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Sample records for similar protective effect

  1. Similarities between pre-eclampsia and atherosclerosis: a protective effect of physical exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belo, Luís; Santos-Silva, Alice; Quintanilha, Alexandre; Rebelo, Irene

    2008-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE), a characteristic hypertensive disorder of human pregnancy and a leading cause of maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity worldwide, shares some similarities with atherosclerosis, namely the involvement of oxidative stress and of endothelial dysfunction in their pathophysiologies, the presence of similar typical lesions and of common risk factors. Although it is widely accepted that regular physical exercise protects against cardiovascular events, few studies have addressed the impact of physical activity in reducing PE risk. In this paper, similarities between atherosclerosis and PE, involving pathogenic mechanisms, are described. This paper also reviews the studies performed until now that evaluated the impact of regular physical exercise (prenataly or during pregnancy) in reducing risk of PE. The potential mechanisms underlying physical activity as a prophylactic approach of PE, as observed with cardiovascular diseases, are discussed.

  2. Radiation protection programmes in Australia and the USA - similarities and differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haski, R.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The aims of a comprehensive radiation protection programme in many working environments, including the Australian states and territories and the United States of America, are similar. However, the means by which the final programme objectives are achieved, may differ. In many cases, this is dictated by specific statutory requirements of the country in question. An opportunity to work in the USA has provided insights into the similarities and differences that exist between the two countries, as they relate to organisational planning and deployment of radiation protection programmes. Examples of variances include: statutory requirements, an organisation's relationship with regulatory authorities, licensing requirements, surveys and monitoring, procedures for receiving and opening packages, waste management, record keeping, role of radiation safety/protection officer, radiation protection training. The importance of the exchange of information, general approach to safety and specific methods in addressing radiation protection can be of significant benefit to both the Australian and the US working environments. Fostering this kind of international collaboration and communication has enormous potential by sharing information and facilitating workplaces in both countries to utilise the most appropriate risk management processes

  3. Extending the Similarity-Attraction Effect : The effects of When-Similarity in mediated communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaptein, M.C.; Castaneda, D.; Fernandez, N.; Nass, C.

    2014-01-01

    The feeling of connectedness experienced in computer-mediated relationships can be explained by the similarity-attraction effect (SAE). Though SAE is well established in psychology, the effects of some types of similarity have not yet been explored. In 2 studies, we demonstrate similarity-attraction

  4. Extending the Similarity-Attraction Effect: The Effects of When-Similarity in Computer-Mediated Communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaptein, M.C.; Castaneda, D.; Fernandez, N.; Nass, C.

    2014-01-01

    The feeling of connectedness experienced in computer-mediated relationships can be explained by the similarity-attraction effect (SAE). Though SAE is well established in psychology, the effects of some types of similarity have not yet been explored. In 2 studies, we demonstrate similarity-attraction

  5. Protected area effectiveness against land development in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, David; Martínez-Vega, Javier

    2018-06-01

    Land use-land cover (LULC) changes towards artificial covers are one of the main global threats to biodiversity conservation. In this comprehensive study, we tested a number of methodological and research hypotheses, and a new covariate control technique in order to address common protected area (PA) assessment issues and accurately assess whether different PA networks have had an effect at preventing development of artificial LULCs in Spain, a highly biodiverse country that has experienced massive socioeconomic transformations in the past two decades. We used digital census data for four PA networks designated between 1990 and 2000: Nature Reserves (NRs), Nature Parks (NPs), Sites of Community Importance (SCIs) and Special Protection Areas (SPAs). We analysed the effect of explanatory variables on the ecological effectiveness of protected polygons (PPs): Legislation stringency, cummulative legal designations, management, size, age and bio-physical characteristics. A multiple Before-After-Control-Impact (BACI) semi-experimental research design was used whereby artificial land cover increase (ALCI) and proportional artificial land cover increase (PALCI) results were compared inside and outside PAs, using 1 km and 5 km buffer areas surrounding PAs as controls. LULC data were retrieved from Corine Land Cover (CLC) 1990 and 2006 data. Results from three spatial-statistical models using progressively restrictive criteria to select control areas increasingly more accurate and similar to the assessed PPs were compared. PAs were a generally effective territorial policy to prevent land development in Spain. NRs were the most effective PA category, with no new artificial land covers in the assessed period, although exact causality could not be attributed due to legal overlaps. SPAs were the least effective category, with worse ALCI data than their control areas. Legal protection was effective against land development, which was influenced by most bio-physical variables

  6. Reversing the similarity effect: The effect of presentation format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Andrea M; Cohen, Andrew L

    2018-06-01

    A context effect is a change in preference that occurs when alternatives are added to a choice set. Models of preferential choice that account for context effects largely assume a within-dimension comparison process. It has been shown, however, that the format in which a choice set is presented can influence comparison strategies. That is, a by-alternative or by-dimension grouping of the dimension values encourage within-alternative or within-dimension comparisons, respectively. For example, one classic context effect, the compromise effect, is strengthened by a by-dimension presentation format. Extrapolation from this result suggests that a second context effect, the similarity effect, will actually reverse when stimuli are presented in a by-dimension format. In the current study, we presented participants with a series of apartment choice sets designed to elicit the similarity effect, with either a by-alternative or by-dimension presentation format. Participants in the by-alternative condition demonstrated a standard similarity effect; however, participants in the by-dimension condition demonstrated a strong reverse similarity effect. The present data can be accounted for by Multialternative Decision Field Theory (MDFT) and the Multiattribute Linear Ballistic Accumulator (MLBA), but not Elimination by Aspects (EBA). Indeed, when some weak assumptions of within-dimension processes are met, MDFT and the MLBA predict the reverse similarity effect. These modeling results suggest that the similarity effect is governed by either forgetting and inhibition (MDFT), or attention to positive or negative differences (MLBA). These results demonstrate that flexibility in the comparison process needs to be incorporated into theories of preferential choice. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effective evaluation of privacy protection techniques in visible and thermal imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Tahir; Berg, Amanda; Ferryman, James; Ahlberg, Jörgen; Felsberg, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Privacy protection may be defined as replacing the original content in an image region with a (less intrusive) content having modified target appearance information to make it less recognizable by applying a privacy protection technique. Indeed, the development of privacy protection techniques also needs to be complemented with an established objective evaluation method to facilitate their assessment and comparison. Generally, existing evaluation methods rely on the use of subjective judgments or assume a specific target type in image data and use target detection and recognition accuracies to assess privacy protection. An annotation-free evaluation method that is neither subjective nor assumes a specific target type is proposed. It assesses two key aspects of privacy protection: "protection" and "utility." Protection is quantified as an appearance similarity, and utility is measured as a structural similarity between original and privacy-protected image regions. We performed an extensive experimentation using six challenging datasets (having 12 video sequences), including a new dataset (having six sequences) that contains visible and thermal imagery. The new dataset is made available online for the community. We demonstrate effectiveness of the proposed method by evaluating six image-based privacy protection techniques and also show comparisons of the proposed method over existing methods.

  8. Predator protection or similar habitat selection in red-breasted goose nesting associations : extremes along a continuum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quinn, JL; Prop, J; Kokorev, Y; Black, JM

    We tested the predator protection and similar habitat hypotheses in relation to red-breasted goose, Branta ruficollis, nesting associations. Geese began laying 1-3 weeks after all associated species. In almost all cases they nested on the mainland only if raptors were also present and always

  9. Predicting sun protection behaviors using protection motivation variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch'ng, Joanne W M; Glendon, A Ian

    2014-04-01

    Protection motivation theory components were used to predict sun protection behaviors (SPBs) using four outcome measures: typical reported behaviors, previous reported behaviors, current sunscreen use as determined by interview, and current observed behaviors (clothing worn) to control for common method bias. Sampled from two SE Queensland public beaches during summer, 199 participants aged 18-29 years completed a questionnaire measuring perceived severity, perceived vulnerability, response efficacy, response costs, and protection motivation (PM). Personal perceived risk (similar to threat appraisal) and response likelihood (similar to coping appraisal) were derived from their respective PM components. Protection motivation predicted all four SPB criterion variables. Personal perceived risk and response likelihood predicted protection motivation. Protection motivation completely mediated the effect of response likelihood on all four criterion variables. Alternative models are considered. Strengths and limitations of the study are outlined and suggestions made for future research.

  10. Management effectiveness evaluation in protected areas of southern Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rodríguez, Fausto; Rosado, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Protected areas are home to biodiversity, habitats and ecosystem as well as a critical component of human well-being and a generator of leisure-related revenues. However, management is sometimes unsatisfactory and requires new ways of evaluation. Management effectiveness of 36 protected areas in southern Ecuador have been assessed. The protected areas belong to three categories: Heritage of Natural Areas of the Ecuadorian State (PANE), created and funded by the State, Areas of Forest and Protective Vegetation (ABVP), created but no funded by the State, and private reserves, declared and funded by private entities. Management effectiveness was evaluated by answers of managers of the protected areas to questionnaires adapted to the socio-economic and environmental characteristics of the region. Questions were classified into six elements of evaluation: context, planning, inputs, processes, outputs and outcomes as recommended by IUCN. Results were classified into four levels: unsatisfactory, slightly satisfactory, satisfactory and very satisfactory. The PANE areas and private reserves showed higher management effectiveness levels (satisfactory and very satisfactory) than ABVP areas, where slightly satisfactory and unsatisfactory levels prevailed. Resources availability was found as the main reason behind this difference. The extension, age and province of location were found irrelevant. Outputs, inputs and processes require main efforts to improve management effectiveness. Improving planning and input in the PANE areas and inputs and outcomes on ABVP areas is necessary to obtain a similar result in all areas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Being similar while judging right and wrong: The effects of personal and situational similarity on moral judgements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Emilia

    2017-07-20

    This study investigated the effects of similarity with the transgressor and the victim on the perceived immorality of the transgression. Participants read two stories describing a person that cheated on their partner and a police officer that mistreated somebody. In the first story we manipulated participants' personal similarity to the transgressor and in the second their personal similarity to the victim. In each story, participants' past situational similarity to the target character was assessed according to their previous experiences of being in the same position. Results show that both personal and past situational similarity to the transgressor determine less severe moral judgements, while personal and past situational similarity with the victim have the opposite effect. We also tested several potential mediators of these effects, derived from competing theoretical accounts of the influence of similarity on perceived responsibility. Empathy emerged as mediating most of the effects of similarity on moral judgements, except those induced by past situational similarity with the victim. The foreseen probability of being in a similar situation mediated only the effects of similarity to the transgressor, and not those of similarity to the victim. Overall, results highlight the complex mechanisms of the influences of similarity on moral judgements. © 2017 International Union of Psychological Science.

  12. Contrasting ecosystem-effects of morphologically similar copepods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake Matthews

    Full Text Available Organisms alter the biotic and abiotic conditions of ecosystems. They can modulate the availability of resources to other species (ecosystem engineering and shape selection pressures on other organisms (niche construction. Very little is known about how the engineering effects of organisms vary among and within species, and, as a result, the ecosystem consequences of species diversification and phenotypic evolution are poorly understood. Here, using a common gardening experiment, we test whether morphologically similar species and populations of Diaptomidae copepods (Leptodiaptomus ashlandi, Hesperodiaptomus franciscanus, Skistodiaptomus oregonensis have similar or different effects on the structure and function of freshwater ecosystems. We found that copepod species had contrasting effects on algal biomass, ammonium concentrations, and sedimentation rates, and that copepod populations had contrasting effects on prokaryote abundance, sedimentation rates, and gross primary productivity. The average size of ecosystem-effect contrasts between species was similar to those between populations, and was comparable to those between fish species and populations measured in previous common gardening experiments. Our results suggest that subtle morphological variation among and within species can cause multifarious and divergent ecosystem-effects. We conclude that using morphological trait variation to assess the functional similarity of organisms may underestimate the importance of species and population diversity for ecosystem functioning.

  13. [The protective effect of XD in ConA-induced liver injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Qian-Qian; Liu, Tao; Dang, Tong-Mei; Cao, Yi-Ming

    2010-12-01

    To explore the protective effect and its mechanism of Modified Xiaochaihu decoction(MXD) in the liver injury of mice. METHORDS: Using Reitman methord to examine serum ALT and ATS; Using sandwich enzyme immunoassay ABC-ELISA to examine serum TNF-α and IFN-γ. Serum ALT and ATS of MXD large dose group and Xiaochaihu decoction (XD )group were lower than that of animal models group, there was significant difference among groups (P0.05) between serum ALT and ATS of MXD small dose group and that of animal models group; MXD large dose group, XD group and Biphenyldimethylesterate (DDB) group are similar, no difference (P>0.05). Serum TNF-α and IFN-γ of MXD large dose group and XD group were significant lower than that of animal models group, there was significant difference among groups (PXD group ware higher than that of MXD large dose group, there was significant difference among groups (PXD group and DDB group were similar, no difference. Xiaocaihu decoction possesses the effect of pro2 tection of hepatic impairment and the protective mechanism might be associated with the inhibition of apoptosis and immunomodulation.

  14. Protective effects of Arctium lappa L. root extracts (AREs) on high fat diet induced quail atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi; Li, Ping; Wang, Chenjing; Jiang, Qixiao; Zhang, Lei; Cao, Yu; Zhong, Weizhen; Wang, Chunbo

    2016-01-08

    This study was designed to evaluate the protective effects of Arctium lappa L. root extracts (AREs) from different extraction methods (aqueous, ethanol, chloroform and flavone) on atherosclerosis. Quails (Coturnix coturnix) were subjected to high fat diet, with or without one of the four different AREs or positive control simvastatin. Blood samples were collected before treatment, after 4.5 weeks or ten weeks to assess lipid profile (Levels of total cholesterol (TC), Triacylglycerol (TG), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)). After ten weeks, the serum levels of nitric oxide (NO) as well as antioxidant and pro-oxidative status (Levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione (GSH), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px)) were measured. Furthermore, aortas were collected after ten weeks treatment, aorta lipid contents (TC, TG and LDL) were assessed, and histology was used to confirm atherosclerotic changes. The results indicated that high fat diet significantly deteriorated lipid profile and antioxidant status in quail serum, while all the extracts significantly reverted the changes similar to simvastatin. Aorta lipid profile assessment revealed similar results. Histology on aortas from quails treated for ten weeks confirmed atherosclerotic changes in high fat diet group, while the extracts significantly alleviated the atherosclerotic changes similar to simvastatin. Among the different extracts, flavones fraction exerted best protective effects. Our data suggest that the protective effects of AREs were medicated via hypolipidemic and anti-oxidant effects. Underlying molecular mechanisms are under investigation.

  15. Gonad protective effect of radiation protective apron in chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Masatoshi; Kato, Hideyuki; Fujibuchi, Toshiou; Ochi, Shigehiro; Morita, Fuminori

    2004-01-01

    Depending on the facility, a radiation protective apron (protector) is used to protect the gonad from radiation exposure in chest radiography. To determine the necessity of using a protector during chest radiography, we measured the effect of the protector on the gonad in this study. First, using a human body phantom, we measured the absorbed dose of the female gonad with and without the protector, using a thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD), and confirmed its protective effect. Using the protector, the absorbed dose was reduced to 28±2% and 39±4% for field sizes of 14 x 17 inch and 14 x 14 inch, respectively. Next, we used Monte Carlo simulation and confirmed, not only the validity of the actual measurement values, but also the fact that the influence of radiation on the absorbed dose of the gonad was mostly from scattered radiation from inside the body for the 14 x 17 inch field size, and also from the X-ray tube for the 14 x 14 inch field size. Although a certain protective effect is achieved by using the protector, the radiation dose to the gonad is only a few μGy even without a protector. Thus, the risk of a genetic effect would be as small as 10 -8 . Given that acceptable risk is below 10 -6 , we conclude the use of a radiation protective apron is not necessary for diagnostic chest radiography. (author)

  16. [Gonad protective effect of radiation protective apron in chest radiography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Masatoshi; Kato, Hideyuki; Fujibuchi, Toshiou; Ochi, Shigehiro; Morita, Fuminori

    2004-12-01

    Depending on the facility, a radiation protective apron (protector) is used to protect the gonad from radiation exposure in chest radiography. To determine the necessity of using a protector during chest radiography, we measured the effect of the protector on the gonad in this study. First, using a human body phantom, we measured the absorbed dose of the female gonad with and without the protector, using a thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD), and confirmed its protective effect. Using the protector, the absorbed dose was reduced to 28+/-2% and 39+/-4% for field sizes of 14 x 17 inch and 14 x 14 inch, respectively. Next, we used Monte Carlo simulation and confirmed, not only the validity of the actual measurement values, but also the fact that the influence of radiation on the absorbed dose of the gonad was mostly from scattered radiation from inside the body for the 14 x 17 inch field size, and also from the X-ray tube for the 14 x 14 inch field size. Although a certain protective effect is achieved by using the protector, the radiation dose to the gonad is only a few microGy even without a protector. Thus, the risk of a genetic effect would be as small as 10(-8). Given that acceptable risk is below 10(-6), we conclude the use of a radiation protective apron is not necessary for diagnostic chest radiography.

  17. Protective Effect of ECQ on Rat Reflux Esophagitis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyeon-Soon; Han, Jeong Hoon; Jeong, Jun Yeong; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2012-12-01

    This study was designed to determine the protective effect of Rumex Aquaticus Herba extracts containing quercetin-3-β-D-glucuronopyranoside (ECQ) on experimental reflux esophagitis. Reflux esophagitis was induced by surgical procedure. The rats were divided into seven groups, namely normal group, control group, ECQ (1, 3, 10, 30 mg/kg) group and omeprazole (30 mg/kg) group. ECQ and omeprazole groups received intraduodenal administration. The Rats were starved for 24 hours before the experiments, but were freely allowed to drink water. ECQ group attenuated the gross esophagitis significantly compared to that treated with omeprazole in a dose-dependent manner. ECQ decreased the volume of gastric juice and increased the gastric pH, which are similar to those of omeprazole group. In addition, ECQ inhibited the acid output effectively in reflux esophagitis. Significantly increased amounts of malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and the mucosal depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH) were observed in the reflux esophagitis. ECQ administration attenuated the decrement of the GSH levels and affected the MDA levels and MPO activity. These results suggest that the ECQ has a protective effect which may be attributed to its multiple effects including anti-secretory, anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory actions on reflux esophagitis in rats.

  18. Effective dose: a radiation protection quantity

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Modern radiation protection is based on the principles of justification, limitation, and optimisation. Assessment of radiation risks for individuals or groups of individuals is, however, not a primary objective of radiological protection. The implementation of the principles of limitation and optimisation requires an appropriate quantification of radiation exposure. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has introduced effective dose as the principal radiological protection quantity to be used for setting and controlling dose limits for stochastic effects in the regulatory context, and for the practical implementation of the optimisation principle. Effective dose is the tissue weighted sum of radiation weighted organ and tissue doses of a reference person from exposure to external irradiations and internal emitters. The specific normalised values of tissue weighting factors are defined by ICRP for individual tissues, and used as an approximate age- and sex-averaged representation of th...

  19. Drug target identification using side-effect similarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campillos, Monica; Kuhn, Michael; Gavin, Anne-Claude

    2008-01-01

    Targets for drugs have so far been predicted on the basis of molecular or cellular features, for example, by exploiting similarity in chemical structure or in activity across cell lines. We used phenotypic side-effect similarities to infer whether two drugs share a target. Applied to 746 marketed...... drugs, a network of 1018 side effect-driven drug-drug relations became apparent, 261 of which are formed by chemically dissimilar drugs from different therapeutic indications. We experimentally tested 20 of these unexpected drug-drug relations and validated 13 implied drug-target relations by in vitro...... binding assays, of which 11 reveal inhibition constants equal to less than 10 micromolar. Nine of these were tested and confirmed in cell assays, documenting the feasibility of using phenotypic information to infer molecular interactions and hinting at new uses of marketed drugs....

  20. Large-scale assessment of Mediterranean marine protected areas effects on fish assemblages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Guidetti

    Full Text Available Marine protected areas (MPAs were acknowledged globally as effective tools to mitigate the threats to oceans caused by fishing. Several studies assessed the effectiveness of individual MPAs in protecting fish assemblages, but regional assessments of multiple MPAs are scarce. Moreover, empirical evidence on the role of MPAs in contrasting the propagation of non-indigenous-species (NIS and thermophilic species (ThS is missing. We simultaneously investigated here the role of MPAs in reversing the effects of overfishing and in limiting the spread of NIS and ThS. The Mediterranean Sea was selected as study area as it is a region where 1 MPAs are numerous, 2 fishing has affected species and ecosystems, and 3 the arrival of NIS and the northward expansion of ThS took place. Fish surveys were done in well-enforced no-take MPAs (HP, partially-protected MPAs (IP and fished areas (F at 30 locations across the Mediterranean. Significantly higher fish biomass was found in HP compared to IP MPAs and F. Along a recovery trajectory from F to HP MPAs, IP were similar to F, showing that just well enforced MPAs triggers an effective recovery. Within HP MPAs, trophic structure of fish assemblages resembled a top-heavy biomass pyramid. Although the functional structure of fish assemblages was consistent among HP MPAs, species driving the recovery in HP MPAs differed among locations: this suggests that the recovery trajectories in HP MPAs are likely to be functionally similar (i.e., represented by predictable changes in trophic groups, especially fish predators, but the specific composition of the resulting assemblages may depend on local conditions. Our study did not show any effect of MPAs on NIS and ThS. These results may help provide more robust expectations, at proper regional scale, about the effects of new MPAs that may be established in the Mediterranean Sea and other ecoregions worldwide.

  1. Large-Scale Assessment of Mediterranean Marine Protected Areas Effects on Fish Assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidetti, Paolo; Baiata, Pasquale; Ballesteros, Enric; Di Franco, Antonio; Hereu, Bernat; Macpherson, Enrique; Micheli, Fiorenza; Pais, Antonio; Panzalis, Pieraugusto; Rosenberg, Andrew A.; Zabala, Mikel; Sala, Enric

    2014-01-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) were acknowledged globally as effective tools to mitigate the threats to oceans caused by fishing. Several studies assessed the effectiveness of individual MPAs in protecting fish assemblages, but regional assessments of multiple MPAs are scarce. Moreover, empirical evidence on the role of MPAs in contrasting the propagation of non-indigenous-species (NIS) and thermophilic species (ThS) is missing. We simultaneously investigated here the role of MPAs in reversing the effects of overfishing and in limiting the spread of NIS and ThS. The Mediterranean Sea was selected as study area as it is a region where 1) MPAs are numerous, 2) fishing has affected species and ecosystems, and 3) the arrival of NIS and the northward expansion of ThS took place. Fish surveys were done in well-enforced no-take MPAs (HP), partially-protected MPAs (IP) and fished areas (F) at 30 locations across the Mediterranean. Significantly higher fish biomass was found in HP compared to IP MPAs and F. Along a recovery trajectory from F to HP MPAs, IP were similar to F, showing that just well enforced MPAs triggers an effective recovery. Within HP MPAs, trophic structure of fish assemblages resembled a top-heavy biomass pyramid. Although the functional structure of fish assemblages was consistent among HP MPAs, species driving the recovery in HP MPAs differed among locations: this suggests that the recovery trajectories in HP MPAs are likely to be functionally similar (i.e., represented by predictable changes in trophic groups, especially fish predators), but the specific composition of the resulting assemblages may depend on local conditions. Our study did not show any effect of MPAs on NIS and ThS. These results may help provide more robust expectations, at proper regional scale, about the effects of new MPAs that may be established in the Mediterranean Sea and other ecoregions worldwide. PMID:24740479

  2. Protective effect by EDTA in radiation inactivation of enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumakura, M; Kaetsu, I

    1985-11-05

    Protective effect by EDTA in radiation inactivation of enzymes such as glucoamylase, cellulase, and urease was studied. A remarkable protective effect by EDTA was observed and had a maximum at certain EDTA concentration. The protective effect was compared with other protective agents in the irradiation of urease, in which the protective ability of EDTA was greater than those of sulfhydryl compounds such as cysteine. (author).

  3. Combination of Nigella sativa with Glycyrrhiza glabra and Zingiber officinale augments their protective effects on doxorubicin-induced toxicity in h9c2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Hosseini

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: All of the extracts have some protective effects against DOX-induced toxicity in cardiomyocytes with similar efficacies, but with different potencies. However, NGZ produced much higher protective effect via reducing oxidative stress and inhibiting of apoptotic induction processes. Further investigations are needed to determine the effects of NGZ on DOX chemotherapy.  

  4. Further Characterization of the Capsule-Like Complex (CLC Produced by Francisella tularensis Subspecies tularensis: Protective Efficacy and Similarity to Outer Membrane Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E. Champion

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is the etiologic agent of tularemia, and subspecies tularensis (type A is the most virulent subspecies. The live vaccine strain (LVS of subspecies holarctica produces a capsule-like complex (CLC that consists of a large variety of glycoproteins. Expression of the CLC is greatly enhanced when the bacteria are subcultured in and grown on chemically defined medium. Deletion of two genes responsible for CLC glycosylation in LVS results in an attenuated mutant that is protective against respiratory tularemia in a mouse model. We sought to further characterize the CLC composition and to determine if a type A CLC glycosylation mutant would be attenuated in mice. The CLCs isolated from LVS extracted with 0.5% phenol or 1 M urea were similar, as determined by gel electrophoresis and Western blotting, but the CLC extracted with urea was more water-soluble. The CLC extracted with either 0.5% phenol or 1 M urea from type A strains was also similar to the CLC of LVS in antigenic properties, electrophoretic profile, and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The solubility of the CLC could be further enhanced by fractionation with Triton X-114 followed by N-Lauroylsarcosine detergents; the largest (>250 kDa molecular size component appeared to be an aggregate of smaller components. Outer membrane vesicles/tubules (OMV/T isolated by differential centrifugation and micro-filtration appeared similar to the CLC by TEM, and many of the proteins present in the OMV/T were also identified in soluble and insoluble fractions of the CLC. Further investigation is warranted to assess the relationship between OMV/T and the CLC. The CLC conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin or flagellin was highly protective against high-dose LVS intradermal challenge and partially protective against intranasal challenge. A protective response was associated with a significant rise in cytokines IL-12, IL-10, and IFN-γ. However, a type A CLC glycosylation mutant

  5. Oxide layers for silicon detector protection against enviroment effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bel'tsazh, E.; Brylovska, I.; Valerian, M.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that for protection of silicon detectors of nuclear radiations oxide layers could be used. The layers are produced by electrochemical oxidation of silicon surface with the following low-temperature annealing. These layers have characteristics similar to those for oxide layers produced by treatment of silicon samples at elevated temperature in oxygen flow. To determine properties of oxide layers produced by electrochemical oxidation the α-particle back-scattering method and the method of volt-farad characteristics were used. Protection properties of such layers were checked on the surface-barrier detectors. It was shown that protection properties of such detectors were conserved during long storage at room temperature and during their storage under wet-bulb temperature. Detectors without protection layer have worsened their characteristics

  6. Protective Effect of Repeatedly Preadministered Brazilian Propolis Ethanol Extract against Stress-Induced Gastric Mucosal Lesions in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Nakamura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to clarify the protective effect of Brazilian propolis ethanol extract (BPEE against stress-induced gastric mucosal lesions in rats. The protective effect of BPEE against gastric mucosal lesions in male Wistar rats exposed to water-immersion restraint stress (WIRS for 6 h was compared between its repeated preadministration (50 mg/kg/day, 7 days and its single preadministration (50 mg/kg. The repeated BPEE preadministration attenuated WIRS-induced gastric mucosal lesions and gastric mucosal oxidative stress more largely than the single BPEE preadministration. In addition, the repeated BPEE preadministration attenuated neutrophil infiltration in the gastric mucosa of rats exposed to WIRS. The protective effect of the repeated preadministration of BPEE against WIRS-induced gastric mucosal lesions was similar to that of a single preadministration of vitamin E (250 mg/kg in terms of the extent and manner of protection. From these findings, it is concluded that BPEE preadministered in a repeated manner protects against gastric mucosal lesions in rats exposed to WIRS more effectively than BPEE preadministered in a single manner possibly through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions.

  7. Scale dependency in effectiveness, isolation, and social-ecological spillover of protected areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ament, Judith M; Cumming, Graeme S

    2016-08-01

    Protected areas are considered vital for the conservation of biodiversity. Given their central role in many conservation strategies, it is important to know whether they adequately protect biodiversity within their boundaries; whether they are becoming more isolated from other natural areas over time; and whether they play a role in facilitating or reducing land-cover change in their surroundings. We used matching methods and national and local analyses of land-cover change to evaluate the combined effectiveness (i.e., avoided natural-cover loss), isolation (i.e., changes in adjacent areas), and spillover effects (i.e., impacts on adjacent areas) of 19 national parks in South Africa from 2000 to 2009. All parks had either similar or lower rates of natural-cover loss than matched control samples. On a national level, mean net loss of natural cover and mean net gain of cultivation cover decreased with distance from park boundary, but there was considerable variation in trends around individual parks, providing evidence for both increased isolation and buffering of protected areas. Fourteen parks had significant positive spillover and reduced natural-cover loss in their surroundings, whereas five parks experienced elevated levels of natural-cover loss. Conclusions about social-ecological spillover effects from protected areas depended heavily on the measures of land-cover change used and the scale at which the results were aggregated. Our findings emphasize the need for high-resolution data when assessing spatially explicit phenomena such as land-cover change and challenge the usefulness of large-scale (coarse grain, broad extent) studies for understanding social-ecological dynamics around protected areas. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  8. Methodology For Evaluation Of Regulatory Effectiveness In Physical Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izmaylov, Alexander; Valente, John; Griggs, James R.; Rexroth, Paul; Piskarev, Alexander; Babkin, Vladimir; Sokolov, Egor; Melton, Ronald B.; Cunningham, Mitchel E.; Baker, Kathryn A.; Brothers, Alan J.

    2005-01-01

    Material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A) regulatory documents play an important role in securing and protecting nuclear material by regulating a variety of activities at different hierarchical levels. The development, implementation, and practical application of these regulatory documents requires a significant investment of financial and material resources. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the effectiveness of the regulatory development process and the extent to which regulations improve the effectiveness of MPC and A at nuclear sites. The joint Russian and U.S. Regulatory Development Project has a goal of evaluating the effectiveness of regulatory documents developed for MPC and A. As part of this joint Project, a methodology for evaluating effectiveness has been developed. This methodology was developed around physical protection objectives. The developed methodology specifies physical protection objectives to be accomplished through the implementation of a regulatory system based on the physical protection goals at the nuclear sites. It includes approaches to assessing regulatory effectiveness, the hierarchical structure of physical protection objectives to be accomplished through implementing regulations, a 'mapping' of the physical protection objectives to the regulatory framework, a list of criteria for evaluating the effectiveness of physical protection regulations and effectiveness indicators, as well as means and methods for gathering information and implementation of this evaluation.

  9. Evaluating heterogeneous conservation effects of forest protection in Indonesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payal Shah

    Full Text Available Establishing legal protection for forest areas is the most common policy used to limit forest loss. This article evaluates the effectiveness of seven Indonesian forest protected areas introduced between 1999 and 2012. Specifically, we explore how the effectiveness of these parks varies over space. Protected areas have mixed success in preserving forest, and it is important for conservationists to understand where they work and where they do not. Observed differences in the estimated treatment effect of protection may be driven by several factors. Indonesia is particularly diverse, with the landscape, forest and forest threats varying greatly from region to region, and this diversity may drive differences in the effectiveness of protected areas in conserving forest. However, the observed variation may also be spurious and arise from differing degrees of bias in the estimated treatment effect over space. In this paper, we use a difference-in-differences approach comparing treated observations and matched controls to estimate the effect of each protected area. We then distinguish the true variation in protected area effectiveness from spurious variation driven by several sources of estimation bias. Based on our most flexible method that allows the data generating process to vary across space, we find that the national average effect of protection preserves an additional 1.1% of forest cover; however the effect of individual parks range from a decrease of 3.4% to an increase of 5.3% and the effect of most parks differ from the national average. Potential biases may affect estimates in two parks, but results consistently show Sebangau National Park is more effective while two parks are substantially less able to protect forest cover than the national average.

  10. Corrosion and protection in reinforced concrete : Pulse cathodic protection: an improved cost-effective alternative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion and protection in reinforced concrete. Pulse cathodic protection: an improved cost-effective alternative. The aim of the research project was to study the possibilities for establishing a new or improved electrochemical method for corrosion prevention/protection for reinforced concrete.

  11. Dose dependent sun protective effect of topical melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, Cecilie; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) by sunlight results in an increasing number of skin conditions. Earlier studies have suggested a protective effect of topical treatment with the pineal hormone melatonin. However, this protective effect has never been evaluated in natural sunlight......-blind study in healthy volunteers. Twenty-three healthy volunteers, 8 male and 15 female, were enrolled. The protective effect of three different doses of melatonin cream (0.5%, 2.5%, 12.5%) against erythema induced by natural sunlight was tested. All participants had their backs exposed to sun from 1:22 PM.......5% concentrations. CONCLUSION: Application of melatonin cream 12.5% protects against natural sunlight induced erythema....

  12. Prosodic Similarity Effects in Short-Term Memory in Developmental Dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Usha; Barnes, Lisa; Mead, Natasha; Power, Alan James; Leong, Victoria

    2016-11-01

    Children with developmental dyslexia are characterized by phonological difficulties across languages. Classically, this 'phonological deficit' in dyslexia has been investigated with tasks using single-syllable words. Recently, however, several studies have demonstrated difficulties in prosodic awareness in dyslexia. Potential prosodic effects in short-term memory have not yet been investigated. Here we create a new instrument based on three-syllable words that vary in stress patterns, to investigate whether prosodic similarity (the same prosodic pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables) exerts systematic effects on short-term memory. We study participants with dyslexia and age-matched and younger reading-level-matched typically developing controls. We find that all participants, including dyslexic participants, show prosodic similarity effects in short-term memory. All participants exhibited better retention of words that differed in prosodic structure, although participants with dyslexia recalled fewer words accurately overall compared to age-matched controls. Individual differences in prosodic memory were predicted by earlier vocabulary abilities, by earlier sensitivity to syllable stress and by earlier phonological awareness. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of prosodic similarity effects in short-term memory. The implications of a prosodic similarity effect for theories of lexical representation and of dyslexia are discussed. © 2016 The Authors. Dyslexia published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 The Authors. Dyslexia published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Evaluation of the effectiveness of gonad protection in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaura, Chiyo; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji

    2004-01-01

    In the present study we describes the evaluation of the effectiveness of gonad protection in diagnostic radiology based on the measurement of organ and the effective doses with and without lead clothing to gonads. We devised in-phantom dosimetry system and measured organ and effective doses in x-ray radiography and CT examinations with the new dosimetry system. From the data of organ and the effective doses we assessed the effectiveness of radiological protection by the use of lead clothing to gonads. Although in chest radiography and chest CT examinations, the effectiveness of radiological protection was not found, in the case of hip joint radiography (AP), gonad doses decreased remarkably by using lead clothing. The effectiveness of radiological protection, i.e. the ratio of the decreased dose to the dose value without protection, in testis and ovary were found to be 91.4% and 68.0%, respectively. It was also found that gonad doses observed with and without gonad protection were extremely lower than those of threshold for sterility recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection 60 (ICRP Publ. 60). (author)

  14. [Evaluation of the effectiveness of gonad protection in diagnostic radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaura, Chiyo; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji

    2004-01-01

    In the present study we describe the evaluation of the effectiveness of gonad protection in diagnostic radiology based on the measurement of organ and the effective doses with and without lead clothing to gonads. We devised in-phantom dosimetry system and measured organ and effective doses in x-ray radiography and CT examinations with the new dosimetry system. From the data of organ and the effective doses we assessed the effectiveness of radiological protection by the use of lead clothing to gonads. Although in chest radiography and chest CT examinations, the effectiveness of radiological protection was not found, in the case of hip joint radiography (AP), gonad doses decreased remarkably by using lead clothing. The effectiveness of radiological protection, i.e. the ratio of the decreased dose to the dose value without protection, in testis and ovary were found to be 91.4% and 68.0%, respectively. It was also found that gonad doses observed with and without gonad protection were extremely lower than those of threshold for sterility recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection 60 (ICRP Publ. 60).

  15. The effect of crop protection strategy on pest and beneficials incidence in protected crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, I; Rodrigues, S; Figueiredo, E; Godinho, M C; Marques, C; Amaro, F; Mexia, A

    2002-01-01

    This study took place in the Oeste region from 1996-1999 and it intended to analyse if the crop protection strategy followed by the farmer influenced the arthropod incidence and the natural control in protected vegetable crops under Mediterranean conditions. The observations were made fortnightly (Autumn/Winter) or weekly (Spring/Summer) in 30-60 plants/parcel (1 plant/35 m2) in order to evaluate incidences. Samples of pests and natural enemies were collected for systematic identification in two greenhouses for each protection strategy (traditional chemical control (TCC), integrated pest management (IPM) and pest control allowed in organic farming (OF)) in lettuce, tomato, green beans and cucumber. Data on incidence of mites, aphids, caterpillars, leafminers, whiteflies, thrips and respective natural enemies were registered as well as phytosanitary treatments performed (farmers' information and/or in loco traces). The leafminers were the pest whose incidence more often presented significant statistical differences between the studied protection strategies. In relation to this pest, the main results obtained were: a higher feeding punctures incidence in TCC than in IPM; higher incidence of adults, mines and feeding punctures in TCC than in OF; and a higher mines' incidence in IPM than in OF. Both in TCC and IPM high percentages of plants with mines were found although without an adult proportional presence. In the first case this was due to the repeatedly phytosanitary treatments applied; in the second case it was due to the natural control, since in IPM and OF greenhouses the collected larvae were mostly parasitized or dead. In spite of the fact these two strategies have as final result a similar mines and adults incidence, their production and environmental costs are quite different. Significant differences at the beneficials' population level between TCC greenhouses and IPM or OF greenhouses were found. As the farmers did no biological treatments these

  16. Is the phonological similarity effect in working memory due to proactive interference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddeley, Alan D; Hitch, Graham J; Quinlan, Philip T

    2018-04-12

    Immediate serial recall of verbal material is highly sensitive to impairment attributable to phonological similarity. Although this has traditionally been interpreted as a within-sequence similarity effect, Engle (2007) proposed an interpretation based on interference from prior sequences, a phenomenon analogous to that found in the Peterson short-term memory (STM) task. We use the method of serial reconstruction to test this in an experiment contrasting the standard paradigm in which successive sequences are drawn from the same set of phonologically similar or dissimilar words and one in which the vowel sound on which similarity is based is switched from trial to trial, a manipulation analogous to that producing release from PI in the Peterson task. A substantial similarity effect occurs under both conditions although there is a small advantage from switching across similar sequences. There is, however, no evidence for the suggestion that the similarity effect will be absent from the very first sequence tested. Our results support the within-sequence similarity rather than a between-list PI interpretation. Reasons for the contrast with the classic Peterson short-term forgetting task are briefly discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Protective effect of edaravone against tobramycin-induced ototoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asplund, Monika Stenkvist; Lidian, Adnan; Linder, Birgitta; Takumida, Masaya; Anniko, Matti

    2009-01-01

    Conclusion. It is suggested that simultaneous treatment with the radical scavenger edaravone has an effective protective effect against tobramycin ototoxicity in rat. Even if the edaravone treatment is postponed for 7 days, it can still prevent hearing loss, but a 14 day delay cannot protect from

  18. [Optimizing staff radiation protection in radiology by minimizing the effective dose].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Boetticher, H; Lachmund, J; Hoffmann, W; Luska, G

    2006-03-01

    In the present study the optimization of radiation protection devices is achieved by minimizing the effective dose of the staff members since the stochastic radiation effects correlate to the effective dose. Radiation exposure dosimetry was performed with TLD measurements using one Alderson Phantom in the patient position and a second phantom in the typical position of the personnel. Various types of protective clothing as well as fixed shields were considered in the calculations. It was shown that the doses of the unshielded organs (thyroid, parts of the active bone marrow) contribute significantly to the effective dose of the staff. Therefore, there is no linear relationship between the shielding factors for protective garments and the effective dose. An additional thyroid protection collar reduces the effective dose by a factor of 1.7 - 3.0. X-ray protective clothing with a 0.35 mm lead equivalent and an additional thyroid protection collar provides better protection against radiation than an apron with a 0.5 mm lead equivalent but no collar. The use of thyroid protection collars is an effective preventive measure against exceeding occupational organ dose limits, and a thyroid shield also considerably reduces the effective dose. Therefore, thyroid protection collars should be a required component of anti-X protection.

  19. A unified frame of predicting side effects of drugs by using linear neighborhood similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Yue, Xiang; Liu, Feng; Chen, Yanlin; Tu, Shikui; Zhang, Xining

    2017-12-14

    Drug side effects are one of main concerns in the drug discovery, which gains wide attentions. Investigating drug side effects is of great importance, and the computational prediction can help to guide wet experiments. As far as we known, a great number of computational methods have been proposed for the side effect predictions. The assumption that similar drugs may induce same side effects is usually employed for modeling, and how to calculate the drug-drug similarity is critical in the side effect predictions. In this paper, we present a novel measure of drug-drug similarity named "linear neighborhood similarity", which is calculated in a drug feature space by exploring linear neighborhood relationship. Then, we transfer the similarity from the feature space into the side effect space, and predict drug side effects by propagating known side effect information through a similarity-based graph. Under a unified frame based on the linear neighborhood similarity, we propose method "LNSM" and its extension "LNSM-SMI" to predict side effects of new drugs, and propose the method "LNSM-MSE" to predict unobserved side effect of approved drugs. We evaluate the performances of LNSM and LNSM-SMI in predicting side effects of new drugs, and evaluate the performances of LNSM-MSE in predicting missing side effects of approved drugs. The results demonstrate that the linear neighborhood similarity can improve the performances of side effect prediction, and the linear neighborhood similarity-based methods can outperform existing side effect prediction methods. More importantly, the proposed methods can predict side effects of new drugs as well as unobserved side effects of approved drugs under a unified frame.

  20. The Effect of Script Similarity on Executive Control in Bilinguals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily L Coderre

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The need for executive control (EC during bilingual language processing is thought to enhance these abilities, conferring a ‘bilingual advantage’ on EC tasks. Recently, the reliability and robustness of the bilingual advantage has been questioned, with many variables reportedly affecting the size and presence of the bilingual advantage. This study investigates one further variable that may affect bilingual EC abilities: the similarity of a bilingual’s two languages. We hypothesize that bilinguals whose two languages have a larger degree of orthographic overlap will require greater EC to manage their languages compared to bilinguals who use two languages with less overlap. We tested three groups of bilinguals with language pairs ranging from high- to low-similarity (German-English (GE, Polish-English (PE, and Arabic-English (AE, respectively and a group of English monolinguals on a Stroop and Simon task. Two components of the bilingual advantage were investigated: an interference advantage, such that bilinguals have smaller interference effects than monolinguals; and a global RT advantage, such that bilinguals are faster overall than monolinguals. Between bilingual groups, these effects were expected to be modulated by script similarity. AE bilinguals showed the smallest Stroop interference effects, but the longest overall RTs in both tasks. These seemingly contradictory results are explained by the presence of cross-linguistic interference in the Stroop task. We conclude that similar-script bilinguals demonstrated more effective domain-general EC than different-script bilinguals, since high orthographic overlap creates more cross-linguistic activation and increases the daily demands on cognitive control. The role of individual variation is also discussed. These results suggest that script similarity is an important variable to consider in investigations of bilingual executive control abilities.

  1. Leadership and management for an effective radiation protection programme: A study on open cast diamond mining in Lesotho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thetha, Pakeng

    2016-04-01

    Leadership and Management system commitment to safety is recognised as a fundamental component of an organisation's safety culture. This study focuses on how organisations can integrate leadership and management in achieving an effective radiation protection programme (RPP), in Lesotho's diamond mining industry. The study made a comparative analysis of relevant studies made on similar open pit mines and industries around the world. The findings suggest that, leaders and managers should ensure that prior radiological assessment is done in order to streamline the radiation protection programme to satisfy the needs of the individual mining companies thus making it more effective. Furthermore there is a need to ensure that leadership and management are integrated at every level of the organization in the implementation of the RPP. Lesotho Diamond Mining industry has no radiation protection programme in place thus its effectiveness could not be assessed. Leaders and managers should be involved at all levels of the organization from site specific radiological evaluation, design, funding, training and implementation of the RPP. Senior managers, supervisors and workers have the responsibility to ensure the protection of those occupationally exposed the public, the environment and future generations by implementing the RPP effectively and efficiently. (au)

  2. Fipronil-induced genotoxicity and DNA damage in vivo: Protective effect of vitamin E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badgujar, P C; Selkar, N A; Chandratre, G A; Pawar, N N; Dighe, V D; Bhagat, S T; Telang, A G; Vanage, G R

    2017-05-01

    Fipronil, an insecticide of the phenylpyrazole class has been classified as a carcinogen by United States Environmental Protection Agency, yet very limited information is available about its genotoxic effects. Adult male and female animals were gavaged with various doses of fipronil (2.5, 12.5, and 25 mg/kg body weight (bw)) to evaluate micronucleus test (mice), chromosome aberration (CA), and comet assay (rats), respectively. Cyclophosphamide (40 mg/kg bw; intraperitoneal) was used as positive control. Another group of animals were pretreated with vitamin E orally (400 mg/kg bw) for 5 days prior to administration of fipronil (12.5 mg/kg). Fipronil exposure in both male and female mice caused significant increase in the frequency of micronuclei (MN) in polychromatic erythrocytes. Similarly, structural CAs in bone marrow cells and DNA damage in the lymphocytes was found to be significantly higher in the male and female rats exposed to fipronil as compared to their respective controls. The average degree of protection (male and female animals combined together) shown by pretreatment of vitamin E against fipronil-induced genotoxicity was 63.28%: CAs; 47.91%: MN formation; and 74.70%: DNA damage. Findings of this study demonstrate genotoxic nature of fipronil regardless of gender effect and documents protective role of vitamin E.

  3. Protective effect of plant polysaccharides against radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bingji; Huang Shafei; Cheng Lurong

    1989-01-01

    A series of polysaccharides have been isolated from Chinese traditional medicinal herbs and tested in mice subjected to ionizing radiation for their protective action. The polysaccharides from different origins showed various degrees of radioprotection. Those isolated from Hericium erinaceus and Armillaria mellea showed a higher radioprotective effect than some other polysaccharides. They could increase the survival rate of irradiated mice to 60%. But the polysaccheride separated from Apocynum venetum has negligible effect. In general, most of these polysaccharides are effective only on administration before irradiation. No apparent protection was observed when given post irradiation. The polysaccharide isolated from Armillaria venetum could raise the survival rate of mice irradiated by lethal dose of γ-rays to 58%. It is effective even when administered after irradiation. Some work has been carried out to clarify the mechanism of radioprotective action of polysaccharides. Protection of hemapoietic organs, regulation of immunological system, induction of release of some endogeneous bioactive substances in the organism and reduction of oxygen tension in some vital tissues may be correlated with the protection of organism against radiation injury

  4. Implications of astrocytes in mediating the protective effects of Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators upon brain damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George E. Barreto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators (SERMs are steroidal or non-steroidal compounds that are already used in clinical practice for the treatment of breast cancer, osteoporosis and menopausal symptoms. While SERMs actions in the breast, bone, and uterus have been well characterized, their actions in the brain are less well understood. Previous works have demonstrated the beneficial effects of SERMs in different chronic neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer, Parkinson’s disease and Multiple sclerosis, as well as acute degeneration as stroke and traumatic brain injury. Moreover, these compounds exhibit similar protective actions as those of estradiol in the Central Nervous System, overt any secondary effect. For these reasons, in the past few years, there has been a growing interest in the neuroprotective effects exerted directly or indirectly by SERMs in the SNC. In this context, astrocytes play an important role in the maintenance of brain metabolism, and antioxidant support to neurons, thus indicating that better protection of astrocytes are an important asset targeting neuronal protection. Moreover, various clinical and experimental studies have reported that astrocytes are essential for the neuroprotective effects of SERMs during neuronal injuries, as these cells express different estrogen receptors in cell membrane, demonstrating that part of SERMs effects upon injury may be mediated by astrocytes. The present work highlights the current evidence on the protective mechanisms of SERMs, such as tamoxifen and raloxifene, in the SNC, and their modulation of astrocytic properties as promising therapeutic targets during brain damage.

  5. Multiple effects of self-protection on the spreading of epidemics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Haifeng; Wang, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Aside from the commonly considered strategies: vaccination or risk, in this work another basic policy self-protection strategy is incorporated into research of epidemics spreading. Then within the network-theoretical framework, we mainly explore the impact of self-protection strategy on the epidemic size and the eradication of infection. Interestingly, we find that the self-protection influence is multiple: given that the effectiveness of the self-protective strategy is negligible, nobody is willing to take up this act, both vaccination and risk traits dominate the whole system; On the contrary, when the effectiveness of self-protective policy is elevated, it becomes a popular strategy and the size of epidemic can be controlled at a relatively low level. However, one worse situation is present as well: when the effectiveness of self-protection is moderate, the infection probability and epidemic size can reach the maximal level. This is because that, under such a case, the emergence of the self-protective strategy neither inspires the enthusiasm of vaccination nor provides ideal effect

  6. Enemies and Friends in the Neighborhood: Orthographic Similarity Effects in Semantic Categorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecher, Diane; Zeelenberg, Rene; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan

    2005-01-01

    Studies investigating orthographic similarity effects in semantic tasks have produced inconsistent results. The authors investigated orthographic similarity effects in animacy decision and in contrast with previous studies, they took semantic congruency into account. In Experiments 1 and 2, performance to a target (cat) was better if a previously…

  7. Experimental and theoretical studies on radiation protective effect of a lighter non-lead protective apron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Yoshihisa; Ono, Koji; Okazaki, Keiichiro

    2005-01-01

    Non-lead aprons using composite materials are often used for radiation protective aprons instead of heavy lead aprons. However, the protective effect of the lighter, non-lead aprons has not been well evaluated, and it is not yet clear how they compare with lead aprons. Therefore, we investigated the protective performance of non-lead aprons theoretically and experimentally by comparing them with lead aprons under clinical conditions. We measured the energy spectra for direct and scattered-rays passing through protective aprons or not, and measured doses with glass dosimeters for validation of theoretical calculations based on the energy spectra. We found that the protective effect of non-lead aprons was higher than that of lead aprons at X-ray of tube voltages of 70-100 kV, which are often used for radiography and fluorography. This demonstrated that the non-lead aprons are more useful in many situations than heavy lead aprons. (author)

  8. Linking management effectiveness indicators to observed effects of protected areas on fire occurrence in the Amazon rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Christoph; Agrawal, Arun

    2013-02-01

    Management-effectiveness scores are used widely by donors and implementers of conservation projects to prioritize, track, and evaluate investments in protected areas. However, there is little evidence that these scores actually reflect the capacity of protected areas to deliver conservation outcomes. We examined the relation between indicators of management effectiveness in protected areas and the effectiveness of protected areas in reducing fire occurrence in the Amazon rainforest. We used data collected with the Management Effectiveness Tracking Tool (METT) scorecard, adopted by some of the world's largest conservation organizations to track management characteristics believed to be crucial for protected-area effectiveness. We used the occurrence of forest fires from 2000 through 2010 as a measure of the effect of protected areas on undesired land-cover change in the Amazon basin. We used matching to compare the estimated effect of protected areas with low versus high METT scores on fire occurrence. We also estimated effects of individual protected areas on fire occurrence and explored the relation between these effects and METT scores. The relations between METT scores and effects of protected areas on fire occurrence were weak. Protected areas with higher METT scores in 2005 did not seem to have performed better than protected areas with lower METT scores at reducing fire occurrence over the last 10 years. Further research into the relations between management-effectiveness indicators and conservation outcomes in protected areas seems necessary, and our results show that the careful application of matching methods can be a suitable method for that purpose. ©2012 Society for Conservation Biology.

  9. Interference effects in learning similar sequences of discrete movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koedijker, J.M.; Oudejans, R.R.D.; Beek, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to examine proactive and retroactive interference effects in learning two similar sequences of discrete movements. In each experiment, the participants in the experimental group practiced two movement sequences on consecutive days (1 on each day, order

  10. Combination of Nigella sativa with Glycyrrhiza glabra and Zingiber officinale augments their protective effects on doxorubicin-induced toxicity in h9c2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Azar; Shafiee-Nick, Reza; Mousavi, Seyed Hadi

    2014-12-01

    The use of doxorubicin (DOX) is limited by its dose-dependent cardio toxicity in which reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) play an important role in the pathological process. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of three medicinal plants, Nigella sativa (N), Glycyrrhiza glabra (G) and Zingiber officinale (Z), and their combination (NGZ), against DOX-induced apoptosis and death in H9c2 cells. The cells were incubated with different concentrations of each extract or NGZ for 4 hr which continued in the presence or absence of 5µM doxorubicin for 24 hr. Cell viability and the apoptotic rate were determined using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium (MTT) and propidium iodide (PI) staining assays, respectively. The level of ROS and lipid peroxidation were measured by fluorimetric methods. Treatment with doxorubicin increased ROS generation, enhanced malondialdehyde (MDA) formation, and induced apoptosis. Co-treatment of the cells with each herb extract increased viability of cells dose-dependently with a maximum protection effect of about 30%, and their potencies were N>G>Z. The combination of the threshold dose of each extract (NGZ) produced a similar effect, which was increased dose-dependently to a maximum protection of 70%. These effects were correlated with the effects of NGZ on ROS and MDA. All of the extracts have some protective effects against DOX-induced toxicity in cardiomyocytes with similar efficacies, but with different potencies. However, NGZ produced much higher protective effect via reducing oxidative stress and inhibiting of apoptotic induction processes. Further investigations are needed to determine the effects of NGZ on DOX chemotherapy.

  11. Measuring the effectiveness of protected area networks in reducing deforestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andam, Kwaw S; Ferraro, Paul J; Pfaff, Alexander; Sanchez-Azofeifa, G Arturo; Robalino, Juan A

    2008-10-21

    Global efforts to reduce tropical deforestation rely heavily on the establishment of protected areas. Measuring the effectiveness of these areas is difficult because the amount of deforestation that would have occurred in the absence of legal protection cannot be directly observed. Conventional methods of evaluating the effectiveness of protected areas can be biased because protection is not randomly assigned and because protection can induce deforestation spillovers (displacement) to neighboring forests. We demonstrate that estimates of effectiveness can be substantially improved by controlling for biases along dimensions that are observable, measuring spatial spillovers, and testing the sensitivity of estimates to potential hidden biases. We apply matching methods to evaluate the impact on deforestation of Costa Rica's renowned protected-area system between 1960 and 1997. We find that protection reduced deforestation: approximately 10% of the protected forests would have been deforested had they not been protected. Conventional approaches to evaluating conservation impact, which fail to control for observable covariates correlated with both protection and deforestation, substantially overestimate avoided deforestation (by over 65%, based on our estimates). We also find that deforestation spillovers from protected to unprotected forests are negligible. Our conclusions are robust to potential hidden bias, as well as to changes in modeling assumptions. Our results show that, with appropriate empirical methods, conservation scientists and policy makers can better understand the relationships between human and natural systems and can use this to guide their attempts to protect critical ecosystem services.

  12. Protective Effect of Chitin Urocanate Nanofibers against Ultraviolet Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikuko Ito

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Urocanic acid is a major ultraviolet (UV-absorbing chromophore. Chitins are highly crystalline structures that are found predominantly in crustacean shells. Alpha-chitin consists of microfibers that contain nanofibrils embedded in a protein matrix. Acid hydrolysis is a common method used to prepare chitin nanofibrils (NFs. We typically obtain NFs by hydrolyzing chitin with acetic acid. However, in the present study, we used urocanic acid to prepare urocanic acid chitin NFs (UNFs and examined its protective effect against UVB radiation. Hos: HR-1 mice coated with UNFs were UVB irradiated (302 nm, 150 mJ/cm2, and these mice showed markedly lower UVB radiation-induced cutaneous erythema than the control. Additionally, sunburn cells were rarely detected in the epidermis of UNFs-coated mice after UVB irradiation. Although the difference was not as significant as UNFs, the number of sunburn cells in mice treated with acetic acid chitin nanofibrils (ANFs tended to be lower than in control mice. These results demonstrate that ANFs have a protective effect against UVB and suggest that the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of NFs influence the protective effect of ANFs against UVB radiation. The combination of NFs with other substances that possess UV-protective effects, such as urocanic acid, may provide an enhanced protective effect against UVB radiation.

  13. Protective Effect against Oxidative Stress in Medicinal Plant Extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeong Hee; Lee, Eun Ju; Shin, Dong O; Hong, Sung Eun; Kim, Jin Kyu

    2000-01-01

    Protective effect of medicinal plant extracts against oxidative stress were screened in this study. Methanol extracts from 48 medicinal plants, which were reported to have antioxidative or anti-inflammatory effect were prepared and screened for their protective activity against chemically-induced and radiation-induced oxidative stress by using MTT assay. Thirty three samples showed protective activity against chemically-induced oxidative stress in various extent. Among those samples, extract of Glycyrrhiza uralensis revealed the strongest activity (25.9% at 100 μg/ml) with relatively lower cytotoxicity. Seven other samples showed higher than 20% protection at 100 μg/ml. These samples were tested for protection activity against radiation-induced oxidative stress. Methanol extract of Alpina officinarum showed the highest activity (17.8% at 20 μg/ml). Five fractions were prepared from the each 10 methanol extracts which showed high protective activity against oxidative stress. Among those fraction samples butanol fractions of Areca catechu var. dulcissima and Spirodela polyrrhiza showed the highest protective activities (78.8% and 77.2%, respectively, at 20 μg/ml)

  14. The protective effects of good parenting on adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVore, Elise R; Ginsburg, Kenneth R

    2005-08-01

    To explore recent developments in the literature regarding parenting practices and adolescent development, with a focus on parenting style, parental monitoring, communication, and supervision. There have been significant recent advances in the study of the relationship between parenting and adolescent development. Several recent intervention studies with a parenting component demonstrated immediate and long-term protective effects on adolescent risk behavior. Parent-child connectedness and authoritative parenting style are protective for teens. Parental monitoring has a protective effect on many adolescent risk behaviors in both middle-class populations and poor urban environments and has been shown both to moderate the effect of peer influence and to persist into late adolescence. Whereas unsupervised time, exposure to sexual possibility situations, and out-of-home care increase sexual behavior, improved parent-child communication reduces sexual risk behaviors. Recent scholarship demonstrates the significant, enduring, and protective influence of positive parenting practices on adolescent development. In particular, parental monitoring, open parent-child communication, supervision, and high quality of the parent-child relationship deter involvement in high-risk behavior. Authoritative parenting generally leads to the best outcomes for teens. Clinicians should find opportunities to discuss evidence-based parenting practices with families. Future research should focus on the development and long-term evaluation of effective parenting interventions.

  15. Population connectivity and the effectiveness of marine protected areas to protect vulnerable, exploited and endemic coral reef fishes at an endemic hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, M. H.; Berumen, M. L.; Hobbs, J.-P. A.; van Herwerden, L.

    2015-06-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) aim to mitigate anthropogenic impacts by conserving biodiversity and preventing overfishing. The effectiveness of MPAs depends on population connectivity patterns between protected and non-protected areas. Remote islands are endemism hotspots for coral reef fishes and provide rare examples of coral reefs with limited fishing pressure. This study explored population genetic connectivity across a network of protected and non-protected areas for the endemic wrasse, Coris bulbifrons, which is listed as "vulnerable" by the IUCN due to its small, decreasing geographic range and declining abundance. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and microsatellite DNA (msatDNA) markers were used to estimate historic and contemporary gene flow to determine the level of population self-replenishment and to measure genetic and genotypic diversity among all four locations in the species range (south-west Pacific Ocean)—Middleton Reef (MR), Elizabeth Reef (ER), Lord Howe Island (LHI) and Norfolk Island (NI). MPAs exist at MR and LHI and are limited or non-existent at ER and NI, respectively. There was no obvious differentiation in mtDNA among locations, however, msatDNA revealed differentiation between the most peripheral (NI) and all remaining locations (MR, ER and LHI). Despite high mtDNA connectivity ( M = 259-1,144), msatDNA connectivity was limited ( M = 3-9) with high self-replenishment (68-93 %) at all locations. NI is the least connected and heavily reliant on self-replenishment, and the absence of MPAs at NI needs to be rectified to ensure the persistence of endemic species at this location. Other endemic fishes exhibit similar patterns of high self-replenishment across the four locations, indicating that a single spatial management approach consisting of a MPA network protecting part of each location could provide reasonable protection for these species. Thus, the existing network of MPAs at this endemic hotspot appears adequate at some locations, but not

  16. Similarity-based search of model organism, disease and drug effect phenotypes

    KAUST Repository

    Hoehndorf, Robert

    2015-02-19

    Background: Semantic similarity measures over phenotype ontologies have been demonstrated to provide a powerful approach for the analysis of model organism phenotypes, the discovery of animal models of human disease, novel pathways, gene functions, druggable therapeutic targets, and determination of pathogenicity. Results: We have developed PhenomeNET 2, a system that enables similarity-based searches over a large repository of phenotypes in real-time. It can be used to identify strains of model organisms that are phenotypically similar to human patients, diseases that are phenotypically similar to model organism phenotypes, or drug effect profiles that are similar to the phenotypes observed in a patient or model organism. PhenomeNET 2 is available at http://aber-owl.net/phenomenet. Conclusions: Phenotype-similarity searches can provide a powerful tool for the discovery and investigation of molecular mechanisms underlying an observed phenotypic manifestation. PhenomeNET 2 facilitates user-defined similarity searches and allows researchers to analyze their data within a large repository of human, mouse and rat phenotypes.

  17. [Methods of gonad protection against effects of chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, A

    1994-05-01

    Together with increasing therapeutic effectiveness neoplastic diseases, the interest in late consequences of adverse effects of chemotherapy is increasing. Such problems include disturbances of gonad function. Treatment of neoplastic diseases leads frequently to infertility and hormonal disturbances resulting from damages to the gonads. Many attempts have been undertaken at protection of the gonads against unfavourable action of drugs. They are based mainly on the "interruption" of the hypothalamo-hypophyseo-gonadal axis in order to make the gonads quiescent. Other direction includes the influence on the metabolism of oncological drugs aimed at inhibition of the development of gonadotoxic derivatives. Another method includes appropriate choice of cytostatics: antimetabolites exert weaker unfavourable action on the gonads than alkylating drugs. The problem of gonad protection remains open. Searching is necessary for drugs without gonadotoxic action and effective methods of protection.

  18. Impact of vaccine herd-protection effects in cost-effectiveness analyses of childhood vaccinations. A quantitative comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holubar, Marisa; Stavroulakis, Maria Christina; Maldonado, Yvonne; Ioannidis, John P A; Contopoulos-Ioannidis, Despina

    2017-01-01

    Inclusion of vaccine herd-protection effects in cost-effectiveness analyses (CEAs) can impact the CEAs-conclusions. However, empirical epidemiologic data on the size of herd-protection effects from original studies are limited. We performed a quantitative comparative analysis of the impact of herd-protection effects in CEAs for four childhood vaccinations (pneumococcal, meningococcal, rotavirus and influenza). We considered CEAs reporting incremental-cost-effectiveness-ratios (ICERs) (per quality-adjusted-life-years [QALY] gained; per life-years [LY] gained or per disability-adjusted-life-years [DALY] avoided), both with and without herd protection, while keeping all other model parameters stable. We calculated the size of the ICER-differences without vs with-herd-protection and estimated how often inclusion of herd-protection led to crossing of the cost-effectiveness threshold (of an assumed societal-willingness-to-pay) of $50,000 for more-developed countries or X3GDP/capita (WHO-threshold) for less-developed countries. We identified 35 CEA studies (20 pneumococcal, 4 meningococcal, 8 rotavirus and 3 influenza vaccines) with 99 ICER-analyses (55 per-QALY, 27 per-LY and 17 per-DALY). The median ICER-absolute differences per QALY, LY and DALY (without minus with herd-protection) were $15,620 (IQR: $877 to $48,376); $54,871 (IQR: $787 to $115,026) and $49 (IQR: $15 to $1,636) respectively. When the target-vaccination strategy was not cost-saving without herd-protection, inclusion of herd-protection always resulted in more favorable results. In CEAs that had ICERs above the cost-effectiveness threshold without herd-protection, inclusion of herd-protection led to crossing of that threshold in 45% of the cases. This impacted only CEAs for more developed countries, as all but one CEAs for less developed countries had ICERs below the WHO-cost-effectiveness threshold even without herd-protection. In several analyses, recommendation for the adoption of the target

  19. Phonological similarity effect in complex span task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camos, Valérie; Mora, Gérôme; Barrouillet, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study was to test the hypothesis that two systems are involved in verbal working memory; one is specifically dedicated to the maintenance of phonological representations through verbal rehearsal while the other would maintain multimodal representations through attentional refreshing. This theoretical framework predicts that phonologically related phenomena such as the phonological similarity effect (PSE) should occur when the domain-specific system is involved in maintenance, but should disappear when concurrent articulation hinders its use. Impeding maintenance in the domain-general system by a concurrent attentional demand should impair recall performance without affecting PSE. In three experiments, we manipulated the concurrent articulation and the attentional demand induced by the processing component of complex span tasks in which participants had to maintain lists of either similar or dissimilar words. Confirming our predictions, PSE affected recall performance in complex span tasks. Although both the attentional demand and the articulatory requirement of the concurrent task impaired recall, only the induction of an articulatory suppression during maintenance made the PSE disappear. These results suggest a duality in the systems devoted to verbal maintenance in the short term, constraining models of working memory.

  20. Effect of Remote Back-Up Protection System Failure on the Optimum Routine Test Time Interval of Power System Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Damchi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate operation of protection system is one of the effective factors to have a desirable reliability in power systems, which vitally needs routine test of protection system. Precise determination of optimum routine test time interval (ORTTI plays a vital role in predicting the maintenance costs of protection system. In the most previous studies, ORTTI has been determined while remote back-up protection system was considered fully reliable. This assumption is not exactly correct since remote back-up protection system may operate incorrectly or fail to operate, the same as the primary protection system. Therefore, in order to determine the ORTTI, an extended Markov model is proposed in this paper considering failure probability for remote back-up protection system. In the proposed Markov model of the protection systems, monitoring facility is taken into account. Moreover, it is assumed that the primary and back-up protection systems are maintained simultaneously. Results show that the effect of remote back-up protection system failures on the reliability indices and optimum routine test intervals of protection system is considerable.

  1. George gives to geology Jane : the name letter effect and incidental similarity cues in fundraising

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, René H.F.P.

    2010-01-01

    - People tend to like others with attributes similar to their own (the similarity principle) and favor products with names similar to their own (the name letter effect). - In the present field experiment, the name letter effect and similarity principle are tested in a phonaton among alumni of

  2. George gives to geology Jane: The name letter effect and incidental similarity cues in fundraising

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, R.H.F.P.

    2010-01-01

    People tend to like others with attributes similar to their own (the similarity principle) and favor products with names similar to their own (the name letter effect). In the present field experiment, the name letter effect and similarity principle are tested in a phonaton among alumni of Utrecht

  3. 36 CFR 1002.20 - Skating, skateboards and similar devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Skating, skateboards and similar devices. 1002.20 Section 1002.20 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 1002.20 Skating, skateboards and similar devices. Using roller skates...

  4. Towards Personalized Medicine: Leveraging Patient Similarity and Drug Similarity Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Fei; Hu, Jianying; Sorrentino, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The rapid adoption of electronic health records (EHR) provides a comprehensive source for exploratory and predictive analytic to support clinical decision-making. In this paper, we investigate how to utilize EHR to tailor treatments to individual patients based on their likelihood to respond to a therapy. We construct a heterogeneous graph which includes two domains (patients and drugs) and encodes three relationships (patient similarity, drug similarity, and patient-drug prior associations). We describe a novel approach for performing a label propagation procedure to spread the label information representing the effectiveness of different drugs for different patients over this heterogeneous graph. The proposed method has been applied on a real-world EHR dataset to help identify personalized treatments for hypercholesterolemia. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach and suggest that the combination of appropriate patient similarity and drug similarity analytics could lead to actionable insights for personalized medicine. Particularly, by leveraging drug similarity in combination with patient similarity, our method could perform well even on new or rarely used drugs for which there are few records of known past performance. PMID:25717413

  5. Radio protective effects of selenium on rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakir, A.; Alya, G

    2005-11-01

    Potential radio-protective effects of different selenium supplement concentrations of 4, 8, 15 and 30 ppm were evaluated in rats. Four groups of rats were administered different concentrations of selenium in drinking water for 30 days before irradiation starting from the ablactation which considered as day 0. The results showed that the sodium selenite of 4 ppm and 8 ppm enhance the 30-day survival of irradiated rats at 7 Gy ( sup 6 sup 0 Co source, whole body irradiation dose rate of 1 Gy x min sup - sup 1) compared to the control group. The mean cumulated probability of survival of rats was 69%+-6 (mean+-S.E.) and 77%+-6 in 4 and 8 ppm groups, respectively, versus 42%+-9 for control group (P<0.001). It was also indicated that sodium selenite with concentrations of 15 and 30 ppm had no significant reduction in mortality. The mean cumulated probability of survival of rats was 50%+-12 (P=0.39) and 49%+-14 (P=0.04), respectively. The toxic effects of selenium were observed at 15 ppm and 30 ppm, survivals after 30 days of selenium intake were 76% and 46%, respectively. It was concluded that 4 and 8 ppm sodium selenite have a radio-protective effect. 15 and 30 ppm sodium selenite had no radio-protective effects in rats, this may be due to a synergism of toxicity and radiation effects. (author)

  6. The effect of moisture content within multilayer protective clothing on protection from radiation and steam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yun; Li, Jun; Song, Guowen

    2018-06-01

    The moisture from skin sweat and atmospheric water affects the thermal protective performance provided by multilayer protective clothing. Four levels of moisture content were selected to evaluate the impact of moisture on thermal protection under dry (thermal radiation) and wet (thermal radiation and low-pressure steam) heat exposure. Also, the role of moisture and its relationship with exposure time were analyzed based on skin heat flux and Henriques integral value. The addition of moisture to a fabric system was found to result in differences in second-degree and third-degree skin burn times. When moisture is added to a fabric system, it both acts as a thermal conductor to present a negative effect and provides a positive effect owing to thermal storage of water and evaporative heat loss. The positive or negative effects of moisture are mainly dependent on the thermal exposure time, the moisture content and the presence of hot steam.

  7. Harmful Effects of Formaldehyde and Possible Protective Effect of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-22

    May 22, 2017 ... the ocular and respiratory system, but it also affects the nervous and genital system. ... possible protective effect of Nigella sativa on the trachea of rats. Niger ..... Vitamin A deficiency in the tracheal epithelium of rats has been ...

  8. Effective self-similar expansion for the Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modugno, Michele; Pagnini, Gianni; Valle-Basagoiti, Manuel Angel

    2018-04-01

    We consider an effective scaling approach for the free expansion of a one-dimensional quantum wave packet, consisting in a self-similar evolution to be satisfied on average, i.e., by integrating over the coordinates. A direct comparison with the solution of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation shows that the effective scaling reproduces with great accuracy the exact evolution—the actual wave function is reproduced with a fidelity close to one—for arbitrary values of the interactions. This result represents a proof of concept of the effectiveness of the scaling ansatz, which has been used in different forms in the literature but never compared against the exact evolution.

  9. Protective effect of building against nuclear fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueck, K.; Lovranich, E.; Steger, F.

    1995-02-01

    In order to adopt appropriate countermeasures to protect the public in case of a wide-spread contamination after a severe reactor accident, a profound knowledge of the dose to be expected and of the dose reduction to be expected if a specific countermeasure is adopted is required. Since external radiation contributes a major fraction of up to 80 % to the total dose, the interest is focused on the reduction of external dose by staying indoors. For this purpose measurements of the dose reduction by external radiation were performed in 40 residential rooms in Vienna which were chosen according to their fraction of the Viennese building structure. They were performed by measurement of the reduction of the gamma-flux in the interior of buildings compared to the gamma-flux outside. Measurements were carried out by a HPGe-detector which was positioned 1 m above ground. The observed dose reduction factors amounted to 0.013 on the average (protection factor 78.7 ± 49.7), with the protection factors of the investigated building types ranging from 6.5 (single house in garden) to 122.9 (edicifices of the turn of the century). The observed protection factors do not include the dose reduction by dense arrangement of buildings in urban areas which has to be considered separately. The dose reduction due to different radionuclide mixtures after severe reactor accidents was also investigated. Factors similar to that observed for Cs-137 were found. The maximum deviations amounted only 12 % and therefore may be neglected in the consideration of protective measures. Additional measurements were performed with the same detector shielded by lead on all sides to determine the contribution of the interior contamination. A contribution of between < 10 % to 50 % to the external dose in the interior of buildings was observed. Measures to reduce the inner contamination in rooms (closing of windows and doors, cleaning upon entering the building interior) in case of an event are therefore

  10. Similarity of Deleterious Effects of Divorce on Chinese and American Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zheng; Bray, Melissa A.; Kehle, Thomas J.; Xin, Tao

    2001-01-01

    Reviews and contrasts the effects of divorce on Chinese children's adjustment to American children of divorce. Results indicate that the deleterious effects of divorce on children's academic and social functioning appear to be similar to that experienced by American children. (Contains 23 references.) (GCP)

  11. Conservation of connectivity of model-space effective interactions under a class of similarity transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Changkui; Gong Yungui; Dong Huining; Reid, Michael F.

    2004-01-01

    Effective interaction operators usually act on a restricted model space and give the same energies (for Hamiltonian) and matrix elements (for transition operators, etc.) as those of the original operators between the corresponding true eigenstates. Various types of effective operators are possible. Those well defined effective operators have been shown to be related to each other by similarity transformation. Some of the effective operators have been shown to have connected-diagram expansions. It is shown in this paper that under a class of very general similarity transformations, the connectivity is conserved. The similarity transformation between Hermitian and non-Hermitian Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbative effective operators is one of such transformations and hence the connectivity can be deducted from each other

  12. Conservation of connectivity of model-space effective interactions under a class of similarity transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Chang-Kui; Gong, Yungui; Dong, Hui-Ning; Reid, Michael F

    2004-09-15

    Effective interaction operators usually act on a restricted model space and give the same energies (for Hamiltonian) and matrix elements (for transition operators, etc.) as those of the original operators between the corresponding true eigenstates. Various types of effective operators are possible. Those well defined effective operators have been shown to be related to each other by similarity transformation. Some of the effective operators have been shown to have connected-diagram expansions. It is shown in this paper that under a class of very general similarity transformations, the connectivity is conserved. The similarity transformation between Hermitian and non-Hermitian Rayleigh-Schrodinger perturbative effective operators is one of such transformations and hence the connectivity can be deducted from each other.

  13. Protective effects of atorvastatin and quercetin on isoprenaline-induced myocardial infarction in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai A. Zaafan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial infarction (MI continues to be a major public health problem in the world. Statins exhibit cardio-protective effects by several mechanisms beyond their lipid lowering activity. Quercetin is a natural flavonoid that possesses significant anti-oxidant and antiinflammatory activities. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of pretreatment with atorvastatin (10 mg/kg and quercetin (50 mg/kg, as well as their combination on isoprenaline-induced MI in rats. Markers chosen to assess cardiac damage included serum activity of creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB and serum level of cardiac troponin-I (cTn-I, as well as oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers including serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, and interleukin-10 (IL-10 as well as cardiac contents of lipid peroxides, reduced glutathione (GSH, and nitrite. Furthermore, ECG monitoring and histological examinations of cardiac tissues were done. Isoprenaline increased serum CK-MB activity and cTn-I level as well as inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers. In addition, it produced ST-segment elevation and degenerative changes in heart tissues. Pretreatment with atorvastatin suppressed significantly the elevated levels of cTn-I, CRP, TNF-α, and IL-10 in serum coupled with reduction in cardiac lipid peroxides; however, it increased cardiac nitrite content. Quercetin decreased isoprenaline-induced changes in oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers with marked improvement in ECG and histopathologic alterations. Combination of quercetin with atorvastatin resulted in similar protective effects. In conclusion, quercetin can be regarded as a promising cardio-protective natural agent in MI alone or combined with atorvastatin.

  14. Sun protection counseling by pediatricians has little effect on parent and child sun protection behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Liza; Brown, Judith; Haukness, Heather; Walsh, Lori; Robinson, June K

    2013-02-01

    To compare counseling concerning sun protection and outdoor exercise with the parent's report of the behavior of a child aged 9-16 years old. Structured interviews of medical personnel in 3 Chicago area practices elicited information about counseling methods and recommendations. In each practice, a convenience sample of parents completed a self-reported survey of their and their child's behavior. Sun protection counseling occurred more frequently than exercise counseling in all practices (P = .014). Sun protection counseling was associated with parental prompting (P = .004), performing a summer camp physical (P = .002), and the child having a sunburn (P = .003). After controlling for the child's age, sex, and skin tone, sun protection counseling was not associated with the child's use of sun protection. In multivariate analysis of the child's sun protection behavior, parental sunburns, indoor tanning in the last 12 months, perception of skin cancer risk, and sun protection self-efficacy were significant (P = .02). Children who pursued outdoor sports were twice as likely to use inadequate sun protection and sustain sunburns (CI 1.3-1.7). The child's sun protection behavior was influenced by parental sun protection, parental perception of skin cancer risk, and parental sun protection self-efficacy; therefore, sun protection for children needs to be aimed at parents as well as children. Communication with parents in a way that incorporates the principles of motivational interviewing may be more effective in promoting behavioral change than admonitions to use sunscreen. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Relative Bioavailability of Niacin Supplements for Dairy Cows: Effects of Rumen Protection and of Feed Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reka Tienken

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to examine the effective systemic bioavailability of niacin— with particular focus on its galenic form—and feed processing. Experiment 1 was conducted with 35 dairy cows to investigate the effects of various doses of oral supplemented nicotinic acid (NA either in differing galenic forms (non-rumen protected (nRP vs. rumen protected form (RP on serum niacin concentrations. Experiment 2 was designed as a pharmacokinetic study examining the serum niacin kinetics over 24 h after giving a single oral bolus of 24 g nRP or RP NA admixed in either pelleted or ground concentrate. In both experiments, only the niacin vitamer nicotinamide (NAM was detected. Results of experiment 1 showed that both galenic forms at a dose of 24 g/cow daily elevated NAM concentrations at the beginning of the experiment. Despite a daily supplementation, NAM concentrations decreased continuously towards the end of the experiment which was more steeply in nRP NA (p = 0.03. On experimental day 21, NAM concentrations were higher when feeding RP NA (p = 0.03 and the highest dose (24 g/day and cow (p < 0.01. Results of experiment 2 indicated that nRP and RP were characterized by similar pharmacokinetic profiles resulting in similar areas under the curves as a net result of the kinetic counterbalancing alterations. Pelleting seemed not to influence the relative bioavailability.

  16. Protective Effect of Unacylated Ghrelin on Compression-Induced Skeletal Muscle Injury Mediated by SIRT1-Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix N. Ugwu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Unacylated ghrelin, the predominant form of circulating ghrelin, protects myotubes from cell death, which is a known attribute of pressure ulcers. In this study, we investigated whether unacylated ghrelin protects skeletal muscle from pressure-induced deep tissue injury by abolishing necroptosis and apoptosis signaling and whether these effects were mediated by SIRT1 pathway. Fifteen adult Sprague Dawley rats were assigned to receive saline or unacylated ghrelin with or without EX527 (a SIRT1 inhibitor. Animals underwent two 6-h compression cycles with 100 mmHg static pressure applied over the mid-tibialis region of the right limb whereas the left uncompressed limb served as the intra-animal control. Muscle tissues underneath the compression region, and at the similar region of the opposite uncompressed limb, were collected for analysis. Unacylated ghrelin attenuated the compression-induced muscle pathohistological alterations including rounding contour of myofibers, extensive nucleus accumulation in the interstitial space, and increased interstitial space. Unacylated ghrelin abolished the increase in necroptosis proteins including RIP1 and RIP3 and attenuated the elevation of apoptotic proteins including p53, Bax, and AIF in the compressed muscle. Furthermore, unacylated ghrelin opposed the compression-induced phosphorylation and acetylation of p65 subunit of NF-kB. The anti-apoptotic effect of unacylated ghrelin was shown by a decrease in apoptotic DNA fragmentation and terminal dUTP nick-end labeling index in the compressed muscle. The protective effects of unacylated ghrelin vanished when co-treated with EX527. Our findings demonstrated that unacylated ghrelin protected skeletal muscle from compression-induced injury. The myoprotective effects of unacylated ghrelin on pressure-induced tissue injury were associated with SIRT1 signaling.

  17. Age/Radiation Parallels in the Effects of 56Fe Particle Irradiation and Protection by Berry Diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, James; Bielinski, Donna; Carrihill-Knoll, Kirsty; Rabin, Bernard; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    Exposing young rats to particles of high-energy and charge (HZE particles) enhances indices of oxidative stress and inflammation and disrupts the functioning of the dopaminergic system and behaviors mediated by this system in a manner similar to that seen in aged animals Previous research has shown that diets supplemented with 2% blueberry or strawberry extracts have the ability to retard and even reverse age-related deficits in behavior and signal transduction in rats, perhaps due to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. A subsequent study has shown that whole-body irradiation with 1.5 Gy of 1 GeV/n high-energy 56 Fe particles impaired performance in the Morris water maze and measures of dopamine release one month following radiation; these deficits were protected by the antioxidant diets. The strawberry diet offered better protection against spatial deficits in the maze because strawberry-fed animals were better able to retain place information, while the blueberry-supplemented animals showed enhanced learning that was dependent on striatal functioning. Additional experiments in cell models to examine possible mechanisms involved in these beneficial effects have shown that, in addition to the well known free radical scavenging effects of berries, it appears that berry fruit can directly reduce stress signaling and enhance protective signals, suggesting the involvement of multiple mechanisms in the beneficial effects observed. Enhancements of "protective" signals (e.g., extracellular signal regulated kinase, ERK) include those that are involved in neuronal communication, neurogenesis, and learning and memory. Reductions in stress signaling include inhibiting nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and cytokines, among others, induced by oxidative and inflammatory stressors. We have found these changes in both BV2 mouse microglial and hippocampal cells. We believe that the possible addition of colorful fruits such as berry fruits to the diet can possibly

  18. Population connectivity and the effectiveness of marine protected areas to protect vulnerable, exploited and endemic coral reef fishes at an endemic hotspot

    KAUST Repository

    Van Der Meer, Martin H.

    2014-12-23

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) aim to mitigate anthropogenic impacts by conserving biodiversity and preventing overfishing. The effectiveness of MPAs depends on population connectivity patterns between protected and non-protected areas. Remote islands are endemism hotspots for coral reef fishes and provide rare examples of coral reefs with limited fishing pressure. This study explored population genetic connectivity across a network of protected and non-protected areas for the endemic wrasse, Coris bulbifrons, which is listed as “vulnerable” by the IUCN due to its small, decreasing geographic range and declining abundance. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and microsatellite DNA (msatDNA) markers were used to estimate historic and contemporary gene flow to determine the level of population self-replenishment and to measure genetic and genotypic diversity among all four locations in the species range (south-west Pacific Ocean)—Middleton Reef (MR), Elizabeth Reef (ER), Lord Howe Island (LHI) and Norfolk Island (NI). MPAs exist at MR and LHI and are limited or non-existent at ER and NI, respectively. There was no obvious differentiation in mtDNA among locations, however, msatDNA revealed differentiation between the most peripheral (NI) and all remaining locations (MR, ER and LHI). Despite high mtDNA connectivity (M = 259–1,144), msatDNA connectivity was limited (M = 3–9) with high self-replenishment (68–93 %) at all locations. NI is the least connected and heavily reliant on self-replenishment, and the absence of MPAs at NI needs to be rectified to ensure the persistence of endemic species at this location. Other endemic fishes exhibit similar patterns of high self-replenishment across the four locations, indicating that a single spatial management approach consisting of a MPA network protecting part of each location could provide reasonable protection for these species. Thus, the existing network of MPAs at this endemic hotspot appears adequate at some locations

  19. Ethnic differences in the effects of media on body image: the effects of priming with ethnically different or similar models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Gina L; Carter, Michele M

    2015-04-01

    Media exposure has been positively correlated with body dissatisfaction. While body image concerns are common, being African American has been found to be a protective factor in the development of body dissatisfaction. Participants either viewed ten advertisements showing 1) ethnically-similar thin models; 2) ethnically-different thin models; 3) ethnically-similar plus-sized models; and 4) ethnically-diverse plus-sized models. Following exposure, body image was measured. African American women had less body dissatisfaction than Caucasian women. Ethnically-similar thin-model conditions did not elicit greater body dissatisfaction scores than ethnically-different thin or plus-sized models nor did the ethnicity of the model impact ratings of body dissatisfaction for women of either race. There were no differences among the African American women exposed to plus-sized versus thin models. Among Caucasian women exposure to plus-sized models resulted in greater body dissatisfaction than exposure to thin models. Results support existing literature that African American women experience less body dissatisfaction than Caucasian women even following exposure to an ethnically-similar thin model. Additionally, women exposed to plus-sized model conditions experienced greater body dissatisfaction than those shown thin models. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Conceptual similarity effects on working memory in sentence contexts: testing a theory of anaphora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowles, H Wind; Garnham, Alan; Simner, Julia

    2010-06-01

    The degree of semantic similarity between an anaphoric noun phrase (e.g., the bird) and its antecedent (e.g., a robin) is known to affect the anaphor resolution process, but the mechanisms that underlie this effect are not known. One proposal (Almor, 1999) is that semantic similarity triggers interference effects in working memory and makes two crucial assumptions: First, semantic similarity impairs working memory just as phonological similarity does (e.g., Baddeley, 1992), and, second, this impairment interferes with processes of sentence comprehension. We tested these assumptions in two experiments that compared recall accuracy between phonologically similar, semantically similar, and control words in sentence contexts. Our results do not provide support for Almor's claims: Phonological overlap decreased recall accuracy in sentence contexts, but semantic similarity did not. These results shed doubt on the idea that semantic interference in working memory is an underlying mechanism in anaphor resolution.

  1. Protective effect of lead aprons in medical radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyskens, C.J.

    1995-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of an ongoing study regarding the protective effect that lead aprons, as used in medical radiology, have on the resulting effective dose for medical personnel. By means of model calculations we have analyzed the protection efficacy of lead aprons for various lead thicknesses, in function of tube potential and of variations in exposure geometry as they occur in practice. The degree of efficacy appears to be highly dependent on the fit of aprons because of the dominating influence of the equivalent dose of partially unshielded organs on the resulting effective dose. Also by model calculations we investigated the ratio between the effective dose and the operational quantify for personal dose monitoring. Our study enables the choice of appropriate correction factors for convering personal dosimetry measurements into effective dose, for typical exposure situations in medical radiology. (orig.) [de

  2. Melanins Protect Sporothrix brasiliensis and Sporothrix schenckii from the Antifungal Effects of Terbinafine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Figueiredo-Carvalho, Maria Helena Galdino; Brito-Santos, Fábio; Almeida-Silva, Fernando; Oliveira, Manoel Marques Evangelista; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2016-01-01

    Terbinafine is a recommended therapeutic alternative for patients with sporotrichosis who cannot use itraconazole due to drug interactions or side effects. Melanins are involved in resistance to antifungal drugs and Sporothrix species produce three different types of melanin. Therefore, in this study we evaluated whether Sporothrix melanins impact the efficacy of antifungal drugs. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFC) of two Sporothrix brasiliensis and four Sporothrix schenckii strains grown in the presence of the melanin precursors L-DOPA and L-tyrosine were similar to the MIC determined by the CLSI standard protocol for S. schenckii susceptibility to amphotericin B, ketoconazole, itraconazole or terbinafine. When MICs were determined in the presence of inhibitors to three pathways of melanin synthesis, we observed, in four strains, an increase in terbinafine susceptibility in the presence of tricyclazole, a DHN-melanin inhibitor. In addition, one S. schenckii strain grown in the presence of L-DOPA had a higher MFC value when compared to the control. Growth curves in presence of 2×MIC concentrations of terbinafine showed that pyomelanin and, to a lesser extent, eumelanin were able to protect the fungi against the fungicidal effect of this antifungal drug. Our results suggest that melanin protects the major pathogenic species of the Sporothrix complex from the effects of terbinafine and that the development of new antifungal drugs targeting melanin synthesis may improve sporotrichosis therapies.

  3. Some effects of cognitive similarity on proactive and retriactive interference in short-term memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunt, A.A.; Sanders, A.F.

    1972-01-01

    An experiment is reported on the effects of cognitive similarity on proactive and retroactive interference (PI, RI) in short term memory. To avoid confounding between cognitive and acoustic similarity, the materials - i.e. words and digits - were matched with respect to vowel pattern. Effects of

  4. Protective effect of Adeturone on E.coli survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldzhijska, M.; Minkova, M.; Pantev, T.

    1980-01-01

    Antiradiation potencies of AET, ATP, and the preparation Adeturone (AET salt of ATP) were studied in terms of E.coli survival following exposure to gamma-ray doses ranging from 1.29 K/kg to 20.64 K/kg AET was found to provide protection only in the case of the highest of three concentrations used, 625 micrograms per milliliter. ATP concentrations of 587 mcg/ml proved ineffective whether used solely or in a mixture with 262.5 mcg/ml of AET. These ineffective AET and ATP concentrations are equimolar with the amounts of AET and ATP contained in Adeturone. The latter showed a protective effect when applied at 625 mcg/ml, but failed to protect at a lower (312 mcg/ml) or at higher (1250 mcg/ml and 1500 mcg/ml) concentrations. Confirmative evidence was thus obtained that chemical binding of the two protectors raises the effectiveness of the combination

  5. Protective effect of Adeturone on E. coli survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldzhijska, M; Minkova, M; Pantev, T [Meditsinska Akademiya, Sofia (Bulgaria). Nauchen Inst. po Rentgenologiya i Radiobiologiya

    1980-01-01

    Antiradiation potencies of AET, ATP, and the preparation Adeturone (AET salt of ATP) were studied in terms of E.coli survival following exposure to gamma-ray doses ranging from 1.29 K/kg to 20.64 K/kg AET was found to provide protection only in the case of the highest of three concentrations used, 625 micrograms per milliliter. ATP concentrations of 587 mcg/ml proved ineffective whether used solely or in a mixture with 262.5 mcg/ml of AET. These ineffective AET and ATP concentrations are equimolar with the amounts of AET and ATP contained in Adeturone. The latter showed a protective effect when applied at 625 mcg/ml, but failed to protect at a lower (312 mcg/ml) or at higher (1250 mcg/ml and 1500 mcg/ml) concentrations. Confirmative evidence was thus obtained that chemical binding of the two protectors raises the effectiveness of the combination.

  6. Effective Summation and Interpolation of Series by Self-Similar Root Approximants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Gluzman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe a simple analytical method for effective summation of series, including divergent series. The method is based on self-similar approximation theory resulting in self-similar root approximants. The method is shown to be general and applicable to different problems, as is illustrated by a number of examples. The accuracy of the method is not worse, and in many cases better, than that of Padé approximants, when the latter can be defined.

  7. The Moderating Role of Cultural Similarity in Leadership Training Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiumei Jane; Jiang, Jianfeng

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the moderating role of cultural similarity between leaders and followers on leadership training effectiveness in terms of followers' fairness perception and organizational citizenship behavior. Design/methodology/approach: A quasi-experiment was conducted with 40 managers from international corporations as the…

  8. Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction from Rice Bran Demonstrates Potent Radiation Protection Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly J. Krager

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The vitamin E analogs δ-tocotrienol (DT3 and γ-tocotrienol (GT3 have significant protective and mitigative capacity against the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation (IR. However, the expense of purification limits their potential use. This study examined the tocotrienol-rich fraction of rice bran (TRFRB isolated from rice bran deodorizer distillate, a rice oil refinement waste product, to determine its protective effects against IR induced oxidative damage and H2O2. Several cell lines were treated with tocotrienols or TRFRB prior to or following exposure to H2O2 or IR. To determine the radioprotective capacity cells were analyzed for morphology, mitochondrial bioenergetics, clonogenic survival, glutathione oxidation, cell cycle, and migration rate. TRFRB displayed similar antioxidant activity compared to pure tocotrienols. Cells pretreated with TRFRB or DT3 exhibited preserved cell morphology and mitochondrial respiration when exposed to H2O2. Oxidized glutathione was decreased in TRFRB treated cells exposed to IR. TRFRB reversed mitochondrial uncoupling and protected cells migration rates following IR exposure. The protective antioxidant capacity of TRFRB treated cells against oxidative injury was similar to that of purified DT3. TRFRB effectively protects normal cells against IR induced injury suggesting that rice bran distillate may be an inexpensive and abundant alternate source.

  9. Review of the effects of protection in marine protected areas: current knowledge and gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ojeda–Martínez, C.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of marine protected areas (MPAs and the conservation of marine environments must be based on reliable information on the quality of the marine environment that can be obtained in a reasonable timeframe. We reviewed studies that evaluated all aspects related to the effectiveness of MPAs in order to describe how the studies were conducted and to detect fields in which research is lacking. Existing parameters used to evaluate the effectiveness of MPAs are summarised. Two-hundred and twenty-two publications were reviewed. We identified the most commonly used study subjects and methodological approaches. Most of the studies concentrated on biological parameters. Peer reviewed studies were based on control vs. impact design. BACI and mBACI designs were used in very few studies. Through this review, we have identified gaps in the objectives assigned to MPAs and the way in which they have been evaluated. We suggest some guidelines aimedat improving the assessment of the effects of protection in MPAs.

  10. Effects of eprosartan on target organ protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro de la Sierra

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Alejandro de la SierraHypertension Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Clínic, IDIBAPS, University of Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Hypertension is the most important cardiovascular risk factor for stroke. Blood pressure reduction by antihypertensive treatment is clearly efficacious in the prevention of stroke (both primary and secondary, although no clear differences have yet been observed between antihypertensive drug classes. However, a recent study reported the clear superiority of the angiotensin-receptor blocker eprosartan over the calcium channel blocker nitrendipine in cardiovascular protection of hypertensive patients with a previous stroke. Comparative studies using angiotensin-receptor blockers have also suggested the superiority of this class of drugs on primary stroke prevention. This effect may be linked to their beneficial actions on left ventricular hypertrophy, atrial enlargement, and supraventricular arrhythmias, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and remodelling, as well as a direct neuroprotective effect mediated through the stimulation of the angiotensin II type-2 receptor. In addition, a sympathoinhibition observed with the renin–angiotensin system blockers and particularly demonstrated with eprosartan, may help to explain the better cardiovascular and cerebrovascular protection in comparison with the calcium antagonist nitrendipine.Keywords: eprosartan, angiotensin-receptor blockers, hypertension, stroke, organ protection

  11. A Novel Drug-Mouse Phenotypic Similarity Method Detects Molecular Determinants of Drug Effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette Prinz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms that translate drug treatment into beneficial and unwanted effects are largely unknown. We present here a novel approach to detect gene-drug and gene-side effect associations based on the phenotypic similarity of drugs and single gene perturbations in mice that account for the polypharmacological property of drugs. We scored the phenotypic similarity of human side effect profiles of 1,667 small molecules and biologicals to profiles of phenotypic traits of 5,384 mouse genes. The benchmarking with known relationships revealed a strong enrichment of physical and indirect drug-target connections, causative drug target-side effect links as well as gene-drug links involved in pharmacogenetic associations among phenotypically similar gene-drug pairs. The validation by in vitro assays and the experimental verification of an unknown connection between oxandrolone and prokineticin receptor 2 reinforces the ability of this method to provide new molecular insights underlying drug treatment. Thus, this approach may aid in the proposal of novel and personalized treatments.

  12. Protecting power equipment against magnetohydrodynamic effects (MHD of electromagnetic pulses (EMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurevich Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the effects of geomagnetic-induced currents (GIC on electrical equipment of power systems and analyzes technical measures for protection against such effects. It is noted that the difference between highaltitude nuclear detonation and solar storm GICs forces applying different methods of electrical equipment protection. It also illustrates that enhancement of transformer immunity to GICs without saturation prevention is not an effective measure to protect the power system. The article offers a special relay designed for fast disconnection of the transformer under GICs.

  13. The neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine on 5-hydroxytryptamine and dopamine in brain: evidence for the protective effect of chlormethiazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, A R; De Souza, R J; Williams, J L; Murray, T K; Cross, A J

    1992-04-01

    Studies were undertaken in mice and rats on the neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine on dopaminergic and 5-hydroxytryptaminergic neurones in the brain and the neuroprotective action of chlormethiazole. In initial studies, mice were injected with methamphetamine (5 mg/kg, i.p.) at 2 hr intervals, to a total of 4 times. This procedure produced a 66% loss of striatal dopamine and a 50% loss of tyrosine hydroxylase activity 3 days later. Chlormethiazole (50 mg/kg, i.p.), given 15 min before each dose of methamphetamine, totally prevented the methamphetamine-induced loss of tyrosine hydroxylase activity and partly prevented the loss of dopamine. Phencyclidine (20 mg/kg, i.p.), given in place of chlormethiazole, also prevented the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase. Administration to rats of 4 doses of methamphetamine (15 mg/kg, i.p.) at 3 hr intervals resulted in a 75% loss of striatal dopamine 3 days later and a similar loss of 5-HT and 5-HIAA in cortex and hippocampus. Chlormethiazole (50 mg/kg, i.p.), given 15 min before each injection of methamphetamine, protected against the loss of dopamine and indoleamine content, in the respective regions. Pentobarbital (25 mg/kg, i.p.) also provided substantial protection but diazepam (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) was without effect. Confirming earlier studies, dizocilpine (1 mg/kg) also provided substantial protection against the methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity. Preliminary data indicated that chlormethiazole was not neuroprotective because of a hypothermic action. These data therefore demonstrate that chlormethiazole is an effective neuroprotective agent against methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity and extend the evidence for the possible value of this drug in preventing neurodegeneration.

  14. Radio protective effects of some medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barupal, G.K.

    2012-01-01

    Many plants are known to have beneficial therapeutic effects as noted in the traditional Indian system of medicine, Ayurveda and used since time immemorial for curing diseases. Even today, nearly 70% of the world's population is dependent on plants for handling their health related problems and plants have been utilized successfully for the treatment of free radical-mediated diseases in human such as Rheumatoid arthritis, Atherosclerosis, Cancer, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, aging and several other conditions including inflammatory diseases. Plant extracts eliciting radio protective efficacy contain a plethora of compounds including antioxidants, immunostimulants, cell proliferation stimulators, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial agent, some of which may act in isolation as well as in combination with other constituents from the same plants. Glycyrrhiza glabra, Allium sepa, Allium sativum, Aloe arborescens, Amaranthus paniculatus, Curcuma longa, Moringa olefera and Syzygium cumini are some important radio protective plants. Alium sativum has been reported to possess antioxidant antimicrobial, antitumor, antimutagenic and anti-inflammatory properties. Aloe arborescens acts as a cell proliferate, healer and allergy reducer. Amaranthus paniculatus is used for purifying blood and treating scrofulous sores. Curcuma longa is widely used in antitumor and antibacterial activities. Leaf extract of Moringa oleifera is significantly used in nervous debility and healing of wound. Chlorella is well known nutrient dense superfood that contains 60% protein, 18 amino acids (including all the essential amino acids), more than 20 vitamins and minerals. Chlorell has been used to treat cancer and also protect the body from the effects of cancer radiation treatment due to its chlorophyll in abundance level. However they have little attention for their radio protective as well as antioxidant. There is an urgent need to develop newer, more efficient and reliable bioassays

  15. The Relationship of Cultural Similarity, Communication Effectiveness and Uncertainty Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, Jolene; Olebe, Margaret

    To investigate the relationship of cultural similarity/dissimilarity, communication effectiveness, and communication variables associated with uncertainty reduction theory, a study examined two groups of students--a multinational group living on an "international floor" in a dormitory at a state university and an unrelated group of U.S.…

  16. Research on radiation effect and radiation protection at JAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kimiaki

    2007-01-01

    Researches on radiation effect and radiation protection at JAEA have been carried out in different sections. In recent years, the organizations were rearranged to attain better research circumstances, and new research programs started. At present, radiation effect studies focus on radiation effect mechanisms at atomic, molecular and cellular levels including simulation studies, and protection studies focus on dosimetry for conditions difficult to cover with currently used methods and data as well as the related basic studies. The outlines of the whole studies and also some descriptions on selected subjects will be given in this paper. (author)

  17. Protective and Catching Safety Systems In Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzhin Marat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article is described application of protective and catching systems in construction. Classification of similar systems, their types and purpose are listed. Dangerous zones on construction site and events to for limiting their influence or protection from the factors. Protective and catching systems is one of the most effective technical equipment, applied in recent time. Protective fences and catching systems are important part in the problem solution. Protective fences protect workers from falling from height. Protective and catching systems allows avoid injuries by workers, also catch debris, fallen from constructing buildings. In regard with continuing development in technical and technological solutions, protective and catching systems require adaptation to a new requirements of construction industry and requirements of normative documents. Technical regulations in the appliance sphere of protective and catching systems requires actualization and aligning with modern normatives. Important role should be given to developing organizational and technological documentation for application of the systems. Scientific studying of technical parameters of fences and protective catching nets also has great interest.

  18. TOXIC EFFECTS OF CHLOROPICRIN AND IMPACT OF SORBED WATER STEAM ON PROTECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Nikolić

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chloropicrin is a chemical substance that has a very toxic effect. Exerts its effect on the respiratory system. Causes pulmonary edema and difficult breathing and suffocating effect. Respiratory protection may be carried into execution respiratory filters. On the protective power filter based on active coal affects adsorbed water vapor. This paper presents the results of the adsorption of water vapor on activated carbon from 5% to 25%. Was used for the experiment apparatus for dynamic adsorption, the results showed that the humidity of 5% coal provides most power protection, while humidity of 25% minimum protective power.

  19. Patterns of development of unspecific reaction of cells and modification of chemical protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veksler, A.M.; Korystov, Yu.N.; Kublik, L.N.; Ehjdus, L.Kh.

    1980-01-01

    A study was made of a correlation between radioprotective efficiency of different chemical agents (weak electrolytes) and conditions of treatment. It was demonstrated that the pattern of changes in the protection efficiency, with modification thereof, is similar to that of the development of unspecific reaction and determined by the intracellular concentration of the chemical agents, which, in turn, is function of physicochemical parameters of the substance and pH gradient between cell and medium. With similar intracellular concentration, caffeine-benzoate, thioglicolic acid and caffeine proved to be equally effective, while the protective effect of cysteamine was appreciably higher

  20. Application of radiological protection measures to meet different environmental protection criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copplestone, D.

    2012-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recognises that there is no simple or single universal definition of ‘environmental protection’, and that the concept differs from country to country and from one circumstance to another. However, there is an increasing need to be able to demonstrate that the environment is protected from radioactive substances released under authorisation for various reasons, such as for wildlife conservation requirements, or wildlife management for commercial reasons, or simply as part of pollution control. The Commission is developing the concept of Representative Organisms, which may be identified from any specific legal requirements or from more general requirements to protect local habitats or ecosystems. Such organisms may be the actual objects of protection or they may be hypothetical, depending on the objectives of the assessment. They may be similar to, or even congruent with, one or more of the Reference Animals and Plants (RAPs). Where this is not the case, attempts can be made to consider the extent to which the Representative Organisms differ from the nearest RAP in terms of known radiation effects upon it, basic biology, radiation dosimetry, and pathways of exposure. This paper discusses the practical implications of such an approach.

  1. Method of forming latent image to protect documents based on the effect moire

    OpenAIRE

    Troyan, О.

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of modern methods of information protection based on printed documents. It is shown that methods of protection from moiré effect provide reliable and effective protection by gaining new protection technology that is displayed in the optical acceleration motion layers and causes moire in fraud. Latent images can securely protect paper documents. Introduce a system of equations to calculate curvilinear patterns, where the optical formula of acceleration and periods moire stored in i...

  2. Quantitative evaluation of the protective effect of respirators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Mikio

    1983-01-01

    The present status and related problems of the quantitative evaluation method for respirator efficiency are generally reviewed. As the introduction, the special features of various types of respirators are summarized, and the basic concept of leakage and the protection factor are explained. As for the quantitative measurement of the protective efficiency, the features of various existing man-test methods such as NaCl aerosol man-test, DOP (dioctyl phthalate) man-test, and SF 6 gas man-test are reviewed and discussed. As the important problems associated with those man-tests, the following aspects are discussed. The measurement of the aerosol concentration within masks; the calculation method for the protection factor; the effect of beards. The examples of measuring the protection factor are also explained for the following respirator systems: half mask respirator with a high efficiency filter; full face mask respirator with a high efficiency filter; demand mode and pressure-demand mode respirators; and mound suit with suspenders. Finally, the outline of the manual of respiratory protection published by NRC in 1976 is briefly reviewed. (Aoki, K.)

  3. Human Primary Trophoblast Cell Culture Model to Study the Protective Effects of Melatonin Against Hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagrillo-Fagundes, Lucas; Clabault, Hélène; Laurent, Laetitia; Hudon-Thibeault, Andrée-Anne; Salustiano, Eugênia Maria Assunção; Fortier, Marlène; Bienvenue-Pariseault, Josianne; Wong Yen, Philippe; Sanderson, J Thomas; Vaillancourt, Cathy

    2016-07-30

    This protocol describes how villous cytotrophoblast cells are isolated from placentas at term by successive enzymatic digestions, followed by density centrifugation, media gradient isolation and immunomagnetic purification. As observed in vivo, mononucleated villous cytotrophoblast cells in primary culture differentiate into multinucleated syncytiotrophoblast cells after 72 hr. Compared to normoxia (8% O2), villous cytotrophoblast cells that undergo hypoxia/reoxygenation (0.5% / 8% O2) undergo increased oxidative stress and intrinsic apoptosis, similar to that observed in vivo in pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia, preterm birth, and intrauterine growth restriction. In this context, primary villous trophoblasts cultured under hypoxia/reoxygenation conditions represent a unique experimental system to better understand the mechanisms and signalling pathways that are altered in human placenta and facilitate the search for effective drugs that protect against certain pregnancy disorders. Human villous trophoblasts produce melatonin and express its synthesizing enzymes and receptors. Melatonin has been suggested as a treatment for preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction because of its protective antioxidant effects. In the primary villous cytotrophoblast cell model described in this paper, melatonin has no effect on trophoblast cells in normoxic state but restores the redox balance of syncytiotrophoblast cells disrupted by hypoxia/reoxygenation. Thus, human villous trophoblast cells in primary culture are an excellent approach to study the mechanisms behind the protective effects of melatonin on placental function during hypoxia/reoxygenation.

  4. Photoprotection beyond ultraviolet radiation--effective sun protection has to include protection against infrared A radiation-induced skin damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, P; Calles, C; Benesova, T; Macaluso, F; Krutmann, J

    2010-01-01

    Solar radiation is well known to damage human skin, for example by causing premature skin ageing (i.e. photoageing). We have recently learned that this damage does not result from ultraviolet (UV) radiation alone, but also from longer wavelengths, in particular near-infrared radiation (IRA radiation, 760-1,440 nm). IRA radiation accounts for more than one third of the solar energy that reaches human skin. While infrared radiation of longer wavelengths (IRB and IRC) does not penetrate deeply into the skin, more than 65% of the shorter wavelength (IRA) reaches the dermis. IRA radiation has been demonstrated to alter the collagen equilibrium of the dermal extracellular matrix in at least two ways: (a) by leading to an increased expression of the collagen-degrading enzyme matrix metalloproteinase 1, and (b) by decreasing the de novo synthesis of the collagen itself. IRA radiation exposure therefore induces similar biological effects to UV radiation, but the underlying mechanisms are substantially different, specifically, the cellular response to IRA irradiation involves the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Effective sun protection requires specific strategies to prevent IRA radiation-induced skin damage. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Waveguiding and mirroring effects in stochastic self-similar and Cantorian ε(∞) universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iovane, G.

    2005-01-01

    A waveguiding effect is considered with respect to the large scale structure of the Universe, where the structures formation appears as if it were a classically self-similar random process at all astrophysical scales. The result is that it seems we live in an El Naschie's ε (∞) Cantorian space-time, where gravitational lensing and waveguiding effects can explain the appearing Universe. In particular, we consider filamentary and planar large scale structures as possible refraction channels for electromagnetic radiation coming from cosmological structures. From this vision the Universe appears like a large self-similar adaptive mirrors set. Consequently, an infinite Universe is just an optical illusion that is produced by mirroring effects connected with the large scale structure of a finite and not so large Universe. Thanks to the presented analytical model supported by a numerical simulation, it is possible to explain the quasar luminosity distribution and the presence of 'twin' or 'brother' objects. More generally, the infinity and the abundance of astrophysical objects could be just a mirroring effect due to the peculiar self-similarity of the Universe

  6. Integrated protection of humans and the environment: a view from Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, K

    2018-01-01

    Six and a half years after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, an area of existing exposure situation remains. One of the main concerns of people is the higher level of ionising radiation than before the accident, although this is not expected to have any discernible health effect. Since the accident, several 'abnormalities' in environmental organisms have been reported. It is still not clear if these abnormalities were induced by radiation. It appears that the impact of the released radioactivity has not been sufficient to threaten the maintenance of biological diversity, the conservation of species, or the health and status of natural habitats, which are the focus in environmental protection. This highlights a difference between the protection of humans and protection of the environment (individuals for humans and populations/species for the environment). The system for protection of the environment has been developed with a similar approach as the system for protection of humans. Reference Animals and Plants (RAPs) were introduced to connect exposure and doses in a way similar to that for Reference Male and Reference Female. RAPs can also be used as a tool to associate the level of radiation (dose rate) with the biological effects on an organism. A difference between the protection of humans and that of the environment was identified: an effect on humans is measured in terms of dose, and an effect on the environment is measured in terms of dose rate. In other words, protection criteria for humans are expressed in term of dose (as dose limits, dose constraints, and reference levels), whereas those for the environment are expressed in terms of dose rate (as derived consideration reference levels).

  7. Coherence protection by random coding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brion, E; Akulin, V M; Dumer, I; Harel, G; Kurizki, G

    2005-01-01

    We show that the multidimensional Zeno effect combined with non-holonomic control allows one to efficiently protect quantum systems from decoherence by a method similar to classical random coding. The method is applicable to arbitrary error-inducing Hamiltonians and general quantum systems. The quantum encoding approaches the Hamming upper bound for large dimension increases. Applicability of the method is demonstrated with a seven-qubit toy computer

  8. Melanins Protect Sporothrix brasiliensis and Sporothrix schenckii from the Antifungal Effects of Terbinafine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Almeida-Paes

    Full Text Available Terbinafine is a recommended therapeutic alternative for patients with sporotrichosis who cannot use itraconazole due to drug interactions or side effects. Melanins are involved in resistance to antifungal drugs and Sporothrix species produce three different types of melanin. Therefore, in this study we evaluated whether Sporothrix melanins impact the efficacy of antifungal drugs. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC and minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFC of two Sporothrix brasiliensis and four Sporothrix schenckii strains grown in the presence of the melanin precursors L-DOPA and L-tyrosine were similar to the MIC determined by the CLSI standard protocol for S. schenckii susceptibility to amphotericin B, ketoconazole, itraconazole or terbinafine. When MICs were determined in the presence of inhibitors to three pathways of melanin synthesis, we observed, in four strains, an increase in terbinafine susceptibility in the presence of tricyclazole, a DHN-melanin inhibitor. In addition, one S. schenckii strain grown in the presence of L-DOPA had a higher MFC value when compared to the control. Growth curves in presence of 2×MIC concentrations of terbinafine showed that pyomelanin and, to a lesser extent, eumelanin were able to protect the fungi against the fungicidal effect of this antifungal drug. Our results suggest that melanin protects the major pathogenic species of the Sporothrix complex from the effects of terbinafine and that the development of new antifungal drugs targeting melanin synthesis may improve sporotrichosis therapies.

  9. Melanins Protect Sporothrix brasiliensis and Sporothrix schenckii from the Antifungal Effects of Terbinafine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Figueiredo-Carvalho, Maria Helena Galdino; Brito-Santos, Fábio; Almeida-Silva, Fernando; Oliveira, Manoel Marques Evangelista; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2016-01-01

    Terbinafine is a recommended therapeutic alternative for patients with sporotrichosis who cannot use itraconazole due to drug interactions or side effects. Melanins are involved in resistance to antifungal drugs and Sporothrix species produce three different types of melanin. Therefore, in this study we evaluated whether Sporothrix melanins impact the efficacy of antifungal drugs. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFC) of two Sporothrix brasiliensis and four Sporothrix schenckii strains grown in the presence of the melanin precursors L-DOPA and L-tyrosine were similar to the MIC determined by the CLSI standard protocol for S. schenckii susceptibility to amphotericin B, ketoconazole, itraconazole or terbinafine. When MICs were determined in the presence of inhibitors to three pathways of melanin synthesis, we observed, in four strains, an increase in terbinafine susceptibility in the presence of tricyclazole, a DHN-melanin inhibitor. In addition, one S. schenckii strain grown in the presence of L-DOPA had a higher MFC value when compared to the control. Growth curves in presence of 2×MIC concentrations of terbinafine showed that pyomelanin and, to a lesser extent, eumelanin were able to protect the fungi against the fungicidal effect of this antifungal drug. Our results suggest that melanin protects the major pathogenic species of the Sporothrix complex from the effects of terbinafine and that the development of new antifungal drugs targeting melanin synthesis may improve sporotrichosis therapies. PMID:27031728

  10. Lunar electrostatic effects and protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yongwei; Yuan, Qingyun; Xiong, Jiuliang

    2013-01-01

    The space environment and features on the moon surface are factors in strong electrostatic electrification. Static electricity will be produced in upon friction between lunar soil and detectors or astronauts on the lunar surface. Lunar electrostatic environment effects from lunar exploration equipment are very harmful. Lunar dust with electrostatic charge may enter the equipment or even cover the instruments. It can affect the normal performance of moon detectors. Owing to the huge environmental differences between the moon and the earth, the electrostatic protection technology on the earth can not be applied. In this paper, we review the electrostatic characteristics of lunar dust, its effects on aerospace equipment and moon static elimination technologies. It was concluded that the effect of charged lunar dust on detectors and astronauts should be completely researched as soon as possible.

  11. The hepato-protective effects of Portulaca oleracea L. extract: review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkhondeh, Tahereh; Samarghandian, Saeed; Azimi-Nezhad, Mohsen; Hozeifi, Soroush

    2018-03-30

    Portulaca oleracea L. (Purslane) has been used in traditional medicine against hepatic injury, alt-hough its actual efficacy has not been fully understood. In addition, few studies have indicated that Portulaca oleracea L. possess protective effects against hepatotoxic agents. However, due to lack of information in human, more studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of Portulaca oleracea L. as a hepato-protective agent. The present study aimed to critically review the recent literature data from 1990 to 2017 regarding the hepato-protective effects of Portulaca oleracea L. and its underlying mechanisms. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Lineup member similarity effects on children's eyewitness identification

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzgerald, Ryan J.; Whiting, Brittany F.; Therrien, Natalie M.; Price, Heather L.

    2014-01-01

    To date, research investigating the similarity among lineup members has focused on adult eyewitnesses. In the present research, children made identifications from lineups containing members of lower or higher similarity to a target person. In Experiment 1, following a live interaction, children's (6–14 years) correct identification rate was reduced in higher-similarity relative to lower-similarity lineups. In Experiment 2, children (6–12 years) and adults watched a video containing a target p...

  13. The proceduralisation of data protection remedies under EU data protection law : Towards a more effective and data subject-oriented remedial system?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galetta, Antonella; de Hert, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The proceduralisation of data protection remedies under EU data protection law: towards a more effective and data subject-oriented remedial system?
The right to remedy breaches of data protection is laid down in both Directive 95/46/EC (Art. 22) and the Council of Europe Data Protection Convention

  14. The protective effect of Mucuna pruriens seeds against snake venom poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Nget Hong; Fung, Shin Yee; Sim, Si Mui; Marinello, Enrico; Guerranti, Roberto; Aguiyi, John C

    2009-06-22

    The seed, leaf and root of Mucuna pruriens have been used in traditional medicine for treatments of various diseases. In Nigeria, the seed is used as oral prophylactics for snakebite. To study the protective effects of Mucuna pruriens seed extract against the lethalities of various snake venoms. Rats were pre-treated with Mucuna pruriens seed extract and challenged with various snake venoms. The effectiveness of anti-Mucuna pruriens (anti-MPE) antibody to neutralize the lethalities of snake venoms was investigated by in vitro neutralization. In rats, MPE pre-treatment conferred effective protection against lethality of Naja sputatrix venom and moderate protection against Calloselasma rhodostoma venom. Indirect ELISA and immunoblotting studies showed that there were extensive cross-reactions between anti-MPE IgG and venoms from many different genera of poisonous snakes, suggesting the involvement of immunological neutralization in the protective effect of MPE pre-treatment against snake venom poisoning. In vitro neutralization experiments showed that the anti-MPE antibodies effectively neutralized the lethalities of Asiatic cobra (Naja) venoms, but were not very effective against other venoms tested. The anti-MPE antibodies could be used in the antiserum therapy of Asiatic cobra (Naja) bites.

  15. Protective effects of pseudoginsenoside-F11 on methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun Fu; Liu, Yan Li; Song, Ming; Liu, Wen; Wang, Jin Hui; Li, Xian; Yang, Jing Yu

    2003-08-01

    In the present study, pseudoginsenoside-F(11) (PF(11)), a saponin that existed in American ginseng, was studied on its protective effect on methamphetamine (MA)-induced behavioral and neurochemical toxicities in mice. MA was intraperitoneally administered at the dose of 10 mg/kg four times at 2-h intervals, and PF(11) was orally administered at the doses of 4 and 8 mg/kg two times at 4-h intervals, 60 min prior to MA administration. The results showed that PF(11) did not significantly influence, but greatly ameliorated, the anxiety-like behavior induced by MA in the light-dark box task. In the forced swimming task, PF(11) significantly shortened the prolonged immobility time induced by MA. In the appetitively motivated T-maze task, PF(11) greatly shortened MA-induced prolonged latency and decreased the error counts. Similar results were also observed in the Morris water maze task. PF(11) significantly shortened the escape latency prolonged by MA. There were significant decreases in the contents of dopamine (DA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), and 5-hydroxyindoacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the brain of MA-treated mice. PF(11) could partially, but significantly, antagonize MA-induced decreases of DA. The above results demonstrate that PF(11) is effective in protection of MA-induced neurotoxicity and also suggest that natural products, such as ginseng, might be potential candidates for the prevention and treatment of the neurological disorders induced by MA abuse.

  16. Protective effects of ether, oxygen and their mixture for radiation in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megumi, Tsuneo; Tsujii, Yukio; Gamo, Sumiko

    1992-01-01

    Protective effects of ether mixed with air or oxygen against ionizing radiation damages were demonstrated in adult flies of Drosophila melanogaster. The protective effects against knock-down on the second day and lethality on the eighth day after irradiation were not affected by the radiation sensitivity and DNA repair capacity of the strains. Ether (4.2%) in oxygen was more effective than ether in air for both endpoints. The protective effects may be due to damages not involving cell division, since no mitotic cells are observed in adult flies except in gonadal glands. A change in the orderliness of the cell membrane by ether is suggested to be the cause of the protective effects. (author). 16 refs.; 3 tabs

  17. Protective effect of Moringa peregrina leaves extract on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Protective effect of Moringa peregrina leaves extract on acetaminophen - induced liver toxicity in albino rats. Samy Abdelfatah Abdel Azim, Mohamed Taha Abdelrahem, Mostafa Mohamed Said, Alshaimaa Khattab ...

  18. Effectiveness of eye drops protective against ultraviolet radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daxer, A; Blumthaler, M; Schreder, J; Ettl, A

    1998-01-01

    To test the effectiveness of commercially available ultraviolet (UV)-protective eye drops (8-hydroxy-1-methylchinolinium methylsulphate) which are recommended for protection against both solar and artificial UV radiation. The spectral transmission in the wavelength range from 250 to 500 nm was investigated in 1-nm steps using a high-resolution double monochromator with holographic gratings of 2,400 lines/mm and a 1,000-watt halogen lamp as light source. The transmission spectrum was measured for different values of the layer thickness. The transmission of a liquid layer of about 10 microns, which corresponds to the thickness of the human tear film, shows a cut-off at 290 nm with a transmission of about 25-50% at shorter wavelengths. For wavelengths longer than 290 nm the transmission is higher than 90%. The threshold time ratio for keratitis formation with and without eye drops is above 0.93 considering solar radiation on the earth's surface and above 0.65 considering radiation from arc-welding, respectively. The transmission spectrum of the eye drops under realistic conditions does not show a protective effect against solar UV radiation. However, there exists reduction of UVC radiation in the spectral range typical of artificial UV sources such as arc-welding. We cannot recommend the application of these eye drops as an UV-protective aid against eye damage by solar UV radiation.

  19. Prioritizing sites for conservation based on similarity to historical baselines and feasibility of protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popejoy, Traci; Randklev, Charles R; Neeson, Thomas M; Vaughn, Caryn C

    2018-05-08

    The shifting baseline syndrome concept advocates for the use of historical knowledge to inform conservation baselines, but does not address the feasibility of restoring sites to those baselines. In many regions, conservation feasibility varies among sites due to differences in resource availability, statutory power, and land-owner participation. We use zooarchaeological records to identify a historical baseline of the freshwater mussel community's composition before Euro-American influence at a river-reach scale. We evaluate how the community reference position and the feasibility of conservation might enable identification of sites where conservation actions would preserve historically representative communities and be likely to succeed. We first present a conceptual model that incorporates community information and landscape factors to link the best conservation areas to potential cost and conservation benefits. Using fuzzy ordination, we identify modern mussel beds that are most like the historical baseline. We then quantify the housing density and land use near each reach to estimate feasibility of habitat restoration. Using our conceptual framework, we identify reaches that have high conservation value (i.e., reaches that contain the best mussel beds) and where restoration actions would be most likely to succeed. Reaches above Lake Belton in central Texas, U.S.A. were most similar in species composition and relative abundance to zooarchaeological sites. A subset of these mussel beds occurred in locations where conservation actions appear to be most feasible. This study demonstrates how to use zooarchaeological data (biodiversity data often readily available) and estimates of conservation feasibility to inform conservation priorities at a local spatial scale. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. The Triterpenoid Betulin Protects against the Neuromuscular Effects of Bothrops jararacussu Snake Venom In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriéle Cristina Ferraz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We confirmed the ability of the triterpenoid betulin to protect against neurotoxicity caused by Bothrops jararacussu snake venom in vitro in mouse isolated phrenic nerve-diaphragm (PND preparations and examined its capability of in vivo protection using the rat external popliteal/sciatic nerve-tibialis anterior (EPSTA preparation. Venom caused complete, irreversible blockade in PND (40 μg/mL, but only partial blockade (~30% in EPSTA (3.6 mg/kg, i.m. after 120 min. In PND, preincubation of venom with commercial bothropic antivenom (CBA attenuated the venom-induced blockade, and, in EPSTA, CBA given i.v. 15 min after venom also attenuated the blockade (by ~70% in both preparations. Preincubation of venom with betulin (200 μg/mL markedly attenuated the venom-induced blockade in PND; similarly, a single dose of betulin (20 mg, i.p., 15 min after venom virtually abolished the venom-induced decrease in contractility. Plasma creatine kinase activity was significantly elevated 120 min after venom injection in the EPSTA but was attenuated by CBA and betulin. These results indicate that betulin given i.p. has a similar efficacy as CBA given i.v. in attenuating the neuromuscular effects of B. jararacussu venom in vivo and could be a useful complementary measure to antivenom therapy for treating snakebite.

  1. The Triterpenoid Betulin Protects against the Neuromuscular Effects of Bothrops jararacussu Snake Venom In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Miriéle Cristina; de Oliveira, Jhones Luiz; de Oliveira Junior, Joel Reis; Cogo, José Carlos; dos Santos, Márcio Galdino; Franco, Luiz Madaleno; Puebla, Pilar; Ferraz, Helena Onishi; Ferraz, Humberto Gomes; da Rocha, Marisa Maria Teixeira; Hyslop, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    We confirmed the ability of the triterpenoid betulin to protect against neurotoxicity caused by Bothrops jararacussu snake venom in vitro in mouse isolated phrenic nerve-diaphragm (PND) preparations and examined its capability of in vivo protection using the rat external popliteal/sciatic nerve-tibialis anterior (EPSTA) preparation. Venom caused complete, irreversible blockade in PND (40 μg/mL), but only partial blockade (~30%) in EPSTA (3.6 mg/kg, i.m.) after 120 min. In PND, preincubation of venom with commercial bothropic antivenom (CBA) attenuated the venom-induced blockade, and, in EPSTA, CBA given i.v. 15 min after venom also attenuated the blockade (by ~70% in both preparations). Preincubation of venom with betulin (200 μg/mL) markedly attenuated the venom-induced blockade in PND; similarly, a single dose of betulin (20 mg, i.p., 15 min after venom) virtually abolished the venom-induced decrease in contractility. Plasma creatine kinase activity was significantly elevated 120 min after venom injection in the EPSTA but was attenuated by CBA and betulin. These results indicate that betulin given i.p. has a similar efficacy as CBA given i.v. in attenuating the neuromuscular effects of B. jararacussu venom in vivo and could be a useful complementary measure to antivenom therapy for treating snakebite. PMID:26633987

  2. Investigation on the effect of nonlinear processes on similarity law in high-pressure argon discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yangyang; Parsey, Guy M.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Christlieb, Andrew J.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, the effect of nonlinear processes (such as three-body collisions and stepwise ionizations) on the similarity law in high-pressure argon discharges has been studied by the use of the Kinetic Global Model framework. In the discharge model, the ground state argon atoms (Ar), electrons (e), atom ions (Ar+), molecular ions (Ar2+), and fourteen argon excited levels Ar*(4s and 4p) are considered. The steady-state electron and ion densities are obtained with nonlinear processes included and excluded in the designed models, respectively. It is found that in similar gas gaps, keeping the product of gas pressure and linear dimension unchanged, with the nonlinear processes included, the normalized density relations deviate from the similarity relations gradually as the scale-up factor decreases. Without the nonlinear processes, the parameter relations are in good agreement with the similarity law predictions. Furthermore, the pressure and the dimension effects are also investigated separately with and without the nonlinear processes. It is shown that the gas pressure effect on the results is less obvious than the dimension effect. Without the nonlinear processes, the pressure and the dimension effects could be estimated from one to the other based on the similarity relations.

  3. The Stroop effect in English-Japanese bilinguals: the effect of phonological similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiya, Hiromi; Healy, Alice F

    2008-01-01

    English-Japanese bilinguals performed a Stroop color-word interference task with both English and Japanese stimuli and responded in both English and Japanese. The Japanese stimuli were either the traditional color terms (TCTs) written in Hiragana or loanwords (LWs) from English written in Katakana. Both within-language and between-language interference were found for all combinations of stimuli and responses. The between-language interference was larger for Katakana LWs (phonologically similar to English) than for Hiragana TCTs, especially with Japanese responses. The magnitude of this phonological effect increased with self-rated reading fluency in Japanese. Overall responding was slower and the Stroop effect larger with English than with Japanese stimuli. These results suggest that unintentional lexical access elicits automatic phonological processing even with intermediate-level reading proficiency.

  4. Welfare Effects of Employment Protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belot, M.V.K.; Boone, J.; van Ours, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Employment protection is often related to costs incurred by the firms when they hire a worker.The stability of the employment relationship, enhanced by employment protection, is also favorable to the productivity of the job.We analyze employment protection focusing on this trade-off between

  5. Exercise-induced circulating extracellular vesicles protect against cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Yihua; Xu, Tianzhao; Lv, Dongchao; Yu, Pujiao; Xu, Jiahong; Che, Lin; Das, Avash; Tigges, John; Toxavidis, Vassilios; Ghiran, Ionita; Shah, Ravi; Li, Yongqin; Zhang, Yuhui; Das, Saumya; Xiao, Junjie

    2017-07-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) serve an important function as mediators of intercellular communication. Exercise is protective for the heart, although the signaling mechanisms that mediate this cardioprotection have not been fully elucidated. Here using nano-flow cytometry, we found a rapid increase in plasma EVs in human subjects undergoing exercise stress testing. We subsequently identified that serum EVs were increased by ~1.85-fold in mice after 3-week swimming. Intramyocardial injection of equivalent quantities of EVs from exercised mice and non-exercised controls provided similar protective effects against acute ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in mice. However, injection of exercise-induced EVs in a quantity equivalent to the increase seen with exercise (1.85 swim group) significantly enhanced the protective effect. Similarly, treatment with exercise-induced increased EVs provided additional anti-apoptotic effect in H 2 O 2 -treated H9C2 cardiomyocytes mediated by the activation of ERK1/2 and HSP27 signaling. Finally, by treating H9C2 cells with insulin-like growth factor-1 to mimic exercise stimulus in vitro, we found an increased release of EVs from cardiomyocytes associated with ALIX and RAB35 activation. Collectively, our results show that exercise-induced increase in circulating EVs enhances the protective effects of endogenous EVs against cardiac I/R injury. Exercise-derived EVs might serve as a potent therapy for myocardial injury in the future.

  6. The effects of familiarity and similarity on compliance in social networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaptein, M.C.; Nass, C.; Markopoulos, P.

    2014-01-01

    Advertisers on social network sites often use recommendations by others in a user's networks to endorse products. While these familiar others are hypothesised to be more effective in influencing users than unfamiliar others, there is a catch: familiarity does not necessarily ensure similarity to the

  7. The protective effect of plasma antioxidants during ozone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ozone (O3) therapy forms part of a group of complementary and alternative medical therapies and is gaining more and more interest worldwide. There is, however, some concern regarding O3-toxicity and uncertainty about the effectiveness of O3-therapy. In this study we investigated the possible protective effects of the ...

  8. Consumption of unprocessed cow's milk protects infants from common respiratory infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loss, G.; Depner, M.; Ulfman, L.H.; Neerven, van R.J.J.; Hose, A.J.; Genuneit, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Breast-feeding is protective against respiratory infections in early life. Given the co-evolutionary adaptations of humans and cattle, bovine milk might exert similar anti-infective effects in human infants. Objective: To study effects of consumption of raw and processed cow's milk on

  9. Role of nitric oxide and KATP channel in the protective effect mediated by nicorandil in bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Yasmin S; Ahmed, Lamiaa A; Salem, Hesham A; Agha, Azza M

    2018-05-01

    Liver fibrosis is one of the most serious conditions affecting patients worldwide. In the present study, the role of nitric oxide and KATP channel was investigated for the first time in the possible protection mediated by nicorandil in bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis in rats. Nicorandil (3 mg/kg/day) was given orally 24 h after bile duct ligation for 14 days till the end of the experiment. Nicorandil group showed marked improvement in liver function tests, hepatic oxidative stress and inflammatory markers as well as inducible and endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein expressions. Furthermore, nicorandil administration led to significant decrement of phosphorylated protein kinase C, fibrosis and hepatic stellate cells activation as indicated by decreased alpha smooth muscle actin expression. Oral co-administration of glibenclamide (5 mg/kg/day) (a KATP channel blocker) with nicorandil mostly showed similar improvement though not reaching to that of nicorandil group. However, co-adminstration of L-NAME (15 mg/kg/day) (an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase) completely abolished the protective effects of nicorandil and produced more or less similar results to that of untreated bile duct ligated group. In conclusion, nicorandil is an effective therapy against the development of bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis in rats where nitric oxide plays a more prominent role in the protective effect of nicorandil than KATP channel opening. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Guide to the Federal Act for Protection against Nuisances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.; Wiedemann, R.

    1980-07-01

    The Federal Act for Protection against Nuisances contains all legal provisions related to pollution, noise, convulsions and shocks, thermal effects and similar effects on the environment. Apart from provisions of the actual Act for Protection against Nuisances, provisions related to nuisances are to be found in a number of legal fields. The authors provide a handy, completable survey on all relevant laws, ordinances, administrative regulations and directives issued by the Government of the federation and its individual states, and on the authorities responsible for their execution. The manual helps improve the transparency of legal provisions and adminstrative competences. (HSCH) [de

  11. Protective agents used as additives in University of Wisconsin solution to promote protection against ischaemia-reperfusion injury in rat lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, C H; Wu, K; Yu, C P; Perng, W C; Yan, H C; Wu, C P; Chang, D M; Hsu, K

    1998-09-01

    1. An intervention to reduce ischaemia-reperfusion lung injury will be an important advance in transplant medicine. Although the mechanisms associated with producing ischaemia-reperfusion endothelial injury have not been completely elucidated, many of the injury mediators have been studied in detail. While no single pharmacological therapy is likely to be totally effective in eliminating this complex injury, we have developed a mixture of agents that are known to block pathways involved in producing ischaemia-reperfusion-associated lung vascular injury.2. The present study modified University of Wisconsin solution (UW) by adding one of the protective agents prostaglandin E1 (PGE1), dexamethasone (Dex) or dibutyryl cAMP (Bt2-cAMP), or a combination of these, to the perfusate of rat lungs exposed to 4 h of cold ischaemia followed by 1 h of reperfusion. Nine modified UW solutions were studied: (1) UW+Dex, (2) UW+PGE1, (3) UW+Bt2-cAMP, (4) UW+Dexx3, (5) UW+PGE1x3, (6) UW+Bt2-cAMPx3, (7) UW+Dex+PGE1, (8) UW+Dex+Bt2-cAMP, (9) UW+PGE1+Bt2-cAMP. These solutions were utilized in individual experiments to assess haemodynamic changes, lung weight gain, the capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc) and pathology in all lungs.3. The results indicate that lung weight gain and Kfc values were significantly lower than with UW alone in groups 1, 2 and 3, which contained only one additional protective agent. In groups 4, 5 and 6, which contain three times the concentration of each protective agent, both Kfc and lung weight gain were similar to those measured in groups 1, 2 and 3, i.e. lungs were protected but the protection was not dose dependent. In groups 7, 8 and 9, which contained two protective agents, lung weight gain and Kfc were greatly reduced compared with UW alone. Histopathological studies showed similar decreases in the injury profiles of lungs.4. Although UW contains several antioxidant protective agents such as allopurinol and glutathione, it did not provide effective

  12. Protective Effects of Cilastatin against Vancomycin-Induced Nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Humanes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vancomycin is a very effective antibiotic for treatment of severe infections. However, its use in clinical practice is limited by nephrotoxicity. Cilastatin is a dehydropeptidase I inhibitor that acts on the brush border membrane of the proximal tubule to prevent accumulation of imipenem and toxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential protective effect of cilastatin on vancomycin-induced apoptosis and toxicity in cultured renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (RPTECs. Porcine RPTECs were cultured in the presence of vancomycin with and without cilastatin. Vancomycin induced dose-dependent apoptosis in cultured RPTECs, with DNA fragmentation, cell detachment, and a significant decrease in mitochondrial activity. Cilastatin prevented apoptotic events and diminished the antiproliferative effect and severe morphological changes induced by vancomycin. Cilastatin also improved the long-term recovery and survival of RPTECs exposed to vancomycin and partially attenuated vancomycin uptake by RPTECs. On the other hand, cilastatin had no effects on vancomycin-induced necrosis or the bactericidal effect of the antibiotic. This study indicates that cilastatin protects against vancomycin-induced proximal tubule apoptosis and increases cell viability, without compromising the antimicrobial effect of vancomycin. The beneficial effect could be attributed, at least in part, to decreased accumulation of vancomycin in RPTECs.

  13. Protecting effect on gamma-ray damage of DNA by tea catechin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, H.; Akai, G.; Yoshinaga, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Yoshioka, H.

    1995-01-01

    The protecting effect of the tea catechin on the radiation induced scission of DNA in vitro. was examined. In addition, ESR spin-trapping method was used to make clear the mechanism of the protection. (author)

  14. Ionizing radiation biological effects and the proper protective measures against it's harmful effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hhalel, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    This book intrduces a good knowledge in specifications of ionizing radiation biological effects and the proper protective measures againest harmful effectes. The book is devided in to five main sections, the first one introduces the hostorical bachground of the contributions of a number of scietists in the basic knolwledge of radiation and its biological effects. The second section deals with the physical and chemical principles of radiation the third one talks about radiation detection. While the fourth section talks (via seven chapter) about the effectes of ionizing radiation on living organisms molecules cells, tissues organs systems and the living organism the fifth section talks about the uses of radiation sources, the probability of radiation accidents, protective measures, international recommendations related to doses and safe use of ionizing radiation. (Abed Al-wali Al-ajlouni). 53 refs., 107 figs., 13 tabs

  15. The ecological effectiveness of protected areas: the United Kingdom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaston, K.J.; Charman, K.; Jackson, S.F.; Armsworth, P.R.; Bonn, A.; Briers, R.A.; Callaghan, C.S.Q.; Catchpole, R.; Hopkins, J.; Kunin, W.E.; Latham, J.; Opdam, P.F.M.; Stoneman, R.; Stroud, D.A.; Tratt, R.

    2006-01-01

    Given the importance placed on protected areas, determining their effectiveness in representing and maintaining biodiversity is a core issue in conservation biology. Nonetheless, frameworks identifying the breadth of issues associated with this effectiveness, and case studies of how well these are

  16. Protective Effect of HSP25 on Radiation Induced Tissue Damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kwon, Hee-Choong; Bae, Sang-Woo; Lee, Yun-Sil; Kim, Sung Ho

    2007-01-01

    Control of cancer by irradiation therapy alone or in conjunction with combination chemotherapy is often limited by organ specific toxicity. Ionizing irradiation toxicity is initiated by damage to normal tissue near the tumor target and within the transit volume of radiotherapy beams. Irradiation-induced cellular, tissue, and organ damage is mediated by acute effects, which can be dose limiting. A latent period follows recovery from the acute reaction, then chronic irradiation fibrosis (late effects) pose a second cause of organ failure. HSP25/27 has been suggested to protect cells against apoptotic cell death triggered by hyperthermia, ionizing radiation, oxidative stress, Fas ligand, and cytotoxic drugs. And several mechanisms have been proposed to account for HSP27-mediated apoptotic protection. However radioprotective effect of HSP25/27 in vivo system has not yet been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of exogenous HSP25 expression, as delivered by adenoviral vectors, to protect animal from radiation induced tissue damage

  17. Protective Effect of Vitamin E against Gamma Radiation Injury in Mice Histological and Ultrastructural Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Nour, S.M.; Abd EI Azeem, M.G.

    2009-01-01

    Vitamin E has been shown to ameliorate the effect of ionising radiation. The present study was designed to study the effect of high dose of gamma-radiation on the intestinal tissue of mice and the protective effect of the natural antioxidant vitamin E; a slow acting free radical scavenger. 24 adult albino male mice were divided into 4 groups (6 animals each). The first group represents the control group. The second experimental group received orally daily doses of vitamin E (100 mg/ kg body wt for 15 days). The third experimental group were exposed to 7 Gy gamma-rays as a single dose, while the fourth experimental group received vitamin E in the same dose before being irradiated. All animals were scarified and jejunal specimens were processed and prepared for histological and ultrastructural study after one day post irradiation. The results suggested that gamma-radiation induced different histological changes in the intestine of irradiated animals. Degeneration of the intestinal cells and microvilli were seen by light microscopic examination. SEM electron microscope (SEM) revealed haemorrhagic ulcerating tissues. In addition, the mitochondria were markedly swollen and loss of cristae, thickness of the terminal web zone was seen by transmission electron microscope. On the contrary, in animals treated with vitamin E, the intestinal tissues revealed structure almost similar to the control group. We conclude that vitamin E had protective effects against gamma-radiation induced oxidative stress

  18. Effects of near-future ocean acidification, fishing, and marine protection on a temperate coastal ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwall, Christopher E; Eddy, Tyler D

    2015-02-01

    Understanding ecosystem responses to global and local anthropogenic impacts is paramount to predicting future ecosystem states. We used an ecosystem modeling approach to investigate the independent and cumulative effects of fishing, marine protection, and ocean acidification on a coastal ecosystem. To quantify the effects of ocean acidification at the ecosystem level, we used information from the peer-reviewed literature on the effects of ocean acidification. Using an Ecopath with Ecosim ecosystem model for the Wellington south coast, including the Taputeranga Marine Reserve (MR), New Zealand, we predicted ecosystem responses under 4 scenarios: ocean acidification + fishing; ocean acidification + MR (no fishing); no ocean acidification + fishing; no ocean acidification + MR for the year 2050. Fishing had a larger effect on trophic group biomasses and trophic structure than ocean acidification, whereas the effects of ocean acidification were only large in the absence of fishing. Mortality by fishing had large, negative effects on trophic group biomasses. These effects were similar regardless of the presence of ocean acidification. Ocean acidification was predicted to indirectly benefit certain species in the MR scenario. This was because lobster (Jasus edwardsii) only recovered to 58% of the MR biomass in the ocean acidification + MR scenario, a situation that benefited the trophic groups lobsters prey on. Most trophic groups responded antagonistically to the interactive effects of ocean acidification and marine protection (46%; reduced response); however, many groups responded synergistically (33%; amplified response). Conservation and fisheries management strategies need to account for the reduced recovery potential of some exploited species under ocean acidification, nonadditive interactions of multiple factors, and indirect responses of species to ocean acidification caused by declines in calcareous predators. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  19. Protective effect of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate on ultraviolet b ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the protective effect of green tea (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg) on ultraviolet B (UV-B)-induced skin damages in hairless mice in order to develop a natural sunscreen ... hydrophilic cream has also showed high.

  20. Advanced physical protection systems for nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, O.E.

    1976-01-01

    Because of the increasing incidence of terrorism, there is growing concern that nuclear materials and facilities need improved physical protection against theft, diversion, or sabotage. Physical protection systems for facilities or transportation which have balanced effectiveness include information systems, access denial systems, adequate and timely response, recovery capability, and use denial methods for despoiling special nuclear materials (SNM). The role of these elements in reducing societal risk is described; however, it is noted that, similar to nuclear war, the absolute risks of nuclear theft and sabotage are basically unquantifiable. Sandia Laboratories has a major US Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) role in developing advanced physical protection systems for improving the security of both SNM and facilities. These activities are surveyed in this paper. A computer simulation model is being developed to assess the cost-effectiveness of alternative physical protection systems under various levels of threat. Improved physical protection equipment such as perimeter and interior alarms, secure portals, and fixed and remotely activated barriers is being developed and tested. In addition, complete prototype protection systems are being developed for representative nuclear facilities. An example is shown for a plutonium storage vault. The ERDA safe-secure transportation system for highway shipments of all significant quantities of government-owned SNM is described. Adversary simulation as a tool for testing and evaluating physical protection systems is discussed. Finally, a list of measures is given for assessing overall physical protection system performance. (author)

  1. Advanced physical protection systems for nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, O.E.

    1975-10-01

    Because of the increasing incidence of terrorism, there is growing concern that nuclear materials and facilities need improved physical protection against theft, diversion, or sabotage. Physical protection systems for facilities or transportation which have balanced effectiveness include information systems, access denial systems, adequate and timely response, recovery capability, and use denial methods for despoiling special nuclear materials (SNM). The role of these elements in reducing societal risk is described; however, it is noted that, similar to nuclear war, the absolute risks of nuclear theft and sabotage are basically unquantifiable. Sandia Laboratories has a major Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) role in developing advanced physical protection systems for improving the security of both SNM and facilities. These activities are surveyed. A computer simulation model is being developed to assess the cost-effectiveness of alternative physical protection systems under various levels of threat. Improved physical protection equipment such as perimeter and interior alarms, secure portals, and fixed and remotely-activated barriers is being developed and tested. In addition, complete prototype protection systems are being developed for representative nuclear facilities. An example is shown for a plutonium storage vault. The ERDA safe-secure transportation system for highway shipments of all significant quantities of government-owned SNM is described. Adversary simulation as a tool for testing and evaluating physical protection systems is discussed. A list of measures is given for assessing overall physical protection system performance. (auth)

  2. Protective Effects of Female Reproductive Factors on Lauren Intestinal-Type Gastric Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Mi; Min, Byung Hoon; Lee, Jeeyun; An, Ji Yeong; Lee, Jun Ho; Sohn, Tae Sung; Bae, Jae Moon; Kim, Jae J; Kang, Won Ki; Kim, Sung; Choi, Min Gew

    2018-01-01

    Gastric cancer shows a male predominance that might be explained by protective effects from estrogens in females. Two Lauren classification histological subtypes, intestinal and diffuse, have distinct carcinogeneses. The purpose of this study was to estimate the effects of sex hormone on female gastric cancer according to Lauren classification. We reviewed medical records for and administered questionnaires, surveying reproductive and hormonal factors, to 758 patients who underwent gastrectomy for gastric cancer at Samsung Medical Center from May 2012 to November 2014. Clinicopathological characteristics were compared between females and males. The incidence of intestinal-type gastric cancer was compared between females subgroups, consist of premenopausal women and three groups of postmenopausal women (five-year intervals after menopause), and males. The association between reproductive factors and intestinal-type gastric cancer was analyzed by multivariate models for the female group. In total, 227 females (29.9%) and 531 males (70.9%) were included in the analysis. Undifferentiated adenocarcinoma and diffuse-type histology were more frequent in female patients than male patients. While 221 (41.6%) male patients had intestinal-type gastric cancer, no premenopausal female patient had this type of gastric cancer. The incidence of intestinal-type gastric cancer increased with time after menopause, and was similar to males after 10 years from menopause. Parity was associated with an increased risk of intestinal-type gastric cancer in menopausal women. These findings support that female sex hormones might be protective against intestinal-type gastric cancer. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2018

  3. Effects of ventilation tunnel protection on stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strizhiboroda, S K; Kuritsyn, B I; Anosov, O S

    1983-09-01

    Analyzed are effects of strata control on a ventilation gate road situated at a depth of 860 m in a coal seam 0.65 m thick with dip angle of 48 degrees. The direct roof and floor consisted of limestone and the main roof of shales. The ventilation gate road with a cross section of 8.2 m/Sup 2/ was supported by the AP-9.2 arched steel supports. The following methods for gate road protection were used: timber cribbings, reinforced cribbings, strips of pneumatic stowing (using waste rocks), and coal support pillars. Effects of gate road protection on roof subsidence, subsidence rate and on support deformation in the gate road were analyzed considering strata control method and the distance to the advancing longwall face. The results of comparative evaluations, given in 4 diagrams, showed that timber cribbings guaranteed the most regular stress distribution and regular roof subsidence. Use of coal support pillars negatively influenced stress distribution. Irrespective of strata control method from 60 to 80% of roof subsidence occurred at a distance from 0 to 40 m behind a working face. Roof subsidence ranged from 17.3 to 38.3 mm/d when support pillars were used, was 27 mm/d when reinforced cribbings were used and ranged from 9.6 to 16.5 mm/d when pneumatic stowing was used. Use of blocks of reinforced concrete for protecting ventilation gate roads in inclined strata is recommended.

  4. Preserving Differential Privacy for Similarity Measurement in Smart Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok-Seng Wong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in both sensor technologies and network infrastructures have encouraged the development of smart environments to enhance people’s life and living styles. However, collecting and storing user’s data in the smart environments pose severe privacy concerns because these data may contain sensitive information about the subject. Hence, privacy protection is now an emerging issue that we need to consider especially when data sharing is essential for analysis purpose. In this paper, we consider the case where two agents in the smart environment want to measure the similarity of their collected or stored data. We use similarity coefficient function FSC as the measurement metric for the comparison with differential privacy model. Unlike the existing solutions, our protocol can facilitate more than one request to compute FSC without modifying the protocol. Our solution ensures privacy protection for both the inputs and the computed FSC results.

  5. Recall of short word lists presented visually at fast rates: effects of phonological similarity and word length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coltheart, V; Langdon, R

    1998-03-01

    Phonological similarity of visually presented list items impairs short-term serial recall. Lists of long words are also recalled less accurately than are lists of short words. These results have been attributed to phonological recoding and rehearsal. If subjects articulate irrelevant words during list presentation, both phonological similarity and word length effects are abolished. Experiments 1 and 2 examined effects of phonological similarity and recall instructions on recall of lists shown at fast rates (from one item per 0.114-0.50 sec), which might not permit phonological encoding and rehearsal. In Experiment 3, recall instructions and word length were manipulated using fast presentation rates. Both phonological similarity and word length effects were observed, and they were not dependent on recall instructions. Experiments 4 and 5 investigated the effects of irrelevant concurrent articulation on lists shown at fast rates. Both phonological similarity and word length effects were removed by concurrent articulation, as they were with slow presentation rates.

  6. Protective effect of milk constituents and sublethal injuries limiting process effectiveness during PEF inactivation of Lb. rhamnosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, H; Schulz, A; Karapetkov, N; Knorr, D

    2009-08-31

    The inactivation of Lb. rhamnosus by pulsed electric field treatment (PEF) was studied in different fractions of raw milk and Ringer solution in order to evaluate the protective effect of nutrient rich media in comparison to aqueous buffer solutions. Apart from monitoring of culturability, analysis of the physiological fitness of Lb. rhamnosus was conducted aiming to identify sublethally damaged cells. Therefore, flow cytometry and a selective medium plating technique were used and compared to each other. The goal of the study was to apply three different parameters describing the physiological fitness of the model organism Lb. rhamnosus after PEF treatment such as culturability, membrane permeability and metabolic activity depending on treatment media and parameters. A concentration dependent protective effect of the milk protein fraction could be shown and allocated to micellar casein as the major milk protein. Increasing the concentration of whey proteins up to 2% showed a similar impact on limiting the PEF inactivation of Lb. rhamnosus. The evaluation of physiological fitness of cells was based on a determination of structural and functional characteristics by rapid cellular staining using carboxyfluorescein diacetate and propidium iodide. This approach showed good accordance to the conventional selective medium plating technique for the enumeration of sublethally-injured bacteria but flow cytometry provided additional information for the characterisation of this fraction. The extent of occurrence of dead, sublethal and vital fractions of cells was found dependent on the PEF treatment parameters such as electrical field strength and energy input as well as the different milk fractions used as treatment media.

  7. Differential protective effects of motorcycle helmets against head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Michael D

    2017-05-19

    Although numerous observational studies have demonstrated a protective effect of motorcycle helmets against head injury, the degree of protection against specific head injury types remains unclear. Experimental biomechanics studies involving cadavers, animals, and computer models have established that head injuries have varying etiologies. This retrospective cross-sectional study compared helmet protection against skull fracture, cerebral contusion, intracranial hemorrhage, and cerebral concussion in a consecutive series of motorcycle operators involved in recent traffic crashes in Kentucky. Police collision reports linked to hospital inpatient and emergency department (ED) claims were analyzed for the period 2008 to 2012. Motorcycle operators with known helmet use who were not killed at the crash scene were included in the study. Helmet use was ascertained from the police report. Skull fracture, cerebral contusion, intracranial hemorrhage, and cerebral concussion were identified from International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes on the claims records. The relative risks of each type of head injury for helmeted versus unprotected operators were estimated using generalized estimating equations. Helmets offer substantial protection against skull fracture (relative risk [RR] = 0.31, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.23, 0.34), cerebral contusion (RR = 0.29, 95% CI, 0.16, 0.53), and intracranial hemorrhage (RR = 0.47, 95% CI, 0.35, 0.63). The findings pertaining to uncomplicated concussion (RR = 0.80, 95% CI, 0.64, 1.01) were inconclusive. A modest protective effect (20% risk reduction) was suggested by the relative risk estimate, but the 95% confidence interval included the null value. Motorcycle helmets were associated with a 69% reduction in skull fractures, 71% reduction in cerebral contusion, and 53% reduction in intracranial hemorrhage. This study finds that current motorcycle helmets do not protect equally against

  8. The protective effect of plasma antioxidants during ozone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-18

    Jul 18, 2008 ... In this study we investigated the possible protective effects of the plasma antioxidant defense system during O3-AHT. Venous blood from six ..... immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and a rationale for ozone therapy and other ...

  9. Human reliability-based MC and A methods for evaluating the effectiveness of protecting nuclear material - 59379

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, Felicia A.; Wyss, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    Material control and accountability (MC and A) operations that track and account for critical assets at nuclear facilities provide a key protection approach for defeating insider adversaries. MC and A activities, from monitoring to inventory measurements, provide critical information about target materials and define security elements that are useful against insider threats. However, these activities have been difficult to characterize in ways that are compatible with the path analysis methods that are used to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of a site's protection system. The path analysis methodology focuses on a systematic, quantitative evaluation of the physical protection component of the system for potential external threats, and often calculates the probability that the physical protection system (PPS) is effective (PE) in defeating an adversary who uses that attack pathway. In previous work, Dawson and Hester observed that many MC and A activities can be considered a type of sensor system with alarm and assessment capabilities that provide recurring opportunities for 'detecting' the status of critical items. This work has extended that characterization of MC and A activities as probabilistic sensors that are interwoven within each protection layer of the PPS. In addition, MC and A activities have similar characteristics to operator tasks performed in a nuclear power plant (NPP) in that the reliability of these activities depends significantly on human performance. Many of the procedures involve human performance in checking for anomalous conditions. Further characterization of MC and A activities as operational procedures that check the status of critical assets provides a basis for applying human reliability analysis (HRA) models and methods to determine probabilities of detection for MC and A protection elements. This paper will discuss the application of HRA methods used in nuclear power plant probabilistic risk assessments to define detection

  10. Investigating Correlation between Protein Sequence Similarity and Semantic Similarity Using Gene Ontology Annotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikram, Najmul; Qadir, Muhammad Abdul; Afzal, Muhammad Tanvir

    2018-01-01

    Sequence similarity is a commonly used measure to compare proteins. With the increasing use of ontologies, semantic (function) similarity is getting importance. The correlation between these measures has been applied in the evaluation of new semantic similarity methods, and in protein function prediction. In this research, we investigate the relationship between the two similarity methods. The results suggest absence of a strong correlation between sequence and semantic similarities. There is a large number of proteins with low sequence similarity and high semantic similarity. We observe that Pearson's correlation coefficient is not sufficient to explain the nature of this relationship. Interestingly, the term semantic similarity values above 0 and below 1 do not seem to play a role in improving the correlation. That is, the correlation coefficient depends only on the number of common GO terms in proteins under comparison, and the semantic similarity measurement method does not influence it. Semantic similarity and sequence similarity have a distinct behavior. These findings are of significant effect for future works on protein comparison, and will help understand the semantic similarity between proteins in a better way.

  11. Variation in the Protective Effect of Higher Education Against Depression*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauldry, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies document that higher education is associated with a reduced likelihood of depression. The protective effects of higher education, however, are known to vary across population subgroups. This study tests competing theories for who is likely to obtain a greater protective benefit from a college degree against depression through an analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health and recently developed methods for analyzing heterogeneous treatment effects involving the use of propensity scores. The analysis examines how the effects of two “treatments” (at least some college education and attaining at least a four-year college degree) on latent depressive symptomology vary by background disadvantage, as indicated by having a low propensity for completing some college or attaining a four-year college degree. Results indicate that people from disadvantaged backgrounds realize a greater protective effect of higher education, either completing some college or attaining a four-year degree, against depressive symptomology than people from advantaged backgrounds. This pattern is more pronounced for people who attain at least a four-year degree than for people who complete at least some college education. PMID:27840772

  12. A Model for Protective Behavior against the Harmful Effects of Radiation based on Medical Institution Classifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Eun Ok; Kwon, Deok Mun; Dong, Kyung Rae; Han, Seung Moo

    2010-01-01

    This study surveyed a total of 1,322 radiation technologist in health care institutions throughout Korea. This is a comparative study conducted on the levels of protective behavior against the harmful effects of radiation in heath care institutions which indicated that university hospitals and general hospitals showed higher level of protective behavior than for medical practitioners. This study found university hospitals have the following 7 characteristics to manage protective behavior against the harmful effects of radiation, protective environment, self-efficacy by distinction of task , self-efficacy, expectation of the protective behavior, the number of patients, level of the education related to the protection of the harmful effects of radiation and protective attitude. While general hospitals have the following 3 characteristics protective environment, expectation of the protective behavior and protective attitude. Hospitals have the following 4 characteristics protective environment, expectation of the protective behavior, protective attitude and self-efficacy and medical clinics have characteristics protective environment

  13. A Model for Protective Behavior against the Harmful Effects of Radiation based on Medical Institution Classifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Eun Ok; Kwon, Deok Mun [Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Kyung Rae [Gwangju Health College University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seung Moo [Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    This study surveyed a total of 1,322 radiation technologist in health care institutions throughout Korea. This is a comparative study conducted on the levels of protective behavior against the harmful effects of radiation in heath care institutions which indicated that university hospitals and general hospitals showed higher level of protective behavior than for medical practitioners. This study found university hospitals have the following 7 characteristics to manage protective behavior against the harmful effects of radiation, protective environment, self-efficacy by distinction of task , self-efficacy, expectation of the protective behavior, the number of patients, level of the education related to the protection of the harmful effects of radiation and protective attitude. While general hospitals have the following 3 characteristics protective environment, expectation of the protective behavior and protective attitude. Hospitals have the following 4 characteristics protective environment, expectation of the protective behavior, protective attitude and self-efficacy and medical clinics have characteristics protective environment.

  14. In the Name of Effective Consumer Protection and Public Policy!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Marie Jull

    2016-01-01

    I. The CJEU has established that under certain circumstances national courts have an obligation, ex officio, to apply specific consumer protection provisions. This article presents a model derived from the argumentation for this obligation in CJEU case law. The model consists of four steps...... that include the specific ideas behind consumer protection provisions as well as the interaction between the principle of effectiveness and principle of equivalence. It is found that the principle of effectiveness is stretched very long and is often not set aside by the “rule of reason”. It is also found...... that the CJEU is open to the idea of regarding consumer protection provisions as (EU) public policy rules which seems to challenge the traditional principle of equivalence. Based on the findings, the author elaborates on the concept of an European public policy doctrine....

  15. Methimazole protects lungs during hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats: an effect not induced by hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tütüncü, Tanju; Demirci, Cagatay; Gözalan, Ugur; Yüksek, Yunus Nadi; Bilgihan, Ayse; Kama, Nuri Aydin

    2007-05-01

    Hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury may lead to remote organ failure with mortal respiratory dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to analyze the possible protective effects of methimazole on lungs after hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury. Forty male Wistar albino rats were randomized into five groups: a control group, in which bilateral pulmonary lobectomy was done; a hepatic ischemia-reperfusion group, in which bilateral pulmonary lobectomy was done after hepatic ischemia-reperfusion; a thyroidectomy-ischemia-reperfusion group (total thyroidectomy followed by, 7 days later, bilateral pulmonary lobectomy after hepatic ischemia-reperfusion); a methimazole-ischemia-reperfusion group (following methimazole administration for 7 days, bilateral pulmonary lobectomy was done after hepatic ischemia-reperfusion); and a methimazole +L-thyroxine-ischemia-reperfusion group (following methimazole and L-thyroxine administration for 7 days, bilateral pulmonary lobectomy was performed after hepatic ischemia-reperfusion). Pulmonary tissue specimens were evaluated histopathologically and for myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde levels. All of the ischemia-reperfusion intervention groups had higher pulmonary injury scoring indices than the control group (P < 0.001). Pulmonary injury index of the ischemia-reperfusion group was higher than that of both the methimazole-supplemented hypothyroid and euthyroid groups (P = 0028; P = 0,038, respectively) and was similar to that of the thyroidectomized group. Pulmonary tissue myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde levels in the ischemia-reperfusion group were similar with that in the thyroidectomized rats but were significantly higher than that in the control, and both the methimazole-supplemented hypothyroid and euthyroid groups. Methimazole exerts a protective role on lungs during hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury, which can be attributed to its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects rather than hypothyroidism alone.

  16. The carrying capacity and the effects of protection level in three marine protected areas in the Balearic Islands (NW Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Coll

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring of fisheries target species in three marine protected areas (MPAs located in the NW Mediterranean provided important conclusions on management effects. The abundance, occurrence and biomass of large fish showed consistent and growing trends inside the MPAs. Fish diversity was also favoured by protection. Nevertheless, spatial variance of these indicators at a medium scale was often of the same order as that caused by time between different protection levels. The carrying capacity was determined for the first time in western Mediterranean MPAs in five out of six sites studied, and in all cases it was achieved within the first five years of protection. The observed values indicate that the system of the studied MPAs is representative of the general coastal environment of the Balearic Islands, but is far from the potential of other MPAs which are considered as hot spots in other localities. Likewise, this study shows that partially protected areas can also be fairly effective if their habitats fit with those required by target species and fishing modalities are suitably regulated or banned.

  17. The role of similarity in updating numerical information in working memory: decomposing the numerical distance effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendínez, Cristina; Pelegrina, Santiago; Lechuga, M Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the process of updating representations in working memory (WM) and how similarity between the information involved influences this process. In WM updating tasks, the similarity in terms of numerical distance between the number to be substituted and the new one facilitates the updating process. We aimed to disentangle the possible effect of two dimensions of similarity that may contribute to this numerical effect: numerical distance itself and common digits shared between the numbers involved. Three experiments were conducted in which different ranges of distances and the coincidence between the digits of the two numbers involved in updating were manipulated. Results showed that the two dimensions of similarity had an effect on updating times. The greater the similarity between the information maintained in memory and the new information that substituted it, the faster the updating. This is consistent both with the idea of distributed representations based on features, and with a selective updating process based on a feature overwriting mechanism. Thus, updating in WM can be understood as a selective substitution process influenced by similarity in which only certain parts of the representation stored in memory are changed.

  18. Can selection explain the protective effects of farming on asthma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wijnand Eduard

    2015-09-01

    No healthy worker selection into farming was observed and changes in asthma prevalence due to early retirement were small. Selection effects are therefore unlikely to explain the protective effects of farming on asthma.

  19. The deceptive nature of UVA tanning versus the modest protective effects of UVB tanning on human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamura, Yoshinori; Coelho, Sergio G; Schlenz, Kathrin; Batzer, Jan; Smuda, Christoph; Choi, Wonseon; Brenner, Michaela; Passeron, Thierry; Zhang, Guofeng; Kolbe, Ludger; Wolber, Rainer; Hearing, Vincent J

    2011-02-01

    The relationship between human skin pigmentation and protection from ultraviolet (UV) radiation is an important element underlying differences in skin carcinogenesis rates. The association between UV damage and the risk of skin cancer is clear, yet a strategic balance in exposure to UV needs to be met. Dark skin is protected from UV-induced DNA damage significantly more than light skin owing to the constitutively higher pigmentation, but an as yet unresolved and important question is what photoprotective benefit, if any, is afforded by facultative pigmentation (i.e. a tan induced by UV exposure). To address that and to compare the effects of various wavelengths of UV, we repetitively exposed human skin to suberythemal doses of UVA and/or UVB over 2 weeks after which a challenge dose of UVA and UVB was given. Although visual skin pigmentation (tanning) elicited by different UV exposure protocols was similar, the melanin content and UV-protective effects against DNA damage in UVB-tanned skin (but not in UVA-tanned skin) were significantly higher. UVA-induced tans seem to result from the photooxidation of existing melanin and its precursors with some redistribution of pigment granules, while UVB stimulates melanocytes to up-regulate melanin synthesis and increases pigmentation coverage, effects that are synergistically stimulated in UVA and UVB-exposed skin. Thus, UVA tanning contributes essentially no photoprotection, although all types of UV-induced tanning result in DNA and cellular damage, which can eventually lead to photocarcinogenesis. 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  20. Effects of rumen-protected tryptophan on performance, nutrient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-06-27

    Jun 27, 2011 ... sources high in rumen-protected Trp (RPT) can be fed to complement the ... collected into plastic containers containing 50 ml of 50% HCl to prevent NH3 .... growth, higher Trp availability could have exerted an effect also on ...

  1. Protective effect of Carica papaya fruit extract against gamma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Radiation side effects have been reported to induce oxidative stress by free radical generation. The protective effect of Carica papaya (CP) fruit extract, vitamins C and E against gamma radiation-induced oxidative damage on postnatal developing rat cerebellum was studied. Forty-two female Wistar rats were mated and ...

  2. Effects of potassium on kesterite solar cells: Similarities, differences and synergies with sodium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Haass

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Addition of alkali dopants is essential for achieving high-efficiency conversion efficiency of thin film solar cells based on chalcogenide semiconductors like Cu(In,GaSe2 (CIGS and Cu2ZnSn(S,Se4 (CZTSSe also called kesterite. Whereas the treatment with potassium allows boosting the performance of CIGS solar cells as compared to the conventional sodium doping, it is debated if similar effects can be expected for kesterite solar cells. Here the influence of potassium is investigated by introducing the dopant during the solution processing of kesterite absorbers. It is confirmed that the presence of potassium leads to an enhanced grain growth and a ten-fold lower potassium concentration is sufficient for obtaining grain size similar to sodium-containing absorbers. Potassium is located predominantly at grain boundaries and it suppresses incorporation of sodium into the absorber layer. The potassium doping increases the apparent carrier concentration to ∼2×1016 cm-3 for a potassium concentration of 0.2 at%. The potassium-doped solar cells yield conversion efficiency close to 10%, on par with only sodium-doped samples. Co-doping with potassium and sodium has not revealed any beneficial synergetic effects and it is concluded that both dopants exhibit similar effects on the kesterite solar cell performance.

  3. The financial protection effect of Ghana National Health Insurance Scheme: evidence from a study in two rural districts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the key functions of health insurance is to provide financial protection against high costs of health care, yet evidence of such protection from developing countries has been inconsistent. The current study uses the case of Ghana to contribute to the evidence pool about insurance's financial protection effects. It evaluates the impact of the country's National Health Insurance Scheme on households' out-of-pocket spending and catastrophic health expenditure. Methods We use data from a household survey conducted in two rural districts, Nkoranza and Offinso, in 2007, two years after the initiation of the Ghana National Health Insurance Scheme. To address the skewness of health expenditure data, the absolute amount of out-of-pocket spending is estimated using a two-part model. We also conduct a probit estimate of the likelihood of catastrophic health expenditures, defined at different thresholds relative to household income and non-food consumption expenditure. The analysis controls for chronic and self-assessed health conditions, which typically drive adverse selection in insurance. Results At the time of the survey, insurance coverage was 35 percent. Although the benefit package of insurance is generous, insured people still incurred out-of-pocket payment for care from informal sources and for uncovered drugs and tests at health facilities. Nevertheless, they paid significantly less than the uninsured. Insurance has been shown to have a protective effect against the financial burden of health care, reducing significantly the likelihood of incurring catastrophic payment. The effect is particularly remarkable among the poorest quintile of the sample. Conclusions Findings from this study confirm the positive financial protection effect of health insurance in Ghana. The effect is stronger among the poor group than among general population. The results are encouraging for many low income countries who are considering a

  4. Ecological effects of full and partial protection in the crowded Mediterranean Sea: a regional meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giakoumi, Sylvaine; Scianna, Claudia; Plass-Johnson, Jeremiah Grahm

    2017-01-01

    the relationships between the level of protection and MPA size, age, and enforcement. Results revealed significant positive effects of protection for fisheries target species and negative effects for urchins as their predators benefited from protection. Full protection provided stronger effects than partial...... to inform decisions. In the human-dominated Mediterranean Sea, fully protected areas occupy only 0.04% of its surface. We evaluated the impacts of full and partial protection on biomass and density of fish assemblages, some commercially important fishes, and sea urchins in 24 Mediterranean MPAs. We explored...

  5. Protective effect of poly ({alpha}-L-glutamate) against UV and {gamma}-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuta, Masakazu E-mail: mfuruta@riast.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Huy, Nguyen Quang; Tsuchiya, Akihito; Nakatsuka, Hiroshige; Hayashi, Toshio

    2004-10-01

    We occasionally found that poly ({alpha}-L-glutamate) showed a superior protective effect on enzymes against UV and {sup 60}Co-{gamma} irradiation. We selected papain and {alpha}-amylase as a model enzyme and irradiated the aqueous solution (10 mg/ml) of each enzyme with UV and {sup 60}Co-{gamma} rays in the presence of poly ({alpha}-L-glutamate) ({alpha}-PGA), poly (glucosyl oxyethyl methacrylate (GEMA)), and glucose (1.25% w/v each). The mixture of the three compounds has a significant protective effect on the activity of papain solution showing 40% of remaining activity twice as much as the control containing no additive at the dose of 15 kGy. Among them, {alpha}-PGA showed the highest protecting effect on the both papain and {alpha}-amylase even after 10-kGy irradiation at which 50% of the activity was retained. {alpha}-PGA also showed significant protective activity on {alpha}-amylase against UV both in solution and under dried state.

  6. Protective effect of poly (α-L-glutamate) against UV and γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Masakazu; Huy, Nguyen Quang; Tsuchiya, Akihito; Nakatsuka, Hiroshige; Hayashi, Toshio

    2004-01-01

    We occasionally found that poly (α-L-glutamate) showed a superior protective effect on enzymes against UV and 60 Co-γ irradiation. We selected papain and α-amylase as a model enzyme and irradiated the aqueous solution (10 mg/ml) of each enzyme with UV and 60 Co-γ rays in the presence of poly (α-L-glutamate) (α-PGA), poly (glucosyl oxyethyl methacrylate (GEMA)), and glucose (1.25% w/v each). The mixture of the three compounds has a significant protective effect on the activity of papain solution showing 40% of remaining activity twice as much as the control containing no additive at the dose of 15 kGy. Among them, α-PGA showed the highest protecting effect on the both papain and α-amylase even after 10-kGy irradiation at which 50% of the activity was retained. α-PGA also showed significant protective activity on α-amylase against UV both in solution and under dried state

  7. Lack of protection against gentamicin ototoxicity by auditory conditioning with noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Strose

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Auditory conditioning consists of the pre-exposure to low levels of a potential harmful agent to protect against a subsequent harmful presentation. OBJECTIVE: To confirm if conditioning with an agent different from the used to cause the trauma can also be effective. METHOD: Experimental study with 17 guinea pigs divided as follows: group Som: exposed to 85 dB broadband noise centered at 4 kHz, 30 minutes a day for 10 consecutive days; group Cont: intramuscular administration of gentamicin 160 mg/kg a day for 10 consecutive days; group Expt: conditioned with noise similarly to group Som and, after each noise presentation, received gentamicin similarly to group Cont. The animals were evaluated by distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs, brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs and scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: The animals that were conditioned with noise did not show any protective effect compared to the ones that received only the ototoxic gentamicin administration. This lack of protection was observed functionally and morphologically. CONCLUSION: Conditioning with 85 dB broadband noise, 30 min a day for 10 consecutive days does not protect against an ototoxic gentamicin administration of 160 mg/kg a day for 10 consecutive days in the guinea pig.

  8. 36 CFR 2.20 - Skating, skateboards, and similar devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Skating, skateboards, and similar devices. 2.20 Section 2.20 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.20 Skating, skateboards, and...

  9. Evaluation on effects of isradipine on renal protection by SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Fengpo; Dong Shenan; Zhang Wei; Wu Xinghong; Lu Guoyuan

    1999-01-01

    The protective effects of isradipine on renal function were evaluated in a study on 40 patients with mild-moderate essential hypertension. Isradipine was administered at ado-sage of 2.5 mg twice daily for 4 weeks after receiving placebo for one week. SPECT were used for detecting renal function. The results of these evaluation indicated that there was significantly increasing in ERPF and GFR (P<0.01) and significant decreasing in resistance of renal vessel (P<0.01), and FF remained unchanged. It suggests that isradipine has a protective effect on renal function and it is beneficial for the long-term therapy

  10. Safety and protective effect of Lactobacillus acidophilus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The protective effect of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus casei, isolated from fresh cow milk, was studied in vivo. Toxicological data of rat serum revealed that the Lactobacillus isolates had liver improvement functions. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities of the rats dosed with Lactobacillus isolates ...

  11. Protective effect of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate on ultraviolet b ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... EGCg shows dose-dependent protective effect against UV-B-induced damage on hairless mouse skin. Thus, the plant compound can potentially be used as an alternative agent for photoprotection against UV-B exposure. Keywords: UV-B, Green tea EGCg, Photoprotection, Stratum corneum, Mitochondrion, Melanosome ...

  12. Effects of Self-Similar Collisions in the Theory of Pressure Broadening and Shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharintsev, S.S.; Salakhov, M.Kh.

    1999-01-01

    In the present paper the self-similar collision model is developed in terms of fractal Brownian motion. Within this model framework, collisions are assumed to carry a non-Markovian character and, therefore, possible memory collisional effects are not taken into account. Applying a self-similar collision model for the motion of the radiator and Anderson-Talman phase-shift theory of collisional broadening, a general formula for the correlation function in the impact limit is described. (author)

  13. Comprehensive health protection measures and its effects at the Bayun Obo Rare-earth Iron mine in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xing-an; Cheng, Yong-e

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the comprehensive sanitary protection methods carried out by the authors at Bayun Obo Rare-earth Iron Mine. The methods are as follows. First, comprehensive measures to prevent dusts in the air. Second, enhancement of the individual protection measures; Third, promoting long-distance running and the establishment a workers. club; Fourth, the establishment of job rotation system; Fifth, increasing the transparency of the medical examination results, paying more attention to the health of the miners; Sixth, publicizing the value of stopping smoking. Results showed that the above-mentioned six aspects of comprehensive sanitary protection methods which we instituted brought about predominant effects. For example, the average dust concentrations in the air at 7 locations in the crushing workshop and 6 in the mining workshop decreased from 1143.67 mg.m -3 in January to June 1983 to 47.617 mg.m -3 in January to June 1991, and to 13.4 mg.m -3 in 2001. In 1983 the average thorium lung burden of 130 dust exposed miners selected by random stratification was 0.85 Bq, while the average thorium lung burden of 135 dust-exposed miners, similarly selected in 1991 was 0.25 Bq, a decrease by a factor of 3.4. It is concluded that the comprehensive health protection measures carried out by the authors for about 20 years in Bayun Obo Mine were proved very effective and should be continued and improved. It is also valuable to recommend our experience to other rare-earth mines and factories as well as thorium dusty units both in China and abroad. (author)

  14. A Strategy toward Collaborative Filter Recommended Location Service for Privacy Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Jianpei

    2018-01-01

    A new collaborative filtered recommendation strategy was proposed for existing privacy and security issues in location services. In this strategy, every user establishes his/her own position profiles according to their daily position data, which is preprocessed using a density clustering method. Then, density prioritization was used to choose similar user groups as service request responders and the neighboring users in the chosen groups recommended appropriate location services using a collaborative filter recommendation algorithm. The two filter algorithms based on position profile similarity and position point similarity measures were designed in the recommendation, respectively. At the same time, the homomorphic encryption method was used to transfer location data for effective protection of privacy and security. A real location dataset was applied to test the proposed strategy and the results showed that the strategy provides better location service and protects users’ privacy. PMID:29751670

  15. A Strategy toward Collaborative Filter Recommended Location Service for Privacy Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Jianpei

    2018-05-11

    A new collaborative filtered recommendation strategy was proposed for existing privacy and security issues in location services. In this strategy, every user establishes his/her own position profiles according to their daily position data, which is preprocessed using a density clustering method. Then, density prioritization was used to choose similar user groups as service request responders and the neighboring users in the chosen groups recommended appropriate location services using a collaborative filter recommendation algorithm. The two filter algorithms based on position profile similarity and position point similarity measures were designed in the recommendation, respectively. At the same time, the homomorphic encryption method was used to transfer location data for effective protection of privacy and security. A real location dataset was applied to test the proposed strategy and the results showed that the strategy provides better location service and protects users' privacy.

  16. Nutritional supplementation with arginine protects radiation-induced effects: an experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Flavia Cristina Morone, E-mail: fcmorone@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Campos-Silva, Pamella; Souza, Diogo Benchimol de; Costa, Waldemar Silva; Sampaio, Francisco Jose Barcellos [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate the protective effect of L-arginine on the prostate (nonneoplasic) of rats with radiation-induced injury. Methods: Twenty-nine Wistar rats, male adult, allocated into three groups: Control group (C) was not exposed to irradiation (n=10); Radiated group (R) had undergone pelvic irradiation (n=10); Supplemented and radiated group (R+S) had undergone pelvic irradiation plus L-arginine supplementation (n=9). The animals were observed for signs of toxicity. After euthanization, the prostate was dissected under magnification and stained by hematoxylin and eosin to study acinar structures and stained with Picrosirius red for collagen analysis. Results: After radiation exposure, all animals presented diarrhea, but supplementation with L-arginine reduced this effect. The weight gain in the R+S group was significantly higher than in the C and R groups. In the R+S group the collagen density and the prostate acinar area was similar to the R and C groups. Epithelial height was significantly reduced in group R compared with group C (p<0.0001). When comparing the group R+S with R, a statistical difference was observed to be present (p<0.0001). Conclusions: Pelvic radiation promotes systemic effects and some structural modifications in the ventral prostate of rats. These modifications can be prevented by oral supplementation with L-arginine. (author)

  17. Effects of the communities that care prevention system on youth reports of protective factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B K Elizabeth; Gloppen, Kari M; Rhew, Isaac C; Oesterle, Sabrina; Hawkins, J David

    2015-07-01

    Many interventions seeking to reduce problem behaviors and promote healthy youth development target both risk and protective factors, yet few studies have examined the effect of preventive interventions on overall levels of protection community wide. In a community-randomized controlled trial, this study tested the effect of Communities That Care (CTC) on protective factors in 24 communities across seven states. Data on protective factors were collected from a panel of 4407 youths in CTC and control communities followed from grade 5 through grade 8. Hierarchical linear modeling compared mean levels of 15 protective factors derived from the social development model in CTC and control communities in grade 8, adjusted for individual and community characteristics and baseline levels of protective factors in grade 5. Global test statistics were calculated to examine effects on protection overall and by domain. Analyses across all protective factors found significantly higher levels of overall protection in CTC compared to control communities. Analyses by domain found significantly higher levels of protection in CTC than control communities in the community, school, and peer/individual domains, but not in the family domain. Significantly higher levels of opportunities for prosocial involvement in the community, recognition for prosocial involvement in school, interaction with prosocial peers, and social skills among CTC compared to control youth contributed to the overall and domain-specific results. This is consistent with CTC's theory of change, which posits that strengthening protective factors is a mechanism through which CTC prevents behavior problems.

  18. Protective Effect of Theaflavin on Erythrocytes Subjected to In Vitro Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahejabeen Fatima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant and free radical scavenging effect of black tea theaflavins has been shown in many epidemiological studies. In the present work we report the protective mechanism of tea theaflavins on biomarkers of oxidative stress, which are elevated during stress conditions. We hereby report the in vitro effect of theaflavins on erythrocyte malondialdehyde (MDA, intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH, and plasma membrane redox system (PMRS of rats. The effect of theaflavin on PMRS has also been validated through an in silico docking simulation study using Molegro Virtual Docker (MVD. We report that theaflavins show significant protection to erythrocyte against oxidative stress induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP. The findings suggest a possible protective role of theaflavins as antioxidant.

  19. The protective effects of black garlic extract for blood and intestinal mucosa to irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Do Young; KIm, Joon Sun; Choi, Hyeong Seok [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences Cancer Center, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jun Hyeok; Park, Won Suk; Min, Byung In [Inje University, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The radiation has been utilized in a number of fields, even though the use of plenty cause a variety of side effects. This study was confirmed for radiation protective effects of aged garlic to contribute to the prevention of disasters that are radiation exposure. We studied the Complete Blood cell Count(CBC) and the small intestine after feeding aged garlic extract into Sprague Dawley Rat which irradiated X-ray beam 7 and 13 Gy. Garlic extract was administered to the results in the experimental group showed a notable difference in the CBC of platelets (p<0.05), red blood cells (p<0.05) and early damaged white blood cells (p<0.05). In addition, it was confirmed that experimental group's small intestine crypt is more survival than irradiation group significantly. And experimental group has small intestine villi length almost similar to the normal group. result of the aged garlic study will be able to be of great benefit for the radiation relevant emergency management.

  20. The protective effects of black garlic extract for blood and intestinal mucosa to irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Do Young; KIm, Joon Sun; Choi, Hyeong Seok; Choi, Jun Hyeok; Park, Won Suk; Min, Byung In

    2016-01-01

    The radiation has been utilized in a number of fields, even though the use of plenty cause a variety of side effects. This study was confirmed for radiation protective effects of aged garlic to contribute to the prevention of disasters that are radiation exposure. We studied the Complete Blood cell Count(CBC) and the small intestine after feeding aged garlic extract into Sprague Dawley Rat which irradiated X-ray beam 7 and 13 Gy. Garlic extract was administered to the results in the experimental group showed a notable difference in the CBC of platelets (p<0.05), red blood cells (p<0.05) and early damaged white blood cells (p<0.05). In addition, it was confirmed that experimental group's small intestine crypt is more survival than irradiation group significantly. And experimental group has small intestine villi length almost similar to the normal group. result of the aged garlic study will be able to be of great benefit for the radiation relevant emergency management

  1. Characterizing Chemical Similarity with Vibrational Spectroscopy: New Insights into the Substituent Effects in Monosubstituted Benzenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yunwen; Zou, Wenli; Cremer, Dieter; Kraka, Elfi

    2017-10-26

    A novel approach is presented to assess chemical similarity based the local vibrational mode analysis developed by Konkoli and Cremer. The local mode frequency shifts are introduced as similarity descriptors that are sensitive to any electronic structure change. In this work, 59 different monosubstituted benzenes are compared. For a subset of 43 compounds, for which experimental data was available, the ortho-/para- and meta-directing effect in electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions could be correctly reproduced, proving the robustness of the new similarity index. For the remaining 16 compounds, the directing effect was predicted. The new approach is broadly applicable to all compounds for which either experimental or calculated vibrational frequency information is available.

  2. Similarly shaped letters evoke similar colors in grapheme-color synesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brang, David; Rouw, Romke; Ramachandran, V S; Coulson, Seana

    2011-04-01

    Grapheme-color synesthesia is a neurological condition in which viewing numbers or letters (graphemes) results in the concurrent sensation of color. While the anatomical substrates underlying this experience are well understood, little research to date has investigated factors influencing the particular colors associated with particular graphemes or how synesthesia occurs developmentally. A recent suggestion of such an interaction has been proposed in the cascaded cross-tuning (CCT) model of synesthesia, which posits that in synesthetes connections between grapheme regions and color area V4 participate in a competitive activation process, with synesthetic colors arising during the component-stage of grapheme processing. This model more directly suggests that graphemes sharing similar component features (lines, curves, etc.) should accordingly activate more similar synesthetic colors. To test this proposal, we created and regressed synesthetic color-similarity matrices for each of 52 synesthetes against a letter-confusability matrix, an unbiased measure of visual similarity among graphemes. Results of synesthetes' grapheme-color correspondences indeed revealed that more similarly shaped graphemes corresponded with more similar synesthetic colors, with stronger effects observed in individuals with more intense synesthetic experiences (projector synesthetes). These results support the CCT model of synesthesia, implicate early perceptual mechanisms as driving factors in the elicitation of synesthetic hues, and further highlight the relationship between conceptual and perceptual factors in this phenomenon. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiation protection effect of selenium on the Rat's prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyung Seok; Choi, Jun Hyeok; Jung, Do Young; Kim, Jang Oh; Shin, Ji Hye; Kim, Joo Hee; Min, Byung In [Inje University, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    High-tech medical equipment has increased the utilization of radiation in the medical field. As a result, research on radiation protection using natural materials has become an important social issue. Selenium is a natural substance that is highly expressed in prostate known that an essential role in prostate cells. Selenium was orally administered to Rat and irradiated with 10 Gy of radiation. Then, the prostate tissue was used as a target organ for 1 day, 7 days and 21 days to investigate the radiation protection effect of selenium through changes of blood components, Superoxide Dismutase and histological changes. As a result, there was a significant protective effect of hematopoietic immune system(hemoglobin concentration, neutrophil, platelet) in the group irradiated with selenium(p<0.05). The observation of tissue changes selenium is an effective component to increase Superoxide Dismutase activity, and it was confirmed that it has an effect of inhibiting the expression of hypertrophy of prostate by irradiation. Therefore, it is considered that selenium can be utilized as a radioprotective agent by inducing prevention of prostate-related diseases.

  4. Effect of emulsification on the skin permeation and UV protection of catechin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Sachie; Mitoma, Tomoaki; Tsuruta, Keiko; Todo, Hiroaki; Sugibayashi, Kenji

    2014-06-01

    An anti-aging effect may be obtained by skin application of tea catechins (Camellia sinensis) since they have high ultraviolet (UV)-protection activity. In this study, the skin permeation of catechin (C), epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC), epicatechin gallate (ECg) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg) was determined and compared, and the effect of emulsification on the skin permeation of C was measured. The UV-protective effect of C was also determined. The in vitro skin permeability of each catechin derivative was determined using side-by-side diffusion of cells. The UV-protective effect of C was determined by applying different concentrations of C to the solution or emulsion on a three-dimensional cultured human skin model or normal human epidermal keratinocytes with UV-irradiation. ECg and EGCg with gallate groups showed lower skin permeability than C, EC and EGC without gallate groups, suggesting that the skin permeability of catechin derivatives may be dependent on the existence of a gallate group. Interestingly, the skin permeation of C was increased by an o/w emulsification. In addition, the C emulsion showed a significantly higher UV-protective effect by C than that with its aqueous solution. These results suggest that the o/w emulsion of catechin derivatives is probably useful as a cosmetic formulation with anti-aging efficacy.

  5. Protective effects of flavonoids from corn silk on oxidative stress ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Protective effects of flavonoids from corn silk on oxidative stress induced by ... The present study aims at exploring the effects of flavonoids from corn silk (FCS) on oxidative stress induced by exhaustive exercise in mice. ... from 32 Countries:.

  6. Effective Hamiltonian for protected edge states in graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, R.; Deshpande, H.

    2017-01-01

    Edge states in topological insulators (TIs) disperse symmetrically about one of the time-reversal invariant momenta Λ in the Brillouin zone (BZ) with protected degeneracies at Λ. Commonly TIs are distinguished from trivial insulators by the values of one or multiple topological invariants that require an analysis of the bulk band structure across the BZ. We propose an effective two-band Hamiltonian for the electronic states in graphene based on a Taylor expansion of the tight-binding Hamiltonian about the time-reversal invariant M point at the edge of the BZ. This Hamiltonian provides a faithful description of the protected edge states for both zigzag and armchair ribbons, though the concept of a BZ is not part of such an effective model. In conclusion, we show that the edge states are determined by a band inversion in both reciprocal and real space, which allows one to select Λ for the edge states without affecting the bulk spectrum.

  7. Usefulness of non-lead aprons in radiation protection for physicians performing interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuguchi, M.; Chida, K.; Taura, M.; Inaba, Y.; Ebata, A.; Yamada, S.

    2008-01-01

    At present, interventional radiology (IVR) tends to involve long procedures (long radiation duration), and physicians are near to the source of scattered radiation. Hence, shielding is critical in protecting physicians from radiation. Protective aprons and additional lead-shielding devices, such as table-side lead drapes, are important means of protecting the physician from scattered radiation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether non-lead aprons are effective in protecting physicians from radiation during IVR procedures. In this study, the radiation protection effects of commercially available protective lead and non-lead aprons, when exposed to diagnostic X rays, are compared. The performance of these non-lead and lead aprons was similar for scattered X rays at tube voltages of 60-120 kV. Properly designed non-lead aprons are thus more suitable for physicians because they weigh ∼20% less than the lead aprons, and are non-toxic. (authors)

  8. Identification with the retail organization and customer-perceived employee similarity: effects on customer spending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netemeyer, Richard G; Heilman, Carrie M; Maxham, James G

    2012-09-01

    Two constructs important to academicians and managers are the degree to which employees and customers identify with an organization, employee organizational identification (employee OI) and customer-company identification (customer identification), respectively. This research examines the effects of these identification constructs and the related construct of customer perceived similarity to employees on customer spending. Via a 1-year multilevel study of 12,047 customers and 1,464 store employees (sales associates) covering 212 stores of a specialty apparel retailer, our study contributes to the literature in 2 critical ways. First, we expand the theoretical network of employee OI and customer identification by examining the related construct of a customer's perceived similarity to store employees. We examine the incremental (not fully mediated) main and interaction effects of customer-perceived similarity to employees and employee OI on customer spending. Second, we examine the effect of customer identification on customer spending relative to the effect of customer satisfaction on customer spending. Thus, our study also contributes by demonstrating a potential complementary route to achieve customer spending (customer identification), a route that may be more readily affected by management than the efforts required for a sustained increase in customer satisfaction. Implications for academics and managers are offered.

  9. Strengthening Radiation Protection Infrastructures in Africa: Towards Establishing Effective and Sustainable Co-operations and Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-09-01

    The third African IRPA 2010 conference on Strengthening Radiation Protection Infrastructures in Africa: Towards Establishing Effective and Sustainable Co-operations and Networks. IAEA's role in radiation protection with focus in Africa. The controlling of exposure to indoor Radon. And Measure of activities and calculation of effective dose of indoor 222 Rn in some dwelling and enclosed areas in Africa - capacity building for radiation protection. It had also address Patient Radiation Protection in Radiotherapy, challenges for advancing medical physic globally, Heath effects and medical applications of non-ionizing radiation, nuclear safety and radiation protection consideration in the design of research and development. The International radiation protection association (IRPA) 2010-2011 strategic plan that address among other issues educations and training activities (2000-2020) and the current UNSCLEAR activities

  10. E.M.I Effects of Cathodic Protection on Electromagnetic Flowmeters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozge Sahin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic flowmeters are used to measure the speed of water flow in water distribution systems. Corrosion problem in metal pipelines can be solved by cathodic protection methods. This paper presents a research on corruptive effects of the cathodic protection system on electromagnetic flowmeter depending on its measuring principle. Experimental measurements are realized on the water distribution pipelines of the Izmir Municipality, Department of Water and Drainage Administration (IZSU in Turkey and measurement results are given. Experimental results proved that the values measured by the electromagnetic flowmeter (EMF are affected by cathodic protection system current. Comments on the measurement results are made and precautions to be taken are proposed.

  11. Protective effect of vanillic acid on ovariectomy-induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The need for an anti-osteoporotic agent is in high demand since osteoporosis contributes to high rates of disability or impairment (high osteoporotic fracture), morbidity and mortality. Hence, the present study is designed to evaluate the protective effects of vanillic acid (VA) against bilateral ovariectomy-induced ...

  12. Protective Effect of Vitamin E on Nicotine Induced Reproductive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Protective Effect of Vitamin E on Nicotine Induced Reproductive Toxicity in ... The health implications of cigarette smoking and ..... toxic byproducts of many metabolic processes in ... Male infertility, clinical ... rats: A possible role of cessation.

  13. Labour Market Effects of Employment Protection. IAB Labour Market Research Topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walwei, Ulrich

    The labor market effects of employment protection were examined in a study of Germany's employment protection regulations and their impact on employment practices and patterns. The following topics were considered: (1) the question of whether Germany's labor market problems are a result of regulations; (2) employment security as a subject of labor…

  14. Study of the Effective Parameters on the Making Use of Protective Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Tabaraie

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and objectives

    Noise threats health of many groups of industrial workers and causes hearing loss. Use of personal protective device is the best control method to protect against hazardous conditions. Hence, this investigation was carried out to determine situation of using of protective devices and effective parameters on it, in Qom province workers community in 2006.

     

    Methods

    This research is descriptive-sectional study. Sample volume was designed 378 persons working in factories in Qom. First of all, list of Qom factories with noise pollution problems, were collected and 30 important factories among them were selected randomly. In the second stage, 378 persons were selected randomly from workers. The interest information was obtained by questionnaire and collected data were analyzed by SPSS software.

     

    Results

    The obtained results showed that, 83.6% of workers have been using ear protective devices. 296 of them, which were using ear protective devices, had an occupational hygienist in their workplaces. This research also showed that, 109 workers that used ear protective devices, had moderate knowledge level. Moreover, 82.5% of trained workers have used ear protective devices. The statistical analysis of the results showed that there were no significant relationship between use of ear protective devices and existence of occupational hygienist in workplace, knowledge and age of workers, worker’s antecedent, physical health of workers and kind of ear protective devices (p> 0.05. 

     

    Conclusion

    These results showed that among all considered parameters; only four parameters were effective in using ear protective devices; education of workers before employment, head workman and employer’s knowledge level, factories facilitation and kind of ear protective devices.

     

  15. Composite symmetry-protected topological order and effective models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nietner, A.; Krumnow, C.; Bergholtz, E. J.; Eisert, J.

    2017-12-01

    Strongly correlated quantum many-body systems at low dimension exhibit a wealth of phenomena, ranging from features of geometric frustration to signatures of symmetry-protected topological order. In suitable descriptions of such systems, it can be helpful to resort to effective models, which focus on the essential degrees of freedom of the given model. In this work, we analyze how to determine the validity of an effective model by demanding it to be in the same phase as the original model. We focus our study on one-dimensional spin-1 /2 systems and explain how nontrivial symmetry-protected topologically ordered (SPT) phases of an effective spin-1 model can arise depending on the couplings in the original Hamiltonian. In this analysis, tensor network methods feature in two ways: on the one hand, we make use of recent techniques for the classification of SPT phases using matrix product states in order to identify the phases in the effective model with those in the underlying physical system, employing Künneth's theorem for cohomology. As an intuitive paradigmatic model we exemplify the developed methodology by investigating the bilayered Δ chain. For strong ferromagnetic interlayer couplings, we find the system to transit into exactly the same phase as an effective spin-1 model. However, for weak but finite coupling strength, we identify a symmetry broken phase differing from this effective spin-1 description. On the other hand, we underpin our argument with a numerical analysis making use of matrix product states.

  16. Energy evaluation of protection effectiveness of anti-vibration gloves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Tomasz; Dobry, Marian Witalis

    2017-09-01

    This article describes an energy method of assessing protection effectiveness of anti-vibration gloves on the human dynamic structure. The study uses dynamic models of the human and the glove specified in Standard No. ISO 10068:2012. The physical models of human-tool systems were developed by combining human physical models with a power tool model. The combined human-tool models were then transformed into mathematical models from which energy models were finally derived. Comparative energy analysis was conducted in the domain of rms powers. The energy models of the human-tool systems were solved using numerical simulation implemented in the MATLAB/Simulink environment. The simulation procedure demonstrated the effectiveness of the anti-vibration glove as a method of protecting human operators of hand-held power tools against vibration. The desirable effect is achieved by lowering the flow of energy in the human-tool system when the anti-vibration glove is employed.

  17. Student and Professor Similarity: Exploring the Effects of Gender and Relative Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrt, Kenneth; Louie, Therese A.; Osland, Asbjorn

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined student responses to faculty traits. Earlier findings revealing a preference for male instructors were obtained before female faculty and students were prevalent on college campuses and may have reflected a male demographic similarity effect. It was hypothesized that students would more favorably evaluate faculty who were…

  18. Interference between Maintenance and Processing in Working Memory: The Effect of Item-Distractor Similarity in Complex Span

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberauer, Klaus; Farrell, Simon; Jarrold, Christopher; Pasiecznik, Kazimir; Greaves, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Four experiments examined the effect of phonological similarity between items and distractors on complex span performance. Item-distractor similarity benefited serial recall when distractors followed the items they were similar to, but not when distractors preceded the items they were similar to. These findings are predicted by C-SOB (contextual…

  19. Excellence through radiation protection practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.A.; Armitage, G.; Popple, R.T.; Carrigan, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    The nuclear generation program at Ontario Hydro was initiated in the early 1960s. Over the last two decades the program has expanded to a planned capacity of ∼ 14,000 MW(electric) by 1992. Each of the nuclear stations consists of four identical reactor units and they range in size from 520 to 880 MW(electric). The overall objectives of Ontario Hydro's radiation protection program are stated as follows: (1) to prevent detrimental nonstochastic health effects to employees and the public; (2) to limit detrimental stochastic health effects occurring in employees or the public to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), social and economic factors being taken into account; and (3) to provide a level of health and safety that is as good as, or better than, comparable safe industries. Although many elements of the radiation protection program are similar to those adopted by other electrical utilities around the world, there are some unique features that have played an important part in the improvements achieved. These include: management commitment, design responsibility, radiation protection training, operations control, and work planning. The issues that need to be addressed in striving for overall excellence in radiological safety over the next decade are summarized

  20. Radiation Effects on PP/PS Blends as a Model of Protection Effects by Aromatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gluszewski, W.

    2006-01-01

    Polypropylene (PP) is the most popular polymer for the application in construction of medical devices, due to the hardness and temperature resistance. Unfortunately, the virgin PP is of low resistance towards ionizing radiation, already to sterilization doses and cannot be applied without additives. Another option is a blend with a second polymer, especially aromatic, and therefore polystyrene (PS) was applied. The classic case of protection in the aliphatic/aromatic system (benzene/cyclohexane in liquid or solid state) shows that the surface area and structure of the interphase is crucial for the effectiveness of energy transfer. Our blends of PP (virgin, F401 from Orlen-Olefins) with PS were prepared in a variety of ways, from mechanical blending, to radiation induced grafting. Two linac accelerators (10 MeV, 6-9 kW) were applied, with different shapes of electron beam, formed according to particular methods used for the investigation of effects; doses were 10-600 kGy. As in the classic case, the protection effect was quantisized from the curve of the effect vs 0-100% PP, 100-0 % PS. Main recognition of the protection effect has been done by the diffused reflection spectroscopy (DRS) developed in our Laboratory for the application to irradiated polymers. The dependence of intensity of bands in the DRS spectrum, attributed to keton groups, which are final products of oxidation, shows clearly the protection effect of PP, executed by PS. The second method of observation of radiation effects is gas chromatography (GC), applied for irradiation products analysis. The maximum sensitivity has been achieved using the instrument type GC 2014 by Shimadzu, with thermal conductivity detector, column packed with molecular sieves 5A. Radiation induced formation of gaseous produced at ambient and lower temperatures is unique in the field of chemistry of polymers. There is no form of energy, except ionizing radiation, to cause chemical reactions to produce a wide spectrum of low

  1. The Effect of Operating Lamps on the Protected Area of a Unidirectional Down Flow (UDF) System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traversari, A A L; Bottenheft, C; Louman, R; van Heumen, S P M; Böggemann, J

    2017-04-01

    Operating lamps are often seen as the most disruptive factors within the protective area in the operating theater (OT). The effect of the operation lamps (with different shapes) should be demonstrated in an OT by trial, since research on the effects of the lamps is still limited. The main aim of this study was to determine the effects of a skirt, different lamps, and the position of the lamp on the protected area. The concentration of airborne particles was measured under different circumstances, in order to determine the size and quality of the protected area. This entrainment/segregation test is based on the deliberate and controlled emission of particles outside the zone that is protected. The degree of protection (DP) at the center of the protected area was higher for the case with the skirt. This skirt stimulates more down flow and prevents the early entry of particles into the protected area. It can also be concluded that Lamp Y, due to its open shape, has the most positive effect on the DP at the center. It has also been shown that the position of the lamp has an effect on the protected area.

  2. Protective effect of 4-coumaric acid from UVB ray damage in the rabbit eye

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodovici, Maura; Caldini, Silvia; Morbidelli, Lucia; Akpan, Victor; Ziche, Marina; Dolara, Piero

    2009-01-01

    UV-induced oxidation damage seems to play a major role in a number of specific pathological conditions of intraocular tissues, such as cataract formation and retinal degeneration. Therefore, antioxidant and/or scavenger compounds might protect the eyes from UV-induced cellular damage. We previously reported that 4-coumaric acid (4-CA) is able to protect rabbit corneal-derived cells (SIRC) from UVB-induced oxidation damage. In this study we evaluated the protective effect of 4-CA against UVB-induced cell damage in rabbit cornea in vivo. Twelve male New Zealand albino rabbits were used; four rabbits were used as a control and received vehicle in one eye and 4-CA acid in the contralateral eye; eight rabbits were exposed to UVB rays (79.2 mJ/cm 2 ) and three days before to UV exposure each animal received 1 drop/day of vehicle in one eye and 1 drop/day of vehicle containing 4-CA (164 ng) in the contralateral eye. Corneal and sclera tissues were removed and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) levels were measured. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and xanthine oxidase (XO) activities were determined in aqueous humour. UVB-induced vessel hyper-reactivity was strongly reduced at 4 and 24 h after UVB exposure after local treatment with 4-CA, 8-oxodGuo levels, a marker of oxidative DNA damage, were significantly increased (P < 0.05) in sclera and cornea by UVB irradiation, but when 4-CA was administered to the conjunctiva in a buffered solution once a day for 3 d before and 6 d after UVB exposure, levels of 8-oxodGuo were similar to controls and significantly reduced (P < 0.05) compared to UVB-treated corneas. XO activity in the aqueous humour was significantly increased. The administration of 4-CA for 3 d before and 6 d after UVB irradiation induced a small but significant (P < 0.05) reduction of XO compared with control eyes. Our results indicate that the administration of 4-CA protects eye tissues, thus reducing the harmful effect of UVB radiation at low

  3. Radiation protection in the age of accountability - measuring our effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, D.E.

    1993-01-01

    Effectiveness and accountability were catch-words of the 1980s for public and private enterprises. This mood has persisted into the current decade and radiation protection authorities have not escaped the organisational microscope. But whereas simple models and measures of effectiveness can be applied to most private companies and government agencies, organisations in the regulatory and preventative health areas cannot be assessed by the same criteria. These organisations are fundamentally different because their primary objective is one of minimisation. This paper looks at options for measuring and reporting the effectiveness of radiation protection organisations. Some performance indicators are proposed and evaluated. The intention is not, however, to present a 'solution' to this apparently vexing problem. Indeed, the answer may be that there is none. 11 refs., 4 figs

  4. Protective effect of Ziziphus mauritiana leaf extract on carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    2005-09-13

    Sep 13, 2005 ... Short Communication. Protective effect of Ziziphus ... INTRODUCTION. Medicinal plants play a key role in the human health care. About 80% of the world .... McGraw Hill International Edition, London. Gregus Z, Kiwassen C ...

  5. The protective effect of ischemic preconditioning on rat testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciralik Harun

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been demonstrated that brief episodes of sublethal ischemia-reperfusion, so-called ischemic preconditioning, provide powerful tissue protection in different tissues such as heart, brain, skeletal muscle, lung, liver, intestine, kidney, retina, and endothelial cells. Although a recent study has claimed that there are no protective effects of ischemic preconditioning in rat testis, the protective effects of ischemic preconditioning on testicular tissue have not been investigated adequately. The present study was thus planned to investigate whether ischemic preconditioning has a protective effect on testicular tissue. Methods Rats were divided into seven groups that each contained seven rats. In group 1 (control group, only unilateral testicular ischemia was performed by creating a testicular torsion by a 720 degree clockwise rotation for 180 min. In group 2, group 3, group 4, group 5, group 6, and group 7, unilateral testicular ischemia was performed for 180 min following different periods of ischemic preconditioning. The ischemic preconditioning periods were as follows: 10 minutes of ischemia with 10 minutes of reperfusion in group 2; 20 minutes of ischemia with 10 minutes of reperfusion in group 3; 30 minutes of ischemia with 10 minutes of reperfusion in group 4; multiple preconditioning periods were used (3 × 10 min early phase transient ischemia with 10 min reperfusion in all episodes in group 5; multiple preconditioning periods were used (5, 10, and 15 min early phase transient ischemia with 10 min reperfusion in all episodes in group 6; and, multiple preconditioning periods were used (10, 20, and 30 min early phase transient ischemia with 10 min reperfusion in all episodes in group 7. After the ischemic protocols were carried out, animals were sacrificed by cervical dislocation and testicular tissue samples were taken for biochemical measurements (protein, malondialdehyde, nitric oxide and histological examination

  6. Studies on the protection effects of functional foods for skin immune system from radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, Sung Tae; Shin, Seong Hae; Kim, Do Sun; Heo, Ji Yun; Kang, Hye In

    2007-07-01

    We evaluated the protective effects of pilot products (HemoHIM and HemoTonic) on the UV-induced skin immune damages as the following. · Protective effects of HemoHIM and HemoTonic against UV using contact hypersensitivity model - Protection against depression of contact hypersensitivity by administration and skin application of HemoHIM and HemoTonic - Induction of dendritic cell differentiation and maturation by HemoHIM and HemoTonic treatment - Improvement of antigen-presenting activity of dedritic cells by HemoHIM and HemoTonic treatment · Protective effects of HemoHIM and HemoTonic on skin immune system against UV-irradiation - Protection of antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells under UV-irradiation - In vivo protection of antigen-presenting activity of Langerhans cells in UV-irradiated mice · Protective effects of HemoHIM on UV-induced apoptosis of dendritic cells - Inhibition of cell membrane change, mitochondrial potential change, SubG1 cell population, nuclear condensation, and DNA fragmentation in UV-irradiated dendritic cells · Anti-allergic effects of HemoHIM and HemoTonic in human adipocyte HMC-1 cells - Inhibition of allergic histamine release from adipocytes - Inhibition of secretion of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, GM-CSF) - Inhibition of c-kit, tryptase, FcεRI mRNA expression From these results, the developed functional food products (HemoHIM, HemoTonic) showed the protection and recovery of the immune functions in the UV-irradiated skin. It is suggested that these products may be used as a new functional food or cosmetic material for the protection of skin damage and the promotion of recovery

  7. Climatic conditions and child height: Sex-specific vulnerability and the protective effects of sanitation and food markets in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulmi, Prajula; Block, Steven A; Shively, Gerald E; Masters, William A

    2016-12-01

    Environmental conditions in early life are known to have impacts on later health outcomes, but causal mechanisms and potential remedies have been difficult to discern. This paper uses the Nepal Demographic and Health Surveys of 2006 and 2011, combined with earlier NASA satellite observations of variation in the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) at each child's location and time of birth to identify the trimesters of gestation and periods of infancy when climate variation is linked to attained height later in life. We find significant differences by sex: males are most affected by conditions in their second trimester of gestation, and females in the first three months after birth. Each 100-point difference in NDVI at those times is associated with a difference in height-for-age z-score (HAZ) measured at age 12-59 months of 0.088 for boys and 0.054 for girls, an effect size similar to that of moving within the distribution of household wealth by close to one quintile for boys and one decile for girls. The entire seasonal change in NDVI from peak to trough is approximately 200-300 points during the 2000-2011 study period, implying a seasonal effect on HAZ similar to one to three quintiles of household wealth. This effect is observed only in households without toilets; in households with toilets, there is no seasonal fluctuation, implying protection against climatic conditions that facilitate disease transmission. We also use data from the Nepal Living Standards Surveys on district-level agricultural production and marketing, and find a climate effect on child growth only in districts where households' food consumption derives primarily from their own production. Robustness tests find no evidence of selection effects, and placebo regression results reveal no significant artefactual correlations. The timing and sex-specificity of climatic effects are consistent with previous studies, while the protective effects of household sanitation and food markets are

  8. A Strategy toward Collaborative Filter Recommended Location Service for Privacy Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A new collaborative filtered recommendation strategy was proposed for existing privacy and security issues in location services. In this strategy, every user establishes his/her own position profiles according to their daily position data, which is preprocessed using a density clustering method. Then, density prioritization was used to choose similar user groups as service request responders and the neighboring users in the chosen groups recommended appropriate location services using a collaborative filter recommendation algorithm. The two filter algorithms based on position profile similarity and position point similarity measures were designed in the recommendation, respectively. At the same time, the homomorphic encryption method was used to transfer location data for effective protection of privacy and security. A real location dataset was applied to test the proposed strategy and the results showed that the strategy provides better location service and protects users’ privacy.

  9. Effect of acoustic similarity on short-term auditory memory in the monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Brian H; Mishkin, Mortimer; Yin, Pingbo

    2013-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the monkey's short-term memory in audition depends on a passively retained sensory trace as opposed to a trace reactivated from long-term memory for use in working memory. Reliance on a passive sensory trace could render memory particularly susceptible to confusion between sounds that are similar in some acoustic dimension. If so, then in delayed matching-to-sample, the monkey's performance should be predicted by the similarity in the salient acoustic dimension between the sample and subsequent test stimulus, even at very short delays. To test this prediction and isolate the acoustic features relevant to short-term memory, we examined the pattern of errors made by two rhesus monkeys performing a serial, auditory delayed match-to-sample task with interstimulus intervals of 1 s. The analysis revealed that false-alarm errors did indeed result from similarity-based confusion between the sample and the subsequent nonmatch stimuli. Manipulation of the stimuli showed that removal of spectral cues was more disruptive to matching behavior than removal of temporal cues. In addition, the effect of acoustic similarity on false-alarm response was stronger at the first nonmatch stimulus than at the second one. This pattern of errors would be expected if the first nonmatch stimulus overwrote the sample's trace, and suggests that the passively retained trace is not only vulnerable to similarity-based confusion but is also highly susceptible to overwriting. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Visual and Phonological Similarity Effects in Verbal Immediate Serial Recall: A Test with Kanji Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Satoru; Logie, Robert H.; Morita, Aiko; Law, Anna

    2008-01-01

    In a series of three experiments, native speakers of Japanese performed serial ordered written recall of visually presented Japanese kanji characters that varied systematically in visual and phonological similarity. Overall effects of phonological similarity were observed for retention of serial order under silent reading in Experiments 1 and 3…

  11. The impact of distracter-target similarity on contextual cueing effects of children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yingying; Merrill, Edward C

    2014-05-01

    Contextual cueing reflects a memory-based attentional guidance process that develops through repeated exposure to displays in which a target location has been consistently paired with a specific context. In two experiments, we compared 20 younger children's (6-7 years old), 20 older children's (9-10 years old), and 20 young adults' (18-21 years old) abilities to acquire contextual cueing effects from displays in which half of the distracters predicted the location of the target and half did not. Across experiments, we varied the similarity between the predictive and nonpredictive distracters and the target. In Experiment 1, the predictive distracters were visually similar to the target and dissimilar from the nonpredictive distracters. In Experiment 2, the nonpredictive distracters were also similar to the target and predictive distracters. All three age groups exhibited contextual cueing in Experiment 1, although the effect was not as strong for the younger children relative to older children and adults. All participants exhibited weaker contextual cueing effects in Experiment 2, with the younger children not exhibiting significant contextual cueing at all. Apparently, when search processes could not be guided to the predictive distracters on the basis of salient stimulus features, younger children in particular experienced difficulty in implicitly identifying and using aspects of the context to facilitate with the acquisition of contextual cueing effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Protective effect of hemin against cadmium-induced testicular damage in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouad, Amr A.; Qureshi, Habib A.; Al-Sultan, Ali Ibrahim; Yacoubi, Mohamed T.; Ali, Abdellah Abusrie

    2009-01-01

    The protective effect of hemin, the heme oxygenase-1 inducer, was investigated in rats with cadmium induced-testicular injury, in which oxidative stress and inflammation play a major role. Testicular damage was induced by a single i.p. injection of cadmium chloride (2 mg/kg). Hemin was given for three consecutive days (40 μmol/kg/day, s.c.), starting 1 day before cadmium administration. Hemin treatment significantly increased serum testosterone level that was reduced by cadmium. Hemin compensated deficits in the antioxidant defense mechanisms (reduced glutathione, and catalase and superoxide dismutase activities), and suppressed lipid peroxidation in testicular tissue resulted from cadmium administration. Also, hemin attenuated the cadmium-induced elevations in testicular tumor necrosis factor-α and nitric oxide levels, and caspase-3 activity. Additionally, hemin ameliorated cadmium-induced testicular tissue damage observed by light and electron microscopic examinations. The protective effect afforded by hemin was abolished by prior administration of zinc protoporphyrin-IX, the heme oxygenase-1 inhibitor. It was concluded that hemin, through its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic effects, represents a potential therapeutic option to protect the testicular tissue from the detrimental effects of cadmium

  13. Radiation-protective effect with screens of fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, H.; Sasaki, Y.; Chaya, K.; Furui, Y.

    1991-01-01

    In a fluoroscopic situation supposing heartworm removal using flexible alligator forceps, the radiationprotective effect of lead-containing screens was examined. Regarding measurements using a gamma-survey meter, X-ray exposure to the operator was reduced from 24.6±7.5 micro-Sievert (μSv)/hr to 0.47±0.08μSv/hr by using protective screens at position A, which corresponds to the operator's face level. At position B, which corresponds to the position of operator's left-hand fingers, the exposure level decreased from 33.1±1.37μSv/hr to 3.01±1.23μSv/hr when screens were used, and decreased more to 0.44±0.16μSv/ hr with the use of protective gloves. At position C, which was at the operator's foot, the exposure level decreased from 0.65±0.27μSv/hr to 0.24±0.10μSv/hr. Regarding measurements using a film badge for 20 experimental dogs, in which each dog was fluoroscopied for 20 sec×15 times, the operator would be totally exposed to 0.1 mSv in H 3mm , dose equivalent value against the eye lens and H 70μm , dose equivalent value against the skin at position B, but below the minimal limit for detection of X-ray (0.1 mSv) in H 1cm , effective dose-equivalent value. Exposure levels were below the minimal limit at positions A and C and at all positions which were protected with screens. Also, dogs were exposed to X-ray 2.20±0.96 mSv on fluoroscopy for 20 sec x 15 times. (author)

  14. Effects of pictures and textual arguments in sun protection public service announcements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer, Henk; Ter Huurne, Ellen; Taal, Erik

    2006-01-01

    The effect of public service announcements aimed at promoting primary prevention of skin cancer may be limited by superficial cognitive processing. The use of both pictures and textual arguments in sun protection public service announcements were evaluated for their potentially beneficial effects on judgment, cognitive processing and persuasiveness. In a 2 x 2 factorial experimental design individuals were shown public service announcements that advocated the advantages of sun protection measures in different versions in which a picture was present or not present and a textual argument was present or not present. The 159 participants were randomly assigned to one of four conditions. In each condition, participants were shown 12 different public service announcements designed according to the condition. Participants judged each public service announcement on attractiveness, credibility, clarity of communication and the required amount of reflection. After the judgment task, they completed a questionnaire to assess knowledge, perceived advantages and disadvantages of sun protection and intended use of sun protection measures. Pictures enhanced attractiveness, but diminished comprehension. Textual arguments enhanced attractiveness, credibility and comprehension. Pictures as well as textual arguments increased knowledge of sun protection measures. Pictures and textual arguments in public service announcements positively influence the individual's perception of the advantages of sun protection methods and the advantages of their adoption.

  15. E.S.R. studies of mechanisms of radiation protection effect by cysteine and cystine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue-Peng, L.; Tie-Cheng, T.; Nian-Yun, L.

    1981-01-01

    By means of E.S.R. the repair mechanism of radiation induced spin transfer from dTMP to cysteine in binary system dTMP-cysteine has been confirmed. Furthermore, a new marked radiation protection effect, exerted by cysteine or cystine on thymine irradiated and observed at low temperature, has been detected. Another sort of fast protection mechanism, including electron transfer and excitation transfer, has been proposed, based on recent advances of primary radiation process of pyrimidine bases and analysed by molecular orbital theory. This fast radiation protection mechanism provides the possibility to utilize electrophilic sulfhydryl protectors for realizing excellent protection effect. (author)

  16. Personality similarity and life satisfaction in couples

    OpenAIRE

    Furler Katrin; Gomez Veronica; Grob Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the association between personality similarity and life satisfaction in a large nationally representative sample of 1608 romantic couples. Similarity effects were computed for the Big Five personality traits as well as for personality profiles with global and differentiated indices of similarity. Results showed substantial actor and partner effects indicating that both partners' personality traits were related to both partners' life satisfaction. Personality similar...

  17. Protective effect of lactobacillus acidophilus and isomaltooligosaccharide on intestinal mucosal barriers in rat models of antibiotic-associated diarrhea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Dan; Fang Lichao; Chen Bingbo; Wei Hong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the protective effect of synbiotics combined lactobacillus acidophilus and iso-malto-oligosaccharide (IMO) on intestinal mucosal barriers in rat models of antibiotic-associated diarrhea(AAD). Methods: Rat models of AAD were prepared with lincomycin gavage for 5 days. The synbiotics was orally administered to the AAD rats daily at three different strengths for 7 days. The intestinal flora and intestinal mucus SIgA levels were determined on d6, d9 and d13. The histopathological changes of ileal mucosa were studied on d13. Results: In the prepared AAD model rats (on d6) there were lower intestinal mucus SIgA levels and intestinal flora disorders were demonstrated. The intestinal floras of the rats administering synbiotics were readjusted to the similar pattern of healthy rats with bacterial translocation corrected on d13 and the levels of SIgA were not significantly different from of the control (P>0.05). The histopathological picture was basically normal in the treated models on d13. Conclusion: The synbiotics combined lactobacillus acidophilus and isomaltooligosaccharide possessed good protective effect on the intestinal mucosal barrier in lincomycin induced rat models of AAD. (authors)

  18. Future development of biological understanding of radiation protection: implications of nonstochastic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, F.F.; McClellan, R.O.; Boecker, B.B.; Muggenburg, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation-protection standards are based on minimizing or preventing biological effects in exposed populations. Radiation-induced biological effects can be classified as stochastic--malignant and hereditary diseases for which the probability of an effect occurring is a function of dose without threshold--and nonstochastic--inflammatory and degenerative diseases for which the severity and frequency of the effect varies with the dose and for which a threshold is present. The current International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) approach for setting limits for intakes of radionuclides by workers, which accounts for doses to significantly exposed organs of the body, is based on limitation of stochastic effects in most situations. When setting exposure limits, nonstochastic effects are generally considered to be unlikely at the limits for stochastic effects. In some situations, limits based on prevention of nonstochastic effects are lower than for stochastic effects. This review considers the threshold radiation doses for thyroid, bone, liver and lung and their relationship to the limits recommended by the ICRP and the cancer risks at the limits. This review indicates that the threshold dose for nonstochastic effects in thyroid and lung is much above the dose limit as advocated by ICRP. The threshold dose for nonstochastic effects in bone and liver is much closer to the dose limit, but protection from nonstochastic effects should still be afforded by the dose limits

  19. Protective Effects of Aqueous Extract of Sempervivum tectorum L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Protective Effects of Aqueous Extract of Sempervivum tectorum L ( Crassulaceae ) on Aluminium-Induced Oxidative Stress in Rat Blood. ... Results: Aluminium (Al) exposure increased, compared to control group, the level of blood Al (293.64 %, p 0.05), glutathione ...

  20. Herd Protection from Drinking Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, James A; Eisenberg, Joseph N S

    2016-11-02

    Herd immunity arises when a communicable disease is less able to propagate because a substantial portion of the population is immune. Nonimmunizing interventions, such as insecticide-treated bednets and deworming drugs, have shown similar herd-protective effects. Less is known about the herd protection from drinking water, sanitation, and hand hygiene (WASH) interventions. We first constructed a transmission model to illustrate mechanisms through which different WASH interventions may provide herd protection. We then conducted an extensive review of the literature to assess the validity of the model results and identify current gaps in research. The model suggests that herd protection accounts for a substantial portion of the total protection provided by WASH interventions. However, both the literature and the model suggest that sanitation interventions in particular are the most likely to provide herd protection, since they reduce environmental contamination. Many studies fail to account for these indirect effects and thus underestimate the total impact an intervention may have. Although cluster-randomized trials of WASH interventions have reported the total or overall efficacy of WASH interventions, they have not quantified the role of herd protection. Just as it does in immunization policy, understanding the role of herd protection from WASH interventions can help inform coverage targets and strategies that indirectly protect those that are unable to be reached by WASH campaigns. Toward this end, studies are needed to confirm the differential role that herd protection plays across the WASH interventions suggested by our transmission model. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  1. Effectiveness of Human Research Protection Program Performance Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsan, Min-Fu; Nguyen, Yen

    2017-10-01

    We analyzed human research protection program performance metric data of all Department of Veterans Affairs research facilities obtained from 2010 to 2016. Among a total of 25 performance metrics, 21 (84%) showed improvement, four (16%) remained unchanged, and none deteriorated during the study period. The overall improvement from these 21 performance metrics was 81.1% ± 18.7% (mean ± SD), with a range of 30% to 100%. The four performance metrics that did not show improvement all had initial noncompliance/incidence rates of performance metrics that showed improvement ranged from 0.05% to 60%. However, of the 21 performance metrics that showed improvement, 10 had initial noncompliance/incidence rates of performance measurement is an effective tool in improving the performance of human research protection programs.

  2. An experimental test of the persuasive effect of source similarity in narrative and nonnarrative health blogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Amy Shirong

    2013-07-25

    Blogs, or websites containing online personal journals, are a form of popular personal communication with immense potential for health promotion. Narratives are stories with a beginning, middle, and end that provide information about the characters and plot. Source similarity refers to the degree to which the message source and each recipient are alike with respect to certain attributes. Narratives and source similarity have seldom been examined in tandem as strategies for health persuasion. Personal health blogs provide a suitable platform for such an investigation. This study examined the persuasive effects of message type and source similarity on participants' intentions to adopt a specific health behavior (running for exercise). A total of 150 participants were randomly assigned to conditions (n=25 per condition) in a completely crossed, 2 (message type: narrative and nonnarrative) × 3 (source similarity: no similarity, non-health-related similarity, and health-related similarity) between-subjects experiment. First, in an online questionnaire, participants provided personal information in 42 categories and rated the relatedness of each category to running and then completed pretest measures of the dependent variables. Based on their responses, 150 personal health blogs were created. Two weeks later, the initial participants read the blog created with their personal characteristics and completed a questionnaire online. The source similarity effect was stronger in nonnarrative than narrative blogs. When the blogs were nonnarrative, those with health-related similarities were more persuasive than those with non-health-related similarities. Narrative blogs generated more positive thoughts and stronger blogger identification than nonnarrative blogs. Health-related source similarity is key for persuasive health communication, especially when the messages are nonnarrative.

  3. Studies on the protection effects of functional foods for skin immune system from radiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, Sung Tae; Shin, Seong Hae; Kim, Do Sun; Heo, Ji Yun; Kang, Hye In [Sunchon National University, Sunchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-15

    We evaluated the protective effects of pilot products (HemoHIM and HemoTonic) on the UV-induced skin immune damages as the following. centre dot Protective effects of HemoHIM and HemoTonic against UV using contact hypersensitivity model - Protection against depression of contact hypersensitivity by administration and skin application of HemoHIM and HemoTonic - Induction of dendritic cell differentiation and maturation by HemoHIM and HemoTonic treatment - Improvement of antigen-presenting activity of dedritic cells by HemoHIM and HemoTonic treatment centre dot Protective effects of HemoHIM and HemoTonic on skin immune system against UV-irradiation - Protection of antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells under UV-irradiation - In vivo protection of antigen-presenting activity of Langerhans cells in UV-irradiated mice centre dot Protective effects of HemoHIM on UV-induced apoptosis of dendritic cells - Inhibition of cell membrane change, mitochondrial potential change, SubG1 cell population, nuclear condensation, and DNA fragmentation in UV-irradiated dendritic cells centre dot Anti-allergic effects of HemoHIM and HemoTonic in human adipocyte HMC-1 cells - Inhibition of allergic histamine release from adipocytes - Inhibition of secretion of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-alpha, GM-CSF) - Inhibition of c-kit, tryptase, FcepsilonRI mRNA expression From these results, the developed functional food products (HemoHIM, HemoTonic) showed the protection and recovery of the immune functions in the UV-irradiated skin. It is suggested that these products may be used as a new functional food or cosmetic material for the protection of skin damage and the promotion of recovery

  4. Gender similarities and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Janet Shibley

    2014-01-01

    Whether men and women are fundamentally different or similar has been debated for more than a century. This review summarizes major theories designed to explain gender differences: evolutionary theories, cognitive social learning theory, sociocultural theory, and expectancy-value theory. The gender similarities hypothesis raises the possibility of theorizing gender similarities. Statistical methods for the analysis of gender differences and similarities are reviewed, including effect sizes, meta-analysis, taxometric analysis, and equivalence testing. Then, relying mainly on evidence from meta-analyses, gender differences are reviewed in cognitive performance (e.g., math performance), personality and social behaviors (e.g., temperament, emotions, aggression, and leadership), and psychological well-being. The evidence on gender differences in variance is summarized. The final sections explore applications of intersectionality and directions for future research.

  5. Indirect application of near infrared light induces neuro-protection in a mouse model of parkinsonism - an abscopal neuro-protective effective evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnstone, D.M.; Spana, S.; Purushothuman, S.; Stone, J.; Mitrofanis, J.; Johnstone, D.M.; Spana, S.; Purushothuman, S.; Stone, J.; El Massri, N.; Mitrofanis, J.; Moro, C.; Torres, N.; Chabrol, C.; De Jaeger, X.; Reinhart, F.; Benabid, A.L.; Wang, X.S.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown near infrared light (NIr), directed transcranially, mitigates the loss of dopaminergic cells in MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine)-treated mice, a model of parkinsonism. These findings complement others suggesting NIr treatment protects against damage from various insults. However one puzzling feature of NIr treatment is that unilateral exposure can lead to a bilateral healing response, suggesting NIr may have 'indirect' protective effects. We investigated whether remote NIr treatment is neuro-protective by administering different MPTP doses (50-, 75-, 100-mg/kg) to mice and treating with 670-nm light directed specifically at either the head or body. Our results show that, despite no direct irradiation of the damaged tissue, remote NIr treatment produces a significant rescue of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells in the substantia nigra pars compacta at the milder MPTP dose of 50-mg/kg (30% increase vs sham-treated MPTP mice, p≤ 0.05). However this protection did not appear as robust as that achieved by direct irradiation of the head (50% increase vs sham-treated MPTP mice, p ≤0.001). There was no quantifiable protective effect of NIr at higher MPTP doses, irrespective of the delivery mode. Astrocyte and microglia cell numbers in substantia nigra pars compacta were not influenced by either mode of NIr treatment. In summary, the findings suggest that treatment of a remote tissue with NIr is sufficient to induce protection of the brain, reminiscent of the 'abscopal effect' sometimes observed in radiation treatment of metastatic cancer. This discovery has implications for the clinical translation of light-based therapies, providing an improved mode of delivery over trans-cranial irradiation. (authors)

  6. Protective effects of oleum curcumae wenchowensis on skin damage due to UVB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhicheng; Zhao Hongguang; Du Xiang; Li Yanbo; Guo Wei; Gong Shouliang; Xiao Jian; Yao Chongshun; Li Xiaokun

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the protective effects of oleum curcumae wenchowensis on skin damage exposed to UVB and its mechanism, and to provide the experimental basis for the protection of skin damage exposed to UVB. Methods: The skin of guinea pigs was exposed to UVB (28.38 J/cm 2 · 30 d) to establish the oxidative damage model. The skin erythema and the rough were observed during the experiment; the thickness of epiderm and the number of fibroblast were observed under light microscope after the experiment. The activities of GSH-Px, SOD, CAT and T-AOC and the contain of MDA in the supernate of skin homogenate were detected with biochemical methods. Results: The epiderm in UVB exposure group and blank group thickened, but that in protective group weren't observed; the number of fibroblast in UVB exposure group and blank group decreased, while that in protective group increased, but that in control group didn't. The content of MDA in the supemate of skin homogenate in UVB exposure group and blank group increased, but that in protective group deceased, and the activities of GSH-Px, SOD, CAT and T-AOC in UVB exposure group and blank group decreased, but those in protective group increased, and control group had no change. Conclusions: Oleum curcumae wenchowensis has the protective effects on skin damage exposed to UVB, which may be mediated by increasing the contain of antioxidases and eliminating the flee radical. (authors)

  7. Protective effect of corticosteroids on radiation pneumonitis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, N.J.; Narine, K.R.; Wade, R.

    1988-01-01

    We explored the protective effect of corticosteroids on the mortality of mice that received thoracic irradiation. Methylprednisolone, 100 mg/kg/week, given from 11 weeks after gamma irradiation of the thorax resulted in an increase in the LD50 (11-26 weeks) from 14.3 +/- 0.3 (mean +/- SE) Gy to 17.6 +/- 0.4 Gy, P less than 0.001, a protection factor of 1.2. Withdrawal of steroids at various times during the period of radiation pneumonitis resulted in accelerated mortality in the next 2-4 weeks, so that the cumulative mortality caught up with that of control animals by 4 weeks after steroid withdrawal. However, after the end of the usual period of pneumonitis withdrawal of steroids did not result in accelerated mortality, suggesting that the time when steroids are protective corresponds to the duration of pneumonitis. A smaller dose of steroids, 25 mg/kg/week, was found to be as protective as the larger dose used in the above experiments. The possibility that corticosteroids reduce mortality, even when given many weeks after radiation, may have important practical and theoretical implications

  8. Protecting the fast breeders: Problem formulation and effects analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oughton, D.H.

    2003-01-01

    Recent debates on protection of the environment from ionising radiation have reached reasonable agreement over the ethical and philosophical basis of environmental protection and a recognition that a practical system of protection will need to support (at a minimum) the principles of sustainable development, biodiversity, and conservation. However, there is still some controversy over the use of dose assessment tools within risk evaluation and management. The paper uses the case of the Dounreay 'radioactive rabbits' to discuss the advantages and limitations of proposed systems, focusing primarily on the interaction between ecological risk assessment (ERA) and the reference flora and fauna approach. It concludes that the reference approach is a valuable tool for the analysis of environmental effects, but that there is a problem if it becomes the driving force of the protection framework. In particular, there is a need for a clearer focus on non-technical issues within the problem formulation stage of ERA, particularly the social, ethical, political and economic issues, and there should be a strong commitment to stakeholder involvement at this stage. The problem formulation stage should identify the relevant assessment tools; the assessment tool should dictate neither the problem formulation nor the risk management. (author)

  9. Field selection of chemical protective clothing and respiratory protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinette, S.; Dodgen, C.; Morley, M.

    1991-01-01

    Safety professionals who must choose appropriate personal protective equipment for hazardous substance response or hazardous waste sites require useable information about the effectiveness of the various products available. Each hazardous waste operation involves a unique combination of chemical hazards requiring a unique combination of protective apparel. A chemical protective suit or respirator must be chosen for each site and each operation on the site. No single protective suit is effective against all chemical hazards. No single respirator is the best choice in every situation. Various sources of information on the effectiveness of protective clothing products will be discussed. Site-specific permeation testing of the proposed protective clothing options will also be discussed. It is both possible and practical to obtain specific information about the degree of protection afforded by a particular suit against a particular chemical mixture. It is also important to know how long the suit will last. Choosing adequate respiratory protection is a complex process. Respirator cartridge performance depends on various environmental factors as well as upon the combination and concentration of chemicals in the air. Once characterization of the air at a site has been accomplished, it may be appropriate to select an alternative to airline respirators and SCBAs. Respirator cartridges can be tested against specific chemical mixtures using worse case environmental factors. The results can be used to predict both the effectiveness and duration of protection afforded by respirator cartridges which can reduce costs and worker fatigue

  10. The effectiveness of contrasting protected areas in preventing deforestation in Madre de Dios, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuohelainen, Anni Johanna; Coad, Lauren; Marthews, Toby R; Malhi, Yadvinder; Killeen, Timothy J

    2012-10-01

    Accurate monitoring of the effectiveness of protected areas (PAs) in decreasing deforestation is increasingly important given the vital role of forest protection in climate change mitigation. Recent studies on PA effectiveness have used remote-sensing imagery to compare deforestation rates within PAs to surrounding areas. However, remote-sensing data used in isolation provides limited information on the factors contributing to effectiveness. We used landscape-modelling techniques to estimate the effectiveness of ten PAs in Madre de Dios, Peru. Factors influencing PA effectiveness were investigated using in situ key-informant interviews. Although all of the PAs studied had positive effectiveness scores, those with the highest scores were ecotourism and conservation concessions, where monitoring and surveillance activities and good relations with surrounding communities were reported as possible factors in decreasing deforestation rates. Native community areas had the lowest scores, with deforestation mainly driven by internal resource use and population growth. Weak local governance and immigration were identified as underlying factors decreasing the effectiveness of protection, whereas good relations with surrounding communities and monitoring activity increased effectiveness. The results highlight the need to combine remote sensing with in situ information on PA management because identification of drivers and deterrents of deforestation is vital for improving the effectiveness of protection.

  11. The radiation protection effects of TMG to the embryonic effects on the organogenesis stage in ICR mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santokuya, Takumi; Gu, Yeunhwa; Suzuki, Ikukatsu; Hasegawa, Takeo; Yamamoto, Youichi; Iwasa, Toshihiro; Yanagisawa, Takaharu

    1999-01-01

    The Organogenesis stage is the most important from the viewpoint of ionizing protection. Many physical and chemical agents in the environment can effect an embryo. Fetal deaths were classified as Preimplantation, Embryonic and Fetal. We studied an excuse as a radio protective agent of the high malformation of the sensitivity most by using TMG to the radiation. This study aimed at obtaining the information to provide it for the fetus' protection to the various environmental radiations. As for Preimplantation death, there was a statistical difference the 2.0Gy Group in comparison with the control group (p<0.05). Embryonic death, a statistical difference was recognized as in all the treatment groups (p<0.001). But, as for the TMG+radiation group, Malformation rate decreased to 1/2. As for Fetal body weight, a statistical difference was recognized in radiation group, the radiation+TMG infusion group chisels for medical use (p<0.05). Therefore, TMG protecting effect to the radiation was made clear by this research

  12. Does cannabidiol protect against adverse psychological effects of THC?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond J.M. eNiesink

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The recreational use of cannabis can have persistent adverse effects on mental health. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC is the main psychoactive constituent of cannabis, and most, if not all, of the effects associated with the use of cannabis are caused by THC. Recent studies have suggested a possible protective effect of another cannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD. A literature search was performed in the bibliographic databases PubMed, PsycINFO and Web of Science using the keyword ‘cannabidiol.’ After removing duplicate entries, 1295 unique titles remained. Based on the titles and abstracts, an initial selection was made. The reference lists of the publications identified in this manner were examined for additional references. Cannabis is not a safe drug. Depending on how often someone uses, the age of onset, the potency of the cannabis that is used and someone's individual sensitivity, the recreational use of cannabis may cause permanent psychological disorders. Most recreational users will never be faced with such persistent mental illness, but in some individuals cannabis use leads to undesirable effects: cognitive impairment, anxiety, paranoia and increased risks of developing chronic psychosis or drug addiction. Studies examining the protective effects of CBD have shown that CBD can counteract the negative effects of THC. However, the question remains of how the laboratory results translate to the types of cannabis that are encountered by real-world recreational users.

  13. Mercury toxicity in beluga whale lymphocytes: Limited effects of selenium protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frouin, H.; Loseto, L.L.; Stern, G.A.; Haulena, M.; Ross, P.S.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing emissions of anthropogenic mercury represents a growing concern to the health of high trophic level marine mammals. In its organic form, this metal bioaccumulates, and can be toxic to several physiological endpoints, including the immune system. In this study, we (1) evaluated the effects of inorganic mercury (mercuric chloride, HgCl 2 ) and organic mercury (methylmercuric chloride, MeHgCl) on the in vitro function of lymphocytes isolated from the peripheral blood of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas); (2) characterized the potential protective effects of sodium selenite (Na 2 SeO 3 ) on cell proliferation of HgCl 2 or MeHgCl-treated beluga whale lymphocytes; and (3) compared these dose-dependent effects to measurements of blood Hg in samples collected from traditionally harvested beluga whales in the western Canadian Arctic. Lymphocyte proliferative responses were reduced following exposure to 1 μM of HgCl 2 and 0.33 μM of MeHgCl. Decreased intracellular thiol levels were observed at 10 μM of HgCl 2 and 0.33 μM of MeHgCl. Metallothionein induction was noted at 0.33 μM of MeHgCl. Concurrent exposure of Se provided a degree of protection against the highest concentrations of inorganic Hg (3.33 and 10 μM) or organic Hg (10 μM) for T-lymphocytes. This in vitro protection of Se against Hg toxicity to lymphocytes may contribute to the in vivo protection in beluga whales exposed to high Hg concentrations. Current Hg levels in free-ranging beluga whales from the Arctic fall into the range of exposures which elicited effects on lymphocytes in our study, highlighting the potential for effects on host resistance to disease. The implications of a changing Arctic climate on Hg fate in beluga food webs and the consequences for the health of beluga whales remain pressing research needs.

  14. Mixed-List Phonological Similarity Effects in Delayed Serial Recall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Simon

    2006-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that placing dissimilar items on lists of phonologically similar items enhances accuracy of ordered recall of the dissimilar items [Farrell, S., & Lewandowsky, S. (2003). Dissimilar items benefit from phonological similarity in serial recall. "Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition," 29,…

  15. Effective protection of biological membranes against photo-oxidative damage: Polymeric antioxidant forming a protecting shield over the membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertins, Omar; Mathews, Patrick D; Gomide, Andreza B; Baptista, Mauricio S; Itri, Rosangela

    2015-10-01

    We have prepared a chitosan polymer modified with gallic acid in order to develop an efficient protection strategy biological membranes against photodamage. Lipid bilayers were challenged with photoinduced damage by photosensitization with methylene blue, which usually causes formation of hydroperoxides, increasing area per lipid, and afterwards allowing leakage of internal materials. The damage was delayed by a solution of gallic acid in a concentration dependent manner, but further suppressed by the polymer at very low concentrations. The membrane of giant unilamellar vesicles was covered with this modified macromolecule leading to a powerful shield against singlet oxygen and thus effectively protecting the lipid membrane from oxidative stress. The results have proven the discovery of a promising strategy for photo protection of biological membranes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The effective thermal conductivity of porous media based on statistical self-similarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kou Jianlong; Wu Fengmin; Lu Hangjun; Xu Yousheng; Song Fuquan

    2009-01-01

    A fractal model is presented based on the thermal-electrical analogy technique and statistical self-similarity of fractal saturated porous media. A dimensionless effective thermal conductivity of saturated fractal porous media is studied by the relationship between the dimensionless effective thermal conductivity and the geometrical parameters of porous media with no empirical constant. Through this study, it is shown that the dimensionless effective thermal conductivity decreases with the increase of porosity (φ) and pore area fractal dimension (D f ) when k s /k g >1. The opposite trends is observed when k s /k g t ). The model predictions are compared with existing experimental data and the results show that they are in good agreement with existing experimental data.

  17. Associations between authoritative parenting and the sun exposure and sun protective behaviours of adolescents and their friends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewse, Avril J; Lea, Stephen E G; Ntala, Eleni; Eiser, J Richard

    2011-05-01

    Associations between the sun exposure and sun protective behaviours of adolescents and their friends were examined along with the role played by authoritative parenting and other family and peer socialisation factors. Four hundred and two adolescents (198 males, 204 females) participated in the research. It was found that these adolescents and their friends shared similar sun exposure and sun protective behaviours and had similar parenting backgrounds. Parental authoritativeness was positively associated with the use of sun protection, even after the effects of other familial and peer variables were controlled, but not with the time spent sunbathing which was associated with friends' behaviours. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.

  18. Phonological similarity and orthographic similarity affect probed serial recall of Chinese characters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Chen; Chen, Hsiang-Yu; Lai, Yvonne C; Wu, Denise H

    2015-04-01

    The previous literature on working memory (WM) has indicated that verbal materials are dominantly retained in phonological representations, whereas other linguistic information (e.g., orthography, semantics) only contributes to verbal WM minimally, if not negligibly. Although accumulating evidence has suggested that multiple linguistic components jointly support verbal WM, the visual/orthographic contribution has rarely been addressed in alphabetic languages, possibly due to the difficulty of dissociating the effects of word forms from the effects of their pronunciations in relatively shallow orthography. In the present study, we examined whether the orthographic representations of Chinese characters support the retention of verbal materials in this language of deep orthography. In Experiments 1a and 2, we independently manipulated the phonological and orthographic similarity of horizontal and vertical characters, respectively, and found that participants' accuracy of probed serial recall was reduced by both similar pronunciations and shared phonetic radicals in the to-be-remembered stimuli. Moreover, Experiment 1b showed that only the effect of phonological, but not that of orthographic, similarity was affected by concurrent articulatory suppression. Taken together, the present results indicate the indispensable contribution of orthographic representations to verbal WM of Chinese characters, and suggest that the linguistic characteristics of a specific language not only determine long-term linguistic-processing mechanisms, but also delineate the organization of verbal WM for that language.

  19. Buprenorphine is protective against the depressive effects of norbuprenorphine on ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megarbane, Bruno; Marie, Nicolas; Pirnay, Stephane; Borron, Stephen W.; Gueye, Papa N.; Risede, Patricia; Monier, Claire; Noble, Florence; Baud, Frederic J.

    2006-01-01

    High dose buprenorphine is used as substitution treatment in heroin addiction. However, deaths have been reported in addicts using buprenorphine. The role of norbuprenorphine, an N-dealkyl metabolite of buprenorphine, was hypothesized to explain these fatal cases. We determined the median intravenous lethal dose (LD 5 ) of norbuprenorphine in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The effects of a single intravenous dose of 3 or 9 mg/kg norbuprenorphine alone on arterial blood gases were studied. Finally, the effect of pre- and post-administrations of buprenorphine on norbuprenorphine-induced changes on arterial blood gases were analyzed. Norbuprenorphine's LD 5 was 10 mg kg -1 . Norbuprenorphine 3 mg kg -1 produces the rapid onset of sustained respiratory depression, as demonstrated at 20 min by a maximal significant increase in PaCO 2 (8.4 ± 0.9 versus 5.7 ± 0.1 kPa), decrease in arterial pH (7.25 ± 0.06 versus 7.44 ± 0.01), and hypoxia (8.3 ± 0.6 versus 11.1 ± 0.2 kPa). Buprenorphine not only protected against the effects of 3 mg kg -1 norbuprenorphine in a dose-dependent manner but also reversed the effects when given afterward. Binding experiments suggest a role for mu- and to a lesser extent for delta-opioid receptors in buprenorphine protective effect against norbuprenorphine-induced respiratory depression. In conclusion, our data clearly show that norbuprenorphine alone causes important deleterious effects on ventilation in rats. However, buprenorphine protective effect calls into question the role for norbuprenorphine in respiratory toxicity associated with buprenorphine use

  20. Protective Effect of a Lipid-Based Preparation from Mycobacterium smegmatis in a Murine Model of Progressive Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de los Angeles García

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A more effective vaccine against tuberculosis (TB is urgently needed. Based on its high genetic homology with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, the nonpathogenic mycobacteria, Mycobacterium smegmatis (Ms, could be an attractive source of potential antigens to be included in such a vaccine. We evaluated the capability of lipid-based preparations obtained from Ms to provide a protective response in Balb/c mice after challenge with Mtb H37Rv strain. The intratracheal model of progressive pulmonary TB was used to assess the level of protection in terms of bacterial load as well as the pathological changes in the lungs of immunized Balb/c mice following challenge with Mtb. Mice immunized with the lipid-based preparation from Ms either adjuvanted with Alum (LMs-AL or nonadjuvanted (LMs showed significant reductions in bacterial load (P<0.01 compared to the negative control group (animals immunized with phosphate buffered saline (PBS. Both lipid formulations showed the same level of protection as Bacille Calmette and Guerin (BCG. Regarding the pathologic changes in the lungs, mice immunized with both lipid formulations showed less pneumonic area when compared with the PBS group (P<0.01 and showed similar results compared with the BCG group. These findings suggest the potential of LMs as a promising vaccine candidate against TB.

  1. Photo-protective effect of calcipotriol upon skin photoreaction to UVA and UVB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, J.I.; Park, B.S.; Chung, J.H.; Lee, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    It has been shown that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 has a photo-protective effect against UVB injury in mouse skin and cultured rat keratinocytes by induction of metallothionein (MT). Calcipotriol is a synthetic analogue of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 with equi-potent cell regulating properties, but with a lower risk of calcium-related side effects. The aim of the present study was to see whether calcipotriol has a photo-protective property both in vitro and in vivo. We examined the effect of calcipotriol on UV-induced damage of cultured human keratinocytes through a cell viability assay, and measurement of DNA synthesis by cultured keratinocytes, on UV-induced damage of mouse skin and on minimal erythema dose (MED). We found that calcipotriol was protective against UVB-induced reduction in DNA synthetic activity of cultured keratinocytes in relatively low doses (20 and 40 mJ/cm 2 ) of UVB. With photo-testing following application of calcipotriol, five subjects among 10 healthy volunteers and three among six psoriasis patients showed an increase in MED compared with the vehicle-treated site. These findings imply that calcipotriol may be photo-protective and that more extensive studies with various doses of UV irradiation and modes of calcipotriol delivery are required. (au)

  2. Photo-protective effect of calcipotriol upon skin photoreaction to UVA and UVB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, J.I.; Park, B.S.; Chung, J.H. [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Dept. of Dermatology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J.H. [Inha Univ. College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-03-01

    It has been shown that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} has a photo-protective effect against UVB injury in mouse skin and cultured rat keratinocytes by induction of metallothionein (MT). Calcipotriol is a synthetic analogue of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} with equi-potent cell regulating properties, but with a lower risk of calcium-related side effects. The aim of the present study was to see whether calcipotriol has a photo-protective property both in vitro and in vivo. We examined the effect of calcipotriol on UV-induced damage of cultured human keratinocytes through a cell viability assay, and measurement of DNA synthesis by cultured keratinocytes, on UV-induced damage of mouse skin and on minimal erythema dose (MED). We found that calcipotriol was protective against UVB-induced reduction in DNA synthetic activity of cultured keratinocytes in relatively low doses (20 and 40 mJ/cm{sup 2}) of UVB. With photo-testing following application of calcipotriol, five subjects among 10 healthy volunteers and three among six psoriasis patients showed an increase in MED compared with the vehicle-treated site. These findings imply that calcipotriol may be photo-protective and that more extensive studies with various doses of UV irradiation and modes of calcipotriol delivery are required. (au). 21 refs.

  3. Protective effects of a zinc-hydroxyapatite toothpaste on enamel erosion: SEM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Marco; Beltrami, Riccardo; Rattalino, Davide; Mirando, Maria; Chiesa, Marco; Poggio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate the protective effects of a zinc-hydroxyapatite toothpaste against an erosive challenge produced by a soft drink (Coca-Cola) using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Forty specimens were assigned to 4 groups of 10 specimens each (group 1: no erosive challenge, no toothpaste treatment, group 2: erosive challenge, no toothpaste treatment, group 3: erosive challenge, fluoride toothpaste treatment, group 4: erosive challenge, zinc-hydroxyapatite toothpaste treatment). The surface of each specimen was imaged by SEM. A visual rating system was used to evaluate the condition of the enamel surface; results were analyzed by nonparametric statistical methods. Statistically significant differences were found between the samples untreated and those immersed in Coca-Cola (group 1, 2); the highest grade of damage was found in group 2, while the lowest grade was recorded in the samples of group 4. Comparing the groups, the two analyzed toothpaste tended to protect in different extend. In this study treatment of erosively challenged enamel with Zn-Hap toothpaste showed a clear protective effect. This was greater than the effect observed for a normal fluoride toothpaste and confirmed the potential benefit the Zn-HAP technology can provide in protecting enamel from erosive acid challenges.

  4. Protective Effect of Purple Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas Linn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the protective effects of purple sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas Linn, Convolvulaceae) extract (IBE) in stimulated BV-2 microglial cells and its anti-oxidant properties. Methods: Cell viability assessment was performed by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5- diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay.

  5. Evaluation the protective effect of diphenhydramine against acute toxicity induced by levamisole in male mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Y. Matti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of different doses of diphenhydramine against acute toxicosis with Levamisole. The Mechanism of levamisole induced acute toxicity and that of protective effect of diphenhydramine against Levamisole toxicosis also examined on the level of cholinesterase (ChE activity. Subcutanous injection of 100mg/kg levamisole in male mice with induced cholinergic over stimulation and death in 100% of animals. The Toxicosis was not related to the significantly decreased in plasma, red blood cells and brain ChE activity. Injection low dose of diphenhydramin 2.5mg/kg S.C. 15 min before levamisole produced protective effect against acute toxicity with levamisole. Significantly decreased the severity of toxicosis and increased survival rates to 100%. Diphenhydramine at low dose alone or with acute dose of levamisole did not Produced Significantly inhibition in ChE activity.The data suggested that the toxic effect of Levamisole was not related to inhibition of ChE. The low dose of diphenhydramine protected mice from Levamisole toxicity. The antidoatal effect of diphenhydramine not at the level of protection from ChE inhibition. There was no adverse interaction between two drugs.

  6. Protective Factors as an Explanation for the "Paradox" of Black-White Differences in Heavy Drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulia, Nina; Ye, Yu; Karriker-Jaffe, Katherine J; Zemore, Sarah E; Jones-Webb, Rhonda

    2018-04-02

    African Americans are generally known to have lower heavy drinking prevalence than Whites despite often greater individual and community risk factors. While it is supposed that their protective resources explain this "paradox," studies have not explicitly examined this. Assess the contribution of protective resources to Black-White differences in heavy drinking, and (secondarily) whether protective resources operate by reducing heavy drinking and/or increasing abstinence. Using data from the 2009-2010 U.S. National Alcohol Survey (N = 3,133 Whites and 1,040 Blacks ages 18+), we applied propensity score (PS) weighting to estimate racial differences in heavy drinking and abstinence under hypothetical conditions in which Whites are similar to Blacks in: (1) age and marital status; (2) socioeconomic position and unfair treatment; (3) neighborhood socioeconomic conditions and alcohol outlet density; and (4) protective resources (proscriptive religiosity, area-level religiosity, "drier" network drinking norms and patterns, and family social support). The Black-White gap in male and female drinkers' baseline heavy drinking increased after weighting adjustments for demographics. In women, this gap was reduced after weighting on disadvantage and eliminated after adjusting for protective resources. In men, adjustment for disadvantage increased the racial gap, and protective resources reduced it. Protective resources had a stronger effect on Black-White differences in men's abstinence than heavy drinking, but similar effects on these outcomes in women. Protective resources help explain Black-White differences in men's and particularly women's heavy drinking. Future research is needed to elucidate mechanisms of action and additional factors underlying racial differences in men's heavy drinking.

  7. Immunogenicity is unrelated to protective immunity when induced by soluble and particulate antigens from Nocardia brasiliensis in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Carmona, Mario C; Ramos, Alma I; Pérez-Rivera, Isabel

    2006-08-01

    Cell-mediated immunity plays a major role in protection against intracellular microbes. Nocardia brasiliensis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes chronic actinomycetoma. In this work, we injected BALB/c mice with soluble P24 and particulate antigens from N. brasiliensis. A higher antibody titer and lymphocyte proliferation was induced by the particulate antigen than by the soluble antigen. However, five months after antigen injection, antibody concentration and lymphocyte proliferation were similar. An increase in CD45R and CD4 T cells was unrelated to protective immunity. Active immunization with soluble or particulate antigens induced complete protection during the primary immune response. This protective response was IgM mediated. The higher immunogenicity was not related to protective immunity since the particulate antigen induced protection similar to the soluble antigen. Using particulate antigens for vaccination guarantees a stronger immune response, local and systemic side effects, but not necessarily protection.

  8. Bioavailability, metabolism and potential health protective effects of dietary flavonoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredsdorff, Lea

    Dietary flavonoids constitute an important group of potential health protective compounds from fruits, vegetables, and plant-based products such as tea and wine. The beneficial effects of a diet high in flavonoids on the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) have been shown in several epidemiologi......Dietary flavonoids constitute an important group of potential health protective compounds from fruits, vegetables, and plant-based products such as tea and wine. The beneficial effects of a diet high in flavonoids on the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) have been shown in several...... of their content. In addition, variation in individual metabolic genotype and microflora may greatly affect the actual flavonoid exposure. The preventive effects of flavonoids on CHD are mainly ascribed to their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. Several mechanisms of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant...... effective absorption of hesperetin and naringenin from the small intestine when consumed as glucosides compared to absorption in the colon VII after microbial degradation of the rhamnoglucosides. In addition it was shown that the conjugate profile was neither affected by the absorption site nor by a 3-fold...

  9. Protective effects of carnosol against oxidative stress induced brain damage by chronic stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarghandian, Saeed; Azimi-Nezhad, Mohsen; Borji, Abasalt; Samini, Mohammad; Farkhondeh, Tahereh

    2017-05-04

    Oxidative stress through chronic stress destroys the brain function. There are many documents have shown that carnosol may have a therapeutic effect versus free radical induced diseases. The current research focused the protective effect of carnosol against the brain injury induced by the restraint stress. The restraint stress induced by keeping animals in restrainers for 21 consecutive days. Thereafter, the rats were injected carnosol or vehicle for 21 consecutive days. At the end of experiment, all the rats were subjected to his open field test and forced swimming test. Afterwards, the rats were sacrificed for measuring their oxidative stress parameters. To measure the modifications in the biochemical aspects after the experiment, the activities of malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) and catalase (CAT) were evaluated in the whole brain. Our data showed that the animals received chronic stress had a raised immobility time versus the non-stressed animals (p < 0.01). Furthermore, chronic stress diminished the number of crossing in the animals that were subjected to the chronic stress versus the non-stressed rats (p < 0.01). Carnosol ameliorated this alteration versus the non-treated rats (p < 0.05). In the vehicle treated rats that submitted to the stress, the level of MDA levels was significantly increased (P < 0.001), and the levels of GSH and antioxidant enzymes were significantly decreased versus the non-stressed animals (P < 0.001). Carnosol treatment reduced the modifications in the stressed animals as compared with the control groups (P < 0.001). All of these carnosol effects were nearly similar to those observed with fluoxetine. The current research shows that the protective effects of carnosol may be accompanied with enhanced antioxidant defenses and decreased oxidative injury.

  10. Effectiveness of Protected Areas for Representing Species and Populations of Terrestrial Mammals in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Maya, José F.; Víquez-R, Luis R.; Belant, Jerrold L.; Ceballos, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Costa Rica has one of the greatest percentages (26%) of protected land in the world. The National Protected Areas System (NPAS) of Costa Rica was established in 1976 and currently includes >190 protected areas within seven different protection categories. The effectiveness of the NPAS to represent species, populations, and areas with high species richness has not been properly evaluated. Such evaluations are fundamental to understand what is necessary to strengthen the NPAS and better protect biodiversity. We present a novel assessment of NPAS effectiveness in protecting mammal species. We compiled the geographical ranges of all terrestrial Costa Rican mammals then determined species lists for all protected areas and the estimated proportion of each species’ geographic range protected. We also classified mammal species according to their conservation status using the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. We found almost complete representation of mammal species (98.5%) in protected areas, but low relative coverage (28.3% on average) of their geographic ranges in Costa Rica and 25% of the species were classified as underprotected according to a priori representation targets. Interestingly, many species-rich areas are not protected, and at least 43% of cells covering the entire country are not included in protected areas. Though protected areas in Costa Rica represent species richness well, strategic planning for future protected areas to improve species complementarity and range protection is necessary. Our results can help to define sites where new protected areas can have a greater impact on mammal conservation, both in terms of species richness and range protection. PMID:25970293

  11. Effectiveness of protected areas for representing species and populations of terrestrial mammals in Costa Rica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José F González-Maya

    Full Text Available Costa Rica has one of the greatest percentages (26% of protected land in the world. The National Protected Areas System (NPAS of Costa Rica was established in 1976 and currently includes >190 protected areas within seven different protection categories. The effectiveness of the NPAS to represent species, populations, and areas with high species richness has not been properly evaluated. Such evaluations are fundamental to understand what is necessary to strengthen the NPAS and better protect biodiversity. We present a novel assessment of NPAS effectiveness in protecting mammal species. We compiled the geographical ranges of all terrestrial Costa Rican mammals then determined species lists for all protected areas and the estimated proportion of each species' geographic range protected. We also classified mammal species according to their conservation status using the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. We found almost complete representation of mammal species (98.5% in protected areas, but low relative coverage (28.3% on average of their geographic ranges in Costa Rica and 25% of the species were classified as underprotected according to a priori representation targets. Interestingly, many species-rich areas are not protected, and at least 43% of cells covering the entire country are not included in protected areas. Though protected areas in Costa Rica represent species richness well, strategic planning for future protected areas to improve species complementarity and range protection is necessary. Our results can help to define sites where new protected areas can have a greater impact on mammal conservation, both in terms of species richness and range protection.

  12. The Synergetic Effect of Cash Transfers for Families, Child Sensitive Social Protection Programs, and Capacity Building for Effective Social Protection on Children’s Nutritional Status in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre M. N. Renzaho

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the synergetic effect of child sensitive social protection programs, augmented by a capacity building for social protection and embedded within existing government’s targeted resource transfers for families on child nutritional status. Design: A repeat cross-sectional quasi-experimental design with measures taken pre- (October–December 2009 and post- (December 2014–February 2015 intervention in the intervention and comparison district. The comparison district received standard social welfare services in the form of targeted resource transfers (TRTs for eligible families. The intervention district received the TRTs plus a child cash payment, augmented by a capacity building for effective social protection outcomes. Propensity scores were used in difference-in-differences models to compare the changes over time between the intervention and control groups. Results: Propensity score matched/weighted models produced better results than the unmatched analyses, and hence we report findings from the radius matching. The intervention resulted in a 5.16 (95% CI: 9.55, 0.77, 7.35 (95% CI: 11.62, 3.08 and 2.84 (95% CI: 5.58, 0.10 percentage point reduction in the prevalence of stunting, underweight, and wasting among children under the age, respectively. The intervention impact was greater in boys than girls for stunting and wasting; and greater in girls than boys for underweight. The intervention also resulted in a 6.66 (95% CI: 2.13, 3.18, 11.40 (95% CI: 16.66, 6.13, and 4.0 (95% CI: 6.43, 1.78 percentage point reduction in the prevalence of stunting, underweight, and wasting among older children (≥24 months. No impact was observed among younger children (<24 months. Conclusions: Targeted resource transfers for families, augmented with a child sensitive social protection program and capacity building for social protection can address effectively child malnutrition. To increase

  13. Examining the relationship between free recall and immediate serial recall: Similar patterns of rehearsal and similar effects of word length, presentation rate, and articulatory suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatarah, Parveen; Ward, Geoff; Smith, Jessica; Hayes, Louise

    2009-07-01

    In five experiments, rehearsal and recall phenomena were examined using the free recall and immediate serial recall (ISR) tasks. In Experiment 1, participants were presented with lists of eight words, were precued or postcued to respond using free recall or ISR, and rehearsed out loud during presentation. The patterns of rehearsal were similar in all the conditions, and there was little difference between recall in the precued and postcued conditions. In Experiment 2, both free recall and ISR were sensitive to word length and presentation rate and showed similar patterns of rehearsal. In Experiment 3, both tasks were sensitive to word length and articulatory suppression. The word length effects generalized to 6-item (Experiment 4) and 12-item (Experiment 5) lists. These findings suggest that the two tasks are underpinned by highly similar rehearsal and recall processes.

  14. Legal and technical regulations in radiation protection and their effects on radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betz, B.

    1975-01-01

    During the last few years, new regulations and guidelines in the field of radiation protection have been issued which affect radiotherapy, too. On September 1st, 1973 the X-ray Ordinance became effective; a few weeks later, new guidelines for radiation protections when using radioactive substances in the field of medicine were published. Of particular topical interest is the appendix of these new guidelines, in which the principles of technical competence in radiation protection when handling radioactive substances in the field of medicine are laid down uniformly for the FRG. Amongst these more recent regulations, there is also the direction by the Minister of the Interior to put the operation of accelerators in the field of medicine according to section 19 of the Atomic Energy Act under the supervision of the state and to employ newly issued administrative guidelines. After a short survey on the radiation protection laws in force, a selection of important stipulations within the new legal regulations and guidelines is discussed with a view to their effects on radiotherapy. (orig./LN) [de

  15. Effects of production methods and protective ingredients on the viability of probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus R0011 in air-dried alginate beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Claude P; Raymond, Yves; Arcand, Yves

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study was to use a microencapsulation technology to prepare air-dried concentrated cultures of Lactobacillus rhamnosus R0011. The cultures were microencapsulated in alginate beads, which were added to a growth medium to allow cell multiplication inside the matrix; the beads were recovered, dipped in protective solutions, and air-dried. The effects of fermentation technology and of the composition of the protective solutions on subsequent survival during air-drying were examined. The cells prepared under a constant pH of 6.2 had only 2.5% survival to air-drying at 25 °C when the protective solution was composed of sucrose and phosphate. Allowing the pH to drop to 4.2 during the biomass production step and using a protective medium composed of glycerol, maltodextrin, yeast extract, and ascorbate increased survival to 20%. If the ingredients of the protective medium at the beginning of drying were concentrated at a water activity of 0.96 rather than 0.98, survival during air-drying increased further to 56%. This rate was similar to that of a traditional freeze-drying process. These data suggest that applying a combination of acid and osmotic stresses to L. rhamnosus R0011 cells improves their subsequent stability during the air-drying process. Dried microencapsulated cultures having 2.6 × 10 11 CFU·g -1 were obtained.

  16. The reno-protective effects of dietary caloric restriction against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies have shown that dietary caloric restriction (CR) without malnutrition can increase longevity. This study aims to evaluate the protective effects of CR on oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation and inflammatory cytokines in the kidney of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Forty 12-week old male Wistar rats, weighing ...

  17. Radiation protection standards: a summary of the biological effects of ionising radiation and principles of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This leaflet in the NRPB At-a-Glance-Series briefly summarises the biological effects of radiation, harm and sensitivity to radiation, radiation protection principles, acceptability of risk and the control of doses to workers, the public and in medical procedures in the UK. (UK)

  18. UV light induced DNA damages and the radiation protection effects of Lingzi mushroom extract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo Thi Thuong Lan; Dinh Ba Tuan; Ta Bich Thuan; Tran Bang Diep; Tran Minh Quynh

    2016-01-01

    UV light has strongly influenced on the growth of E. coli as well as caused DNA damages. Configurations of both genomic DNA and pUC 19 plasmids extracted from E. coli were significantly changed by the exposure to UV light of 254 nm and DLT, an extract of Ganoderma lucidum Lingzi mushroom. The results also revealed the radio-protective effects of DLT to UV radiation. By adding 2% DLT to its culturing suspension, the growth of E. coli was significantly decreased, whereas a low DLT amount of about 0.5% slightly improved its growth, indicated that the DLT extract can be used as a promising protective substance against UV radiation. At the molecular level, the radio-protective effects of DLT were observed for both UV treated DNA and protein. Thus, DLT can protect DNA in vivo, but not in vitro. This effect was also observed for Taq polymerase, suggested that the radioprotection effect of DLT may due to it accelerated the degradation of radicals or species that produced in the suspensions during UV exposure. (author)

  19. Incentivizing More Effective Marine Protected Areas with the Global Ocean Refuge System (GLORES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah O. Hameed

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Healthy oceans are essential to human survival and prosperity, yet oceans are severely impacted worldwide by anthropogenic threats including overfishing, climate change, industrialization, pollution, and habitat destruction. Marine protected areas (MPAs have been implemented around the world and are effective conservation tools that can mitigate some of these threats and build resilience when designed and managed well. However, despite a rich scientific literature on MPA effectiveness, science is not the main driver behind the design and implementation of many MPAs, leading to variable MPA effectiveness and bias in global MPA representativity. As a result, the marine conservation community focuses on promoting the creation of more MPAs as well as more effective ones, however no structure to improve or accelerate effective MPA implementation currently exists. To safeguard marine ecosystems on a global scale and better monitor progress toward ecosystem protection, robust science-based criteria are needed for evaluating MPAs and synthesizing the extensive and interdisciplinary science on MPA effectiveness. This paper presents a strategic initiative led by Marine Conservation Institute called the Global Ocean Refuge System (GLORES. GLORES aims to set standards to improve the quality of MPAs and catalyze strong protection for at least 30% of the ocean by 2030. Such substantial increase in marine protection is needed to maintain the resilience of marine ecosystems and restore their benefits to people. GLORES provides a comprehensive strategy that employs the rich body of MPA science to scale up existing marine conservation efforts.

  20. The Effectiveness, Costs and Coastal Protection Benefits of Natural and Nature-Based Defences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Siddharth; Beck, Michael W; Reguero, Borja G; Losada, Iñigo J; van Wesenbeeck, Bregje; Pontee, Nigel; Sanchirico, James N; Ingram, Jane Carter; Lange, Glenn-Marie; Burks-Copes, Kelly A

    2016-01-01

    There is great interest in the restoration and conservation of coastal habitats for protection from flooding and erosion. This is evidenced by the growing number of analyses and reviews of the effectiveness of habitats as natural defences and increasing funding world-wide for nature-based defences-i.e. restoration projects aimed at coastal protection; yet, there is no synthetic information on what kinds of projects are effective and cost effective for this purpose. This paper addresses two issues critical for designing restoration projects for coastal protection: (i) a synthesis of the costs and benefits of projects designed for coastal protection (nature-based defences) and (ii) analyses of the effectiveness of coastal habitats (natural defences) in reducing wave heights and the biophysical parameters that influence this effectiveness. We (i) analyse data from sixty-nine field measurements in coastal habitats globally and examine measures of effectiveness of mangroves, salt-marshes, coral reefs and seagrass/kelp beds for wave height reduction; (ii) synthesise the costs and coastal protection benefits of fifty-two nature-based defence projects and; (iii) estimate the benefits of each restoration project by combining information on restoration costs with data from nearby field measurements. The analyses of field measurements show that coastal habitats have significant potential for reducing wave heights that varies by habitat and site. In general, coral reefs and salt-marshes have the highest overall potential. Habitat effectiveness is influenced by: a) the ratios of wave height-to-water depth and habitat width-to-wavelength in coral reefs; and b) the ratio of vegetation height-to-water depth in salt-marshes. The comparison of costs of nature-based defence projects and engineering structures show that salt-marshes and mangroves can be two to five times cheaper than a submerged breakwater for wave heights up to half a metre and, within their limits, become more cost

  1. The Effectiveness, Costs and Coastal Protection Benefits of Natural and Nature-Based Defences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Narayan

    Full Text Available There is great interest in the restoration and conservation of coastal habitats for protection from flooding and erosion. This is evidenced by the growing number of analyses and reviews of the effectiveness of habitats as natural defences and increasing funding world-wide for nature-based defences-i.e. restoration projects aimed at coastal protection; yet, there is no synthetic information on what kinds of projects are effective and cost effective for this purpose. This paper addresses two issues critical for designing restoration projects for coastal protection: (i a synthesis of the costs and benefits of projects designed for coastal protection (nature-based defences and (ii analyses of the effectiveness of coastal habitats (natural defences in reducing wave heights and the biophysical parameters that influence this effectiveness. We (i analyse data from sixty-nine field measurements in coastal habitats globally and examine measures of effectiveness of mangroves, salt-marshes, coral reefs and seagrass/kelp beds for wave height reduction; (ii synthesise the costs and coastal protection benefits of fifty-two nature-based defence projects and; (iii estimate the benefits of each restoration project by combining information on restoration costs with data from nearby field measurements. The analyses of field measurements show that coastal habitats have significant potential for reducing wave heights that varies by habitat and site. In general, coral reefs and salt-marshes have the highest overall potential. Habitat effectiveness is influenced by: a the ratios of wave height-to-water depth and habitat width-to-wavelength in coral reefs; and b the ratio of vegetation height-to-water depth in salt-marshes. The comparison of costs of nature-based defence projects and engineering structures show that salt-marshes and mangroves can be two to five times cheaper than a submerged breakwater for wave heights up to half a metre and, within their limits, become

  2. Protective effect of chlorpromazine on TNF-mediated hapten-induced irritant reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erroi, A; Fantuzzi, G; Demitri, M T; Echtenacher, B; Gnocchi, P; Isetta, A; Ghezzi, P

    1995-01-01

    Picryl chloride-induced irritant reaction (IR) was shown to be mediated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies, but not interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1 Ra), had a protective effect. Chlorpromazine (CPZ), an inhibitor of TNF synthesis, protected against IR and inhibited the IR-associated TNF induction in ear homogenates. Investigation of the role of polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) in neutropenic mice showed that neutropenia did not prevent the development of the IR.

  3. Contribution to the practical experience in the field of the radiation protection education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozelj, M.; Stritar, A.

    1996-01-01

    In the present paper we discuss deficiencies, differences and similarities in knowledge among people with diverse professional and educational background attending our radiation protection courses. Suggestions for overcoming the problems resulting from this diversity are given. The crucial topics for understanding the system of radiation protection are given and relevant approach suggested, with emphasis to stochastic effects. Implementation of radiation protection training for particular job and task was problematic due to shortage of written procedures. It is our practice to choose relevant lecturers for each particular course to reduce this problem. This approach is described and discussed. (author)

  4. The effect of the phytoestrogen genistein on myocardial protection, preconditioning and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbarouni, Eftihia; Iliodromitis, Efstathios K; Zoga, Anastasia; Vlachou, Georgia; Andreadou, Ioanna; Kremastinos, Dimitrios Th

    2006-08-01

    We have previously shown that estrogen administered in ovariectomized female rabbits significantly reduce myocardial infarct size. We now investigated whether the phytoestrogen genistein similarly protects ischemic myocardium and whether this is associated with its antioxidant properties. In addition, we examined whether genistein abolishes preconditioning, since at high doses, it inhibits tyrosine kinase. We studied five groups of New Zealand white female rabbits. Group A (n = 12) were normal controls, group B (n = 14) were ovariectomized 4 weeks prior to the experiment, group C (n = 10) were ovariectomized and treated with genistein (0.2 mg kg(-1) day(-1) subcutaneously) for 4 weeks before the experiment, group D (n = 12) had intact gonads and were treated with genistein (0.2 mg kg(-1) day(-1) subcutaneously) for 4 weeks before the experiment and group E (n = 8) were ovariectomized 4 weeks prior to the experiment and treated with a single dose of genistein (0.2 mg kg(-1) day(-1) subcutaneously) just prior to the experiment. All animals underwent 30 min of heart ischemia and 120 min of reperfusion, with (subgroup I) or without (subgroup II) preconditioning. Malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration just before the experiment was determined. We found significant differences between the groups-p protect ischemic myocardium in either ovariectomized or non-ovariectomized animals-BII vs CII and AII vs DII, p = NS. There was no significant difference between the preconditioned animals, with intact gonads or ovariectomized (AI vs BI, p = NS), ovariectomized with or without genistein (BI vs CI, p = NS) and non-ovariectomized whether treated with genistein or not (AI vs DI, p = NS). A single dose of genistein did not offer any protection (EII vs BII, p = NS), nor did it modify the preconditioning effect (EI vs BI, p = NS). We found no significant difference in MDA plasma levels between the groups. Genistein, at this dose, does not reduce infarct size per se nor abolishes the

  5. Relationship between haemagglutination-inhibiting antibody titres and clinical protection against influenza: development and application of a bayesian random-effects model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudeville, Laurent; Bailleux, Fabrice; Riche, Benjamin; Megas, Françoise; Andre, Philippe; Ecochard, René

    2010-03-08

    Antibodies directed against haemagglutinin, measured by the haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay are essential to protective immunity against influenza infection. An HI titre of 1:40 is generally accepted to correspond to a 50% reduction in the risk of contracting influenza in a susceptible population, but limited attempts have been made to further quantify the association between HI titre and protective efficacy. We present a model, using a meta-analytical approach, that estimates the level of clinical protection against influenza at any HI titre level. Source data were derived from a systematic literature review that identified 15 studies, representing a total of 5899 adult subjects and 1304 influenza cases with interval-censored information on HI titre. The parameters of the relationship between HI titre and clinical protection were estimated using Bayesian inference with a consideration of random effects and censorship in the available information. A significant and positive relationship between HI titre and clinical protection against influenza was observed in all tested models. This relationship was found to be similar irrespective of the type of viral strain (A or B) and the vaccination status of the individuals. Although limitations in the data used should not be overlooked, the relationship derived in this analysis provides a means to predict the efficacy of inactivated influenza vaccines when only immunogenicity data are available. This relationship can also be useful for comparing the efficacy of different influenza vaccines based on their immunological profile.

  6. Relationship between haemagglutination-inhibiting antibody titres and clinical protection against influenza: development and application of a bayesian random-effects model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megas Françoise

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibodies directed against haemagglutinin, measured by the haemagglutination inhibition (HI assay are essential to protective immunity against influenza infection. An HI titre of 1:40 is generally accepted to correspond to a 50% reduction in the risk of contracting influenza in a susceptible population, but limited attempts have been made to further quantify the association between HI titre and protective efficacy. Methods We present a model, using a meta-analytical approach, that estimates the level of clinical protection against influenza at any HI titre level. Source data were derived from a systematic literature review that identified 15 studies, representing a total of 5899 adult subjects and 1304 influenza cases with interval-censored information on HI titre. The parameters of the relationship between HI titre and clinical protection were estimated using Bayesian inference with a consideration of random effects and censorship in the available information. Results A significant and positive relationship between HI titre and clinical protection against influenza was observed in all tested models. This relationship was found to be similar irrespective of the type of viral strain (A or B and the vaccination status of the individuals. Conclusion Although limitations in the data used should not be overlooked, the relationship derived in this analysis provides a means to predict the efficacy of inactivated influenza vaccines when only immunogenicity data are available. This relationship can also be useful for comparing the efficacy of different influenza vaccines based on their immunological profile.

  7. Multi-targeted mechanisms underlying the endothelial protective effects of the diabetic-safe sweetener erythritol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniëlle M P H J Boesten

    Full Text Available Diabetes is characterized by hyperglycemia and development of vascular pathology. Endothelial cell dysfunction is a starting point for pathogenesis of vascular complications in diabetes. We previously showed the polyol erythritol to be a hydroxyl radical scavenger preventing endothelial cell dysfunction onset in diabetic rats. To unravel mechanisms, other than scavenging of radicals, by which erythritol mediates this protective effect, we evaluated effects of erythritol in endothelial cells exposed to normal (7 mM and high glucose (30 mM or diabetic stressors (e.g. SIN-1 using targeted and transcriptomic approaches. This study demonstrates that erythritol (i.e. under non-diabetic conditions has minimal effects on endothelial cells. However, under hyperglycemic conditions erythritol protected endothelial cells against cell death induced by diabetic stressors (i.e. high glucose and peroxynitrite. Also a number of harmful effects caused by high glucose, e.g. increased nitric oxide release, are reversed. Additionally, total transcriptome analysis indicated that biological processes which are differentially regulated due to high glucose are corrected by erythritol. We conclude that erythritol protects endothelial cells during high glucose conditions via effects on multiple targets. Overall, these data indicate a therapeutically important endothelial protective effect of erythritol under hyperglycemic conditions.

  8. Protective effects of Mengshan green tea and hawk tea against UV-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaoming; Ren Zhenglong; Zhang Huaiyu; Tang Zongxiang; Luo Peigao

    2005-01-01

    A group of cultured normal human skin-derived fibroblasts was used as the cell model to investigate protective and repair effects of aqueous extracts of Mengshan green tea and Hawk tea against 320-400 nm UV-ray irradiation, with the methods of MTT colorimetry and LDH release. It was found that the aqueous extracts had strong protective effect on fibroblasts against the UV-rays with dose dependence. There were no significant differences between the two kinds of tea aqueous extracts in a higher concentration of 5 mg/mL, whereas at lower concentrations of 2.5 and 1.25 mg/mL the, green tea aqueous extract was less effective than the hawk-tea aqueous extract in protecting fibroblasts from the UV-ray damage. Meanwhile, it was discovered that the green tea and hawk-tea aqueous extract could repair damages induced by the UV irradiation with dose dependence. But there were no statistically significant differences between the two kinds of aqueous extract. The effects may be related to antioxidant effect of tea polyphenol. (authors)

  9. Unique natural exopolysaccharides for biomimetic protective effect against urban pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borel, Magali; Lamarque, Elisabeth; Loing, Estelle

    Through natural selection, living organisms have evolved well-adapted survival strategies over time. The shallow salt waters of Moorea lagoon are the site of accumulation of microbial mats called "Kopara," in the native Polynesian language. This unique ecosystem is rich in film-forming exopolysaccharides (EPSs) secreted by microorganisms within the biofilm, as a mean to protect themselves from environmental stress (strong ultraviolet [UV], pH, salinity … ). Using blue biotechnology, a manufacturing process was developed to obtain an EPS with skin benefits. The active ingredient (EPS-229) protects against urban pollution, including free radicals, heavy metals, hydrocarbons, and PM 2.5 (particulate matter with a size lower than 2.5 μm). The anti-lipid peroxidation action of EPS-229 was studied in an in vitro UVB-irradiated keratinocyte culture model, using lipophilic fluorescent probe. The chelating properties of EPS-229 were evaluated in tubo in the presence of cadmium and lead. The protective effect of EPS-229 on pollution-exposed skin explants was investigated through quantification of released malondialdehyde (MDA) and histological observation of skin morphology using optical microscopy. Clinical evaluation of the protective and cleansing efficacy of a water solution containing EPS-229 (0.02% and 0.01% w/v, respectively) was performed, against placebo, on a panel of 18 volunteers. For these studies, the forearms of volunteers were treated with EPS-229 before (anti-adhesion affect) or after (cleansing effect) application of PM 2.5 (iron particles of 1 μm). The presence of skin-adherent particles was observed and quantified by image analysis, using specific digital masks. In vitro , EPS-229 significantly protected keratinocyte cell membranes from lipid peroxidation. A decrease of 28% was achieved when a concentration of 0.001% w/v EPS-229 was applied to the cell culture. In tubo , EPS-229 also presented strong chelating properties. Maximal adsorption was

  10. Radiation protection principles applied to conventional industries producing deleterious environmental effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadmor, J.

    1980-01-01

    Comparison of the radiation protection standards, for the population at large, with the conventional pollutants ambient standards, reveals differences in basic principles which result in more relaxed ambient standards for conventional pollutants and consequently, the penalization of the nuclear industry, due to the increased cost of its safety measures. It is proposed that radiation protection principles should be used as a prototype for pollutants having harmful environmental effects and that radiation health physicists should be active in the application of these principles of population protection. A case study of atmospheric release of SO 2 , under different conditions, is analyzed, to emphasize the importance of consideration of the size of the exposed population. (H.K.)

  11. Radiological and nuclear safety- evolution, standards and similarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soman, S.D.

    1996-01-01

    With the realisation of potential for severe health affects after the discovery of x-rays and radioactivity, the radiation protection aspect became focus of interest for medical users from the beginning of this century. With the activities of International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), the standards evolved during all these years based on epidemiological data and radio-biological research. The current standards are the ICRP recommendations of 1990. Based on these, internationally harmonised standards for protection against ionising radiation and safety of radioactive sources were brought out by IAEA in 1994. The nuclear safety (implies safety of nuclear power plants) came into prominence when large scale units were designed and operated since mid 1950s. The philosophy in nuclear safety has evolved in past 2-3 decades taking into account the lessons learned from accidents, mainly Three Mile Island (1979) and Chernobyl-4 (1986). These current nuclear safety standards are incorporated in INSAG reports, particularly INSAG-3. This paper brings out salient features of these evolutions, current standards and similarity of radiation and nuclear safety standards in their present form. (author). 7 refs., 10 tabs

  12. Surf similarity and solitary wave runup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Madsen, Per A.

    2008-01-01

    The notion of surf similarity in the runup of solitary waves is revisited. We show that the surf similarity parameter for solitary waves may be effectively reduced to the beach slope divided by the offshore wave height to depth ratio. This clarifies its physical interpretation relative to a previ...... functional dependence on their respective surf similarity parameters. Important equivalencies in the runup of sinusoidal and solitary waves are thus revealed.......The notion of surf similarity in the runup of solitary waves is revisited. We show that the surf similarity parameter for solitary waves may be effectively reduced to the beach slope divided by the offshore wave height to depth ratio. This clarifies its physical interpretation relative...... to a previous parameterization, which was not given in an explicit form. Good coherency with experimental (breaking) runup data is preserved with this simpler parameter. A recasting of analytical (nonbreaking) runup expressions for sinusoidal and solitary waves additionally shows that they contain identical...

  13. Combination Social Protection for Reducing HIV-Risk Behavior Among Adolescents in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluver, Lucie D; Orkin, F Mark; Yakubovich, Alexa R; Sherr, Lorraine

    2016-05-01

    Social protection (ie, cash transfers, free schools, parental support) has potential for adolescent HIV prevention. We aimed to identify which social protection interventions are most effective and whether combined social protection has greater effects in South Africa. In this prospective longitudinal study, we interviewed 3516 adolescents aged 10-18 between 2009 and 2012. We sampled all homes with a resident adolescent in randomly selected census areas in 4 urban and rural sites in 2 South African provinces. We measured household receipt of 14 social protection interventions and incidence of HIV-risk behaviors. Using gender-disaggregated multivariate logistic regression and marginal effects analyses, we assessed respective contributions of interventions and potential combination effects. Child-focused grants, free schooling, school feeding, teacher support, and parental monitoring were independently associated with reduced HIV-risk behavior incidence (odds ratio: 0.10-0.69). Strong effects of combination social protection were shown, with cumulative reductions in HIV-risk behaviors. For example, girls' predicted past-year incidence of economically driven sex dropped from 11% with no interventions to 2% among those with a child grant, free school, and good parental monitoring. Similarly, girls' incidence of unprotected/casual sex or multiple partners dropped from 15% with no interventions to 10% with either parental monitoring or school feeding, and to 7% with both interventions. In real world, high-epidemic conditions, "combination social protection," shows strong HIV prevention effects for adolescents and may maximize prevention efforts.

  14. Ethical considerations in protecting the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation. A report for discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-01

    In recent years awareness of the vulnerability of the environment has increased and the need to protect it against the effects of industrial pollutants has been recognized. This trend is reflected in new and developing international policies for environmental protection. In the context of protection of the environment against ionizing radiation, the existing international approach is based on providing for the protection of humans. The current recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) include the statement that {sup t}he standard of environmental control needed to protect man to the degree currently thought desirable will ensure that other species are not put at risk... {sup .} In the light of the new focus of concern for the environment, this statement is being critically reviewed in several international fora. The IAEA has, over many years, sponsored studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on species other than humans. Most recently it published a discussion report as IAEA-TECDOC-1091 (1999) in which the need for developing a system for protecting the environment against the effects of ionizing radiation was elaborated and in which various related technical and philosophical issues for resolution were discussed. The current report explores the ethical principles that could underlie a system of environmental protection. It is intended as one step in the development of a framework for the protection of the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation, and is being published in order to promote awareness of the current developments in this field as well as to encourage discussion amongst those involved.

  15. Ethical considerations in protecting the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation. A report for discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-02-01

    In recent years awareness of the vulnerability of the environment has increased and the need to protect it against the effects of industrial pollutants has been recognized. This trend is reflected in new and developing international policies for environmental protection. In the context of protection of the environment against ionizing radiation, the existing international approach is based on providing for the protection of humans. The current recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) include the statement that t he standard of environmental control needed to protect man to the degree currently thought desirable will ensure that other species are not put at risk... . In the light of the new focus of concern for the environment, this statement is being critically reviewed in several international fora. The IAEA has, over many years, sponsored studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on species other than humans. Most recently it published a discussion report as IAEA-TECDOC-1091 (1999) in which the need for developing a system for protecting the environment against the effects of ionizing radiation was elaborated and in which various related technical and philosophical issues for resolution were discussed. The current report explores the ethical principles that could underlie a system of environmental protection. It is intended as one step in the development of a framework for the protection of the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation, and is being published in order to promote awareness of the current developments in this field as well as to encourage discussion amongst those involved

  16. The protection effects of buildings in front of nuclear fall-out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueck, K.; Lovranich, E.; Steger, F.

    1995-02-01

    In order to adopt appropriate countermeasures to protect the public in case of a wide-spread contamination after a severe reactor accident, a profound knowledge of the dose to be expected of the dose reduction to be expected if a specific countermeasure is adopted is required. Since external radiation contributes a major fraction of up to 80 % to the total dose, the interest is focussed on the reduction of external dose by staying indoors. For this purpose measurements of the dose reduction by external radiation were performed in 40 residential rooms in Vienna which were chosen according to their fraction of the Viennese building structure. They were performed by measurement of the reduction of the gamma-flux in the interior of buildings compared to the gamma-flux outside. Measurements were carried out by a HPGe-detector which was positioned 1 m above ground. The observed dose reduction factors amounted to 0.013 on the average (protection factor 78,7 '+-' 49,7), with the protection factors of the investigated building types ranging from 6,5 (single house in garden) to 122,9 (edicifices of the turn of the century). The observed protection factors do not include the dose reduction by dense arrangement of buildings in urban areas which has to be considered separately. The dose reduction due to different radionuclide mixtures after severe reactor accidents was also investigated. Factors similar to that observed for Cs-137 were found. The maximum deviations amounted only 12 % and therefore may be neglected in the consideration of protective measures. Additional measurements were performed with the same detector shielded by lead on all sides to determine the contribution of the interior contamination. A contribution of between < 10 % to 50 % to the external dose in the interior of buildings was observed. Measures to reduce the inner contamination in rooms (closing of windows and doors, cleaning upon entering the building interior) in case of an event are therefore

  17. Rumen-protected choline: A significance effect on dairy cattle nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprakash, G; Sathiyabarathi, M; Robert, M Arokia; Tamilmani, T

    2016-08-01

    Choline is a vitamin-like substance it has multi-function in animal production, reproduction, and health. The transition period is most crucial stage in lactation cycle of dairy cows due to its association with negative hormonal and energy balances. Unfortunately, unprotected choline easily degrades in the rumen; therefore, choline added to the diet in a rumen-protected form. The use of rumen-protected choline (RPC) is a preventive measurement for the fatty liver syndrome and ketosis; may improve milk production as well as milk composition and reproduction parameters. This review summarizes the effectiveness of RPC on animal production, health, and reproduction.

  18. Mercury toxicity in beluga whale lymphocytes: Limited effects of selenium protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frouin, H. [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Institute of Ocean Sciences, 9860 West Saanich Rd, P.O. Box 6000, Sidney, BC, V8L 4B2 (Canada); Loseto, L.L.; Stern, G.A. [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Freshwater Institute, 501 University Crescent, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N6 (Canada); Haulena, M. [Vancouver Aquarium, 845 Avison Way, Vancouver, BC, V6G 3E2 (Canada); Ross, P.S., E-mail: peter.s.ross@dfo-mpo.gc.ca [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Institute of Ocean Sciences, 9860 West Saanich Rd, P.O. Box 6000, Sidney, BC, V8L 4B2 (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Increasing emissions of anthropogenic mercury represents a growing concern to the health of high trophic level marine mammals. In its organic form, this metal bioaccumulates, and can be toxic to several physiological endpoints, including the immune system. In this study, we (1) evaluated the effects of inorganic mercury (mercuric chloride, HgCl{sub 2}) and organic mercury (methylmercuric chloride, MeHgCl) on the in vitro function of lymphocytes isolated from the peripheral blood of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas); (2) characterized the potential protective effects of sodium selenite (Na{sub 2}SeO{sub 3}) on cell proliferation of HgCl{sub 2} or MeHgCl-treated beluga whale lymphocytes; and (3) compared these dose-dependent effects to measurements of blood Hg in samples collected from traditionally harvested beluga whales in the western Canadian Arctic. Lymphocyte proliferative responses were reduced following exposure to 1 {mu}M of HgCl{sub 2} and 0.33 {mu}M of MeHgCl. Decreased intracellular thiol levels were observed at 10 {mu}M of HgCl{sub 2} and 0.33 {mu}M of MeHgCl. Metallothionein induction was noted at 0.33 {mu}M of MeHgCl. Concurrent exposure of Se provided a degree of protection against the highest concentrations of inorganic Hg (3.33 and 10 {mu}M) or organic Hg (10 {mu}M) for T-lymphocytes. This in vitro protection of Se against Hg toxicity to lymphocytes may contribute to the in vivo protection in beluga whales exposed to high Hg concentrations. Current Hg levels in free-ranging beluga whales from the Arctic fall into the range of exposures which elicited effects on lymphocytes in our study, highlighting the potential for effects on host resistance to disease. The implications of a changing Arctic climate on Hg fate in beluga food webs and the consequences for the health of beluga whales remain pressing research needs.

  19. 77 FR 70745 - Proposed Change to Data Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-27

    ... protection policy for Form EIA-7A was similar except that the name and address of the responding company, the... changed the data protection policy for Forms EIA-3, EIA-5, EIA-7A and EIA-8A from protecting the data as.... No changes were made to the pre-2011 protection policy for Forms EIA-1, EIA-4, EIA-6Q, and EIA-20...

  20. Protection of the Environment: Current ICRP Work and EC-Funded Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, C.M.; Holm, L.E.

    2003-01-01

    The requirement for assessments of the environmental effects of radiation, i.e. effects on non-human biota, is increasing due to growing public concern for environmental protection issues and integration of environmental impact assessments into the regulatory process. Thus, there is a strong need to establish a framework for the assessment of environmental impact of ionising radiation, as well as a system for protection of the environment from ionising radiation. These ambitions are reflected in a number of international efforts and various 'systems' have been proposed or are under development. This paper considers the current discussions on environmental protection within the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), as part of the Commission's ongoing revision of its recommendations as laid out in Publication 60. Furthermore, the paper reviews work within the EC-funded FASSET (Framework for ASSessment of Environmental impacT) project. The concepts developed both by ICRP and FASSET are similar, and the FASSET approach and results may illustrate how forthcoming ICRP recommendations could be turned into practical application. (orig.)

  1. The effects of similarity of theme and instantiation in analogical reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanowitz, K L

    2001-01-01

    The influence of 2 types of structural similarity on analogical reasoning was examined. The theme of a story is a structural component that constrains other relationships in the story. Another structural component is the way in which the theme is implemented. Participants received pairs of stories that varied in the similarity of these two components. Participants in Experiment 1 judged stories containing similar themes as more analogous than stories with dissimilar themes. Likewise, stories with similar implementations were judged as more analogous than stories with dissimilar implementations. Experiment 2 revealed a similar pattern when participants had the opportunity to transfer information from source to target stories. Greater transfer was seen for stories with similar themes than for stories with dissimilar themes. Greater transfer was also seen for stories with similar implementations of different themes than for stories with different implementations.

  2. Magical thinking in predictions of negative events: Evidence for tempting fate but not for a protection effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Job van Wolferen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we test two hypotheses regarding magical thinking about the perceived likelihood of future events. The first is that people believe that those who ``tempt fate'' by failing to take necessary precautions are more likely to suffer negative outcomes. The second is the ``protection effect'', where reminding people of precautions they have taken leads them to see related risks as less likely. To this end, we describe the results from three attempted direct replications of a protection effect experiment reported in Tykocinski (2008 and two replications of a tempting fate experiment reported in Risen and Gilovich (2008 in which we add a test of the protection effect. We did not replicate the protection effect but did replicate the tempting fate effect.

  3. Protective effect of Hongxue tea mixture against radiation injury in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Chun; Zhang Xuehui; Wang Qi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To develop health food of anti-radiation among biological source in Yunnan. Methods: Screening test was done of the health food of biological source of anti-radiation injury in mice. It is indicated that Hong-Xue Tea Mixture among the biological source has the effect against radiation injury, observing experiment of dose-effect of Hong-Xue Tea Mixture was done. Micronuclei in the bone marrow polychromatophilic erythrocytes in each dose group of mice were examined, leucocytes number and 30 day survival rate of mice following whole-body 5.0 Gy γ irradiation were also determined. Results: Research showed that Hong-Xue Tea Mixture and Spirulina Platensis Mixture among the biological source have protective effect against radiation injury in mice. Observing experiment of dose-effect of Hong-Xue Tea Mixture show that low, medium and high dose of Hong-Xue Tea Mixture can significantly decrease bone marrow PECMN rate of mice, increase leucocytes number and 30 day survival rate. Conclusion: Hong-Xue Tea Mixture has potent protective effects against radiation injury in mice. (authors)

  4. Effect of similar elements on improving glass-forming ability of La-Ce-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tao; Li Ran; Pang Shujie

    2009-01-01

    To date the effect of unlike component elements on glass-forming ability (GFA) of alloys have been studied extensively, and it is generally recognized that the main consisting elements of the alloys with high GFA usually have large difference in atomic size and atomic interaction (large negative heat of mixing) among them. In our recent work, a series of rare earth metal-based alloy compositions with superior GFA were found through the approach of coexistence of similar constituent elements. The quinary (La 0.5 Ce 0.5 ) 65 Al 10 (Co 0.6 Cu 0.4 ) 25 bulk metallic glass (BMG) in a rod form with a diameter up to 32 mm was synthesized by tilt-pour casting, for which the glass-forming ability is significantly higher than that for ternary Ln-Al-TM alloys (Ln = La or Ce; TM = Co or Cu) with critical diameters for glass-formation of several millimeters. We suggest that the strong frustration of crystallization by utilizing the coexistence of La-Ce and Co-Cu to complicate competing crystalline phases is helpful to construct BMG component with superior GFA. The results of our present work indicate that similar elements (elements with similar atomic size and chemical properties) have significant effect on GFA of alloys.

  5. Integrating Topographic Measures to Explore the Protective Effects of Peonidin Against the N-Methyl-N-Nitrosourea Induced Photoreceptor Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Tao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The pathphysiological properties of N-Methyl -N -nitrosourea (MNU induced photoreceptor degeneration are similar to the hereditary retinitis pigmentosa (RP. The present study sought to explore the beneficial effects of the peonidin, a common aglycone form of anthocyanin, on the MNU induced photoreceptor degeneration via topographic measurements. Methods: The MNU administrated mouse received peonidin or vehicle injections, and then they were examined by electroretinography (ERG, multi electrode array (MEA, histological and immunohistochemistry studies. Results: The protective effects of peonidin on the MNU administrated retinas were systematically verified and quantified by topographic measures. The peonidin treatment could protect the photoreceptor against the MNU toxicity both functionally and morphologicaly. The most sensitive zone to peonidin therapy was sorted out, indicating that different rescuing kinetics existed between the retinal hemispheres and retinal quadrants. Moreover, the hyperactive spontaneous firing response and the debilitated light induced response in MNU administrated retinas could be partially reversed by peonidin treatment. To our knowledge, this was the first study to explore the pharmacological effects of peonidin on the electrophysiological properties of inner visual signal pathways. Conclusion: The peonidin could ameliorate the MNU induced photoreceptors degeneration and rectify the abnormities in the inner visual signal pathways. Future refinements of the knowledge cast insights into the discovery of a novel treatment for human RP.

  6. A protective effect of dietary calcium against acute waterborne cadmium uptake in rainbow trout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldisserotto, B.; Kamunde, C.; Matsuo, A.; Wood, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    The present study examined the interactions between elevated dietary calcium (as ionic Ca 2+ in the form of CaCl 2 ·2H 2 O) and acute waterborne Cd exposure (50 μg/l as CdNO 3 for 3 h) on whole body uptake and internal distribution of newly accumulated Cd, Ca 2+ , and Na + in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Fish were fed with three diets 20 (control), 30 and 60 mg Ca 2+ /g food: for 7 days before fluxes were measured with radiotracers over a 3 h period. The two elevated Ca 2+ diets reduced the whole body uptake of both Ca 2+ and Cd by >50% and similarly reduced the internalization of both newly accumulated metals in most tissues, effects which reflect the shared branchial uptake route for Ca 2+ and Cd. As the Ca 2+ concentrations of the fluid phases of the stomach and intestinal contents were greatly elevated by the experimental diets, increased gastrointestinal Ca 2+ uptake likely caused the down-regulation of the branchial Ca 2+ (and Cd) uptake pathway. Waterborne Na + uptake and internal distribution were not affected. While plasma Ca 2+ surged after the first two feedings of the 60 mg Ca 2+ /g diet, internal homeostasis was quickly restored. Total Ca 2+ , Na + , and Cl - levels in tissues were not affected by diets. While dietary Ca 2+ protected against waterborne Cd uptake, it did not protect against the relative inhibition of waterborne Ca 2+ uptake caused by waterborne Cd. Acute exposure to 50 μg/l Cd reduced the uptake and internalization of newly accumulated Ca 2+ (but not Na + ) by 70% or more, regardless of diet. Since elevated dietary Ca 2+ reduces waterborne Cd uptake, fish eating a Ca 2+ -rich invertebrate diet may be more protected against waterborne Cd toxicity in a field situation

  7. Long-Term Protective Effects of Methamphetamine Preconditioning Against Single-Day Methamphetamine Toxic Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Hodges, A.B; Ladenheim, B; McCoy, M.T; Beauvais, G; Cai, N; Krasnova, I.N; Cadet, J.L

    2011-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) use is associated with neurotoxic effects which include decreased levels of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT) and their metabolites in the brain. We have shown that escalating METH dosing can protect against METH induced neurotoxicity in rats sacrificed within 24 hours after a toxic METH challenge. The purpose of the current study was to investigate if the protective effects of METH persisted for a long period of time. We also tested if a second challenge with a toxic dos...

  8. The Court of Justice and Effective Judicial Protection: What Has the Charter Changed?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prechal, A.

    2015-01-01

    Since the coming into force of the Charter as primary law of the EU, Article 47 CFR is ‘the reference standard’ when the Court deals with issues of ffective judicial protection. However, the general principle of effective judicial protection existed already for some 25 years, developed in the case

  9. Effective Results Analysis for the Similar Software Products’ Orthogonality

    OpenAIRE

    Ion Ivan; Daniel Milodin

    2009-01-01

    It is defined the concept of similar software. There are established conditions of archiving the software components. It is carried out the orthogonality evaluation and the correlation between the orthogonality and the complexity of the homogenous software components is analyzed. Shall proceed to build groups of similar software products, belonging to the orthogonality intervals. There are presented in graphical form the results of the analysis. There are detailed aspects of the functioning o...

  10. The nerve protection and in vivo therapeutic effect of Acalypha indica extract in frogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernie H. Purwaningsih

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim To demonstrate nerve protection and/or treatment effect of Acalypha indica Linn. extract on nerve paralysis induced by subcutaneus injection of pancuronium bromide on frog’s back.Methods The study was performed on sixty frogs (Bufo melanostictus Schneider that divided into two groups, i.e. the neuro-protection and neuro-therapy group. Each group was divided further into 6 sub-treatment groups: negative control group treated by water and positive control group treated by piracetam, treatment groups received the extracts 200, 300, 400, 500 mg/kgBW. Pancuronium bromide 0.2% (1 : 20 dilutions were injected subcutaneously as muscle relaxant. The protective effect was studied by giving the extract orally, 1 hour prior to injection; while the therapeutic effect of the extract was studied by 10 minute treatment after injecting pancuronium bromide solution. The parameters measured were the onset and duration of paralysis (in minutes and the recovery time (time needed to recover into normal condition.Results The study showed significantly different protective effect of Acalypha indica Linn. root water extract at 400 and 500 mg/KgBW compared to negative control group and positive control group (piracetam (p < 0.05; while the therapeutic effect was obvious at the dose 200-500 mg/KgBW compared to negative control group (p = 0.000. There was no significant difference compared to positive control group (piracetam, except at 300 mg/KgBW (p = 0.012.Conclusion These results have proven that the water extract of Acalypha indica Linn. root has comparable protective and treatment effect on nerves system, as piracetam, but further studies should be performed to provide more evidences particularly pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies on two animal models that commonly used. (Med J Indones 2010; 19:96-102Keywords: Acalypha indica Linn, Bufo melanostictus Schneider, nerve-protection

  11. Ultraviolet-B-effects on plants: Spectra of harmful effects, primary damage and UV protective mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellmann, E.; Beggs, C.; Moehle, B.; Schneider-Ziebert, U.; Steinmetz, V.; Koch, U.

    1986-01-01

    In two model systems of higher plants, damage caused by ultraviolet-B-radiation was analysed as to its mechanism of action and the spectral quantum efficiency. These investigations were to provide information on the relevance of such UV effects in cases of increased ultraviolet-B-irradiation owing to the destruction of ozone. The results indicate the very high tolerance of the plants to ultraviolet-B-radiation which obviously is the result of very effective protective mechanisms, and show at the same time that potential damage must already be reckoned with, given the current share of ultraviolet-B-radiation in solar radiation. Should ultraviolet-B-radiation be increased, then indirect damage to the plant from the destruction of ultraviolet protective mechanisms through UV-B-radiation will probably constitute a particular risk. (orig./MG) [de

  12. testiculo-protective effect of moringa- oleifera seed extract on copper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PUBLICATIONS1

    the fact that Moringa oleifera seed extract offers a protective effect to the testes. ... then concentrated to dryness over a hot water bath at 40°C. ... which is necessary for different metabolic func- .... quirements for the male germ cell to maintain.

  13. Objectives, Extent and Organization of Radiological and Environmental Protection in Relation to the Nature and Size of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kathren, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Radiological and environmental protection programs for nuclear facilities have similar goals and objectives, which are basically to protect people and the environment from adverse effects. To be effective, the programs must have organizational independence and a strong commitment from management. In return, the programs should ensure that the facility is operating in full compliance with law and good practice. The scope and elements of radiological environmental protection programs will vary according to facility type and size, with the larger and more complex facilities having a diversity of staff and functions. Examples of good and poor organization charts are given and discussed from the standpoint of program effectiveness along with a discussion of the role of the radiation protection committee. (author)

  14. Protective Effect of Vitamin E on Nicotine Induced Reproductive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current study assessed the protective role of vitamin E in alleviating the detrimental effect of nicotine on reproductive functions in male rats. Twenty four male albino rats were divided into four groups of six rats. Control group was treated orally with 1.1 ml/kg body weight normal saline, nicotine treated group received 1.0 ...

  15. Protection by GDNF and other trophic factors against the dopamine-depleting effects of neurotoxic doses of methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cass, Wayne A; Peters, Laura E; Harned, Michael E; Seroogy, Kim B

    2006-08-01

    Repeated methamphetamine (METH) administration to animals can result in long-lasting decreases in striatal dopamine (DA) content. It has previously been shown that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) can reduce the DA-depleting effects of neurotoxic doses of METH. However, there are several other trophic factors that are protective against dopaminergic toxins. Thus, the present experiments further investigated the protective effect of GDNF as well as the protective effects of several other trophic factors. Male Fischer-344 rats were given an intracerebral injection of trophic factor (2-10 microg) 1 day before METH (5 mg/kg, s.c., 4 injections at 2-h intervals). Seven days later DA levels in the striatum were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Initial experiments indicated that only intrastriatal GDNF, and not intranigral GDNF, was protective. Thereafter, all other trophic factors were administered into the striatum. Members of the GDNF family (GDNF, neurturin, and artemin) all provided significant protection against the DA-depleting effects of METH, with GDNF providing the greatest protection. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neurotrophin-3, acidic fibroblast growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, ciliary neurotrophic factor, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha), heregulin beta1 (HRG-beta1), and amphiregulin (AR) provided no significant protection at the doses examined. These results suggest that the GDNF family of trophic factors can provide significant protection against the DA-depleting effects of neurotoxic doses of METH.

  16. Long-term organ protection by doxazosin and/or quinapril as antihypertensive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Delgado, Julio; Lazaro, Alberto; Gomez-Garre, Dulcenombre; Osende, Julio I; Gonzalez-Rubio, Maria L; Herraiz, Marta; Manzarbeitia, Félix; Fortes, José; Fernandez-Cruz, Arturo; Egido, Jesús

    2006-01-01

    Even with optimal blood pressure control, organ protection may also depend on the selected therapeutic regime. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors have been shown to provide excellent organ protection in hypertension, and may show dose-dependent protective effects. Adrenergic alpha blockers have been associated with an increased rate of heart failure in the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) and Vasodilator-Heart Failure Trial (V-HeFT). This has been related to a proapoptotic effect of this drug in cardiomyocytes. Our purpose is to compare the heart and renal protection of a high quinapril dose, with a combined low quinapril dose plus doxazosin, in an animal model of chronic hypertension. Uninephrectomized spontaneously hypertensive 12-week-old rats were treated for 36 weeks with either quinapril or a combination of doxazosin plus a low quinapril dose. Tight blood pressure control was achieved with both treatments. Renal and cardiac protection was assessed by different parameters, and cardiac apoptosis was evaluated by active caspase-3, apoptotic protein and heat shock protein levels. Untreated hypertensive and normotensive rats were included as controls. Both treatments showed significant heart and renal protection compared with untreated animals. Both therapeutic regimes showed similar protection in renal and cardiac pathology, coronary media fibrosis, myocardial apoptosis and cardiac index. Proteinuria and left ventricular hypertrophy regression were significantly lower in the quinapril group compared with the combined treatment group. Blood pressure control with a high quinapril dose provided higher organ protection than a combined therapy with a lower quinapril dose. This effect was not due to a deleterious effect of doxazosin.

  17. Different sizes, similar challenges = Tamaño diferente, retos similares : Out-of-home care for youth in Germany and the Netherlands = Medidas de protección a la infancia con separación familiar en Alemania y Holanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harder, Annemiek T.; Zeller, Maren; López, Mónica; Köngeter, S.; Knorth, Erik J.

    2013-01-01

    While there is a large difference in the number of young inhabitants in the Netherlands and Germany, their child protection frameworks are quite similar. In both countries, child protection services are mainly focused on youth aged 0 to 18 and regulations are aimed at clients’ responsibility and

  18. Housing growth in and near United States protected areas limits their conservation value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radeloff, Volker C; Stewart, Susan I; Hawbaker, Todd J; Gimmi, Urs; Pidgeon, Anna M; Flather, Curtis H; Hammer, Roger B; Helmers, David P

    2010-01-12

    Protected areas are crucial for biodiversity conservation because they provide safe havens for species threatened by land-use change and resulting habitat loss. However, protected areas are only effective when they stop habitat loss within their boundaries, and are connected via corridors to other wild areas. The effectiveness of protected areas is threatened by development; however, the extent of this threat is unknown. We compiled spatially-detailed housing growth data from 1940 to 2030, and quantified growth for each wilderness area, national park, and national forest in the conterminous United States. Our findings show that housing development in the United States may severely limit the ability of protected areas to function as a modern "Noah's Ark." Between 1940 and 2000, 28 million housing units were built within 50 km of protected areas, and 940,000 were built within national forests. Housing growth rates during the 1990s within 1 km of protected areas (20% per decade) outpaced the national average (13%). If long-term trends continue, another 17 million housing units will be built within 50 km of protected areas by 2030 (1 million within 1 km), greatly diminishing their conservation value. US protected areas are increasingly isolated, housing development in their surroundings is decreasing their effective size, and national forests are even threatened by habitat loss within their administrative boundaries. Protected areas in the United States are thus threatened similarly to those in developing countries. However, housing growth poses the main threat to protected areas in the United States whereas deforestation is the main threat in developing countries.

  19. ICRP 's view on protection of non-human species from ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, L.E.

    2003-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is currently reviewing its existing recommendations for radiological protection. Up till now, it has not published any recommendations as to how assessment or management of radiation effects in non-human organisms should be carried out. The Commission set up a Task Group in the year 2000 to address this issue, and recently adopted the Task Group's report. The report addresses the role that ICRP could play in this important and developing area, building on the approach that has been developed for human protection. ICRP will develop a small set of Reference Fauna and Flora, plus their relevant databases to serve as a basis for the more fundamental understanding and interpretation of the relationships between exposure and dose, and between dose and certain categories of effect. The concept of Reference Fauna and Flora is similar to that of Reference Man used for human radiological protection, in that it is intended to act as a basis for calculations and decision-making. The decision by the Commission to develop a framework for the assessment of radiation effects in non-human species has not been driven by any particular concern over environmental radiation hazards. It has rather been developed to fill a conceptual gap in radiological protection, and to clarify how ICRP can contribute to the attainment of society's goals of environmental protection by developing a protection policy based on scientific and ethical-philosophical principles. (author)

  20. Neutron effects in humans: protection considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Committee I of the International Commission on Radiological Protection has recommended that the Quality Factor for neutrons should be changed from 10 to 20. This article is an interesting recount of the tale of Q from the viewpoint of an observer which illustrates many of the problems that the selection of protection standards pose. 32 refs., 5 tabs

  1. Similar effects of bottom trawling and natural disturbance on composition and function of benthic communities across habitats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Denderen, Pieter Daniël; Bolam, S.G.; Hiddink, J.G.

    2015-01-01

    communities in similar ways. Both sources of disturbance caused declines in long-living, hard-bodied (exoskeleton) and suspension-feeding organisms. Given these similar impacts, there was no detectable trawling effect on communities exposed to high natural disturbance. Conversely, in 3 out of 5 areas with low...

  2. Protective Effects of Ginseng on Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Yi eOng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ginseng (Order: Apiales, Family: Araliaceae, Genus: Panax has been used as a traditional herbal medicine for over 2000 years, and is recorded to have antianxiety, antidepressant and cognition enhancing properties. The protective effect of ginseng on neurological disorders is discussed in this review. Ginseng species and ginsenosides, and their intestinal metabolism and bioavailability are briefly introduced. This is followed by molecular mechanisms of effects of ginseng on the brain, including glutamatergic transmission, monoamine transmission, estrogen signaling, nitric oxide production, the Keap1/Nrf2 adaptive cellular stress pathway, neuronal survival, apoptosis, neural stem cells and neuroregeneration, microglia, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and cerebral microvessels. The molecular mechanisms of the neuroprotective effects of ginseng in Alzheimer’s disease including Aβ formation, tau hyperphosphorylation and oxidative stress, major depression, stroke, Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis / experimental allergic encephalitis are then presented. It is hoped that this discussion will stimulate more studies on the use of ginseng in these disorders.

  3. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1975-01-01

    Physical and radiological terms, quantities, and units. Basic principles of radiation protection (ICRP, IAEA, EURATOM, FRG). Biological effects of ionizing radiation. Objectives of practical radiation protection. (HP) [de

  4. Consumer protection act for digital products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Viktor E.

    1996-03-01

    This report proposes a `Consumer Protection Act for Digital Products' to support electronic commerce and to control the increasing abuse and lack of security on the national information highways. Patterned after the `Food and Drug Act of 1906 (21 USC)' and subsequent legislation, a new agency similar to that of the FDA would have the authority `to develop administrative policy with regard to the safety, effectiveness, and labeling of digital products and their communications for human use, and to review and evaluate new applications of such products.' Specifically, it is proposed that standards, originally developed by the defense industry for the labeling, enveloping, and authentication of digital products delivered to the Government, be extended to promote global electronic commerce by protecting the intellectual property rights of producers, establishing their liability for the end-use of digital products, and give consumers means for informed decision making and purchase.

  5. Geno protective and anti-apoptotic effect of green tea against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This study aims to examine the protective effect of green tea on the disturbances in oxidative stress and apoptosis related factors, mostly produced due to perinatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure, that subsequently induces liver cell damage. Materials and Methods: Anti-free radical, Antioxidant, scavenging, ...

  6. Protective effect of Allium neapolitanum Cyr. versus Allium sativum L. on acute ethanol-induced oxidative stress in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nencini, Cristina; Franchi, Gian Gabriele; Cavallo, Federica; Micheli, Lucia

    2010-04-01

    This study investigated the protective effect of Allium neapolitanum Cyr., a spontaneous species of the Italian flora, compared with garlic (Allium sativum L.) on liver injury induced by ethanol in rats. Male albino Wistar rats were orally treated with fresh Allium homogenates (leaves or bulbs, 250 mg/kg) daily for 5 days, whereas controls received vehicle only. At the end of the experimental 5-day period, the animals received an acute ethanol dose (6 mL/kg, i.p.) 2 hours before the last Allium administration and were sacrificed 6 hours after ethanol administration. The activities of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione reductase (GR) and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), ascorbic acid (AA), and reduced (GSH) and oxidized glutathione in liver tissue were determined. Administration of both Allium species for 5 days (leaves or bulbs) led to no statistical variation of nonenzymatic parameters versus the control group; otherwise Allium treatment caused an increase of GSH and AA levels compared with the ethanol group and a diminution of MDA levels, showing in addition that A. neapolitanum bulb had the best protective effect. Regarding to enzymatic parameters, GR and CAT activities were enhanced significantly compared with the ethanol group, whereas SOD activity showed a trend different from other parameters estimated. However, the treatment with both Allium species followed by acute ethanol administration reestablished the nonenzymatic parameters similar to control values and enhanced the activities of the enzymes measured. These results suggest that fresh Allium homogenates (leaves or bulbs) possess antioxidant properties and provide protection against ethanol-induced liver injury.

  7. Radiation safety and radiation protection problems on the TESLA Accelerator Installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovic, R.; Pavlovic, S.; Orlic, M.

    1997-01-01

    As we can see from the examples of many accelerator facilities installed throughout the world with ion beam energy, mass and charge characteristics and design similar to the TESLA Accelerator Installation, there is a great diversity among them, and each radiation protection and safety programme must be designed to facilitate the safe and effective operation of the accelerator according to the needs of the operating installation. Although there is no standard radiation protection and safety organization suitable for all institutions, experience suggests some general principles that should be integrated with all the disciplines involved in a comprehensive safety programme. (author)

  8. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    A NRPB leaflet in the 'At-a-Glance' series explains in a simple but scientifically accurate way what radiation is, the biological effects and the relative sensitivity of different parts of the human body. The leaflet then discusses radiation protection principles, radiation protection in the UK and finally the effectiveness of this radiation protection as judged by a breakdown of the total dose received by an average person in the UK, a heavy consumer of Cumbrian seafood, an average nuclear industry worker and an average person in Cornwall. (UK)

  9. Research on effectiveness assessment programs for physical protection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Janghoon; Yoo, Hosik; Ham, Taekyu [Korea Institute of Nuclear Non-proliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    PPS (Physical Protection System) is an integrated set of procedures, installation and human resources to protect valuable assets from physical attack of potential adversaries. Since nuclear facilities or radioactive materials can be attractive targets for terrorists, PPS should be installed and maintained throughout the entire lifecycle of nuclear energy systems. One of key ingredients for effective protection is a reliable assessment procedure of the PPS capability. Due to complexity of possible threat categories and pathways, several pathway analysis programs have been developed to ease analysis or visualization. ASSESS using ASD approach runs fast and adopts a relatively simple modeling process for facility elements. But uncertainty due to assumptions used in modeling might complicate the interpretation of results. On the other hand, 2D pathway program such as TESS can utilize more self-consistent detection probability and delay time since actual pathway on 2D map is available. Also, this pathway visualization helps users understand analysis result more intuitively. But, in general, 2D pathway programs require strong computational power and careful optimization. Another possible difference between two approaches is response force deployment and RFT.

  10. Research on effectiveness assessment programs for physical protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Janghoon; Yoo, Hosik; Ham, Taekyu

    2015-01-01

    PPS (Physical Protection System) is an integrated set of procedures, installation and human resources to protect valuable assets from physical attack of potential adversaries. Since nuclear facilities or radioactive materials can be attractive targets for terrorists, PPS should be installed and maintained throughout the entire lifecycle of nuclear energy systems. One of key ingredients for effective protection is a reliable assessment procedure of the PPS capability. Due to complexity of possible threat categories and pathways, several pathway analysis programs have been developed to ease analysis or visualization. ASSESS using ASD approach runs fast and adopts a relatively simple modeling process for facility elements. But uncertainty due to assumptions used in modeling might complicate the interpretation of results. On the other hand, 2D pathway program such as TESS can utilize more self-consistent detection probability and delay time since actual pathway on 2D map is available. Also, this pathway visualization helps users understand analysis result more intuitively. But, in general, 2D pathway programs require strong computational power and careful optimization. Another possible difference between two approaches is response force deployment and RFT

  11. Psidium guajava Linn confers gastro protective effects on rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston Raja, N R; Sundar, K

    2012-02-01

    The best alternatives to synthetic medicines, available, for the treatment of gastric ulcer disorders, are the natural products found in plants. They are known to exhibit a variety of activities. The present study is aimed at the screening of Psidium (P.) guajava Linn for its gastro protective effect. The methanol extracts of the leaves of P. guajava were tested in three different ulcer models viz. aspirin (ASP), pyloric ligation (PL) and ethanol (EtoH) induced ulcer models in rats. The treatment of P. guajava at varying doses (100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg) significantly (p guajava may be responsible for the anti-ulcer property exhibited. The results further suggest that P. guajava possess gastro protective as well as ulcer healing properties which might also be due to its anti-secretory properties.

  12. Effective Results Analysis for the Similar Software Products’ Orthogonality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Ivan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available It is defined the concept of similar software. There are established conditions of archiving the software components. It is carried out the orthogonality evaluation and the correlation between the orthogonality and the complexity of the homogenous software components is analyzed. Shall proceed to build groups of similar software products, belonging to the orthogonality intervals. There are presented in graphical form the results of the analysis. There are detailed aspects of the functioning of the software product allocated for the orthogonality.

  13. Resource rents: The effects of energy taxes and quantity instruments for climate protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenack, Klaus; Edenhofer, Ottmar; Kalkuhl, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide emissions correspond to fossil resource use. When considering this supply side of climate protection, crucial questions come to fore. It seems likely that owners of fossil resources would object to emission reductions. Moreover, policy instruments such as taxes may not be effective at all: it seems individually rational to leave no fossil resources unused. In this context, it can be expected that economic sectors will react strategically to climate policy, aiming at a re-distribution of rents. To address these questions, we investigate the effectiveness, efficiency, and resource rents for energy taxes, resource taxes, and quantity rationing of emissions. The analysis is based on a game theoretic growth model with explicit factor markets and policy instruments. Market equilibrium depends on a government that acts as a Stackelberg leader with a climate protection goal. We find that resource taxes and quantity rationing achieve this objective efficiently, energy taxation is only second-best. The use of quantity rationing to achieve climate protection generates substantial rents for resource owners. - Highlights: ► Resource taxes and quantity rationing (carbon budgets) are efficient. ► Carbon budgets increase resource rents, while taxes decrease rents. ► Resource owners may support climate protection. ► Climate protection introduces a climate rent.

  14. Investigating the effect of non-similar fins in thermoeconomic optimization of plate fin heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajabdollahi, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Thermoeconomic optimization of plate fin heat exchanger with similar (SF) and different (DF) or non-similar fin in each side is presented in this work. For this purpose, both heat exchanger effectiveness and total annual cost (TAC) are optimized simultaneously using multi-objective particle swarm optimization algorithm. The above procedure is performed for various mass flow rates in each side. The optimum results reveal that no thermoeconomic improvement is observed in the case of same mass flow rate in each side while both effectiveness and TAC are improved in the case of different mass flow rate. For example, effectiveness and TAC are improved 0.95% and 10.17% respectively, for the DF compared with SF. In fact, the fin configuration should be selected more compact in a side with lower mass flow rate compared with the other side in the thermoeconomic viewpoint. Furthermore, for the thermodynamic optimization viewpoint both SF and DF have the same optimum result while for the economic (or thermoeconomic) optimization viewpoint, the significant decrease in TAC is accessible in the case of DF compared with SF. - Highlights: • Thermoeconomic modeling of compact heat exchanger. • Selection of fin and heat exchanger geometries as nine decision variables. • Applying MOPSO algorithm for multi objective optimization. • Considering the similar and different fin specification in each side. • Investigation of optimum design parameters for various mass flow rates

  15. Effects of ionizing radiation on plants and animals at levels implied by current radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The 1977 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection stated that the commission believes that if man is adequately protected from radiation, other organisms are also likely to be sufficiently protected. The present report examines this statement by considering the effects of ionizing radiation on animals and plants in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The conclusions are that chronic dose rates of IMGy.d -1 or less are unlikely to cause measurable deleterious effects in terrestrial populations, and that in the aquatic environment limiting chronic dose rates to 10MGy.d -1 to the maximally exposed individuals would provide adequate protection for the population. Thus specific radiation protection standards for non-human organisms are not needed. 193 refs, 2 figs, 7 tabs

  16. Protective MCMV immunity by vaccination of the salivary gland via Wharton's duct: replication-deficient recombinant adenovirus expressing individual MCMV genes elicits protection similar to that of MCMV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangliang; Zhang, Fangfang; Wang, Ruixue; London, Lucille; London, Steven D

    2014-04-01

    Salivary glands, a major component of the mucosal immune system, confer antigen-specific immunity to mucosally acquired pathogens. We investigated whether a physiological route of inoculation and a subunit vaccine approach elicited MCMV-specific and protective immunity. Mice were inoculated by retrograde perfusion of the submandibular salivary glands via Wharton's duct with tcMCMV or MCMV proteins focused to the salivary gland via replication-deficient adenovirus expressing individual MCMV genes (gB, gH, IE1; controls: saline and replication deficient adenovirus without MCMV inserts). Mice were evaluated for MCMV-specific antibodies, T-cell responses, germinal center formation, and protection against a lethal MCMV challenge. Retrograde perfusion with tcMCMV or adenovirus expressed MCMV proteins induced a 2- to 6-fold increase in systemic and mucosal MCMV-specific antibodies, a 3- to 6-fold increase in GC marker expression, and protection against a lethal systemic challenge, as evidenced by up to 80% increased survival, decreased splenic pathology, and decreased viral titers from 10(6) pfu to undetectable levels. Thus, a focused salivary gland immunization via a physiological route with a protein antigen induced systemic and mucosal protective immune responses. Therefore, salivary gland immunization can serve as an alternative mucosal route for administering vaccines, which is directly applicable for use in humans.

  17. Older Adults' Perceptions of Nutrition as Protective Against Detrimental Effects of Environmental Pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Kristina; Gaetke, Lisa; Stephenson, Tammy; Brewer, Dawn

    2017-08-01

    The aging process makes older adults vulnerable to the detrimental health effects of environmental contaminants. Our study assessed older adults' perceptions regarding diet being protective against environmental contaminants, their levels of concern about exposure, and their interest in learning about protective food-related strategies. A needs assessment to collect such information has not been conducted among older adults. Health fair survey results showed that they perceived diet as beneficial against contaminants, were concerned about health implications of exposure, and were interested in learning how to protect health through diet-related strategies. Results suggest that a nutrition-focused curriculum addressing how dietary strategies can help protect against environmental contaminants is needed for Extension professionals.

  18. Protective effects of Mucuna pruriens seed extract pretreatment against cardiovascular and respiratory depressant effects of Calloselasma rhodostoma (Malayan pit viper) venom in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, S Y; Tan, N H; Sim, S M

    2010-12-01

    The protective effects of Mucuna pruriens seed extract (MPE) against the cardio-respiratory depressant and neuromuscular paralytic effects induced by injection of Calloselasma rhodostoma (Malayan pit viper) venom in anaesthetized rats were investigated. While MPE pretreatment did not reverse the inhibitory effect of the venom on the gastrocnemius muscle excitability, it significantly attenuated the venom-induced cardio-respiratory depressant effects (p < 0.05). The protection effects may have an immunological mechanism, as indicated by the presence of several proteins in the venom that are immunoreactive against anti-MPE. However, we cannot rule out the possibility that the pretreatment may exert a direct, non-immunological protective action against the venom.

  19. Hand protection from ultraviolet exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khazova, M.; O'Hagan, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: A number of industrial applications and public services involve exposure to ultraviolet radiation (U.V.R.) from a variety of lamps and lasers, for example, in forensic examination, biological trans-illuminators, dentistry, laser material processing, microelectronics, etc. The proposed European Union Directive on Optical Radiation would place specific requirements on employers to provide adequate safety measures to reduce exposure to U.V.R., including gloves for hand protection. The selection of gloves should be based on a risk assessment and on the performance characteristics of the gloves for the task. However, current International and national standards do not describe evaluation procedures of disposable gloves for hand protection against non-ionising radiation. A methodology for assessment of the UV protection level for disposable gloves and a simple measurement protocol are proposed, based on a common approach with UV protection by clothing and sunscreens. Glove Ultraviolet Protection Factor is defined as a time-scale increase in exposure permitted for the hand protected by a glove with respect to an unprotected hand. However, the wide variety of U.V.R. sources and the real-life conditions of glove use (stretching and wetting the surface by liquids) bring substantial challenges to the assessment method. Our study of ∼ 50 samples of widely used disposable gloves made of different materials (nitrile, vinyl, latex and chloroprene) showed that for all tested gloves a change in U.V.R. attenuation with stretching is characteristic for the type of glove material and can be included as a scaling factor in the definition of U.V.R. protection. Glove material has a bigger effect on U.V.R. protection level than variations in the glove thickness or its colour. The following approaches are suggested to overcome the problem of variable U.V.R. sources: - Worst case scenario minimal protection level, most restrictive case - Application

  20. Hand protection from ultraviolet exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khazova, M.; O' Hagan, J.B. [Health Protection Agency, Radiation Protection Division, Chilton, Did cot (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: A number of industrial applications and public services involve exposure to ultraviolet radiation (U.V.R.) from a variety of lamps and lasers, for example, in forensic examination, biological trans-illuminators, dentistry, laser material processing, microelectronics, etc. The proposed European Union Directive on Optical Radiation would place specific requirements on employers to provide adequate safety measures to reduce exposure to U.V.R., including gloves for hand protection. The selection of gloves should be based on a risk assessment and on the performance characteristics of the gloves for the task. However, current International and national standards do not describe evaluation procedures of disposable gloves for hand protection against non-ionising radiation. A methodology for assessment of the UV protection level for disposable gloves and a simple measurement protocol are proposed, based on a common approach with UV protection by clothing and sunscreens. Glove Ultraviolet Protection Factor is defined as a time-scale increase in exposure permitted for the hand protected by a glove with respect to an unprotected hand. However, the wide variety of U.V.R. sources and the real-life conditions of glove use (stretching and wetting the surface by liquids) bring substantial challenges to the assessment method. Our study of {approx} 50 samples of widely used disposable gloves made of different materials (nitrile, vinyl, latex and chloroprene) showed that for all tested gloves a change in U.V.R. attenuation with stretching is characteristic for the type of glove material and can be included as a scaling factor in the definition of U.V.R. protection. Glove material has a bigger effect on U.V.R. protection level than variations in the glove thickness or its colour. The following approaches are suggested to overcome the problem of variable U.V.R. sources: - Worst case scenario minimal protection level, most restrictive case - Application

  1. Development of similarity theory for control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myshlyaev, L. P.; Evtushenko, V. F.; Ivushkin, K. A.; Makarov, G. V.

    2018-05-01

    The area of effective application of the traditional similarity theory and the need necessity of its development for systems are discussed. The main statements underlying the similarity theory of control systems are given. The conditions for the similarity of control systems and the need for similarity control control are formulated. Methods and algorithms for estimating and similarity control of control systems and the results of research of control systems based on their similarity are presented. The similarity control of systems includes the current evaluation of the degree of similarity of control systems and the development of actions controlling similarity, and the corresponding targeted change in the state of any element of control systems.

  2. Protective effect of Iris germanica L. in β-amyloid-induced animal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Protective effect of Iris germanica L. in β-amyloid-induced animal model of alzheimer's disease. ... The day after surgery, animals in treatment groups received different doses of the aqueous extract of Iris by gavage for 30 days. Morris water maze test (MWM) was performed to assess the effects of I. germanica on learning ...

  3. Protective effect of different antioxidant agents in UVB-irradiated keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Salucci

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Skin cells can respond to UVB-induced damage either by tolerating it, or restoring it through antioxidant activation and DNA repair mechanisms or, ultimately, undergoing programmed cell death, when damage is massive. Nutritional factors, in particular, food antioxidants, have attracted much interest because of their potential use in new preventive, protective, and therapeutic strategies for chronic degenerative diseases, including skin inflammation and cancer. Some polyphenols, present in virgin olive oil, well tolerated by organism after oral administration, show a variety of pharmacological and clinical benefits such as anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, and neuro-protective activities. Here, the protective effects of antioxidant compounds against UV-induced apoptosis have been described in HaCat cell line. Human keratinocytes were pre-treated with antioxidants before UVB exposure and their effects have been evaluated by means of ultrastructural analyses. After UVB radiation, a known cell death trigger, typical apoptotic features, absent in control condition and in antioxidant alone-treated cells, appear. An evident numerical decrease of ultrastructural apoptotic patterns and TUNEL positive nuclei can be observed when natural antioxidants were supplied before cell death induction. These data have been confirmed by molecular investigation of caspase activity. In conclusion, this paper highlights antioxidant compound ability to prevent apoptotic cell death in human keratinocytes exposed to UVB, suggesting, for these molecules, a potential role in preventing skin damage. 

  4. Similarity increases altruistic punishment in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussweiler, Thomas; Ockenfels, Axel

    2013-11-26

    Humans are attracted to similar others. As a consequence, social networks are homogeneous in sociodemographic, intrapersonal, and other characteristics--a principle called homophily. Despite abundant evidence showing the importance of interpersonal similarity and homophily for human relationships, their behavioral correlates and cognitive foundations are poorly understood. Here, we show that perceived similarity substantially increases altruistic punishment, a key mechanism underlying human cooperation. We induced (dis)similarity perception by manipulating basic cognitive mechanisms in an economic cooperation game that included a punishment phase. We found that similarity-focused participants were more willing to punish others' uncooperative behavior. This influence of similarity is not explained by group identity, which has the opposite effect on altruistic punishment. Our findings demonstrate that pure similarity promotes reciprocity in ways known to encourage cooperation. At the same time, the increased willingness to punish norm violations among similarity-focused participants provides a rationale for why similar people are more likely to build stable social relationships. Finally, our findings show that altruistic punishment is differentially involved in encouraging cooperation under pure similarity vs. in-group conditions.

  5. UV dose-effect relationships and current protection exposure standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, M.S.; Campbell, G.W.

    1982-04-01

    In this paper we have attempted to quantify the health effects in man of uv-radiation exposure of wavelengths from 240 nm to 320 nm. Exposure to uv in this region could result in the formation of skin cancer or premature aging in man. The induction of cancer by uv radiation results from changes in genetic material. We have used the DNA action spectrum coupled with the uv skin cancer data available in the literature to derive the dose-effect relationships. The results are compared against the current uv protection standards

  6. Protective effect of pumpkin seed oil against genotoxicity induced by azathioprine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Elfiky

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Pumpkin is a leafy green vegetable; it belongs to the Cucurbitaceae family. Pumpkin seed oil supplementation can prevent changes in plasma lipids and blood pressure. The present study was conducted to evaluate the protective effect of pumpkin seed oil against cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of azathioprine. Oral administration of pumpkin seed oil either before or after treatment of azathioprine was effective in the reduction of the frequencies of Mn-PCEs, decreased the DNA fragmentation, total sperm abnormalities and significantly increased sperm count, percentage of PCEs, and enhanced the ratio of PCEs to NCEs. However, random amplified polymorphism of DNA (RAPD showed distinct differences in animal groups intoxicated with azathioprine before and after pumpkin seed oil treatment, which reflected a DNA protective effect of pumpkin seed oil. Depletion of glutathione content in the testis was also observed in azathioprine treated mice, which was improved by an oral administration of pumpkin seed oil either before or after treatment with azathioprine.

  7. Study on radiation protective effect of resveratrol and its molecular mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv Qiujun; Wen Liqing; Zhang Min; Guo Shaoming; Chen Yuanyuan; Wu Zuze

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate radiation-protective effect of resveratrol and its molecular mechanism. Methods: Kunming mice were administered with resveratrol before 60 Co γ-irradiation. Thirty-day survival rate and the average life span of dead mice post-irradiation were observed. The apoptosis of spleen from irradiated mice was detected by FACS and in situ terminal labeling method. The effect of resveratrol on the activities of Caspase-3 and Caspase-8, and the expression levels of Bcl-2 and Fas were examined. Results: Administration with resveratrol resulted in increases of 30-day survival rate and prolongation of average life span of the dead mice. Apoptotic rate of spleen cells decreased, expression level of bcl-2 increased, the expression of Fas did not change, and the activities of Caspase-3 and Caspase-8 increased in spleen cells of irradiation groups. Conclusion: The results indicate that resveratrol has radiation-protective effect and its mechanism might be related with its suppression of apoptosis of radiation-sensitive cells

  8. Older Adults' Perceptions of Nutrition as Protective against Detrimental Effects of Environmental Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Kristina; Gaetke, Lisa; Stephenson, Tammy; Brewer, Dawn

    2017-01-01

    The aging process makes older adults vulnerable to the detrimental health effects of environmental contaminants. Our study assessed older adults' perceptions regarding diet as protective against environmental contaminants, levels of concern about exposure to environmental contaminants, and interest in learning about protective food-related…

  9. Effect of Heterogeneous Interest Similarity on the Spread of Information in Mobile Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Narisa; Sui, Guoqin; Yang, Fan

    2018-06-01

    Mobile social networks (MSNs) are important platforms for spreading news. The fact that individuals usually forward information aligned with their own interests inevitably changes the dynamics of information spread. Thereby, first we present a theoretical model based on the discrete Markov chain and mean field theory to evaluate the effect of interest similarity on the information spread in MSNs. Meanwhile, individuals' interests are heterogeneous and vary with time. These two features result in interest shift behavior, and both features are considered in our model. A leveraging simulation demonstrates the accuracy of our model. Moreover, the basic reproduction number R0 is determined. Further extensive numerical analyses based on the model indicate that interest similarity has a critical impact on information spread at the early spreading stage. Specifically, the information always spreads more quickly and widely if the interest similarity between an individual and the information is higher. Finally, five actual data sets from Sina Weibo illustrate the validity of the model.

  10. Effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide in the urinary system, with special emphasis on its protective effects in the kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reglodi, Dora; Kiss, Peter; Horvath, Gabriella; Lubics, Andrea; Laszlo, Eszter; Tamas, Andrea; Racz, Boglarka; Szakaly, Peter

    2012-04-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a widespread neuropeptide with diverse effects in the nervous system and peripheral organs. One of the most well-studied effects of PACAP is its cytoprotective action, against different harmful stimuli in a wide variety of cells and tissues. PACAP occurs in the urinary system, from the kidney to the lower urinary tract. The present review focuses on the nephroprotective effects of PACAP and summarizes data obtained regarding the protective effects of PACAP in different models of kidney pathologies. In vitro data show that PACAP protects tubular cells against oxidative stress, myeloma light chain, cisplatin, cyclosporine-A and hypoxia. In vivo data provide evidence for its protective effects in ischemia/reperfusion, cisplatin, cyclosporine-A, myeloma kidney injury, diabetic nephropathy and gentamicin-induced kidney damage. Results accumulated on the renoprotective effects of PACAP suggest that PACAP is an emerging candidate for treatment of human kidney pathologies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The efficiency cost of protective measures in climate policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Böhringer, Christoph; Garcia-Muros, Xaquin; Cazcarro, Ignacio; Arto, Iñaki

    2017-01-01

    Despite recent achievements towards a global climate agreement, climate action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions remains quite heterogeneous across countries. Energy-intensive and trade-exposed (EITE) industries in industrialized countries are concerned on stringent domestic emission pricing that puts them at a competitive disadvantage against producers of similar goods in other countries with more lenient emission regulation. This paper focuses on climate policy design in the United States of America (US) and compares the economic implications of four alternative protective measures for US EITE industries: (i) output-based rebates, (ii) exemptions from emission pricing, (iii) energy intensity standards, and (iv) carbon intensity standards. Using a large-scale computable general equilibrium model we quantify how these protective measures affect competitiveness of US EITE industries. We find that protective measures can improve common trade-related competitiveness indicators such as revealed comparative advantage or relative world trade shares but at the same time may lead to a decline in the output value for EITE industries because of negative income effects. The economy-wide cost of emission abatement under protective measures increase as compared to uniform emission pricing stand-alone such that the gains of protective measures for EITE exports may be more than compensated through losses in domestic EITE demand. - Highlights: • We assess impacts for US emission-intensive and trade-exposed (EITE) industries. • EITE impacts are quantified via competitiveness metrics and production output. • Protective measures reduce adverse competitiveness impacts but can depress output. • Output losses are due to negative income effects that reduce domestic EITE demand. • Protective measures run the risk of making US climate policy much more costly.

  12. [Protective effect of compound bismuth and magnesium granules on aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, F H; Hu, F L; Wei, H; Zhang, Y Y; Yang, G B; Lei, X Y; Yang, Y P; Sun, W N; Cui, M H

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the protective effect of compound bismuth and magnesium granules on aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats and its possible mechanism. Acute gastric mucosal injury model was developed with intraperitoneal injection of aspirin in Wistar rats. The rats were divided into normal control group, injury group, sucralfate protection group, compound bismuth and magnesium granules protection group and its herbal components protection group(each group 12 rats). In the protection groups, drugs as mentioned above were administered by gavage before treated with intraperitoneal injection of aspirin. To evaluate the extent of gastric mucosal injury and the protective effect of drugs, gastric mucosal lesion index, gastric mucosal blood flow, content of gastric mucosal hexosamine, prostaglandins (PG), nitric oxide(NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and interleukin (IL) -1, 2, 8 were measured in each group, and histological changes were observed by gross as well as under microscope and electron microscope. Contents of hexosamine, NO, and PG in all the protection groups were significantly higher than those in the injury group (all Pcompound bismuth and magnesium granules group was significantly higher than that in the sucralfate group ((11.29±0.51) vs(10.80±0.36)nmol/ml, Pcompound bismuth and magnesium granules group were significantly lower than those in the sucralfate group ((328.17±6.56) vs(340.23±8.05)pg/ml, PCompound bismuth and magnesium granules and its herbal components may have significant protective effect on aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury.

  13. Gastrointestinal protective effect of dietary spices during ethanol-induced oxidant stress in experimental rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Usha N S; Srinivasan, Krishnapura

    2010-04-01

    Spices are traditionally known to have digestive stimulant action and to cure digestive disorders. In this study, the protective effect of dietary spices with respect to activities of antioxidant enzymes in gastric and intestinal mucosa was examined. Groups of Wistar rats were fed for 8 weeks with diets containing black pepper (0.5%), piperine (0.02%), red pepper (3.0%), capsaicin (0.01%), and ginger (0.05%). All these spices significantly enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes--superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione-S-transferase--in both gastric and intestinal mucosa, suggesting a gastrointestinal protective role for these spices. In a separate study, these dietary spices were found to alleviate the diminished activities of antioxidant enzymes in gastric and intestinal mucosa under conditions of ethanol-induced oxidative stress. The gastroprotective effect of the spices was also reflected in their positive effect on mucosal glycoproteins, thereby lowering mucosal injury. The amelioration of the ethanol-induced decrease in the activities of antioxidant enzymes in gastric and intestinal mucosa by dietary spices suggests their beneficial gastrointestinal protective role. This is the first report on the gastrointestinal protective potential of dietary spices.

  14. Protective effects of erythropoietin against cuprizone-induced oxidative stress and demyelination in the mouse corpus callosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Ragerdi Kashani

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Increasing evidence in both experimental and clinical studies suggests that oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. The aim of the present work is to investigate the protective effects of erythropoietin against cuprizone-induced oxidative stress. Materials and Methods: Adult male C57BL/6J mice were fed a chow containing 0.2 % cuprizone for 6 weeks. After 3 weeks, mice were simultaneously treated with erythropoietin (5,000 IU/ kg body weight by daily intraperitoneal injections. Results: Our results showed that cuprizone induced oxidative stress accompanied with down-regulation of subunits of the respiratory chain complex and demyelination of corpus callosum. Erythropoietin antagonized these effects. Biochemical analysis showed that oxidative stress induced by cuprizone was regulated by erythropoietin. Similarly, erythropoietin induced the expression of subunits of the respiratory chain complex over normal control values reflecting a mechanism to compensate cuprizone-mediated down-regulation of these genes. Conclusion: The data implicate that erythropoietin abolishes destructive cuprizone effects in the corpus callosum by decreasing oxidative stress and restoring mitochondrial respiratory enzyme activity.

  15. Inflammatory Effects of the Plant Protection Product Stifenia (FEN560 on Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Lamotte

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Plant defense stimulators (PDSs rely on the activation of plant innate immunity in order to protect crops against various pests. These molecules are thought to be a safer alternative to classical plant protection products. Given that innate immune systems share common features in plants and vertebrates, PDS can potentially cross-react with innate immunity of non-target organisms. To test this hypothesis, we studied effects of the commercial PDS Stifenia (FEN560, which is composed of crushed fenugreek seeds. We tested various concentrations of Stifenia (0.03–1 mg mL−1 on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and checked, 20 h later, cell metabolic activity (MA using XTT assay, cell death by flow cytometry analysis, and IL-1β inflammatory cytokine released in the culture medium using ELISA. Stifenia induced a general decrease of the cell MA, which was concomitant with a dose-dependent release of IL-1β. Our results highlight the activation of human immune cells. The inflammatory effect of Stifenia was partially inhibited by pan-caspase inhibitor. Accordingly, Stifenia induced the release of p20 caspase-1 fragment into the culture medium suggesting the involvement of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Furthermore, we observed that Stifenia can induce cell death. We also tested the effect of Stifenia on Zebrafish larvae. After 24 h of exposure, Stifenia induced a dose-dependent IL-1β and TNFα gene expression. The human-cell-based approach developed in this work revealed a high sensitivity concerning inflammatory properties of a plant protection product. These tests could be routinely used to screen the potential adverse effects of this type of compounds. Finally, our results suggest a potential danger of using extensively certain PDS for crop protection.

  16. Perceived Similarity With Gay Men Mediates the Effect of Antifemininity on Heterosexual Men's Antigay Prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Carmen; Vázquez, Carolina; Falomir-Pichastor, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    This research examined the hypothesis that heterosexual men's motivation to differentiate themselves from gay men mediates the relationship between the antifemininity norm of masculinity and antigay prejudice. We assessed masculinity through three concepts: status, thoughness, and antifemininity. Participants then reported their perceived similarity with gay men and their antigay prejudice. The results showed that antifemininity was the best predictor of both perceived similarity and antigay prejudice: The more people endorsed the antifemininity norm, the more they perceived themselves as dissimilar from gay men and showed antigay prejudice. More important, perceived similarity mediated the effect of antifemininity on antigay prejudice. These findings provide direct evidence for the link between masculinity and the motivation to differentiate oneself from gay men, and they suggest that antigay prejudice accomplishes the identity function of maintaining unambiguous gender boundaries.

  17. Protective Effect of Argan and Olive Oils against LPS-Induced Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Mice Livers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soufiane El Kamouni

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis causes severe dysregulation of organ functions, via the development of oxidative stress and inflammation. These pathophysiological mechanisms are mimicked in mice injected with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Here, protective properties of argan oil against LPS-induced oxidative stress and inflammation are explored in the murine model. Mice received standard chow, supplemented with argan oil (AO or olive oil (OO for 25 days, before septic shock was provoked with a single intraperitoneal injection of LPS, 16 hours prior to animal sacrifice. In addition to a rise in oxidative stress and inflammatory markers, injected LPS also caused hepatotoxicity, accompanied by hyperglycemia, hypercholesterolemia and hyperuremia. These LPS-associated toxic effects were blunted by AO pretreatment, as corroborated by normal plasma parameters and cell stress markers (glutathione: GSH and antioxidant enzymology (catalase, CAT; superoxide dismutase, SOD and glutathione peroxidase, GPx. Hematoxylin–eosin staining revealed that AO can protect against acute liver injury, maintaining a normal status, which is pointed out by absent or reduced LPS-induced hepatic damage markers (i.e., alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate transaminase (AST. Our work also indicated that AO displayed anti-inflammatory activity, due to down-regulations of genes encoding pro-inflammatory cytokines Interleukin-6 (IL-6 and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α and in up-regulations of the expression of anti-inflammatory genes encoding Interleukin-4 (IL-4 and Interleukin-10 (IL-10. OO provided animals with similar, though less extensive, protective changes. Collectively our work adds compelling evidence to the protective mechanisms of AO against LPS-induced liver injury and hence therapeutic potentialities, in regard to the management of human sepsis. Activations of IL-4/Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors (IL-4/PPARs signaling and, under LPS, an anti-inflammatory IL-10/Liver

  18. Evaluating the effect of annotation size on measures of semantic similarity

    KAUST Repository

    Kulmanov, Maxat

    2017-02-13

    Background: Ontologies are widely used as metadata in biological and biomedical datasets. Measures of semantic similarity utilize ontologies to determine how similar two entities annotated with classes from ontologies are, and semantic similarity is increasingly applied in applications ranging from diagnosis of disease to investigation in gene networks and functions of gene products.

  19. Protective effects of ischemic postconditioning on intestinal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DING Jun-tao

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To explore the protective effects of two types of ischemic postconditioning (IP on intestinal mucosa barrier in rabbits with crush injury of the hind limb. Methods: This study was conducted between August and December 2008 in the Department of Trauma Surgery, Daping Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China. The model of crush injury to the hind limb of rabbits was firstly developed by a 25 kg object with the right hind limbs fixed by wooden splints, and then two types of IP were established, including occluding/opening the common iliac artery and vein alternatively (traditional IP, IP A and binding/loosening the proximum of the injured hind limb alternatively (modified IP, IP B. Thirty-six male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: IP A group, IP B group and control group, with 12 rabbits in each group. The serum levels of diamine oxidase (DAO and intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP were detected at 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours after injury. Pathological changes of ileum were examined at 24 hours after injury. Results: The serum levels of I-FABP at 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours after injury in both IP A and IP B groups had a significant decrease, compared with control group. DAO levels also showed the same change trend at 2 and 6 hours after injury, but showed no significant difference between two IP groups. No difference in pathological changes of ileum was found among the three groups. Conclusions: IP can protect intestinal mucosa barrier function on the model of hind limb crush injury in rabbits. Meanwhile the modified IP B shows the same protection as the traditional IP A, and is worth applying in clinic. Key words: Ischemic postconditioning; Crush syndrome; Intestinal mucosa

  20. The usage of phase change materials in fire fighter protective clothing: its effect on thermal protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mengmeng

    2017-12-01

    The thermal protective performance of the fire fighter protective clothing is of vital importance for fire fighters. In the study fabrics treated by phase change materials (PCMs) were applied in the multi-layered fabrics of the fire fighter protective clothing ensemble. The PCM fabrics were placed at the different layers of the clothing and their thermal protective performance were measured by a TPP tester. Results show that with the application of the PCM fabrics the thermal protection of the multi-layered fabrics was greatly increased. The time to reach a second degree burn was largely reduced. The location of the PCM fabrics at the different layers did not affect much on the thermal protective performance. The higher amount of the PCM adds on, the higher thermal protection was brought. The fabrics with PCMs of a higher melting temperature could contribute to higher thermal protection.

  1. Protective effect of melatonin on thrombocytopoiesis in irratiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Aiguo; Hu Qun; Yang Mo; Li Zhiguang; Huang Weizhe; Pang Yaxuan; Li Guixia; Wu Baixiang; Huo Taihui

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the protective effect of melatonin on thrombocytopoiesis (T) and its mechanism in total-bodily irradiated mice. Methods: Altogether 18 female BALB/c mice were randomly divided into three experimental groups (6 each): Group 1(normal control, N) received neither irradiation nor melatonin; Group 2 (model control, C); received total body-irradiation for 4 Gy gamma-rays and Group 3 (melatonin, M), received melatonin after irradiation at the dosage of 10 mg·kg -1 ·d -1 via i. p. injection in consecutive 21 days. In Group C normal saline instead of melatonin was administered in the same way as above. Peripheral blood platelets and white blood cells (WBC) were analyzed for the three groups on day 0, day 7, day 14, and day 21. All the mice were sacrificed to collect bone marrow cells for the assays of colony-forming unit-megakaryocyte (CFU-MK) and of colony-forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F). The effects of melatonin of different concentrations (0-500 nmol/L) on CFU-MK formation were observed in vitro. Results: The results showed that melatonin enhanced the recovery of T. Moreover, melatonin also promoted the increase of CFU-F (28 ± 10.4 vs 14.6 ± 2.8) and CFU-MK (19.63 ± 3.28 vs 11 ± 2.24) in vivo. The amount of CFU-MK in vitro was dependent on the concentration of melatonin. Compared with the control group, the size of CFU-MK in Group M was much larger and MK cells were more mature, especially when the melatonin concentration was 200 nmol/L. Conclusion: Melatonin provides protective effect on T in irradiated mice. It enhances T in vivo and promotes the growth of bone marrow stromal cells as well as megakaryocytes in vitro. Therefore, we speculate that the T-protective activity of melatonin may be mediated via promoting growth of the progenitors of platelet, megakaryocytes, and bone marrow stromal cells. (authors)

  2. Swazi men's perception of the protective effect of male circumcision ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    about the protective effect of circumcision against STIs including HIV, and its implication to the mass MC strategy. .... In addition, permission to conduct the study was also granted by the FLAS Research and Evaluation Unit. ..... Willingness to be circumcised for preventing HIV among Chinese men who have sex with men.

  3. Protective Effect of Bombyx mori L Cocoon (Abresham) and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    Protective Effect of Bombyx mori L Cocoon (Abresham) and its ... agonist, at high doses, has been reported to produce ... 12:12 h. Standard pellet diet and tap water were ... induction of myocardial injury on the scheduled ... Total protein in of B. mori cocoon (Abresham) ..... The authors thank Professor SK Maulik, Head,.

  4. Inspiration or deflation? Feeling similar or dissimilar to slim and plus-size models affects self-evaluation of restrained eaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papies, Esther K; Nicolaije, Kim A H

    2012-01-01

    The present studies examined the effect of perceiving images of slim and plus-size models on restrained eaters' self-evaluation. While previous research has found that such images can lead to either inspiration or deflation, we argue that these inconsistencies can be explained by differences in perceived similarity with the presented model. The results of two studies (ns=52 and 99) confirmed this and revealed that restrained eaters with high (low) perceived similarity to the model showed more positive (negative) self-evaluations when they viewed a slim model, compared to a plus-size model. In addition, Study 2 showed that inducing in participants a similarities mindset led to more positive self-evaluations after viewing a slim compared to a plus-size model, but only among restrained eaters with a relatively high BMI. These results are discussed in the context of research on social comparison processes and with regard to interventions for protection against the possible detrimental effects of media images. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Accounting for biological effectiveness in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) presents a practical problem to radiological protection when attempts are made to ensure that the assessed risks from different types of radiation and different modes of exposure to radiation are commensurate with one another. Unfortunately, the theoretical understanding of RBE is still in the stage of competing explanations and hypotheses. Furthermore, the division of the concept of dose equivalent into a set of concepts for risk assessment and another set for measurement and control has introduced conflicting requirements of a practical nature that are difficult to resolve. Many of those working in radiobiology and radiation protection have perceived the need to increase the quality factors for photon and neutron radiations. It may be more reasonable to change the quality factors for neutrons than for other radiations. The advantages and disadvantages of different methods for accommodating such changes within the dose-equivalent concepts are to be examined. The method of accommodating such a change that has the least practical disadvantages is to increase the quality factors for all secondary particles produced in tissue by neutron radiations by a constant factor. The only disadvantage would be the perception that the quality factors for these secondary particles were not treated in a consistent fashion for all types of ionising radiation. (author)

  6. Effect of top ligament blanking on reducing flow induced vibration of protective grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Kyong Bo; Ryu, Joo Young; Kwon, Oh Joon; Park, Joon Kyoo; Jeon, Sang Youn; Suh, Jung Min [KEPCO NF Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The protective grid is a Inconel 718 spacer grid located just above the bottom nozzle in many kinds of fuel assemblies for PWR. The purpose of using protective grid is to capture debris before they flow up into the fuel assembly and get trapped by the other grids causing fuel rod damages as well as to provide support at the lower end plugs of fuel rods. Recently, it has been reported that strap failure has occurred in the protective grids and the flow induced vibration of the strap has resulted in the strap fatigue failure. After the root cause of the protective grid failure was found to be the flow induced vibration of the strap, KEPCO NF has made an effort to find the vibration tendencies of grid strap and draw vibration mitigation concepts of the protective grid strap. The vibration tendency and the effect of the vibration mitigation concept of the protective grid which have been found by the results of the loop tests and simulations in KEPCO NF are presented herein.

  7. A little similarity goes a long way: the effects of peripheral but self-revealing similarities on improving and sustaining interracial relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Tessa V; Magee, Joe C; Gordon, Sarah H; Gullett, Lindy

    2014-07-01

    Integrating theory on close relationships and intergroup relations, we construct a manipulation of similarity that we demonstrate can improve interracial interactions across different settings. We find that manipulating perceptions of similarity on self-revealing attributes that are peripheral to the interaction improves interactions in cross-race dyads and racially diverse task groups. In a getting-acquainted context, we demonstrate that the belief that one's different-race partner is similar to oneself on self-revealing, peripheral attributes leads to less anticipatory anxiety than the belief that one's partner is similar on peripheral, nonself-revealing attributes. In another dyadic context, we explore the range of benefits that perceptions of peripheral, self-revealing similarity can bring to different-race interaction partners and find (a) less anxiety during interaction, (b) greater interest in sustained contact with one's partner, and (c) stronger accuracy in perceptions of one's partners' relationship intentions. By contrast, participants in same-race interactions were largely unaffected by these manipulations of perceived similarity. Our final experiment shows that among small task groups composed of racially diverse individuals, those whose members perceive peripheral, self-revealing similarity perform superior to those who perceive dissimilarity. Implications for using this approach to improve interracial interactions across different goal-driven contexts are discussed.

  8. Protective Effect of Pyruvate Against Radiation-Induced Damage in Collagenized Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griko, Y. V.; Yan, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation produces both acute and late effects on the collagenized tissues and have profound effects on wound healing. Because of the crucial practical importance for new radioprotective agents, our study has been focused on evaluation of the efficacy of non-toxic naturally occurring compounds to protect tissue integrity against high-dose gamma radiation. Here, we demonstrate that molecular integrity of collagen may serve as a sensitive biological marker for quantitative evaluation of molecular damage to collagenized tissue and efficacy of radioprotective agents. Increasing doses of gamma radiation (0-50kGy) result in progressive destruction of the native collagen fibrils, which provide a structural framework, strength, and proper milieu for the regenerating tissue. The strategy used in this study involved the thermodynamic specification of all structural changes in collagenized matrix of skin, aortic heart valve, and bone tissue induced by different doses and conditions of g-irradiation. This study describes a simple biophysical approach utilizing the Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) to characterize the structural resistance of the aortic valve matrix exposed to different doses of g-irradiation. It allows us to identify the specific response of each constituent as well as to determine the influence of the different treatments on the characteristic parameters of protein structure. We found that pyruvate, a substance that naturally occurs in the body, provide significant protection (up to 80%) from biochemical and biomechanical damage to the collagenized tissue through the effective targeting of reactive oxygen species. The recently discovered role of pyruvate in the cell antioxidant defense to O2 oxidation, and its essential constituency in the daily human diet, indicate that the administration of pyruvate-based radioprotective formulations may provide safe and effective protection from deleterious effects of ionizing

  9. Personality similarity in negotiations: Testing the dyadic effects of similarity in interpersonal traits and the use of emotional displays on negotiation outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kelly Schwind; DeRue, D Scott; Matta, Fadel K; Howe, Michael; Conlon, Donald E

    2016-10-01

    We build on the small but growing literature documenting personality influences on negotiation by examining how the joint disposition of both negotiators with respect to the interpersonal traits of agreeableness and extraversion influences important negotiation processes and outcomes. Building on similarity-attraction theory, we articulate and demonstrate how being similarly high or similarly low on agreeableness and extraversion leads dyad members to express more positive emotional displays during negotiation. Moreover, because of increased positive emotional displays, we show that dyads with such compositions also tend to reach agreements faster, perceive less relationship conflict, and have more positive impressions of their negotiation partner. Interestingly, these results hold regardless of whether negotiating dyads are similar in normatively positive (i.e., similarly agreeable and similarly extraverted) or normatively negative (i.e., similarly disagreeable and similarly introverted) ways. Overall, these findings demonstrate the importance of considering the dyad's personality configuration when attempting to understand the affective experience as well as the downstream outcomes of a negotiation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Distance and protective barrier effects on the composite resin degree of conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Margareth; Trevizam, Natália Carvalho; Takayassu, Renata Nakase; Leme, Ariene Arcas; Soares, Giulliana Panfiglio

    2013-01-01

    Context: The food wrap films are used to cover the tip of curing light units in order to avoid contamination and prevent damage to the light guide. However, their effects on resin polymerization are not fully known. Aims: We investigated the effects on restoration efficiency of a food wrap protective barrier used on the tip of curing light units. Materials and Methods: For each treatment, five replications were performed, a total of 60 bovine incisor. The degree of conversion (%DC) of restorations with the composite resin Opallis EA2 was evaluated using 3 curing light devices (Optilux 501, Optilight and Ultra LED) and 2 curing distances (0 and 5 mm). The composite resin was tested for restoration of cavities in bovine crowns. %DC values were measured by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance technique. Statistical Analysis Used: The data were analyzed using 3-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. Results: Use of the protective film lowered %DC (F = 4.13; P = 0.05), and the effects of curing distance were associated to the curing light device (F = 3.61; P = 0.03). Conclusions: The distance from the light curing tip and use of a translucent protective barrier on the light-cure device can both impair composite resin %DC. PMID:24015001

  11. Protective and therapeutic effects of fucoxanthin against sunburn caused by UV irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mio Matsui

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mild exposure to ultraviolet (UV radiation is also harmful and hazardous to the skin and often causes a photosensitivity disorder accompanied by sunburn. To understand the action of UV on the skin we performed a microarray analysis to isolate UV-sensitive genes. We show here that UV irradiation promoted sunburn and downregulated filaggrin (Flg; fucoxanthin (FX exerted a protective effect. In vitro analysis showed that UV irradiation of human dermal fibroblasts caused production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS without cellular toxicity. ROS production was diminished by N-acetylcysteine (NAC or FX, but not by retinoic acid (RA. In vivo analysis showed that UV irradiation caused sunburn and Flg downregulation, and that FX, but not NAC, RA or clobetasol, exerted a protective effect. FX stimulated Flg promoter activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Flg promoter deletion and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that caudal type homeo box transcription factor 1 (Cdx1 was a key factor for Flg induction. Cdx1 was also downregulated in UV-exposed skin. Therefore, our data suggested that the protective effects of FX against UV-induced sunburn might be exerted by promotion of skin barrier formation through induction of Flg, unrelated to quenching of ROS or an RA-like action.

  12. Evidence for radiation-induced Bystander effects and relevance to radiotherapy and to radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgieva, R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: There are two major arms of radiation science in which Bystander effects (ByEff) could be of practical importance: radiotherapy and risk assessment. Basic biological principles, including dose-response relationships that have become dogma in the context of targeted effects of IR must now be reconsidered. The direct effects of radiation and the bystander components had to be reinvestigated to show the difference between them. It may be necessary to introduce a factor for ByEff's when calculating dose to both normal tissues and tumor. Presumably the relative effects on normal or tumor tissues could be different and that difference may not be always predictable. In relation to radiation protection, the existence of RIByEff's raises important questions for the way radiation dose is measured and modeled. The biological effect of exposure to low-doses radiation is likely to vary between individuals and between organs in one the same individual. Further studies on non-targeted effects should contribute to the establishment of adequate environmental and occupational radiation protection standards. This lecture looks at the history, the current data and controversies that are now beginning to resolve the questions concerning the mechanisms underlying the induction and transmission of ByEff. Especially, effects on radiotherapy and radiation protection are discussed

  13. Innovative protection cookbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, D.L.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A large portion of the international community relies on expert judgment and military expertise to form the protection strategy of weapons-grade nuclear materials. This approach can be less than effectual for two primary reasons. First, much of the nuclear material that needs the most protection is not in a static form and located in easily secured storage locations. Some of the most effective measures for protection of in-process material are administrative and procedural in nature. There are basic protection differences between countries just like there are differences in baking bread. However, the necessary steps to produce bread are basically the same around the world. Certain ingredients are required to give it flavor, make it rise, and have a certain texture. So it is in the development of protection systems. A measure of intrusion detection, some access controls and searches, a pinch of computerized accounting, a layer of delay barriers, and a smidgen of armed response--and the basis for a 'cookbook' is born. Any and all protection systems can begin with simple elements that can be just as effective as the most sophisticated modern components. This paper will describe some of those simple, but effective, innovative protection measures. (author)

  14. Persuasive Effects of Point of View, Protagonist Competence, and Similarity in a Health Narrative About Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meng; Bell, Robert A; Taylor, Laramie D

    2017-08-01

    We examined the persuasive effects of three narrative features in a message about type 2 diabetes: narrative point of view (first- vs. third-person perspective), protagonist competence (positive role model who prevents diabetes vs. negative role model who develops diabetes), and protagonist-reader similarity (demographically similar vs. dissimilar). We posited that a first-person point of view would elevate people's identification levels more than a third-person point of view, especially when the protagonist was depicted as a positive role model. We also expected a similar protagonist to foster greater levels of identification than a dissimilar one. In addition, the positive effect of a competent role model on identification was expected to be enhanced under the condition of reader-protagonist similarity. Finally, we hypothesized that the effects of identification on persuasion would be mediated by self-referencing. Participants 30 years of age or younger (N = 489) were randomly assigned to read a story about a person with a family history of type 2 diabetes that was altered with regard to the experimental factors. Thereafter they completed a questionnaire incorporating measures of study variables. Greater levels of identification were found to foster self-referencing, leading to persuasion. Identification was strongest with a first-person point of view and when the narrator was a positive role model. The effect of identification on persuasion was mediated by self-referencing. Contrary to expectations, protagonist-reader demographic similarity did not affect identification or self-referencing. There was no support for the two moderation hypotheses.

  15. Protective effects of incensole acetate on cerebral ischemic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussaieff, Arieh; Yu, Jin; Zhu, Hong; Gattoni-Celli, Sebastiano; Shohami, Esther; Kindy, Mark S

    2012-03-14

    The resin of Boswellia species is a major anti-inflammatory agent that has been used for centuries to treat various conditions including injuries and inflammatory conditions. Incensole acetate (IA), a major constituent of this resin, has been shown to inhibit NF-κB activation and concomitant inflammation, as well as the neurological deficit following head trauma. Here, we show that IA protects against ischemic neuronal damage and reperfusion injury in mice, attenuating the inflammatory nature of ischemic damage. IA given post-ischemia, reduced infarct volumes and improved neurological activities in the mouse model of ischemic injury in a dose dependent fashion. The protection from damage was accompanied by inhibition of TNF-α, IL-1β and TGF-β expression, as well as NF-κB activation following injury. In addition, IA is shown to have a therapeutic window of treatment up to 6h after ischemic injury. Finally, the protective effects of IA were partially mediated by TRPV3 channels as determined by the TRPV3 deficient mice and channel blocker studies. This study suggests that the anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities of IA may serve as a novel therapeutic treatment for ischemic and reperfusion injury, and as a tool in the ongoing research of mechanisms for neurological damage. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Protective effects of C-phycocyanin on alcohol-induced acute liver injury in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Dong; Liu, Bing; Luan, Xiying; Sun, Junyan; Liu, Nana; Qin, Song; Du, Zhenning

    2016-03-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption leads to liver disease. Extensive evidence suggests that C-phycocyanin (C-PC), a chromophore phycocyanobilin derived from Spirulina platensis, exerts protective effects against chemical-induced organ damage. In this study, we investigated whether C-PC could protect against ethanol-induced acute liver injury. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (CHOL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), liver homogenate malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) content were measured, and pathological examination of liver sections were examined. C-PC showed obvious inhibitory effects on serum ALT, AST, TG, CHOL, LDL and MDA, and SOD content significantly increased in the liver. The structure of hepatic lobules was clear, liver sinus returned to normal, and liver cell cords were arranged in neat rows. Cloudiness, swelling, inflammatory cell infiltration and spotty necrosis of liver cells were significantly reduced. Therefore, C-PC can significantly protect against ethanol-induced acute liver injury.

  17. Assessment of Protective Effect of Some Modern Agrochemicals against Ozone-Induced Stress in Sensitive Clover and Tobacco Cultivars

    OpenAIRE

    Blum, Oleg; Didyk, Nataliya; Pavluchenko, Nataliya; Godzik, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Some modern agrochemicals with antioxidant potential were tested for their protective effect against ozone injury using clover and tobacco ozone-sensitive cultivars as model plants subjected to ambient ozone at two sites (Kyiv city in Ukraine and Szarów village in Poland). All used agrochemicals showed partial protective effects against ozone injury on clover and tobacco. Conducted studies confirmed the effectiveness of modern fungicides belonging to strobilurin group as protectants of sensit...

  18. Assessment of Protective Effect of Some Modern Agrochemicals against Ozone-Induced Stress in Sensitive Clover and Tobacco Cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Oleg; Didyk, Nataliya; Pavluchenko, Nataliya; Godzik, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Some modern agrochemicals with antioxidant potential were tested for their protective effect against ozone injury using clover and tobacco ozone-sensitive cultivars as model plants subjected to ambient ozone at two sites (Kyiv city in Ukraine and Szarów village in Poland). All used agrochemicals showed partial protective effects against ozone injury on clover and tobacco. Conducted studies confirmed the effectiveness of modern fungicides belonging to strobilurin group as protectants of sensitive crops against ozone damage. The effectiveness of new growth regulators "Emistym C" and "Agrostymulin" was showed for the first time. Out of the studied agrochemicals, fungicide "Strobi" and natural growth regulator "Emistym C" demonstrated the best protective effects. These agrochemicals present promise for further studies of their possible utilization for enhancement of ozone tolerance of sensitive crops.

  19. Protective Effect of Morocco Carob Honey Against Lead-Induced Anemia and Hepato-Renal Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Aicha Fassi Fihri; Noori S. Al-Waili; Redouan El-Haskoury; Meryem Bakour; Afaf Amarti; Mohammad J. Ansari; Badiaa Lyoussi

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Natural honey has many biological activities including protective effect against toxic materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of carob honey against lead-induced hepato-renal toxicity and lead-induced anemia in rabbits. Methods: Twenty four male rabbits were allocated into four groups six rabbits each; group 1: control group, received distilled water (0.1 ml / kg.b.wt /daily); group 2: received oral lead acetate (2 g/kg.b.wt/daily); group 3: tr...

  20. The influence of cross-language similarity on within- and between-language Stroop effects in trilinguals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuven, W.J.B. van; Conklin, K.; Coderre, E.L.; Guo, T.; Dijkstra, A.F.J.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated effects of cross-language similarity on within- and between-language Stroop interference and facilitation in three groups of trilinguals. Trilinguals were either proficient in three languages that use the same-script (alphabetic in German–English–Dutch trilinguals), two

  1. Training for effective environmental protection in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson, D.; Brake, J.; Hickman, C.; Tamm, J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the role of environmental training in the delivery of effective environmental protection programs for construction projects in the nuclear industry. The paper uses a case study approach, based on Point Lepreau Generating Station's Refurbishment Project, to demonstrate how the underpinning principles of 'training, awareness and competence' can be delivered within a structured environmental management framework, to achieve sustained excellence in environmental management and performance. Key issues addressed by the paper include the early identification of different target audiences, making effective use of communication themes, and the importance of reinforcement and follow-up in support of training goals. (author)

  2. DNA protective effect of ginseng and the antagonistic effect of Chinese turnip: A supplementation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Yim Tong; Wong, Kam Shing; Han, Andrea; Pak, Sok Cheon; Kalle, Wouter

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this clinical study is to provide scientific evidence for supporting traditional Chinese application and usage to the patients. For this purpose, we tested the ability if Panax ginseng extract to lower oxidative damage to nuclear DNA in human lymphocytes by comparing the effect of cooked Chinese turnip on this effect. Seven healthy subjects (4 males and 3 females from 37 to 60 years) participated two occasions which were at least 2 weeks apart. About 2 mL of fasting blood sample for baseline measurement was taken on arrival. They were requested to ingest the content of 5 ginseng capsules in 200 mL water. The subject remained fasting for 2 h until the second blood sample taken. In the other occasion, the experiment was repeated except a piece of cooked turnip (10 g) was taken with the ginseng extract. The two occasions could be interchanged. Comet assay was performed on two specimens on the same day for the evaluation of lymphocytic DNA damage with or without oxidative stress. For the group with ginseng supplementation, there was a significant decrease in comet score for hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) treatment over the 2-h period while no change in DNA damage for unstressed sample. For the group with ginseng together with turnip supplementation, there was no significant difference in comet score for both H 2 O 2 treatment and phosphate-buffered saline treatment. Ginseng extract could reduce DNA damage mediated by H 2 O 2 effectively, but this protection effect was antagonized by the ingestion of cooked turnip at the same time. In the current study, commercial ginseng extract was used for supplementing volunteers. Ginseng extract could protect DNA from oxidative stress in vivo while turnip diminished the protection.

  3. Cervicovaginal secretions protect from human papillomavirus infection: effects of vaginal douching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Tang-Yuan; Chang, Ying-Cheng; Ding, Dah-Ching

    2013-06-01

    Cervicovaginal secretions (CVSs) are reported to protect against human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Although vaginal douching is known to clear both viral inoculants and CVSs, its effect on CVSs in women with HPV infection is unknown. The in vitro HPV pseudovirus infection system was used to test the protective activity of CVSs against HPV infection in samples collected before and after vaginal douching. To simulate different time points of vaginal douching in relation to viral exposure, the cell CVS reconstitute was washed after different viral exposure durations. In the CVSs of premenopausal and postmenopausal women who did not perform douching, the CVSs inhibited HPV infection by 56.7 ± 1.8% and 53.6 ± 2.5%, respectively; in women who had performed douching, the CVSs inhibited HPV infection by only 31.2 ± 7.1%, which was significantly lower (p infection existed for up to 8 hours after HPV exposure, and cell washing increased the clearance to up to 82-93% of the infectious load. This study confirms the protective activity of CVSs against HPV infection regardless of age. In this in vitro study, the net effect of douching was found to be beneficial. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Protective Effect of Mulberry (Morus alba L.) Extract against Benzo[a]pyrene Induced Skin Damage through Inhibition of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hyunju; Lee, JungA; Park, Deokhoon; Jung, Eunsun

    2017-12-20

    Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), a type of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, is present in the atmosphere surrounding our environment. Although B[a]P is a procarcinogen, enzymatically metabolized benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE) could intercalate into DNA to form bulky BPDE-DNA adducts as an ultimate carcinogenic product in human keratinocytes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of mulberry extract, purified from the fruit of Morus Alba L., on B[a]P-induced cytotoxicity in human keratinocytes and its mechanisms of action. In this study, we confirmed that B[a]P induced nuclear translocation and the activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) were decreased by pretreatment of mulberry extract. Mulberry extract could decrease DNA damage through the suppression of B[a]P derived DNA adduct formation and restoration of cell cycle retardation at S phase in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, cyanidin-3-glucoside (C3G), a major active compound of mulberry extract, showed biological activities to protect the cells from B[a]P exposure, similar to the effectivity of the mulberry extract. These results indicated that the inhibitory effect of C3G against B[a]P inducing skin cancer is attributable to repress the AhR signaling pathway.

  5. Protective effects of bacterial endotoxin in reconstruction of hematopoiesis after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenzhong, Zhao; Renqian, Zhong [Second Military medical Coll., Shanghai, SH (China). Dept. of Radiation Medicine

    1989-06-01

    The mechanism of protective effects of bacterial endotoxin (ET) in reconstruction of hemopoiesis post-irradiation has been studied. The results showed that (1) in normal men, dogs, rabbits and rats, after im injection of typhobacterial endotoxin (ETt), the peripheral blood leucocytes (PBL) increased in number remarkably; (2) the injection of microdoses of ETt into hypothalamus of the rabbits and rats caused no obvious change in number of PBL, suggesting that there was neither regulation on the granulomacrophagopoiesis of the vegetative nervous center in hypothalamus nor the regulative effect of the hypothalamo-pituitary endocrine system. The curves of the stimulating factor (CSF) levels in serum after injection of bacillus coli endotoxin (ETc) were compared between the mouse bone marrow cell (BMC) membrane {sup 3}H-galactose incorporation method and the agar cellular colony culture technique. It was shown that they had obvious relationships with the dose-response curve of purified CSF-1. There was no effect on the incorporation value and colony number when ETc was added to culture well directly. The protective effects of the ETc-serum on the 8 Gy irradiated mice was realized by inducing GM-CSF and promoting the reconstruction of hematopoiesis.

  6. Knowledge of outdoor workers on the effects of natural UV radiation and methods of protection against exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hault, K; Rönsch, H; Beissert, S; Knuschke, P; Bauer, A

    2016-04-01

    The most important but influenceable risk factor in the development of skin cancer is the unprotected exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. In order to assure adequate and effective protection against UV exposure, a level of knowledge about solar radiation and its effects is required. The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge of workers in outdoor professions on the effects of natural UV radiation and methods of protection against exposure. Forty outdoor workers were given a standardized questionnaire designed to ascertain their level of knowledge. The majority of participants knew exposure to solar radiation can be detrimental depending on exposure time. Eighty-three percentage recognized that people working regularly in an outdoor environment may be at risk due to high exposure. Long-sleeved clothing plus headgear and sunscreen containing sun-protecting substances were deemed adequate methods of protection by 83% and 85% respectively. Seventy percentage of the outdoor workers were familiar with the definition of the sun protection factor (SPF), yet only 25% correctly identified the amount of sunscreen needed to achieve the SPF as indicated on the product. A mere 8% of participants knew that symptoms of a sunburn first became apparent 3 h after sun exposure and only 18% were able to accurately gauge the amount of time they could spend in the sun before developing one. Although 30% had heard of the ultraviolet index (UVI), only 13% understood that protecting your skin using additional measures is recommended as of UVI 3. Overall, 30% of the outdoor workers thought themselves sufficiently protected against the harmful effects of the sun. While the participants of this study had a basic fundamental understanding of the effects of solar radiation and methods of protection against exposure, there remains an urgent need for further clarification across all demographic groups. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  7. Effects of multiple viewings of an ultraviolet photo on sun protection behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, H I M

    2018-05-02

    To determine whether multiple viewings of one's ultraviolet (UV) facial photo differentially affects subsequent sun protection behaviors relative to a single viewing. Pretest-posttest control group. Southern California college students (N = 151) were randomly assigned to be shown their UV facial photo one time, multiple times over the course of 2 weeks, or not at all. Emotional reactions, perceived susceptibility to skin damage, and sun protection intentions were assessed immediately, and sun protection behaviors were assessed during a surprise telephonic follow-up 1 month later. Immediately after viewing a UV photo of their face, participants reported significantly greater perceived susceptibility to skin damage, greater intentions to engage in future sun protection, and more negative emotions than those who had not seen a UV photo. Moreover, 1 month later, those who had viewed their UV photo were less likely to report having sunbathed and reported significantly greater sun protection than did controls. There were no differences in sun protection behaviors between those who had been shown their UV photo only once during the initial intervention session and those who had been sent their UV photo several times thereafter. However, among those who had been sent their UV photo several times, those who reported having viewed their photo on additional occasions reported significantly greater sun protection behaviors than those who had not. Being randomly assigned to view a UV facial photo multiple times generally neither strengthened nor weakened effects on subsequent sun protection behaviors relative to being shown the photo just once. However, among those who were sent their photo and thus had the option of viewing it more often than they had been assigned to, those who chose to view their photo more frequently also engaged in more sun protection behaviors. Copyright © 2018 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluating the effectiveness of protected areas for maintaining biodiversity, securing habitats, and reducing threats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geldmann, Jonas

    of this thesis has been to evaluate the performance and effectiveness of protected area in securing biodiversity, by evaluating their ability to either improve conservation responses, the state of biodiversity, or alternatively to reduce the human pressures responsible for the loss of biodiversity. The scope......Protected areas are amongst the most important conservation responses to halt the loss of biodiversity and cover more than 12.7% of the terrestrial surface of earth. Likewise, protected areas are an important political instrument and a key component of the Convention for Biological Diversity (CBD......); seeking to protect at least 17% of the terrestrial surface and 10% of the coastal and marine areas by 2020. Protected areas are expected to deliver on many different objectives covering biodiversity, climate change mitigation, local livelihood, and cultural & esthetic values. Within each...

  9. Exposure to intimate partner violence reduces the protective effect that women's high education has on children's corporal punishment: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Mariano; Dahlblom, Kjerstin; Solórzano, Lucia; Herrera, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that women's education is protective against corporal punishment (CP) of children. However, the effect that women's exposure to intimate partner violence (IPV) has on the association between women's education and children's CP has not been studied. To understand how the interaction between women's exposure to IPV and their education level influences the occurrence of children's CP at the household level. We selected 10,156 women who had at least one child less than 16 years old from cross-sectional data from the 2006-2007 Nicaraguan Demographic and Health Survey. Children's CP was defined as the punishment of children by slapping them, hitting them with a fist, or hitting them with a rope, belt, stick, or other object. IPV was measured by using a conflict tactic scale. The WHO Self-Reporting Questionnaire 20 (SRQ-20) was used to assess the women's mental health. We computed adjusted risk ratios (ARR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using Poisson regression with a robust variance estimator. Women's exposure to IPV was associated with a 10-17% increase in the risk of children's CP. IPV and children's CP were associated with impaired women's mental health. Women's lifetime exposure to emotional IPV and controlling behavior by a partner significantly decreased the protective effect from women's high education level on children's CP. When women were exposed to emotional IPV, the protective effect from having a college education decreased from ARR=0.61 (95% CI 0.47-0.80) to ARR=0.98 (95% CI 0.80-1.19). A similar pattern was found among women exposed to controlling behavior by a partner, the protective effect decreased from ARR=0.71 (95% CI 0.53-0.90) to ARR=0.86 (95% CI 0.70-1.06). This study shows how significant gains in one positive social determinant of children's well-being can be undermined when it interacts with men's violence toward women. Policies that aim to end children's CP must include actions to end women's exposure to IPV.

  10. Priming of disability and elderly stereotype in motor performance: similar or specific effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Frederik; Rohmer, Odile; Louvet, Eva

    2012-04-01

    In three experimental studies, the effects of priming participants with the disability stereotype were investigated with respect to their subsequent motor performance. Also explored were effects of activating two similar stereotypes, persons with a disability and elderly people. In Study 1, participants were primed with the disability stereotype versus with a neutral prime, and then asked to perform on a motor coordination task. In Studies 2 and 3, a third condition was introduced: priming participants with the elderly stereotype. Results indicated that priming participants with the disability stereotype altered their motor performance: they showed decreased manual dexterity and performed slower than the non-primed participants. Priming with the elderly stereotype decreased only performance speed. These findings underline that prime-to-behavior effects may depend on activation of specific stereotype content.

  11. Effect of acute gamma radiation and protective action of different concentration of extracts of safora japonica and hypericum perforatum on the life of aboriginal earthworms of Absheron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suleymanova, A.S.; Garibov, A.A.; Samedov, P.A.; Farajov, M.F.

    2012-01-01

    Full text : As atomic power is increasingly recognized as a potential energy source to sustain future human development, radiological protection of the environment will become an even more important environmental safety concern. Thus, an understanding of the effects of ionizing radiation on non-human biota is required by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the radiological protection of the environment. Soil processes are vital to sustainable terrestrial ecosystems, and soil invertebrates play an important role in nutrient cycling by feeding on microbiota. Because of their ecological importance, soil invertebrates are used for ecological impact assessments of terrestrial ecosystem pollutants. For chemical substances, single-species laboratory tests are used to understand toxicity. Standard tests using earthworms and spring tails have been developed by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). Laboratory toxicity tests are also applicable in field contamination monitoring to determine if test organisms have been exposed to field-corrected soils. In such assays, gene expression as a biomarker has been receiving increased attention as it may produce fast, sensitive and diagnostic assays. A similar use of laboratory tests can be applied to assess the environmental impact of ionizing radiation. An understanding of the dose-effect relations of ionising radiation for non-human biota establishes important baselines for radiobiological protection of ecosystems. We used standard laboratory tests to examine dose-effect relationships of gamma radiation on the survival, biomass changing, feeding activity, coprolite excretion of aboriginal earthworms

  12. Evaluation of protection factor of respiratory protective equipment using indigenously developed protection factor test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patkulkar, D.S.; Ganesh, G.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2018-01-01

    Assigned protection factor (APF) is an indicator representing effectiveness of a respirator and it provides workplace level of respiratory protection for workers in providing protection against exposure to airborne contaminants Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) specifies 'Respirator APF' and 'Maximum Use Concentration' (MUC - a term derived using APF) shall be an integral part of Respirator Protection Standard. MUC establishes the maximum airborne concentration of a contaminant in which a respirator with a given APF may be used. The use of particulate respirators such as half face mask, full face mask and powered air purifying respirators is essential for radioactive jobs in nuclear facilities to prevent any intake of radionuclide. With this impetus, the Protection Factor Test Facility (PFTF) for testing and evaluation of respiratory protective equipment meeting relevant applicable standards was designed, fabricated and installed in Respiratory Protective Equipment Laboratory of Health Physics Division

  13. Measuring impact of protected area management interventions: current and future use of the Global Database of Protected Area Management Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coad, Lauren; Leverington, Fiona; Knights, Kathryn; Geldmann, Jonas; Eassom, April; Kapos, Valerie; Kingston, Naomi; de Lima, Marcelo; Zamora, Camilo; Cuardros, Ivon; Nolte, Christoph; Burgess, Neil D; Hockings, Marc

    2015-11-05

    Protected areas (PAs) are at the forefront of conservation efforts, and yet despite considerable progress towards the global target of having 17% of the world's land area within protected areas by 2020, biodiversity continues to decline. The discrepancy between increasing PA coverage and negative biodiversity trends has resulted in renewed efforts to enhance PA effectiveness. The global conservation community has conducted thousands of assessments of protected area management effectiveness (PAME), and interest in the use of these data to help measure the conservation impact of PA management interventions is high. Here, we summarize the status of PAME assessment, review the published evidence for a link between PAME assessment results and the conservation impacts of PAs, and discuss the limitations and future use of PAME data in measuring the impact of PA management interventions on conservation outcomes. We conclude that PAME data, while designed as a tool for local adaptive management, may also help to provide insights into the impact of PA management interventions from the local-to-global scale. However, the subjective and ordinal characteristics of the data present significant limitations for their application in rigorous scientific impact evaluations, a problem that should be recognized and mitigated where possible. © 2015 The Authors.

  14. Protection by DABCO against inactivation of transforming DNA by near-ultraviolet light: action spectra and implications for involvement of singlet oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peak, J.G.; Peak, M.J.; Foote, C.S.

    1981-01-01

    Diazobicyclo (2.2.2) octane (DABCO) protects the genetic activity of purified transforming Bacillus subtilis DNA against inactivation by near-, but not far-, UV light. The maximum dose-modifying factor is 0.4, at 0.1 M DABCO. Maximal protection is at about 350 nm and no protection occurs below 313 nm. The spectrum for protection is similar to that described for 2-aminoethylisothiouronium bromide hydrobromide. The relevance of these observations with regard to the role of singlet oxygen in near-UV effects is discussed. (author)

  15. Effect of Flow Velocity on Corrosion Rate and Corrosion Protection Current of Marine Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seong Jong [Kunsan National University, Kunsan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Min Su; Jang, Seok Ki; Kim, Seong Jong [Mokpo National Maritime University, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In spite of highly advanced paint coating techniques, corrosion damage of marine metal and alloys increase more and more due to inherent micro-cracks and porosities in coatings formed during the coating process. Furthermore, flowing seawater conditions promote the breakdown of the protective oxide of the materials introducing more oxygen into marine environments, leading to the acceleration of corrosion. Various corrosion protection methods are available to prevent steel from marine corrosion. Cathodic protection is one of the useful corrosion protection methods by which the potential of the corroded metal is intentionally lowered to an immune state having the advantage of providing additional protection barriers to steel exposed to aqueous corrosion or soil corrosion, in addition to the coating. In the present investigation, the effect of flow velocity was examined for the determination of the optimum corrosion protection current density in cathodic protection as well as the corrosion rate of the steel. It is demonstrated from the result that the material corrosion under dynamic flowing conditions seems more prone to corrosion than under static conditions.

  16. Effectiveness analyses may underestimate protection of infants after group C meningococcal immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, David M; Kelly, Dominic; Heath, Paul T; McCarthy, Noel D; Pollard, Andrew J; Granoff, Dan M

    2006-07-15

    Group C meningococcal conjugate-vaccine effectiveness in the United Kingdom declines from ~90% in the first year to 0% between 1 and 4 years after immunization in infants immunized at 2, 3, and 4 months of age and to 61% in toddlers given a single dose. Confidence intervals are wide, and the extent of protection is uncertain. Serum samples were obtained from children 3-5 years of age who were participants in a preschool booster-vaccine trial. Serum bactericidal activity was measured with human complement. Group C anticapsular antibody concentrations were measured by a radioantigen binding assay. Passive protection was analyzed in an infant rat bacteremia model. Serum samples from UK children who had been immunized 2-3 years earlier as infants or toddlers had higher levels of radioantigen binding, bactericidal activity, and passive protection than did historical control serum samples from unimmunized children (P or =1 : 4 (considered to be protective) than those immunized as toddlers (61% vs. 24%; Pprotection (50% and 41%, respectively; P=.4). We found no evidence of lower immunity in children immunized as infants than as toddlers. On the basis of serum bactericidal activity and/or passive protection, 40%-50% of both age groups are protected at 2-3 years after immunization, which was significantly greater than in unimmunized historical controls (<5%).

  17. Protective Effects of Parent-College Student Communication During the First Semester of College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Meg L.; Morgan, Nicole; Abar, Caitlin; Maggs, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Recent studies suggest that parents maintain influence as their adolescents transition into college. Advances in communication technology make frequent communication between parents and college students easy and affordable. This study examines the protective effect of parent-college student communication on student drinking behaviors, estimated peak blood alcohol concentration (eBAC), and serious negative consequences of drinking. Participants Participants were 746 first-year, first-time, full-time students at a large university in the U.S. Methods Participants completed a baseline and 14 daily web-based surveys. Results The amount of time spent communicating with parents on weekend days predicted the number of drinks consumed, heavy drinking, and peak eBAC consistent with a protective within-person effect. No association between communication and serious negative consequences was observed. Conclusions Encouraging parents to communicate with their college students, particularly on weekend days, could be a relatively simple, easily implemented protective process to reduce dangerous drinking behaviors. PMID:21660810

  18. Mucosal protection by sucralfate and its components in acid-exposed rabbit esophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlando, R.C.; Turjman, N.A.; Tobey, N.A.; Schreiner, V.J.; Powell, D.W.

    1987-08-01

    Sucralfate has been reported to protect the esophageal epithelium of the rabbit and cat against acid injury. To determine the contribution of its components, aluminum hydroxide and sucrose octasulfate (SOS), rabbit esophageal epithelia were mounted in Ussing chambers to monitor changes in electrical resistance (R) upon exposure to HCl (pH 1.4-1.6). In untreated tissues, acidification of the luminal bath produced a progressive decline in R, indicating increased epithelial permeability. Sucralfate added to the luminal bath 45 min after acidification increased R to preexposure levels--an effect accompanied by increased luminal pH. Similar to sucralfate, aluminum hydroxide added to the acidified bath increased R and luminal pH. However, the effect of aluminum hydroxide could be abolished by titration with HCl to maintain pH similar to acid-treated control tissues. Tissues treated with sucralfate and whose luminal solutions were titrated with HCl to maintain pH similar to controls no longer exhibited an increase in R but, in contrast to aluminum hydroxide treatment, the acid-induced decline in R was prevented. This action of sucralfate was shown to be a property of its other component, SOS. Sucrose octasulfate, like acid-titrated sucralfate solutions, did not increase luminal bath pH, yet prevented the acid-induced decline in R. Confirmation of protection by SOS was shown by additional morphologic and flux studies.

  19. Risperidone-Induced Renal Damage and Metabolic Side Effects: The Protective Effect of Resveratrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedat Bilgiç

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of the study was to investigate the possible protective qualities of resveratrol (RSV against the side effects of risperidone (RIS in an experimental model in rat kidneys with histologic and biochemical assessments. Materials and Methods. Experimental procedures were performed on 35 female Sprague Dawley rats. Rats were randomly divided into five groups: control, untreated rats (n=7 were in group 1; group 2 was given 2 mg/kg/day RIS (n=7; group 3 was treated with 2 mg/kg/day RIS and 20 mg/kg/day RSV (n=7; group 4 was treated with 2 mg/kg/day RIS and 40 mg/kg/day RSV (n=7; and group 5 was treated with 2 mg/kg/day RIS and 80 mg/kg/day RSV (n=7. All treatments were administered for two weeks by gavage. On treatment day 15, kidney tissues were removed for analysis. Results. The results showed that RSV treatment reduced weight gain induced by RIS. In addition, RSV increased the total antioxidant status (TAS and decreased serum creatinine (Cr, blood urea nitrogen (BUN, oxidative stress index (OSI, and total oxidant status (TOS levels significantly (p<0.05. Conclusion. This study revealed that treatment with RSV might protect kidney tissues against the side effects of RIS. RSV could be an effective course of therapy to enhance therapeutic efficacy.

  20. Repair of massively defected hemi-joints using demineralized osteoarticular allografts with protected cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siming; Yang, Xiaohong; Tang, Shenghui; Zhang, Xunmeng; Feng, Zhencheng; Cui, Shuliang

    2015-08-01

    Surgical replacement of massively defected joints necessarily relies on osteochondral grafts effective to both of bone and cartilage. Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) retains the osteoconductivity but destroys viable chondrocytes in the cartilage portion essential for successful restoration of defected joints. This study prepared osteochondral grafts of DBM with protected cartilage. Protected cartilage portions was characterized by cellular and molecular biology and the grafts were allogenically used for grafting. Protected cartilage showed similar histomorphological structure and protected proteins estimated by total proteins and cartilage specific proteins as in those of fresh controls when DBMs were generated in bone portions. Such grafts were successfully used for simultaneously repair of bone and cartilage in massively defected osteoarticular joints within 16 weeks post-surgery. These results present an allograft with clinical potential for simultaneous restoration of bone and cartilage in defected joints.

  1. The Short-term Protective Effects of 'Non-PPE' Gloves Used by Greenhouse Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roff, Martin

    2015-10-01

    decreased. The measurement of protection is restricted by the limit of quantification (LOQ) such that protection must apparently increase with challenge, nevertheless the above trends remained even after removal of data gloves, protection was similar for dry and wet tasks. For cotton gloves, protection was lower for wet tasks, although this might have been consistent with that decreasing trend, because the ungloved hand challenges were higher for wet tasks than dry.Default PF values for cotton and SRSU non-PPE gloves may be taken for regulatory exposure assessments from lower quantiles of the distributions of PF results, being 1.3 and 7-10 respectively. The lower quantiles for cotton gloves are close to one, indicating no protection at all. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  2. Protective effect of theophylline on renal functions in experimental pneumoperitoneum model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Sefa Alperen; Ceylan, Cavit; Serel, Tekin Ahmet; Doluoglu, Omer Gokhan; Soyupek, Arap Sedat; Guzel, Ahmet; Özorak, Alper; Uz, Efkan; Savas, Hasan Basri; Baspinar, Sirin

    2015-07-01

    Our objective in this experimental study is to research the effect of the intra-abdominal pressure which rises following pneumoperitoneum and whether Theophylline has a possible protective activity on this situation. In our study, 24 Wistar Albino rats were used. Rats were divided into two groups. The first group was set for only pneumoperitoneum model. The second group was given 15 mg/kg of Theophylline intraperitoneally before setting pneumoperitoneum model. Then urea, creatinine, cystatin-C, tissue and serum total antioxidant capacity, total oxidant capacity and oxidative stress index in two groups were measured and compared with each other. Apoptosis and histopathological conditions in the renal tissues were examined. The differences between the groups were analyzed with the Mann-Whitney U test. Results were considered significant at p OSI values (p > 0.05). The mean value of urea were similar in pneumoperitoneum and pneumoperitoneum + theophylline groups (p = 0.12). The mean cystatin-C value was 2.2 ± 0.3 µg/mL in pneumoperitoneum, 1.74 ± 0.33 µg/mL in pneumoperitoneum + theophylline (p = 0.002). According to our study, lower cystatin-C levels in the group, where Theophylline was given, are suggestive of lower renal injury in this group. However, this opinion is interrogated as there is no difference in terms of tissue and serum TAS, TOS, OSI and urea values between the groups.

  3. Long-term potentiation protects rat hippocampal slices from the effects of acute hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, F F; Addae, J I; McRae, A; Stone, T W

    2001-07-13

    We have previously shown that long-term potentiation (LTP) decreases the sensitivity of glutamate receptors in the rat hippocampal CA1 region to exogenously applied glutamate agonists. Since the pathophysiology of hypoxia/ischemia involves increased concentration of endogenous glutamate, we tested the hypothesis that LTP could reduce the effects of hypoxia in the hippocampal slice. The effects of LTP on hypoxia were measured by the changes in population spike potentials (PS) or field excitatory post-synaptic potentials (fepsps). Hypoxia was induced by perfusing the slice with (i) artificial CSF which had been pre-gassed with 95%N2/5% CO2; (ii) artificial CSF which had not been pre-gassed with 95% O2/5% CO2; or (iii) an oxygen-glucose deprived (OGD) medium which was similar to (ii) and in which the glucose had been replaced with sucrose. Exposure of a slice to a hypoxic medium for 1.5-3.0 min led to a decrease in the PS or fepsps; the potentials recovered to control levels within 3-5 min. Repeat exposure, 45 min later, of the same slice to the same hypoxic medium for the same duration as the first exposure caused a reduction in the potentials again; there were no significant differences between the degree of reduction caused by the first or second exposure for all three types of hypoxic media (P>0.05; paired t-test). In some of the slices, two episodes of LTP were induced 25 and 35 min after the first hypoxic exposure; this caused inhibition of reduction in potentials caused by the second hypoxic insult which was given at 45 min after the first; the differences in reduction in potentials were highly significant for all the hypoxic media used (Peffects of LTP were not prevented by cyclothiazide or inhibitors of NO synthetase compounds that have been shown to be effective in blocking the effects of LTP on the actions of exogenously applied AMPA and NMDA, respectively. The neuroprotective effects of LTP were similar to those of propentofylline, a known neuroprotective

  4. Protecting knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sofka, Wolfgang; de Faria, Pedro; Shehu, Edlira

    2018-01-01

    Most firms use secrecy to protect their knowledge from potential imitators. However, the theoretical foundations for secrecy have not been well explored. We extend knowledge protection literature and propose theoretical mechanisms explaining how information visibility influences the importance...... of secrecy as a knowledge protection instrument. Building on mechanisms from information economics and signaling theory, we postulate that secrecy is more important for protecting knowledge for firms that have legal requirements to reveal information to shareholders. Furthermore, we argue that this effect...... and a firm's investment in fixed assets. Our findings inform both academics and managers on how firms balance information disclosure requirements with the use of secrecy as a knowledge protection instrument....

  5. Protective and therapeutic effects of fucoxanthin against sunburn caused by UV irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Mio; Tanaka, Kosuke; Higashiguchi, Naoki; Okawa, Hisato; Yamada, Yoichi; Tanaka, Ken; Taira, Soichiro; Aoyama, Tomoko; Takanishi, Misaki; Natsume, Chika; Takakura, Yuuki; Fujita, Norihisa; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Fujita, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Mild exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is also harmful and hazardous to the skin and often causes a photosensitivity disorder accompanied by sunburn. To understand the action of UV on the skin we performed a microarray analysis to isolate UV-sensitive genes. We show here that UV irradiation promoted sunburn and downregulated filaggrin (Flg); fucoxanthin (FX) exerted a protective effect. In vitro analysis showed that UV irradiation of human dermal fibroblasts caused production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) without cellular toxicity. ROS production was diminished by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or FX, but not by retinoic acid (RA). In vivo analysis showed that UV irradiation caused sunburn and Flg downregulation, and that FX, but not NAC, RA or clobetasol, exerted a protective effect. FX stimulated Flg promoter activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Flg promoter deletion and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that caudal type homeo box transcription factor 1 (Cdx1) was a key factor for Flg induction. Cdx1 was also downregulated in UV-exposed skin. Therefore, our data suggested that the protective effects of FX against UV-induced sunburn might be exerted by promotion of skin barrier formation through induction of Flg, unrelated to quenching of ROS or an RA-like action. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A protective effect of dietary calcium against acute waterborne cadmium uptake in rainbow trout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldisserotto, B.; Kamunde, C.; Matsuo, A.; Wood, C.M

    2004-03-30

    The present study examined the interactions between elevated dietary calcium (as ionic Ca{sup 2+} in the form of CaCl{sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O) and acute waterborne Cd exposure (50 {mu}g/l as CdNO{sub 3} for 3 h) on whole body uptake and internal distribution of newly accumulated Cd, Ca{sup 2+}, and Na{sup +} in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Fish were fed with three diets 20 (control), 30 and 60 mg Ca{sup 2+}/g food: for 7 days before fluxes were measured with radiotracers over a 3 h period. The two elevated Ca{sup 2+} diets reduced the whole body uptake of both Ca{sup 2+} and Cd by >50% and similarly reduced the internalization of both newly accumulated metals in most tissues, effects which reflect the shared branchial uptake route for Ca{sup 2+} and Cd. As the Ca{sup 2+} concentrations of the fluid phases of the stomach and intestinal contents were greatly elevated by the experimental diets, increased gastrointestinal Ca{sup 2+} uptake likely caused the down-regulation of the branchial Ca{sup 2+} (and Cd) uptake pathway. Waterborne Na{sup +} uptake and internal distribution were not affected. While plasma Ca{sup 2+} surged after the first two feedings of the 60 mg Ca{sup 2+}/g diet, internal homeostasis was quickly restored. Total Ca{sup 2+}, Na{sup +}, and Cl{sup -} levels in tissues were not affected by diets. While dietary Ca{sup 2+} protected against waterborne Cd uptake, it did not protect against the relative inhibition of waterborne Ca{sup 2+} uptake caused by waterborne Cd. Acute exposure to 50 {mu}g/l Cd reduced the uptake and internalization of newly accumulated Ca{sup 2+} (but not Na{sup +}) by 70% or more, regardless of diet. Since elevated dietary Ca{sup 2+} reduces waterborne Cd uptake, fish eating a Ca{sup 2+}-rich invertebrate diet may be more protected against waterborne Cd toxicity in a field situation.

  7. Melatonin Protective Effects against Liver Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Khonakdar-Tarsi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (I/R is a common phenomenon during liver surgery, transplantation, infection and trauma which results in damage and necrosis of the hepatic tissue through different pathways. Mechanisms involved in I/R damage are very intricate and cover several aspects. Several factors are involved in I/R-induced damages; briefly, decrease in sinusoidal perfusion and ATP generation because of low or no O2 supply, increase in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and inflammatory factors and destruction of parenchymal cells resulted by these molecules are of the main causes of liver tissue injury during reperfusion. Melatonin’s antioxidant effect, and regulatory roles in the expression of different genes in the I/R insulted liver have been investigated by several studies. Melatonin and its metabolites are of the powerful direct scavengers of free radicals and ROS, so it can directly protect liver cell impairment from oxidative stress following I/R. In addition, this bioactive molecule up-regulates anti-oxidant enzyme genes like superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px and catalase (CAT. Tumor necrosis factors (TNF-α and interleukin-1 (IL-1, as potent pro-inflammatory factors, are generated in huge amounts during reperfusion. Melatonin is able to alleviate TNF-α generation and has hepatoprotective effect during I/R. It reduces the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines via reducing the binding of NF-κB to DNA. Imbalance between vasodilators (nitric oxide, NO and vasoconstrictors (endothelin, ET during I/R was shown to be the primary cause of liver microcirculation disturbance. Melatonin helps maintaining the stability of liver circulation and reduces hepatic injury during I/R through preventing alteration of the normal balance between ET and NO. The aim of this review was to explore the mechanisms of liver I/R injuries and the protective effects of melatonin against them.

  8. Protective Effect of Tetrandrine on Sodium Taurocholate-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-lin Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tet is a type of alkaloid extracted from Stephania tetrandra, and it has recently been demonstrated that Tet can protect against inflammation and free radical injury and inhibit the release of inflammatory mediators. The present study was designed to observe the protective effect of Tet on sodium taurocholate-induced severe acute pancreatitis (SAP. The rat model of SAP was induced by retrograde bile duct injection of sodium taurocholate and then treated with Verapamil and Tet. The results showed that Tet can reduce NF-κB activation in pancreas issue, inhibit the SAP cascade, and improve SAP through inducing pancreas acinar cell apoptosis and stabilizing intracellular calcium in the pancreas, thus mitigating the damage to the pancreas. Our study revealed that Tet may reduce systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS and multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (MODS to protect against damage, and these roles may be mediated through the NF-κB pathway to improve the proinflammatory/anti-inflammatory imbalance.

  9. Long-term protective effects of methamphetamine preconditioning against single-day methamphetamine toxic challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, A B; Ladenheim, B; McCoy, M T; Beauvais, G; Cai, N; Krasnova, I N; Cadet, J L

    2011-03-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) use is associated with neurotoxic effects which include decreased levels of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT) and their metabolites in the brain. We have shown that escalating METH dosing can protect against METH induced neurotoxicity in rats sacrificed within 24 hours after a toxic METH challenge. The purpose of the current study was to investigate if the protective effects of METH persisted for a long period of time. We also tested if a second challenge with a toxic dose of METH would cause further damage to monoaminergic terminals. Saline-pretreated rats showed significant METH-induced decreases in striatal DA and 5-HT levels in rats sacrificed 2 weeks after the challenge. Rats that received two METH challenges showed no further decreases in striatal DA or 5-HT levels in comparison to the single METH challenge. In contrast, METH-pretreated rats showed significant protection against METH-induced striatal DA and 5-HT depletion. In addition, the METH challenge causes substantial decreases in cortical 5-HT levels which were not further potentiated by a second drug challenge. METH preconditioning provided almost complete protection against METH -induced 5-HT depletion. These results are consistent with the idea that METH pretreatment renders the brain refractory to METH-induced degeneration of brain monoaminergic systems.

  10. Protective effect of lycopene on high-fat diet-induced cognitive impairment in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Fan, Jin; Wang, Jian; Li, Yuxia; Xiao, Li; Duan, Dan; Wang, Qingsong

    2016-08-03

    A Western diet, high in saturated fats, has been linked to the development of cognitive impairment. Lycopene has recently received considerable attention for its potent protective properties demonstrated in several models of nervous system dysfunction. However, it remains unclear whether lycopene exerts protective effects on cognition. The present study aimed to investigate the protective effects of lycopene on learning and memory impairment and the potential underlying mechanism in rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD). One-month-old male rats were fed different diets for 16 weeks (n=12 per group), including a standard chow diet (CD), a HFD, or a HFD plus lycopene (4mg/kg, oral gavage in the last three weeks). Behavioral testing, including the Morris water maze (MWM), object recognition task (ORT), and anxiety-like behavior in an open field (OF), were assessed at week 16. The dendritic spine density and neuronal density in the hippocampal CA1 subfield were subsequently measured. The results indicate that HFD consumption for 16 weeks significantly impaired spatial memory (Plycopene significantly attenuated learning and memory impairments and prevented the reduction in dendritic spine density (Plycopene helps to protect HFD induced cognitive dysfunction. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  11. An effective framework for finding similar cases of dengue from audio and text data using domain thesaurus and case base reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Rajinder; Kaur, Jaspreet; Thapar, Vivek

    2018-02-01

    Dengue, also known as break-bone fever, is a tropical disease transmitted by mosquitoes. If the similarity between dengue infected users can be identified, it can help government's health agencies to manage the outbreak more effectively. To find similarity between cases affected by Dengue, user's personal and health information are the two fundamental requirements. Identification of similar symptoms, causes, effects, predictions and treatment procedures, is important. In this paper, an effective framework is proposed which finds similar patients suffering from dengue using keyword aware domain thesaurus and case base reasoning method. This paper focuses on the use of ontology dependent domain thesaurus technique to extract relevant keywords and then build cases with the help of case base reasoning method. Similar cases can be shared with users, nearby hospitals and health organizations to manage the problem more adequately. Two million case bases were generated to test the proposed similarity method. Experimental evaluations of proposed framework resulted in high accuracy and low error rate for finding similar cases of dengue as compared to UPCC and IPCC algorithms. The framework developed in this paper is for dengue but can easily be extended to other domains also.

  12. Coupling effect of nodes popularity and similarity on social network persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaogang; Jin, Cheng; Huang, Jiaxuan; Min, Yong

    2017-02-21

    Network robustness represents the ability of networks to withstand failures and perturbations. In social networks, maintenance of individual activities, also called persistence, is significant towards understanding robustness. Previous works usually consider persistence on pre-generated network structures; while in social networks, the network structure is growing with the cascading inactivity of existed individuals. Here, we address this challenge through analysis for nodes under a coevolution model, which characterizes individual activity changes under three network growth modes: following the descending order of nodes' popularity, similarity or uniform random. We show that when nodes possess high spontaneous activities, a popularity-first growth mode obtains highly persistent networks; otherwise, with low spontaneous activities, a similarity-first mode does better. Moreover, a compound growth mode, with the consecutive joining of similar nodes in a short period and mixing a few high popularity nodes, obtains the highest persistence. Therefore, nodes similarity is essential for persistent social networks, while properly coupling popularity with similarity further optimizes the persistence. This demonstrates the evolution of nodes activity not only depends on network topology, but also their connective typology.

  13. Effects of cost metric on cost-effectiveness of protected-area network design in urban landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhalter, J C; Lockwood, J L; Maslo, B; Fenn, K H; Leu, K

    2016-04-01

    A common goal in conservation planning is to acquire areas that are critical to realizing biodiversity goals in the most cost-effective manner. The way monetary acquisition costs are represented in such planning is an understudied but vital component to realizing cost efficiencies. We sought to design a protected-area network within a forested urban region that would protect 17 birds of conservation concern. We compared the total costs and spatial structure of the optimal protected-area networks produced using three acquisition-cost surrogates (area, agricultural land value, and tax-assessed land value). Using the tax-assessed land values there was a 73% and 78% cost savings relative to networks derived using area or agricultural land value, respectively. This cost reduction was due to the considerable heterogeneity in acquisition costs revealed in tax-assessed land values, especially for small land parcels, and the corresponding ability of the optimization algorithm to identify lower-cost parcels for inclusion that had equal value to our target species. Tax-assessed land values also reflected the strong spatial differences in acquisition costs (US$0.33/m(2)-$55/m(2)) and thus allowed the algorithm to avoid inclusion of high-cost parcels when possible. Our results add to a nascent but growing literature that suggests conservation planners must consider the cost surrogate they use when designing protected-area networks. We suggest that choosing cost surrogates that capture spatial- and size-dependent heterogeneity in acquisition costs may be relevant to establishing protected areas in urbanizing ecosystems. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  14. Comparative evaluation of different approaches to environmental protection against ionising radiation in view of practicability and consistency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, M.; Hornung, L.; Mundigl, S.; Kirchner, G.

    2006-01-01

    International organisations, including ICRP, IAEA and UNSCEAR, and the international scientific community are currently engaged in work on the protection of non-human species against ionising radiation as a complement to the existing framework centred on humans. The basic ideas and conceptual approaches developed during the last decade substantially agree with each other. The EC funded FASSET project (Framework for Assessment of Environmental Impact) summarizes and reviews the current knowledge of radiation effects on biota, provides basic dosimetric models for fauna and flora and suggests an assessment framework. Protection of the environment against ionising radiation, on the one hand, aims to close a conceptual gap in radiation protection. Therefore, current frameworks for environmental protection conceptually follow radiation protection of man. On the other hand, preservation of natural resources, habitats and the biological diversity are common objectives of environmental protection against radioactive as well as chemical pollutants, suggesting an integrated approach based on the fundamental ideas of conventional environmental protection. In essence, a conceptual framework encompassing protection of man as well as of fauna and flora against chemical and radioactive pollutants would be highly desirable in view of coherence, consistency and transparency. Such an umbrella concept communicates the positive message that similar issues are treated in a conceptually similar manner, thus facilitating scientific justification and public communication and increasing acceptance. This paper discusses different concepts and approaches to radiation protection of man, radiation protection of non-human biota and environmental protection against chemical pollutants, identifies common principles and differences, addresses conflicting requirements and evaluates the feasibility and limitations of such an encompassing framework. (authors)

  15. [Protective effect and mechanism of compound Ginkgo biloba granules on oxidative stress injury of HUVEC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Chen, Xi; Kan, Xiao-Xi; Li, Yu-Jie; Yang, Qing; Wang, Ya-Jie; Chen, Ying; Weng, Xiao-Gang; Cai, Wei-Yan; Huang, He-Fei; Zhu, Xiao-Xin

    2016-02-01

    To reveal the protective and anti-apoptosis effect of compound Ginkgo biloba granules on oxidative stress injury of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Negative control group, H2O2 model group and 4 drug pretreatment groups (80, 160, 320, 640 mg• L⁻¹) were established. The cell proliferation, morphological changes in each group after oxidative stress injury was detected by MTT assay and through microscope observation respectively. The content of LDH, MDA, SOD and NO and SOD activity in supernatant were detected to judge the protection effect of the drugs on endothelial cells. The protective effect on HUVEC apoptosis was analyzed by Caspase-3 activity test and Annexin V-FITC/PI staining. Western blot was used to observe the expression of apoptosis-related proteins Bcl-2 and Bax. Results showed that 1 200 μmol• L⁻¹ H2O2 can induce oxidative stress injury in endothelial cells and reduce the cell survival rate; cell proliferation inhibition degree is positively correlated with the effect time of H2O2. Besides, 80, 160, 320 640 mg•L⁻¹ compound Ginkgo biloba granules can protect HUVEC from oxidative stress injury, recover the normal proliferation level of cells, improve their state, prohibit cell apoptosis, and can up-regulate and down-regulate the expression level of Bcl-2 and Bax respectively. In conclusion, compound G. biloba granules can protect HUVEC from the oxidative stress injury induced by H2O2, its mechanism may be correlated with inhibition of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in HUVEC. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  16. Breast Milk Hormones and Their Protective Effect on Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fissore MariaF

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Data accumulated over recent years have significantly advanced our understanding of growth factors, cytokines, and hormones in breast milk. Here we deal with leptin, adiponectin, IGF-I, ghrelin, and the more recently discovered hormones, obestatin, and resistin, which are present in breast milk and involved in food intake regulation and energy balance. Little is known about these compounds in infant milk formulas. Nutrition in infancy has been implicated in the long-term tendency to obesity, and a longer duration of breastfeeding appears to protect against its development. Diet-related differences in serum leptin and ghrelin values in infancy might explain anthropometric differences and differences in dietary habits between breast-fed and formula-fed infants also later in life. However, there are still gaps in our understanding of how hormones present in breast milk affect children. Here we examine the data related to hormones contained in mother's milk and their potential protective effect on subsequent obesity.

  17. Proposals for software analysis of cost effectiveness and cost-benefit for optimisation of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, C.; Lombard, J.; Lefaure, C.

    1990-06-01

    The objective of this report is to present the principles of decision making software for radiation protection option, applying ALARA principle. The choice of optimum options is performed by applying the models of cost effectiveness and cost-benefit. Options of radiation protection are described by two indicators: a simple economic indicator: cost of radiation protection; and dosimetry indicator: collective dose related to protection. For both analyses the software enables sensitivity analysis. It would be possible to complete the software by integrating a module which would take into account combinations of two options since they are not independent

  18. Protective Effects of Lemon Juice on Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic excessive alcohol consumption (more than 40–80 g/day for males and more than 20–40 g/day for females could induce serious liver injury. In this study, effects of lemon juice on chronic alcohol-induced liver injury in mice were evaluated. The serum biochemical profiles and hepatic lipid peroxidation levels, triacylglycerol (TG contents, antioxidant enzyme activities, and histopathological changes were examined for evaluating the hepatoprotective effects of lemon juice in mice. In addition, the in vitro antioxidant capacities of lemon juice were determined. The results showed that lemon juice significantly inhibited alcohol-induced increase of alanine transaminase (ALT, aspartate transaminase (AST, hepatic TG, and lipid peroxidation levels in a dose-dependent manner. Histopathological changes induced by alcohol were also remarkably improved by lemon juice treatment. These findings suggest that lemon juice has protective effects on alcohol-induced liver injury in mice. The protective effects might be related to the antioxidant capacity of lemon juice because lemon juice showed in vitro antioxidant capacity.

  19. Protective Effect of Morocco Carob Honey Against Lead-Induced Anemia and Hepato-Renal Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aicha Fassi Fihri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Natural honey has many biological activities including protective effect against toxic materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of carob honey against lead-induced hepato-renal toxicity and lead-induced anemia in rabbits. Methods: Twenty four male rabbits were allocated into four groups six rabbits each; group 1: control group, received distilled water (0.1 ml / kg.b.wt /daily; group 2: received oral lead acetate (2 g/kg.b.wt/daily; group 3: treated with oral honey (1g /kg.b.wt/daily and oral lead (2 g/kg.b.wt/daily, and group 4: received oral honey (1 g/kg.b.wt/daily. Honey and lead were given daily during 24 days of experimentation. Laboratory tests and histopathological evaluations of kidneys were done. Results: Oral administration of lead induced hepatic and kidney injury and caused anemia during three weeks of the exposure. Treatment with honey prevented hepato-renal lead toxicity and ameliorated lead-induced anemia when honey was given to animals during lead exposure. Conclusion: It might be concluded that honey has a protective effect against lead-induced blood, hepatic and renal toxic effects.

  20. Protective Effect of Morocco Carob Honey Against Lead-Induced Anemia and Hepato-Renal Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fihri, Aicha Fassi; Al-Waili, Noori S; El-Haskoury, Redouan; Bakour, Meryem; Amarti, Afaf; Ansari, Mohammad J; Lyoussi, Badiaa

    2016-01-01

    Natural honey has many biological activities including protective effect against toxic materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of carob honey against lead-induced hepato-renal toxicity and lead-induced anemia in rabbits. Twenty four male rabbits were allocated into four groups six rabbits each; group 1: control group, received distilled water (0.1 ml / kg.b.wt /daily); group 2: received oral lead acetate (2 g/kg.b.wt/daily); group 3: treated with oral honey (1g /kg.b.wt/daily) and oral lead (2 g/kg.b.wt/daily), and group 4: received oral honey (1 g/kg.b.wt/daily). Honey and lead were given daily during 24 days of experimentation. Laboratory tests and histopathological evaluations of kidneys were done. Oral administration of lead induced hepatic and kidney injury and caused anemia during three weeks of the exposure. Treatment with honey prevented hepato-renal lead toxicity and ameliorated lead-induced anemia when honey was given to animals during lead exposure. It might be concluded that honey has a protective effect against lead-induced blood, hepatic and renal toxic effects. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Occupational radiation protection: Protecting workers against exposure to ionizing radiation. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-07-01

    Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can occur in a range of industries, mining and milling; medical institutions, educational and research establishments and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. The term 'occupational exposure' refers to the radiation exposure incurred by a worker, which is attributable to the worker's occupation and committed during a period of work. According to the latest (2000) Report of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), an estimated 11 million workers are monitored for exposure to ionizing radiation. They incur radiation doses attributable to their occupation, which range from a small fraction of the global average background exposure to natural radiation up to several times that value. It should be noted that the UNSCEAR 2000 Report describes a downward trend in the exposure of several groups of workers, but it also indicates that occupational exposure is affecting an increasingly large group of people worldwide. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS), which are co-sponsored by, inter alia, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the International Labour Organization (ILO), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO), establish a system of radiation protection which includes radiation dose limits for occupational exposure. Guidance supporting the requirements of the BSS for occupational protection is provided in three interrelated Safety Guides, jointly sponsored by the IAEA and the ILO. These Guides describe, for example, the implications for employers in discharging their main responsibilities (such as setting up appropriate radiation protection programmes) and similarly for workers (such as properly using the radiation monitoring devices provided to them). The IAEA i organized its first International Conference on Occupational Radiation Protection. The

  2. Lithium as a prooxidant? A possible protective role of selenium – in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Musik

    2017-09-01

    In Vero cells lithium decreased all studied parameters, particularly GPx. Selenium co-treatment showed a distinct protective effect. In FaDu cells the similar effect was observed only in case of GSH. The results point to differences in action of lithium and selenium in physiological and pathological state. As long-term lithium therapy is applied in psychiatric patients the results regarding Vero line let suggest that selenium might be considered as an adjuvant alleviating side effects of Li-treatment.

  3. On the use of age-specific effective dose coefficients in radiation protection of the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1998-01-01

    Current radiation protection standards for the public include a limit on effective dose in any year for individuals in critical groups. This paper considers the question of how the annual dose limit should be applied in controlling routine exposures of populations consisting of individuals of all ages. We assume that the fundamental objective of radiation protection is limitation of lifetime risk and, therefore, that standards for controlling routine exposures of the public should provide a reasonable correspondence with lifetime risk, taking into account the age dependence of intakes and doses and the variety of radionuclides and exposure pathways of concern. Using new calculations of the per capita (population-averaged) risk of cancer mortality per unit activity inhaled or ingested in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Federal Guidance Report No. 13, we show that applying a limit on annual effective dose only to adults, which was the usual practice in radiation protection of the public before the development of age-specific effective dose coefficients, provides a considerably better correspondence with lifetime risk that applying the annual dose limit to the critical group of any age. (author)

  4. On the use of age-specific effective dose coefficients in radiation protection of the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1998-01-01

    Current radiation protection standards for the public include a limit on effective dose in any year for individuals in critical groups. This paper considers the question of how the annual dose limit should be applied in controlling routine exposures of populations consisting of individuals of all ages. The authors assume that the fundamental objective of radiation protection is limitation of lifetime risk and, therefore, that standards for controlling routine exposures of the public should provide a reasonable correspondence with lifetime risk, taking into account the age dependence of intakes and doses and the variety of radionuclides and exposure pathways of concern. Using new calculations of the per capita (population-averaged) risk of cancer mortality per unit activity inhaled or ingested in the US Environmental Protection Agency's Federal Guidance Report No. 13, the authors show that applying a limit on annual effective dose only to adults, which was the usual practice in radiation protection of the public before the development of age-specific effective dose coefficients, provides a considerably better correspondence with lifetime risk than applying the annual dose limit to the critical group of any age

  5. The protective effect of curcumin in Olfactory Ensheathing Cells exposed to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfanti, Roberta; Musumeci, Teresa; Russo, Cristina; Pellitteri, Rosalia

    2017-02-05

    Curcumin, a phytochemical component derived from the rhizomes of Curcuma longa, has shown a great variety of pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor, anti-depression and anti-oxidant activity. Therefore, in the last years it has been used as a therapeutic agent since it confers protection in different neurodegenerative diseases, cerebral ischemia and excitotoxicity. Olfactory Ensheathing Cells (OECs) are glial cells of the olfactory system. They are able to secrete several neurotrophic growth factors, promote axonal growth and support the remyelination of damaged axons. OEC transplantation has emerged as a possible experimental therapy to induce repair of spinal cord injury, even if the functional recovery is still limited. Since hypoxia is a secondary effect in spinal cord injury, this in vitro study investigates the protective effect of curcumin in OECs exposed to hypoxia. Primary OECs were obtained from neonatal rat olfactory bulbs and placed both in normal and hypoxic conditions. Furthermore, some cells were grown with basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF) and/or curcumin at different concentration and times. The results obtained through immunocytochemical procedures and MTT test show that curcumin stimulates cell viability in OECs grown in normal and hypoxic conditions. Furthermore, the synergistic effect of curcumin and bFGF is the most effective exerting protection on OECs. Since spinal cord injury is often accompanied by secondary insults, such as ischemia or hypoxia, our results suggest that curcumin in combination with bFGF might be considered a possible approach for restoration in injuries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Protective effects of tenuigenin on Staphylococcus aureus-induced pneumonia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bin; Qiao, Jiutao; Shen, Yongbin; Li, Lianyong

    2017-09-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of death in infants and young children. Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) is one of the most important bacteria that leads to pneumonia. Tenuigenin (TGN), a major active component isolated from the root of the Chinese herb Polygala tenuifolia, has been known to have anti-inflammatory effect. In this study, we aimed to investigate the protective effects of TGN on S.aureus-induced pneumonia in mice. The results showed that TGN significantly attenuated S.aureus-induced lung histopathological changes. TGN also inhibited lung wet/dry (W/D) ratio, and inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β production. Furthermore, S.aureus-induced NF-κB activation was significantly inhibited by the treatment of TGN. In conclusion, the results of this study showed that TGN protected against S.aureus-induced pneumonia by inhibiting NF-κB activation. TGN might be a potential agent in the treatment of pneumonia induced by S.aureus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Synthesis of Similars of the Retinoic Acid with Anti-Cancer Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin Cordoba, R.

    2001-01-01

    Three precursors were synthesized in the route toward new structures similar of the retinoic acid. They are the bromocetones 15, 35 and 36. Two new similar of the retinoic acid were synthesized; they are the acids 39 and 40. The mechanism for the formation of 1,1,4,4-tetramethyl-1, 2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene (17), starting from benzene and 2,5-dimethyl-2, 5-dichlorine-hexane was studied. This reaction intended to be carried out in four elementary reactions. Under the used conditions, the product is isolated in 95%. Also, the effect of the dilution in the yield of the tetramethyltehydro-naphthalene was studied; the good relationship of benzene to the compound dichloride was of 29:1. It is determined that the bromocetones 15, 35 and 36 are little reactive toward the joining of Heck when the crotonic acid is used. Probably, the presence of the groups metoxyle and hydroxyle to the halogen in the bromocetones 15 and 36, respectively, affect the reactivity. In the case of the bromocetone 35, to make this reaction, the group protective acilo gets lost before being made the vinylation of Heck, becoming the bromocetone 36. The joining of Heck between the acrylic acid and the bromocetone 15 in an isolated yield of 33% was possible to be made. It indicates that besides the electronic effects that affect to the bromocetone in this type of reaction, the vinyllic methyl in the crotonic acid causes a low reactivity in this joining, for this substrate in particular. (Author) [es

  8. Experimental Evaluation of the Effectiveness Offered by Different Types of Personal Protective Clothing Against Nanoaerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domat, M.; Pla, J.; Cadavid-Rodríguez, M. C.; Fito, C.

    2017-06-01

    The rapid expansion of nanotechnology is outpacing health and safety recommendations for engineered nanomaterials. Thus, there is a lack of information about the effects that nanomaterials can induce in the human health. Nevertheless, workers in nanotechnology-related industries are potentially at risk of being exposed to nanomaterials. Therefore, there is a need of characterize the behaviour of personal protective equipment against penetration nanoparticles, in order to provide an adequate protection to the workers. In this study, the efficiency of several protective dermal equipment against water-based NaCl aerosol was evaluated. For this purpose, different protective clothing and gloves were selected to carry out the assays, simulating typical use conditions of protective equipment under occupational settings. Results obtained exposed that the level of protection offered by the distinct types of personal protective coveralls depended not only on the fabric, but also on their fitting to the body of the subject. On the other hand, the efficiency of the protective gloves was set in the range from 95% to 99%, depending on the thickness and the type of material.

  9. Protective effect of EDTA preadministration on renal ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belloni Daniela

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chelation therapy with sodium edetate (EDTA improved renal function and slowed the progression of renal insufficiency in patients subjected to lead intoxication. This study was performed to identify the underlying mechanism of the ability of EDTA treatment to protect kidneys from damage. Methods The effects of EDTA administration were studied in a rat model of acute renal failure induced by 60 minutes ischemia followed or not by 60 minutes reperfusion. Renal ischemic damage was evaluated by histological studies and by functional studies, namely serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels. Treatment with EDTA was performed 30 minutes before the induction of ischemia. Polymorphonuclear cell (PMN adhesion capability, plasmatic nitric oxide (NO levels and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS renal expression were studied as well as the EDTA protection from the TNFα-induced vascular leakage in the kidneys. Data was compared by two-way analysis of variance followed by a post hoc test. Results EDTA administration resulted in the preservation of both functional and histological parameters of rat kidneys. PMN obtained from peripheral blood of EDTA-treated ischemized rats, displayed a significant reduction in the expression of the adhesion molecule Mac-1 with respect to controls. NO was significantly increased by EDTA administration and eNOS expression was higher and more diffuse in kidneys of rats treated with EDTA than in the controls. Finally, EDTA administration was able to prevent in vivo the TNFα-induced vascular leakage in the kidneys. Conclusion This data provides evidence that EDTA treatment is able to protect rat kidneys from ischemic damage possibly through the stimulation of NO production.

  10. Effects of Distributed Generation on Overcurrent Relay Coordination and an Adaptive Protection Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilik, Semih C.; Arsoy, Aysen B.

    2017-07-01

    Integration of distributed generation (DG) such as renewable energy sources to electrical network becomes more prevalent in recent years. Grid connection of DG has effects on load flow directions, voltage profile, short circuit power and especially protection selectivity. Applying traditional overcurrent protection scheme is inconvenient when system reliability and sustainability are considered. If a fault happens in DG connected network, short circuit contribution of DG, creates additional branch element feeding the fault current; compels to consider directional overcurrent (OC) protection scheme. Protection coordination might get lost for changing working conditions when DG sources are connected. Directional overcurrent relay parameters are determined for downstream and upstream relays when different combinations of DG connected singular or plural, on radial test system. With the help of proposed flow chart, relay parameters are updated and coordination between relays kept sustained for different working conditions in DigSILENT PowerFactory program.

  11. Incorporation of epidemiological findings into radiation protection standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, J R

    In standard setting there is a tendency to use data from experimental studies in preference to findings from epidemiological studies. Yet the epidemiological studies are usually the first and at times the only source of data on such critical effects as cancer, reproductive failure, and chronic cardiac and cardiovascular disease in exposed humans. A critique of the protection offered by current and proposed standards for ionizing and non-ionizing radiation illustrates some of the problems. Similar problems occur with water and air pollutants and with occupational exposures of many types. The following sorts of problems were noted: (a) Consideration of both thermal and non-thermal effects especially of non-ionizing radiation. (b) Interpretation of non-significant results as equivalent to no effect. (c) Accepting author's interpretation of a study, rather than examining its data independently for evidence of hazard. (d) Discounting data on unanticipated effects because of poor fit to preconceptions. (e) Dependence on threshold assumptions and demonstrations of dose-response relationships. (f) Choice of insensitive epidemiological indicators and procedures. (g) Consideration of each study separately, rather than giving weight to the conjunction of evidence from all available studies. These problems may be minimized by greater involvement of epidemiologists and their professional organizations in decisions about health protection.

  12. Stuttering Prevalence among Kurdish-Farsi Students Effects of the Two Languages Similarities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiwa Mohamadi

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: It has been noted that stuttering is more prevalent in bilinguals than in monolinguals. The similarities of the languages involved have been mentioned to justify the difference between stuttering prevalence among bilingual and monolingual speakers. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of language similarities on prevalence of stuttering among Kurdish-Farsi bilingual students. Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive analytic study, we examined all of Javanroud’s schools’ bilingual students. We used teacher referral method for the primary screening of speech disorders. Essential information about speech disorders, specifically stuttering, had been given to teachers before this primary step. The bilingual researcher then diagnosed stuttering students based on DSM-IV criteria through personal interview, text reading, and spontaneous speech in Kurdish and Farsi. Results: Among 11425 bilingual students of Javanroud’s schools, 129 students were identified as stutterers. These findings indicated that overall prevalence of stuttering in this population is 1.13%. Among elementary, guidance and high school students the prevalence of stuttering was 2.06%, 0.87% and 0.5% respectively. Prevalence of stuttering among boys was 1.35% and 0.88% among girls. An overall male/female ratio was 1.5/1. Prevalence of stuttering in elementary, guidance and high school differed significantly (P=0.000. Prevalence of stuttering in males was significantly higher than females (P=0.034. Discussion: Prevalence of stuttering among Javanroud’s bilingual students was higher than the universal accepted prevalence in monolinguals (1% but lower than other studies in bilingual population. The similarities of Kurdish and Farsi languages play an important role in this and are discussed in the paper.

  13. Development of a risk informed fire protection program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, J.; McDevitt, B.; Sawyer, O.; Volk, M.A.; Drennan, J.; Sweely, C.

    2015-07-01

    Over the past decade, one of the largest challenges for the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Operator in the United States has been the implementation of risk-informed, performance-based (RI-PB) fire protection strategies into their fire protection program. Regardless of whether a utility decides to fully transition their licensing basis from deterministic to risk based, or if they simply complete a fire probabilistic risk assessment (FPRA) in order to augment their current program, it is clear that risk-informed, performance based fire protection strategies and the associated challenges are the growing trend in the United States and are here to stay. The experience of the nuclear industry in the United States with the implementation of RI-PB fire protection strategies can provide a great deal of insight for plants and utilities that follow, either by choice or necessity, a similar path. The similarities in the design of the United States and Spanish nuclear plants make these insights even more significant contributions to the strategy and planning for the Spanish fleet. The experience in United States will provide guidance to avoid similar missteps and better plan for the challenges of the transition process. As the Spanish fleet develops risk-informed and deterministic strategies to improve fire safety, an understanding of the challenges and lessons learned from the United States experience will save time and money. (Author)

  14. Immunosuppression by non-ionising and ionising radiation - are there similarities?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, V.

    2003-01-01

    Solar UV radiation, the ubiqitous environmental non-ionising radiation, initiates its immunomodulating effects almost entirely in the skin. In direct contrast, ionising radiation penetrates much more efficiently, and has a multitude of internal targets throughout the body. As a consequence, the mechanisms underlying UV-induced immunosuppression have been more readily characterised, whereas surprisingly little is known about immunosuppression resulting from ionising radiation. Photoimmunological studies in mice during the past 20-30 years have established the action spectrum for UV-induced immunosuppression, implicating the UVB waveband, 290-320 nm. Controversy rages over the immunosuppressive potential of the UVA waveband, 320-400 nm, but we demonstrate that environmentally relevant doses of UVA not only are immunologically innocuous, but provide protection against UVB-immunosuppression. Increasingly larger UVA exposures increasingly immunosuppress mice. The UVA immunoprotective effect is strongly dependent on the induction of a cutaneous redox-regulated enzyme, haem oxygenase (heat shock protein 32) that is known to protect cells from oxidative stress, and it is consistent that a number of exogenous antioxidants (vitamin E, vitamin C, green tea polyphenols, isoflavones) can protect effectively from photoimmuno-suppression. Thus the UV-immunosuppressed state is promoted by oxidative damage and depletion of endogenous antioxidant molecules. It is also associated with cutaneous cytokine derangements, such that Th-2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-10) are increased at the expense of Th-1 cytokines (IFN-gamma, IL-12), and with histamine and inflammatory prostaglandin activity. In contrast, immunoprotective UVA irradiation protects the cutaneous cytokine array, inhibits IL-10 upregulation and increases IFN-gamma and IL-12 expression. On the other hand, while ionising radiation is known to cause immunosuppression, large doses target the bone marrow and haemopoiesis lethally and

  15. Protective effect of pumpkin seed oil against genotoxicity induced by azathioprine

    OpenAIRE

    Elfiky, S.A.; Elelaimy, I.A.; Hassan, A.M.; Ibrahim, H.M.; Elsayad, R.I.

    2012-01-01

    Pumpkin is a leafy green vegetable; it belongs to the Cucurbitaceae family. Pumpkin seed oil supplementation can prevent changes in plasma lipids and blood pressure. The present study was conducted to evaluate the protective effect of pumpkin seed oil against cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of azathioprine. Oral administration of pumpkin seed oil either before or after treatment of azathioprine was effective in the reduction of the frequencies of Mn-PCEs, decreased the DNA fragmentation, total ...

  16. Can Economic Deprivation Protect Health? Paradoxical Multilevel Effects of Poverty on Hispanic Children’s Wheezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Timothy W.; Kim, Young-an; Grineski, Sara E.; Clark-Reyna, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Prior research suggests that economic deprivation has a generally negative influence on residents’ health. We employ hierarchical logistic regression modeling to test if economic deprivation presents respiratory health risks or benefits to Hispanic children living in the City of El Paso (Texas, USA) at neighborhood- and individual-levels, and whether individual-level health effects of economic deprivation vary based on neighborhood-level economic deprivation. Data come from the US Census Bureau and a population-based survey of El Paso schoolchildren. The dependent variable is children’s current wheezing, an established respiratory morbidity measure, which is appropriate for use with economically-deprived children with an increased likelihood of not receiving a doctor’s asthma diagnosis. Results reveal that economic deprivation (measured based on poverty status) at both neighborhood- and individual-levels is associated with reduced odds of wheezing for Hispanic children. A sensitivity analysis revealed similar significant effects of individual- and neighborhood-level poverty on the odds of doctor-diagnosed asthma. Neighborhood-level poverty did not significantly modify the observed association between individual-level poverty and Hispanic children’s wheezing; however, greater neighborhood poverty tends to be more protective for poor (as opposed to non-poor) Hispanic children. These findings support a novel, multilevel understanding of seemingly paradoxical effects of economic deprivation on Hispanic health. PMID:25101769

  17. Can Economic Deprivation Protect Health? Paradoxical Multilevel Effects of Poverty on Hispanic Children’s Wheezing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy W. Collins

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Prior research suggests that economic deprivation has a generally negative influence on residents’ health. We employ hierarchical logistic regression modeling to test if economic deprivation presents respiratory health risks or benefits to Hispanic children living in the City of El Paso (Texas, USA at neighborhood- and individual-levels, and whether individual-level health effects of economic deprivation vary based on neighborhood-level economic deprivation. Data come from the US Census Bureau and a population-based survey of El Paso schoolchildren. The dependent variable is children’s current wheezing, an established respiratory morbidity measure, which is appropriate for use with economically-deprived children with an increased likelihood of not receiving a doctor’s asthma diagnosis. Results reveal that economic deprivation (measured based on poverty status at both neighborhood- and individual-levels is associated with reduced odds of wheezing for Hispanic children. A sensitivity analysis revealed similar significant effects of individual- and neighborhood-level poverty on the odds of doctor-diagnosed asthma. Neighborhood-level poverty did not significantly modify the observed association between individual-level poverty and Hispanic children’s wheezing; however, greater neighborhood poverty tends to be more protective for poor (as opposed to non-poor Hispanic children. These findings support a novel, multilevel understanding of seemingly paradoxical effects of economic deprivation on Hispanic health.

  18. The effect of protected sardine fish oil as feed supplement on ruminal fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramono, A.; Widayati, D. T.; Handayanta, E.

    2018-03-01

    The research aims to evaluate the influence of protected sardine fish oil as feed supplement on ruminal fermentation (pH rumen fluid, ammonia concentration and volatile fatty acids production in the rumen). Protected feed supplement was produced from sardine fish oil and soybean meal, through two protection methods, they were saponification and microencapsulation. The experiment consists of two treatments i.e. P0: basal diet (control) and P1: basal diet + 3 % protected feed supplement. Each treatment was repeated 10 times. The kinetics observation of the pH rumen fluid, ammonia concentration and volatile fatty acids production were performed at incubation times 0, 2, 4 and 6 hours respectively. Data were analyzed using independent samples t-test. Results in cow with protected feed supplement showed that kinetics of pH rumen fluid: 7.23; 7.13; 6.90 and 6.76 respectively; ruminal ammonia concentration: 26.70; 31.06; 19.75 and 15.52 respectively; and volatile fatty acids production: 22.75; 26.08; 29.19 and 25.79 respectively. The results could be concluded that the effect of supplementation of protected sardine fish oil have an optimal of pH rumen fluid, ammonia concentration, and volatile fatty acids production so it did not interfere the ruminal fermentation in the rumen.

  19. Dexmedetomidine May Produce Extra Protective Effects on Sepsis-induced Diaphragm Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective was to evaluate the protective effects of dexmedetomidine (DEX, a selective agonist of α2-adrenergic receptor, on sepsis-induced diaphragm injury and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from PubMed articles published in English from 1990 to 2015. Study Selection: Clinical or basic research articles were selected mainly according to their level of relevance to this topic. Results: Sepsis could induce severe diaphragm dysfunction and exacerbate respiratory weakness. The mechanism of sepsis-induced diaphragm injury includes the increased inflammatory cytokines and excessive oxidative stress and superfluous production of nitric oxide (NO. DEX can reduce inflammatory cytokines, inhibit nuclear factor-kappaB signaling pathways, suppress the activation of caspase-3, furthermore decrease oxidative stress and inhibit NO synthase. On the basis of these mechanisms, DEX may result in a shorter period of mechanical ventilation in septic patients in clinical practice. Conclusions: Based on this current available evidence, DEX may produce extra protective effects on sepsis-induced diaphragm injury. Further direct evidence and more specific studies are still required to confirm these beneficial effects.

  20. Acanthopanax senticosus extracts have a protective effect on Drosophila gut immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjia; Luo, Qiuxiang; Jin, Li Hua

    2013-03-07

    Aanthopanax senticosus (A. senticosus) Harms is a classical adaptogenic agent used in China. It has been applied as an analeptic aid to improve weakened physical status. However, little is known about the effects of A. senticosus on inflammatory disease processes. Flies fed with standard cornmeal-yeast medium were used as controls, and the treatment groups contained 10% of A. senticosus aqueous extracts (root or fruit) in standard medium. Survival rate was performed by feeding a vial containing five layers of filter paper hydrated with 5% sucrose solution contaminated with pathogenic or toxic compounds. Imaging of the guts was viewed under the microscope. Death cells were detected by 7-AAD staining. The A. senticosus extract improved the survival rate, attenuated the death of intestinal epithelial cells, promoted the expression of antimicrobial peptide genes, and decreased the formation of melanotic masses. Moreover, our results indicated that the protective effect of fruit is much higher than that of root extracts. A. senticosus extracts have a protective effect on Drosophila gut immunity and stress response, and may contribute to the prevention of inflammatory diseases induced by pathogenic and toxic compounds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The protective effect of infliximab on cisplatin-induced intestinal tissue toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, I; Kalkan, Y; Ozer, E; Yucel, A F; Pergel, A; Cure, E; Cure, M C; Sahin, D A

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin (CP) is a popular chemotherapeutic agent. However, high doses of CP may lead to severe side effects to the gastrointestinal system. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of infliximab on small intestine injury induced by high doses of CP. The A total of 30 rats were equally divided into three groups, including sham (C), cisplatin (CP), and cisplatin + infliximab (CPI). The CP group was treated with 7 mg/kg intraperitoneal cisplatin, and a laparotomy was performed 5 days later. The CPI group received 7 mg/kg infliximab intraperitoneally, were administered 7 mg/kg cisplatin 4 days later, and a laparotomy was performed 5 days after receiving cisplatin. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis of small intestine tissue sections were performed, and superoxide dismutase, malondialdehyde, and TNF-α levels were measured. Histopathological evaluation revealed that the CP group had damage in the epithelium and connective tissue, but this damage was significantly improved in the CPI group (p < 0.05). In addition, these histopathological findings were confirmed by biochemical analyses. These results suggest that infliximab is protective against the adverse effects of CP.

  2. Protective Effects of Hydroxychloroquine against Accelerated Atherosclerosis in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauli, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality are a challenge in management of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Higher risk of CV disease in SLE patients is mostly related to accelerated atherosclerosis. Nevertheless, high prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors in SLE patients does not fully explain the increased CV risk. Despite the pathological bases of accelerated atherosclerosis are not fully understood, it is thought that this process is driven by the complex interplay between SLE and atherosclerosis pathogenesis. Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is a cornerstone in treatment of SLE patients and has been thought to exert a broad spectrum of beneficial effects on disease activity, prevention of damage accrual, and mortality. Furthermore, HCQ is thought to protect against accelerated atherosclerosis targeting toll-like receptor signaling, cytokine production, T-cell and monocyte activation, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction. HCQ was also described to have beneficial effects on traditional CV risk factors, such as dyslipidemia and diabetes. In conclusion, despite lacking randomized controlled trials unambiguously proving the protection of HCQ against accelerated atherosclerosis and incidence of CV events in SLE patients, evidence analyzed in this review is in favor of its beneficial effect. PMID:29670462

  3. Effects of rumen-protected γ-aminobutyric acid on performance and nutrient digestibility in heat-stressed dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, J B; Bu, D P; Wang, J Q; Sun, X Z; Pan, L; Zhou, L Y; Liu, W

    2014-09-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of rumen-protected γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on performance and nutrient digestibility in heat-stressed dairy cows. Sixty Holstein dairy cows (141±15 d in milk, 35.9±4.3kg of milk/d, and parity 2.0±1.1) were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatments according to a completely randomized block design. Treatments consisted of 0 (control), 40, 80, or 120mg of true GABA/kg of dry matter (DM). The trial lasted 10wk. The average temperature-humidity indices at 0700, 1400, and 2200h were 78.4, 80.2, and 78.7, respectively. Rectal temperatures decreased linearly at 0700, 1400, and 2200h with increasing GABA concentration. Supplementation of GABA had no effect on respiration rates at any time point. Dry matter intake, energy-corrected milk, 4% fat-corrected milk, and milk fat yield tended to increase linearly with increasing GABA concentration. Supplementation of GABA affected, in a quadratic manner, milk protein and lactose concentrations, and milk protein yield, and the peak values were reached at a dose of 40mg of GABA/kg. Milk urea nitrogen concentration responded quadratically. Total solids content increased linearly with increasing GABA concentration. Supplementation of GABA had no effect on milk yield, lactose production, total solids, milk fat concentration, somatic cell score, or feed efficiency. Apparent total-tract digestibilities of DM, organic matter, crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, and acid detergent fiber were similar among treatments. These results indicate that rumen-protected GABA supplementation to dairy cows can alleviate heat stress by reducing rectal temperature, increase DM intake and milk production, and improve milk composition. The appropriate supplemental GABA level for heat-stressed dairy cows is 40mg/kg of DM. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Social contexts and personal relationships : The effect of meeting opportunities on similarity for relationships of different strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mollenhorst, Gerald; Völker, Beate; Flap, Henk

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of social contexts on similarity in personal relationships. We argue that the effect of social contexts is larger for weaker, and smaller for stronger relationships. Using data from The Survey of the Social Networks of the Dutch (collected in 1999/2000, n = 1007), we

  5. The Effect of Protection Statuses on Protection-Use Balance: The Case of Zelve Open Air Museum (Nevşehir/Avanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şenay GÜNGÖR

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cappadocia, which is one of Turkey’s most important destinations by virtue of its natural, historical and cultural features, houses unique places within it. Having been declared an open air museum taking into account its natural structure and archaeological heritage, Zelve is one of the two open air museums in the region. Zelve Open Air Museum, which is a UNESCO World Heritage and situated within Goreme National Park, is at the same time a natural and archaeological site. These protection statuses have made it difficult for local people living in the region to make tourism investments and engage in tourism. This study investigated the effect of protection statuses on the balance between protection and use, taking Zelve Open Air Museum as a case in point. Case study, which is one of the qualitative research methods, was used in this study and focus group interview, observation, interview and document analysis techniques were employed to collect data. The village people, who regarded the area as their own property before its declaration as an open air museum, think that Zelve was seized from them after its conversion into a museum and other protection statuses. The problems which local people met were revealed in the study and possible solutions to them were proposed.

  6. Color and opacity of composites protected with surface sealants and submitted to artificial accelerated aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Fabiano Gamero; Roberti Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca; Cruvinel, Diogo Rodrigues; Sousa, Ana Beatriz Silva; de Carvalho Panzeri Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the color similarity, stability and opacity of composites (TPH, Charisma, and Concept, shade A2) protected with surface sealants (Fortify Plus and Biscover) and cyanoacrylate (Super Bonder). Forty specimens of each composite were made and separated into 4 groups (n=10) according to the surface protection: GI - without sealant; GII - cyanoacrylate; GIII - Fortify Plus; GIV - Biscover. Color and opacity readings were taken before and after Artificial Acelerated Aging (AAA) and the values obtained for color stability were submitted to statistical analysis by 2-way ANOVA and Bonferroni's test (P<.05). The values acquired for color similarity were submitted to 1-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (P<.05). The specimen sufaces were compared before and after AAA using Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM). Studied composites did not present the same values for the coordinates L*, a* and b * before AAA, indicating that there was no color similarity among them. All composites presented color alteration after AAA with clinically unacceptable values. Protected groups presented lower opacity variation after AAA, in comparison with the control goup. SEM evaluation demonstrated that AAA increased the surface irregularities in all of the studied groups. Surface sealants were not effective in maintaining composite color, but were able to maintain opacity.

  7. Protective effects of dark chocolate on endothelial function and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Davide; Desideri, Giovambattista; Ferri, Claudio

    2013-11-01

    Relationship between cocoa consumption and cardiovascular disease, particularly focusing on clinical implications resulting from the beneficial effects of cocoa consumption on endothelial function and insulin resistance. This could be of clinical relevance and may suggest the mechanistic explanation for the reduced risk of cardiovascular events reported in the different studies after cocoa intake. Increasing evidence supports a protective effect of cocoa consumption against cardiovascular disease. Cocoa and flavonoids from cocoa have been described to improve endothelial function and insulin resistance. A proposed mechanism could be considered in the improvement of the endothelium-derived vasodilator nitric oxide by enhancing nitric oxide synthesis or by decreasing nitric oxide breakdown. The endothelium plays a pivotal role in the arterial homeostasis, and insulin resistance is the most important pathophysiological feature in various prediabetic and diabetic states. Reduced nitric oxide bioavailability with endothelial dysfunction is considered the earliest step in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Further, insulin resistance could account, at least in part, for the endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial dysfunction has been considered an important and independent predictor of future development of cardiovascular risk and events. Cocoa and flavonoids from cocoa might positively modulate these mechanisms with a putative role in cardiovascular protection.

  8. Different sizes, similar challenges: Out of home care for youth in Germany and the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemiek T. Harder

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available While there is a large difference in the number of young inhabitants in the Netherlands and Germany, their child protection frameworks are quite similar. In both countries, child protection services are mainlyfocused on youth aged 0 to 18 and regulations are aimed at clients' responsibility and their active involvement during care. Youth care services consist of community-based services, day treatment and outof-home care services, which include foster care and residential care. The history of out-of-home care services in both countries is characterized by similar developments. Over the last four decades, similar trends in residential care, towards more small-scale forms of residential care, smaller residential group sizes, and increasing professionalization of staff have emerged. Over the last two decades, a comparable trend towards increasing professionalization can be seen in the context of foster care in both countries. In addition, the number of youths in out-of-home care increased in both countries over the last decade, specifically in foster care. Over the last decade, more studies have been conducted in residential care than in foster care in both countries. Despite similar trends and developments in out-of-home care practice, research mainly shows differences in applied topics and methods between Germany and the Netherlands.

  9. Systems approach to tamper protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myre, W.C.; Eaton, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    Tamper-protection is a fundamental requirement of effective containment and surveillance systems. Cost effective designs require that the tamper protection requirements be considered early in the design phase and at the system level. A discussion of tamper protection alternatives as well as an illustrative example system is presented

  10. Protective and Antioxidant Effects of a Chalconoid from Pulicaria incisa on Brain Astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat Elmann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Astrocytes, the most abundant glial cells in the brain, protect neurons from reactive oxygen species (ROS and provide them with trophic support, such as glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF. Thus, any damage to astrocytes will affect neuronal survival. In the present study, by activity-guided fractionation, we have purified from the desert plant Pulicaria incisa two protective compounds and determined their structures by spectroscopic methods. The compounds were found to be new chalcones—pulichalconoid B and pulichalconoid C. This is the first study to characterize the antioxidant and protective effects of these compounds in any biological system. Using primary cultures of astrocytes, we have found that pulichalconoid B attenuated the accumulation of ROS following treatment of these cells with hydrogen peroxide by 89% and prevented 89% of the H2O2-induced death of astrocytes. Pulichalconoid B exhibited an antioxidant effect both in vitro and in the cellular antioxidant assay in astrocytes and microglial cells. Pulichalconoid B also caused a fourfold increase in GDNF transcription in these cells. Thus, this chalcone deserves further studies in order to evaluate if beneficial therapeutic effect exists.

  11. Phonological similarity in working memory span tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Michael; Macnamara, Brooke N; Conway, Andrew R A

    2016-08-01

    In a series of four experiments, we explored what conditions are sufficient to produce a phonological similarity facilitation effect in working memory span tasks. By using the same set of memoranda, but differing the secondary-task requirements across experiments, we showed that a phonological similarity facilitation effect is dependent upon the semantic relationship between the memoranda and the secondary-task stimuli, and is robust to changes in the representation, ordering, and pool size of the secondary-task stimuli. These findings are consistent with interference accounts of memory (Brown, Neath, & Chater, Psychological Review, 114, 539-576, 2007; Oberauer, Lewandowsky, Farrell, Jarrold, & Greaves, Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 19, 779-819, 2012), whereby rhyming stimuli provide a form of categorical similarity that allows distractors to be excluded from retrieval at recall.

  12. Protective Effect of Extract of Folium Ginkgo on Repeated Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the protective effect of extract of Folium Ginkgo (FGE) on repeated cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Methods: The model in waking mice induced by repeated cerebral ischemia-reperfusion were used in the experiment to observe the effect of FGE on behavior, oxygen free radical metabolism and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) content by step-through experiment, diving stand and colorimetric method. Results: FGE could obviously improve the learning ability and memory of model animals, and could lower obviously the content of malonyldialdehyde, nitric oxide and PGE2, restore the lowered activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase in cerebral tissue. Conclusion: FGE has highly protective effect against repeated ischemia-reperfusion injury, the mechanism might be related with its action on anti-lipid oxidatin, improve the activity of antioxidase and inhibit the producing of PGE2.

  13. Protective Effect of Anar-5 Herbal Treatment on Experimental Chronic Atrophic Gastritis in Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdenetsogt Dungubat

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic gastritis is a long progressive illness caused by inflammation of the gastric mucosa; combined with loss of epithelial regeneration, atrophy of lymphoid tissue and impairment of gastric secretory and motility functions.1 Evidence of illness is noted by inflammation and redness to the mucosa followed by stomach ulcer through reactivation and recrudescence and it is caused by loss of balance between musical protective and damaging factors. The loss of acid base balance and mucosal bicarbonate deficiency in the stomach constitute the major role in pathogenesis of inflammation and ulcers. The mucus of gastric mucosal layer softens the epithelium while it protects mucous membranes from hydrochloric acid. Glycoprotein included in the mucin is not able to protect mucous membranes by itself and it becomes protective after transforming into the gel in alkaline environment. Digestive tract diseases are the second leading cause out of top 5 morbidity causes in Mongolia.2 Chronic gastritis accounts for 12% of total incidences of digestive tract diseases.3 There was an increased demand to study the effects of pharmacologic treatment with low cost and less adverse effect during this period of high morbidity of digestive tract among the population and it became the main reason to conduct this study. The Anar-5 herbal medicine has been used for early symptoms of any stomach pain, vomiting, disorders of digestion, stomach irritation and loss of appetite in Mongolian traditional medicine. In order to provide scientifically based description for effect/mechanisms of this medicine, we have tried to identify protective effects of Anar-5 herbal medicine for stomach as we create the model of the chronic gastritis.

  14. Cardiopulmonary protective effects of the selective FXR agonist obeticholic acid in the rat model of monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignozzi, Linda; Morelli, Annamaria; Cellai, Ilaria; Filippi, Sandra; Comeglio, Paolo; Sarchielli, Erica; Maneschi, Elena; Vannelli, Gabriella Barbara; Adorini, Luciano; Maggi, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activation by obeticholic acid (OCA) has been demonstrated to inhibit inflammation and fibrosis development and even induce fibrosis regression in liver, kidney and intestine in multiple disease models. OCA also inhibits liver fibrosis in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis patients. FXR activation has also been demonstrated to suppress the inflammatory response and to promote lung repair after lung injury. This study investigated the effects of OCA treatment (3, 10 or 30mg/kg, daily for 5days a week, for 7 and/or 28 days) on inflammation, tissue remodeling and fibrosis in the monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) rat model. Treatment with OCA attenuated MCT-induced increased pulmonary arterial wall thickness and right ventricular hypertrophy, by i) blunting pathogenic inflammatory mechanisms (downregulation of interleukin 6, IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, MCP-1) and ii) enhancing protective mechanisms counteracting fibrosis and endothelial/mesenchymal transition. MCT-injected rats also showed a marked decrease of pulmonary artery responsiveness to both endothelium-dependent and independent relaxant stimuli, such as acetylcholine and a nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside. Administration of OCA (30mg/kg) normalized this decreased responsiveness. Accordingly, OCA treatment induced profound beneficial effects on lung histology. In particular, both OCA doses markedly reduced the MCT-induced medial wall thickness increase in small pulmonary arteries. To evaluate the objective functional improvement by OCA treatment of MCT-induced PAH, we performed a treadmill test and measured duration of exercise. MCT significantly reduced, and OCA normalized treadmill endurance. Results with OCA were similar, or even superior, to those obtained with tadalafil, a well-established treatment of PAH. In conclusion, OCA treatment demonstrates cardiopulmonary protective effects, modulating lung vascular remodeling, reducing

  15. Protecting the Amazon with protected areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Robert; Moore, Nathan J.; Arima, Eugenio; Perz, Stephen; Simmons, Cynthia; Caldas, Marcellus; Vergara, Dante; Bohrer, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses climate-tipping points in the Amazon Basin resulting from deforestation. It applies a regional climate model to assess whether the system of protected areas in Brazil is able to avoid such tipping points, with massive conversion to semiarid vegetation, particularly along the south and southeastern margins of the basin. The regional climate model produces spatially distributed annual rainfall under a variety of external forcing conditions, assuming that all land outside protected areas is deforested. It translates these results into dry season impacts on resident ecosystems and shows that Amazonian dry ecosystems in the southern and southeastern basin do not desiccate appreciably and that extensive areas experience an increase in precipitation. Nor do the moist forests dry out to an excessive amount. Evidently, Brazilian environmental policy has created a sustainable core of protected areas in the Amazon that buffers against potential climate-tipping points and protects the drier ecosystems of the basin. Thus, all efforts should be made to manage them effectively. PMID:19549819

  16. A regulatory perspective on whether the system of radiation protection is fit for purpose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    The system of radiation protection has its origins in the early efforts to protect people from x rays and radium. It was at the Second International Congress of Radiology in Stockholm in 1928 where the first radiation protection recommendations were adopted. The system of protection steadily evolved as new sources of exposure arose and understanding of radiation-related health risks improved. Safeguarding against these risks has required regulators to set enforceable (i.e. measurable) standards. From erythema dose to tolerance dose, critical organ dose to effective dose equivalent, and now effective dose, the units used to set these limits have evolved along with the science underpinning them. Similarly, the definition of the person or group being protected has changed – from Standard Man to Reference Man to Reference Person, with age and gender differences now considered explicitly. As regulators look towards implementing the changes in the 2007 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), there remain questions about how to translate an optimisation-based system of constraints and reference levels into the more familiar regime of enforceable limits. Nevertheless, as the new ICRP Recommendations are refinements of a system that did the job it was designed to do more than adequately, so too will the new system of radiation protection be fit for purpose.

  17. A system of dose-effects relationships for the Northern wildlife: radiation protection criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazykina, T.G.

    2004-01-01

    The key issue in the assessment system for radiation protection of wildlife is the establishment of a set of dose-effects relationships for reference representatives of natural biota, based on scientific data from a range of doses and a range of radiation effects. Risks to natural populations in particular habitats can be evaluated from a comparison of estimated doses to biota with the scale of dose-effects relationships for different types of biota. Within the frame of the EC Project EPIC 'Environmental Protection from Ionizing Contaminants' 2000-2003), a database has been created, which include the published and unpublished data relating to dose effects relationships for flora and fauna in the Northern and Arctic areas. The EPIC database contains information based exclusively on Russian/FSU experimental and field studies; chronic/lifetime exposures were the focus of the work, owing to the fact that such exposures are the most typical in radiological assessments for biota. In total, the EPIC database radiation effects on biota contains about 1600 records from 440 publications, including datasets on terrestrial and aquatic animals, plants, soil fauna and microorganisms. The EPIC database information cover a very wide range of radiation dose rates to wild flora and fauna: from below 10 -5 Gy d -1 up to more than 1 Gy d -1 . A great variety of radiation effects are registered in the EPIC database, from stimulation at low doses up to death from acute radiation syndrome at high doses. From data, compiled in the EPIC database, the dose-effects relationships were derived for different types of northern organisms. The system of dose-effects relationships forms the scale of severity of radiation effects at increasing levels of chronic radiation exposure. With its focus on the effects of low-to-moderate chronic exposure, the system of dose effects relationships provides a useful tool for scientists and decision-makers to establish safety standards for protecting the

  18. Material for radioactive protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R.S.; Boyer, N.W.

    A boron containing burn resistant, low-level radiation protection material useful, for example, as a liner for radioactive waste disposal and storage, a component for neutron absorber, and a shield for a neutron source is described. The material is basically composed of borax in the range of 25 to 50%, coal tar in the range of 25 to 37.5%, with the remainder being an epoxy resin mix. A preferred composition is 50% borax, 25% coal tar and 25% epoxy resin. The material is not susceptible to burning and is about 1/5 the cost of existing radiation protection material utilized in similar applications.

  19. Induction and Subversion of Human Protective Immunity: Contrasting Influenza and Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Ascough

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and influenza are among the most important causes of severe respiratory disease worldwide. Despite the clinical need, barriers to developing reliably effective vaccines against these viruses have remained firmly in place for decades. Overcoming these hurdles requires better understanding of human immunity and the strategies by which these pathogens evade it. Although superficially similar, the virology and host response to RSV and influenza are strikingly distinct. Influenza induces robust strain-specific immunity following natural infection, although protection by current vaccines is short-lived. In contrast, even strain-specific protection is incomplete after RSV and there are currently no licensed RSV vaccines. Although animal models have been critical for developing a fundamental understanding of antiviral immunity, extrapolating to human disease has been problematic. It is only with recent translational advances (such as controlled human infection models and high-dimensional technologies that the mechanisms responsible for differences in protection against RSV compared to influenza have begun to be elucidated in the human context. Influenza infection elicits high-affinity IgA in the respiratory tract and virus-specific IgG, which correlates with protection. Long-lived influenza-specific T cells have also been shown to ameliorate disease. This robust immunity promotes rapid emergence of antigenic variants leading to immune escape. RSV differs markedly, as reinfection with similar strains occurs despite natural infection inducing high levels of antibody against conserved antigens. The immunomodulatory mechanisms of RSV are thus highly effective in inhibiting long-term protection, with disturbance of type I interferon signaling, antigen presentation and chemokine-induced inflammation possibly all contributing. These lead to widespread effects on adaptive immunity with impaired B cell memory and reduced T cell

  20. Induction and Subversion of Human Protective Immunity: Contrasting Influenza and Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascough, Stephanie; Paterson, Suzanna; Chiu, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza are among the most important causes of severe respiratory disease worldwide. Despite the clinical need, barriers to developing reliably effective vaccines against these viruses have remained firmly in place for decades. Overcoming these hurdles requires better understanding of human immunity and the strategies by which these pathogens evade it. Although superficially similar, the virology and host response to RSV and influenza are strikingly distinct. Influenza induces robust strain-specific immunity following natural infection, although protection by current vaccines is short-lived. In contrast, even strain-specific protection is incomplete after RSV and there are currently no licensed RSV vaccines. Although animal models have been critical for developing a fundamental understanding of antiviral immunity, extrapolating to human disease has been problematic. It is only with recent translational advances (such as controlled human infection models and high-dimensional technologies) that the mechanisms responsible for differences in protection against RSV compared to influenza have begun to be elucidated in the human context. Influenza infection elicits high-affinity IgA in the respiratory tract and virus-specific IgG, which correlates with protection. Long-lived influenza-specific T cells have also been shown to ameliorate disease. This robust immunity promotes rapid emergence of antigenic variants leading to immune escape. RSV differs markedly, as reinfection with similar strains occurs despite natural infection inducing high levels of antibody against conserved antigens. The immunomodulatory mechanisms of RSV are thus highly effective in inhibiting long-term protection, with disturbance of type I interferon signaling, antigen presentation and chemokine-induced inflammation possibly all contributing. These lead to widespread effects on adaptive immunity with impaired B cell memory and reduced T cell generation and

  1. Physical protection cooperation with Former Soviet Union countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of physical protection cooperation activities between Sandia (SNL) and the Former Soviet Union (FSU) regarding Material Protection Control and Accounting (MPC ampersand A) responsibilities. Begun four years ago as part of the Safe, Secure Dismantlement Program, this project is intended to stem proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Purpose of the program is to accelerate progress toward a goal shared by both Russia and the United States: to reduce the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation, including such threats as theft, diversion, and unauthorized possession of nuclear materials. This will be accomplished by strengthening the MPC ampersand A systems in both, countries. This new program (US Department of Energy Laboratory-to-Laboratory MPC ampersand A program) is designed to complement Government-to-Government programs sponsored by US Senators Nunn and Lugar. US and Russian representatives exchange visits and discuss physical protection philosophies. Russian representatives have received formal training in the US process of system design and analysis to include the design of an effective physical protection system, determination of physical protection system objectives, initial design of a physical protection system, evaluation of the design, and often redesign or refinement of the existing system. Some Russian organizations have philosophies similar to those of the United States, but when they differ, the US and Russian representatives must negotiate. Other Russian organizations, because of heavy reliance on guard forces, have not developed a systematic design process. Cooperative work between US national laboratories and Russian counterparts has resulted in major physical protection enhancements at a Russian demonstration site and other advancements for Laboratory-to-Laboratory projects

  2. Turbulence, dynamic similarity and scale effects in high-velocity free-surface flows above a stepped chute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Stefan; Chanson, Hubert

    2009-07-01

    In high-velocity free-surface flows, air entrainment is common through the interface, and intense interactions take place between turbulent structures and entrained bubbles. Two-phase flow properties were measured herein in high-velocity open channel flows above a stepped chute. Detailed turbulence measurements were conducted in a large-size facility, and a comparative analysis was applied to test the validity of the Froude and Reynolds similarities. The results showed consistently that the Froude similitude was not satisfied using a 2:1 geometric scaling ratio. Lesser number of entrained bubbles and comparatively greater bubble sizes were observed at the smaller Reynolds numbers, as well as lower turbulence levels and larger turbulent length and time scales. The results implied that small-size models did underestimate the rate of energy dissipation and the aeration efficiency of prototype stepped spillways for similar flow conditions. Similarly a Reynolds similitude was tested. The results showed also some significant scale effects. However a number of self-similar relationships remained invariant under changes of scale and confirmed the analysis of Chanson and Carosi (Exp Fluids 42:385-401, 2007). The finding is significant because self-similarity may provide a picture general enough to be used to characterise the air-water flow field in large prototype channels.

  3. Filling Predictable and Unpredictable Gaps, with and without Similarity-Based Interference: Evidence for LIFG Effects of Dependency Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiken, Kimberly; McElree, Brian; Pylkkänen, Liina

    2015-01-01

    One of the most replicated findings in neurolinguistic literature on syntax is the increase of hemodynamic activity in the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) in response to object relative (OR) clauses compared to subject relative clauses. However, behavioral studies have shown that ORs are primarily only costly when similarity-based interference is involved and recently, Leiken and Pylkkänen (2014) showed with magnetoencephalography (MEG) that an LIFG increase at an OR gap is also dependent on such interference. However, since ORs always involve a cue indicating an upcoming dependency formation, OR dependencies could be processed already prior to the gap-site and thus show no sheer dependency effects at the gap itself. To investigate the role of gap predictability in LIFG dependency effects, this MEG study compared ORs to verb phrase ellipsis (VPE), which was used as an example of a non-predictable dependency. Additionally, we explored LIFG sensitivity to filler-gap order by including right node raising structures, in which the order of filler and gap is reverse to that of ORs and VPE. Half of the stimuli invoked similarity-based interference and half did not. Our results demonstrate that LIFG effects of dependency can be elicited regardless of whether the dependency is predictable, the stimulus materials evoke similarity-based interference, or the filler precedes the gap. Thus, contrary to our own prior data, the current findings suggest a highly general role for the LIFG in dependency interpretation that is not limited to environments involving similarity-based interference. Additionally, the millisecond time-resolution of MEG allowed for a detailed characterization of the temporal profiles of LIFG dependency effects across our three constructions, revealing that the timing of these effects is somewhat construction-specific.

  4. Sequence diversity, cytotoxicity and antigenic similarities of the leukotoxin of isolates of Mannheimia species from mastitis in domestic sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omaleki, Lida; Browning, Glenn F; Barber, Stuart R; Allen, Joanne L; Srikumaran, Subramaniam; Markham, Philip F

    2014-11-07

    Species within the genus Mannheimia are among the most important causes of ovine mastitis. Isolates of these species can express leukotoxin A (LktA), a primary virulence factor of these bacteria. To examine the significance of variation in the LktA, the sequences of the lktA genes in a panel of isolates from cases of ovine mastitis were compared. The cross-neutralising capacities of rat antisera raised against LktA of one Mannheimia glucosida, one haemolytic Mannheimia ruminalis, and two Mannheimia haemolytica isolates were also examined to assess the effect that variation in the lktA gene can have on protective immunity against leukotoxins with differing sequences. The lktA nucleotide distance between the M. haemolytica isolates was greater than between the M. glucosida isolates, with the M. haemolytica isolates divisible into two groups based on their lktA sequences. Comparison of the topology of phylogenetic trees of 16S rDNA and lktA sequences revealed differences in the relationships between some isolates, suggesting horizontal gene transfer. Cross neutralisation data obtained with monospecific anti-LktA rat sera were used to derive antigenic similarity coefficients for LktA from the four Mannheimia species isolates. Similarity coefficients indicated that LktA of the two M. haemolytica isolates were least similar, while LktA from M. glucosida was most similar to those for one of the M. haemolytica isolates and the haemolytic M. ruminalis isolate. The results suggested that vaccination with the M. glucosida leukotoxin would generate the greatest cross-protection against ovine mastitis caused by Mannheimia species with these alleles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effective fire protection for turbines ensures high operational availability; Wirksamer Brandschutz fuer Turbinen stellt hohe Verfuegbarkeit sicher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knop, Arnd [Minimax GmbH und Co. KG, Bad Oldesloe (Germany). Div. Energy

    2013-10-01

    Designing fire protection in power plants is extremely complex and related to different requirements from operators, insurers, and experts. High- and low-pressure water mist systems are increasingly used in turbine fire protection, as they have ideal properties for this type of application. There are multifaceted fire risks in the areas adjacent to a turbine. Therefore, an overall view of all protected areas is indispensable for effective and reliable fire protection. The paper provides a detailed look at the entire spectrum of possible fire protection technologies for turbines and their adjacent areas, describes functionalities and itemises the benefits of individual fire protection measures. (orig.)

  6. Potential effects of the fire protection system sprays at Browns Ferry on fission product transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemczyk, S.J.

    1983-01-01

    The fire protection system (FPS) sprays within any nuclear plant are not intended to mitigate radioactive releases to the environment resulting from severe core-damage accidents. However, it has been shown here that during certain postulated severe accident scenarios at the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant, the functioning of FPS sprays could have a significant impact on the radioactive releases. Thus the effects of those sprays need to be taken into account for realistic estimation of source terms for some accident scenarios. The effects would include direct ones such as cooling of the reactor building atmosphere and scrubbing of radioactivity from it, as well as indirect effects such as an altered likelihood of hydrogen burning and flooding of various safety-related pumps in the reactor building basement. Thus some of the impacts of the sprays would be beneficial with respect to mitigating releases to the environment but some others might not be. The effects of the FPS would be very scenario dependent with a wide range of potential effects often existing for a given accident sequence. Any generalization of the specific results presented here for Browns Ferry to other nuclear plants must be done cautiously, as it appears from a preliminary investigation that the relevant physical and operational characteristics of FPS spray systems differ widely among even otherwise apparently similar plants. Likewise the standby gas treatment systems, which substantially impact the effects of the FPS, differ significantly among plants. More work for both Mark I plants and other plants, BWRs and PWRs alike, is indicated so the potential effects of FPS spray systems during severe accidents can be at least ball-parked for more realistic accident analyses

  7. The time course of protecting a visual memory representation from perceptual interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk evan Moorselaar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cueing a remembered item during the delay of a visual memory task leads to enhanced recall of the cued item compared to when an item is not cued. This cueing benefit has been proposed to reflect attention within visual memory being shifted from a distributed mode to a focused mode, thus protecting the cued item against perceptual interference. Here we investigated the dynamics of building up this mnemonic protection against visual interference by systematically varying the SOA between cue onset and a subsequent visual mask in an orientation memory task. Experiment 1 showed that a cue counteracted the deteriorating effect of pattern masks. Experiment 2 demonstrated that building up this protection is a continuous process that is completed in approximately half a second after cue onset. The similarities between shifting attention in perceptual and remembered space are discussed.

  8. The time course of protecting a visual memory representation from perceptual interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Moorselaar, Dirk; Gunseli, Eren; Theeuwes, Jan; N. L. Olivers, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Cueing a remembered item during the delay of a visual memory task leads to enhanced recall of the cued item compared to when an item is not cued. This cueing benefit has been proposed to reflect attention within visual memory being shifted from a distributed mode to a focused mode, thus protecting the cued item against perceptual interference. Here we investigated the dynamics of building up this mnemonic protection against visual interference by systematically varying the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between cue onset and a subsequent visual mask in an orientation memory task. Experiment 1 showed that a cue counteracted the deteriorating effect of pattern masks. Experiment 2 demonstrated that building up this protection is a continuous process that is completed in approximately half a second after cue onset. The similarities between shifting attention in perceptual and remembered space are discussed. PMID:25628555

  9. Protective gloves on manual sugar cane cutting are really effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahão, R F; Gonzaga, M C; Braunbeck, O A

    2012-01-01

    Problems related to the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), specially the use of protective gloves for the manual sugar cane cutting, motivated this research, made possible by a tripartite negotiation involving the Ministry of Labor, the Union of Rural Workers and the Employer's Association of sugarcane agribusiness. The main objective was to evaluate, from an ergonomics perspective, the impact of use of the gloves during the manual cane sugar cutting, raising questions on safety, effectiveness and comfort. The research was carried in a sugarcane industry of São Paulo for two seasons involving 47 workers who made a qualitative analysis of acceptance of four models of protective gloves. The methodology included the use of semi-structured interviews, questionnaires and field observations and the experimental determination of the coefficient of static friction developed between the gloves and the surfaces of the machete handle. The main results indicate the general inadequacy of the gloves currently used forcing the employees to improvise. Workers found the glove of leather and nylon scraping the best reported for comfort in use. The overall results highlight the problem of detachment of test standards for the manufacture of PPE, ignoring users and the activity to be performed.

  10. Tropical Deforestation, Community Forests, and Protected Areas in the Maya Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Barton. Bray

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Community forests and protected areas have each been proposed as strategies to stop deforestation. These management strategies should be regarded as hypotheses to be evaluated for their effectiveness in particular places. We evaluated the community-forestry hypothesis and the protected-area hypothesis in community forests with commercial timber production and strict protected areas in the Maya Forest of Guatemala and Mexico. From land-use and land cover change (LUCC maps derived from satellite images, we compared deforestation in 19 community forests and 11 protected areas in both countries in varying periods from 1988 to 2005. Deforestation rates were higher in protected areas than in community forests, but the differences were not significant. An analysis of human presence showed similar deforestation rates in inhabited protected areas and recently inhabited community forests, but the differences were not significant. There was also no significant difference in deforestation between uninhabited protected areas, uninhabited community forests, and long-inhabited community forests. A logistic regression analysis indicated that the factors correlated with deforestation varied by country. Distance to human settlements, seasonal wetlands, and degree and length of human residence were significant in Guatemala, and distance to previous deforestation and tropical semideciduous forest were significant in Mexico. Varying contexts and especially colonization histories are highlighted as likely factors that influence different outcomes. Poorly governed protected areas perform no better as a conservation strategy than poorly governed community forests with recent colonists in active colonization fronts. Long-inhabited extractive communities perform as well as uninhabited strict protected areas under low colonization pressure. A review of costs and benefits suggests that community forests may generate more local income with lower costs. Small sample sizes

  11. A study of the effectiveness of hand protection when handling UO2 fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washington, R.R.; Sullivan, D.F.

    1981-01-01

    Simple tests were performed to estimate the effectiveness of various forms of hand protection in reducing skin doses when handling UO 2 fuel pellets. Household rubber gloves (rubberized cotton) appeared to be the most effective of the varieties tested. Nylon gloves and latex finger cots were least effective. (author)

  12. The effects of gravity on human walking: a new test of the dynamic similarity hypothesis using a predictive model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raichlen, David A

    2008-09-01

    The dynamic similarity hypothesis (DSH) suggests that differences in animal locomotor biomechanics are due mostly to differences in size. According to the DSH, when the ratios of inertial to gravitational forces are equal between two animals that differ in size [e.g. at equal Froude numbers, where Froude = velocity2/(gravity x hip height)], their movements can be made similar by multiplying all time durations by one constant, all forces by a second constant and all linear distances by a third constant. The DSH has been generally supported by numerous comparative studies showing that as inertial forces differ (i.e. differences in the centripetal force acting on the animal due to variation in hip heights), animals walk with dynamic similarity. However, humans walking in simulated reduced gravity do not walk with dynamically similar kinematics. The simulated gravity experiments did not completely account for the effects of gravity on all body segments, and the importance of gravity in the DSH requires further examination. This study uses a kinematic model to predict the effects of gravity on human locomotion, taking into account both the effects of gravitational forces on the upper body and on the limbs. Results show that dynamic similarity is maintained in altered gravitational environments. Thus, the DSH does account for differences in the inertial forces governing locomotion (e.g. differences in hip height) as well as differences in the gravitational forces governing locomotion.

  13. Mother-Newborn Pairs in Malawi Have Similar Antibody Repertoires to Diverse Malaria Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudová, Sarah; Walldorf, Jenny A; Bailey, Jason A; Divala, Titus; Mungwira, Randy; Mawindo, Patricia; Pablo, Jozelyn; Jasinskas, Algis; Nakajima, Rie; Ouattara, Amed; Adams, Matthew; Felgner, Philip L; Plowe, Christopher V; Travassos, Mark A; Laufer, Miriam K

    2017-10-01

    Maternal antibodies may play a role in protecting newborns against malaria disease. Plasmodium falciparum parasite surface antigens are diverse, and protection from infection requires allele-specific immunity. Although malaria-specific antibodies have been shown to cross the placenta, the extent to which antibodies that respond to the full repertoire of diverse antigens are transferred from the mother to the infant has not been explored. Understanding the breadth of maternal antibody responses and to what extent these antibodies are transferred to the child can inform vaccine design and evaluation. We probed plasma from cord blood and serum from mothers at delivery using a customized protein microarray that included variants of malaria vaccine target antigens to assess the intensity and breadth of seroreactivity to three malaria vaccine candidate antigens in mother-newborn pairs in Malawi. Among the 33 paired specimens that were assessed, mothers and newborns had similar intensity and repertoire of seroreactivity. Maternal antibody levels against vaccine candidate antigens were the strongest predictors of infant antibody levels. Placental malaria did not significantly impair transplacental antibody transfer. However, mothers with placental malaria had significantly higher antibody levels against these blood-stage antigens than mothers without placental malaria. The repertoire and levels of infant antibodies against a wide range of malaria vaccine candidate antigen variants closely mirror maternal levels in breadth and magnitude regardless of evidence of placental malaria. Vaccinating mothers with an effective malaria vaccine during pregnancy may induce high and potentially protective antibody repertoires in newborns. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. Protective effects of vitamin C against gamma-ray induced wholly damage and genetic damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Chunling; Jiang Weiwei; Zhang Ping; Chen Xiang; Zhu Shengtao

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Protective effects of supplemental vitamin C against 60 Co-gamma-ray induced wholly damage and genetic damage was investigated in mice. Method: Mice were divided into normal control group, irradiation control group and vitamin C experimental group 1,2,3 (which were orally given vitamin C 15, 30, 45 mg/kg.bw for 10 successive days respectively prior to gamma-ray irradiation). Micronuclei in the bone marrow polychromatophilic erythrocytes in each group of mice were examined and the 30 day survival rate of mice following whole-body 5.0 Gy γ irradiation were also determined. Results: Supplemental vitamin C prior to gamma-rays irradiation can significantly decrease bone marrow PECMN rate of mice and increase 30 day survival rate and prolong average survival time. The protection factor is 2.09. Conclusion: Vitamin C has potent protective effects against gamma irradiation induced damage in mice. In certain dose range, vitamin C can absolutely suppress the gamma-rays induced genetic damage in vivo

  15. Study on radiation-induced deactivation and post-deactivation of some oxidoreductases in dilute aqueous solution and protective effect: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yiqing; Ha Hongfei

    1993-01-01

    In this work the radiation-induced deactivation of catalase in dilute aqueous solution was reported. The effects of irradiation atmosphere, temperature and original concentration of catalase in dilute aqueous solutions on the deactivation of catalase were investigated. The protective effect by some additives (CH 3 CH 2 OH, HCOONa and EDTA) to radiation deactivation in dilute aqueous solutions was also studied. Remarkable protective effect by those additives was observed. The mechanism of radiation deactivation and protective effect have been discussed

  16. Protective effect of grape seed extracts on human lymphocytes: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Yim Tong; Lee, Kit Yee; Kalle, Wouter; Pak, Sok Cheon

    2013-03-01

    Grape seed extracts (GSEs) possess a broad spectrum of antioxidative properties that protects various cells from free radicals and oxidative stress. In this study, the genoprotective effect of GSE on human lymphocytic DNA was studied using standard and lysed cell comet assays. Lymphocytes from 5 healthy subjects were pretreated with GSE in different concentrations. The standard and lysed cell comet assays were performed on treated, untreated, challenged, and unchallenged cells in parallel. Cells were then subjected to an oxidant challenge induced with 5-min exposures to hydrogen peroxide. In the standard comet assay, GSE significantly diminished hydrogen-peroxide-induced DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. In the lysed cell assay, however, the antioxidant effect was diminished at a higher GSE concentration. Data indicate that the cell membrane might play a role in limiting cellular access to antioxidants, which directly affects the genoprotective or potential pro-oxidant effect of antioxidants on human DNA. Using both standard and lysed cell comet assays in parallel could be a useful way to elucidate the mechanism of protection or damage by antioxidants.

  17. Effects of antibiotics on protected specimen brush sampling in ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prats, E; Dorca, J; Pujol, M; Garcia, L; Barreiro, B; Verdaguer, R; Gudiol, F; Manresa, F

    2002-05-01

    The effects of antibiotic treatment on the results of protected specimen brushing (PSB) in ventilator-associated pneumonia were prospectively assessed by performing this procedure before antibiotic treatment, and 12, 24, 48 and 72 h after initiation of antibiotic treatment, in 35 ventilated patients who developed pneumonia during mechanical ventilation. The number of micro-organisms isolated, their concentration (colony-forming units (cfu) mL(-1)), and the number of cases with a positive PSB (> or =10(3) cfu x mL(-1)) were evaluated. Within 12 h of the initiation of effective antibiotic treatment a rapid, significant decrease in the numbers of organisms isolated, their individual concentrations and the percentage of positive PSB results were observed. Certain bacterial species (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzee) appeared to be more vulnerable to antibiotics than others (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumanni). This data confirms that prior antibiotic treatment, even after only a few hours of activity, significantly decreases the sensitivity of protected brush specimen; this effect appears to be particularly marked among the species involved in early ventilator associated pneumonia.

  18. Allergen immunotherapy in people, dogs, cats and horses - differences, similarities and research needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, R S; Jensen-Jarolim, E; Roth-Walter, F; Marti, E; Janda, J; Seida, A A; DeBoer, D

    2018-04-19

    In human patients with seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis sensitized to grass pollen, the first successful allergen immunotherapy (AIT) was reported in 1911. Today, immunotherapy is an accepted treatment for allergic asthma, allergic rhinitis and hypersensitivities to insect venom. AIT is also used for atopic dermatitis and recently for food allergy. Subcutaneous, epicutaneous, intralymphatic, oral and sublingual protocols of AIT exist. In animals, most data are available in dogs where subcutaneous AIT is an accepted treatment for atopic dermatitis. Initiating a regulatory response and a production of "blocking" IgG antibodies with AIT are similar mechanisms in human beings and dogs with allergic diseases. Although subcutaneous immunotherapy is used for atopic dermatitis in cats, data for its efficacy is sparse. There is some evidence for successful treatment of feline asthma with AIT. In horses, most studies evaluate the effect of AIT on insect hypersensitivity with conflicting results though promising pilot studies have demonstrated the prophylaxis of insect hypersensitivity with recombinant antigens of biting midges (Culicoides spp.). Optimising AIT using allergoids, peptide immunotherapy, recombinant allergens and new adjuvants with the different administration types of allergen extracts hopefully will further improve compliance and efficacy of this proven treatment modality. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. The Short-term Protective Effects of ‘Non-PPE’ Gloves Used by Greenhouse Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roff, Martin

    2015-01-01

    absorbent cotton gloves it decreased. The measurement of protection is restricted by the limit of quantification (LOQ) such that protection must apparently increase with challenge, nevertheless the above trends remained even after removal of data gloves, protection was similar for dry and wet tasks. For cotton gloves, protection was lower for wet tasks, although this might have been consistent with that decreasing trend, because the ungloved hand challenges were higher for wet tasks than dry. Default PF values for cotton and SRSU non-PPE gloves may be taken for regulatory exposure assessments from lower quantiles of the distributions of PF results, being 1.3 and 7–10 respectively. The lower quantiles for cotton gloves are close to one, indicating no protection at all. PMID:26240197

  20. An Analysis on the Moisture and Thermal Protective Performance of Firefighter Clothing Based on Different Layer Combinations and Effect of Washing on Heat Protection and Vapour Transfer Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Atalay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fabric assemblies for firefighting clothing have been tested for heat protection and comfort. The constituent materials and fabric structures have been specifically selected and tailored for firefighters’ clothing. In order to do this, four types of outer shell fabrics, four types of moisture barrier fabrics, and four types of heat barriers with different weights and material compositions were used to make a multilayered fabric assembly. Heat transfer (flame, heat transfer (radiant, and water vapour resistance tests were conducted according to the latest EN469 test standard which also recommends washing tests. These tests reveal that material content and material brand have considerable effect on the required performance levels of heat protection. In addition, while washing tests have improved water vapor transfer properties, they have a deteriorating effect on heat protection performance. Considering heat protection and moisture comfort properties, the optimal assemblies are thereby identified.

  1. Purification, characterisation and protective effects of polysaccharides from alfalfa on hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaopu; Dong, Xiaofang; Ma, Hao; Cui, Yaoming; Tong, Jianming

    2014-11-04

    The objective of this study was to determine the preliminary characteristics and protective effects of alfalfa polysaccharides (APS) on hepatocytes in vitro. The crude APS was purified by DEAE-cellulose and Sephadex G-100 chromatography, resulting in the four purified fractions: APS-1, APS-2, APS-3 and APS-4. The results indicated that APS-3 had higher carbohydrate and uronic acid contents and that APS-4 had a more complicated monosaccharide composition compared to the other purified fractions. The average molecular weights of APS-1, APS-2, APS-3 and APS-4 were 48,536, 6,221, 66,559 and 13,076 Da, respectively. Furthermore, APS (crude and its purified fractions) restored the activities of antioxidant enzymes and increased the total antioxidant capacity of hepatocytes subjected to H2O2-induced oxidative stress. Furthermore, APS treatment counteracted the increases in lactic dehydrogenase and malonaldehyde in the culture supernatant. These results clearly demonstrate that APS possesses a protective effect against oxidative injury in hepatocytes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The protective effect of marriage for survival: a review and update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendall, Michael S; Weden, Margaret M; Favreault, Melissa M; Waldron, Hilary

    2011-05-01

    The theory that marriage has protective effects for survival has itself lived for more than 100 years since Durkheim's groundbreaking study of suicide (Durkheim 1951 [1897]). Investigations of differences in this protective effect by gender, by age, and in contrast to different unmarried statuses, however, have yielded inconsistent conclusions. These investigations typically either use data in which marital status and other covariates are observed in cross-sectional surveys up to 10 years before mortality exposure, or use data from panel surveys with much smaller sample sizes. Their conclusions are usually not based on formal statistical tests of contrasts between men and women or between never-married, divorced/separated, and widowed statuses. Using large-scale pooled panel survey data linked to death registrations and earnings histories for U.S. men and women aged 25 and older, and with appropriate contrast tests, we find a consistent survival advantage for married over unmarried men and women, and an additional survival "premium" for married men. We find little evidence of mortality differences between never-married, divorced/separated, and widowed statuses.

  3. Solvent effect on redox properties of hexanethiolate monolayer-protected gold nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bin; Zhang, Meiqin; Shao, Yuanhua; Girault, Hubert H

    2006-11-02

    The capacitance of monolayer-protected gold nanoclusters (MPCs), C(MPC), in solution has been theoretically reconsidered from an electrostatic viewpoint, in which an MPC is considered as an isolated charged sphere within two dielectric layers, the intrinsic coating monolayer, and the bulk solvent. The model predicts that the bulk solvent provides an important contribution to C(MPC) and influences the redox properties of MPCs. This theoretical prediction is then examined experimentally by comparing the redox properties of MPCs in four organic solvents: 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE), dichloromethane (DCM), chlorobenzene (CB), and toluene (TOL), in all of which MPCs have excellent solubility. Furthermore, this set of organic solvents features a dielectric constant in a range from 10.37 (DCE) to 2.38 (TOL), which is wide enough to probe the solvent effect. In these organic solvents, tetrahexylammonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (THATf2N) is used as the supporting electrolyte. Cyclic and differential pulse voltammetric results provide concrete evidence that, despite the monolayer protection, the solvent plays a significant effect on the properties of MPCs in solution.

  4. Analysis of aluminum protective effect for female astronauts in solar particle events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Feng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to ensure the health and safety of female astronauts in space, the risks of space radiation should be evaluated, and effective methods for protecting against space radiation should be investigated. In this paper, a dose calculation model is established for Chinese female astronauts. The absorbed doses of some organs in two historical solar particle events are calculated using Monte Carlo methods, and the shielding conditions are 0 gcm-2 and 5 gcm-2 aluminum, respectively. The calculated results are analysed, compared, and discussed. The results show that 5 gcm-2 aluminum cannot afford enough effective protection in solar particle events. Hence, once encountering solar particle events in manned spaceflight missions, in order to ensure the health and safety of female astronauts, they are not allowed to stay in the pressure vessel, and must enter into the thicker shielding location such as food and water storage cabin.

  5. Effectiveness of China's National Forest Protection Program and nature reserves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Guopeng; Young, Stephen S; Wang, Lin; Wang, Wei; Long, Yongcheng; Wu, Ruidong; Li, Junsheng; Zhu, Jianguo; Yu, Douglas W

    2015-10-01

    There is profound interest in knowing the degree to which China's institutions are capable of protecting its natural forests and biodiversity in the face of economic and political change. China's 2 most important forest-protection policies are its National Forest Protection Program (NFPP) and its national-level nature reserves (NNRs). The NFPP was implemented in 2000 in response to deforestation-caused flooding. We undertook the first national, quantitative assessment of the NFPP and NNRs to examine whether the NFPP achieved its deforestation-reduction target and whether the NNRs deter deforestation altogether. We used MODIS data to estimate forest cover and loss across mainland China (2000-2010). We also assembled the first-ever polygon dataset for China's forested NNRs (n = 237, 74,030 km(2) in 2000) and used both conventional and covariate-matching approaches to compare deforestation rates inside and outside NNRs (2000-2010). In 2000, 1.765 million km(2) or 18.7% of mainland China was forested (12.3% with canopy cover of ≥70%)) or woodland (6.4% with canopy cover <70% and tree plus shrub cover ≥40%). By 2010, 480,203 km(2) of forest and woodland had been lost, an annual deforestation rate of 2.7%. Forest-only loss was 127,473 km(2) (1.05% annually). In the NFPP provinces, the forest-only loss rate was 0.62%, which was 3.3 times lower than in the non-NFPP provinces. Moreover, the Landsat data suggest that these loss rates are overestimates due to large MODIS pixel size. Thus, China appears to have achieved, and even exceeded, its target of reducing deforestation to 1.1% annually in the NFPP provinces. About two-thirds of China's NNRs were effective in protecting forest cover (prevented loss 4073 km(2) unmatched approach; 3148 km(2) matched approach), and within-NNR deforestation rates were higher in provinces with higher overall deforestation. Our results indicate that China's existing institutions can protect domestic forest cover. © 2015 The Authors

  6. Role of different types of solid models in hydrodynamic modeling and their effects on groundwater protection processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bódi, Erika; Buday, Tamás; McIntosh, Richard William

    2013-04-01

    handle pinching out lithological units and lenticular bodies easier while most hydrodynamic softwares cannot handle flow units related to such model layers. Interpretation of tectonic disturbance is similar. In Hungary groundwater is extracted mainly from Pleistocene and Pannonian aquifers sediments of which were deposited in the ancient Pannonian Lake. When the basin lost its open-marine connection eustasy had no direct effects on facies changes therefore subsidence and sediment supply became the main factors. Various basin-filling related facies developed including alluvial plain facies, different delta facies types and pelitic deep-basin facies. Creating solid models based on sequence stratigraphic methods requires more raw data and also genetic approaches, in addition more working hours hence this method is seldom used in practice. Lithology-based models can be transformed into sequence stratigraphic models by extending the data base (e.g. detecting more survey data). In environments where the obtained models differ significantly notable changes can occur in the supply directions in addition the groundwater travel-time of the two models even on equal extraction terms. Our study aims to call attention to the consequences of using different solid models for typical depositional systems of the Great Hungarian Plain and to their effects on groundwater protection.

  7. Temperature Dependence of Field-Effect Mobility in Organic Thin-Film Transistors: Similarity to Inorganic Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Jun; Nagase, Takashi; Kobayashi, Takashi; Naito, Hiroyoshi

    2016-04-01

    Carrier transport in solution-processed organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) based on dioctylbenzothienobenzothiophene (C8-BTBT) has been investigated in a wide temperature range from 296 to 10 K. The field-effect mobility shows thermally activated behavior whose activation energy becomes smaller with decreasing temperature. The temperature dependence of field-effect mobility found in C8-BTBT is similar to that of others materials: organic semiconducting polymers, amorphous oxide semiconductors and hydrogenated amorphous silicon. These results indicate that hopping transport between isoenergetic localized states becomes dominated in a low temperature regime in these materials.

  8. The effects of similarity in sexual excitation, inhibition, and mood on sexual arousal problems and sexual satisfaction in newlywed couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykins, Amy D; Janssen, Erick; Newhouse, Sarah; Heiman, Julia R; Rafaeli, Eshkol

    2012-05-01

    Despite the importance of sexuality for romantic relationships, there has been little research attention to individual differences and dyadic variables, including couple similarity, and their association with sexual problems and satisfaction. The current study examined the effects of the propensity for sexual inhibition and sexual excitation scales (SIS/SES) and the effects of different mood states on sexuality (Mood and Sexuality Questionnaire [MSQ]), at both the individual and the dyad level, on sexual arousal problems and sexual satisfaction. Similarity in SIS/SES and MSQ was measured in a nonclinical sample of 35 newlywed couples and operationally defined as the within-couple, z-transformed correlations between the two partners' item responses. Sexual arousal problems were assessed using self-report measures (Demographic and Sexual History Questionnaire) and focused on the past 3 months. Sexual satisfaction was assessed using the Global Measure of Sexual Satisfaction. Regression analyses revealed that greater similarity in the effects of anxiety and stress on sexuality was associated with more reported sexual arousal problems of wives. In contrast, the husbands' sexual arousal problems were related only to their own higher SIS1 scores. Higher SES scores predicted lower sexual satisfaction for both husbands and wives. Wives who reported strong positive mood effects on their sexuality indicated greater sexual satisfaction, while husbands who were more similar to their wives in the effect of positive moods on sexuality indicated greater sexual satisfaction. The findings show that, above and beyond one's own sexual propensities, similarity in various aspects of sexuality predicts sexual problems (more so in women) and sexual satisfaction (in both men and women). © 2012 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  9. Protective effects of polysaccharides from Psidium guajava leaves against oxidative stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seo-Young; Kim, Eun-A; Kim, Young-Sun; Yu, Seok-Kyu; Choi, Changyong; Lee, Jung-Suk; Kim, Yong-Tae; Nah, Jae-Woon; Jeon, You-Jin

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze antioxidant properties of a polysaccharide isolated from Psidium guajava leaves (PS-PGL) in vitro including its radical scavenging activities and protective effects against damage to cells as well as in vivo in zebrafish. The water extract of P. guajava leaves (WE-PGL) and PS-PGL showed strong radical scavenging effects in terms of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), hydroxyl, and alkyl radical. Compared to WE-PGL, PS-PGL enhanced all scavenging activities and in particular strongly scavenged the hydroxyl radical (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], 0.02mg/mL). In addition, PS-PGL exerted a protective effect against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress and against toxicity to Vero cells. Furthermore, in vivo experiments using zebrafish embryos indicated that treatment with hydrogen peroxide decreased the survival rate and heart-beating rate of zebrafish embryos, whereas these problems were reduced by PS-PGL treatment. Moreover, PS-PGL inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, lipid peroxidation, and cell death. Taken together, these results suggest that PS-PGL may be useful as a beneficial antioxidant material in the food and cosmetic industries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Protective effect of thymoquinone against lead-induced hepatic toxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabrouk, Aymen; Bel Hadj Salah, Imen; Chaieb, Wafa; Ben Cheikh, Hassen

    2016-06-01

    Lead (Pb) intoxication is a worldwide health problem which frequently affects the liver. This study was carried out to investigate the potential protective effect of thymoquinone (TQ), the major active ingredient of volatile oil of Nigella sativa seeds, against Pb-induced liver damage. Adult male rats were randomized into four groups: Control group received no treatment, Pb group was exposed to 2000 ppm Pb acetate in drinking water, Pb-TQ group was cotreated with Pb plus TQ (5 mg/kg/day, per orally), and TQ group receiving only TQ. All treatments were applied for 5 weeks. Results indicated that Pb exposure increased hepatic Pb content, damaged hepatic histological structure (necrotic foci, hepatic strands disorganization, hypertrophied hepatocytes, cytoplasmic vacuolization, cytoplasmic loss, chromatin condensation, mononuclear cell infiltration, congestion, centrilobular swelling), and changed liver function investigated by plasma biochemical parameters (AST, ALT, ALP, γ-GT, LDH). Pb treatment also decreased total antioxidant status level and increased lipid peroxidation in the liver. Supplementation with TQ remarkably improved the Pb-induced adverse effects without significantly reducing the metal accumulation in the liver. In conclusion, our results indicate, for the first time, a protective effect of TQ against Pb-induced hepatotoxicity and suggest that this component might be clinically useful in Pb intoxication.

  11. Protein structure similarity from principle component correlation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou James

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Owing to rapid expansion of protein structure databases in recent years, methods of structure comparison are becoming increasingly effective and important in revealing novel information on functional properties of proteins and their roles in the grand scheme of evolutionary biology. Currently, the structural similarity between two proteins is measured by the root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD in their best-superimposed atomic coordinates. RMSD is the golden rule of measuring structural similarity when the structures are nearly identical; it, however, fails to detect the higher order topological similarities in proteins evolved into different shapes. We propose new algorithms for extracting geometrical invariants of proteins that can be effectively used to identify homologous protein structures or topologies in order to quantify both close and remote structural similarities. Results We measure structural similarity between proteins by correlating the principle components of their secondary structure interaction matrix. In our approach, the Principle Component Correlation (PCC analysis, a symmetric interaction matrix for a protein structure is constructed with relationship parameters between secondary elements that can take the form of distance, orientation, or other relevant structural invariants. When using a distance-based construction in the presence or absence of encoded N to C terminal sense, there are strong correlations between the principle components of interaction matrices of structurally or topologically similar proteins. Conclusion The PCC method is extensively tested for protein structures that belong to the same topological class but are significantly different by RMSD measure. The PCC analysis can also differentiate proteins having similar shapes but different topological arrangements. Additionally, we demonstrate that when using two independently defined interaction matrices, comparison of their maximum

  12. Surface protection during plasma hydrogenation for acceptor passivation in InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopata, J.; Dautremont-Smith, W.C.; Pearton, S.J.; Lee, J.W.; Ha, N.T.; Luftman, H.S.

    1990-01-01

    Various dielectric and metallic films were examined as H-permeable surface protection layers on InP during H 2 or D 2 plasma exposure for passivation of acceptors in the InP. Plasma deposited SiN x , SiO 2 , and a-Si(H) films ranging in thickness from 85 to 225 angstrom were used to protect p-InP during d 2 plasma exposure at 250 degrees C. Optimum protective layer thicknesses were determined by a trade-off between the effectiveness of the layer to prevent P loss from the wafer surface and the ability to diffuse atomic H or D at a rate greater than or equal to that in the underlying InP. SIMS and capacitance-voltage depth profiling were used to determine the extent of D in-diffusion and acceptor passivation respectively. Sputter deposited W and e-beam evaporated Ti films ∼100 Angstrom thick were also evaluated. The W coated sample yielded similar results to those with dielectric films in that acceptors in p-InP were passivated to a similar depth for the same plasma exposure. The 100 Angstrom Ti film, however, did not allow the D to diffuse into the InP substrate. It is surmised that the Ti film trapped the D, thus preventing diffusion into the substrate

  13. Protective effect of grifolin against brain injury in an acute cerebral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the protective effects of grifolin against brain injury in an acute cerebral ischemia rat model. Methods: Rats were assigned to five groups: control, negative control, and grifolin (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, p.o.) treated groups, which received the drug for 2 weeks. All the animals were sacrificed at the end of ...

  14. Fishing inside or outside? A case studies analysis of potential spillover effect from marine protected areas, using food web models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colléter, Mathieu; Gascuel, Didier; Albouy, Camille; Francour, Patrice; Tito de Morais, Luis; Valls, Audrey; Le Loc'h, François

    2014-11-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) are implemented worldwide as an efficient tool to preserve biodiversity and protect ecosystems. We used food web models (Ecopath and EcoTroph) to assess the ability of MPAs to reduce fishing impacts on targeted resources and to provide biomass exports for adjacent fisheries. Three coastal MPAs: Bonifacio and Port-Cros (Mediterranean Sea), and Bamboung (Senegalese coast), were used as case studies. Pre-existing related Ecopath models were homogenized and ecosystem characteristics were compared based on network indices and trophic spectra analyses. Using the EcoTroph model, we simulated different fishing mortality scenarios and assessed fishing impacts on the three ecosystems. Lastly, the potential biomass that could be exported from each MPA was estimated. Despite structural and functional trophic differences, the three MPAs showed similar patterns of resistance to simulated fishing mortalities, with the Bonifacio case study exhibiting the highest potential catches and a slightly inferior resistance to fishing. We also show that the potential exports from our small size MPAs are limited and thus may only benefit local fishing activities. Based on simulations, their potential exports were estimated to be at the same order of magnitude as the amount of catch that could have been obtained inside the reserve. In Port Cros, the ban of fishing inside MPA could actually allow for improved catch yields outside the MPA due to biomass exports. This was not the case for the Bonifacio site, as its potential exports were too low to offset catch losses. This insight suggests the need for MPA networks and/or sufficiently large MPAs to effectively protect juveniles and adults and provide important exports. Finally, we discuss the effects of MPAs on fisheries that were not considered in food web models, and conclude by suggesting possible improvements in the analysis of MPA efficiency.

  15. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP signalling exerts chondrogenesis promoting and protecting effects: implication of calcineurin as a downstream target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Juhász

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP is an important neurotrophic factor influencing differentiation of neuronal elements and exerting protecting role during traumatic injuries or inflammatory processes of the central nervous system. Although increasing evidence is available on its presence and protecting function in various peripheral tissues, little is known about the role of PACAP in formation of skeletal components. To this end, we aimed to map elements of PACAP signalling in developing cartilage under physiological conditions and during oxidative stress. mRNAs of PACAP and its receptors (PAC1,VPAC1, VPAC2 were detectable during differentiation of chicken limb bud-derived chondrogenic cells in micromass cell cultures. Expression of PAC1 protein showed a peak on days of final commitment of chondrogenic cells. Administration of either the PAC1 receptor agonist PACAP 1-38, or PACAP 6-38 that is generally used as a PAC1 antagonist, augmented cartilage formation, stimulated cell proliferation and enhanced PAC1 and Sox9 protein expression. Both variants of PACAP elevated the protein expression and activity of the Ca-calmodulin dependent Ser/Thr protein phosphatase calcineurin. Application of PACAPs failed to rescue cartilage formation when the activity of calcineurin was pharmacologically inhibited with cyclosporine A. Moreover, exogenous PACAPs prevented diminishing of cartilage formation and decrease of calcineurin activity during oxidative stress. As an unexpected phenomenon, PACAP 6-38 elicited similar effects to those of PACAP 1-38, although to a different extent. On the basis of the above results, we propose calcineurin as a downstream target of PACAP signalling in differentiating chondrocytes either in normal or pathophysiological conditions. Our observations imply the therapeutical perspective that PACAP can be applied as a natural agent that may have protecting effect during joint inflammation and/or may promote

  16. Calcium depletion in rabbit myocardium. Calcium paradox protection by hypothermia and cation substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, T L; Langer, G A

    1982-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to define further the basis of control of myocardial membrane permeability by further examination of the "calcium paradox." To this end, the protective effect of hypothermia and addition of micromolar amounts of divalent cations during the Ca-free perfusion period were studied. Damage during Ca++ repletion to the isolated arterially perfused, interventricular rabbit septum was assessed by contracture development, loss of developed tension, and loss of 42K and creatine kinase. Progressive hypothermia prolongs the time of Ca-free perfusion needed to cause similar 42K, creatine kinase and developed tension losses upon Ca++ repletion. Complete protection against the Ca-paradox after 30-60 minutes Ca-free perfusion is seen at 18 degree C. The inclusion of 50 microM Ca++ during 30 minutes "Ca-free" perfusion also provides complete protection during Ca++ repletion i.e., there was full mechanical recovery with no 42K or creatine kinase loss. Other divalent cations perfused in 50 microM concentrations during the Ca-free period exhibited variable ability to protect when Ca++ was reperfused. The order of effectiveness (Ca++ greater than Cd++ greater than Mn++ greater than Co++ greater than Mg++) was related to the crystal ionic radius, with those cations whose radii are closest to that of Ca++ (0.99 A) exerting the greatest protective effect. The cation sequence for effectiveness in Ca-paradox protection is the same sequence for potency of excitation-contraction uncoupling. The mechanism of hypothermic protection is likely a phase transition in the membrane lipids (from a more liquid to a less liquid state) which stabilizes membrane structure and preserves Ca++ permeability characteristics during the Ca-free period. The mechanism of protection via cation addition is perhaps a cation's ability to substitute for Ca++ (dependent on unhydrated crystal ionic radius) at critical sarcolemmal binding sites to preserve control of Ca++ permability during

  17. Protective effects of glycyrrhizic acid against non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xue; Duan, Xingping; Wang, Changyuan; Liu, Zhihao; Sun, Pengyuan; Huo, Xiaokui; Ma, Xiaodong; Sun, Huijun; Liu, Kexin; Meng, Qiang

    2017-07-05

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become a predictive factor of death from many diseases. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the protective effect of glycyrrhizic acid (GA), a natural triterpene glycoside, on NAFLD induced by a high-fat diet (HFD) in mice, and further to elucidate the mechanisms underlying GA protection. GA treatment significantly reduced the relative liver weight, serum ALT, AST activities, levels of serum lipid, blood glucose and insulin. GA suppressed lipid accumulation in liver. Further mechanism investigation indicated that GA reduced hepatic lipogenesis via downregulating SREBP-1c, FAS and SCD1 expression, increased fatty acids β-oxidation via an increase in PPARα, CPT1α and ACADS, and promoted triglyceride metabolism through inducing LPL activity. Furthermore, GA reduced gluconeogenesis through repressing PEPCK and G6Pase, and increased glycogen synthesis through an induction in gene expression of PDase and GSK3β. In addition, GA increased insulin sensitivity through upregulating phosphorylation of IRS-1 and IRS-2. In conclusion, GA produces protective effect against NAFLD, due to regulation of genes involved in lipid, glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of target and non-target similarity on neural classification performance: A boost from confidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar R Marathe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain computer interaction (BCI technologies have proven effective in utilizing single-trial classification algorithms to detect target images in rapid serial visualization presentation tasks. While many factors contribute to the accuracy of these algorithms, a critical aspect that is often overlooked concerns the feature similarity between target and non-target images. In most real-world environments there are likely to be many shared features between targets and non-targets resulting in similar neural activity between the two classes. It is unknown how current neural-based target classification algorithms perform when qualitatively similar target and non-target images are presented. This study address this question by comparing behavioral and neural classification performance across two conditions: first, when targets were the only infrequent stimulus presented amongst frequent background distracters; and second when targets were presented together with infrequent non-targets containing similar visual features to the targets. The resulting findings show that behavior is slower and less accurate when targets are presented together with similar non-targets; moreover, single-trial classification yielded high levels of misclassification when infrequent non-targets are included. Furthermore, we present an approach to mitigate the image misclassification. We use confidence measures to assess the quality of single-trial classification, and demonstrate that a system in which low confidence trials are reclassified through a secondary process can result in improved performance.

  19. Individual protection of NPP personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshcheev, V.S.; Gol'dshtejn, D.S.; Chetverikova, Z.S.

    1983-01-01

    Specific features of NPP personnel individual protection are considered, mainly with respect to maintenance and repair works on various type reactors. The major concern is given to the selection and application reglamentations of the individual protection system (IPS), employment of sanitary locks, the organization of individual protection under the conditions of a heating microclimate. The ways are specified to the development and introduction of the most effective IPS and improvement of the entire NPP personnel individual protection system with respect to providing the necessary protection effect for maintaining high working capability of the personnel and minimizing the IPS impact on human organism functional systems. The accumulated experience in the personnel individual protection can be applied during construction and operation of NPP's in CMEA member-countries [ru

  20. Dragon's blood dropping pills have protective effects on focal cerebral ischemia rats model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Nian; Yang, Fang-Ju; Li, Yan; Li, Yu-Juan; Dai, Rong-Ji; Meng, Wei-Wei; Chen, Yan; Deng, Yu-Lin

    2013-12-15

    Dragon's blood is a bright red resin obtained from Dracaena cochinchinensis (Lour.) S.C.Chen (Yunnan, China). As a traditional Chinese medicinal herb, it has great traditional medicinal value and is used for wound healing and to stop bleeding. Its main biological activity comes from phenolic compounds. In this study, phenolic compounds were made into dropping pills and their protective effects were examined by establishing focal cerebral ischemia rats model used method of Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion (MCAO), and by investigating indexes of neurological scores, infarct volume, cerebral index, cerebral water content and oxidation stress. Compared to model group, high, middle and low groups of Dragon's blood dropping pills could improve the neurological function significantly (ppills had protective effects on focal cerebral ischemia rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.