in virtual populations of children were simulated for two body weight-related dosing regimens equivalent to 10 and 20 mg once daily in adults. The quality of the model was judged by means of a visual predictive check. Subsequently, paediatric simulations of the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC), maximum (peak) plasma drug concentration (C max) and concentration in plasma after 24 h (C 24h) were compared with the adult reference simulations. Simulations for AUC, C max and C 24h throughout the investigated age range largely overlapped with values obtained for the corresponding dose in the adult reference simulation for both body weight-related dosing regimens. However

  18. Application of pharmacokinetic modeling to the radiation dosimetry of hepatobiliary agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loberg, M.D.; Buddemeyer, E.U.

    1981-01-01

    Dosimetry calculations based on biodistribution data from lower animal species often inadequately approximate the true dosimetry in humans and seldom apply in the presence of human pathology. An alternative approach is to use animal data for the limited purpose of developing a pharmacokinetic model describing the various compartments and their interconnecting pathways. To the extent that components are similarly connected in man, the model can be used to compute cumulative concentrations (μCi-h/gm) in humans by using the compartment masses and rate constants appropriate for man. In this manner dose estimates can be obtained which are less dependent upon the species from which the model was derived. The altered radiation dose in certain disease states having a known relationship to the model can also be predicted with confidence. This work reports the development in dogs of a four-compartment model which accurately describes the in-vivo distribution of Tc/sup 99m/-HIDA. The pharmacokinetic model was used to predict the kinetics of the HIDA analog which would yield clinically useful information, while minimizing patient radiation exposure

  19. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for Fentanyl in support of the development of Provisional Advisory Levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankaran, Harish; Adeshina, Femi; Teeguarden, Justin G.

    2013-01-01

    Provisional Advisory Levels (PALs) are tiered exposure limits for toxic chemicals in air and drinking water that are developed to assist in emergency responses. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling can support this process by enabling extrapolations across doses, and exposure routes, thereby addressing gaps in the available toxicity data. Here, we describe the development of a PBPK model for Fentanyl – a synthetic opioid used clinically for pain management – to support the establishment of PALs. Starting from an existing model for intravenous Fentanyl, we first optimized distribution and clearance parameters using several additional IV datasets. We then calibrated the model using pharmacokinetic data for various formulations, and determined the absorbed fraction, F, and time taken for the absorbed amount to reach 90% of its final value, t90. For aerosolized pulmonary Fentanyl, F = 1 and t90 50 human datasets. • Model predictions are in good agreement with the available pharmacokinetic data. • The model can be used for extrapolating across routes, doses and exposure durations. • We illustrate how the model can be used for developing Provisional Advisory Levels

  20. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of activity of ceftazidime during continuous and intermittent infusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Mouton (Johan); A.A. Vinks; N.C. Punt

    1997-01-01

    textabstractWe developed and applied pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) models to characterize in vitro bacterial rate of killing as a function of ceftazidime concentrations over time. For PK-PD modeling, data obtained during continuous and intermittent infusion of

  1. Metoprolol Dose Equivalence in Adult Men and Women Based on Gender Differences: Pharmacokinetic Modeling and Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy R. Eugene

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent meta-analyses and publications over the past 15 years have provided evidence showing there are considerable gender differences in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol. Throughout this time, there have not been any research articles proposing a gender stratified dose-adjustment resulting in an equivalent total drug exposure. Metoprolol pharmacokinetic data was obtained from a previous publication. Data was modeled using nonlinear mixed effect modeling using the MONOLIX software package to quantify metoprolol concentration–time data. Gender-stratified dosing simulations were conducted to identify equivalent total drug exposure based on a 100 mg dose in adults. Based on the pharmacokinetic modeling and simulations, a 50 mg dose in adult women provides an approximately similar metoprolol drug exposure to a 100 mg dose in adult men.

  2. Population pharmacokinetics model of THC used by pulmonary route in occasional cannabis smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsot, A; Audebert, C; Attolini, L; Lacarelle, B; Micallef, J; Blin, O

    Cannabis is the most widely used illegal drug in the world. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main source of the pharmacological effect. Some studies have been carried out and showed significant variability in the described models as the values of the estimated pharmacokinetic parameters. The objective of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model for THC in occasional cannabis smokers. Twelve male volunteers (age: 20-28years, body weight: 62.5-91.0kg), tobacco (3-8 cigarette per day) and cannabis occasional smokers were recruited from the local community. After ad libitum smoking cannabis cigarette according a standardized procedure, 16 blood samples up to 72h were collected. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using a non-linear mixed effects model, with NONMEM software. Demographic and biological data were investigated as covariates. A three-compartment model with first-order elimination fitted the data. The model was parameterized in terms of micro constants and central volume of distribution (V 1 ). Normal ALT concentration (6.0 to 45.0IU/l) demonstrated a statistically significant correlation with k 10 . The mean values (%Relative Standard Error (RSE)) for k 10 , k 12 , k 21 , k 23 , k 32 and V 1 were 0.408h -1 (48.8%), 4.070h -1 (21.4%), 0.022h -1 (27.0%), 1.070h -1 (14.3%), 1.060h -1 (16.7%) and 19.10L (39.7%), respectively. We have developed a population pharmacokinetic model able to describe the quantitative relationship between administration of inhaled doses of THC and the observed plasma concentrations after smoking cannabis. In addition, a linear relationship between ALT concentration and value of k 10 has been described and request further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A computer-aided framework for development, identification andmanagement of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heitzig, Martina; Linninger, Andreas; Sin, Gürkan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work is the development of a generic computer-aided modelling framework to support the development of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models thereby increasing the efficiency and quality of the modelling process. In particular, the framework systematizes the modelling...

  4. Development of good modelling practice for phsiologically based pharmacokinetic models for use in risk assessment: The first steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    The increasing use of tissue dosimetry estimated using pharmacokinetic models in chemical risk assessments in multiple countries necessitates the need to develop internationally recognized good modelling practices. These practices would facilitate sharing of models and model eva...

  5. Mathematical modeling and simulation in animal health. Part I: Moving beyond pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riviere, J E; Gabrielsson, J; Fink, M; Mochel, J

    2016-06-01

    The application of mathematical modeling to problems in animal health has a rich history in the form of pharmacokinetic modeling applied to problems in veterinary medicine. Advances in modeling and simulation beyond pharmacokinetics have the potential to streamline and speed-up drug research and development programs. To foster these goals, a series of manuscripts will be published with the following goals: (i) expand the application of modeling and simulation to issues in veterinary pharmacology; (ii) bridge the gap between the level of modeling and simulation practiced in human and veterinary pharmacology; (iii) explore how modeling and simulation concepts can be used to improve our understanding of common issues not readily addressed in human pharmacology (e.g. breed differences, tissue residue depletion, vast weight ranges among adults within a single species, interspecies differences, small animal species research where data collection is limited to sparse sampling, availability of different sampling matrices); and (iv) describe how quantitative pharmacology approaches could help understanding key pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of a drug candidate, with the goal of providing explicit, reproducible, and predictive evidence for optimizing drug development plans, enabling critical decision making, and eventually bringing safe and effective medicines to patients. This study introduces these concepts and introduces new approaches to modeling and simulation as well as clearly articulate basic assumptions and good practices. The driving force behind these activities is to create predictive models that are based on solid physiological and pharmacological principles as well as adhering to the limitations that are fundamental to applying mathematical and statistical models to biological systems. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Development of a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model of the Rat Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj K. Singh Badhan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS drug disposition is dictated by a drug’s physicochemical properties and its ability to permeate physiological barriers. The blood–brain barrier (BBB, blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier and centrally located drug transporter proteins influence drug disposition within the central nervous system. Attainment of adequate brain-to-plasma and cerebrospinal fluid-to-plasma partitioning is important in determining the efficacy of centrally acting therapeutics. We have developed a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of the rat CNS which incorporates brain interstitial fluid (ISF, choroidal epithelial and total cerebrospinal fluid (CSF compartments and accurately predicts CNS pharmacokinetics. The model yielded reasonable predictions of unbound brain-to-plasma partition ratio (Kpuu,brain and CSF:plasma ratio (CSF:Plasmau using a series of in vitro permeability and unbound fraction parameters. When using in vitro permeability data obtained from L-mdr1a cells to estimate rat in vivo permeability, the model successfully predicted, to within 4-fold, Kpuu,brain and CSF:Plasmau for 81.5% of compounds simulated. The model presented allows for simultaneous simulation and analysis of both brain biophase and CSF to accurately predict CNS pharmacokinetics from preclinical drug parameters routinely available during discovery and development pathways.

  7. The Influence of Normalization Weight in Population Pharmacokinetic Covariate Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulooze, Sebastiaan C; Völler, Swantje; Välitalo, Pyry A J; Calvier, Elisa A M; Aarons, Leon; Krekels, Elke H J; Knibbe, Catherijne A J

    2018-03-23

    In covariate (sub)models of population pharmacokinetic models, most covariates are normalized to the median value; however, for body weight, normalization to 70 kg or 1 kg is often applied. In this article, we illustrate the impact of normalization weight on the precision of population clearance (CL pop ) parameter estimates. The influence of normalization weight (70, 1 kg or median weight) on the precision of the CL pop estimate, expressed as relative standard error (RSE), was illustrated using data from a pharmacokinetic study in neonates with a median weight of 2.7 kg. In addition, a simulation study was performed to show the impact of normalization to 70 kg in pharmacokinetic studies with paediatric or obese patients. The RSE of the CL pop parameter estimate in the neonatal dataset was lowest with normalization to median weight (8.1%), compared with normalization to 1 kg (10.5%) or 70 kg (48.8%). Typical clearance (CL) predictions were independent of the normalization weight used. Simulations showed that the increase in RSE of the CL pop estimate with 70 kg normalization was highest in studies with a narrow weight range and a geometric mean weight away from 70 kg. When, instead of normalizing with median weight, a weight outside the observed range is used, the RSE of the CL pop estimate will be inflated, and should therefore not be used for model selection. Instead, established mathematical principles can be used to calculate the RSE of the typical CL (CL TV ) at a relevant weight to evaluate the precision of CL predictions.

  8. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for assessment of human exposure to bisphenol A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Doerge, Daniel R.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    A previously developed physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for bisphenol A (BPA) in adult rhesus monkeys was modified to characterize the pharmacokinetics of BPA and its phase II conjugates in adult humans following oral ingestion. Coupled with in vitro studies on BPA metabolism in the liver and the small intestine, the PBPK model was parameterized using oral pharmacokinetic data with deuterated-BPA (d 6 -BPA) delivered in cookies to adult humans after overnight fasting. The availability of the serum concentration time course of unconjugated d 6 -BPA offered direct empirical evidence for the calibration of BPA model parameters. The recalibrated PBPK adult human model for BPA was then evaluated against published human pharmacokinetic studies with BPA. A hypothesis of decreased oral uptake was needed to account for the reduced peak levels observed in adult humans, where d 6 -BPA was delivered in soup and food was provided prior to BPA ingestion, suggesting the potential impact of dosing vehicles and/or fasting on BPA disposition. With the incorporation of Monte Carlo analysis, the recalibrated adult human model was used to address the inter-individual variability in the internal dose metrics of BPA for the U.S. general population. Model-predicted peak BPA serum levels were in the range of pM, with 95% of human variability falling within an order of magnitude. This recalibrated PBPK model for BPA in adult humans provides a scientific basis for assessing human exposure to BPA that can serve to minimize uncertainties incurred during extrapolations across doses and species. - Highlights: • A PBPK model predicts the kinetics of bisphenol A (BPA) in adult humans. • Serum concentrations of aglycone BPA are available for model calibration. • Model predicted peak BPA serum levels for adult humans were in the range of pM. • Model predicted 95% of human variability fell within an order of magnitude.

  9. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics study of rhein treating renal fibrosis based on metabonomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hao; Luo, Guangwen; Xiang, Zheng; Cai, Xiaojun; Chen, Dahui

    2016-12-01

    The selection of effect indicators in the pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic study of complex diseases to describe the relationship between plasma concentration and effect indicators is difficult. Three effect indicators of renal fibrosis were successfully determined. The relationship between pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of rhein in rhubarb was elucidated. The study was a metabolomics analysis of rat plasma and pharmacokinetics/ pharmacodynamics of rhein. A sensitive and simple ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was applied to determine the rhein plasma concentration in the rat model of renal fibrosis and rat sham-operated group after the administration of rhubarb decoction. Then, the ultra performance liquid chromatography-Micromass quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF/MS) metabolomics method was used to screen biomarkers of renal fibrosis in rat plasma. Furthermore, the relationship between the plasma concentration of rhein and the concentration of three biomarkers directly related to renal fibrosis were analyzed. The three screened biomarkers could represent the effect of rhein treatment on renal fibrosis. Increasing the plasma concentration of rhein tended to restore the concentration of the three biomarkers in the model group compared with that in the sham-operated group. Evident differences in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) of rhein were also observed under different pathological states. The results provide valuable information for the clinical application of rhubarb. Rhein intervention could recover the physiological balance in living organisms from the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic levels. New information on the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic study of complex diseases is provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Application of Pharmacokinetics Modelling to Predict Human Exposure of a Cationic Liposomal Subunit Antigen Vaccine System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj K. S. Badhan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacokinetics of a liposomal subunit antigen vaccine system composed of the cationic lipid dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DDA and the immunostimulatory agent trehalose 6,6-dibehenate (TDB (8:1 molar ratio combined with the Ag85B-ESAT-6 (H1 antigen were modelled using mouse in-vivo data. Compartment modelling and physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK were used to predict the administration site (muscle and target site (lymph temporal concentration profiles and factors governing these. Initial estimates using compartmental modelling established that quadriceps pharmacokinetics for the liposome demonstrated a long half-life (22.6 days compared to the associated antigen (2.62 days. A mouse minimal-PBPK model was developed and successfully predicted quadriceps liposome and antigen pharmacokinetics. Predictions for the popliteal lymph node (PLN aligned well at earlier time-points. A local sensitivity analysis highlighted that the predicted AUCmuscle was sensitive to the antigen degradation constant kdeg (resulting in a 3-log change more so than the fraction escaping the quadriceps (fe (resulting in a 10-fold change, and the predicted AUCPLN was highly sensitive to fe. A global sensitivity analysis of the antigen in the muscle demonstrated that model predictions were within the 50th percentile for predictions and showed acceptable fits. To further translate in-vitro data previously generated by our group, the mouse minimal-PBPK model was extrapolated to humans and predictions made for antigen pharmacokinetics in muscle and PLN. Global analysis demonstrated that both kdeg and fe had a minimal impact on the resulting simulations in the muscle but a greater impact in the PLN. In summary, this study has predicted the in-vivo fate of DDA:TDB:H1 in humans and demonstrated the roles that formulation degradation and fraction escaping the depot site can play upon the overall depot effect within the site of administration.

  11. Pharmacokinetics of high-dose intravenous melatonin in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars P H; Werner, Mads U; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2016-01-01

    This crossover study investigated the pharmacokinetics and adverse effects of high-dose intravenous melatonin. Volunteers participated in 3 identical study sessions, receiving an intravenous bolus of 10 mg melatonin, 100 mg melatonin, and placebo. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 0, 60......, 120, 180, 240, 300, 360, and 420 minutes after the bolus. Quantitative determination of plasma melatonin concentrations was performed using a radioimmunoassay technique. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by a compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis. Adverse effects included assessments...... of sedation and registration of other symptoms. Sedation, evaluated as simple reaction times, was measured at baseline and 120, 180, 300, and 420 minutes after the bolus. Twelve male volunteers completed the study. Median (IQR) Cmax after the bolus injections of 10 mg and 100 mg of melatonin were 221...

  12. Influence of Erroneous Patient Records on Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling and Individual Bayesian Estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Aize Franciscus; Touw, Daniel J.; Marcus, Marco A. E.; Neef, Cornelis; Proost, Johannes H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Observational data sets can be used for population pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling. However, these data sets are generally less precisely recorded than experimental data sets. This article aims to investigate the influence of erroneous records on population PK modeling and individual

  13. Challenges Associated With Applying Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for Public Health Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development and application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models in chemical toxicology have grown steadily since their emergence in the 1980s. However, critical evaluation of PBPK models to support public health decision-making across federal agencies has t...

  14. Pharmacokinetic properties and in silico ADME modeling in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honório, Kathia M; Moda, Tiago L; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2013-03-01

    The discovery and development of a new drug are time-consuming, difficult and expensive. This complex process has evolved from classical methods into an integration of modern technologies and innovative strategies addressed to the design of new chemical entities to treat a variety of diseases. The development of new drug candidates is often limited by initial compounds lacking reasonable chemical and biological properties for further lead optimization. Huge libraries of compounds are frequently selected for biological screening using a variety of techniques and standard models to assess potency, affinity and selectivity. In this context, it is very important to study the pharmacokinetic profile of the compounds under investigation. Recent advances have been made in the collection of data and the development of models to assess and predict pharmacokinetic properties (ADME--absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) of bioactive compounds in the early stages of drug discovery projects. This paper provides a brief perspective on the evolution of in silico ADME tools, addressing challenges, limitations, and opportunities in medicinal chemistry.

  15. A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model to Predict the Pharmacokinetics of Highly Protein-Bound Drugs and Impact of Errors in Plasma Protein Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Min; Nagar, Swati; Korzekwa, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the pharmacokinetics of highly protein-bound drugs is difficult. Also, since historical plasma protein binding data was often collected using unbuffered plasma, the resulting inaccurate binding data could contribute to incorrect predictions. This study uses a generic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict human plasma concentration-time profiles for 22 highly protein-bound drugs. Tissue distribution was estimated from in vitro drug lipophilicity data, plasma protein binding, and blood: plasma ratio. Clearance was predicted with a well-stirred liver model. Underestimated hepatic clearance for acidic and neutral compounds was corrected by an empirical scaling factor. Predicted values (pharmacokinetic parameters, plasma concentration-time profile) were compared with observed data to evaluate model accuracy. Of the 22 drugs, less than a 2-fold error was obtained for terminal elimination half-life (t1/2, 100% of drugs), peak plasma concentration (Cmax, 100%), area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0–t, 95.4%), clearance (CLh, 95.4%), mean retention time (MRT, 95.4%), and steady state volume (Vss, 90.9%). The impact of fup errors on CLh and Vss prediction was evaluated. Errors in fup resulted in proportional errors in clearance prediction for low-clearance compounds, and in Vss prediction for high-volume neutral drugs. For high-volume basic drugs, errors in fup did not propagate to errors in Vss prediction. This is due to the cancellation of errors in the calculations for tissue partitioning of basic drugs. Overall, plasma profiles were well simulated with the present PBPK model. PMID:26531057

  16. Virtual pharmacokinetic model of human eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotha, Sreevani; Murtomäki, Lasse

    2014-07-01

    A virtual pharmacokinetic 3D model of the human eye is built using Comsol Multiphysics® software, which is based on the Finite Element Method (FEM). The model considers drug release from a polymer patch placed on sclera. The model concentrates on the posterior part of the eye, retina being the target tissue, and comprises the choroidal blood flow, partitioning of the drug between different tissues and active transport at the retina pigment epithelium (RPE)-choroid boundary. Although most straightforward, in order to check the mass balance, no protein binding or metabolism is yet included. It appeared that the most important issue in obtaining reliable simulation results is the finite element mesh, while time stepping has hardly any significance. Simulations were extended to 100,000 s. The concentration of a drug is shown as a function of time at various points of retina, as well as its average value, varying several parameters in the model. This work demonstrates how anybody with basic knowledge of calculus is able to build physically meaningful models of quite complex biological systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dose Assessment of Cefquinome by Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling in Mouse Model of Staphylococcus aureus Mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to characterize the mammary gland pharmacokinetics of cefquinome after an intramammary administration and integrate pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model. The pharmacokinetic profiles of cefquinome in gland tissue were measured using high performance liquid chromatograph. Therapeutic regimens covered various dosages ranging from 25 to 800 μg/gland and multiple dosing intervals of 8, 12, and 24 h. The in vivo bacterial killing activity elevated when dosage increased or when dosing intervals were shortened. The best antibacterial effect was demonstrated by a mean 1.5 log10CFU/gland visible count reduction. On the other hand, the results showed that the percentage of time duration of drug concentration exceeding the MIC during a dose interval (%T > MIC was generally 100% because of the influence of drug distribution caused by the blood-milk barrier. Therefore, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic parameter of the ratio of area under the concentration-time curve over 24 h to the MIC (AUC0-24/MIC was used to describe the efficacy of cefquinome instead of %T > MIC. When the magnitude of AUC0-24/MIC exceeding 16571.55 h•mL/g, considerable activity of about 1.5 log10CFU/g gland bacterial count reduction was observed in vivo. Based on the Monte Carlo simulation, the clinical recommended regimen of three infusions of 75 mg per quarter every 12 h can achieve a 76.67% cure rate in clinical treatment of bovine mastitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection.

  18. Population pharmacokinetic modelling of the enterohepatic recirculation of diclofenac and rofecoxib in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntjens, D R H; Strougo, A; Chain, A; Metcalf, A; Summerfield, S; Spalding, D J M; Danhof, M; Della Pasqua, O

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Enterohepatic recirculation (EHC) is a common pharmacokinetic phenomenon that has been poorly modelled in animals. The presence of EHC leads to the appearance of multiple peaks in the concentration-time profile and increased exposure, which may have implications for drug effect and extrapolation across species. The aim of this investigation was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model for diclofenac and rofecoxib that describes EHC and to assess its consequence for the pharmacodynamics of both drugs. Experimental approach: The pharmacokinetics of diclofenac and rofecoxib was characterized in male rats following intravenous, intraperitoneal and oral administration. Blood samples were collected at pre-defined time points after dosing to determine plasma concentrations over time. A parametric approach using nonlinear mixed effects modelling was applied to describe EHC, whilst simulations were used to evaluate its impact on PGE2 inhibition. Key results: For diclofenac, EHC was described by a compartmental model with periodic transfer rate and metabolite formation rate. For rofecoxib, EHC modelling required a conversion compartment with first-order recycling rate and lag time. Based on model predictions, EHC causes an increase of 95% in the systemic exposure to diclofenac and of 15% in the exposure to rofecoxib. In addition, EHC prolongs the inhibition of PGE2 and increases the duration of the anti-inflammatory effect (24 h for rofecoxib 10 mg kg−1) without affecting maximum inhibition. Conclusions and implications: Our findings show the relevance of exploring EHC in a quantitative manner to accurately interpret pharmacodynamic findings in vivo, in particular when scaling across species. PMID:18193075

  19. WORKSHOP ON APPLICATION OF STATISTICAL METHODS TO BIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING FOR RISK ASSESSMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biologically-based pharmacokinetic models are being increasingly used in the risk assessment of environmental chemicals. These models are based on biological, mathematical, statistical and engineering principles. Their potential uses in risk assessment include extrapolation betwe...

  20. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling of an antagonist (SM-406/AT-406) of multiple inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) in a mouse xenograft model of human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Li, Yanyan; Zou, Peng; Yu, Jing-yu; McEachern, Donna; Wang, Shaomeng; Sun, Duxin

    2013-09-01

    The inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) are a class of key apoptosis regulators overexpressed or dysregulated in cancer. SM-406/AT-406 is a potent and selective small molecule mimetic of Smac that antagonizes the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). A physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK-PD) model was developed to predict the tissue concentration-time profiles of SM-406, the related onco-protein levels in tumor, and the tumor growth inhibition in a mouse model bearing human breast cancer xenograft. In the whole body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for pharmacokinetics characterization, a well stirred (perfusion rate-limited) model was used to describe SM-406 pharmacokinetics in the lung, heart, kidney, intestine, liver and spleen, and a diffusion rate-limited (permeability limited) model was used for tumor. Pharmacodynamic (PD) models were developed to correlate the SM-406 concentration in tumor to the cIAP1 degradation, pro-caspase 8 decrease, CL-PARP accumulation and tumor growth inhibition. The PBPK-PD model well described the experimental pharmacokinetic data, the pharmacodynamic biomarker responses and tumor growth. This model may be helpful to predict tumor and plasma SM-406 concentrations in the clinic. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Investigating pulmonary and systemic pharmacokinetics of inhaled olodaterol in healthy volunteers using a population pharmacokinetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghardt, Jens Markus; Weber, Benjamin; Staab, Alexander; Kunz, Christina; Formella, Stephan; Kloft, Charlotte

    2016-03-01

    Olodaterol, a novel β2-adrenergic receptor agonist, is a long-acting, once-daily inhaled bronchodilator approved for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The aim of the present study was to describe the plasma and urine pharmacokinetics of olodaterol after intravenous administration and oral inhalation in healthy volunteers by population pharmacokinetic modelling and thereby to infer its pulmonary fate. Plasma and urine data after intravenous administration (0.5-25 μg) and oral inhalation (2.5-70 μg via the Respimat® inhaler) were available from a total of 148 healthy volunteers (single and multiple dosing). A stepwise model building approach was applied, using population pharmacokinetic modelling. Systemic disposition parameters were fixed to estimates obtained from intravenous data when modelling data after inhalation. A pharmacokinetic model, including three depot compartments with associated parallel first-order absorption processes (pulmonary model) on top of a four-compartment body model (systemic disposition model), was found to describe the data the best. The dose reaching the lung (pulmonary bioavailable fraction) was estimated to be 49.4% [95% confidence interval (CI) 46.1, 52.7%] of the dose released from the device. A large proportion of the pulmonary bioavailable fraction [70.1% (95% CI 66.8, 73.3%)] was absorbed with a half-life of 21.8 h (95% CI 19.7, 24.4 h). The plasma and urine pharmacokinetics of olodaterol after intravenous administration and oral inhalation in healthy volunteers were adequately described. The key finding was that a high proportion of the pulmonary bioavailable fraction had an extended pulmonary residence time. This finding was not expected based on the physicochemical properties of olodaterol. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for assessment of human exposure to bisphenol A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaoxia, E-mail: xiaoxia.yang@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Doerge, Daniel R. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Teeguarden, Justin G. [Health Effects and Exposure Science, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Fisher, Jeffrey W. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    A previously developed physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for bisphenol A (BPA) in adult rhesus monkeys was modified to characterize the pharmacokinetics of BPA and its phase II conjugates in adult humans following oral ingestion. Coupled with in vitro studies on BPA metabolism in the liver and the small intestine, the PBPK model was parameterized using oral pharmacokinetic data with deuterated-BPA (d{sub 6}-BPA) delivered in cookies to adult humans after overnight fasting. The availability of the serum concentration time course of unconjugated d{sub 6}-BPA offered direct empirical evidence for the calibration of BPA model parameters. The recalibrated PBPK adult human model for BPA was then evaluated against published human pharmacokinetic studies with BPA. A hypothesis of decreased oral uptake was needed to account for the reduced peak levels observed in adult humans, where d{sub 6}-BPA was delivered in soup and food was provided prior to BPA ingestion, suggesting the potential impact of dosing vehicles and/or fasting on BPA disposition. With the incorporation of Monte Carlo analysis, the recalibrated adult human model was used to address the inter-individual variability in the internal dose metrics of BPA for the U.S. general population. Model-predicted peak BPA serum levels were in the range of pM, with 95% of human variability falling within an order of magnitude. This recalibrated PBPK model for BPA in adult humans provides a scientific basis for assessing human exposure to BPA that can serve to minimize uncertainties incurred during extrapolations across doses and species. - Highlights: • A PBPK model predicts the kinetics of bisphenol A (BPA) in adult humans. • Serum concentrations of aglycone BPA are available for model calibration. • Model predicted peak BPA serum levels for adult humans were in the range of pM. • Model predicted 95% of human variability fell within an order of magnitude.

  3. Modeling Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Glucagon for Simulation of the Glucoregulatory System in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye

    The goal of this thesis was to develop a pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) model for glucagon. The proposed PD model included multiplication of the stimulating glucagon effect and inhibiting insulin effect on the endogenous glucose production (EGP). Moreover, the concentration-response re......The goal of this thesis was to develop a pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) model for glucagon. The proposed PD model included multiplication of the stimulating glucagon effect and inhibiting insulin effect on the endogenous glucose production (EGP). Moreover, the concentration...

  4. Application of in Vitro Biotransformation Data and Pharmacokinetic Modeling to Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    The adverse biological effects of toxic substances are dependent upon the exposure concentration and the duration of exposure. Pharmacokinetic models can quantitatively relate the external concentration of a toxicant in the environment to the internal dose of the toxicant in the ...

  5. PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR HUMAN EXPOSURES TO METHYL TERTIARY-BUTYL ETHER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humans can be exposed by inhalation, ingestion, or dermal absorption to methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE), an oxygenated fuel additive, from contaminated water sources. The purpose of this research was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model describing in human...

  6. Evaluating Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Interactions with Computational Models in Supporting Cumulative Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yu-Mei; Clewell, Harvey; Campbell, Jerry; Andersen, Melvin

    2011-01-01

    Simultaneous or sequential exposure to multiple chemicals may cause interactions in the pharmacokinetics (PK) and/or pharmacodynamics (PD) of the individual chemicals. Such interactions can cause modification of the internal or target dose/response of one chemical in the mixture by other chemical(s), resulting in a change in the toxicity from that predicted from the summation of the effects of the single chemicals using dose additivity. In such cases, conducting quantitative cumulative risk assessment for chemicals present as a mixture is difficult. The uncertainties that arise from PK interactions can be addressed by developing physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to describe the disposition of chemical mixtures. Further, PK models can be developed to describe mechanisms of action and tissue responses. In this article, PBPK/PD modeling efforts conducted to investigate chemical interactions at the PK and PD levels are reviewed to demonstrate the use of this predictive modeling framework in assessing health risks associated with exposures to complex chemical mixtures. PMID:21655141

  7. Population pharmacokinetics of olprinone in healthy male volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunisawa T

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Takayuki Kunisawa,1 Hidefumi Kasai,2 Makoto Suda,2 Manabu Yoshimura,3 Ami Sugawara,3 Yuki Izumi,3 Takafumi Iida,3 Atsushi Kurosawa,3 Hiroshi Iwasaki3 1Surgical Operation Department, Asahikawa Medical University Hospital, Hokkaido, Japan; 2Clinical Study Management Division, Bell Medical Solutions Inc, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Hokkaido, Japan Background: Olprinone decreases the cardiac preload and/or afterload because of its vasodilatory effect and increases myocardial contractility by inhibiting phosphodiesterase III. Purpose: The objective of this study was to characterize the population pharmacokinetics of olprinone after a single continuous infusion in healthy male volunteers. Methods: We used 500 plasma concentration data points collected from nine healthy male volunteers for the study. The population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using the nonlinear mixed effect model (NONMEM® software. Results: The time course of plasma concentration of olprinone was best described using a two-compartment model. The final pharmacokinetic parameters were total clearance (7.37 mL/minute/kg, distribution volume of the central compartment (134 mL/kg, intercompartmental clearance (7.75 mL/minute/kg, and distribution volume of the peripheral compartment (275 mL/kg. The interindividual variability in the total clearance was 12.4%, and the residual error variability (exponential and additive were 22.2% and 0.129 (standard deviation. The final pharmacokinetic model was assessed using a bootstrap method and visual predictive check. Conclusion: We developed a population pharmacokinetic model of olprinone in healthy male adults. The bootstrap method and visual predictive check showed that this model was appropriate. Our results might be used to develop the population pharmacokinetic model in patients. Keywords: phosphodiesterase III inhibitor, men, pharmacokinetic model

  8. Pharmacokinetic models relevant to toxicity and metabolism for uranium in humans and animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrenn, M.E.; Lipsztein, J.; Bertelli, L.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to summarize pharmacokinetic models of uranium metabolism. Fortunately, others have recently reviewed metabolic models of all types, not just pharmacokinetic models. Their papers should be consulted for greater biological detail than is possible here. Improvements in the models since these other papers are noted. Models for assessing the biological consequences of exposure should account for the kinetics of intake by ingestion, inhalation, and injection, and the chemical form of uranium; predict the time dependent concentration in red blood cells, plasma, urine, kidney, bone and other organs (or compartments); and be adaptable to calculating these concentrations for varying regimens of intake. The biological parameters in the models come from metabolic data in humans and animals. Some of these parameters are reasonably well defined. For example, the cumulative urinary excretion at 24 hours post injection of soluble uranium in man is about 70%, the absorbed fraction for soluble uranium ingested by man in drinking water during normal dietary conditions is about 1%, and the half time in the mammalian kidney is several days. 17 refs., 8 figs

  9. Using Akaike's information theoretic criterion in mixed-effects modeling of pharmacokinetic data: a simulation study [version 3; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Olofsen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Akaike's information theoretic criterion for model discrimination (AIC is often stated to "overfit", i.e., it selects models with a higher dimension than the dimension of the model that generated the data. However, with experimental pharmacokinetic data it may not be possible to identify the correct model, because of the complexity of the processes governing drug disposition. Instead of trying to find the correct model, a more useful objective might be to minimize the prediction error of drug concentrations in subjects with unknown disposition characteristics. In that case, the AIC might be the selection criterion of choice. We performed Monte Carlo simulations using a model of pharmacokinetic data (a power function of time with the property that fits with common multi-exponential models can never be perfect - thus resembling the situation with real data. Prespecified models were fitted to simulated data sets, and AIC and AICc (the criterion with a correction for small sample sizes values were calculated and averaged. The average predictive performances of the models, quantified using simulated validation sets, were compared to the means of the AICs. The data for fits and validation consisted of 11 concentration measurements each obtained in 5 individuals, with three degrees of interindividual variability in the pharmacokinetic volume of distribution. Mean AICc corresponded very well, and better than mean AIC, with mean predictive performance. With increasing interindividual variability, there was a trend towards larger optimal models, but with respect to both lowest AICc and best predictive performance. Furthermore, it was observed that the mean square prediction error itself became less suitable as a validation criterion, and that a predictive performance measure should incorporate interindividual variability. This simulation study showed that, at least in a relatively simple mixed-effects modelling context with a set of prespecified models

  10. Complexity-aware simple modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Schiavon, Mariana; El-Samad, Hana

    2018-02-26

    Mathematical models continue to be essential for deepening our understanding of biology. On one extreme, simple or small-scale models help delineate general biological principles. However, the parsimony of detail in these models as well as their assumption of modularity and insulation make them inaccurate for describing quantitative features. On the other extreme, large-scale and detailed models can quantitatively recapitulate a phenotype of interest, but have to rely on many unknown parameters, making them often difficult to parse mechanistically and to use for extracting general principles. We discuss some examples of a new approach-complexity-aware simple modeling-that can bridge the gap between the small-scale and large-scale approaches. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Application of Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Prediction of Tofacitinib Exposure in Japanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Misaki; Tse, Susanna; Hirai, Midori; Kurebayashi, Yoichi

    2017-05-09

    Tofacitinib (3-[(3R,4R)-4-methyl-3-[methyl(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)amino]piperidin-1-yl]-3 -oxopropanenitrile) is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor that is approved in countries including Japan and the United States for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, and is being developed across the globe for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. In the present study, a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model was applied to compare the pharmacokinetics of tofacitinib in Japanese and Caucasians to assess the potential impact of ethnicity on the dosing regimen in the two populations. Simulated plasma concentration profiles and pharmacokinetic parameters, i.e. maximum concentration and area under plasma concentration-time curve, in Japanese and Caucasian populations after single or multiple doses of 1 to 30 mg tofacitinib were in agreement with clinically observed data. The similarity in simulated exposure between Japanese and Caucasian populations supports the currently approved dosing regimen in Japan and the United States, where there is no recommendation for dose adjustment according to race. Simulated results for single (1 to 100 mg) or multiple doses (5 mg twice daily) of tofacitinib in extensive and poor metabolizers of CYP2C19, an enzyme which has been shown to contribute in part to tofacitinib elimination and is known to exhibit higher frequency in Japanese compared to Caucasians, were also in support of no recommendation for dose adjustment in CYP2C19 poor metabolizers. This study demonstrated a successful application of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling in evaluating ethnic sensitivity in pharmacokinetics at early stages of development, presenting its potential value as an efficient and scientific method for optimal dose setting in the Japanese population.

  12. Simple Tidal Prism Models Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luketina, D.

    1998-01-01

    Simple tidal prism models for well-mixed estuaries have been in use for some time and are discussed in most text books on estuaries. The appeal of this model is its simplicity. However, there are several flaws in the logic behind the model. These flaws are pointed out and a more theoretically correct simple tidal prism model is derived. In doing so, it is made clear which effects can, in theory, be neglected and which can not.

  13. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to predict the pharmacokinetics of highly protein-bound drugs and the impact of errors in plasma protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Min; Nagar, Swati; Korzekwa, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Predicting the pharmacokinetics of highly protein-bound drugs is difficult. Also, since historical plasma protein binding data were often collected using unbuffered plasma, the resulting inaccurate binding data could contribute to incorrect predictions. This study uses a generic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict human plasma concentration-time profiles for 22 highly protein-bound drugs. Tissue distribution was estimated from in vitro drug lipophilicity data, plasma protein binding and the blood: plasma ratio. Clearance was predicted with a well-stirred liver model. Underestimated hepatic clearance for acidic and neutral compounds was corrected by an empirical scaling factor. Predicted values (pharmacokinetic parameters, plasma concentration-time profile) were compared with observed data to evaluate the model accuracy. Of the 22 drugs, less than a 2-fold error was obtained for the terminal elimination half-life (t1/2 , 100% of drugs), peak plasma concentration (Cmax , 100%), area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-t , 95.4%), clearance (CLh , 95.4%), mean residence time (MRT, 95.4%) and steady state volume (Vss , 90.9%). The impact of fup errors on CLh and Vss prediction was evaluated. Errors in fup resulted in proportional errors in clearance prediction for low-clearance compounds, and in Vss prediction for high-volume neutral drugs. For high-volume basic drugs, errors in fup did not propagate to errors in Vss prediction. This is due to the cancellation of errors in the calculations for tissue partitioning of basic drugs. Overall, plasma profiles were well simulated with the present PBPK model. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Population Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: An intranasal gel dosage formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness (SMS).The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) was evaluated using data collected in Phase II IND protocols. We reported earlier statistically significant gender differences in PK parameters of INSCOP at a dose level of 0.4 mg. To identify covariates that influence PK parameters of INSCOP, we examined population covariates of INSCOP PK model for 0.4 mg dose. Methods: Plasma scopolamine concentrations versus time data were collected from 20 normal healthy human subjects (11 male/9 female) after a 0.4 mg dose. Phoenix NLME was employed for PK analysis of these data using gender, body weight and age as covariates for model selection. Model selection was based on a likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL). Statistical significance for base model building and individual covariate analysis was set at P less than 0.05{delta(-2LL)=3.84}. Results: A one-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order elimination best described INSCOP concentration ]time profiles. Inclusion of gender, body weight and age as covariates individually significantly reduced -2LL by the cut-off value of 3.84(P less than 0.05) when tested against the base model. After the forward stepwise selection and backward elimination steps, gender was selected to add to the final model which had significant influence on absorption rate constant (ka) and the volume of distribution (V) of INSCOP. Conclusion: A population pharmacokinetic model for INSCOP has been identified and gender was a significant contributing covariate for the final model. The volume of distribution and Ka were significantly higher in males than in females which confirm gender-dependent pharmacokinetics of scopolamine after administration of a 0.4 mg dose.

  15. Liquid chromatography method development and optimization for valsartan: pharmacokinetics of oral hydrogels in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohail, M.; Minhas, M.U.

    2017-01-01

    A simple, rapid, precise, accurate high performance liquid chromatography method has been developed and subsequently validated for determination of valsartan in rabbit plasma. The method was developed employing mixture of mobile phase consisting of 0.02 M potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer and acetonitrile (45:55), pH was adjusted to 2.7 using 50% orthophosphoric acid and pumped thorough chromatographic system at a flow rate of 1 ml/min. An isocratic elution mode was carried out at HPLC system (Agilent Technologies, 1200 series, USA) fitted with variable wavelength detector and data processing software ChemStation. For sample analysis, 20 mul sample was injected and eluate was monitored at 225nm wavelength. Pharmacokinetic evaluation was performed in rabbits after the oral administration of valsartan loaded PVA-co-poly(AA) hydrogels. The mean Cmax of valsartan was 408.439ng/ml, Tmax was 12h and half life (t1/2) was 8.812h. The extraction procedure was simple with good response even at very low drug concentration, thereby making this method suitable for pharmacokinetic application. It is concluded that developed method is simple, fast, cost effective, and reproducible for the analysis of pharmacokinetic parameters in the rabbit plasma. (author)

  16. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Therapeutic Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Harvey; Chow, Timothy W

    2017-09-01

    Biologics or therapeutic proteins are becoming increasingly important as treatments for disease. The most common class of biologics are monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Recently, there has been an increase in the use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling in the pharmaceutical industry in drug development. We review PBPK models for therapeutic proteins with an emphasis on mAbs. Due to their size and similarity to endogenous antibodies, there are distinct differences between PBPK models for small molecules and mAbs. The high-level organization of a typical mAb PBPK model consists of a whole-body PBPK model with organ compartments interconnected by both blood and lymph flows. The whole-body PBPK model is coupled with tissue-level submodels used to describe key mechanisms governing mAb disposition including tissue efflux via the lymphatic system, elimination by catabolism, protection from catabolism binding to the neonatal Fc (FcRn) receptor, and nonlinear binding to specific pharmacological targets of interest. The use of PBPK modeling in the development of therapeutic proteins is still in its infancy. Further application of PBPK modeling for therapeutic proteins will help to define its developing role in drug discovery and development. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Terbinafine in Rats and Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini-Yeganeh, Mahboubeh; McLachlan, Andrew J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) model capable of describing and predicting terbinafine concentrations in plasma and tissues in rats and humans. A PB-PK model consisting of 12 tissue and 2 blood compartments was developed using concentration-time data for tissues from rats (n = 33) after intravenous bolus administration of terbinafine (6 mg/kg of body weight). It was assumed that all tissues except skin and testis tissues were well-stirred compartments with perfusion rate limitations. The uptake of terbinafine into skin and testis tissues was described by a PB-PK model which incorporates a membrane permeability rate limitation. The concentration-time data for terbinafine in human plasma and tissues were predicted by use of a scaled-up PB-PK model, which took oral absorption into consideration. The predictions obtained from the global PB-PK model for the concentration-time profile of terbinafine in human plasma and tissues were in close agreement with the observed concentration data for rats. The scaled-up PB-PK model provided an excellent prediction of published terbinafine concentration-time data obtained after the administration of single and multiple oral doses in humans. The estimated volume of distribution at steady state (Vss) obtained from the PB-PK model agreed with the reported value of 11 liters/kg. The apparent volume of distribution of terbinafine in skin and adipose tissues accounted for 41 and 52%, respectively, of the Vss for humans, indicating that uptake into and redistribution from these tissues dominate the pharmacokinetic profile of terbinafine. The PB-PK model developed in this study was capable of accurately predicting the plasma and tissue terbinafine concentrations in both rats and humans and provides insight into the physiological factors that determine terbinafine disposition. PMID:12069977

  18. A general method to determine sampling windows for nonlinear mixed effects models with an application to population pharmacokinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Lee Kien; McGree, James; Duffull, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Optimal design methods have been proposed to determine the best sampling times when sparse blood sampling is required in clinical pharmacokinetic studies. However, the optimal blood sampling time points may not be feasible in clinical practice. Sampling windows, a time interval for blood sample collection, have been proposed to provide flexibility in blood sampling times while preserving efficient parameter estimation. Because of the complexity of the population pharmacokinetic models, which are generally nonlinear mixed effects models, there is no analytical solution available to determine sampling windows. We propose a method for determination of sampling windows based on MCMC sampling techniques. The proposed method attains a stationary distribution rapidly and provides time-sensitive windows around the optimal design points. The proposed method is applicable to determine sampling windows for any nonlinear mixed effects model although our work focuses on an application to population pharmacokinetic models. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic(PB-PK) model for ethylene dibromide : relevance of extrahepatic metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hissink, A M; Wormhoudt, L.W.; Sherratt, P.J.; Hayes, D.J.; Commandeur, J N; Vermeulen, N P; van Bladeren, P.J.

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) model was developed for ethylene dibromide (1,2-dibromoethane, EDB) for rats and humans, partly based on previously published in vitro data (Ploemen et al., 1997). In the present study, this PB-PK model has been validated for the rat. In addition, new

  20. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) model for ethylene dibromide : relevance of extrahepatic metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hissink, A.M.; Wormhoudt, L.W.; Sherratt, P.J.; Hayes, J.D.; Commandeur, J.N.M.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.; Bladeren, P.J. van

    2000-01-01

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) model was developed for ethylene dibromide (1,2-dibromoethane, EDB) for rats and humans, partly based on previously published in vitro data (Ploemen et al., 1997). In the present study, this PB-PK model has been validated for the rat. In addition, new

  1. Semi-physiological pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling and simulation of 5-fluorouracil for thrombocytopenia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobuchi, Shinji; Ito, Yukako; Hayakawa, Taro; Nishimura, Asako; Shibata, Nobuhito; Takada, Kanji; Sakaeda, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    1. The aim of this study was to develop a simple pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model that could characterize the complete time-course of alterations in platelet counts to predict the onset and degree of thrombocytopenia, which severely limits the use of the anticancer agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), in rats. 2. Platelet counts were measured in rats following the intravenous administration of various doses of 5-FU for 4 days to obtain data for an analysis of the PK-PD model. Our PK-PD model consisted of a two-compartment PK model, with three compartments for the PD model and 10 structural PK-PD model parameters. 3. After the 5-FU treatment, platelet counts transiently decreased to a nadir level, showed a rebound to above the baseline level before recovering to baseline levels. Nadir platelet counts and rebounds varied with the AUC0-∞ level. The final PK-PD model effectively characterized platelet count data and final PD parameters were estimated with high certainty. 4. This PK-PD model and simulation may represent a valuable tool for quantifying and predicting the complete time-course of alterations in blood cell counts, and could contribute to the development of therapeutic strategies with 5-FU and assessments of various novel anticancer agents that are difficult to examine in humans.

  2. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Voriconazole To Develop an Alternative Dosing Regimen in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastine, Silke; Lehrnbecher, Thomas; Müller, Carsten; Farowski, Fedja; Bader, Peter; Ullmann-Moskovits, Judith; Cornely, Oliver A; Groll, Andreas H; Hempel, Georg

    2018-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic variability of voriconazole (VCZ) in immunocompromised children is high, and adequate exposure, particularly in the first days of therapy, is uncertain. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed to explore VCZ exposure in plasma after alternative dosing regimens. Concentration data were obtained from a pediatric phase II study. Nonlinear mixed effects modeling was used to develop the model. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to test an array of three-times-daily (TID) intravenous dosing regimens in children 2 to 12 years of age. A two-compartment model with first-order absorption, nonlinear Michaelis-Menten elimination, and allometric scaling best described the data (maximal kinetic velocity for nonlinear Michaelis-Menten clearance [ V max ] = 51.5 mg/h/70 kg, central volume of distribution [ V 1 ] = 228 liters/70 kg, intercompartmental clearance [ Q ] = 21.9 liters/h/70 kg, peripheral volume of distribution [ V 2 ] = 1,430 liters/70 kg, bioavailability [ F ] = 59.4%, K m = fixed value of 1.15 mg/liter, absorption rate constant = fixed value of 1.19 h -1 ). Interindividual variabilities for V max , V 1 , Q , and F were 63.6%, 45.4%, 67%, and 1.34% on a logit scale, respectively, and residual variability was 37.8% (proportional error) and 0.0049 mg/liter (additive error). Monte Carlo simulations of a regimen of 9 mg/kg of body weight TID simulated for 24, 48, and 72 h followed by 8 mg/kg two times daily (BID) resulted in improved early target attainment relative to that with the currently recommended BID dosing regimen but no increased rate of accumulation thereafter. Pharmacokinetic modeling suggests that intravenous TID dosing at 9 mg/kg per dose for up to 3 days may result in a substantially higher percentage of children 2 to 12 years of age with adequate exposure to VCZ early during treatment. Before implementation of this regimen in patients, however, validation of exposure, safety, and tolerability in a carefully designed

  3. Pharmacokinetic modeling of gentamicin in treatment of infective endocarditis: Model development and validation of existing models

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wijk, Lars; Proost, Johannes H.; Sinha, Bhanu; Touw, Daan J.

    2017-01-01

    Gentamicin shows large variations in half-life and volume of distribution (Vd) within and between individuals. Thus, monitoring and accurately predicting serum levels are required to optimize effectiveness and minimize toxicity. Currently, two population pharmacokinetic models are applied for predicting gentamicin doses in adults. For endocarditis patients the optimal model is unknown. We aimed at: 1) creating an optimal model for endocarditis patients; and 2) assessing whether the endocarditis and existing models can accurately predict serum levels. We performed a retrospective observational two-cohort study: one cohort to parameterize the endocarditis model by iterative two-stage Bayesian analysis, and a second cohort to validate and compare all three models. The Akaike Information Criterion and the weighted sum of squares of the residuals divided by the degrees of freedom were used to select the endocarditis model. Median Prediction Error (MDPE) and Median Absolute Prediction Error (MDAPE) were used to test all models with the validation dataset. We built the endocarditis model based on data from the modeling cohort (65 patients) with a fixed 0.277 L/h/70kg metabolic clearance, 0.698 (±0.358) renal clearance as fraction of creatinine clearance, and Vd 0.312 (±0.076) L/kg corrected lean body mass. External validation with data from 14 validation cohort patients showed a similar predictive power of the endocarditis model (MDPE -1.77%, MDAPE 4.68%) as compared to the intensive-care (MDPE -1.33%, MDAPE 4.37%) and standard (MDPE -0.90%, MDAPE 4.82%) models. All models acceptably predicted pharmacokinetic parameters for gentamicin in endocarditis patients. However, these patients appear to have an increased Vd, similar to intensive care patients. Vd mainly determines the height of peak serum levels, which in turn correlate with bactericidal activity. In order to maintain simplicity, we advise to use the existing intensive-care model in clinical practice to avoid

  4. Pharmacokinetic modeling of gentamicin in treatment of infective endocarditis: Model development and validation of existing models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gomes

    Full Text Available Gentamicin shows large variations in half-life and volume of distribution (Vd within and between individuals. Thus, monitoring and accurately predicting serum levels are required to optimize effectiveness and minimize toxicity. Currently, two population pharmacokinetic models are applied for predicting gentamicin doses in adults. For endocarditis patients the optimal model is unknown. We aimed at: 1 creating an optimal model for endocarditis patients; and 2 assessing whether the endocarditis and existing models can accurately predict serum levels. We performed a retrospective observational two-cohort study: one cohort to parameterize the endocarditis model by iterative two-stage Bayesian analysis, and a second cohort to validate and compare all three models. The Akaike Information Criterion and the weighted sum of squares of the residuals divided by the degrees of freedom were used to select the endocarditis model. Median Prediction Error (MDPE and Median Absolute Prediction Error (MDAPE were used to test all models with the validation dataset. We built the endocarditis model based on data from the modeling cohort (65 patients with a fixed 0.277 L/h/70kg metabolic clearance, 0.698 (±0.358 renal clearance as fraction of creatinine clearance, and Vd 0.312 (±0.076 L/kg corrected lean body mass. External validation with data from 14 validation cohort patients showed a similar predictive power of the endocarditis model (MDPE -1.77%, MDAPE 4.68% as compared to the intensive-care (MDPE -1.33%, MDAPE 4.37% and standard (MDPE -0.90%, MDAPE 4.82% models. All models acceptably predicted pharmacokinetic parameters for gentamicin in endocarditis patients. However, these patients appear to have an increased Vd, similar to intensive care patients. Vd mainly determines the height of peak serum levels, which in turn correlate with bactericidal activity. In order to maintain simplicity, we advise to use the existing intensive-care model in clinical practice to

  5. Estimating Margin of Exposure to Thyroid Peroxidase Inhibitors Using High-Throughput in vitro Data, High-Throughput Exposure Modeling, and Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Jeremy A.; Tan, Yu-Mei; Gilbert, Mary; Isaacs, Kristin; El-Masri, Hisham

    2016-01-01

    Some pharmaceuticals and environmental chemicals bind the thyroid peroxidase (TPO) enzyme and disrupt thyroid hormone production. The potential for TPO inhibition is a function of both the binding affinity and concentration of the chemical within the thyroid gland. The former can be determined through in vitro assays, and the latter is influenced by pharmacokinetic properties, along with environmental exposure levels. In this study, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was integrated with a pharmacodynamic (PD) model to establish internal doses capable of inhibiting TPO in relation to external exposure levels predicted through exposure modeling. The PBPK/PD model was evaluated using published serum or thyroid gland chemical concentrations or circulating thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) hormone levels measured in rats and humans. After evaluation, the model was used to estimate human equivalent intake doses resulting in reduction of T4 and T3 levels by 10% (ED10) for 6 chemicals of varying TPO-inhibiting potencies. These chemicals were methimazole, 6-propylthiouracil, resorcinol, benzophenone-2, 2-mercaptobenzothiazole, and triclosan. Margin of exposure values were estimated for these chemicals using the ED10 and predicted population exposure levels for females of child-bearing age. The modeling approach presented here revealed that examining hazard or exposure alone when prioritizing chemicals for risk assessment may be insufficient, and that consideration of pharmacokinetic properties is warranted. This approach also provides a mechanism for integrating in vitro data, pharmacokinetic properties, and exposure levels predicted through high-throughput means when interpreting adverse outcome pathways based on biological responses. PMID:26865668

  6. Pharmacokinetics for regulatory risk analysis: the case of trichloroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogen, K T

    1988-12-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models describing the uptake, metabolism, and excretion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are now proposed for use in regulatory health-risk assessment. A steady-state analysis of one such model is shown to provide simple, convenient predicted relationships between an applied dose and the corresponding toxicologically effective, metabolized dose for certain VOCs like trichloroethylene (TCE). A version of this PBPK model was fit to data on human metabolism of TCE to urinary metabolites in chronically exposed workers, yielding a direct estimate of PBPK parameters governing human capacity to metabolize TCE. It is shown that this estimate is consistent with others based on experimental studies of TCE metabolism in humans exposed to TCE by inhalation for short periods. These results are applied to human cancer-risk assessment using rodent bioassay data on TCE-induced tumorigenesis.

  7. A comprehensive physiologically based pharmacokinetic knowledgebase and web-based interface for rapid model ranking and querying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Published physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models from peer-reviewed articles are often well-parameterized, thoroughly-vetted, and can be utilized as excellent resources for the construction of models pertaining to related chemicals. Specifically, chemical-specific pa...

  8. Pharmacokinetic models of morphine and its metabolites in neonates: Systematic comparisons of models from the literature, and development of a new meta-model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.R. Knøsgaard (Katrine Rørbæk); D.J.R. Foster (David John Richard); M. Kreilgaard (Mads); E. Sverrisdóttir (Eva); R.N. Upton (Richard Neil); J.N. van den Anker (John)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMorphine is commonly used for pain management in preterm neonates. The aims of this study were to compare published models of neonatal pharmacokinetics of morphine and its metabolites with a new dataset, and to combine the characteristics of the best predictive models to design a

  9. A simple model for indentation creep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginder, Ryan S.; Nix, William D.; Pharr, George M.

    2018-03-01

    A simple model for indentation creep is developed that allows one to directly convert creep parameters measured in indentation tests to those observed in uniaxial tests through simple closed-form relationships. The model is based on the expansion of a spherical cavity in a power law creeping material modified to account for indentation loading in a manner similar to that developed by Johnson for elastic-plastic indentation (Johnson, 1970). Although only approximate in nature, the simple mathematical form of the new model makes it useful for general estimation purposes or in the development of other deformation models in which a simple closed-form expression for the indentation creep rate is desirable. Comparison to a more rigorous analysis which uses finite element simulation for numerical evaluation shows that the new model predicts uniaxial creep rates within a factor of 2.5, and usually much better than this, for materials creeping with stress exponents in the range 1 ≤ n ≤ 7. The predictive capabilities of the model are evaluated by comparing it to the more rigorous analysis and several sets of experimental data in which both the indentation and uniaxial creep behavior have been measured independently.

  10. The pharmacokinetics of the interstitial space in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Levitt, David G

    2003-01-01

    Background The pharmacokinetics of extracellular solutes is determined by the blood-tissue exchange kinetics and the volume of distribution in the interstitial space in the different organs. This information can be used to develop a general physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model applicable to most extracellular solutes. Methods The human pharmacokinetic literature was surveyed to tabulate the steady state and equilibrium volume of distribution of the solutes mannitol, EDTA, morphi...

  11. A Multi-Route Model of Nicotine-Cotinine Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Brain Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding in Humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Housand, Conrad; Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Gunawan, Rudy; Timchalk, Charles

    2013-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics of nicotine, the pharmacologically active alkaloid in tobacco responsible for addiction, are well characterized in humans. We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model of nicotine pharmacokinetics, brain dosimetry and brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) occupancy. A Bayesian framework was applied to optimize model parameters against multiple human data sets. The resulting model was consistent with both calibration and test data sets, but in general underestimated variability. A pharmacodynamic model relating nicotine levels to increases in heart rate as a proxy for the pharmacological effects of nicotine accurately described the nicotine related changes in heart rate and the development and decay of tolerance to nicotine. The PBPK model was utilized to quantitatively capture the combined impact of variation in physiological and metabolic parameters, nicotine availability and smoking compensation on the change in number of cigarettes smoked and toxicant exposure in a population of 10,000 people presented with a reduced toxicant (50%), reduced nicotine (50%) cigarette Across the population, toxicant exposure is reduced in some but not all smokers. Reductions are not in proportion to reductions in toxicant yields, largely due to partial compensation in response to reduced nicotine yields. This framework can be used as a key element of a dosimetry-driven risk assessment strategy for cigarette smoke constituents.

  12. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Modeling to Study the Antipyretic Effect of Qingkailing Injection on Pyrexia Model Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixin Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Qingkailing injection (QKLI is a modern Chinese medicine preparation derived from a well-known classical formulation, An-Gong-Niu-Huang Wan. Although the clinical efficacy of QKLI has been well defined, its severe adverse drug reactions (ADRs were extensively increased. Through thorough attempts to reduce ADR rates, it was realized that the effect-based rational use plays the key role in clinical practices. Hence, the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD model was introduced in the present study, aiming to link the pharmacokinetic profiles with the therapeutic outcomes of QKLI, and subsequently to provide valuable guidelines for the rational use of QKLI in clinical settings. The PK properties of the six dominant ingredients in QKLI were compared between the normal treated group (NTG and the pyrexia model group (MTG. Rectal temperatures were measured in parallel with blood sampling for NTG, MTG, model control group (MCG, and normal control group (NCG. Baicalin and geniposide exhibited appropriate PK parameters, and were selected as the PK markers to map the antipyretic effect of QKLI. Then, a PK-PD model was constructed upon the bacalin and geniposide plasma concentrations vs. the rectal temperature variation values, by a two-compartment PK model with a Sigmoid Emax PD model to explain the time delay between the drug plasma concentration of PK markers and the antipyretic effect after a single dose administration of QKLI. The findings obtained would provide fundamental information to propose a more reasonable dosage regimen and improve the level of individualized drug therapy in clinical settings.

  13. A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model of morphine exposure and subsequent morphine consumption in postoperative pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Rasmus Vestergaard; Nyberg, Joakim; Lund, Trine Meldgaard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) relationship between exposure of morphine and subsequent morphine consumption and to develop simulation tools for model validation. Methods Dose, formulation and time of morphine administration was available from a published study...

  14. Simple spherical ablative-implosion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, F.J.; Steele, J.T.; Larsen, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    A simple model of the ablative implosion of a high-aspect-ratio (shell radius to shell thickness ratio) spherical shell is described. The model is similar in spirit to Rosenbluth's snowplow model. The scaling of the implosion time was determined in terms of the ablation pressure and the shell parameters such as diameter, wall thickness, and shell density, and compared these to complete hydrodynamic code calculations. The energy transfer efficiency from ablation pressure to shell implosion kinetic energy was examined and found to be very efficient. It may be possible to attach a simple heat-transport calculation to our implosion model to describe the laser-driven ablation-implosion process. The model may be useful for determining other energy driven (e.g., ion beam) implosion scaling

  15. The sheep as a model of preclinical safety and pharmacokinetic evaluations of candidate microbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Jonathon D S; Cameron, David; Dias, Nicola; Holding, Jeremy; Muntendam, Alex; Oostebring, Freddy; Dreier, Peter; Rohan, Lisa; Nuttall, Jeremy

    2015-07-01

    When developing novel microbicide products for the prevention of HIV infection, the preclinical safety program must evaluate not only the active pharmaceutical ingredient but also the product itself. To that end, we applied several relatively standard toxicology study methodologies to female sheep, incorporating an assessment of the pharmacokinetics, safety, tolerability, and local toxicity of a dapivirine-containing human vaginal ring formulation (Dapivirine Vaginal Ring-004). We performed a 3-month general toxicology study, a preliminary pharmacokinetic study using drug-loaded vaginal gel, and a detailed assessment of the kinetics of dapivirine delivery to plasma, vaginal, and rectal fluid and rectal, vaginal, and cervical tissue over 28 days of exposure and 3 and 7 days after removal of the ring. The findings of the general toxicology study supported the existing data from both preclinical and clinical studies in that there were no signs of toxicity related to dapivirine. In addition, the presence of the physical dapivirine ring did not alter local or systemic toxicity or the pharmacokinetics of dapivirine. Pharmacokinetic studies indicated that the dapivirine ring produced significant vaginal tissue levels of dapivirine. However, no dapivirine was detected in cervical tissue samples using the methods described here. Plasma and vaginal fluid levels were lower than those in previous clinical studies, while there were detectable dapivirine levels in the rectal tissue and fluid. All tissue and fluid levels tailed off rapidly to undetectable levels following removal of the ring. The sheep represents a very useful model for the assessment of the safety and pharmacokinetics of microbicide drug delivery devices, such as the vaginal ring. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Pharmacokinetics and Biodistribution of the Illegal Food Colorant Rhodamine B in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yung-Yi; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2017-02-08

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) demonstrated rhodamine B as a potential carcinogen in 1978. Nevertheless, rhodamine B has been illegally used as a colorant in food in many countries. Few pharmacokinetic and toxicological investigations have been performed since the first pharmacokinetic study on rhodamine B in 1961. The aims of this study were to develop a simple and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography method with fluorescence detection for the quantitative detection of rhodamine B in the plasma and organs of rats and to estimate its pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. The results demonstrated that the oral bioavailabilities of rhodamine B were 28.3 and 9.8% for the low-dose and high-dose exposures, respectively. Furthermore, rhodamine B was highly accumulated in the liver and, to a lesser extent, the kidney, but was undetectable in the brain. These results provide useful information for improving the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of rhodamine B, supporting additional food safety evaluations.

  17. Integration of Life-Stage Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models with Adverse Outcome Pathways and Environmental Exposure Models to Screen for Environmental Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Life-stage Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to include descriptions of several life-stage events such as pregnancy, fetal development, the neonate and child growth. The overall modeling strategy was used for in vitro to in vivo (IVIVE) extrapolat...

  18. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Relationship of Gabapentin in a CFA-induced Inflammatory Hyperalgesia Rat Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Malte Selch; Keizer, Ron; Munro, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Gabapentin displays non-linear drug disposition, which complicates dosing for optimal therapeutic effect. Thus, the current study was performed to elucidate the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PKPD) relationship of gabapentin's effect on mechanical hypersensitivity in a rat model of CFA......-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia. METHODS: A semi-mechanistic population-based PKPD model was developed using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling, based on gabapentin plasma and brain extracellular fluid (ECF) time-concentration data and measurements of CFA-evoked mechanical hyperalgesia following administration...

  19. A simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic model evaluating the effect of anti-nicotine antibodies on nicotine disposition in the brains of rats and humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saylor, Kyle, E-mail: saylor@vt.edu; Zhang, Chenming, E-mail: chzhang2@vt.edu

    2016-09-15

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was applied to investigate the effects of anti-nicotine antibodies on nicotine disposition in the brains of rats and humans. Successful construction of both rat and human models was achieved by fitting model outputs to published nicotine concentration time course data in the blood and in the brain. Key parameters presumed to have the most effect on the ability of these antibodies to prevent nicotine from entering the brain were selected for investigation using the human model. These parameters, which included antibody affinity for nicotine, antibody cross-reactivity with cotinine, and antibody concentration, were broken down into different, clinically-derived in silico treatment levels and fed into the human PBPK model. Model predictions suggested that all three parameters, in addition to smoking status, have a sizable impact on anti-nicotine antibodies' ability to prevent nicotine from entering the brain and that the antibodies elicited by current human vaccines do not have sufficient binding characteristics to reduce brain nicotine concentrations. If the antibody binding characteristics achieved in animal studies can similarly be achieved in human studies, however, nicotine vaccine efficacy in terms of brain nicotine concentration reduction is predicted to meet threshold values for alleviating nicotine dependence. - Highlights: • Modelling of nicotine disposition in the presence of anti-nicotine antibodies • Key vaccine efficacy factors are evaluated in silico in rats and in humans. • Model predicts insufficient antibody binding in past human nicotine vaccines. • Improving immunogenicity and antibody specificity may lead to vaccine success.

  20. A simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic model evaluating the effect of anti-nicotine antibodies on nicotine disposition in the brains of rats and humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saylor, Kyle; Zhang, Chenming

    2016-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was applied to investigate the effects of anti-nicotine antibodies on nicotine disposition in the brains of rats and humans. Successful construction of both rat and human models was achieved by fitting model outputs to published nicotine concentration time course data in the blood and in the brain. Key parameters presumed to have the most effect on the ability of these antibodies to prevent nicotine from entering the brain were selected for investigation using the human model. These parameters, which included antibody affinity for nicotine, antibody cross-reactivity with cotinine, and antibody concentration, were broken down into different, clinically-derived in silico treatment levels and fed into the human PBPK model. Model predictions suggested that all three parameters, in addition to smoking status, have a sizable impact on anti-nicotine antibodies' ability to prevent nicotine from entering the brain and that the antibodies elicited by current human vaccines do not have sufficient binding characteristics to reduce brain nicotine concentrations. If the antibody binding characteristics achieved in animal studies can similarly be achieved in human studies, however, nicotine vaccine efficacy in terms of brain nicotine concentration reduction is predicted to meet threshold values for alleviating nicotine dependence. - Highlights: • Modelling of nicotine disposition in the presence of anti-nicotine antibodies • Key vaccine efficacy factors are evaluated in silico in rats and in humans. • Model predicts insufficient antibody binding in past human nicotine vaccines. • Improving immunogenicity and antibody specificity may lead to vaccine success.

  1. Use of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Use of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models to Quantify the Impact of Human Age and Interindividual Differences in Physiology and Biochemistry Pertinent to Risk Final Report for Cooperative Agreement. This report describes and demonstrates techniques necessary to extrapolate and incorporate in vitro derived metabolic rate constants in PBPK models. It also includes two case study examples designed to demonstrate the applicability of such data for health risk assessment and addresses the quantification, extrapolation and interpretation of advanced biochemical information on human interindividual variability of chemical metabolism for risk assessment application. It comprises five chapters; topics and results covered in the first four chapters have been published in the peer reviewed scientific literature. Topics covered include: Data Quality ObjectivesExperimental FrameworkRequired DataTwo example case studies that develop and incorporate in vitro metabolic rate constants in PBPK models designed to quantify human interindividual variability to better direct the choice of uncertainty factors for health risk assessment. This report is intended to serve as a reference document for risk assors to use when quantifying, extrapolating, and interpretating advanced biochemical information about human interindividual variability of chemical metabolism.

  2. Evaluation of three physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling tools for emergency risk assessment after acute dichloromethane exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerleider, R. Z.; Olie, J. D N; van Eijkeren, J. C H; Bos, P. M J; Hof, B. G H; de Vries, I.; Bessems, J. G M; Meulenbelt, J.; Hunault, C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models may be useful in emergency risk assessment, after acute exposure to chemicals, such as dichloromethane (DCM). We evaluated the applicability of three PBPK models for human risk assessment following a single exposure to DCM: one model

  3. Comparison between the SIMPLE and ENERGY mixing models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, K.J.; Todreas, N.E.

    1980-07-01

    The SIMPLE and ENERGY mixing models were compared in order to investigate the limitations of SIMPLE's analytically formulated mixing parameter, relative to the experimentally calibrated ENERGY mixing parameters. For interior subchannels, it was shown that when the SIMPLE and ENERGY parameters are reduced to a common form, there is good agreement between the two models for a typical fuel geometry. However, large discrepancies exist for typical blanket (lower P/D) geometries. Furthermore, the discrepancies between the mixing parameters result in significant differences in terms of the temperature profiles generated by the ENERGY code utilizing these mixing parameters as input. For edge subchannels, the assumptions made in the development of the SIMPLE model were extended to the rectangular edge subchannel geometry used in ENERGY. The resulting effective eddy diffusivities (used by the ENERGY code) associated with the SIMPLE model are again closest to those of the ENERGY model for the fuel assembly geometry. Finally, the SIMPLE model's neglect of a net swirl effect in the edge region is most limiting for assemblies exhibiting relatively large radial power skews

  4. Study on pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of the isocorydine derivative (AICD) in rats by HPLC-DAD method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yali Chen; Qian Yan; Mei Zhong; Quanyi Zhao; Junxi Liu; Duolong Di; Jinxia Liu

    2015-01-01

    A simple and effective high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection method coupled with a liquid-liquid extraction pretreatment has been developed for determining the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of a novel structurally modified derivative(8-acetaminoisocorydine) of isocorydine.According to the in vivo experiments data calculations by DAS 2.0 software,a two-compartment metabolic model was suitable for describing the pharmacokinetic of 8-acetaminoisocorydine in rats.8-Acetamino-isocorydine was absorbed well after oral administration,and the absolute bioavailability was 76.5%.The half-life of 8-acetamino-isocorydine after intravenous and oral administration was 2.2 h and 2.0 h,respectively.In vivo,8-acetamino-isocorydine was highly distributed in the lungs,kidney and liver;however,relatively little entered the brain,suggesting that 8-acetaminoisocorydine could not easily pass through the blood brain barrier.Our work describes the first characterization of the pharmacokinetic parameters and tissue distribution of 8-acetamino-isocorydine.The acquired data will provide useful information for the in vivo pharmacology of 8-acetaminoisocorydine,and can be applied to new drug research.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of mitragynine in man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trakulsrichai S

    2015-04-01

    the study without adverse reactions. The median duration of abuse was 1.75 years. We analyzed one subject separately due to the abnormal behavior of blood concentration. From data of nine subjects, the pharmacokinetic parameters established were time to reach the maximum plasma concentration (0.83±0.35 hour, terminal half-life (23.24±16.07 hours, and the apparent volume of distribution (38.04±24.32 L/kg. The urine excretion of unchanged form was 0.14%. The pharmacokinetics were observed to be oral two-compartment model. Conclusion: This was the first pharmacokinetic study in humans, which demonstrated linearity and was consistent with the oral two-compartment model with a terminal half-life of about 1 day. The pharmacokinetic linearity and parameters reported are necessary pharmacological information of Kratom, and there is a possibility for it to be developed medically as a pain killer or better opioid substitute in the future. Keywords: kratom, human, pharmacokinetics

  6. A simple model for binary star evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whyte, C.A.; Eggleton, P.P.

    1985-01-01

    A simple model for calculating the evolution of binary stars is presented. Detailed stellar evolution calculations of stars undergoing mass and energy transfer at various rates are reported and used to identify the dominant physical processes which determine the type of evolution. These detailed calculations are used to calibrate the simple model and a comparison of calculations using the detailed stellar evolution equations and the simple model is made. Results of the evolution of a few binary systems are reported and compared with previously published calculations using normal stellar evolution programs. (author)

  7. Ofloxacin pharmacokinetics in renal failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Fillastre, J P; Leroy, A; Humbert, G

    1987-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ofloxacin were investigated in 12 normal subjects and 21 uremic patients after the administration of a single oral 200-mg dose. An open three-compartment body model was used to calculate ofloxacin pharmacokinetic parameters. In healthy subjects, the peak plasma level averaged 2.24 +/- 0.90 micrograms/ml and was obtained at 0.83 +/- 0.31 h. The absorption rate constant was 4.22 +/- 1.64 h-1. The terminal half-life was 7.86 +/- 1.81 h. The apparent volume of distribution...

  8. Quantification of metoprolol beta 2-adrenoceptor antagonism in asthmatic patients by pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braat, M. C.; Jonkers, R. E.; van Boxtel, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    An integrated pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model was used to quantify the beta 2-blocking activity of metoprolol in seven asthmatic patients. The patients received a subcutaneous dose of terbutaline on two consecutive days. On day 1 they were pretreated with placebo and on day 2 with metoprolol

  9. Linking Simple Economic Theory Models and the Cointegrated Vector AutoRegressive Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Niels Framroze

    This paper attempts to clarify the connection between simple economic theory models and the approach of the Cointegrated Vector-Auto-Regressive model (CVAR). By considering (stylized) examples of simple static equilibrium models, it is illustrated in detail, how the theoretical model and its stru....... Further fundamental extensions and advances to more sophisticated theory models, such as those related to dynamics and expectations (in the structural relations) are left for future papers......This paper attempts to clarify the connection between simple economic theory models and the approach of the Cointegrated Vector-Auto-Regressive model (CVAR). By considering (stylized) examples of simple static equilibrium models, it is illustrated in detail, how the theoretical model and its......, it is demonstrated how other controversial hypotheses such as Rational Expectations can be formulated directly as restrictions on the CVAR-parameters. A simple example of a "Neoclassical synthetic" AS-AD model is also formulated. Finally, the partial- general equilibrium distinction is related to the CVAR as well...

  10. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Relationship of Gabapentin in a CFA-induced Inflammatory Hyperalgesia Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Malte Selch; Keizer, Ron; Munro, Gordon; Mørk, Arne; Holm, René; Savic, Rada; Kreilgaard, Mads

    2016-05-01

    Gabapentin displays non-linear drug disposition, which complicates dosing for optimal therapeutic effect. Thus, the current study was performed to elucidate the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PKPD) relationship of gabapentin's effect on mechanical hypersensitivity in a rat model of CFA-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia. A semi-mechanistic population-based PKPD model was developed using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling, based on gabapentin plasma and brain extracellular fluid (ECF) time-concentration data and measurements of CFA-evoked mechanical hyperalgesia following administration of a range of gabapentin doses (oral and intravenous). The plasma/brain ECF concentration-time profiles of gabapentin were adequately described with a two-compartment plasma model with saturable intestinal absorption rate (K m  = 44.1 mg/kg, V max  = 41.9 mg/h∙kg) and dose-dependent oral bioavailability linked to brain ECF concentration through a transit compartment. Brain ECF concentration was directly linked to a sigmoid E max function describing reversal of hyperalgesia (EC 50, plasma  = 16.7 μg/mL, EC 50, brain  = 3.3 μg/mL). The proposed semi-mechanistic population-based PKPD model provides further knowledge into the understanding of gabapentin's non-linear pharmacokinetics and the link between plasma/brain disposition and anti-hyperalgesic effects. The model suggests that intestinal absorption is the primary source of non-linearity and that the investigated rat model provides reasonable predictions of clinically effective plasma concentrations for gabapentin.

  11. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for Fentanyl in support of the development of Provisional Advisory Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankaran, Harish, E-mail: harish.shankaran@pnnl.gov [Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Adeshina, Femi [National Homeland Security Research Center, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Teeguarden, Justin G. [Systems Toxicology Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Provisional Advisory Levels (PALs) are tiered exposure limits for toxic chemicals in air and drinking water that are developed to assist in emergency responses. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling can support this process by enabling extrapolations across doses, and exposure routes, thereby addressing gaps in the available toxicity data. Here, we describe the development of a PBPK model for Fentanyl – a synthetic opioid used clinically for pain management – to support the establishment of PALs. Starting from an existing model for intravenous Fentanyl, we first optimized distribution and clearance parameters using several additional IV datasets. We then calibrated the model using pharmacokinetic data for various formulations, and determined the absorbed fraction, F, and time taken for the absorbed amount to reach 90% of its final value, t90. For aerosolized pulmonary Fentanyl, F = 1 and t90 < 1 min indicating complete and rapid absorption. The F value ranged from 0.35 to 0.74 for oral and various transmucosal routes. Oral Fentanyl was absorbed the slowest (t90 ∼ 300 min); the absorption of intranasal Fentanyl was relatively rapid (t90 ∼ 20–40 min); and the various oral transmucosal routes had intermediate absorption rates (t90 ∼ 160–300 min). Based on these results, for inhalation exposures, we assumed that all of the Fentanyl inhaled from the air during each breath directly, and instantaneously enters the arterial circulation. We present model predictions of Fentanyl blood concentrations in oral and inhalation scenarios relevant for PAL development, and provide an analytical expression that can be used to extrapolate between oral and inhalation routes for the derivation of PALs. - Highlights: • We develop a Fentanyl PBPK model for relating external dose to internal levels. • We calibrate the model to oral and inhalation exposures using > 50 human datasets. • Model predictions are in good agreement with the available

  12. A Review on Pharmacokinetic Modeling and the Effects of Environmental Stressors on Pharmacokinetics for Operational Medicine: Operational Pharmacokinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Manning et al. 1986), which may cause physiological changes. For example, emotional distress may lead to elevated heart rate, blood pressure and...related changes in renal functions were reported during a Stroop word color conflict test (Fauvel, Hadj-Aissa et al. 1991). Emotional stressors could...M. Skee, et al. (2001). "Pharmacokinetics of norelgestromin and ethinyl estradiol delivered by a contraceptive patch (Ortho Evra (TM)/Evra (TM

  13. A quantitative systems pharmacology approach, incorporating a novel liver model, for predicting pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkaoui-Rbati, Mohammed H; Paine, Stuart W; Littlewood, Peter; Rauch, Cyril

    2017-01-01

    All pharmaceutical companies are required to assess pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) of new chemical entities (NCEs) and mathematical prediction helps to select the best NCE candidate with regard to adverse effects resulting from a DDI before any costly clinical studies. Most current models assume that the liver is a homogeneous organ where the majority of the metabolism occurs. However, the circulatory system of the liver has a complex hierarchical geometry which distributes xenobiotics throughout the organ. Nevertheless, the lobule (liver unit), located at the end of each branch, is composed of many sinusoids where the blood flow can vary and therefore creates heterogeneity (e.g. drug concentration, enzyme level). A liver model was constructed by describing the geometry of a lobule, where the blood velocity increases toward the central vein, and by modeling the exchange mechanisms between the blood and hepatocytes. Moreover, the three major DDI mechanisms of metabolic enzymes; competitive inhibition, mechanism based inhibition and induction, were accounted for with an undefined number of drugs and/or enzymes. The liver model was incorporated into a physiological-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model and simulations produced, that in turn were compared to ten clinical results. The liver model generated a hierarchy of 5 sinusoidal levels and estimated a blood volume of 283 mL and a cell density of 193 × 106 cells/g in the liver. The overall PBPK model predicted the pharmacokinetics of midazolam and the magnitude of the clinical DDI with perpetrator drug(s) including spatial and temporal enzyme levels changes. The model presented herein may reduce costs and the use of laboratory animals and give the opportunity to explore different clinical scenarios, which reduce the risk of adverse events, prior to costly human clinical studies.

  14. A quantitative systems pharmacology approach, incorporating a novel liver model, for predicting pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed H Cherkaoui-Rbati

    Full Text Available All pharmaceutical companies are required to assess pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDIs of new chemical entities (NCEs and mathematical prediction helps to select the best NCE candidate with regard to adverse effects resulting from a DDI before any costly clinical studies. Most current models assume that the liver is a homogeneous organ where the majority of the metabolism occurs. However, the circulatory system of the liver has a complex hierarchical geometry which distributes xenobiotics throughout the organ. Nevertheless, the lobule (liver unit, located at the end of each branch, is composed of many sinusoids where the blood flow can vary and therefore creates heterogeneity (e.g. drug concentration, enzyme level. A liver model was constructed by describing the geometry of a lobule, where the blood velocity increases toward the central vein, and by modeling the exchange mechanisms between the blood and hepatocytes. Moreover, the three major DDI mechanisms of metabolic enzymes; competitive inhibition, mechanism based inhibition and induction, were accounted for with an undefined number of drugs and/or enzymes. The liver model was incorporated into a physiological-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK model and simulations produced, that in turn were compared to ten clinical results. The liver model generated a hierarchy of 5 sinusoidal levels and estimated a blood volume of 283 mL and a cell density of 193 × 106 cells/g in the liver. The overall PBPK model predicted the pharmacokinetics of midazolam and the magnitude of the clinical DDI with perpetrator drug(s including spatial and temporal enzyme levels changes. The model presented herein may reduce costs and the use of laboratory animals and give the opportunity to explore different clinical scenarios, which reduce the risk of adverse events, prior to costly human clinical studies.

  15. Population Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Modeling of Haloperidol in Patients With Schizophrenia Using Positive and Negative Syndrome Rating Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reddy, Venkatesh Pilla; Kozielska, Magdalena; Johnson, Martin; Mafirakureva, Nyashadzaishe; Vermeulen, An; Liu, Jing; de Greef, Rik; Rujescu, Dan; Groothuis, Geny M. M.; Danhof, Meindert; Proost, Johannes H.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) model that quantifies the efficacy of haloperidol, accounting for the placebo effect, the variability in exposure-response, and the dropouts. Subsequently, the developed model was utilized to characterize an effective

  16. In vitro and in vivo experimental data for pyrethroid pharmacokinetic models: the case of bifenthrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrethroids are a class of neurotoxic synthetic pesticides. Exposure to pyrethroids has increased due to declining use of other classes of pesticides. Our studies are focused on generating in vitro and in vivo data for the development of pharmacokinetic models for pyrethroids. Us...

  17. Accelerated pharmacokinetic map determination for dynamic contrast enhanced MRI using frequency-domain based Tofts model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajuvalli, Nithin N; Nayak, Krupa N; Geethanath, Sairam

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) is widely used in the diagnosis of cancer and is also a promising tool for monitoring tumor response to treatment. The Tofts model has become a standard for the analysis of DCE-MRI. The process of curve fitting employed in the Tofts equation to obtain the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters is time-consuming for high resolution scans. Current work demonstrates a frequency-domain approach applied to the standard Tofts equation to speed-up the process of curve-fitting in order to obtain the pharmacokinetic parameters. The results obtained show that using the frequency domain approach, the process of curve fitting is computationally more efficient compared to the time-domain approach.

  18. Simple models with ALICE fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Striet, J

    2000-01-01

    We introduce two simple models which feature an Alice electrodynamics phase. In a well defined sense the Alice flux solutions we obtain in these models obey first order equations similar to those of the Nielsen-Olesen fluxtube in the abelian higgs model in the Bogomol'nyi limit. Some numerical solutions are presented as well.

  19. Preliminary physiologically based pharmacokinetic models for benzo[a]pyrene and dibenzo[def,p]chrysene in rodents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowell, Susan Ritger; Amin, Shantu G.; Anderson, Kim A.; Krishnegowda, Gowdahalli; Sharma, Arun K.; Soelberg, Jolen J.; Williams, David E.; Corley, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants generated as byproducts of natural and anthropogenic combustion processes. Despite significant public health concern, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling efforts for PAHs have so far been limited to naphthalene, plus simpler PK models for pyrene, nitropyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). The dearth of published models is due in part to the high lipophilicity, low volatility, and myriad metabolic pathways for PAHs, all of which present analytical and experimental challenges. Our research efforts have focused upon experimental approaches and initial development of PBPK models for the prototypic PAH, B[a]P, and the more potent, albeit less studied transplacental carcinogen, dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC). For both compounds, model compartments included arterial and venous blood, flow limited lung, liver, richly perfused and poorly perfused tissues, diffusion limited fat, and a two compartment theoretical gut (for oral exposures). Hepatic and pulmonary metabolism was described for both compounds, as were fractional binding in blood and fecal clearance. Partition coefficients for parent PAH along with their diol and tetraol metabolites were estimated using published algorithms and verified experimentally for the hydroxylated metabolites. The preliminary PBPK models were able to describe many, but not all, of the available data sets, comprising multiple routes of exposure (oral, intravenous) and nominal doses spanning several orders of magnitude. Supported by Award Number P42 ES016465 from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. -- Highlights: ► We present PBPK models for benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC). ► B[a]P model accurately predicts data from multiple sources over a wide dose range. ► DBC model was based on the B[a]P model as less chemical specific data is available. ► DBC model accurately predicted preliminary

  20. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling: Methodology, Applications, and Limitations with a Focus on Its Role in Pediatric Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feras Khalil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK modeling was introduced years ago, but it has not been practiced significantly. However, interest in and implementation of this modeling technique have grown, as evidenced by the increased number of publications in this field. This paper demonstrates briefly the methodology, applications, and limitations of PBPK modeling with special attention given to discuss the use of PBPK models in pediatric drug development and some examples described in detail. Although PBPK models do have some limitations, the potential benefit from PBPK modeling technique is huge. PBPK models can be applied to investigate drug pharmacokinetics under different physiological and pathological conditions or in different age groups, to support decision-making during drug discovery, to provide, perhaps most important, data that can save time and resources, especially in early drug development phases and in pediatric clinical trials, and potentially to help clinical trials become more “confirmatory” rather than “exploratory”.

  1. Uncertainty and Variability in Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models: Key Issues and Case Studies (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Uncertainty and Variability in Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models: Key Issues and Case Studies. This report summarizes some of the recent progress in characterizing uncertainty and variability in physi...

  2. Estimation of pharmacokinetic parameters from non-compartmental variables using Microsoft Excel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dansirikul, Chantaratsamon; Choi, Malcolm; Duffull, Stephen B

    2005-06-01

    This study was conducted to develop a method, termed 'back analysis (BA)', for converting non-compartmental variables to compartment model dependent pharmacokinetic parameters for both one- and two-compartment models. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet was implemented with the use of Solver and visual basic functions. The performance of the BA method in estimating pharmacokinetic parameter values was evaluated by comparing the parameter values obtained to a standard modelling software program, NONMEM, using simulated data. The results show that the BA method was reasonably precise and provided low bias in estimating fixed and random effect parameters for both one- and two-compartment models. The pharmacokinetic parameters estimated from the BA method were similar to those of NONMEM estimation.

  3. Performance of target-controlled infusion of propofol using two different pharmacokinetic models in open heart surgery - a randomised controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, P J; Sailam, S; Sivasailam, R; Thingnum, S K S; Puri, G D

    2016-01-01

    We compared the performance of a propofol target-controlled infusion (TCI) using Marsh versus PGIMER models in patients undergoing open heart surgery, in terms of measured plasma levels of propofol and objective pharmacodynamic effect. Twenty-three, ASA II/III adult patients aged 18-65 years and scheduled for elective open heart surgery received Marsh or PGIMER (Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research) pharmacokinetic models of TCI for the induction and maintenance of anaesthesia with propofol in a randomized, active-controlled, non-inferiority trial. The plasma levels of propofol were measured at specified time points before, during and after bypass. The performances of both the models were similar, as determined by the error (%) in maintaining the target plasma concentrations: MDPE of -5.0 (-12.0, 5.0) in the PGIMER group vs -6.4 (-7.7 to 0.5) in the Marsh group and MDAPE of 9.1 (5, 15) in the PGIMER group vs 8 (6.7, 10.1) in the Marsh group. These values indicate that both models over-predicted the plasma propofol concentration. The new pharmacokinetic model based on data from Indian patients is comparable in performance to the commercially available Marsh pharmacokinetic model. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of Snake Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchaya Sanhajariya

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding snake venom pharmacokinetics is essential for developing risk assessment strategies and determining the optimal dose and timing of antivenom required to bind all venom in snakebite patients. This review aims to explore the current knowledge of snake venom pharmacokinetics in animals and humans. Literature searches were conducted using EMBASE (1974–present and Medline (1946–present. For animals, 12 out of 520 initially identified studies met the inclusion criteria. In general, the disposition of snake venom was described by a two-compartment model consisting of a rapid distribution phase and a slow elimination phase, with half-lives of 5 to 48 min and 0.8 to 28 h, respectively, following rapid intravenous injection of the venoms or toxins. When the venoms or toxins were administered intramuscularly or subcutaneously, an initial absorption phase and slow elimination phase were observed. The bioavailability of venoms or toxins ranged from 4 to 81.5% following intramuscular administration and 60% following subcutaneous administration. The volume of distribution and the clearance varied between snake species. For humans, 24 out of 666 initially identified publications contained sufficient information and timed venom concentrations in the absence of antivenom therapy for data extraction. The data were extracted and modelled in NONMEM. A one-compartment model provided the best fit, with an elimination half-life of 9.71 ± 1.29 h. It is intended that the quantitative information provided in this review will provide a useful basis for future studies that address the pharmacokinetics of snakebite in humans.

  5. Prediction of clinical response based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models of 5-hydroxytryptamine reuptake inhibitors in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreilgaard, Mads; Smith, D. G.; Brennum, L. T.

    2008-01-01

    Bridging the gap between preclinical research and clinical trials is vital for drug development. Predicting clinically relevant steady-state drug concentrations (Css) in serum from preclinical animal models may facilitate this transition. Here we used a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK...

  6. Predicting Cortisol Exposure from Paediatric Hydrocortisone Formulation Using a Semi-Mechanistic Pharmacokinetic Model Established in Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Johanna; Parra-Guillen, Zinnia P; Hartung, Niklas; Huisinga, Wilhelm; Ross, Richard J; Whitaker, Martin J; Kloft, Charlotte

    2018-04-01

    Optimisation of hydrocortisone replacement therapy in children is challenging as there is currently no licensed formulation and dose in Europe for children under 6 years of age. In addition, hydrocortisone has non-linear pharmacokinetics caused by saturable plasma protein binding. A paediatric hydrocortisone formulation, Infacort ® oral hydrocortisone granules with taste masking, has therefore been developed. The objective of this study was to establish a population pharmacokinetic model based on studies in healthy adult volunteers to predict hydrocortisone exposure in paediatric patients with adrenal insufficiency. Cortisol and binding protein concentrations were evaluated in the absence and presence of dexamethasone in healthy volunteers (n = 30). Dexamethasone was used to suppress endogenous cortisol concentrations prior to and after single doses of 0.5, 2, 5 and 10 mg of Infacort ® or 20 mg of Infacort ® /hydrocortisone tablet/hydrocortisone intravenously. A plasma protein binding model was established using unbound and total cortisol concentrations, and sequentially integrated into the pharmacokinetic model. Both specific (non-linear) and non-specific (linear) protein binding were included in the cortisol binding model. A two-compartment disposition model with saturable absorption and constant endogenous cortisol baseline (Baseline cort ,15.5 nmol/L) described the data accurately. The predicted cortisol exposure for a given dose varied considerably within a small body weight range in individuals weighing cortisol exposure indicated the importance of defining an accurate hydrocortisone dose to mimic physiological concentrations for neonates and infants weighing <20 kg. EudraCT number: 2013-000260-28, 2013-000259-42.

  7. Pharmacokinetics and effects on serum cholinesterase activities of organophosphorus pesticides acephate and chlorpyrifos in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suemizu, Hiroshi; Sota, Shigeto; Kuronuma, Miyuki; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Organophosphorus pesticides acephate and chlorpyrifos in foods have potential to impact human health. The aim of the current study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of acephate and chlorpyrifos orally administered at lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level doses in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes. Absorbed acephate and its metabolite methamidophos were detected in serum from wild type mice and chimeric mice orally administered 150mg/kg. Approximately 70% inhibition of cholinesterase was evident in plasma of chimeric mice with humanized liver (which have higher serum cholinesterase activities than wild type mice) 1day after oral administrations of acephate. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents from chimeric mice studies were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Estimated plasma concentrations of acephate and chlorpyrifos in humans were consistent with reported concentrations. Acephate cleared similarly in humans and chimeric mice but accidental/incidental overdose levels of chlorpyrifos cleared (dependent on liver metabolism) more slowly from plasma in humans than it did in mice. The data presented here illustrate how chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes in combination with a simple PBPK model can assist evaluations of toxicological potential of organophosphorus pesticides. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dermal pharmacokinetics of microemulsion formulations determined by in vivo microdialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreilgaard, Mads

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the potential of improving dermal drug delivery of hydrophilic and lipophilic substances by formulation in microemulsion vehicles and to establish a reliable pharmacokinetic model to analyze cutaneous microdialysis data.......To investigate the potential of improving dermal drug delivery of hydrophilic and lipophilic substances by formulation in microemulsion vehicles and to establish a reliable pharmacokinetic model to analyze cutaneous microdialysis data....

  9. Population Pharmacokinetics and Optimal Sampling Strategy for Model-Based Precision Dosing of Melphalan in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Kana; Dong, Min; Fukuda, Tsuyoshi; Chandra, Sharat; Mehta, Parinda A; McConnell, Scott; Anaissie, Elias J; Vinks, Alexander A

    2018-05-01

    High-dose melphalan is an important component of conditioning regimens for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The current dosing strategy based on body surface area results in a high incidence of oral mucositis and gastrointestinal and liver toxicity. Pharmacokinetically guided dosing will individualize exposure and help minimize overexposure-related toxicity. The purpose of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model and optimal sampling strategy. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed with NONMEM using 98 observations collected from 15 adult patients given the standard dose of 140 or 200 mg/m 2 by intravenous infusion. The determinant-optimal sampling strategy was explored with PopED software. Individual area under the curve estimates were generated by Bayesian estimation using full and the proposed sparse sampling data. The predictive performance of the optimal sampling strategy was evaluated based on bias and precision estimates. The feasibility of the optimal sampling strategy was tested using pharmacokinetic data from five pediatric patients. A two-compartment model best described the data. The final model included body weight and creatinine clearance as predictors of clearance. The determinant-optimal sampling strategies (and windows) were identified at 0.08 (0.08-0.19), 0.61 (0.33-0.90), 2.0 (1.3-2.7), and 4.0 (3.6-4.0) h post-infusion. An excellent correlation was observed between area under the curve estimates obtained with the full and the proposed four-sample strategy (R 2  = 0.98; p strategy promises to achieve the target area under the curve as part of precision dosing.

  10. Locally Simple Models Construction: Methodology and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Kazakov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most notable trends associated with the Fourth industrial revolution is a significant strengthening of the role played by semantic methods. They are engaged in artificial intelligence means, knowledge mining in huge flows of big data, robotization, and in the internet of things. Smart contracts also can be mentioned here, although the ’intelligence’ of smart contracts still needs to be seriously elaborated. These trends should inevitably lead to an increased role of logical methods working with semantics, and significantly expand the scope of their application in practice. However, there are a number of problems that hinder this process. We are developing an approach, which makes the application of logical modeling efficient in some important areas. The approach is based on the concept of locally simple models and is primarily focused on solving tasks in the management of enterprises, organizations, governing bodies. The most important feature of locally simple models is their ability to replace software systems. Replacement of programming by modeling gives huge advantages, for instance, it dramatically reduces development and support costs. Modeling, unlike programming, preserves the explicit semantics of models allowing integration with artificial intelligence and robots. In addition, models are much more understandable to general people than programs. In this paper we propose the implementation of the concept of locally simple modeling on the basis of so-called document models, which has been developed by us earlier. It is shown that locally simple modeling is realized through document models with finite submodel coverages. In the second part of the paper an example of using document models for solving a management problem of real complexity is demonstrated.

  11. Myotoxicity of Gemfibrozil in Cynomolgus Monkey Model and Its Relationship to Pharmacokinetic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Aiming; Xie, Shuilin; Sun, He; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Wei, Xiaoxiong; Dai, Renke

    2008-01-01

    Fibrate drugs are PPARα agonists prescribed for the treatment of dyslipidemia. Severe myotoxicity has been reported associated with their use albeit at a low frequency, especially for gemfibrozil. Few studies have investigated the mechanism of fibrate-induced myotoxicity in vivo. Considering the apparent species-related differences in PPARα agonist-induced hepatotoxicity, we studied the myotoxicity of gemfibrozil in a Cynomolgus monkey model and explored the relationship between myotoxicity and pharmacokinetics. Six Cynomolgus monkeys were dosed with gemfibrozil twice daily at 600 mg/kg/day for the first two periods (P1 and P2, 8 days and 9 days respectively) and 300 mg/kg/day for the third period (P3, 14 days). Creatine kinase and myoglobin were measured, together with hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity markers. Behavioral responses were recorded for indication of toxicity. Pharmacokinetics was carried out following the 16th dosage of P1 and 17th dosage of P2 when myotoxicity was identified. Multivariable data analysis was employed to explore the relationship between pharmacokinetic parameters and myotoxicity markers. Consequently, myotoxicity occurred in monkey #2 (M2) and M6 in P1, M3 and M4 in P2, M3 and M6 in P3. Data analysis showed T80-150 (sustained time above the given concentration) contributed for myotoxicity discriminance and correlated with myotoxicity risk. This study revealed Cynomolgus monkey may be a good animal model for myotoxicity evaluation with sensitivity, reproducibility and similarities to humans. More interestingly they exhibited a much higher incidence of myotoxicity than that of human. Sustained high drug concentration plays an important role for the occurrence of myotoxicity. This may suggest an influence of drug transport and metabolism on myotoxicity. PMID:19150455

  12. Myotoxicity of gemfibrozil in Cynomolgus monkey model and its relationship to pharmacokinetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Aiming; Xie Shuilin; Sun He; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Wei Xiaoxiong; Dai Renke

    2009-01-01

    Fibrate drugs are PPARα agonists prescribed for the treatment of dyslipidemia. Severe myotoxicity has been reportedly associated with their use albeit at a low frequency, especially for gemfibrozil. Few studies have investigated the mechanism of fibrate-induced myotoxicity in vivo. Considering the apparent species-related differences in PPARα agonist-induced hepatotoxicity, we studied the myotoxicity of gemfibrozil in a Cynomolgus monkey model and explored the relationship between myotoxicity and pharmacokinetics. Six Cynomolgus monkeys were dosed with gemfibrozil twice daily at 600 mg/kg/day for the first two periods (P1 and P2, 8 days and 9 days respectively) and 300 mg/kg/day for the third period (P3, 14 days). Creatine kinase and myoglobin were measured, together with hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity markers. Behavioral responses were recorded for indication of toxicity. Pharmacokinetics was carried out following the 16th dosage of P1 and 17th dosage of P2 when myotoxicity was identified. Multivariable data analysis was employed to explore the relationship between pharmacokinetic parameters and myotoxicity markers. Consequently, myotoxicity occurred in monkey no. 2 (M2) and M6 in P1, M3 and M4 in P2, M3 and M6 in P3. Data analysis showed T80-150 (sustained time above the given concentration) contributed for myotoxicity discriminance and correlated with myotoxicity risk. This study revealed Cynomolgus monkey may be a good animal model for myotoxicity evaluation with sensitivity, reproducibility and similarities to humans. More interestingly, they exhibited a much higher incidence of myotoxicity than that of humans. Sustained high drug concentration plays an important role for the occurrence of myotoxicity. This may suggest an influence of drug transport and metabolism on myotoxicity

  13. Myotoxicity of gemfibrozil in Cynomolgus monkey model and its relationship to pharmacokinetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiming, Liu; Shuilin, Xie [Guangzhou Institute of Biomedicine and Health, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510663 (China); He, Sun [School of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Gonzalez, Frank J [National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Xiaoxiong, Wei [Medpace, Inc., Cincinnati, OH 45212 (United States); Dai Renke [Guangzhou Institute of Biomedicine and Health, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510663 (China)], E-mail: dai_renke@gibh.ac.cn

    2009-03-15

    Fibrate drugs are PPAR{alpha} agonists prescribed for the treatment of dyslipidemia. Severe myotoxicity has been reportedly associated with their use albeit at a low frequency, especially for gemfibrozil. Few studies have investigated the mechanism of fibrate-induced myotoxicity in vivo. Considering the apparent species-related differences in PPAR{alpha} agonist-induced hepatotoxicity, we studied the myotoxicity of gemfibrozil in a Cynomolgus monkey model and explored the relationship between myotoxicity and pharmacokinetics. Six Cynomolgus monkeys were dosed with gemfibrozil twice daily at 600 mg/kg/day for the first two periods (P1 and P2, 8 days and 9 days respectively) and 300 mg/kg/day for the third period (P3, 14 days). Creatine kinase and myoglobin were measured, together with hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity markers. Behavioral responses were recorded for indication of toxicity. Pharmacokinetics was carried out following the 16th dosage of P1 and 17th dosage of P2 when myotoxicity was identified. Multivariable data analysis was employed to explore the relationship between pharmacokinetic parameters and myotoxicity markers. Consequently, myotoxicity occurred in monkey no. 2 (M2) and M6 in P1, M3 and M4 in P2, M3 and M6 in P3. Data analysis showed T80-150 (sustained time above the given concentration) contributed for myotoxicity discriminance and correlated with myotoxicity risk. This study revealed Cynomolgus monkey may be a good animal model for myotoxicity evaluation with sensitivity, reproducibility and similarities to humans. More interestingly, they exhibited a much higher incidence of myotoxicity than that of humans. Sustained high drug concentration plays an important role for the occurrence of myotoxicity. This may suggest an influence of drug transport and metabolism on myotoxicity.

  14. Pharmacokinetics: curiosity or cure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notari, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    What is the fate of a drug from the time of its introduction into the body to the end of its duration. Pharmacokinetic studies are often designed to provide an answer to this question. But this question may be asked of any drug and research that is limited to answering it will remain empirical. Pharmacokinetic studies can provide answers to many other drug-related questions. In doing so pharmacokinetic research has the potential of improving drug therapy as well as the design and evaluation of drugs. While significant contributions can be cited, the future of pharmacokinetics depends upon its increased impact on clinical practice and drug design. How can a molecule be tailored for site specificity. Can chemical modification selectively alter absorption, distribution, metabolism, binding or excretion. In what new ways can pharmacokinetic information increase the predictability of drug therapy. Such questions, to which pharmacokinetics should provide answers, are numerous and easily identified. But the definitive studies are difficult both to create and conduct. Whether or not pharmacokinetics can achieve its full potential will depend upon the extent to which it can provide answers to these currently unanswered questions

  15. The Use of Physiology-Based Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Modeling in the Discovery of the Dual Orexin Receptor Antagonist ACT-541468.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiber, Alexander; de Kanter, Ruben; Roch, Catherine; Gatfield, John; Boss, Christoph; von Raumer, Markus; Schindelholz, Benno; Muehlan, Clemens; van Gerven, Joop; Jenck, Francois

    2017-09-01

    The identification of new sleep drugs poses particular challenges in drug discovery owing to disease-specific requirements such as rapid onset of action, sleep maintenance throughout major parts of the night, and absence of residual next-day effects. Robust tools to estimate drug levels in human brain are therefore key for a successful discovery program. Animal models constitute an appropriate choice for drugs without species differences in receptor pharmacology or pharmacokinetics. Translation to man becomes more challenging when interspecies differences are prominent. This report describes the discovery of the dual orexin receptor 1 and 2 (OX 1 and OX 2 ) antagonist ACT-541468 out of a class of structurally related compounds, by use of physiology-based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK-PD) modeling applied early in drug discovery. Although all drug candidates exhibited similar target receptor potencies and efficacy in a rat sleep model, they exhibited large interspecies differences in key factors determining their pharmacokinetic profile. Human PK models were built on the basis of in vitro metabolism and physicochemical data and were then used to predict the time course of OX 2 receptor occupancy in brain. An active ACT-541468 dose of 25 mg was estimated on the basis of OX 2 receptor occupancy thresholds of about 65% derived from clinical data for two other orexin antagonists, almorexant and suvorexant. Modeling predictions for ACT-541468 in man were largely confirmed in a single-ascending dose trial in healthy subjects. PBPK-PD modeling applied early in drug discovery, therefore, has great potential to assist in the identification of drug molecules when specific pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic requirements need to be met. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  16. Prediction of Human Pharmacokinetic Profile After Transdermal Drug Application Using Excised Human Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Syunsuke; Karashima, Masatoshi; Arai, Yuta; Tohyama, Kimio; Amano, Nobuyuki

    2017-09-01

    Although several mathematical models have been reported for the estimation of human plasma concentration profiles of drug substances after dermal application, the successful cases that can predict human pharmacokinetic profiles are limited. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the prediction of human plasma concentrations after dermal application using in vitro permeation parameters obtained from excised human skin. The in vitro skin permeability of 7 marketed drug products was evaluated. The plasma concentration-time profiles of the drug substances in humans after their dermal application were simulated using compartment models and the clinical pharmacokinetic parameters. The transdermal process was simulated using the in vitro skin permeation rate and lag time assuming a zero-order absorption. These simulated plasma concentration profiles were compared with the clinical data. The result revealed that the steady-state plasma concentration of diclofenac and the maximum concentrations of nicotine, bisoprolol, rivastigmine, and lidocaine after topical application were within 2-fold of the clinical data. Furthermore, the simulated concentration profiles of bisoprolol, nicotine, and rivastigmine reproduced the decrease in absorption due to drug depletion from the formulation. In conclusion, this simple compartment model using in vitro human skin permeation parameters as zero-order absorption predicted the human plasma concentrations accurately. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of Botanical Drugs and Plant Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez More, Gina Paola; Cardenas, Paola Andrea; Costa, Geison M; Simoes, Claudia M O; Aragon, Diana Marcela

    2017-01-01

    Botanical drugs contain plant extracts, which are complex mixtures of compounds. As with conventional drugs, it is necessary to validate their efficacy and safety through preclinical and clinical studies. However, pharmacokinetic studies for active constituents or characteristic markers in botanical drugs are rare. The objective of this review was to investigate the global state of the art in pharmacokinetic studies of active ingredients present in plant extracts and botanical drugs. A review of pharmacokinetics studies of chemical constituents of plant extracts and botanical drugs was performed, with a total of 135 studies published between January 2004 and February 2015 available in recognized scientific databases. Botanical preparations were mainly found in the form of aqueous extracts of roots and rhizomes. The most widely studied species was Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, and the compound most frequently used as a pharmacokinetic marker was berberine. Most studies were performed using the Sprague Dawley rat model, and the preparations were mainly administered orally in a single dose. Quantification of plasma concentrations of pharmacokinetic markers was performed mainly by liquid-liquid extraction, followed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry detector. In conclusion, in recent years there has been an increasing interest among researchers worldwide in the study of pharmacokinetics of bioactive compounds in botanical drugs and plant extracts, especially those from the Traditional Chinese Medicine. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Limitations of Single Slice Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MR in Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Bone Sarcomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toms, Andoni P. (Dept. of Radiology, The Norfolk and Norwich Univ. Hospital, Norwich, Norfolk (United Kingdom)); White, Lawrence M.; Bleakney, Robert R. (Dept. of Medical Imaging, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada)); Kandel, Rita (Dept. of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada)); Noseworthy, Michael (Health Sciences Centre, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada)); Lee, Shepstone (Institute of Health, Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich, Norfolk (United Kingdom)); Blackstein, Martin E. (Dept. of Oncology, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada)); Wunder, Jay (Musculoskeletal Oncology Unit, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada))

    2009-06-15

    Background: Single slice dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) appears to provide perfusion data about sarcomas in vivo that correlate with tumor necrosis on equivalent pathological sections. However, sarcomas are heterogeneous and therefore single slice DCE-MRI may not correlate with total tumor necrosis. Purpose: To determine whether changes in pharmacokinetic modeling of DCE-MRI, during chemotherapy for primary bone sarcomas correlated with histological measures of total tumor necrosis. Material and Methods: Twelve patients with appendicular primary bone sarcomas were included in the study. Each patient had DCE-MRI before, and after completion, of pre-operative chemotherapy. The mean arterial slope (A), endothelial permeability coefficient (Ktrans), and extravascular extracellular volume (Ve) were derived from each data set using a modified two compartment pharmacokinetic model. Total tumor necrosis rates were compared with changes in A, Ktrans, and Ve. Results: Six patients had total tumor necrosis of =90% and six had a measure of <90%. The median percentage changes in A, Ktrans, and Ve for the =90% necrosis group were -52.5% (-83 to 6), -66% (-82 to 26), and 23.5% (-26 to 40), respectively. For the <90% necrosis group, A = - 35% (-75 to 132), Ktrans= - 53 (-66 to 149) and Ve= - 14.5% (-42 to 40). One patient with >90% necrosis had increases in all three measures. Comparison of the two groups generated P-values of 0.699 for A, 0.18 for Ktrans, and 0.31 for Ve. Conclusion: There was no statistically significant correlation between changes in pharmacokinetic perfusion parameters and total tumor necrosis. When using single slice DCE-MRI heterogeneous histology of primary bone sarcomas and repair mediated angiogenesis might both be confounding factors

  19. Prediction of Deoxypodophyllotoxin Disposition in Mouse, Rat, Monkey and Dog by Physiologically-based Pharmacokinetic Model and the Extrapolation to Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Chen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Deoxypodophyllotoxin (DPT is a potential anti-tumor candidate prior to its clinical phase. The aim of the study was to develop a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK model consisting of 13 tissue compartments to predict DPT disposition in mouse, rat, monkey and dog based on in vitro and in silico inputs. Since large interspecies difference was found in unbound fraction of DPT in plasma, we assumed that Kt:pl,u (unbound tissue-to-plasma concentration ratio was identical across species. The predictions of our model were then validated by in vivo data of corresponding preclinical species, along with visual predictive checks. Reasonable matches were found between observed and predicted plasma concentrations and pharmacokinetic parameters in all four animal species. The prediction in the related seven tissues of mouse was also desirable. We also attempted to predict human pharmacokinetic profile by both the developed PBPK model and interspecies allometric scaling across mouse, rat and monkey, while dog was excluded from the scaling. The two approaches reached similar results. We hope the study will help in the efficacy and safety assessment of DPT in future clinical studies and provide a reference to the preclinical screening of similar compounds by PBPK model.

  20. Determination and pharmacokinetic study of catechin in rat plasma by HPLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xie

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A high performance liquid chromatographic method was developed and validated for the quantitative determination of catechin in rat plasma and its pharmacokinetic study after intragastric administration of Catechu and Xiongdanjiangre Wan into SD rats. Plasma samples were prepared by protein precipitation using methanol–5% aqueous zinc sulfate (70:30, v/v as precipitant. Chromatographic separation was achieved on Hypersil C18 column (250 mm×4.6 mm, 10 μm with acetonitrile–water–triethylamine (6:94:0.3, v/v/v, pH 4.0±0.1, adjusted with phosphoric acid as mobile phase, followed by a UV detection at 207 nm. Good linearity was obtained over the range of 0.143–7.15 mg/L of catechin, with correlation coefficient of 0.9992. The method was simple, sensitive, accurate and reproducible and has been successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study of catechin in rat plasma. Keywords: HPLC, Determination, Pharmacokinetic, Catechin, Rat, Plasma

  1. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PB/PK) model for multiple exposure routes for soman in multiple species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sweeney, R.E.; Langenberg, J.P.; Maxwell, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PB/PK) model has been developed in advanced computer simulation language (ACSL) to describe blood and tissue concentration-time profiles of the C(±)P(-) stereoisomers of soman after inhalation, subcutaneous and intravenous exposures at low (0.8-1.0 × LD50),

  2. Simple Models for the Dynamic Modeling of Rotating Tires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Delamotte

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Large Finite Element (FE models of tires are currently used to predict low frequency behavior and to obtain dynamic model coefficients used in multi-body models for riding and comfort. However, to predict higher frequency behavior, which may explain irregular wear, critical rotating speeds and noise radiation, FE models are not practical. Detailed FE models are not adequate for optimization and uncertainty predictions either, as in such applications the dynamic solution must be computed a number of times. Therefore, there is a need for simpler models that can capture the physics of the tire and be used to compute the dynamic response with a low computational cost. In this paper, the spectral (or continuous element approach is used to derive such a model. A circular beam spectral element that takes into account the string effect is derived, and a method to simulate the response to a rotating force is implemented in the frequency domain. The behavior of a circular ring under different internal pressures is investigated using modal and frequency/wavenumber representations. Experimental results obtained with a real untreaded truck tire are presented and qualitatively compared with the simple model predictions with good agreement. No attempt is made to obtain equivalent parameters for the simple model from the real tire results. On the other hand, the simple model fails to represent the correct variation of the quotient of the natural frequency by the number of circumferential wavelengths with the mode count. Nevertheless, some important features of the real tire dynamic behavior, such as the generation of standing waves and part of the frequency/wavenumber behavior, can be investigated using the proposed simplified model.

  3. A human life-stage physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic model for chlorpyrifos: development and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jordan Ned; Hinderliter, Paul M; Timchalk, Charles; Bartels, Michael J; Poet, Torka S

    2014-08-01

    Sensitivity to some chemicals in animals and humans are known to vary with age. Age-related changes in sensitivity to chlorpyrifos have been reported in animal models. A life-stage physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model was developed to predict disposition of chlorpyrifos and its metabolites, chlorpyrifos-oxon (the ultimate toxicant) and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), as well as B-esterase inhibition by chlorpyrifos-oxon in humans. In this model, previously measured age-dependent metabolism of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-oxon were integrated into age-related descriptions of human anatomy and physiology. The life-stage PBPK/PD model was calibrated and tested against controlled adult human exposure studies. Simulations suggest age-dependent pharmacokinetics and response may exist. At oral doses ⩾0.6mg/kg of chlorpyrifos (100- to 1000-fold higher than environmental exposure levels), 6months old children are predicted to have higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and higher levels of red blood cell cholinesterase inhibition compared to adults from equivalent doses. At lower doses more relevant to environmental exposures, simulations predict that adults will have slightly higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and greater cholinesterase inhibition. This model provides a computational framework for age-comparative simulations that can be utilized to predict chlorpyrifos disposition and biological response over various postnatal life stages. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for the Oxime TMB-4: Simulation of Rodent and Human Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-13

    later, Garrigue and other colleagues (Maurizis et al. 1992) pub- lished an in vitro binding study of TMB-4 with rabbit cartilaginous tissue cultures...as well as fat, kidney, liver, rapidly perfused tissues and slowly perfused tissues . All tissue compartments are diffusion limited. Model...pharmacokinetic data from the literature. The model was parameterized using rat plasma, tissue and urine time course data from intramuscular administration, as

  5. Exploring inductive linearization for pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic systems of nonlinear ordinary differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Chihiro; Duffull, Stephen B

    2018-02-01

    Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic systems are often expressed with nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs). While there are numerous methods to solve such ODEs these methods generally rely on time-stepping solutions (e.g. Runge-Kutta) which need to be matched to the characteristics of the problem at hand. The primary aim of this study was to explore the performance of an inductive approximation which iteratively converts nonlinear ODEs to linear time-varying systems which can then be solved algebraically or numerically. The inductive approximation is applied to three examples, a simple nonlinear pharmacokinetic model with Michaelis-Menten elimination (E1), an integrated glucose-insulin model and an HIV viral load model with recursive feedback systems (E2 and E3, respectively). The secondary aim of this study was to explore the potential advantages of analytically solving linearized ODEs with two examples, again E3 with stiff differential equations and a turnover model of luteinizing hormone with a surge function (E4). The inductive linearization coupled with a matrix exponential solution provided accurate predictions for all examples with comparable solution time to the matched time-stepping solutions for nonlinear ODEs. The time-stepping solutions however did not perform well for E4, particularly when the surge was approximated by a square wave. In circumstances when either a linear ODE is particularly desirable or the uncertainty in matching the integrator to the ODE system is of potential risk, then the inductive approximation method coupled with an analytical integration method would be an appropriate alternative.

  6. Rational Design of Glucose-Responsive Insulin Using Pharmacokinetic Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakh, Naveed A; Bisker, Gili; Lee, Michael A; Gong, Xun; Strano, Michael S

    2017-11-01

    A glucose responsive insulin (GRI) is a therapeutic that modulates its potency, concentration, or dosing of insulin in relation to a patient's dynamic glucose concentration, thereby approximating aspects of a normally functioning pancreas. Current GRI design lacks a theoretical basis on which to base fundamental design parameters such as glucose reactivity, dissociation constant or potency, and in vivo efficacy. In this work, an approach to mathematically model the relevant parameter space for effective GRIs is induced, and design rules for linking GRI performance to therapeutic benefit are developed. Well-developed pharmacokinetic models of human glucose and insulin metabolism coupled to a kinetic model representation of a freely circulating GRI are used to determine the desired kinetic parameters and dosing for optimal glycemic control. The model examines a subcutaneous dose of GRI with kinetic parameters in an optimal range that results in successful glycemic control within prescribed constraints over a 24 h period. Additionally, it is demonstrated that the modeling approach can find GRI parameters that enable stable glucose levels that persist through a skipped meal. The results provide a framework for exploring the parameter space of GRIs, potentially without extensive, iterative in vivo animal testing. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. A Study of Simple Diffraction Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerkvist, Finn

    In this paper two simple methods for cabinet edge diffraction are examined. Calculations with both models are compared with more sophisticated theoretical models and with measured data. The parameters involved are studied and their importance for normal loudspeaker box designs is examined....

  8. A Simple Probabilistic Combat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-13

    Government may violate any copyrights that exist in this work. This page intentionally left blank. ABSTRACT The Lanchester ...page intentionally left blank. TABLE OF CONTENTS Page No.Abstract iii List of Illustrations vii 1. INTRODUCTION 1 2. DETERMINISTIC LANCHESTER MODEL...This page intentionally left blank. 1. INTRODUCTION The Lanchester combat model1 is a simple way to assess the effects of quantity and quality

  9. A first-generation physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of alpha-tocopherol in human influenza vaccine adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegenge, Million A; Mitkus, Robert J

    2015-04-01

    Alpha (α)-tocopherol is a component of a new generation of squalene-containing oil-in-water (SQ/W) emulsion adjuvants that have been licensed for use in certain influenza vaccines. Since regulatory pharmacokinetic studies are not routinely required for influenza vaccines, the in vivo fate of this vaccine constituent is largely unknown. In this study, we constructed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for emulsified α-tocopherol in human adults and infants. An independent sheep PBPK model was also developed to inform the local preferential lymphatic transfer and for the purpose of model evaluation. The PBPK model predicts that α-tocopherol will be removed from the injection site within 24h and rapidly transfer predominantly into draining lymph nodes. A much lower concentration of α-tocopherol was estimated to peak in plasma within 8h. Any systemically absorbed α-tocopherol was predicted to accumulate slowly in adipose tissue, but not in other tissues. Model evaluation and uncertainty analyses indicated acceptable fit, with the fraction of dose taken up into the lymphatics as most influential on plasma concentration. In summary, this study estimates the in vivo fate of α-tocopherol in adjuvanted influenza vaccine, may be relevant in explaining its immunodynamics in humans, and informs current regulatory risk-benefit analyses. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Prediction of clearance, volume of distribution and half-life by allometric scaling and by use of plasma concentrations predicted from pharmacokinetic constants: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, I

    1999-08-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters (clearance, CL, volume of distribution in the central compartment, VdC, and elimination half-life, t1/2beta) predicted by an empirical allometric approach have been compared with parameters predicted from plasma concentrations calculated by use of the pharmacokinetic constants A, B, alpha and beta, where A and B are the intercepts on the Y axis of the plot of plasma concentration against time and alpha and beta are the rate constants, both pairs of constants being for the distribution and elimination phases, respectively. The pharmacokinetic parameters of cefpiramide, actisomide, troglitazone, procaterol, moxalactam and ciprofloxacin were scaled from animal data obtained from the literature. Three methods were used to generate plots for the prediction of clearance in man: dependence of clearance on body weight (simple allometric equation); dependence of the product of clearance and maximum life-span potential (MLP) on body weight; and dependence of the product of clearance and brain weight on body weight. Plasma concentrations of the drugs were predicted in man by use of A, B, alpha and beta obtained from animal data. The predicted plasma concentrations were then used to calculate CL, VdC and t1/2beta. The pharmacokinetic parameters predicted by use of both approaches were compared with measured values. The results indicate that simple allometry did not predict clearance satisfactorily for actisomide, troglitazone, procaterol and ciprofloxacin. Use of MLP or the product of clearance and brain weight improved the prediction of clearance for these four drugs. Except for troglitazone, VdC and t1/2beta predicted for man by use of the allometric approach were comparable with measured values for the drugs studied. CL, VdC and t1/2beta predicted by use of pharmacokinetic constants were comparable with values predicted by simple allometry. Thus, if simple allometry failed to predict clearance of a drug, so did the pharmacokinetic constant

  11. Levodopa pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling and 6-[F-18]levodopa positron emission tomography in patients with Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietz, M; Harder, S; Graff, J; Kunig, G; Vontobel, P; Leenders, KL; Baas, H

    Objective: Parameters of a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model of levodopa have been claimed to reflect the magnitude of the dopaminergic deficit in patients with Parkinson's disease. The aim of this study was to correlate such parameters with positron emission tomography (PET) with

  12. Population Pharmacokinetics of Tracers: A New Tool for Medical Imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandia, Peggy; Jaudet, Cyril; Chatelut, Etienne; Concordet, Didier

    2017-02-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography is a medical imaging method measuring the activity of a radiotracer chosen to accumulate in cancer cells. A recent trend of medical imaging analysis is to account for the radiotracer's pharmacokinetic properties at a voxel (three-dimensional-pixel) level to separate the different tissues. These analyses are closely linked to population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling. Kineticists possess the cultural background to improve medical imaging analysis. This article stresses the common points with population pharmacokinetics and highlights the methodological locks that need to be lifted.

  13. Y-Scaling in a simple quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumano, S.; Moniz, E.J.

    1988-01-01

    A simple quark model is used to define a nuclear pair model, that is, two composite hadrons interacting only through quark interchange and bound in an overall potential. An ''equivalent'' hadron model is developed, displaying an effective hadron-hadron interaction which is strongly repulsive. We compare the effective hadron model results with the exact quark model observables in the kinematic region of large momentum transfer, small energy transfer. The nucleon reponse function in this y-scaling region is, within the traditional frame work sensitive to the nucleon momentum distribution at large momentum. We find a surprizingly small effect of hadron substructure. Furthermore, we find in our model that a simple parametrization of modified hadron size in the bound state, motivated by the bound quark momentum distribution, is not a useful way to correlate different observables

  14. A Simple Model of Self-Assessments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Dominguez Martinez (Silvia); O.H. Swank (Otto)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractWe develop a simple model that describes individuals' self-assessments of their abilities. We assume that individuals learn about their abilities from appraisals of others and experience. Our model predicts that if communication is imperfect, then (i) appraisals of others tend to be too

  15. Lisdexamfetamine: A pharmacokinetic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiran, Eloisa; Kessler, Félix Henrique; Fröehlich, Pedro Eduardo; Limberger, Renata Pereira

    2016-06-30

    Lisdexamfetamine (LDX) is a d-amphetamine (d-AMPH) pro-drug used to treat Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Binge Eating Disorder (BED) symptoms. The in vivo pharmacodynamics of LDX is the same as that of its active product d-AMPH, although there are a few qualitative and quantitative differences due to pharmacokinetics. Due to the specific pharmacokinetics of the long-acting stimulants, this article revises the pharmacokinetic studies on LDX, the newest amphetamine pro-drug. The Medline/Pubmed, Science Direct and Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (Lilacs and Ibecs) (2007-2016) databases were searched for articles and their list of references. As for basic pharmacokinetics studies, since LDX is a newly developed medication, there are few results concerning biotransformation, distribution and the use of different biological matrices for analysis. This is the first robust review on this topic, gathering data from all clinical pharmacokinetics studies available in the literature. The particular pharmacokinetics of LDX plays a major role in studying this pro-drug, since this knowledge was essential to understand some reports on clinical effects in literature, e.g. the small likelihood of reducing the effect by interactions, the effect of long duration use and the still questionable reduction of the potential for abuse. In general the already well-known pharmacokinetic properties of amphetamine make LDX relatively predictable, simplifying the use of LDX in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The Monash University Interactive Simple Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommenget, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Monash university interactive simple climate model is a web-based interface that allows students and the general public to explore the physical simulation of the climate system with a real global climate model. It is based on the Globally Resolved Energy Balance (GREB) model, which is a climate model published by Dommenget and Floeter [2011] in the international peer review science journal Climate Dynamics. The model simulates most of the main physical processes in the climate system in a very simplistic way and therefore allows very fast and simple climate model simulations on a normal PC computer. Despite its simplicity the model simulates the climate response to external forcings, such as doubling of the CO2 concentrations very realistically (similar to state of the art climate models). The Monash simple climate model web-interface allows you to study the results of more than a 2000 different model experiments in an interactive way and it allows you to study a number of tutorials on the interactions of physical processes in the climate system and solve some puzzles. By switching OFF/ON physical processes you can deconstruct the climate and learn how all the different processes interact to generate the observed climate and how the processes interact to generate the IPCC predicted climate change for anthropogenic CO2 increase. The presentation will illustrate how this web-base tool works and what are the possibilities in teaching students with this tool are.

  17. A simple model of self-assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dominguez-Martinez, S.; Swank, O.H.

    2009-01-01

    We develop a simple model that describes individuals' self-assessments of their abilities. We assume that individuals learn about their abilities from appraisals of others and experience. Our model predicts that if communication is imperfect, then (i) appraisals of others tend to be too positive and

  18. A NOVEL PNYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID (DMA): THE LUNG AS A STORAGE COMPARTMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    A NOVEL PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID (DMA): THE LUNG AS A STORAGE COMPARTMENT. Evans, M.V., Hughes, M.F., and Kenyon, E.M. USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC 27711DMA is the major methylated metabolite of inorganic arsenic, a kno...

  19. A Pharmacokinetic Model of a Tissue Implantable Cortisol Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael A; Bakh, Naveed; Bisker, Gili; Brown, Emery N; Strano, Michael S

    2016-12-01

    Cortisol is an important glucocorticoid hormone whose biochemistry influences numerous physiological and pathological processes. Moreover, it is a biomarker of interest for a number of conditions, including posttraumatic stress disorder, Cushing's syndrome, Addison's disease, and others. An implantable biosensor capable of real time monitoring of cortisol concentrations in adipose tissue may revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders, as well as provide an invaluable research tool. Toward this end, a mathematical model, informed by the physiological literature, is developed to predict dynamic cortisol concentrations in adipose, muscle, and brain tissues, where a significant number of important processes with cortisol occur. The pharmacokinetic model is applied to both a prototypical, healthy male patient and a previously studied Cushing's disease patient. The model can also be used to inform the design of an implantable sensor by optimizing the sensor dissociation constant, apparent delay time, and magnitude of the sensor output versus system dynamics. Measurements from such a sensor would help to determine systemic cortisol levels, providing much needed insight for proper medical treatment for various cortisol-related conditions. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Quantitative 2- and 3-dimensional analysis of pharmacokinetic model-derived variables for breast lesions in dynamic, contrast-enhanced MR mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauth, E.A.M.; Jaeger, H.J.; Maderwald, S.; Muehler, A.; Kimmig, R.; Forsting, M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: 2- and 3-dimensional evaluation of quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters derived from the Tofts model modeling dynamic contrast enhancement of lesions in MR mammography. Materials and methods: In 95 patients, MR mammography revealed 127 suspicious lesions. The initial rate of enhancement was coded by color intensity, the post-initial enhancement change is coded by color hue. 2D and 3D analysis of distribution of color hue and intensity, vascular permeability and extracellular volume were performed. Results: In 2D, malignant lesions showed significant higher number of bright red, medium red, dark red, bright green, medium green, dark green and bright blue pixels than benign lesions. In 3D, statistical significant differences between malignant and benign lesions was found for all this parameters. Vascular permeability was significant higher in malignant lesions than in benign lesions. Regression model using the 3D data found that the best discriminator between malignant and benign lesions was combined number of voxels and medium green pixels, with a sensitivity of 79.4% and a specificity of 83.1%. Conclusions: Quantitative analysis of pharmacokinetic variables of contrast kinetics showed significant differences between malignant and benign lesions. 3D analysis showed superior diagnostic differentiation between malignant and benign lesions than 2D analysis. The parametric analysis using a pharmacokinetic model allows objective analysis of contrast enhancement in breast lesions

  1. A comprehensive physiologically based pharmacokinetic ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Published physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models from peer-reviewed articles are often well-parameterized, thoroughly-vetted, and can be utilized as excellent resources for the construction of models pertaining to related chemicals. Specifically, chemical-specific parameters and in vivo pharmacokinetic data used to calibrate these published models can act as valuable starting points for model development of new chemicals with similar molecular structures. A knowledgebase for published PBPK-related articles was compiled to support PBPK model construction for new chemicals based on their close analogues within the knowledgebase, and a web-based interface was developed to allow users to query those close analogues. A list of 689 unique chemicals and their corresponding 1751 articles was created after analysis of 2,245 PBPK-related articles. For each model, the PMID, chemical name, major metabolites, species, gender, life stages and tissue compartments were extracted from the published articles. PaDEL-Descriptor, a Chemistry Development Kit based software, was used to calculate molecular fingerprints. Tanimoto index was implemented in the user interface as measurement of structural similarity. The utility of the PBPK knowledgebase and web-based user interface was demonstrated using two case studies with ethylbenzene and gefitinib. Our PBPK knowledgebase is a novel tool for ranking chemicals based on similarities to other chemicals associated with existi

  2. Optimization of the reference region method for dual pharmacokinetic modeling using Gd-DTPA/MRI and (18) F-FDG/PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Éric; Lebel, Réjean; Croteau, Étienne; Blanchette, Marie; Tremblay, Luc; Lecomte, Roger; Bentourkia, M'hamed; Lepage, Martin

    2015-02-01

    The combination of MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) offers new possibilities for the development of novel methodologies. In pharmacokinetic image analysis, the blood concentration of the imaging compound as a function of time, [i.e., the arterial input function (AIF)] is required for MRI and PET. In this study, we tested whether an AIF extracted from a reference region (RR) in MRI can be used as a surrogate for the manually sampled (18) F-FDG AIF for pharmacokinetic modeling. An MRI contrast agent, gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) and a radiotracer, (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18) F-FDG), were simultaneously injected in a F98 glioblastoma rat model. A correction to the RR AIF for Gd-DTPA is proposed to adequately represent the manually sampled AIF. A previously published conversion method was applied to convert this AIF into a (18) F-FDG AIF. The tumor metabolic rate of glucose (TMRGlc) calculated with the manually sampled (18) F-FDG AIF, the (18) F-FDG AIF converted from the RR AIF and the (18) F-FDG AIF converted from the corrected RR AIF were found not statistically different (P>0.05). An AIF derived from an RR in MRI can be accurately converted into a (18) F-FDG AIF and used in PET pharmacokinetic modeling. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A modeling paradigm for interdisciplinary water resources modeling: Simple Script Wrappers (SSW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, David R.; Bulatewicz, Tom; Aistrup, Joseph A.; Andresen, Daniel; Bernard, Eric A.; Kulcsar, Laszlo; Peterson, Jeffrey M.; Staggenborg, Scott A.; Welch, Stephen M.

    2014-05-01

    Holistic understanding of a water resources system requires tools capable of model integration. This team has developed an adaptation of the OpenMI (Open Modelling Interface) that allows easy interactions across the data passed between models. Capabilities have been developed to allow programs written in common languages such as matlab, python and scilab to share their data with other programs and accept other program's data. We call this interface the Simple Script Wrapper (SSW). An implementation of SSW is shown that integrates groundwater, economic, and agricultural models in the High Plains region of Kansas. Output from these models illustrates the interdisciplinary discovery facilitated through use of SSW implemented models. Reference: Bulatewicz, T., A. Allen, J.M. Peterson, S. Staggenborg, S.M. Welch, and D.R. Steward, The Simple Script Wrapper for OpenMI: Enabling interdisciplinary modeling studies, Environmental Modelling & Software, 39, 283-294, 2013. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envsoft.2012.07.006 http://code.google.com/p/simple-script-wrapper/

  4. Drugs in space: Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in astronauts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Johannes; Yu, Yichao; Seubert, Christoph N; Wotring, Virginia E; Derendorf, Hartmut

    2017-11-15

    Space agencies are working intensely to push the current boundaries of human spaceflight by sending astronauts deeper into space than ever before, including missions to Mars and asteroids. Spaceflight alters human physiology due to fluid shifts, muscle and bone loss, immune system dysregulation, and changes in the gastrointestinal tract and metabolic enzymes. These alterations may change the pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamics of medications used by astronauts and subsequently might impact drug efficacy and safety. Most commonly, medications are administered during space missions to treat sleep disturbances, allergies, space motion sickness, pain, and sinus congestion. These medications are administered under the assumption that they act in a similar way as on Earth, an assumption that has not been investigated systematically yet. Few inflight pharmacokinetic data have been published, and pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies during spaceflight are also lacking. Therefore, bed-rest models are often used to simulate physiological changes observed during microgravity. In addition to pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic changes, decreased drug and formulation stability in space could also influence efficacy and safety of medications. These alterations along with physiological changes and their resulting pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects must to be considered to determine their ultimate impact on medication efficacy and safety during spaceflight. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A Simple Model of Global Aerosol Indirect Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Smith, Steven J.; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Kai; Pringle, Kirsty; Carslaw, Kenneth; Pierce, Jeffrey; Bauer, Susanne; Adams, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Most estimates of the global mean indirect effect of anthropogenic aerosol on the Earth's energy balance are from simulations by global models of the aerosol lifecycle coupled with global models of clouds and the hydrologic cycle. Extremely simple models have been developed for integrated assessment models, but lack the flexibility to distinguish between primary and secondary sources of aerosol. Here a simple but more physically based model expresses the aerosol indirect effect (AIE) using analytic representations of cloud and aerosol distributions and processes. Although the simple model is able to produce estimates of AIEs that are comparable to those from some global aerosol models using the same global mean aerosol properties, the estimates by the simple model are sensitive to preindustrial cloud condensation nuclei concentration, preindustrial accumulation mode radius, width of the accumulation mode, size of primary particles, cloud thickness, primary and secondary anthropogenic emissions, the fraction of the secondary anthropogenic emissions that accumulates on the coarse mode, the fraction of the secondary mass that forms new particles, and the sensitivity of liquid water path to droplet number concentration. Estimates of present-day AIEs as low as 5 W/sq m and as high as 0.3 W/sq m are obtained for plausible sets of parameter values. Estimates are surprisingly linear in emissions. The estimates depend on parameter values in ways that are consistent with results from detailed global aerosol-climate simulation models, which adds to understanding of the dependence on AIE uncertainty on uncertainty in parameter values.

  6. A Human Life-Stage Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Model for Chlorpyrifos: Development and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Timchalk, Charles; Bartels, M. J.; Poet, Torka S.

    2014-08-01

    Sensitivity to chemicals in animals and humans are known to vary with age. Age-related changes in sensitivity to chlorpyrifos have been reported in animal models. A life-stage physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model was developed to computationally predict disposition of CPF and its metabolites, chlorpyrifos-oxon (the ultimate toxicant) and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), as well as B-esterase inhibition by chlorpyrifos-oxon in humans. In this model, age-dependent body weight was calculated from a generalized Gompertz function, and compartments (liver, brain, fat, blood, diaphragm, rapid, and slow) were scaled based on body weight from polynomial functions on a fractional body weight basis. Blood flows among compartments were calculated as a constant flow per compartment volume. The life-stage PBPK/PD model was calibrated and tested against controlled adult human exposure studies. Model simulations suggest age-dependent pharmacokinetics and response may exist. At oral doses ≥ 0.55 mg/kg of chlorpyrifos (significantly higher than environmental exposure levels), 6 mo old children are predicted to have higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and higher levels of red blood cell cholinesterase inhibition compared to adults from equivalent oral doses of chlorpyrifos. At lower doses that are more relevant to environmental exposures, the model predicts that adults will have slightly higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and greater cholinesterase inhibition. This model provides a computational framework for age-comparative simulations that can be utilized to predict CPF disposition and biological response over various postnatal life-stages.

  7. [A study of population pharmacokinetics of linezolid in Chinese].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Bai, N; Liu, Y N; Wang, R

    2016-12-12

    Objective: To study the population pharmacokinetic (PPK) profiles of linezolid in Chinese healthy volunteers and infected patients. Methods: Linezolid 600 mg was administered to 31 Chinese healthy volunteers with a single dose and to 57 infected patients every 12 h for at least 5 doses. High performance liquid chromatography was applied to determine the plasma concentration of linezolid. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling method was applied to analyze the PPK profiles. Results: For healthy volunteers with single dose of linezolid, 2-compartment with linear elimination model was the most appropriate structural pharmacokinetic model. The population typical value of apparent volume of central compartment was 26.99 L, volume of peripheral compartment was 22.22 L, apparent clearance of central compartment was 7.99 L/h, and clearance of peripheral compartment was 101.28 L/h. For each 1 kg deviation of weight from the mean value, 0.62 L of volume of peripheral compartment was correlated. For Chinese infected patients with multiple doses of linezolid, 1-compartment with linear elimination model was the most appropriate structural pharmacokinetic model. The population typical value of apparent volume was 38.85 L, and apparent clearance was 4.70 L/h. For each 1 kg deviation of weight from the mean value, 0.79 L of volume, as well as 0.04 L/h of clearance were correlated. For each 1 year deviation of age from the mean value, -0.045 L/h of clearance was correlated. Conclusions: The pharmacokinetic profiles of linezolid in Chinese simulate a 2-compartment with linear elimination model when single dose is administrated, and the weight is linearly positive-correlated to volume. While a 1-compartment with linear elimination model is appropriate when multiple doses are administrated, and the weight is linearly positive-correlated to volume and clearance, but the age is linearly negative-correlated to clearance.

  8. Investigation of clinical pharmacokinetic variability of an opioid antagonist through physiologically based absorption modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xuan; He, Minxia; Kulkarni, Rajesh; Patel, Nita; Zhang, Xiaoyu

    2013-08-01

    Identifying the source of inter- and/or intrasubject variability in pharmacokinetics (PK) provides fundamental information in understanding the pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics relationship of a drug and project its efficacy and safety in clinical populations. This identification process can be challenging given that a large number of potential causes could lead to PK variability. Here we present an integrated approach of physiologically based absorption modeling to investigate the root cause of unexpectedly high PK variability of a Phase I clinical trial drug. LY2196044 exhibited high intersubject variability in the absorption phase of plasma concentration-time profiles in humans. This could not be explained by in vitro measurements of drug properties and excellent bioavailability with low variability observed in preclinical species. GastroPlus™ modeling suggested that the compound's optimal solubility and permeability characteristics would enable rapid and complete absorption in preclinical species and in humans. However, simulations of human plasma concentration-time profiles indicated that despite sufficient solubility and rapid dissolution of LY2196044 in humans, permeability and/or transit in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract may have been negatively affected. It was concluded that clinical PK variability was potentially due to the drug's antagonism on opioid receptors that affected its transit and absorption in the GI tract. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Transplacental pharmacokinetics of diclofenac in perfused human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintaku, Kyohei; Hori, Satoko; Tsujimoto, Masayuki; Nagata, Hideaki; Satoh, Shoji; Tsukimori, Kiyomi; Nakano, Hitoo; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Taketani, Yuji; Ohtani, Hisakazu; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2009-05-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the transplacental transfer properties of diclofenac and to determine the effect of L-lactic acid on the transplacental transfer of diclofenac. The maternal and fetal vessels of human placenta were perfused in a single-pass mode with a solution containing diclofenac and antipyrine. The transplacental pharmacokinetic model was fitted to the time profiles of the drug concentrations in the effluent and placenta to obtain transplacental pharmacokinetic parameters. In addition, chloride ion in the perfusate was partially replaced with L-lactic acid to see the change in the transplacental transfer properties of diclofenac. The TPT(ss) value (ratio of the rate of amount transferred across the placenta to that infused in the steady state) of diclofenac was 2.22%, which was approximately one-third that of antipyrine and was significantly reduced in the presence of L-lactic acid. The transplacental pharmacokinetic model could adequately explain the transplacental transfer of diclofenac with influx clearances from maternal and fetal perfusates to placental tissue of 0.276 and 0.0345 ml/min/g cotyledon and efflux rate constants from placental tissue to maternal and fetal perfusates of 0.406 and 0.0337 min(-1), respectively. By taking into account protein binding, the placental tissue/plasma concentration ratio in humans for diclofenac was estimated to be 0.108 ml/g of cotyledon and was smaller than that of antipyrine. In conclusion, human placental perfusion and transplacental pharmacokinetic modeling allowed us to determine the transplacental transfer properties of diclofenac quantitatively. Diclofenac may share transplacental transfer system(s) with L-lactic acid.

  10. Complex versus simple models: ion-channel cardiac toxicity prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Hitesh B

    2018-01-01

    There is growing interest in applying detailed mathematical models of the heart for ion-channel related cardiac toxicity prediction. However, a debate as to whether such complex models are required exists. Here an assessment in the predictive performance between two established large-scale biophysical cardiac models and a simple linear model B net was conducted. Three ion-channel data-sets were extracted from literature. Each compound was designated a cardiac risk category using two different classification schemes based on information within CredibleMeds. The predictive performance of each model within each data-set for each classification scheme was assessed via a leave-one-out cross validation. Overall the B net model performed equally as well as the leading cardiac models in two of the data-sets and outperformed both cardiac models on the latest. These results highlight the importance of benchmarking complex versus simple models but also encourage the development of simple models.

  11. Complex versus simple models: ion-channel cardiac toxicity prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitesh B. Mistry

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in applying detailed mathematical models of the heart for ion-channel related cardiac toxicity prediction. However, a debate as to whether such complex models are required exists. Here an assessment in the predictive performance between two established large-scale biophysical cardiac models and a simple linear model Bnet was conducted. Three ion-channel data-sets were extracted from literature. Each compound was designated a cardiac risk category using two different classification schemes based on information within CredibleMeds. The predictive performance of each model within each data-set for each classification scheme was assessed via a leave-one-out cross validation. Overall the Bnet model performed equally as well as the leading cardiac models in two of the data-sets and outperformed both cardiac models on the latest. These results highlight the importance of benchmarking complex versus simple models but also encourage the development of simple models.

  12. Combinatorial structures to modeling simple games and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinero, Xavier

    2017-09-01

    We connect three different topics: combinatorial structures, game theory and chemistry. In particular, we establish the bases to represent some simple games, defined as influence games, and molecules, defined from atoms, by using combinatorial structures. First, we characterize simple games as influence games using influence graphs. It let us to modeling simple games as combinatorial structures (from the viewpoint of structures or graphs). Second, we formally define molecules as combinations of atoms. It let us to modeling molecules as combinatorial structures (from the viewpoint of combinations). It is open to generate such combinatorial structures using some specific techniques as genetic algorithms, (meta-)heuristics algorithms and parallel programming, among others.

  13. Quantitative analysis of elevation of serum creatinine via renal transporter inhibition by trimethoprim in healthy subjects using physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Tomohisa; Kudo, Toshiyuki; Kume, Toshiyuki; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki; Ito, Kiyomi

    2018-02-01

    Serum creatinine (SCr) levels rise during trimethoprim therapy for infectious diseases. This study aimed to investigate whether the elevation of SCr can be quantitatively explained using a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model incorporating inhibition by trimethoprim on tubular secretion of creatinine via renal transporters such as organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2), OCT3, multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1 (MATE1), and MATE2-K. Firstly, pharmacokinetic parameters in the PBPK model of trimethoprim were determined to reproduce the blood concentration profile after a single intravenous and oral administration of trimethoprim in healthy subjects. The model was verified with datasets of both cumulative urinary excretions after a single administration and the blood concentration profile after repeated oral administration. The pharmacokinetic model of creatinine consisted of the creatinine synthesis rate, distribution volume, and creatinine clearance (CL cre ), including tubular secretion via each transporter. When combining the models for trimethoprim and creatinine, the predicted increments in SCr from baseline were 29.0%, 39.5%, and 25.8% at trimethoprim dosages of 5 mg/kg (b.i.d.), 5 mg/kg (q.i.d.), and 200 mg (b.i.d.), respectively, which were comparable with the observed values. The present model analysis enabled us to quantitatively explain increments in SCr during trimethoprim treatment by its inhibition of renal transporters. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Diagnostic value of quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters and relative quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters in breast lesions with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, T T; Liu, W H; Zhang, Y Q; Li, L H; Wang, R; Ye, Y Y

    2017-08-01

    Objective: To explore the differential between the value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters and relative pharmacokinetic quantitative parameters in breast lesions. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 255 patients(262 breast lesions) who was obtained by clinical palpation , ultrasound or full-field digital mammography , and then all lessions were pathologically confirmed in Zhongda Hospital, Southeast University from May 2012 to May 2016. A 3.0 T MRI scanner was used to obtain the quantitative MR pharmacokinetic parameters: volume transfer constant (K(trans)), exchange rate constant (k(ep))and extravascular extracellular volume fraction (V(e)). And measured the quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters of normal glands tissues which on the same side of the same level of the lesions; and then calculated the value of relative pharmacokinetic parameters: rK(rans)、rk(ep) and rV(e).To explore the diagnostic value of two pharmacokinetic parameters in differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast lesions using receiver operating curves and model of logistic regression. Results: (1)There were significant differences between benign lesions and malignant lesions in K(trans) and k(ep) ( t =15.489, 15.022, respectively, P 0.05). The areas under the ROC curve(AUC)of K(trans), k(ep) and V(e) between malignant and benign lesions were 0.933, 0.948 and 0.387, the sensitivity of K(trans), k(ep) and V(e) were 77.1%, 85.0%, 51.0% , and the specificity of K(trans), k(ep) and V(e) were 96.3%, 93.6%, 60.8% for the differential diagnosis of breast lesions if taken the maximum Youden's index as cut-off. (2)There were significant differences between benign lesions and malignant lesions in rK(trans), rk(ep) and rV(e) ( t =14.177, 11.726, 2.477, respectively, P quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters and the prediction probability of relative quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters( Z =0.867, P =0.195). Conclusion: There was no significant

  15. Estimation of placental and lactational transfer and tissue distribution of atrazine and its main metabolites in rodent dams, fetuses, and neonates with physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Zhoumeng; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Wang, Ran; Ross, Matthew K.; Filipov, Nikolay M.

    2013-01-01

    Atrazine (ATR) is a widely used chlorotriazine herbicide, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, and a potential developmental toxicant. To quantitatively evaluate placental/lactational transfer and fetal/neonatal tissue dosimetry of ATR and its major metabolites, physiologically based pharmacokinetic models were developed for rat dams, fetuses and neonates. These models were calibrated using pharmacokinetic data from rat dams repeatedly exposed (oral gavage; 5 mg/kg) to ATR followed by model evaluation against other available rat data. Model simulations corresponded well to the majority of available experimental data and suggest that: (1) the fetus is exposed to both ATR and its major metabolite didealkylatrazine (DACT) at levels similar to maternal plasma levels, (2) the neonate is exposed mostly to DACT at levels two-thirds lower than maternal plasma or fetal levels, while lactational exposure to ATR is minimal, and (3) gestational carryover of DACT greatly affects its neonatal dosimetry up until mid-lactation. To test the model's cross-species extrapolation capability, a pharmacokinetic study was conducted with pregnant C57BL/6 mice exposed (oral gavage; 5 mg/kg) to ATR from gestational day 12 to 18. By using mouse-specific parameters, the model predictions fitted well with the measured data, including placental ATR/DACT levels. However, fetal concentrations of DACT were overestimated by the model (10-fold). This overestimation suggests that only around 10% of the DACT that reaches the fetus is tissue-bound. These rodent models could be used in fetal/neonatal tissue dosimetry predictions to help design/interpret early life toxicity/pharmacokinetic studies with ATR and as a foundation for scaling to humans. - Highlights: • We developed PBPK models for atrazine in rat dams, fetuses, and neonates. • We conducted pharmacokinetic (PK) study with atrazine in pregnant mice. • Model predictions were in good agreement with experimental rat and mouse PK data.

  16. Estimation of placental and lactational transfer and tissue distribution of atrazine and its main metabolites in rodent dams, fetuses, and neonates with physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Zhoumeng [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Interdisciplinary Toxicology Program, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Fisher, Jeffrey W. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Wang, Ran [Center for Environmental Health Sciences, Department of Basic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States); Institute of Food Safety, Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanjing 210014 (China); Ross, Matthew K. [Center for Environmental Health Sciences, Department of Basic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States); Filipov, Nikolay M., E-mail: filipov@uga.edu [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Interdisciplinary Toxicology Program, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Atrazine (ATR) is a widely used chlorotriazine herbicide, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, and a potential developmental toxicant. To quantitatively evaluate placental/lactational transfer and fetal/neonatal tissue dosimetry of ATR and its major metabolites, physiologically based pharmacokinetic models were developed for rat dams, fetuses and neonates. These models were calibrated using pharmacokinetic data from rat dams repeatedly exposed (oral gavage; 5 mg/kg) to ATR followed by model evaluation against other available rat data. Model simulations corresponded well to the majority of available experimental data and suggest that: (1) the fetus is exposed to both ATR and its major metabolite didealkylatrazine (DACT) at levels similar to maternal plasma levels, (2) the neonate is exposed mostly to DACT at levels two-thirds lower than maternal plasma or fetal levels, while lactational exposure to ATR is minimal, and (3) gestational carryover of DACT greatly affects its neonatal dosimetry up until mid-lactation. To test the model's cross-species extrapolation capability, a pharmacokinetic study was conducted with pregnant C57BL/6 mice exposed (oral gavage; 5 mg/kg) to ATR from gestational day 12 to 18. By using mouse-specific parameters, the model predictions fitted well with the measured data, including placental ATR/DACT levels. However, fetal concentrations of DACT were overestimated by the model (10-fold). This overestimation suggests that only around 10% of the DACT that reaches the fetus is tissue-bound. These rodent models could be used in fetal/neonatal tissue dosimetry predictions to help design/interpret early life toxicity/pharmacokinetic studies with ATR and as a foundation for scaling to humans. - Highlights: • We developed PBPK models for atrazine in rat dams, fetuses, and neonates. • We conducted pharmacokinetic (PK) study with atrazine in pregnant mice. • Model predictions were in good agreement with experimental rat and mouse PK data

  17. [Study on differences between pharmacokinetics and chromatopharmacodynamics for Chinese materia medica formulae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fuyuan; Deng, Kaiwen; Zou, Huan; Qiu, Yun; Chen, Feng; Zhou, Honghao

    2011-01-01

    To study on the differences between chromatopharmacokinetics (pharmacokinetics with fingerprint chromatography) and chromatopharmacodynamics (pharmacodynamics with fingerprint chromatography) of Chinese materia medica formulae to answer the question whether the pharmacokinetic parameters of multiple composites can be utilized to guide the medication of multiple composites. On the base of established four chromatopharmacology (pharmacology with chromatographic fingerprint), the pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics were analyzed comparably on their mathematical model and parameter definition. On the basis of quantitative pharmacology, the function expressions and total statistical parameters, such as total zero moment, total first moment, total second moment of the pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics were analyzed to the common expressions and elucidated results for single and multiple components in Chinese materia medica formulae. Total quantitative pharmacokinetic, i.e., chromatopharmacokinetic parameter were decided by each component pharmacokinetic parameters, whereas the total quantitative pharmacodynamic, i.e., chromatopharmacodynamic parameter were decided by both of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters of each components. The pharmacokinetic parameters were corresponded to pharmacodynamic parameters with an existing stable effective coefficient when the constitutive ratio of each composite was a constant. The effects of Chinese materia medica were all controlled by pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic coefficient. It is a special case that the pharmacokinetic parameter could independently guide the clinical medication for single component whereas the chromatopharmacokinetic parameters are not applied to the multiple drug combination system, and not be used to solve problems of chromatopharmacokinetic of Chinese materia medica formulae.

  18. Application of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models in Chemical Risk Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moiz Mumtaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-exposure risk assessment of chemical and environmental stressors is a public health challenge. Linking exposure to health outcomes is a 4-step process: exposure assessment, hazard identification, dose response assessment, and risk characterization. This process is increasingly adopting “in silico” tools such as physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK models to fine-tune exposure assessments and determine internal doses in target organs/tissues. Many excellent PBPK models have been developed. But most, because of their scientific sophistication, have found limited field application—health assessors rarely use them. Over the years, government agencies, stakeholders/partners, and the scientific community have attempted to use these models or their underlying principles in combination with other practical procedures. During the past two decades, through cooperative agreements and contracts at several research and higher education institutions, ATSDR funded translational research has encouraged the use of various types of models. Such collaborative efforts have led to the development and use of transparent and user-friendly models. The “human PBPK model toolkit” is one such project. While not necessarily state of the art, this toolkit is sufficiently accurate for screening purposes. Highlighted in this paper are some selected examples of environmental and occupational exposure assessments of chemicals and their mixtures.

  19. Simple model of the arms race

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zane, L.I.

    1982-01-01

    A simple model of a two-party arms race is developed based on the principle that the race will continue so long as either side can unleash an effective first strike against the other side. The model is used to examine how secrecy, the ABM, MIRV-ing, and an MX system affect the arms race

  20. Development of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Model to Determine Dosimetry and Cholinesterase Inhibition for a Binary Mixture of Chlorpyrifos and Diazinon in the Rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timchalk, Chuck; Poet, Torka S.

    2008-05-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models have been developed and validated for the organophosphorus (OP) insecticides chlorpyrifos (CPF) and diazinon (DZN). Based on similar pharmacokinetic and mode of action properties it is anticipated that these OPs could interact at a number of important metabolic steps including: CYP450 mediated activation/detoxification, and blood/tissue cholinesterase (ChE) binding/inhibition. We developed a binary PBPK/PD model for CPF, DZN and their metabolites based on previously published models for the individual insecticides. The metabolic interactions (CYP450) between CPF and DZN were evaluated in vitro and suggests that CPF is more substantially metabolized to its oxon metabolite than is DZN. These data are consistent with their observed in vivo relative potency (CPF>DZN). Each insecticide inhibited the other’s in vitro metabolism in a concentration-dependent manner. The PBPK model code used to described the metabolism of CPF and DZN was modified to reflect the type of inhibition kinetics (i.e. competitive vs. non-competitive). The binary model was then evaluated against previously published rodent dosimetry and ChE inhibition data for the mixture. The PBPK/PD model simulations of the acute oral exposure to single- (15 mg/kg) vs. binary-mixtures (15+15 mg/kg) of CFP and DZN at this lower dose resulted in no differences in the predicted pharmacokinetics of either the parent OPs or their respective metabolites; whereas, a binary oral dose of CPF+DZN at 60+60 mg/kg did result in observable changes in the DZN pharmacokinetics. Cmax was more reasonably fit by modifying the absorption parameters. It is anticipated that at low environmentally relevant binary doses, most likely to be encountered in occupational or environmental related exposures, that the pharmacokinetics are expected to be linear, and ChE inhibition dose-additive.

  1. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics of flurbiprofen in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumpulainen, Elina; Välitalo, Pyry; Kokki, Merja; Lehtonen, Marko; Hooker, Andrew; Ranta, Veli-Pekka; Kokki, Hannu

    2010-01-01

    AIMS This study was designed to characterize paediatric pharmacokinetics and central nervous system exposure of flurbiprofen. METHODS The pharmacokinetics of flurbiprofen were studied in 64 healthy children aged 3 months to 13 years, undergoing surgery with spinal anaesthesia. Children were administered preoperatively a single dose of flurbiprofen intravenously as prodrug (n = 27) or by mouth as syrup (n = 37). A single cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sample (n = 60) was collected at the induction of anaesthesia, and plasma samples (n = 304) before, during and after the operation (up to 20 h after administration). A population pharmacokinetic model was built using the NONMEM software package. RESULTS Flurbiprofen concentrations in plasma were well described by a three compartment model. The apparent bioavailability of oral flurbiprofen syrup was 81%. The estimated clearance (CL) was 0.96 l h−1 70 kg−1. Age did not affect the clearance after weight had been included as a covariate. The estimated volume of distribution at steady state (Vss) was 8.1 l 70 kg−1. Flurbiprofen permeated into the CSF, reaching concentrations that were seven-fold higher compared with unbound plasma concentrations. CONCLUSIONS Flurbiprofen pharmacokinetics can be described using only weight as a covariate in children above 6 months, while more research is needed in neonates and in younger infants. PMID:20840447

  2. Population Pharmacokinetics of Fentanyl in the Critically Ill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Leena; Ferrell, Benjamin A; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Pandharipande, Pratik P; Heltsley, Rebecca; Ely, E Wesley; Stein, C Michael; Girard, Timothy D

    2016-01-01

    Objective To characterize fentanyl population pharmacokinetics in patients with critical illness and identify patient characteristics associated with altered fentanyl concentrations. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Medical and surgical ICUs in a large tertiary care hospital in the United States. Patients Patients with acute respiratory failure and/or shock who received fentanyl during the first five days of their ICU stay. Measurements and Main Results We collected clinical and hourly drug administration data and measured fentanyl concentrations in plasma collected once daily for up to five days after enrollment. Among 337 patients, the mean duration of infusion was 58 hours at a median rate of 100 µg/hr. Using a nonlinear mixed-effects model implemented by NONMEM, we found fentanyl pharmacokinetics were best described by a two-compartment model in which weight, severe liver disease, and congestive heart failure most affected fentanyl concentrations. For a patient population with a mean weight of 92 kg and no history of severe liver disease or congestive heart failure, the final model, which performed well in repeated 10-fold cross-validation, estimated total clearance (CL), intercompartmental clearance (Q), and volumes of distribution for the central (V1) and peripheral compartments (V2) to be 35 (95% confidence interval: 32 to 39) L/hr, 55 (42 to 68) L/hr, 203 (140 to 266) L, and 523 (428 to 618) L, respectively. Severity of illness was marginally associated with fentanyl pharmacokinetics but did not improve the model fit after liver and heart disease were included. Conclusions In this study, fentanyl pharmacokinetics during critical illness were strongly influenced by severe liver disease, congestive heart failure, and weight, factors that should be considered when dosing fentanyl in the ICU. Future studies are needed to determine if data-driven fentanyl dosing algorithms can improve outcomes for ICU patients. PMID:26491862

  3. HPLC assay for ethiofos in plasma: Application to pharmacokinetics in the beagle dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swynnerton, N.F.; Mangold, D.J.; Ludden, T.M.

    1985-01-01

    An HPLC assay for ethiofos [S-2-(3-amino-propylamino)ethyl phosphorothioate, WR 2727] in plasma is presented. Its application to the development of pharmacokinetic parameters following IV administration of the drug to beagle dogs is demonstrated and preliminary pharmacokinetics of four dosings will be presented. Following a dose of 150 mg kg -1 , the plasma concentration versus time profile was best described by a two-compartment pharmacokinetics model. Mean pharmacokinetic parameters were: terminal elimination half-life = 16.0 minutes, volume of central compartment = 129 mL kg -1 , and clearance = 11.0 mL min -1 kg -1

  4. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic modeling of enrofloxacin against Escherichia coli in broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang eKana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to establish a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD modeling approach for the dosage schedule design and decreasing the emergence of drug-resistant bacteria. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of 929 E. coli isolates from broilers to enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were determined following CLSI guidance. The MIC50 was calculated as the populational PD parameter for enrofloxacin against E. coli in broilers. The 101 E. coli strains with MIC closest to the MIC50 (0.05µg/mL were submitted for serotype identification. The 13 E. coli strains with O and K serotype were further utilitzed for determining pathogencity in mice. Of all the strains tested, the E. coli designated strain Anhui 112 was selected for establishing the disease model and PK/PD study. The pharmacokinetics (PKs of enrofloxacin after oral administration at the dose of 10mg/kg body weights (BW in healthy and infected broilers was evaluated with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC method. For intestinal contents after oral administration, the peak concentration (Cmax, the time when the maximum concentration reached (Tmax, and the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC were 21.69~31.69μg/mL, 1.13~1.23h, and 228.97~444.86μg.hr/mL, respectively. The MIC and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC of enrofloxacin against E. coli (Anhui 112 in Mueller-Hinton (MH broth and intestinal contents were determined to be similar, 0.25μg/mL and 0.5μg/mL respectively. In this study, the sum of concentrations of enrofloxacin and its metabolite (ciprofloxacin was used for the PK/PD integration and modeling. The ex vivo growth inhibition data were fitted to the sigmoid Emax (Hill equation to provide values for intestinal contents of 24h area under concentration–time curve/MIC ratios (AUC0~24h/MIC producing, bacteriostasis (624.94h, bactericidal activity (1065.93h and bacterial eradication (1343.81h. PK/PD modeling was established to

  5. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of the antihypertensive interaction between azilsartan medoxomil and chlorthalidone in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Puttrevu, Santosh; Ramakrishna, Rachumallu; Bhateria, Manisha; Jain, Moon; Hanif, Kashif; Bhatta, Rabi Sankar

    2017-05-01

    A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model was developed to describe the time course of blood pressure following oral administration of azilsartan medoxomil (AZM) and/or chlorthalidone (CLT) in spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats. The drug concentration and pharmacological effects, including systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and tail-cuff manometry, respectively. Sequential PK-PD analysis was performed, wherein the plasma concentration-time data was modeled by one compartmental analysis. Subsequently PD parameters were calculated to describe the time-concentration-response relationship using indirect response (IDR) PK-PD model. The combination of AZ and CLT had greater BP lowering effect compared to AZ or CLT alone, despite of no pharmacokinetic interaction between two drugs. These findings suggest synergistic antihypertensive pharmacodynamic interaction between AZ and CLT noncompetitively, which was simulated by inhibitory function of AZ and stimulatory function of CLT after concomitant administration of the two drugs. The present model was able to capture the turnover of blood pressure adequately at different time points at two different dose levels. The current PK-PD model was successfully utilized in the simulation of PD effect at a dose combination of 0.5 and 2.5 mg/kg for AZ and CLT, respectively. The developed preclinical PK-PD model may provide guidance in the optimization of dose ratio of individual drugs in the combined pharmacotherapy of AZ and CLT at clinical situations.

  6. Anti-colchicine Fab fragments prevent lethal colchicine toxicity in a porcine model: a pharmacokinetic and clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddleston, Michael; Fabresse, Nicolas; Thompson, Adrian; Al Abdulla, Ibrahim; Gregson, Rachael; King, Tim; Astier, Alain; Baud, Frederic J; Clutton, R Eddie; Alvarez, Jean-Claude

    2018-08-01

    Colchicine poisoning is commonly lethal. Colchicine-specific Fab fragments increase rat urinary colchicine clearance and have been associated with a good outcome in one patient. We aimed to develop a porcine model of colchicine toxicity to study the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of ovine Fab. A Göttingen minipig critical care model was established and serial blood samples taken for colchicine and Fab pharmacokinetics, clinical chemistry, and haematology. Animals were euthanised when the mean arterial pressure fell below 45 mmHg without response to vasopressor, or at study completion. Initial studies indicated that oral dosing produced variable pharmacokinetics and time-to-euthanasia. By contrast, intravenous infusion of 0.25 mg/kg colchicine over 1 h produced reproducible pharmacokinetics (AUC 0-20 343 [SD = 21] µg/L/h), acute multi-organ injury, and cardiotoxicity requiring euthanasia a mean of 22.5 (SD = 3.2) h after dosing. A full-neutralising equimolar Fab dose given 6 h after the infusion (50% first hour, 50% next 6 h [to reduce renal-loss of unbound Fab]) produced a 7.35-fold increase in plasma colchicine (AUC 0-20 2,522 [SD = 14] µg/L/h), and removed all free plasma colchicine, but did not prevent toxicity (euthanasia at 29.1 [SD = 3.4] h). Earlier administration over 1 h of the full-neutralising dose, 1 or 3 h after the colchicine, produced a 12.9-fold (AUC 0-20 4,433 [SD = 607] µg/L/h) and 6.0-fold (AUC 0-20 2,047 [SD = 51] µg/L/h) increase in plasma colchicine, respectively, absence of free plasma colchicine until 20 h, and survival to study end without marked cardiotoxicity. Colchicine-specific Fab given early, in equimolar dose, bound colchicine, eliciting its movement into the blood, and preventing severe toxicity. Clinical studies are now needed to determine how soon this antidote must be given to work in human poisoning.

  7. Mechanistic Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Model of the Heart Accounting for Inter-Individual Variability: Development and Performance Verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylutki, Zofia; Mendyk, Aleksander; Polak, Sebastian

    2018-04-01

    Modern model-based approaches to cardiac safety and efficacy assessment require accurate drug concentration-effect relationship establishment. Thus, knowledge of the active concentration of drugs in heart tissue is desirable along with inter-subject variability influence estimation. To that end, we developed a mechanistic physiologically based pharmacokinetic model of the heart. The models were described with literature-derived parameters and written in R, v.3.4.0. Five parameters were estimated. The model was fitted to amitriptyline and nortriptyline concentrations after an intravenous infusion of amitriptyline. The cardiac model consisted of 5 compartments representing the pericardial fluid, heart extracellular water, and epicardial intracellular, midmyocardial intracellular, and endocardial intracellular fluids. Drug cardiac metabolism, passive diffusion, active efflux, and uptake were included in the model as mechanisms involved in the drug disposition within the heart. The model accounted for inter-individual variability. The estimates of optimized parameters were within physiological ranges. The model performance was verified by simulating 5 clinical studies of amitriptyline intravenous infusion, and the simulated pharmacokinetic profiles agreed with clinical data. The results support the model feasibility. The proposed structure can be tested with the goal of improving the patient-specific model-based cardiac safety assessment and offers a framework for predicting cardiac concentrations of various xenobiotics. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Development and application of a multiroute physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for oxytetracycline in dogs and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhoumeng; Li, Mengjie; Gehring, Ronette; Riviere, Jim E

    2015-01-01

    Oxytetracycline (OTC) is a commonly used tetracycline antibiotic in veterinary and human medicine. To establish a quantitative model for predicting OTC plasma and tissue exposure, a permeability-limited multiroute physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was developed in dogs. The model was calibrated with plasma pharmacokinetic data in beagle dogs following single intravenous (5 mg/kg), oral (100 mg/kg), and intramuscular (20 mg/kg) administrations. The model predicted other available dog data well, including drug concentrations in the liver, kidney, and muscle after repeated exposure, and data in the mixed-breed dog. The model was extrapolated to humans and the human model adequately simulated measured plasma OTC concentrations after intravenous (7.14 mg/kg) and oral exposures (6.67 mg/kg). The dog model was applied to predict 24-h OTC area-under-the-curve after three therapeutic treatments. Results were 27.75, 51.76, and 64.17 μg/mL*h in the plasma, and 120.93, 225.64, and 279.67 μg/mL*h in the kidney for oral (100 mg/kg), intravenous (10 mg/kg), and intramuscular (20 mg/kg) administrations, respectively. This model can be used to predict plasma and tissue concentrations to aid in designing optimal therapeutic regimens with OTC in veterinary, and potentially, human medicine; and as a foundation for scaling to other tetracycline antibiotics and to other animal species. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 104:233-243, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  9. Update on a Pharmacokinetic-Centric Alternative Tier II Program for MMT—Part II: Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling and Manganese Risk Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Taylor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a variety of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK models have been developed for the essential element manganese. This paper reviews the development of PBPK models (e.g., adult, pregnant, lactating, and neonatal rats, nonhuman primates, and adult, pregnant, lactating, and neonatal humans and relevant risk assessment applications. Each PBPK model incorporates critical features including dose-dependent saturable tissue capacities and asymmetrical diffusional flux of manganese into brain and other tissues. Varied influx and efflux diffusion rate and binding constants for different brain regions account for the differential increases in regional brain manganese concentrations observed experimentally. We also present novel PBPK simulations to predict manganese tissue concentrations in fetal, neonatal, pregnant, or aged individuals, as well as individuals with liver disease or chronic manganese inhalation. The results of these simulations could help guide risk assessors in the application of uncertainty factors as they establish exposure guidelines for the general public or workers.

  10. Compartmental modelling of the pharmacokinetics of a breast cancer resistance protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, Thomas R B; Chappell, Mike J; Yates, James T W; Jones, Kevin; Wood, Gemma; Coleman, Tanya

    2011-11-01

    A mathematical model for the pharmacokinetics of Hoechst 33342 following administration into a culture medium containing a population of transfected cells (HEK293 hBCRP) with a potent breast cancer resistance protein inhibitor, Fumitremorgin C (FTC), present is described. FTC is reported to almost completely annul resistance mediated by BCRP in vitro. This non-linear compartmental model has seven macroscopic sub-units, with 14 rate parameters. It describes the relationship between the concentration of Hoechst 33342 and FTC, initially spiked in the medium, and the observed change in fluorescence due to Hoechst 33342 binding to DNA. Structural identifiability analysis has been performed using two methods, one based on the similarity transformation/exhaustive modelling approach and the other based on the differential algebra approach. The analyses demonstrated that all models derived are uniquely identifiable for the experiments/observations available. A kinetic modelling software package, namely FACSIMILE (MPCA Software, UK), was used for parameter fitting and to obtain numerical solutions for the system equations. Model fits gave very good agreement with in vitro data provided by AstraZeneca across a variety of experimental scenarios. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model of Trichloroethylene and Its Metabolities for Use in Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    Stenner , R.D., Merdink, J.L., Fisher, J.W., and Bull, R., Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for trichloroethylene considering enterohepatic...B6C3F1 mice. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol., 123, 1- 8, 1993. 21. Templin, M.V., Stevens, D.K., Stenner , R.D., Bonate, P.L., Tuman, D., and Bull, R.J

  12. Pharmacokinetics study of bio-adhesive tablet of Panax notoginseng saponins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Hanzhou

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Panax notoginseng saponin (PNS is the main active gradient of Chinese traditional medicine Panax notoginseng. Although its prominent therapeutic efficacy has been demonstrated by various researchers, the broader application is restricted by the low bioavailability of PNS. This article aims to discuss PNS's plasma pharmacokinetics after oral administration of bio-adhesive tablet of PNS to beagle dogs and improve its bioavailability in comparison with normal tablet. The bio-adhesive tablet was prepared according to our previous patent, using chitosan as main excipient. A simple and sensitive LC-MS/MS combined with solid-phase extraction (SPE method for the analysis of PNS in dog's plasma was developed in our previous study, and was validated to apply in the pharmacokinetics study in this work. Three ingredients: Notoginsenoside R1 (R1, Ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1 and Ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1 (Figure 1, were chosen as indicators of PNS to analyze it in vivo. Statistically significant increase (P

  13. Statistical identifiability and convergence evaluation for nonlinear pharmacokinetic models with particle swarm optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seongho; Li, Lang

    2014-02-01

    The statistical identifiability of nonlinear pharmacokinetic (PK) models with the Michaelis-Menten (MM) kinetic equation is considered using a global optimization approach, which is particle swarm optimization (PSO). If a model is statistically non-identifiable, the conventional derivative-based estimation approach is often terminated earlier without converging, due to the singularity. To circumvent this difficulty, we develop a derivative-free global optimization algorithm by combining PSO with a derivative-free local optimization algorithm to improve the rate of convergence of PSO. We further propose an efficient approach to not only checking the convergence of estimation but also detecting the identifiability of nonlinear PK models. PK simulation studies demonstrate that the convergence and identifiability of the PK model can be detected efficiently through the proposed approach. The proposed approach is then applied to clinical PK data along with a two-compartmental model. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A simple assay of paracetamol based on dried blood spot suitable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dried blood spots in Guthrie cards are a reliable means of blood sampling suitable for pharmacoki-netic analysis in children. The aim of this study was to develop a simple and reliable bioanalytical method to measure the concentration of paracetamol in dried blood spots. Paracetamol was ex-tracted from dry blood spots by ...

  15. Mathematical modeling and simulation in animal health - Part II: principles, methods, applications, and value of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in veterinary medicine and food safety assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Z; Gehring, R; Mochel, J P; Lavé, T; Riviere, J E

    2016-10-01

    This review provides a tutorial for individuals interested in quantitative veterinary pharmacology and toxicology and offers a basis for establishing guidelines for physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model development and application in veterinary medicine. This is important as the application of PBPK modeling in veterinary medicine has evolved over the past two decades. PBPK models can be used to predict drug tissue residues and withdrawal times in food-producing animals, to estimate chemical concentrations at the site of action and target organ toxicity to aid risk assessment of environmental contaminants and/or drugs in both domestic animals and wildlife, as well as to help design therapeutic regimens for veterinary drugs. This review provides a comprehensive summary of PBPK modeling principles, model development methodology, and the current applications in veterinary medicine, with a focus on predictions of drug tissue residues and withdrawal times in food-producing animals. The advantages and disadvantages of PBPK modeling compared to other pharmacokinetic modeling approaches (i.e., classical compartmental/noncompartmental modeling, nonlinear mixed-effects modeling, and interspecies allometric scaling) are further presented. The review finally discusses contemporary challenges and our perspectives on model documentation, evaluation criteria, quality improvement, and offers solutions to increase model acceptance and applications in veterinary pharmacology and toxicology. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of dibromoacetic acid in F344 rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, Jessica L.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Easterling, Michael R.; Melnick, Ronald L.

    2010-01-01

    A novel physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model structure, which includes submodels for the common metabolites (glyoxylate (GXA) and oxalate (OXA)) that may be involved in the toxicity or carcinogenicity of dibromoacetic acid (DBA), has been developed. Particular attention is paid to the representation of hepatic metabolism, which is the primary elimination mechanism. DBA-induced suicide inhibition is modeled by irreversible covalent binding of the intermediate metabolite α-halocarboxymethylglutathione (αH1) to the glutathione-S-transferase zeta (GSTzeta) enzyme. We also present data illustrating the presence of a secondary non-GSTzeta metabolic pathway for DBA, but not dichloroacetic acid (DCA), that produces GXA. The model is calibrated with plasma and urine concentration data from DBA exposures in female F344 rats through intravenous (IV), oral gavage, and drinking water routes. Sensitivity analysis is performed to confirm identifiability of estimated parameters. Finally, model validation is performed with data sets not used during calibration. Given the structural similarity of dihaloacetates (DHAs), we hypothesize that the PBPK model presented here has the capacity to describe the kinetics of any member or mixture of members of this class in any species with the alteration of chemical-and species-specific parameters.

  17. Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of BPA in rats at different life stages using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaoxia, E-mail: Xiaoxia.Yang@fda.hhs.gov; Doerge, Daniel R.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2013-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has received considerable attention throughout the last decade due to its widespread use in consumer products. For the first time a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed in neonatal and adult rats to quantitatively evaluate age-dependent pharmacokinetics of BPA and its phase II metabolites. The PBPK model was calibrated in adult rats using studies on BPA metabolism and excretion in the liver and gastrointestinal tract, and pharmacokinetic data with BPA in adult rats. For immature rats the hepatic and gastrointestinal metabolism of BPA was inferred from studies on the maturation of phase II enzymes coupled with serum time course data in pups. The calibrated model predicted the measured serum concentrations of BPA and BPA conjugates after administration of 100 μg/kg of d6-BPA in adult rats (oral gavage and intravenous administration) and postnatal days 3, 10, and 21 pups (oral gavage). The observed age-dependent BPA serum concentrations were partially attributed to the immature metabolic capacity of pups. A comparison of the dosimetry of BPA across immature rats and monkeys suggests that dose adjustments would be necessary to extrapolate toxicity studies from neonatal rats to infant humans. - Highlights: • A PBPK model predicts the kinetics of bisphenol A (BPA) in young and adult rats. • BPA metabolism within enterocytes is required for fitting of oral BPA kinetic data. • BPA dosimetry in young rats is different than adult rats and young monkeys.

  18. Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of BPA in rats at different life stages using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Doerge, Daniel R.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has received considerable attention throughout the last decade due to its widespread use in consumer products. For the first time a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed in neonatal and adult rats to quantitatively evaluate age-dependent pharmacokinetics of BPA and its phase II metabolites. The PBPK model was calibrated in adult rats using studies on BPA metabolism and excretion in the liver and gastrointestinal tract, and pharmacokinetic data with BPA in adult rats. For immature rats the hepatic and gastrointestinal metabolism of BPA was inferred from studies on the maturation of phase II enzymes coupled with serum time course data in pups. The calibrated model predicted the measured serum concentrations of BPA and BPA conjugates after administration of 100 μg/kg of d6-BPA in adult rats (oral gavage and intravenous administration) and postnatal days 3, 10, and 21 pups (oral gavage). The observed age-dependent BPA serum concentrations were partially attributed to the immature metabolic capacity of pups. A comparison of the dosimetry of BPA across immature rats and monkeys suggests that dose adjustments would be necessary to extrapolate toxicity studies from neonatal rats to infant humans. - Highlights: • A PBPK model predicts the kinetics of bisphenol A (BPA) in young and adult rats. • BPA metabolism within enterocytes is required for fitting of oral BPA kinetic data. • BPA dosimetry in young rats is different than adult rats and young monkeys

  19. Characterization of the pharmacokinetics of gasoline using PBPK modeling with a complex mixtures chemical lumping approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, James E; Andersen, Melvin E; Yang, Raymond S H

    2003-09-01

    Gasoline consists of a few toxicologically significant components and a large number of other hydrocarbons in a complex mixture. By using an integrated, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling and lumping approach, we have developed a method for characterizing the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of gasoline in rats. The PBPK model tracks selected target components (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-xylene [BTEX], and n-hexane) and a lumped chemical group representing all nontarget components, with competitive metabolic inhibition between all target compounds and the lumped chemical. PK data was acquired by performing gas uptake PK studies with male F344 rats in a closed chamber. Chamber air samples were analyzed every 10-20 min by gas chromatography/flame ionization detection and all nontarget chemicals were co-integrated. A four-compartment PBPK model with metabolic interactions was constructed using the BTEX, n-hexane, and lumped chemical data. Target chemical kinetic parameters were refined by studies with either the single chemical alone or with all five chemicals together. o-Xylene, at high concentrations, decreased alveolar ventilation, consistent with respiratory irritation. A six-chemical interaction model with the lumped chemical group was used to estimate lumped chemical partitioning and metabolic parameters for a winter blend of gasoline with methyl t-butyl ether and a summer blend without any oxygenate. Computer simulation results from this model matched well with experimental data from single chemical, five-chemical mixture, and the two blends of gasoline. The PBPK model analysis indicated that metabolism of individual components was inhibited up to 27% during the 6-h gas uptake experiments of gasoline exposures.

  20. Identification of intestinal loss of a drug through physiologically based pharmacokinetic simulation of plasma concentration-time profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Sheila Annie

    2008-01-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding of the role of the gut as a metabolizing organ, recognition of gut wall metabolism and/or other factors contributing to intestinal loss of a compound has been a challenging task due to the lack of well characterized methods to distinguish it from first-pass hepatic extraction. The implications of identifying intestinal loss of a compound in drug discovery and development can be enormous. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) simulations of pharmacokinetic profiles provide a simple, reliable and cost-effective way to understand the mechanisms underlying pharmacokinetic processes. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the application of PBPK simulations in bringing to light intestinal loss of orally administered drugs, using two example compounds: verapamil and an in-house compound that is no longer in development (referred to as compound A in this article). A generic PBPK model, built in-house using MATLAB software and incorporating absorption, metabolism, distribution, biliary and renal elimination models, was employed for simulation of concentration-time profiles. Modulation of intrinsic hepatic clearance and tissue distribution parameters in the generic PBPK model was done to achieve a good fit to the observed intravenous pharmacokinetic profiles of the compounds studied. These optimized clearance and distribution parameters are expected to be invariant across different routes of administration, as long as the kinetics are linear, and were therefore employed to simulate the oral profiles of the compounds. For compounds with reasonably good solubility and permeability, an area under the concentration-time curve for the simulated oral profile that far exceeded the observed would indicate some kind of loss in the intestine. PBPK simulations applied to compound A showed substantial loss of the compound in the gastrointestinal tract in humans but not in rats. This accounted for the lower bioavailability of the

  1. A pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model capturing the time course of torasemide-induced diuresis in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulin, A; Schneider, M; Dron, F; Woehrlé, F

    2016-12-01

    A pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modelling approach was used to determine a dosage regimen which maximizes diuretic efficiency of torasemide in dogs. Kinetic profiles of plasma concentration, torasemide excretion rate in urine (TERU) and diuresis were investigated in 10 dogs after single oral administrations at 3 dose levels, 0.2, 0.8 and 1.6 mg/kg, and an intravenous injection of 0.2 mg/kg. Endogenous regulation was evidenced by a proteresis loop between TERU and diuresis. To describe the diuresis-time profile, TERU served as input into a turnover model with inhibition of loss of response, extended by a moderator acting on both loss and production of response. Estimated maximum inhibition of loss of response, I max , was 0.984 showing that torasemide is an efficacious diuretic able to suppress almost total water reabsorption. A TERU 50, value producing half of I max , of 1.45 μg/kg/h was estimated from the model. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters were used to simulate the torasemide dose-effect relationship after oral administration. Model predictions were in good agreement with diuresis measured in a validation study conducted in 10 dogs, which were administered oral doses of 0.15, 0.4, 0.75, 1.5 and 4.5 mg/kg for 5 days. Finally, oral dose associated with the highest daily diuretic efficiency was predicted to be 0.1 mg/kg. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Isoniazid Pharmacokinetics-Pharmacodynamics in an Aerosol Infection Model of Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaram, Ramesh; Shandil, Radha. K.; Gaonkar, Sheshagiri; Kaur, Parvinder; Suresh, B. L.; Mahesh, B. N.; Jayashree, R.; Nandi, Vrinda; Bharath, Sowmya; Kantharaj, E.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2004-01-01

    Limited data exist on the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) parameters of the bactericidal activities of the available antimycobacterial drugs. We report on the PK-PD relationships for isoniazid. Isoniazid exhibited concentration (C)-dependent killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv in vitro, with a maximum reduction of 4 log10 CFU/ml. In these studies, 50% of the maximum effect was achieved at a C/MIC ratio of 0.5, and the maximum effect did not increase with exposure times of up to 21 days. Conversely, isoniazid produced less than a 0.5-log10 CFU/ml reduction in two different intracellular infection models (J774A.1 murine macrophages and whole human blood). In a murine model of aerosol infection, isoniazid therapy for 6 days produced a reduction of 1.4 log10 CFU/lung. Dose fractionation studies demonstrated that the 24-h area under the concentration-time curve/MIC (r2 = 0.83) correlated best with the bactericidal efficacy, followed by the maximum concentration of drug in serum/MIC (r2 = 0.73). PMID:15273105

  3. An Age-Dependent Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model for the Organophosphorus Insecticide Chlorpyrifos in the Preweanling Rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timchalk, Chuck; Kousba, Ahmed A.; Poet, Torka S.

    2007-08-01

    Juvenile rats are more susceptible than adults to the acute toxicity of organophosphorus insecticides like chlorpyrifos (CPF). Age- and dose-dependent differences in metabolism may be responsible. Of importance is CYP450 activation and detoxification of CPF to chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPF-oxon) and trichloropyridinol (TCP), as well as B-esterase (cholinesterase; ChE) and A-esterase (PON-1) detoxification of CPF-oxon to TCP. In the current study, a modified physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model incorporating age-dependent changes in CYP450, PON-1, and tissue ChE levels for rats was developed. In this model, age was used as a dependent function to estimate body weight which was then used to allometrically scale both metabolism and tissue ChE levels. Model simulations suggest that preweanling rats are particularly sensitive to CPF toxicity, with levels of CPF-oxon in blood and brain disproportionately increasing, relative to the response in adult rats. This age-dependent non-linear increase in CPF-oxon concentration may potentially result from the depletion of non-target B-esterases, and a lower PON-1 metabolic capacity in younger animals. These results indicate that the PBPK/PD model behaves consistently with the general understanding of CPF toxicity, pharmacokinetics and tissue ChE inhibition in neonatal and adult rats. Hence, this model represents an important starting point for developing a computational model to assess the neurotoxic potential of environmentally relevant organophosphate exposures in infants and children.

  4. Prediction of a Therapeutic Dose for Buagafuran, a Potent Anxiolytic Agent by Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling Starting from Pharmacokinetics in Rats and Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Yang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK/pharmacodynamic (PD models can contribute to animal-to-human extrapolation and therapeutic dose predictions. Buagafuran is a novel anxiolytic agent and phase I clinical trials of buagafuran have been completed. In this paper, a potentially effective dose for buagafuran of 30 mg t.i.d. in human was estimated based on the human brain concentration predicted by a PBPK/PD modeling. The software GastroPlusTM was used to build the PBPK/PD model for buagafuran in rat which related the brain tissue concentrations of buagafuran and the times of animals entering the open arms in the pharmacological model of elevated plus-maze. Buagafuran concentrations in human plasma were fitted and brain tissue concentrations were predicted by using a human PBPK model in which the predicted plasma profiles were in good agreement with observations. The results provided supportive data for the rational use of buagafuran in clinic.

  5. Pharmacokinetic study of gallocatechin-7-gallate from Pithecellobium clypearia Benth. in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacokinetic profile of gallocatechin-7-gallate (J10688 was studied in rats after intravenous administration. Male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD rats received 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg (i.v. of J10688 and plasma drug concentrations were determined by a high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC–MS method. The pharmacokinetic software Data Analysis System (Version 3.0 was used to calculate the pharmacokinetic parameters. For different i.v. doses of J10688, the mean peak plasma concentration (C0 values ranged from 11.26 to 50.82 mg/L, and mean area under the concentration-time curve (AUC0–t values ranged from 1.75 to 11.80 (mg·h/L. J10688 lacked dose-dependent pharmacokinetic properties within doses between 1 and 10 mg/kg, based on the power model. The method developed in this study was sensitive, precise, and stable. The pharmacokinetic properties of J10688 in SD rats were shown to have rapid distribution and clearance values. These pharmacokinetic results may contribute to an improved understanding of the pharmacological actions of J10688.

  6. Effect of feeding on the pharmacokinetics of oral minocycline in healthy research dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnot, Melanie L; Cole, Lynette K; Lorch, Gwendolen; Rajala-Schultz, Paivi J; Papich, Mark G

    2015-12-01

    The effect of food on minocycline oral absorption in dogs is unknown. The objective was to determine the pharmacokinetics of minocycline after administration of a single oral dose in fed and fasted dogs. Ten research hounds were administered oral minocycline (approximately 5 mg/kg) with and without food, in a crossover study, with a one-week wash-out between treatments. Blood samples were collected immediately prior to minocycline administration and over 24 h. Minocycline plasma drug concentrations were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography using ultraviolet detection and were analysed with compartmental modelling to determine primary pharmacokinetic parameters. Each dog was analysed independently, followed by calculation of means and variation of the dogs. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test [analysing secondary pharmacokinetic parameters - peak concentration (CMAX ), area under the concentration versus time curve (AUC)] was used to compare the two groups. A population pharmacokinetic modelling approach was performed using nonlinear mixed effects modelling of primary parameters for the population as fixed effects and the difference between subjects as a random effect. Covariate analysis was used to identify the source of variability in the population. No significant difference was found between treatments for AUC (P = 0.0645), although AUC was higher in fasted dogs. A significant difference was found for CMAX (P = 0.0059), with fasted dogs attaining a higher CMAX . The covariate of fed versus fasted accounted for a significant variation in the pharmacokinetics. Because feeding was a significant source of variation for the population's primary pharmacokinetic parameters and fasted dogs had higher minocycline concentrations, we recommend administering minocycline without food. © 2015 ESVD and ACVD.

  7. Mixed Effects Modeling Using Stochastic Differential Equations: Illustrated by Pharmacokinetic Data of Nicotinic Acid in Obese Zucker Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leander, Jacob; Almquist, Joachim; Ahlström, Christine; Gabrielsson, Johan; Jirstrand, Mats

    2015-05-01

    Inclusion of stochastic differential equations in mixed effects models provides means to quantify and distinguish three sources of variability in data. In addition to the two commonly encountered sources, measurement error and interindividual variability, we also consider uncertainty in the dynamical model itself. To this end, we extend the ordinary differential equation setting used in nonlinear mixed effects models to include stochastic differential equations. The approximate population likelihood is derived using the first-order conditional estimation with interaction method and extended Kalman filtering. To illustrate the application of the stochastic differential mixed effects model, two pharmacokinetic models are considered. First, we use a stochastic one-compartmental model with first-order input and nonlinear elimination to generate synthetic data in a simulated study. We show that by using the proposed method, the three sources of variability can be successfully separated. If the stochastic part is neglected, the parameter estimates become biased, and the measurement error variance is significantly overestimated. Second, we consider an extension to a stochastic pharmacokinetic model in a preclinical study of nicotinic acid kinetics in obese Zucker rats. The parameter estimates are compared between a deterministic and a stochastic NiAc disposition model, respectively. Discrepancies between model predictions and observations, previously described as measurement noise only, are now separated into a comparatively lower level of measurement noise and a significant uncertainty in model dynamics. These examples demonstrate that stochastic differential mixed effects models are useful tools for identifying incomplete or inaccurate model dynamics and for reducing potential bias in parameter estimates due to such model deficiencies.

  8. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic guided trial design in oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kesteren, Ch; Mathôt, R. A. A.; Beijnen, J. H.; Schellens, J. H. M.

    2003-01-01

    The application of pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) modeling in drug development has emerged during the past decades and it is has been suggested that the investigation of PK-PD relationships during drug development may facilitate and optimize the design of subsequent clinical

  9. A simple spatiotemporal chaotic Lotka-Volterra model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprott, J.C.; Wildenberg, J.C.; Azizi, Yousef

    2005-01-01

    A mathematically simple example of a high-dimensional (many-species) Lotka-Volterra model that exhibits spatiotemporal chaos in one spatial dimension is described. The model consists of a closed ring of identical agents, each competing for fixed finite resources with two of its four nearest neighbors. The model is prototypical of more complicated models in its quasiperiodic route to chaos (including attracting 3-tori), bifurcations, spontaneous symmetry breaking, and spatial pattern formation

  10. A new approach to the compartmental analysis in pharmacokinetics: fractional time evolution of diclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Jovan K; Atanacković, Milica T; Pilipović, Ana S; Rapaić, Milan R; Pilipović, Stevan; Atanacković, Teodor M

    2010-04-01

    This study presents a new two compartmental model and its application to the evaluation of diclofenac pharmacokinetics in a small number of healthy adults, during a bioequivalence trial. In the model the integer order derivatives are replaced by derivatives of real order often called fractional order derivatives. Physically that means that a history (memory) of a biological process, realized as a transfer from one compartment to another one with the mass balance conservation, is taken into account. This kind of investigations in pharmacokinetics is founded by Dokoumetzidis and Macheras through the one compartmental models while our contribution is the analysis of multi-dimensional compartmental models with the applications of the two compartmental model in evaluation of diclofenac pharmacokinetics. Two experiments were preformed with 12 healthy volunteers with two slow release 100 mg diclofenac tablet formulations. The agreement of the values predicted by the proposed model with the values obtained through experiments is shown to be good. Thus, pharmacokinetics of slow release diclofenac can be described well by a specific two compartmental model with fractional derivatives of the same order. Parameters in the model are determined by the least-squares method and the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) numerical procedure is used. The results show that the fractional order two compartmental model for diclofenac is superior in comparison to the classical two compartmental model. Actually this is true in general case since the classical one is a special case of the fractional one.

  11. Population pharmacokinetics of dihydroartemisinin and piperaquine in pregnant and nonpregnant women with uncomplicated malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarning, Joel; Rijken, Marcus J; McGready, Rose; Phyo, Aung Pyae; Hanpithakpong, Warunee; Day, Nicholas P J; White, Nicholas J; Nosten, François; Lindegardh, Niklas

    2012-04-01

    Pregnant women are particularly vulnerable to malaria. The pharmacokinetic properties of antimalarial drugs are often affected by pregnancy, resulting in lower drug concentrations and a consequently higher risk of treatment failure. The objective of this study was to evaluate the population pharmacokinetic properties of piperaquine and dihydroartemisinin in pregnant and nonpregnant women with uncomplicated malaria. Twenty-four pregnant and 24 matched nonpregnant women on the Thai-Myanmar boarder were treated with a standard fixed oral 3-day treatment, and venous plasma concentrations of both drugs were measured frequently for pharmacokinetic evaluation. Population pharmacokinetics were evaluated with nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. The main pharmacokinetic finding was an unaltered total exposure to piperaquine but reduced exposure to dihydroartemisinin in pregnant compared to nonpregnant women with uncomplicated malaria. Piperaquine was best described by a three-compartment disposition model with a 45% higher elimination clearance and a 47% increase in relative bioavailability in pregnant women compared with nonpregnant women. The resulting net effect of pregnancy was an unaltered total exposure to piperaquine but a shorter terminal elimination half-life. Dihydroartemisinin was best described by a one-compartment disposition model with a 38% lower relative bioavailability in pregnant women than nonpregnant women. The resulting net effect of pregnancy was a decreased total exposure to dihydroartemisinin. The shorter terminal elimination half-life of piperaquine and lower exposure to dihydroartemisinin will shorten the posttreatment prophylactic effect and might affect cure rates. The clinical impact of these pharmacokinetic findings in pregnant women with uncomplicated malaria needs to be evaluated in larger series.

  12. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolder, Patrick C; Schmid, Yasmin; Steuer, Andrea E; Kraemer, Thomas; Rentsch, Katharina M; Hammann, Felix; Liechti, Matthias E

    2017-10-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is used recreationally and in clinical research. The aim of the present study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics and exposure-response relationship of oral LSD. We analyzed pharmacokinetic data from two published placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over studies using oral administration of LSD 100 and 200 µg in 24 and 16 subjects, respectively. The pharmacokinetics of the 100-µg dose is shown for the first time and data for the 200-µg dose were reanalyzed and included. Plasma concentrations of LSD, subjective effects, and vital signs were repeatedly assessed. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using compartmental modeling. Concentration-effect relationships were described using pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling. Geometric mean (95% confidence interval) maximum plasma concentration values of 1.3 (1.2-1.9) and 3.1 (2.6-4.0) ng/mL were reached 1.4 and 1.5 h after administration of 100 and 200 µg LSD, respectively. The plasma half-life was 2.6 h (2.2-3.4 h). The subjective effects lasted (mean ± standard deviation) 8.2 ± 2.1 and 11.6 ± 1.7 h for the 100- and 200-µg LSD doses, respectively. Subjective peak effects were reached 2.8 and 2.5 h after administration of LSD 100 and 200 µg, respectively. A close relationship was observed between the LSD concentration and subjective response within subjects, with moderate counterclockwise hysteresis. Half-maximal effective concentration values were in the range of 1 ng/mL. No correlations were found between plasma LSD concentrations and the effects of LSD across subjects at or near maximum plasma concentration and within dose groups. The present pharmacokinetic data are important for the evaluation of clinical study findings (e.g., functional magnetic resonance imaging studies) and the interpretation of LSD intoxication. Oral LSD presented dose-proportional pharmacokinetics and first-order elimination up to 12 h. The effects of LSD were related

  13. The use of in vitro metabolic parameters and physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to explore the risk assessment of trichloroethylene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hissink, E.M.; Bogaards, J.J.P.; Freidig, A.P.; Commandeur, J.N.M.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.; Bladeren, P.J. van

    2002-01-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model has been developed for trichloroethylene (1,1,2-trichloroethene, TRI) for rat and humans, based on in vitro metabolic parameters. These were obtained using individual cytochrome P450 and glutathione S-transferase enzymes. The main enzymes involved

  14. USE OF SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS ON A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR CHLOROFORM IN RATS TO DETERMINE AGE-RELATED TOXICITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    USE OF SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS ON A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR CHLOROFORM IN RATS TO DETERMINE AGE-RELATED TOXICITY.CR Eklund, MV Evans, and JE Simmons. US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, ETD,PKB, Research Triangle Park, NC. Chloroform (CHCl3) is a disinfec...

  15. Single-cell and subcellular pharmacokinetic imaging allows insight into drug action in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Greg M; Yang, Katy S; Reiner, Thomas; Kohler, Rainer H; Sorger, Peter; Mitchison, Tim; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic analysis at the organ level provides insight into how drugs distribute throughout the body, but cannot explain how drugs work at the cellular level. Here we demonstrate in vivo single-cell pharmacokinetic imaging of PARP-1 inhibitors and model drug behaviour under varying conditions. We visualize intracellular kinetics of the PARP-1 inhibitor distribution in real time, showing that PARP-1 inhibitors reach their cellular target compartment, the nucleus, within minutes in vivo both in cancer and normal cells in various cancer models. We also use these data to validate predictive finite element modelling. Our theoretical and experimental data indicate that tumour cells are exposed to sufficiently high PARP-1 inhibitor concentrations in vivo and suggest that drug inefficiency is likely related to proteomic heterogeneity or insensitivity of cancer cells to DNA-repair inhibition. This suggests that single-cell pharmacokinetic imaging and derived modelling improve our understanding of drug action at single-cell resolution in vivo.

  16. Forecasting gastrointestinal precipitation and oral pharmacokinetics of dantrolene in dogs using an in vitro precipitation testing coupled with in silico modeling and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambayashi, Atsushi; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the current research was to determine the precipitation kinetics of dantrolene sodium using canine biorelevant in vitro testing and to model the precipitation kinetics by appropriately coupling the data with an in silico tool adapted for dogs. The precipitation profiles of dantrolene sodium solutions were obtained with the in vitro paddle apparatus at a revolution rate of 50rpm. The in silico prediction tool was designed using STELLA software and the predicted plasma concentration profiles of dantrolene using the in vitro precipitation data were compared with the observed in vivo pharmacokinetics in beagle dogs. The plasma profiles of dantrolene, which served as a model weakly acidic drug which precipitates in the upper gastrointestinal tract, was successfully predicted using the in vitro precipitation testing coupled with the in silico modeling and simulation approach. The approach was subsequently used to forecast the effect of pharmaceutical excipients (HPMC/PG) on the ability of the drug to supersaturate in the gut and the resulting pharmacokinetics. The agreement of the simulated pharmacokinetics with the observed values confirms the ability of canine biorelevant media to predict oral performance of enhanced dosage forms in dogs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Towards a Simple Constitutive Model for Bread Dough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Roger I.

    2008-07-01

    Wheat flour dough is an example of a soft solid material consisting of a gluten (rubbery) network with starch particles as a filler. The volume fraction of the starch filler is high-typically 60%. A computer-friendly constitutive model has been lacking for this type of material and here we report on progress towards finding such a model. The model must describe the response to small strains, simple shearing starting from rest, simple elongation, biaxial straining, recoil and various other transient flows. A viscoelastic Lodge-type model involving a damage function. which depends on strain from an initial reference state fits the given data well, and it is also able to predict the thickness at exit from dough sheeting, which has been a long-standing unsolved puzzle. The model also shows an apparent rate-dependent yield stress, although no explicit yield stress is built into the model. This behaviour agrees with the early (1934) observations of Schofield and Scott Blair on dough recoil after unloading.

  18. An alternate metabolic hypothesis for a binary mixture of trichloroethylene and carbon tetrachloride: application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon tetrachloride (CC4) and trichloroethylene (TCE) are hepatotoxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and environmental contaminants. Previous physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models describe the kinetics ofindividual chemical disposition and metabolic clearance fo...

  19. A simple model for skewed species-lifetime distributions

    KAUST Repository

    Murase, Yohsuke; Shimada, Takashi; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2010-01-01

    A simple model of a biological community assembly is studied. Communities are assembled by successive migrations and extinctions of species. In the model, species are interacting with each other. The intensity of the interaction between each pair

  20. Target and Tissue Selectivity Prediction by Integrated Mechanistic Pharmacokinetic-Target Binding and Quantitative Structure Activity Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlot, Anna H C; de Witte, Wilhelmus E A; Danhof, Meindert; van der Graaf, Piet H; van Westen, Gerard J P; de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2017-12-04

    Selectivity is an important attribute of effective and safe drugs, and prediction of in vivo target and tissue selectivity would likely improve drug development success rates. However, a lack of understanding of the underlying (pharmacological) mechanisms and availability of directly applicable predictive methods complicates the prediction of selectivity. We explore the value of combining physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling with quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling to predict the influence of the target dissociation constant (K D ) and the target dissociation rate constant on target and tissue selectivity. The K D values of CB1 ligands in the ChEMBL database are predicted by QSAR random forest (RF) modeling for the CB1 receptor and known off-targets (TRPV1, mGlu5, 5-HT1a). Of these CB1 ligands, rimonabant, CP-55940, and Δ 8 -tetrahydrocanabinol, one of the active ingredients of cannabis, were selected for simulations of target occupancy for CB1, TRPV1, mGlu5, and 5-HT1a in three brain regions, to illustrate the principles of the combined PBPK-QSAR modeling. Our combined PBPK and target binding modeling demonstrated that the optimal values of the K D and k off for target and tissue selectivity were dependent on target concentration and tissue distribution kinetics. Interestingly, if the target concentration is high and the perfusion of the target site is low, the optimal K D value is often not the lowest K D value, suggesting that optimization towards high drug-target affinity can decrease the benefit-risk ratio. The presented integrative structure-pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling provides an improved understanding of tissue and target selectivity.

  1. A supermolecular curcumin for enhanced antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities: molecular characteristics, computer modeling and in vivo pharmacokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Qunyou; Wu Jianyong; Li Yi; Zhang Jingqing; Mei Hu; Zhao Chunjing

    2013-01-01

    The supermolecular curcumin (SMCCM) exhibiting remarkably improved solubility and release characteristics was fabricated to increase the oral bioavailability in rat as well as the antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities of curcumin (CCM) against human lung adenocarcinoma cell A549. SMCCM was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, morphology and structure, aqueous solubility, and release behavior in vitro. Computer modeling of the supermolecular structure was performed. The pharmacokinetics, antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities of SMCCM were evaluated. The mechanisms by which SMCCM inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis were identified. The formation of SMCCM was testified and the supermolecular structure was studied by a computer modeling technique. Compared to free CCM, SMCCM with much higher aqueous solubility exhibited obviously enhanced release and more favorable pharmacokinetic profiles, and, furthermore, SMCCM showed higher anticancer efficacy, enhanced induction of G2/M-phase arrest and apoptosis in A549 cells, which might be involved with the increases in reactive oxygen species production and intracellular Ca 2+ accumulation, and a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. SMCCM remarkably enhanced not only the oral bioavailability but also the antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities of CCM along with improved solubility and release characteristics of CCM. (paper)

  2. A supermolecular curcumin for enhanced antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities: molecular characteristics, computer modeling and in vivo pharmacokinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qunyou; Wu, Jianyong; Li, Yi; Mei, Hu; Zhao, Chunjing; Zhang, Jingqing

    2013-01-01

    The supermolecular curcumin (SMCCM) exhibiting remarkably improved solubility and release characteristics was fabricated to increase the oral bioavailability in rat as well as the antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities of curcumin (CCM) against human lung adenocarcinoma cell A549. SMCCM was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, morphology and structure, aqueous solubility, and release behavior in vitro. Computer modeling of the supermolecular structure was performed. The pharmacokinetics, antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities of SMCCM were evaluated. The mechanisms by which SMCCM inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis were identified. The formation of SMCCM was testified and the supermolecular structure was studied by a computer modeling technique. Compared to free CCM, SMCCM with much higher aqueous solubility exhibited obviously enhanced release and more favorable pharmacokinetic profiles, and, furthermore, SMCCM showed higher anticancer efficacy, enhanced induction of G2/M-phase arrest and apoptosis in A549 cells, which might be involved with the increases in reactive oxygen species production and intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, and a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. SMCCM remarkably enhanced not only the oral bioavailability but also the antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities of CCM along with improved solubility and release characteristics of CCM.

  3. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of SCT800, a new recombinant FVIII, in hemophilia A mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ruo-lan; Liu, Liang; Xie, Liang-zhi; Gai, Wen-lin; Cao, Si-shuo; Meng, Zhi-yun; Gan, Hui; Wu, Zhuo-na; Li, Jian; Zheng, Ying; Zhu, Xiao-xia; Dou, Gui-fang

    2016-01-01

    Aim: SCT800 is a new third-generation recombinant FVIII agent that is undergoing promising preclinical study. This study aimed to investigate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of SCT800 in hemophilia A mice. Methods: After hemophilia A mice were intravenously injected with single dose of SCT800 (80, 180, and 280 IU/kg) or the commercially available product Xyntha (280 IU/kg), pharmacokinetics profiles were evaluated based on measuring plasma FVIII: C. For pharmacodynamics study, dose-response curves of SCT800 and Xyntha (1–200 IU/kg) were constructed using a tail bleeding model monitoring both bleeding time and blood loss. Results: Pharmacokinetics profile analysis showed a dose independency of SCT800 ranging from 80 to 280 IU/kg and comparable pharmacokinetic profiles between SCT800 and Xyntha at the doses tested. Pharmacodynamics study revealed comparable ED50 values of SCT800 and Xyntha in the tail bleeding model: 14.78 and 15.81 IU/kg for bleeding time, respectively; 13.50 and 13.58 IU/kg for blood loss, respectively. Moreover, at the doses tested, the accompanying dose-related safety evaluation in the tail bleeding model showed lower hypercoagulable tendency and wider dosage range potential for SCT800 than Xyntha. Conclusion: In hemophilia A mice, SCT800 shows comparable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics to Xyntha at the doses tested, and possibly with better safety properties. PMID:26806305

  4. Population pharmacokinetics of tamsulosin hydrochloride in paediatric patients with neuropathic and non-neuropathic bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Yasuhiro; Tatami, Shinji; Yamamura, Norio; Tadayasu, Yusuke; Sarashina, Akiko; Liesenfeld, Karl-Heinz; Staab, Alexander; Schäfer, Hans-Günter; Ieiri, Ichiro; Higuchi, Shun

    2010-01-01

    AIMS The main objective of this study was to characterize the population pharmacokinetics of tamsulosin hydrochloride (HCl) in paediatric patients with neuropathic and non-neuropathic bladder. A secondary objective was to compare the pharmacokinetics in paediatric patients and adults. METHODS Tamsulosin HCl plasma concentrations in 1082 plasma samples from 189 paediatric patients (age range 2–16 years) were analyzed with NONMEM, applying a one compartment model with first-order absorption. Based on the principles of allometry, body weight was incorporated in the base model, along with fixed allometric exponents. Covariate analysis was performed by means of a stepwise forward inclusion and backward elimination procedure. Simulations based on the final model were used to compare the pharmacokinetics with those in adults. RESULTS Beside the priori-implemented body weight, only α1-acid glycoprotein had an effect on both apparent clearance and apparent volume of distribution. No other investigated covariates, including gender, age, race, patient population and concomitant therapy with anti-cholinergics, significantly affected the pharmacokinetics of tamsulosin HCl (P tamsulosin HCl in paediatric patients was established and it described the data well. There was no major difference in the pharmacokinetics of tamsulosin HCl between paediatric patients (age range 2–16 years) and adults when the effect of body weight was taken into consideration. PMID:20642551

  5. Development of a mechanism-based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model to characterize the thermoregulatory effects of serotonergic drugs in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Ling Jiang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We have shown recently that concurrent harmaline, a monoamine oxidase-A inhibitor (MAOI, potentiates serotonin (5-HT receptor agonist 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT-induced hyperthermia. The objective of this study was to develop an integrated pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD model to characterize and predict the thermoregulatory effects of such serotonergic drugs in mice. Physiological thermoregulation was described by a mechanism-based indirect-response model with adaptive feedback control. Harmaline-induced hypothermia and 5-MeO-DMT–elicited hyperthermia were attributable to the loss of heat through the activation of 5-HT1A receptor and thermogenesis via the stimulation of 5-HT2A receptor, respectively. Thus serotonergic 5-MeO-DMT–induced hyperthermia was readily distinguished from handling/injection stress-provoked hyperthermic effects. This PK/PD model was able to simultaneously describe all experimental data including the impact of drug-metabolizing enzyme status on 5-MeO-DMT and harmaline PK properties, and drug- and stress-induced simple hypo/hyperthermic and complex biphasic effects. Furthermore, the modeling results revealed a 4-fold decrease of apparent SC50 value (1.88–0.496 µmol/L for 5-MeO-DMT when harmaline was co-administered, providing a quantitative assessment for the impact of concurrent MAOI harmaline on 5-MeO-DMT–induced hyperthermia. In addition, the hyperpyrexia caused by toxic dose combinations of harmaline and 5-MeO-DMT were linked to the increased systemic exposure to harmaline rather than 5-MeO-DMT, although the body temperature profiles were mispredicted by the model. The results indicate that current PK/PD model may be used as a new conceptual framework to define the impact of serotonergic agents and stress factors on thermoregulation.

  6. A 6-month mixed-effect pharmacokinetic model for post-transplant intravenous anti-hepatitis B immunoglobulin prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han S

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Seunghoon Han,1,2 Gun Hyung Na,3 Dong-Goo Kim3 1Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seocho-gu, Seoul, South Korea; 2Pharmacometrics Institute for Practical Education and Training, The Catholic University of Korea, Seocho-gu, Seoul, South Korea; 3Department of Surgery, Seoul St Mary’s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seocho-gu, Seoul, South Korea Background: Although individualized dosage regimens for anti-hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG therapy have been suggested, the pharmacokinetic profile and factors influencing the basis for individualization have not been sufficiently assessed. We sought to evaluate the pharmacokinetic characteristics of anti-HBIG quantitatively during the first 6 months after liver transplantation. Methods: Identical doses of 10,000 IU HBIG were administered to adult liver transplant recipients daily during the first week, weekly thereafter until 28 postoperative days, and monthly thereafter. Blood samples were obtained at days 1, 7, 28, 84, and 168 after transplantation. Plasma HBIG titer was quantified using 4 different immunoassay methods. The titer determined by each analytical method was used for mixed-effect modeling, and the most precise results were chosen. Simulations were performed to predict the plausible immunoglobulin maintenance dose. Results: HBIG was eliminated from the body most rapidly in the immediate post-transplant period, and the elimination rate gradually decreased thereafter. In the early post-transplant period, patients with higher DNA titer tend to have lower plasma HBIG concentrations. The maintenance doses required to attain targets in 90%, 95%, and 99% of patients were ~15.3, 18.2, and 25.1 IU, respectively, multiplied by the target trough level (in IU/L. Conclusion: The variability (explained and unexplained in HBIG pharmacokinetics was relatively larger in the early post-transplant period. Dose individualization based upon

  7. Application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in predicting drug–drug interactions for sarpogrelate hydrochloride in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min JS

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Jee Sun Min,1 Doyun Kim,1 Jung Bae Park,1 Hyunjin Heo,1 Soo Hyeon Bae,2 Jae Hong Seo,1 Euichaul Oh,1 Soo Kyung Bae1 1Integrated Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon, 2Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seocho-gu, Seoul, South Korea Background: Evaluating the potential risk of metabolic drug–drug interactions (DDIs is clinically important. Objective: To develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK model for sarpogrelate hydrochloride and its active metabolite, (R,S-1-{2-[2-(3-methoxyphenylethyl]-phenoxy}-3-(dimethylamino-2-propanol (M-1, in order to predict DDIs between sarpogrelate and the clinically relevant cytochrome P450 (CYP 2D6 substrates, metoprolol, desipramine, dextromethorphan, imipramine, and tolterodine. Methods: The PBPK model was developed, incorporating the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of sarpogrelate hydrochloride, and M-1 based on the findings from in vitro and in vivo studies. Subsequently, the model was verified by comparing the predicted concentration-time profiles and pharmacokinetic parameters of sarpogrelate and M-1 to the observed clinical data. Finally, the verified model was used to simulate clinical DDIs between sarpogrelate hydrochloride and sensitive CYP2D6 substrates. The predictive performance of the model was assessed by comparing predicted results to observed data after coadministering sarpogrelate hydrochloride and metoprolol. Results: The developed PBPK model accurately predicted sarpogrelate and M-1 plasma concentration profiles after single or multiple doses of sarpogrelate hydrochloride. The simulated ratios of area under the curve and maximum plasma concentration of metoprolol in the presence of sarpogrelate hydrochloride to baseline were in good agreement with the observed ratios. The predicted fold-increases in the area under the curve ratios of metoprolol

  8. SimpleBox 4.0: Improving the model while keeping it simple….

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, Anne; Schoorl, Marian; van de Meent, Dik

    2016-04-01

    Chemical behavior in the environment is often modeled with multimedia fate models. SimpleBox is one often-used multimedia fate model, firstly developed in 1986. Since then, two updated versions were published. Based on recent scientific developments and experience with SimpleBox 3.0, a new version of SimpleBox was developed and is made public here: SimpleBox 4.0. In this new model, eight major changes were implemented: removal of the local scale and vegetation compartments, addition of lake compartments and deep ocean compartments (including the thermohaline circulation), implementation of intermittent rain instead of drizzle and of depth dependent soil concentrations, adjustment of the partitioning behavior for organic acids and bases as well as of the value for enthalpy of vaporization. In this paper, the effects of the model changes in SimpleBox 4.0 on the predicted steady-state concentrations of chemical substances were explored for different substance groups (neutral organic substances, acids, bases, metals) in a standard emission scenario. In general, the largest differences between the predicted concentrations in the new and the old model are caused by the implementation of layered ocean compartments. Undesirable high model complexity caused by vegetation compartments and a local scale were removed to enlarge the simplicity and user friendliness of the model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Population pharmacokinetics and dosing regimen design of milrinone in preterm infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisis, Mary; Jiang, Xuemin; McLachlan, Andrew J; Evans, Nick; Kluckow, Martin; Osborn, David

    2007-01-01

    Aims To define the pharmacokinetics of milrinone in very preterm infants and determine an optimal dose regimen to prevent low systemic blood flow in the first 12 h after birth. Methods A prospective open‐labelled, dose‐escalation pharmacokinetic study was undertaken in two stages. In stage one, infants received milrinone at 0.25 μg/kg/min (n = 8) and 0.5 μg/kg/min (n = 11) infused from 3 to 24 h of age. Infants contributed 4–5 blood samples for concentration–time data which were analysed using a population modelling approach. A simulation study was used to explore the optimal dosing regimen to achieve target milrinone concentrations (180–300 ng/ml). This milrinone regimen was evaluated in stage two (n = 10). Results Infants (n = 29) born before 29 weeks gestation were enrolled. Milrinone pharmacokinetics were described using a one‐compartment model with first‐order elimination rate, with a population mean clearance (CV%) of 35 ml/h (24%) and volume of distribution of 512 ml (21%) and estimated half‐life of 10 h. The 0.25 and 0.5 μg/kg/min dosage regimens did not achieve optimal milrinone concentration‐time profiles to prevent early low systemic blood flow. Simulation studies predicted a loading infusion (0.75 μg/kg/min for 3 h) followed by maintenance infusion (0.2 μg/kg/min until 18 h of age) would provide an optimal milrinone concentration profile. This was confirmed in stage two of the study. Conclusion Population pharmacokinetic modelling in the preterm infant has established an optimal dose regimen for milrinone that increases the likelihood of achieving therapeutic aims and highlights the importance of pharmacokinetic studies in neonatal clinical pharmacology. PMID:16690639

  10. Prediction of interindividual variation in drug plasma levels in vivo from individual enzyme kinetic data and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaards, J.J.P.; Hissink, E.M.; Briggs, M.; Weaver, R.; Jochemsen, R.; Jackson, P.; Bertrand, M.; Bladeren, P. van

    2000-01-01

    A strategy is presented to predict interindividual variation in drug plasma levels in vivo by the use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling and human in vitro metabolic parameters, obtained through the combined use of microsomes containing single cytochrome P450 enzymes and a human liver

  11. Population pharmacokinetic modeling of glibenclamide in poorly controlled South African type 2 diabetic subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rambiritch V

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Virendra Rambiritch,1 Poobalan Naidoo,2 Breminand Maharaj,1 Goonaseelan Pillai3 1University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, 2Department of Internal Medicine, RK Khan Regional Hospital, Chatsworth, South Africa; 3Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland Aim: The aim of this study was to describe the pharmacokinetics (PK of glibenclamide in poorly controlled South African type 2 diabetic subjects using noncompartmental and model-based methods. Methods: A total of 24 subjects with type 2 diabetes were administered increasing doses (0 mg/d, 2.5 mg/d, 5 mg/d, 10 mg/d, and 20 mg/d of glibenclamide daily at 2-week intervals. Plasma glibenclamide, glucose, and insulin determinations were performed. Blood sampling times were 0 minute, 30 minutes, 60 minutes, 90 minutes, and 120 minutes (post breakfast sampling and 240 minutes, 270 minutes, 300 minutes, 330 minutes, 360 minutes, and 420 minutes (post lunch sampling on days 14, 28, 42, 56, and 70 for doses of 0 mg, 2.5 mg, 5.0 mg, 10 mg, and 20 mg, respectively. Blood sampling was performed after the steady state was reached.  A total of 24 individuals in the data set contributed to a total of 841 observation records. The PK was analyzed using noncompartmental analysis methods, which were implemented in WinNonLin®, and population PK analysis using NONMEM®. Glibenclamide concentration data were log transformed prior to fitting. Results: A two-compartmental disposition model was selected after evaluating one-, two-, and three-compartmental models to describe the time course of glibenclamide plasma concentration data. The one-compartment model adequately described the data; however, the two-compartment model provided a better fit. The three-compartment model failed to achieve successful convergence. A more complex model, to account for enterohepatic recirculation that was observed in the data, was unsuccessful. Conclusion: In South African diabetic subjects, glibenclamide demonstrates linear PK and was best

  12. Pharmacokinetics of labelled compounds with technetium-99m and samarium-153

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borda O, L.B.; Torres L, M.N.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to establish the different pharmacokinetics parameters of the main radiopharmaceuticals labeled with technetium-99m and samarium-153. These parameters could be subsequently used as reference to compare other products with the same use. Mathematical models and a computerized pharmacokinetic program were used to this purpose. A biodistribution study in quadruplicate and/or quintuplicate was conducted for each radiopharmaceutical, data was was obtained in injection dose percentages. The biodistribution study involved the injection of a predetermined dose of the radiopharmaceutical into animals (rats or mice), which were subsequently put away at different time intervals, removing the relevant organs. Activity in each organ was read by means of a well-type NaI scintillation counter, data obtained in activity counts was transformed into injection dose percentages. Based on these percentages, the mathematical model was constructed and the pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained using the computerized program Expo 2 v. 1, which is written in C language and works in windows. Analyzing the results obtained, we can conclude that the use of the Expo 2 v. 1 program for a bi compartmental analysis allowed us to obtain reliable pharmacokinetic parameters which describe what happens in the organism when the radiopharmaceutical passes from the central compartment to the peripheral one and vice versa

  13. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Modelling of the Analgesic and Antihyperalgesic Effects of Morphine after Intravenous Infusion in Human Volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Foster, David J. R.; Kreilgaard, Mads

    2014-01-01

    Using a modelling approach, this study aimed to (i) examine whether the pharmacodynamics of the analgesic and antihyperalgesic effects of morphine differ; (ii) investigate the influence of demographic, pain sensitivity and genetic (OPRM1) variables on between-subject variability of morphine...... pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in human experimental pain models. The study was a randomized, double-blind, 5-arm, cross-over, placebo-controlled study. The psychophysical cutaneous pain tests, electrical pain tolerance (EPTo) and secondary hyperalgesia areas (2HA) were studied in 28 healthy individuals (15...

  14. Effects of pathological conditions on ocular pharmacokinetics of antimicrobial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Kayoko; Ohtori, Akira; Tojo, Kakuji

    2010-10-01

    A diffusion model of ocular pharmacokinetics was used to estimate the effects of pathological conditions on ocular pharmacokinetics. In vivo rabbit data after topical instillation of ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin were compared with the simulated concentrations in the aqueous and vitreous humors. The barrier capacity of the surrounding membranes such as the retina/choroid/sclera (RCS) membrane and the cornea was characterized by dimensionless Sherwood number derived by the pseudo-steady state approach (PSSA). We assumed the barrier capacity decreased by inflammation; when the barrier capacity of the RCS membrane and the cornea was assumed to be one-tenth for the RCS membrane and a half for the cornea respectively, the in vivo data agreed with the simulated profile without contradiction. The drug concentration gradient simulated in the vitreous body near the RCS membrane was more significant in the inflamed eyes than in the normal eyes, suggesting that the elimination of the drugs from the RCS membrane was enhanced by inflammation. The present diffusion model can better describe the ocular pharmacokinetics in both normal and diseased conditions.

  15. Population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of linezolid-induced thrombocytopenia in hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Yasuhiro; Holford, Nicholas H G; Kasai, Hidefumi; Ogami, Chika; Heo, Young-A; Higashi, Yoshitsugu; Mizoguchi, Akiko; To, Hideto; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro

    2017-08-01

    Thrombocytopenia is among the most important adverse effects of linezolid treatment. Linezolid-induced thrombocytopenia incidence varies considerably but has been associated with impaired renal function. We investigated the pharmacodynamic mechanism (myelosuppression or enhanced platelet destruction) and the role of impaired renal function (RF) in the development of thrombocytopenia. The pharmacokinetics of linezolid were described with a two-compartment distribution model with first-order absorption and elimination. RF was calculated using the expected creatinine clearance. The decrease platelets by linezolid exposure was assumed to occur by one of two mechanisms: inhibition of the formation of platelets (PDI) or stimulation of the elimination (PDS) of platelets. About 50% of elimination was found to be explained by renal clearance (normal RF). The population mean estimated plasma protein binding of linezolid was 18% [95% confidence interval (CI) 16%, 20%] and was independent of the observed concentrations. The estimated mixture model fraction of patients with a platelet count decreased due to PDI was 0.97 (95% CI 0.87, 1.00), so the fraction due to PDS was 0.03. RF had no influence on linezolid pharmacodynamics. We have described the influence of weight, renal function, age and plasma protein binding on the pharmacokinetics of linezolid. This combined pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and turnover model identified that the most common mechanism of thrombocytopenia associated with linezolid is PDI. Impaired RF increases thrombocytopenia by a pharmacokinetic mechanism. The linezolid dose should be reduced in RF. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. A simple model for determining photoelectron-generated radiation scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dipp, T.M.

    1993-12-01

    The generation of radiation via photoelectrons induced off of a conducting surface was explored using a simple model to determine fundamental scaling laws. The model is one-dimensional (small-spot) and uses monoenergetic, nonrelativistic photoelectrons emitted normal to the illuminated conducting surface. Simple steady-state radiation, frequency, and maximum orbital distance equations were derived using small-spot radiation equations, a sin 2 type modulation function, and simple photoelectron dynamics. The result is a system of equations for various scaling laws, which, along with model and user constraints, are simultaneously solved using techniques similar to linear programming. Typical conductors illuminated by low-power sources producing photons with energies less than 5.0 eV are readily modeled by this small-spot, steady-state analysis, which shows they generally produce low efficiency (η rsL -10.5 ) pure photoelectron-induced radiation. However, the small-spot theory predicts that the total conversion efficiency for incident photon power to photoelectron-induced radiated power can go higher than 10 -5.5 for typical real conductors if photons having energies of 15 eV and higher are used, and should go even higher still if the small-spot limit of this theory is exceeded as well. Overall, the simple theory equations, model constraint equations, and solution techniques presented provide a foundation for understanding, predicting, and optimizing the generated radiation, and the simple theory equations provide scaling laws to compare with computational and laboratory experimental data

  17. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Paclitaxel Monotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stage, Tore B; Bergmann, Troels K; Kroetz, Deanna L

    2018-01-01

    Paclitaxel is an anticancer agent efficacious in the treatment of ovarian, breast, and lung cancer. Due to a strong link between the pharmacokinetics and therapeutic efficacy of paclitaxel, we reviewed the literature on paclitaxel pharmacokinetics. Systematic data mining was performed to extract ...

  18. Population pharmacokinetics of caffeine and its metabolites theobromine, paraxanthine and theophylline after inhalation in combination with diacetylmorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandvliet, Anthe S; Huitema, Alwin D R; de Jonge, Milly E; den Hoed, Rob; Sparidans, Rolf W; Hendriks, Vincent M; van den Brink, Wim; van Ree, Jan M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2005-01-01

    The stimulant effect of caffeine, as an additive in diacetylmorphine preparations for study purposes, may interfere with the pharmacodynamic effects of diacetylmorphine. In order to obtain insight into the pharmacology of caffeine after inhalation in heroin users, the pharmacokinetics of caffeine and its dimethylxanthine metabolites were studied. The objectives were to establish the population pharmacokinetics under these exceptional circumstances and to compare the results to published data regarding intravenous and oral administration in healthy volunteers. Diacetylmorphine preparations containing 100 mg of caffeine were used by 10 persons by inhalation. Plasma concentrations of caffeine, theobromine, paraxanthine and theophylline were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Non-linear mixed effects modelling was used to estimate population pharmacokinetic parameters. The model was evaluated by the jack-knife procedure. Caffeine was rapidly and effectively absorbed after inhalation. Population pharmacokinetics of caffeine and its dimethylxanthine metabolites could adequately and simultaneously be described by a linear multi-compartment model. The volume of distribution for the central compartment was estimated to be 45.7 l and the apparent elimination rate constant of caffeine at 8 hr after inhalation was 0.150 hr(-1) for a typical individual. The bioavailability was approximately 60%. The presented model adequately describes the population pharmacokinetics of caffeine and its dimethylxanthine metabolites after inhalation of the caffeine sublimate of a 100 mg tablet. Validation proved the stability of the model. Pharmacokinetics of caffeine after inhalation and intravenous administration are to a large extent similar. The bioavailability of inhaled caffeine is approximately 60% in experienced smokers.

  19. Incorporating pharmacokinetic differences between children and adults in assessing children's risks to environmental toxicants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginsberg, Gary; Hattis, Dale; Sonawane, Babasaheb

    2004-01-01

    Children's risks from environmental toxicant exposure can be affected by pharmacokinetic factors that affect the internal dose of parent chemical or active metabolite. There are numerous physiologic differences between neonates and adults that affect pharmacokinetics including size of lipid, and tissue compartments, organ blood flows, protein binding capacity, and immature function of renal and hepatic systems. These factors combine to decrease the clearance of many therapeutic drugs, which can also be expected to occur with environmental toxicants in neonates. The net effect may be greater or lesser internal dose of active toxicant depending upon how the agent is distributed, metabolized, and eliminated. Child/adult pharmacokinetic differences decrease with increasing postnatal age, but these factors should still be considered in any children's age group, birth through adolescence, for which there is toxicant exposure. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models can simulate the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of xenobiotics in both children and adults, allowing for a direct comparison of internal dose and risk across age groups. This review provides special focus on the development of hepatic cytochrome P-450 enzymes (CYPs) in early life and how this information, along with many factors unique to children, can be applied to PBPK models for this receptor population. This review describes a case study involving the development of neonatal PBPK models for the CYP1A2 substrates caffeine and theophylline. These models were calibrated with pharmacokinetic data in neonates and used to help understand key metabolic differences between neonates and adults across these two drugs

  20. Modelling hemoglobin and hemoglobin:haptoglobin complex clearance in a non-rodent species– pharmacokinetic and therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicitas S Boretti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical studies suggest that haptoglobin (Hp supplementation could be an effective therapeutic modality during acute or chronic hemolytic diseases. Hp prevents Hb extravasation and neutralizes Hb’s oxidative and NO scavenging activity in the vasculature. Small animal models such as mouse, rat and guinea pig appear to be valuable to provide proof-of-concept for Hb neutralization by Hp in diverse pre-clinical conditions. However, these species differ significantly from human in the clearance of Hb:Hp complexes, which leads to long persistence of circulating Hb:Hp complexes after administration of human plasma derived Hp. Alternative animal models must therefore be explored to guide pre-clinical development of these potential therapeutics. In contrast to rodents, dogs have high Hp plasma concentrations comparable to human. In this study we show that like human macrophages, dog peripheral blood monocyte derived macrophages express a glucocorticoid inducible endocytic clearance pathways with a high specificity for the Hb:Hp complex. Evaluating the Beagle dog as a non-rodent model species we provide the first pharmacokinetic parameter estimates of free Hb and Hb:Hp phenotype complexes. The data reflect a drastically reduced volume of distribution (Vc of the complex compared to free Hb, increased exposures (Cmax and AUC and significantly reduced total body clearance (CL with a terminal half-life (t1/2 of approximately 12 hours. Distribution and clearance was identical for dog and human Hb (± glucocorticoid stimulation and for dimeric and multimeric Hp preparations bound to Hb. Collectively, our study supports the dog as a non-rodent animal model to study pharmacological and pharmacokinetic aspects of Hb clearance systems and apply the model to studying Hp therapeutics.

  1. Dose selection based on physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Hannah M; Mayawala, Kapil; Poulin, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are built using differential equations to describe the physiology/anatomy of different biological systems. Readily available in vitro and in vivo preclinical data can be incorporated into these models to not only estimate pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters and plasma concentration-time profiles, but also to gain mechanistic insight into compound properties. They provide a mechanistic framework to understand and extrapolate PK and dose across in vitro and in vivo systems and across different species, populations and disease states. Using small molecule and large molecule examples from the literature and our own company, we have shown how PBPK techniques can be utilised for human PK and dose prediction. Such approaches have the potential to increase efficiency, reduce the need for animal studies, replace clinical trials and increase PK understanding. Given the mechanistic nature of these models, the future use of PBPK modelling in drug discovery and development is promising, however some limitations need to be addressed to realise its application and utility more broadly.

  2. Explaining Ethnic Variability of Transporter Substrate Pharmacokinetics in Healthy Asian and Caucasian Subjects with Allele Frequencies of OATP1B1 and BCRP: A Mechanistic Modeling Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Barton, Hugh A

    2018-04-01

    Ethnic variability in the pharmacokinetics of organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B1 substrates has been observed, but its basis is unclear. A previous study hypothesizes that, without applying an intrinsic ethnic variability in transporter activity, allele frequencies of transporters cannot explain observed ethnic variability in pharmacokinetics. However, this hypothesis contradicts the data collected from compounds that are OATP1B1 substrates but not breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) substrates. The objective of this study is to evaluate a hypothesis that is physiologically reasonable and more consistent with clinical observations. We evaluated if allele frequencies of two transporters (OATP1B1 and BCRP) are key contributors to ethnic variability. In this hypothesis, the same genotype leads to the same activity independent of ethnicity, in contrast to the previous hypothesis of intrinsic ethnic variability in OATP1B1 activity. As a validation, we perform mechanistic pharmacokinetic modeling for SLCO1B1 (encoding OATP1B1) and ABCG2 (encoding BCRP) genotyped pharmacokinetic data from 18 clinical studies with healthy Caucasian and/or Asian subjects. Simulations based on the current hypothesis reasonably describe SLCO1B1 and ABCG2 genotyped pharmacokinetic time course data for five transporter substrates (atorvastatin, pitavastatin, pravastatin, repaglinide, and rosuvastatin) in Caucasian and Asian populations. This hypothesis covers the observations that can (e.g., ethnic differences in rosuvastatin pharmacokinetics) or cannot (e.g., lack of differences for pitavastatin pharmacokinetics) be explained by the previous hypothesis. It helps to characterize sources of ethnic variability and provides a foundation for predicting ethnic variability in transporter substrate pharmacokinetics.

  3. Simple protein precipitation extraction technique followed by validated chromatographic method for linezolid analysis in real human plasma samples to study its pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Samah A; Eissa, Maya S; Ahmed, Hytham M

    2017-02-01

    Fast and sensitive HPLC method was developed, optimized and validated for quantification of linezolid (LNZ) in human plasma using guaifenesin as an internal standard (IS). Analyte and IS were extracted from plasma by simple protein precipitation extraction technique using methanol as the precipitating solvent. The pretreated samples were injected in a mobile phase formed of acetonitrile:water:methanol (20:70:10v/v/v) in an isocratic mode at a flow rate of 1.5mL/min with UV detection at 251nm. Separation was done using Aglient ODS C 18 . The method showed linearity in the range of 0.75-50μg/mL with correlation coefficients equals to 0.9991. Precision and accuracy were in conformity with the criteria normally accepted in bio-analytical method validation. The RSDs for intra- and inter-day assays were <3.56 and 4.63%, respectively. The intra- and inter-day accuracies were 94.67-98.28% and 91.25-96.18%, respectively. The mean absolute recoveries ranged from 92.56±1.78 to 95.24±2.84. According to stability results, LNZ was stable in human plasma during the storage and analysis. LNZ a pharmacokinetic behavior was studied by applying the proposed analytical method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A Combined Pharmacokinetic and Radiologic Assessment of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Response to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semple, Scott; Harry, Vanessa N. MRCOG.; Parkin, David E.; Gilbert, Fiona J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the combination of pharmacokinetic and radiologic assessment of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an early response indicator in women receiving chemoradiation for advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty women with locally advanced cervical cancer were included in a prospective cohort study. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was carried out before chemoradiation, after 2 weeks of therapy, and at the conclusion of therapy using a 1.5-T MRI scanner. Radiologic assessment of uptake parameters was obtained from resultant intensity curves. Pharmacokinetic analysis using a multicompartment model was also performed. General linear modeling was used to combine radiologic and pharmacokinetic parameters and correlated with eventual response as determined by change in MRI tumor size and conventional clinical response. A subgroup of 11 women underwent repeat pretherapy MRI to test pharmacokinetic reproducibility. Results: Pretherapy radiologic parameters and pharmacokinetic K trans correlated with response (p < 0.01). General linear modeling demonstrated that a combination of radiologic and pharmacokinetic assessments before therapy was able to predict more than 88% of variance of response. Reproducibility of pharmacokinetic modeling was confirmed. Conclusions: A combination of radiologic assessment with pharmacokinetic modeling applied to dynamic MRI before the start of chemoradiation improves the predictive power of either by more than 20%. The potential improvements in therapy response prediction using this type of combined analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI may aid in the development of more individualized, effective therapy regimens for this patient group.

  5. Pharmacokinetics and Bioavailability of Inhaled Esketamine in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonkman, Kelly; Duma, Andreas; Olofsen, Erik; Henthorn, Thomas; van Velzen, Monique; Mooren, René; Siebers, Liesbeth; van den Beukel, Jojanneke; Aarts, Leon; Niesters, Marieke; Dahan, Albert

    2017-10-01

    Esketamine is traditionally administered via intravenous or intramuscular routes. In this study we developed a pharmacokinetic model of inhalation of nebulized esketamine with special emphasis on pulmonary absorption and bioavailability. Three increasing doses of inhaled esketamine (dose escalation from 25 to 100 mg) were applied followed by a single intravenous dose (20 mg) in 19 healthy volunteers using a nebulizer system and arterial concentrations of esketamine and esnorketamine were obtained. A multicompartmental pharmacokinetic model was developed using population nonlinear mixed-effects analyses. The pharmacokinetic model consisted of three esketamine, two esnorketamine disposition and three metabolism compartments. The inhalation data were best described by adding two absorption pathways, an immediate and a slower pathway, with rate constant 0.05 ± 0.01 min (median ± SE of the estimate). The amount of esketamine inhaled was reduced due to dose-independent and dose-dependent reduced bioavailability. The former was 70% ± 5%, and the latter was described by a sigmoid EMAX model characterized by the plasma concentration at which absorption was impaired by 50% (406 ± 46 ng/ml). Over the concentration range tested, up to 50% of inhaled esketamine is lost due to the reduced dose-independent and dose-dependent bioavailability. We successfully modeled the inhalation of nebulized esketamine in healthy volunteers. Nebulized esketamine is inhaled with a substantial reduction in bioavailability. Although the reduction in dose-independent bioavailability is best explained by retention of drug and particle exhalation, the reduction in dose-dependent bioavailability is probably due to sedation-related loss of drug into the air.

  6. Pharmacokinetic model of myocardial 99mTc-sestamibi washout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tsubasa; Monzen, Hajime; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Hara, Masatake

    2013-01-01

    Technetium-99m sestamibi ( 99m Tc-MIBI) scintigraphy has been reported to be a functional imaging tool for in vivo detection of mitochondrial dysfunction in myocardium and multidrug resistance-associated protein expression in tumors. The purpose of this study was to propose a clinically applicable pharmacokinetic model with metabolic equilibrium of 99m Tc-MIBI and to evaluate the accuracy of the model. For this study, eight healthy men received 99m Tc-MIBI scintigraphy. The planar images were obtained at 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 h after 99m Tc-MIBI injection. The measured time series 99m Tc-MIBI counts were fitted to our model by nonlinear regression analysis. The predictive performance of the model was determined by comparing the residuals between measured and predicted values. We obtained a good regression by fitting data from 0.25 to 6 h after 99m Tc-MIBI injection, with excellent correlation between measured and predicted 99m Tc-MIBI counts (R 2 =0.9792) and a slope near unity. The 95% confidence interval of the mean prediction error included 0, which means that the prediction was not significantly biased. The precision of the prediction was also excellent. Our model shows good predictive capacity, with favorable bias and accuracy. By comparing the predictive values of this model with measured values, mitochondrial 99m Tc-MIBI washout can be quantified. 99m Tc-MIBI washout rates are reported to be a promising method for evaluating cardiac function in patients with cardiac diseases and P-glycoprotein expression in tumor cells. Therefore, this quantification could be useful for mitochondrial functional imaging, especially in patients with cardiac diseases or tumors. (author)

  7. Application of Physiologically Based Absorption Modeling to Characterize the Pharmacokinetic Profiles of Oral Extended Release Methylphenidate Products in Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxia Yang

    Full Text Available A previously presented physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for immediate release (IR methylphenidate (MPH was extended to characterize the pharmacokinetic behaviors of oral extended release (ER MPH formulations in adults for the first time. Information on the anatomy and physiology of the gastrointestinal (GI tract, together with the biopharmaceutical properties of MPH, was integrated into the original model, with model parameters representing hepatic metabolism and intestinal non-specific loss recalibrated against in vitro and in vivo kinetic data sets with IR MPH. A Weibull function was implemented to describe the dissolution of different ER formulations. A variety of mathematical functions can be utilized to account for the engineered release/dissolution technologies to achieve better model performance. The physiological absorption model tracked well the plasma concentration profiles in adults receiving a multilayer-release MPH formulation or Metadate CD, while some degree of discrepancy was observed between predicted and observed plasma concentration profiles for Ritalin LA and Medikinet Retard. A local sensitivity analysis demonstrated that model parameters associated with the GI tract significantly influenced model predicted plasma MPH concentrations, albeit to varying degrees, suggesting the importance of better understanding the GI tract physiology, along with the intestinal non-specific loss of MPH. The model provides a quantitative tool to predict the biphasic plasma time course data for ER MPH, helping elucidate factors responsible for the diverse plasma MPH concentration profiles following oral dosing of different ER formulations.

  8. Evaluation of Pharmacokinetic Assumptions Using a 443 Chemical Library (IVIVE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the increasing availability of high-throughput and in vitro data for untested chemicals, there is a need for pharmacokinetic (PK) models for in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE). Though some PBPK models have been created for individual compounds us...

  9. Population pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital in infants with neonatal encephalopathy treated with therapeutic hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellhaas, Renée A; Ng, Chee M; Dillon, Christina H; Barks, John D E; Bhatt-Mehta, Varsha

    2013-02-01

    Phenobarbital is the first-line treatment for neonatal seizures. Many neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy are treated with therapeutic hypothermia, and about 40% have clinical seizures. Little is known about the pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital in infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy who undergo therapeutic hypothermia. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of therapeutic hypothermia on phenobarbital pharmacokinetics, taking into account maturational changes. Level 3 neonatal ICU. Infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy and suspected seizures, all treated with phenobarbital. Some of these infants also received treatment with therapeutic hypothermia. None. A retrospective cohort study of 39 infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy treated with phenobarbital (20 were treated with therapeutic hypothermia and 19 were not). Data on phenobarbital plasma concentrations were collected in 39 subjects with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy with or without therapeutic hypothermia. Using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling, population pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital were developed with a total of 164 plasma concentrations. A one-compartment model best described the pharmacokinetics. The clearance of phenobarbital was linearly related to body weight and matured with increasing age with a maturation half-life of 22.1 days. Therapeutic hypothermia did not influence the pharmacokinetic parameters of phenobarbital. Therapeutic hypothermia does not influence the clearance of phenobarbital after accounting for weight and age. Standard phenobarbital dosing is appropriate for the initial treatment of seizures in neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy treated with therapeutic hypothermia.

  10. Modelling Tityus scorpion venom and antivenom pharmacokinetics. Evidence of active immunoglobulin G's F(ab')2 extrusion mechanism from blood to tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevcik, C; D'Suze, G; Díaz, P; Salazar, V; Hidalgo, C; Azpúrua, H; Bracho, N

    2004-12-01

    Modelling Tityus scorpion venom and antivenom pharmacokinetics. Evidence of active immunoglobulin G's F(ab')(2) extrusion mechanism from blood to tissues. We measured pharmacokinetic parameters for T. discrepans venom in rams. Forty, 75 or 100 microg/kg venom were injected subcutaneously in the inner side of the thigh. Plasma venom content (venenemia) was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) from 0 to 300 min after injecting venom. Venenemia was fit to a three-compartment model (inoculation site, plasma and extra vascular extracellular space), it was assumed that the venom may also be irreversibly removed from plasma. Calculated time course of venom content shows that at any time no more that 30% of the venom is present in plasma. Venenemia peaks at 1h and decays afterwards. Fluorescently labelled antivenom [horse anti-TityusF(ab')(2) or fraction antigen binding, immuglobulin without Fc chain covalently bound to fluorescine or fluorescamine] pharmacokinetics was determined. Although F(ab')(2) molecular weight is >/=10 times bigger that toxin's, the rate of outflow of F(ab')(2) from blood to tissues was approximately 4 times faster than the venom's outflow. Venom content in the injection site decays exponentially for >6h, this prediction was confirmed immunohistochemically. Only approximately 5% of the venom is eliminated in 10h; approximately 80% of the venom is in the tissues after 2h and remains there for >10h.

  11. Predicting dermal penetration for ToxCast chemicals using in silico estimates for diffusion in combination with physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predicting dermal penetration for ToxCast chemicals using in silico estimates for diffusion in combination with physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling.Evans, M.V., Sawyer, M.E., Isaacs, K.K, and Wambaugh, J.With the development of efficient high-throughput (HT) in ...

  12. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of antipsychotic drugs in patients with schizophrenia Part I : The use of PANSS total score and clinical utility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reddy, Venkatesh Pilla; Kozielska, Magdalena; Suleiman, Ahmed Abbas; Johnson, Martin; Vermeulen, An; Liu, Jing; de Greef, Rik; Groothuis, Geny M. M.; Danhof, Meindert; Proost, Johannes H.

    Background: To develop a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model using individual-level data of Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score to characterize the antipsychotic drug effect taking into account the placebo effect and dropout rate. In addition, a clinical utility (CU)

  13. Pharmacokinetic/pharmaco-dynamic modelling and simulation of the effects of different cannabinoid receptor type 1 antagonists on (9)-tetrahydrocannabinol challenge tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guan, Zheng; Klumpers, Linda E.; Oyetayo, Olubukayo-Opeyemi; Heuberger, Jules; van Gerven, Joop M. A.; Stevens, Jasper

    Aim: The severe psychiatric side effects of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) antagonists hampered their wide development but this might be overcome by careful management of drug development with pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analyses. PK/PD models suitable for direct comparison of

  14. Population Pharmacokinetics of Intravenous Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) in Preterm and Term Neonates: Model Development and External Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Sarah F; Roberts, Jessica K; Samiee-Zafarghandy, Samira; Stockmann, Chris; King, Amber D; Deutsch, Nina; Williams, Elaine F; Allegaert, Karel; Wilkins, Diana G; Sherwin, Catherine M T; van den Anker, John N

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to develop a population pharmacokinetic model for intravenous paracetamol in preterm and term neonates and to assess the generalizability of the model by testing its predictive performance in an external dataset. Nonlinear mixed-effects models were constructed from paracetamol concentration-time data in NONMEM 7.2. Potential covariates included body weight, gestational age, postnatal age, postmenstrual age, sex, race, total bilirubin, and estimated glomerular filtration rate. An external dataset was used to test the predictive performance of the model through calculation of bias, precision, and normalized prediction distribution errors. The model-building dataset included 260 observations from 35 neonates with a mean gestational age of 33.6 weeks [standard deviation (SD) 6.6]. Data were well-described by a one-compartment model with first-order elimination. Weight predicted paracetamol clearance and volume of distribution, which were estimated as 0.348 L/h (5.5 % relative standard error; 30.8 % coefficient of variation) and 2.46 L (3.5 % relative standard error; 14.3 % coefficient of variation), respectively, at the mean subject weight of 2.30 kg. An external evaluation was performed on an independent dataset that included 436 observations from 60 neonates with a mean gestational age of 35.6 weeks (SD 4.3). The median prediction error was 10.1 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 6.1-14.3] and the median absolute prediction error was 25.3 % (95 % CI 23.1-28.1). Weight predicted intravenous paracetamol pharmacokinetics in neonates ranging from extreme preterm to full-term gestational status. External evaluation suggested that these findings should be generalizable to other similar patient populations.

  15. Heritability of metoprolol and torsemide pharmacokinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthaei, Johannes; Brockmöller, Jürgen; Tzvetkov, Mladen

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol and torsemide due to polymorphisms in CYP2D6, CYP2C9 and OATP1B1 has been extensively studied. However, it is still unknown how much of variation in pharmacokinetics of these two clinically important drugs in total is due to genetic factors....... of the heritable variability in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol and torsemide remains to be elucidated. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  16. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling of cardiac toxicity in human acute overdoses: utility and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mégarbane, Bruno; Aslani, Arsia Amir; Deye, Nicolas; Baud, Frédéric J

    2008-05-01

    Hypotension, cardiac failure, QT interval prolongation, dysrhythmias, and conduction disturbances are common complications of overdoses with cardiotoxicants. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationships are useful to assess diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment efficacy in acute poisonings. To review the utility and limits of PK/PD studies of cardiac toxicity. Discussion of various models, mainly those obtained in digitalis, cyanide, venlafaxine and citalopram poisonings. A sigmoidal E(max) model appears adequate to represent the PK/PD relationships in cardiotoxic poisonings. PK/PD correlations investigate the discrepancies between the time course of the effect magnitude and its evolving concentrations. They may help in understanding the mechanisms of occurrence as well as disappearance of a cardiotoxic effect. When data are sparse, population-based PK/PD modeling using computer-intensive algorithms is helpful to estimate population mean values of PK parameters as well as their individual variability. Further PK/PD studies are needed in medical toxicology to allow understanding of the meaning of blood toxicant concentration in acute poisonings and thus improve management.

  17. Population pharmacokinetics of telapristone (CDB-4124) and its active monodemethylated metabolite CDB-4453, with a mixture model for total clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Denise; Podolski, Joseph; Kirsch, Alan; Wiehle, Ronald; Fleckenstein, Lawrence

    2011-12-01

    Telapristone is a selective progesterone antagonist that is being developed for the long-term treatment of symptoms associated with endometriosis and uterine fibroids. The population pharmacokinetics of telapristone (CDB-4124) and CDB-4453 was investigated using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. Data from two clinical studies (n = 32) were included in the analysis. A two-compartment (parent) one compartment (metabolite) mixture model (with two populations for apparent clearance) with first-order absorption and elimination adequately described the pharmacokinetics of telapristone and CDB-4453. Telapristone was rapidly absorbed with an absorption rate constant (Ka) of 1.26 h(-1). Moderate renal impairment resulted in a 74% decrease in Ka. The population estimates for oral clearance (CL/F) for the two populations were 11.6 and 3.34 L/h, respectively, with 25% of the subjects being allocated to the high-clearance group. Apparent volume of distribution for the central compartment (V2/F) was 37.4 L, apparent inter-compartmental clearance (Q/F) was 21.9 L/h, and apparent peripheral volume of distribution for the parent (V4/F) was 120 L. The ratio of the fraction of telapristone converted to CDB-4453 to the distribution volume of CDB-4453 (Fmet(est)) was 0.20/L. Apparent volume of distribution of the metabolite compartment (V3/F) was fixed to 1 L and apparent clearance of the metabolite (CLM/F) was 2.43 L/h. A two-compartment parent-metabolite model adequately described the pharmacokinetics of telapristone and CDB-4453. The clearance of telapristone was separated into two populations and could be the result of metabolism via polymorphic CYP3A5.

  18. Computational opioid prescribing: a novel application of clinical pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Oscar A; Linares, Annemarie L

    2011-01-01

    We implemented a pharmacokinetics-based mathematical modeling technique using algebra to assist prescribers with point-of-care opioid dosing. We call this technique computational opioid prescribing (COP). Because population pharmacokinetic parameter values are needed to estimate drug dosing regimen designs for individual patients using COP, and those values are not readily available to prescribers because they exist scattered in the vast pharmacology literature, we estimated the population pharmacokinetic parameter values for 12 commonly prescribed opioids from various sources using the bootstrap resampling technique. Our results show that opioid dosing regimen design, evaluation, and modification is feasible using COP. We conclude that COP is a new technique for the quantitative assessment of opioid dosing regimen design evaluation and adjustment, which may help prescribers to manage acute and chronic pain at the point-of-care. Potential benefits include opioid dose optimization and minimization of adverse opioid drug events, leading to potential improvement in patient treatment outcomes and safety.

  19. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Modeling in Pediatric Drug Development, and the Importance of Standardized Scaling of Clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germovsek, Eva; Barker, Charlotte I S; Sharland, Mike; Standing, Joseph F

    2018-04-19

    Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PKPD) modeling is important in the design and conduct of clinical pharmacology research in children. During drug development, PKPD modeling and simulation should underpin rational trial design and facilitate extrapolation to investigate efficacy and safety. The application of PKPD modeling to optimize dosing recommendations and therapeutic drug monitoring is also increasing, and PKPD model-based dose individualization will become a core feature of personalized medicine. Following extensive progress on pediatric PK modeling, a greater emphasis now needs to be placed on PD modeling to understand age-related changes in drug effects. This paper discusses the principles of PKPD modeling in the context of pediatric drug development, summarizing how important PK parameters, such as clearance (CL), are scaled with size and age, and highlights a standardized method for CL scaling in children. One standard scaling method would facilitate comparison of PK parameters across multiple studies, thus increasing the utility of existing PK models and facilitating optimal design of new studies.

  20. A simple oblique dip model for geomagnetic micropulsations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Lawrie

    Full Text Available It is pointed out that simple models adopted so far have tended to neglect the obliquity of the magnetic field lines entering the Earth's surface. A simple alternative model is presented, in which the ambient field lines are straight, but enter wedge shaped boundaries at half a right-angle. The model is illustrated by assuming an axially symmetric, compressional, impulse type disturbance at the outer boundary, all other boundaries being assumed to be perfectly conducting. The numerical method used is checked from the instant the excitation ceases, by an analytical method. The first harmonic along field lines is found to be of noticeable size, but appears to be mainly due to coupling with the fundamental, and with the first harmonic across field lines.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (MHD waves and instabilities.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of Active Components From Guhong Injection in Normal and Pathological Rat Models of Cerebral Ischemia: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Guhong Injection (GHI is usually administered for the treatment of stroke in clinics. Aceglutamide and hydroxyl safflower yellow A (HSYA are its key ingredients for brain protective effect. To investigate the pharmacokinetics of aceglutamide and HSYA under pathological and normal conditions, the pharmacokinetic parameters and characteristics of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO and normal rats given the same dosage of GHI were studied compared.Methods: 12 SD rats were divided into two groups, namely, MCAO and normal groups. Both groups were treated with GHI in the same dosage. Plasma samples were collected from the jaw vein at different time points and subsequently tested by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC.Results: After administration of GHI, both aceglutamide and HSYA were immediately detected in the plasma. Ninety percent of aceglutamide and HSYA was eliminated within 3 h. For aceglutamide, statistically significant differences in the parameters including AUC(0−t, AUC(0−∞, AUMC(0−t, AUMC(0−∞, Cmax (P < 0.01, and Vz (P < 0.05. Meanwhile, compared with the MCAO group, in the normal group, the values of AUC(0−t, AUMC(0−t, VRT(0−t, and Cmax (P < 0.01 for HSYA were significantly higher, whereas the value of MRT(0−t was significantly lower in the normal group.Conclusions: The in vivo trials based on the different models showed that, the pharmacokinetic behaviors and parameters of aceglutamide and HSYA in GHI were completely different. These results suggest that the pathological damage of ischemia-reperfusion has a significant impact on the pharmacokinetic traits of aceglutamide and HSYA.

  2. Population Pharmacokinetics of Tenofovir in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients Taking Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Jullien, Vincent; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Rey, Elisabeth; Jaffray, Patrick; Krivine, Anne; Moachon, Laurence; Lillo-Le Louet, Agnès; Lescoat, Anne; Dupin, Nicolas; Salmon, Dominique; Pons, Gérard; Urien, Saïk

    2005-01-01

    The influence of renal function on tenofovir pharmacokinetics was investigated in 193 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients by the use of a population approach performed with the nonlinear mixed effects modeling program NONMEM. Tenofovir pharmacokinetics was well described by a two-compartment open model in which the absorption and the distribution rate constants are equal. Typical population estimates of apparent central distribution volume (Vc/F), peripheral distribution volu...

  3. The Structured Intuitive Model for Product Line Economics (SIMPLE)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clements, Paul C; McGregor, John D; Cohen, Sholom G

    2005-01-01

    .... This report presents the Structured Intuitive Model of Product Line Economics (SIMPLE), a general-purpose business model that supports the estimation of the costs and benefits in a product line development organization...

  4. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Absorption Modeling for Osmotic Pump Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Zhanglin; Talattof, Arjang; Fan, Jianghong; Tsakalozou, Eleftheria; Sharan, Satish; Sun, Dajun; Wen, Hong; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Xinyuan

    2017-07-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) and absorption modeling approaches were employed for oral extended-release (ER) drug products based on an osmotic drug delivery system (osmotic pumps). The purpose was to systemically evaluate the in vivo relevance of in vitro dissolution for this type of formulation. As expected, in vitro dissolution appeared to be generally predictive of in vivo PK profiles, because of the unique feature of this delivery system that the in vitro and in vivo release of osmotic pump drug products is less susceptible to surrounding environment in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract such as pH, hydrodynamic, and food effects. The present study considered BCS (Biopharmaceutics Classification System) class 1, 2, and 3 drug products with half-lives ranging from 2 to greater than 24 h. In some cases, the colonic absorption models needed to be adjusted to account for absorption in the colon. C max (maximum plasma concentration) and AUCt (area under the concentration curve) of the studied drug products were sensitive to changes in colon permeability and segmental GI transit times in a drug product-dependent manner. While improvement of the methodology is still warranted for more precise prediction (e.g., colonic absorption and dynamic movement in the GI tract), the results from the present study further emphasized the advantage of using PBPK modeling in addressing product-specific questions arising from regulatory review and drug development.

  5. Tubocurarine and pancuronium: a pharmacokinetic view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, C A; Somogyi, A A; Ramzan, M I; Triggs, E J

    1980-02-01

    This review is an attempt to bring together the pharmacokinetic data on d-tubocurarine and pancuronium with clinical observations on relaxant dosage and effect. The modelling techniques used here represent an oversimplification of the relationships between relaxant plasma concentration and response as they do not predict either the time of onset of paralysis or its peak intensity. However, they do enable calculation of a bolus dose of relaxant required to achieve a particular intensity of paralysis for the average patient once pseudo-distribution equilibrium has been achieved. This has been further extended to predict the cumulation of the relaxants with subsequent dosage in average patients. Suggested regimens incorporating bolus and infusion doses of the relaxants to achieve continuous neuromuscular blockade have been calculated also. Averaged pharmacokinetic parameters derived from patients with renal or hepatic dysfunction have been used to predict the likely duration and intensities of paralysis for the relaxants.

  6. Analyzing C2 Structures and Self-Synchronization with Simple Computational Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    16th ICCRTS “Collective C2 in Multinational Civil-Military Operations” Analyzing C2 Structures and Self- Synchronization with Simple...Self- Synchronization with Simple Computational Models 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...models. The Kuramoto Model, though with some serious limitations, provides a representation of information flow and self- synchronization in an

  7. Energy economy in the actomyosin interaction: lessons from simple models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Steven L

    2010-01-01

    The energy economy of the actomyosin interaction in skeletal muscle is both scientifically fascinating and practically important. This chapter demonstrates how simple cross-bridge models have guided research regarding the energy economy of skeletal muscle. Parameter variation on a very simple two-state strain-dependent model shows that early events in the actomyosin interaction strongly influence energy efficiency, and late events determine maximum shortening velocity. Addition of a weakly-bound state preceding force production allows weak coupling of cross-bridge mechanics and ATP turnover, so that a simple three-state model can simulate the velocity-dependence of ATP turnover. Consideration of the limitations of this model leads to a review of recent evidence regarding the relationship between ligand binding states, conformational states, and macromolecular structures of myosin cross-bridges. Investigation of the fine structure of the actomyosin interaction during the working stroke continues to inform fundamental research regarding the energy economy of striated muscle.

  8. Population Pharmacokinetics of Telapristone (CDB-4124) and its Active Monodemethylated Metabolite CDB-4453, with a Mixture Model for Total Clearance

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Denise; Podolski, Joseph; Kirsch, Alan; Wiehle, Ronald; Fleckenstein, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Telapristone is a selective progesterone antagonist that is being developed for the long-term treatment of symptoms associated with endometriosis and uterine fibroids. The population pharmacokinetics of telapristone (CDB-4124) and CDB-4453 was investigated using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. Data from two clinical studies (n?=?32) were included in the analysis. A two-compartment (parent) one compartment (metabolite) mixture model (with two populations for apparent clearance) with first-or...

  9. Preclinical Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling and Simulation in the Pharmaceutical Industry: An IQ Consortium Survey Examining the Current Landscape

    OpenAIRE

    Schuck, Edgar; Bohnert, Tonika; Chakravarty, Arijit; Damian-Iordache, Valeriu; Gibson, Christopher; Hsu, Cheng-Pang; Heimbach, Tycho; Krishnatry, Anu Shilpa; Liederer, Bianca M; Lin, Jing; Maurer, Tristan; Mettetal, Jerome T; Mudra, Daniel R; Nijsen, Marjoleen JMA; Raybon, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The application of modeling and simulation techniques is increasingly common in preclinical stages of the drug discovery and development process. A survey focusing on preclinical pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) analysis was conducted across pharmaceutical companies that are members of the International Consortium for Quality and Innovation in Pharmaceutical Development. Based on survey responses, ~68% of companies use preclinical PK/PD analysis in all therapeutic areas indicating its...

  10. Pharmacokinetics of Snake Venom

    OpenAIRE

    Suchaya Sanhajariya; Stephen B. Duffull; Geoffrey K. Isbister

    2018-01-01

    Understanding snake venom pharmacokinetics is essential for developing risk assessment strategies and determining the optimal dose and timing of antivenom required to bind all venom in snakebite patients. This review aims to explore the current knowledge of snake venom pharmacokinetics in animals and humans. Literature searches were conducted using EMBASE (1974–present) and Medline (1946–present). For animals, 12 out of 520 initially identified studies met the inclusion criteria. In general, ...

  11. Simple classical model for Fano statistics in radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, David V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, National Security Division - Radiological and Chemical Sciences Group PO Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)], E-mail: David.Jordan@pnl.gov; Renholds, Andrea S.; Jaffe, John E.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Rene Corrales, L.; Peurrung, Anthony J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, National Security Division - Radiological and Chemical Sciences Group PO Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2008-02-01

    A simple classical model that captures the essential statistics of energy partitioning processes involved in the creation of information carriers (ICs) in radiation detectors is presented. The model pictures IC formation from a fixed amount of deposited energy in terms of the statistically analogous process of successively sampling water from a large, finite-volume container ('bathtub') with a small dipping implement ('shot or whiskey glass'). The model exhibits sub-Poisson variance in the distribution of the number of ICs generated (the 'Fano effect'). Elementary statistical analysis of the model clarifies the role of energy conservation in producing the Fano effect and yields Fano's prescription for computing the relative variance of the IC number distribution in terms of the mean and variance of the underlying, single-IC energy distribution. The partitioning model is applied to the development of the impact ionization cascade in semiconductor radiation detectors. It is shown that, in tandem with simple assumptions regarding the distribution of energies required to create an (electron, hole) pair, the model yields an energy-independent Fano factor of 0.083, in accord with the lower end of the range of literature values reported for silicon and high-purity germanium. The utility of this simple picture as a diagnostic tool for guiding or constraining more detailed, 'microscopic' physical models of detector material response to ionizing radiation is discussed.

  12. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling for the determination of a cimicoxib dosing regimen in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeunesse, Elisabeth C; Schneider, Marc; Woehrle, Frederique; Faucher, Mathieu; Lefebvre, Herve P; Toutain, Pierre-Louis

    2013-12-11

    Cimicoxib is a new coxib anti-inflammatory drug for use in the dog. To determine a preclinical dosage regimen for cimicoxib in dog, a reversible model of kaolin-induced paw inflammation was used. Dosage regimens were established using pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling approach (indirect response model). Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic endpoints investigated with the inflammation model established the efficacy of cimicoxib at a dose of 2 mg/kg administered orally (single dose) in 12 beagle dogs.For both the oral and IV route of administration two groups of dogs to be identified namely Poor Metabolizers (PM) and Extensive Metabolizers (EM).The terminal half-life after oral administration was 8.0 ± 0.6 h for the PM and 4.6 ± 2.6 h for the EM groups, with the corresponding values after the IV route being 5.6 ± 1.7 h and 2.7 ± 0.9 h (mean ± SD).The main pharmacodynamic parameters (potency, efficacy, and sensitivity) were estimated for four endpoints (body temperature, creeping speed, ground vertical reaction force and clinical lameness score). The plasma concentration corresponding to half the maximum of the indirect effect were 239 μg/L for creeping speed, 284 μg/L for the lameness score, 161 μg/L for the ground reaction vertical force and 193 μg/L for the body temperature.To document possible polymorphism of the cimicoxib disposition in the target dog population, cimicoxib was administered by the intravenous route to 40 dogs (four different sized breeds). The cimicoxib half-lives in these 40 dogs were of same order of the magnitude as those of the EM beagle dogs. Thus pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters obtained from the EM beagle dogs were selected to simulate the dose-effect relationship of cimicoxib after an oral administration allowing a dosage regimen to be selected for confirmation by a clinical trial. Cimicoxib was an efficacious anti-inflammatory, antipyretic and analgesic drug and a dosage regimen of 2 mg

  13. Evaluation of Pharmacokinetic Assumptions Using a 443 Chemical Library (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the increasing availability of high-throughput and in vitro data for untested chemicals, there is a need for pharmacokinetic (PK) models for in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE). Though some PBPK models have been created for individual compounds using in vivo data, we ...

  14. [Pharmacokinetics of digoxin in hyperthyroidism. Effect of methimazole].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izbicka, Maria; Gasińska, Teresa; Dec, Renata

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular abnormalities may be the only manifestations of overt hyperthyroidism. In patients with heart failure and atrial fibrillation digoxin can be beneficial in controlling the symptoms and signs, but hyperthyroid patients show an impaired response or even resistance to digoxin treatment. The aim of the study is to establish: 1. Are there any differences in the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of digoxin between hypertyroid and euthyroid patients? 2. Does simultaneous administration of digoxin and methimazole affect the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of dogoxin? 3. Does methimazole-induced euthyroidism change the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of digoxin? The subject of the study were 28 patients with hyperthyroidism and 15 healthy persons. We evaluated the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of digoxin. Moreover we evaluated pharmacokinetics of a single dose of digoxin after simultaneous administration of digoxin and methimazole in 12 patients and 12 methimazole treated patients werere-assessed once they had become euthyroid. Hyperthyroid patients showed significantly lower serum digoxin concentrations, shorter T1/2 beta and a significantly smaller area under the concentration curve (AUC) that the control group. Administration of methimazole did not affect digoxin pharmacokinetics. In hyperthyroid patients: 1. the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of digoxin does differ from that observed in healthy subjects. 2.methimazole do not alter digoxin pharmacokinetics.

  15. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibody T1h and variant anti-CD6 murine 10D12 in healthy animals and in experimental arthritis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    León, M; Hernández, I; Aldana, L; Ayra, F; Castro, Y; Leyva, R; García, L; Pérez, S.; Casaco, A.

    2016-01-01

    Biodistribution and pharmacokinetic of two radio labeled monoclonal antibodies was performed with the help of imaging techniques. Isotopic labeling was carried out by means of standardized methods. Pharmacokinetic evaluation was performed using the population approach and sparse data design. Introduction: Targeted therapy with monoclonal antibodies (MAb) is an efficient option for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Th1 is a MAb anti human CD6 developed for the treatment of autoimmune disease and 10D12 is its counterpart anti murine CD6 developed as a pharmacological tool to get deep into the response mechanisms in animals models of rheumatoid arthritis.To investigate the behavior of both antibodies in the assay system, molecules were labeled with 125I to evaluate pharmacokinetic in healthy animals and with 99mTc to evaluate the antibody uptake in inflamed area of induced arthritis. Materials and methods: Antibodies were supplied by the Center of Molecular immunology. Iodination was performed by the iodogen method and technetium labeling was carried out directly by Schwarz method. Female C57BL6 from CENPALAB were used for experiments. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetic was performed by a sparse data design using the population approach. Uptake in region of inflammation was quantified by gammagraphy at the same time points of blood sampling. A compartmental model was build to quantify uptake kinetic. Pharmacokinetic profiles were analyzed using MONOLIX software version 4.2. Results: Minor pharmacokinetic differences were found between monoclonal antibodies labeled with 125I and 99mTc. As a humanized antibody, T1h shows a faster clearance than 10D12 and a biodistribution pattern reflecting preference for excretion mechanisms. The arthritis accumulation was not consistent with a targeted mediated uptake. On the other hand, radio labeled 10D12 shows an accumulation profile in arthritis with two peaks of maximum concentration representing an initial transit to

  16. An accurate and simple large signal model of HEMT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Qing

    1989-01-01

    A large-signal model of discrete HEMTs (high-electron-mobility transistors) has been developed. It is simple and suitable for SPICE simulation of hybrid digital ICs. The model parameters are extracted by using computer programs and data provided by the manufacturer. Based on this model, a hybrid...

  17. Clinical pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital in neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touw, D J; Graafland, O; Cranendonk, A; Vermeulen, R J; van Weissenbruch, M M

    2000-01-01

    Demographic and clinical pharmacokinetic data collected from term and preterm neonates who were treated with intravenous phenobarbital have been analysed to evaluate the role of patient characteristics in pharmacokinetic parameters. Significant relationships between total body weight (TBW) or body

  18. Two simple models of classical heat pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marathe, Rahul; Jayannavar, A M; Dhar, Abhishek

    2007-03-01

    Motivated by recent studies of models of particle and heat quantum pumps, we study similar simple classical models and examine the possibility of heat pumping. Unlike many of the usual ratchet models of molecular engines, the models we study do not have particle transport. We consider a two-spin system and a coupled oscillator system which exchange heat with multiple heat reservoirs and which are acted upon by periodic forces. The simplicity of our models allows accurate numerical and exact solutions and unambiguous interpretation of results. We demonstrate that while both our models seem to be built on similar principles, one is able to function as a heat pump (or engine) while the other is not.

  19. [Pharmacokinetic study of six aconitine alkaloids in aconiti lateralis radix praeparata in beagle dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ri-Ping; Lai, Xiao-Ping; Zhao, Yai; Yu, Liang-Wen; Zhu, Yue-Lan; Li, Geng

    2014-02-01

    To study the pharmacokinetics characteristics of six Aconitum alkaloids aconitine (AC), mesaconitine (MA), hypaconitine (HA), benzoylaconine (BAC), benzoylmesaconine (BMA) and benzoylhypaconine (BHA) in beagle dogs. An ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed for simultaneous quantitation of six Aconitum alkaloids in beagle dog plasma after oral administration of Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparata decoction. UPLC/MS/MS system coupled with an electrospray ionization (ESI) source was performed in multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. Sample preparation was performed with solid-phase extraction(SPE) on a 3 mL HLB cartridge before the analysis. The separation was applied on a Waters C8 column (100 mm x 2.1 mm, 1.7 microm) and a gradient elution of methanol and 0.2% formic acid-water was used as mobile phase. The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by the results of the analysis through the DAS 2. 1 software (Drug and Statistics for Windows). The results showed that the fitting model for the six Aconitum alkaloids was the one-compartment model pharmacokinetics. The method is successfully used for the pharmacokinetic evaluation of the six Aconitum alkaloids in beagle dog plasma, it can help monitor the ADME/Tox process when taking Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparata by observing the pharmacokinetic process. The results provide a good reference for clinical treatment and safe application of Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparata.

  20. Simple model of inhibition of chain-branching combustion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babushok, Valeri I.; Gubernov, Vladimir V.; Minaev, Sergei S.; Miroshnichenko, Taisia P.

    2017-11-01

    A simple kinetic model has been suggested to describe the inhibition and extinction of flame propagation in reaction systems with chain-branching reactions typical for hydrocarbon systems. The model is based on the generalised model of the combustion process with chain-branching reaction combined with the one-stage reaction describing the thermal mode of flame propagation with the addition of inhibition reaction steps. Inhibitor addition suppresses the radical overshoot in flame and leads to the change of reaction mode from the chain-branching reaction to a thermal mode of flame propagation. With the increase of inhibitor the transition of chain-branching mode of reaction to the reaction with straight-chains (non-branching chain reaction) is observed. The inhibition part of the model includes a block of three reactions to describe the influence of the inhibitor. The heat losses are incorporated into the model via Newton cooling. The flame extinction is the result of the decreased heat release of inhibited reaction processes and the suppression of radical overshoot with the further decrease of the reaction rate due to the temperature decrease and mixture dilution. A comparison of the results of modelling laminar premixed methane/air flames inhibited by potassium bicarbonate (gas phase model, detailed kinetic model) with the results obtained using the suggested simple model is presented. The calculations with the detailed kinetic model demonstrate the following modes of combustion process: (1) flame propagation with chain-branching reaction (with radical overshoot, inhibitor addition decreases the radical overshoot down to the equilibrium level); (2) saturation of chemical influence of inhibitor, and (3) transition to thermal mode of flame propagation (non-branching chain mode of reaction). The suggested simple kinetic model qualitatively reproduces the modes of flame propagation with the addition of the inhibitor observed using detailed kinetic models.

  1. Overall feature of EAST operation space by using simple Core-SOL-Divertor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiwatari, R.; Hatayama, A.; Zhu, S.; Takizuka, T.; Tomita, Y.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a simple Core-SOL-Divertor (C-S-D) model to investigate qualitatively the overall features of the operational space for the integrated core and edge plasma. To construct the simple C-S-D model, a simple core plasma model of ITER physics guidelines and a two-point SOL-divertor model are used. The simple C-S-D model is applied to the study of the EAST operational space with lower hybrid current drive experiments under various kinds of trade-off for the basic plasma parameters. Effective methods for extending the operation space are also presented. As shown by this study for the EAST operation space, it is evident that the C-S-D model is a useful tool to understand qualitatively the overall features of the plasma operation space. (author)

  2. Modeling and Prediction Using Stochastic Differential Equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Rune; Møller, Jan Kloppenborg; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic/pharmakodynamic (PK/PD) modeling for a single subject is most often performed using nonlinear models based on deterministic ordinary differential equations (ODEs), and the variation between subjects in a population of subjects is described using a population (mixed effects) setup...... deterministic and can predict the future perfectly. A more realistic approach would be to allow for randomness in the model due to e.g., the model be too simple or errors in input. We describe a modeling and prediction setup which better reflects reality and suggests stochastic differential equations (SDEs...

  3. Pharmacokinetic modeling of 4,4'-methylenedianiline released from reused polyurethane dialyzer potting materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Luu, H M; Hutter, J C

    2000-01-01

    4, 4'-Methylenedianiline (MDA) is a hydrolysis degradation product that can be released from polyurethanes commonly used in medical device applications. MDA is mutagenic and carcinogenic in animals. In humans, it is hepatotoxic, a known contact and respiratory allergen, and a suspected carcinogen. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to estimate the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of MDA in patients exposed to MDA leached from the potting materials of hemodialyzers. A worst-case reuse situation and a single use case were investigated. The PBPK model included five tissue compartments: liver, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, slowly perfused tissues, and richly perfused tissues. Physiological and chemical parameters of a healthy individual used in the model were obtained from the literature. The model was calibrated using previously published kinetic studies of IV administered doses of (14) C-MDA to rats. The model was validated using independent data published for MDA-exposed workers. The PBPK results indicated that dialysis patients who are exposed to MDA released from dialyzers (new or reused) could accumulate low levels of MDA and metabolites (total MDA) over time. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. Population Pharmacokinetics of Morphine and Morphine-6-Glucuronide following Rectal Administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brokjær, Anne; Kreilgaard, Mads; Olesen, Anne Estrup

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: To safely and effectively administer morphine as liquid formulation via the rectal route, a thorough understanding of the pharmacokinetics is warranted. The aims were: 1) to develop a population pharmacokinetic model of liquid rectal morphine and morphine-6-glucoronide (M6G), 2...... cm from the anal verge. A 2 mg morphine hydrochloride dose was administered intravenously as reference. Blood samples were drawn at baseline and at nine time points post dosing. Serum was obtained by centrifugation and assayed for contents of morphine and M6G with a validated high performance liquid...... chromatographic method. Modelling was performed using NONMEM 7.2 and the first order conditional estimation method with interaction. RESULTS: A two compartment distribution model with one absorption transit compartment for rectal administration and systemic clearance from the central compartment best described...

  5. Population pharmacokinetics of oxaliplatin (85 mg/m(2)) in combination with 5-fluorouracil in patients with advanced colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kho, Y.H.; Jansman, F.G.A.; Prins, N.H.; Neef, C.; Brouwers, J.R.B.J.

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) studies of oxaliplatin, using a dose regimen of 85mg/m(2) are lacking. A PK model may be used in future studies to investigate the relationship between pharmacokinetics and dose limiting toxicity. The purpose of this study was to construct a population PK model to describe

  6. Simple model systems: a challenge for Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Carlo Marta

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The success of biomedical researches has led to improvement in human health and increased life expectancy. An unexpected consequence has been an increase of age-related diseases and, in particular, neurodegenerative diseases. These disorders are generally late onset and exhibit complex pathologies including memory loss, cognitive defects, movement disorders and death. Here, it is described as the use of simple animal models such as worms, fishes, flies, Ascidians and sea urchins, have facilitated the understanding of several biochemical mechanisms underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD, one of the most diffuse neurodegenerative pathologies. The discovery of specific genes and proteins associated with AD, and the development of new technologies for the production of transgenic animals, has helped researchers to overcome the lack of natural models. Moreover, simple model systems of AD have been utilized to obtain key information for evaluating potential therapeutic interventions and for testing efficacy of putative neuroprotective compounds.

  7. Plasma exogenous creatinine excretion for the assessment of renal function in avian medicine--pharmacokinetic modeling in racing pigeons (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scope, Alexandra; Schwendenwein, Ilse; Schauberger, Günther

    2013-09-01

    The diagnostic evaluation of the glomerular filtration rate by urinary clearance has significant practical limitations in birds because urine is excreted together with feces. Thus, pharmacokinetic modeling of an exogenous plasma creatinine clearance could be useful for assessing renal creatinine excretion in birds. For this study, creatinine (50 mg/kg) was administered to 2 groups of 15 pigeons (Columba livia) each; in one group by the intravenous (IV) route and in the second by the intramuscular (IM) route. The time series of the plasma creatinine concentrations were analyzed by pharmacokinetic models. Body mass-specific creatinine excretion was determined for IV and IM administration to be between 6.30 and 6.44 mL/min per kg, respectively. Body surface area-specific creatinine clearance, which is related to the metabolic rate, was calculated between 0.506 and 0.523 mL/min per dm2, respectively. The results showed that IV as well as IM administration can be used for assessing renal creatinine excretion in pigeons. For practical reasons, IM administration is recommended, with the use of the Bateman function to calculate creatinine elimination.

  8. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling using microsoft excel and visual basic for applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Dale J

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are mathematical descriptions depicting the relationship between external exposure and internal dose. These models have found great utility for interspecies extrapolation. However, specialized computer software packages, which are not widely distributed, have typically been used for model development and utilization. A few physiological models have been reported using more widely available software packages (e.g., Microsoft Excel), but these tend to include less complex processes and dose metrics. To ascertain the capability of Microsoft Excel and Visual Basis for Applications (VBA) for PBPK modeling, models for styrene, vinyl chloride, and methylene chloride were coded in Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL), Excel, and VBA, and simulation results were compared. For styrene, differences between ACSL and Excel or VBA compartment concentrations and rates of change were less than +/-7.5E-10 using the same numerical integration technique and time step. Differences using VBA fixed step or ACSL Gear's methods were generally Excel and VBA PBPK model dose metrics differed by no more than -0.013% or -0.23%, respectively, from ACSL results. These differences are likely attributable to different step sizes rather than different numerical integration techniques. These results indicate that Microsoft Excel and VBA can be useful tools for utilizing PBPK models, and given the availability of these software programs, it is hoped that this effort will help facilitate the use and investigation of PBPK modeling.

  9. Anticancer activity using positron emission tomography-computed tomography and pharmacokinetics of β-eudesmol in human cholangiocarcinoma xenografted nude mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plengsuriyakarn, Tullayakorn; Karbwang, Juntra; Na-Bangchang, Kesara

    2015-03-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is an important public health problem in several parts of South East Asia, particularly in Thailand. The limited availability of effective diagnostic tools for early stage CCA, including chemotherapeutic options, constitutes a major problem for treatment and control of CCA. The aim of the present study was to assess the anti-CCA activity and pharmacokinetics of β-eudesmol in CCA-xenografted nude mouse model and healthy mice. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose was used for detecting and monitoring tumour development, and PET-CT with technetium-99m was used to investigate its pharmacokinetics property. Results support the role of PET-CT as a potential tool for detecting and monitoring the progress of lung metastasis. Tumour size and lung metastasis were significantly inhibited by 91.6% (of baseline) and 95% (of total lung mass), respectively, following treatment with high-dose β-eudesmol (100 mg/kg body weight for 30 days). Survival time was prolonged by 64.4% compared with untreated controls. Systemic clearance of the compound was rapid, particularly during the first 60 min. The compound was distributed to the vital organs at maximum levels 2 h after oral administration and 15 min after intravenous injection. Results from the present study suggest the potential of β-eudesmol as a promising candidate for further development as an anti-CCA drug with respect to its pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetic properties. PET-CT, with radiotracers (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose and technetium-99m, was shown to be a reliable tool in the investigation of anti-CCA and pharmacokinetic properties of β-eudesmol in CCA-xenografted and healthy mice. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Clinical pharmacokinetics of melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Nathja Groth; Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Gögenur, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    was performed in PubMed and Embase databases. The pharmacokinetic variables included maximal plasma/serum concentration (Cmax), time to maximal plasma/serum concentration (Tmax), elimination half-life (T1/2), area-under-the-curve plasma/serum concentrations (AUC), clearance (Cl), volume of distribution (VD......) and 1602 L (4 mg, oral). Bioavailability of oral melatonin ranged from 9 to 33%. Pharmacokinetics was affected by age, caffeine, smoking, oral contraceptives, feeding status, and fluvoxamine. Critically ill patients displayed accelerated absorption and compromised elimination. CONCLUSIONS: Despite...

  11. Nonlinear mixed effects modelling approach in investigating phenobarbital pharmacokinetic interactions in epileptic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vučićević, Katarina; Jovanović, Marija; Golubović, Bojana; Kovačević, Sandra Vezmar; Miljković, Branislava; Martinović, Žarko; Prostran, Milica

    2015-02-01

    The present study aimed to establish population pharmacokinetic model for phenobarbital (PB), examining and quantifying the magnitude of PB interactions with other antiepileptic drugs concomitantly used and to demonstrate its use for individualization of PB dosing regimen in adult epileptic patients. In total 205 PB concentrations were obtained during routine clinical monitoring of 136 adult epilepsy patients. PB steady state concentrations were measured by homogeneous enzyme immunoassay. Nonlinear mixed effects modelling (NONMEM) was applied for data analyses and evaluation of the final model. According to the final population model, significant determinant of apparent PB clearance (CL/F) was daily dose of concomitantly given valproic acid (VPA). Typical value of PB CL/F for final model was estimated at 0.314 l/h. Based on the final model, co-therapy with usual VPA dose of 1000 mg/day, resulted in PB CL/F average decrease of about 25 %, while 2000 mg/day leads to an average 50 % decrease in PB CL/F. Developed population PB model may be used in estimating individual CL/F for adult epileptic patients and could be applied for individualizing dosing regimen taking into account dose-dependent effect of concomitantly given VPA.

  12. A 'simple' hybrid model for power derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyle, Matthew R.; Elliott, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a method for valuing power derivatives using a supply-demand approach. Our method extends work in the field by incorporating randomness into the base load portion of the supply stack function and equating it with a noisy demand process. We obtain closed form solutions for European option prices written on average spot prices considering two different supply models: a mean-reverting model and a Markov chain model. The results are extensions of the classic Black-Scholes equation. The model provides a relatively simple approach to describe the complicated price behaviour observed in electricity spot markets and also allows for computationally efficient derivatives pricing. (author)

  13. Foreshock and aftershocks in simple earthquake models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemian, J; Tiampo, K F; Klein, W; Dominguez, R

    2015-02-27

    Many models of earthquake faults have been introduced that connect Gutenberg-Richter (GR) scaling to triggering processes. However, natural earthquake fault systems are composed of a variety of different geometries and materials and the associated heterogeneity in physical properties can cause a variety of spatial and temporal behaviors. This raises the question of how the triggering process and the structure interact to produce the observed phenomena. Here we present a simple earthquake fault model based on the Olami-Feder-Christensen and Rundle-Jackson-Brown cellular automata models with long-range interactions that incorporates a fixed percentage of stronger sites, or asperity cells, into the lattice. These asperity cells are significantly stronger than the surrounding lattice sites but eventually rupture when the applied stress reaches their higher threshold stress. The introduction of these spatial heterogeneities results in temporal clustering in the model that mimics that seen in natural fault systems along with GR scaling. In addition, we observe sequences of activity that start with a gradually accelerating number of larger events (foreshocks) prior to a main shock that is followed by a tail of decreasing activity (aftershocks). This work provides further evidence that the spatial and temporal patterns observed in natural seismicity are strongly influenced by the underlying physical properties and are not solely the result of a simple cascade mechanism.

  14. CARVEDILOL POPULATION PHARMACOKINETIC ANALYSIS – APPLIED VALIDATION PROCEDURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Catić-Đorđević

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Carvedilol is a nonselective beta blocker/alpha-1 blocker, which is used for treatment of essential hypertension, chronic stable angina, unstable angina and ischemic left ventricular dysfunction. The aim of this study was to describe carvedilol population pharmacokinetic (PK analysis as well as the validation of analytical procedure, which is an important step regarding this approach. In contemporary clinical practice, population PK analysis is often more important than standard PK approach in setting a mathematical model that describes the PK parameters. Also, it includes the variables that have particular importance in the drugs pharmacokinetics such as sex, body mass, dosage, pharmaceutical form, pathophysiological state, disease associated with the organism or the presence of a specific polymorphism in the isoenzyme important for biotransformation of the drug. One of the most frequently used approach in population PK analysis is the Nonlinear Modeling of Mixed Effects - NONMEM modeling. Analytical methods used in the data collection period is of great importance for the implementation of a population PK analysis of carvedilol in order to obtain reliable data that can be useful in clinical practice. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC analysis of carvedilol is used to confirm the identity of a drug and provide quantitative results and also to monitor the efficacy of the therapy. Analytical procedures used in other studies could not be fully implemented in our research as it was necessary to perform certain modification and validation of the method with the aim of using the obtained results for the purpose of a population pharmacokinetic analysis. Validation process is a logical terminal phase of analytical procedure development that provides applicability of the procedure itself. The goal of validation is to ensure consistency of the method and accuracy of results or to confirm the selection of analytical method for a given sample

  15. A generic whole body physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for therapeutic proteins in PK-Sim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederalt, Christoph; Kuepfer, Lars; Solodenko, Juri; Eissing, Thomas; Siegmund, Hans-Ulrich; Block, Michael; Willmann, Stefan; Lippert, Jörg

    2018-04-01

    Proteins are an increasingly important class of drugs used as therapeutic as well as diagnostic agents. A generic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed in order to represent at whole body level the fundamental mechanisms driving the distribution and clearance of large molecules like therapeutic proteins. The model was built as an extension of the PK-Sim model for small molecules incorporating (i) the two-pore formalism for drug extravasation from blood plasma to interstitial space, (ii) lymph flow, (iii) endosomal clearance and (iv) protection from endosomal clearance by neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) mediated recycling as especially relevant for antibodies. For model development and evaluation, PK data was used for compounds with a wide range of solute radii. The model supports the integration of knowledge gained during all development phases of therapeutic proteins, enables translation from pre-clinical species to human and allows predictions of tissue concentration profiles which are of relevance for the analysis of on-target pharmacodynamic effects as well as off-target toxicity. The current implementation of the model replaces the generic protein PBPK model available in PK-Sim since version 4.2 and becomes part of the Open Systems Pharmacology Suite.

  16. Atmospheric greenhouse effect - simple model; Atmosfaerens drivhuseffekt - enkel modell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanestroem, Ingolf; Henriksen, Thormod

    2011-07-01

    The article shows a simple model for the atmospheric greenhouse effect based on consideration of both the sun and earth as 'black bodies', so that the physical laws that apply to them, may be used. Furthermore, explained why some gases are greenhouse gases, but other gases in the atmosphere has no greenhouse effect. But first, some important concepts and physical laws encountered in the article, are repeated. (AG)

  17. [Impact of ECMO on drugs pharmacokinetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasni, Nesrine; Lemaitre, Florian; Fernandez, Christine; Combes, Alain; Farinotti, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a life support system used in the treatment of patients of all ages with severe respiratory or cardiorespiratory failure. Despite the intensive use of drugs in the treatment of patients on ECMO, few studies have been conducted to determine the impact of this device on the pharmacokinetics of drugs. Publications in this field have shown pharmacokinetics changes resulting in an increase in volume of distribution of drugs and/or decreased clearance with consequent increase of their half-life. Reduced plasma concentrations of some drugs due to their adsorption on the different components of the circuit further complicates the determination of pharmacokinetic parameters of patients treated by ECMO. The literature published up to now on the pharmacokinetic changes associated with ECMO provide preliminary support for dosage adjustment. However, more research is needed to identify dosage strategies for this patient population. © 2011 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  18. A simple mechanical model for the isotropic harmonic oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nita, Gelu M

    2010-01-01

    A constrained elastic pendulum is proposed as a simple mechanical model for the isotropic harmonic oscillator. The conceptual and mathematical simplicity of this model recommends it as an effective pedagogical tool in teaching basic physics concepts at advanced high school and introductory undergraduate course levels.

  19. Design and Use of the Simple Event Model (SEM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hage, W.R.; Malaisé, V.; Segers, R.H.; Hollink, L.

    2011-01-01

    Events have become central elements in the representation of data from domains such as history, cultural heritage, multimedia and geography. The Simple Event Model (SEM) is created to model events in these various domains, without making assumptions about the domain-specific vocabularies used. SEM

  20. A review of morphine and morphine-6-glucuronide's pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationships in experimental and clinical pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sverrisdóttir, Eva; Lund, Trine Meldgaard; Olesen, Anne Estrup

    2015-01-01

    Morphine is a widely used opioid for treatment of moderate to severe pain, but large interindividual variability in patient response and no clear guidance on how to optimise morphine dosage regimen complicates treatment strategy for clinicians. Population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models can...... a detailed overview of the published human population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies for morphine analgesia in addition to basic drug disposition and pharmacological properties of morphine and its analgesic active metabolite, morphine-6-glucuronide, that may help identify future covariates....... Furthermore, based on simulations from key pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models, the contribution of morphine-6-glucuronide to the analgesic response in patients with renal insufficiency was investigated. Simulations were also used to examine the impact of effect-site equilibration half-life on time course...

  1. Multi-Criteria Decision Making For Determining A Simple Model of Supplier Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwati

    2017-06-01

    Supplier selection is a decision with many criteria. Supplier selection model usually involves more than five main criteria and more than 10 sub-criteria. In fact many model includes more than 20 criteria. Too many criteria involved in supplier selection models sometimes make it difficult to apply in many companies. This research focuses on designing supplier selection that easy and simple to be applied in the company. Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) is used to weighting criteria. The analysis results there are four criteria that are easy and simple can be used to select suppliers: Price (weight 0.4) shipment (weight 0.3), quality (weight 0.2) and services (weight 0.1). A real case simulation shows that simple model provides the same decision with a more complex model.

  2. Multiscale Modeling of Antibody Drug Conjugates: Connecting tissue and cellular distribution to whole animal pharmacokinetics and potential implications for efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilliers, Cornelius; Guo, Hans; Liao, Jianshan; Christodolu, Nikolas; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody drug conjugates exhibit complex pharmacokinetics due to their combination of macromolecular and small molecule properties. These issues range from systemic concerns, such as deconjugation of the small molecule drug during the long antibody circulation time or rapid clearance from non-specific interactions, to local tumor tissue heterogeneity, cell bystander effects, and endosomal escape. Mathematical models can be used to study the impact of these processes on overall distribution in an efficient manner, and several types of models have been used to analyze varying aspects of antibody distribution including physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models and tissue-level simulations. However, these processes are quantitative in nature and cannot be handled qualitatively in isolation. For example, free antibody from deconjugation of the small molecule will impact the distribution of conjugated antibodies within the tumor. To incorporate these effects into a unified framework, we have coupled the systemic and organ-level distribution of a PBPK model with the tissue-level detail of a distributed parameter tumor model. We used this mathematical model to analyze new experimental results on the distribution of the clinical antibody drug conjugate Kadcyla in HER2 positive mouse xenografts. This model is able to capture the impact of the drug antibody ratio (DAR) on tumor penetration, the net result of drug deconjugation, and the effect of using unconjugated antibody to drive ADC penetration deeper into the tumor tissue. This modeling approach will provide quantitative and mechanistic support to experimental studies trying to parse the impact of multiple mechanisms of action for these complex drugs. PMID:27287046

  3. Evaluation of Drug-Drug Interaction Potential Between Sacubitril/Valsartan (LCZ696) and Statins Using a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen; Ji, Tao; Einolf, Heidi; Ayalasomayajula, Surya; Lin, Tsu-Han; Hanna, Imad; Heimbach, Tycho; Breen, Christopher; Jarugula, Venkateswar; He, Handan

    2017-05-01

    Sacubitril/valsartan (LCZ696) has been approved for the treatment of heart failure. Sacubitril is an in vitro inhibitor of organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs). In clinical studies, LCZ696 increased atorvastatin C max by 1.7-fold and area under the plasma concentration-time curve by 1.3-fold, but had little or no effect on simvastatin or simvastatin acid exposure. A physiologically based pharmacokinetics modeling approach was applied to explore the underlying mechanisms behind the statin-specific LCZ696 drug interaction observations. The model incorporated OATP-mediated clearance (CL int,T ) for simvastatin and simvastatin acid to successfully describe the pharmacokinetic profiles of either analyte in the absence or presence of LCZ696. Moreover, the model successfully described the clinically observed drug effect with atorvastatin. The simulations clarified the critical parameters responsible for the observation of a low, yet clinically relevant, drug-drug interaction DDI between sacubitril and atorvastatin and the lack of effect with simvastatin acid. Atorvastatin is administered in its active form and rapidly achieves C max that coincide with the low C max of sacubitril. In contrast, simvastatin requires a hydrolysis step to the acid form and therefore is not present at the site of interactions at sacubitril concentrations that are inhibitory. Similar models were used to evaluate the drug-drug interaction risk for additional OATP-transported statins which predicted to maximally result in a 1.5-fold exposure increase. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. PHARMACOKINETIC RESEARCHES AND PRACTICAL MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Belolipetskaya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An article gives in a comprehensive manner the main idea of pharmacokinetics, as the science about rules of substances behavior in the internal environment of the organism, as well as of main parameters of pharmacokinetic researches. The article provides vivid and very  persuasive examples of high practical importance of this science both for creating new medical forms of drugs and for choosing the optimal of therapy regime.

  5. PHARMACOKINETIC RESEARCHES AND PRACTICAL MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Belolipetskaya

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available An article gives in a comprehensive manner the main idea of pharmacokinetics, as the science about rules of substances behavior in the internal environment of the organism, as well as of main parameters of pharmacokinetic researches. The article provides vivid and very  persuasive examples of high practical importance of this science both for creating new medical forms of drugs and for choosing the optimal of therapy regime.

  6. Dose- and time-dependent pharmacokinetics of apigenin trimethyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhennawy, Mai Gamal; Lin, Hai-Shu

    2018-06-15

    Apigenin trimethyl ether (5,7,4'-trimethoxyflavone, ATE), one of the key polymethoxyflavones present in black ginger (rhizome of Kaempferia parviflora) possesses various health-promoting activities. To optimize its medicinal application, the pharmacokinetics of ATE was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats with emphases to identify the impacts from dose and repeated dosing on its major pharmacokinetic parameters. Plasma ATE levels were monitored by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. Upon single intravenous administration (2 mg/kg), plasma levels of ATE declined through an apparent first-order process while dose-escalation to 4 and 8 mg/kg led to its non-linear disposition, which could be described by the Michaelis-Menten model. Similarly, dose-dependent oral pharmacokinetics was confirmed and when the dose was escalated from 5 to 15 and 45 mg/kg, much longer mean residence time (MRT 0→last ), higher dose-normalized maximal plasma concentration (C max /Dose) and exposure (AUC/Dose) were observed at 15 and/or 45 mg/kg. One-week daily oral administration of ATE at 15 mg/kg caused its accelerated elimination and the plasma exposure (AUC) after intravenous (2 mg/kg) and oral administration (15 mg/kg) dropped ~40 and 60%, respectively. As ATE displayed both dose- and time-dependent pharmacokinetics, caution is needed in the medicinal applications of ATE and/or black ginger. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Population pharmacokinetics of bupivacaine in combined lumbar and sciatic nerve block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eljebari, Hanene; Jebabli, Nadia; Salouage, Issam; Gaies, Emna; Lakhal, Mohamed; Boussofara, Mehdi; Klouz, Anis

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The primary aim of this study was to establish the population pharmacokinetic (PPK) model of bupivacaine after combined lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve blocks and secondary aim is to assess the effect of patient's characteristics including age, body weight and sex on pharmacokinetic parameters. Materials and Methods: A total of 31 patients scheduled for elective lower extremity surgery with combined lumbar and sciatic nerve block using plain bupivacaine 0.5% were included. The total bupivacaine plasma concentrations were measured before injection and after two blocks placement and at selected time points. Monitoring of bupivacaine was made by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet detection. Non-linear mixed effects modeling was used to analyze the PPK of bupivacaine. Results: One compartment model with first order absorption, two input compartments and a central elimination was selected. The Shapiro-Wilks test of normality for normalized prediction distribution errors for this model (P = 0.156) showed this as a valid model. The selected model predicts a population clearance of 930 ml/min (residual standard error [RSE] = 15.48%, IC 95% = 930 ± 282.24) with inter individual variability of 75.29%. The central volume of distribution was 134 l (RSE = 12.76%, IC = 134 ± 33.51 L) with inter individual variability of 63.40%. The absorption of bupivacaine in two sites Ka1 and Ka2 were 0.00462/min for the lumbar site and 0.292/min for the sciatic site. Age, body weight and sex have no effect on the bupivacaine pharmacokinetics in this studied population. Conclusion: The developed model helps us to assess the systemic absorption of bupivacaine at two injections sites. PMID:24741194

  8. An intercomparison of mesoscale models at simple sites for wind energy applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Bjarke Tobias; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Sempreviva, Anna Maria

    2017-01-01

    of the output from 25 NWP models is presented for three sites in northern Europe characterized by simple terrain. The models are evaluated sing a number of statistical properties relevant to wind energy and verified with observations. On average the models have small wind speed biases offshore and aloft ( ... %) and larger biases closer to the surface over land (> 7 %). A similar pattern is detected for the inter-model spread. Strongly stable and strongly unstable atmospheric stability conditions are associated with larger wind speed errors. Strong indications are found that using a grid spacing larger than 3 km...... decreases the accuracy of the models, but we found no evidence that using a grid spacing smaller than 3 km is necessary for these simple sites. Applying the models to a simple wind energy offshore wind farm highlights the importance of capturing the correct distributions of wind speed and direction....

  9. Simple model of string with colour degrees of freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadasz, Leszek

    1994-03-01

    We consider a simple model of string with colour charges on its ends. The model is constructed by rewriting the action describing classical spinless as well as spinning particles with colour charge in terms of fields living on the “string worldsheet” bounded by trajectories of the particles.

  10. Simple mathematical models for housing allocation to a homeless ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present simple mathematical models for modelling a homeless population and housing allocation. We look at a situation whereby the local authority makes temporary accommodation available for some of the homeless for a while and we examine how this affects the number of families homeless at any given time.

  11. A Simple theoretical model for 63Ni betavoltaic battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZUO, Guoping; ZHOU, Jianliang; KE, Guotu

    2013-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the energy deposition distribution in semiconductors is performed for 63 Ni beta particles. Results show that the energy deposition distribution exhibits an approximate exponential decay law. A simple theoretical model is developed for 63 Ni betavoltaic battery based on the distribution characteristics. The correctness of the model is validated by two literature experiments. Results show that the theoretical short-circuit current agrees well with the experimental results, and the open-circuit voltage deviates from the experimental results in terms of the influence of the PN junction defects and the simplification of the source. The theoretical model can be applied to 63 Ni and 147 Pm betavoltaic batteries. - Highlights: • The energy deposition distribution is found following an approximate exponential decay law when beta particles emitted from 63 Ni pass through a semiconductor. • A simple theoretical model for 63 Ni betavoltaic battery is constructed based on the exponential decay law. • Theoretical model can be applied to the betavoltaic batteries which radioactive source has a similar energy spectrum with 63 Ni, such as 147 Pm

  12. A simple model for simultaneous methanogenic-denitrification systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garibay-Orijel, C.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Rinderknecht-Seijas, N.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a useful and simple model for studies of simultaneous methanogenic-denitrification (M-D) systems. One equation predicts an inverse relationship between the percentage of electron donor channeled into dissimilatory denitrification and the loading ratio X given by grams degradable COD per...

  13. Dynamic 99mTc-MAG3 renography: images for quality control obtained by combining pharmacokinetic modelling, an anthropomorphic computer phantom and Monte Carlo simulated scintillation camera imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brolin, Gustav; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina; Ljungberg, Michael

    2013-05-01

    In dynamic renal scintigraphy, the main interest is the radiopharmaceutical redistribution as a function of time. Quality control (QC) of renal procedures often relies on phantom experiments to compare image-based results with the measurement setup. A phantom with a realistic anatomy and time-varying activity distribution is therefore desirable. This work describes a pharmacokinetic (PK) compartment model for 99mTc-MAG3, used for defining a dynamic whole-body activity distribution within a digital phantom (XCAT) for accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based images for QC. Each phantom structure is assigned a time-activity curve provided by the PK model, employing parameter values consistent with MAG3 pharmacokinetics. This approach ensures that the total amount of tracer in the phantom is preserved between time points, and it allows for modifications of the pharmacokinetics in a controlled fashion. By adjusting parameter values in the PK model, different clinically realistic scenarios can be mimicked, regarding, e.g., the relative renal uptake and renal transit time. Using the MC code SIMIND, a complete set of renography images including effects of photon attenuation, scattering, limited spatial resolution and noise, are simulated. The obtained image data can be used to evaluate quantitative techniques and computer software in clinical renography.

  14. Observations and models of simple nocturnal slope flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doran, J.C.; Horst, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of simple nocturnal slope winds were taken on Rattlesnake Mountain, a nearly ideal two-dimensional ridge. Tower and tethered balloon instrumentation allowed the determination of the wind and temperature characteristics of the katabatic layer as well as the ambient conditions. Two cases were chosen for study; these were marked by well-defined surface-based temperature inversions and a low-level maximum in the downslope wind component. The downslope development of the slope flow could be determined from the tower measurements, and showed a progressive strenghtening of the katabatic layer. Hydraulic models developed by Manins and Sawford (1979a) and Briggs (1981) gave useful estimates of drainage layer depths, but were not otherwise applicable. A simple numerical model that relates the eddy diffusivity to the local turbulent kinetic energy was found to give good agreement with the observed wind and temperature profiles of the slope flows

  15. Simple model for low-frequency guitar function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ove; Vistisen, Bo B.

    1980-01-01

    - frequency guitar function. The model predicts frequency responce of sound pressure and top plate mobility which are in close quantitative agreement with experimental responses. The absolute sound pressure level and mobility level are predicted to within a few decibels, and the equivalent piston area......The frequency response of sound pressure and top plate mobility is studied around the two first resonances of the guitar. These resonances are shown to result from a coupling between the fundamental top plate mode and the Helmholtz resonance of the cavity. A simple model is proposed for low...

  16. Simple models of equilibrium and nonequilibrium phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebowitz, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    This volume consists of two chapters of particular interest to researchers in the field of statistical mechanics. The first chapter is based on the premise that the best way to understand the qualitative properties that characterize many-body (i.e. macroscopic) systems is to study 'a number of the more significant model systems which, at least in principle are susceptible of complete analysis'. The second chapter deals exclusively with nonequilibrium phenomena. It reviews the theory of fluctuations in open systems to which they have made important contributions. Simple but interesting model examples are emphasised

  17. Design of optimized hypoxia-activated prodrugs using pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Bettina Foehrenbacher

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia contributes to resistance of tumors to some cytotoxic drugs and to radiotherapy, but can in principle be exploited with hypoxia-activated prodrugs (HAP. HAP in clinical development fall into two broad groups. Class I HAP (like the benzotriazine N-oxides tirapazamine and SN30000, are activated under relatively mild hypoxia. In contrast, Class II HAP (such as the nitro compounds PR-104A or TH-302 are maximally activated only under extreme hypoxia, but their active metabolites (effectors diffuse to cells at intermediate O2 and thus also eliminate moderately hypoxic cells. Here, we use a spatially resolved pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (SR-PK/PD model to compare these two strategies and to identify the features required in an optimal Class II HAP. The model uses a Green’s function approach to calculate spatial and longitudinal gradients of O2, prodrug and effector concentrations, and resulting killing in a digitized 3D tumor microregion to estimate activity as monotherapy and in combination with radiotherapy. An analogous model for a normal tissue with mild hypoxia and short intervesssel distances (based on a cremaster muscle microvessel network was used to estimate tumor selectivity of cell killing. This showed that Class II HAP offer advantages over Class I including higher tumor selectivity and greater freedom to vary prodrug diffusibility and rate of metabolic activation. The model suggests that the largest gains in class II HAP antitumor activity could be realized by optimizing effector stability and prodrug activation rates. We also use the model to show that diffusion of effector into blood vessels is unlikely to materially increase systemic exposure for realistic tumor burdens and effector clearances. However, we show that the tumor selectivity achievable by hypoxia-dependent prodrug activation alone is limited if dose-limiting normal tissues are even mildly hypoxic

  18. Simple, fast and accurate two-diode model for photovoltaic modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishaque, Kashif; Salam, Zainal; Taheri, Hamed [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, UTM 81310, Skudai, Johor Bahru (Malaysia)

    2011-02-15

    This paper proposes an improved modeling approach for the two-diode model of photovoltaic (PV) module. The main contribution of this work is the simplification of the current equation, in which only four parameters are required, compared to six or more in the previously developed two-diode models. Furthermore the values of the series and parallel resistances are computed using a simple and fast iterative method. To validate the accuracy of the proposed model, six PV modules of different types (multi-crystalline, mono-crystalline and thin-film) from various manufacturers are tested. The performance of the model is evaluated against the popular single diode models. It is found that the proposed model is superior when subjected to irradiance and temperature variations. In particular the model matches very accurately for all important points of the I-V curves, i.e. the peak power, short-circuit current and open circuit voltage. The modeling method is useful for PV power converter designers and circuit simulator developers who require simple, fast yet accurate model for the PV module. (author)

  19. Efficacy of Cefquinome against Escherichia coli Environmental Mastitis Assessed by Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Integration in Lactating Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the pharmacodynamic effectiveness of cefquinome against environmental Escherichia coli mastitis infection, following an intramammary administration. We established the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD model in lactating mice. The PK/PD parameters were identified to achieve an antibacterial efficacy as indicated by PD activity, cytokine expression and PK/PD simulation. From our findings, given an 200 μg/gland dose once daily can achieve a considerable therapeutic effectiveness in experimental circumstance.

  20. Population pharmacokinetics of intravenous Erwinia asparaginase in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassen, Sebastiaan D T; Mathôt, Ron A A; Pieters, Rob; Kloos, Robin Q H; de Haas, Valérie; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; van den Bos, Cor; Tissing, Wim J E; Te Loo, Maroeska; Bierings, Marc B; Kollen, Wouter J W; Zwaan, Christian M; van der Sluis, Inge M

    2017-03-01

    Erwinia asparaginase is an important component in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A large variability in serum concentrations has been observed after intravenous Erwinia asparaginase. Currently, Dutch Childhood Oncology Group protocols dose alterations are based on trough concentrations to ensure adequate asparaginase activity (≥100 IU/L). The aim of this study was to describe the population pharmacokinetics of intravenous Erwinia asparaginase to quantify and gather insight into inter-individual and inter-occasion variability. The starting dose was evaluated on the basis of the derived population pharmacokinetic parameters. In a multicenter prospective observational study, a total of 714 blood samples were collected from 51 children (age 1-17 years) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The starting dose was 20,000 IU/m 2 three times a week and adjusted according to trough levels from week three onwards. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed using NONMEM ® A 2-compartment linear model with allometric scaling best described the data. Inter-individual and inter-occasion variability of clearance were 33% and 13%, respectively. Clearance in the first month of treatment was 14% higher ( P <0.01). Monte Carlo simulations with our pharmacokinetic model demonstrated that patients with a low weight might require higher doses to achieve similar concentrations compared to patients with high weight. The current starting dose of 20,000 IU/m 2 might result in inadequate concentrations, especially for smaller, lower weight patients, hence dose adjustments based on individual clearance are recommended. The protocols were approved by the institutional review boards. (Registered at NTR 3379 Dutch Trial Register; www.trialregister.nl). Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  1. Compartmental analysis, imaging techniques and population pharmacokinetic. Experiences at CENTIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernández, Ignacio; León, Mariela; Leyva, Rene; Castro, Yusniel; Ayra, Fernando E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In pharmacokinetic evaluation small rodents are used in a large extend. Traditional pharmacokinetic evaluations by the two steps approach can be replaced by the sparse data design which may also represent a complicated situation to evaluate satisfactorily from the statistical point of view. In this presentation different situations of sparse data sampling are analyzed based on practical consideration. Non linear mixed effect model was selected in order to estimate pharmacokinetic parameters in simulated data from real experimental results using blood sampling and imaging procedures. Materials and methods: Different scenarios representing several experimental designs of incomplete individual profiles were evaluated. Data sets were simulated based on real data from previous experiments. In all cases three to five blood samples were considered per time point. A combination of compartmental analysis with tumor uptake obtained by gammagraphy of radiolabeled drugs is also evaluated.All pharmacokinetic profiles were analyzed by means of MONOLIX software version 4.2.3. Results: All sampling schedules yield the same results when computed using the MONOLIX software and the SAEM algorithm. Population and individual pharmacokinetic parameters were accurately estimated with three or five determination per sampling point. According with the used methodology and software tool, it can be an expected result, but demonstrating the method performance in such situations, allow us to select a more flexible design using a very small number of animals in preclinical research. The combination with imaging procedures also allows us to construct a completely structured compartmental analysis. Results of real experiments are presented demonstrating the versatility of used methodology in different evaluations. The same sampling approach can be considered in phase I or II clinical trials. (author)

  2. A simple model to estimate the optimal doping of p - Type oxide superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adir Moysés Luiz

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen doping of superconductors is discussed. Doping high-Tc superconductors with oxygen seems to be more efficient than other doping procedures. Using the assumption of double valence fluctuations, we present a simple model to estimate the optimal doping of p-type oxide superconductors. The experimental values of oxygen content for optimal doping of the most important p-type oxide superconductors can be accounted for adequately using this simple model. We expect that our simple model will encourage further experimental and theoretical researches in superconducting materials.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of methyl salicylate-2-O-β-D-lactoside, a novel salicylic acid analog isolated from Gaultheria yunnanensis, in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dan; Ma, Xiaowei; Xin, Wenyu; Huang, Chao; Zhang, Weiku; Zhang, Tiantai; Du, Guanhua

    2013-12-01

    Methyl salicylate-2-O-β-D-lactoside (MSL), a natural salicylate derivative of Gaultheria yunnanensis (Franch.) Rehder (G. yunnanensis), has been shown to provide a beneficial anti-inflammatory effect in animal models. Studies on the pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of MSL can provide both a substantial foundation for understanding its mechanism and empirical evidence to support its use in clinical practice. A simple and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method, coupled with ultraviolet analyte detection, was developed for determining the concentration of MSL and its metabolite in beagle plasma. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a Agilent Zorbax SB-C18 column (5 μM,4.6 × 250 mm). The mobile phase consisted of aqueous solution containing 0.1% phosphoric acid and acetonitrile (82:90, v/v), at a flow rate of 1 mL/min. Validation of the assay demonstrated that the developed HPLC method was sensitive, accurate and selective for the determination of MSL and its metabolite in dog plasma. After orally administering three doses of MSL, it could no longer be detected in dog plasma and its metabolite, salicylic acid, was detected. Salicylic acid showed a single peak in the plasma concentration-time curves and linear pharmacokinetics following the three oral doses (r(2) > 0.99). In contrast, only MSL was detected in plasma following intravenous administration. These results will aid in understanding the pharmacological significance of MSL. The developed method was successfully used for evaluation of the oral and intravenous pharmacokinetic profile of MSL in dogs. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Modeling reproductive decisions with simple heuristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Todd

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Many of the reproductive decisions that humans make happen without much planning or forethought, arising instead through the use of simple choice rules or heuristics that involve relatively little information and processing. Nonetheless, these heuristic-guided decisions are typically beneficial, owing to humans' ecological rationality - the evolved fit between our constrained decision mechanisms and the adaptive problems we face. OBJECTIVE This paper reviews research on the ecological rationality of human decision making in the domain of reproduction, showing how fertility-related decisions are commonly made using various simple heuristics matched to the structure of the environment in which they are applied, rather than being made with information-hungry mechanisms based on optimization or rational economic choice. METHODS First, heuristics for sequential mate search are covered; these heuristics determine when to stop the process of mate search by deciding that a good-enough mate who is also mutually interested has been found, using a process of aspiration-level setting and assessing. These models are tested via computer simulation and comparison to demographic age-at-first-marriage data. Next, a heuristic process of feature-based mate comparison and choice is discussed, in which mate choices are determined by a simple process of feature-matching with relaxing standards over time. Parental investment heuristics used to divide resources among offspring are summarized. Finally, methods for testing the use of such mate choice heuristics in a specific population over time are then described.

  5. Some simple applications of probability models to birth intervals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrestha, G.

    1987-07-01

    An attempt has been made in this paper to apply some simple probability models to birth intervals under the assumption of constant fecundability and varying fecundability among women. The parameters of the probability models are estimated by using the method of moments and the method of maximum likelihood. (author). 9 refs, 2 tabs

  6. Alterations in Pharmacokinetics of Gemcitabine and Erlotinib by Concurrent Administration of Hyangsayukgunja-Tang, a Gastroprotective Herbal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Shin, Soyoung; Kim, Sarah; Bulitta, Jürgen B; Weon, Kwon-Yeon; Joo, Sang Hoon; Ma, Eunsook; Yoo, Sun Dong; Park, Gi-Young; Kwon, Dong Rak; Jeong, Seok Won; Lee, Da Young; Shin, Beom Soo

    2017-09-10

    Gemcitabine and erlotinib are the chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of various cancers and their combination is being accepted as a first-line treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. Hyangsayukgunja-tang (HYT) is a traditional oriental medicine used in various digestive disorders and potentially helpful to treat gastrointestinal adverse effects related to chemotherapy. The present study was aimed to evaluate the effect of HYT on the pharmacokinetics of gemcitabine and erlotinib given simultaneously in rats. Rats were pretreated with HYT at an oral dose of 1200 mg/kg/day once daily for a single day or 14 consecutive days. Immediately after pretreatment with HYT, gemcitabine and erlotinib were administered by intravenous injection (10 mg/kg) and oral administration (20 mg/kg), respectively. The effects of HYT on pharmacokinetics of the two drugs were estimated by non-compartmental analysis and pharmacokinetic modeling. The pharmacokinetics of gemcitabine and erlotinib were not altered by single dose HYT pretreatment. However, the plasma levels of OSI-420 and OSI-413, active metabolites of erlotinib, were significantly decreased in the multiple dose HYT pretreatment group. The pharmacokinetic model estimated increased systemic clearances of OSI-420 and OSI-413 by multiple doses of HYT. These data suggest that HYT may affect the elimination of OSI-420 and OSI-413.

  7. Specific heat of the simple-cubic Ising model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, X.; Blöte, H.W.J.

    2010-01-01

    We provide an expression quantitatively describing the specific heat of the Ising model on the simple-cubic lattice in the critical region. This expression is based on finite-size scaling of numerical results obtained by means of a Monte Carlo method. It agrees satisfactorily with series expansions

  8. Pharmacokinetics of dexmedetomidine administered to patients with end-stage renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism undergoing general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, W; Zhang, Y; Zhang, M-Z; Huang, X-H; Li, Y; Li, R; Liu, Q-W

    2018-06-01

    The primary objective of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics of dexmedetomidine in patients with end-stage renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism with those in normal individuals. Fifteen patients with end-stage renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism (Renal-failure Group) and 8 patients with normal renal and parathyroid gland function (Control Group) received intravenous 0.6 μg/kg dexmedetomidine for 10 minutes before anaesthesia induction. Arterial blood samples for plasma dexmedetomidine concentration analysis were drawn at regular intervals after the infusion was stopped. The pharmacokinetics were analysed using a nonlinear mixed-effect model with NONMEM software. The statistical significance of covariates was examined using the objective function (-2 log likelihood). In the forward inclusion and backward deletion, covariates (age, weight, sex, height, lean body mass [LBM], body surface area [BSA], body mass index [BMI], plasma albumin and grouping factor [renal failure or not]) were tested for significant effects on pharmacokinetic parameters. The validity of our population model was also evaluated using bootstrap simulations. The dexmedetomidine concentration-time curves fitted best with the principles of a two-compartmental pharmacokinetic model. No covariate of systemic clearance further improved the model. The final pharmacokinetic parameter values were as follows: V 1  = 60.6 L, V 2  = 222 L, Cl 1  = 0.825 L/min and Cl 2  = 4.48 L/min. There was no influence of age, weight, sex, height, LBM, BSA, BMI, plasma albumin and grouping factor (renal failure or not) on pharmacokinetic parameters. Although the plasma albumin concentrations (35.46 ± 4.13 vs 44.10 ± 1.12 mmol/L, respectively, P Renal-failure Group than in the Control Group (81.68 ± 18.08 vs 63.07 ± 13.45 μg/kg/min, respectively, P renal failure and hyperparathyroidism were similar to those in patients with normal renal function. Further

  9. ADAM, a hands-on patient simulator for teaching principles of drug disposition and compartmental pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuna, Ines; Holt, Andrew

    2017-11-01

    To design, construct and validate a pharmacokinetics simulator that offers students hands-on opportunities to participate in the design, administration and analysis of oral and intravenous dosing regimens. The Alberta Drug Administration Modeller (ADAM) is a mechanical patient in which peristaltic circulation of water through a network of silicone tubing and glass bottles creates a representation of the outcomes of drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination. Changing peristaltic pump rates and volumes in bottles allows values for pharmacokinetic constants to be varied, thereby simulating differences in drug properties and in patient physiologies and pathologies. Following administration of methylene blue dye by oral or intravenous routes, plasma and/or urine samples are collected and drug concentrations are determined spectrophotometrically. The effectiveness of the simulator in enhancing student competence and confidence was assessed in two undergraduate laboratory classes. The simulator effectively models one- and two-compartment drug behaviour in a mathematically-robust and realistic manner. Data allow calculation of numerous pharmacokinetic constants, by traditional graphing methods or with curve-fitting software. Students' competence in solving pharmacokinetic problems involving calculations and graphing improved significantly, while an increase in confidence and understanding was reported. The ADAM is relatively inexpensive and straightforward to construct, and offers a realistic, hands-on pharmacokinetics learning opportunity for students that effectively complements didactic lectures. © 2017 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Semiphysiological versus Empirical Modelling of the Population Pharmacokinetics of Free and Total Cefazolin during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Coen van Hasselt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a first population pharmacokinetic (PK model for free and total cefazolin during pregnancy, which can be used for dose regimen optimization. Secondly, analysis of PK studies in pregnant patients is challenging due to study design limitations. We therefore developed a semiphysiological modeling approach, which leveraged gestation-induced changes in creatinine clearance (CrCL into a population PK model. This model was then compared to the conventional empirical covariate model. First, a base two-compartmental PK model with a linear protein binding was developed. The empirical covariate model for gestational changes consisted of a linear relationship between CL and gestational age. The semiphysiological model was based on the base population PK model and a separately developed mixed-effect model for gestation-induced change in CrCL. Estimates for baseline clearance (CL were 0.119 L/min (RSE 58% and 0.142 L/min (RSE 44% for the empirical and semiphysiological models, respectively. Both models described the available PK data comparably well. However, as the semiphysiological model was based on prior knowledge of gestation-induced changes in renal function, this model may have improved predictive performance. This work demonstrates how a hybrid semiphysiological population PK approach may be of relevance in order to derive more informative inferences.

  11. Simple model for decay of laser generated shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trainor, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    A simple model is derived to calculate the hydrodynamic decay of laser-generated shock waves. Comparison with detailed hydrocode simulations shows good agreement between calculated time evolution of shock pressure, position, and instantaneous pressure profile. Reliability of the model decreases in regions of the target where superthermal-electron preheat effects become comparable to shock effects

  12. Pharmacokinetic modeling: Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of bisphenol A in monkeys with extrapolation to humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Vanlandingham, Michelle; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for bisphenol A (BPA) in adult rhesus monkeys using intravenous (iv) and oral bolus doses of 100 μg d6-BPA/kg (). This calibrated PBPK adult monkey model for BPA was then evaluated against published monkey kinetic studies with BPA. Using two versions of the adult monkey model based on monkey BPA kinetic data from and , the aglycone BPA pharmacokinetics were simulated for human oral ingestion of 5 mg d16-BPA per person (Völkel et al., 2002). Völkel et al. were unable to detect the aglycone BPA in plasma, but were able to detect BPA metabolites. These human model predictions of the aglycone BPA in plasma were then compared to previously published PBPK model predictions obtained by simulating the Völkel et al. kinetic study. Our BPA human model, using two parameter sets reflecting two adult monkey studies, both predicted lower aglycone levels in human serum than the previous human BPA PBPK model predictions. BPA was metabolized at all ages of monkey (PND 5 to adult) by the gut wall and liver. However, the hepatic metabolism of BPA and systemic clearance of its phase II metabolites appear to be slower in younger monkeys than adults. The use of the current non-human primate BPA model parameters provides more confidence in predicting the aglycone BPA in serum levels in humans after oral ingestion of BPA. -- Highlights: ► A bisphenol A (BPA) PBPK model for the infant and adult monkey was constructed. ► The hepatic metabolic rate of BPA increased with age of the monkey. ► The systemic clearance rate of metabolites increased with age of the monkey. ► Gut wall metabolism of orally administered BPA was substantial across all ages of monkeys. ► Aglycone BPA plasma concentrations were predicted in humans orally given oral doses of deuterated BPA.

  13. A simple model of bedform migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Jesper; Ernstsen, Verner Brandbyge; Flemming, Burg W

    2010-01-01

    and width) of naturally-packed bed material on the bedform lee side, qb(crest). The model is simple, built on a rational description of simplified sediment mechanics, and its calibration constant can be explained in accordance with estimated values of the physical constants on which it is based. Predicted......A model linking subaqueous dune migration to the effective (grain related) shear stress is calibrated by means of flume data for bedform dimensions and migration rates. The effective shear stress is calculated on the basis of a new method assuming a near-bed layer above the mean bed level in which...... the current velocity accelerates towards the bedform crest. As a consequence, the effective bed shear stress corresponds to the shear stress acting directly on top of the bedform. The model operates with the critical Shields stress as a function of grain size, and predicts the deposition (volume per unit time...

  14. The metabolism and pharmacokinetics of isotretinoin in patients with acne and rosacea are not influenced by ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønhøj Larsen, F; Jakobsen, P; Grønhøj Larsen, C

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Isotretinoin is effective in the treatment of severe acne and rosacea. Both parent drug and its main metabolite 4-oxo-isotretinoin are potentially teratogenic compounds and contain a carboxylic acid moiety. In the presence of ethanol, naturally occurring as well as synthetic retinoids......-RA), and other possible metabolites in the presence or absence of ethanol are converted to their corresponding ethyl derivatives in patients with severe acne or rosacea after multiple isotretinoin dosing. In addition, pharmacokinetic parameters of the parent drug and its 4-oxo metabolite were determined....... PATIENTS/METHODS: Eleven patients with severe acne or rosacea were treated with isotretinoin daily for 3 months and investigated pharmacokinetically during 24 h after 1 month of treatment and for up to 28 days after discontinuation of therapy. A possible influence of ethanol was evaluated using a simple...

  15. Characteristics and Properties of a Simple Linear Regression Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowal Robert

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A simple linear regression model is one of the pillars of classic econometrics. Despite the passage of time, it continues to raise interest both from the theoretical side as well as from the application side. One of the many fundamental questions in the model concerns determining derivative characteristics and studying the properties existing in their scope, referring to the first of these aspects. The literature of the subject provides several classic solutions in that regard. In the paper, a completely new design is proposed, based on the direct application of variance and its properties, resulting from the non-correlation of certain estimators with the mean, within the scope of which some fundamental dependencies of the model characteristics are obtained in a much more compact manner. The apparatus allows for a simple and uniform demonstration of multiple dependencies and fundamental properties in the model, and it does it in an intuitive manner. The results were obtained in a classic, traditional area, where everything, as it might seem, has already been thoroughly studied and discovered.

  16. Preclinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamic Target of SCY-078, a First-in-Class Orally Active Antifungal Glucan Synthesis Inhibitor, in Murine Models of Disseminated Candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wring, Stephen A; Randolph, Ryan; Park, SeongHee; Abruzzo, George; Chen, Qing; Flattery, Amy; Garrett, Graig; Peel, Michael; Outcalt, Russell; Powell, Kendall; Trucksis, Michelle; Angulo, David; Borroto-Esoda, Katyna

    2017-04-01

    SCY-078 (MK-3118) is a novel, semisynthetic derivative of enfumafungin and represents the first compound of the triterpene class of antifungals. SCY-078 exhibits potent inhibition of β-(1,3)-d-glucan synthesis, an essential cell wall component of many pathogenic fungi, including Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. SCY-078 is currently in phase 2 clinical development for the treatment of invasive fungal diseases. In vitro disposition studies to assess solubility, intestinal permeability, and metabolic stability were predictive of good oral bioavailability. Preclinical pharmacokinetic studies were consistent with once-daily administration to humans. After intravenous delivery, plasma clearance in rodents and dogs was low, representing candidiasis, exceeded plasma by 20- to 25-fold for the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 h to infinity (AUC 0-∞ ) and C max SCY-078 achieved efficacy endpoints following oral delivery across multiple murine models of disseminated candidiasis. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic indices C max /MIC and AUC/MIC correlated with outcome. Target therapeutic exposure, expressed as the plasma AUC 0-24 , was comparable across models, with an upper value of 11.2 μg·h/ml (15.4 μM·h); the corresponding mean value for free drug AUC/MIC was ∼0.75. Overall, these results demonstrate that SCY-078 has the oral and intravenous (i.v.) pharmacokinetic properties and potency in murine infection models of disseminated candidiasis to support further investigation as a novel i.v. and oral treatment for invasive fungal diseases. Copyright © 2017 Wring et al.

  17. Preclinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamic Target of SCY-078, a First-in-Class Orally Active Antifungal Glucan Synthesis Inhibitor, in Murine Models of Disseminated Candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Ryan; Park, SeongHee; Abruzzo, George; Chen, Qing; Flattery, Amy; Garrett, Graig; Peel, Michael; Outcalt, Russell; Powell, Kendall; Trucksis, Michelle; Angulo, David; Borroto-Esoda, Katyna

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT SCY-078 (MK-3118) is a novel, semisynthetic derivative of enfumafungin and represents the first compound of the triterpene class of antifungals. SCY-078 exhibits potent inhibition of β-(1,3)-d-glucan synthesis, an essential cell wall component of many pathogenic fungi, including Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. SCY-078 is currently in phase 2 clinical development for the treatment of invasive fungal diseases. In vitro disposition studies to assess solubility, intestinal permeability, and metabolic stability were predictive of good oral bioavailability. Preclinical pharmacokinetic studies were consistent with once-daily administration to humans. After intravenous delivery, plasma clearance in rodents and dogs was low, representing candidiasis, exceeded plasma by 20- to 25-fold for the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 h to infinity (AUC0–∞) and Cmax. SCY-078 achieved efficacy endpoints following oral delivery across multiple murine models of disseminated candidiasis. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic indices Cmax/MIC and AUC/MIC correlated with outcome. Target therapeutic exposure, expressed as the plasma AUC0–24, was comparable across models, with an upper value of 11.2 μg·h/ml (15.4 μM·h); the corresponding mean value for free drug AUC/MIC was ∼0.75. Overall, these results demonstrate that SCY-078 has the oral and intravenous (i.v.) pharmacokinetic properties and potency in murine infection models of disseminated candidiasis to support further investigation as a novel i.v. and oral treatment for invasive fungal diseases. PMID:28137806

  18. A simple geometrical model describing shapes of soap films suspended on two rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Felix J.; Kilvington, Charles D.; Wildenberg, Rebekah L.; Camacho, Franco E.; Walecki, Wojciech J.; Walecki, Peter S.; Walecki, Eve S.

    2016-09-01

    We measured and analysed the stability of two types of soap films suspended on two rings using the simple conical frusta-based model, where we use common definition of conical frustum as a portion of a cone that lies between two parallel planes cutting it. Using frusta-based we reproduced very well-known results for catenoid surfaces with and without a central disk. We present for the first time a simple conical frusta based spreadsheet model of the soap surface. This very simple, elementary, geometrical model produces results surprisingly well matching the experimental data and known exact analytical solutions. The experiment and the spreadsheet model can be used as a powerful teaching tool for pre-calculus and geometry students.

  19. Mechanism-based population pharmacokinetic modelling in diabetes: vildagliptin as a tight binding inhibitor and substrate of dipeptidyl peptidase IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landersdorfer, Cornelia B; He, Yan-Ling; Jusko, William J

    2012-01-01

    AIMS To assess the pharmacokinetics of vildagliptin at different doses and build a mechanism-based population model that simultaneously describes vildagliptin pharmacokinetics and its effects on DPP-4 activity based on underlying physiology and biology. METHODS Vildagliptin concentrations and DPP-4 activity vs. time from 13 type 2 diabetic patients after oral vildagliptin 10, 25 or 100 mg and placebo twice daily for 28 days were co-modelled. NONMEM VI and S-ADAPT were utilized for population modelling. RESULTS A target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) model accounting for capacity-limited high affinity binding of vildagliptin to DPP-4 in plasma and tissues had good predictive performance. Modelling the full time course of the vildagliptin-DPP-4 interaction suggested parallel vildagliptin dissociation from DPP-4 by a slow first-order process and hydrolysis by DPP-4 to an inactive metabolite as a disposition mechanism. Due to limited amounts of DPP-4, vildagliptin concentrations increased slightly more than dose proportionally. This newly proposed model and the parameter estimates are supported by published in vitro studies. Mean parameter estimates (inter-individual coefficient of variation) were: non-saturable clearance 36 l h−1 (25%), central volume of distribution 22 l (37%), half-life of dissociation from DPP-4 1.1 h (94%) and half-life of hydrolysis 6.3 h (81%). CONCLUSIONS Vildagliptin is both an inhibitor and substrate for DPP-4. By utilizing the TMDD approach, slow dissociation of vildagliptin from DPP-4 was found in patients and the half-life of hydrolysis by DPP-4 estimated. This model can be used to predict DPP-4 inhibition effects of other dosage regimens and be modified for other DPP-4 inhibitors to differentiate their properties. PMID:22442826

  20. A simple flow-concentration modelling method for integrating water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A simple flow-concentration modelling method for integrating water quality and ... flow requirements are assessed for maintenance low flow, drought low flow ... the instream concentrations of chemical constituents that will arise from different ...

  1. [Plasma ibuprofen enantiomers and their pharmacokinetics in Beagle dogs determined by HPLC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-yan; Kong, Ai-ying; Yang, Bo; Yan, Liang-ping; Di, Xin

    2015-12-01

    A chiral high-performance liquid chromatography method was developed for the simultaneous determination of ibuprofen enantiomers in dog plasma. It was used to study the pharmacokinetics in the Beagle dog after intravenous administration of racemic-ibuprofen, S-ibuprofen and R-ibuprofen. Ketoprofen was chosen as the internal standard. After a simple precipitation using methanol as the precipitating solvent, both analytes and IS were separated on a Kromasil 100-5CHI-TBB chiral column (250 mm x4.6 mm, 5 μm) with isocratic elution using acetonitrile - 20 mmol x L(-1) phosphate buffer (pH 3.0, containing 5% methanol) (6 : 4) as the mobile phase. The detection wavelength was 220 nm. Liner calibration curves for both of the ibuprofen enantiomers were over the concentration range from 0.5 to 50 μg x mL(-1) with a lower limit of quantification of 0.5 μg x mL(-1), the accuracies were all in standard ranges. The intra- and inter- assay precisions were all below 7%. The recovery rate was 93.1% to 100.4%. The experiments proved that the method was simple, rapid and sensitive. It can be used in the quantitative determination of ibuprofen enantiomers in dog plasma. The method was used to determine the concentration of ibuprofen enantiomers in Beagle dog plasma after a single intravenous administration of racemic-ibuprofen, S-ibuprofen and R-ibuprofen (9 mg x kg(-1)) and the pharmacokinetics parameters were calculated based on the concentration-time curves. The C(max) of S-ibuprofen in Beagle dog plasma after a single intravenous administration of racemic-ibuprofen, S-ibuprofen and R-ibuprofen were 30.8 ± 4.7, 46.1 ± 5.9 and 20.0 ± 2.6 μg x mL(-1), respectively. In terms of the exposure of active ingredient, it revealed a significant difference between the administration of S-ibuprofen and the other two groups. The systematical R- to S- chiral inversion was discussed. Comparing the pharmacokinetic parameters at different doses, chiral inversion were 70.1% ± 36.6% and 76

  2. Simple models for the simulation of submarine melt for a Greenland glacial system model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Johanna; Perrette, Mahé; Ganopolski, Andrey

    2018-01-01

    Two hundred marine-terminating Greenland outlet glaciers deliver more than half of the annually accumulated ice into the ocean and have played an important role in the Greenland ice sheet mass loss observed since the mid-1990s. Submarine melt may play a crucial role in the mass balance and position of the grounding line of these outlet glaciers. As the ocean warms, it is expected that submarine melt will increase, potentially driving outlet glaciers retreat and contributing to sea level rise. Projections of the future contribution of outlet glaciers to sea level rise are hampered by the necessity to use models with extremely high resolution of the order of a few hundred meters. That requirement in not only demanded when modeling outlet glaciers as a stand alone model but also when coupling them with high-resolution 3-D ocean models. In addition, fjord bathymetry data are mostly missing or inaccurate (errors of several hundreds of meters), which questions the benefit of using computationally expensive 3-D models for future predictions. Here we propose an alternative approach built on the use of a computationally efficient simple model of submarine melt based on turbulent plume theory. We show that such a simple model is in reasonable agreement with several available modeling studies. We performed a suite of experiments to analyze sensitivity of these simple models to model parameters and climate characteristics. We found that the computationally cheap plume model demonstrates qualitatively similar behavior as 3-D general circulation models. To match results of the 3-D models in a quantitative manner, a scaling factor of the order of 1 is needed for the plume models. We applied this approach to model submarine melt for six representative Greenland glaciers and found that the application of a line plume can produce submarine melt compatible with observational data. Our results show that the line plume model is more appropriate than the cone plume model for simulating

  3. Simple inflationary quintessential model. II. Power law potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haro, Jaume; Amorós, Jaume; Pan, Supriya

    2016-09-01

    The present work is a sequel of our previous work [Phys. Rev. D 93, 084018 (2016)] which depicted a simple version of an inflationary quintessential model whose inflationary stage was described by a Higgs-type potential and the quintessential phase was responsible due to an exponential potential. Additionally, the model predicted a nonsingular universe in past which was geodesically past incomplete. Further, it was also found that the model is in agreement with the Planck 2013 data when running is allowed. But, this model provides a theoretical value of the running which is far smaller than the central value of the best fit in ns , r , αs≡d ns/d l n k parameter space where ns, r , αs respectively denote the spectral index, tensor-to-scalar ratio and the running of the spectral index associated with any inflationary model, and consequently to analyze the viability of the model one has to focus in the two-dimensional marginalized confidence level in the allowed domain of the plane (ns,r ) without taking into account the running. Unfortunately, such analysis shows that this model does not pass this test. However, in this sequel we propose a family of models runs by a single parameter α ∈[0 ,1 ] which proposes another "inflationary quintessential model" where the inflation and the quintessence regimes are respectively described by a power law potential and a cosmological constant. The model is also nonsingular although geodesically past incomplete as in the cited model. Moreover, the present one is found to be more simple compared to the previous model and it is in excellent agreement with the observational data. In fact, we note that, unlike the previous model, a large number of the models of this family with α ∈[0 ,1/2 ) match with both Planck 2013 and Planck 2015 data without allowing the running. Thus, the properties in the current family of models compared to its past companion justify its need for a better cosmological model with the successive

  4. Treatment with subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl: results from a population pharmacokinetic study in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosten, Astrid W; Abrantes, João A; Jönsson, Siv; de Bruijn, Peter; Kuip, Evelien J M; Falcão, Amílcar; van der Rijt, Carin C D; Mathijssen, Ron H J

    2016-04-01

    Transdermal fentanyl is effective for the treatment of moderate to severe cancer-related pain but is unsuitable for fast titration. In this setting, continuous subcutaneous fentanyl may be used. As data on the pharmacokinetics of continuous subcutaneous fentanyl are lacking, we studied the pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl. Furthermore, we evaluated rotations from the subcutaneous to the transdermal route. Fifty-two patients treated with subcutaneous and/or transdermal fentanyl for moderate to severe cancer-related pain participated. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed and evaluated using non-linear mixed-effects modelling. For rotations from subcutaneous to transdermal fentanyl, a 1:1 dose conversion ratio was used while the subcutaneous infusion was continued for 12 h (with a 50 % tapering after 6 h). A 6-h scheme with 50 % tapering after 3 h was simulated using the final model. A one-compartment model with first-order elimination and separate first-order absorption processes for each route adequately described the data. The estimated apparent clearance of fentanyl was 49.6 L/h; the absorption rate constant for subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl was 0.0358 and 0.0135 h(-1), respectively. Moderate to large inter-individual and inter-occasion variability was found. Around rotation from subcutaneous to transdermal fentanyl, measured and simulated plasma fentanyl concentrations rose and increasing side effects were observed. We describe the pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl in one patient cohort and report several findings that are relevant for clinical practice. Further research is warranted to study the optimal scheme for rotations from the subcutaneous to the transdermal route.

  5. The pharmacokinetic behaviour of hypoxoside taken orally by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    measured with a high-performance liquid chromatography . method. For the ... the South African Medicines Control Council to conduct a phase I pharmacokinetic and ... The significance of various factors that influence the pharmacokinetic ...

  6. A simple multistage closed-(box+reservoir model of chemical evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caimmi R.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Simple closed-box (CB models of chemical evolution are extended on two respects, namely (i simple closed-(box+reservoir (CBR models allowing gas outflow from the box into the reservoir (Hartwick 1976 or gas inflow into the box from the reservoir (Caimmi 2007 with rate proportional to the star formation rate, and (ii simple multistage closed-(box+reservoir (MCBR models allowing different stages of evolution characterized by different inflow or outflow rates. The theoretical differential oxygen abundance distribution (TDOD predicted by the model maintains close to a continuous broken straight line. An application is made where a fictitious sample is built up from two distinct samples of halo stars and taken as representative of the inner Galactic halo. The related empirical differential oxygen abundance distribution (EDOD is represented, to an acceptable extent, as a continuous broken line for two viable [O/H]-[Fe/H] empirical relations. The slopes and the intercepts of the regression lines are determined, and then used as input parameters to MCBR models. Within the errors (-+σ, regression line slopes correspond to a large inflow during the earlier stage of evolution and to low or moderate outflow during the subsequent stages. A possible inner halo - outer (metal-poor bulge connection is also briefly discussed. Quantitative results cannot be considered for applications to the inner Galactic halo, unless selection effects and disk contamination are removed from halo samples, and discrepancies between different oxygen abundance determination methods are explained.

  7. Genealogies in simple models of evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunet, Éric; Derrida, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    We review the statistical properties of the genealogies of a few models of evolution. In the asexual case, selection leads to coalescence times which grow logarithmically with the size of the population, in contrast with the linear growth of the neutral case. Moreover for a whole class of models, the statistics of the genealogies are those of the Bolthausen–Sznitman coalescent rather than the Kingman coalescent in the neutral case. For sexual reproduction in the neutral case, the time to reach the first common ancestors for the whole population and the time for all individuals to have all their ancestors in common are also logarithmic in the population size, as predicted by Chang in 1999. We discuss how these times are modified by introducing selection in a simple way. (paper)

  8. [Research progress on current pharmacokinetic evaluation of Chinese herbal medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guofu; Zhao, Haoru; Yang, Jin

    2011-03-01

    In order to prove safety and efficacy, herbal medicines must undergo the rigorous scientific researches such as pharmacokinetic and bioavailability, before they are put on the market in the foreign countries. Botanical Drug Products promulgated by the US FDA could guide industry sponsors to develop herbal drugs, which was also an important reference for investigating Chinese herbal medicines. This paper reviews and discusses novel approaches for how to assess systemic exposure and pharmacokinetic of Chinese herbal medicines, which were in line with FDA guidance. This mainly focus on identifying pharmacokinetic markers of botanical products, integral pharmacokinetic study of multiple components, Biopharmaceutics drug disposition classification system, and population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic study in herb-drug interaction.

  9. Development of population pharmacokinetics model of icotinib with non-linear absorption characters in healthy Chinese volunteers to assess the CYP2C19 polymorphism and food-intake effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Pei; Chen, Jia; Liu, Dongyang; Zheng, Xin; Zhao, Qian; Jiang, Ji

    2015-07-01

    Icotinib is a potent and selective inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) approved to treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, its high variability may impede its application. The objectives of this analysis were to assess plasma pharmacokinetics and identify covariates that may explain variability in icotinib absorption and/or disposition following single dose of icotinib in healthy volunteers. Data from two clinical studies (n = 22) were analyzed. One study was designed as three-period and Latin-squared (six sequence) trial to evaluate dose proportionality, and the other one was designed as two-way crossover trial to evaluate food effect on pharmacokinetics (PK) characters. Icotinib concentrations in plasma were analyzed using non-linear mixed-effects model (NONMEM) method. The model was used to assess influence of food, demographic characteristics, measurements of blood biochemistry, and CYP2C19 genotype on PK characters of icotinib in humans. The final model was diagnosed by goodness-of-fit plots and evaluated by visual predictive check (VPC) and bootstrap methods. A two-compartment model with saturated absorption character was developed to capture icotinib pharmacokinetics. Typical value of clearance, distribution clearance, central volume of distribution, maximum absorption rate were 29.5 L/h, 24.9 L/h, 18.5 L, 122.2 L and 204,245 μg/h, respectively. When icotinib was administrated with food, bioavailability was estimated to be increased by 48%. Inter-occasion variability was identified to affect on maximum absorption rate constant in food-effect study. CL was identified to be significantly influenced by age, albumin concentration (ALB), and CYP2C19 genotype. No obvious bias was found by VPC and bootstrap methods. The developed model can capture icotinib pharmacokinetics well in healthy volunteers. Food intake can increase icotinib exposure. Three covariates, age, albumin concentration, and CYP2C19 genotype, were identified to

  10. Bioavailability and Pharmacokinetics of Oral Cocaine in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Marion A; Jufer Phipps, Rebecca A; Cone, Edward J; Walsh, Sharon L

    2018-06-01

    The pharmacokinetic profile of oral cocaine has not been fully characterized and prospective data on oral bioavailability are limited. A within-subject study was performed to characterize the bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of oral cocaine. Fourteen healthy inpatient participants (six males) with current histories of cocaine use were administered two oral doses (100 and 200 mg) and one intravenous (IV) dose (40 mg) of cocaine during three separate dosing sessions. Plasma samples were collected for up to 24 h after dosing and analyzed for cocaine and metabolites by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by non-compartmental analysis, and a two-factor model was used to assess for dose and sex differences. The mean ± SEM oral cocaine bioavailability was 0.32 ± 0.04 after 100 and 0.45 ± 0.06 after 200 mg oral cocaine. Volume of distribution (Vd) and clearance (CL) were both greatest after 100 mg oral (Vd = 4.2 L/kg; CL = 116.2 mL/[min kg]) compared to 200 mg oral (Vd = 2.9 L/kg; CL = 87.5 mL/[min kg]) and 40 mg IV (Vd = 1.3 L/kg; CL = 32.7 mL/[min kg]). Oral cocaine area-under-thecurve (AUC) and peak concentration increased in a dose-related manner. AUC metabolite-to-parent ratios of benzoylecgonine and ecgonine methyl ester were significantly higher after oral compared to IV administration and highest after the lower oral dose. In addition, minor metabolites were detected in higher concentrations after oral compared to IV cocaine. Oral cocaine produced a pharmacokinetic profile different from IV cocaine, which appears as a rightward and downward shift in the concentration-time profile. Cocaine bioavailability values were similar to previous estimates. Oral cocaine also produced a unique metabolic profile, with greater concentrations of major and minor metabolites.

  11. pyhector: A Python interface for the simple climate model Hector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N Willner, Sven; Hartin, Corinne; Gieseke, Robert

    2017-04-01

    Pyhector is a Python interface for the simple climate model Hector (Hartin et al. 2015) developed in C++. Simple climate models like Hector can, for instance, be used in the analysis of scenarios within integrated assessment models like GCAM1, in the emulation of complex climate models, and in uncertainty analyses. Hector is an open-source, object oriented, simple global climate carbon cycle model. Its carbon cycle consists of a one pool atmosphere, three terrestrial pools which can be broken down into finer biomes or regions, and four carbon pools in the ocean component. The terrestrial carbon cycle includes primary production and respiration fluxes. The ocean carbon cycle circulates carbon via a simplified thermohaline circulation, calculating air-sea fluxes as well as the marine carbonate system (Hartin et al. 2016). The model input is time series of greenhouse gas emissions; as example scenarios for these the Pyhector package contains the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs)2. These were developed to cover the range of baseline and mitigation emissions scenarios and are widely used in climate change research and model intercomparison projects. Using DataFrames from the Python library Pandas (McKinney 2010) as a data structure for the scenarios simplifies generating and adapting scenarios. Other parameters of the Hector model can easily be modified when running the model. Pyhector can be installed using pip from the Python Package Index.3 Source code and issue tracker are available in Pyhector's GitHub repository4. Documentation is provided through Readthedocs5. Usage examples are also contained in the repository as a Jupyter Notebook (Pérez and Granger 2007; Kluyver et al. 2016). Courtesy of the Mybinder project6, the example Notebook can also be executed and modified without installing Pyhector locally.

  12. Pharmacokinetics and clinical efficacy of phenobarbital in asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia: a thermopharmacological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, M P H; Groenendaal, F; Toet, M C; van Straaten, H L M; van Hasselt, J G C; Huitema, A D R; de Vries, L S; Egberts, A C G; Rademaker, C M A

    2012-10-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia can influence the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs, the discipline which is called thermopharmacology. We studied the effect of therapeutic hypothermia on the pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital in asphyxiated neonates, and the clinical efficacy and the effect of phenobarbital on the continuous amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG) in a prospective study. Data were obtained from the prospective SHIVER study, performed in two of the ten Dutch level III neonatal intensive care units. Phenobarbital data were collected between 2008 and 2010. Newborns were eligible for inclusion if they had a gestational age of at least 36 weeks and presented with perinatal asphyxia and encephalopathy. According to protocol in both hospitals an intravenous (repeated) loading dose of phenobarbital 20 mg/kg divided in 1-2 doses was administered if seizures occurred or were suspected before or during the hypothermic phase. Phenobarbital plasma concentrations were measured in plasma using a fluorescence polarization immunoassay. aEEG was monitored continuously. A one-compartmental population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model was developed using a multi-level Markov transition model. No (clinically relevant) effect of moderate therapeutic hypothermia on phenobarbital pharmacokinetics could be identified. The observed responsiveness was 66%. While we still advise an initial loading dose of 20 mg/kg, clinicians should not be reluctant to administer an additional dose of 10-20 mg/kg. An additional dose should be given before switching to a second-line anticonvulsant drug. Based on our pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model, administration of phenobarbital under hypothermia seems to reduce the transition rate from a continuous normal voltage (CNV) to discontinuous normal voltage aEEG background level in hypothermic asphyxiated newborns, which may be attributed to the additional neuroprotection of phenobarbital in infants with a CNV pattern.

  13. Simple implementation of general dark energy models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomfield, Jolyon K.; Pearson, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a formalism for the numerical implementation of general theories of dark energy, combining the computational simplicity of the equation of state for perturbations approach with the generality of the effective field theory approach. An effective fluid description is employed, based on a general action describing single-scalar field models. The formalism is developed from first principles, and constructed keeping the goal of a simple implementation into CAMB in mind. Benefits of this approach include its straightforward implementation, the generality of the underlying theory, the fact that the evolved variables are physical quantities, and that model-independent phenomenological descriptions may be straightforwardly investigated. We hope this formulation will provide a powerful tool for the comparison of theoretical models of dark energy with observational data

  14. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of rhubarb anthraquinones extract in normal and disease rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peijin; Lu, Qianfeng; Jiang, Wenjiao; Pei, Xue; Sun, Yilin; Hao, Haiping; Hao, Kun

    2017-07-01

    Anthraquinones extract from Rheum palmatum L. (rhubarb) including rhein, emodin, aloe-emodin, chrysophanol, physcion and sennoside A, has been widely used in China to treat various diseases. This study was designed to explore the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of rhubarb anthraquinones extract in diabetic nephropathy and acute liver injury rats. The diabetic nephropathy and acute liver injury rats were induced by intraperitoneal injection with streptozotocin (STZ) and carbon tetrachloride (CCL 4 ), respectively. The rats were treated with different doses of rhubarb anthraquinones extract (37.5, 75 and 150mg/kg) as administration groups. For pharmacokinetics, the drug concentrations of rhubarb anthraquinones consisting of rhein, emodin, aloe-emodin, chrysophanol, physcion and sennoside A were determined. For pharmacodynamics, the anti-diabetic nephropathy and hepatoprotective effects were assessed under different dosage regimens. The rhein, emodin, aloe-emodin, chrysophanol were considered as pharmacokinetic markers at three doses of rhubarb anthraquinones extract. In diabetic nephropathy rats, no obvious pharmacokinetic change of the four ingredients was observed compared with control rats. However, the plasma exposures of the four ingredients increased in acute liver injury rats compared with control rats. The serum creatinine (SCr), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and urine protein (UP) values in diabetic nephropathy rats decreased compared with those in the model group, which suggested that rhubarb anthraquinones extract displayed certain therapeutic and preventive effects against the diabetic nephropathy. However, rhubarb anthraquinones extract cannot ameliorate the CCL 4 -induced liver injury under the three different dosage regimens. There was no significant pharmacokinetic difference after a single oral administration of rhubarb anthraquinones extract between control and diabetic nephropathy rats. However, apparent pharmacokinetic differences were

  15. Pharmacokinetic Study of Piracetam in Focal Cerebral Ischemic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Pankaj; Dash, Debabrata; Krishnamurthy, Sairam

    2018-04-01

    Cerebral ischemia affects hepatic enzymes and brain permeability extensively. Piracetam was investigated up to phase III of clinical trials and there is lack of data on brain penetration in cerebral ischemic condition. Thus, knowledge of the pharmacokinetics and brain penetration of piracetam during ischemic condition would aid to improve pharmacotherapeutics in ischemic stroke. Focal cerebral ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion for 2 h in male Wistar rats followed by reperfusion. After 24 h of middle cerebral artery occlusion or 22 h of reperfusion, piracetam was administered for pharmacokinetic, brain penetration, and pharmacological experiments. In pharmacokinetic study, blood samples were collected at different time points after 200-mg/kg (oral) and 75-mg/kg (intravenous) administration of piracetam through right external jugular vein cannulation. In brain penetration study, the cerebrospinal fluid, systemic blood, portal blood, and brain samples were collected at pre-designated time points after 200-mg/kg oral administration of piracetam. In a separate experiment, the pharmacological effect of the single oral dose of piracetam in middle cerebral artery occlusion was assessed at a dose of 200 mg/kg. All the pharmacokinetic parameters of piracetam including area under curve (AUC 0-24 ), maximum plasma concentration (C max ), time to reach the maximum plasma concentration (t max ), elimination half-life (t 1/2 ), volume of distribution (V z ), total body clearance, mean residence time, and bioavailability were found to be similar in ischemic stroke condition except for brain penetration. Piracetam exposure (AUC 0-2 ) in brain and CSF were found to be 2.4- and 3.1-fold higher, respectively, in ischemic stroke compared to control rats. Piracetam significantly reduced infarct volume by 35.77% caused by middle cerebral artery occlusion. There was no change in the pharmacokinetic parameters of piracetam in the ischemic stroke model except for

  16. Drug Transport and Pharmacokinetics for Chemical Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Laurent; Kanneganti, Kumud; Kim, Kwang Seok

    2010-01-01

    Experiments in continuous-stirred vessels were proposed to introduce methods in pharmacokinetics and drug transport to chemical engineering students. The activities can be incorporated into the curriculum to illustrate fundamentals learned in the classroom. An appreciation for the role of pharmacokinetics in drug discovery will also be gained…

  17. Concurrent determination of Metformin and some ACE inhibitors: Its application to Pharmacokinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhan Ahmed Siddiqui

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study illustrates development and validation of a simple high performance liquid chromatographic method for the simultaneous determination of metformin hydrochloride and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (captopril, lisinopril, and enalapril in bulk dosage form and their application in pharmacokinetic studies. The quality resolute chromatogram was obtained by using a Purospher® Star RP-18 endcapped (250 × 4.6 mm id column as stationary phase while acetonitrile-water 50:50 (v/v as mobile phase, adjusted to pH 3.0 with phosphoric acid. Effluent was monitored at a flow rate of 1 mL min−1 at room temperature (25 °C, detector was set at 218 nm. The method was validated according to ICH guidelines. The linearity was studied over the concentration range of 10–10,000 ng mL−1 for metformin and 30–10,000 ng mL−1 for captopril, lisinopril, and enalapril, demonstrating good linearity with minimum r = 0.9964, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to pharmacokinetic studies of metformin, lisinopril, captopril and enalapril.

  18. Pharmacokinetic modeling of a gel-delivered dapivirine microbicide in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halwes, Michael E; Steinbach-Rankins, Jill M; Frieboes, Hermann B

    2016-10-10

    Although a number of drugs have been developed for the treatment and prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, it has proven difficult to optimize the drug and dosage parameters. The vaginal tissue, comprised of epithelial, stromal and blood compartments presents a complex system which challenges evaluation of drug kinetics solely through empirical effort. To provide insight into the underlying processes, mathematical modeling and computational simulation have been applied to the study of retroviral microbicide pharmacokinetics. Building upon previous pioneering work that modeled the delivery of Tenofovir (TFV) via topical delivery to the vaginal environment, here we computationally evaluate the performance of the retroviral inhibitor dapivirine released from a microbicide gel. We adapt the TFV model to simulate the multicompartmental diffusion and uptake of dapivirine into the blood plasma and vaginal compartments. The results show that dapivirine is expected to accumulate at the interface between the gel and epithelium compartments due to its hydrophobic characteristics. Hydrophobicity also results in decreased diffusivity, which may impact distribution by up to 2 orders of magnitude compared to TFV. Maximum concentrations of dapivirine in the epithelium, stroma, and blood were 9.9e7, 2.45e6, and 119pg/mL, respectively. This suggests that greater initial doses or longer time frames are required to obtain higher drug concentrations in the epithelium. These observations may have important ramifications if a specific time frame is required for efficacy, or if a minimum/maximum concentration is needed in the mucus, epithelium, or stroma based on combined efficacy and safety data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. PHARMACOKINETICS AND PHARMACOKINETIC DYNAMIC RELATIONSHIP OF ROCURONIUM BROMIDE IN HUMANS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIERDA, JMKH; PROOST, JH; SCHIERE, S; HOMMES, FDM

    The existing human pharmacokinetic studies have been reviewed and compared with data derived from animals. The earliest study confirms the similarity of rocuronium to vecuronium with respect to the variables derived from the plasma concentration decay curves and the proportion excreted renally.

  20. Ibrutinib Dosing Strategies Based on Interaction Potential of CYP3A4 Perpetrators Using Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zwart, L; Snoeys, J; De Jong, J; Sukbuntherng, J; Mannaert, E; Monshouwer, M

    2016-11-01

    Based on ibrutinib pharmacokinetics and potential sensitivity towards CYP3A4-mediated drug-drug interactions (DDIs), a physiologically based pharmacokinetic approach was developed to mechanistically describe DDI with various CYP3A4 perpetrators in healthy men under fasting conditions. These models were verified using clinical data for ketoconazole (strong CYP3A4 inhibitor) and used to prospectively predict and confirm the inducing effect of rifampin (strong CYP3A4 inducer); DDIs with mild (fluvoxamine, azithromycin) and moderate inhibitors (diltiazem, voriconazole, clarithromycin, itraconazole, erythromycin), and moderate (efavirenz) and strong CYP3A4 inducers (carbamazepine), were also predicted. Ketoconazole increased ibrutinib area under the curve (AUC) by 24-fold, while rifampin decreased ibrutinib AUC by 10-fold; coadministration of ibrutinib with strong inhibitors or inducers should be avoided. The ibrutinib dose should be reduced to 140 mg (quarter of maximal prescribed dose) when coadministered with moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors so that exposures remain within observed ranges at therapeutic doses. Thus, dose recommendations for CYP3A4 perpetrator use during ibrutinib treatment were developed and approved for labeling. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  1. Thermal margin comparison between DAM and simple model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Jeonghun; Yook, Daesik [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    The nuclear industry in Korea, has considered using a detail analysis model (DAM), which described each rod, to get more thermal margin with the design a dry storage facility for nuclear spent fuel (NSF). A DAM is proposed and a thermal analysis to determine the cladding integrity is performed using test conditions with a homogenized NSF assembly analysis model(Simple model). The result show that according to USA safety criteria, temperature of canister surface has to keep below 500 K in normal condition and 630 K in excess condition. A commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) called ANSYS Fluent version 14.5 was used.

  2. The effect of age on digoxin pharmacokinetics in Fischer-344 rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.L.; Owens, S.M.; Ruch, S.; Kennedy, R.H.; Seifen, E.

    1990-01-01

    Digoxin protein binding and pharmacokinetics were studied in 4-, 14-, and 25-month-old male Fischer-344 rats to determine if there were age-dependent changes in digoxin disposition. Serum protein binding did not differ among age groups. The average percentage unbound digoxin for all animals was 61.3 ± 5.3% (means ± SD, n = 15). For pharmacokinetic studies, [ 3 H]digoxin and 1 mg/kg unlabeled digoxin were administered as an intravenous bolus dose to animals from each age group. The [ 3 H]digoxin terminal elimination half-life was 2.0, 2.3, and 2.5 hr, respectively. The steady-state volume of distribution in the three age groups was 1.51, 1.49, and 1.27 liters/kg, respectively. Total body clearance for the three age groups was 14.2, 12.1, and 7.5 ml/min/kg, respectively. Analysis of variance of these data followed by Duncan's multiple range test indicated a significant decrease in clearance in the aged rats (25-month-old, p less than 0.05). This age-dependent decrease in clearance suggested that digoxin pharmacokinetics could be a significant factor in age-related alterations in digoxin cardiotoxicity in the rat, as it is in humans, and that the Fischer-344 rat could be a useful model for studies of digoxin pharmacokinetic changes with age

  3. Identification of Super Phenix steam generator by a simple polynomial model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau, I.

    1981-01-01

    This note suggests a method of identification for the steam generator of the Super-Phenix fast neutron power plant for simple polynomial models. This approach is justified in the selection of the adaptive control. The identification algorithms presented will be applied to multivariable input-output behaviours. The results obtained with the representation in self-regressive form and by simple polynomial models will be compared and the effect of perturbations on the output signal will be tested, in order to select a good identification algorithm for multivariable adaptive regulation [fr

  4. Pharmacokinetics of Lidocaine Hydrochloride Administered with or without Adrenaline for the Paravertebral Brachial Plexus Block in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquette, Amélie; Troncy, Eric; Guillot, Martin; Varin, France; Del Castillo, Jérôme R E

    2017-01-01

    Adrenaline is known to prolong the duration of local anesthesia but its effects on the pharmacokinetic processes of local anesthetic drugs are not fully understood. Our objective was to develop a compartmental model for quantification of adrenaline's impact on the pharmacokinetics of perineurally-injected lidocaine in the dog. Dogs were subjected to paravertebral brachial plexus block using lidocaine alone or adrenalinated lidocaine. Data was collected through a prospective, randomised, blinded crossover protocol performed over three periods. Blood samples were collected during 180 minutes following block execution. Compartmental pharmacokinetic models were developed and their goodness-of-fit were compared. The lowering effects of adrenaline on the absorption of lidocaine were statistically determined with one-sided tests. A one-compartment disposition model with two successive zero-order absorption processes best fitted our experimental data. Adrenaline decreased the peak plasma lidocaine concentration by approximately 60% (P Adrenaline decreased the absorption rate of lidocaine and prolonged the duration of its absorption.

  5. A simple statistical model for geomagnetic reversals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constable, Catherine

    1990-01-01

    The diversity of paleomagnetic records of geomagnetic reversals now available indicate that the field configuration during transitions cannot be adequately described by simple zonal or standing field models. A new model described here is based on statistical properties inferred from the present field and is capable of simulating field transitions like those observed. Some insight is obtained into what one can hope to learn from paleomagnetic records. In particular, it is crucial that the effects of smoothing in the remanence acquisition process be separated from true geomagnetic field behavior. This might enable us to determine the time constants associated with the dominant field configuration during a reversal.

  6. Quantitative determination of metaxalone in human plasma by LC-MS and its application in a pharmacokinetic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanting Zhao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A simple and rapid method using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS for the determination of metaxalone in human plasma has been developed and validated. Letrozole was used as the internal standard (IS. The plasma samples were simply treated with acetonitrile which allowed the precipitation of plasma proteins. The chromatographic separation was achieved on a Sapphire C18 (2.1 mm × 150 mm, 5 µm, Newark, USA column using the mobile phase (5 mM ammonium acetate containing 0.01% formic acid: acetonitrile (45:55, v/v at a flow rate of 0.3 ml/min. The selected ion monitoring (SIM in the positive mode was used for the determination of [M + H]+ m/z 222.1 and 286.1 for metaxalone and letrozole, respectively. The standard curve obtained was linear (r2 ≥ 0.99 over the concentration range of 30.24−5040 ng/ml. Meanwhile, no interfering peaks or matrix effect was observed. The method established was simple and successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of metaxalone in healthy Chinese volunteers after a single oral dose administration of 800 mg metaxalone. The main pharmacokinetic parameters of metaxalone were as follow: Cmax, (1664 ± 1208 ng/ml and (2063 ± 907 ng/ml; AUC0−36, (13925 ± 6590 ng/ml h and (18620 ± 5717 ng/ml h; t1/2, (13.6 ± 7.7 h and (20.3 ± 7.7 h for the reference and test tablets, respectively. These pharmacokinetic parameters of metaxalone in healthy Chinese volunteers were reported for the first time.

  7. A Population Pharmacokinetic Model for Disposition in Plasma, Saliva and Urine of Scopolamine after Intranasal Administration to Healthy Human Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L.; Tam, V. H.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2014-01-01

    An intranasal gel formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness. The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated under the Food and Drug Administration guidelines for clinical trials with an Investigative New Drug (IND) protocol. The aim of this project was to develop a PK model that can predict the relationship between plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine concentrations using data collected from the IND clinical trials with INSCOP. Methods: Twelve healthy human subjects were administered three dose levels (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg) of INSCOP. Serial blood, saliva and urine samples were collected between 5 min and 24 h after dosing and scopolamine concentrations were measured by using a validated LC-MS-MS assay. Pharmacokinetic Compartmental models, using actual dosing and sampling times, were built using Phoenix (version 1.2). Model selection was based on the likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL) and comparison of the quality of fit plots. Results: The best structural model for INSCOP (minimal -2LL= 502.8) was established. It consisted of one compartment each for plasma, saliva and urine, respectively, which were connected with linear transport processes except the nonlinear PK process from plasma to saliva compartment. The best-fit estimates of PK parameters from individual PK compartmental analysis and Population PK model analysis were shown in Tables 1 and 2, respectively. Conclusion: A population PK model that could predict population and individual PK of scopolamine in plasma, saliva and urine after dosing was developed and validated. Incorporating a non-linear transfer from plasma to saliva compartments resulted in a significantly improved model fitting. The model could be used to predict scopolamine plasma concentrations from salivary and urinary drug levels, allowing non-invasive therapeutic monitoring of scopolamine in space and other remote environments.

  8. A simple dynamic energy capacity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gander, James P.

    2012-01-01

    I develop a simple dynamic model showing how total energy capacity is allocated to two different uses and how these uses and their corresponding energy flows are related and behave through time. The control variable of the model determines the allocation. All the variables of the model are in terms of a composite energy equivalent measured in BTU's. A key focus is on the shadow price of energy capacity and its behavior through time. Another key focus is on the behavior of the control variable that determines the allocation of overall energy capacity. The matching or linking of the model's variables to real world U.S. energy data is undertaken. In spite of some limitations of the data, the model and its behavior fit the data fairly well. Some energy policy implications are discussed. - Highlights: ► The model shows how energy capacity is allocated to current output production versus added energy capacity production. ► Two variables in the allocation are the shadow price of capacity and the control variable that determines the allocation. ► The model was linked to U.S. historical energy data and fit the data quite well. ► In particular, the policy control variable was cyclical and consistent with the model. ► Policy implications relevant to the allocation of energy capacity are discussed briefly.

  9. Population pharmacokinetics of levamisole in children with steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreeftmeijer-Vegter, A.R.; Dorlo, T.P.C.; Gruppen, M.P.; De Boer, A.; De Vries, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim was to investigate the population pharmacokinetics of levamisole in children with steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome. Methods Non-linear mixed effects modelling was performed on samples collected during a randomized controlled trial. Samples were collected from children who were

  10. Renormalization group analysis of a simple hierarchical fermion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorlas, T.C.

    1991-01-01

    A simple hierarchical fermion model is constructed which gives rise to an exact renormalization transformation in a 2-dimensional parameter space. The behaviour of this transformation is studied. It has two hyperbolic fixed points for which the existence of a global critical line is proven. The asymptotic behaviour of the transformation is used to prove the existence of the thermodynamic limit in a certain domain in parameter space. Also the existence of a continuum limit for these theories is investigated using information about the asymptotic renormalization behaviour. It turns out that the 'trivial' fixed point gives rise to a two-parameter family of continuum limits corresponding to that part of parameter space where the renormalization trajectories originate at this fixed point. Although the model is not very realistic it serves as a simple example of the appliclation of the renormalization group to proving the existence of the thermodynamic limit and the continuum limit of lattice models. Moreover, it illustrates possible complications that can arise in global renormalization group behaviour, and that might also be present in other models where no global analysis of the renormalization transformation has yet been achieved. (orig.)

  11. A Simple Exercise Reveals the Way Students Think about Scientific Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruebush, Laura; Sulikowski, Michelle; North, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Scientific modeling is an integral part of contemporary science, yet many students have little understanding of how models are developed, validated, and used to predict and explain phenomena. A simple modeling exercise led to significant gains in understanding key attributes of scientific modeling while revealing some stubborn misconceptions.…

  12. Valid statistical approaches for analyzing sholl data: Mixed effects versus simple linear models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Machelle D; Sethi, Sunjay; Lein, Pamela J; Keil, Kimberly P

    2017-03-01

    The Sholl technique is widely used to quantify dendritic morphology. Data from such studies, which typically sample multiple neurons per animal, are often analyzed using simple linear models. However, simple linear models fail to account for intra-class correlation that occurs with clustered data, which can lead to faulty inferences. Mixed effects models account for intra-class correlation that occurs with clustered data; thus, these models more accurately estimate the standard deviation of the parameter estimate, which produces more accurate p-values. While mixed models are not new, their use in neuroscience has lagged behind their use in other disciplines. A review of the published literature illustrates common mistakes in analyses of Sholl data. Analysis of Sholl data collected from Golgi-stained pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus of male and female mice using both simple linear and mixed effects models demonstrates that the p-values and standard deviations obtained using the simple linear models are biased downwards and lead to erroneous rejection of the null hypothesis in some analyses. The mixed effects approach more accurately models the true variability in the data set, which leads to correct inference. Mixed effects models avoid faulty inference in Sholl analysis of data sampled from multiple neurons per animal by accounting for intra-class correlation. Given the widespread practice in neuroscience of obtaining multiple measurements per subject, there is a critical need to apply mixed effects models more widely. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Modelling simple helically delivered dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenwick, John D; Tome, Wolfgang A; Kissick, Michael W; Mackie, T Rock

    2005-01-01

    In a previous paper, we described quality assurance procedures for Hi-Art helical tomotherapy machines. Here, we develop further some ideas discussed briefly in that paper. Simple helically generated dose distributions are modelled, and relationships between these dose distributions and underlying characteristics of Hi-Art treatment systems are elucidated. In particular, we describe the dependence of dose levels along the central axis of a cylinder aligned coaxially with a Hi-Art machine on fan beam width, couch velocity and helical delivery lengths. The impact on these dose levels of angular variations in gantry speed or output per linear accelerator pulse is also explored

  14. Simple Protein Modification Using Zwitterionic Polymer to Mitigate the Bioactivity Loss of Conjugated Insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jinbing; Lu, Yang; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Hui; Wang, Zhigang; Cao, Zhiqiang

    2017-06-01

    Polymer-protein conjugation has been extensively explored toward a better protein drug with improved pharmacokinetics. However, a major problem with polymer-protein conjugation is that the polymers drastically reduce the bioactivity of the modified protein. There is no perfect solution to prevent the bioactivity loss, no matter the polymer is conjugated in a non-site specific way, or a more complex site-specific procedure. Here the authors report for the first time that when zwitterionic carboxybetaine polymer (PCB) is conjugated to insulin through simple conventional coupling chemistry. The resulting PCB-insulin does not show a significant reduction of in vitro bioactivity. The obtained PCB-insulin shows two significant advantages as a novel pharmaceutical agent. First, its therapeutic performance is remarkable. For PCB-insulin, there is a 24% increase of in vivo pharmacological activity of lowering blood glucose compared with native insulin. Such uncommonly seen increase has rarely been reported and is expected to be due to both the improved pharmacokinetics and retained bioactivity of PCB-insulin. Second, the production is simple from manufacturing standpoints. Conjugation procedure involves only one-step coupling reaction without complex site-specific linkage technique. The synthesized PCB-insulin conjugates do not require chromatographic separation to purify and obtain particular isoforms. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Evaluation and optimisation of current milrinone prescribing for the treatment and prevention of low cardiac output syndrome in paediatric patients after open heart surgery using a physiology-based pharmacokinetic drug-disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Winnie

    2014-01-01

    Milrinone is the drug of choice for the treatment and prevention of low cardiac output syndrome (LCOS) in paediatric patients after open heart surgery across Europe. Discrepancies, however, among prescribing guidance, clinical studies and practice pattern require clarification to ensure safe and effective prescribing. However, the clearance prediction equations derived from classical pharmacokinetic modelling provide limited support as they have recently failed a clinical practice evaluation. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate current milrinone dosing using physiology-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modelling and simulation to complement the existing pharmacokinetic knowledge and propose optimised dosing regimens as a basis for improving the standard of care for paediatric patients. A PBPK drug-disease model using a population approach was developed in three steps from healthy young adults to adult patients and paediatric patients with and without LCOS after open heart surgery. Pre- and postoperative organ function values from adult and paediatric patients were collected from literature and integrated into a disease model as factorial changes from the reference values in healthy adults aged 20-40 years. The disease model was combined with the PBPK drug model and evaluated against existing pharmacokinetic data. Model robustness was assessed by parametric sensitivity analysis. In the next step, virtual patient populations were created, each with 1,000 subjects reflecting the average adult and paediatric patient characteristics with regard to age, sex, bodyweight and height. They were integrated into the PBPK drug-disease model to evaluate the effectiveness of current milrinone dosing in achieving the therapeutic target range of 100-300 ng/mL milrinone in plasma. Optimised dosing regimens were subsequently developed. The pharmacokinetics of milrinone in healthy young adults as well as adult and paediatric patients were accurately described with an

  16. A Simple Model for Nonlinear Confocal Ultrasonic Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Zhou, Lin; Si, Li-Sheng; Gong, Xiu-Fen

    2007-01-01

    A confocally and coaxially arranged pair of focused transmitter and receiver represents one of the best geometries for medical ultrasonic imaging and non-invasive detection. We develop a simple theoretical model for describing the nonlinear propagation of a confocal ultrasonic beam in biological tissues. On the basis of the parabolic approximation and quasi-linear approximation, the nonlinear Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) equation is solved by using the angular spectrum approach. Gaussian superposition technique is applied to simplify the solution, and an analytical solution for the second harmonics in the confocal ultrasonic beam is presented. Measurements are performed to examine the validity of the theoretical model. This model provides a preliminary model for acoustic nonlinear microscopy.

  17. Pegylated interferon fractal pharmacokinetics: individualized dosing for hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Mamta K; Pasipanodya, Jotam G; Alder, Lara; Lee, William M; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2013-03-01

    Despite recent advances in hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapeutics, the combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin (PEGIFN/RBV) remains the cornerstone of treatment. Optimization and individualization of PEGIFN dosing could improve outcomes. Week one PEGIFN serum concentrations in 42 HCV genotype 1-infected patients treated with conventional PEGIFN/RBV were analyzed using multicompartmental pharmacokinetic models. For each patient, pharmacokinetic parameter estimates, weight, age, interleukin-28B (IL-28B) single-nucleotide polymorphism, CD4 count, baseline HCV RNA, gender, race, and HIV status were examined using classification and regression tree analysis to identify factors predictive of sustained viral response (SVR). Survival analysis was performed to compare the time to undetectable viral load in patients with and without the highest scoring predictor. PEGIFN concentrations varied at least 87-fold. Pharmacokinetics were best described by a two-compartment model with an 8.4-h absorption lag. Patient weight correlated with PEGIFN systemic clearance based on fractal geometry relationships. SVR was achieved in 36% of patients; a PEGIFN cumulative 1-week area under the curve (AUC) of ≤0.79 mg · h/liter scored highest in predicting poor response, followed by a weight of ≥93.7 kg. Patients with a PEGIFN AUC of >0.79 mg · h/liter achieved undetectable viral load more rapidly than those with a lower AUC (hazard ratio, 1.63; 95% confidence interval, 1.21 to 2.04). PEGIFN exhibits wide pharmacokinetic variability, mainly driven by patient weight, so that the standard dose may not reach levels needed to achieve SVR. Optimizing dose to patient weight and PEGIFN AUC in the first week offers a solution to improve SVR and to potentially shorten duration of therapy.

  18. Simple models of the thermal structure of the Venusian ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitten, R.C.; Knudsen, W.C.

    1980-01-01

    Analytical and numerical models of plasma temperatures in the Venusian ionosphere are proposed. The magnitudes of plasma thermal parameters are calculated using thermal-structure data obtained by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter. The simple models are found to be in good agreement with the more detailed models of thermal balance. Daytime and nighttime temperature data along with corresponding temperature profiles are provided

  19. Pharmacokinetic study of medicinal polymers: models based on dextrans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulakov, V.N.; Pimenova, G.N.; Matveev, V.A.; Sedov, V.V.; Vasil'ev, A.E.

    1986-01-01

    The authors study the pharmacokinetics of dextrans with various molecular masses modified by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) using a radioisotope method. The radionuclide 125 I was selectively bound to a FITC residue attached to the polysaccharide by electrochemical iodination under potentiostatic conditions. In the experiments, dextrans modified by FITC were labeled with 125 I (DF- 125 I) by electrochemical iodination. The separation of DF- 125 I and FITC from ionic forms of the radionuclide not bound to the polymer was carried out. The properties of the samples obtained are presented. The radioactivity accumulated in the rate organs and urine studied are shown. The features of DF- 125 I behavior in the blood and liver are examined

  20. From complex to simple: interdisciplinary stochastic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazilu, D A; Zamora, G; Mazilu, I

    2012-01-01

    We present two simple, one-dimensional, stochastic models that lead to a qualitative understanding of very complex systems from biology, nanoscience and social sciences. The first model explains the complicated dynamics of microtubules, stochastic cellular highways. Using the theory of random walks in one dimension, we find analytical expressions for certain physical quantities, such as the time dependence of the length of the microtubules, and diffusion coefficients. The second one is a stochastic adsorption model with applications in surface deposition, epidemics and voter systems. We introduce the ‘empty interval method’ and show sample calculations for the time-dependent particle density. These models can serve as an introduction to the field of non-equilibrium statistical physics, and can also be used as a pedagogical tool to exemplify standard statistical physics concepts, such as random walks or the kinetic approach of the master equation. (paper)

  1. Modeling Simple Driving Tasks with a One-Boundary Diffusion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, Roger; Strayer, David

    2014-01-01

    A one-boundary diffusion model was applied to the data from two experiments in which subjects were performing a simple simulated driving task. In the first experiment, the same subjects were tested on two driving tasks using a PC-based driving simulator and the psychomotor vigilance test (PVT). The diffusion model fit the response time (RT) distributions for each task and individual subject well. Model parameters were found to correlate across tasks which suggests common component processes were being tapped in the three tasks. The model was also fit to a distracted driving experiment of Cooper and Strayer (2008). Results showed that distraction altered performance by affecting the rate of evidence accumulation (drift rate) and/or increasing the boundary settings. This provides an interpretation of cognitive distraction whereby conversing on a cell phone diverts attention from the normal accumulation of information in the driving environment. PMID:24297620

  2. Reconstructing exposures from biomarkers using exposure-pharmacokinetic modeling--A case study with carbaryl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kathleen; Phillips, Martin; Grulke, Christopher; Yoon, Miyoung; Young, Bruce; McDougall, Robin; Leonard, Jeremy; Lu, Jingtao; Lefew, William; Tan, Yu-Mei

    2015-12-01

    Sources of uncertainty involved in exposure reconstruction for short half-life chemicals were characterized using computational models that link external exposures to biomarkers. Using carbaryl as an example, an exposure model, the Cumulative and Aggregate Risk Evaluation System (CARES), was used to generate time-concentration profiles for 500 virtual individuals exposed to carbaryl. These exposure profiles were used as inputs into a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict urinary biomarker concentrations. These matching dietary intake levels and biomarker concentrations were used to (1) compare three reverse dosimetry approaches based on their ability to predict the central tendency of the intake dose distribution; and (2) identify parameters necessary for a more accurate exposure reconstruction. This study illustrates the trade-offs between using non-iterative reverse dosimetry methods that are fast, less precise and iterative methods that are slow, more precise. This study also intimates the necessity of including urine flow rate and elapsed time between last dose and urine sampling as part of the biomarker sampling collection for better interpretation of urinary biomarker data of short biological half-life chemicals. Resolution of these critical data gaps can allow exposure reconstruction methods to better predict population-level intake doses from large biomonitoring studies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. A pharmacokinetic approach to model-guided design of infliximab schedules in ulcerative colitis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Pérez-Pitarch

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infliximab, an anti-tumour necrosis factor approved for treatment of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, is administered at predefined interdose-intervals. On insufficient response or loss of response, treatment can be intensified. The lack or loss of response is likely related to complex pharmacokinetics of infliximab. Aims: To explore optimal dosing strategies of infliximab in treatment-naïve patients with ulcerative colitis through predictive Monte Carlo simulations based on a validated population PK model. Methods: A population of 2,000 treatment-naïve patients was generated by Montecarlo simulation. Six dosing strategies for maintenance therapy were simulated on this population. Strategies 1 and 2 consisted on 5 mg/kg and 6 mg/kg doses, respectively, and 8 weeks inter-dose interval. Strategies 3 and 4 used Individualized doses, adjusted to albumin level, sex and body weight, and a fix inter-dose interval of 8 weeks to achieve a target trough concentration of 5 mg/L or 6 mg/L, respectively. Strategies 5 and 6 used a fix dose of 5 mg/kg and individualized inter-dose intervals, adjusted to the same covariates, to achieve a target concentration, of 5 mg/L or 6 mg/L, respectively. Results: Strategies 2-6 reached trough levels statistically higher than strategy 1 (p < 0.05. Strategy 5 proved to be the best dosing strategy. It was associated with a higher proportion of responder patients than strategy 1 (62 % vs. 40 % without reaching higher peak concentrations. Conclusions: Optimization of maintenance treatment of colitis with infliximab by a pharmacokinetic approach could benefit infliximab-naive patients with ulcerative colitis.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of drugs in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feghali, Maisa; Venkataramanan, Raman; Caritis, Steve

    2015-11-01

    Pregnancy is a complex state where changes in maternal physiology have evolved to favor the development and growth of the placenta and the fetus. These adaptations may affect preexisting disease or result in pregnancy-specific disorders. Similarly, variations in physiology may alter the pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics that determines drug dosing and effect. It follows that detailed pharmacologic information is required to adjust therapeutic treatment strategies during pregnancy. Understanding both pregnancy physiology and the gestation-specific pharmacology of different agents is necessary to achieve effective treatment and limit maternal and fetal risk. Unfortunately, most drug studies have excluded pregnant women based on often-mistaken concerns regarding fetal risk. Furthermore, over two-thirds of women receive prescription drugs while pregnant, with treatment and dosing strategies based on data from healthy male volunteers and non-pregnant women, and with little adjustment for the complex physiology of pregnancy and its unique disease states. This review will describe basic concepts in pharmacokinetics and their clinical relevance and highlight the variations in pregnancy that may impact the pharmacokinetic properties of medications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Automatic individual arterial input functions calculated from PCA outperform manual and population-averaged approaches for the pharmacokinetic modeling of DCE-MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Requena, Roberto; Prats-Montalbán, José Manuel; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Alberich-Bayarri, Ángel; García-Martí, Gracián; Pérez, Rosario; Ferrer, Alberto

    2015-08-01

    To introduce a segmentation method to calculate an automatic arterial input function (AIF) based on principal component analysis (PCA) of dynamic contrast enhanced MR (DCE-MR) imaging and compare it with individual manually selected and population-averaged AIFs using calculated pharmacokinetic parameters. The study included 65 individuals with prostate examinations (27 tumors and 38 controls). Manual AIFs were individually extracted and also averaged to obtain a population AIF. Automatic AIFs were individually obtained by applying PCA to volumetric DCE-MR imaging data and finding the highest correlation of the PCs with a reference AIF. Variability was assessed using coefficients of variation and repeated measures tests. The different AIFs were used as inputs to the pharmacokinetic model and correlation coefficients, Bland-Altman plots and analysis of variance tests were obtained to compare the results. Automatic PCA-based AIFs were successfully extracted in all cases. The manual and PCA-based AIFs showed good correlation (r between pharmacokinetic parameters ranging from 0.74 to 0.95), with differences below the manual individual variability (RMSCV up to 27.3%). The population-averaged AIF showed larger differences (r from 0.30 to 0.61). The automatic PCA-based approach minimizes the variability associated to obtaining individual volume-based AIFs in DCE-MR studies of the prostate. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Visceral leishmaniasis relapse hazard is linked to reduced miltefosine exposure in patients from Eastern Africa: a population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorlo, Thomas P C; Kip, Anke E; Younis, Brima M; Ellis, Sally J; Alves, Fabiana; Beijnen, Jos H; Njenga, Simon; Kirigi, George; Hailu, Asrat; Olobo, Joseph; Musa, Ahmed M; Balasegaram, Manica; Wasunna, Monique; Karlsson, Mats O; Khalil, Eltahir A G

    2017-11-01

    Low efficacy of miltefosine in the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis was recently observed in Eastern Africa. To describe the pharmacokinetics and establish a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship for miltefosine in Eastern African patients with visceral leishmaniasis, using a time-to-event approach to model relapse of disease. Miltefosine plasma concentrations from 95 patients (48 monotherapy versus 47 combination therapy) were included in the population pharmacokinetic model using non-linear mixed effects modelling. Subsequently a time-to-event model was developed to model the time of clinical relapse. Various summary pharmacokinetic parameters (various AUCs, Time > EC50, Time > EC90), normalized within each treatment arm to allow simultaneous analysis, were evaluated as relapse hazard-changing covariates. A two-compartment population model with first-order absorption fitted the miltefosine pharmacokinetic data adequately. Relative bioavailability was reduced (-74%, relative standard error 4.7%) during the first week of treatment of the monotherapy arm but only the first day of the shorter combination regimen. Time to the relapse of infection could be described using a constant baseline hazard (baseline 1.8 relapses/year, relative standard error 72.7%). Miltefosine Time > EC90 improved the model significantly when added in a maximum effect function on the baseline hazard (half maximal effect with Time > EC90 6.97 days for monotherapy). Miltefosine drug exposure was found to be decreased in Eastern African patients with visceral leishmaniasis, due to a (transient) initial lower bioavailability. Relapse hazard was inversely linked to miltefosine exposure. Significantly lower miltefosine exposure was observed in children compared with adults, further urging the need for implementation of dose adaptations for children. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  7. Study of the time course of the clinical effect of propofol compared with the time course of the predicted effect-site concentration : performance of three pharmacokinetic-dynamic models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppens, M.; Van Limmen, J. G. M.; Schnider, T.; Wyler, B.; Bonte, S.; Dewaele, F.; Struys, M. M. R. F.; Vereecke, H. E. M.

    In the ideal pharmacokinetic-dynamic (PK-PD) model for calculating the predicted effect-site concentration of propofol (Ce(PROP)), for any Ce(PROP), the corresponding hypnotic effect should be constant. We compared three PK-PD models (Marsh PK with Shuttler PD, Schnider PK with fixed ke0, and

  8. Comparison of blood biochemics between acute myocardial infarction models with blood stasis and simple acute myocardial infarction models in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Shaochun; Yu Xiaofeng; Wang Jia; Zhou Jinying; Xie Haolin; Sui Dayun

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To construct the acute myocardial infarction models in rats with blood stasis and study the difference on blood biochemics between the acute myocardial infarction models with blood stasis and the simple acute myocardial infarction models. Methods: Wistar rats were randomly divided into control group, acute blood stasis model group, acute myocardial infarction sham operation group, acute myocardial infarction model group and of acute myocardial infarction model with blood stasis group. The acute myocardial infarction models under the status of the acute blood stasis in rats were set up. The serum malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), free fatty acid (FFA), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels were detected, the activities of serum superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and the levels of prostacycline (PGI2), thromboxane A 2 (TXA 2 ) and endothelin (ET) in plasma were determined. Results: There were not obvious differences in MDA, SOD, GSH-Px and FFA between the acute myocardial infarction models with blood stasis in rats and the simple acute myocardial infarction models (P 2 and NO, and the increase extents of TXA 2 , ET and TNF-α in the acute myocardial infarction models in rats with blood stasis were higher than those in the simple acute myocardial infarction models (P 2 and NO, are significant when the acute myocardial infarction models in rats with blood stasis and the simple acute myocardial infarction models are compared. The results show that it is defective to evaluate pharmacodynamics of traditional Chinese drug with only simple acute myocardial infarction models. (authors)

  9. Climate stability and sensitivity in some simple conceptual models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, J. Ray [University College Dublin, Meteorology and Climate Centre, School of Mathematical Sciences, Dublin (Ireland)

    2012-02-15

    A theoretical investigation of climate stability and sensitivity is carried out using three simple linearized models based on the top-of-the-atmosphere energy budget. The simplest is the zero-dimensional model (ZDM) commonly used as a conceptual basis for climate sensitivity and feedback studies. The others are two-zone models with tropics and extratropics of equal area; in the first of these (Model A), the dynamical heat transport (DHT) between the zones is implicit, in the second (Model B) it is explicitly parameterized. It is found that the stability and sensitivity properties of the ZDM and Model A are very similar, both depending only on the global-mean radiative response coefficient and the global-mean forcing. The corresponding properties of Model B are more complex, depending asymmetrically on the separate tropical and extratropical values of these quantities, as well as on the DHT coefficient. Adopting Model B as a benchmark, conditions are found under which the validity of the ZDM and Model A as climate sensitivity models holds. It is shown that parameter ranges of physical interest exist for which such validity may not hold. The 2 x CO{sub 2} sensitivities of the simple models are studied and compared. Possible implications of the results for sensitivities derived from GCMs and palaeoclimate data are suggested. Sensitivities for more general scenarios that include negative forcing in the tropics (due to aerosols, inadvertent or geoengineered) are also studied. Some unexpected outcomes are found in this case. These include the possibility of a negative global-mean temperature response to a positive global-mean forcing, and vice versa. (orig.)

  10. PKSolver: An add-in program for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data analysis in Microsoft Excel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Huo, Meirong; Zhou, Jianping; Xie, Shaofei

    2010-09-01

    This study presents PKSolver, a freely available menu-driven add-in program for Microsoft Excel written in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), for solving basic problems in pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) data analysis. The program provides a range of modules for PK and PD analysis including noncompartmental analysis (NCA), compartmental analysis (CA), and pharmacodynamic modeling. Two special built-in modules, multiple absorption sites (MAS) and enterohepatic circulation (EHC), were developed for fitting the double-peak concentration-time profile based on the classical one-compartment model. In addition, twenty frequently used pharmacokinetic functions were encoded as a macro and can be directly accessed in an Excel spreadsheet. To evaluate the program, a detailed comparison of modeling PK data using PKSolver and professional PK/PD software package WinNonlin and Scientist was performed. The results showed that the parameters estimated with PKSolver were satisfactory. In conclusion, the PKSolver simplified the PK and PD data analysis process and its output could be generated in Microsoft Word in the form of an integrated report. The program provides pharmacokinetic researchers with a fast and easy-to-use tool for routine and basic PK and PD data analysis with a more user-friendly interface. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Population pharmacokinetics of levamisole in children with steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreeftmeijer-Vegter, A. R.; Dorlo, T. P. C.; Gruppen, M. P.; de Boer, A. [=Anthonius; de Vries, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the population pharmacokinetics of levamisole in children with steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome. Non-linear mixed effects modelling was performed on samples collected during a randomized controlled trial. Samples were collected from children who were receiving 2.5 mg

  12. Population pharmacokinetic analysis of oxaliplatin in adults and children identifies important covariates for dosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikanjam, Mina; Stewart, Clinton F; Takimoto, Chris H; Synold, Timothy W; Beaty, Orren; Fouladi, Maryam; Capparelli, Edmund V

    2015-03-01

    To characterize the determinants of variability for oxaliplatin pharmacokinetics including age, renal function, and hepatic function in children and adults. Oxaliplatin pharmacokinetic data were combined from phase I and II clinical trials: three pediatric trials (Peds1-3) and two adult NCI organ dysfunction studies (Hepatic and Renal). A population pharmacokinetic model was developed utilizing platinum ultrafiltrate concentrations to characterize changes in oxaliplatin disposition with age and organ dysfunction along with other potential sources of oxaliplatin pharmacokinetic variability. A total of 1,508 concentrations from 186 children and adults were used in the study. The data were well described by a three-compartment model. Serum creatinine (SCR) was an independent predictor of clearance (CL) while age was an independent predictor of volume of distribution. Although age was a significant covariate on CL in the univariate analysis, age effects on CL were entirely accounted for by SCR. Gender, hepatic function, and race had no effect on CL or volume of distribution. Median CL values were 0.58 (Hepatic), 0.34 (Renal), 0.78 (Peds1), 0.74 (Peds2), and 0.81 (Peds3) (L/h/kg(0.75)). Monte Carlo simulations of the final model with 130 mg/m(2) yielded median AUC values of: 14.2 (2-6 years), 16.8 (6-12 years), 16.5 (12-18 years), and 17.3 (>18 years) (µg h/mL). Renal function had the greatest effect on CL with a small age effect seen on the distribution of oxaliplatin. Young pediatric patients had higher CL values than adults as a result of better renal function.

  13. Acetaminophen developmental pharmacokinetics in premature neonates and infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Brian J; van Lingen, Richard A; Hansen, Tom G

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe acetaminophen developmental pharmacokinetics in premature neonates through infancy to suggest age-appropriate dosing regimens.......The aim of this study was to describe acetaminophen developmental pharmacokinetics in premature neonates through infancy to suggest age-appropriate dosing regimens....

  14. A systems approach for tumor pharmacokinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Michael Thurber

    Full Text Available Recent advances in genome inspired target discovery, small molecule screens, development of biological and nanotechnology have led to the introduction of a myriad of new differently sized agents into the clinic. The differences in small and large molecule delivery are becoming increasingly important in combination therapies as well as the use of drugs that modify the physiology of tumors such as anti-angiogenic treatment. The complexity of targeting has led to the development of mathematical models to facilitate understanding, but unfortunately, these studies are often only applicable to a particular molecule, making pharmacokinetic comparisons difficult. Here we develop and describe a framework for categorizing primary pharmacokinetics of drugs in tumors. For modeling purposes, we define drugs not by their mechanism of action but rather their rate-limiting step of delivery. Our simulations account for variations in perfusion, vascularization, interstitial transport, and non-linear local binding and metabolism. Based on a comparison of the fundamental rates determining uptake, drugs were classified into four categories depending on whether uptake is limited by blood flow, extravasation, interstitial diffusion, or local binding and metabolism. Simulations comparing small molecule versus macromolecular drugs show a sharp difference in distribution, which has implications for multi-drug therapies. The tissue-level distribution differs widely in tumors for small molecules versus macromolecular biologic drugs, and this should be considered in the design of agents and treatments. An example using antibodies in mouse xenografts illustrates the different in vivo behavior. This type of transport analysis can be used to aid in model development, experimental data analysis, and imaging and therapeutic agent design.

  15. Rectal methadone in cancer patients with pain. A preliminary clinical and pharmacokinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, C; Zecca, E; Brunelli, C; Rizzio, E; Saita, L; Lodi, F; De Conno, F

    1995-10-01

    Cancer pain can be treated in most cases with oral analgesics. However, during their clinical history, 53% to 70% of patients will need alternative routes of opioid administration. The rectal administration of opioids is a simple alternative route for many patients. There are no data in the literature regarding the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of rectal methadone. We evaluated the analgesia, tolerability and absorption profile of methadone hydrochloride in six opioid-naive cancer patients with pain. A blood sample was collected before administration of a single dose of drug (10 mg) and then again after fixed times. At these fixed times the patients were asked about pain, nausea and drowsiness by means of a visual analogue scale of 0-100 mm (VAS). Pain relief was statistically significant as early as 30 minutes and up to eight hours after methadone administration. None of the patients reported significant side effects. The pharmacokinetics of rectal methadone showed rapid and extensive distribution phases followed by a slow elimination phase. Rectal methadone can be considered an effective analgesic therapy for patients with cancer pain for whom oral and/or parenteral opioids are not indicated or available.

  16. Population pharmacokinetics of adefovir dipivoxil tablets in healthy Chinese volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jihan; Zhang, Yaping; Huang, Xiaohui; Li, Lujin; Li, Yunfei; Wang, Kun; Yang, Juan; He, Yingchun; Lv, Yinghua; Zheng, Qingshan

    2014-01-01

    To develop a population pharmacokinetic model of adefovir dipivoxil in healthy volunteers and evaluate the effect of individual factors on the pharmacokinetics of adefovir dipivoxil. Plasma concentration data collected from 32 healthy Chinese subjects in a Phase I clinical study was pooled. Subjects received a single oral dose of 10 mg, 20 mg, or 30 mg adefovir dipivoxil, or multiple doses of 10 mg once a day for 9 days. Plasma concentrations of adefovir dipivoxil were measured using a validated liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric method. A nonlinear mixed-effect model was used to analyze the plasma concentration data of adefovir dipivoxil in healthy volunteers and to calculate the relevant parameters as well as inter- and intra-individual variability. The time course of adefovir dipivoxil concentration is best described by a first-order absorption and first-order elimination two-compartment model with lag time. The final estimate of total body clearance (CL) is 56.9 L/h and 78.7 L/h for single and multiple dosing regimen, respectively; the volume distribution of the central compartment (V2) is 106 L; inter-compartmental clearance (Q) is 220 L/h; volume distribution of the peripheral compartment (V3) is 498 L and 800 L for single and multiple dosing regimen, respectively; absorption rate is 0.509 h-1; and lag time is 0.315 hours. The inter-individual variabilities of CL and V2 were 22.4% and 58.9%, respectively. The proportional error of residual variability is 14.1% and the additive error is 0.30 ng/L. The final pharmacokinetic model was evaluated using a bootstrap method. A nonlinear mixed effect model for oral adefovir dipivoxil formulations was developed in healthy Chinese subjects. A multiple dosing regimen may significantly increase the body clearance and volume distribution of the peripheral compartment compared to a single dosing regimen. *These authors contribute equally to this work.

  17. Pharmacokinetic modelling of intravenous tobramycin in adolescent and adult patients with cystic fibrosis using the nonparametric expectation maximization (NPEM) algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touw, D J; Vinks, A A; Neef, C

    1997-06-01

    The availability of personal computer programs for individualizing drug dosage regimens has stimulated the interest in modelling population pharmacokinetics. Data from 82 adolescent and adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) who were treated with intravenous tobramycin because of an exacerbation of their pulmonary infection were analysed with a non-parametric expectation maximization (NPEM) algorithm. This algorithm estimates the entire discrete joint probability density of the pharmacokinetic parameters. It also provides traditional parametric statistics such as the means, standard deviation, median, covariances and correlations among the various parameters. It also provides graphic-2- and 3-dimensional representations of the marginal densities of the parameters investigated. Several models for intravenous tobramycin in adolescent and adult patients with CF were compared. Covariates were total body weight (for the volume of distribution) and creatinine clearance (for the total body clearance and elimination rate). Because of lack of data on patients with poor renal function, restricted models with non-renal clearance and the non-renal elimination rate constant fixed at literature values of 0.15 L/h and 0.01 h-1 were also included. In this population, intravenous tobramycin could be best described by median (+/-dispersion factor) volume of distribution per unit of total body weight of 0.28 +/- 0.05 L/kg, elimination rate constant of 0.25 +/- 0.10 h-1 and elimination rate constant per unit of creatinine clearance of 0.0008 +/- 0.0009 h-1/(ml/min/1.73 m2). Analysis of populations of increasing size showed that using a restricted model with a non-renal elimination rate constant fixed at 0.01 h-1, a model based on a population of only 10 to 20 patients, contained parameter values similar to those of the entire population and, using the full model, a larger population (at least 40 patients) was needed.

  18. A simple model of bipartite cooperation for ecological and organizational networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Serguei; Reed-Tsochas, Felix; Uzzi, Brian

    2009-01-22

    In theoretical ecology, simple stochastic models that satisfy two basic conditions about the distribution of niche values and feeding ranges have proved successful in reproducing the overall structural properties of real food webs, using species richness and connectance as the only input parameters. Recently, more detailed models have incorporated higher levels of constraint in order to reproduce the actual links observed in real food webs. Here, building on previous stochastic models of consumer-resource interactions between species, we propose a highly parsimonious model that can reproduce the overall bipartite structure of cooperative partner-partner interactions, as exemplified by plant-animal mutualistic networks. Our stochastic model of bipartite cooperation uses simple specialization and interaction rules, and only requires three empirical input parameters. We test the bipartite cooperation model on ten large pollination data sets that have been compiled in the literature, and find that it successfully replicates the degree distribution, nestedness and modularity of the empirical networks. These properties are regarded as key to understanding cooperation in mutualistic networks. We also apply our model to an extensive data set of two classes of company engaged in joint production in the garment industry. Using the same metrics, we find that the network of manufacturer-contractor interactions exhibits similar structural patterns to plant-animal pollination networks. This surprising correspondence between ecological and organizational networks suggests that the simple rules of cooperation that generate bipartite networks may be generic, and could prove relevant in many different domains, ranging from biological systems to human society.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of BMEDA after Intravenous Administration in Beagle Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsien Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacokinetics of N,N-bis(2-mercapatoethly-N',N'-diethylenediamine (BMEDA, a molecule that can form a chelate with rhenium-188 (188Re to produce the 188Re-BMEDA-liposomes, was studied. In this work, beagles received a single injection of BMEDA, at doses of 1, 2, or 5 mg/kg; the concentration of BMEDA in the beagles’ plasma was then analyzed and determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. Based on the pharmacokinetic parameters of BMEDA, we found that male and female animals shared similar patterns indicating that the pharmacokinetics of BMEDA is independent of gender differences. In addition, the pharmacokinetics of BMEDA was seen to be non-linear because the increase of mean AUC0–t and AUC0–∞ values tend to be greater than dose proportional while the mean Vss and CL values of BMEDA appeared to be dose dependent. The information on the pharmacokinetics of BMEDA generated from this study will serve as a basis to design appropriate pharmacology and toxicology studies for future human use.

  20. Simple model with damping of the mode-coupling instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pestrikov, D V [AN SSSR, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki

    1996-08-01

    In this paper we use a simple model to study the suppression of the transverse mode-coupling instability. Two possibilities are considered. One is due to the damping of particular synchrobetatron modes, and another - due to Landau damping, caused by the nonlinearity of betatron oscillations. (author)

  1. Population pharmacokinetics of ifosfamide and its 2-and 3-dechloroethylated and 4-hydroxylated metabolites in resistant small-cell lung cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerbusch, T; vanPutten, JWG; Groen, HJM; Huitema, ADR; Mathot, RAA; Beijnen, JH

    The aim of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model that could describe the pharmacokinetics of ifosfamide, 2- and 3-dechloroethylifosfamide and 4-hydroxyifosfamide, and calculate their plasma exposure and urinary excretion. A group of 14 patients with small-cell lung cancer

  2. Use of Paired Simple and Complex Models to Reduce Predictive Bias and Quantify Uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doherty, John; Christensen, Steen

    2011-01-01

    -constrained uncertainty analysis. Unfortunately, however, many system and process details on which uncertainty may depend are, by design, omitted from simple models. This can lead to underestimation of the uncertainty associated with many predictions of management interest. The present paper proposes a methodology...... of these details born of the necessity for model outputs to replicate observations of historical system behavior. In contrast, the rapid run times and general numerical reliability of simple models often promulgates good calibration and ready implementation of sophisticated methods of calibration...... that attempts to overcome the problems associated with complex models on the one hand and simple models on the other hand, while allowing access to the benefits each of them offers. It provides a theoretical analysis of the simplification process from a subspace point of view, this yielding insights...

  3. Population pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic modelling of eltrombopag in healthy volunteers and subjects with chronic liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Colm; Hayes, Siobhan C; Wire, Mary; Zhang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Aims To characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD) of eltrombopag in chronic liver disease (CLD). Methods The PK/PD model was developed using data from 79 CLD patients using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling. Results The PK of eltrombopag were described by a two-compartment model with dual sequential first-order absorption. Gender, race and severity of CLD were predictors of the apparent clearance of eltrombopag. The PD of eltrombopag in CLD were adequately described by a four-compartment lifespan model, in which eltrombopag stimulated platelet precursor production rate. East Asian CLD patients were less sensitive to the stimulatory effect of eltrombopag. Following a daily dose regimen of 50 mg eltrombopag, the time to achieve peak platelet counts was longer for the CLD population compared with patients who had immune thrombocytopenic purpura, but was comparable to patients with hepatitis C. Likewise, it took a longer time for platelet counts to rebound back to baseline once eltrombopag treatment was discontinued. Conclusions The time course of the platelet response in CLD was different from that in immune thrombocytopenic purpura but comparable to that in hepatitis C. PMID:24117976

  4. Structure of simple liquids; Structure des liquides simples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blain, J F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    The results obtained by application to argon and sodium of the two important methods of studying the structure of liquids: scattering of X-rays and neutrons, are presented on one hand. On the other hand the principal models employed for reconstituting the structure of simple liquids are exposed: mathematical models, lattice models and their derived models, experimental models. (author) [French] On presente d'une part les resultats obtenus par application a l'argon et au sodium des deux principales methodes d'etude de la structure des liquides: la diffusion des rayons X et la diffusion des neutrons; d'autre part, les principaux modeles employes pour reconstituer la structure des liquides simples sont exposes: modeles mathematiques, modeles des reseaux et modeles derives, modeles experimentaux. (auteur)

  5. A simple model for behaviour change in epidemics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brauer Fred

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People change their behaviour during an epidemic. Infectious members of a population may reduce the number of contacts they make with other people because of the physical effects of their illness and possibly because of public health announcements asking them to do so in order to decrease the number of new infections, while susceptible members of the population may reduce the number of contacts they make in order to try to avoid becoming infected. Methods We consider a simple epidemic model in which susceptible and infectious members respond to a disease outbreak by reducing contacts by different fractions and analyze the effect of such contact reductions on the size of the epidemic. We assume constant fractional reductions, without attempting to consider the way in which susceptible members might respond to information about the epidemic. Results We are able to derive upper and lower bounds for the final size of an epidemic, both for simple and staged progression models. Conclusions The responses of uninfected and infected individuals in a disease outbreak are different, and this difference affects estimates of epidemic size.

  6. Relative sensitivities of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters to arterial input function (AIF) scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Cai, Yu; Moloney, Brendan; Chen, Yiyi; Huang, Wei; Woods, Mark; Coakley, Fergus V; Rooney, William D; Garzotto, Mark G; Springer, Charles S

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic-Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) has been used widely for clinical applications. Pharmacokinetic modeling of DCE-MRI data that extracts quantitative contrast reagent/tissue-specific model parameters is the most investigated method. One of the primary challenges in pharmacokinetic analysis of DCE-MRI data is accurate and reliable measurement of the arterial input function (AIF), which is the driving force behind all pharmacokinetics. Because of effects such as inflow and partial volume averaging, AIF measured from individual arteries sometimes require amplitude scaling for better representation of the blood contrast reagent (CR) concentration time-courses. Empirical approaches like blinded AIF estimation or reference tissue AIF derivation can be useful and practical, especially when there is no clearly visible blood vessel within the imaging field-of-view (FOV). Similarly, these approaches generally also require magnitude scaling of the derived AIF time-courses. Since the AIF varies among individuals even with the same CR injection protocol and the perfect scaling factor for reconstructing the ground truth AIF often remains unknown, variations in estimated pharmacokinetic parameters due to varying AIF scaling factors are of special interest. In this work, using simulated and real prostate cancer DCE-MRI data, we examined parameter variations associated with AIF scaling. Our results show that, for both the fast-exchange-limit (FXL) Tofts model and the water exchange sensitized fast-exchange-regime (FXR) model, the commonly fitted CR transfer constant (K(trans)) and the extravascular, extracellular volume fraction (ve) scale nearly proportionally with the AIF, whereas the FXR-specific unidirectional cellular water efflux rate constant, kio, and the CR intravasation rate constant, kep, are both AIF scaling insensitive. This indicates that, for DCE-MRI of prostate cancer and possibly other cancers, kio and kep may be more suitable imaging

  7. Pharmacokinetics of Melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Gögenur, Ismail; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Despite widespread clinical application of melatonin, several unanswered questions remain regarding the pharmacokinetics of this drug. This lack of knowledge may contribute to the inconsistency of results in previous clinical studies. Currently, a t max value of 30-45 min and a t ½elimination of ...

  8. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic (PKPD) Analysis with Drug Discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negus, S Stevens; Banks, Matthew L

    2016-08-30

    Discriminative stimulus and other drug effects are determined by the concentration of drug at its target receptor and by the pharmacodynamic consequences of drug-receptor interaction. For in vivo procedures such as drug discrimination, drug concentration at receptors in a given anatomical location (e.g., the brain) is determined both by the dose of drug administered and by pharmacokinetic processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion that deliver drug to and from that anatomical location. Drug discrimination data are often analyzed by strategies of dose-effect analysis to determine parameters such as potency and efficacy. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic (PKPD) analysis is an alternative to conventional dose-effect analysis, and it relates drug effects to a measure of drug concentration in a body compartment (e.g., venous blood) rather than to drug dose. PKPD analysis can yield insights on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic determinants of drug action. PKPD analysis can also facilitate translational research by identifying species differences in pharmacokinetics and providing a basis for integrating these differences into interpretation of drug effects. Examples are discussed here to illustrate the application of PKPD analysis to the evaluation of drug effects in rhesus monkeys trained to discriminate cocaine from saline.

  9. Validation of the replica trick for simple models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinzato, Takashi

    2018-04-01

    We discuss the replica analytic continuation using several simple models in order to prove mathematically the validity of the replica analysis, which is used in a wide range of fields related to large-scale complex systems. While replica analysis consists of two analytical techniques—the replica trick (or replica analytic continuation) and the thermodynamical limit (and/or order parameter expansion)—we focus our study on replica analytic continuation, which is the mathematical basis of the replica trick. We apply replica analysis to solve a variety of analytical models, and examine the properties of replica analytic continuation. Based on the positive results for these models we propose that replica analytic continuation is a robust procedure in replica analysis.

  10. Using pharmacokinetic modelling to improve prescribing practices of intravenous aminophylline in childhood asthma exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Lewis; McBride, Antonia; Lilley, Andrew; Sinha, Ian; Johnson, Trevor N; Hawcutt, Daniel B

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate physiologically based pharmacokinetic modelling (PBPK) software in paediatric asthma patients using intravenous aminophylline. Prospective clinical audit of children receiving iv aminophylline (July 2014 to June 2016), and in-silico modelling using Simcyp software. Thirty-eight admissions (25 children) were included. Children with aminophylline levels ≥10 mg/l had equivalent clinical outcomes compared to those model. PBPK modelling of a 5 mg/kg iv loading dose (≤18yr) shows a mean C max of 8.99 mg/L (5th-95th centiles 5.5-13.7 mg/L), with 70.3% of subjects  20 mg/L. For an aminophylline infusion (0-12 y) of 1.0  mg/kg/h, the mean steady state infusion concentration was 16.4 mg/L, (5th-95th centiles 5.3-32 mg/L), with 26.8% having a serum concentration >20 mg/L. For 12-18yr receiving 0.5  mg/kg/h infusion, the mean steady state infusion concentration was 9.37 mg/L (5th-95th centiles 3.4-18 mg/L), with 59.8% having a serum concentration modelling correlates well with clinical data. Current aminophylline iv loading dosage recommendations achieve levels risk of toxicity (>20 mg/l). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pharmacokinetics of inhaled anesthetics in green iguanas (Iguana iguana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Robert J; Pypendop, Bruno H; Barter, Linda S; Hawkins, Michelle G

    2006-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that differences in anesthetic uptake and elimination in iguanas would counter the pharmacokinetic effects of blood:gas solubility and thus serve to minimize kinetic differences among inhaled agents. 6 green iguanas (Iguana iguana). Iguanas were anesthetized with isoflurane, sevoflurane, or desflurane in a Latin-square design. Intervals from initial administration of an anesthetic agent to specific induction events and from cessation of administration of an anesthetic agent to specific recovery events were recorded. End-expired gas concentrations were measured during anesthetic washout. Significant differences were not detected for any induction or recovery events for any inhalation agent in iguanas. Washout curves best fit a 2-compartment model, but slopes for both compartments did not differ significantly among the 3 anesthetics. Differences in blood:gas solubility for isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane did not significantly influence differences in pharmacokinetics for the inhalation agents in iguanas.

  12. Pharmacokinetics and metabolism of olerciamide A from Portulaca oleracea L. in rats by UHPLC-UV and UHPLC-ESI-Q-TOF/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Zheming; Li, Cuiyu; Gao, Mingzhe; Ying, Xixiang; Yang, Guanlin

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the pharmacokinetics of olerciamide A in rats after oral and intravenous administration of Portulaca oleracea L. extract by a simple and rapid ultra high-performance liquid chromatography method with bergapten as internal standard. The pharmacokinetic results indicated that olerciamide A was rapidly distributed with a time to peak concentration of 30 min after oral administration and presented a low oral absolute bioavailability of 4.57%. The metabolism of olerciamide A in rats was also investigated using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray coupled with quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry to elucidate the reason for the low absolute bioavailability of olerciamide A and seven metabolites of oleraciamide A were found in rat plasma and urine. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. A Simple, Realistic Stochastic Model of Gastric Emptying.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiraphat Yokrattanasak

    Full Text Available Several models of Gastric Emptying (GE have been employed in the past to represent the rate of delivery of stomach contents to the duodenum and jejunum. These models have all used a deterministic form (algebraic equations or ordinary differential equations, considering GE as a continuous, smooth process in time. However, GE is known to occur as a sequence of spurts, irregular both in size and in timing. Hence, we formulate a simple stochastic process model, able to represent the irregular decrements of gastric contents after a meal. The model is calibrated on existing literature data and provides consistent predictions of the observed variability in the emptying trajectories. This approach may be useful in metabolic modeling, since it describes well and explains the apparently heterogeneous GE experimental results in situations where common gastric mechanics across subjects would be expected.

  14. Two point function for a simple general relativistic quantum model

    OpenAIRE

    Colosi, Daniele

    2007-01-01

    We study the quantum theory of a simple general relativistic quantum model of two coupled harmonic oscillators and compute the two-point function following a proposal first introduced in the context of loop quantum gravity.

  15. Enantioselective pharmacokinetics of sibutramine in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Keumhan; Bae, Kyoungjin; Min, Bokyoung; Kim, Eunyoung; Kwon, Kwang-il; Jeong, Taecheon; Kang, Wonku

    2010-02-01

    Racemic sibutramine is widely used to treat obesity owing to its inhibition of serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake in synapses. Although the enantioselective effects of sibutramine and its two active desmethyl-metabolites, monodesmethylsibutramine (MDS) and didesmethylsibutramine (DDS), on anorexia and energy expenditure have been elucidated, the enantioselective pharmacokinetics of sibutramine are still unclear. Therefore, we aimed to characterize the enantioselective pharmacokinetics of sibutramine and its metabolites in plasma and urine following an intravenous and a single oral administration of sibutramine in rats. The absolute bioavailability of sibutramine was only about 7%. The pharmacologically less effective S-isomer of DDS was predominant in the plasma: the C ( max ) and the AUC ( inf ) were 28 and 30 times higher than those of the R-isomer, respectively (psibutramine metabolites MDS and DDS were present at lower concentrations, owing to their rapid biotransformation to hydroxylated and/or carbamoylglucuronized forms and their faster excretion in the urine. The present study is the first to elucidate the enantioselective pharmacokinetics of sibutramine in rats.

  16. A pharmacokinetic study of diclofenac sodium in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Ma, He; Cen, Nannan; Zhou, Ai; Tao, Hengxun

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the pharmacokinetics of a single intravenous injection (i.v.) and oral administration (p.o.) of diclofenac sodium (DIC) in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Twelve male SD rats were divided into 2 groups (n=6 per group); one group was injected intravenously with 2 mg/kg DIC, whereas the other group was lavaged with 2 mg/kg DIC. Blood samples were collected prior to DIC delivery (0 h) and 0.033, 0.083, 0.167, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 h post-administration. Blood plasma samples were analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) following pretreatment to induce protein precipitation. Pharmacokinetics software was applied to calculate relevant pharmacokinetic parameters using a non-compartmental model. Following i.v. administration of DIC, the terminal elimination rate constant (λ z ), apparent terminal elimination half-life (t ½ ), area under the concentration-time curve from time 0 extrapolated to infinity (AUC0 -∞ ), clearance (CL), apparent volume of distribution (V z ), mean residence time (MRT), and apparent volume of distribution at steady state (V ss ) were 0.57±0.05 l/h, 1.22±0.11 h, 3356±238 h × ng/ml, 0.60±0.04 l/h, 1.05±0.10 l, 1.05±0.07 h and 0.63±0.07 l, respectively. Following p.o. administration of DIC, the λ z , t ½ , C max , t max , AUC 0-∞ , CL, V z , MRT were: 0.63±0.12 l/h, 1.12±0.18 h, 1272±112 ng/ml, 0.19±0.04 h, 2501±303 h × ng/ml, 0.81±0.10 l/h, 1.29±0.12 l, and 2.70±0.18 h, respectively. The pharmacokinetic parameters of i.v. and p.o. DIC in rats show that the drug is rapidly absorbed, distributed, and eliminated.

  17. Population pharmacokinetics of artesunate and dihydroartemisinin in pregnant and non-pregnant women with malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bose Carl

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The World Health Organization endorses the use of artemisinin-based combination therapy for treatment of acute uncomplicated falciparum malaria in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. However, the effects of pregnancy on the pharmacokinetics of artemisinin derivatives, such as artesunate (AS, are poorly understood. In this analysis, the population pharmacokinetics of oral AS, and its active metabolite dihydroartemisinin (DHA, were studied in pregnant and non-pregnant women at the Kingasani Maternity Clinic in the DRC. Methods Data were obtained from 26 pregnant women in the second (22 - 26 weeks or the third (32 - 36 weeks trimester of pregnancy and from 25 non-pregnant female controls. All subjects received 200 mg AS. Plasma AS and DHA were measured using a validated LC-MS method. Estimates for pharmacokinetic and variability parameters were obtained through nonlinear mixed effects modelling. Results A simultaneous parent-metabolite model was developed consisting of mixed zero-order, lagged first-order absorption of AS, a one-compartment model for AS, and a one-compartment model for DHA. Complete conversion of AS to DHA was assumed. The model displayed satisfactory goodness-of-fit, stability, and predictive ability. Apparent clearance (CL/F and volume of distribution (V/F estimates, with 95% bootstrap confidence intervals, were as follows: 195 L (139-285 L for AS V/F, 895 L/h (788-1045 L/h for AS CL/F, 91.4 L (78.5-109 L for DHA V/F, and 64.0 L/h (55.1-75.2 L/h for DHA CL/F. The effect of pregnancy on DHA CL/F was determined to be significant, with a pregnancy-associated increase in DHA CL/F of 42.3% (19.7 - 72.3%. Conclusions In this analysis, pharmacokinetic modelling suggests that pregnant women have accelerated DHA clearance compared to non-pregnant women receiving orally administered AS. These findings, in conjunction with a previous non-compartmental analysis of the modelled data, provide further evidence that

  18. Availability, Pharmaceutics, Security, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacological Activities of Patchouli Alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanying Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patchouli alcohol (PA, a tricyclic sesquiterpene, is one of the critical bioactive ingredients and is mainly isolated from aerial part of Pogostemon cablin (known as guanghuoxiang in China belonging to Labiatae. So far, PA has been widely applied in perfume industries. This review was written with the use of reliable information published between 1974 and 2016 from libraries and electronic researches including NCKI, PubMed, Reaxys, ACS, ScienceDirect, Springer, and Wiley-Blackwell, aiming at presenting comprehensive outline of security, pharmacokinetics, and bioactivities of PA and at further providing a potential guide in exploring the PA and its use in various medical fields. We found that PA maybe was a low toxic drug that was acquired numerously through vegetable oil isolation and chemical synthesis and its stability and low water dissolution were improved in pharmaceutics. It also possessed specific pharmacokinetic characteristics, such as two-compartment open model, first-order kinetic elimination, and certain biometabolism and biotransformation process, and was shown to have multiple biological activities, that is, immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, antitumor, antimicrobial, insecticidal, antiatherogenic, antiemetic, whitening, and sedative activity. However, the systematic evaluations of preparation, pharmaceutics, toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and bioactivities underlying molecular mechanisms of action also required further investigation prior to practices of PA in clinic.

  19. Availability, Pharmaceutics, Security, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacological Activities of Patchouli Alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guanying; Peng, Cheng; Xie, Xiaofang; Zhang, Sanyin; Cao, Xiaoyu

    2017-01-01

    Patchouli alcohol (PA), a tricyclic sesquiterpene, is one of the critical bioactive ingredients and is mainly isolated from aerial part of Pogostemon cablin (known as guanghuoxiang in China) belonging to Labiatae. So far, PA has been widely applied in perfume industries. This review was written with the use of reliable information published between 1974 and 2016 from libraries and electronic researches including NCKI, PubMed, Reaxys, ACS, ScienceDirect, Springer, and Wiley-Blackwell, aiming at presenting comprehensive outline of security, pharmacokinetics, and bioactivities of PA and at further providing a potential guide in exploring the PA and its use in various medical fields. We found that PA maybe was a low toxic drug that was acquired numerously through vegetable oil isolation and chemical synthesis and its stability and low water dissolution were improved in pharmaceutics. It also possessed specific pharmacokinetic characteristics, such as two-compartment open model, first-order kinetic elimination, and certain biometabolism and biotransformation process, and was shown to have multiple biological activities, that is, immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, antitumor, antimicrobial, insecticidal, antiatherogenic, antiemetic, whitening, and sedative activity. However, the systematic evaluations of preparation, pharmaceutics, toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and bioactivities underlying molecular mechanisms of action also required further investigation prior to practices of PA in clinic.

  20. Metabolism and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of flumioxazin in pregnant animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaku, Tomoyuki, E-mail: takakut@sc.sumitomo-chem.co.jp; Nagahori, Hirohisa; Sogame, Yoshihisa

    2014-06-15

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to predict the concentration of flumioxazin, in the blood and fetus of pregnant humans during a theoretical accidental intake (1000 mg/kg). The data on flumioxazin concentration in pregnant rats (30 mg/kg po) was used to develop the PBPK model in pregnant rats using physiological parameters and chemical specific parameters. The rat PBPK model developed was extrapolated to a human model. Liver microsomes of female rats and a mixed gender of humans were used for the in vitro metabolism study. To determine the % of flumioxazin absorbed after administration at a dose of 1000 mg/kg assuming maximum accidental intake, the biliary excretion study of [phenyl-U-{sup 14}C]flumioxazin was conducted in bile duct-cannulated female rats (Crl:CD (SD)) to collect and analyze the bile, urine, feces, gastrointestinal tract, and residual carcass. The % of flumioxazin absorbed at a dose of 1000 mg/kg in rats was low (12.3%) by summing up {sup 14}C of the urine, bile, and residual carcass. The pregnant human model that was developed demonstrated that the maximum flumioxazin concentration in the blood and fetus of a pregnant human at a dose of 1000 mg/kg po was 0.86 μg/mL and 0.68 μg/mL, respectively, which is much lower than K{sub m} (202.4 μg/mL). Because the metabolism was not saturated and the absorption rate was low at a dose of 1000 mg/kg, the calculated flumioxazin concentration in pregnant humans was thought to be relatively low, considering the flumioxazin concentration in pregnant rats at a dose of 30 mg/kg. For the safety assessment of flumioxazin, these results would be useful for further in vitro toxicology experiments. - Highlights: • A PBPK model of flumioxazin in pregnant humans was developed. • Simulated flumioxazin concentration in pregnant humans was relatively low. • The results would be useful for further in vitro toxicology experiments.

  1. Metabolism and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of flumioxazin in pregnant animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaku, Tomoyuki; Nagahori, Hirohisa; Sogame, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to predict the concentration of flumioxazin, in the blood and fetus of pregnant humans during a theoretical accidental intake (1000 mg/kg). The data on flumioxazin concentration in pregnant rats (30 mg/kg po) was used to develop the PBPK model in pregnant rats using physiological parameters and chemical specific parameters. The rat PBPK model developed was extrapolated to a human model. Liver microsomes of female rats and a mixed gender of humans were used for the in vitro metabolism study. To determine the % of flumioxazin absorbed after administration at a dose of 1000 mg/kg assuming maximum accidental intake, the biliary excretion study of [phenyl-U- 14 C]flumioxazin was conducted in bile duct-cannulated female rats (Crl:CD (SD)) to collect and analyze the bile, urine, feces, gastrointestinal tract, and residual carcass. The % of flumioxazin absorbed at a dose of 1000 mg/kg in rats was low (12.3%) by summing up 14 C of the urine, bile, and residual carcass. The pregnant human model that was developed demonstrated that the maximum flumioxazin concentration in the blood and fetus of a pregnant human at a dose of 1000 mg/kg po was 0.86 μg/mL and 0.68 μg/mL, respectively, which is much lower than K m (202.4 μg/mL). Because the metabolism was not saturated and the absorption rate was low at a dose of 1000 mg/kg, the calculated flumioxazin concentration in pregnant humans was thought to be relatively low, considering the flumioxazin concentration in pregnant rats at a dose of 30 mg/kg. For the safety assessment of flumioxazin, these results would be useful for further in vitro toxicology experiments. - Highlights: • A PBPK model of flumioxazin in pregnant humans was developed. • Simulated flumioxazin concentration in pregnant humans was relatively low. • The results would be useful for further in vitro toxicology experiments

  2. Statistical analysis of Amenamevir (ASP2151) between pharmacokinetics and clinical efficacies with non-linear effect model for the treatment of genital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Akitsugu; Katashima, Masataka; Kaibara, Atsunori; Sawamoto, Taiji; Zhang, Wenhui; Keirns, James

    2014-09-01

    Amenamevir is the international non-proprietary name for ASP2151 synthesized by Astellas Pharma, Inc. It is a structurally novel class of helicase-primase inhibitor and demonstrated more potency in vitro anti-viral activity with low cytotoxicity against varicella-zoster virus (VZV), herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) than acyclovir (ACV). Phase II randomized trial assessed the safety and efficacy of ASP2151 for episodic therapy of recurrent genital herpes was conducted. Participants self-initiated with ASP2151 (100, 200, or 400 mg daily for 3 days), ASP2151 (1,200 mg as a single dose), placebo for 3 days, or Valacyclovir (500 mg twice daily for 3 days). We present a first population pharmacokinetic (PPK) modeling analysis of Amenamevir for genital herpes patients. The final model retained the effect of Weight and Albumin on CL. Statistical analysis between pharmacokinetics and clinical efficacies was done by using the time above 200 ng/mL (T200 ). T200 derived from the final PPK model to consider the correlation with Time to lesion healing and viral shedding. This finding suggested that it could be necessary to maintain the Amenamevir concentration above the threshold level to prevent the virus replication. © 2014, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  3. Simple model of surface roughness for binary collision sputtering simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsey, Sloan J. [Institute of Solid-State Electronics, TU Wien, Floragasse 7, A-1040 Wien (Austria); Hobler, Gerhard, E-mail: gerhard.hobler@tuwien.ac.at [Institute of Solid-State Electronics, TU Wien, Floragasse 7, A-1040 Wien (Austria); Maciążek, Dawid; Postawa, Zbigniew [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Lojasiewicza 11, 30348 Kraków (Poland)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • A simple model of surface roughness is proposed. • Its key feature is a linearly varying target density at the surface. • The model can be used in 1D/2D/3D Monte Carlo binary collision simulations. • The model fits well experimental glancing incidence sputtering yield data. - Abstract: It has been shown that surface roughness can strongly influence the sputtering yield – especially at glancing incidence angles where the inclusion of surface roughness leads to an increase in sputtering yields. In this work, we propose a simple one-parameter model (the “density gradient model”) which imitates surface roughness effects. In the model, the target’s atomic density is assumed to vary linearly between the actual material density and zero. The layer width is the sole model parameter. The model has been implemented in the binary collision simulator IMSIL and has been evaluated against various geometric surface models for 5 keV Ga ions impinging an amorphous Si target. To aid the construction of a realistic rough surface topography, we have performed MD simulations of sequential 5 keV Ga impacts on an initially crystalline Si target. We show that our new model effectively reproduces the sputtering yield, with only minor variations in the energy and angular distributions of sputtered particles. The success of the density gradient model is attributed to a reduction of the reflection coefficient – leading to increased sputtering yields, similar in effect to surface roughness.

  4. Simple model of surface roughness for binary collision sputtering simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsey, Sloan J.; Hobler, Gerhard; Maciążek, Dawid; Postawa, Zbigniew

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A simple model of surface roughness is proposed. • Its key feature is a linearly varying target density at the surface. • The model can be used in 1D/2D/3D Monte Carlo binary collision simulations. • The model fits well experimental glancing incidence sputtering yield data. - Abstract: It has been shown that surface roughness can strongly influence the sputtering yield – especially at glancing incidence angles where the inclusion of surface roughness leads to an increase in sputtering yields. In this work, we propose a simple one-parameter model (the “density gradient model”) which imitates surface roughness effects. In the model, the target’s atomic density is assumed to vary linearly between the actual material density and zero. The layer width is the sole model parameter. The model has been implemented in the binary collision simulator IMSIL and has been evaluated against various geometric surface models for 5 keV Ga ions impinging an amorphous Si target. To aid the construction of a realistic rough surface topography, we have performed MD simulations of sequential 5 keV Ga impacts on an initially crystalline Si target. We show that our new model effectively reproduces the sputtering yield, with only minor variations in the energy and angular distributions of sputtered particles. The success of the density gradient model is attributed to a reduction of the reflection coefficient – leading to increased sputtering yields, similar in effect to surface roughness.

  5. Application of Simple CFD Models in Smoke Ventilation Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; la Cour-Harbo, Hans

    2004-01-01

    The paper examines the possibilities of using simple CFD models in practical smoke ventilation design. The aim is to assess if it is possible with a reasonable accuracy to predict the behaviour of smoke transport in case of a fire. A CFD code mainly applicable for “ordinary” ventilation design...

  6. Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Reproducibility of Histogram Analysis on Pharmacokinetic Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-yi; Su, Zi-hua; Xu, Xiao; Sun, Zhi-peng; Duan, Fei-xue; Song, Yuan-yuan; Li, Lu; Wang, Ying-wei; Ma, Xin; Guo, Ai-tao; Ma, Lin; Ye, Hui-yi

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been increasingly used to evaluate the permeability of tumor vessel. Histogram metrics are a recognized promising method of quantitative MR imaging that has been recently introduced in analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters in oncology due to tumor heterogeneity. In this study, 21 patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) underwent paired DCE-MRI studies on a 3.0 T MR system. Extended Tofts model and population-based arterial input function were used to calculate kinetic parameters of RCC tumors. Mean value and histogram metrics (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) of each pharmacokinetic parameter were generated automatically using ImageJ software. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility and scan–rescan reproducibility were evaluated using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and coefficient of variation (CoV). Our results demonstrated that the histogram method (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) was not superior to the conventional Mean value method in reproducibility evaluation on DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters (K trans & Ve) in renal cell carcinoma, especially for Skewness and Kurtosis which showed lower intra-, inter-observer and scan-rescan reproducibility than Mean value. Our findings suggest that additional studies are necessary before wide incorporation of histogram metrics in quantitative analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:27380733

  7. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the injectable formulation of methadone hydrochloride and methadone in lipid nanocarriers administered orally to horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosignani, N; Luna, S P; Dalla Costa, T; Pimenta, E L; Detoni, C B; Guterres, S S; Puoli Filho, J N; Pantoja, J C; Pigatto, M C

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the thermal, electrical and mechanical antinociceptive and physiological effects (heart rate, respiratory rate, arterial blood pressure, head height and abdominal auscultation score), and pharmacokinetics, of 0.5 mg/kg of the injectable formulation (ORAL) or nanoparticulated methadone (NANO) given orally, in six adult mares, using a crossover, blind and prospective design. Repeated-measure models were used to compare parametric data between and within treatments, followed by Tukey's test. Nonparametric data were analysed with Wilcoxon signed-rank, adjusted by Bonferroni tests. Blood samples were also collected up to 6 h after dosing for plasma drug quantification by LC-MS/MS. Methadone pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by noncompartmental and compartmental approaches. There were no differences in pharmacodynamic parameters. No statistical differences were observed in the pharmacokinetic parameters from noncompartmental analysis for both groups, except a significant decrease in peak plasma concentration, increase in apparent volume of distribution per fraction absorbed (Vd ss /F) and increased mean residence time (MRT) for NANO. One-compartment open model with first order elimination best described the pharmacokinetic profiles for both groups. Neither ORAL nor NANO administered orally to horses produced antinociception. The nanoencapsulated formulation of methadone given orally to horses did not improve methadone pharmacokinetic parameters or increased systemic body exposure to methadone. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. [Advances on pharmacokinetics of traditional Chinese medicine under disease states].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zi-peng; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Rui-jie; Yang, Qing; Zhu, Xiao-xin

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, more and more research shows that the pharmacokinetic parameter of traditional Chinese medicine can be affected by the disease states. It's possible that drug metabolic enzymes, transporters, cell membrane permeability and the change of microbes group could be interfered with physiological and pathological changes, which enables the pharmacokinetics of traditional Chinese medicine in the body to be altered, including the process of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion, and then the pharmacokinetic parameters of traditional chinese medicine are altered. It's found that investigating the pharmacokinetic of traditional Chinese medicine in the pathological state is more useful than that of in normal state because the great part of traditional Chinese medicine is mainly used to treat disease. This article reflects the latest research on the pharmacokinetic of traditional Chinese medicine in the disease state such as diabete, cerebral ischemia, liver injury, inflammatory disease, nervous system disorders and fever in order to provide certain reference for clinicians designing reasonable administration dose.

  9. Pharmacokinetics and modeling of immune cell trafficking: quantifying differential influences of target tissues versus lymphocytes in SJL and lipopolysaccharide-treated mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banks William A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immune cell trafficking into the CNS and other tissues plays important roles in health and disease. Rapid quantitative methods are not available that could be used to study many of the dynamic aspects of immune cell-tissue interactions. Methods We used pharmacokinetics and modeling to quantify and characterize the trafficking of radioactively labeled lymphocytes into brain and peripheral tissues. We used variance from two-way ANOVAs with 2 × 2 experimental designs to model the relative influences of lymphocytes and target tissues in trafficking. Results We found that in male CD-1 mice, about 1 in 5,000 intravenously injected lymphocytes entered each gram of brain. Uptake by brain was 2 to 3 times higher in naïve SJL females, but uptake by spleen and clearance from blood was lower, demonstrating a dichotomy in immune cell distribution. Treatment of CD-1 mice with lipopolysaccharide (LPS increased immune cell uptake into brain but decreased uptake by spleen and axillary nodes. Conclusions Differences in brain uptake and in uptake by spleen between SJL and CD-1 mice were primarily determined by lymphocytes, whereas differences in uptake with LPS were primarily determined by lymphocytes for the brain but by the tissues for the spleen and the axillary lymph node. These results show that immune cells normally enter the CNS and that tissues and immune cells interact in ways that can be quantified by pharmacokinetic models.

  10. Impact of pharmaceutical cocrystals: the effects on drug pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Ning; Perry, Miranda L; Weyna, David R; Zaworotko, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    Pharmaceutical cocrystallization has emerged in the past decade as a new strategy to enhance the clinical performance of orally administered drugs. A pharmaceutical cocrystal is a multi-component crystalline material in which the active pharmaceutical ingredient is in a stoichiometric ratio with a second compound that is generally a solid under ambient conditions. The resulting cocrystal exhibits different solid-state thermodynamics, leading to changes in physicochemical properties that offer the potential to significantly modify drug pharmacokinetics. The impact of cocrystallization upon drug pharmacokinetics has not yet been well delineated. Herein, we compile previously published data to address two salient questions: what effect does cocrystallization impart upon physicochemical properties of a drug substance and to what degree can those effects impact its pharmacokinetics. Cocrystals can impact various aspects of drug pharmacokinetics, including, but not limited to, drug absorption. The diversity of solid forms offered through cocrystallization can facilitate drastic changes in solubility and pharmacokinetics. Therefore, it is unsurprising that cocrystal screening is now a routine step in early-stage drug development. With the increasing recognition of pharmaceutical cocrystals from clinical, regulatory and legal perspectives, the systematic commercialization of cocrystal containing drug products is just a matter of time.

  11. Chaos from simple models to complex systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cencini, Massimo; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2010-01-01

    Chaos: from simple models to complex systems aims to guide science and engineering students through chaos and nonlinear dynamics from classical examples to the most recent fields of research. The first part, intended for undergraduate and graduate students, is a gentle and self-contained introduction to the concepts and main tools for the characterization of deterministic chaotic systems, with emphasis to statistical approaches. The second part can be used as a reference by researchers as it focuses on more advanced topics including the characterization of chaos with tools of information theor

  12. Pharmacokinetic analysis of Gd-DTPA enhancement in dynamic MR of breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, T.; Knopp, M.V.; Hoffmann, U.; Brix, G.; Junkermann, H.; Zuna, I.; Fournier, D. von; Kaick, G. van

    1994-01-01

    Dynamic Gd-DTPA enhanced MR of the breast was performed in one single slice in 27 patients with suspicious nodular lesions. The results could be histologically verified in all cases. A rapid spin-echo sequence with a time resolution of 8.75 s was used for the dynamic examination. The signal changes were analysed using a pharmacokinetic model which allowed parametrization of the contrast enhancement and transformation of the data into colour coded parameter images. The parameters allowed reliable distinction of 9 benign from 18 malignant lesions (p 21 ''). One fibroadenoma could not be distinguished from the carcinomas. Lymph node metastases and the pharmacokinetic parameter amplitude correlated significantly (p<0.05). (orig.)

  13. Simple Regge pole model for Compton scattering of protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, M.; Fazal-e-Aleem

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that by a phenomenological choice of the residue functions, the differential cross section for ν p → ν p, including the very recent measurements up to - t=4.3 (GeV/c) 2 , can be explained at all measured energies greater than 2 GeV with simple Regge pole model

  14. Simple Model-Free Controller for the Stabilization of Planetary Inverted Pendulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanhuan Mai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple model-free controller is presented for solving the nonlinear dynamic control problems. As an example of the problem, a planetary gear-type inverted pendulum (PIP is discussed. To control the inherently unstable system which requires real-time control responses, the design of a smart and simple controller is made necessary. The model-free controller proposed includes a swing-up controller part and a stabilization controller part; neither controller has any information about the PIP. Since the input/output scaling parameters of the fuzzy controller are highly sensitive, we use genetic algorithm (GA to obtain the optimal control parameters. The experimental results show the effectiveness and robustness of the present controller.

  15. Landau-Zener transitions and Dykhne formula in a simple continuum model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Yujin; Garmon, Savannah

    The Landau-Zener model describing the interaction between two linearly driven discrete levels is useful in describing many simple dynamical systems; however, no system is completely isolated from the surrounding environment. Here we examine a generalizations of the original Landau-Zener model to study simple environmental influences. We consider a model in which one of the discrete levels is replaced with a energy continuum, in which we find that the survival probability for the initially occupied diabatic level is unaffected by the presence of the continuum. This result can be predicted by assuming that each step in the evolution for the diabatic state evolves independently according to the Landau-Zener formula, even in the continuum limit. We also show that, at least for the simplest model, this result can also be predicted with the natural generalization of the Dykhne formula for open systems. We also observe dissipation as the non-escape probability from the discrete levels is no longer equal to one.

  16. Population pharmacokinetics of a three-day chloroquine treatment in patients with Plasmodium vivax infection on the Thai-Myanmar border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglund, Richard; Moussavi, Younis; Ruengweerayut, Ronnatrai; Cheomung, Anurak; Äbelö, Angela; Na-Bangchang, Kesara

    2016-02-29

    A three-day course of chloroquine remains a standard treatment of Plasmodium vivax infection in Thailand with satisfactory clinical efficacy and tolerability although a continuous decline in in vitro parasite sensitivity has been reported. Information on the pharmacokinetics of chloroquine and its active metabolite desethylchloroquine are required for optimization of treatment to attain therapeutic exposure and thus prevent drug resistance development. The study was conducted at Mae Tao Clinic for migrant worker, Tak province, Thailand. Blood samples were collected from a total of 75 (8 Thais and 67 Burmeses; 36 males and 39 females; aged 17-52 years) patients with mono-infection with P. vivax malaria [median (95 % CI) admission parasitaemia 4898 (1206-29,480)/µL] following treatment with a three-day course of chloroquine (25 mg/kg body weight chloroquine phosphate over 3 days). Whole blood concentrations of chloroquine and desethylchloroquine were measured using high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection. Concentration-time profiles of both compounds were analysed using a population-based pharmacokinetic approach. All patients showed satisfactory response to standard treatment with a three-day course of chloroquine with 100 % cure rate within the follow-up period of 42 days. Neither recurrence of P. vivax parasitaemia nor appearance of P. falciparum occurred. A total of 1045 observations from 75 participants were included in the pharmacokinetic analysis. Chloroquine disposition was most adequately described by the two-compartment model with one transit compartment absorption model into the central compartment and a first-order transformation of chloroquine into desethylchloroquine with an additional peripheral compartment added to desethylchloroquine. First-order elimination from the central compartment of chloroquine and desethylchloroquine was assumed. The model exhibited a strong predictive ability and the pharmacokinetic parameters were

  17. Effects of Body Size and Gender on the Population Pharmacokinetics of Artesunate and Its Active Metabolite Dihydroartemisinin in Pediatric Malaria Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Carrie A.; Tan, Beesan; Duparc, Stephan; Borghini-Fuhrer, Isabelle; Jung, Donald; Shin, Chang-Sik; Fleckenstein, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Despite the important role of the antimalarial artesunate and its active metabolite dihydroartemisinin (DHA) in malaria treatment efforts, there are limited data on the pharmacokinetics of these agents in pediatric patients. This study evaluated the effects of body size and gender on the pharmacokinetics of artesunate-DHA using data from pediatric and adult malaria patients. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling was used to obtain a base model consisting of first-order artesunate absorption and on...

  18. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Lisdexamfetamine Compared with D-Amphetamine in Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick C. Dolder

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Lisdexamfetamine is a prodrug of D-amphetamine used for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Lisdexamfetamine is thought to have a prolonged pharmacokinetic profile compared with oral D-amphetamine, possibly associated with lower drug liking and a lower risk of oral misuse. However, differences in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of lisdexamfetamine and D-amphetamine have not been directly compared.Methods: Equimolar doses of D-amphetamine (40 mg and lisdexamfetamine (100 mg, and placebo were administered in 24 healthy subjects in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. Plasma concentrations of amphetamine, subjective effects, and vital signs were repeatedly assessed. The pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using compartmental modeling.Results: The increase in plasma concentrations of amphetamine had a 0.6 ± 0.6 h (mean ± SD longer lag time and reached peak levels 1.1 ± 1.5 h later after lisdexamfetamine administration compared with D-amphetamine administration, but no differences in maximal concentrations or total exposure (AUC were found between the two treatments. Consistent with the pharmacokinetics, the subjective and cardiovascular stimulant effects of lisdexamfetamine also occurred later compared with D-amphetamine. However, no differences in peak ratings of potentially abuse-related subjective drug effects (e.g., drug liking, drug high, stimulation, happy, well-being, and self-confidence were observed after lisdexamfetamine administration compared with D-amphetamine administration. Lisdexamfetamine and D-amphetamine also produced similar peak increases in mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature, pupil size, and adverse effects.Conclusion: The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of lisdexamfetamine are similar to D-amphetamine administered 1h later. Lisdexamfetamine is likely associated with a similar risk of oral abuse as D

  19. Low heritability in pharmacokinetics of talinolol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthaei, Johannes; Tzvetkov, Mladen V; Gal, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Efflux transporters like MDR1 and MRP2 may modulate the pharmacokinetics of about 50 % of all drugs. It is currently unknown how much of the variation in the activities of important drug membrane transporters like MDR1 or MRP2 is determined by genetic or by environmental factors...... of talinolol was predefined as the primary parameter. Heritability was analyzed by structural equation modeling and by within- and between-subject variance and talinolol clearance was correlated with polymorphisms in MDR1, MRP2, BCRP, MDR5, OATP1B1, and OCT1. RESULTS: Talinolol clearance varied approximately...

  20. Comparative pharmacokinetic profiles of tectorigenin in rat plasma by UPLC-MS/MS after oral administration of Iris tectorum Maxim extract and pure tectoridin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Yang, Xiaolin; An, Jinmeng; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Zhenzhong; Huang, Wenzhe; Yang, Zhonglin; Li, Fei

    2015-10-10

    Iris tectorum Maxim, a well-known herb medicine, is commonly used for treatment of inflammation, cough, and pharyngitis for a long time in China. Tectoridin, main active ingredient of Iris tectorum Maxim, is often used for its quality control. This study was aimed to analyze the pharmacokinetic profile of tectorigenin (the metabolite of tectoridin) after oral administration of I. tectorum Maxim extract, and to compare the pharmacokinetic characterization of tectorigenin after oral administration of I. tectorum Maxim extract (ITME) and pure tectoridin (PT) in rats. In addition, a simple, reliable and sensitive UPLC-MS/MS method was developed for determination of tectorigenin in rat plasma, using kaempferol as internal standard. The processed samples were separated on a Poroshell 120 SB-C₁₈ column and detected by positive electrospray ionization in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The method validation results indicated that the established method was simple, specific and reliable. The pharmacokinetic results showed that the plasma concentration of tectorigenin in ITME group was much higher than that of the PT group (p<0.01). Moreover, compared to PT group, t₁/₂ value and AUC(0-∞) value were also notably increased in ITME group (p<0.01). In conclusion, potential interaction exists between those chemical components in ITME, and the co-existing components in ITME could notably promote the absorption of tectoridin in rats, however, the exact compound(s) which enhance the absorption of tectoridin should be investigated in future study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A simple procedure to model water level fluctuations in partially inundated wetlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spieksma, JFM; Schouwenaars, JM

    When modelling groundwater behaviour in wetlands, there are specific problems related to the presence of open water in small-sized mosaic patterns. A simple quasi two-dimensional model to predict water level fluctuations in partially inundated wetlands is presented. In this model, the ratio between

  2. Water nanoelectrolysis: A simple model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olives, Juan; Hammadi, Zoubida; Morin, Roger; Lapena, Laurent

    2017-12-01

    A simple model of water nanoelectrolysis—defined as the nanolocalization at a single point of any electrolysis phenomenon—is presented. It is based on the electron tunneling assisted by the electric field through the thin film of water molecules (˜0.3 nm thick) at the surface of a tip-shaped nanoelectrode (micrometric to nanometric curvature radius at the apex). By applying, e.g., an electric potential V1 during a finite time t1, and then the potential -V1 during the same time t1, we show that there are three distinct regions in the plane (t1, V1): one for the nanolocalization (at the apex of the nanoelectrode) of the electrolysis oxidation reaction, the second one for the nanolocalization of the reduction reaction, and the third one for the nanolocalization of the production of bubbles. These parameters t1 and V1 completely control the time at which the electrolysis reaction (of oxidation or reduction) begins, the duration of this reaction, the electrolysis current intensity (i.e., the tunneling current), the number of produced O2 or H2 molecules, and the radius of the nanolocalized bubbles. The model is in good agreement with our experiments.

  3. The simple modelling method for storm- and grey-water quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The simple modelling method for storm- and grey-water quality management applied to Alexandra settlement. ... objectives optimally consist of educational programmes, erosion and sediment control, street sweeping, removal of sanitation system overflows, impervious cover reduction, downspout disconnections, removal of ...

  4. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicology of theranostic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Homan; Mintri, Shrutika; Menon, Archita Venugopal; Lee, Hea Yeon; Choi, Hak Soo; Kim, Jonghan

    2015-11-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are considered a promising tool in both diagnosis and therapeutics. Theranostic NPs possess the combined properties of targeted imaging and drug delivery within a single entity. While the categorization of theranostic NPs is based on their structure and composition, the pharmacokinetics of NPs are significantly influenced by the physicochemical properties of theranostic NPs as well as the routes of administration. Consequently, altered pharmacokinetics modify the pharmacodynamic efficacy and toxicity of NPs. Although theranostic NPs hold great promise in nanomedicine and biomedical applications, a lack of understanding persists on the mechanisms of the biodistribution and adverse effects of NPs. To better understand the diagnostic and therapeutic functions of NPs, this review discusses the factors that influence the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicology of theranostic NPs, along with several strategies for developing novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities.

  5. A simple model of hysteresis behavior using spreadsheet analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrmann, A.; Blachowicz, T.

    2015-01-01

    Hysteresis loops occur in many scientific and technical problems, especially as field dependent magnetization of ferromagnetic materials, but also as stress-strain-curves of materials measured by tensile tests including thermal effects, liquid-solid phase transitions, in cell biology or economics. While several mathematical models exist which aim to calculate hysteresis energies and other parameters, here we offer a simple model for a general hysteretic system, showing different hysteresis loops depending on the defined parameters. The calculation which is based on basic spreadsheet analysis plus an easy macro code can be used by students to understand how these systems work and how the parameters influence the reactions of the system on an external field. Importantly, in the step-by-step mode, each change of the system state, compared to the last step, becomes visible. The simple program can be developed further by several changes and additions, enabling the building of a tool which is capable of answering real physical questions in the broad field of magnetism as well as in other scientific areas, in which similar hysteresis loops occur.

  6. A simple model of hysteresis behavior using spreadsheet analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrmann, A; Blachowicz, T

    2015-01-01

    Hysteresis loops occur in many scientific and technical problems, especially as field dependent magnetization of ferromagnetic materials, but also as stress-strain-curves of materials measured by tensile tests including thermal effects, liquid-solid phase transitions, in cell biology or economics. While several mathematical models exist which aim to calculate hysteresis energies and other parameters, here we offer a simple model for a general hysteretic system, showing different hysteresis loops depending on the defined parameters. The calculation which is based on basic spreadsheet analysis plus an easy macro code can be used by students to understand how these systems work and how the parameters influence the reactions of the system on an external field. Importantly, in the step-by-step mode, each change of the system state, compared to the last step, becomes visible. The simple program can be developed further by several changes and additions, enabling the building of a tool which is capable of answering real physical questions in the broad field of magnetism as well as in other scientific areas, in which similar hysteresis loops occur

  7. A simple model explaining super-resolution in absolute optical instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Ulf; Sahebdivan, Sahar; Kogan, Alex; Tyc, Tomáš

    2015-05-01

    We develop a simple, one-dimensional model for super-resolution in absolute optical instruments that is able to describe the interplay between sources and detectors. Our model explains the subwavelength sensitivity of a point detector to a point source reported in previous computer simulations and experiments (Miñano 2011 New J. Phys.13 125009; Miñano 2014 New J. Phys.16 033015).

  8. A clinical pharmacokinetic microdosing study of docetaxel with Japanese patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Ken-ichi; Yoshino, Etsuko; Kawara, Kaori; Maeda, Kazuya; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Taro; Kaneta, Toshikado; Ishida, Hiroo; Sasaki, Yasutsuna

    2015-10-01

    Whether microdosing studies can be used to evaluate the human pharmacokinetics of new anticancer drugs remains unclear. The disposition of docetaxel in cancer patients is linear in terms of dose proportionality. We examined whether the pharmacokinetics of docetaxel in a clinically relevant therapeutic dose could be predicted from the pharmacokinetics of a microdose of docetaxel in Japanese patients with cancer. A microdose of docetaxel (100 μg/patient) was given by 5-min intravenous infusion on day 1, followed by a therapeutic dose of docetaxel (60-75 mg m(-2)), given by 1-h intravenous infusion on day 8. Plasma docetaxel was analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model was used to calculate the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time 0 to infinity (AUC0-inf). Nine patients received both a microdose and therapeutic dose of docetaxel. The AUC0-inf after microdosing was 3640 ± 1150 ng h L(-1), while that after therapeutic dosing adjusted to 100 mg/patient was 2230 ± 757 µg h L(-1). The ratio of docetaxel clearance in therapeutic dose to that in microdose was 1.8 (P = 0.0041). Plasma α1-acid glycoprotein concentrations negatively correlated with docetaxel clearance at therapeutic dose, whereas the trend was weak at microdose. Docetaxel clearance showed marginal nonlinearity between microdose and therapeutic dose, presumably because of saturation of plasma protein binding; however, the magnitude was within twofold, allowing practically acceptable extrapolation.

  9. Improved automatic filtering methodology for an optimal pharmacokinetic modelling of DCE-MR images of the prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez Martinez, V.; Bosch Roig, I.; Sanz Requena, R.

    2016-07-01

    In Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance (DCEMR) studies with high temporal resolution, images are quite noisy due to the complicate balance between temporal and spatial resolution. For this reason, the temporal curves extracted from the images present remarkable noise levels and, because of that, the pharmacokinetic parameters calculated by least squares fitting from the curves and the arterial phase (a useful marker in tumour diagnosis which appears in curves with high arterial contribution) are affected. In order to solve these limitations, an automatic filtering method was developed by our group. In this work, an advanced automatic filtering methodology is presented to further improve noise reduction of the temporal curves in order to obtain more accurate kinetic parameters and a proper modelling of the arterial phase. (Author)

  10. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic integration and modelling of florfenicol for the pig pneumonia pathogens Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Pasteurella multocida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Dorey

    Full Text Available Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD integration and modelling were used to predict dosage schedules for florfenicol for two pig pneumonia pathogens, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Pasteurella multocida. Pharmacokinetic data were pooled for two bioequivalent products, pioneer and generic formulations, administered intramuscularly to pigs at a dose rate of 15 mg/kg. Antibacterial potency was determined in vitro as minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and Mutant Prevention Concentration in broth and pig serum, for six isolates of each organism. For both organisms and for both serum and broth MICs, average concentration:MIC ratios over 48 h were similar and exceeded 2.5:1 and times greater than MIC exceeded 35 h. From in vitro time-kill curves, PK/PD modelling established serum breakpoint values for the index AUC24h/MIC for three levels of inhibition of growth, bacteriostasis and 3 and 4log10 reductions in bacterial count; means were 25.7, 40.2 and 47.0 h, respectively, for P. multocida and 24.6, 43.8 and 58.6 h for A. pleuropneumoniae. Using these PK and PD data, together with literature MIC distributions, doses for each pathogen were predicted for: (1 bacteriostatic and bactericidal levels of kill; (2 for 50 and 90% target attainment rates (TAR; and (3 for single dosing and daily dosing at steady state. Monte Carlo simulations for 90% TAR predicted single doses to achieve bacteriostatic and bactericidal actions over 48 h of 14.4 and 22.2 mg/kg (P. multocida and 44.7 and 86.6 mg/kg (A. pleuropneumoniae. For daily doses at steady state, and 90% TAR bacteriostatic and bactericidal actions, dosages of 6.2 and 9.6 mg/kg (P. multocida and 18.2 and 35.2 mg/kg (A. pleuropneumoniae were required. PK/PD integration and modelling approaches to dose determination indicate the possibility of tailoring dose to a range of end-points.

  11. Elucidating the in vivo fate of nanocrystals using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model: a case study with the anticancer agent SNX-2112

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong D

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dong Dong,1* Xiao Wang,1* Huailing Wang,1 Xingwang Zhang,2 Yifei Wang,1 Baojian Wu2 1Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, 2Division of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Introduction: SNX-2112 is a promising anticancer agent but has poor solubility in both water and oil. In the study reported here, we aimed to develop a nanocrystal formulation for SNX-2112 and to determine the pharmacokinetic behaviors of the prepared nanocrystals. Methods: Nanocrystals of SNX-2112 were prepared using the wet-media milling technique and characterized by particle size, differential scanning calorimetry, drug release, etc. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK modeling was undertaken to evaluate the drug’s disposition in rats following administration of drug cosolvent or nanocrystals. Results: The optimized SNX-2112 nanocrystals (with poloxamer 188 as the stabilizer were 203 nm in size with a zeta potential of -11.6 mV. In addition, the nanocrystals showed a comparable release profile to the control (drug cosolvent. Further, the rat PBPK model incorporating the parameters of particulate uptake (into the liver and spleen and of in vivo drug release was well fitted to the experimental data following administration of the drug nanocrystals. The results reveal that the nanocrystals rapidly released drug molecules in vivo, accounting for their cosolvent-like pharmacokinetic behaviors. Due to particulate uptake, drug accumulation in the liver and spleen was significant at the initial time points (within 1 hour. Conclusion: The nanocrystals should be a good choice for the systemic delivery of the poorly soluble drug SNX-2112. Also, our study contributes to an improved understanding of the in vivo fate of nanocrystals. Keywords: intravenous delivery, PBPK, tissue distribution, poloxamer 188

  12. QSAR modelling using combined simple competitive learning networks and RBF neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhpour, R; Sarram, M A; Rezaeian, M; Sheikhpour, E

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to propose a QSAR modelling approach based on the combination of simple competitive learning (SCL) networks with radial basis function (RBF) neural networks for predicting the biological activity of chemical compounds. The proposed QSAR method consisted of two phases. In the first phase, an SCL network was applied to determine the centres of an RBF neural network. In the second phase, the RBF neural network was used to predict the biological activity of various phenols and Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitors. The predictive ability of the proposed QSAR models was evaluated and compared with other QSAR models using external validation. The results of this study showed that the proposed QSAR modelling approach leads to better performances than other models in predicting the b